WorldWideScience

Sample records for nitride substrates relations

  1. Relation between microstructure and thermal conductivity in aluminium nitride substrates; Relations entre la microstructure et la conductivite thermique dans les substrats de nitrure d`aluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarrige, J.; Lecompte, J.P.; Seck, O. [Faculte des Sciences (CNRS), 87 - Limoges (France). Laboratoire de Materiaux Ceramiques et Traitements de Surface

    1996-12-31

    Sintered aluminium nitride is a promising ceramic substrate for future power electronics applications. This ceramic is characterized by a high thermal conductivity (100 to 200 W/m.K) which depends on two main factors: the oxygen content of the AlN powder used for the sintering process and the microstructure of the sintered material. The oxygen content changes with sintering additions. For instance, boron nitride allows the diffusion of oxygen from the nitride grains to the grain joints. With a complement of yttrium oxide in the liquid phase, the BN/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} couple allows to increase the conductivity to 190 W/m.K with a reduction of the oxygen content. The second part of the study concerns the microstructure of sintered materials. A control of conductivity can be obtained using an adjustment of the sintering cycles. Only two types of microstructure, the secondary phase dispersed in the AlN matrix and the secondary phase that concentrates around triple junctions, allow a better contact between nitride grains and thus higher conductivities of 210 W/m.K. (J.S.) 6 refs.

  2. Conductive and robust nitride buffer layers on biaxially textured substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Sambasivan [Chicago, IL; Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN; Barnett, Scott A [Evanston, IL; Kim, Ilwon [Skokie, IL; Kroeger, Donald M [Knoxville, TN

    2009-03-31

    The present invention relates to epitaxial, electrically conducting and mechanically robust, cubic nitride buffer layers deposited epitaxially on biaxially textured substrates such as metals and alloys. The invention comprises of a biaxially textured substrate with epitaxial layers of nitrides. The invention also discloses a method to form such epitaxial layers using a high rate deposition method as well as without the use of forming gases. The invention further comprises epitaxial layers of oxides on the biaxially textured nitride layer. In some embodiments the article further comprises electromagnetic devices which may have superconducting properties.

  3. Growth of gallium nitride and indium nitride nanowires on conductive and flexible carbon cloth substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Ling, Yichuan; Wang, Gongming; Lu, Xihong; Tong, Yexiang; Li, Yat

    2013-03-07

    We report a general strategy for synthesis of gallium nitride (GaN) and indium nitride (InN) nanowires on conductive and flexible carbon cloth substrates. GaN and InN nanowires were prepared via a nanocluster-mediated growth method using a home built chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system with Ga and In metals as group III precursors and ammonia as a group V precursor. Electron microscopy studies reveal that the group III-nitride nanowires are single crystalline wurtzite structures. The morphology, density and growth mechanism of these nanowires are determined by the growth temperature. Importantly, a photoelectrode fabricated by contacting the GaN nanowires through a carbon cloth substrate shows pronounced photoactivity for photoelectrochemical water oxidation. The ability to synthesize group III-nitride nanowires on conductive and flexible substrates should open up new opportunities for nanoscale photonic, electronic and electrochemical devices.

  4. Integrated silicon and silicon nitride photonic circuits on flexible substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Li, Mo

    2014-06-15

    Flexible integrated photonic devices based on crystalline materials on plastic substrates have a promising potential in many unconventional applications. In this Letter, we demonstrate a fully integrated photonic system including ring resonators and grating couplers, based on both crystalline silicon and silicon nitride, on flexible plastic substrate by using the stamping-transfer method. A high yield has been achieved by a simple, yet reliable transfer method without significant performance degradation.

  5. Control of Defects in Aluminum Gallium Nitride ((Al)GaN) Films on Grown Aluminum Nitride (AlN) Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    like HEMTs . A nanolayer of AlGaN over GaN provides extra 2DEG charge density because of the piezoelectric effect of the AlGaN layer. The higher...Control of Defects in Aluminum Gallium Nitride ((Al) GaN ) Films on Grown Aluminum Nitride (AlN) Substrates by Iskander G. Batyrev, Chi-Chin Wu...Aluminum Gallium Nitride ((Al) GaN ) Films on Grown Aluminum Nitride (AlN) Substrates Iskander G. Batyrev and N. Scott Weingarten Weapons and

  6. Formation and characterization of DNA microarrays at silicon nitride substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Mary; Redmond, Gareth

    2005-01-01

    A versatile method for direct, covalent attachment of DNA microarrays at silicon nitride layers, previously deposited by chemical vapor deposition at silicon wafer substrates, is reported. Each microarray fabrication process step, from silicon nitride substrate deposition, surface cleaning, amino-silanation, and attachment of a homobifunctional cross-linking molecule to covalent immobilization of probe oligonucleotides, is defined, characterized, and optimized to yield consistent probe microarray quality, homogeneity, and probe-target hybridization performance. The developed microarray fabrication methodology provides excellent (high signal-to-background ratio) and reproducible responsivity to target oligonucleotide hybridization with a rugged chemical stability that permits exposure of arrays to stringent pre- and posthybridization wash conditions through many sustained cycles of reuse. Overall, the achieved performance features compare very favorably with those of more mature glass based microarrays. It is proposed that this DNA microarray fabrication strategy has the potential to provide a viable route toward the successful realization of future integrated DNA biochips.

  7. GaN Substrates for III-Nitride Devices

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Despite the rapid commercialization of III-nitride semiconductor devices for applications in visible and ultraviolet optoelectronics and in high-power and high-frequency electronics, their full potential is limited by two primary obstacles: i) a high defect density and biaxial strain due to the heteroepitaxial growth on foreign substrates, which result in lower performance and shortened device lifetime, and ii) a strong built-in electric field due to spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization...

  8. Fabrication of hexagonal gallium nitride films on silicon (111) substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Li; XUE Chengshan; WANG Cuimei; LI Huaixiang; REN Yuwen

    2003-01-01

    Hexagonal gallium nitride films were successfully fabricated through ammoniating Ga2O3 films deposited on silicon (111 ) substrates by electrophoresis. The structure, composition, and surface morphology of the formed films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM),and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The measurement results reveal that the polycrystalline GaN films with hexagonal wurtzite structure were successfully grown on the silicon (111) substrates. Preliminary results suggest that varying the ammoniating temperature has obvious effect on the quality of the GaN films formed with this method.

  9. Synthesis of gallium nitride nanostructures by nitridation of electrochemically deposited gallium oxide on silicon substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, Norizzawati Mohd; Yasui, Kanji; Hashim, Abdul Manaf

    2014-12-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) nanostructures were successfully synthesized by the nitridation of the electrochemically deposited gallium oxide (Ga2O3) through the utilization of a so-called ammoniating process. Ga2O3 nanostructures were firstly deposited on Si substrate by a simple two-terminal electrochemical technique at a constant current density of 0.15 A/cm2 using a mixture of Ga2O3, HCl, NH4OH and H2O for 2 h. Then, the deposited Ga2O3 sample was ammoniated in a horizontal quartz tube single zone furnace at various ammoniating times and temperatures. The complete nitridation of Ga2O3 nanostructures at temperatures of 850°C and below was not observed even the ammoniating time was kept up to 45 min. After the ammoniating process at temperature of 900°C for 15 min, several prominent diffraction peaks correspond to hexagonal GaN (h-GaN) planes were detected, while no diffraction peak of Ga2O3 structure was detected, suggesting a complete transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN. Thus, temperature seems to be a key parameter in a nitridation process where the deoxidization rate of Ga2O3 to generate gaseous Ga2O increase with temperature. The growth mechanism for the transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN was proposed and discussed. It was found that a complete transformation can not be realized without a complete deoxidization of Ga2O3. A significant change of morphological structures takes place after a complete transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN where the original nanorod structures of Ga2O3 diminish, and a new nanowire-like GaN structures appear. These results show that the presented method seems to be promising in producing high-quality h-GaN nanostructures on Si.

  10. Novel band structures in germanene on aluminium nitride substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Miaojuan; Li, Mingming

    2017-09-01

    Germanene is difficult to grow epitaxially on conventional semiconductor substrates, and to open a sizable band gap is also a hot topic. Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the structural and electronic properties of germanene/aluminium nitride heterobilayers (Ge/AlN HBLs). The results indicate that the Dirac cone with the nearly linear band dispersion of germanene is almost maintained in the band gap of the substrate. Very low effective masses and high carrier mobilities are achieved, and the band gap of germanene can be effectively tuned from 0.004 to 0.46 eV. These results suggest a possible method to design effective field effect transistors that can operate at room temperature.

  11. Synthesis of gallium nitride nanostructures by nitridation of electrochemically deposited gallium oxide on silicon substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, Norizzawati Mohd; Yasui, Kanji; Hashim, Abdul Manaf

    2014-01-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) nanostructures were successfully synthesized by the nitridation of the electrochemically deposited gallium oxide (Ga2O3) through the utilization of a so-called ammoniating process. Ga2O3 nanostructures were firstly deposited on Si substrate by a simple two-terminal electrochemical technique at a constant current density of 0.15 A/cm(2) using a mixture of Ga2O3, HCl, NH4OH and H2O for 2 h. Then, the deposited Ga2O3 sample was ammoniated in a horizontal quartz tube single zone furnace at various ammoniating times and temperatures. The complete nitridation of Ga2O3 nanostructures at temperatures of 850°C and below was not observed even the ammoniating time was kept up to 45 min. After the ammoniating process at temperature of 900°C for 15 min, several prominent diffraction peaks correspond to hexagonal GaN (h-GaN) planes were detected, while no diffraction peak of Ga2O3 structure was detected, suggesting a complete transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN. Thus, temperature seems to be a key parameter in a nitridation process where the deoxidization rate of Ga2O3 to generate gaseous Ga2O increase with temperature. The growth mechanism for the transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN was proposed and discussed. It was found that a complete transformation can not be realized without a complete deoxidization of Ga2O3. A significant change of morphological structures takes place after a complete transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN where the original nanorod structures of Ga2O3 diminish, and a new nanowire-like GaN structures appear. These results show that the presented method seems to be promising in producing high-quality h-GaN nanostructures on Si.

  12. The influence of substrate temperature on the tribo- mechanical properties of chromium nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merie, V. V.; Negrea, G.; Modi, E.

    2016-08-01

    Different nitrides such as titanium nitride, chromium nitride and so on are used in a widespread range of applications such as cutting tools, medical implants, and microelectromechanical devices and all that due to their mechanical, physical and chemical properties. The aim of this study is to obtain chromium nitride thin films and to characterize them by atomic force microscopy investigations. The chromium nitride thin films were deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering on silicon substrates. During the deposition process, the discharge current, the argon and nitrogen flows, the pressure inside the chamber and the deposition time were kept constant. A chromium target with a purity of 99.95 % was used. Some of the films were deposited after a chromium buffer layer was previously deposited on the silicon substrate. The deposition was carried out when substrate temperature was at room temperature, at 300 and 500°C respectively. Once the films were deposited, atomic force microscopy investigations were performed in order to emphasize the influence of the substrate temperature on the topographical, mechanical and tribological characteristics. The results pointed out an important influence of the substrate temperature on topographical, mechanical and tribological properties of the investigated chromium nitride thin films.

  13. Direct growth of nanocrystalline hexagonal boron nitride films on dielectric substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tay, Roland Yingjie [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Temasek Laboratories@NTU, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Tsang, Siu Hon [Temasek Laboratories@NTU, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Loeblein, Manuela; Chow, Wai Leong [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); CNRS-International NTU Thales Research Alliance CINTRA UMI 3288, Research Techno Plaza, 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore, Singapore 637553 (Singapore); Loh, Guan Chee [Institue of High Performance Computing, 1 Fusionopolis Way, #16-16 Connexis, Singapore 138632 (Singapore); Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931 (United States); Toh, Joo Wah; Ang, Soon Loong [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Teo, Edwin Hang Tong, E-mail: htteo@ntu.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2015-03-09

    Atomically thin hexagonal-boron nitride (h-BN) films are primarily synthesized through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on various catalytic transition metal substrates. In this work, a single-step metal-catalyst-free approach to obtain few- to multi-layer nanocrystalline h-BN (NCBN) directly on amorphous SiO{sub 2}/Si and quartz substrates is demonstrated. The as-grown thin films are continuous and smooth with no observable pinholes or wrinkles across the entire deposited substrate as inspected using optical and atomic force microscopy. The starting layers of NCBN orient itself parallel to the substrate, initiating the growth of the textured thin film. Formation of NCBN is due to the random and uncontrolled nucleation of h-BN on the dielectric substrate surface with no epitaxial relation, unlike on metal surfaces. The crystallite size is ∼25 nm as determined by Raman spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the NCBN formed sheets of multi-stacked layers with controllable thickness from ∼2 to 25 nm. The absence of transfer process in this technique avoids any additional degradation, such as wrinkles, tears or folding and residues on the film which are detrimental to device performance. This work provides a wider perspective of CVD-grown h-BN and presents a viable route towards large-scale manufacturing of h-BN substrates and for coating applications.

  14. Aluminium nitride: from the powder to the substrate. Le nitrure d'aluminium: de la poudre au substrat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarrige, J. (Lab. de Ceramiques Nouvelles, Limoges (France)); Mexmain, J. (Lab. de Ceramiques Nouvelles, Limoges (France)); Oumaloul, M. (Lab. de Ceramiques Nouvelles, Limoges (France)); Bachelard, R. (CRRA ELF ATOCHEM, Pierre Benite (France)); Disson, J.P. (CRRA ELF ATOCHEM, Pierre Benite (France))

    1993-04-01

    The aluminium nitride is a material which should replace alumina or beryllia as substrate for power electronic applications. The powder, prepared by carbothermal nitridation, is dispersed in a butanone-2-ethanol azeotrop solvent with a phosphate ester. Electrical conductivity, sedimentation, viscosity have been used to determine which phenomena take place in the defloculation of the suspension. The stability of AlN suspensions is due mainly to an electrostatic mechanism, with a steric contribution. The aluminium nitride tape-casting slip has been sintered at 1850 C in a nitrogen atmosphere. Removing of the binder and plasticizer can be performed in the same oven at 650 C, due to their nature and low concentration. The thermal conductivity of the substrates has been measured and is in the 160 to 200 W/m.K range. (orig.).

  15. Growth and spectroscopic characterization of monolayer and few-layer hexagonal boron nitride on metal substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigelson, Boris N.; Bermudez, Victor M.; Hite, Jennifer K.; Robinson, Zachary R.; Wheeler, Virginia D.; Sridhara, Karthik; Hernández, Sandra C.

    2015-02-01

    Atomically thin two dimensional hexagonal boron nitride (2D h-BN) is one of the key materials in the development of new van der Waals heterostructures due to its outstanding properties including an atomically smooth surface, high thermal conductivity, high mechanical strength, chemical inertness and high electrical resistance. The development of 2D h-BN growth is still in the early stages and largely depends on rapid and accurate characterization of the grown monolayer or few layers h-BN films. This paper demonstrates a new approach to characterizing monolayer h-BN films directly on metal substrates by grazing-incidence infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS). Using h-BN films grown by atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition on Cu and Ni substrates, two new sub-bands are found for the A2u out-of-plane stretching mode. It is shown, using both experimental and computational methods, that the lower-energy sub-band is related to 2D h-BN coupled with substrate, while the higher energy sub-band is related to decoupled (or free-standing) 2D h-BN. It is further shown that this newly-observed fine structure in the A2u mode can be used to assess, quickly and easily, the homogeneity of the h-BN-metal interface and the effects of metal surface contamination on adhesion of the layer.

  16. Integrated Optical Pumping of Cr & Ti-Doped Sapphire Substrates With III-V Nitride Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-24

    the Cr in sapphire could also permit the construction of white light LEDs . Ultimately, an integrated III-V Nitride optical pump for Ti:Sapphire could...substrates by MOCVD. 2. Characterization of doped sapphire/ InGaN structures byPL to simulate electrical injection by laser or LED device structures Part 2 1...Cr:sapphire substrate. Solid line is the spectrum of blue and red light emitted by InGaN LED epitaxially grown on Cr:sapphire substrate. The light was collected

  17. Gallium nitride epitaxy on silicon: Importance of substrate preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, G.A.; Sverdlov, B.N.; Botchkarev, A.; Morkoc, H.; Thompson, W.H.; Nayfeh, M.H. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Smith, D.J.; Tsen, S.C.Y. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Hexagonal GaN films grown on non-isomorphic substrates are usually characterized by numerous threading defects which are essentially boundaries between wurtzite GaN domains where the stacking sequences do not align. One origin of these defects is irregularities on the substrate surface such as surface steps. Using Si <111> substrates and a substrate preparation procedure that makes wide atomically flat terraces, the authors demonstrate that reduction of these irregularities greatly improves the crystalline and luminescent quality of GaN films grown by plasma-enhanced molecular beam epitaxy. X-ray rocking curve width decreases from over 1 degree to less than 20 minutes, while PL halfwidth decreases from over 15 meV to less than 10 meV.

  18. Molecular beam epitaxy of cubic III-nitrides on GaAs substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    As, D.J.; Schikora, D.; Lischka, K. [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Paderborn, Paderborn (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Molecular beam epitaxy has successfully been used to grow crystalline layers of group III-nitrides (GaN, AlN and InN) with cubic (zinc-blende) structure on GaAs substrates. In this article, we discuss these efforts that, despite inherent difficulties due to the metastability of the c-III nitrides, led to substantial improvements of the structural, electrical and optical quality of these wide gap semiconductors. We review experimental work concerned with the epitaxy of c-GaN and the control of the growth process in-situ, the important issue of p- and n-type doping of c-GaN and investigations of the structural and optical properties of c-InGaN and c-AlGaN. (orig.)

  19. Nitridation effects of Si(1 1 1) substrate surface on InN nanorods grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Shan [Faculty of Materials Science and Chemistry, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Tan, Jin, E-mail: jintan_cug@163.com [Faculty of Materials Science and Chemistry, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Engineering Research Center of Nano-Geomaterials of Ministry of Education, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Li, Bin; Song, Hao; Wu, Zhengbo; Chen, Xin [Faculty of Materials Science and Chemistry, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2015-02-05

    Graphical abstract: The morphology evolution of InN nanorods in samples (g)–(i). The alignment of InN nanorods is improved and the deviation angle distribution narrows down with increase in nitriding time. It suggests that extending the nitriding time can enhance the vertical orientation of InN nanorods. - Highlights: • InN nanorods were grown on surface nitrided Si(1 1 1) substrate using PAMBE system. • Nitridation of substrate surface has a strong effect on morphology of InN nanorods. • InN nanorods cannot be formed with 1 min nitridation of Si(1 1 1) substrate. • Increasing nitriding time will increase optimum growth temperature of InN nanorods. • Increasing nitriding time can enhance vertical orientation of InN nanorods. - Abstract: The InN nanorods were grown on Si(1 1 1) substrate by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) system, with a substrate nitridation process. The effect of nitriding time of Si(1 1 1) substrate on morphology, orientation and growth temperature of InN nanorods was characterized via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The deviation angle of InN nanorods was measured to evaluate the alignment of arrays. The results showed that InN nanorods could not be formed with 1 min nitridation of Si(1 1 1) substrate, but they could be obtained again when the nitriding time was increased to more than 10 min. In order to get aligned InN nanorods, the growth temperature needed to increase with longer nitriding time. The vertical orientation of InN nanorods could be enhanced with increase in nitriding time. The influence of the substrate nitridation on the photoluminescence (PL) spectra of InN nanorods has been investigated.

  20. Microstructures and properties of the nitrided layers fabricated on titanium substrate by direct current nitrogen arc melting technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xin; Ren Zhenan; Sun Daqian; Wang Li; Zhao Yunqiang

    2008-01-01

    The nitrided layers mainly containing TiN dendrites were fabricated by direct current nitrogen arc melting method. The test results show that the layers are harder and more resistant to wear than the titanium substrate. Arc traveling speeds and arc currents have an effect on both the microstructures and the properties of the layers. Decreasing the arc traveling speed or increasing the arc current can obviously enhance the hardness and the wear resistance of the nitrided layers.

  1. Substrate temperature influence on the trombogenicity in amorphous carbon nitride thin coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galeano-Osorio, D.S.; Vargas, S.; Lopez-Cordoba, L.M.; Ospina, R. [Laboratorio de Fisica del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 via al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia); Restrepo-Parra, E., E-mail: erestrepopa@unal.edu.co [Laboratorio de Fisica del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 via al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia); Arango, P.J. [Laboratorio de Fisica del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 via al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia)

    2010-10-01

    Carbon nitride thin films were obtained through plasma assisted physical vapor deposition technique by pulsed arc, varying the substrate temperature and investigating the influence of this parameter on the films hemocompatibility. For obtaining approaches of blood compatibility, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was used in order to study the platelets adherence and their morphology. Moreover, the elemental chemical composition was determined by using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), finding C, N and O. The coatings hemocompatibility was evaluated by in vitro thrombogenicity test, whose results were correlated with the microstructure and roughness of the films obtained. During the films growth process, the substrate temperature was varied, obtaining coatings under different temperatures, room temperature (T{sub room}), 100 deg. C, 150 deg. C and 200 deg. C. Parameters as interelectrodic distance, voltage, work pressure and number of discharges, were remained constant. By EDS, carbon and nitrogen were found in the films. Visible Raman spectroscopy was used, and it revealed an amorphous lattice, with graphitic process as the substrate temperature was increased. However, at a critical temperature of 150 deg. C, this tendency was broken, and the film became more amorphous. This film showed the lowest roughness, 2 {+-} 1 nm. This last characteristic favored the films hemocompatibility. Also, it was demonstrated that the blood compatibility of carbon nitride films obtained were affected by the I{sub D}/I{sub G} or sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} ratio and not by the absolute sp{sup 3} or sp{sup 2} concentration.

  2. Nitride-based Quantum-Confined Structures for Ultraviolet-Visible Optical Devices on Silicon Substrates

    KAUST Repository

    Janjua, Bilal

    2017-04-01

    III–V nitride quantum-confined structures embedded in nanowires (NWs), also known as quantum-disks-in-nanowires (Qdisks-in-NWs), have recently emerged as a new class of nanoscale materials exhibiting outstanding properties for optoelectronic devices and systems. It is promising for circumventing the technology limitation of existing planar epitaxy devices, which are bounded by the lattice-, crystal-structure-, and thermal- matching conditions. This work presents significant advances in the growth of good quality GaN, InGaN and AlGaN Qdisks-in-NWs based on careful optimization of the growth parameters, coupled with a meticulous layer structure and active region design. The NWs were grown, catalyst-free, using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) on silicon (Si) substrates. A 2-step growth scheme was developed to achieve high areal density, dislocation free and vertically aligned NWs on Ti/Si substrates. Numerical modeling of the NWs structures, using the nextnano3 software, showed reduced polarization fields, and, in the presence of Qdisks, exhibited improved quantum-confinement; thus contributing to high carrier radiative-recombination rates. As a result, based on the growth and device structure optimization, the technologically challenging orange and yellow NWs light emitting devices (LEDs) targeting the ‘green-yellow’ gap were demonstrated on scalable, foundry compatible, and low-cost Ti coated Si substrates. The NWs work was also extended to LEDs emitting in the ultraviolet (UV) range with niche applications in environmental cleaning, UV-curing, medicine, and lighting. In this work, we used a Ti (100 nm) interlayer and Qdisks to achieve good quality AlGaN based UV-A (320 - 400 nm) device. To address the issue of UV-absorbing polymer, used in the planarization process, we developed a pendeo-epitaxy technique, for achieving an ultra-thin coalescence of the top p-GaN contact layer, for a self-planarized Qdisks-in-NWs UV-B (280 – 320 nm) LED grown

  3. Substrate-dependent thermal conductivity of aluminum nitride thin-films processed at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkerk, B. E., E-mail: boubakeur.belkerk@gmail.com [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), University of Nantes, 2 rue de la Houssinière BP 32229, 44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Universités de Constantine, Laboratoire Microsystèmes et Instrumentation (LMI), Université Constantine 1, Faculté des Sciences de la Technologie, Route de Ain El Bey, Constantine 25017 (Algeria); Bensalem, S.; Soussou, A.; Carette, M.; Djouadi, M. A.; Scudeller, Y. [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), University of Nantes, 2 rue de la Houssinière BP 32229, 44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Al Brithen, H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy at College of Science, King Saud University at Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we report on investigation concerning the substrate-dependent thermal conductivity (k) of Aluminum Nitride (AlN) thin-films processed at low temperature by reactive magnetron sputtering. The thermal conductivity of AlN films grown at low temperature (<200 °C) on single-crystal silicon (Si) and amorphous silicon nitride (SiN) with thicknesses ranging from 100 nm to 4000 nm was measured with the transient hot-strip technique. The k values for AlN films on SiN were found significantly lower than those on Silicon consistently with their microstructures revealed by X-ray diffraction, high resolution scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The change in k was due to the thermal boundary resistance found to be equal to 10 × 10{sup −9} Km{sup 2}W{sup −1} on SiN against 3.5 × 10{sup −9} Km{sup 2}W{sup −1} on Si. However, the intrinsic thermal conductivity was determined with a value as high as 200 Wm{sup −1}K{sup −1} whatever the substrate.

  4. Poly(ethylene glycol) monolayer formation and stability on gold and silicon nitride substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerruti, Marta; Fissolo, Stefano; Carraro, Carlo; Ricciardi, Carlo; Majumdar, Arun; Maboudian, Roya

    2008-10-07

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are extensively used to modify substrates to prevent nonspecific protein adsorption and to increase hydrophilicity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, complemented by water contact angle measurements, is employed to investigate the formation and stability upon aging and heating of PEG monolayers formed on gold and silicon nitride substrates. In particular, thiolated PEG monolayers on gold, with and without the addition of an undecylic spacer chain, and PEG monolayers formed with oxysilane precursors on silicon nitride have been probed. It is found that PEG-thiol SAMs are degraded after less than two weeks of exposure to air and when heated at temperatures as low as 120 degrees C. On the contrary, PEG-silane SAMs are stable for more than two weeks, and fewer molecules are desorbed even after two months of aging, compared to those desorbed in two weeks from the PEG-thiol SAMs. A strongly bound hydration layer is found on PEG-silane SAMs aged for two months. Heating PEG-silane SAMs to temperatures as high as 160 degrees C improves the quality of the monolayer, desorbing weakly bound contaminants. The differences in stability between PEG-thiol SAMs and PEG-silane SAMs are ascribed to the different types of bonding to the surface and to the fact that the thiol-Au bond can be easily oxidized, thus causing desorption of PEG molecules from the surface.

  5. III-nitride core-shell nanorod array on quartz substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Si-Young; Min, Jung-Wook; Hwang, Hyeong-Yong; Lekhal, Kaddour; Lee, Ho-Jun; Jho, Young-Dahl; Lee, Dong-Seon; Lee, Yong-Tak; Ikarashi, Nobuyuki; Honda, Yoshio; Amano, Hiroshi

    2017-03-27

    We report the fabrication of near-vertically elongated GaN nanorods on quartz substrates. To control the preferred orientation and length of individual GaN nanorods, we combined molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with pulsed-mode metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The MBE-grown buffer layer was composed of GaN nanograins exhibiting an ordered surface and preferred orientation along the surface normal direction. Position-controlled growth of the GaN nanorods was achieved by selective-area growth using MOCVD. Simultaneously, the GaN nanorods were elongated by the pulsed-mode growth. The microstructural and optical properties of both GaN nanorods and InGaN/GaN core-shell nanorods were then investigated. The nanorods were highly crystalline and the core-shell structures exhibited optical emission properties, indicating the feasibility of fabricating III-nitride nano-optoelectronic devices on amorphous substrates.

  6. III-nitride core–shell nanorod array on quartz substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Si-Young; Min, Jung-Wook; Hwang, Hyeong-Yong; Lekhal, Kaddour; Lee, Ho-Jun; Jho, Young-Dahl; Lee, Dong-Seon; Lee, Yong-Tak; Ikarashi, Nobuyuki; Honda, Yoshio; Amano, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    We report the fabrication of near-vertically elongated GaN nanorods on quartz substrates. To control the preferred orientation and length of individual GaN nanorods, we combined molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with pulsed-mode metal–organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The MBE-grown buffer layer was composed of GaN nanograins exhibiting an ordered surface and preferred orientation along the surface normal direction. Position-controlled growth of the GaN nanorods was achieved by selective-area growth using MOCVD. Simultaneously, the GaN nanorods were elongated by the pulsed-mode growth. The microstructural and optical properties of both GaN nanorods and InGaN/GaN core–shell nanorods were then investigated. The nanorods were highly crystalline and the core–shell structures exhibited optical emission properties, indicating the feasibility of fabricating III-nitride nano-optoelectronic devices on amorphous substrates. PMID:28345641

  7. Optical properties of plasma deposited amorphous carbon nitride films on polymer substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, S.H., E-mail: abo_95@yahoo.co [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Sohag University, 82524 Sohag (Egypt); El-Hossary, F.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Sohag University, 82524 Sohag (Egypt); Gamal, G.A.; Kahlid, M.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, South Valley University, 83523 Qena (Egypt)

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous carbon nitride thin films were deposited on polymer substrates using radio frequency (rf) plasma in a mixture of nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and acetylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) gasses. The samples were prepared at different rf plasma power (350, 400, 450, 500, and 550 W), at constant plasma exposure time of 10 min, and constant N{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 2} ratio of 50%. The crystal structure and surface morphology of the prepared samples were examined using X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy analysis, respectively. The absence of the carbon nitride diffraction peaks confirms the amorphous nature of these films. The root mean square roughness of the films increased from 3.77 to 25.22 nm as the power increased from 350 to 550 W. The thickness and the deposition rate were found to increase with increasing plasma power. Over the whole studied wavelength range, from 200 to 2500 nm, the transmittance decreased with increasing plasma power. A shift in the onset of absorption towards higher wavelengths with increasing plasma power, indicating a decrease in the optical band gap, has been observed. The refractive index values were found to decrease while the extinction coefficient increased with increasing plasma power.

  8. Elastic properties of indium nitrides grown on sapphire substrates determined by nano-indentation: In comparison with other nitrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Yonenaga

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The hardness of wurtzite indium nitride (α-InN films of 0.5 to 4 μm in thickness was measured by the nano-indentation method at room temperature. After investigation of crystalline quality by x-ray diffraction, the hardness and Young’s modulus were determined to be 8.8 ± 0.4 and 184 ± 5 GPa, respectively, for the In (0001- and N ( 000 1 ̄ -growth faces of InN films. The bulk and shear moduli were then derived to be 99 ± 3 and 77 ± 2 GPa, respectively. The Poisson’s ratio was evaluated to be 0.17 ± 0.03. The results were examined comprehensively in comparison with previously reported data of InN as well as those of other nitrides of aluminum nitride and gallium nitride. The underlying physical process determining the moduli and hardness was examined in terms of atomic bonding and dislocation energy of the nitrides and wurtzite zinc oxide.

  9. Nitride superluminescent diodes with broadened emission spectrum fabricated using laterally patterned substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafar, A; Stanczyk, S; Sarzynski, M; Grzanka, S; Goss, J; Targowski, G; Nowakowska-Siwinska, A; Suski, T; Perlin, P

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate InGaN/GaN superluminescent diodes with broadened emission spectra fabricated on surface-shaped bulk GaN (0001) substrates. The patterning changes the local vicinal angle linearly along the device waveguide, which results in an indium incorporation profile in InGaN quantum wells. The structure was investigated by microphotoluminescence mapping, showing a shift of central emission wavelength from 413 nm to 430 nm. Spectral full width at half maximum of processed superluminescent diodes is equal to 6.1 nm, while the reference chips show 3.4 nm. This approach may open the path for using nitride devices in applications requiring broad emission spectrum and high beam quality, such as optical coherence tomography.

  10. Localized surface plasmon resonances in gold nano-patches on a gallium nitride substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antonio, Palma; Inchingolo, Alessio Vincenzo; Perna, Giuseppe; Capozzi, Vito; Stomeo, Tiziana; De Vittorio, Massimo; Magno, Giovanni; Grande, Marco; Petruzzelli, Vincenzo; D'Orazio, Antonella

    2012-11-16

    In this paper we describe the design, fabrication and characterization of gold nano-patches, deposited on gallium nitride substrate, acting as optical nanoantennas able to efficiently localize the electric field at the metal-dielectric interface. We analyse the performance of the proposed device, evaluating the transmission and the electric field localization by means of a three-dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. We detail the fabrication protocol and show the morphological characterization. We also investigate the near-field optical transmission by means of scanning near-field optical microscope measurements, which reveal the excitation of a localized surface plasmon resonance at a wavelength of 633 nm, as expected by the FDTD calculations. Such results highlight how the final device can pave the way for the realization of a single optical platform where the active material and the metal nanostructures are integrated together on the same chip.

  11. Growth of ternary and quaternary cubic III-nitrides on 3C-SiC substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schörmann, J.; Potthast, S.; Schnietz, M.; Li, S. F.; As, D. J.; Lischka, K.

    2006-06-01

    Cubic GaN, AlxGa1-xN/GaN multiple quantum wells and quaternary AlxGayIn1-x-yN layers were grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy on 3C-SiC substrates. Using the intensity of a reflected high energy electron beam as a probe optimum growth conditions of c-III nitrides were found, when a 1 monolayer Ga coverage is formed at the growing surface. Clear RHEED oscillations during the initial growth of AlxGa1-xN/GaN quantum wells were observed. X-ray diffraction measurements of these quantum well structures show clear satellite peaks indicating smooth interfaces. Growth of quaternary AlxGayIn1-x-yN lattice matched to GaN were demonstrated.

  12. Preparation of silicon carbide nitride films on Si substrate by pulsed high-energy density plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Thin films of silicon carbide nitride (SiCN) were prepared on (111) oriented silicon substrates by pulsed high-energy density plasma (PHEDP). The evolution of the chemical bonding states between silicon, nitrogen and carbon was investigated as a function of discharge voltage using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. With an increase in discharge voltage both the C1s and N 1s spectra shift to lower binding energy due to the formation of C-Si and N-Si bonds. The Si-C-N bonds were observed in the deconvolved C1s and N 1s spectra. The X-ray diffractometer (XRD) results show that there were no crystals in the films. The thickness of the films was approximately 1-2 μm with scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  13. Boron nitride nanosheets as improved and reusable substrates for gold nanoparticles enabled surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, Qiran

    2015-01-01

    Atomically thin boron nitride (BN) nanosheets have been found to be excellent substrates for noble metal particles enabled surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), thanks to their good adsorption of aromatic molecules, high thermal stability and weak Raman scattering. Faceted gold (Au) nanoparticles have been synthesized on BN nanosheets using a simple but controllable and reproducible sputtering and annealing method. The size and density of the Au particles can be controlled by sputtering time, current and annealing temperature etc. Under the same sputtering and annealing conditions, the Au particles on BN of different thicknesses show various sizes because the surface diffusion coefficients of Au depend on the thickness of BN. Intriguingly, decorated with similar morphology and distribution of Au particles, BN nanosheets exhibit better Raman enhancements than silicon substrates as well as bulk BN crystals. Additionally, BN nanosheets show no noticeable SERS signal and hence cause no interference to the Raman signal of the analyte. The Au/BN substrates can be reused by heating in air to remove the adsorbed analyte without loss of SERS enhancement. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2015.

  14. Poly-crystalline thin-film by aluminum induced crystallization on aluminum nitride substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhopal, Muhammad Fahad; Lee, Doo Won; Lee, Soo Hong

    2016-09-01

    Thin-film polycrystalline silicon ( pc-Si) on foreign (non-silicon) substrates has been researched by various research groups for the production of photovoltaic cells. High quality pc-Si deposition on foreign substrates with superior optical properties is considered to be the main hurdle in cell fabrication. Metal induced crystallization (MIC) is one of the renowned techniques used to produce this quality of material. In the current study, an aluminum induced crystallization (AIC) method was adopted to produce pc-Si thin-film on aluminum nitride (AlN) substrate by a seed layer approach. Aluminum and a-Si layer were deposited using an e-beam evaporator. Various annealing conditions were used in order to investigate the AIC grown pc-Si seed layers for process optimization. The effect of thermal annealing on grain size, defects preferentially crystallographic orientation of the grains were analyzed. Surface morphology was studied using an optical microscope. Poly-silicon film with a crystallinity fraction between 95-100% and an FWHM between 5-6 cm-1 is achievable at low temperatures and for short time intervals. A grain size of about 10 micron can be obtained at a low deposition rate on an AIN substrate. Similarly, Focused ion beam (FIB) also showed that at 425 °C sample B and at 400 °C sample A were fully crystallized. The crystalline quality of pc-Si was evaluated using μ-Raman spectroscopy as a function of annealed conditions and Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) was used to determine the phase direction of the pc-Si layer. The current study implicates that a poly-silicon layer with good crystallographic orientation and crystallinity fraction is achievable on AIN substrate at low temperatures and short time frames.

  15. Spatially-resolved spectral image of a microwave-induced plasma with Okamoto-cavity for nitridation of steel substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shigeo; Arai, Yuuki; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    When a nitrogen microwave-induced plasma produced with an Okamoto-cavity was employed as a source for the nitridation of steel samples, the characteristics of the plasma were investigated by analyzing a spatially-resolved emission image of nitrogen excited species obtained with a two-dimensionally imaging spectrograph. Our previous study had reported on an excellent performance of the Okamoto-cavity microwave-induced plasma (MIP), enabling a nitrided layer having a several-micrometer-thickness to form on an iron substrate, even if the treatment is completed within 1 min, which is superior to a conventional plasma nitriding using low-pressure glow discharges requiring a prolonged treatment time. In this paper, the reason for this is discussed based on a spectrometric investigation. The emission images of band heads of nitrogen molecule and nitrogen molecule ion extended toward the axial/radial directions of the plasma at larger microwave powers supplied to the MIP, thus elevating the number density of the excited species of nitrogen, which would activate any chemical reaction on the iron substrate. However, a drastic increase in the growth rate of the nitrided layer when increasing the microwave power from 600 to 700 W, which had been observed in our previous study, could not be explained only from such a variation in the excited species of nitrogen. This result is probably because the growth process is dominantly controlled by thermal diffusion of nitrogen atom after it enters into the iron substrate, where the substrate temperature is the most important parameter concerning the mobility in the iron lattice. Therefore, the Okamoto-cavity MIP could contribute to a thermal source through radiative heating as well as a source of nitrogen excited species, especially in the growth process of the nitrided layer.

  16. An exploration of laser-sustained plasma interactions with titanium substrates during nitriding without direct irradiation by the laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Amber Nalani

    Laser-sustained plasma (LSP) is plasma which can be sustained indefinitely by a laser beam away from any potentially interacting surfaces. LSPs can be sustained at steady state by balancing power input through inverse bremsstrahlung absorption with loss through radiation (continuous and line), convection, and conduction. For many years, plasma has been considered a negative influence in laser materials processing, disrupting the beam path and distorting radiation prior to the beam reaching the surface. New research indicates that LSP can be an opportunity for metallurgical surface treatments and the deposition of coatings with an improvement in properties over conventional coating methods. For the first time, the LSP was used to nitride surfaces independently of the associated laser beam and the resulting specimens were examined to gain new insights into the effects of laser plasmas on surface modification processes. A titanium plate was placed parallel to and at a radial distance from an LSP, rather than perpendicular to it, as is the typical geometry for laser processing. During the exposure of the substrate to the LSP, the process was observed via a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The processed substrates were then examined visually, by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, focused ion beam, transmission electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction to elucidate the morphological and microstructural features that are characteristic of this processing method. Results indicated that an LSP is a powerful tool for heating surfaces and simultaneously introducing activated gas species into the melt. The nitrided surfaces exhibited complex and uncommon morphologies, including faceted titanium nitride crystals, which had not been produced by conventional laser nitriding. The underlying microstructure demonstrated that LSP can generate layers similar to those produced by conventional laser nitriding, but to a much greater depth. This

  17. The impact of substrate properties and thermal annealing on tantalum nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosser, M., E-mail: michaela_grosser@yahoo.de [Chair of Micromechanics, Microfluidics/Microactuators, Saarland University, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Muench, M.; Seidel, H. [Chair of Micromechanics, Microfluidics/Microactuators, Saarland University, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Bienert, C.; Roosen, A. [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstr. 5, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Schmid, U. [Department for Microsystems Technology, Institute of Sensor and Actuator Systems, Vienna University of Technology, Floragasse 7, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-01-15

    In this study film properties of sputter-deposited tantalum nitride (TaN{sub x}) thin layers are investigated focusing on the impact of substrate properties, varying nitrogen content for film synthetization as well as post-deposition annealings in the temperature range up to 500 Degree-Sign C. For comparison, these investigations are done on low temperature co-fired ceramics and on silicon based substrates whereas the latter approach ensures defined and well-known surface properties. Furthermore, results on the phase evolution with high temperature annealings are presented showing a transformation of Ta{sub 4}N to Ta{sub 2}N in the temperature range between 350 Degree-Sign C and 500 Degree-Sign C. With increasing nitrogen content (i.e. nitrogen flow during film deposition) in the TaN{sub x} layers the topography shows first an increase in surface roughness, next a range where a smoothing of the surface characteristics is observed, and finally buckling and the existence of grain agglomerates. All these analyses are further evaluated with electrical measurements on the film resistivity and on the oxidation behaviour to gain deeper insight into material parameters relevant for micromachined devices which are operated under harsh environmental conditions.

  18. The impact of substrate properties and thermal annealing on tantalum nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosser, M.; Münch, M.; Seidel, H.; Bienert, C.; Roosen, A.; Schmid, U.

    2012-01-01

    In this study film properties of sputter-deposited tantalum nitride (TaNx) thin layers are investigated focusing on the impact of substrate properties, varying nitrogen content for film synthetization as well as post-deposition annealings in the temperature range up to 500 °C. For comparison, these investigations are done on low temperature co-fired ceramics and on silicon based substrates whereas the latter approach ensures defined and well-known surface properties. Furthermore, results on the phase evolution with high temperature annealings are presented showing a transformation of Ta4N to Ta2N in the temperature range between 350 °C and 500 °C. With increasing nitrogen content (i.e. nitrogen flow during film deposition) in the TaNx layers the topography shows first an increase in surface roughness, next a range where a smoothing of the surface characteristics is observed, and finally buckling and the existence of grain agglomerates. All these analyses are further evaluated with electrical measurements on the film resistivity and on the oxidation behaviour to gain deeper insight into material parameters relevant for micromachined devices which are operated under harsh environmental conditions.

  19. Nanostructural engineering of nitride nucleation layers for GaN substrate dislocation reduction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koleske, Daniel David; Lee, Stephen Roger; Lemp, Thomas Kerr; Coltrin, Michael Elliott; Cross, Karen Charlene; Thaler, Gerald

    2009-07-01

    With no lattice matched substrate available, sapphire continues as the substrate of choice for GaN growth, because of its reasonable cost and the extensive prior experience using it as a substrate for GaN. Surprisingly, the high dislocation density does not appear to limit UV and blue LED light intensity. However, dislocations may limit green LED light intensity and LED lifetime, especially as LEDs are pushed to higher current density for high end solid state lighting sources. To improve the performance for these higher current density LEDs, simple growth-enabled reductions in dislocation density would be highly prized. GaN nucleation layers (NLs) are not commonly thought of as an application of nano-structural engineering; yet, these layers evolve during the growth process to produce self-assembled, nanometer-scale structures. Continued growth on these nuclei ultimately leads to a fully coalesced film, and we show in this research program that their initial density is correlated to the GaN dislocation density. In this 18 month program, we developed MOCVD growth methods to reduce GaN dislocation densities on sapphire from 5 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} using our standard delay recovery growth technique to 1 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} using an ultra-low nucleation density technique. For this research, we firmly established a correlation between the GaN nucleation thickness, the resulting nucleation density after annealing, and dislocation density of full GaN films grown on these nucleation layers. We developed methods to reduce the nuclei density while still maintaining the ability to fully coalesce the GaN films. Ways were sought to improve the GaN nuclei orientation by improving the sapphire surface smoothness by annealing prior to the NL growth. Methods to eliminate the formation of additional nuclei once the majority of GaN nuclei were developed using a silicon nitride treatment prior to the deposition of the nucleation layer. Nucleation layer thickness was determined

  20. Nanostructural engineering of nitride nucleation layers for GaN substrate dislocation reduction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koleske, Daniel David; Lee, Stephen Roger; Lemp, Thomas Kerr; Coltrin, Michael Elliott; Cross, Karen Charlene; Thaler, Gerald

    2009-07-01

    With no lattice matched substrate available, sapphire continues as the substrate of choice for GaN growth, because of its reasonable cost and the extensive prior experience using it as a substrate for GaN. Surprisingly, the high dislocation density does not appear to limit UV and blue LED light intensity. However, dislocations may limit green LED light intensity and LED lifetime, especially as LEDs are pushed to higher current density for high end solid state lighting sources. To improve the performance for these higher current density LEDs, simple growth-enabled reductions in dislocation density would be highly prized. GaN nucleation layers (NLs) are not commonly thought of as an application of nano-structural engineering; yet, these layers evolve during the growth process to produce self-assembled, nanometer-scale structures. Continued growth on these nuclei ultimately leads to a fully coalesced film, and we show in this research program that their initial density is correlated to the GaN dislocation density. In this 18 month program, we developed MOCVD growth methods to reduce GaN dislocation densities on sapphire from 5 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} using our standard delay recovery growth technique to 1 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} using an ultra-low nucleation density technique. For this research, we firmly established a correlation between the GaN nucleation thickness, the resulting nucleation density after annealing, and dislocation density of full GaN films grown on these nucleation layers. We developed methods to reduce the nuclei density while still maintaining the ability to fully coalesce the GaN films. Ways were sought to improve the GaN nuclei orientation by improving the sapphire surface smoothness by annealing prior to the NL growth. Methods to eliminate the formation of additional nuclei once the majority of GaN nuclei were developed using a silicon nitride treatment prior to the deposition of the nucleation layer. Nucleation layer thickness was determined

  1. The effects of substrates on the geometry and optical properties of aluminum nitride nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharavi, Mohammad Amin; Haratizadeh, Hamid; Kitai, Adrian; Moafi, Ali

    2012-12-01

    Based on a Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process, an alumina tube electric furnace was assembled to synthesize different one dimensional aluminum nitride (AIN) nanostructures via aluminum powder and nitrogen gas flow. The products obtained where nanowires, nanorods, a unique chain-linked nanocage structure made from an entanglement of AIN nanowires and an interesting micro-sized spherical architecture. The different growth parameters dictated to the system result the product variety, making structure tuning possible. The incorporation of different substrates (silicon and alumina) not only leads to the formation of different shaped structures, but also results different optical emissions ranging from 450 nm (blue) to 650 nm (red), indicating the high potential of AIN nanostructures in LED fabrication. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Selective Area Electron Diffraction (SAED), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Photoluminescence (PL) and Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis results are discussed and a Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS)/Vapor-Solid (VS) based growth mechanism is proposed for the mentioned structures.

  2. MEMS flexible artificial basilar membrane fabricated from piezoelectric aluminum nitride on an SU-8 substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jongmoon; Jang, Jeong Hun; Choi, Hongsoo

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we present a flexible artificial basilar membrane (FABM) that mimics the passive mechanical frequency selectivity of the basilar membrane. The FABM is composed of a cantilever array made of piezoelectric aluminum nitride (AlN) on an SU-8 substrate. We analyzed the orientations of the AlN crystals using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The AIN crystals are oriented in the c-axis (0 0 2) plane and effective piezoelectric coefficient was measured as 3.52 pm V-1. To characterize the frequency selectivity of the FABM, mechanical displacements were measured using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer. When electrical and acoustic stimuli were applied, the measured resonance frequencies were in the ranges of 663.0-2369 Hz and 659.4-2375 Hz, respectively. These results demonstrate that the mechanical frequency selectivity of this piezoelectric FABM is close to the human communication frequency range (300-3000 Hz), which is a vital feature of potential auditory prostheses.

  3. Growth of ternary and quaternary cubic III-nitrides on 3C-SiC substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoermann, J.; Potthast, S.; Schnietz, M.; Li, S.F.; As, D.J.; Lischka, K. [Department of Physics, University of Paderborn, Warburger Str. 100, 33095 Paderborn (Germany)

    2006-06-15

    Cubic GaN, Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN multiple quantum wells and quaternary Al{sub x}Ga{sub y}In{sub 1-x-y}N layers were grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy on 3C-SiC substrates. Using the intensity of a reflected high energy electron beam as a probe optimum growth conditions of c-III nitrides were found, when a 1 monolayer Ga coverage is formed at the growing surface. Clear RHEED oscillations during the initial growth of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN quantum wells were observed. X-ray diffraction measurements of these quantum well structures show clear satellite peaks indicating smooth interfaces. Growth of quaternary Al{sub x}Ga{sub y}In{sub 1-x-y}N lattice matched to GaN were demonstrated. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Electrophoretic deposition of hydroxyapatite-hexagonal boron nitride composite coatings on Ti substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göncü, Yapıncak; Geçgin, Merve; Bakan, Feray; Ay, Nuran

    2017-10-01

    In this study, commercial pure titanium samples were coated with nano hydroxyapatite-nano hexagonal boron nitride (nano HA-nano hBN) composite by electrophoretic deposition (EPD). The effect of process parameters (applied voltage, deposition time and solid concentration) on the coating morphology, thickness and the adhesion behavior were studied systematically and crack free nano hBN-nano HA composite coating production was achieved for developing bioactive coatings on titanium substrates for orthopedic applications. For the examination of structural and morphological characteristics of the coating surfaces, various complementary analysis methods were performed. For the structural characterization, XRD and Raman Spectroscopy were used while, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) techniques were carried out for revealing the morphological characterization. The results showed that nano HA-nano hBN were successfully deposited on Ti surface with uniform, crack-free coating by EPD. The amounts of hBN in suspension are considered to have no effect on coating thickness. By adding hBN into HA, the morphology of HA did not change and hBN has no significant effect on porous structure. These nanostructured surfaces are expected to be suitable for proliferation of cells and have high potential for bioactive materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Silicon Nitride Barrier Films on Poly(ethylene terephthalate) Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungjin; Luo, Hao; Singh, Ankit K; Zhu, Ting; Graham, Samuel; Pierron, Olivier N

    2016-10-03

    A singular critical onset strain value has been used to characterize the strain limits of barrier films used in flexible electronics. However, such metrics do not account for time-dependent or environmentally assisted cracking, which can be critical in determining the overall reliability of these thin-film coatings. In this work, the time-dependent channel crack growth behavior of silicon nitride barrier films on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrates is investigated in dry and humid environments by tensile tests with in situ optical microscopy and numerical models. The results reveal the occurrence of environmentally assisted crack growth at strains well below the critical onset crack strain and in the absence of polymer-relaxation-assisted, time-dependent crack growth. The crack growth rates in laboratory air are about 1 order of magnitude larger than those tested in dry environments (dry air or dry nitrogen). In laboratory air, crack growth rates increase from ∼200 nm/s to 60 μm/s for applied stress intensity factors, K, ranging from 1.0 to 1.4 MPa·m(1/2), below the measured fracture toughness Kc of 1.8 MPa·m(1/2). The crack growth rates in dry environments were also strongly dependent on the prior storage of the specimens, with larger rates for specimens exposed to laboratory air (and therefore moisture) prior to testing compared to specimens stored in a dry environment. This behavior is attributed to moisture-assisted cracking, with a measured power law exponent of ∼22 in laboratory air. This study also reveals that much larger densities of channel cracks develop in the humid environment, suggesting an easier initiation of channel cracks in the presence of water vapor. The results obtained in this work are critical to address the time-dependent and environmental reliability issues of thin brittle barriers on PET substrates for flexible electronics applications.

  6. Influence of substrate pre-treatments by Xe{sup +} ion bombardment and plasma nitriding on the behavior of TiN coatings deposited by plasma reactive sputtering on 100Cr6 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vales, S., E-mail: sandra.vales@usp.br [Universidade de São Paulo (USP), Escola de Engenharia de São Carlos, Av. Trabalhador São Carlense 400, São Carlos, SP CEP 13566-590 (Brazil); Brito, P., E-mail: ppbrito@gmail.com [Pontifícia Universidade Católica de Minas Gerais (PUC-MG), Av. Dom José Gaspar 500, 30535-901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Pineda, F.A.G., E-mail: pipe8219@gmail.com [Universidade de São Paulo (USP), Escola de Engenharia de São Carlos, Av. Trabalhador São Carlense 400, São Carlos, SP CEP 13566-590 (Brazil); Ochoa, E.A., E-mail: abigail_ochoa@hotmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campus Universitário Zeferino Vaz, Barão Geraldo, Campinas, SP CEP 13083-970 (Brazil); Droppa, R., E-mail: roosevelt.droppa@ufabc.edu.br [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Av. dos Estados, 5001, Santo André, SP CEP 09210-580 (Brazil); Garcia, J., E-mail: jose.garcia@sandvik.com [Sandvik Coromant R& D, Lerkrogsvägen 19, SE-12680, Stockholm (Sweden); Morales, M., E-mail: monieriz@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campus Universitário Zeferino Vaz, Barão Geraldo, Campinas, SP CEP 13083-970 (Brazil); Alvarez, F., E-mail: alvarez@ifi.unicamp.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campus Universitário Zeferino Vaz, Barão Geraldo, Campinas, SP CEP 13083-970 (Brazil); and others

    2016-07-01

    In this paper the influence of pre-treating a 100Cr6 steel surface by Xe{sup +} ion bombardment and plasma nitriding at low temperature (380 °C) on the roughness, wear resistance and residual stresses of thin TiN coatings deposited by reactive IBAD was investigated. The Xe{sup +} ion bombardment was carried out using a 1.0 keV kinetic energy by a broad ion beam assistance deposition (IBAD, Kaufman cell). The results showed that in the studied experimental conditions the ion bombardment intensifies nitrogen diffusion by creating lattice imperfections, stress, and increasing roughness. In case of the combined pre-treatment with Xe{sup +} ion bombardment and subsequent plasma nitriding, the samples evolved relatively high average roughness and the wear volume increased in comparison to the substrates exposed to only nitriding or ion bombardment. - Highlights: • Effect of Xe ion bombardment and plasma nitriding on TiN coatings was investigated. • Xe ion bombardment with 1.0 KeV increases nitrogen retention in plasma nitriding. • 1.0 KeV ion impact energy causes sputtering, thus increasing surface roughness. • TiN coating wear is minimum after plasma nitriding due to lowest roughness.

  7. SYNTHESIS OF THICK GALLIUM NITRIDE LAYERS BY METHOD OF MULTI-STAGE GROWTH ON SUBSTRATES WITH COLUMN STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina G. Mynbaeva

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research.The paper deals with processes of formation and transformation of defects during multi-stage growth of thick gallium nitride layers with hydride vapor phase epitaxy on GaN/Al2O3 substrates with buried column pattern formed with the use of metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. Methods. The growth of initial GaN layers was performed with the use of metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. On the surface of the initial layers columns with the height of 800 nm were generated by means of ion etching. These columns were overgrown with 3-4 µm-thick GaN layers. On thus formed substrate multi-stage growth of GaN layers was performed with the use of hydride vapor-phase epitaxy. The total thickness of GaN layers was 100-1500 µm. The grown layers were studied by optical and electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Main Results. Density of threading dislocations in the layers grown by hydride vapor-phase epitaxy was (3-6·107 cm-2, that was one order of magnitude lower than in the used substrate, and two to three orders lower than dislocation density in typical GaN layers grown on commercial sapphire substrates. Raman spectroscopy data were indicative of low level of mechanical stress in the layers and their high structural uniformity. It was established that under multi-stage growth conditions, non-catastrophic cracks (those that do not cause sample destruction are able to transform into macropores and appear to be an important structural element, serving to stress relaxation in the bulk of thick gallium nitride layers grown on foreign substrates. Practical Relevance. The results of the study can be used in the development of III-nitride heterostructures for optoelectronics and high-power and high-frequency microelectronics.

  8. High Quality, Low Cost Bulk Gallium Nitride Substrates Grown by the Electrochemical Solution Growth Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seacrist, Michael [SunEdison Inc., St. Peters, MO (United States)

    2017-08-15

    The objective of this project was to develop the Electrochemical Solution Growth (ESG) method conceived / patented at Sandia National Laboratory into a commercially viable bulk gallium nitride (GaN) growth process that can be scaled to low cost, high quality, and large area GaN wafer substrate manufacturing. The goal was to advance the ESG growth technology by demonstrating rotating seed growth at the lab scale and then transitioning process to prototype commercial system, while validating the GaN material and electronic / optical device quality. The desired outcome of the project is a prototype commercial process for US-based manufacturing of high quality, large area, and lower cost GaN substrates that can drive widespread deployment of energy efficient GaN-based power electronic and optical devices. In year 1 of the project (Sept 2012 – Dec 2013) the overall objective was to demonstrate crystalline GaN growth > 100um on a GaN seed crystal. The development plan included tasks to demonstrate and implement a method for purifying reagent grade salts, develop the reactor 1 process for rotating seed Electrochemical Solution Growth (ESG) of GaN, grow and characterize ESG GaN films, develop a fluid flow and reaction chemistry model for GaN film growth, and design / build an improved growth reactor capable of scaling to 50mm seed diameter. The first year’s project objectives were met in some task areas including salt purification, film characterization, modeling, and reactor 2 design / fabrication. However, the key project objective of the growth of a crystalline GaN film on the seed template was not achieved. Amorphous film growth on the order of a few tenths of a micron has been detected with a film composition including Ga and N, plus several other impurities originating from the process solution and hardware. The presence of these impurities, particularly the oxygen, has inhibited the demonstration of crystalline GaN film growth on the seed template. However, the

  9. Epitaxially-grown Gallium Nitride on Gallium Oxide substrate for photon pair generation in visible and telecomm wavelengths

    KAUST Repository

    Awan, Kashif M.

    2016-08-11

    Gallium Nitride (GaN), along with other III-Nitrides, is attractive for optoelectronic and electronic applications due to its wide direct energy bandgap, as well as high thermal stability. GaN is transparent over a wide wavelength range from infra-red to the visible band, which makes it suitable for lasers and LEDs. It is also expected to be a suitable candidate for integrated nonlinear photonic circuits for a wide range of applications from all-optical signal processing to quantum computing and on-chip wavelength conversion. Despite its abundant use in commercial devices, there is still need for suitable substrate materials to reduce high densities of threading dislocations (TDs) and other structural defects like stacking faults, and grain boundaries. All these defects degrade the optical quality of the epi-grown GaN layer as they act as non-radiative recombination centers.

  10. Plasma-nitriding of tantalum at relatively low temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Deyuan; LIN Qin; ZHAO Haomin; FEI Qinyong; GENG Man

    2004-01-01

    The combined quadratic orthogonal regression method of experiment design was employed to explore the effects of process parameters of plasma nitriding of tantalum such as total pressure, temperature and original hydrogen molar fraction on the hardness, roughness and structure of nitriding surfaces. The regression equations of hardness, roughness and structure were given according to the results of regression and statistic analysis. And the diffusion activation energy of nitrogen in tantalum on plasma nitriding conditions was calculated according to the experimental data of hardness of plasma-nitriding of tantalum vs time and temperature. The diffusion activation energy calculated belongs to (155.49 + 10.51)kJ/mol (783-983 K).

  11. Liquid flow cells having graphene on nitride for microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adiga, Vivekananda P.; Dunn, Gabriel; Zettl, Alexander K.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2016-09-20

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to liquid flow cells for microscopy. In one aspect, a device includes a substrate having a first and a second oxide layer disposed on surfaces of the substrate. A first and a second nitride layer are disposed on the first and second oxide layers, respectively. A cavity is defined in the first oxide layer, the first nitride layer, and the substrate, with the cavity including a third nitride layer disposed on walls of the substrate and the second oxide layer that define the cavity. A channel is defined in the second oxide layer. An inlet port and an outlet port are defined in the second nitride layer and in fluid communication with the channel. A plurality of viewports is defined in the second nitride layer. A first graphene sheet is disposed on the second nitride layer covering the plurality of viewports.

  12. Raman measurements of dilute nitride alloys GaP(As)N grown on GaP substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarenko, A.; Pirogov, E.; Sobolev, M.; Bukatin, A.; Nikitina, E.

    2016-08-01

    The structural properties of GaP(As)N dilute nitrides alloys grown on GaP substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy are investigated. The samples were studied by Raman scattering and high-resolution X-ray diffraction. In this work the impact of lattice mismatch of GaP(As)N layer and GaP substrate on the form of the spectrum of Raman scattering of samples was detected. It was shown that the addition of arsenic in solid solution GaPAsN can compensate the elastic stresses in the crystal lattice, and we can estimate the lattice mismatch between epitaxial layer GaP(As)N and GaP substrate by the intensity ratio of LOX/TOr phonon peaks.

  13. Thermodynamic Studies of Decane on Boron Nitride and Graphite Substrates Using Synchrotron Radiation and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strange, Nicholas; Arnold, Thomas; Forster, Matthew; Parker, Julia; Larese, J. Z.; Diamond Light Source Collaboration; University of Tennessee Team

    2014-03-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has a lattice structure similar to that of graphite with a slightly larger lattice parameter in the basal plane. This, among other properties, makes it an excellent substrate in place of graphite, eliciting some important differences. This work is part of a larger effort to examine the interaction of alkanes with magnesium oxide, graphite, and boron nitride surfaces. In our current presentation, we will discuss the interaction of decane with these surfaces. Decane exhibits a fully commensurate structure on graphite and hBN at monolayer coverages. In this particular experiment, we have examined the monolayer structure of decane adsorbed on the basal plane of hBN using synchrotron x-ray radiation at Diamond Light Source. Additionally, we have examined the system experimentally with volumetric isotherms as well as computationally using molecular dynamics simulations. The volumetric isotherms allow us to calculate properties which provide important information about the adsorbate's interaction with not only neighboring molecules, but also the interaction with the adsorbent boron nitride.

  14. Deposition of magnesium nitride thin films on stainless steel-304 substrates by using a plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, Amir Hoshang; Habibi, Maryam; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood

    2014-08-01

    In this research, for the first time, we synthesize magnesium nitride thin films on 304-type stainless steel substrates using a Mather-type (2 kJ) plasma focus (PF) device. The films of magnesium nitride are coated with different number of focus shots (like 15, 25 and 35) at a distance of 8 cm from the anode tip and at 0° angular position with respect to the anode axis. For investigation of the structural properties and surface morphology of magnesium nitride films, we utilized the X-ray diffractometer (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis, respectively. Also, the elemental composition is characterized by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. Furthermore, Vicker's microhardness is used to study the mechanical properties of the deposited films. The results show that the degree of crystallinity of deposited thin films (from XRD), the average size of particles and surface roughness (from AFM), crystalline growth of structures (from SEM) and the hardness values of the films depend on the number of focus shots. The EDX analysis demonstrates the existence of the elemental composition of magnesium in the deposited samples.

  15. Evaluation of silicon nitride as a substrate for culture of PC12 cells: an interfacial model for functional studies in neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Jaime Medina Benavente

    Full Text Available Silicon nitride is a biocompatible material that is currently used as an interfacial surface between cells and large-scale integration devices incorporating ion-sensitive field-effect transistor technology. Here, we investigated whether a poly-L-lysine coated silicon nitride surface is suitable for the culture of PC12 cells, which are widely used as a model for neural differentiation, and we characterized their interaction based on cell behavior when seeded on the tested material. The coated surface was first examined in terms of wettability and topography using contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy and then, conditioned silicon nitride surface was used as the substrate for the study of PC12 cell culture properties. We found that coating silicon nitride with poly-L-lysine increased surface hydrophilicity and that exposing this coated surface to an extracellular aqueous environment gradually decreased its roughness. When PC12 cells were cultured on a coated silicon nitride surface, adhesion and spreading were facilitated, and the cells showed enhanced morphological differentiation compared to those cultured on a plastic culture dish. A bromodeoxyuridine assay demonstrated that, on the coated silicon nitride surface, higher proportions of cells left the cell cycle, remained in a quiescent state and had longer survival times. Therefore, our study of the interaction of the silicon nitride surface with PC12 cells provides important information for the production of devices that need to have optimal cell culture-supporting properties in order to be used in the study of neuronal functions.

  16. Quality improvement of ZnO thin layers overgrown on Si(100 substrates at room temperature by nitridation pretreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available To improve the quality of ZnO thin film overgrown on Si(100 substrate at RT (room temperature, the Si(100 surface was pretreated with different methods. The influence of interface on the overgrown ZnO layers was investigated by atomic force microscopy, photoluminescence and X-ray diffraction. We found that the nitridation pretreatment could significantly improve the quality of RT ZnO thin film through two-fold effects: one was to buffer the big lattice mismatch and ease the stress resulted from heterojunction growth; the other was to balance the interface charge, block the symmetric inheritance from the cubic Si (100 substrate and thus restrain the formation of zincblende phase.

  17. Nanostructures based in boro nitride thin films deposited by PLD onto Si/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/DLC substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman, W S; Riascos, H [Grupo Plasma, Laser y Aplicaciones, Universidad Tecnologica de Pereira (Colombia); Caicedo, J C [Grupo de PelIculas Delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Ospina, R [Laboratorio de Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, sede Manizales (Colombia); Tirado-MejIa, L, E-mail: hriascos@utp.edu.c [Laboratorio de Optoelectronica, Universidad del Quindio (Colombia)

    2009-05-01

    Diamond-like carbon and boron nitride were deposited like nanostructered bilayer on Si/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} substrate, both with (100) crystallographic orientation, these films were deposited through pulsed laser technique (Nd: YAG: 8 Jcm{sup -2}, 9ns). Graphite (99.99%) and boron nitride (99.99%) targets used to growth the films in argon atmosphere. The thicknesses of bilayer were determined with a perfilometer, active vibration modes were analyzed using infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), finding bands associated around 1400 cm{sup -1} for B - N bonding and bands around 1700 cm{sup -1} associated with C=C stretching vibrations of non-conjugated alkenes and azometinic groups, respectively. The crystallites of thin films were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and determinated the h-BN (0002), alpha-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (101) phases. The aim of this study is to relate the dependence on physical and chemical characteristics of the system Si/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/DLC/BN with gas pressure adjusted at the 1.33, 2.67 and 5.33 Pa values.

  18. Low Temperature Silicon Nitride by Hot Wire Chemical Vapour Deposition for the Use in Impermeable Thin Film Encapsulation on Flexible Substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spee, D.A.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2011-01-01

    High quality non porous silicon nitride layers were deposited by hot wire chemical vapour deposition at substrate temperatures lower than 110 C. The layer properties were investigated using FTIR, reflection/transmission measurements and 1:6 buffered HF etching rate. A Si–H peak position of 2180 cm−1

  19. Precipitation growth of graphene under exfoliated hexagonal boron nitride to form heterostructures on cobalt substrate by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Renjing; Khanaki, Alireza; Tian, Hao; He, Yanwei; Cui, Yongtao; Xu, Zhongguang; Liu, Jianlin

    2017-07-01

    Research on graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) heterostructures has attracted much attention for band engineering and device performance optimization of graphene. However, the growth of graphene/h-BN heterostructure is still challenging, which usually requires high growth temperature and long growth duration. In this paper, we demonstrate graphene/h-BN heterostructures by growing graphene onto the substrates which consist of exfoliated h-BN flakes on Co thin films using molecular beam epitaxy. The heterostructure samples grown at different temperatures and growth times were characterized by Raman, optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, microwave impedance microscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy. It is found that the graphene/h-BN heterostructures were formed by the formation of graphene underneath rather than on top of the h-BN flakes. The growth mechanism is discussed.

  20. The Adhesion Improvement of Cubic Boron Nitride Film on High Speed Steel Substrate Implanted by Boron Element

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Zhi-hai; ZHANG Ping; TAN Jun

    2005-01-01

    Cubic boron nitride(c-BN) films were deposited on W6Mo5Cr4V2 high speed steel(HSS) substrate implanted with boron ion by RF-magnetron sputtering. The films were analyzed by the bending beam method, scratch test, XPS and AFM. The experimental results show that the implantation of boron atom can reduce the in ternal stress and improve the adhesion strength of the films. The critical load of scratch test rises to 27.45 N, compared to 1.75 N of c-BN film on the unimplanted HSS. The AFM shows that the surface of the c-BN film on the implanted HSS is low in roughness and small in grain size. Then the composition of the boron implanted layer was analyzed by the XPS. And the influence of the boron implanted layer on the internal stress and adhesion strength of c-BN films were investigated.

  1. Crystalline boron nitride aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Rousseas, Michael; Goldstein, Anna P.; Mickelson, William; Worsley, Marcus A.; Woo, Leta

    2017-04-04

    This disclosure provides methods and materials related to boron nitride aerogels. In one aspect, a material comprises an aerogel comprising boron nitride. The boron nitride has an ordered crystalline structure. The ordered crystalline structure may include atomic layers of hexagonal boron nitride lying on top of one another, with atoms contained in a first layer being superimposed on atoms contained in a second layer.

  2. Crystalline boron nitride aerogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Rousseas, Michael; Goldstein, Anna P.; Mickelson, William; Worsley, Marcus A.; Woo, Leta

    2017-04-04

    This disclosure provides methods and materials related to boron nitride aerogels. In one aspect, a material comprises an aerogel comprising boron nitride. The boron nitride has an ordered crystalline structure. The ordered crystalline structure may include atomic layers of hexagonal boron nitride lying on top of one another, with atoms contained in a first layer being superimposed on atoms contained in a second layer.

  3. Low temperature silicon nitride by hot wire chemical vapour deposition for the use in impermeable thin film encapsulation on flexible substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spee, D A; van der Werf, C H M; Rath, J K; Schropp, R E I

    2011-09-01

    High quality non porous silicon nitride layers were deposited by hot wire chemical vapour deposition at substrate temperatures lower than 110 degrees C. The layer properties were investigated using FTIR, reflection/transmission measurements and 1:6 buffered HF etching rate. A Si-H peak position of 2180 cm(-1) in the Fourier transform infrared absorption spectrum indicates a N/Si ratio around 1.2. Together with a refractive index of 1.97 at a wavelength of 632 nm and an extinction coefficient of 0.002 at 400 nm, this suggests that a transparent high density silicon nitride material has been made below 110 degrees C, which is compatible with polymer films and is expected to have a high impermeability. To confirm the compatibility with polymer films a silicon nitride layer was deposited on poly(glycidyl methacrylate) made by initiated chemical vapour deposition, resulting in a highly transparent double layer.

  4. Forchlorfenuron detection based on its inhibitory effect towards catalase immobilized on boron nitride substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qin; Cai, Lijuan; Zhao, Huijie; Tang, Jiaqian; Shen, Yuanyuan; Hu, Xiaoya; Zeng, Haibo

    2015-01-15

    An enzymatic procedure based on a catalase biosensor for the detection of forchlorfenuron (CPPU) has been reported in this work. Catalase was immobilized on boron nitride (BN) sheets dispersed in chitosan by adsorption. The immobilized catalase exhibited direct electron transfer character and excellent electrocatalytic activity towards H2O2 reduction. After introducing CPPU into the H2O2 containing phosphate buffer solution, the catalase-catalyzed H2O2 reduction current decreased. By measuring the current decrease, CPPU can be determined in the range of 0.5-10.0 µM with the detection limit of 0.07 μM. The non-competitive inhibition behavior of CPPU towards catalase was verified by the Lineweaver-Burk plots. Long stability character has been ascribed to this biosensor. Possible use of this biosensor in flow systems is illustrated. The proposed biosensor has been successfully applied to CPPU determination in fruits samples with satisfactory results.

  5. Optical and Electrical Properties of III-Nitrides and Related Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Hongxing [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Lin, Jingyu [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States)

    2016-01-22

    Among the members of the III-nitride material system, boron-nitride (BN) is the least studied and understood. Its extraordinary physical properties, such as ultra-high chemical stability, thermal conductivity, electrical resistivity, band gap (Eg ~ 6 eV), and optical absorption near the band gap make hexagonal BN (h-BN) the material of choice for emerging applications such as deep ultraviolet (DUV) optoelectronic devices. Moreover, h-BN has a close lattice match to graphene and is the most suitable substrate and dielectric/separation layer for graphene electronics and optoelectronics. Similar to graphene, low dimensional h-BN is expected to possess rich new physics. Other potential applications include super-capacitors and electron emitters. However, our knowledge concerning the semiconducting properties of h-BN is very scarce. The project aims to extend our studies to the “newest” family member of the III-nitride material system, h-BN, and to address issues that have not yet been explored but are expected to profoundly influence our understanding on its fundamental properties and device applications. During the supporting period, we have improved the growth processes of h-BN epilayers by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), investigated the fundamental material properties, and identified several unique features of h-BN as well as critical issues that remain to be addressed.

  6. Low-temperature silicon nitride for thin-film electronics on polyimide foil substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleskova, H.; Wagner, S.; Gašparík, V.; Kováč, P.

    2001-05-01

    We optimized silicon nitride (SiN x) layers, deposited by 13.56 MHz plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) at 150°C, to provide a high quality gate dielectric layer for the amorphous silicon thin film technology on polyimide foils. The layers were deposited from mixtures of silane, ammonia, and hydrogen. We varied the H 2 flow rate from 55 to 220 sccm and the rf power from 5 to 50 W, while the pressure was kept at 500 mTorr and the ratio of ammonia to silane flow at 10:1. The best film was obtained from the gas composition of SiH 4:NH 3:H 2=1:10:44 and the rf power of ˜20 W. This film grows at the rate of 1.5 Å/s, has a refractive index n=1.80, a dielectric constant ɛ=7.46, a dielectric breakdown field >3.4 MV/cm, a Si/N ratio of ˜0.67, and a hydrogen content of ˜2×10 22 cm -3, and etches in 10:1 buffered HF at a rate of 61 Å/s.

  7. Synthesis of Indium Nitride Epitaxial Layers on a Substrate of Porous Indium Phosphide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Suchikova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a technique to obtain InN films on porous InP substrates by radical-beam gettering epitaxy. According to the results of the Auger spectroscopy, InN film thickness ranged from 100 nm to 0.5 microns depending on the etching conditions.

  8. Hardness evaluation, stoichiometry and grain size of titanium nitride films obtained with plasma nitriding on Ti-6Al-4V samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasconcellos, Marcos Antonio Zen; Lima, Saulo Cordeiro; Hinrichs, Ruth [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Titanium nitride films were formed on the surface of Ti-6Al-4V discs by plasma nitriding (glow discharge) in different N{sub 2}:H{sub 2} atmospheres at several substrate temperatures. In this study the influence of the process parameters on dynamic micro-hardness were investigated. Grain sizes of the nitride films, determined with X Ray Diffraction, were related to the nitriding parameters. TiNx stoichiometry was determined with Nuclear Reaction Analysis and showed a correlation to substrate temperature during the nitriding process. Micro-hardness measurements were taken on the nitrided surfaces. Grain sizes increased for a particular gas composition of 60%N{sub 2}+40%H{sub 2} where hardness was lowest. (author)

  9. Measurement and thermal modeling of sapphire substrate temperature at III-Nitride MOVPE conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creighton, J. Randall; Coltrin, Michael E.; Figiel, Jeffrey J.

    2017-04-01

    Growth rates and alloy composition of AlGaN grown by MOVPE is often very temperature dependent due to the presence of gas-phase parasitic chemical processes. These processes make wafer temperature measurement highly important, but in fact such measurements are very difficult because of substrate transparency in the near-IR ( 900 nm) where conventional pyrometers detect radiation. The transparency problem can be solved by using a mid-IR pyrometer operating at a wavelength ( 7500 nm) where sapphire is opaque. We employ a mid-IR pyrometer to measure the sapphire wafer temperature and simultaneously a near-IR pyrometer to measure wafer pocket temperature, while varying reactor pressure in both a N2 and H2 ambient. Near 1300 °C, as the reactor pressure is lowered from 300 Torr to 10 Torr the wafer temperature drops dramatically, and the ∆T between the pocket and wafer increases from 20 °C to 250 °C. Without the mid-IR pyrometer the large wafer temperature change with pressure would not have been noted. In order to explain this behavior we have developed a quasi-2D thermal model that includes a proper accounting of the pressure-dependent thermal contact resistance, and also accounts for sapphire optical transmission. The model and experimental results demonstrate that at most growth conditions the majority of the heat is transported from the wafer pocket to the wafer via gas conduction, in the free molecular flow limit. In this limit gas conductivity is independent of gap size but first order in pressure, and can quantitatively explain results from 20 to 300 Torr. Further analysis yields a measure of the thermal accommodation coefficients; α(H2) =0.23, α(N2) =0.50, which are in the range typically measured.

  10. Elimination of leakage of optical modes to GaN substrate in nitride laser diodes using a thick InGaN waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muziol, Grzegorz; Turski, Henryk; Siekacz, Marcin; Grzanka, Szymon; Perlin, Piotr; Skierbiszewski, Czesław

    2016-09-01

    A novel design consisting of a thick InGaN waveguide is proposed to fully eliminate leakage to the GaN substrate in nitride laser diodes. The design is based on the effective refractive index engineering and does not require the commonly used thick AlGaN claddings. The conditions required to fully eliminate the optical leakage are discussed. Experimental results from eight blue laser diodes with different indium contents and thicknesses of the InGaN waveguide grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy are presented to validate the theoretical results.

  11. GaN-Ready Aluminum Nitride Substrates for Cost-Effective, Very Low Dislocation Density III-Nitride LED's

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandra Schujman; Leo Schowalter

    2010-10-15

    The objective of this project was to develop and then demonstrate the efficacy of a costeffective approach for a low defect density substrate on which AlInGaN LEDs can be fabricated. The efficacy of this “GaN-ready” substrate would then be tested by growing high efficiency, long lifetime InxGa1-xN blue LEDs. The approach used to meet the project objectives was to start with low dislocation density AlN single-crystal substrates and grow graded AlxGa1-xN layers on top. Pseudomorphic AlxGa1-xN epitaxial layers grown on bulk AlN substrates were used to fabricate light emitting diodes and demonstrate better device performance as a result of the low defect density in these layers when benched marked against state-of-the-art LEDs fabricated on sapphire substrates. The pseudomorphic LEDs showed excellent output powers compared to similar wavelength devices grown on sapphire substrates, with lifetimes exceeding 10,000 hours (which was the longest time that could reliably be estimated). In addition, high internal quantum efficiencies were demonstrated at high driving current densities even though the external quantum efficiencies were low due to poor photon extraction. Unfortunately, these pseudomorphic LEDs require high Al content so they emit in the ultraviolet. Sapphire based LEDs typically have threading dislocation densities (TDD) > 108 cm-2 while the pseudomorphic LEDs have TDD ≤ 105 cm-2. The resulting TDD, when grading the AlxGa1-xN layer all the way to pure GaN to produce a “GaN-ready” substrate, has varied between the mid 108 down to the 106 cm-2. These inconsistencies are not well understood. Finally, an approach to improve the LED structures on AlN substrates for light extraction efficiency was developed by thinning and roughening the substrate.

  12. Impact of substrate nitridation on the growth of InN on In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(111) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, YongJin, E-mail: yjcho@alumni.nd.edu [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5–7, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Sadofev, Sergey; Fernández-Garrido, Sergio [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5–7, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Calarco, Raffaella, E-mail: calarco@pdi-berlin.de [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5–7, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Riechert, Henning [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5–7, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Galazka, Zbigniew; Uecker, Reinhard [Leibniz-Institut für Kristallzüchtung, Max-Born-Str. 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Brandt, Oliver [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5–7, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-04-30

    Highlights: • An in situ nitridation of the In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(111) substrate converts the surface of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(111) to InN0001. • The morphology of InN films deposited on such nitridated In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(111) substrates is characteristic for growth by instable step-flow. • This different morphology is demonstrated to be a consequence of the different polarity of the InN films. • The polarity of InN films grown on In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(111) can be controlled. - Abstract: We study the growth of InN films on In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(111) substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy under N excess. InN films deposited directly on In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(111) exhibit a strongly faceted morphology. A nitridation step prior to growth is found to convert the In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(111) surface to InN{0001}. The morphology of InN films deposited on such nitridated In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(111) substrates is characteristic for growth by instable step-flow and is thus drastically different from the three-dimensional growth obtained without nitridation. We show that this change originates from the different polarity of the films: while InN films deposited directly on In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(111) are In-polar, they are N-polar when grown on the nitridated substrate.

  13. Impact of layer and substrate properties on the surface acoustic wave velocity in scandium doped aluminum nitride based SAW devices on sapphire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillinger, M., E-mail: manuel.gillinger@tuwien.ac.at; Knobloch, T.; Schneider, M.; Schmid, U. [Institute of Sensor and Actuator Systems, TU Wien, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Shaposhnikov, K.; Kaltenbacher, M. [Institute of Mechanics and Mechatronics, TU Wien, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2016-06-06

    This paper investigates the performance of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices consisting of reactively sputter deposited scandium doped aluminum nitride (Sc{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N) thin films as piezoelectric layers on sapphire substrates for wireless sensor or for RF-MEMS applications. To investigate the influence of piezoelectric film thickness on the device properties, samples with thickness ranging from 500 nm up to 3000 nm are fabricated. S{sub 21} measurements and simulations demonstrate that the phase velocity is predominantly influenced by the mass density of the electrode material rather than by the thickness of the piezoelectric film. Additionally, the wave propagation direction is varied by rotating the interdigital transducer structures with respect to the crystal orientation of the substrate. The phase velocity is about 2.5% higher for a-direction compared to m-direction of the sapphire substrate, which is in excellent agreement with the difference in the anisotropic Young's modulus of the substrate corresponding to these directions.

  14. Gallium nitride optoelectronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, T. L.; Chu, S. S.

    1972-01-01

    The growth of bulk gallium nitride crystals was achieved by the ammonolysis of gallium monochloride. Gallium nitride single crystals up to 2.5 x 0.5 cm in size were produced. The crystals are suitable as substrates for the epitaxial growth of gallium nitride. The epitaxial growth of gallium nitride on sapphire substrates with main faces of (0001) and (1T02) orientations was achieved by the ammonolysis of gallium monochloride in a gas flow system. The grown layers had electron concentrations in the range of 1 to 3 x 10 to the 19th power/cu cm and Hall mobilities in the range of 50 to 100 sq cm/v/sec at room temperature.

  15. 纯钛材离子渗氮后在Hank's人工模拟体液中的电化学性能%Electrochemical Behavior and Corrosion Resistance of Ion Nitriding Layer on Titanium Substrate in Artificially Simulated Body Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴新春; 陈吉; 韩啸

    2013-01-01

    As-cast Ti substrate was ion nitridized so as to increase the surface hardness and corrosion resistance as well as compatibility to human body. The elemental composition, phase structure, and morphology of as - obtained ion nitriding layer were analyzed with an energy dispersive spectrometer, an X-ray diffractometer, and a scanning electron microscope, while its hardness was measured with a hardness meter. Moreover, the electrochemical behavior and corrosion resistance of as - cast Ti substrate and the ion nitriding layer in Hank' s solution of 37 ℃ were comparatively investigated based on measurements of potentiodynamic polarization curves and alternating current impedance spectra. It was found that a gradient ion nitriding layer with a thickness of 17 μm was formed on Ti substrate surface after ion nitriding at 650 ℃. As -obtained ion nitriding layer consisted of α - Ti ( N) , Ti2 N and TiN. Moreover, the ion nitriding layer had a hardness of about (650 ±20) HV, which was 2. 3 times as much as that of the Ti substrate, while the Ti substrate after ion nitriding possessed greatly improved corrosion resistance.%为了提高纯钛材的表面硬度及耐蚀性,使之更适应人体环境,对铸态纯钛材表面进行离子渗氮.利用能谱仪、X射线衍射仪、扫描电镜及显微硬度计研究了渗氮钛材的成分、相结构、形貌及硬度,利用动电位极化曲线及交流阻抗谱对比研究了纯钛材及离子渗氮钛材在37℃的Hank's人工模拟体液中的电化学行为.结果表明:经过650℃渗氮处理后,铸态纯钛材表面形成了17 μm的梯度渗氮层,其相组成为α-Ti(N),Ti2N,TiN;表面显微硬度约为(650±20) HV,为铸态纯钛材的2.3倍;离子渗氮钛材的耐蚀性明显提高.

  16. Effect of Au/SiO2 substrate on the structural and optical properties of gallium nitride grown by CVD

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Ramos-Carrazco; R Garcia-Gutierrez; M Barboza-Flores; R Rangel; O E Contreras; D Berman-Mendoza

    2014-12-01

    The improvement of the growth of thick GaN films using a fused silica wafer covered with a thin gold layer by chemical vapour deposition at 800 °C is reported. In order to compare the surface properties, crystalline quality, micromilling performance and luminescence, the characterization of a GaN film grown on a silicon wafer is presented as well. The different morphologies of the surface observed on the GaN films are compared on each substrate and the resulting microstructures are presented in detail. High resolution TEM images of the GaN films show the main crystallographic planes characterizing these structures. The wurtzite structure was determined for each sample using the substrates of Au/SiO2 and Si (100) from the XRD patterns. Also, the re-deposition effect after ion milling of the GaN films is reported. The performance of ionic beam on the surface of the GaN thick films for the geometries patterning of rectangular, circular and annular with two different ion doses was compared. Cathodoluminescence spectra showed that the top surfaces of the samples emit strong UV emissions peaked at 3.35 and 3.32 eV which are related to the Y4 and Y6 transitions.

  17. Modeling of the effects of different substrate materials on the residual thermal stresses in the aluminum nitride crystal grown by sublimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R. G.; Idesman, A.; Nyakiti, L.; Chaudhuri, J.

    2009-02-01

    A three-dimensional numerical finite element modeling method is applied to compare interfacial residual thermal stress distribution in AlN single crystals grown by using different substrates such as silicon carbide, boron nitride, tungsten, tantalum carbide, and niobium carbide. A dimensionless coordinate system is used which reduces the numbers of computations and hence simplifies the stress analysis. All components of the stress distribution, both in the film and in the substrate, including the normal stress along the growth direction as well as in-plane normal stresses and shear stresses are fully investigated. This information about the stress distribution provides insight into understanding and controlling the AlN single crystal growth by the sublimation technique. The normal stress in the film at the interface along the growth direction and the shear stresses are zero except at the edges, whereas in-plane stresses are nonzero. The in-plane stresses are compressive when TaC and NbC substrates are used. A small compressive stress might be beneficial in prohibiting crack growth in the film. The compressive stress in the AlN is lower for the TaC substrate than that for the NbC. Tensile in-plane stresses are formed in the AlN for 6H-SiC, BN, and W substrates. This tensile stress in the film is detrimental as it will assist in the crack growth. The stress concentration at the edges of the AlN film at the interface is compressive in nature when TaC and NbC are used as a substrate. This causes the film to bend downward (i.e., convex shape) and assist it to adhere to the substrate. The AlN film curves upward or in a concave shape when SiC, BN, and W substrates are used since the stress concentration at the edges of the AlN film is tensile at the interface and this may cause detachment of the film from the substrate.

  18. Substrate engineering by hexagonal boron nitride/SiO2 for hysteresis-free graphene FETs and large-scale graphene p-n junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hua; Wu, Juanxia; Chen, Yabin; Zhang, Haoli; Zhang, Jin

    2013-10-01

    We have explored an approach for the fabrication of intrinsic and hysteresis-free graphene field-effect transistors (FETs) and for the construction of graphene p-n junctions based on substrate engineering by hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN)/SiO2. The effect of various interfaces on the performance of the graphene FETs was systematically studied by constructing four types of graphene devices (graphene/SiO2 FETs, graphene/h-BN FETs, h-BN/graphene/SiO2 FETs, and h-BN/graphene/h-BN FETs). Graphene/SiO2 FETs and h-BN/graphene/SiO2 FETs always exhibit large hysteresis before and after annealing, whereas graphene/h-BN FETs and h-BN/graphene/h-BN FETs show intrinsic properties after annealing. Raman measurements also indicate that graphene on a SiO2 substrate contains large amounts of p-doping, whereas that on a h-BN substrate is intrinsic. Thus, the graphene/h-BN interface gives intrinsic and hysteresis-free graphene FETs, whilst the graphene/SiO2 interface affords p-doping and a hysteresis effect in the graphene FETs. This result is because h-BN serves as an insulation layer, which prevents charge trapping between the graphene and the charge traps at the graphene/SiO2 interface, which cause the hysteresis. In addition, the negligible electrostatic doping of h-BN into graphene also ensures the intrinsic and hysteresis-free properties of graphene/BN/SiO2 FETs. Moreover, benefitting from the p-doped and intrinsic features of graphene on SiO2 and h-BN substrates, respectively, large-scale graphene p-n junction superlattices with great potential difference are constructed and integrated into photodetector arrays by substrate engineering with h-BN/SiO2. Efficient hot carrier-assisted photocurrent was generated by laser excitation at the junction under ambient conditions.

  19. Optical characterization of gallium nitride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirilyuk, Victoria

    2002-01-01

    Group III-nitrides have been considered a promising system for semiconductor devices since a few decades, first for blue- and UV-light emitting diodes, later also for high-frequency/high-power applications. Due to the lack of native substrates, heteroepitaxially grown III-nitride layers are usually

  20. Edge and substrate-induced bandgap in zigzag graphene nanoribbons on the hexagonal nitride boron 8-ZGNR/h-BN(0001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Ilyasov

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The results of DFT (GGA-PBEsol and DFT(PBE-D2 study of the band structure of zigzag graphene nanoribbons on hexagonal nitride boron 8-ZGNR/h-BN(0001 are presented, suitable as potential base for new materials for spintronics. It offers a study of regularities in the changes of the valence band electron structure and the induction of the energy gap in the series 8-ZGNR → 8-ZGNR/h-BN(0001 → graphene/h-BN(0001. The peculiarities of the spin state at the Fermi level, the roles of the edge effect and the effect of substrate in formation of the band gap in 8-ZGNR/h-BN(0001 system are discussed. Our calculations shown that vdW-correction plays an important role in the adsorption of GNR on h-BN and results in reduction of the interplanar distances in equilibrium systems ZGNRs/h-BN(0001. As a result of the structural changes we have obtained new values of the energy gap in the 8-ZGNR-AF and 8-ZGNR-AF/h-BN(0001 systems. The paper demonstrates appearance of 600 meV energy gap in the 8-ZGNR/h-BN(0001 interface. The contributions of nanoribbon edges and the substrate in formation of the gap have been differentiated for the first time. The estimations of local magnetic moments on carbon atoms are made. Shown that in case of ferromagnetic ordering substrate presense causes insignificant splitting of the bands. The splitting reached only (14-28 meV. Since the electronic states of a suspended GNR in point (k=π are degenerate near the Fermi level, we can assume that the above splitting in 8-ZGNR/h-BN(0001 is only determined by the contribution of the h-BN(0001 substrate.

  1. Hard carbon nitride and method for preparing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, E.E.; Cohen, M.L.; Hansen, W.L.

    1992-05-05

    Novel crystalline [alpha](silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride and [beta](silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride are formed by sputtering carbon in the presence of a nitrogen atmosphere onto a single crystal germanium or silicon, respectively, substrate. 1 figure.

  2. Engineering plasmon dispersion relations : hybrid nanoparticle chain - substrate plasmon polaritons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Compaijen, Paul J.; Malyshev, Victor A.; Knoester, Jasper

    2015-01-01

    We consider the dispersion relations of the optical excitations in a chain of silver nanoparticles situated above a metal substrate and show that they are hybrid plasmon polaritons, composed of localized surface plasmons and surface plasmon polaritons. We demonstrate a strong dependence of the syste

  3. Fabrication and Characterization of Vertical Gallium Nitride Power Schottky Diodes on Bulk GaN Substrates FY2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-09

    crystal GaN substrate grown using the ammonothermal growth technique . To investigate the electrical performance of the SDs as a function of diode size...availability and use of high-quality native substrates, demonstrating an ideal route for achieving GaN-based device structures with low-threading dislocation...30 s on a hot plate and subsequently flood exposed for 8 s. After flood exposure, the sample was developed for 60 s in an AZ300 Metal Ion Free

  4. Substrate Activity Screening (SAS) and Related Approaches in Medicinal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladysz, Rafaela; Lambeir, Anne-Marie; Joossens, Jurgen; Augustyns, Koen; Van der Veken, Pieter

    2016-03-04

    Substrate activity screening (SAS) was presented a decade ago by Ellman and co-workers as a straightforward methodology for the identification of fragment-sized building blocks for enzyme inhibitors. Ever since, SAS and variations derived from it have been successfully applied to the discovery of inhibitors of various families of enzymatically active drug targets. This review covers key achievements and challenges of SAS and related methodologies, including the modified substrate activity screening (MSAS) approach. Special attention is given to the kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of these methodologies, as a thorough understanding thereof is crucial for successfully transforming the identified fragment-sized hits into potent inhibitors.

  5. Epitaxial Growth of Ⅲ Nitrides and Relevant Devices on Metal-Based Substrates%在金属衬底上外延生长Ⅲ族氮化物及相关器件

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文樑; 李国强

    2012-01-01

    The comparison of advantages and disadvantages of growing HI nitrides and relevant devices on sapphire substrates and metal-based substrates are reviewed. And the significance of metal as substrates for the epitaxial growth of MⅢ nitrides and relevant devices on metal-based substrates for their unique excellent physical and chemical properties are pointed out. It describes in detail on the recent development of epitaxial growth of Ⅲ nitrides and relevant devices on metal-based substrates and the development of corresponding epitaxial growth technologies. Compared with metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) , pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has much lower growth temperature, and therefore could suppress the severe interfacial reactions between metal substrates and epilayers in the case of MOCVD or MBE growth, and accordingly could grown Ⅲ nitrides directly on metal-based substrates. The application of PLD sheds light on directly growing Ⅲ nitrides and relevant devices on metal-based substrates.%通过分析对比蓝宝石衬底和金属衬底上外延生长Ⅲ族氮化物及相关器件的优缺点,指出了金属所具有的独特优异的物理及化学性能,以及金属作为衬底外延生长Ⅲ族氮化物及相关器件的重大意义.详细介绍了国内外在金属衬底上外延生长Ⅲ族氮化物及相关器件的研究状况及所发展的相关外延技术.相比金属有机物气相沉积技术和分子束外延技术,脉冲激光沉积技术可以实现Ⅲ族氮化物的低温外延生长,从而克服金属有机物气相沉积技术和分子束外延技术采用的高温生长而导致金属衬底与外延薄膜间发生的剧烈界面反应,可以直接在金属衬底上外延生长Ⅲ族氮化物及相关器件.脉冲激光沉积技术为在金属衬底上外延生长Ⅲ族氮化物及相关器件开拓了广阔的前景.

  6. Direct growth of hexagonal boron nitride/graphene heterostructures on cobalt foil substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhongguang; Khanaki, Alireza; Tian, Hao; Zheng, Renjing; Suja, Mohammad; Liu, Jianlin, E-mail: jianlin@ece.ucr.edu [Quantum Structures Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Zheng, Jian-Guo [Irvine Materials Research Institute, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-2800 (United States)

    2016-07-25

    Graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (G/h-BN) heterostructures have attracted a great deal of attention because of their exceptional properties and wide variety of potential applications in nanoelectronics. However, direct growth of large-area, high-quality, and stacked structures in a controllable and scalable way remains challenging. In this work, we demonstrate the synthesis of h-BN/graphene (h-BN/G) heterostructures on cobalt (Co) foil by sequential deposition of graphene and h-BN layers using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. It is found that the coverage of h-BN layers can be readily controlled on the epitaxial graphene by growth time. Large-area, uniform-quality, and multi-layer h-BN films on thin graphite layers were achieved. Based on an h-BN (5–6 nm)/G (26–27 nm) heterostructure, capacitor devices with Co(foil)/G/h-BN/Co(contact) configuration were fabricated to evaluate the dielectric properties of h-BN. The measured breakdown electric field showed a high value of ∼2.5–3.2 MV/cm. Both I-V and C-V characteristics indicate that the epitaxial h-BN film has good insulating characteristics.

  7. Substrate recognition and catalysis by flap endonucleases and related enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Christopher G; Atack, John M; Chapados, Brian; Tainer, John A; Grasby, Jane A

    2010-04-01

    FENs (flap endonucleases) and related FEN-like enzymes [EXO-1 (exonuclease-1), GEN-1 (gap endonuclease 1) and XPG (xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group G)] are a family of bivalent-metal-ion-dependent nucleases that catalyse structure-specific hydrolysis of DNA duplex-containing nucleic acid structures during DNA replication, repair and recombination. In the case of FENs, the ability to catalyse reactions on a variety of substrates has been rationalized as a result of combined functional and structural studies. Analyses of FENs also exemplify controversies regarding the two-metal-ion mechanism. However, kinetic studies of T5FEN (bacteriophage T5 FEN) reveal that a two-metal-ion-like mechanism for chemical catalysis is plausible. Consideration of the metallobiochemistry and the positioning of substrate in metal-free structures has led to the proposal that the duplex termini of substrates are unpaired in the catalytically active form and that FENs and related enzymes may recognize breathing duplex termini within more complex structures. An outstanding issue in FEN catalysis is the role played by the intermediate (I) domain arch or clamp. It has been proposed that FENs thread the 5'-portion of their substrates through this arch, which is wide enough to accommodate single-stranded, but not double-stranded, DNA. However, FENs exhibit gap endonuclease activity acting upon substrates that have a region of 5'-duplex. Moreover, the action of other FEN family members such as GEN-1, proposed to target Holliday junctions without termini, appears incompatible with a threading mechanism. An alterative is that the I domain is used as a clamp. A future challenge is to clarify the role of this domain in FENs and related enzymes.

  8. Strain-effect transistors: Theoretical study on the effects of external strain on III-nitride high-electron-mobility transistors on flexible substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shervin, Shahab; Kim, Seung-Hwan; Asadirad, Mojtaba; Ravipati, Srikanth; Lee, Keon-Hwa; Bulashevich, Kirill; Ryou, Jae-Hyun

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents strain-effect transistors (SETs) based on flexible III-nitride high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) through theoretical calculations. We show that the electronic band structures of InAlGaN/GaN thin-film heterostructures on flexible substrates can be modified by external bending with a high degree of freedom using polarization properties of the polar semiconductor materials. Transfer characteristics of the HEMT devices, including threshold voltage and transconductance, are controlled by varied external strain. Equilibrium 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is enhanced with applied tensile strain by bending the flexible structure with the concave-side down (bend-down condition). 2DEG density is reduced and eventually depleted with increasing compressive strain in bend-up conditions. The operation mode of different HEMT structures changes from depletion- to enchantment-mode or vice versa depending on the type and magnitude of external strain. The results suggest that the operation modes and transfer characteristics of HEMTs can be engineered with an optimum external bending strain applied in the device structure, which is expected to be beneficial for both radio frequency and switching applications. In addition, we show that drain currents of transistors based on flexible InAlGaN/GaN can be modulated only by external strain without applying electric field in the gate. The channel conductivity modulation that is obtained by only external strain proposes an extended functional device, gate-free SETs, which can be used in electro-mechanical applications.

  9. Strain-effect transistors: Theoretical study on the effects of external strain on III-nitride high-electron-mobility transistors on flexible substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shervin, Shahab; Asadirad, Mojtaba [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4006 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Kim, Seung-Hwan; Ravipati, Srikanth; Lee, Keon-Hwa [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4006 (United States); Bulashevich, Kirill [STR Group, Inc., Engels av. 27, P.O. Box 89, 194156, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Ryou, Jae-Hyun, E-mail: jryou@uh.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4006 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Texas Center for Superconductivity at the University of Houston (TcSUH), University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States)

    2015-11-09

    This paper presents strain-effect transistors (SETs) based on flexible III-nitride high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) through theoretical calculations. We show that the electronic band structures of InAlGaN/GaN thin-film heterostructures on flexible substrates can be modified by external bending with a high degree of freedom using polarization properties of the polar semiconductor materials. Transfer characteristics of the HEMT devices, including threshold voltage and transconductance, are controlled by varied external strain. Equilibrium 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is enhanced with applied tensile strain by bending the flexible structure with the concave-side down (bend-down condition). 2DEG density is reduced and eventually depleted with increasing compressive strain in bend-up conditions. The operation mode of different HEMT structures changes from depletion- to enchantment-mode or vice versa depending on the type and magnitude of external strain. The results suggest that the operation modes and transfer characteristics of HEMTs can be engineered with an optimum external bending strain applied in the device structure, which is expected to be beneficial for both radio frequency and switching applications. In addition, we show that drain currents of transistors based on flexible InAlGaN/GaN can be modulated only by external strain without applying electric field in the gate. The channel conductivity modulation that is obtained by only external strain proposes an extended functional device, gate-free SETs, which can be used in electro-mechanical applications.

  10. 流延法制备AlN陶瓷基板的研究%Tape Casting Process of Aluminium Nitride Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹峻; 张擎雪; 庄汉锐; 邬凤英

    2001-01-01

    从颗粒尺寸、浆料流体类型、干燥条件、排胶机制等方面对流延法制备AlN陶瓷基板展开了较为系统的研究.结果表明,颗粒尺寸的不同直接影响到浆料粘度及分散剂用量.适于AlN流延成型的浆料流体类型属于假塑性流体.保持一定的溶剂气氛有利于获得表面平整光滑的流延素坯膜.二次排胶有利于排除AlN流延素坯膜中的残余碳.烧结后基板的断口SEM照片表明晶粒发育较为完善,无明显开气孔,断裂模式为沿晶断裂.%Tape casting process of aluminium nitride substrate was studied from the following aspects such as particle size,the style of slurry fluid,drying condition and debinding mechanism.As a result,it was indicated that various particle size directly influenced The slurry viscosity and the amout of dispersant. The style of slurry fluid suit for tape casting of AlN was pseudo plastic. The green tape with flat and smooth surface was fabricated when keeping solvent atmosphere. Twice-debinding process was an available way to remove carbon impurity in the AlN green tape. The SEM photograph of the fractured surface of the sintered substrate showed that crystal particle grew well,open porosity did not appear and fracture mode was intercrystalline fracture.

  11. Formation of Gallium Nitride Crystal Loops on Silicon (111) Substrate%Si(111)衬底上生长GaN晶环的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王显明; 孙振翠; 魏芹芹; 王强; 曹文田; 薛成山

    2004-01-01

    利用热壁化学气相沉积在Si(111)衬底上获得GaN晶环,采用扫描电镜(SEM)、选择区电子衍射(SAED)、X射线衍射(XRD),光致发光(PL)谱和傅里叶红外吸收谱(FTIR)对晶环的组成、结构、形貌和光学特性进行分析.初步结果证明:在Si(111)衬底上获得择优生长的六方纤锌矿结构的GaN晶环.SEM显示在均匀的薄膜上出现直径约为10μm的5晶环,由XRD和SAED的分析证实晶环呈六方纤矿多晶结构,FTIR显示GaN薄膜的主要成分为GaN,同时含有少量的C污染,PL测试表明晶环呈现不同于GaN薄膜的发光特性.%The crystal loops of Gallium nitride (GaN) were deposited on silicon (111) substrate by using hot-wall chemical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), x-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence (PL) and Fourier Transform Infrared transmission (FTIR) Spectroscopy were employed to analyze the surface morphology, structure and optical properties of GaN layer.SEM image shows five half-loops attached to a crystal string side by side in the uniform films. XRD, SAED patterns reveal that the formed loops are polycrystalline hexagonal gallium nitride. FTIR pattern shows the main composition of the film is GaN and it contains trifle carbon contamination. New feature is found in PL pattern of the crystal loops,which is different from the bulk GaN films.

  12. Modeling, synthesis and study of highly efficient solar cells based on III-nitride nanowire arrays grown on Si substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozharov, A. M.; Bolshakov, A. D.; Kudryashov, D. A.; Kryzhanovskaya, N. V.; Cirlin, G. E.; Mukhin, I. S.; Harmand, J. C.; Tchernysheva, M.

    2015-11-01

    In this letter we investigate photovoltaic properties of GaN nanowires (NWs) - Si substrate heterostructure obtained by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Antireflection properties of the NW array were studied theoretically and experimentally to show an order of magnitude enhancement in antireflection comparing to the pure Si surface (2.5% vs. 33.8%). In order to determine optimal morphology and doping levels of the structure with maximum possible efficiency we simulated it's properties using a finite difference method. The carried out simulation showed that a maximum efficiency should be 20%.

  13. Silicon nitride and intrinsic amorphous silicon double antireflection coatings for thin-film solar cells on foreign substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Da; Kunz, Thomas [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern), Division: Photovoltaics and Thermosensoric, Haberstr. 2a, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Wolf, Nadine [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern), Division: Energy Efficiency, Am Galgenberg 87, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Liebig, Jan Philipp [Materials Science and Engineering, Institute I, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstr. 5, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Wittmann, Stephan; Ahmad, Taimoor; Hessmann, Maik T.; Auer, Richard [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern), Division: Photovoltaics and Thermosensoric, Haberstr. 2a, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Göken, Mathias [Materials Science and Engineering, Institute I, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstr. 5, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Brabec, Christoph J. [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern), Division: Photovoltaics and Thermosensoric, Haberstr. 2a, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Institute of Materials for Electronics and Energy Technology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstr. 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-05-29

    Hydrogenated intrinsic amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) was investigated as a surface passivation method for crystalline silicon thin film solar cells on graphite substrates. The results of the experiments, including quantum efficiency and current density-voltage measurements, show improvements in cell performance. This improvement is due to surface passivation by an a-Si:H(i) layer, which increases the open circuit voltage and the fill factor. In comparison with our previous work, we have achieved an increase of 0.6% absolute cell efficiency for a 40 μm thick 4 cm{sup 2} aperture area on the graphite substrate. The optical properties of the SiN{sub x}/a-Si:H(i) stack were studied using spectroscopic ellipsometer techniques. Scanning transmission electron microscopy inside a scanning electron microscope was applied to characterize the cross section of the SiN{sub x}/a-Si:H(i) stack using focus ion beam preparation. - Highlights: • We report a 10.8% efficiency for thin-film silicon solar cell on graphite. • Hydrogenated intrinsic amorphous silicon was applied for surface passivation. • SiN{sub x}/a-Si:H(i) stacks were characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometer techniques. • Cross-section micrograph was obtained by scanning transmission electron microscopy. • Quantum efficiency and J-V measurements show improvements in the cell performance.

  14. Relative Specificity: All Substrates Are Not Created Equal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zeng

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A biological molecule, e.g., an enzyme, tends to interact with its many cognate substrates, targets, or partners differentially. Such a property is termed relative specificity and has been proposed to regulate important physiological functions, even though it has not been examined explicitly in most complex biochemical systems. This essay reviews several recent large-scale studies that investigate protein folding, signal transduction, RNA binding, translation and transcription in the context of relative specificity. These results and others support a pervasive role of relative specificity in diverse biological processes. It is becoming clear that relative specificity contributes fundamentally to the diversity and complexity of biological systems, which has significant implications in disease processes as well.

  15. Method and device to synthesize boron nitride nanotubes and related nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-07-19

    Methods and apparatus for producing chemical nanostructures having multiple elements, such as boron and nitride, e.g. boron nitride nanotubes, are disclosed. The method comprises creating a plasma jet, or plume, such as by an arc discharge. The plasma plume is elongated and has a temperature gradient along its length. It extends along its length into a port connector area having ports for introduction of feed materials. The feed materials include the multiple elements, which are introduced separately as fluids or powders at multiple ports along the length of the plasma plume, said ports entering the plasma plume at different temperatures. The method further comprises modifying a temperature at a distal portion of or immediately downstream of said plasma plume; and collecting said chemical nanostructures after said modifying.

  16. Si(111)衬底上生长GaN晶绳的研究%Formation of gallium nitride crystal string on silicon (111) substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹文田; 孙振翠; 魏芹芹; 薛成山; 王强

    2003-01-01

    利用热壁化学气相沉积在Si(111)衬底上获得GaN晶绳,采用傅里叶红外吸收谱(FTIR)、扫描电子显微镜(SEM)、选区电子衍射(SAED)、X射线衍射(XRD)和光致发光谱(PL)对晶绳进行组成、结构、形貌和光学特性分析.初步结果证明:在Si(111)衬底上获得择优生长的六方纤锌矿结构的GaN晶绳.SEM显示在均匀的薄膜上出现6μm的晶绳,FTIR显示GaN薄膜的主要成分为GaN同时含有少量的C污染,由XRD和SAED的综合分析得出晶绳呈六方纤锌矿单晶结构,PL测试表明晶绳呈现不同于GaN薄膜的发光特性.%GaN crystal string was deposited on Si (111) substrate by hot- wall chemical vapor depo- sition. Fourier Transform Infrared Transmission (FTIR) Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED), X- Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy were employed to analyze the composition, surface morphology, structure, and optical property of GaN layer. FTIR pattern shows the main composition of the film is GaN and it contains trifle carbon contamination. SEM images show a crystal string with a diameter of 6μ m appears in the uniform film. XRD, SAED patterns reveal that the formed string is single- crystalline hexagonal gallium nitride. New feature is found in PL pattern of the crystal string, which is different from the bulk GaN films.

  17. Enhanced corrosion resistance properties of radiofrequency cold plasma nitrided carbon steel: Gravimetric and electrochemical results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouanis, F.Z. [Laboratoire des Procedes d' Elaboration des Revetements Fonctionnels, PERF-LSPES UMR-CNRS 8008, ENSCL, BP 90108, F-59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Bentiss, F. [Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination et d' Analytique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Chouaib Doukkali, B.P. 20, M-24000 El Jadida (Morocco); Traisnel, M. [Laboratoire des Procedes d' Elaboration des Revetements Fonctionnels, PERF-LSPES UMR-CNRS 8008, ENSCL, BP 90108, F-59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Jama, C. [Laboratoire des Procedes d' Elaboration des Revetements Fonctionnels, PERF-LSPES UMR-CNRS 8008, ENSCL, BP 90108, F-59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)], E-mail: charafeddine.jama@ensc-lille.fr

    2009-03-01

    Cold plasma nitriding treatment was performed to improve the corrosion resistance of C38 carbon steel. Nitriding process was conducted using a radiofrequency nitrogen plasma discharge for different times of treatment on non-heated substrates. The modification of the corrosion resistance characteristic of the C38 steel due to the treatment in acid medium (1 M HCl) were investigated by gravimetric and electrochemical tests such as potentiodynamic polarisation curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). It was shown that the plasma nitriding treatment improves the corrosion resistance. Indeed, in the gravimetric tests, nitrided samples showed lower weight loss and lower corrosion rate in comparison to untreated one. In the Tafel polarisation tests, the nitrided samples showed greatly reduced corrosion current densities, anodic dissolution and also retarded the hydrogen evolution reaction. Using EIS method, an adequate structural model of the interface was used and the values of the corresponding parameters were calculated and discussed. The results obtained from weight loss and electrochemical studies were in reasonable agreement. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was carried out to establish the mechanism of corrosion inhibition of nitrided C38 steel in 1 M HCl medium. The enhancement of the corrosion resistance is believed to be related to the iron nitride compound layer formed on the C38 steel surface during plasma nitriding, which protected the underlying metal from corrosive attack in the aggressive solutions.

  18. Properties of the State of the Art of Bulk III-V Nitride Substrates and Homoepitaxial Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Czochralski or Bridgman because of the extremely high melting temperatures and very high nitrogen decomposition pressures [15–17]. Therefore, crystal...growers across the world have modified or adapted different methods requiring lower temperatures and pressures to grow bulk AlN and GaN semiconductors...high temperature (high nitrogenpressure solution technique— HPS) and HVPE (a quasi-bulk growth process) methods have produced relatively large area

  19. Growth of polar and non-polar nitride semiconductor quasi-substrates by hydride vapor phase epitaxy for the development of optoelectronic devices by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldawer, Adam Lyle

    The family of nitride semiconductors has had a profound influence on the development of optoelectronics for a large variety of applications. However, as of yet there are no native substrates commercially available that are grown by liquid phase methods as with Si and GaAs. As a result, the majority of electronic and optoelectronic devices are grown heteroepitaxially on sapphire and SiC. This PhD research addresses both the development of polar and non-polar GaN and AIN templates by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy (HVPE) on sapphire and SiC substrates, as well as the growth and characterization of optoelectronic devices on these templates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Polar and non-polar GaN templates have been grown in a vertical HVPE reactor on the C- and R-planes of sapphire respectively. The growth conditions have been optimized to allow the formation for thick (50um) GaN templates without cracks. These templates were characterized structurally by studying their surface morphologies by SEM and AFM, and their structure through XRD and TEM. The polar C-plane GaN templates were found to be atomically smooth. However, the surface morphology of the non-polar GaN films grown on the R-plane of sapphire were found to have a facetted surface morphology, with the facets intersecting at 120° angles. This surface morphology reflects an equilibrium growth, since the A-plane of GaN grows faster than the M-planes of GaN due to the lower atomic density of the plane. For the development of deep-UV optoelectronics, it is required to grow AIGaN quantum wells on AIN templates. However, since AIN is a high melting point material, such templates have to be grown at higher temperatures, close to half the melting point of the material (1500 °C). As these temperatures cannot be easily obtained by traditional furnace heating, an HVPE reactor has been designed to heat the substrate inductively to these temperatures. This apparatus has been used to grow high-quality, transparent AIN films

  20. Low pressure growth of cubic boron nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Tiong P. (Inventor); Shing, Yuh-Han (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method for forming thin films of cubic boron nitride on substrates at low pressures and temperatures. A substrate is first coated with polycrystalline diamond to provide a uniform surface upon which cubic boron nitride can be deposited by chemical vapor deposition. The cubic boron nitride film is useful as a substitute for diamond coatings for a variety of applications in which diamond is not suitable. any tetragonal or hexagonal boron nitride. The cubic boron nitride produced in accordance with the preceding example is particularly well-suited for use as a coating for ultra hard tool bits and abrasives, especially those intended to use in cutting or otherwise fabricating iron.

  1. Plasma-nitriding assisted micro-texturing into stainless steel molds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aizawa Tatsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Micro-texturing has grown up to be one of the most promising procedures. This related application required for large-area, fine micro-texturing onto the stainless steel mold materials. A new method other than laser-machining, micro-milling or micro-EDM was awaited for further advancement of this micro-texturing. In the present paper, a plasma nitriding assisted micro-texturing was developed to make various kinds of micro-patterns onto the martensitic stainless steels. First, original patterns were printed onto the surface of substrate by using the ink-jet printer. Then, the masked substrate was subjected to high density plasma nitriding; the un-masked surfaces were nitrided to have higher hardness. This nitrided substrate was further treated by sand-blasting to selectively dig the soft, masked surfaces. Finally, the micro-patterned martensitic stainless steel substrate was fabricated as a mold to duplicate these micro-patterns onto the work materials. The spatial resolution and depth profile controllability of this plasma nitriding assisted micro-texturing was investigated for variety of initial micro-patterns. The original size and dimension of initial micro-patterns were precisely compared with the three dimensional geometry of micro-textures after blasting treatment. The plastic cover case for smart cellular phones was employed to demonstrate how useful this processing is in practice.

  2. Substrate utilization and VSS relations in activated sludge processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droste, R.L.; Fernandes, L.; Sun, X. [Ottawa Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1993-12-31

    A new empirical substrate removal model for activated sludge in continuous flow stirred tank reactor (CFSTR) and sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was developed in this study. This model includes an exponential function of volatile suspended solids to express the active biomass which is actually involved in substrate utilization. Results indicate that the proposed exponential models predict more accurately effluent COD in CFSTR and SBR systems than the first or zero order models. (author). 7 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  3. High-Frequency, Low-Noise Nitride-Based Power Transistors Grown on Bulk III-N Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — One of the main issues for III-nitride growth is the lack of a suitable native substrate. Growth on foreign substrates such as sapphire or SiC results in nitride...

  4. Electronic properties and relative stabilities of heterogeneous edge-decorated zigzag boron nitride nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, L.L., E-mail: liabc@hebut.edu.cn; Yu, X.F.; Yang, X.J.; Zhang, X.H.; Xu, X.W.; Jin, P.; Zhao, J.L.; Wang, X.X.; Tang, C.C., E-mail: tangcc@hebut.edu.cn

    2015-11-15

    The wide band gap of boron nitride (BN) materials has been a major bottleneck for a wider application of BN in electronics. In this work, density functional theory computations were used to study the band structure of zigzag BN nanoribbons (BNNRs). Due to the ionic origin of the BN band gap, a heterogeneous edge decoration is an effective way to modulate the electronic band structure of BNNRs. This study demonstrates that a metallic behavior and magnetism can be realized by applying a NO{sub 2}–NH{sub 2} pair edge decoration. Although the lone electron pair of the NH{sub 2} group is partly responsible for the metallic behavior, the effective potential difference induced by the donor–acceptor pair is also crucial for metallic behavior. Furthermore, these newly formed BNNRs were found to be more stable than H-passivated BNNRs. This simple chemical modification method offers great opportunities for the development of future BNNR-based electronic devices. - Graphical abstract: Due to the ionic origin of a BN band gap, heterogeneous edge decoration is an effective way to modulate its electronic structures. Metallicity and magnetism can be realized by NO{sub 2}–NH{sub 2} pair decoration. Although the N lone pair electrons in NH{sub 2} group are responsible for the metallicity, the effective potential difference induced by a donor–acceptor pair is crucial for the formation of metallicity. - Highlights: • Heterogeneous edge decoration is effective for tuning BNNRs' electronic structures. • NO{sub 2}–NH{sub 2} pair decoration can lead to metallic behavior and magnetism for BNNRs. • The effective potential difference is crucial for the formation of metallicity. • NO{sub 2}–NH{sub 2} pair decorated BNNRs is more stable than H-passivated ones.

  5. Molybdenum enhanced low-temperature deposition of crystalline silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowden, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    A process for chemical vapor deposition of crystalline silicon nitride which comprises the steps of: introducing a mixture of a silicon source, a molybdenum source, a nitrogen source, and a hydrogen source into a vessel containing a suitable substrate; and thermally decomposing the mixture to deposit onto the substrate a coating comprising crystalline silicon nitride containing a dispersion of molybdenum silicide.

  6. Investigation of some microstructural features related to corrosion initiation in titanium-aluminium nitride coated steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronkainen, H. (Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), Espoo (Finland)); Ehrnsten, U. (Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), Espoo (Finland)); Zilliacus, R. (Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), Espoo (Finland)); Saarilahti, J. (Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), Espoo (Finland)); Mahiout, A. (Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), Espoo (Finland)); Hannula, S.P. (Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), Espoo (Finland))

    1992-11-20

    In this work the microstructural features and defects identified previously in corrosion and porosity tests of the coatings were studied. The influence of surface roughness was evaluated with (Ti, Al)N coatings on two different types of substrates. Coatings deposited on the roughest surfaces on either a high speed steel or a stainless steel had the highest porosity. However, the dependence of the porosity on the surface roughness was not straightforward. Interrupted coating runs were carried out to obtain more information on the initiation of defects in the substrate-coating interface. Samples produced in the interrupted runs were analysed using metallographic methods, scanning electron microscopy with X-ray analysis, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Sputtering was found to be effective in removing the impurities from the interface and none of the non-metallic elements (carbon, oxygen, sulphur) studied exhibited any enrichment on the interface. The use of a tungsten filament for enhancement of the plasma was found to result in a tungsten-enriched layer at the substrate-coating interface, which may have an effect on adhesion and corrosion properties of the coating. However, no droplet types of formations were detected after sputter cleaning or when either titanium or aluminium evaporation was started, suggesting that tungsten was evenly distributed in the coating. (orig.)

  7. Optimum temperature on corrosion resistance for plasma ion nitrided 316L stainless steel in sea water solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Sang-Ok; Kim, Seong-Jong

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate the optimum plasma ion nitriding temperature on corrosion resistance in natural sea water for plasma ion nitrided 316L stainless steel. Plasma ion nitriding was conducted at different temperatures of 350, 400, 450, and 500 °C with a mixture of 75% of nitrogen and 25% of hydrogen during 10 h. In conclusion of anodic polarization test, a wide passive potential region and a high corrosion potential were observed at a plasma ion nitriding temperature of 450 °C. Moreover, relatively less damage depth and clean surface micrographs were observed at 450 °C as results of observation of three-dimensional (3D) microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM) after polarization experiments. In addition, higher corrosion potential and lower corrosion current density were indicated at plasma ion nitrided samples than the value of untreated substrate after Tafel analysis. Hence, plasma ion nitrided at 450 °C in sea water solution represented optimum corrosion resistance among the all the plasma ion nitriding temperature parameters.

  8. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  9. Cathodoluminescence spectra of gallium nitride nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Chang; Li, Guan-Hua; Lin, Yuan-Ting; Chang, Ching-Wen; Wadekar, Paritosh; Chen, Quark Yung-Sung; Rigutti, Lorenzo; Tchernycheva, Maria; Julien, François Henri; Tu, Li-Wei

    2011-12-14

    Gallium nitride [GaN] nanorods grown on a Si(111) substrate at 720°C via plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied by field-emission electron microscopy and cathodoluminescence [CL]. The surface topography and optical properties of the GaN nanorod cluster and single GaN nanorod were measured and discussed. The defect-related CL spectra of GaN nanorods and their dependence on temperature were investigated. The CL spectra along the length of the individual GaN nanorod were also studied. The results reveal that the 3.2-eV peak comes from the structural defect at the interface between the GaN nanorod and Si substrate. The surface state emission of the single GaN nanorod is stronger as the diameter of the GaN nanorod becomes smaller due to an increased surface-to-volume ratio.

  10. Methods of repairing a substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedell, James A. (Inventor); Easler, Timothy E. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A precursor of a ceramic adhesive suitable for use in a vacuum, thermal, and microgravity environment. The precursor of the ceramic adhesive includes a silicon-based, preceramic polymer and at least one ceramic powder selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, boron carbide, boron oxide, boron nitride, hafnium boride, hafnium carbide, hafnium oxide, lithium aluminate, molybdenum silicide, niobium carbide, niobium nitride, silicon boride, silicon carbide, silicon oxide, silicon nitride, tin oxide, tantalum boride, tantalum carbide, tantalum oxide, tantalum nitride, titanium boride, titanium carbide, titanium oxide, titanium nitride, yttrium oxide, zirconium boride, zirconium carbide, zirconium oxide, and zirconium silicate. Methods of forming the ceramic adhesive and of repairing a substrate in a vacuum and microgravity environment are also disclosed, as is a substrate repaired with the ceramic adhesive.

  11. Microstructure of titanium nitride thin films controlled by ion bombardment in a magnetron-sputtering device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerny, R. (Karlova Univ., Prague (Czech Republic). Fakulta Matematicko-Fyzikalni); Kuzel, R. Jr. (Karlova Univ., Prague (Czech Republic). Fakulta Matematicko-Fyzikalni); Valvoda, V. (Karlova Univ., Prague (Czech Republic). Fakulta Matematicko-Fyzikalni); Kadlec, S. (Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czechoslovakia). Inst. of Physics); Musil, J. (Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czechoslovakia). Inst. of Physics)

    1994-05-01

    The structure of titanium nitride thin films deposited by unbalanced magnetron sputtering on high chromium steel substrates was studied by X-ray diffraction. In order to characterize relations between the microstructure of sputtered TiN films and the deposition conditions, the parameter E[sub p] was introduced as the average energy transmitted from bombarding particles (ions, electrons, neutrals, photons) to one condensing particle of the film. A transition from a porous to a compact microstructure was found with increasing E[sub p]. The possible inhomogeneity of titanium nitride films is discussed. (orig.)

  12. Cubic III-nitrides: potential photonic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onabe, K.; Sanorpim, S.; Kato, H.; Kakuda, M.; Nakamura, T.; Nakamura, K.; Kuboya, S.; Katayama, R.

    2011-01-01

    The growth and characterization of some cubic III-nitride films on suitable cubic substrates have been done, namely, c- GaN on GaAs by MOVPE, c-GaN and c-AlGaN on MgO by RF-MBE, and c-InN and c-InGaN (In-rich) on YSZ by RFMBE. This series of study has been much focused on the cubic-phase purity as dependent on the respective growth conditions and resulting electrical and optical properties. For c-GaN and c-InN films, a cubic-phase purity higher than 95% is attained in spite of the metastable nature of the cubic III-nitrides. However, for c-AlGaN and c-InGaN films, the cubic-phase purity is rapidly degraded with significant incorporation of the hexagonal phase through stacking faults on cubic {111} faces which may be exposed on the roughened growing or substrate surface. It has been shown that the electron mobilities in c-GaN and c-AlGaN films are much related to phase purity.

  13. Solution-Based High-Density Arrays of Dielectric Microsphere Structures for Improved Crystal Quality of III-Nitride Layers on Si Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Jun Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent development of dielectric microsphere lithography has been able to open up new means of performing simple and easy patterning on the semiconductor surfaces. Here, we report uniform and high-density arrays of microspheres using a solution-based spin-coating method. The arrays of microspheres were used for etching mask to form the arrays of III-nitride microrods. By regrowing GaN layer on the microrod structures, high-quality GaN layer was achieved in terms of surface morphology as well as XRD characterization. To apply the advantages such as improved crystal quality and light extraction enhancement, light-emitting diodes (LEDs were grown and then fabricated. The regrown LEDs with microspheres showed much improved optical output power and forward voltage characteristics in the same current injection. Therefore, we believe that this approach is quite useful for the development of high efficiency LEDs for future lighting.

  14. EDITORIAL: Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jung; Kneissl, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Throughout the history of group-III-nitride materials and devices, scientific breakthroughs and technological advances have gone hand-in-hand. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the discovery of the nucleation of smooth (0001) GaN films on c-plane sapphire and the activation of p-dopants in GaN led very quickly to the realization of high-brightness blue and green LEDs, followed by the first demonstration of GaN-based violet laser diodes in the mid 1990s. Today, blue InGaN LEDs boast record external quantum efficiencies exceeding 80% and the emission wavelength of the InGaN-based laser diode has been pushed into the green spectral range. Although these tremenduous advances have already spurred multi-billion dollar industries, there are still a number of scientific questions and technological issues that are unanswered. One key challenge is related to the polar nature of the III-nitride wurtzite crystal. Until a decade ago all research activities had almost exclusively concentrated on (0001)-oriented polar GaN layers and heterostructures. Although the device characteristics seem excellent, the strong polarization fields at GaN heterointerfaces can lead to a significant deterioration of the device performance. Triggered by the first demonstration non-polar GaN quantum wells grown on LiAlO2 by Waltereit and colleagues in 2000, impressive advances in the area of non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors and devices have been achieved. Today, a large variety of heterostructures free of polarization fields and exhibiting exceptional electronic and optical properties have been demonstrated, and the fundamental understanding of polar, semipolar and non-polar nitrides has made significant leaps forward. The contributions in this Semiconductor Science and Technology special issue on non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors provide an impressive and up-to-date cross-section of all areas of research and device physics in this field. The articles cover a wide range of

  15. Superelectrophilic chemistry of amino-nitriles and related substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Raja, Erum K.; Klumpp, Douglas A.

    2011-01-01

    The superacid-promoted Houben-Hoesch reactions of amino-nitriles and related compounds have been studied. The nitriles form dicationic electrophiles and react with benzene in fair to good yields (12-95%). The intermediate iminium ions may also be reduced to the benzylic amines by NaBH4 or H2.

  16. ANALYSIS OF WATER RELATIONS OF SUBSTRATES USED IN GREEN ROOF SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Baryła

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Green roofs, as the restoration of biologically active area, are fairly common and effective method of storm water management in urban areas. Depend on the design of the green roof and the type of substrate, they are able to retain 50–90% of rainwater. The aim of the study was to determine the physicochemical properties of two substrates used in the construction of green roofs (intensive and extensive. Water retention of substrates was compared to water retention of substrates undelined with the drainage layer made from crushed autoclaved aerated concrete. In the experiment, which uses drainage layer, higher drying the top layer of the substrate was observed, which may be related to high water absorption drainage material. The effluent from the substrate using aerated concrete as a drainage layer amounted to an average of 22–51% of the volume of water supplied to the extensive substrate, whereas 19–46% of the volume of water supplied to the intensive substrate. The effluent from the substrate without the drainage layer amounted 40-48% of the volume of water supplied.

  17. Boron nitride composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2017-02-21

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes: a matrix material including hexagonal boron nitride and one or more borate binders; and a plurality of cubic boron nitride particles dispersed in the matrix material. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes: a matrix material including hexagonal boron nitride and amorphous boron nitride; and a plurality of cubic boron nitride particles dispersed in the matrix material.

  18. Plasma nitriding of steels

    CERN Document Server

    Aghajani, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the effect of plasma nitriding on the properties of steels. Parameters of different grades of steels are considered, such as structural and constructional steels, stainless steels and tools steels. The reader will find within the text an introduction to nitriding treatment, the basis of plasma and its roll in nitriding. The authors also address the advantages and disadvantages of plasma nitriding in comparison with other nitriding methods. .

  19. Diffusion kinetics of nitrogen in tantalum during plasma-nitriding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张德元; 林勤; 曾卫军; 李放; 许兰萍; 付青峰

    2001-01-01

    The activation energies of nitrogen in tantalum on plasma nitriding conditions were calculated according to the experimental data of hardness of plasma-nitriding of tantalum vs time and temperature. The activation energy calculated is 148.873±0.390  kJ/mol. The depth increasing of nitriding layer with time follows square root relation. The nitriding process of tantalum is controlled by diffusion of nitrogen atoms in tantalum solid solution.

  20. Vertical III-nitride thin-film power diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wierer, Jr., Jonathan; Fischer, Arthur J.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2017-03-14

    A vertical III-nitride thin-film power diode can hold off high voltages (kV's) when operated under reverse bias. The III-nitride device layers can be grown on a wider bandgap template layer and growth substrate, which can be removed by laser lift-off of the epitaxial device layers grown thereon.

  1. Vertical III-nitride thin-film power diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierer, Jr., Jonathan; Fischer, Arthur J.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2017-03-14

    A vertical III-nitride thin-film power diode can hold off high voltages (kV's) when operated under reverse bias. The III-nitride device layers can be grown on a wider bandgap template layer and growth substrate, which can be removed by laser lift-off of the epitaxial device layers grown thereon.

  2. PECVD silicon nitride diaphragms for condenser microphones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheeper, P.R.; Voorthuyzen, J.A.; Bergveld, P.

    1991-01-01

    The application of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposited (PECVD) silicon nitride as a diaphragm material for condenser microphones has been investigated. By means of adjusting the SiH4/NH3 gas-flow composition, silicon-rich silicon nitride films have been obtained with a relatively low tensile s

  3. The functional consequences of relative substrate specificity in complex biochemical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan eZeng

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A biochemical activity, that is, enzymatic reaction or molecular interaction, frequently involves a molecule, for example, an enzyme, capable of interacting with numerous substrates or partners. Specificity is a fundamental property of biochemical activities, and relative specificity refers to the situation whereby a molecule interacts with multiple substrates or partners but with different affinities. Here, a hypothesis is proposed that any molecule, such as an enzyme, would have a range of preferences or relative specificity for its many native substrates, which differentially impacts the phenotypes of these substrates and hence shapes the relevant biological processes in vivo. While the mechanisms underlying the specific recognition between enzymes and individual substrates have been studied extensively, whether any enzyme exhibits intrinsic selectivity towards its ensemble of substrates is often overlooked, and whether this selectivity has any functional consequences is much less appreciated. There are, however, several lines of evidence in the literature that are consistent with the hypothesis and reviewed here. Furthermore, this hypothesis is supported by our analyses of a number of diverse biochemical systems at a large scale. Thus, the human microRNA processing machinery possesses relative specificity towards its hundreds of substrates, which might contribute to differential microRNA biogenesis; the promoter binding affinity of the transcription factor Ndt80 might regulate Ndt80 target mRNA expression in the budding yeast; Cdk1 kinase specificity might lead to variable substrate phosphorylation in vivo; and the density of HuR deposition to its thousands of RNA targets might partly explain differential RNA expression in human cells. It is proposed, therefore, that relative specificity is a universal property of complex biochemical systems and that the hypothesis could denote a general principle in biology.

  4. Formation and control of stoichiometric hafnium nitride thin films by direct sputtering of hafnium nitride target

    CERN Document Server

    Gotoh, Y; Ishikawa, J; Liao, M Y

    2003-01-01

    Hafnium nitride thin films were prepared by radio-frequency sputter deposition with a hafnium nitride target. Deposition was performed with various rf powers, argon pressures, and substrate temperatures, in order to investigate the influences of these parameters on the film properties, particularly the nitrogen composition. It was found that stoichiometric hafnium nitride films were formed at an argon gas pressure of less than 2 Pa, irrespective of the other deposition parameters within the range investigated. Maintaining the nitrogen composition almost stoichiometric, orientation, stress, and electrical resistivity of the films could be controlled with deposition parameters. (author)

  5. Growth of gallium nitride based devices on silicon(001) substrates by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy; Wachstum von Galliumnitrid-basierten Bauelementen auf Silizium(001)-Substraten mittels metallorganischer Gasphasenepitaxie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiher, Fabian

    2009-02-25

    The main topic of this thesis is to investigate GaN-based layer systems grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on Si(001) substrates. A temperature shift up to 45 K is measured for a complete device structure on a 2-inch silicon substrate. By using a 40 nm thin LT-AlN-seed layer (680 C), the GaN crystallites on Si(001) substrates are almost oriented with their GaN(10 anti 12)-planes parallel to the Si(001)-plane. A four-fold azimuthal symmetry occurs for these layers, with the GaN[10 anti 11]-direction is aligned parallel to one of the four equivalent left angle 110 right angle -directions, respectively. However, a mono-crystalline and fully coalesced GaN-layer with this crystallographic orientation could not yet been obtained. If a deposition temperature of more than 1100 C is used for the AlN-seed layer, solely the GaN[0001]- growth direction of crystallites occurs in the main GaN layer on Si(001) substrates. These c-axis oriented GaN columns feature two opposite azimuthal alignments that are rotated by 90 with respect to each other and with GaN[11 anti 20] parallel Si[110] and GaN[10 anti 10] parallel Si[110], respectively. By using 4 off-oriented substrates towards the Si[110]-direction, one certain azimuthal texture component can be selected. The critical value of the miscut angle corresponds to theoretical calculations predicting the occurrence of atomic double steps on the Si(001) surface. The achieved crystallographic quality of the GaN layers on Si(001) is characterized by having a tilt of FWHM=0.27 and a twist of FWHM=0.8 of the crystallites, determined by X-ray diffraction. A completely crack-free, up to 2.5 {mu}m thick, and mono-crystalline GaN-template can be realized on Si(001), integrating 4 or 5 LT-AlN-interlayers in the GaN buffer structure. Based on this structure, the first successful implementation of an (InGaN/GaN)-LED on Si(001) is achieved. Furthermore, the possible fabrication of GaN-based FET-structures is demonstrated with a fully

  6. A Hybrid Multi-gate Model of a Gallium Nitride (GaN) High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) Device Incorporating GaN-substrate Thermal Boundary Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    coordinates and elliptical cylinder coordinates (8, 9). Douglas et al. studied the effects of several HEMT design parameters, including substrate thermal...Determination of Thermal Resistance of FETs. IEEE Transaction on Microwave Theory and Techniques 2005, 53 (1), 306‒313. 10. Douglas , E. A.; Ren, F...Physics Letters 2010, 97, 232107‒1-3. 29. Taking, S.; Banerjee, A.; Zhou, H.; Li, X.; Khokhar, A. Z.; Oxland, R.; McGregor , I.; Bentley, S.; Rahman, F

  7. Deposition and thermal characterization of nano-structured aluminum nitride thin film on Cu-W substrate for high power light emitting diode package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun Min; Kim, Min-Sun

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we developed AlN thick film on metal substrate for hybrid type LED package such as chip on board (COB) using metal printed circuit board (PCB). Conventional metal PCB uses ceramic-polymer composite as electrical insulating layer. Thermal conductivities of such type dielectric film are typically in the range of 1~4 W/m · K depending on the ceramic filler. Also, Al or Cu alloy are mainly used for metal base for high thermal conduction to dissipate heat from thermal source mounted on metal PCB. Here we used Cu-W alloy with low thermal expansion coefficient as metal substrate to reduce thermal stress between insulating layer and base metal. AlN with polyimide (PI) powder were used as starting materials for deposition. We could obtain very high thermal conductivity of 28.3 W/m · K from deposited AlN-PI thin film by AlN-3 wt% PI powder. We made hybrid type high power LED package using AlN-PI thin film. We tested thermal performance of this film by thermal transient measurement and compared with conventional metal PCB substrate.

  8. Tribological properties of boron nitride synthesized by ion beam deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.; Spalvins, T.

    1985-01-01

    The adhesion and friction behavior of boron nitride films on 440 C bearing stainless steel substrates was examined. The thin films containing the boron nitride were synthesized using an ion beam extracted from a borazine plasma. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with BN in sliding contact with itself and various transition metals. It is indicated that the surfaces of atomically cleaned BN coating film contain a small amount of oxides and carbides, in addition to boron nitride. The coefficients of friction for the BN in contact with metals are related to the relative chemical activity of the metals. The more active the metal, the higher is the coefficient of friction. The adsorption of oxygen on clean metal and BN increases the shear strength of the metal - BN contact and increases the friction. The friction for BN-BN contact is a function of the shear strength of the elastic contacts. Clean BN surfaces exhibit relatively strong interfacial adhesion and high friction. The presence of adsorbates such as adventitious carbon contaminants on the BN surfaces reduces the shear strength of the contact area. In contrast, chemically adsorbed oxygen enhances the shear strength of the BN-BN contact and increases the friction.

  9. Gallium nitride electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Siddharth; Jena, Debdeep

    2013-07-01

    In the past two decades, there has been increasing research and industrial activity in the area of gallium nitride (GaN) electronics, stimulated first by the successful demonstration of GaN LEDs. While the promise of wide band gap semiconductors for power electronics was recognized many years before this by one of the contributors to this issue (J Baliga), the success in the area of LEDs acted as a catalyst. It set the field of GaN electronics in motion, and today the technology is improving the performance of several applications including RF cell phone base stations and military radar. GaN could also play a very important role in reducing worldwide energy consumption by enabling high efficiency compact power converters operating at high voltages and lower frequencies. While GaN electronics is a rapidly evolving area with active research worldwide, this special issue provides an opportunity to capture some of the great advances that have been made in the last 15 years. The issue begins with a section on epitaxy and processing, followed by an overview of high-frequency HEMTs, which have been the most commercially successful application of III-nitride electronics to date. This is followed by review and research articles on power-switching transistors, which are currently of great interest to the III-nitride community. A section of this issue is devoted to the reliability of III-nitride devices, an area that is of increasing significance as the research focus has moved from not just high performance but also production-worthiness and long-term usage of these devices. Finally, a group of papers on new and relatively less studied ideas for III-nitride electronics, such as interband tunneling, heterojunction bipolar transistors, and high-temperature electronics is included. These areas point to new areas of research and technological innovation going beyond the state of the art into the future. We hope that the breadth and quality of articles in this issue will make it

  10. Cathodic Cage Plasma Nitriding: An Innovative Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. M. de Sousa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cylindrical samples of AISI 1020, AISI 316, and AISI 420 steels, with different heights, were simultaneously treated by a new technique of ionic nitriding, entitled cathodic cage plasma nitriding (CCPN, in order to evaluate the efficiency of this technique to produce nitrided layers with better properties compared with those obtained using conventional ionic nitriding technique. This method is able to eliminate the edge effect in the samples, promoting a better uniformity of temperature, and consequently, a smaller variation of the thickness/height relation can be obtained. The compound layers were characterized by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and microhardness test profile. The results were compared with the properties of samples obtained with the conventional nitriding, for the three steel types. It was verified that samples treated by CCPN process presented, at the same temperature, a better uniformity in the thickness and absence of the edge effect.

  11. Scar dechanneling: new method for scar-related left ventricular tachycardia substrate ablation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berruezo, A.; Fernandez-Armenta, J.; Andreu, D.; Penela, D.; Herczku, C.; Evertz, R.; Cipolletta, L.; Acosta, J.; Borras, R.; Arbelo, E.; Tolosana, J.M.; Brugada, J.; Mont, L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ventricular tachycardia (VT) substrate ablation usually requires extensive ablation. Scar dechanneling technique may limit the extent of ablation needed. METHODS AND RESULTS: The study included 101 consecutive patients with left ventricular scar-related VT (75 ischemic patients; left ven

  12. Wafer-Scale and Wrinkle-Free Epitaxial Growth of Single-Orientated Multilayer Hexagonal Boron Nitride on Sapphire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, A-Rang; Hong, Seokmo; Hyun, Chohee; Yoon, Seong In; Kim, Gwangwoo; Jeong, Hu Young; Shin, Tae Joo; Park, Sung O; Wong, Kester; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Park, Noejung; Yu, Kwangnam; Choi, Eunjip; Mishchenko, Artem; Withers, Freddie; Novoselov, Kostya S; Lim, Hyunseob; Shin, Hyeon Suk

    2016-05-11

    Large-scale growth of high-quality hexagonal boron nitride has been a challenge in two-dimensional-material-based electronics. Herein, we present wafer-scale and wrinkle-free epitaxial growth of multilayer hexagonal boron nitride on a sapphire substrate by using high-temperature and low-pressure chemical vapor deposition. Microscopic and spectroscopic investigations and theoretical calculations reveal that synthesized hexagonal boron nitride has a single rotational orientation with AA' stacking order. A facile method for transferring hexagonal boron nitride onto other target substrates was developed, which provides the opportunity for using hexagonal boron nitride as a substrate in practical electronic circuits. A graphene field effect transistor fabricated on our hexagonal boron nitride sheets shows clear quantum oscillation and highly improved carrier mobility because the ultraflatness of the hexagonal boron nitride surface can reduce the substrate-induced degradation of the carrier mobility of two-dimensional materials.

  13. Effect of relative humidity on the peeling behavior of a thin film on a rigid substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhilong; Wang, Cong; Yang, Yazheng; Chen, Shaohua

    2016-09-01

    Inspired by gecko adhesion in humid environments, a modified Kendall's model is established in order to investigate the effect of relative humidity on the interfacial peeling behavior of a thin film adhering on a rigid substrate. When the humidity is less than 90%, a monolayer of water molecules adsorbed on the substrate surface induces a strong disjoining pressure at the interface. As a result, the steady-state peel-off force between the thin film and substrate is significantly enhanced. When the humidity is greater than 90%, water molecules condense into water droplets. Four different peeling models are established on this occasion, depending on the surface wettability of the film and substrate. It is found that the steady-state peel-off force is influenced by the water meniscus in a complicated manner, which is either enhanced or reduced by the water capillarity comparing to that predicted by the classical Kendall's model, i.e., a dry peeling model. It should be noted that, at the vicinity of the wetting transition, the peel-off force of the four models can be reduced to an identical one, which means the four peeling models can transit from one to another continuously. The present model, as an extension of the classical Kendall's one, should be useful not only for understanding gecko adhesion in humid environments, but also for analyzing interface behaviors of a film-substrate system in real applications.

  14. Study of High Quality Indium Nitride Films Grown on Si(100 Substrate by RF-MOMBE with GZO and AlN Buffer Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chun Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Wurtzite structure InN films were prepared on Si(100 substrates using radio-frequency metal-organic molecular beam epitaxy (RF-MOMBE system. Ga-doped ZnO (GZO and Amorphous AlN (a-AlN film were used as buffer layers for InN films growth. Structural, surface morphology and optical properties of InN films were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and photoluminescence (PL. XRD results indicated that all InN films exhibited preferred growth orientation along the c-axis with different intermediate buffers. TEM images exhibit the InN/GZO growth by two-dimensional mode and thickness about 900 nm. Also, the InN films can be obtained by growth rate about ~1.8 μm/h. Optical properties indicated that the band gap of InN/GZO is about 0.79 eV. These results indicate that the control of buffer layer is essential for engineering the growth of InN on silicon wafer.

  15. 用N2-H2等离子体氮化GaAs衬底对ECR-PEMOCVD生长立方GaN的影响%Effects of GaAs Substrate Nitridation with N2-H2 Plasma on c-GaN Epitaxy Growth by ECR-PEMOCVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王三胜; 顾彪; 徐茵; 秦福文; 隋郁; 杨大智

    2001-01-01

    我们研究了采用电子回旋共振等离子体增强金属有机化学气相沉积(ECR-PEMOCVE)技术在GaAs(001)衬底上外延生长立方GaN的过程中衬底氮化条件对外延膜生长的影响.发现氮化时在氮等离子体中加入氢等离子体对于立方GaN薄膜生长具有显著影响.和氮化过程中不加入氢等离子体相比,氮化过程中加入氢等离子体生长出的外延膜其X射线衍射(XRD)半高宽(FWHM)可以最高降低40%以上.原子力显微镜(AFM)观察表明:在N2-H2混合等离子中氮化过的衬底上外延的缓冲层表面变得更为平滑,晶粒也变得粗大.最后,我们提出了一个化学模型对上述结果进行了分析和解释..%The effects of nitridation conditions to GaAs (001) substrates in N2-H2 plasmas on c-GaN film grown by electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (ECRPE-MOCVD) was investigated. It was found that there have remarkable effects on the growth of c-GaN film when hydrogen plasma was added during nitridation. XRD ( θ - 2θ)analysis showed that the FWHM of epitaxy film growing with hydrogen plasma during nitridation was improved exceeds 40 % compared with that of epitaxy film growing without hydrogen plasma during nitridation. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) observation showed that the surface of buffer layers becomes smoother and the crystallites become larger when nitridated in N2-H2 plasmas. We think that the uniform nucleation of GaAs (001) substrate surface is a crucial factor for getting better crystalline quality of c-GaN. Finally, a chemical model is put forward to interpret the influence of hydrogen plasma during the nitridation process.

  16. Method of synthesizing cubic system boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuzu, S.; Sumiya, H.; Degawa, J.

    1987-10-13

    A method is described for synthetically growing cubic system boron nitride crystals by using boron nitride sources, solvents for dissolving the boron nitride sources, and seed crystals under conditions of ultra-high pressure and high temperature for maintaining the cubic system boron nitride stable. The method comprises the following steps: preparing a synthesizing vessel having at least two chambers, arrayed in order in the synthesizing vessel so as to be heated according to a temperature gradient; placing the solvents having different eutectic temperatures in each chamber with respect to the boron nitride sources according to the temperature gradient; placing the boron nitride source in contact with a portion of each of the solvents heated at a relatively higher temperature and placing at least a seed crystal in a portion of each of the solvents heated at a relatively lower temperature; and growing at least one cubic system boron nitride crystal in each of the solvents in the chambers by heating the synthesizing vessel for establishing the temperature gradient while maintaining conditions of ultra-high pressure and high temperature.

  17. Substrates and enzyme activities related to biotransformation of resveratrol from phenylalanine by Alternaria sp. MG1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinhua; Shi, Junling; Liu, Yanlin

    2013-12-01

    To identify the substrates and enzymes related to resveratrol biosynthesis in Alternaria sp. MG1, different substrates were used to produce resveratrol, and their influence on resveratrol production was analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Formation of resveratrol and related intermediates was identified using mass spectrum. During the biotransformation, activities of related enzymes, including phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), trans-cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H), and 4-coumarate-CoA ligase (4CL), were analyzed and tracked. The reaction system contained 100 mL 0.2 mol/L phosphate buffer (pH 6.5), 120 g/L Alternaria sp. MG1 cells, 0.1 g/L MgSO₄, and 0.2 g/L CaSO₄ and different substrates according to the experimental design. The biotransformation was carried out for 21 h at 28 °C and 120 rpm. Resveratrol formation was identified when phenylalanine, tyrosine, cinnamic acid, and p-coumaric acid were separately used as the only substrate. Accumulation of cinnamic acid, p-coumaric acid, and resveratrol and the activities of PAL, C4H, and 4CL were identified and changed in different trends during transformation with phenylalanine as the only substrate. The addition of carbohydrates and the increase of phenylalanine concentration promoted resveratrol production and yielded the highest value (4.57 μg/L) when 2 g/L glucose, 1 g/L cyclodextrin, and phenylalanine (4.7 mmol/L) were used simultaneously.

  18. Application of a new composite cubic-boron nitride gasket assembly for high pressure inelastic x-ray scattering studies of carbon related materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lin; Yang, Wenge; Xiao, Yuming; Liu, Bingbing; Chow, Paul; Shen, Guoyin; Mao, Wendy L.; Mao, Ho-kwang (Jilin); (Stanford); (CIW)

    2011-09-15

    We have developed a new composite cubic-boron nitride (c-BN) gasket assembly for high pressure diamond anvil cell studies, and applied it to inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) studies of carbon related materials in order to maintain a larger sample thickness and avoid the interference from the diamond anvils. The gap size between the two diamond anvils remained {approx}80 {micro}m at 48.0 GPa with this new composite c-BN gasket assembly. The sample can be located at the center of the gap, {approx}20 {micro}m away from the surface of both diamond anvils, which provides ample distance to separate the sample signal from the diamond anvils. The high pressure IXS of a solvated C{sub 60} sample was studied up to 48 GPa, and a pressure induced bonding transition from sp{sup 2} to sp{sup 3} was observed at 27 GPa.

  19. Application of a new composite cubic-boron nitride gasket assembly for high pressure inelastic x-ray scattering studies of carbon related materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lin; Yang, Wenge; Xiao, Yuming; Liu, Bingbing; Chow, Paul; Shen, Guoyin; Mao, Wendy L.; Mao, Ho Kwang

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a new composite cubic-boron nitride (c-BN) gasket assembly for high pressurediamond anvil cell studies, and applied it to inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) studies of carbon related materials in order to maintain a larger sample thickness and avoid the interference from the diamond anvils. The gap size between the two diamond anvils remained ~80 μm at 48.0 GPa with this new composite c-BN gasket assembly. The sample can be located at the center of the gap, ~20 μm away from the surface of both diamond anvils, which provides ample distance to separate the sample signal from the diamond anvils. The high pressure IXS of a solvated C₆₀ sample was studied up to 48 GPa, and a pressure induced bonding transition from sp² to sp³ was observed at 27 GPa.

  20. Application of a new composite cubic-boron nitride gasket assembly for high pressure inelastic x-ray scattering studies of carbon related materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Yang, Wenge; Xiao, Yuming; Liu, Bingbing; Chow, Paul; Shen, Guoyin; Mao, Wendy L; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2011-07-01

    We have developed a new composite cubic-boron nitride (c-BN) gasket assembly for high pressure diamond anvil cell studies, and applied it to inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) studies of carbon related materials in order to maintain a larger sample thickness and avoid the interference from the diamond anvils. The gap size between the two diamond anvils remained ~80 μm at 48.0 GPa with this new composite c-BN gasket assembly. The sample can be located at the center of the gap, ~20 μm away from the surface of both diamond anvils, which provides ample distance to separate the sample signal from the diamond anvils. The high pressure IXS of a solvated C(60) sample was studied up to 48 GPa, and a pressure induced bonding transition from sp(2) to sp(3) was observed at 27 GPa.

  1. Junctions between a boron nitride nanotube and a boron nitride sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baowan, Duangkamon; Cox, Barry J; Hill, James M

    2008-02-20

    For future nanoelectromechanical signalling devices, it is vital to understand how to connect various nanostructures. Since boron nitride nanostructures are believed to be good electronic materials, in this paper we elucidate the classification of defect geometries for combining boron nitride structures. Specifically, we determine possible joining structures between a boron nitride nanotube and a flat sheet of hexagonal boron nitride. Firstly, we determine the appropriate defect configurations on which the tube can be connected, given that the energetically favourable rings for boron nitride structures are rings with an even number of sides. A new formula E = 6+2J relating the number of edges E and the number of joining positions J is established for each defect, and the number of possible distinct defects is related to the so-called necklace and bracelet problems of combinatorial theory. Two least squares approaches, which involve variation in bond length and variation in bond angle, are employed to determine the perpendicular connection of both zigzag and armchair boron nitride nanotubes with a boron nitride sheet. Here, three boron nitride tubes, which are (3, 3), (6, 0) and (9, 0) tubes, are joined with the sheet, and Euler's theorem is used to verify geometrically that the connected structures are sound, and their relationship with the bonded potential energy function approach is discussed. For zigzag tubes (n,0), it is proved that such connections investigated here are possible only for n divisible by 3.

  2. Characterization of ultrathin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate oxide deposited by RF-magnetron sputtering on gallium nitride epilayer on sapphire substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quah, Hock Jin; Cheong, Kuan Yew, E-mail: ckuanyew@yahoo.com

    2014-12-15

    A systematic study was performed on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films RF-magnetron sputtered on GaN substrate and subjected to different post-deposition annealing (PDA) temperatures (200–800 °C) in oxygen ambient. The as-deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films subjected to PDA at 200 and 400 °C were present in amorphous phase and therefore undetectable by X-ray diffraction. By further enhancing the PDA temperature (≥600 °C), a transformation from amorphous to polycrystalline phase of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} happened. The increment of PDA temperature has contributed to an enhancement in leakage current density-electric field (J–E) characteristics of the investigated samples. A correlation between the acquired J–E characteristics with effective oxide charge, slow trap density, interface trap density, and total interface trap density were discussed. A detailed investigation on the conduction of charges through the as-deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} gates subjected to different PDA temperatures via space-charge-limited conduction, Schottky emission, Poole–Frenkel emission, and Fowler–Nordheim tunneling were presented. - Highlights: • Post-deposition annealing (PDA) in oxygen ambient of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films deposited on GaN. • Formation of crystalline Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films subjected to PDA at/beyond 600 °C. • J–E characteristics of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaN system are dependent on MOS characteristics. • Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaN system was subjected to high temperature measurements. • Current conduction mechanisms governing the leakage current of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaN system.

  3. Residual Stress Induced by Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2005-01-01

    The present chapter is devoted to the various mechanisms involved in the buildup and relief of residual stress in nitrided and nitrocarburized cases. The work presented is an overview of model studies on iron and iron-based alloys. Subdivision is made between the compound (or white) layer......, developing at the surfce and consisting of iron-based (carbo)nitrides, and the diffusion zone underneath, consisting of iron and alloying element nitrides dispersed in af ferritic matrix. Microstructural features are related directly to the origins of stress buildup and stres relief....

  4. Residual Stress Induced by Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2005-01-01

    The present chapter is devoted to the various mechanisms involved in the buildup and relief of residual stress in nitrided and nitrocarburized cases. The work presented is an overview of model studies on iron and iron-based alloys. Subdivision is made between the compound (or white) layer......, developing at the surfce and consisting of iron-based (carbo)nitrides, and the diffusion zone underneath, consisting of iron and alloying element nitrides dispersed in af ferritic matrix. Microstructural features are related directly to the origins of stress buildup and stres relief....

  5. Microstructure and Properties of Plasma Source Nitrided AISI 316 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G. Y.; Lei, M. K.

    2016-11-01

    Plasma source nitriding is a relatively new nitriding technology which can overcome those inherent shortcomings associated with conventional direct current plasma nitriding technology such as the arcing surface damage, the edging effect and the hollow cathode effect. There is considerable study on the properties of nitrided samples for laboratorial scale plasma source nitriding system; however, little information has been reported on the industrial-scale plasma source nitriding system. In this work, AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel samples were nitrided by an industrial-scale plasma source nitriding system at various nitriding temperatures (350, 400, 450 and 500 °C) with a floating potential. A high-nitrogen face-centered-cubic phase (γN) formed on the surface of nitrided sample surface. As the nitriding temperature was increased, the γN phase layer thickness increased, varying from 1.5 μm for the lowest nitriding temperature of 350 °C, to 30 μm for the highest nitriding temperature of 500 °C. The maximum Vickers microhardness of the γN phase layer with a peak nitrogen concentration of 20 at.% is about HV 0.1 N 15.1 GPa at the nitriding temperature of 450 °C. The wear and corrosion experimental results demonstrated that the γN phase was formed on the surface of AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel by plasma source nitriding, which exhibits not only high wear resistance, but also good pitting corrosion resistance.

  6. Carbothermic synthesis of 820 μm uranium nitride kernels: Literature review, thermodynamics, analysis, and related experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindemer, T.B. [Harbach Engineering and Solutions, Dayton, OH 45458 (United States); Voit, S.L.; Silva, C.M.; Besmann, T.M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6223 (United States); Hunt, R.D., E-mail: huntrd@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6223 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The US Department of Energy is developing a new nuclear fuel that would be less susceptible to ruptures during a loss-of-coolant accident. The fuel would consist of tristructural isotropic coated particles with uranium nitride (UN) kernels with diameters near 825 μm. This effort explores factors involved in the conversion of uranium oxide–carbon microspheres into UN kernels. An analysis of previous studies with sufficient experimental details is provided. Thermodynamic calculations were made to predict pressures of carbon monoxide and other relevant gases for several reactions that can be involved in the conversion of uranium oxides and carbides into UN. Uranium oxide–carbon microspheres were heated in a microbalance with an attached mass spectrometer to determine details of calcining and carbothermic conversion in argon, nitrogen, and vacuum. A model was derived from experiments on the vacuum conversion to uranium oxide–carbide kernels. UN-containing kernels were fabricated using this vacuum conversion as part of the overall process. Carbonitride kernels of ∼89% of theoretical density were produced along with several observations concerning the different stages of the process.

  7. Preparation of high-pressure phase boron nitride films by physical vapor deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, P W; Zhao, Y N; Li, D M; Liu, H W; Zou Guang Tian

    2002-01-01

    The high-pressure phases boron nitride films together with cubic, wurtzic, and explosive high-pressure phases, were successfully deposited on the metal alloy substrates by tuned substrate radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The percentage of cubic boron nitride phase in the film was about 50% as calculated by Fourier transform infrared measurements. Infrared peak position of cubic boron nitride at 1006.3 cm sup - sup 1 , which is close to the stressless state, indicates that the film has very low internal stress. Transition electron microscope micrograph shows that pure cubic boron nitride phase exits on the surface of the film. The growth mechanism of the BN films was also discussed.

  8. Effect and behaviour of different substrates in relation to the formation of aerobic granular sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronk, M; Abbas, B; Al-Zuhairy, S H K; Kraan, R; Kleerebezem, R; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2015-06-01

    When aerobic granular sludge is applied for industrial wastewater treatment, different soluble substrates can be present. For stable granular sludge formation on volatile fatty acids (e.g. acetate), production of storage polymers under anaerobic feeding conditions has been shown to be important. This prevents direct aerobic growth on readily available chemical oxygen demand (COD), which is thought to result in unstable granule formation. Here, we investigate the impact of acetate, methanol, butanol, propanol, propionaldehyde, and valeraldehyde on granular sludge formation at 35 °C. Methanogenic archaea, growing on methanol, were present in the aerobic granular sludge system. Methanol was completely converted to methane and carbon dioxide by the methanogenic archaeum Methanomethylovorans uponensis during the 1-h anaerobic feeding period, despite the relative high dissolved oxygen concentration (3.5 mg O2 L(-1)) during the subsequent 2-h aeration period. Propionaldehyde and valeraldehyde were fully disproportionated anaerobically into their corresponding carboxylic acids and alcohols. The organic acids produced were converted to storage polymers, while the alcohols (produced and from influent) were absorbed onto the granular sludge matrix and converted aerobically. Our observations show that easy biodegradable substrates not converted anaerobically into storage polymers could lead to unstable granular sludge formation. However, when the easy biodegradable COD is absorbed in the granules and/or when the substrate is converted by relatively slow growing bacteria in the aerobic period, stable granulation can occur.

  9. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Manning

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P. Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower flame temperatures for gun barrels. Further, boron can dope steel, which drastically improves its strength and wear resistance, and can block the formation of softer carbides. A scalable synthesis method for producing boron nitride nano-particles that can be readily dispersed into propellants has been developed. Even dispersion of the nano-particles in a double-base propellant has been demonstrated using a solvent-based processing approach. Stability of a composite propellant with the BN additive was verified. In this paper, results from propellant testing of boron nitride nano-composite propellants are presented, including closed bomb and wear and erosion testing. Detailed characterization of the erosion tester substrates before and after firing was obtained by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This promising boron nitride additive shows the ability to improve gun wear and erosion resistance without any destabilizing effects to the propellant. Potential applications could include less erosive propellants in propellant ammunition for large, medium and small diameter fire arms.

  10. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thelma MANNING; Henry GRAU; Paul MATTER; Michael BEACHY; Christopher HOLT; Samuel SOPOK; Richard FIELD; Kenneth KLINGAMAN; Michael FAIR; John BOLOGNINI; Robin CROWNOVER; Carlton P. ADAM; Viral PANCHAL; Eugene ROZUMOV

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN) is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P). Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower flame temperatures for gun barrels. Further, boron can dope steel, which drastically improves its strength and wear resistance, and can block the formation of softer carbides. A scalable synthesis method for producing boron nitride nano-particles that can be readily dispersed into propellants has been developed. Even dispersion of the nano-particles in a double-base propellant has been demonstrated using a solvent-based processing approach. Stability of a composite propellant with the BN additive was verified. In this paper, results from propellant testing of boron nitride nano-composite propellants are presented, including closed bomb and wear and erosion testing. Detailed characterization of the erosion tester substrates before and after firing was obtained by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This promising boron nitride additive shows the ability to improve gun wear and erosion resistance without any destabilizing effects to the propellant. Potential applications could include less erosive propellants in propellant ammunition for large, medium and small diameter fire arms.

  11. Methods of forming boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, Tammy L; Wertsching, Alan K; Pinhero, Patrick J; Crandall, David L

    2015-03-03

    A method of forming a boron nitride. The method comprises contacting a metal article with a monomeric boron-nitrogen compound and converting the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound to a boron nitride. The boron nitride is formed on the same or a different metal article. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is borazine, cycloborazane, trimethylcycloborazane, polyborazylene, B-vinylborazine, poly(B-vinylborazine), or combinations thereof. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is polymerized to form the boron nitride by exposure to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. The boron nitride is amorphous boron nitride, hexagonal boron nitride, rhombohedral boron nitride, turbostratic boron nitride, wurzite boron nitride, combinations thereof, or boron nitride and carbon. A method of conditioning a ballistic weapon and a metal article coated with the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound are also disclosed.

  12. Methods of forming boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trowbridge, Tammy L; Wertsching, Alan K; Pinhero, Patrick J; Crandall, David L

    2015-03-03

    A method of forming a boron nitride. The method comprises contacting a metal article with a monomeric boron-nitrogen compound and converting the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound to a boron nitride. The boron nitride is formed on the same or a different metal article. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is borazine, cycloborazane, trimethylcycloborazane, polyborazylene, B-vinylborazine, poly(B-vinylborazine), or combinations thereof. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is polymerized to form the boron nitride by exposure to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. The boron nitride is amorphous boron nitride, hexagonal boron nitride, rhombohedral boron nitride, turbostratic boron nitride, wurzite boron nitride, combinations thereof, or boron nitride and carbon. A method of conditioning a ballistic weapon and a metal article coated with the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound are also disclosed.

  13. Optical studies of cubic III-nitride structures

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, Ross E L

    2014-01-01

    The properties of cubic nitrides grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on GaAs (001) have been studied using optical and electrical techniques. The aim of these studies was the improvement of the growth techniques in order to improve the quality of grown nitrides intended for bulk substrate and optoelectronic device applications. We have also characterised hexagonal nanocolumn structures incorporating indium. Firstly, bulk films of cubic AlxGa1-xN with aluminium fractions (x) spanning the ...

  14. Performance of chromium nitride based coatings under plastic processing conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Cunha, l.; Andritschky, M.; Pischow, K.; Wang, Z.(Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing, China); Zarychta, A.; Miranda, A. S.; A.M. Cunha

    2000-01-01

    Chromium nitride based coatings were produced in the form of monolithic and multilayer coatings, by DC and RF reactive magnetron sputtering. These coatings were deposited onto stainless steel and tool steel substrates. Chromium nitride coatings have;proved to be wear and corrosion resistant. The combination of these characteristics was necessary to protect surfaces during plastic processing. In order to select the best coatings, some mechanical and tribological tests were performed. Har...

  15. Protozoan colonization on artificial substrates in relation to water quality in a tropical Indian harbour

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A field study was conducted to evaluate the protozoancolonization patterns on artificial substrates in relation to organic pollution within a tropical harbour. The composition of protozoans and their succession rates on artificial substrates(polyurethane foam units) were compared between two field stations(A and B), and their presence were considered with regards to the prevailing water quality conditions at the study sites. Altogether 44 genera of flagellates and ciliates were documented. The common genera of flagellates and ciliates were documented. The common genera of flagellates encountered included Monas, Polytoma,and Chromalina. Among the ciliates, the predominant genera were Tetrahymena, Vorticella, Lagynophyra, and Heloiphyra. These groups exhibited characteristic successional patterns in relation to ambient water quality. At Station A, located close to the sewage outfall, the water quality parameters included poor Secchi-disc transparency(0.48m), dissolved oxygen of 1.93 mg/ml, salinity of 18 psu, and temperature 31.3 鳦. Here, thenanoflagellates(spumella)colonized first, followed by microcilliate(Tetrahymena) and sessile form(Vorticella). Station B, located on the seaward side, was characterized by relatively less-stressed environmental conditions with transparency 1.85m and dissolved oxygen value of 6.04 mg/ml. Salinity of 27.27 psu, and mean temperature of 30鳦 were recordedat "B". At this station, the nanoflagellate Polytoma was first documented to colonize on the substrate, followed by microcilliate(Lagynophra) and suctorid(Heliophyra). These findings support the use of protozoans as indicator species for evaluating the hazards posed by organic pollution to natural estuarine communities.

  16. Gallium Nitride Schottky betavoltaic nuclear batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Min, E-mail: mlu2006@sinano.ac.c [Su zhou Institute of Nano-technology and Nano-bionics, CAS, Su zhou 215125 (China); Zhang Guoguang [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Fu Kai; Yu Guohao [Su zhou Institute of Nano-technology and Nano-bionics, CAS, Su zhou 215125 (China); Su Dan; Hu Jifeng [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Gallium Nitride nuclear batteries with Ni-63 are demonstrated for the first time. {yields} Open circuit voltage of 0.1 V and conversion efficiency of 0.32% have been obtained. {yields} The limited performance is due to thin effective energy deposition layer. {yields} The output power is expected to greatly increase with growing thick GaN films. -- Abstract: Gallium Nitride (GaN) Schottky betavoltaic nuclear batteries (GNBB) are demonstrated in our work for the first time. GaN films are grown on sapphire substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), and then GaN Schottky diodes are fabricated by normal micro-fabrication process. Nickel with mass number of 63 ({sup 63}Ni), which emits {beta} particles, is loaded on the GaN Schottky diodes to achieve GNBB. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence (PL) are carried out to investigate the crystal quality for the GaN films as grown. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics shows that the GaN Schottky diodes are not jet broken down at -200 V due to consummate fabrication processes, and the open circuit voltage of the GNBB is 0.1 V and the short circuit current density is 1.2 nA cm{sup -2}. The limited performance of the GNBB is due to thin effective energy deposition layer, which is only 206 nm to absorb very small partial energy of the {beta} particles because of the relatively high dislocation density and carrier concentration. However, the conversion efficiency of 0.32% and charge collection efficiency (CCE) of 29% for the GNBB have been obtained. Therefore, the output power of the GNBB are expected to greatly increase with growing high quality thick GaN films.

  17. 基底温度对反应磁控溅射氮化铝薄膜的影响%Effects of Substrate Temperature on Aluminum Nitride Films by Reactively Magnetron Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄美东; 张琳琳; 王丽格; 佟莉娜; 李晓娜; 董闯

    2011-01-01

    采用反应磁控溅射法结合加热控温电源,在光学玻璃基底上制备氮化铝(AlN)薄膜,通过X射线衍射(XRD)技术对薄膜样品物相结构进行分析,利用纳米压痕仪测试薄膜样品的硬度及弹性模量,用椭圆偏振仪及光栅光谱仪测试了薄膜样品的光学性能,分析和研究了基底温度对AlN薄膜的结构及性能的影响.结果表明,用此方法获得的AlN薄膜呈晶态,属于六方晶系,温度对AlN(100)面衍射峰强度影响不大,但对(110)面衍射峰的影响较大,因而温度对AlN的择优取向有一定影响.AlN(100)峰半高宽随温度升高而减小,表明晶粒尺寸随温度升高有变大趋势.随沉积温度升高,薄膜硬度从150℃的8 GPa增加到350℃的10 GPa左右,随基底温度升高,薄膜的硬度增加.弹性模量随温度的变化趋势与硬度的基本一致.在可见光区域AlN薄膜透过率超过90%,基本属于透明膜.基底温度对薄膜折射率也有较明显影响,折射率大致随温度升高而增大,但由椭偏测试及透射谱线分析得到的厚度结果表明,随温度升高,AlN薄膜的沉积速率下降.%Aluminum nitride ( A1N) thin films were reactively deposited onto glass substrates using reactive magnetron sputtering with a temperature-controllable heater. Hie phase and structure of the films were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD). Nano-indenter and ellipsometer as well as grating spectrograph were employed to characterize hardness, elastic module, and optical properties of the films. The effects of substrate temperature on the structure and properties of the A1N films were intensely analyzed and studied. Hie results showed that the A1N films fabricated by this method were crystalline with a hexagonal structure. Hie deposition temperature influenced the preferred orientation of the films. It seemed that the plane (110) of A1N was more sensitive to temperature than the plane (100). The full width of half maximum (FWHM) of peak (100

  18. Growth of crystalline ZnO films on the nitridated (0001) sapphire surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butashin, A. V.; Kanevsky, V. M.; Muslimov, A. E., E-mail: amuslimov@mail.ru; Prosekov, P. A.; Kondratev, O. A.; Blagov, A. E.; Vasil’ev, A. L.; Rakova, E. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Babaev, V. A.; Ismailov, A. M. [Dagestan State University (Russian Federation); Vovk, E. A.; Nizhankovsky, S. V. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute for Single Crystals (Ukraine)

    2015-07-15

    The surface morphology and structure of (0001) sapphire substrates subjected to thermochemical nitridation in a mixture of N{sub 2}, CO, and H{sub 2} gases are investigated by electron and probe microscopy and X-ray and electron diffraction. It is shown that an aluminum nitride layer is formed on the substrate surface and heteroepitaxial ZnO films deposited onto such substrates by magnetron sputtering have a higher quality when compared with films grown on sapphire.

  19. Nitriding behavior of Ni and Ni-based binary alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonovic, Matej

    2015-01-15

    precipitate-free microstructure known as expanded austenite or S-phase, which can enhance surface hardness, fatigue properties and corrosion properties.Nitriding of multicomponent Ni-based alloys is usually applied in the industry. Nevertheless, the understanding of nitriding is mostly based on phenomenological research and experience. Thereby there is still absence of complete understanding of nitriding of Ni-based alloys, which requires further detailed investigations. Since studying the nitrided multicomponent alloys is complicated, in this thesis fundamental investigations were performed on pure nickel and binary Ni-based model alloys.This thesis focuses on the nitriding behavior of pure nickel, which will result with an thermodynamic evaluation of the Ni-N system. Furthermore, deeper insights in the nitriding behavior of the binary Ni-based alloys is obtained upon nitriding Ni-4 wt.% Ti and Ni-2 wt.% Ti (Ni-5 at.% Ti and Ni-2.5 at.% Ti) alloys. Thereby, the development of large residual macrostresses parallel to the surface of the specimen is related with the N concentration gradient in the nitrided zone.

  20. RF-sputtered silicon and hafnium nitrides - Properties and adhesion to 440C stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, A.; Aron, P. R.

    1983-01-01

    Silicon nitride and hafnium nitride coatings were deposited by reactive RF sputtering on oxidized and unoxidized 440C stainless steel substrates. Sputtering was done in mixtures of argon and nitrogen gases from pressed powder silicon nitride and from hafnium metal targets. Depositions were at two background pressures, 8 and 20 mtorr, and at two different fractions (f) of nitrogen in argon, 0.25 and 0.60, for hafnium nitride and at f = 0.25 for silicon nitride. The coatings and the interface between the coating and substrates were investigated by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and Auger electron spectroscopy. A Knoop microhardness of 1650 + or 100 kg/sq mm was measured for hafnium nitride and 3900 + or 500 kg/sq mm for silicon nitride. The friction coefficients between a 440C rider and the coatings were measured under lubricated conditions. Scratch test results demonstrate that the adhesion of hafnium nitride to both oxidized and unoxidized 440C is superior to that of silicon nitride. Oxidized 440C is found to have increased adhesion, to both nitrides, over that of unoxidized 440C.

  1. RF-sputtered silicon and hafnium nitrides - Properties and adhesion to 440C stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, A.; Aron, P. R.

    1983-01-01

    Silicon nitride and hafnium nitride coatings were deposited by reactive RF sputtering on oxidized and unoxidized 440C stainless steel substrates. Sputtering was done in mixtures of argon and nitrogen gases from pressed powder silicon nitride and from hafnium metal targets. Depositions were at two background pressures, 8 and 20 mtorr, and at two different fractions (f) of nitrogen in argon, 0.25 and 0.60, for hafnium nitride and at f = 0.25 for silicon nitride. The coatings and the interface between the coating and substrates were investigated by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and Auger electron spectroscopy. A Knoop microhardness of 1650 + or 100 kg/sq mm was measured for hafnium nitride and 3900 + or 500 kg/sq mm for silicon nitride. The friction coefficients between a 440C rider and the coatings were measured under lubricated conditions. Scratch test results demonstrate that the adhesion of hafnium nitride to both oxidized and unoxidized 440C is superior to that of silicon nitride. Oxidized 440C is found to have increased adhesion, to both nitrides, over that of unoxidized 440C.

  2. Effect of PostNitride Annealing on Wear and Corrosion Behavior of Titanium Alloy Ti-6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandan, C.; Mohan, L.

    2016-10-01

    Titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V, was plasma nitrided using RF plasma with 100% N at 800 °C and annealed at 850 °C in vacuum. XRD and XPS studies show the formation of titanium nitrides after nitriding and redistribution of nitrogen after annealing. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies in Hank's solution show that nitriding decreases the corrosion resistance of the substrate and postnitride annealing improves the corrosion resistance of the nitrided samples. After nitriding, wear rate has decreased by an order of magnitude in reciprocating wear experiments and decreased further in annealed samples in comparison with that of substrate. Thus, postnitride annealing improves both corrosion and wear resistance of the nitrided sample. These improvements are attributed to redistribution of nitrogen and formation of a thin oxide layer on the sample due to annealing.

  3. GaN-based light-emitting diodes on various substrates: a critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoqiang; Wang, Wenliang; Yang, Weijia; Lin, Yunhao; Wang, Haiyan; Lin, Zhiting; Zhou, Shizhong

    2016-05-01

    GaN and related III-nitrides have attracted considerable attention as promising materials for application in optoelectronic devices, in particular, light-emitting diodes (LEDs). At present, sapphire is still the most popular commercial substrate for epitaxial growth of GaN-based LEDs. However, due to its relatively large lattice mismatch with GaN and low thermal conductivity, sapphire is not the most ideal substrate for GaN-based LEDs. Therefore, in order to obtain high-performance and high-power LEDs with relatively low cost, unconventional substrates, which are of low lattice mismatch with GaN, high thermal conductivity and low cost, have been tried as substitutes for sapphire. As a matter of fact, it is not easy to obtain high-quality III-nitride films on those substrates for various reasons. However, by developing a variety of techniques, distincts progress has been made during the past decade, with high-performance LEDs being successfully achieved on these unconventional substrates. This review focuses on state-of-the-art high-performance GaN-based LED materials and devices on unconventional substrates. The issues involved in the growth of GaN-based LED structures on each type of unconventional substrate are outlined, and the fundamental physics behind these issues is detailed. The corresponding solutions for III-nitride growth, defect control, and chip processing for each type of unconventional substrate are discussed in depth, together with a brief introduction to some newly developed techniques in order to realize LED structures on unconventional substrates. This is very useful for understanding the progress in this field of physics. In this review, we also speculate on the prospects for LEDs on unconventional substrates.

  4. Sheath Characteristic in ECR Plasma Nitriding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The sheath plasma characteristics changing with the negative bias applied to the substrate during electron cyclotron resonance plasma nitriding are studied. The sheath characteristics obtained by a Langmuir single probe and an ion energy analyzer show that when the negative bias applied to the substrate is increasing, the most probable energy of ions in the sheath and the full width of half maximum of ions energy distribution increase, the thickness of the sheath also increases, whereas the saturation current of ion decreases. It has been found from the optical emission spectrum that there are strong lines of N2 and N2+. Based on our experiment results the mechanism of plasma nitriding is discussed.

  5. Non-uniform, axisymmetric misfit strain: in thin films bonded on plate substrates/substrate systems: the relation between non-uniform film stresses and system curvatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yonggang Huang; D. Ngo; A.J. Rosakis

    2005-01-01

    Current methodologies used for the inference of thin film stress through curvature measurements are strictly restricted to stress and curvature states which are assumed to remain uniform over the entire film/substrate system. By considering a circular thin film/substrate system subject to non-uniform, but axisymmetric misfit strain distributions in the thin film, we derived relations between the film stresses and the misfit strain, and between the plate system's curvatures and the misfit strain. These relations feature a "local"part which involves a direct dependence of the stress or curvature components on the misfit strain at the same point, and a "non-local" part which reflects the effect of misfit strain of other points on the location of scrutiny. Most notably, we also derived relations between the polar components of the film stress and those of system curvatures which allow for the experimental inference of such stresses from full-field curvature measurements in the presence of arbitrary radial non-uniformities. These relations also feature a "non-local"dependence on curvatures making a full-field measurement a necessity. Finally, it is shown that the interfacial shear tractions between the film and the substrate are proportional to the radial gradients of the first curvature invariant and can also be inferred experimentally.

  6. Ultra-sensitive Hall sensors based on graphene encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dauber, Jan; Stampfer, Christoph [JARA-FIT and 2nd Institute of Physics, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-8/9), Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Sagade, Abhay A.; Neumaier, Daniel [Advanced Microelectronic Center Aachen (AMICA), AMO GmbH, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Oellers, Martin [JARA-FIT and 2nd Institute of Physics, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)

    2015-05-11

    The encapsulation of graphene in hexagonal boron nitride provides graphene on substrate with excellent material quality. Here, we present the fabrication and characterization of Hall sensor elements based on graphene boron nitride heterostructures, where we gain from high mobility and low charge carrier density at room temperature. We show a detailed device characterization including Hall effect measurements under vacuum and ambient conditions. We achieve a current- and voltage-related sensitivity of up to 5700 V/AT and 3 V/VT, respectively, outpacing state-of-the-art silicon and III/V Hall sensor devices. Finally, we extract a magnetic resolution limited by low frequency electric noise of less than 50 nT/√(Hz) making our graphene sensors highly interesting for industrial applications.

  7. Distinct Neural Substrates for Maintaining Locations and Spatial Relations in Working Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara J Blacker

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous work has demonstrated a distinction between maintenance of two types of spatial information in working memory (WM: spatial locations and spatial relations. While a body of work has investigated the neural mechanisms of sensory-based information like spatial locations, little is known about how spatial relations are maintained in WM. In two experiments, we used fMRI to investigate the involvement of early visual cortex in the maintenance of spatial relations in WM. In both experiments, we found less quadrant-specific BOLD activity in visual cortex when a single spatial relation, compared to a single spatial location, was held in WM. Also across both experiments, we found a consistent set of brain regions that were differentially activated during maintenance of locations versus relations. Maintaining a location, compared to a relation, was associated with greater activity in typical spatial WM regions like posterior parietal cortex and prefrontal regions. Whereas maintaining a relation, compared to a location, was associated with greater activity in the parahippocampal gyrus and precuneus/retrosplenial cortex. Further, in Experiment 2 we manipulated WM load and included trials where participants had to maintain three spatial locations or relations. Under this high load condition, the regions sensitive to locations versus relations were somewhat different than under low load. We also identified regions that were sensitive to load specifically for location or relation maintenance, as well as overlapping regions sensitive to load more generally. These results suggest that the neural substrates underlying WM maintenance of spatial locations and relations are distinct from one another and that the neural representations of these distinct types of spatial information change with load.

  8. Distinct Neural Substrates for Maintaining Locations and Spatial Relations in Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacker, Kara J.; Courtney, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated a distinction between maintenance of two types of spatial information in working memory (WM): spatial locations and spatial relations. While a body of work has investigated the neural mechanisms of sensory-based information like spatial locations, little is known about how spatial relations are maintained in WM. In two experiments, we used fMRI to investigate the involvement of early visual cortex in the maintenance of spatial relations in WM. In both experiments, we found less quadrant-specific BOLD activity in visual cortex when a single spatial relation, compared to a single spatial location, was held in WM. Also across both experiments, we found a consistent set of brain regions that were differentially activated during maintenance of locations vs. relations. Maintaining a location, compared to a relation, was associated with greater activity in typical spatial WM regions like posterior parietal cortex and prefrontal regions. Whereas maintaining a relation, compared to a location, was associated with greater activity in the parahippocampal gyrus and precuneus/retrosplenial cortex. Further, in Experiment 2 we manipulated WM load and included trials where participants had to maintain three spatial locations or relations. Under this high load condition, the regions sensitive to locations vs. relations were somewhat different than under low load. We also identified regions that were sensitive to load specifically for location or relation maintenance, as well as overlapping regions sensitive to load more generally. These results suggest that the neural substrates underlying WM maintenance of spatial locations and relations are distinct from one another and that the neural representations of these distinct types of spatial information change with load. PMID:27932963

  9. Method for forming monolayer graphene-boron nitride heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Peter Werner; Sutter, Eli Anguelova

    2016-08-09

    A method for fabricating monolayer graphene-boron nitride heterostructures in a single atomically thin membrane that limits intermixing at boundaries between graphene and h-BN, so as to achieve atomically sharp interfaces between these materials. In one embodiment, the method comprises exposing a ruthenium substrate to ethylene, exposing the ruthenium substrate to oxygen after exposure to ethylene and exposing the ruthenium substrate to borazine after exposure to oxygen.

  10. Silicon nitride equation of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert C.; Swaminathan, Pazhayannur K.

    2017-01-01

    This report presents the development of a global, multi-phase equation of state (EOS) for the ceramic silicon nitride (Si3N4).1 Structural forms include amorphous silicon nitride normally used as a thin film and three crystalline polymorphs. Crystalline phases include hexagonal α-Si3N4, hexagonal β-Si3N4, and the cubic spinel c-Si3N4. Decomposition at about 1900 °C results in a liquid silicon phase and gas phase products such as molecular nitrogen, atomic nitrogen, and atomic silicon. The silicon nitride EOS was developed using EOSPro which is a new and extended version of the PANDA II code. Both codes are valuable tools and have been used successfully for a variety of material classes. Both PANDA II and EOSPro can generate a tabular EOS that can be used in conjunction with hydrocodes. The paper describes the development efforts for the component solid phases and presents results obtained using the EOSPro phase transition model to investigate the solid-solid phase transitions in relation to the available shock data that have indicated a complex and slow time dependent phase change to the c-Si3N4 phase. Furthermore, the EOSPro mixture model is used to develop a model for the decomposition products; however, the need for a kinetic approach is suggested to combine with the single component solid models to simulate and further investigate the global phase coexistences.

  11. Surface properties of nitrided layer on AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel produced by high temperature plasma nitriding in short time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yang, E-mail: metalytu@163.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yantai University, Qingquan Road 32, Yantai 264005 (China); Wang, Zhuo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yantai University, Qingquan Road 32, Yantai 264005 (China); Wang, Liang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian Maritime University, Linghai Road 1, Dalian 116026 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The 8 μm nitrided layer was produced on the surface of AISI 316L stainless steel by plasma nitrided at high temperatures (540 °C) within 1 h. • The nitrided layer consisted of nitrogen expanded austenite and possibly a small amount of free-CrN and iron nitrides. • It could critically reduce processing time compared with low temperature nitriding. • High temperature plasma nitriding could improve pitting corrosion resistance of the substrate in 3.5% NaCl solution. - Abstract: It has generally been believed that the formation of the S phase or expanded austenite γ{sub N} with enough thickness depends on the temperature (lower than 480 °C) and duration of the process. In this work, we attempt to produce nitrogen expanded austenite layer at high temperature in short time. Nitriding of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel was carried out at high temperatures (>520 °C) for times ranging from 5 to 120 min. The microstructures, chemical composition, the thickness and the morphology of the nitrided layer, as well as its surface hardness, were investigated using X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and microhardness tester. The corrosion properties of the untreated and nitrided samples were evaluated using anodic polarization tests in 3.5% NaCl solution. The results confirmed that nitrided layer was shown to consist of γ{sub N} and a small amount of free-CrN and iron nitrides. High temperature plasma nitriding not only increased the surface hardness but also improved the corrosion resistance of the austenitic stainless steel, and it can critically reduce processing time compared with low temperature nitriding.

  12. Surface Texturing-Plasma Nitriding Duplex Treatment for Improving Tribological Performance of AISI 316 Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naiming Lin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Surface texturing-plasma nitriding duplex treatment was conducted on AISI 316 stainless steel to improve its tribological performance. Tribological behaviors of ground 316 substrates, plasma-nitrided 316 (PN-316, surface-textured 316 (ST-316, and duplex-treated 316 (DT-316 in air and under grease lubrication were investigated using a pin-on-disc rotary tribometer against counterparts of high carbon chromium bearing steel GCr15 and silicon nitride Si3N4 balls. The variations in friction coefficient, mass loss, and worn trace morphology of the tested samples were systemically investigated and analyzed. The results showed that a textured surface was formed on 316 after electrochemical processing in a 15 wt % NaCl solution. Grooves and dimples were found on the textured surface. As plasma nitriding was conducted on a 316 substrate and ST-316, continuous and uniform nitriding layers were successfully fabricated on the surfaces of the 316 substrate and ST-316. Both of the obtained nitriding layers presented thickness values of more than 30 μm. The nitriding layers were composed of iron nitrides and chromium nitride. The 316 substrate and ST-316 received improved surface hardness after plasma nitriding. When the tribological tests were carried out under dry sliding and grease lubrication conditions, the tested samples showed different tribological behaviors. As expected, the DT-316 samples revealed the most promising tribological properties, reflected by the lowest mass loss and worn morphologies. The DT-316 received the slightest damage, and its excellent tribological performance was attributed to the following aspects: firstly, the nitriding layer had high surface hardness; secondly, the surface texture was able to capture wear debris, store up grease, and then provide continuous lubrication.

  13. Surface Texturing-Plasma Nitriding Duplex Treatment for Improving Tribological Performance of AISI 316 Stainless Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Naiming; Liu, Qiang; Zou, Jiaojuan; Guo, Junwen; Li, Dali; Yuan, Shuo; Ma, Yong; Wang, Zhenxia; Wang, Zhihua; Tang, Bin

    2016-10-27

    Surface texturing-plasma nitriding duplex treatment was conducted on AISI 316 stainless steel to improve its tribological performance. Tribological behaviors of ground 316 substrates, plasma-nitrided 316 (PN-316), surface-textured 316 (ST-316), and duplex-treated 316 (DT-316) in air and under grease lubrication were investigated using a pin-on-disc rotary tribometer against counterparts of high carbon chromium bearing steel GCr15 and silicon nitride Si₃N₄ balls. The variations in friction coefficient, mass loss, and worn trace morphology of the tested samples were systemically investigated and analyzed. The results showed that a textured surface was formed on 316 after electrochemical processing in a 15 wt % NaCl solution. Grooves and dimples were found on the textured surface. As plasma nitriding was conducted on a 316 substrate and ST-316, continuous and uniform nitriding layers were successfully fabricated on the surfaces of the 316 substrate and ST-316. Both of the obtained nitriding layers presented thickness values of more than 30 μm. The nitriding layers were composed of iron nitrides and chromium nitride. The 316 substrate and ST-316 received improved surface hardness after plasma nitriding. When the tribological tests were carried out under dry sliding and grease lubrication conditions, the tested samples showed different tribological behaviors. As expected, the DT-316 samples revealed the most promising tribological properties, reflected by the lowest mass loss and worn morphologies. The DT-316 received the slightest damage, and its excellent tribological performance was attributed to the following aspects: firstly, the nitriding layer had high surface hardness; secondly, the surface texture was able to capture wear debris, store up grease, and then provide continuous lubrication.

  14. Synthesis of Binary Transition Metal Nitrides, Carbides and Borides from the Elements in the Laser-Heated Diamond Anvil Cell and Their Structure-Property Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lkhamsuren Bayarjargal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal nitrides, carbides and borides have a high potential for industrial applications as they not only have a high melting point but are generally harder and less compressible than the pure metals. Here we summarize recent advances in the synthesis of binary transition metal nitrides, carbides and borides focusing on the reaction of the elements at extreme conditions generated within the laser-heated diamond anvil cell. The current knowledge of their structures and high-pressure properties like high-(p; T stability, compressibility and hardness is described as obtained from experiments.

  15. Scanning tunneling microscopy of initial nitridation processes on oxidized Si(100) surface with radical nitrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, R; Ikeda, H; Sakashita, M; Sakai, A; Yasuda, Y; Nakatsuka, O; Zaima, S

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the initial nitridation processes on oxidized Si(100) with radical nitrogen at a substrate temperature of 850degC using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). It is found that the thin oxide layer suppresses the changes of original Si step structures during nitridation, and this effect critically depends on the growth conditions of the oxide layer. Comparison of the nitride island morphology to the case of the clean surface suggests that the migration of the precursor during nitridation is suppressed by the oxygen in the layer. (author)

  16. Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  17. Boron nitride composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2016-02-16

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), and a plurality of cubic boron nitride (cBN) particles, wherein the plurality of cBN particles are dispersed in a matrix of the hBN. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes a plurality of cBN particles, and one or more borate-containing binders.

  18. Boron nitride composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2016-02-16

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), and a plurality of cubic boron nitride (cBN) particles, wherein the plurality of cBN particles are dispersed in a matrix of the hBN. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes a plurality of cBN particles, and one or more borate-containing binders.

  19. Bond Angles in the Crystalline Silicon/Silicon Nitride Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Robert H.; Bachlechner, Martina E.

    2006-03-01

    Silicon nitride deposited on a silicon substrate has major applications in both dielectric layers in microelectronics and as antireflection and passivation coatings in photovoltaic applications. Molecular dynamic simulations are performed to investigate the influence of temperature and rate of externally applied strain on the structural and mechanical properties of the silicon/silicon nitride interface. Bond-angles between various atom types in the system are used to find and understand more about the mechanisms leading to the failure of the crystal. Ideally in crystalline silicon nitride, bond angles of 109.5 occur when a silicon atom is at the vertex and 120 angles occur when a nitrogen atom is at the vertex. The comparison of the calculated angles to the ideal values give information on the mechanisms of failure in silicon/silicon nitride system.

  20. Physics of wurtzite nitrides and oxides passport to devices

    CERN Document Server

    Gil, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    This book gives a survey of the current state of the art of a special class of nitrides semiconductors, Wurtzite Nitride and Oxide Semiconductors. It includes properties, growth and applications. Research in the area of nitrides semiconductors is still booming although some basic materials sciences issues were solved already about 20 years ago. With the advent of modern technologies and the successful growth of nitride substrates, these materials currently experience a second birth. Advanced new applications like light-emitters, including UV operating LEDs, normally on and normally off high frequency operating transistors are expected. With progress in clean room technology, advanced photonic and quantum optic applications are envisioned in a close future. This area of research is fascinating for researchers and students in materials science, electrical engineering, chemistry, electronics, physics and biophysics. This book aims to be the ad-hoc instrument to this active field of research.

  1. Nitridation of silicon by nitrogen neutral beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, Yasuhiro, E-mail: yasuhirohara2002@yahoo.co.jp [Organization for Research and Development of Innovative Science and Technology, Kansai University, Yamate-cho 3-3-35, Suita 564-8680, Osaka (Japan); Shimizu, Tomohiro; Shingubara, Shoso [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Science, Kansai University, Yamate-cho 3-3-35, Suita 564-8680, Osaka (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Nitrided silicon was formed by nitrogen neutral beam at room temperature. • Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layer was formed at the acceleration voltage more than 20 V. • Formed Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layer show the effective as the passivation film in the wet etching process. - Abstract: Silicon nitridation was investigated at room temperature using a nitrogen neutral beam (NB) extracted at acceleration voltages of less than 100 V. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis confirmed the formation of a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layer on a Si (1 0 0) substrate when the acceleration voltage was higher than 20 V. The XPS depth profile indicated that nitrogen diffused to a depth of 36 nm for acceleration voltages of 60 V and higher. The thickness of the silicon nitrided layer increased with the acceleration voltages from 20 V to 60 V. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis indicated a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layer thickness of 3.1 nm was obtained at an acceleration voltage of 100 V. Moreover, it was proved that the nitrided silicon layer formed by the nitrogen NB at room temperature was effective as the passivation film in the wet etching process.

  2. Nitrogen Availability Of Nitriding Atmosphere In Controlled Gas Nitriding Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalski J.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Parameters which characterize the nitriding atmosphere in the gas nitriding process of steel are: the nitriding potential KN, ammonia dissociation rate α and nitrogen availabilitymN2. The article discusses the possibilities of utilization of the nitriding atmosphere’s nitrogen availability in the design of gas nitriding processes of alloyed steels in atmospheres derived from raw ammonia, raw ammonia diluted with pre-dissociated ammonia, with nitrogen, as well as with both nitrogen and pre-dissociated ammonia. The nitriding processes were accomplished in four series. The parameters selected in the particular processes were: process temperature (T, time (t, value of nitriding potential (KN, corresponding to known dissociation rate of the ammonia which dissociates during the nitriding process (α. Variable parameters were: nitrogen availability (mN2, composition of the ingoing atmosphere and flow rate of the ingoing atmosphere (FIn.

  3. Nitriding of high speed steel by bipolar PBII for improvement in adhesion strength of DLC films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Junho, E-mail: choi@mech.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Soejima, Koji; Kato, Takahisa [University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Kawaguchi, Masahiro [Tokyo Metropolitan Industrial Technology Research Institute (TIRI), Tokyo (Japan); Lee, Wonsik [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (KITECH), Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-01

    In the present study, bipolar plasma based ion implantation and deposition (bipolar PBII) was used for plasma nitriding of high speed steel (SKH2), and the effects of the treatment parameters (positive pulse voltage, negative pulse voltage, treatment pressure, treatment time, and precursor gases) on the nitriding process were investigated. The hardness, roughness, and depth of nitride layer were also measured. The adhesion strength of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films coated on the nitride substrate was evaluated by carrying out Rockwell indentation and microscratch tests. Nitriding by bipolar PBII was achieved in the combining of two effects: nitrogen ion implantation by applying a high negative pulse voltage and thermal diffusion of nitrogen atoms under the application of a high positive pulse voltage. However, a very high voltage negative pulse caused surface roughening of the nitride layer. Application of a high positive pulse voltage during nitriding was found to be effective in promoting the thermal diffusion of the implanted nitrogen atoms. Effective nitriding could be achieved under the following conditions: high positive pulse voltage, low negative pulse voltage, high nitrogen gas pressure, and addition of hydrogen to the precursor gas. The adhesion strength of the DLC films on the SKH2 substrate was well improved after nitriding.

  4. Group-III Nitride Field Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensaoula, Abdelhak; Berishev, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Field-emission devices (cold cathodes) having low electron affinities can be fabricated through lattice-mismatched epitaxial growth of nitrides of elements from group III of the periodic table. Field emission of electrons from solid surfaces is typically utilized in vacuum microelectronic devices, including some display devices. The present field-emission devices and the method of fabricating them were developed to satisfy needs to reduce the cost of fabricating field emitters, make them compatible with established techniques for deposition of and on silicon, and enable monolithic integration of field emitters with silicon-based driving circuitry. In fabricating a device of this type, one deposits a nitride of one or more group-III elements on a substrate of (111) silicon or other suitable material. One example of a suitable deposition process is chemical vapor deposition in a reactor that contains plasma generated by use of electron cyclotron resonance. Under properly chosen growth conditions, the large mismatch between the crystal lattices of the substrate and the nitride causes strains to accumulate in the growing nitride film, such that the associated stresses cause the film to crack. The cracks lie in planes parallel to the direction of growth, so that the growing nitride film becomes divided into microscopic growing single-crystal columns. The outer ends of the fully-grown columns can serve as field-emission tips. By virtue of their chemical compositions and crystalline structures, the columns have low work functions and high electrical conductivities, both of which are desirable for field emission of electrons. From examination of transmission electron micrographs of a prototype device, the average column width was determined to be about 100 nm and the sharpness of the tips was determined to be characterized by a dimension somewhat less than 100 nm. The areal density of the columns was found to about 5 x 10(exp 9)/sq cm . about 4 to 5 orders of magnitude

  5. Nitridation of chromium powder in ammonia atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Li; Qiang Zhen; Rong Li

    2015-01-01

    CrN powder was synthesized by nitriding Cr metal in ammonia gas flow, and its chemical reaction mechanism and nitridation process were studied. Through thermodynamic calculations, the Cr−N−O predominance diagrams were constructed for different tempera-tures. Chromium nitride formed at 700−1200°C under relatively higher nitrogen and lower oxygen partial pressures. Phases in the products were then investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), and the Cr2N content varied with reaction temperature and holding time. The results indicate that the Cr metal powder nitridation process can be explained by a diffusion model. Further, Cr2N formed as an intermediate product because of an incomplete reaction, which was observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). After nitriding at 1000°C for 20 h, CrN powder with an average grain size of 63 nm was obtained, and the obtained sample was analyzed by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  6. Iron-based alloy and nitridation treatment for PEM fuel cell bipolar plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Yang, Bing [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-11-09

    A corrosion resistant electrically conductive component that can be used as a bipolar plate in a PEM fuel cell application is composed of an alloy substrate which has 10-30 wt. % Cr, 0.5 to 7 wt. % V, and base metal being Fe, and a continuous surface layer of chromium nitride and vanadium nitride essentially free of base metal. A oxide layer of chromium vanadium oxide can be disposed between the alloy substrate and the continuous surface nitride layer. A method to prepare the corrosion resistant electrically conductive component involves a two-step nitridization sequence by exposing the alloy to a oxygen containing gas at an elevated temperature, and subsequently exposing the alloy to an oxygen free nitrogen containing gas at an elevated temperature to yield a component where a continuous chromium nitride layer free of iron has formed at the surface.

  7. Group III-nitride lasers: a materials perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew T. Hardy

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available An overview of III-Nitride based laser diodes (LDs is presented focusing on the materials challenges in each phase of device development. We discuss early breakthroughs leading to the first commercial GaN LDs, covering crystal growth, p-type doping, and defect reduction. Additional device issues, such as polarization effects, strain, and index dispersion are addressed as they apply to the development of blue and green LDs for pico-projector applications. State of the art device results are highlighted. Devices grown on non-polar and semi-polar GaN substrates address many polarization related problems present in c-plane GaN growth. Device results, advantages, and limitations of various non-polar and semi-polar systems are discussed in terms of polarization properties, Indium incorporation, extended defect formation, and critical thickness. A brief description of challenges and progress in UV LDs is also presented.

  8. Design of nitride semiconductors for solar energy conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakutayev, Andriy

    2016-01-01

    Nitride semiconductors are a promising class of materials for solar energy conversion applications, such as photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical cells. Nitrides can have better solar absorption and electrical transport properties than the more widely studied oxides, as well as the potential for better scalability than other pnictides or chalcogenides. In addition, nitrides are also relatively unexplored compared to other chemistries, so they provide a great opportunity for new materials discovery. This paper reviews the recent advances in the design of novel semiconducting nitrides for solar energy conversion technologies. Both binary and multinary nitrides are discussed, with a range of metal chemistries (Cu3N, ZnSnN2, Sn3N4, etc.) and crystal structures (delafossite, perovskite, spinel, etc.), including a brief overview of wurtzite III-N materials and devices. The current scientific challenges and promising future directions in the field are also highlighted.

  9. Improvement in nano-hardness and corrosion resistance of low carbon steel by plasma nitriding with negative DC bias voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alim, Mohamed Mounes; Saoula, Nadia; Tadjine, Rabah; Hadj-Larbi, Fayçal; Keffous, Aissa; Kechouane, Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we study the effect of plasma nitriding on nano-hardness and corrosion resistance of low carbon steel samples. The plasma was generated through a radio-frequency inductively coupled plasma source. The substrate temperature increased (by the self-induced heating mechanism) with the treatment time for increasing negative bias voltages. X-rays diffraction analysis revealed the formation of nitride phases (ɛ-Fe2-3N and γ'-Fe4N) in the compound layer of the treated samples. A phase transition occurred from 3.5 kV to 4.0 kV and was accompanied by an increase in the volume fraction of the γ'-Fe4N phase and a decrease in that of the ɛ-Fe2-3N phase. Auger electron spectroscopy revealed a deep diffusion of the implanted nitrogen beyond 320 nm. The nano-hardness increased by ~400% for the nitrogen-implanted samples compared to the untreated state, the nitride phases are believed to participate to the hardening. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements revealed that the plasma nitriding has improved the corrosion resistance behavior of the material. When compared to the untreated state, the sample processed at 4.0 kV exhibits a shift of +500 mV and a reduction to 3% in its corrosion current. These results were obtained for relatively low bias voltages and short treatment time (2 h).

  10. Metal Nitrides for Plasmonic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, Gururaj V.; Schroeder, Jeremy; Guler, Urcan;

    2012-01-01

    Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications.......Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications....

  11. Epitaxial growth of III-V nitrides and phase separation and ordering in indium gallium nitride alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doppalapudi, Dharanipal

    The family of III-V nitrides are wide band-gap semiconductors with a broad range of opto-electronic applications in LEDs, laser diodes, UV detectors as well as high temperature/high frequency devices. Due to the lack of good quality native substrates, GaN is grown on foreign substrates that have a lattice and thermal mismatch with GaN. This results in a material with a high density of defects, which in turn adversely affects the opto-electronic properties of the epilayer. In this study, GaN films were epitaxially grown on various substrates (C-plane sapphire, A-plane sapphire, SiC and ZnO) by molecular beam epitaxy. Additionally, GaN homoepitaxy onto laterally overgrown thick GaN substrates was investigated. It was demonstrated that the polarity of the GaN film plays a major role in determining the properties of the films. The growth parameters were optimized to eliminate inversion domain boundaries, which result in domains of opposite polarity in the GaN lattice. For growth on A-plane sapphire, it was found that substrate nitridation and low temperature buffer deposition are critical in order to obtain good epitaxial growth, in spite of the relatively small mismatch between the film and substrate. A crystallographic model was developed to explain this observation. By optimizing growth parameters, GaN films with excellent structural, transport, optical and device properties were grown. The second part of this research involves growth of ternary alloys and superlattice structures, which are essential in the fabrication of many devices. It was found that the InN-GaN pseudo-binary system is not homogeneous over the entire composition range. Due to the mismatch between the tetrahedral radii of GaN and InN, InGaN alloys exhibited phase separation and long-range atomic ordering. Investigations of InxGa1-xN films grown over a wide range of compositions by XRD and TEM showed that the predominant strain relieving mechanism was phase separation in films with x > 0.2, and

  12. Atomic-layer deposition of silicon nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Yokoyama, S; Ooba, K

    1999-01-01

    Atomic-layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride has been investigated by means of plasma ALD in which a NH sub 3 plasma is used, catalytic ALD in which NH sub 3 is dissociated by thermal catalytic reaction on a W filament, and temperature-controlled ALD in which only a thermal reaction on the substrate is employed. The NH sub 3 and the silicon source gases (SiH sub 2 Cl sub 2 or SiCl sub 4) were alternately supplied. For all these methods, the film thickness per cycle was saturated at a certain value for a wide range of deposition conditions. In the catalytic ALD, the selective deposition of silicon nitride on hydrogen-terminated Si was achieved, but, it was limited to only a thin (2SiO (evaporative).

  13. Quantifying the relative contributions of different solute carriers to aggregate substrate transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taslimifar, Mehdi; Oparija, Lalita; Verrey, Francois; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan; Olgac, Ufuk; Makrides, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Determining the contributions of different transporter species to overall cellular transport is fundamental for understanding the physiological regulation of solutes. We calculated the relative activities of Solute Carrier (SLC) transporters using the Michaelis-Menten equation and global fitting to estimate the normalized maximum transport rate for each transporter (Vmax). Data input were the normalized measured uptake of the essential neutral amino acid (AA) L-leucine (Leu) from concentration-dependence assays performed using Xenopus laevis oocytes. Our methodology was verified by calculating Leu and L-phenylalanine (Phe) data in the presence of competitive substrates and/or inhibitors. Among 9 potentially expressed endogenous X. laevis oocyte Leu transporter species, activities of only the uniporters SLC43A2/LAT4 (and/or SLC43A1/LAT3) and the sodium symporter SLC6A19/B0AT1 were required to account for total uptake. Furthermore, Leu and Phe uptake by heterologously expressed human SLC6A14/ATB0,+ and SLC43A2/LAT4 was accurately calculated. This versatile systems biology approach is useful for analyses where the kinetics of each active protein species can be represented by the Hill equation. Furthermore, its applicable even in the absence of protein expression data. It could potentially be applied, for example, to quantify drug transporter activities in target cells to improve specificity. PMID:28091567

  14. Nitride quantum light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, T.; Oliver, R. A.

    2016-02-01

    Prototype nitride quantum light sources, particularly single-photon emitters, have been successfully demonstrated, despite the challenges inherent in this complex materials system. The large band offsets available between different nitride alloys have allowed device operation at easily accessible temperatures. A wide range of approaches has been explored: not only self-assembled quantum dot growth but also lithographic methods for site-controlled nanostructure formation. All these approaches face common challenges, particularly strong background signals which contaminate the single-photon stream and excessive spectral diffusion of the quantum dot emission wavelength. If these challenges can be successfully overcome, then ongoing rapid progress in the conventional III-V semiconductors provides a roadmap for future progress in the nitrides.

  15. Gallium Nitride MMICs for mm-Wave Power Operation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quay, R.; Maroldt, S.; Haupt, C.; Heijningen, M. van; Tessmann, A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a Gallium Nitride MMIC technology for high-power amplifiers between 27 GHz and 101 GHz based on 150 nm- and 100 nm-gate technologies is presented. The GaN HEMT MMICs are designed using coplanar waveguide transmission-line-technology on 3-inch semi-insulating SiC substrates. The measure

  16. Electronic structure of spontaneously strained graphene on hexagonal Boron Nitride

    OpenAIRE

    San-Jose, Pablo; Gutiérrez, Ángel; Sturla, Mauricio; Guinea, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Hexagonal Boron Nitride substrates have been shown to dramatically improve the electric properties of graphene. Recently, it has been observed that when the two honeycomb crystals are close to perfect alignment, strong lattice distortions develop in graphene due to the moir\\'e adhesion landscape. Simultaneously a gap opens at the Dirac point. Here we derive a simple low energy model for graphene carriers close to alignment with the substrate, taking into account spontaneous strains at equilib...

  17. ZnO deposition on metal substrates: Relating fabrication, morphology, and wettability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaini, Sara S.; Kronawitter, Coleman X.; Carey, Van P.; Mao, Samuel S.

    2013-05-01

    It is not common practice to deposit thin films on metal substrates, especially copper, which is a common heat exchanger metal and practical engineering material known for its heat transfer properties. While single crystal substrates offer ideal surfaces with uniform structure for compatibility with oxide deposition, metallic surfaces needed for industrial applications exhibit non-idealities that complicate the fabrication of oxide nanostructure arrays. The following study explored different ZnO fabrication techniques to deposit a (super)hydrophobic thin film of ZnO on a metal substrate, specifically copper, in order to explore its feasibility as an enhanced condensing surface. ZnO was selected for its non-toxicity, ability to be made (super)hydrophobic with hierarchical roughness, and its photoinduced hydrophilicity characteristic, which could be utilized to pattern it to have both hydrophobic-hydrophilic regions. We investigated the variation of ZnO's morphology and wetting state, using SEMs and sessile drop contact angle measurements, as a function of different fabrication techniques: sputtering, pulsed laser deposition (PLD), electrodeposition and annealing Zn. We successfully fabricated (super)hydrophobic ZnO on a mirror finish, commercially available copper substrate using the scalable electrodeposition technique. PLD for ZnO deposition did not prove viable, as the ZnO samples on metal substrates were hydrophilic and the process does not lend itself to scalability. The annealed Zn sheets did not exhibit consistent wetting state results.

  18. Effect and behaviour of different substrates in relation to the formation of aerobic granular sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, M.; Abbas, B.; Al-zuhairy, S.H.K.; Kraan, R.; Kleerebezem, R.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.

    2015-01-01

    When aerobic granular sludge is applied for industrial wastewater treatment, different soluble substrates can be present. For stable granular sludge formation on volatile fatty acids (e.g. acetate), production of storage polymers under anaerobic feeding conditions has been shown to be important. Thi

  19. The relative importance of exogenous and substrate-derived nitrogen for microbial growth during leaf decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheever, B M; Webster, J R; Bilger, E E; Thomas, S A

    2013-07-01

    Heterotrophic microbes colonizing detritus obtain nitrogen (N) for growth by assimilating N from their substrate or immobilizing exogenous inorganic N. Microbial use of these two pools has different implications for N cycling and organic matter decomposition in the face of the global increase in biologically available N. We used sugar maple leaves labeled with 15N to differentiate between microbial N that had been assimilated from the leaf substrate (enriched with 15N) or immobilized from the water (natural abundance 15N:14N) in five Appalachian streams ranging in ambient NO3(-)N concentrations from about 5 to 900 microg NO3(-)N/L. Ambient NO3(-) concentration increased sugar maple decomposition rate but did not influence the proportion of microbial N derived from substrate or exogenous pools. Instead, these proportions were strongly influenced by the percentage of detrital ash-free dry mass (AFDM) remaining. Substrate-derived N made up a large proportion of the microbial N after the first 24 h in all streams. Detrital and microbial isotopic 15N signatures approached that of the water as decomposition progressed in all streams, suggesting that exogenous N may be the predominant source of N for meeting microbial requirements even when exogenous N concentrations are low. Our results support predictions of more rapid decomposition of organic matter in response to increased N availability and highlight the tight coupling of processes driving microbial N cycling and organic matter decomposition.

  20. Wear monitoring of protective nitride coatings using image processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Inge Lise; Guibert, M.; Belin, M.

    2010-01-01

    A double-layer model system, consisting of a thin layer of tribological titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN) on 17 top of titanium nitride (TiN), was deposited on polished 100Cr6 steel substrates. The TiAlN top-coatings 18 were exposed to abrasive wear by a reciprocating wear process in a linear tribo...... processing by color detection is a potential technique for early 25 warning or determination of residual thickness of tribological tool coatings prior to complete wear....

  1. Implementation of Strategies to Improve the Reliability of III-Nitride Photodetectors towards the Realization of Visible and Solar-Blind Imaging Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulmer, John J.

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation detectors are being heavily researched for applications in non-line-of-sight (NLOS) communication systems, flame monitoring, biological detection, and astronomical studies. These applications are currently being met by the use of Si-based photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), which are bulky, fragile, expensive and require the use of external filters to achieve true visible-blind and solar-blind operation. GaN and AlxGa1-xN avalanche photodiodes have been of great interest as a replacement for PMT technology. III-Nitride materials are radiation hard and have a wide, tunable bandgap that allows devices to operate in both visible and solar-blind regimes without the use of external filters. The high price and relative unavailability of bulk substrates demands heteroepitaxy of III-Nitride films on lattice-mismatched substrates, which leads to large dark current and premature breakdown in GaN and AlGaN avalanche photodiodes. While significant advances have been made towards the development of III-Nitride UV photodetectors using a variety of device designs, GaN-based avalanche photodiodes typically demonstrate poor device performance, low yield, and breakdown that results in permanent device damage. To address these challenges, a novel implantation technique was used to achieve edge termination and electric field redistribution at the contact edges in GaN and AlGaN p-i-n photodiode structures to enhance reliability. This process was successful at significantly reducing the levels of dark current over two orders of magnitude and resulted in improved device reliability. Further improvement in reliability of III-Nitride devices was also proposed and explored by a technique for isolation of electrically conductive structural defects. The large number of dislocations induced by the lattice and thermal mismatch with the substrate are known to be leakage current pathways and non-radiative recombination centers in III-Nitride films. This process selectively

  2. Thermodynamic Routes to Novel Metastable Nitrogen-Rich Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holder, Aaron M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Arca, Elisabetta [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zakutayev, Andriy A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lany, Stephan [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sun, Wenhao [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Orvananos, Bernardo [Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Ceder, Gerbrand [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Massachusetts Institute of Technology; University of California, Berkeley

    2017-07-17

    Compared to oxides, the nitrides are relatively unexplored, making them a promising chemical space for novel materials discovery. Of particular interest are nitrogen-rich nitrides, which often possess useful semiconducting properties for electronic and optoelectronic applications. However, such nitrogen-rich compounds are generally metastable, and the lack of a guiding theory for their synthesis has limited their exploration. Here, we review the remarkable metastability of observed nitrides, and examine the thermodynamics of how reactive nitrogen precursors can stabilize metastable nitrogen-rich compositions during materials synthesis. We map these thermodynamic strategies onto a predictive computational search, training a data-mined ionic substitution algorithm specifically for nitride discovery, which we combine with grand-canonical DFT-SCAN phase stability calculations to compute stabilizing nitrogen chemical potentials. We identify several new nitrogen-rich binary nitrides for experimental investigation, notably the transition metal nitrides Mn3N4, Cr3N4, V3N4, and Nb3N5, the main group nitride SbN, and the pernitrides FeN2, CrN2, and Cu2N2. By formulating rational thermodynamic routes to metastable compounds, we expand the search space for functional technological materials beyond equilibrium phases and compositions.

  3. III-nitride grown on freestanding GaN nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yongjin; Zhu, Hongbo [Institute of Communication Technology, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing, Jiang-Su 210003 (China); Hu, Fangren; Hane, Kazuhiro [Department of Nanomechanics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    We report here the epitaxial growth of III-nitride on the freestanding GaN nanostructures by molecular beam epitaxy growth. Various GaN nanostructures are defined by electron beam lithography and realized on GaN-on-silicon substrate by fast atom beam etching. Silicon substrate beneath GaN nanostructures is removed from the backside to form the freestanding GaN slab, and the epitaxial growth of III-nitride by MBE is performed on the prepared GaN template. The selective growth takes place with the assistance of GaN nanostructures and generates hexagonal III-nitride pyramids. Thin epitaxial structures, depending on the shape and the size of GaN nanostructure, can produce the promising optical performance. This work opens the way to combine silicon micromachining with the epitaxial growth of III-nitride by MBE on GaN-on-silicon substrate for further integrated optics (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Effect of plasma nitriding time on surface properties of hard chromium electroplated AISI 1010 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocabas, Mustafa [Yildiz Technical Univ., Istanbul (Turkey). Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Dept.; Danisman, Murat [Gedik Univ., Istanbul (Turkey). Electrical and Electronic Engineering Dept.; Cansever, Nurhan [Yildiz Technical Univ., Istanbul (Turkey); Uelker, Suekrue [Afyon Kocatepe Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2015-06-01

    Properties of steel can be enhanced by surface treatments such as coating. In some cases, further treatments such as nitriding can also be used in order to get even better results. In order to investigate the properties of nitride layer on hard Cr coated AISI 1010 steel, substrates were electroplated to form hard Cr coatings. Then hard Cr coatings were plasma nitrided at 700 C for 3 h, 5 h and 7 h and nitride phases on the coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis. The layer thickness and surface properties of nitride films were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The hardness and adhesion properties of Cr-N phases were examined using nano indentation and Daimler-Benz Rockwell C adhesion tests. The highest measured hardness was 24.1 GPa and all the three samples exhibited poor adhesion.

  5. Nitriding of Hard Fe Electrodeposition and Its Effects on Wear Resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Nitriding is employed for the hard Fe electrodeposition toproduce a hard-facing and antiwear coating. It only takes 1 h for the hard Fe coating, which is much shorter than nitriding the Fe and steel. The results showed that the nitriding can increase the microhardness, wear resistance of the coating, as well as the bonding strength of the coating with the substrate. Additionally it can eliminate the brittleness, turn the internal stress of the coating from tension to compression.The wear resistance of the nitrided Fe coating is 4.6 times as high as that of Cr coating. It is simple and economic to combine hard Fe electroplating and nitriding, which is a good technology of the tribological surface modification.

  6. The rapid nitriding of Al alloys with the controlling of plasma power density and pretreatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Jun; Moon, Kyoung Il [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Seung; Choi, Yoon [A-Tech System, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    The properties of AlN make this material very attractive for optical, electronic, and tribological application. Also, if the AlN could be formed on the Al surface to enhance its surface properties, Al could be applied for the lightening of machine parts. However, a dense oxide film exists on the surface of Al, which prevents the formation of the Al nitride even during plasma nitriding and plasma coating process. In this study, plasma nitriding has been tried to form an AlN layer on Al after the surface activation processes. During the plasma nitriding, the density of the nitrogen ions was amplified by means of controlling the power of the Al substrates. The film thickness, microstructural features and the mechanical properties such as hardness and wear properties of the AlN layer were examined as a function of the process parameters of pretreatment and plasma nitriding

  7. Neurochemical substrates and neuroanatomical generators of the event-related P300

    OpenAIRE

    Frodl-Bauch, Thomas; Bottlender, Ronald; Hegerl, Ulrich

    1999-01-01

    The present review focuses on the current knowledge of the neurochemical processes and neuronal structures involved in the generation of P300. The increasing knowledge in this area facilitates the physiological interpretation of P300 findings as well as the link between P300 research and other research findings in biological psychiatry. Concerning the question of neurochemical substrates, the glutamatergic, GABAergic, cholinergic, noradrenergic, dopaminergic and serotonergic influences on P30...

  8. Preparation of Cubic Boron Nitride Coating on WC-Co Substrate by Micro/Nanocrystalline Diamond Film Interlayer%基于微纳米金刚石过渡层的cBN刀具涂层制备

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐锋; 左敦稳; 张旭辉; 户海峰; 张骋; 王珉

    2013-01-01

    Cubic Boron Nitride(cBN) is a super-hard material, of which hardness is only less than diamond. But it has excellent chemical stability, especially no chemical reaction with ferrous materials. The cBN coating has irreplaceable function in the application of modern cutting tools. Research is carried out on the preparation of cBN coating on YG6 by micro/nanocrystalline diamond (M/NCD) film inter-layer. The micro/nanocrystalline diamond film is deposited in hot filament chemical vapor deposition system and cBN is deposited in radio frequency magnetron sputtering system. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman, atomic force microscopy(AFM), Fourier transferred infrared(FTIR) and in-denter are used to investigate the content, morphology and adhesion of the coating. The results show that the adhesion of cBN coating on WC-Co by micro/nanocrystalline diamond interlayer is much higher than that by nano diamond interlayer. The moderate bias voltage is important for the cBN film deposition in the magnetron sputtering process.%立方氮化硼(Cubic Boron Nitride,cBN)是仅次于金刚石的超硬材料,比金刚石具有更高的化学稳定性,可以胜任铁系金属的加工.本文在YG6硬质合金上基于微纳米金刚石过渡层开展cBN涂层的制备研究.本文在热丝化学气相沉积系统中制备微纳米金刚石过渡层(Micro/nanocrystalline diamond,M/NCD),在射频磁控溅射系统中制备cBN涂层,并对M/NCD与cBN涂层进行了成分、微观形貌与结合性能的研究.研究结果发现,在硬质合金基体上,M/NCD过渡层的结合性能明显优于NCD过渡层.磁控溅射制备cBN涂层过程中,存在适合cBN沉积的衬底偏压阈值,过高或过低的衬底偏压均不利于cBN含量的提高.

  9. Preferential orientation in metal nitride deposited by the UBM system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhon Jairo Olaya

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This work was aimed at studying the influence of ion bombardment on the preferred orientation (OP of transition metal nitrides (TMN produced by the reactive sputtering technique with a variable unbalanced magnetron through permanent magnets. Tita- nium nitride (TiN coatings were thus studied by varying two parameters: ion-atom ratio on the substrate (Ji/Ja and nitrogen flux. Deposition conditions were as follows: 7 mTorr working pressure, ~ 380ºC substrate temperature, 2 and 8.5 sccm nitrogen flux and 245-265 discharge power. The results showed that preferred orientation (111 and the crystalline behaviour of the produced coatings depended more on nitrogen flux than on ion bombardment. Similarly, micro-hardness measured on films deposited on steel AISI-M2 substrates increased from 1600 to 2000 HV0.025 when nitrogen flux was increased.

  10. Analysis of plasma nitrided steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salik, J.; Ferrante, J.; Honecy, F.; Hoffman, R., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The analysis of plasma nitrided steels can be divided to two main categories - structural and chemical. Structural analysis can provide information not only on the hardening mechanisms but also on the fundamental processes involved. Chemical analysis can be used to study the kinetics for the nitriding process and its mechanisms. In this paper preliminary results obtained by several techniques of both categories are presented and the applicability of those techniques to the analysis of plasma-nitrided steels is discussed.

  11. Nanocharacterization of Titanium Nitride Thin Films Obtained by Reactive Magnetron Sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merie, Violeta Valentina; Pustan, Marius Sorin; Bîrleanu, Corina; Negrea, Gavril

    2015-05-01

    Titanium nitride thin films are used in applications such as tribological layers for cutting tools, coating of some medical devices (scalpel blades, prosthesis, implants, etc.), sensors, electrodes for bioelectronics, microelectronics, diffusion barrier, bio-micro-electromechanical systems, and so on. This work is a comparative study concerning the influence of substrate temperature on some mechanical and tribological characteristics of titanium nitride thin films. The researched thin films were obtained by the reactive magnetron sputtering method. The experiments employed two kinds of substrates: a steel substrate and a silicon one. The elaboration of titanium nitride thin films was done at two temperatures. First, when the substrates were at room temperature, and second, when the substrates were previously heated at 250°C. The temperature of 250°C was kept constant during the deposition of the films. The samples were then investigated by atomic force microscopy in order to establish their mechanical and tribological properties. The nanohardness, Young's modulus, roughness, and friction force were some of the determined characteristics. The results demonstrated that the substrate which was previously heated at 250°C led to the obtaining of more adherent titanium nitride thin films than the substrate used at room temperature. The preheating of both substrates determined the decrease of thin films roughness. The friction force, nanohardness and Young's modulus of the tested samples increased when the substrates were preheated at 250°C.

  12. Tribology of nitrided-coated steel-a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskar Santosh V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface engineering such as surface treatment, coating, and surface modification are employed to increase surface hardness, minimize adhesion, and hence, to reduce friction and improve resistance to wear. To have optimal tribological performance of Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD hard coating to the substrate materials, pretreatment of the substrate materials is always advisable to avoid plastic deformation of the substrate, which may result in eventual coating failure. The surface treatment results in hardening of the substrate and increase in load support effect. Many approaches aim to improve the adhesion of the coatings onto the substrate and nitriding is the one of the best suitable options for the same. In addition to tribological properties, nitriding leads to improved corrosion resistance. Often corrosion resistance is better than that obtainable with other surface engineering processes such as hard-chrome and nickel plating. Ability of this layer to withstand thermal stresses gives stability which extends the surface life of tools and other components exposed to heat. Most importantly, the nitrogen picked-up by the diffusion layer increases the rotating-bending fatigue strength in components. The present article reviews mainly the tribological advancement of different nitrided-coated steels based on the types of coatings, structure, and the tribo-testing parameters, in recent years.

  13. Fatigue modelling for gas nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Weil

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to develop an algorithm able to predict the fatigue lifetime of nitrided steels. Linear multi-axial fatigue criteria are used to take into account the gradients of mechanical properties provided by the nitriding process. Simulations on rotating bending fatigue specimens are made in order to test the nitrided surfaces. The fatigue model is applied to the cyclic loading of a gear from a simulation using the finite element software Ansys. Results show the positive contributions of nitriding on the fatigue strength

  14. Titanium Nitride Cermets

    Science.gov (United States)

    1952-07-01

    C ermets 7 Effect of Amount of Metal on Strength of TiN-Ni-Cr....26 Cerme ts S Effect of Amount of Metal on Strength of TiN-Co-Cr....27 Cermets 9...Figures 7 and 8. Titanium Nitride-Nickel-Chromium Cerme ts From Figure 7, it can be seen that 2900OF was the better firing temperature. The 20% metal

  15. Surface-nitriding treatment of steels using microwave-induced nitrogen plasma at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Shigeo, E-mail: s.sato@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Arai, Yuuki [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Yamashita, Noboru; Kojyo, Atsushi; Kodama, Kenji [Rigaku Corporation, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1146 (Japan); Ohtsu, Naofumi [Kitami Institute of Technology, Kitami, Hokkaido 090-8507 (Japan); Okamoto, Yukio [Research Institute of Industrial Technology, Toyo University, Kawagoe 350-8585 (Japan); Wagatsuma, Kazuaki [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2012-07-15

    A rapid surface-nitriding system using microwave-induced nitrogen plasma at atmospheric pressure was developed for modifying iron and steel surfaces. Since the conventional plasma nitriding technique requires a low-pressure atmosphere in the treatment chamber, the population of excited nitrogen molecules in the plasma is limited. Accordingly, several hours are required for nitriding treatment. By contrast, the developed nitriding system can use atmospheric-pressure plasma through application of the Okamoto cavity for excitation of nitrogen plasma. The high population of excited nitrogen molecules induced by the atmospheric-pressure plasma allowed the formation of a nitriding layer that was several micrometers thick within 1 min and produced an expanded austenite iron phase with a high nitrogen concentration close to the solubility limit on the iron substrate. In addition, the nitriding treatment on high-chromium steel was performed by introducing a reducing gas such as NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2} into the treatment chamber. While the nitriding reaction did not proceed in a simple N{sub 2} atmosphere due to surface oxidation, the surface reduction induced by the NH{sub 3} or H{sub 2} gas promoted the nitriding reaction at the surface. These nitriding phenomena characteristics of the atmospheric-pressure plasma are discussed in this paper based on the effects of the specimen temperature and plasma atmosphere on the thickness, the chemical states, and the nitride compounds of the nitrided layer as investigated by X-ray diffraction, glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  16. Structural properties of iron nitride on Cu(100): An ab-initio molecular dynamics study

    KAUST Repository

    Heryadi, Dodi

    2011-01-01

    Due to their potential applications in magnetic storage devices, iron nitrides have been a subject of numerous experimental and theoretical investigations. Thin films of iron nitride have been successfully grown on different substrates. To study the structural properties of a single monolayer film of FeN we have performed an ab-initio molecular dynamics simulation of its formation on a Cu(100) substrate. The iron nitride layer formed in our simulation shows a p4gm(2x2) reconstructed surface, in agreement with experimental results. In addition to its structural properties, we are also able to determine the magnetization of this thin film. Our results show that one monolayer of iron nitride on Cu(100) is ferromagnetic with a magnetic moment of 1.67 μ B. © 2011 Materials Research Society.

  17. Pair distribution functions of silicon/silicon nitride interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Deng; Bachlechner, Martina E.

    2006-03-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate different mechanical and structural properties of the silicon/silicon nitride interface. One way to characterize the structure as tensile strain is applied parallel to the interface is to calculate pair distribution functions for specific atom types. The pair distribution function gives the probability of finding a pair of atoms a distance r apart, relative to the probability expected for a completely random distribution at the same density. The pair distribution functions for bulk silicon nitride reflect the fracture of the silicon nitride film at about 8 % and the fact that the centerpiece of the silicon nitride film returns to its original structure after fracture. The pair distribution functions for interface silicon atoms reveal the formation of bonds for originally unbound atom pairs, which is indicative of the interstitial-vacancy defect that causes failure in silicon.

  18. Multipactor suppressing titanium nitride thin films analyzed through XPS and AES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro C, M.; Durrer, W.; Lopez, J. A.; Pinales, L. A. [Physics Department, University of Texas, El Paso TX 79968 (United States); Encinas B, C.; Moller, D. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados S. C., Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, 31109 Chihuahua (Mexico)

    2008-02-15

    Cathodic-magnetron-deposited titanium nitride films were grown on anodized aluminum substrates and studied via AES and XPS spectroscopies to determine their depth-dependence composition. As it is well known, the native oxide grown on aluminum does not make the substrate impervious to radio frequency damage, and typically a thin film coating is needed to suppress substrate damage. In this article we present the profile composition of titanium nitride films, used as a protective coating for aluminum, that underwent prior conditioning through anodization, observed after successive sputtering stages. (Author)

  19. Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanostructures via Nitridation of Nanopatterned Titanium Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Kim, Jongbum

    2017-01-01

    Plasmonic titanium nitride nanostructures are obtained via nitridation of titanium dioxide. Nanoparticles acquired a cubic shape with sharper edges following the rock-salt crystalline structure of TiN. Lattice constant of the resulting TiN nanoparticles matched well with the tabulated data. Energ...

  20. Cathodic Cage Plasma Nitriding of Ti6Al4V Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej OSSOWSKI

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Glow discharge nitriding is being used increasingly more often for modifying the properties of titanium and its alloys with the aim to increase their frictional wear resistance, fatigue strength, and, in the case of medical applications, to eliminate the metallosis effect. Unlike PVD methods, ion nitriding ensures the formation of diffusive layers with very good adhesion to the substrate, but which still have some disadvanteges such as the “edge effect” or “hollow cathode effect” which hinders treatment of complex workpieces. The paper compares nitrided layers produced on Ti6Al4V alloy using two different types of nitriding processes. The first process is conventional dc plasma nitriding (DCPN where the samples were placed at the cathode potential, while the second one is a new method of cathodic cage plasma nitriding (CCPN process, where the substrate is insulated from the cathode and anode. The experiments have shown that the treatment conducted in a cathodic cage can be alternative for conventional ion nitriding, especially when used for small parts with complicated shapes used in the space or medical industry. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.1.7343

  1. Changes in aquatic microbial responses to C-substrates with stream water and sediment quality related to land use pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutter, Marc I; Cains, Jonathan

    2017-10-01

    The degradation of aquatic ecosystems by multiply-acting stressors is a key threat requiring new approaches to identify impairment processes and restoration targets. Heterotrophic respiration of C-substrates can be an integrative indicator of how aquatic ecosystems respond to pollution. We utilised sixteen C-substrates (simple metabolites to dissolved organic matter (DOM)) to characterise substrate induced respiration (SIR) for sediments from sixteen NE Scotland streams covering a range of land use-related pollution pressures. Pollution explanatory variables were as assessed from GIS-derived land cover areas, dissolved water chemistry (N, P, base cations and trace elements) and sediment trace metals (by aqua-regia digest). Large inter-site variation in dissolved and sediment chemical concentrations was strongly significantly correlated with land cover: dissolved N, Ca, Mg, K, Na positively with agriculture and urban, negatively with semi-natural land areas; sediment As, Ba, Co, Zn with agriculture, Cu, Pb, Zn with urban areas. Simple linear regression modelling was used to explore the influences across land cover, dissolved and sediment chemistry with C-substrate responses, both individually and using principal components-derived SIR 'fingerprints'. The data supported the hypothesis that pollution pressures altered water and sediment quality, in turn affecting sediment microbes and their respiration responses to a range of C-substrates, especially discriminating the DOM respiration. Since headwater DOM is a dominant pool of C driving ecosystem processes downstream then any loss of ability to utilise DOM should be further explored in terms of possible connections to pollution processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Substrates of metacognition on perception and metacognition on higher-order cognition relate to different subsystems of the mentalizing network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valk, Sofie L; Bernhardt, Boris C; Böckler, Anne; Kanske, Philipp; Singer, Tania

    2016-10-01

    Humans have the ability to reflect upon their perception, thoughts, and actions, known as metacognition (MC). The brain basis of MC is incompletely understood, and it is debated whether MC on different processes is subserved by common or divergent networks. We combined behavioral phenotyping with multi-modal neuroimaging to investigate whether structural substrates of individual differences in MC on higher-order cognition (MC-C) are dissociable from those underlying MC on perceptual accuracy (MC-P). Motivated by conceptual work suggesting a link between MC and cognitive perspective taking, we furthermore tested for overlaps between MC substrates and mentalizing networks. In a large sample of healthy adults, individual differences in MC-C and MC-P did not correlate. MRI-based cortical thickness mapping revealed a structural basis of this independence, by showing that individual differences in MC-P related to right prefrontal cortical thickness, while MC-C scores correlated with measures in lateral prefrontal, temporo-parietal, and posterior midline regions. Surface-based superficial white matter diffusivity analysis revealed substrates resembling those seen for cortical thickness, confirming the divergence of both MC faculties using an independent imaging marker. Despite their specificity, substrates of MC-C and MC-P fell clearly within networks known to participate in mentalizing, confirmed by task-based fMRI in the same subjects, previous meta-analytical findings, and ad-hoc Neurosynth-based meta-analyses. Our integrative multi-method approach indicates domain-specific substrates of MC; despite their divergence, these nevertheless likely rely on component processes mediated by circuits also involved in mentalizing. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3388-3399, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Neural substrates related to auditory working memory comparisons in dyslexia: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Tim; Heilman, Kenneth M; Gopinath, Kaundinya; Peck, Kyung; Bauer, Russell; Briggs, Richard W; Torgesen, Joseph K; Crosson, Bruce

    2008-07-01

    Adult readers with developmental phonological dyslexia exhibit significant difficulty comparing pseudowords and pure tones in auditory working memory (AWM). This suggests deficient AWM skills for adults diagnosed with dyslexia. Despite behavioral differences, it is unknown whether neural substrates of AWM differ between adults diagnosed with dyslexia and normal readers. Prior neuroimaging of adults diagnosed with dyslexia and normal readers, and post-mortem findings of neural structural anomalies in adults diagnosed with dyslexia support the hypothesis of atypical neural activity in temporoparietal and inferior frontal regions during AWM tasks in adults diagnosed with dyslexia. We used fMRI during two binaural AWM tasks (pseudowords or pure tones comparisons) in adults diagnosed with dyslexia (n = 11) and normal readers (n = 11). For both AWM tasks, adults diagnosed with dyslexia exhibited greater activity in left posterior superior temporal (BA 22) and inferior parietal regions (BA 40) than normal readers. Comparing neural activity between groups and between stimuli contrasts (pseudowords vs. tones), adults diagnosed with dyslexia showed greater primary auditory cortex activity (BA 42; tones > pseudowords) than normal readers. Thus, greater activity in primary auditory, posterior superior temporal, and inferior parietal cortices during linguistic and non-linguistic AWM tasks for adults diagnosed with dyslexia compared to normal readers indicate differences in neural substrates of AWM comparison tasks.

  4. Optical frequency comb generation from aluminum nitride micro-ring resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, Hojoong; Fong, King Y; Zhang, Xufeng; Tang, Hong X

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum nitride is an appealing nonlinear optical material for on-chip wavelength conversion. Here we report optical frequency comb generation from high quality factor aluminum nitride micro-ring resonators integrated on silicon substrates. By engineering the waveguide structure to achieve near-zero dispersion at telecommunication wavelengths and optimizing the phase matching for four-wave mixing, frequency combs are generated with a single wavelength continuous-wave pump laser. The Kerr coefficient (n2) of aluminum nitride is further extracted from our experimental results.

  5. Thick film fabrication of aluminum nitride microcircuits. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perdieu, L.H.

    1994-03-01

    A new substrate material, aluminum nitride (AlN), and 11 new thick film inks were analyzed to determine their chemical compatibility, their electrical properties, their mechanical properties, and their overall suitability for use in the manufacturing of high-power microcircuits with efficient thermal properties. Because high-power chips emit a great deal of heat in a small surface area, a new substrate material was needed to dissipate that heat faster than the substrate material currently in use. Overall, the new materials were found to be acceptable for accomplishing this purpose.

  6. Hafnium nitride buffer layers for growth of GaN on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Robert D.; Weber, Eicke R.

    2005-08-16

    Gallium nitride is grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy on (111) and (001) silicon substrates using hafnium nitride buffer layers. Wurtzite GaN epitaxial layers are obtained on both the (111) and (001) HfN/Si surfaces, with crack-free thickness up to 1.2 {character pullout}m. However, growth on the (001) surface results in nearly stress-free films, suggesting that much thicker crack-free layers could be obtained.

  7. Cathodic Cage Plasma Nitriding of Ti6Al4V Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Ossowski, Maciej (OPI); Borowski, Tomasz; Michal TARNOWSKI; Tadeusz WIERZCHON

    2016-01-01

    Glow discharge nitriding is being used increasingly more often for modifying the properties of titanium and its alloys with the aim to increase their frictional wear resistance, fatigue strength, and, in the case of medical applications, to eliminate the metallosis effect. Unlike PVD methods, ion nitriding ensures the formation of diffusive layers with very good adhesion to the substrate, but which still have some disadvanteges such as the “edge effect” or “hollow cathode effect” which hinder...

  8. Electronic properties of Mn-decorated silicene on hexagonal boron nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2013-12-17

    We study silicene on hexagonal boron nitride, using first-principles calculations. Since hexagonal boron nitride is semiconducting, the interaction with silicene is weaker than for metallic substrates. It therefore is possible to open a 50 meV band gap in the silicene. We further address the effect of Mn decoration by determining the onsite Hubbard interaction parameter, which turns out to differ significantly for decoration at the top and hollow sites. The induced magnetism in the system is analyzed in detail.

  9. Multifractal characteristics of titanium nitride thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ţălu Ştefan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The study presents a multi-scale microstructural characterization of three-dimensional (3-D micro-textured surface of titanium nitride (TiN thin films prepared by reactive DC magnetron sputtering in correlation with substrate temperature variation. Topographical characterization of the surfaces, obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM analysis, was realized by an innovative multifractal method which may be applied for AFM data. The surface micromorphology demonstrates that the multifractal geometry of TiN thin films can be characterized at nanometer scale by the generalized dimensions Dq and the singularity spectrum f(α. Furthermore, to improve the 3-D surface characterization according with ISO 25178-2:2012, the most relevant 3-D surface roughness parameters were calculated. To quantify the 3-D nanostructure surface of TiN thin films a multifractal approach was developed and validated, which can be used for the characterization of topographical changes due to the substrate temperature variation.

  10. Methods for improved growth of group III nitride buffer layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnik, Yurity; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

    2014-07-15

    Methods are disclosed for growing high crystal quality group III-nitride epitaxial layers with advanced multiple buffer layer techniques. In an embodiment, a method includes forming group III-nitride buffer layers that contain aluminum on suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. A hydrogen halide or halogen gas is flowing into the growth zone during deposition of buffer layers to suppress homogeneous particle formation. Some combinations of low temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) and high temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) may be used to improve crystal quality and morphology of subsequently grown group III-nitride epitaxial layers. The buffer may be deposited on the substrate, or on the surface of another buffer. The additional buffer layers may be added as interlayers in group III-nitride layers (e.g., GaN, AlGaN, AlN).

  11. Methods for improved growth of group III nitride buffer layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Yurity; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

    2014-07-15

    Methods are disclosed for growing high crystal quality group III-nitride epitaxial layers with advanced multiple buffer layer techniques. In an embodiment, a method includes forming group III-nitride buffer layers that contain aluminum on suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. A hydrogen halide or halogen gas is flowing into the growth zone during deposition of buffer layers to suppress homogeneous particle formation. Some combinations of low temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) and high temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) may be used to improve crystal quality and morphology of subsequently grown group III-nitride epitaxial layers. The buffer may be deposited on the substrate, or on the surface of another buffer. The additional buffer layers may be added as interlayers in group III-nitride layers (e.g., GaN, AlGaN, AlN).

  12. Platinum nitride with fluorite structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Rong; Zhang, Xiao-Feng

    2005-01-31

    The mechanical stability of platinum nitride has been studied using first-principles calculations. By calculating the single-crystal elastic constants, we show that platinum nitride can be stabilized in the fluorite structure, in which the nitrogen atoms occupy all the tetrahedral interstitial sites of the metal lattice. The stability is attributed to the pseudogap effect from analysis of the electronic structure.

  13. Electrochemical nitridation of metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heli; Turner, John A.

    2015-06-30

    Electrochemical nitridation of metals and the produced metals are disclosed. An exemplary method of electrochemical nitridation of metals comprises providing an electrochemical solution at low temperature. The method also comprises providing a three-electrode potentiostat system. The method also comprises stabilizing the three-electrode potentiostat system at open circuit potential. The method also comprises applying a cathodic potential to a metal.

  14. Homoepitaxial growth of gallium nitride and aluminum nitride and its effects on device properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandusky, James R.

    Lattice and thermal mismatch between epitaxial layers and substrates have long been the major challenge in obtaining high quality devices in the III-Nitride material system due to the lack of availability of native substrates. Recently methods for obtaining high quality free standing native substrates have been achieved and these products are beginning to enter the commercial market. However the quality of these substrates is significantly lower than those in traditional substrates such as Si and GaAs and the high cost and low availability makes it difficult to study the homoepitaxial growth. In order to use these substrates for epitaxial growth, one first must understand what features are needed for the substrates to be epi ready. In addition, one must understand what features in the substrates impact optoelectronic device performances most significantly. Initial homoepitaxial growth was carried out on both AIN and GaN substrates. On AIN substrates it was found that annealing the sample prior to growth was very important to obtain improved surface morphologies for the homoepitaxial layers. Similar annealing steps were attempted on GaN substrates, however annealing under hydrogen left large Ga droplets on the surface. For homoepitaxy on HVPE GaN substrates, the substrate characteristics, such as bowing, surface morphology, structural properties, and optical properties were found to have a large influence on growth and device performance. Even with a reduced dislocation density, substrates with poor characteristics performed worse than devices on GaN/sapphire. The effect of polishing process on the substrates was found to be very important and substrates with subsurface damage led to poor growth, even though the starting surface was very smooth. Optimization of a thin GaN layer and a multiple quantum well structure revealed very different optimum growth conditions for the HVPE substrates and the GaN/sapphire templates. Theoretical modeling using density functional

  15. Adhesion measurements and chemical and microstructural characterization at interfaces of titanium nitride and titanium aluminum nitride coatings on stainless steel, inconel and titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Robert Dallas

    To assess the adhesion of nitride coatings on metal alloys, Ti 6Al-4V, 17-4 PH stainless steel and Inconel 718 alloy substrates were coated with titanium nitride (TiN) using both cathodic arc and electron beam evaporation. Titanium aluminum nitride ((Ti,Al)N) was also deposited using cathodic arc evaporation. X-ray photoelectron, Auger electron, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopies were used in tandem with cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy to analyze the coatings and the coating-substrate interfaces. The interfaces were found to be abrupt with a thin layer of W contamination located between the substrate and the Ti interlayer, deposited to improve adhesion, on electron beam evaporated samples. Metallic macroparticles up to two microns in diameter were observed in cathodic arc evaporated coatings. Residual stress analysis of the coatings revealed the presence of biaxial compressive residual stresses in all coatings. Residual stresses increased for coating-substrate systems with a larger mismatch between the coefficients of thermal expansion for the coating and the substrate. Scratch tests of the coatings revealed lower critical load values for coatings on Ti 6Al-4V due to the lower hardness of the substrate alloy relative to the stainless steel and Inconel alloys. The scratch test is a common method for evaluating adhesion of a coating to its substrate; however, this technique is not well understood due to complex loading of specimen as coating is removed. Plate impact spallation, is a more uncommon method for evaluating adhesion, but the advantage of this technique is that the interface is subjected to purely tensile loading. During plate impact spallation, the interfaces of the coated samples were loaded in tension using a high speed shock wave which caused spallation either at the interface, in the coating or in the metal. Failure in cathodic arc deposited coatings occurred in the form of isolated spallation craters located within the

  16. Method and apparatus for use of III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductors in optical communications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui, Rongqing (Lenexa, KS); Jiang,Hong-Xing (Manhattan, KS); Lin, Jing-Yu (Manhattan, KS)

    2008-03-18

    The present disclosure relates to the use of III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductor materials for optical communications. In one embodiment, an optical device includes an optical waveguide device fabricated using a III-nitride semiconductor material. The III-nitride semiconductor material provides for an electrically controllable refractive index. The optical waveguide device provides for high speed optical communications in an infrared wavelength region. In one embodiment, an optical amplifier is provided using optical coatings at the facet ends of a waveguide formed of erbium-doped III-nitride semiconductor materials.

  17. Functionalized boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainsbury, Toby; Ikuno, Takashi; Zettl, Alexander K

    2014-04-22

    A plasma treatment has been used to modify the surface of BNNTs. In one example, the surface of the BNNT has been modified using ammonia plasma to include amine functional groups. Amine functionalization allows BNNTs to be soluble in chloroform, which had not been possible previously. Further functionalization of amine-functionalized BNNTs with thiol-terminated organic molecules has also been demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles have been self-assembled at the surface of both amine- and thiol-functionalized boron nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) in solution. This approach constitutes a basis for the preparation of highly functionalized BNNTs and for their utilization as nanoscale templates for assembly and integration with other nanoscale materials.

  18. Relative humidity sensing using dye-doped polymer thin-films on metal substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Madhuri; Ding, Boyang; Blaikie, Richard

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate humidity sensors based on optical resonances sustained in sub-wavelength thick dye-doped polymer coatings on reflecting surfaces. As a result of coupling between dye molecular absorption and Fabry-Perot resonances in the air-coating-surface cavity, the absorption spectra of such thin-film structures show a strong resonant peak under certain illumination conditions. These resonances are sensitive to the structural and material properties of the thin-film, metal underlayer and ambient conditions and hence can be used for gas and vapor sensing applications. Specifically, we present our proof of principle experimental results for humidity sensing using a thin-film structure comprising Rhodamine6G-doped polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) films on silver substrates. Depending on the PVA film thickness, dye-concertation and angle of incidence, the resonant absorption peak can undergo either red-shift or blue-shift as RH level increases in the range 20% to 60%. Also, the absorption magnitude at certain wavelengths near to resonance show almost linear reduction which can be used as the sensing signal. Our simulation studies show a very good agreement with the experimental data. The spectral and temporal sensitivity of this thin-film structure is attributed to the changes in the thickness of the PVA layer which swells by absorbing water molecules

  19. Effects of Aqueous Vapour Consistence in Nitriding Furnace on the Quality of the Sintered Nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGZijiang

    1998-01-01

    If the aqueous vapour consistence is too high(>0.7%),it is very disadvantageous to the sintered products in the nitriding furnace,when silcon nitride bonded silicon carbide products are synthesized by nitridation of silicon.

  20. Amorphous carbon buffer layers for separating free gallium nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altakhov, A. S.; Gorbunov, R. I.; Kasharina, L. A.; Latyshev, F. E.; Tarala, V. A.; Shreter, Yu. G.

    2016-11-01

    The possibility of using amorphous diamond-like carbon (DLC) films for self-separation of gallium nitride (GaN) layers grown by hydride vapor-phase epitaxy has been analyzed. DLC films have been synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition under low pressure on sapphire (Al2O3) substrates with a (0001) crystallographic orientation. The samples have been studied by the methods of Raman scattering and X-ray diffraction analysis. It is shown that thin DLC films affect only slightly the processes of nucleation and growth of gallium nitride films. Notably, the strength of the "GaN film-Al2O3" substrate interface decreases, which facilitates separation of the GaN layers.

  1. Thermodynamics, kinetics and process control of nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mittemeijer, Eric J.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    1997-01-01

    As a prerequisite for the predictability of properties obtained by a nitriding treatment of iron based workpieces, the relation between the process parameters and the composition and structure of the surface layer produced must be known. At present, even the description of thermodynamic equilibrium...... of pure Fe-N phases has not been fully achieved. It is shown that taking into account the ordering of nitrogen in the epsilon and gamma' iron nitride phases leads to an improved understanding of the Fe-N phase diagram. Although consideration of thermodynamics indicates the state the system strives for...... of the International Federation for Heat Treatment and Surface Engineering held in Brighton, UK on 1-5 September 1996. (C) 1997 The Institute of Materials....

  2. Thermodynamic ground states of platinum metal nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aberg, D; Sadigh, B; Crowhurst, J; Goncharov, A

    2007-10-09

    We have systematically studied the thermodynamic stabilities of various phases of the nitrides of the platinum metal elements using density functional theory. We show that for the nitrides of Rh, Pd, Ir and Pt two new crystal structures, in which the metal ions occupy simple tetragonal lattice sites, have lower formation enthalpies at ambient conditions than any previously proposed structures. The region of stability can extend up to 17 GPa for PtN{sub 2}. Furthermore, we show that according to calculations using the local density approximation, these new compounds are also thermodynamically stable at ambient pressure and thus may be the ground state phases for these materials. We further discuss the fact that the local density and generalized gradient approximations predict different values of the absolute formation enthalpies as well different relative stabilities between simple tetragonal and the pyrite or marcasite structures.

  3. The insulin receptor substrate-1-related 4PS substrate but not the interleukin-2R gamma chain is involved in interleukin-13-mediated signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L M; Michieli, P; Lie, W R; Liu, F; Lee, C C; Minty, A; Sun, X J; Levine, A; White, M F; Pierce, J H

    1995-12-01

    Interleukin-13 (IL-13) induced a potent mitogenic response in IL-3-dependent TF-1 cells and DNA synthesis to a lesser extent in MO7E and FDC-P1 cells. IL-13 stimulation of these lines, like IL-4 and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), resulted in tyrosine phosphorylation of a 170-kD substrate. The tyrosine-phosphorylated 170-kD substrate strongly associated with the 85-kD subunit of phosphoinositol-3 (PI-3) kinase and with Grb-2. Anti-4PS serum readily detected the 170-kD substrate in lysates from both TF-1 and FDC-P1 cells stimulated with IL-13 or IL-4. These data provide evidence that IL-13 induces tyrosine phosphorylation of the 4PS substrate, providing an essential interface between the IL-13 receptor and signaling molecules containing SH2 domains. IL-13 and IL-4 stimulation of murine L cell fibroblasts, which endogenously express the IL-4 receptor (IL-4R alpha) and lack expression of the IL-2 receptor gamma subunit (IL-2R gamma), resulted in tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1)/4PS. Enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1/4PS was observed in response to IL-4, but not IL-13 treatment of L cells transfected with the IL-2R gamma chain. These results indicate that IL-13 does not use the IL-2R gamma subunit in its receptor complex and that expression of IL-2R gamma enhances, but is not absolutely required for mediating IL-4-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1/4PS.

  4. Boron doped Si rich oxide/SiO{sub 2} and silicon rich nitride/SiN{sub x} bilayers on molybdenum-fused silica substrates for vertically structured Si quantum dot solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Ziyun, E-mail: z.lin@unsw.edu.au; Wu, Lingfeng; Jia, Xuguang; Zhang, Tian; Puthen-Veettil, Binesh; Yang, Terry Chien-Jen; Conibeer, Gavin; Perez-Wurfl, Ivan [School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering, University of New South Wales, Building H6, Tyree Energy Technologies Building, Kensington, New South Wales 2052 (Australia)

    2015-07-28

    Vertically structured Si quantum dots (QDs) solar cells with molybdenum (Mo) interlayer on quartz substrates would overcome current crowding effects found in mesa-structured cells. This study investigates the compatibility between boron (B) doped Si QDs bilayers and Mo-fused silica substrate. Both Si/SiO{sub 2} and Si/SiN{sub x} based QDs bilayers were studied. The material compatibility under high temperature treatment was assessed by examining Si crystallinity, microstress, thin film adhesion, and Mo oxidation. It was observed that the presence of Mo interlayer enhanced the Si QDs size confinement, crystalline fraction, and QDs size uniformity. The use of B doping was preferred compared to phosphine (PH{sub 3}) doping studied previously in terms of better surface and interface properties by reducing oxidized spots on the film. Though crack formation due to thermal mismatch after annealing remained, methods to overcome this problem were proposed in this paper. Schematic diagram to fabricate full vertical structured Si QDs solar cells was also suggested.

  5. Relative reactivities of halogen-substituted substrates (R-Br, R-Cl) toward the halophilic attack by a carbanion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Relative reactivities of bromine-substituted substrates (R-Br) or chlorine-substituted substrates (R-Cl) toward bromophilic or chlorophilic attack by a carbanion have been evaluated by the intermolecular competition kinetics. Relative reactivity orders are CF3CFBr2 >CF3CBr3≥CBr4>CHBr3>CF3CFBrCF2Br>CF2Br2>BrCF2CF2Br>BrCH2CO2Et≥BrCF2CFHBr>CH2Br2 > BrCH2CH2Br, and Cl3CNO2>Cl3CCN>Cl3CCOPh >cyclo-C5Cl6>Cl3CCOCl>CCl3CF2Cl>CCl3CF3≥CCl4>CCl3CCl3≥CCl3(CF2)2Cl>Cl3CCOCCl3>CCl3(CF2)6Cl>Cl3CCO2Et>Cl3CF >Cl3CPh>Cl3CCH2O2CCH3.

  6. Thermodynamic Analysis for Carbothermal Reduction and Nitridation of TiO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Renhong; JIANG Mingxue; SHI Xiaoqi

    2007-01-01

    The diagrams of stability relations ( namely, Predominance area phase diagram, PAPD ) of nitride , carbide and oxides in Ti-C-N-O system were plotted by thermodynamic calculation. The optimum conditions and main influence factors for the synthesis of titanium nitride and titanium carbide by carbothermal reduction in nitrogen atmosphere were discussed.

  7. Oxidative damage to collagen and related substrates by metal ion/hydrogen peroxide systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawkins, C L; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    1997-01-01

    . In this study electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy with spin trapping has been used to identify radicals formed on collagen and related materials by metal ion-H2O2 mixtures. Attack of the hydroxyl radical, from a Fe(II)-H2O2 redox couple, on collagen peptides gave signals from both side chain (.CHR...

  8. Study of the Active Screen Plasma Nitriding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Cheng; C. X. Li; H. Dong; T. Bell

    2004-01-01

    Active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) is a novel nitriding process, which overcomes many of the practical problems associated with the conventional DC plasma nitriding (DCPN). Experimental results showed that the metallurgical characteristics and hardening effect of 722M24 steel nitrided by ASPN at both floating potential and anodic (zero) potential were similar to those nitrided by DCPN. XRD and high-resolution SEM analysis indicated that iron nitride particles with sizes in sub-micron scale were deposited on the specimen surface in AS plasma nitriding. These indicate that the neutral iron nitride particles, which are sputtered from the active screen and transferred through plasma to specimen surface, are considered to be the dominant nitrogen carder in ASPN. The OES results show that NH could not be a critical species in plasma nitriding.

  9. Optimization of the ASPN Process to Bright Nitriding of Woodworking Tools Using the Taguchi Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkowicz, J.; Staśkiewicz, J.; Szafirowicz, K.; Jakrzewski, D.; Grzesiak, G.; Stępniak, M.

    2013-02-01

    The subject of the research is optimization of the parameters of the Active Screen Plasma Nitriding (ASPN) process of high speed steel planing knives used in woodworking. The Taguchi approach was applied for development of the plan of experiments and elaboration of obtained experimental results. The optimized ASPN parameters were: process duration, composition and pressure of the gaseous atmosphere, the substrate BIAS voltage and the substrate temperature. The results of the optimization procedure were verified by the tools' behavior in the sharpening operation performed in normal industrial conditions. The ASPN technology proved to be extremely suitable for nitriding the woodworking planing tools, which because of their specific geometry, in particular extremely sharp wedge angles, could not be successfully nitrided using conventional direct current plasma nitriding method. The carried out research proved that the values of fracture toughness coefficient K Ic are in correlation with maximum spalling depths of the cutting edge measured after sharpening, and therefore may be used as a measure of the nitrided planing knives quality. Based on this criterion the optimum parameters of the ASPN process for nitriding high speed planing knives were determined.

  10. Synthesis of ternary metal nitride nanoparticles using mesoporous carbon nitride as reactive template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Anna; Müller, Jens Oliver; Antonietti, Markus; Thomas, Arne

    2008-12-23

    Mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride was used as both a nanoreactor and a reactant for the synthesis of ternary metal nitride nanoparticles. By infiltration of a mixture of two metal precursors into mesoporous carbon nitride, the pores act first as a nanoconfinement, generating amorphous mixed oxide nanoparticles. During heating and decomposition, the carbon nitride second acts as reactant or, more precisely, as a nitrogen source, which converts the preformed mixed oxide nanoparticles into the corresponding nitride (reactive templating). Using this approach, ternary metal nitride particles with diameters smaller 10 nm composed of aluminum gallium nitride (Al-Ga-N) and titanium vanadium nitride (Ti-V-N) were synthesized. Due to the confinement effect of the carbon nitride matrix, the composition of the resulting metal nitride can be easily adjusted by changing the concentration of the preceding precursor solution. Thus, ternary metal nitride nanoparticles with continuously adjustable metal composition can be produced.

  11. ALKBH7 Variant Related to Prostate Cancer Exhibits Altered Substrate Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Tina A.; Podolsky, Robert H.; Dyson, Gregory; Cisneros, Gerardo Andrés

    2017-01-01

    The search for prostate cancer biomarkers has received increased attention and several DNA repair related enzymes have been linked to this dysfunction. Here we report a targeted search for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and functional impact characterization of human ALKBH family dioxygenases related to prostate cancer. Our results uncovered a SNP of ALKBH7, rs7540, which is associated with prostate cancer disease in a statistically significantly manner in two separate cohorts, and maintained in African American men. Comparisons of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on the wild-type and variant protein structures indicate that the resulting alteration in the enzyme induces a significant structural change that reduces ALKBH7’s ability to bind its cosubstrate. Experimental spectroscopy studies with purified proteins validate our MD predictions and corroborate the conclusion that this cancer-associated mutation affects productive cosubstrate binding in ALKBH7. PMID:28231280

  12. Lattice dynamics and electron/phonon interactions in epitaxial transition-metal nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Antonio Rodolph Bighetti

    Transition metal (TM) nitrides, due to their unique combination of remarkable physical properties and simple NaCl structure, are presently utilized in a broad range of applications and as model systems in the investigation of complex phenomena. Group-IVB nitrides TiN, ZrN, and HfN have transport properties which include superconductivity and high electrical conductivity; consequentially, they have become technologically important as electrodes and contacts in the semiconducting and superconducting industries. The Group-VB nitride VN, which exhibits enhanced ductility, is a fundamental component in superhard and tough nanostructured hard coatings. In this thesis, I investigate the lattice dynamics responsible for controlling superconductivity and electrical conductivities in Group-IVB nitrides and elasticity and structural stability of the NaCl-structure Group-VB nitride VN. Our group has already synthesized high-quality epitaxial TiN, HfN, and CeN layers on MgO(001) substrates. By irradiating the growth surface with high ion fluxes at energies below the bulk lattice-atom displacement threshold, dense epitaxial single crystal TM nitride films with extremely smooth surfaces have been grown using ultra-high vacuum magnetically-unbalanced magnetron sputter deposition. Using this approach, I completed the Group-IVB nitride series by growing epitaxial ZrN/MgO(001) films and then grew Group-VB nitride VN films epitaxially on MgO(001), MgO(011), and MgO(111). The combination of high-resolution x-ray diffraction (XRD) reciprocal lattice maps (RLMs), high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (HR-XTEM), and selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) show that single-crystal stoichiometric ZrN films grown at 450 °C are epitaxially oriented cube-on-cube with respect to their MgO(001) substrates, (001) ZrN||(001)MgO and [100]ZrN||[100]MgO. The layers are essentially fully relaxed with a lattice parameter of 0.4575 nm. X-ray reflectivity results reveal that

  13. Effect of Plasma Nitriding Temperatures on Characteristics of Aisi 201 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuxin; Zheng, Shaomei

    2016-10-01

    Samples of AISI 201 austenitic stainless steel were produced by plasma nitriding at 350∘C, 390∘C, 420∘C, 450∘C and 480∘C for 5h. Systematic characterization of the nitrided layer was carried out in terms of micrograph observations, phase identification, chemical composition depth profiling, surface microhardness measurements and electrochemical corrosion tests. The results show that the surface hardness and the layer thickness increased with increasing temperature. XRD indicated that a single S-phase layer was formed during low temperature (≤420∘C), while Cr2N or CrN phase was formed besides S-phase when nitrided at 450∘C and 480∘C. The specimen treated at 390∘C presents a much enhanced corrosion resistance compared to the untreated substrate. The corrosion resistance deteriorated for samples treated above 450∘C due to the formation of chromium nitrides.

  14. Deep ultraviolet emission in hexagonal boron nitride grown by high-temperature molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, T. Q. P.; Cassabois, G.; Valvin, P.; Rousseau, E.; Summerfield, A.; Mellor, C. J.; Cho, Y.; Cheng, T. S.; Albar, J. D.; Eaves, L.; Foxon, C. T.; Beton, P. H.; Novikov, S. V.; Gil, B.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the opto-electronic properties of hexagonal boron nitride grown by high temperature plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. We combine atomic force microscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and photoluminescence spectroscopy in the deep ultraviolet to compare the quality of hexagonal boron nitride grown either on sapphire or highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. For both substrates, the emission spectra peak at 235 nm, indicating the high optical quality of hexagonal boron nitride grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The epilayers on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite demonstrate superior performance in the deep ultraviolet (down to 210 nm) compared to those on sapphire. These results reveal the potential of molecular beam epitaxy for the growth of hexagonal boron nitride on graphene, and more generally, for fabricating van der Waals heterostructures and devices by means of a scalable technology.

  15. Hemocompatibility of titanium nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, I; Baquey, C; Candelon, B; Monties, J R

    1992-10-01

    The left ventricular assist device is based on the principle of the Maillard-Wenkel rotative pump. The materials which make up the pump must present particular mechanical, tribological, thermal and chemical properties. Titanium nitride (TiN) because of its surface properties and graphite because of its bulk characteristics have been chosen. The present study evaluated the in vitro hemocompatibility of TiN coating deposited by the chemical vapor deposition process. Protein adsorption, platelet retention and hemolysis tests have been carried out. In spite of some disparities, the TiN behavior towards albumin and fibrinogen is interesting, compared with the one of a reference medical grade elastomer. The platelet retention test gives similar results as those achieved with the same elastomer. The hemolysis percentage is near to zero. TiN shows interesting characteristics, as far as mechanical and tribological problems are concerned, and presents very encouraging blood tolerability properties.

  16. Compositional analysis of silicon oxide/silicon nitride thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meziani Samir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen, amorphous silicon nitride (SiNx:H abbreviated SiNx films were grown on multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si substrate by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD in parallel configuration using NH3/SiH4 gas mixtures. The mc-Si wafers were taken from the same column of Si cast ingot. After the deposition process, the layers were oxidized (thermal oxidation in dry oxygen ambient environment at 950 °C to get oxide/nitride (ON structure. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX were employed for analyzing quantitatively the chemical composition and stoichiometry in the oxide-nitride stacked films. The effect of annealing temperature on the chemical composition of ON structure has been investigated. Some species, O, N, Si were redistributed in this structure during the thermal oxidation of SiNx. Indeed, oxygen diffused to the nitride layer into Si2O2N during dry oxidation.

  17. Crystallographic phases and magnetic properties of iron nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guo-Ke [Department of Physics, Hebei Advanced Thin Films Laboratory, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China); Department of Mathematics and Physics, Shijiazhuang Tiedao University, Shijiazhuang 050043 (China); Liu, Yan; Zhao, Rui-Bin [Department of Physics, Hebei Advanced Thin Films Laboratory, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China); Shen, Jun-Jie [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Shijiazhuang Tiedao University, Shijiazhuang 050043 (China); Wang, Shang; Shan, Pu-Jia; Zhen, Cong-Mian [Department of Physics, Hebei Advanced Thin Films Laboratory, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China); Hou, Deng-Lu, E-mail: houdenglu@mail.hebtu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Hebei Advanced Thin Films Laboratory, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China)

    2015-08-31

    Iron nitride films, including single phase films of α-FeN (expanded bcc Fe), γ′-Fe{sub 4}N, ε-Fe{sub 3−x}N (0 ≤ x ≤ 1), and γ″-FeN, were sputtered onto AlN buffered glass substrates. It was found possible to control the phases in the films merely by changing the nitrogen partial pressure during deposition. The magnetization decreased with increased nitrogen concentration and dropped to zero when the N:Fe ratio was above 0.5. The experimental results, along with spin polarized band calculations, have been used to discuss and analyze the magnetic properties of iron nitrides. It has been demonstrated that in addition to influencing the lattice constant of the various iron nitrides, the nearest N atoms have a significant influence on the exchange splitting of the Fe atoms. Due to the hybridization of Fe-3d and N-2p states, the magnetic moment of Fe atoms decreases with an increase in the number of nearest neighbor nitrogen atoms. - Highlights: • Single phase γ′-Fe{sub 4}N, ε-Fe{sub 3−x}N, and γ″-FeN films were obtained using dc sputtering. • The phases in iron nitride films can be controlled by the nitrogen partial pressure. • The nearest N neighbors have a significant influence on the exchange splitting of Fe.

  18. Development of high-thermal-conductivity silicon nitride ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Zhou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Silicon nitride (Si3N4 with high thermal conductivity has emerged as one of the most promising substrate materials for the next-generation power devices. This paper gives an overview on recent developments in preparing high-thermal-conductivity Si3N4 by a sintering of reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN method. Due to the reduction of lattice oxygen content, the SRBSN ceramics could attain substantially higher thermal conductivities than the Si3N4 ceramics prepared by the conventional gas-pressure sintering of silicon nitride (SSN method. Thermal conductivity could further be improved through increasing the β/α phase ratio during nitridation and enhancing grain growth during post-sintering. Studies on fracture resistance behaviors of the SRBSN ceramics revealed that they possessed high fracture toughness and exhibited obvious R-curve behaviors. Using the SRBSN method, a Si3N4 with a record-high thermal conductivity of 177 Wm−1K−1 and a fracture toughness of 11.2 MPa m1/2 was developed. Studies on the influences of two typical metallic impurity elements, Fe and Al, on thermal conductivities of the SRBSN ceramics revealed that the tolerable content limits for the two impurities were different. While 1 wt% of impurity Fe hardly degraded thermal conductivity, only 0.01 wt% of Al caused large decrease in thermal conductivity.

  19. Study of spatial homogeneity and nitridation of an Al nanopattern template with spectroscopic photoemission and low energy electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, B.; Ólafsson, S.; Zakharov, A. A.; Göthelid, M.; Agnarsson, B.; Gislason, H. P.

    2013-01-01

    We report a study on the spatial homogeneity and nitridation of a nanopattern template using a spectroscopic photoemission and low energy electron microscopy. The template was composed of Al nanodots which were patterned into a SiO2/Si(1 1 1) surface using e-beam lithography and reactive ion etching. The template exhibited a global inhomogeneity in terms of the local topography, Al composition and structure of the individual nanopatterns. After nitridation, the individual nanopatterns were diminished, more corrugated and faceted. The nitridated nanopatterns were structurally ordered but differently orientated. The nitridation effectively removed the fluorine contaminants by decomposition of the fluorocarbon sidewalls, resulting in the AlN nanopatterns and partially nitridated Si substrate surface outside the nanopattern domains.

  20. Aluminum nitride for heatspreading in RF IC's

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Spina, L.; Iborra, E.; Schellevis, H.; Clement, M.; Olivares, J.; Nanver, L. K.

    2008-09-01

    To reduce the electrothermal instabilities in silicon-on-glass high-frequency bipolar devices, the integration of thin-film aluminum nitride as a heatspreader is studied. The AlN is deposited by reactive sputtering and this material is shown to fulfill all the requirements for actively draining heat from RF IC's, i.e., it has good process compatibility, sufficiently high thermal conductivity and good electrical isolation also at high frequencies. The residual stress and the piezoelectric character of the material, both of which can be detrimental for the present application, are minimized by a suitable choice of deposition conditions including variable biasing of the substrate in a multistep deposition cycle. Films of AlN as thick as 4 μm are successfully integrated in RF silicon-on-glass bipolar junction transistors that display a reduction of more than 70% in the value of the thermal resistance.

  1. Laser ablation of molecular carbon nitride compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, D., E-mail: d.fischer@fkf.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Schwinghammer, K. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM) and Center for Nanoscience (CeNS), 80799 Munich (Germany); Sondermann, C. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Lau, V.W.; Mannhart, J. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Lotsch, B.V. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM) and Center for Nanoscience (CeNS), 80799 Munich (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    We present a method for the preparation of thin films on sapphire substrates of the carbon nitride precursors dicyandiamide (C{sub 2}N{sub 4}H{sub 4}), melamine (C{sub 3}N{sub 6}H{sub 6}), and melem (C{sub 6}N{sub 10}H{sub 6}), using the femtosecond-pulsed laser deposition technique (femto-PLD) at different temperatures. The depositions were carried out under high vacuum with a femtosecond-pulsed laser. The focused laser beam is scanned on the surface of a rotating target consisting of the pelletized compounds. The resulting polycrystalline, opaque films were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, infrared, Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, photoluminescence, SEM, and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry measurements. The crystal structures and optical/spectroscopic results of the obtained rough films largely match those of the bulk materials.

  2. Improved heat dissipation in gallium nitride light-emitting diodes with embedded graphene oxide pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Nam; Cuong, Tran Viet; Han, Min; Ryu, Beo Deul; Chandramohan, S; Park, Jong Bae; Kang, Ji Hye; Park, Young-Jae; Ko, Kang Bok; Kim, Hee Yun; Kim, Hyun Kyu; Ryu, Jae Hyoung; Katharria, Y S; Choi, Chel-Jong; Hong, Chang-Hee

    2013-01-01

    The future of solid-state lighting relies on how the performance parameters will be improved further for developing high-brightness light-emitting diodes. Eventually, heat removal is becoming a crucial issue because the requirement of high brightness necessitates high-operating current densities that would trigger more joule heating. Here we demonstrate that the embedded graphene oxide in a gallium nitride light-emitting diode alleviates the self-heating issues by virtue of its heat-spreading ability and reducing the thermal boundary resistance. The fabrication process involves the generation of scalable graphene oxide microscale patterns on a sapphire substrate, followed by its thermal reduction and epitaxial lateral overgrowth of gallium nitride in a metal-organic chemical vapour deposition system under one-step process. The device with embedded graphene oxide outperforms its conventional counterpart by emitting bright light with relatively low-junction temperature and thermal resistance. This facile strategy may enable integration of large-scale graphene into practical devices for effective heat removal.

  3. Investigation on the production of copper nitride (copper azide) thin films and their nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi-Kaljahi, Amir; Savaloni, Hadi

    2013-01-01

    Copper thin films of 80-nm thickness were deposited on glass substrate using electron beam deposition at two different deposition angles of 0° and 40°, and they were post-annealed under flow of nitrogen at different temperatures. The structure of the films was analyzed using X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscope, and scanning electron microscope. Investigation on the copper nitride phase formation showed that this phase was not formed in the samples produced at 0°, while those prepared at oblique angle of 40° clearly showed the formation of copper azide phase. This is related to the porosity of the film structure, hence increased surface area for the reaction of nitrogen with copper atoms. Therefore, this is a simple method for preparation of copper nitride films that are not usually formed due to low reactivity of copper (as transition metal) with nitrogen. The results showed that the crystallite size (coherently diffracting domains), grain size, and surface roughness increase with annealing temperature.

  4. Growth and characterisation of group-III nitride-based nanowires for devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meijers, R.J.

    2007-08-30

    One of the main goals of this thesis was to get more insight into the mechanisms driving the growth of nitride nanowires by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PA-MBE). The influence of the group-III and group-V flux as well as the substrate temperature T{sub sub} has been studied leading to the conclusion that the III-V ratio determines the growth mode. Ga desorption limits the temperature range to grow GaN nanowires and dissociation of InN is the limiting factor for InN nanowire growth. A reduction of the surface diffusivity on polar surfaces under N-rich conditions explains the anisotropic growth. Growth kinetics of the nanowires show that there are two important contributions to the growth. The first is growth by direct impingement and its contribution is independent of the nanowire diameter. The second contribution comes from atoms, which absorb on the substrate or wire sidewalls and diffuse along the sidewalls to the top of the wire, which acts as an effective sink for the adatoms due to a reduced surface mobility on the polar top of the wires. This diffusion channel, which is enhanced at higher T{sub sub}, becomes more significant for smaller wire diameters, because its contribution scales like 1/d. Experiments with an interruption of the growth and sharp interfaces in TEM images of heterostructures show that the suggestion in literature of a droplet-mediated PA-MBE nitride growth has to be discarded. Despite a thin amorphous silicon nitride wetting layer on the substrate surface, both GaN and InN nanowires grow in the wurtzite structure and epitaxially in a one-to-one relation to the Si(111) substrate surface. There is no evidence for cubic phases. TEM images and optical studies display a high crystalline and optical quality of GaN and InN nanowires. The substrate induces some strain in the bottom part of the nanowires, especially in InN due to the lower T{sub sub} than for GaN, which is released without the formation of dislocations. Only some stacking

  5. Study of indium nitride and indium oxynitride band gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sparvoli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the study of the optical band gap of indium oxynitride (InNO and indium nitride (InN deposited by magnetron reactive sputtering. InNO shows multi-functionality in electrical and photonic applications, transparency in visible range, wide band gap, high resistivity and low leakage current. The deposition processes were performed in a magnetron sputtering system using a four-inches pure In (99.999% target and nitrogen and oxygen as plasma gases. The pressure was kept constant at 1.33 Pa and the RF power (13.56 MHz constant at 250 W. Three-inches diameter silicon wafer with 370 micrometer thickness and resistivity in the range of 10 ohm-centimeter was used as substrate. The thin films were analyzed by UV-Vis-NIR reflectance, photoluminescence (PL and Hall Effect. The band gap was obtained from Tauc analysis of the reflectance spectra and photoluminescence. The band gap was evaluated for both films: for InNO the value was 2.48 eV and for InN, 1.52 eV. The relative quantities obtained from RBS spectra analysis in InNO sample are 48% O, 12% N, 40% In and in InN sample are 8% O, 65% N, 27% In.

  6. Nanotribological performance of fullerene-like carbon nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores-Ruiz, Francisco Javier; Enriquez-Flores, Christian Ivan [Centro de Investigación y Estudios Avanzados (CINVESTAV) IPN, Unidad Querétaro, Lib. Norponiente 2000, Real de Juriquilla, C.P. 76230, Querétaro, Qro., México (Mexico); Chiñas-Castillo, Fernando, E-mail: fernandochinas@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Instituto Tecnológico de Oaxaca, Oaxaca, Oax. Calz. Tecnológico No. 125, CP. 68030, Oaxaca, Oax. (Mexico); Espinoza-Beltrán, Francisco Javier [Centro de Investigación y Estudios Avanzados (CINVESTAV) IPN, Unidad Querétaro, Lib. Norponiente 2000, Real de Juriquilla, C.P. 76230, Querétaro, Qro., México (Mexico)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • Fullerene-like CNx samples show an elastic recovery of 92.5% and 94.5% while amorphous CNx samples had only 75% elastic recovery. • Fullerene-like CNx films show an increment of 34.86% and 50.57% in fractions of C 1s and N 1s. • Fullerene-like CNx samples show a lower friction coefficient compared to amorphous CNx samples. • Friction reduction characteristics of fullerene-like CNx films are strongly related to the increase of sp{sup 3} CN bonds. - Abstract: Fullerene-like carbon nitride films exhibit high elastic modulus and low friction coefficient. In this study, thin CNx films were deposited on silicon substrate by DC magnetron sputtering and the tribological behavior at nanoscale was evaluated using an atomic force microscope. Results show that CNx films with fullerene-like structure have a friction coefficient (CoF ∼ 0.009–0.022) that is lower than amorphous CNx films (CoF ∼ 0.028–0.032). Analysis of specimens characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that films with fullerene-like structure have a higher number of sp{sup 3} CN bonds and exhibit the best mechanical properties with high values of elastic modulus (E > 180 GPa) and hardness (H > 20 GPa). The elastic recovery determined on specimens with a fullerene-like CNx structure was of 95% while specimens of amorphous CNx structure had only 75% elastic recovery.

  7. Inelastic light scattering spectroscopy of semiconductor nitride nanocolumns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calleja, J.M.; Lazic, S.; Sanchez-Paramo, J. [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Agullo-Rueda, F. [Materials Science Institute of Madrid, CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Cerutti, L.; Ristic, J.; Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Sanchez-Garcia, M.A.; Grandal, J.; Calleja, E. [ISOM and Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica, ETSIT, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Trampert, A.; Jahn, U. [Paul-Drude-Institut fuer Festkoerperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    A review of inelastic light scattering measurements on group III-nitride nanocolumns grown by molecular beam epitaxy is presented. The nanocolumns are hexagonal, high quality single crystals with diameters in the range of 20 to 100 nm, with no traces of extended defects. GaN nanocolumns grown on bare Si substrates with both (111) and (100) orientation display narrow phonon peaks, indicating the absence of strain inhomogeneities. This opens the possibility of efficient integration of the nanocolumns as optoelectronic devices with the complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. Measurements of the E{sub 2} phonon frequency on AlGaN nanocolumns indicate a linear dependence of the Al concentration on the Al relative flux, up to 60%. The E{sub 2} peak width increases with Al content due to phonon damping by alloy scattering. Inelastic light scattering measurements in InN nanocolumns display a coupled LO phonon-plasmon mode together with uncoupled phonons. The coupled mode is not observed in a reference compact sample. The origin of the coupled mode is attributed to spontaneous accumulation of electrons at the lateral surfaces of the nanocolumns. The presence of free electrons in the nanocolumns is confirmed by infrared reflectance measurements. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Non-combinatorial library screening reveals subsite cooperativity and identifies new high-efficiency substrates for kallikrein-related peptidase 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Veer, Simon J; Swedberg, Joakim E; Parker, Edward A; Harris, Jonathan M

    2012-04-01

    An array of substrates link the tryptic serine protease, kallikrein-related peptidase 14 (KLK14), to physiological functions including desquamation and activation of signaling molecules associated with inflammation and cancer. Recognition of protease cleavage sequences is driven by complementarity between exposed substrate motifs and the physicochemical signature of an enzyme's active site cleft. However, conventional substrate screening methods have generated conflicting subsite profiles for KLK14. This study utilizes a recently developed screening technique, the sparse matrix library, to identify five novel high-efficiency sequences for KLK14. The optimal sequence, YASR, was cleaved with higher efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)=3.81 ± 0.4 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)) than favored substrates from positional scanning and phage display by 2- and 10-fold, respectively. Binding site cooperativity was prominent among preferred sequences, which enabled optimal interaction at all subsites as indicated by predictive modeling of KLK14/substrate complexes. These simulations constitute the first molecular dynamics analysis of KLK14 and offer a structural rationale for the divergent subsite preferences evident between KLK14 and closely related KLKs, KLK4 and KLK5. Collectively, these findings highlight the importance of binding site cooperativity in protease substrate recognition, which has implications for discovery of optimal substrates and engineering highly effective protease inhibitors.

  9. Functional carbon nitride materials — design strategies for electrochemical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Fabian K.; Zheng, Yun; Schwarz, Dana; Merschjann, Christoph; Schnick, Wolfgang; Wang, Xinchen; Bojdys, Michael J.

    2017-06-01

    In the past decade, research in the field of artificial photosynthesis has shifted from simple, inorganic semiconductors to more abundant, polymeric materials. For example, polymeric carbon nitrides have emerged as promising materials for metal-free semiconductors and metal-free photocatalysts. Polymeric carbon nitride (melon) and related carbon nitride materials are desirable alternatives to industrially used catalysts because they are easily synthesized from abundant and inexpensive starting materials. Furthermore, these materials are chemically benign because they do not contain heavy metal ions, thereby facilitating handling and disposal. In this Review, we discuss the building blocks of carbon nitride materials and examine how strategies in synthesis, templating and post-processing translate from the molecular level to macroscopic properties, such as optical and electronic bandgap. Applications of carbon nitride materials in bulk heterojunctions, laser-patterned memory devices and energy storage devices indicate that photocatalytic overall water splitting on an industrial scale may be realized in the near future and reveal a new avenue of 'post-silicon electronics'.

  10. Leachability of nitrided ilmenite in hydrochloric acid

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Swanepoel, JJ

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Titanium nitride in upgraded nitrided ilmenite (bulk of iron removed) can selectively be chlorinated to produce titanium tetrachloride. Except for iron, most other components present during this low temperature (ca. 200 °C) chlorination reaction...

  11. Plasmonic titanium nitride nanostructures for perfect absorbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Li, Wen-Wei; Kinsey, Nathaniel

    2013-01-01

    We propose a metamaterial based perfect absorber in the visible region, and investigate the performance of titanium nitride as an alternative plasmonic material. Numerical and experimental results reveal that titanium nitride performs better than gold as a plasmonic absorbing material...

  12. Microstructural behavior of nitriding compound layer for Nb-carbonitride coating grown by thermo-reactive diffusion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyunghoon; Kang, Namhyun; Bae, Jong-Seong; Lee, Chang-Woo

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to understand the microstructural behavior of nitriding compound layer and its effect on Nb-carbonitride growth produced by the thermo-reactive diffusion (TRD) process. Gas nitriding was performed at 550 °C for 3 and 6 h, followed by TRD at 900 °C for 6 h. The nitriding compound layers had thicknesses of 10 and 16 μm for nitriding time of 3 and 6 h, respectively. The corresponding Nb-carbonitride layers produced by TRD were 7.2 and 11.2 μm thick, respectively. Reheating at 900 °C transformed the microstructure of the nitriding compounds to Fe3O4 and FeN0.0939. As reheating proceeded to 30 min, high concentration of nitrogen, initially existing in the nitride layer diffused to 80-90 μm into the substrate. Therefore, the TRD process produced NbN layer at the interfacial area due to intensively dissolved nitrogen from FeN0.0939. As the TRD proceeded, supply of C atoms from the base metal became competitive with the N diffusion. Thus, the TRD coating layer was grown to above the interface. Reheating at 900 °C for the 16-μm-thick nitride layer resulted in a nitrogen content ˜0.4 at% higher than that for the 10-μm-thick nitride layer, thereby producing a thicker Nb-carbonitride layer.

  13. Friction and transfer behavior of pyrolytic boron nitride in contact with various metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with pyrolytic boron nitride in sliding contact with itself and various metals. Auger emission spectroscopy was used to monitor transfer of pyrolytic boron nitride to metals and metals to pyrolytic boron nitride. Results indicate that the friction coefficient for pyrolytic boron nitride in contact with metals can be related to the chemical activity of the metals and more particularly to the d valence bond character of the metal. Transfer was found to occur to all metals except silver and gold and the amount of transfer was less in the presence than in the absence of metal oxide. Friction was less for pyrolytic boron nitride in contact with a metal in air than in vacuum.

  14. Characterization and in vivo evaluation of a bio-corrodible nitrided iron stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qimao; Zhang, Deyuan; Xin, Chaohua; Liu, Xiangdong; Lin, Wenjiao; Zhang, Wanqian; Chen, Sun; Sun, Kun

    2013-03-01

    A bio-corrodible nitrided iron stent was developed using a vacuum plasma nitriding technique. In the nitrided iron stents, the tensile strength, radial strength, stiffness and in vitro electrochemical corrosion rate were significantly increased compared with those of the control pure iron stent. To evaluate its performance in vivo, the deployment of the nitrided iron stents in juvenile pig iliac arteries was performed. At 3 or 6 months postoperatively, the stented vessels remained patent well; however, slight luminal loss resulting from intimal hyperplasia and relative stenosis of the stented vessel segment with piglets growth were observed by 12 months; no thrombosis or local tissue necrosis was found. At 1 month postoperatively, a nearly intact layer of endothelial cells formed on the stented vessel wall. Additionally, a decreased inflammation scoring, considerably corroded struts and corrosion products accumulation were seen. These findings indicate the potential of this nitrided iron stent as an attractive biodegradable stent.

  15. Epitaxial growth of group III-nitride films by pulsed laser deposition and their use in the development of LED devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoqiang; Wang, Wenliang; Yang, Weijia; Wang, Haiyan

    2015-11-01

    Recently, pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technology makes viable the epitaxial growth of group III-nitrides on thermally active substrates at low temperature. The precursors generated from the pulsed laser ablating the target has enough kinetic energy when arriving at substrates, thereby effectively suppressing the interfacial reactions between the epitaxial films and the substrates, and eventually makes the film growth at low temperature possible. So far, high-quality group III-nitride epitaxial films have been successfully grown on a variety of thermally active substrates by PLD. By combining PLD with other technologies such as laser rastering technique, molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), III-nitride-based light-emitting diode (LED) structures have been realized on different thermally active substrates, with high-performance LED devices being demonstrated. This review focuses on the epitaxial growth of group III-nitrides on thermally active substrates by PLD and their use in the development of LED devices. The surface morphology, interfacial property between film and substrate, and crystalline quality of as-grown group III-nitride films by PLD, are systematically reviewed. The corresponding solutions for film homogeneity on large size substrates, defect control, and InGaN films growth by PLD are also discussed in depth, together with introductions to some newly developed technologies for PLD in order to realize LED structures, which provides great opportunities for commercialization of LEDs on thermally active substrates.

  16. Cathodic Cage Plasma Nitriding: An Innovative Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa,R.R.M.; de Araújo, F. O.; J. A. P. da Costa; Brandim,A.S.; R. A. de Brito; C. Alves

    2012-01-01

    Cylindrical samples of AISI 1020, AISI 316, and AISI 420 steels, with different heights, were simultaneously treated by a new technique of ionic nitriding, entitled cathodic cage plasma nitriding (CCPN), in order to evaluate the efficiency of this technique to produce nitrided layers with better properties compared with those obtained using conventional ionic nitriding technique. This method is able to eliminate the edge effect in the samples, promoting a better uniformity of temperature, and...

  17. Growth of aluminum nitride bulk crystals by sublimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bei

    The commercial potential of III-nitride semiconductors is already being realized by the appearance of high efficiency, high reliability, blue and green LEDS around the world. However, the lack of a native nitride substrate has hindered the full-realization of more demanding III-nitride devices. To date, single aluminum nitride (AlN) crystals are not commercially available. New process investigation is required to scale up the crystal size. New crucibles stable up to very high temperatures (˜2500°C) are needed which do not incorporate impurities into the growing crystals. In this thesis, the recent progresses in bulk AlN crystal growth by sublimation-recondensation were reviewed first. The important physical, optical and electrical properties as well as chemical and thermal stabilities of AlN were discussed. The development of different types of growth procedures including self-seeding, substrate employed and a new "sandwich" technique were covered in detail. Next, the surface morphology and composition at the initial stages of AlN grown on 6H-SiC (0001) were investigated. Discontinuous AlN coverage occurred after 15 minutes of growth. The initial discontinuous nucleation of AlN and different lateral growth of nuclei indicated discontinuous AIN direct growth on on-axis 6H-SiC substrates. At the temperature in excess of 2100°C, the durability of the furnace fixture materials (crucibles, retorts, etc.) remains a critical problem. The thermal and chemical properties and performance of several refractory materials, including tantalum carbide, niobium carbide, tungsten, graphite, and hot-pressed boron nitride (HPBN), in inert gas, as well as under AIN crystal growth conditions were discussed. TaC and NbC are the most stable crucible materials in the crystal growth system. HPBN crucible is more suitable for AlN self-seeding growth, as crystals tend to nucleate in thin colorless platelets with low dislocation density. Finally, clear and colorless thin platelet Al

  18. III-nitride based light emitting diodes and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Jung; Amano, Hiroshi; Morkoç, Hadis

    2017-01-01

    The revised edition of this important book presents updated and expanded coverage of light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on heteroepitaxial GaN on Si substrates, and includes new chapters on tunnel junction LEDs, green/yellow LEDs, and ultraviolet LEDs. Over the last two decades, significant progress has been made in the growth, doping and processing technologies of III-nitride based semiconductors, leading to considerable expectations for nitride semiconductors across a wide range of applications. LEDs are already used in traffic signals, signage lighting, and automotive applications, with the ultimate goal of the global replacement of traditional incandescent and fluorescent lamps, thus reducing energy consumption and cutting down on carbon-dioxide emission. However, some critical issues must be addressed to allow the further improvements required for the large-scale realization of solid-state lighting, and this book aims to provide the readers with details of some contemporary issues on which the performanc...

  19. Molecular beam epitaxy for high-efficiency nitride optoelectronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heffernan, J.; Kauer, M.; Windle, J.; Hooper, S.E.; Bousquet, V.; Zellweger, C.; Barnes, J.M. [Sharp Laboratories of Europe, Edmund Halley Road, Oxford Science Park, Oxford OX4 4GB (United Kingdom)

    2006-06-15

    We review the significant progress made in the development of nitride laser diodes by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). We report on our recent result of room temperature continuous-wave operation of InGaN quantum well laser diodes grown by MBE. Ridge waveguide lasers fabricated on freestanding GaN substrates have a continuous-wave threshold current of 125 mA, corresponding to a threshold current density of 5.7 kA cm{sup -2}. The lasers have a threshold voltage of 8.6 V and a lifetime of several minutes. We outline the further technical challenges associated with demonstrating lifetimes of several thousand hours and present an assessment of the potential of MBE as a growth method for commercial quality nitride optoelectronic devices. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Culture of Iris Pigment Epithelial Cells on Expanded-Polytetrafluroethylene (ePTFE Substrates for the Treatment of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Nian

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Transplantation of an intact differentiated retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cell layer may provide a means to treat Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD. However, harvesting RPE cells can be a technically complicated procedure. Our current work aimed to prepare intact differentiated iris pigment epithelial (IPE cell layers, which are easy to obtain and have the same embryonic origin and similar properties as RPE cells, on ePTFE substrates for transplantation purposes to rescue deteriorated photoreceptors in AMD. Methods: IPE cells isolated from rat eyes were seeded on different substrates, including fibronectin n-heptylamine (HA ePTFE substrates, HA ePTFE substrates, ePTFE substrates and fibronectin tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS as control. Cell number and morphology were assessed at each time interval. The formation of tight junction was examined by immunostaining of junction proteins. Results: An obvious increasing trend of cell number was observed in IPE cells on fibronectin n-heptylamine (HA ePTFE substrate, exhibiting heavy pigmentation and epithelial morphology. At Day 28, tight junction formation was indicated by cell-cell junctional proteins along cell borders. Conclusion: Harvested IPE cells cultured on fibronectin HA-ePTFE substrates can differentiate and form a cell monolayer that may be suitable for transplantation.

  1. Theoretical Compton profile of diamond, boron nitride and carbon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Julio C.; Quevedo, Carlos R.; Gomez, José M.; Di Rocco, Héctor O.

    2017-09-01

    In the present study, we used the generalized gradient approximation method to determine the electron wave functions and theoretical Compton profiles of the following super-hard materials: diamond, boron nitride (h-BN), and carbon nitride in its two known phases: βC3N4 and gC3N4 . In the case of diamond and h-BN, we compared our theoretical results with available experimental data. In addition, we used the Compton profile results to determine cohesive energies and found acceptable agreement with previous experiments.

  2. Coupling mechanisms in inductive discharges with RF substrate bias driven at consecutive harmonics with adjustable relative phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberger, Thomas; Berger, Birk; Schulze, Julian; Schuengel, Edmund; Koepke, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Hybrid combinations of inductive and capacitive RF discharges are commonly used for plasma etching because the inductive coupling ensures a high plasma density, while the capacitive coupling allows the control of the ion bombardment energy at the substrate. We experimentally study the coupling mechanisms between the two driving-voltage sources in such a plasma driven inductively at 13.56 MHz and capacitively at 27.12 MHz in argon and neon at low pressure. We find that the resulting DC self-bias can be controlled via the Electrical Asymmetry Effect by adjusting the relative phase between the two driving harmonics in the E-mode. Langmuir probe measurements and Phase Resolved Optical Emission Spectroscopy (PROES) reveal that the addition of the applied RF-bias in the plasma acts as a catalyst for the transition between E- and H-mode. PROES measurements generally show that the electron power absorption dynamics are affected by the relative phase between the two driving voltage waveforms and by the ratio of the inductive to the capacitive driving powers. Finally, the ion flux-energy distribution function is measured at the RF-powered electrode and found also to be affected by coupling effects.

  3. Mathematical Modelling of Nitride Layer Growth of Low Temperature Gas and Plasma Nitriding of AISI 316L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triwiyanto A.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper present mathematical model which developed to predict the nitrided layer thickness (case depth of gas nitrided and plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steel according to Fick’s first law for pure iron by adapting and manipulating the Hosseini’s model to fit the diffusion mechanism where nitrided structure formed by nitrided AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel. The mathematical model later tested against various actual gas nitriding and plasma nitriding experimental results with varying nitriding temperature and nitriding duration to see whether the model managed to successfully predict the nitrided layer thickness. This model predicted the coexistence of ε-Fe2-3N and γ΄-Fe4N under the present nitriding process parameters. After the validation process, it is proven that the mathematical model managed to predict the nitrided layer growth of the gas nitrided and plasma nitrided of AISI 316L SS up to high degree of accuracy.

  4. III-Nitride nanowire optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Songrui; Nguyen, Hieu P. T.; Kibria, Md. G.; Mi, Zetian

    2015-11-01

    Group-III nitride nanowire structures, including GaN, InN, AlN and their alloys, have been intensively studied in the past decade. Unique to this material system is that its energy bandgap can be tuned from the deep ultraviolet (~6.2 eV for AlN) to the near infrared (~0.65 eV for InN). In this article, we provide an overview on the recent progress made in III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices, including light emitting diodes, lasers, photodetectors, single photon sources, intraband devices, solar cells, and artificial photosynthesis. The present challenges and future prospects of III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices are also discussed.

  5. Structural materialization of stainless steel molds and dies by the low temperature high density plasma nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aizawa Tatsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Various kinds of stainless steels have been widely utilized as a mold substrate material for injection molding and as a die for mold-stamping and direct stamping processes. Since they suffered from high temperature transients and thermal cycles in practice, they must be surface-treated by dry and wet coatings, or, by plasma nitriding. Martensitic stainless steel mold was first wet plated by the nickel phosphate (NiP, which was unstable at the high temperature stamping condition; and, was easy to crystalize or to fracture by itself. This issue of nuisance significantly lowered the productivity in fabrication of optical elements at present. In the present paper, the stainless steel mold was surface-treated by the low-temperature plasma nitriding. The nitrided layer by this surface modification had higher nitrogen solute content than 4 mass%; the maximum solid-solubility of nitrogen is usually 0.1 mass% in the equilibrium phase diagram. Owing to this solid-solution with high nitrogen concentration, the nitrided layer had high hardness of 1400 Hv within its thickness of 40 μm without any formation of nitrides after 14.4 ks plasma nitriding at 693 K. This nitrogen solid-solution treated stainless steel had thermal resistivity even at the mold-stamping conditions up to 900 K.

  6. On the intrinsic moisture permeation rate of remote microwave plasma-deposited silicon nitride layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assche, F.J.H. Van; Unnikrishnan, S.; Michels, J.J.; Mol, A.M.B. van; Weijer, P. van de; Sanden, M.C.M. van de; Creatore, M.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a low substrate temperature (110°C) remote microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process of silicon nitride barrier layers against moisture permeation for organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and other moisture sensitive devices such as organic photovoltaic cells

  7. Method of chemical vapor deposition of boron nitride using polymeric cyanoborane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, Leon

    1994-01-01

    Polymeric cyanoborane is volatilized, decomposed by thermal or microwave plasma energy, and deposited on a substrate as an amorphous film containing boron, nitrogen and carbon. Residual carbon present in the film is removed by ammonia treatment at an increased temperature, producing an adherent, essentially stoichiometric boron nitride film.

  8. Surface morphology of titanium nitride thin films synthesized by DC reactive magnetron sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ţǎlu Ştefan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the influence of temperature on the 3-D surface morphology of titanium nitride (TiN thin films synthesized by DC reactive magnetron sputtering has been analyzed. The 3-D morphology variation of TiN thin films grown on p-type Si (100 wafers was investigated at four different deposition temperatures (473 K, 573 K, 673 K, 773 K in order to evaluate the relation among the 3-D micro-textured surfaces. The 3-D surface morphology of TiN thin films was characterized by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM and fractal analysis applied to the AFM data. The 3-D surface morphology revealed the fractal geometry of TiN thin films at nanometer scale. The global scale properties of 3-D surface geometry were quantitatively estimated using the fractal dimensions D, determined by the morphological envelopes method. The fractal dimension D increased with the substrate temperature variation from 2.36 (at 473 K to 2.66 (at 673 K and then decreased to 2.33 (at 773 K. The fractal analysis in correlation with the averaged power spectral density (surface yielded better quantitative results of morphological changes in the TiN thin films caused by substrate temperature variations, which were more precise, detailed, coherent and reproducible. It can be inferred that fractal analysis can be easily applied for the investigation of morphology evolution of different film/substrate interface phases obtained using different thin-film technologies.

  9. Investigating the correlation between some of the properties of plasma nitrided AISI 316L stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Olzon-Dionysio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available When AISI 316L stainless steels are submitted to the nitriding process at temperatures lower than 450 °C, a high nitrogen content expanded austenite phase is formed, which shows higher hardness and higher pitting corrosion resistance compared to the untreated material. As a result, this material becomes adequate for biomedical application. The conditions of the nitriding technique, such as gas mixture, pressure, time and temperature, play an important role in some properties of the modified layer, including: thickness, hardness and N concentration along the layer. This paper explores a set of six samples of AISI 316L, nitrided at different times and temperatures, whose properties show important differences. The aim of this research is to investigate the correlation between the nitrided layer thickness (in the range of 0.77 to 11 µm with both X-ray patterns characteristics and hardness measurements, which used two distinct loads. The results of this study show that: whereas the 3.6 gf load was suitable to measure the real hardness for four of the nitrided layers showing thickness ≥ 2.9 µm, the 50 gf load measured a substrate contribution, probably even for the highest thickness, 11 µm. Moreover, analyzing different reflections of the X-ray patterns showed evidence of the clear consistency between the X-Ray depths and the nitrided layer thicknesses: if the layer thickness is lower than the penetration depth of X-rays, two phases (austenite and expanded substrate are present. If the layer thickness is higher, only the austenite is observed. Finally, concerning the citotoxicity property, all the samples, nitrided or not, were approved in the test for biocompatibility, indicating their potential use for biomedical applications.

  10. Boron Nitride Nanoribbons from Exfoliation of Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh; Hurst, Janet; Santiago, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Two types of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) were exfoliated into boron nitride nanoribbons (BNNR), which were identified using transmission electron microscopy: (1) commercial BNNTs with thin tube walls and small diameters. Tube unzipping was indicated by a large decrease of the sample's surface area and volume for pores less than 2 nm in diameter. (2) BNNTs with large diameters and thick walls synthesized at NASA Glenn Research Center. Here, tube unraveling was indicated by a large increase in external surface area and pore volume. For both, the exfoliation process was similar to the previous reported method to exfoliate commercial hexagonal boron nitride (hBN): Mixtures of BNNT, FeCl3, and NaF (or KF) were sequentially treated in 250 to 350 C nitrogen for intercalation, 500 to 750 C air for exfoliation, and finally HCl for purification. Property changes of the nanosized boron nitride throughout this process were also similar to the previously observed changes of commercial hBN during the exfoliation process: Both crystal structure (x-ray diffraction data) and chemical properties (Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy data) of the original reactant changed after intercalation and exfoliation, but most (not all) of these changes revert back to those of the reactant once the final, purified products are obtained.

  11. Homogeneous dispersion of gallium nitride nanoparticles in a boron nitride matrix by nitridation with urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusunose, Takafumi; Sekino, Tohru; Ando, Yoichi

    2010-07-01

    A Gallium Nitride (GaN) dispersed boron nitride (BN) nanocomposite powder was synthesized by heating a mixture of gallium nitrate, boric acid, and urea in a hydrogen atmosphere. Before heat treatment, crystalline phases of urea, boric acid, and gallium nitrate were recognized, but an amorphous material was produced by heat treatment at 400 degrees C, and then was transformed into GaN and turbostratic BN (t-BN) by further heat treatment at 800 degrees C. TEM obsevations of this composite powder revealed that single nanosized GaN particles were homogeneously dispersed in a BN matrix. Homogeneous dispersion of GaN nanoparticles was thought to be attained by simultaneously nitriding gallium nitrate and boric acid to GaN and BN with urea.

  12. Phosphorus removal by laboratory-scale unvegetated vertical-flow constructed wetland systems using anthracite, steel slag and related blends as substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junmei; He, Feng; Xu, Dong; Wang, Rong; Zhang, Xiangling; Xiao, Enrong; Wu, Zhenbin

    2011-01-01

    This research aimed to investigate the phosphorus (P) removal of a series of laboratory-scale unvegetated vertical-flow constructed wetland systems using anthracite, steel slag and related blends as substrate in treatment of low concentration domestic sewage. The long-term performance of P removal was firstly studied by using single substrate of anthracite or steel slag, and three systems applying various combined substrates were investigated when the average P loading rate varied between 0.9 and 1.5 g TP/m2 x d. The results demonstrated that both anthracite and steel slag systems were highly effective in removing total P (CTP, 77.17 +/- 23.34% and 90.26 +/- 4.48%) and soluble reactive P (SRP, 92.14 +/- 12.56% and 96.20 +/- 2.58%). The system filled with anthracite, vermiculite and steel slag from the top down removed 82.45 +/- 9.52% and 87.83 +/- 8.58% of TP and SRP, respectively. However, other combined substrate systems showed comparative low and fluctuant P removal. The effluent pH was maintained at 7-9, which met environmental requirements of China. Therefore, anthracite provides a long-term high efficiency of P removal and may be a promising substrate from the standpoint of the effluent pH, and the arrangement of combined substrate has a prominent effect on P removal.

  13. Investigation into nitrided spur gears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilbas, B.S.; Coban, A.; Nickel, J.; Sunar, M.; Sami, M.; Abdul Aleem, B.J. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-12-01

    The cold forging method has been widely used in industry to produce machine parts. In general, gears are produced by shaping or hobbing. One of the shaping techniques is precision forging, which has several advantages over hobbing. In the present study, cold forging of spur gears from Ti-6Al-4V material is introduced. To improve the surface properties of the resulting gears, plasma nitriding was carried out. Nuclear reaction analysis was carried out to obtain the nitrogen concentration, while the micro-PIXE technique was used to determine the elemental distribution in the matrix after forging and nitriding processes. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray powder diffraction were used to investigate the metallurgical changes and formation of nitride components in the surface region. Microhardness and friction tests were carried out to measure the hardness depth profile and friction coefficient at the surface. Finally, scoring failure tests were conducted to determine the rotational speed at which the gears failed. Three distinct regions were obtained in the nitride region, and at the initial stages of the scoring tests, failure in surface roughness was observed in the vicinity of the tip of the gear tooth. This occurred at a particular rotational speed and work input.

  14. Investigation into nitrided spur gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Coban, A.; Nickel, J.; Sunar, M.; Sami, M.; Aleem, B. J. Abdul

    1996-12-01

    The cold forging method has been widely used in industry to produce machine parts. In general, gears are produced by shaping or hobbing. One of the shaping techniques is precision forging, which has several advantages over hobbing. In the present study, cold forging of spur gears from Ti-6A1-4V material is introduced. To improve the surface properties of the resulting gears, plasma nitriding was carried out. Nuclear reaction analysis was carried out to obtain the nitrogen concentration, while the micro-PIXE technique was used to determine the elemental distribution in the matrix after forging and nitriding processes. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray powder diffraction were used to investigate the metallurgical changes and formation of nitride components in the surface region. Microhardness and friction tests were carried out to measure the hardness depth profile and friction coefficient at the surface. Finally, scoring failure tests were conducted to determine the rotational speed at which the gears failed. Three distinct regions were obtained in the nitride region, and at the initial stages of the scoring tests, failure in surface roughness was observed in the vicinity of the tip of the gear tooth. This occurred at a particular rotational speed and work input.

  15. The preparation of high-adsorption, spherical, hexagonal boron nitride by template method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ning, E-mail: zhangning5832@163.com; Liu, Huan; Kan, Hongmin; Wang, Xiaoyang; Long, Haibo; Zhou, Yonghui

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • The high-adsorption, spherical, hexagonal boron nitride powders were prepared. • The influence mechanism of template content on the micro-morphology and adsorption was explored. • At appropriate synthesis temperature, higher adsorption mesoporous spheres h-BN began to form. - Abstract: This research used low-cost boric acid and borax as a source of boron, urea as a nitrogen source, dodecyl-trimethyl ammonium chloride (DTAC) as a template, and thus prepared different micro-morphology hexagonal boron nitride powders under a flowing ammonia atmosphere at different nitriding temperatures. The effects of the template content and nitriding temperature on the micro-morphology of hexagonal boron nitride were studied and the formation mechanism analysed. The influences of the template content and nitriding temperature on adsorption performance were also explored. The results showed that at a nitriding temperature of 675 °C, the micro-morphologies of h-BN powder were orderly, inhomogeneous spherical, uniform spherical, beam, and pie-like with increasing template content. The micro-morphology was inhomogeneous spherical at a DTAC dose of 7.5%. The micro-morphology was uniform spherical at a DTAC dose of 10%. At a DTAC dose of 12%, the micro-morphology was a mixture of beam and pie-like shapes. At a certain template content (DTAC at 10%) and at lower nitriding temperatures (625 °C and 650 °C), spherical shell structures with surface subsidence began to form. The porous spheres would appear at a nitriding temperature of 675 °C, and the ball diameter thus formed was approximately 500–600 nm. The ball diameter was about 600–700 nm when the nitriding temperature was 700 °C. At a nitriding temperature of 725 °C, the ball diameter was between 800 and 1000 nm and sintering necking started to form. When the relative pressure was higher, previously closed pores opened and connected with the outside world: the adsorption then increased significantly. The

  16. Analysis of the growth of concomitant nitride layers produced by a post-discharge assisted process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oseguera, J. [ITESM-CEM, Carretera al Lago de Guadalupe km. 3.5 Atizapan, 52926 (Mexico)]. E-mail: joseguer@itesm.mx; Castillo, F. [ITESM-CEM, Carretera al Lago de Guadalupe km. 3.5 Atizapan, 52926 (Mexico); Gomez, A. [UFRO, Av. Francisco Salazar 01145, Temuco, Casilla 54-d (Chile); Fraguela, A. [BUAP, Rio Verde y Ave. San Claudio, San Manuel, Puebla, 72570 (Mexico)

    2006-11-23

    In the present work, the growth of concomitant nitride layers during a post-discharge process is studied. The analysis takes into account the similarities and differences between nitriding post-discharge processes and other nitriding processes, employing a mathematical simulation of nitrogen diffusion. The considered differences are related to the thermodynamic standard states, the nitrogen concentration on the surface and the sputtering of the surface (this one for plasma processes). Nitrogen diffusion and layer formation are described from the beginning of the process by means of a mathematical model.

  17. Improved photoluminescence of silicon nanocrystals in silicon nitride prepared by ammonia sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, K; Feng, J Y; Zhang, Z J [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2006-09-28

    In the present work we investigated the photoluminescence property of silicon nanocrystals in silicon nitride prepared by ammonia sputtering. Silicon nanocrystals were demonstrated to form even after thermal annealing at 700 deg. C. Compared with the control sample using N{sub 2} as the reactive gas, the luminescence intensity of silicon nanocrystals in silicon nitride prepared by NH{sub 3} sputtering was greatly increased. The improvement in photoluminescence was attributed to the introduction of hydrogen-related bonds, which could well passivate the nonradiative defects existing at the interface between silicon nanocrystals and the silicon nitride matrix.

  18. Plasma-enhanced growth, composition, and refractive index of silicon oxy-nitride films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Kent Erik

    1995-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry and refractive index measurements have been carried out on silicon oxy-nitride produced by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Nitrous oxide and ammonia were added to a constant flow of 2% silane in nitrogen, to produce oxy-nitride films with atomic...... nitrogen concentrations between 2 and 10 at. %. A simple atomic valence model is found to describe both the measured atomic concentrations and published material compositions for silicon oxy-nitride produced by PECVD. A relation between the Si–N bond concentration and the refractive index is found....... This relation suggest that the refractive index of oxy-nitride with a low nitrogen concentration is determined by the material density. It is suggested that the relative oxygen concentration in the gas flow is the major deposition characterization parameter, and that water vapor is the predominant reaction by...

  19. Field-effect transistors based on cubic indium nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oseki, Masaaki; Okubo, Kana; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Ohta, Jitsuo; Fujioka, Hiroshi

    2014-02-04

    Although the demand for high-speed telecommunications has increased in recent years, the performance of transistors fabricated with traditional semiconductors such as silicon, gallium arsenide, and gallium nitride have reached their physical performance limits. Therefore, new materials with high carrier velocities should be sought for the fabrication of next-generation, ultra-high-speed transistors. Indium nitride (InN) has attracted much attention for this purpose because of its high electron drift velocity under a high electric field. Thick InN films have been applied to the fabrication of field-effect transistors (FETs), but the performance of the thick InN transistors was discouraging, with no clear linear-saturation output characteristics and poor on/off current ratios. Here, we report the epitaxial deposition of ultrathin cubic InN on insulating oxide yttria-stabilized zirconia substrates and the first demonstration of ultrathin-InN-based FETs. The devices exhibit high on/off ratios and low off-current densities because of the high quality top and bottom interfaces between the ultrathin cubic InN and oxide insulators. This first demonstration of FETs using a ultrathin cubic indium nitride semiconductor will thus pave the way for the development of next-generation high-speed electronics.

  20. Influence of the relative humidity on the morphology of inkjet printed spots of IgG on a non-porous substrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mujawar, Liyakat Hamid; Kuerten, J.G.M.; Siregar, D.P.; Amerongen, van A.; Norde, Willem

    2014-01-01

    During the drying of inkjet printed droplets, the solute particles (IgG-Alexa-635 molecules) in the drop may distribute unevenly on the substrate, resulting in a “coffee-stain” spot morphology. In our study, we investigated the influence of the relative humidity on the distribution of inkjet printed

  1. Identification of residues involved in substrate specificity and cytotoxicity of two closely related cutinases from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Dedieu

    Full Text Available The enzymes belonging to the cutinase family are serine enzymes active on a large panel of substrates such as cutin, triacylglycerols, and phospholipids. In the M. tuberculosis H37Rv genome, seven genes coding for cutinase-like proteins have been identified with strong immunogenic properties suggesting a potential role as vaccine candidates. Two of these enzymes which are secreted and highly homologous, possess distinct substrates specificities. Cfp21 is a lipase and Cut4 is a phospholipase A2, which has cytotoxic effects on macrophages. Structural overlay of their three-dimensional models allowed us to identify three areas involved in the substrate binding process and to shed light on this substrate specificity. By site-directed mutagenesis, residues present in these Cfp21 areas were replaced by residues occurring in Cut4 at the same location. Three mutants acquired phospholipase A1 and A2 activities and the lipase activities of two mutants were 3 and 15 fold greater than the Cfp21 wild type enzyme. In addition, contrary to mutants with enhanced lipase activity, mutants that acquired phospholipase B activities induced macrophage lysis as efficiently as Cut4 which emphasizes the relationship between apparent phospholipase A2 activity and cytotoxicity. Modification of areas involved in substrate specificity, generate recombinant enzymes with higher activity, which may be more immunogenic than the wild type enzymes and could therefore constitute promising candidates for antituberculous vaccine production.

  2. Plant performance on Mediterranean green roofs: interaction of species-specific hydraulic strategies and substrate water relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondo, Fabio; Trifilò, Patrizia; Lo Gullo, Maria A; Andri, Sergio; Savi, Tadeja; Nardini, Andrea

    2015-01-20

    Recent studies have highlighted the ecological, economic and social benefits assured by green roof technology to urban areas. However, green roofs are very hostile environments for plant growth because of shallow substrate depths, high temperatures and irradiance and wind exposure. This study provides experimental evidence for the importance of accurate selection of plant species and substrates for implementing green roofs in hot and arid regions, like the Mediterranean area. Experiments were performed on two shrub species (Arbutus unedo L. and Salvia officinalis L.) grown in green roof experimental modules with two substrates slightly differing in their water retention properties, as derived from moisture release curves. Physiological measurements were performed on both well-watered and drought-stressed plants. Gas exchange, leaf and xylem water potential and also plant hydraulic conductance were measured at different time intervals following the last irrigation. The substrate type significantly affected water status. Arbutus unedo and S. officinalis showed different hydraulic responses to drought stress, with the former species being substantially isohydric and the latter one anisohydric. Both A. unedo and S. officinalis were found to be suitable species for green roofs in the Mediterranean area. However, our data suggest that appropriate choice of substrate is key to the success of green roof installations in arid environments, especially if anisohydric species are employed.

  3. Infrared SPR sensing with III-nitride dielectric layers

    OpenAIRE

    Núñez-Cascarejo, A.; Estéban, O.; Méndez, J.A,; M. González-Herráez; Naranjo, F. B.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, Aluminum Indium Nitride (AlxIn1-xN) has been used as the dielectric overlay for a surface plasmon resonance sensor. The use of a ternary compound such as AlxIn1-xN for the dielectric allows a fine tuning of its refractive index by varying its composition, thus improving the sensor performance. Narrower transmittance resonances and higher sensitivities are obtained for transducers where the substrate rotates while depositing the ternary compound, which is attributed to the deposi...

  4. High-Q aluminum nitride photonic crystal nanobeam cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Pernice, W H P; Schuck, C; Tang, H X

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate high optical quality factors in aluminum nitride (AlN) photonic crystal nanobeam cavities. Suspended AlN photonic crystal nanobeams are fabricated in sputter-deposited AlN-on-insulator substrates using a self-protecting release process. Employing one-dimensional photonic crystal cavities coupled to integrated optical circuits we measure quality factors up to 146,000. By varying the waveguide-cavity coupling gap, extinction ratios in excess of 15 dB are obtained. Our results open the door for integrated photonic bandgap structures made from a low loss, wide-transparency, nonlinear optical material system.

  5. Lasing action in gallium nitride quasicrystal nanorod arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shih-Pang; Sou, Kuok-Pan; Chen, Chieh-Han; Cheng, Yuh-Jen; Huang, Ji-Kai; Lin, Chung-Hsiang; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Chang, Chun-Yen; Hsieh, Wen-Feng

    2012-05-21

    We report the observation of lasing action from an optically pumped gallium nitride quasicrystal nanorod arrays. The nanorods were fabricated from a GaN substrate by patterned etching, followed by epitaxial regrowth. The nanorods were arranged in a 12-fold symmetric quasicrystal pattern. The regrowth grew hexagonal crystalline facets and core-shell multiple quantum wells (MQWs) on nanorods. Under optical pumping, multiple lasing peaks resembling random lasing were observed. The lasing was identified to be from the emission of MQWs on the nanorod sidewalls. The resonant spectrum and mode field of the 12-fold symmetric photonic quasicrystal nanorod arrays is discussed.

  6. Polarity Control and Doping in Aluminum Gallium Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    seems to go hand in hand with a decrease in resistivity. In other words, a more activated sample shows a more intense ABX transition as well as a...Al0.8Ga0.2N grown on c- oriented AlN single crystal substrates; Physica Status Solidi (c) 9 (3-4); 584-587 (2012). 5 Y. Taniyasu, M. Kasu and T. Makimoto ...emitting diodes; Nature 406 (6798); 865-868 (2000). 21 U. T. Schwarz and M. Kneissl; Nitride emitters go nonpolar; physica status solidi (RRL

  7. Preparation and Instability of Nanocrystalline Cuprous Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Malinda D; White, Miles A; Thompson, Michelle J; Miller, Gordon J; Vela, Javier

    2015-07-06

    Low-dimensional cuprous nitride (Cu3N) was synthesized by nitridation (ammonolysis) of cuprous oxide (Cu2O) nanocrystals using either ammonia (NH3) or urea (H2NCONH2) as the nitrogen source. The resulting nanocrystalline Cu3N spontaneously decomposes to nanocrystalline CuO in the presence of both water and oxygen from air at room temperature. Ammonia was produced in 60% chemical yield during Cu3N decomposition, as measured using the colorimetric indophenol method. Because Cu3N decomposition requires H2O and produces substoichiometric amounts of NH3, we conclude that this reaction proceeds through a complex stoichiometry that involves the concomitant release of both N2 and NH3. This is a thermodynamically unfavorable outcome, strongly indicating that H2O (and thus NH3 production) facilitate the kinetics of the reaction by lowering the energy barrier for Cu3N decomposition. The three different Cu2O, Cu3N, and CuO nanocrystalline phases were characterized by a combination of optical absorption, powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and electronic density of states obtained from electronic structure calculations on the bulk solids. The relative ease of interconversion between these interesting and inexpensive materials bears possible implications for catalytic and optoelectronic applications.

  8. Fabrication and characterization of gallium nitride electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jerry Wayne

    Gallium nitride (GaN)-based high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), and Schottky rectifiers were fabricated and characterized. Novel dielectric materials Gd 2O3 and ScO were evaluated as potential gate dielectrics for GaN MOS applications. The devices presented herein show tremendous potential for elevated temperature, high frequency, and/or high voltage operation. AlGaN/GaN HEMTs were grown by MOCVD on sapphire and SiC substrates and by RF-MBE on sapphire substrates. Devices were fabricated with gate lengths from 100 nm to 1.2 mum. Drain current density approached 1 A/mm and extrinsic transconductance exceeded 200 mS/mm for small gate periphery devices. For the shortest gate length, a unity-gain cutoff frequency (fT) of 59 GHz and a maximum frequency of oscillation (fmax) of 90 GHz were extracted from measured scattering parameters. The experimental s-parameters were in excellent agreement with simulated results from small-signal linear modeling. Large signal characterization of 0.25 x 150 mum2 devices produced 2.75 W/mm at 3 GHz and 1.7 W/mm at 10 GHz. Devices fabricated on high thermal conductivity SiC substrates exhibited superior high temperature performance and a reduced density of threading dislocations. Novel gate dielectrics Gd2O3 and ScO were grown by gas source molecular beam epitaxy (GSMBE). Current-voltage (I-V) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) data were collected from MOS capacitors to evaluate the bulk and interfacial electrical properties of the insulators. Single crystal Gd2O 3 was demonstrated on GaN, but the resultant MOSFET exhibited a large gate leakage attributed to defects and dislocations in the oxide. MOSFETs with a stacked gate dielectric of Gd2O3/SiO2 were operational at a drain source bias of 80 V and a gate bias of +7 V. Bulk GaN templates grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HYPE) were used to fabricate vertical geometry Schottky rectifiers. Size- and temperature

  9. The new Polish nitriding and nitriding like processes in the modern technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Has, Z.; Kula, P. [Technical Univ. of Lodz (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    Modern technological methods for making nitrided layers and low-friction combined layers have been described. The possibilities of structures and properties forming were analyzed as well as the area and examples of application were considered. Nitrided layers are applied in high loaded frictional couples, widely. They can be formed on steel or cast iron machine parts by the classic gas nitriding process or by modern numerous nitriding technologies.

  10. Excellent enhancement of corrosion properties of Fe–9Al–30Mn–1.8C alloy in 3.5% NaCl and 10% HCl aqueous solutions using gas nitriding treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yung-Chang; Lin, Chih-Lung; Chao, Chuen-Guang; Liu, Tzeng-Feng, E-mail: Lewischen815@gmail.com

    2015-06-05

    Highlights: • The FeAlMnC alloy was gas-nitrided to simultaneously achieve the aging effect. • Anti-corrosion components AlN, Fe{sub 3}N and Fe{sub 4}N were identified by using GIXRD method. • The present nitrided alloy showed a great improvement in corrosion resistance. • The nitrided sample showed an excellent coherence between nitrided layer and matrix. • The nitrided and then stretched sample maintained satisfactory corrosion behavior. - Abstract: The as-quenched Fe–9.0Al–30Mn–1.8C (in wt.%) alloy gas nitrided at 550 °C for 4 h show excellent corrosion resistance investigated in 3.5% NaCl and 10% HCl solutions. Owing to the high corrosion resistance components, the gas-nitrided layer consists mainly of AlN with a slight amount of Fe{sub 3}N and Fe{sub 4}N identified by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction technique. Therefore, the pitting potential and corrosion potential of the nitrided sample are +1860 mV and +30 mV, respectively. Surprisingly, it is worthy to be pointed out that the nitrided and then tensile-tested alloy reveals very shallow in fracture depth and the excellent lattice coherence is shown between the nitrided layer and the substrate. Moreover, due to the extremely high nitrogen concentration (about 17–18 wt.%) at stretched surface, the corrosion resistance of present gas-nitrided and then tensile-tested alloy is superior to those optimally gas-nitrided or plasma-nitrided high-strength alloy steels, as well as martensitic stainless steels. The nitrided and then stretched alloy still retains a satisfactory corrosion resistance (E{sub pit} = +890 mV; E{sub corr} = +10 mV). Furthermore, only nanoscale-size pits were observed on the corroded surface after being immersed in 10% HCl for 24 h.

  11. Indium gallium nitride multijunction solar cell simulation using silvaco atlas

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Baldomero

    2007-01-01

    This thesis investigates the potential use of wurtzite Indium Gallium Nitride as photovoltaic material. Silvaco Atlas was used to simulate a quad-junction solar cell. Each of the junctions was made up of Indium Gallium Nitride. The band gap of each junction was dependent on the composition percentage of Indium Nitride and Gallium Nitride within Indium Gallium Nitride. The findings of this research show that Indium Gallium Nitride is a promising semiconductor for solar cell use. United...

  12. Thermionic field emission in gold nitride Schottky nanodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyropoulos-Antonakakis, N.; Sarantopoulou, E.; Kollia, Z.; Samardžija, Z.; Kobe, S.; Cefalas, A. C.

    2012-11-01

    We report on the thermionic field emission and charge transport properties of gold nitride nanodomains grown by pulsed laser deposition with a molecular fluorine laser at 157 nm. The nanodomains are sandwiched between the metallic tip of a conductive atomic force microscope and a thin gold layer forming thus a metal-semiconductor-metal junction. Although the limited existing data in the literature indicate that gold nitride was synthesized previously with low efficiency, poor stability, and metallic character; in this work, it is shown that gold nitride nanodomains exhibit semiconducting behavior and the metal-semiconductor-metal contact can be modeled with the back-to-back Schottky barrier model. From the experimental I-V curves, the main charge carrier transport process is found to be thermionic field emission via electron tunneling. The rectifying, near symmetric and asymmetric current response of nanocontacts is related to the effective contact area of the gold nitride nanodomains with the metals. A lower limit for the majority charge carriers concentration at the boundaries of nanodomains is also established using the full depletion approximation, as nanodomains with thickness as low as 6 nm were found to be conductive. Current rectification and charge memory effects are also observed in "quite small" conductive nanodomains (6-10 nm) due to stored charges. Indeed, charges near the surface are identified as inversion domains in the phase shift mapping performed with electrostatic force microscopy and are attributed to charge trapping at the boundaries of the nanodomains.

  13. Phase identification of iron nitrides and iron oxy-nitrides with Mossbauer spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borsa, DM; Boerma, DO

    2003-01-01

    The Mossbauer spectroscopy of all known Fe nitrides is the topic of this paper. Most of the data were accumulated during a study of the growth of the various Fe nitride phases using molecular beam epitaxy of Fe in the presence of a flux of atomic N, or by post-nitriding freshly grown Fe layers also

  14. Magnetostrictive iron gallium thin films grown onto antiferromagnetic manganese nitride: Structure and magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandru, Andrada-Oana; Corbett, Joseph P.; Richard, Andrea L.; Gallagher, James; Meng, Keng-Yuan; Ingram, David C.; Yang, Fengyuan; Smith, Arthur R.

    2016-10-01

    We report structural and magnetic properties of magnetostrictive Fe100 -xGax (x ≈ 15) alloys when deposited onto antiferromagnetic manganese nitride and non-magnetic magnesium oxide substrates. From X-ray diffraction measurements, we find that the FeGa films are single crystalline. Scanning tunneling microscopy imaging reveals that the surface morphologies are dictated by the growth temperature, composition, and substrate. The magnetic properties can be tailored by the substrate, as found by magnetic force microscopy imaging and vibrating sample magnetometry measurements. In addition to pronounced tetragonal deformations, depositing FeGa onto manganese nitride leads to the formation of stripe-like magnetic domain patterns and to the appearance of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

  15. Salt bath nitriding of 304 austenitic stainless steel at low temperature and corrosion resistance of nitriding layer%304奥氏体不锈钢低温盐浴氮化处理及其耐蚀性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄润波; 闫静; 曾德志; 张太平; 胡泽晶; 罗伟; 王均

    2012-01-01

    采用低温(430℃)盐浴对304奥氏体不锈钢进行氮化处理,研究了氮化时间对渗氮层组织,显微硬度及耐蚀性的影响.分别用X射线衍射仪(XRD)、表面显微硬度计、光学显微镜分析了渗氮层的相组成、显微硬度、截面形貌和厚度.结果表明,304不锈钢表面的渗氮层厚度和显微硬度都随处理时间的延长而增大.氮化处理1h得到的渗氮层由单一的S相组成.经盐浴渗氮处理的304不锈钢,其耐Cl-点蚀性能得到改善,430℃下氮化4h得到的渗氮层耐蚀性能最好.%304 austenitic stainless steel was nitrided in a salt bath at low temperature (430 °C). The effects of nitriding time on microstructure, microhardness, and corrosion resistance of nitriding layer were studied. The phase composition, microhardness, cross-sectional morphology, and thickness of nitriding layer were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), microhardness tester, and optical microscopy. The results showed that the thickness and microhardness of nitriding layer on 304 stainless steel substrate are increased with the increasing of nitriding time. The layer obtained by nitriding for 1 h is composed of a single S phase. The 304 stainless steel shows improved corrosion resistance by nitriding and exhibits optimal corrosion resistance after nitriding for 4 h.

  16. Composite Reinforcement using Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-09

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 11-Mar-2013 to 10-Mar-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Composite Reinforcement using Boron Nitride Nanotubes...AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Boron nitride nanotubes have been proposed as a...and titanium (Ti) metal clusters with boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT). First-principles density-functional theory plus dispersion (DFT-D) calculations

  17. Analysis of plasma-nitrided steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salik, J.; Ferrante, J.; Honecy, F.; Hoffman, R., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis of plasma nitrided steels can be divided to two main categories - structural and chemical. Structural analysis can provide information not only on the hardening mechanisms but also on the fundamental processes involved. Chemical analysis can be used to study the kinetics for the nitriding process and its mechanisms. In this paper preliminary results obtained by several techniques of both categories are presented and the applicability of those techniques to the analysis of plasma-nitrided steels is discussed.

  18. A New Method for Lift-off of III-Nitride Semiconductors for Heterogeneous Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zang KeYan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The release and transfer of GaN epilayers to other substrates is of interest for a variety of applications, including heterogeneous integration of silicon logic devices, III–V power devices and optical devices. We have developed a simple wet chemical etching method to release high-quality epitaxial III-nitride films from their substrates. This method builds on a nanoepitaxial lateral overgrowth (NELO process that provides III-Nitride films with low dislocation densities. NELO is accomplished using a nanoporous mask layer patterned on GaN substrates. Chemical removal of the SiO2 layer after growth of III-Nitride overlayers causes fracture at the interface between the GaN film and the original GaN substrate, resulting in free-standing GaN films with nanostructured surfaces on one side. These layers can be transferred to other substrates, and the nano-structured surface can be used in photonic devices, or planarized for power devices.

  19. Thin film phase diagram of iron nitrides grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gölden, D.; Hildebrandt, E.; Alff, L.

    2017-01-01

    A low-temperature thin film phase diagram of the iron nitride system is established for the case of thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy and nitrided by a nitrogen radical source. A fine-tuning of the nitridation conditions allows for growth of α ‧ -Fe8Nx with increasing c / a -ratio and magnetic anisotropy with increasing x until almost phase pure α ‧ -Fe8N1 thin films are obtained. A further increase of nitrogen content below the phase decomposition temperature of α ‧ -Fe8N (180 °C) leads to a mixture of several phases that is also affected by the choice of substrate material and symmetry. At higher temperatures (350 °C), phase pure γ ‧ -Fe4N is the most stable phase.

  20. Recent progress in the synthesis and characterization of amorphous and crystalline carbon nitride coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Widlow, I

    2000-01-01

    This review summarizes our most recent findings in the structure and properties of amorphous and crystalline carbon nitride coatings, synthesized by reactive magnetron sputtering. By careful control of the plasma conditions via proper choice of process parameters such as substrate bias, target power and gas pressure, one can precisely control film structure and properties. With this approach, we were able to produce amorphous carbon nitride films with controlled hardness and surface roughness. In particular, we can synthesize ultrathin (1 nm thick) amorphous carbon nitride films to be sufficiently dense and uniform that they provide adequate corrosion protection for hard disk applications. We demonstrated the strong correlation between ZrN (111) texture and hardness in CN sub x /ZrN superlattice coatings. Raman spectroscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption show the predominance of sp sup 3 -bonded carbon in these superlattice coatings.

  1. Secondary electron yield from stainless steel surface coated with titanium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, O. S.; Meshkov, I. N.; Rudakov, A. Yu.; Philippov, A. V.

    2014-09-01

    The experiment on measurement of secondary electron yield from surface of a stainless steel Kh189 sample covered with titanium nitride is performed at stand "Recuperator". This work is related to known problem of electron clouds formation in a vacuum chamber by a propagating charge particle beam. An original method of secondary electron yield measurement was developed in this experiment. The obtained results allow one to estimate efficiency of coating nitride titanium.

  2. In vitro bio-functionality of gallium nitride sensors for radiation biophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Markus; Howgate, John; Schmid, Martin; Schoell, Sebastian; Sachsenhauser, Matthias; Adigüzel, Denis; Stutzmann, Martin; Sharp, Ian D; Thalhammer, Stefan

    2012-07-27

    There is an increasing interest in the integration of hybrid bio-semiconductor systems for the non-invasive evaluation of physiological parameters. High quality gallium nitride and its alloys show promising characteristics to monitor cellular parameters. Nevertheless, such applications not only request appropriate sensing capabilities but also the biocompatibility and especially the biofunctionality of materials. Here we show extensive biocompatibility studies of gallium nitride and, for the first time, a biofunctionality assay using ionizing radiation. Analytical sensor devices are used in medical settings, as well as for cell- and tissue engineering. Within these fields, semiconductor devices have increasingly been applied for online biosensing on a cellular and tissue level. Integration of advanced materials such as gallium nitride into these systems has the potential to increase the range of applicability for a multitude of test devices and greatly enhance sensitivity and functionality. However, for such applications it is necessary to optimize cell-surface interactions and to verify the biocompatibility of the semiconductor. In this work, we present studies of mouse fibroblast cell activity grown on gallium nitride surfaces after applying external noxa. Cell-semiconductor hybrids were irradiated with X-rays at air kerma doses up to 250 mGy and the DNA repair dynamics, cell proliferation, and cell growth dynamics of adherent cells were compared to control samples. The impact of ionizing radiation on DNA, along with the associated cellular repair mechanisms, is well characterized and serves as a reference tool for evaluation of substrate effects. The results indicate that gallium nitride does not require specific surface treatments to ensure biocompatibility and suggest that cell signaling is not affected by micro-environmental alterations arising from gallium nitride-cell interactions. The observation that gallium nitride provides no bio-functional influence on

  3. Substrate temperature influence on the properties of GaN thin films grown by hollow-cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alevli, Mustafa, E-mail: mustafaalevli@marmara.edu.tr; Gungor, Neşe [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Marmara University, Goztepe, 34722 Istanbul (Turkey); Haider, Ali; Kizir, Seda; Leghari, Shahid A.; Biyikli, Necmi, E-mail: biyikli@unam.bilkent.edu.tr [Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Bilkent, 06800 Ankara, Turkey and National Nanotechnology Research Center (UNAM), Bilkent University, Bilkent, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2016-01-15

    Gallium nitride films were grown by hollow cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition using triethylgallium and N{sub 2}/H{sub 2} plasma. An optimized recipe for GaN film was developed, and the effect of substrate temperature was studied in both self-limiting growth window and thermal decomposition-limited growth region. With increased substrate temperature, film crystallinity improved, and the optical band edge decreased from 3.60 to 3.52 eV. The refractive index and reflectivity in Reststrahlen band increased with the substrate temperature. Compressive strain is observed for both samples, and the surface roughness is observed to increase with the substrate temperature. Despite these temperature dependent material properties, the chemical composition, E{sub 1}(TO), phonon position, and crystalline phases present in the GaN film were relatively independent from growth temperature.

  4. Synthetic peptides and fluorogenic substrates related to the reactive site sequence of Kunitz-type inhibitors isolated from Bauhinia: interaction with human plasma kallikrein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, M L; Santomauro-Vaz, E M; Andrade, S A; Juliano, M A; Pott, V J; Sampaio, M U; Sampaio, C A

    2001-01-01

    We have previously described Kunitz-type serine proteinase inhibitors purified from Bauhinia seeds. Human plasma kallikrein shows different susceptibility to those inhibitors. In this communication, we describe the interaction of human plasma kallikrein with fluorogenic and non-fluorogenic peptides based on the Bauhinia inhibitors' reactive site. The hydrolysis of the substrate based on the B. variegata inhibitor reactive site sequence, Abz-VVISALPRSVFIQ-EDDnp (Km 1.42 microM, kcat 0.06 s(-1), and kcat/Km 4.23 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)), is more favorable than that of Abz-VMIAALPRTMFIQ-EDDnp, related to the B. ungulata sequence (Km 0.43 microM, kcat 0.00017 s(-1), and kcat/Km 3.9 x 10(2) M(-1) s(-1)). Human plasma kallikrein does not hydrolyze the substrates Abz-RPGLPVRFESPL-EDDnp and Abz-FESPLRINIIKE-EDDnp based on the B. bauhinioides inhibitor reactive site sequence, the most effective inhibitor of the enzyme. These peptides are competitive inhibitors with Ki values in the nM range. The synthetic peptide containing 19 amino acids based on the B. bauhinioides inhibitor reactive site (RPGLPVRFESPL) is poorly cleaved by kallikrein. The given substrates are highly specific for trypsin and chymotrypsin hydrolysis. Other serine proteinases such as factor Xa, factor XII, thrombin and plasmin do not hydrolyze B. bauhinioides inhibitor related substrates.

  5. Deposition of titanium nitride layers by electric arc - Reactive plasma spraying method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serban, Viorel-Aurel [University ' Politehnica' of Timisoara, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, No. 1 Mihai Viteazu Boulevard, 300222 Timisoara (Romania); Rosu, Radu Alexandru, E-mail: raduniz@gmail.com [University ' Politehnica' of Timisoara, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, No. 1 Mihai Viteazu Boulevard, 300222 Timisoara (Romania); Bucur, Alexandra Ioana [National Institute for Research and Development in Electrochemistry and Condensed Matter Timisoara, Analysis and Characterization Department, No. 1 P Andronescu Street, Timisoara 300224 (Romania); Pascu, Doru Romulus [Romania National Research and Development Institute for Welding and Material Testing Timisoara, No. 30 Mihai Viteazu Boulevard, 300222 Timisoara (Romania)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Titanium nitride layers deposited by electric arc - reactive plasma spraying method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deposition of titanium nitride layers on C45 steel at different spraying distances. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterization of the coatings hardness as function of the spraying distances. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determination of the corrosion behavior of titanium nitride layers obtained. - Abstract: Titanium nitride (TiN) is a ceramic material which possesses high mechanical properties, being often used in order to cover cutting tools, thus increasing their lifetime, and also for covering components which are working in corrosive environments. The paper presents the experimental results on deposition of titanium nitride coatings by a new combined method (reactive plasma spraying and electric arc thermal spraying). In this way the advantages of each method in part are combined, obtaining improved quality coatings in the same time achieving high productivity. Commercially pure titanium wire and C45 steel as substrate were used for experiments. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the deposited coatings are composed of titanium nitride (TiN, Ti{sub 2}N) and small amounts of Ti{sub 3}O. The microstructure of the deposited layers, investigated both by optical and scanning electron microscopy, shows that the coatings are dense, compact, without cracks and with low porosity. Vickers microhardness of the coatings presents maximum values of 912 HV0.1. The corrosion tests in 3%NaCl solution show that the deposited layers have a high corrosion resistance compared to unalloyed steel substrate.

  6. Low temperature aluminum nitride thin films for sensory applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarar, E.; Hrkac, V.; Zamponi, C.; Piorra, A.; Kienle, L.; Quandt, E.

    2016-07-01

    A low-temperature sputter deposition process for the synthesis of aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films that is attractive for applications with a limited temperature budget is presented. Influence of the reactive gas concentration, plasma treatment of the nucleation surface and film thickness on the microstructural, piezoelectric and dielectric properties of AlN is investigated. An improved crystal quality with respect to the increased film thickness was observed; where full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the AlN films decreased from 2.88 ± 0.16° down to 1.25 ± 0.07° and the effective longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient (d33,f) increased from 2.30 ± 0.32 pm/V up to 5.57 ± 0.34 pm/V for film thicknesses in the range of 30 nm to 2 μm. Dielectric loss angle (tan δ) decreased from 0.626% ± 0.005% to 0.025% ± 0.011% for the same thickness range. The average relative permittivity (ɛr) was calculated as 10.4 ± 0.05. An almost constant transversal piezoelectric coefficient (|e31,f|) of 1.39 ± 0.01 C/m2 was measured for samples in the range of 0.5 μm to 2 μm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations performed on thin (100 nm) and thick (1.6 μm) films revealed an (002) oriented AlN nucleation and growth starting directly from the AlN-Pt interface independent of the film thickness and exhibit comparable quality with the state-of-the-art AlN thin films sputtered at much higher substrate temperatures.

  7. Nucleation of iron nitrides during gaseous nitriding of iron; the effect of a preoxidation treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friehling, Peter B.; Poulsen, Finn Willy; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2001-01-01

    grains. On prolonged nitriding, immediate nucleation at the surface of iron grains becomes possible. Calculated incubation times for the nucleation of gamma'-Fe4N1-x during nitriding are generally longer than those observed experimentally in the present work. The incubation time is reduced dramatically......The nucleation of iron nitrides during gaseous nitriding has been investigated using light microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Initially, the nucleation of gamma'-Fe4N1-x on a pure iron surface starts at grain boundaries meeting the surface, from where the nitride grains grow laterally into the iron...

  8. Optical Properties of Amorphous AlN Thin Films on Glass and Silicon Substrates Grown by Single Ion Beam Sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajakbari, Fatemeh; Mojtahedzadeh Larijani, Majid; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood; Aslaninejad, Morteza; Hojabri, Alireza

    2010-09-01

    The structural and optical properties of aluminum nitride (AlN) films deposited on glass and silicon substrates by single ion beam sputtering technique have been investigated. The X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) study revealed the formation of the amorphous phase of AlN. The optical characteristics of films, such as refractive index, extinction coefficient, and average thickness, were calculated by Swanepoel's method using transmittance measurements. The refractive index and average roughness values of the films increased with film thickness. Moreover, it was found that thickness augmentation leads to a decrease in optical band gap energy calculated using Tauc's relation.

  9. Insect chymotrypsins: chloromethyl ketone inactivation and substrate specificity relative to possible coevolutional adaptation of insects and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Adriana R; Sato, Paloma M; Terra, Walter R

    2009-03-01

    Insect digestive chymotrypsins are present in a large variety of insect orders but their substrate specificity still remains unclear. Four insect chymotrypsins from 3 different insect orders (Dictyoptera, Coleoptera, and two Lepidoptera) were isolated using affinity chromatography. Enzymes presented molecular masses in the range of 20 to 31 kDa and pH optima in the range of 7.5 to 10.0. Kinetic characterization using different colorimetric and fluorescent substrates indicated that insect chymotrypsins differ from bovine chymotrypsin in their primary specificity toward small substrates (like N-benzoyl-L-Tyr p-nitroanilide) rather than on their preference for large substrates (exemplified by Succynil-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe p-nitroanilide). Chloromethyl ketones (TPCK, N- alpha-tosyl-L-Phe chloromethyl ketone and Z-GGF-CK, N- carbobenzoxy-Gly-Gly-Phe-CK) inactivated all chymotrypsins tested. Inactivation rates follow apparent first-order kinetics with variable second order rates (TPCK, 42 to 130 M(-1) s(-1); Z-GGF-CK, 150 to 450 M(-1) s(-1)) that may be remarkably low for S. frugiperda chymotrypsin (TPCK, 6 M(-1) s(-1); Z-GGF-CK, 6.1 M(-1) s(-1)). Homology modelling and sequence alignment showed that in lepidopteran chymotrypsins, differences in the amino acid residues in the neighborhood of the catalytic His 57 may affect its pKa value. This is proposed as the cause of the decrease in His 57 reactivity toward chloromethyl ketones. Such amino acid replacement in the active site is proposed to be an adaptation to the presence of dietary ketones.

  10. Fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride nanoantennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, Justin A., E-mail: jabriggs@stanford.edu [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, 348 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, 496 Lomita Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Naik, Gururaj V.; Baum, Brian K.; Dionne, Jennifer A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, 496 Lomita Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Petach, Trevor A.; Goldhaber-Gordon, David [Department of Physics, Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    CMOS-compatible fabrication of plasmonic materials and devices will accelerate the development of integrated nanophotonics for information processing applications. Using low-temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD), we develop a recipe for fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride (TiN) that is plasmonic in the visible and near infrared. Films are grown on silicon, silicon dioxide, and epitaxially on magnesium oxide substrates. By optimizing the plasma exposure per growth cycle during PEALD, carbon and oxygen contamination are reduced, lowering undesirable loss. We use electron beam lithography to pattern TiN nanopillars with varying diameters on silicon in large-area arrays. In the first reported single-particle measurements on plasmonic TiN, we demonstrate size-tunable darkfield scattering spectroscopy in the visible and near infrared regimes. The optical properties of this CMOS-compatible material, combined with its high melting temperature and mechanical durability, comprise a step towards fully CMOS-integrated nanophotonic information processing.

  11. Fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride nanoantennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Justin A.; Naik, Gururaj V.; Petach, Trevor A.; Baum, Brian K.; Goldhaber-Gordon, David; Dionne, Jennifer A.

    2016-02-01

    CMOS-compatible fabrication of plasmonic materials and devices will accelerate the development of integrated nanophotonics for information processing applications. Using low-temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD), we develop a recipe for fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride (TiN) that is plasmonic in the visible and near infrared. Films are grown on silicon, silicon dioxide, and epitaxially on magnesium oxide substrates. By optimizing the plasma exposure per growth cycle during PEALD, carbon and oxygen contamination are reduced, lowering undesirable loss. We use electron beam lithography to pattern TiN nanopillars with varying diameters on silicon in large-area arrays. In the first reported single-particle measurements on plasmonic TiN, we demonstrate size-tunable darkfield scattering spectroscopy in the visible and near infrared regimes. The optical properties of this CMOS-compatible material, combined with its high melting temperature and mechanical durability, comprise a step towards fully CMOS-integrated nanophotonic information processing.

  12. Preparation of graphitic carbon nitride by electrodeposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chao; CAO Chuanbao; ZHU Hesun

    2003-01-01

    The CNx thin film was deposited on Si(100) substrate from a saturated acetone solution of cyanuric trichloride and melamine (cyanuric trichloride/melamine=1︰1.5) at room temperature. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that the diffraction peaks in the pattern coincided well with those of graphite-like carbon nitride calculated in the literature. The lattice constants (a=4.79 A, c=6.90 A) for g-C3N4 matched with those of ab initio calculations (a=4.74 A, c=6.72 A) quite well. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements indicated that the elements in the deposited films were mostly of C and N (N/C=0.75), and N (400.00 eV) bonded with C (287.72 eV) in the form of six-member C3N3 ring. The peaks at 800 cm-1, 1310 cm-1 and 1610 cm-1 in the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum indicated that triazine ring existed in the product. These results demonstrated that crystalline g-C3N4 was obtained in the CNx film.

  13. Low-temperature deposition of crystalline silicon nitride nanoparticles by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chan-Soo; Youn, Woong-Kyu; Lee, Dong-Kwon; Seol, Kwang-Soo; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2009-07-01

    The nanocrystalline alpha silicon nitride (α-Si 3N 4) was deposited on a silicon substrate by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition at the substrate temperature of 700 °C under 4 and 40 Torr at the wire temperatures of 1430 and 1730 °C, with a gas mixture of SiH 4 and NH 3. The size and density of crystalline nanoparticles on the substrate increased with increasing wire temperature. With increasing reactor pressure, the crystallinity of α-Si 3N 4 nanoparticles increased, but the deposition rate decreased.

  14. Synthesis of amorphous carbon nitride by ion implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChenZ.; OlofinjanaA.; BellJ

    2001-01-01

    N2+ were implanted into diamondlike carbon (DLC) films in an attempt to synthesizeamorphous carbon nitride. The DLC films were previously deposited on steel substrate by using anion beam sputtering deposition (IBSD) where a single Kaufman type ion gun with argon sourcewas used to sputter a graphite target and simultaneously bombard the growing film. Parallel to theion implantation route, amorphous carbon nitride films were also synthesized by directly using thereactive ion beam sputtering deposition (RIBSD) with nitrogen source to incorporate nitrogen intothe film. The structure and properties of the films were determined by using Raman spectroscopy,XPS and nano-indentation. The implantation of N2+ into a-C films offers a higher hardness thanthat directly synthesized by RIBSD, probably through an increase in sp3/sp2 ratio and in the pro-portion of nitrogen atoms chemically bonding to carbon atoms. The results show that althoughthere are differences in film composition, structure and properties between these two processes,both methods can be used for synthesis of nitrogen-containing amorphous DLC thin films whichsignificantly modify the substrate surface.

  15. Crystallographic alignment of high-density gallium nitride nanowire arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuykendall, Tevye; Pauzauskie, Peter J; Zhang, Yanfeng; Goldberger, Joshua; Sirbuly, Donald; Denlinger, Jonathan; Yang, Peidong

    2004-08-01

    Single-crystalline, one-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures are considered to be one of the critical building blocks for nanoscale optoelectronics. Elucidation of the vapour-liquid-solid growth mechanism has already enabled precise control over nanowire position and size, yet to date, no reports have demonstrated the ability to choose from different crystallographic growth directions of a nanowire array. Control over the nanowire growth direction is extremely desirable, in that anisotropic parameters such as thermal and electrical conductivity, index of refraction, piezoelectric polarization, and bandgap may be used to tune the physical properties of nanowires made from a given material. Here we demonstrate the use of metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) and appropriate substrate selection to control the crystallographic growth directions of high-density arrays of gallium nitride nanowires with distinct geometric and physical properties. Epitaxial growth of wurtzite gallium nitride on (100) gamma-LiAlO(2) and (111) MgO single-crystal substrates resulted in the selective growth of nanowires in the orthogonal [1\\[Evec]0] and [001] directions, exhibiting triangular and hexagonal cross-sections and drastically different optical emission. The MOCVD process is entirely compatible with the current GaN thin-film technology, which would lead to easy scale-up and device integration.

  16. Zirconium nitride hard coatings; Revestimentos protetores de nitreto de zirconio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman, Daiane; Amorim, Cintia Lugnani Gomes de; Soares, Gabriel Vieira; Figueroa, Carlos Alejandro; Baumvol, Israel Jacob Rabin; Basso, Rodrigo Leonardo de Oliveira [Universidade de Caxias do Sul (UCS), Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Zirconium nitride (ZrN) nanometric films were deposited onto different substrates, in order to study the surface crystalline microstructure and also to investigate the electrochemical behavior to obtain a better composition that minimizes corrosion reactions. The coatings were produced by physical vapor deposition (PVD). The influence of the nitrogen partial pressure, deposition time and temperature over the surface properties was studied. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and corrosion experiments were performed to characterize the ZrN hard coatings. The ZrN films properties and microstructure changes according to the deposition parameters. The corrosion resistance increases with temperature used in the films deposition. Corrosion tests show that ZrN coating deposited by PVD onto titanium substrate can improve the corrosion resistance. (author)

  17. Facile synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes and improved electrical conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongjun; Luo, Lijie; Zhou, Longchang; Mo, Libin; Tong, Zhangfa

    2010-02-01

    A layer of catalyst film on substrate is usually required during the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth of one-dimensional (1D) nanomaterials. In this work, however, a novel approach for synthesizing high-purity bamboo-like boron nitride (BN) nanotubes directly on commercial stainless steel foils was demonstrated. Synthesis was realized by heating boron and zinc oxide (ZnO) powders at 1200 degrees C under a mixture gas flow of nitrogen and hydrogen. The stainless steel foils played an additional role of catalyst besides the substrate during the VLS growth of the nanotubes. In addition, the electrical conductivity of the BN nanotubes was efficiently improved in a simple way by coating with Au and Pd nanoparticles. The decorated BN nanotubes may find potential applications in catalysts, sensors and nanoelectronics.

  18. Electronic structure of spontaneously strained graphene on hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    San-Jose, Pablo; Gutiérrez-Rubio, A.; Sturla, Mauricio; Guinea, Francisco

    2014-09-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride substrates have been shown to dramatically improve the electric properties of graphene. Recently, it has been observed that when the two honeycomb crystals are close to perfect alignment, strong lattice distortions develop in graphene due to the moiré adhesion landscape. Simultaneously, a gap opens at the Dirac point. Here, we derive a simple low-energy electronic model for graphene aligned with the substrate, taking into account spontaneous strains at equilibrium and pseudogauge fields. We carry out a detailed characterization of the modified band structure, gap, local and global density of states, and band topology in terms of physical parameters. We show that the overall electronic structure is strongly modified by the spontaneous strains.

  19. Quantum emission from hexagonal boron nitride monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Toan Trong; Bray, Kerem; Ford, Michael J.; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Artificial atomic systems in solids are widely considered the leading physical system for a variety of quantum technologies, including quantum communications, computing and metrology. To date, however, room-temperature quantum emitters have only been observed in wide-bandgap semiconductors such as diamond and silicon carbide, nanocrystal quantum dots, and most recently in carbon nanotubes. Single-photon emission from two-dimensional materials has been reported, but only at cryogenic temperatures. Here, we demonstrate room-temperature, polarized and ultrabright single-photon emission from a colour centre in two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride. Density functional theory calculations indicate that vacancy-related defects are a probable source of the emission. Our results demonstrate the unprecedented potential of van der Waals crystals for large-scale nanophotonics and quantum information processing.

  20. Mechanical Hysteresis of Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Aiguo; LI Haoran

    2011-01-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is an important structural material with layered microstructure.Because of the plastic anisotropy,this material shows obvious mechanical hysteresis (nonlinear elastic deformation).There are hysteretic loops at the cyclical load-unload stress-strain curves of h-BN.Consequently,two hot-pressed h-BN cylinders with different textures were studied.The mechanical hysteresis is heavily texture-dependent.The area of hysteretic loop is linearly related with the square of loading stresslevel.Two minor loops attached on the hysteretic loops with the same extreme stresses have congruent shapes.It can be concluded that the mechanical hysteresis of h-BN can he explained by a Kink Nonlinear Elastic model developed from the study of a ternary carbide Ti3SiC2.

  1. Pure and doped boron nitride nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Terrones

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available More than ten years ago, it was suggested theoretically that boron nitride (BN nanotubes could be produced. Soon after, various reports on their synthesis appeared and a new area of nanotube science was born. This review aims to cover the latest advances related to the synthesis of BN nanotubes. We show that these tubes can now be produced in larger amounts and, in particular, that the chemistry of BN tubes appears to be very important to the production of reinforced composites with insulating characteristics. From the theoretical standpoint, we also show that (BN-C heteronanotubes could have important implications for nanoelectronics. We believe that BN nanotubes (pure and doped could be used in the fabrication of novel devices in which pure carbon nanotubes do not perform very efficiently.

  2. Substrate profiling of human vaccinia-related kinases identifies coilin, a Cajal body nuclear protein, as a phosphorylation target with neurological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-García, Marta; Vázquez-Cedeira, Marta; Kellerman, Efrat; Renbaum, Paul; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Lazo, Pedro A

    2011-12-21

    Protein phosphorylation by kinases plays a central role in the regulation and coordination of multiple biological processes. In general, knowledge on kinase specificity is restricted to substrates identified in the context of specific cellular responses, but kinases are likely to have multiple additional substrates and be integrated in signaling networks that might be spatially and temporally different, and in which protein complexes and subcellular localization can play an important role. In this report the substrate specificity of atypical human vaccinia-related kinases (VRK1 and VRK2) using a human peptide-array containing 1080 sequences phosphorylated in known signaling pathways has been studied. The two kinases identify a subset of potential peptide targets, all of them result in a consensus sequence composed of at least four basic residues in peptide targets. Linear peptide arrays are therefore a useful approach in the characterization of kinases and substrate identification, which can contribute to delineate the signaling network in which VRK proteins participate. One of these target proteins is coilin; a basic protein located in nuclear Cajal bodies. Coilin is phosphorylated in Ser184 by both VRK1 and VRK2. Coilin colocalizes and interacts with VRK1 in Cajal bodies, but not with the mutant VRK1 (R358X). VRK1 (R358X) is less active than VRK1. Altered regulation of coilin might be implicated in several neurological diseases such as ataxias and spinal muscular atrophies.

  3. Effect of different growing substrates on the plant water relations and marketable fruit yield greenhouse-grown tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Borowski

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In the period 2009-2011, a study was conducted in a greenhouse, using fertigation, to determine water relations and fruit yield of tomato grown in different substrates. Tomato plants were grown on rockwool slabs, 15 dm3  in volume, and on slabs of the same volume made of the following straw chaff: rape straw; rape straw + peat (3:1; rape straw + pine bark (3:1; triticale straw; triticale straw + peat (3:1; triticale straw + pine bark (3:1. 2 tomato plants were grown on each slab, leaving 22 fruit clusters on each plant during the period from February to October. The obtained results showed that water potential, stomatal conductance, transpiration, water saturation deficit, and leaf free proline content in tomato grown on rockwool and on rape or triticale straw chaff substrates did not differ statistically significantly. Also, no significant differences were found in marketable tomato fruit yield and dry matter content in tomato fruits. Peat or pine bark addition to rape or triticale straw substrates had no significant effect on the change in their commercially useful traits. In the opinion of the present authors, substrates made of rape or triticale straw alone, and even more so with the addition of peat or bark, are not inferior in any way to commonly used rockwool.

  4. Magnetron sputter deposited tantalum and tantalum nitride thin films: An analysis of phase, hardness and composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernoulli, D. [Laboratory for Nanometallurgy, Department of Materials, ETH-Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Müller, U. [EMPA, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Schwarzenberger, M. [Laboratory for Nanometallurgy, Department of Materials, ETH-Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Hauert, R. [EMPA, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Spolenak, R. [Laboratory for Nanometallurgy, Department of Materials, ETH-Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2013-12-02

    Tantalum (Ta) and tantalum nitride thin films are highly important as diffusion barriers and adhesion layers in microelectronics and hard coatings for cutting tools. In this study, the effect of the underlying substrate on the phase formation of Ta and the influence of a changing N{sub 2}/Ar flow ratio on hardness, phase and composition of reactively formed tantalum nitride have been investigated. Ta is DC sputter deposited and forms β-Ta on amorphous diamond-like carbon and on the amorphous natural oxide layers of Ti and Si(100) while a 15 nm TaN seed layer results in the formation of α-Ta. The chemical composition of the topmost layers of a substrate influences the formation of α- and β-Ta. With increasing N{sub 2}/Ar flow ratios a transition from amorphous Ta-rich tantalum nitride over face-centered cubic tantalum nitride (fcc-TaN) to (100) textured fcc-TaN at flow ratios above 45% is observed. The hardness of the tantalum nitride thin film reaches a maximum at a flow ratio of 45%, followed by a decrease in hardness for higher N{sub 2}/Ar flow ratios. The increase in hardness is associated with a decrease in grain size and shows a stronger correlation for a Meyers and Ashworth relationship than for a Hall–Petch relationship. - Highlights: • Chemical composition of the substrate influences the phase of deposited Ta. • FCC-TaN seed layer leads to α-Ta on the natural oxide layers of Ti and Si(100). • Meyers and Ashworth relationship correlates stronger than Hall–Petch relationship.

  5. Group III-nitride thin films grown using MBE and bismuth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisielowski, Christian K.; Rubin, Michael

    2000-01-01

    The present invention comprises growing gallium nitride films in the presence of bismuth using MBE at temperatures of about 1000 K or less. The present invention further comprises the gallium nitride films fabricated using the inventive fabrication method. The inventive films may be doped with magnesium or other dopants. The gallium nitride films were grown on sapphire substrates using a hollow anode Constricted Glow Discharge nitrogen plasma source. When bismuth was used as a surfactant, two-dimensional gallium nitride crystal sizes ranging between 10 .mu.m and 20 .mu.m were observed. This is 20 to 40 times larger than crystal sizes observed when GaN films were grown under similar circumstances but without bismuth. It is thought that the observed increase in crystal size is due bismuth inducing an increased surface diffusion coefficient for gallium. The calculated value of 4.7.times.10.sup.-7 cm.sup.2 /sec. reveals a virtual substrate temperature of 1258 K which is 260 degrees higher than the actual one.

  6. Structural characterization of buried nitride layers formed by nitrogen ion implantation in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, A.D. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari Campus, Santacruz (E), Mumbai, Maharashtra 400098 (India)], E-mail: adyadav@physics.mu.ac.in; Patel, A.P.; Dubey, S.K. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari Campus, Santacruz (E), Mumbai, Maharashtra 400098 (India); Panigrahi, B.K.; Kesavamoorthy, R.; Nair, K.G.M. [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu 603102 (India)

    2008-04-15

    The synthesis of buried silicon nitride insulating layers was carried out by SIMNI (separation by implanted nitrogen) process using implantation of 140 keV nitrogen ({sup 14}N{sup +}) ions at fluence of 1.0 x 10{sup 17}, 2.5 x 10{sup 17} and 5.0 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} into <1 1 1> single crystal silicon substrates held at elevated temperature (410 deg. C). The structures of ion-beam synthesized buried silicon nitride layers were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. The XRD studies reveal the formation of hexagonal silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) structure at all fluences. The concentration of the silicon nitride phase was found to be dependent on the ion fluence. The intensity and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of XRD peak were found to increase with increase in ion fluence. The Raman spectra for samples implanted with different ion fluences show crystalline silicon (c-Si) substrate peak at wavenumber 520 cm{sup -1}. The intensity of the silicon peak was found to decrease with increase in ion fluence.

  7. Low temperature anodic bonding to silicon nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weichel, Steen; Reus, Roger De; Bouaidat, Salim;

    2000-01-01

    Low-temperature anodic bonding to stoichiometric silicon nitride surfaces has been performed in the temperature range from 3508C to 4008C. It is shown that the bonding is improved considerably if the nitride surfaces are either oxidized or exposed to an oxygen plasma prior to the bonding. Both bulk...

  8. Composite Reinforcement using Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-15

    ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 The public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for...nitride nanotubes change with the presence of atomic oxygen were also carried out. 15.  SUBJECT TERMS Nanotubes, Boron Nitride, Composites, Theoretical

  9. Method of preparation of uranium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline Loetsch; Thomson, Robert Kenneth James

    2013-07-09

    Method for producing terminal uranium nitride complexes comprising providing a suitable starting material comprising uranium; oxidizing the starting material with a suitable oxidant to produce one or more uranium(IV)-azide complexes; and, sufficiently irradiating the uranium(IV)-azide complexes to produce the terminal uranium nitride complexes.

  10. Thermodynamics, kinetics and process control of nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mittemeijer, Eric J.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    1999-01-01

    , the nitriding result is determined largely by the kinetics of the process. The nitriding kinetics have been shown to be characterised by the occurring local near-equilibria and stationary states at surfaces and interfaces, and the diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in the various phases, for which new data have...

  11. Colonization of plant substrates at hydrothermal vents and cold seeps in the northeast Atlantic and Mediterranean and occurrence of symbiont-related bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil M Szafranski

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Reducing conditions with elevated sulphide and methane concentrations in ecosystems such as hydrothermal vents, cold seeps or organic falls, are suitable for chemosynthetic primary production. Understanding processes driving bacterial diversity, colonization and dispersal is of prime importance for deep-sea microbial ecology. This study provides a detailed characterization of bacterial assemblages colonizing plant-derived substrates using a standardised approach over a geographic area spanning the North-East Atlantic and Mediterranean. Wood and alfalfa substrates in colonization devices were deployed for different periods at 8 deep-sea chemosynthesis-based sites in 4 distinct geographic areas. Pyrosequencing of a fragment of the 16S rRNA-encoding gene was used to describe bacterial communities. Colonization occurred within the first 14 days. The diversity was higher in samples deployed for more than 289 days. After 289 days, no relation was observed between community richness and deployment duration, suggesting that diversity may have reached saturation sometime in between. Communities in long-term deployments were different, and their composition was mainly influenced by the geographical location where devices were deployed. Numerous sequences related to horizontally-transmitted chemosynthetic symbionts of metazoans were identified. Their potential status as free-living forms of these symbionts was evaluated based on sequence similarity and monophyly with demonstrated symbionts. Results suggest that some free-living forms of metazoan symbionts or their close relatives, such as the epsilonproteobacterium associated with the shrimp Rimicaris exoculata, are efficient colonizers of plant substrates at vents and seeps.

  12. Colonization of plant substrates at hydrothermal vents and cold seeps in the northeast Atlantic and Mediterranean and occurrence of symbiont-related bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szafranski, Kamil M; Deschamps, Philippe; Cunha, Marina R; Gaudron, Sylvie M; Duperron, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Reducing conditions with elevated sulfide and methane concentrations in ecosystems such as hydrothermal vents, cold seeps or organic falls, are suitable for chemosynthetic primary production. Understanding processes driving bacterial diversity, colonization and dispersal is of prime importance for deep-sea microbial ecology. This study provides a detailed characterization of bacterial assemblages colonizing plant-derived substrates using a standardized approach over a geographic area spanning the North-East Atlantic and Mediterranean. Wood and alfalfa substrates in colonization devices were deployed for different periods at 8 deep-sea chemosynthesis-based sites in four distinct geographic areas. Pyrosequencing of a fragment of the 16S rRNA-encoding gene was used to describe bacterial communities. Colonization occurred within the first 14 days. The diversity was higher in samples deployed for more than 289 days. After 289 days, no relation was observed between community richness and deployment duration, suggesting that diversity may have reached saturation sometime in between. Communities in long-term deployments were different, and their composition was mainly influenced by the geographical location where devices were deployed. Numerous sequences related to horizontally-transmitted chemosynthetic symbionts of metazoans were identified. Their potential status as free-living forms of these symbionts was evaluated based on sequence similarity with demonstrated symbionts. Results suggest that some free-living forms of metazoan symbionts or their close relatives, such as Epsilonproteobacteria associated with the shrimp Rimicaris exoculata, are efficient colonizers of plant substrates at vents and seeps.

  13. Development of fluorescent substrates and assays for the key autophagy-related cysteine protease enzyme, ATG4B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh G; Honson, Nicolette S; Arns, Steven; Davis, Tara L; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Kovacic, Suzana; Kumar, Nag S; Pfeifer, Tom A; Young, Robert N

    2014-04-01

    The cysteine protease ATG4B plays a role in key steps of the autophagy process and is of interest as a potential therapeutic target. At an early step, ATG4B cleaves proLC3 isoforms to form LC3-I for subsequent lipidation to form LC3-II and autophagosome membrane insertion. ATG4B also cleaves phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) from LC3-II to regenerate LC3-I, enabling its recycling for further membrane biogenesis. Here, we report several novel assays for monitoring the enzymatic activity of ATG4B. An assay based on mass spectrometric analysis and quantification of cleavage of the substrate protein LC3-B was developed and, while useful for mechanistic studies, was not suitable for high throughput screening (HTS). A doubly fluorescent fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) ligand YFP-LC3B-EmGFP (FRET-LC3) was constructed and shown to be an excellent substrate for ATG4B with rates of cleavage similar to that for LC3B itself. A HTS assay to identify candidate inhibitors of ATG4B utilizing FRET-LC3 as a substrate was developed and validated with a satisfactory Z' factor and high signal-to-noise ratio suitable for screening small molecule libraries. Pilot screens of the 1,280-member library of pharmacologically active compounds (LOPAC(™)) and a 3,481-member library of known drugs (KD2) gave hit rates of 0.6% and 0.5% respectively, and subsequent titrations confirmed ATG4B inhibitory activity for three compounds, both in the FRET and mass spectrometry assays. The FRET- and mass spectrometry-based assays we have developed will allow for both HTS for inhibitors of ATG4B and mechanistic approaches to study inhibition of a major component of the autophagy pathway.

  14. Molten-Salt-Based Growth of Group III Nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrip, Karen E.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Kerley, Thomas M.

    2008-10-14

    A method for growing Group III nitride materials using a molten halide salt as a solvent to solubilize the Group-III ions and nitride ions that react to form the Group III nitride material. The concentration of at least one of the nitride ion or Group III cation is determined by electrochemical generation of the ions.

  15. Thermal Residual Stress in Environmental Barrier Coated Silicon Nitride - Modeled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Abdul-Aziz; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2009-01-01

    When exposed to combustion environments containing moisture both un-reinforced and fiber reinforced silicon based ceramic materials tend to undergo surface recession. To avoid surface recession environmental barrier coating systems are required. However, due to differences in the elastic and thermal properties of the substrate and the environmental barrier coating, thermal residual stresses can be generated in the coated substrate. Depending on their magnitude and nature thermal residual stresses can have significant influence on the strength and fracture behavior of coated substrates. To determine the maximum residual stresses developed during deposition of the coatings, a finite element model (FEM) was developed. Using this model, the thermal residual stresses were predicted in silicon nitride substrates coated with three environmental coating systems namely barium strontium aluminum silicate (BSAS), rare earth mono silicate (REMS) and earth mono di-silicate (REDS). A parametric study was also conducted to determine the influence of coating layer thickness and material parameters on thermal residual stress. Results indicate that z-direction stresses in all three systems are small and negligible, but maximum in-plane stresses can be significant depending on the composition of the constituent layer and the distance from the substrate. The BSAS and REDS systems show much lower thermal residual stresses than REMS system. Parametric analysis indicates that in each system, the thermal residual stresses can be decreased with decreasing the modulus and thickness of the coating.

  16. Influence of temperature and substrate conditions on the omt-1 gene expression of Aspergillus parasiticus in relation to its aflatoxin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Ojalvo, Daniel; Rodríguez, Alicia; Bernáldez, Victoria; Córdoba, Juan J; Rodríguez, Mar

    2013-09-02

    Most strains of Aspergillus parasiticus are able to produce high concentrations of aflatoxin (AF) B1 and G1 which are among the most potent mutagenic, teratogenic, and carcinogenic mycotoxins. Molecular studies in relation to activity of secondary metabolite gene clusters are crucial to improving food safety. In the present work, reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) was used to monitor the influence of temperature, substrates containing nitrogen and incubation time on the omt-1 gene expression in A. parasiticus. Phenotypic AFB1 and G1 production was also evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). The results demonstrated that temperature (25°C and 30°C) influenced relative expression of omt-1 gene throughout the time (maximum at 25°C) while substrate composition was not affected by it. However, when effect of temperature and substrate was analyzed at each incubation time, significant effects were found. Optimal conditions for biosynthesis of AFB1 and AFG1 were similar, and they were related to changes in temperature and sodium nitrate. The highest AFB1 and G1 production levels were found at 25°C. However, lower AFB1 and G1 values were obtained when A. parasiticus grew on the substrate containing sodium nitrate and there was no production of these AFs at 37°C in any of the conditions tested. In addition, omt-1 gene expression was correlated to AFB1 and G1 syntheses at the different conditions. Use of temperature conditions and sodium nitrate concentrations which limit production of AFs holds potential for preventing AF from entering the food chain.

  17. Resistance of Silicon Nitride Turbine Components to Erosion and Hot Corrosion/oxidation Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strangmen, Thomas E.; Fox, Dennis S.

    1994-01-01

    Silicon nitride turbine components are under intensive development by AlliedSignal to enable a new generation of higher power density auxiliary power systems. In order to be viable in the intended applications, silicon nitride turbine airfoils must be designed for survival in aggressive oxidizing combustion gas environments. Erosive and corrosive damage to ceramic airfoils from ingested sand and sea salt must be avoided. Recent engine test experience demonstrated that NT154 silicon nitride turbine vanes have exceptional resistance to sand erosion, relative to superalloys used in production engines. Similarly, NT154 silicon nitride has excellent resistance to oxidation in the temperature range of interest - up to 1400 C. Hot corrosion attack of superalloy gas turbine components is well documented. While hot corrosion from ingested sea salt will attack silicon nitride substantially less than the superalloys being replaced in initial engine applications, this degradation has the potential to limit component lives in advanced engine applications. Hot corrosion adversely affects the strength of silicon nitride in the 850 to 1300 C range. Since unacceptable reductions in strength must be rapidly identified and avoided, AlliedSignal and the NASA Lewis Research Center have pioneered the development of an environmental life prediction model for silicon nitride turbine components. Strength retention in flexure specimens following 1 to 3300 hour exposures to high temperature oxidation and hot corrosion has been measured and used to calibrate the life prediction model. Predicted component life is dependent upon engine design (stress, temperature, pressure, fuel/air ratio, gas velocity, and inlet air filtration), mission usage (fuel sulfur content, location (salt in air), and times at duty cycle power points), and material parameters. Preliminary analyses indicate that the hot corrosion resistance of NT154 silicon nitride is adequate for AlliedSignal's initial engine

  18. PECVD low stress silicon nitride analysis and optimization for the fabrication of CMUT devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagolini, Alvise; Savoia, Alessandro Stuart; Picciotto, Antonino; Boscardin, Maurizio; Bellutti, Pierluigi; Lamberti, Nicola; Caliano, Giosuè

    2015-01-01

    Two technological options to achieve a high deposition rate, low stress plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) silicon nitride to be used in capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUT) fabrication are investigated and presented. Both options are developed and implemented on standard production line PECVD equipment in the framework of a CMUT technology transfer from R & D to production. A tradeoff between deposition rate, residual stress and electrical properties is showed. The first option consists in a double layer of silicon nitride with a relatively high deposition rate of ~100 nm min-1 and low compressive residual stress, which is suitable for the fabrication of the thick nitride layer used as a mechanical support of the CMUTs. The second option involves the use of a mixed frequency low-stress silicon nitride with outstanding electrical insulation capability, providing improved mechanical and electrical integrity of the CMUT active layers. The behavior of the nitride is analyzed as a function of deposition parameters and subsequent annealing. The nitride layer characterization is reported in terms of interfaces density influence on residual stress, refractive index, deposition rate, and thickness variation both as deposited and after thermal treatment. A sweet spot for stress stability is identified at an interfaces density of 0.1 nm-1, yielding 87 MPa residual stress after annealing. A complete CMUT device fabrication is reported using the optimized nitrides. The CMUT performance is tested, demonstrating full functionality in ultrasound imaging applications and an overall performance improvement with respect to previous devices fabricated with non-optimized silicon nitride.

  19. The plasma footprint of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet on a flat polymer substrate and its relation to surface treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyshchenko, Iuliia; Nikiforov, Anton Yu.; De Geyter, Nathalie; Morent, Rino

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work is to show the correlation between the plasma propagation in the footprint of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet on a flat polymer surface and the plasma treatment impact on the polymer properties. An argon plasma jet working in open air is used as plasma source, while PET thin films are used a substrates for plasma treatment. Light emission photographs are taken with an ICCD camera to have a close look at the generated structures in the plasma jet footprint on the surface. Water contact angle (WCA) measurement and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis are also performed to obtain information about the impact of the plasma treatment on the PET surface characteristics. A variation in ICCD camera gate duration (1 µs, 100 µs, 50 ms) results in the photographs of the different plasma structures occurring during the plasma propagation on the flat PET surface. Contact angle measurements provide results on improvement of the PET hydrophilic character, while XPS analysis shows the distribution of atomic elements on the treated substrate surface. Light emission images help explaining the obtained WCA and XPS results. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  20. Substrate Effect on Thin Layer MoSe2 Field-Effect Transistors with Photo-Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellus, Matthew Z.; Chien, Hui-Chun; Sicilian, David L.; Weintrub, Benjamin I.; Kumar, Jatinder; St. Aubin, A. Davis; Hoffman, T. B.; Zhang, Y.; Edgar, J. H.; Chiu, Hsin-Ying

    2014-03-01

    The discovery of graphene has opened the gates for the study of layered semiconducting materials such as the transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), i.e. MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, WSe2. In addition, recent works have shown that hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) can act as an ideal substrate with electrical performance enhancement for graphene and possibly for other materials as well. In this study, we examine this substrate effect for MoSe2 by comparing various material properties on both SiO2 and hBN. Field-effect transistors (FETs) were fabricated on both substrates using mechanically exfoliated MoSe2. Our FETs show n-type doping and strong gate modulation yielding Ion/Ioff ratios larger than 106 for both substrates. Using a 4-probe measurement we found a relatively high mobility on SiO2 that was larger than previous reports, with a slight variation between substrates. Under illumination, devices on both substrates showed ``photo-doping'' effects that in some cases were very large and persistent, thought to be the persistent photoconductivity (PPC) effect. These initial results have shown promising characteristics in MoSe2 for applications in electronics and optoelectronics as well as shown the effects that a substrate can play in device performance and material properties.

  1. Solvothermal synthesis: a new route for preparing nitrides

    CERN Document Server

    Demazeau, G; Denis, A; Largeteau, A

    2002-01-01

    Solvothermal synthesis appears to be an interesting route for preparing nitrides such as gallium nitride and aluminium nitride, using ammonia as solvent. A nitriding additive is used to perform the reaction and, in the case of gallium nitride, is encapsulated by melt gallium. The syntheses are performed in the temperature range 400-800 deg. C and in the pressure range 100-200 MPa. The synthesized powders are characterized by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Finely divided gallium nitride GaN and aluminium nitride AlN, both with wurtzite-type structure, can be obtained by this route.

  2. Surface nitridation of silicon nano-particles using double multi-hollow discharge plasma CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Giichiro; Yamamoto, Kosuke; Kawashima, Yuki; Sato, Muneharu; Nakahara, Kenta; Itagaki, Naho; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu [Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Kamataki, Kunihiro [Center for Reserch and Advancement in Higher Education, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Kondo, Michio [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    We present production of silicon nano-particles and their surface nitridation for efficient multiple-exciton generation. Nitridated silicon nano-particles were produced using double multi-hollow discharge plasma CVD, where generation of silicon particles and their nitridation were independently performed using SiH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} and N{sub 2} multi-hollow discharge plasmas. We succeeded in controlling nitrogen content in a silicon nano-particle by varying a number density of N radicals irradiated to the Si particle. We also observed strong photoluminescence (PL) emission around 300-500 nm from silicon nano-particles, where the PL peak energy is about 2.5 and 3.1 eV for pure Si nano-particles, and 2.5, 3.1, and 4.1 eV for nitridated Si nano-particles. The additional UV-peak of 4.1 eV from nitridated Si particles is closely related to the nitridation surface layer on Si nano-particles (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. High temperature mechanical performance of a hot isostatically pressed silicon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wereszczak, A.A.; Ferber, M.K.; Jenkins, M.G.; Lin, C.K.J. [and others

    1996-01-01

    Silicon nitride ceramics are an attractive material of choice for designers and manufacturers of advanced gas turbine engine components for many reasons. These materials typically have potentially high temperatures of usefulness (up to 1400{degrees}C), are chemically inert, have a relatively low specific gravity (important for inertial effects), and are good thermal conductors (i.e., resistant to thermal shock). In order for manufacturers to take advantage of these inherent properties of silicon nitride, the high-temperature mechanical performance of the material must first be characterized. The mechanical response of silicon nitride to static, dynamic, and cyclic conditions at elevated temperatures, along with reliable and representative data, is critical information that gas turbine engine designers and manufacturers require for the confident insertion of silicon nitride components into gas turbine engines. This final report describes the high-temperature mechanical characterization and analyses that were conducted on a candidate structural silicon nitride ceramic. The high-temperature strength, static fatigue (creep rupture), and dynamic and cyclic fatigue performance were characterized. The efforts put forth were part of Work Breakdown Structure Subelement 3.2.1, {open_quotes}Rotor Data Base Generation.{close_quotes} PY6 is comparable to other hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) silicon nitrides currently being considered for advanced gas turbine engine applications.

  4. Growth and characterization of III-nitrides materials system for photonic and electronic devices by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Dongwon

    A wide variety of group III-Nitride-based photonic and electronic devices have opened a new era in the field of semiconductor research in the past ten years. The direct and large bandgap nature, intrinsic high carrier mobility, and the capability of forming heterostructures allow them to dominate photonic and electronic device market such as light emitters, photodiodes, or high-speed/high-power electronic devices. Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) based on group III-Nitrides materials are of interest due to potential capabilities for low dark current densities, high sensitivities and high optical gains in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral region. Wide-bandgap GaN-based APDs are excellent candidates for short-wavelength photodetectors because they have the capability for cut-off wavelengths in the UV spectral region (lambda operate in the solar-blind spectral regime of lambda 10,000 and 50, respectively. The large stable optical gains are attributed to the improved crystalline quality of epitaxial layers grown on low dislocation density bulk substrates. GaN p-i-n rectifiers have brought much research interest due to its superior physical properties. The AIN-free full-vertical GaN p-i-n rectifiers on n-type 6H-SiC substrates by employing a conducting AIGaN:Si buffer layer provides the advantages of the reduction of sidewall damage from plasma etching and lower forward resistance due to the reduction of current crowding at the bottom n-type layer. The AlGaN:Si nucleation layer was proven to provide excellent electrical properties while also acting as a good buffer role for subsequent GaN growth. The reverse breakdown voltage for a relatively thin 2.5 mum-thick i-region was found to be over -400V.

  5. Silicon nitride gradient film as the underlayer of ultra-thin tetrahedral amorphous carbon overcoat for magnetic recording slider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Guigen, E-mail: wanggghit@yahoo.com [Shenzhen Graduate School, Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Kuang Xuping; Zhang Huayu; Zhu Can [Shenzhen Graduate School, Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Han Jiecai [Shenzhen Graduate School, Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Center for Composite Materials, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Zuo Hongbo [Center for Composite Materials, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Ma Hongtao [SAE Technologies Development (Dongguan) Co., Ltd., Dongguan 523087 (China)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ultra-thin carbon films with different silicon nitride (Si-N) film underlayers were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It highlighted the influences of Si-N underlayers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The carbon films with Si-N underlayers obtained by nitriding especially at the substrate bias of -150 V, can exhibit better corrosion protection properties - Abstract: There are higher technical requirements for protection overcoat of magnetic recording slider used in high-density storage fields for the future. In this study, silicon nitride (Si-N) composition-gradient films were firstly prepared by nitriding of silicon thin films pre-sputtered on silicon wafers and magnetic recording sliders, using microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma source. The ultra-thin tetrahedral amorphous carbon films were then deposited on the Si-N films by filtered cathodic vacuum arc method. Compared with amorphous carbon overcoats with conventional silicon underlayers, the overcoats with Si-N underlayers obtained by plasma nitriding especially at the substrate bias of -150 V, can provide better corrosion protection for high-density magnetic recording sliders.

  6. Process for the production of metal nitride sintered bodies and resultant silicon nitride and aluminum nitride sintered bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, S.; Omori, M.; Hayashi, J.; Kayano, H.; Hamano, M.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the manufacture of metal nitride sintered bodies, in particular, a process in which a mixture of metal nitrite powders is shaped and heated together with a binding agent is described. Of the metal nitrides Si3N4 and AIN were used especially frequently because of their excellent properties at high temperatures. The goal is to produce a process for metal nitride sintered bodies with high strength, high corrosion resistance, thermal shock resistance, thermal shock resistance, and avoidance of previously known faults.

  7. Valence electronic structure of tantalum carbide and nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN; ChangZeng

    2007-01-01

    The valence electronic structures of tantalum carbide (TaC) and tantalum nitride (TaN) are studied by using the empirical electronic theory (EET). The results reveal that the bonds of these compounds have covalent, metallic and ionic characters. For a quantitative analysis of the relative strength of these components, their ionicities have been calculated by implanting the results of EET to the PVL model. It has been found that the ionicity of tantalum carbide is smaller than that of tantalum nitride. The EET results also reveal that the covalent electronic number of the strongest bond in the former is larger than that of the latter. All these suggest that the covalent bond of TaC is stronger than that of TaN, which coincides to that deduced from the first-principles method.……

  8. Valence electronic structure of tantalum carbide and nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The valence electronic structures of tantalum carbide (TaC) and tantalum nitride (TaN) are studied by using the empirical electronic theory (EET). The results reveal that the bonds of these compounds have covalent, metallic and ionic characters. For a quantitative analysis of the relative strength of these components, their ionicities have been calculated by implanting the results of EET to the PVL model. It has been found that the ionicity of tantalum carbide is smaller than that of tantalum nitride. The EET results also reveal that the covalent electronic number of the strongest bond in the former is larger than that of the latter. All these suggest that the covalent bond of TaC is stronger than that of TaN, which coincides to that deduced from the first-principles method.

  9. Nitridation of silicon /111/ - Auger and LEED results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delord, J. F.; Schrott, A. G.; Fain, S. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Clean silicon (111) (7x7) surfaces at up to 1050 C have been reacted with nitrogen ions and neutrals produced by a low energy ion gun. The LEED patterns observed are similar to those previously reported for reaction of silicon (111) (7x7) with NH3. The nitrogen KLL peak exhibits no shift or change in shape with nitride growth. At the same time the magnitude of the elemental silicon LVV peak at 92 eV decreases progressively as a new peak at 84 eV increases. The position of both peaks appears to be independent of the degree of nitridation. Since the Auger spectra are free of oxygen and other impurities, these features can be attributed only to silicon, nitrogen, and their reaction products. Characteristic features of the Auger spectra are related to LEED observations and to the growth of microcrystals of Si3N4.

  10. III-nitride semiconductors and their modern devices

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book is dedicated to GaN and its alloys AlGaInN (III-V nitrides), semiconductors with intrinsic properties well suited for visible and UV light emission and electronic devices working at high temperature, high frequency, and harsh environments. There has been a rapid growth in the industrial activity relating to GaN, with GaN now ranking at the second position (after Si) among all semiconductors. This is mainly thanks to LEDs, but also to the emergence of lasers and high power and high frequency electronics. GaN-related research activities are also diversifying, ranging from advanced optical sources and single electron devices to physical, chemical, and biological sensors, optical detectors, and energy converters. All recent developments of nitrides and of their technology are gathered here in a single volume, with chapters written by world leaders in the field. This third book of the series edited by B. Gil is complementary to the preceding two, and is expected to offer a modern vision of nitrides and...

  11. Offshore Substrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This shapefile displays the distribution of substrate types from Pt. Arena to Pt. Sal in central/northern California. Originally this data consisted of seven paper...

  12. Behavior of incorporated nitrogen in plasma-nitrided silicon oxide formed by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Nao; Itokawa, Hiroshi; Fujitsuka, Ryota; Sekine, Katsuyuki; Onoue, Seiji; Tonotani, Junichi

    2016-04-01

    The behavior of nitrogen (N) atoms in plasma-nitrided silicon oxide (SiO2) formed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was characterized by physical analysis and from electrical properties. The changes in the chemical bonding and distribution of N in plasma-nitrided SiO2 were investigated for different subsequent processes. N-Si3, N-Si2O, and N2 are formed in a SiO2 film by plasma nitridation. N2 molecules diffuse out during annealing at temperatures higher than 900 °C. NH species are generated from N2 molecules and H in the SiO2 film with subsequent oxide deposition using O3 as an oxidant. The capacitance-voltage (C-V) curves of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors are obtained. The negative shift of the C-V curve is caused by the increase in the density of positive fix charge traps in CVD-SiO2 induced by plasma nitridation. The C-V curve of plasma-nitrided SiO2 subjected to annealing shifts to the positive direction and that subjected to the subsequent oxide deposition shifts markedly to the negative direction. It is clarified that the density of positive charge fixed traps in plasma-nitrided SiO2 films decrease because the amount of N2 molecules is decreased by annealing, and that the density of traps increases because NH species are generated and move to the interface between SiO2 and the Si substrate with the subsequent oxide deposition.

  13. Facile fabrication of boron nitride nanosheets-amorphous carbon hybrid film for optoelectronic applications

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Shanhong

    2015-01-01

    A novel boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs)-amorphous carbon (a-C) hybrid film has been deposited successfully on silicon substrates by simultaneous electrochemical deposition, and showed a good integrity of this B-C-N composite film by the interfacial bonding. This synthesis can potentially provide the facile control of the B-C-N composite film for the potential optoelectronic devices. This journal is

  14. Transparent polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Norimasa; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Marquardt, Hauke; Kurnosov, Alexander; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kim, Byung-Nam; Yoshida, Hidehiro; Masuno, Atsunobu; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kulik, Eleonora; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Wakai, Fumihiro; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    Glasses and single crystals have traditionally been used as optical windows. Recently, there has been a high demand for harder and tougher optical windows that are able to endure severe conditions. Transparent polycrystalline ceramics can fulfill this demand because of their superior mechanical properties. It is known that polycrystalline ceramics with a spinel structure in compositions of MgAl2O4 and aluminum oxynitride (γ-AlON) show high optical transparency. Here we report the synthesis of the hardest transparent spinel ceramic, i.e. polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride (c-Si3N4). This material shows an intrinsic optical transparency over a wide range of wavelengths below its band-gap energy (258 nm) and is categorized as one of the third hardest materials next to diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN). Since the high temperature metastability of c-Si3N4 in air is superior to those of diamond and cBN, the transparent c-Si3N4 ceramic can potentially be used as a window under extremely severe conditions. PMID:28303948

  15. Friction Characteristics of Nitrided Layers on AISI 430 Ferritic Stainless Steel Obtained by Various Nitriding Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan AYDIN

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of plasma, gas and salt-bath nitriding techniques on the friction coefficient of AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel was studied in this paper. Samples were plasma nitrided in 80 % N2 + 20 % H2 atmosphere at 450 °C and 520 °C for 8 h at a pressure of 2 mbar, gas nitrided in NH3 and CO2 atmosphere at 570 °C for 13 h and salt-bath nitrided in a cyanide-cyanate salt-bath at 570 °C for 1.5 h. Characterisation of nitrided layers on the ferritic stainless steel was carried out by means of microstructure, microhardness, surface roughness and friction coefficient measurements. Friction characteristics of the nitrided layers on the 430 steel were investigated using a ball-on-disc friction-wear tester with a WC-Co ball as the counter-body under dry sliding conditions. Analysis of wear tracks was carried out by scanning electron microscopy. Maximum hardness and maximum case depth were achieved on the plasma nitrided sample at 520 ºC for 8 h. The plasma and salt-bath nitriding techniques significantly decreased the average surface roughness of the 430 ferritic stainless steel. The friction test results showed that the salt-bath nitrided layer had better friction-reducing ability than the other nitrided layers under dry sliding conditions. Furthermore, the friction characteristic of the plasma nitrided layer at 520 ºC was better than that of the plasma nitrided layer at 450 °C.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.1.3819

  16. Plasma Nitriding of Low Alloy Sintered Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiva Mansoorzadeh; Fakhreddin Ashrafizadeh; Xiao-Ying Li; Tom Bell

    2004-01-01

    Fe-3Cr-0.5Mo-0.3C and Fe-3Cr-1.4Mn-0.5Mo-0.367C sintered alloys were plasma nitrided at different temperatures. Characterization was performed by microhardness measurement, optical microscopy, SEM and XRD. Both materials had similar nitriding case properties. 1.4% manganese did not change the as-sintered microstructure considerably.It was observed that monophase compound layer, γ, formed with increasing temperature. Compound layer thickness increased with increasing temperature while nitriding depth increased up to a level and then decreased. Core softening was more pronounced at higher temperature owing to cementite coarsening.

  17. Atomic Resolution Microscopy of Nitrides in Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson

    2014-01-01

    MN and CrMN type nitride precipitates in 12%Cr steels have been investigated using atomic resolution microscopy. The MN type nitrides were observed to transform into CrMN both by composition and crystallography as Cr diffuses from the matrix into the MN precipitates. Thus a change from one precip...... layer between the crystalline nitride and ferrite matrix. Usually precipitates are described as having (semi) coherent or incoherent interfaces, but in this case it is more energetically favourable to create an amorphous layer instead of the incoherent interface....

  18. Synthesis of ternary nitrides by mechanochemical alloying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, C.J.H.; Zhu, J.J.; Lindelov, H.;

    2002-01-01

    Ternary metal nitrides ( of general formula MxM'N-y(z)) attract considerable interest because of their special mechanical, electrical, magnetic, and catalytic properties. Usually they are prepared by ammonolysis of ternary oxides (MxM'O-y(m)) at elevated temperatures. We show that ternary...... nitrides by mechanochemical alloying of a binary transition metal nitride (MxN) with an elemental transition metal. In this way, we have been able to prepare Fe3Mo3N and Co3Mo3N by ball-milling of Mo2N with Fe and Co, respectively. The transformation sequence from the starting materials ( the binary...

  19. Plasma nitriding of AISI 52100 ball bearing steel and effect of heat treatment on nitrided layer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ravindra Kumar; J Alphonsa; Ram Prakash; K S Boob; J Ghanshyam; P A Rayjada; P M Raole; S Mukherjee

    2011-02-01

    In this paper an effort has been made to plasma nitride the ball bearing steel AISI 52100. The difficulty with this specific steel is that its tempering temperature (∼170–200°C) is much lower than the standard processing temperature (∼460–580°C) needed for the plasma nitriding treatment. To understand the mechanism, effect of heat treatment on the nitrided layer steel is investigated. Experiments are performed on three different types of ball bearing races i.e. annealed, quenched and quench-tempered samples. Different gas compositions and process temperatures are maintained while nitriding these samples. In the quenched and quench-tempered samples, the surface hardness has decreased after plasma nitriding process. Plasma nitriding of annealed sample with argon and nitrogen gas mixture gives higher hardness in comparison to the hydrogen–nitrogen gas mixture. It is reported that the later heat treatment of the plasma nitrided annealed sample has shown improvement in the hardness of this steel. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the dominant phases in the plasma nitrided annealed sample are (Fe2−3N) and (Fe4N), whereas in the plasma nitrided annealed sample with later heat treatment only -Fe peak occurs.

  20. Molecular beam epitaxy of InN dots on nitrided sapphire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanyuk, Yaroslav E.; Dengel, Radu-Gabriel; Stebounova, LarissaV.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2007-04-20

    A series of self-assembled InN dots are grown by radio frequency (RF) plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) directly on nitrided sapphire. Initial nitridation of the sapphire substrates at 900 C results in the formation of a rough AlN surface layer, which acts as a very thin buffer layer and facilitates the nucleation of the InN dots according to the Stranski-Krastanow growth mode, with a wetting layer of {approx}0.9 nm. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) reveals that well-confined InN nanoislands with the greatest height/width at half-height ratio of 0.64 can be grown at 460 C. Lower substrate temperatures result in a reduced aspect ratio due to a lower diffusion rate of the In adatoms, whereas the thermal decomposition of InN truncates the growth at T>500 C. The densities of separated dots vary between 1.0 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2} and 2.5 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2} depending on the growth time. Optical response of the InN dots under laser excitation is studied with apertureless near-field scanning optical microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy, although no photoluminescence is observed from these samples. In view of the desirable implementation of InN nanostructures into photonic devices, the results indicate that nitrided sapphire is a suitable substrate for growing self-assembled InN nanodots.

  1. Molecular beam epitaxy of InN dots on nitrided sapphire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanyuk, Yaroslav E.; Dengel, Radu-Gabriel; Stebounova, LarissaV.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2007-04-20

    A series of self-assembled InN dots are grown by radio frequency (RF) plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) directly on nitrided sapphire. Initial nitridation of the sapphire substrates at 900 C results in the formation of a rough AlN surface layer, which acts as a very thin buffer layer and facilitates the nucleation of the InN dots according to the Stranski-Krastanow growth mode, with a wetting layer of {approx}0.9 nm. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) reveals that well-confined InN nanoislands with the greatest height/width at half-height ratio of 0.64 can be grown at 460 C. Lower substrate temperatures result in a reduced aspect ratio due to a lower diffusion rate of the In adatoms, whereas the thermal decomposition of InN truncates the growth at T>500 C. The densities of separated dots vary between 1.0 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2} and 2.5 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2} depending on the growth time. Optical response of the InN dots under laser excitation is studied with apertureless near-field scanning optical microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy, although no photoluminescence is observed from these samples. In view of the desirable implementation of InN nanostructures into photonic devices, the results indicate that nitrided sapphire is a suitable substrate for growing self-assembled InN nanodots.

  2. The neural substrates of cognitive flexibility are related to individual differences in preschool irritability: A fNIRS investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanwei Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Preschool (age 3–5 is a phase of rapid development in both cognition and emotion, making this a period in which the neurodevelopment of each domain is particularly sensitive to that of the other. During this period, children rapidly learn how to flexibly shift their attention between competing demands and, at the same time, acquire critical emotion regulation skills to respond to negative affective challenges. The integration of cognitive flexibility and individual differences in irritability may be an important developmental process of early childhood maturation. However, at present it is unclear if they share common neural substrates in early childhood. Our main goal was to examine the neural correlates of cognitive flexibility in preschool children and test for associations with irritability. Forty-six preschool aged children completed a novel, child-appropriate, Stroop task while dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC activation was recorded using functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS. Parents rated their child’s irritability. Results indicated that left DLPFC activation was associated with cognitive flexibility and positively correlated with irritability. Right DLPFC activation was also positively correlated with irritability. Results suggest the entwined nature of cognitive and emotional neurodevelopment during a developmental period of rapid and mutual acceleration.

  3. Flat-Top and Stacking-Fault-Free GaAs-Related Nanopillars Grown on Si Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouta Tateno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The VLS (vapor-liquid-solid method is one of the promising techniques for growing vertical III-V compound semiconductor nanowires on Si for application to optoelectronic circuits. Heterostructures grown in the axial direction by the VLS method and in the radial direction by the general layer-by-layer growth method make it possible to fabricate complicated and functional three-dimensional structures in a bottom-up manner. We can grow some vertical heterostructure nanopillars with flat tops on Si(111 substrates, and we have obtained core-multishell Ga(InP/GaAs/GaP nanowires with flat tops and their air-gap structures by using selective wet etching. Simulations indicate that a high- factor of over 2000 can be achieved for this air-gap structure. From the GaAs growth experiments, we found that zincblende GaAs without any stacking faults can be grown after the GaP nanowire growth. Pillars containing a quantum dot and without stacking faults can be grown by using this method. We can also obtain flat-top pillars without removing the Au catalysts when using small Au particles.

  4. Soft magnetism in nitrided Fe93Ni4Cr3 and Fe94Ni4T2 cold-rolled alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Craus, CB; Chezan, AR; Chechenin, NG; Boerma, DO; Niesen, L

    2003-01-01

    The magnetic properties in relation with the structure of nitrided cold-rolled Fe93Ni4Cr3 and Fe94Ni4Ti2 were studied. Various low-temperature nitriding treatments were applied in order to obtain soft magnetic materials. We show that the magnetic anisotropy depends sensitively on the nitrogen conten

  5. Transport properties of ultrathin black phosphorus on hexagonal boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doganov, Rostislav A.; Özyilmaz, Barbaros [Centre for Advanced 2D Materials and Graphene Research Centre, National University of Singapore, 6 Science Drive 2, 117546 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, 117542 Singapore (Singapore); Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering (NGS), National University of Singapore, 28 Medical Drive, 117456 Singapore (Singapore); Koenig, Steven P.; Yeo, Yuting [Centre for Advanced 2D Materials and Graphene Research Centre, National University of Singapore, 6 Science Drive 2, 117546 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, 117542 Singapore (Singapore); Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)

    2015-02-23

    Ultrathin black phosphorus, or phosphorene, is a two-dimensional material that allows both high carrier mobility and large on/off ratios. Similar to other atomic crystals, like graphene or layered transition metal dichalcogenides, the transport behavior of few-layer black phosphorus is expected to be affected by the underlying substrate. The properties of black phosphorus have so far been studied on the widely utilized SiO{sub 2} substrate. Here, we characterize few-layer black phosphorus field effect transistors on hexagonal boron nitride—an atomically smooth and charge trap-free substrate. We measure the temperature dependence of the field effect mobility for both holes and electrons and explain the observed behavior in terms of charged impurity limited transport. We find that in-situ vacuum annealing at 400 K removes the p-doping of few-layer black phosphorus on both boron nitride and SiO{sub 2} substrates and reduces the hysteresis at room temperature.

  6. Pulsed laser deposition of niobium nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farha, Ashraf Hassan, E-mail: ahass006@odu.edu; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E., E-mail: helsayed@odu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States); Applied Research Center, Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11566 (Egypt); Ufuktepe, Yüksel, E-mail: ufuk@cu.edu.tr [Department of Physics, University of Cukurova, 01330 Adana (Turkey); Myneni, Ganapati, E-mail: rao@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States)

    2015-12-04

    Niobium nitride (NbN{sub x}) films were grown on Nb and Si(100) substrates using pulsed laser deposition. NbN{sub x} films were deposited on Nb substrates using PLD with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ = 1064 nm, ∼40 ns pulse width, and 10 Hz repetition rate) at different laser fluences, nitrogen background pressures and deposition substrate temperatures. When all the fabrication parameters are fixed, except for the laser fluence, the surface roughness, nitrogen content, and grain size increase with increasing laser fluence. Increasing nitrogen background pressure leads to a change in the phase structure of the NbN{sub x} films from mixed β-Nb{sub 2}N and cubic δ-NbN phases to single hexagonal β-Nb{sub 2}N. The substrate temperature affects the preferred orientation of the crystal structure. The structural and electronic, properties of NbN{sub x} deposited on Si(100) were also investigated. The NbN{sub x} films exhibited a cubic δ-NbN with a strong (111) orientation. A correlation between surface morphology, electronic, and superconducting properties was found. The observations establish guidelines for adjusting the deposition parameters to achieve the desired NbN{sub x} film morphology and phase.

  7. Chemical rate model for the surface pyrolysis of tetrakis(dimethylamido)titanium to form titanium nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toprac, Anthony J.; Iacoponi, John A.; Littau, Karl A.

    1998-09-01

    A chemical kinetic rate model for the deposition of titanium nitride films from the surface reaction of tetrakis(dimethyl-amido)titanium (TDMAT) was developed. Without ammonia addition, TDMAT forms a titanium nitride film by pyrolyzing on the hot substrate surface. Experimental data from the applied materials 5000 deposition tool was modeled using a CSTR formulation. With the parameters of the surface reaction model regressed to fit portions of the experimental results, reasonably accurate model predictions over the entire domain of experimental data were obtained.

  8. Mechanism and prediction of failure of diamond films deposited on various substrates by HFCVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ling-ping; SUN Xin-yuan; LI Shao-lu; LI De-yi; CHEN Xiao-hua

    2004-01-01

    Diamond films were deposited on the WC-Co cemented carbide and Si3N4 ceramic cutting tool substrates by hot-filament-assisted chemical vapour deposition. The adherence property of diamond films was estimated using the critical load (Pcr) in the indentation test. The adhesive strength of diamond films is related to the intermediate layer between the film and the substrate. Poor adhesion of diamond films to polished cemented carbide substrate is owing to the formation of graphite phase in the interface. The adhesion of diamond films deposited on acid etched cemented carbide substrate is improved, and the peeling-off of the films often happens in the loosen layer of WC particles where the cobalt element is nearly removed. The diamond films' adhesion to cemented carbide substrate whose surface layer is decarbonizated is strengthened dramatically because WC phase forms by reaction between the deposited carbon and tungsten in the surface layer of substrates during the deposition of diamond, which results in chemical combination in the film-substrate interface. The adhesion of diamond films to silicon nitride substrate is the firmest due to the formation of chemical combination of the SiC intermediate layer in the interfaces. In the piston-turning application, the diamond-coated Si3N4 ceramic and the cemented carbide cutting tools usually fail in the form of collapsing of edge and cracking or flaking respectively. They have no built-up edge(BUE) as long as coating is intact.As it wears through, BUE develops and the cutting force on it increases 1 - 3 times than that prior to failure. This can predict the failure of diamond-coated cutting tools.

  9. Elastic Properties of Several Silicon Nitride Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X.; Metcalf, T. H.; Wang, Q.; Photiadis, D. M.

    2007-01-01

    We have measured the internal friction (Q{sup -1}) of amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiN{sub x}) films prepared by a variety of methods, including low-pressure chemical-vapor deposition (LPCVD), plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition (PECVD), and hot-wire chemical-vapor deposition (HWCVD) from 0.5 K to room temperature. The measurements are made by depositing the films onto extremely high-Q silicon double paddle oscillator substrates with a resonant frequency of {approx}5500 Hz. We find the elastic properties of these a-SiN{sub x} films resemble those of amorphous silicon (a-Si) films, demonstrating considerable variation which depends on the film growth methods and post deposition annealing. The internal friction for most of the films shows a broad temperature-independent plateau below 30 K, characteristic of amorphous solids. The values of Q{sup -1}, however, vary from film to film in this plateau region by more than one order of magnitude. This has been observed in tetrehedrally covalent-bonded amorphous thin films, like a-Si, a-Ge, and a-C. The PECVD films have the highest Q{sup -1} just like a normal amorphous solid, while LPCVD films have an internal friction more than one order of magnitude lower. All the films show a reduction of Q{sup -1} after annealing at 800 C, even for the LPCVD films which were prepared at 850 C. This can be viewed as a reduction of structural disorder.

  10. Epitaxial growth of ZnO thin films on AlN substrates deposited at low temperature by magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmane, S.; Soussou, A.; Gautron, E.; Jouan, P.Y.; Le Brizoual, L.; Barreau, N.; Djouadi, M.A. [Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel -IMN-, UMR CNRS 6502, Nantes (France); Abdallah, B. [Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel -IMN-, UMR CNRS 6502, Nantes (France); Atomic Energy Commission Syrian (AECS), Damascus (Syria); Soltani, A. [IEMN, UMR CNRS 8520, USTL, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    2010-07-15

    Hexagonal aluminium nitride (AlN) and zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films have been deposited by DC and RF reactive magnetron sputtering at room temperature. For a first set of samples, sputtered AlN films were deposited on silicon ZnO substrate. For a second set, ZnO films were deposited on AlN substrate. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) analysis of the synthesized AlN film on ZnO buffer layer have shown some amorphous zones close to the interface followed by a nanocrystalline layer exhibiting (10-10) and (0002) orientations of the hexagonal AlN crystalline phase. At the top of the film, a relatively well-crystallized layer with a single (0002) orientation has been observed. We have related the relatively bad interface to the presence of oxygen coming from ZnO substrate. This behaviour was different for the growth of ZnO film when AlN was used as substrate. In fact, we have observed thanks to HRTEM images and selected area electron diffraction patterns, that the ZnO film deposited on AlN substrate exhibits an epitaxial growth which is strongly dependent on the crystalline quality of AlN film. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  11. Kinetics and thermodynamics of Si(111) surface nitridation in ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansurov, Vladimir G.; Malin, Timur V.; Galitsyn, Yurij G.; Shklyaev, Alexander A.; Zhuravlev, Konstantin S.

    2016-05-01

    Kinetics and thermodynamics of Si(111) surface nitridation under an ammonia flux at different substrate temperatures are investigated by reflection high-energy electron diffraction. Two different stages of the nitridation process were revealed. The initial stage is the fast (within few seconds) formation of ordered two-dimensional SiN phase, occuring due to the topmost active surface Si atom (Sisurf) interaction with ammonia molecules. It is followed by the late stage consisting in the slow (within few minutes) amorphous Si3N4 phase formation as a result of the interaction of Si atoms in the lattice site (Siinc) with chemisorbed ammonia molecules. It was found that the ordered SiN phase formation rate decreases, as the temperature increases. The kinetic model of the initial stage was developed, in which the ordered SiN phase formation is the two-dimensional phase transition in the lattice gas with SiN cells. The enthalpy of the active surface Si atom generation on the clean Si(111) surface was estimated to be about 1.5 eV. In contrast, the amorphous Si3N4 phase formation is the normal (thermally activated) chemical process with the first-order kinetics, whose activation energy and pre-exponential factor are 2.4 eV and 108 1/s, respectively.

  12. Reactive pulsed laser deposition of gold nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caricato, A.P. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Fernandez, M. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Leggieri, G. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy)]. E-mail: leggieri@le.infn.it; Luches, A. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Martino, M. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Romano, F. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Tunno, T. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Valerini, D. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Verdyan, A. [Science Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, Holon 58102 (Israel); Soifer, Y.M. [Science Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, Holon 58102 (Israel); Azoulay, J. [Science Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, Holon 58102 (Israel); Meda, L. [IGD Polimeri Europa S.p.A, Novara (Italy)

    2007-07-31

    We report on the growth and characterization of gold nitride thin films on Si <1 0 0> substrates at room temperature by reactive pulsed laser ablation. A pure (99.95%) Au target was ablated with KrF excimer laser pulses in nitrogen containing atmosphere (N{sub 2} or NH{sub 3}). The gas ambient pressure was varied in the range 0.1-100 Pa. The morphology of the films was studied by using optical, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, evidencing compact films with RMS roughness in the range 3.6-35.1 nm, depending on the deposition pressure. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) were used to detect the nitrogen concentration into the films. The EDS nitrogen peak does not decrease in intensity after 2 h annealing at 250 deg. C. Film resistivity was measured using a four-point probe and resulted in the (4-20) x 10{sup -8} {omega} m range, depending on the ambient pressure, to be compared with the value 2.6 x 10{sup -8} {omega} m of a pure gold film. Indentation and scratch measurements gave microhardness values of 2-3 GPa and the Young's modulus close to 100 GPa. X-ray photoemission spectra clearly showed the N 1s peak around 400 eV and displaced with respect to N{sub 2} phase. All these measurements point to the formation of the gold nitride phase.

  13. Reactive pulsed laser deposition of gold nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricato, A. P.; Fernàndez, M.; Leggieri, G.; Luches, A.; Martino, M.; Romano, F.; Tunno, T.; Valerini, D.; Verdyan, A.; Soifer, Y. M.; Azoulay, J.; Meda, L.

    2007-07-01

    We report on the growth and characterization of gold nitride thin films on Si substrates at room temperature by reactive pulsed laser ablation. A pure (99.95%) Au target was ablated with KrF excimer laser pulses in nitrogen containing atmosphere (N 2 or NH 3). The gas ambient pressure was varied in the range 0.1-100 Pa. The morphology of the films was studied by using optical, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, evidencing compact films with RMS roughness in the range 3.6-35.1 nm, depending on the deposition pressure. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) were used to detect the nitrogen concentration into the films. The EDS nitrogen peak does not decrease in intensity after 2 h annealing at 250 °C. Film resistivity was measured using a four-point probe and resulted in the (4-20) × 10 -8 Ω m range, depending on the ambient pressure, to be compared with the value 2.6 × 10 -8 Ω m of a pure gold film. Indentation and scratch measurements gave microhardness values of 2-3 GPa and the Young's modulus close to 100 GPa. X-ray photoemission spectra clearly showed the N 1s peak around 400 eV and displaced with respect to N 2 phase. All these measurements point to the formation of the gold nitride phase.

  14. Titanium Nitride and Nitrogen Ion Implanted Coated Dental Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Berzins

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Titanium nitride and/or nitrogen ion implanted coated dental materials have been investigated since the mid-1980s and considered in various applications in dentistry such as implants, abutments, orthodontic wires, endodontic files, periodontal/oral hygiene instruments, and casting alloys for fixed restorations. Multiple methodologies have been employed to create the coatings, but detailed structural analysis of the coatings is generally lacking in the dental literature. Depending on application, the purpose of the coating is to provide increased surface hardness, abrasion/wear resistance, esthetics, and corrosion resistance, lower friction, as well as greater beneficial interaction with adjacent biological and material substrates. While many studies have reported on the achievement of these properties, a consensus is not always clear. Additionally, few studies have been conducted to assess the efficacy of the coatings in a clinical setting. Overall, titanium nitride and/or nitrogen ion implanted coated dental materials potentially offer advantages over uncoated counterparts, but more investigation is needed to document the structure of the coatings and their clinical effectiveness.

  15. Surface modification of titanium by plasma nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapczinski Myriam Pereira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A systematic investigation was undertaken on commercially pure titanium submitted to plasma nitriding. Thirteen different sets of operational parameters (nitriding time, sample temperature and plasma atmosphere were used. Surface analyses were performed using X-ray diffraction, nuclear reaction and scanning electron microscopy. Wear tests were done with stainless steel Gracey scaler, sonic apparatus and pin-on-disc machine. The obtained results indicate that the tribological performance can be improved for samples treated with the following conditions: nitriding time of 3 h; plasma atmosphere consisting of 80%N2+20%H2 or 20%N2+80%H2; sample temperature during nitriding of 600 or 800 degreesC.

  16. Titanium nitride nanoparticles for therapeutic applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Kildishev, Alexander V.; Boltasseva, Alexandra;

    2014-01-01

    Titanium nitride nanoparticles exhibit plasmonic resonances in the biological transparency window where high absorption efficiencies can be obtained with small dimensions. Both lithographic and colloidal samples are examined from the perspective of nanoparticle thermal therapy. © 2014 OSA....

  17. Materials synthesis: Two-dimensional gallium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koratkar, Nikhil A.

    2016-11-01

    Graphene is used as a capping sheet to synthesize 2D gallium nitride by means of migration-enhanced encapsulation growth. This technique may allow the stabilization of 2D materials that are not amenable to synthesis by traditional methods.

  18. Dissolution of bulk specimens of silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, W. F.; Merkle, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    An accurate chemical characterization of silicon nitride has become important in connection with current efforts to incorporate components of this material into advanced heat engines. However, there are problems concerning a chemical analysis of bulk silicon nitride. Current analytical methods require the pulverization of bulk specimens. A pulverization procedure making use of grinding media, on the other hand, will introduce contaminants. A description is given of a dissolution procedure which overcomes these difficulties. It has been found that up to at least 0.6 g solid pieces of various samples of hot pressed and reaction bonded silicon nitride can be decomposed in a mixture of 3 mL hydrofluoric acid and 1 mL nitric acid overnight at 150 C in a Parr bomb. High-purity silicon nitride is completely soluble in nitric acid after treatment in the bomb. Following decomposition, silicon and hydrofluoric acid are volatilized and insoluble fluorides are converted to a soluble form.

  19. In vitro bio-functionality of gallium nitride sensors for radiation biophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofstetter, Markus [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Howgate, John [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 3, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Schmid, Martin [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Schoell, Sebastian; Sachsenhauser, Matthias [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 3, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Adiguezel, Denis [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Stutzmann, Martin; Sharp, Ian D. [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 3, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Thalhammer, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.thalhammer@helmholtz-muenchen.de [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    2012-07-27

    dynamics of adherent cells were compared to control samples. The impact of ionizing radiation on DNA, along with the associated cellular repair mechanisms, is well characterized and serves as a reference tool for evaluation of substrate effects. The results indicate that gallium nitride does not require specific surface treatments to ensure biocompatibility and suggest that cell signaling is not affected by micro-environmental alterations arising from gallium nitride-cell interactions. The observation that gallium nitride provides no bio-functional influence on the cellular environment confirms that this material is well suited for future biosensing applications without the need for additional chemical surface modification.

  20. Photocurrent generation in carbon nitride and carbon nitride/conjugated polymer composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, Joshua C; Billon, Florence; Debiemme-Chouvy, Catherine; Deslouis, Claude; Pailleret, Alain; Semenikhin, Oleg A

    2012-09-26

    The semiconductor and photovoltaic properties of carbon nitride (CNx) thin films prepared using a reactive magnetron cathodic sputtering technique were investigated both individually and as composites with an organic conjugated polymer, poly(2,2'-bithiophene) (PBT). The CNx films showed an increasing thickness as the deposition power and/or nitrogen content in the gas mixture increase. At low nitrogen content and low deposition power (25-50 W), the film structure was dominated by the abundance of the graphitic sp(2) regions, whereas at higher nitrogen contents and magnetron power CNx films started to demonstrate semiconductor properties, as evidenced by the occurrence of photoconductivity and the development of a space charge region. However, CNx films alone did not show any reproducible photovoltaic properties. The situation changed, however, when CNx was deposited onto conjugated PBT substrates. In this configuration, CNx was found to function as an acceptor material improving the photocurrent generation both in solution and in solid state photovoltaic devices, with the external quantum efficiencies reaching 1% at high nitrogen contents. The occurrence of the donor-acceptor charge transfer was further evidenced by suppression of the n-doping of the PBT polymer by CNx. Nanoscale atomic force microscopy (AFM) and current-sensing AFM data suggested that CNx may form a bulk heterojunction with PBT.

  1. Reticulated porous silicon nitride-based ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Mazzocchi, Mauro; Medri, Valentina; Guicciardi, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    The interest towards the production of porous silicon nitride originates from the unique combination of light weight, of mechanical and physical properties typical of this class of ceramics that make them attractive for many engineering applications. Although pores are generally believed to deteriorate the mechanical properties of ceramics (the strength of porous ceramics decreases exponentially with an increase of porosity), the recent literature reports that porous silicon nitride can exhib...

  2. Scanning proximal microscopy study of the thin layers of silicon carbide-aluminum nitride solid solution manufactured by fast sublimation epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tománek P.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study is a growth of SiC/(SiC1−x(AlNx structures by fast sublimation epitaxy of the polycrystalline source of (SiC1−x(AlNx and their characterisation by proximal scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. For that purpose optimal conditions of sublimation process have been defined. Manufactured structures could be used as substrates for wide-band-gap semiconductor devices on the basis of nitrides, including gallium nitride, aluminum nitride and their alloys, as well as for the production of transistors with high mobility of electrons and also for creation of blue and ultraviolet light emitters (light-emitted diodes and laser diodes. The result of analysis shows that increasing of the growth temperature up to 2300 K allows carry out sublimation epitaxy of thin layers of aluminum nitride and its solid solution.

  3. The Nitrogen-Nitride Anode.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delnick, Frank M.

    2014-10-01

    Nitrogen gas N 2 can be reduced to nitride N -3 in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt electrolyte. However, the direct oxidation of N -3 back to N 2 is kinetically slow and only occurs at high overvoltage. The overvoltage for N -3 oxidation can be eliminated by coordinating the N -3 with BN to form the dinitridoborate (BN 2 -3 ) anion which forms a 1-D conjugated linear inorganic polymer with -Li-N-B-N- repeating units. This polymer precipitates out of solution as Li 3 BN 2 which becomes a metallic conductor upon delithiation. Li 3 BN 2 is oxidized to Li + + N 2 + BN at about the N 2 /N -3 redox potential with very little overvoltage. In this report we evaluate the N 2 /N -3 redox couple as a battery anode for energy storage.

  4. An alternative approach to the growth of single crystal gallium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan, Neville

    1993-06-01

    This project has been primarily concerned with investigating a new approach to the synthesis of epitaxial layers of high purity gallium nitride. The new approach involves the use of hydrazoic acid, HN3, a previously untried precursor as the source of active nitrogen. A new, all-stainless steel apparatus which is UHV compatible, has been constructed. It has been designed to allow growth studies to be made by the chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) technique or by low pressure metal organic vapour phase deposition (LPMOCVD) at pressures up to ca. 1 mbar. During the grant period, the apparatus has been constructed, tested, and modified. Experiments have been carried out which show that gallium nitride and aluminium nitride can be made from the reaction of hydrazoic acid with trimethyl gallium and trimethyl aluminium respectively, at a hot substrate surface. In-situ RHEED patterns and ex-situ Auger spectra and x-ray diffraction data have been obtained. Systematic studies aimed at producing high quality single crystal films have been made. The results are promising and uniform, golden yellow films of gallium nitride can now be produced. RHEED data show that the films are composed of highly orientated crystals. The x-ray results support this, with crystal sizes being at least 1000 A with the crystals strongly orientated along the c-axis.

  5. Fabrication and Characterization of a Ruthenium Nitride Membrane for Electrochemical pH Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hung Liao

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available ThepH sensing and nonideal characteristics of a ruthenium nitride (RuN sensing membrane pH sensor were investigated. RuN thin films were deposited from a 99.9% ruthenium target on p-type silicon substrates using radio frequency (r.f. sputtering with N2 gas. Subsequently, the nanometric structure and surface morphology of RuN thin films were determined. The sensitivity of the RuN sensing membrane pH sensor was 58.03 mV/pH, obtained from ID-VG curves with a current-voltage (I-V measurement system in standard buffer solutions from pH 1 to pH 13 at room temperature (25 °C. Moreover, the nonideal characteristics of the RuN sensing membrane, such as temperature coefficient, drift with light influence, drift rate and hysteresis width, etc. were also investigated. Finally, the sensing characteristics of the RuN membrane were compared with titanium nitride (TiN, aluminum nitride (AlN and silicon nitride (Si3N4 membranes.

  6. Modelling of the layer evolution during nitriding processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, U.; Oseguera, J.; Schabes, P. [CEM, Atizapan (Mexico)

    1995-12-31

    The evolution of concomitant layers of nitrides is presented. The layer formation is experimentally achieved through two processes: Nitriding with a weakly ionized plasma and nitrogen post-discharge nitriding. The nitriding processes were performed on samples of pure iron and carbon steel. Nitriding temperatures were close but different from the eutectoid transformation point temperature. The experimental layer growth pattern is compared with a model of mass transfer, in which interface mass balance is considered. In the model the authors have considered the formation of one and two compact nitride layers. For short time of treatment, it is shown that a parabolic profile does not satisfactorily describe the layer growth.

  7. Electrochemical Solution Growth of Magnetic Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monson, Todd C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pearce, Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic nitrides, if manufactured in bulk form, would provide designers of transformers and inductors with a new class of better performing and affordable soft magnetic materials. According to experimental results from thin films and/or theoretical calculations, magnetic nitrides would have magnetic moments well in excess of current state of the art soft magnets. Furthermore, magnetic nitrides would have higher resistivities than current transformer core materials and therefore not require the use of laminates of inactive material to limit eddy current losses. However, almost all of the magnetic nitrides have been elusive except in difficult to reproduce thin films or as inclusions in another material. Now, through its ability to reduce atmospheric nitrogen, the electrochemical solution growth (ESG) technique can bring highly sought after (and previously inaccessible) new magnetic nitrides into existence in bulk form. This method utilizes a molten salt as a solvent to solubilize metal cations and nitrogen ions produced electrochemically and form nitrogen compounds. Unlike other growth methods, the scalable ESG process can sustain high growth rates (~mm/hr) even under reasonable operating conditions (atmospheric pressure and 500 °C). Ultimately, this translates into a high throughput, low cost, manufacturing process. The ESG process has already been used successfully to grow high quality GaN. Below, the experimental results of an exploratory express LDRD project to access the viability of the ESG technique to grow magnetic nitrides will be presented.

  8. Multi-objective optimization of steel nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Cavaliere

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Steel nitriding is a thermo-chemical process largely employed in the machine components production to solve mainly wear and fatigue damage in materials. The process is strongly influenced by many different variables such as steel composition, nitrogen potential (range 0.8–35, temperature (range 350–1200 °C, time (range 2–180 hours. In the present study, the influence of such parameters affecting the nitriding layers' thickness, hardness, composition and residual stress was evaluated. The aim was to streamline the process by numerical–experimental analysis allowing to define the optimal conditions for the success of the process. The optimization software that was used is modeFRONTIER (Esteco, through which was defined a set of input parameters (steel composition, nitrogen potential, nitriding time, etc. evaluated on the basis of an optimization algorithm carefully chosen for the multi-objective analysis. The mechanical and microstructural results belonging to the nitriding process, performed with different processing conditions for various steels, are presented. The data were employed to obtain the analytical equations describing nitriding behavior as a function of nitriding parameters and steel composition. The obtained model was validated through control designs and optimized by taking into account physical and processing conditions.

  9. Gettering of interstitial iron in silicon by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposited silicon nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, A. Y.; Sun, C.; Markevich, V. P.; Peaker, A. R.; Murphy, J. D.; Macdonald, D.

    2016-11-01

    It is known that the interstitial iron concentration in silicon is reduced after annealing silicon wafers coated with plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposited (PECVD) silicon nitride films. The underlying mechanism for the significant iron reduction has remained unclear and is investigated in this work. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) depth profiling of iron is performed on annealed iron-contaminated single-crystalline silicon wafers passivated with PECVD silicon nitride films. SIMS measurements reveal a high concentration of iron uniformly distributed in the annealed silicon nitride films. This accumulation of iron in the silicon nitride film matches the interstitial iron loss in the silicon bulk. This finding conclusively shows that the interstitial iron is gettered by the silicon nitride films during annealing over a wide temperature range from 250 °C to 900 °C, via a segregation gettering effect. Further experimental evidence is presented to support this finding. Deep-level transient spectroscopy analysis shows that no new electrically active defects are formed in the silicon bulk after annealing iron-containing silicon with silicon nitride films, confirming that the interstitial iron loss is not due to a change in the chemical structure of iron related defects in the silicon bulk. In addition, once the annealed silicon nitride films are removed, subsequent high temperature processes do not result in any reappearance of iron. Finally, the experimentally measured iron decay kinetics are shown to agree with a model of iron diffusion to the surface gettering sites, indicating a diffusion-limited iron gettering process for temperatures below 700 °C. The gettering process is found to become reaction-limited at higher temperatures.

  10. Quantitative Prediction of Human Renal Clearance and Drug-Drug Interactions of Organic Anion Transporter Substrates Using In Vitro Transport Data: A Relative Activity Factor Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathialagan, Sumathy; Piotrowski, Mary A; Tess, David A; Feng, Bo; Litchfield, John; Varma, Manthena V

    2017-04-01

    Organic anion transporters (OATs) are important in the renal secretion, and thus, the clearance, of many drugs; and their functional change can result in pharmacokinetic variability. In this study, we applied transport rates measured in vitro using OAT-transfected human embryonic kidney cells to predict human renal secretory and total renal clearance of 31 diverse drugs. Selective substrates to OAT1 (tenofovir), OAT2 (acyclovir and ganciclovir), and OAT3 (benzylpenicillin, oseltamivir acid) were used to obtain relative activity factors (RAFs) for these individual transporters by relating in vitro transport clearance (after physiologic scaling) to in vivo secretory clearance. Using the estimated RAFs (0.64, 7.3, and 4.1, respectively, for OAT1, OAT2, and OAT3, respectively) and the in vitro active clearances, renal secretory clearance and total renal clearance were predicted with average fold errors (AFEs) of 1.89 and 1.40, respectively. The results show that OAT3-mediated transport play a predominant role in renal secretion for 22 of the 31 drugs evaluated. This mechanistic static approach was further applied to quantitatively predict renal drug-drug interactions (AFE ∼1.6) of the substrate drugs with probenecid, a clinical probe OAT inhibitor. In conclusion, the proposed in vitro-in vivo extrapolation approach is the first comprehensive attempt toward mechanistic modeling of renal secretory clearance based on routinely employed in vitro cell models.

  11. Investigation of (111 wafers and comparison with (100 substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Bahari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available  In the last decade, Si(100 has been used as a suitable substrate in field effect transistors. Some issues such as leakage current and tunneling current through the ultrathin films have been increased with shrinking the electronic devices – particularly, field effect transistors – to nanoscale, which is threatening more use of Si(100. We have thus demonstrated a series of experiments to grow ultrathin films on both Si(100 and Si(111 substrates and studied their nanostructural properties to see the possibility of replacing Si(100 with Si(111. The obtained results indicate that Si(111 substrate with silicon nitride film on top is desirable.

  12. Thermal Oxidation of Silicon Carbide Substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiufang Chen; Li'na Ning; Yingmin Wang; Juan Li; Xiangang Xu; Xiaobo Hu; Minhua Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Thermal oxidation was used to remove the subsurface damage of silicon carbide (SiC) surfaces. The anisotrow of oxidation and the composition of oxide layers on Si and C faces were analyzed. Regular pits were observed on the surface after the removal of the oxide layers, which were detrimental to the growth of high quality epitaxial layers. The thickness and composition of the oxide layers were characterized by Rutherford backscat-tering spectrometry (RBS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Epitaxial growth was performed in a metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system. The substrate surface morphol-ogy after removing the oxide layer and gallium nitride (GaN) epilayer surface were observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results showed that the GaN epilayer grown on the oxidized substrates was superior to that on the unoxidized substrates.

  13. Effects of immobilization and aerobic training on proteins related to intramuscular substrate storage and metabolism in young and older men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigelsø Hansen, Andreas; Gram, Martin; Wiuff, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    GS (74%) protein compared to the older men. Immobilization decreased and training restored HAD activity, GS and SNAP23 protein content in young and older men. CONCLUSION: Evidence of age-related metabolic inflexibility is presented, seen as body fat and IMTG accumulation. The question arises...

  14. Direct access to macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with inverse opal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weitian; DiSalvo, Francis J

    2015-03-21

    We report a facile synthesis of single-phase, nanocrystalline macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with an inverse opal morphology. The material is characterized using XRD, SEM, HR-TEM/STEM, TGA and XPS. Interconversion of macroporous CrN to Cr2O3 and back to CrN while retaining the inverse opal morphology is also demonstrated.

  15. Structural analysis of nitride layer formed on uranium metal by glow plasma surface nitriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Kezhao, E-mail: liukz@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China); Bin Ren [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China); Xiao Hong [China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-71, Mianyang 621907 (China); Long Zhong [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Hong Zhanglian, E-mail: hong_zhanglian@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Yang Hui [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Wu Sheng [China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-71, Mianyang 621907 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nitride layer was formed on uranium by glow plasma surface nitriding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Four zones were observed in the nitride layer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The chemical states of uranium, nitrogen, and oxygen were identified by AES. - Abstract: The nitride layer was formed on uranium metal by a glow plasma surface nitriding method. The structure and composition of the layer were investigated by X-ray diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy. The nitride layer mainly consisted of {alpha}-phase U{sub 2}N{sub 3} nanocrystals with an average grain size about 10-20 nm. Four zones were identified in the layer, which were the oxide surface zone, the nitride mainstay zone, the oxide-existence interface zone, and the nitrogen-diffusion matrix zone. The gradual decrease of binding energies of uranium revealed the transition from oxide to nitride to metal states with the layer depth, while the chemical states of nitrogen and oxygen showed small variation.

  16. III-Nitride advanced technologies and equipment for microelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, S. I.; Alexeev, A. N.; Mamaev, V. V.; Krasovitsky, D. M.; Chaly, V. P.

    2016-12-01

    Using of complex equipment SemiTEq shown in example of a closed cycle of basic technological operations for production of high-power field microwave transistors based on gallium nitride in the "Svetlana-Rost" JSC. Basic technological operations are shown: MBE growth of heterostructures, metal deposition of contacts using electron-beam evaporation system, thermal annealing of ohmic contacts, meza-isolation plasma-chemical etching and dielectric plasma deposition. The main problems during the technological route as well as ways to solve are discussed. In particular, ways to reduce the dislocation density in the active region of the transistor heterostructures grown on the mismatched substrates are described in detail. Special attention given to the homogeneity and reproducibility both after some manufacturing operations and applied to the end product.

  17. Methods for improved growth of group III nitride semiconductor compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnik, Yuriy; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

    2015-03-17

    Methods are disclosed for growing group III-nitride semiconductor compounds with advanced buffer layer technique. In an embodiment, a method includes providing a suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. The method includes forming an AlN buffer layer by flowing an ammonia gas into a growth zone of the processing chamber, flowing an aluminum halide containing precursor to the growth zone and at the same time flowing additional hydrogen halide or halogen gas into the growth zone of the processing chamber. The additional hydrogen halide or halogen gas that is flowed into the growth zone during buffer layer deposition suppresses homogeneous AlN particle formation. The hydrogen halide or halogen gas may continue flowing for a time period while the flow of the aluminum halide containing precursor is turned off.

  18. Spectroscopic ellipsometry characterization of thin-film silicon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jellison, G.E. Jr.; Modine, F.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Doshi, P.; Rohatgi, A. [Georiga Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1997-05-01

    We have measured and analyzed the optical characteristics of a series of silicon nitride thin films prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on silicon substrates for photovoltaic applications. Spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements were made by using a two-channel spectroscopic polarization modulator ellipsometer that measures N, S, and C data simultaneously. The data were fit to a model consisting of air / roughness / SiN / crystalline silicon. The roughness was modeled using the Bruggeman effective medium approximation, assuming 50% SiN, 50% voids. The optical functions of the SiN film were parameterized using a model by Jellison and Modine. All the {Chi}{sup 2} are near 1, demonstrating that this model works extremely well for all SiN films. The measured dielectric functions were used to make optimized SiN antireflection coatings for crystalline silicon solar cells.

  19. Localized surface phonon polariton resonances in polar gallium nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Kaijun, E-mail: kfeng@nd.edu; Islam, S. M.; Verma, Jai; Hoffman, Anthony J. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Streyer, William; Wasserman, Daniel [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Jena, Debdeep [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14850 (United States)

    2015-08-24

    We demonstrate the excitation of localized surface phonon polaritons in an array of sub-diffraction pucks fabricated in an epitaxial layer of gallium nitride (GaN) on a silicon carbide (SiC) substrate. The array is characterized via polarization- and angle-dependent reflection spectroscopy in the mid-infrared, and coupling to several localized modes is observed in the GaN Reststrahlen band (13.4–18.0 μm). The same structure is simulated using finite element methods and the charge density of the modes are studied; transverse dipole modes are identified for the transverse electric and magnetic polarizations and a quadrupole mode is identified for the transverse magnetic polarization. The measured mid-infrared spectrum agrees well with numerically simulated spectra. This work could enable optoelectronic structures and devices that support surface modes at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths.

  20. Methods for forming group III-arsenide-nitride semiconductor materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Jo S. (Inventor); Welch, David F. (Inventor); Scifres, Donald R. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for forming Group III-arsenide-nitride semiconductor materials. Group III elements are combined with group V elements, including at least nitrogen and arsenic, in concentrations chosen to lattice match commercially available crystalline substrates. Epitaxial growth of these III-V crystals results in direct bandgap materials, which can be used in applications such as light emitting diodes and lasers. Varying the concentrations of the elements in the III-V crystals varies the bandgaps, such that materials emitting light spanning the visible spectra, as well as mid-IR and near-UV emitters, can be created. Conversely, such material can be used to create devices that acquire light and convert the light to electricity, for applications such as full color photodetectors and solar energy collectors. The growth of the III-V crystals can be accomplished by growing thin layers of elements or compounds in sequences that result in the overall lattice match and bandgap desired.

  1. Structure and Thermal Stability of Copper Nitride Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangan Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper nitride (Cu3N thin films were deposited on glass via DC reactive magnetron sputtering at various N2 flow rates and partial pressures with 150°C substrate temperature. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the microstructure and morphology. The results show that the films are composed of Cu3N crystallites with anti-ReO3 structure. The microstructure and morphology of the Cu3N film strongly depend on the N2 flow rate and partial pressure. The cross-sectional micrograph of the film shows typical columnar, compact structure. The thermal stabilities of the films were investigated using vacuum annealing under different temperature. The results show that the introducing of argon in the sputtering process decreases the thermal stability of the films.

  2. Low-threshold indium gallium nitride quantum dot microcavity lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Alexander J.

    Gallium nitride (GaN) microcavities with embedded optical emitters have long been sought after as visible light sources as well as platforms for cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED) experiments. Specifically, materials containing indium gallium nitride (InGaN) quantum dots (QDs) offer an outstanding platform to study light matter interactions and realize practical devices, such as on-chip light emitting diodes and nanolasers. Inherent advantages of nitride-based microcavities include low surface recombination velocities, enhanced room-temperature performance (due to their high exciton binding energy, as high as 67 meV for InGaN QDs), and emission wavelengths in the blue region of the visible spectrum. In spite of these advantages, several challenges must be overcome in order to capitalize on the potential of this material system. Such diffculties include the processing of GaN into high-quality devices due to the chemical inertness of the material, low material quality as a result of strain-induced defects, reduced carrier recombination effciencies due to internal fields, and a lack of characterization of the InGaN QDs themselves due to the diffculty of their growth and therefore lack of development relative to other semiconductor QDs. In this thesis we seek to understand and address such issues by investigating the interaction of light coupled to InGaN QDs via a GaN microcavity resonator. Such coupling led us to the demonstration of the first InGaN QD microcavity laser, whose performance offers insights into the properties and current limitations of the nitride materials and their emitters. This work is organized into three main sections. Part I outlines the key advantages and challenges regarding indium gallium nitride (InGaN) emitters embedded within gallium nitride (GaN) optical microcavities. Previous work is also discussed which establishes context for the work presented here. Part II includes the fundamentals related to laser operation, including the

  3. Identification of nitriding mechanisms in high purity reaction bonded silicon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggerty, J.S.

    1993-03-01

    The rapid, low-temperature nitriding results from surface effects on the Si particles beginning with loss of chemisorbed H and sequential formation of thin amorphous Si nitride layers. Rapid complete conversion to Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] during the fast reaction can be inhibited when either too few or too many nuclei form on Si particels. Optimally, [approximately] 10 Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] nuclei form per Si particles under rapid, complete nitridation conditions. Nitridation during the slow reaction period appears to progress by both continued reaction of nonpreferred Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] growth interfaces and direct nitridation of the remaining Si/vapor interfaces.

  4. Identification of nitriding mechanisms in high purity reaction bonded silicon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggerty, J.S.

    1993-03-01

    The rapid, low-temperature nitriding results from surface effects on the Si particles beginning with loss of chemisorbed H and sequential formation of thin amorphous Si nitride layers. Rapid complete conversion to Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} during the fast reaction can be inhibited when either too few or too many nuclei form on Si particels. Optimally, {approximately} 10 Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} nuclei form per Si particles under rapid, complete nitridation conditions. Nitridation during the slow reaction period appears to progress by both continued reaction of nonpreferred Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} growth interfaces and direct nitridation of the remaining Si/vapor interfaces.

  5. Sympathetic and parasympathetic activity in cancer-related fatigue: more evidence for a physiological substrate in cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagundes, Christopher P; Murray, David M; Hwang, Beom Seuk; Gouin, Jean-Philippe; Thayer, Julian F; Sollers, John J; Shapiro, Charles L; Malarkey, William B; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K

    2011-09-01

    Fatigue is a notable clinical problem in cancer survivors, and understanding its pathophysiology is important. This study evaluated relationships between fatigue and both sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system activity in breast cancer survivors. Norepinephrine and heart rate variability (HRV) were evaluated at rest, as well as during and after a standardized laboratory speech and mental arithmetic stressor. The participants, 109 women who had completed treatment for stage 0-IIIA breast cancer within the past two years, were at least two months post surgery, radiation or chemotherapy, whichever occurred last. Women who reported more fatigue had significantly higher norepinephrine and lower HRV before and after the stressor than their less fatigued counterparts. Fatigue was not related to treatment or disease variables including treatment type, cancer stage, time since diagnosis, and time since treatment. Importantly, the relationship between HRV and cancer-related fatigue was sizeable. Based on research that has demonstrated characteristic age-related HRV decrements, our findings suggest a 20-year difference between fatigued and non-fatigued cancer survivors, raising the possibility that fatigue may signify accelerated aging. Furthermore, lower HRV and elevated norepinephrine have been associated with a number of adverse health outcomes; accordingly, fatigue may also signal the need for increased vigilance to other health threats.

  6. Electron mobility calculation for graphene on substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, Hideki; Ogawa, Matsuto [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1, Rokko-dai, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Tsuchiya, Hideaki, E-mail: tsuchiya@eedept.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1, Rokko-dai, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Kamakura, Yoshinari; Mori, Nobuya [Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Division of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2014-08-28

    By a semiclassical Monte Carlo method, the electron mobility in graphene is calculated for three different substrates: SiO{sub 2}, HfO{sub 2}, and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). The calculations account for polar and non-polar surface optical phonon (OP) scatterings induced by the substrates and charged impurity (CI) scattering, in addition to intrinsic phonon scattering in pristine graphene. It is found that HfO{sub 2} is unsuitable as a substrate, because the surface OP scattering of the substrate significantly degrades the electron mobility. The mobility on the SiO{sub 2} and h-BN substrates decreases due to CI scattering. However, the mobility on the h-BN substrate exhibits a high electron mobility of 170 000 cm{sup 2}/(V·s) for electron densities less than 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2}. Therefore, h-BN should be an appealing substrate for graphene devices, as confirmed experimentally.

  7. Effect of variation of silicon nitride passivation layer on electron irradiated aluminum gallium nitride/gallium nitride HEMT structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Helen C.

    Silicon nitride passivation on AlGaNGaN heterojunction devices can improve performance by reducing electron traps at the surface. This research studies the effect of displacement damage caused by 1 MeV electron irradiation as a function of the variation of passivation layer thickness and heterostructure layer variation on AlGaN/GaN HEMTs. The effects of passivation layer thickness are investigated at thicknesses of 0, 20, 50 and 120 nanometers on AlGaNGaN test structures with either an AlN nucleation layer or a GaN cap structures which are then measured before and immediately after 1.0 MeV electron irradiation at fluences of 1016 cm-2. Hall system measurements are used to observe changes in mobility, carrier concentration and conductivity as a function of Si3N4 thickness. Models are developed that relate the device structure and passivation layer under 1 MeV radiation to the observed changes to the measured photoluminescence and deep level transient spectroscopy. A software model is developed to determine the production rate of defects from primary 1 MeV electrons that can be used for other energies and materials. The presence of either a 50 or 120 nm Si 3N4 passivation layer preserves the channel current for both and appears to be optimal for radiation hardness.

  8. Preparation and characterization of GaN films grown on Ga-diffused Si(111) substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhencui; CAO Wentian; WEI Qinqin; WANG Shuyun; XUE Chengshan; SUN Haibo

    2005-01-01

    Hexagonal GaN films were prepared by nitriding Ga2O3 films with flowing ammonia. Ga2O3 films were deposited on Ga-diffused Si (111) substrates by radio frequency (r.f.) magnetron sputtering. This paper have investigated the change of structural properties of GaN films nitrided in NH3 atmosphere at the temperatures of 850, 900, and 950℃ for 15min and nitrided at the temperature of 900℃ for 10, 15, and 20 min, respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to analyze the structure, surface morphology and composition of synthesized samples. The results reveal that the as-grown films are polycrystalline GaN with hexagonal wurtzite structure and GaN films with the highest crystal quality can be obtained when nitrided at 900℃ for 15 min.

  9. Aluminum Nitride Micro-Channels Grown via Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy for MEMs Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodak, L.E.; Kuchibhatla, S.; Famouri, P.; Ting, L.; Korakakis, D.

    2008-01-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) is a promising material for a number of applications due to its temperature and chemical stability. Furthermore, AlN maintains its piezoelectric properties at higher temperatures than more commonly used materials, such as Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) [1, 2], making AlN attractive for high temperature micro and nanoelectromechanical (MEMs and NEMs) applications including, but not limited to, high temperature sensors and actuators, micro-channels for fuel cell applications, and micromechanical resonators. This work presents a novel AlN micro-channel fabrication technique using Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE). AlN easily nucleates on dielectric surfaces due to the large sticking coefficient and short diffusion length of the aluminum species resulting in a high quality polycrystalline growth on typical mask materials, such as silicon dioxide and silicon nitride [3,4]. The fabrication process introduced involves partially masking a substrate with a silicon dioxide striped pattern and then growing AlN via MOVPE simultaneously on the dielectric mask and exposed substrate. A buffered oxide etch is then used to remove the underlying silicon dioxide and leave a free standing AlN micro-channel. The width of the channel has been varied from 5 ìm to 110 ìm and the height of the air gap from 130 nm to 800 nm indicating the stability of the structure. Furthermore, this versatile process has been performed on (111) silicon, c-plane sapphire, and gallium nitride epilayers on sapphire substrates. Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction (RHEED), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), and Raman measurements have been taken on channels grown on each substrate and indicate that the substrate is influencing the growth of the AlN micro-channels on the SiO2 sacrificial layer.

  10. Growth evolution of AlN films on silicon (111) substrates by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Wenliang; Yang, Weijia; Zhou, Shizhong; Lin, Zhiting [State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Li, Guoqiang, E-mail: msgli@scut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Department of Electronic Materials, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China)

    2015-05-14

    AlN films with various thicknesses have been grown on Si(111) substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The surface morphology and structural property of the as-grown AlN films have been investigated carefully to comprehensively explore the epitaxial behavior. The ∼2 nm-thick AlN film initially grown on Si substrate exhibits an atomically flat surface with a root-mean-square surface roughness of 0.23 nm. As the thickness increases, AlN grains gradually grow larger, causing a relatively rough surface. The surface morphology of ∼120 nm-thick AlN film indicates that AlN islands coalesce together and eventually form AlN layers. The decreasing growth rate from 240 to 180 nm/h is a direct evidence that the growth mode of AlN films grown on Si substrates by PLD changes from the islands growth to the layer growth. The evolution of AlN films throughout the growth is studied deeply, and its corresponding growth mechanism is hence proposed. These results are instructional for the growth of high-quality nitride films on Si substrates by PLD, and of great interest for the fabrication of AlN-based devices.

  11. Electrical and optical properties of silicon-doped gallium nitride polycrystalline films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S R Bhattacharyya; A K Pal

    2008-02-01

    Si-doped GaN films in polycrystalline form were deposited on quartz substrates at deposition temperatures ranging from 300–623 K using r.f. sputtering technique. Electrical, optical and microstructural properties were studied for these films. It was observed that films deposited at room temperature contained mainly hexagonal gallium nitride (ℎ-GaN) while films deposited at 623 K were predominantly cubic (-GaN) in nature. The films deposited at intermediate temperatures were found to contain both the hexagonal and cubic phases of GaN. Studies on the variation of conductivity with temperature indicated Mott’s hopping for films containing -GaN while Efros and Shklovskii (E–S) hopping within the Coulomb gap was found to dominate the carrier transport mechanism in the films containing ℎ-GaN. A crossover from Mott’s hopping to E–S hopping in the `soft’ Coulomb gap was noticed with lowering of temperature for films containing mixed phases of GaN. The relative intensity of the PL peak at ∼ 2.73 eV to that for peak at ∼ 3.11 eV appearing due to transitions from deep donor to valence band or shallow acceptors decreased significantly at higher temperature. Variation of band gap showed a bowing behaviour with the amount of cubic phase present in the films.

  12. Chemical bonding and humidity sensing properties of amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) by acetylene gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Siti Aisyah Abd; Purhanudin, Noorain; Awang, Rozidawati

    2017-05-01

    Amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) thin films were deposited by radio frequency plasma enhance chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) using a fixed mixture of acetylene (C2H2) at 20 sccm and nitrogen (N2) gases at 50 sccm. The films were deposited at different RF power of 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100 W. The deposition pressure, deposition time and substrate temperature were kept constant at 0.8 mbar, 30 minutes and 100°C, respectively. The chemical bonding of the a-CNx thin films was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and its sensing properties was determined using a home built humidity sensor system. The increase of RF powers leads to an increment of formation of double (C=N) and triple (C≡N) bonds as compared to a-CNx deposited using methane (CH4) or ethane (C2H6) gas. This is due to a higher ratio of C to H atoms in C2H2. The humidity sensing performance show the sensitivity of the films is the highest at low deposition power in changes of relative humidity (%RH). The a-CNx thin film show good repeatability and high sensitivity as a humidity sensing materials which prepared at low RF power.

  13. Morphological and Electrochemical Study of Sulfide/Nitride Nanostructure Deposited Through Pulsed Plasma Electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, H.; Sobhani, M.

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of coating a steel St12 substrate with a sulfide/nitride layer. The coating process was conducted through a plasma electrolysis technique with a pulsed regime applied at frequencies of 100, 500, and 1000 Hz. It was found that the use of higher frequencies in the mentioned process provides better control over workpiece surface temperature and leads to reduced extent of voltage variations required to achieve a fixed temperature. The coating deposited at the frequency of 1000 Hz and voltage of about 235 V exhibited a nanostructure composed of 50 nm particles. The deposited coating consisted of an outer porous layer and an inner relatively dense layer. The x-ray studies identified the phases of the coating as γ'-Fe4N, Fe2-3N and FeS. The presence of FeS phase reduces the friction coefficient of the surface to about half the value obtainable in its absence. Studying the electrochemical impedance of the layer revealed that using a higher frequency in the deposition process increases the stability of resulting layer against seven days of immersion in the corrosive solution.

  14. Wetting behaviour of carbon nitride nanostructures grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad Kamal, Shafarina Azlinda; Ritikos, Richard; Abdul Rahman, Saadah

    2015-02-01

    Tuning the wettability of various coating materials by simply controlling the deposition parameters is essential for various specific applications. In this work, carbon nitride (CNx) films were deposited on silicon (1 1 1) substrates using radio-frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition employing parallel plate electrode configuration. Effects of varying the electrode distance (DE) on the films' structure and bonding properties were investigated using Field emission scanning electron microscopy, Atomic force microscopy, Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The wettability of the films was analyzed using water contact angle measurements. At high DE, the CNx films' surface was smooth and uniform. This changed into fibrous nanostructures when DE was decreased. Surface roughness of the films increased with this morphological transformation. Nitrogen incorporation increased with decrease in DE which manifested the increase in both relative intensities of Cdbnd N to Cdbnd C and Nsbnd H to Osbnd H bonds. sp2-C to sp3-C ratio increased as DE decreased due to greater deformation of sp2 bonded carbon at lower DE. The films' characteristics changed from hydrophilic to super-hydrophobic with the decrease in DE. Roughness ratio, surface porosity and surface energy calculated from contact angle measurements were strongly dependent on the morphology, surface roughness and bonding properties of the films.

  15. Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Nitride from Bis(tert-butylamino)silane and N2 Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoops, Harm C M; Braeken, Eline M J; de Peuter, Koen; Potts, Stephen E; Haukka, Suvi; Pore, Viljami; Kessels, Wilhelmus M M

    2015-09-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride (SiNx) is deemed essential for a variety of applications in nanoelectronics, such as gate spacer layers in transistors. In this work an ALD process using bis(tert-butylamino)silane (BTBAS) and N2 plasma was developed and studied. The process exhibited a wide temperature window starting from room temperature up to 500 °C. The material properties and wet-etch rates were investigated as a function of plasma exposure time, plasma pressure, and substrate table temperature. Table temperatures of 300-500 °C yielded a high material quality and a composition close to Si3N4 was obtained at 500 °C (N/Si=1.4±0.1, mass density=2.9±0.1 g/cm3, refractive index=1.96±0.03). Low wet-etch rates of ∼1 nm/min were obtained for films deposited at table temperatures of 400 °C and higher, similar to that achieved in the literature using low-pressure chemical vapor deposition of SiNx at >700 °C. For novel applications requiring significantly lower temperatures, the temperature window from room temperature to 200 °C can be a solution, where relatively high material quality was obtained when operating at low plasma pressures or long plasma exposure times.

  16. Simulation of oxidation-nitridation-induced microstructural degradation in a cracked Ni-based superalloy at high temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Kang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In turbine engines, high temperature components made of superalloys may crack in a creep process during service. With the inward flux of the gases, e.g. oxygen and nitrogen, along those cracks, the microstructure of the superalloy substrate nearby the cracks may degrade by internal oxidation and nitridation. The aim of this study is to investigate and simulate the oxidation-nitridation-induced microstructural degradation in superalloys by taking a variant of Ni-based superalloy IN-792 as a sample. After the creep testing of the superalloy in air, the microstructures on the cross section of the superalloy were analysed in a scanning electron microscope, equipped with energy/wavelength dispersive systems. Internal oxidation and nitridation, presenting by Al/Ti oxides and nitrides, were observed under a porous and even cracked Cr-oxide scale which was formed on the superalloy surface or along the creep cracks connecting the superalloy surface. Meanwhile, the reinforcing γ′ precipitates were depleted. Such oxidation-nitridation-induced microstructural degradation was simulated by using an oxidation-diffusion model, focusing the diffusion of the alloying elements in metallic phases of the superalloy.

  17. Effect of applied dc bias voltage on composition, chemical bonding and mechanical properties of carbon nitride films prepared by PECVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-xuan; XU Tao; HAO Jun-ying; CHEN Jian-min; ZHOU Hui-di; XUE Qun-ji; LIU Hui-wen

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nitride films were deposited on Si (100) substrates using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique from CH4 and N2 at different applied dc bias voltage. The microstructure, composition and chemical bonding of the resulting films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The mechanical properties such as hardness and elastic modulus of the films were evaluated using nano-indentation. As the results, the Raman spectra, showing the G and D bands, indicate the amorphous structure of the films. XPS and FTIR measurements demonstrate the existence of various carbon-nitride bonds in the films and the hydrogenation of carbon nitride phase. The composition ratio of N to C, the nano-hardness and the elastic modulus of the carbon nitride films increase with increasing dc bias voltage and reach the maximums at a dc bias voltage of 300 V, then they decrease with further increase of the dc bias voltage. Moreover, the XRD analyses indicate that the carbon nitride film contains some polycrystalline C3N4 phase embedded in the amorphous matrix at optimized deposition condition of dc bias voltage of 300 V.

  18. In situ characterization of the nitridation of dysprosium during mechanochemical processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaques, Brian J.; Osterberg, Daniel D.; Alanko, Gordon A.; Tamrakar, Sumit; Smith, Cole R.; Hurley, Michael F.; Butt, Darryl P., E-mail: DarrylButt@BoiseState.edu

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • A nitridation reaction in a high energy planetary ball mill was monitored in situ. • Dysprosium mononitride was synthesized from Dy at low temperatures in short times. • Ideal gas law and in situ temperature and pressure used to assess reaction extent. • It is proposed that reaction rate is proportional to the creation of new surface. - Abstract: Processing of advanced nitride ceramics traditionally requires long durations at high temperatures and, in some cases, in hazardous atmospheres. In this study, dysprosium mononitride (DyN) was rapidly formed from elemental dysprosium in a closed system at ambient temperatures. An experimental procedure was developed to quantify the progress of the nitridation reaction during mechanochemical processing in a high energy planetary ball mill (HEBM) as a function of milling time and intensity using in situ temperature and pressure measurements, SEM, XRD, and particle size analysis. No intermediate phases were formed. It was found that the creation of fresh dysprosium surfaces dictates the rate of the nitridation reaction, which is a function of milling intensity and the number of milling media. These results show clearly that high purity nitrides can be synthesized with short processing times at low temperatures in a closed system requiring a relatively small processing footprint.

  19. Colloidal Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles: Properties and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Suslov, Sergey; Kildishev, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    Optical properties of colloidal plasmonic titanium nitride nanoparticles are examined with an eye on their photothermal and photocatalytic applications via transmission electron microscopy and optical transmittance measurements. Single crystal titanium nitride cubic nanoparticles with an average...

  20. Method of manufacture of atomically thin boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K

    2013-08-06

    The present invention provides a method of fabricating at least one single layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) suspending at least one multilayer boron nitride across a gap of a support structure and (2) performing a reactive ion etch upon the multilayer boron nitride to produce the single layer hexagonal boron nitride suspended across the gap of the support structure. The present invention also provides a method of fabricating single layer hexagonal boron nitride. In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) providing multilayer boron nitride suspended across a gap of a support structure and (2) performing a reactive ion etch upon the multilayer boron nitride to produce the single layer hexagonal boron nitride suspended across the gap of the support structure.

  1. III-nitride Photonic Integrated Circuit: Multi-section GaN Laser Diodes for Smart Lighting and Visible Light Communication

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao

    2017-04-01

    The past decade witnessed the rapid development of III-nitride light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and laser diodes (LDs), for smart lighting, visible-light communication (VLC), optical storage, and internet-of-things. Recent studies suggested that the GaN-based LDs, which is free from efficiency droop, outperform LEDs as a viable high-power light source. Conventionally, the InGaN-based LDs are grown on polar, c-plane GaN substrates. However, a relatively low differential gain limited the device performance due to a significant polarization field in the active region. Therefore, the LDs grown on nonpolar m-plane and semipolar (2021)-plane GaN substrates are posed to deliver high-efficiency owing to the entirely or partially eliminated polarization field. To date, the smart lighting and VLC functionalities have been demonstrated based on discrete devices, such as LDs, transverse-transmission modulators, and waveguide photodetectors. The integration of III-nitride photonic components, including the light emitter, modulator, absorber, amplifier, and photodetector, towards the realization of III-nitride photonic integrated circuit (PIC) offers the advantages of small-footprint, high-speed, and low power consumption, which has yet to be investigated. This dissertation presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of the multi-section InGaN laser diodes with integrated functionalities on semipolar (2021)-plane GaN substrates for enabling such photonic integration. The blue-emitting integrated waveguide modulator-laser diode (IWM-LD) exhibits a high modulation efficiency of 2.68 dB/V. A large extinction ratio of 11.3 dB is measured in the violet-emitting IWM-LD. Utilizing an integrated absorber, a high optical power (250mW), droop-free, speckle-free, and large modulation bandwidth (560MHz) blue-emitting superluminescent diode is reported. An integrated short-wavelength semiconductor optical amplifier with the laser diode at ~404 nm is demonstrated with a large gain of 5

  2. Plasma assisted metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of hard chromium nitride thin film coatings using chromium(III) acetylacetonate as the precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasgupta, Arup; Kuppusami, P.; Lawrence, Falix; Raghunathan, V.S.; Antony Premkumar, P.; Nagaraja, K.S

    2004-06-15

    A new technique has been developed for depositing hard nanocrystalline chromium nitride (CrN) thin films on metallic and ceramic substrates using plasma assisted metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (PAMOCVD) technique. In this low temperature and environment-friendly process, a volatile mixture of chromium(III) acetylacetonate and either ammonium iodide or ammonium bifluoride were used as precursors. Nitrogen and hydrogen have been used as the gas precursors. By optimizing the processing conditions, a maximum deposition rate of {approx}0.9 {mu}m/h was obtained. A comprehensive characterization of the CrN films was carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD), microhardness, and microscopy. The microstructure of the CrN films deposited on well-polished stainless steel (SS) showed globular particles, while a relatively smooth surface morphology was observed for coatings deposited on polished yittria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)

  3. Use of Acoustic Emission During Scratch Testing for Understanding Adhesion Behavior of Aluminum Nitride Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, R. K.; Mishra, P.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, acoustic emission during scratch testing of the aluminum nitride coatings formed on stainless steel substrate by reactive magnetron sputtering was analyzed to assess the coating failure. The AlN coatings were formed under the variation of substrate temperature, substrate bias potential, and discharge power. The coatings deposited in the temperature range of 100 to 400 °C showed peak acoustic emission less than 1.5%, indicating ductile nature of the coating. However, for coatings formed with substrate negative bias potential of 20 to 50 V, numerous sharp acoustic bursts with maximum emission approaching 80% were observed, indicating brittle nature of the coatings with large number of defects present. The shift in the intensity of the first major acoustic peak toward higher load, with the increasing bias potential, confirmed improved adhesion of the coating. Also, the higher discharge power resulted in increased acoustic emission.

  4. Deposition of titanium nitride layers by electric arc - Reactive plasma spraying method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şerban, Viorel-Aurel; Roşu, Radu Alexandru; Bucur, Alexandra Ioana; Pascu, Doru Romulus

    2013-01-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) is a ceramic material which possesses high mechanical properties, being often used in order to cover cutting tools, thus increasing their lifetime, and also for covering components which are working in corrosive environments. The paper presents the experimental results on deposition of titanium nitride coatings by a new combined method (reactive plasma spraying and electric arc thermal spraying). In this way the advantages of each method in part are combined, obtaining improved quality coatings in the same time achieving high productivity. Commercially pure titanium wire and C45 steel as substrate were used for experiments. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the deposited coatings are composed of titanium nitride (TiN, Ti2N) and small amounts of Ti3O. The microstructure of the deposited layers, investigated both by optical and scanning electron microscopy, shows that the coatings are dense, compact, without cracks and with low porosity. Vickers microhardness of the coatings presents maximum values of 912 HV0.1. The corrosion tests in 3%NaCl solution show that the deposited layers have a high corrosion resistance compared to unalloyed steel substrate.

  5. Maintainable substrate carrier for electroplating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen-An [Milpitas, CA; Abas, Emmanuel Chua [Laguna, PH; Divino, Edmundo Anida [Cavite, PH; Ermita, Jake Randal G [Laguna, PH; Capulong, Jose Francisco S [Laguna, PH; Castillo, Arnold Villamor [Batangas, PH; Ma,; Xiaobing, Diana [Saratoga, CA

    2012-07-17

    One embodiment relates to a substrate carrier for use in electroplating a plurality of substrates. The carrier includes a non-conductive carrier body on which the substrates are placed and conductive lines embedded within the carrier body. A plurality of conductive clip attachment parts are attached in a permanent manner to the conductive lines embedded within the carrier body. A plurality of contact clips are attached in a removable manner to the clip attachment parts. The contact clips hold the substrates in place and conductively connecting the substrates with the conductive lines. Other embodiments, aspects and features are also disclosed.

  6. Maintainable substrate carrier for electroplating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chen-An; Abas, Emmanuel Chua; Divino, Edmundo Anida; Ermita, Jake Randal G.; Capulong, Jose Francisco S.; Castillo, Arnold Villamor; Ma, Diana Xiaobing

    2016-08-02

    One embodiment relates to a substrate carrier for use in electroplating a plurality of substrates. The carrier includes a non-conductive carrier body on which the substrates are placed and conductive lines embedded within the carrier body. A plurality of conductive clip attachment parts are attached in a permanent manner to the conductive lines embedded within the carrier body. A plurality of contact clips are attached in a removable manner to the clip attachment parts. The contact clips hold the substrates in place and conductively connecting the substrates with the conductive lines. Other embodiments, aspects and features are also disclosed.

  7. Porous Boron Nitride with Tunable Pore Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jun; Wu, Xiaojun; Yang, Jinlong; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2014-01-16

    On the basis of a global structural search and first-principles calculations, we predict two types of porous boron-nitride (BN) networks that can be built up with zigzag BN nanoribbons (BNNRs). The BNNRs are either directly connected with puckered B (N) atoms at the edge (type I) or connected with sp(3)-bonded BN chains (type II). Besides mechanical stability, these materials are predicted to be thermally stable at 1000 K. The porous BN materials entail large surface areas, ranging from 2800 to 4800 m(2)/g. In particular, type-II BN material with relatively large pores is highly favorable for hydrogen storage because the computed hydrogen adsorption energy (-0.18 eV) is very close to the optimal adsorption energy (-0.15 eV) suggested for reversible hydrogen storage at room temperature. Moreover, the type-II materials are semiconductors with width-dependent direct bandgaps, rendering the type-II BN materials promising not only for hydrogen storage but also for optoelectronic and photonic applications.

  8. Ceramic processing of boron nitride insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, C. S.; McCulloch, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    Fuel pin simulators (FPS) are the prime elements of several test facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These experimental facilities are used to conduct out-of-reactor thermal-hydraulic and mechanical interaction safety tests for both light-water and breeder reactor programs. The FPS units simulate the geometry, heat flux profiles, and operational capabilities of a reactor core element under steady-state and transient conditions. They are subjected to temperatures as high as 1600/sup 0/C (2900/sup 0/F) and power levels as high as 57.5 kW/m (17.5 kW/ft) as well as severe thermal stresses during transient tests. The insulating material in the narrow annulus between the heating coil and the FPS sheath is subjected to very rigorous conditions. Accuracy of the reactor safety test information and validity of the test data depend on the heat flux uniformity under all test conditions and on the reliable operation of all fuel pin simulators and their internal thermocouples. Boron nitride (BN), because of its high degree of chemical inertness combined with its relatively unique properties of high thermal conductivity and low electrical conductivity, is the most suitable insulating material for FPS. The important BN properties, thermal conductivity and electrical resistance, are strongly influenced by crystallite orientation and by impurities. The article describes new BN powder processing techniques, which optimize these properties.

  9. Optical and Micro-Structural Characterization of MBE Grown Indium Gallium Nitride Polar Quantum Dots

    KAUST Repository

    El Afandy, Rami

    2011-07-07

    Gallium nitride and related materials have ushered in scientific and technological breakthrough for lighting, mass data storage and high power electronic applications. These III-nitride materials have found their niche in blue light emitting diodes and blue laser diodes. Despite the current development, there are still technological problems that still impede the performance of such devices. Three-dimensional nanostructures are proposed to improve the electrical and thermal properties of III-nitride optical devices. This thesis consolidates the characterization results and unveils the unique physical properties of polar indium gallium nitride quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy technique. In this thesis, a theoretical overview of the physical, structural and optical properties of polar III-nitrides quantum dots will be presented. Particular emphasis will be given to properties that distinguish truncated-pyramidal III-nitride quantum dots from other III-V semiconductor based quantum dots. The optical properties of indium gallium nitride quantum dots are mainly dominated by large polarization fields, as well as quantum confinement effects. Hence, the experimental investigations for such quantum dots require performing bandgap calculations taking into account the internal strain fields, polarization fields and confinement effects. The experiments conducted in this investigation involved the transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction as well as photoluminescence spectroscopy. The analysis of the temperature dependence and excitation power dependence of the PL spectra sheds light on the carrier dynamics within the quantum dots, and its underlying wetting layer. A further analysis shows that indium gallium nitride quantum dots through three-dimensional confinements are able to prevent the electronic carriers from getting thermalized into defects which grants III-nitrides quantum dot based light emitting diodes superior thermally induced optical

  10. Are variations in heterotrophic soil respiration related to changes in substrate availability and microbial biomass carbon in the subtropical forests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hui; Chen, Xiaomei; Xiao, Guoliang; Guenet, Bertrand; Vicca, Sara; Shen, Weijun

    2015-12-01

    Soil temperature and moisture are widely-recognized controlling factors on heterotrophic soil respiration (Rh), although they often explain only a portion of Rh variability. How other soil physicochemical and microbial properties may contribute to Rh variability has been less studied. We conducted field measurements on Rh half-monthly and associated soil properties monthly for two years in four subtropical forests of southern China to assess influences of carbon availability and microbial properties on Rh. Rh in coniferous forest was significantly lower than that in the other three broadleaf species-dominated forests and exhibited obvious seasonal variations in the four forests (P carbon (DOC) were significantly important to Rh variations, but the effect of DOC content on Rh was confounded with temperature, as revealed by partial mantel test. Microbial biomass carbon (MBC) was significantly related to Rh variations across forests during the warm season (P = 0.043). Our results suggest that DOC and MBC may be important when predicting Rh under some conditions, and highlight the complexity by mutual effects of them with environmental factors on Rh variations.

  11. Substrate-energy metabolism and metabolic risk factors for cardiovascular disease in relation to fetal growth and adult body composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kensara, Osama A; Wooton, Steve A; Phillips, David I W; Patel, Mayank; Hoffman, Daniel J; Jackson, Alan A; Elia, Marinos

    2006-08-01

    The effect of fetal programming on intermediary metabolism is uncertain. Therefore, we examined whether fetal programming affects oxidative and nonoxidative macronutrient metabolism and the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in adult life. Healthy older men, aged 64-72 years, with either a lower birth weight (LBW, or=75th %ile; n = 13) had measurements of 1) net oxidative metabolism using indirect calorimetry before and for 6 h after a mixed meal (3,720 kJ) and 2) postprandial oxidation of exogenous [13C]palmitic acid. Body composition was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. After adjustment for current weight and height, the LBW group had a lower resting energy expenditure (REE) in the preprandial (4.01 vs. 4.54 kJ/min, P = 0.015) and postprandial state (4.60 vs. 5.20 kJ/min, P = 0.004), and less fat-free mass than the HBW group. The BW category was a significant, independent, and better predictor of REE than weight plus height. There were no significant differences between groups in net oxidative and nonoxidative macronutrient (protein, fat, carbohydrate) metabolism (or of exogenous [13C]palmitate) or in the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, which was present almost twice as commonly in the LBW than in the HBW group. The study suggests that fetal programming affects both pre- and postprandial EE in older life by mechanisms that are at least partly related to the mass of the fat-free body. BW was found to be a significant predictor of REE that was independent of adult weight plus height.

  12. Neural substrates of successful working memory and long-term memory formation in a relational spatial memory task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Heiko C; Daselaar, Sander M; Fernández, Guillén; Kessels, Roy P C

    2016-11-01

    Working memory (WM) tasks may involve brain activation actually implicated in long-term memory (LTM). In order to disentangle these two memory systems, we employed a combined WM/LTM task, using a spatial relational (object-location) memory paradigm and analyzed which brain areas were associated with successful performance for either task using fMRI. Critically, we corrected for the performance on the respective memory task when analyzing subsequent memory effects. The WM task consisted of a delayed-match-to-sample task assessed in an MRI scanner. Each trial consisted of an indoor or outdoor scene in which the exact configuration of four objects had to be remembered. After a short delay (7-13 s), the scene was presented from a different angle and spatial recognition for two objects was tested. After scanning, participants received an unexpected subsequent recognition memory (LTM) task, where the two previously unprobed objects were tested. Brain activity during encoding, delay phase and probe phase was analyzed based on WM and LTM performance. Results showed that successful WM performance, when corrected for LTM performance, was associated with greater activation in the inferior frontal gyrus and left fusiform gyrus during the early stage of the maintenance phase. A correct decision during the WM probe was accompanied by greater activation in a wide network, including bilateral hippocampus, right superior parietal gyrus and bilateral insula. No voxels exhibited supra-threshold activity during the encoding phase, and we did not find any differential activity for correct versus incorrect trials in the WM task when comparing LTM correct versus LTM incorrect trials.

  13. Modeling of Nitrogen Penetration in Medical Grade CoCrMo Alloy during Plasma Nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvaidas GALDIKAS

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available For analysis of plasma nitriding process and nitrogen penetration into CoCrMo alloy the trapping-detrapping model is applied. This model is commonly used for analysis of stainless steel nitriding, however, in this work it is shown that the same nitrogen penetration mechanism takes place in CoCrMo alloys. From the fitting of experimental curves, taken from literature, it is found by the proposed model that diffusion coefficient depends on nitrogen concentration according to Einstein-Smoluchowski relation D µ 1/CN. The diffusion coefficients for 400oC temperature nitriding of in CoCrMo are calculated. The shape of nitrogen depth profile curves are analyzed showing influence of different parameters such as detrapping activation energy, chromium concentration, etc.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.1.3458

  14. Dielectric response of wurtzite gallium nitride in the terahertz frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibberd, M. T.; Frey, V.; Spencer, B. F.; Mitchell, P. W.; Dawson, P.; Kappers, M. J.; Oliver, R. A.; Humphreys, C. J.; Graham, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    We report on the characterization of the intrinsic, anisotropic, dielectric properties of wurtzite gallium nitride in the spectral range of 0.5-11 THz, using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The ordinary (ε˜⊥) and extraordinary (ε˜∥) components of the complex dielectric function were determined experimentally for a semi-insulating, m-plane gallium nitride single crystal, providing measurements of the refractive indices (n⊥,∥) and absorption coefficients (α⊥,∥) . These material parameters were successfully modeled by considering the contribution of the optical phonon modes, measured using Raman spectroscopy, to the dielectric function, giving values for the relative static dielectric constants of ε0⊥ = 9.22 ± 0.02 and ε0∥ = 10.32 ± 0.03 for wurtzite gallium nitride.

  15. Modeling of Nitrogen Penetration in Medical Grade CoCrMo Alloy during Plasma Nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvaidas GALDIKAS

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available For analysis of plasma nitriding process and nitrogen penetration into CoCrMo alloy the trapping-detrapping model is applied. This model is commonly used for analysis of stainless steel nitriding, however, in this work it is shown that the same nitrogen penetration mechanism takes place in CoCrMo alloys. From the fitting of experimental curves, taken from literature, it is found by the proposed model that diffusion coefficient depends on nitrogen concentration according to Einstein-Smoluchowski relation D µ 1/CN. The diffusion coefficients for 400oC temperature nitriding of in CoCrMo are calculated. The shape of nitrogen depth profile curves are analyzed showing influence of different parameters such as detrapping activation energy, chromium concentration, etc.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.1.3458

  16. Silicon nitride ceramic having high fatigue life and high toughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeckley, Russell L.

    1996-01-01

    A sintered silicon nitride ceramic comprising between about 0.6 mol % and about 3.2 mol % rare earth as rare earth oxide, and between about 85 w/o and about 95 w/o beta silicon nitride grains, wherein at least about 20% of the beta silicon nitride grains have a thickness of greater than about 1 micron.

  17. [The effect of plasma nitriding on tungsten burs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicciu, D; Russo, S; Grasso, C

    1989-01-01

    The authors have experimented the nitriding's effects on some cilindrical burs carbide utilized in dentistry after disamination on the applications methodics on plasma nitriding in neurosurgery, orthopedic surgery and in odontotherapy. This reacherys point out that nitriding plasma a durings increase and cutis greater capacity establish.

  18. Magnetovolume effects in manganese nitrides with antiperovskite structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshi Takenaka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetostructural correlations in antiperovskite manganese nitrides were investigated systematically for stoichiometric and solid solution Mn3Cu1−xAxN (A = Co, Ni, Zn, Ga, Ge, Rh, Pd, Ag, In, Sn or Sb. This class of nitrides is attracting great attention because of their giant negative thermal expansion, which is achieved by doping Ge or Sn into the A site as a relaxant of the sharp volume contraction on heating (spontaneous volume magnetostriction ωs because of the magnetovolume effects. The physical background of large ωs and mechanism of how the volume contraction becomes gradual with temperature are central concerns for the physics and applications of these nitrides. An entire dataset of thermal expansion, crystal structure and magnetization demonstrates that the cubic triangular antiferromagnetic state is crucial for large ωs. The intimate relationship between ωs and the magnetic structure is discussed in terms of geometrical frustration related to the Mn6N octahedron and magnetic stress concept. The results presented herein also show that ωs depends on the number of d electrons in the A atom, suggesting the important role of the d orbitals of the A atom. Not all the dopants in the A site, but the elements that disturb the cubic triangular antiferromagnetic state, are effective in broadening the volume change. This fact suggests that instability neighboring the phase boundary is related to the broadening. The relation between the gradual volume change and the local structure anomaly is suggested by recent microprobe studies.

  19. Dilute nitride InNP quantum dots: Growth and photoluminescence mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang, Y. J. [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Takabayashi, K.; Kamiya, I. [Quantum Interface Laboratory, Toyota Technological Institute, Nagoya 468-8511 (Japan); Sukrittanon, S. [Material Science and Engineering Program, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Pan, J. L.; Tu, C. W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2014-10-27

    Self-assembled dilute nitride InNP quantum dots (QDs) in GaP matrix grown under the Stranski-Krastanov mode by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy are studied. The N-related localized states inside the InNP QDs provide a spatially direct recombination channel, in contrast to the spatially indirect channel through the strained In(N)P QDs/GaP interface states. The N incorporation into InP QDs therefore causes a blueshift and double-peak features in photoluminescence, which are not observed in other dilute nitride materials.

  20. Numerical simulation of discharge plasma generation and nitriding the metals and alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval, T. V.; Manakov, R. A.; Nguyen Bao, Hung; Tran My, Kim An

    2017-01-01

    This research provides the numerical simulation of the plasma generation in a hollow cathode as well as the diffusion of nitrogen atoms into the metal in the low-pressure glow discharge plasma. The characteristics of the gas discharge were obtained and the relation of the basic technological parameters and the structural and phase state of the nitrided material were defined. Authors provided the comparison of calculations with the experimental results of titanium nitriding by low-pressure glow discharge plasma in a hollow cathode.

  1. Ion-plasma nitriding as a method of instruments and parts durability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samigullin, A. D.; Galiakbarov, A. T.; Galiakbarov, R. T.; Samigullina, A. R.

    2017-01-01

    Improvement of the machines, parts, devices reliability as well as improvement of their quality and operation are topics of interest at the present time. Solution to these problems is related to hardening of the product surface layers in the first place. This article deals with parameters of nitriding process using the example of 38XM steel which is applied in essential parts of turbine installations and compressors operating at temperatures up to 400°C. The article also provides the results of nitriding at different modes.

  2. 2.0A resolution crystal structures of the ternary complexes of human phenylalanine hydroxylase catalytic domain with tetrahydrobiopterin and 3-(2-thienyl)-L-alanine or L-norleucine: substrate specificity and molecular motions related to substrate binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Ole Andreas; Stokka, Anne J; Flatmark, Torgeir; Hough, Edward

    2003-10-31

    The crystal structures of the catalytic domain of human phenylalanine hydroxylase (hPheOH) in complex with the physiological cofactor 6(R)-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) and the substrate analogues 3-(2-thienyl)-L-alanine (THA) or L-norleucine (NLE) have been determined at 2.0A resolution. The ternary THA complex confirms a previous 2.5A structure, and the ternary NLE complex shows that similar large conformational changes occur on binding of NLE as those observed for THA. Both structures demonstrate that substrate binding triggers structural changes throughout the entire protomer, including the displacement of Tyr138 from a surface position to a buried position at the active site, with a maximum displacement of 20.7A for its hydroxyl group. Two hinge-bending regions, centred at Leu197 and Asn223, act in consort upon substrate binding to create further large structural changes for parts of the C terminus. Thus, THA/L-Phe binding to the active site is likely to represent the epicentre of the global conformational changes observed in the full-length tetrameric enzyme. The carboxyl and amino groups of THA and NLE are positioned identically in the two structures, supporting the conclusion that these groups are of key importance in substrate binding, thus explaining the broad non-physiological substrate specificity observed for artificially activated forms of the enzyme. However, the specific activity with NLE as the substrate was only about 5% of that with THA, which is explained by the different affinities of binding and different catalytic turnover.

  3. Effect of plasma nitriding on electrodeposited Ni–Al composite coating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daemi, N.; Mahboubi, F.; Alimadadi, Hossein

    2011-01-01

    In this study plasma nitriding is applied on nickel–aluminum composite coating, deposited on steel substrate. Ni–Al composite layers were fabricated by electro-deposition process in Watt’s bath containing Al particles. Electrodeposited specimens were subjected to plasma atmosphere comprising of N2......–20% H2, at 500°C, for 5h. The surface morphology investigated, using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the surface roughness was measured by use of contact method. Chemical composition was analyzed by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and formation of AlN phase was confirmed by X-ray diffraction....... The corrosion resistance of composite coatings was measured by potentiodynamic polarization in 3.5% NaCl solution. The obtained results show that plasma nitriding process leads to an increase in microhardness and corrosion resistance, simultaneously....

  4. Simulation of STM technique for electron transport through boron-nitride nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganji, M.D. [Department of Chemistry, Azad University, Ghaemshahr Branch, Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: ganji_md@yahoo.com; Mohammadi-nejad, A. [Department of Computer Engineering, Olom Fonon University of Mazandaran, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-06-30

    We report first-principles calculations on the electrical transport properties of boron-nitrid nanotubes (BNNTs). We consider a single walled (5,0) boron-nitrid nanotube sandwiched between an Au(1 0 0) substrate and a monatomic Au scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip. Lateral motion of the tip over the nanotube wall cause it to change from one conformation class to the others and to switch between a strongly and a weakly conducting state. Thus, surprisingly, despite their apparent simplicity these Au/BNNT/Au nanowires are shown to be a convenient switch. Experiments with a conventional STM are proposed to test these predictions. The projection of the density of states (PDOS) and the transmission coefficients T(E) of the two-probe systems at zero bias are analyzed, and it suggests that the variation of the coupling between the wire and the electrodes leads to switching behaviour.

  5. Titanium nitride coatings synthesized by IPD method with eliminated current oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chodun Rafał

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the effects of elimination of current oscillations within the coaxial plasma accelerator during IPD deposition process on the morphology, phase structure and properties of synthesized TiN coatings. Current observations of waveforms have been made by use of an oscilloscope. As a test material for experiments, titanium nitride TiN coatings synthesized on silicon and high-speed steel substrates were used. The coatings morphology, phase composition and wear resistance properties were determined. The character of current waveforms in the plasma accelerator electric circuit plays a crucial role during the coatings synthesis process. Elimination of the current oscillations leads to obtaining an ultrafine grained structure of titanium nitride coatings and to disappearance of the tendency to structure columnarization. The coatings obtained during processes of a non-oscillating character are distinguished by better wear-resistance properties.

  6. Nano Indentation Inspection of the Mechanical Properties of Gold Nitride Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armen Verdyan

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The morphology and the local mechanical properties of gold nitride thin films were studied by atomic force microscope (AFM. Gold nitride films were deposited for the first time on silicon substrate without any buffer layer at room temperature by reactive pulsed laser ablation deposition (RPLD. The films were fabricated on (100 Si wafers by RPLD technique in which KrF excimer laser was used to ablate a gold target in N2 atmosphere (0.1 GPa-100 Pa and ambient temperature. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy inspections showed that the films were flat plane with rms roughness in the range of 35.1 nm-3.6 nm, depending on the deposition pressure. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS and energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS used to detect the nitrogen concentration in the films, have revealed a composition close to Au3N. The film

  7. Swift Heavy Ion Beam-induced Recrystallisation of Buried Silicon Nitride Layer (Review Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Som

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies on MeV heavy ion beam-induced epitaxial crystallisation of a buried silicon nitride layer are reported. Transmission electron micrographs and selected area diffraction patterns have been used to study the recrystallisation of an ion beam-synthesised layer. Complete recrystallisation of the silicon nitride layer having good quality interfaces with the top- and the substrate-Si has been obsorved. Recrystallisation is achieved at significantly lower temperatures of 100 and 200OC for oxygen and silver ions, respectively. The fact that recrystallisation is achieved at the lowest temperature for the oxygen ions is discussed on the basis of energy loss processes.Defence Science Journal, 2009, 59(4, pp.351-355, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.59.1533

  8. Nano Indentation Inspection of the Mechanical Properties of Gold Nitride Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armen Verdyan

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The morphology and the local mechanical properties of gold nitride thin films were studied by atomic force microscope (AFM. Gold nitride films were deposited for the first time on silicon substrate without any buffer layer at room temperature by reactive pulsed laser ablation deposition (RPLD. The films were fabricated on (100 Si wafers by RPLD technique in which KrF excimer laser was used to ablate a gold target in N2 atmosphere (0.1 GPa-100 Pa and ambient temperature. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy inspections showed that the films were flat plane with rms roughness in the range of 35.1 nm-3.6 nm, depending on the deposition pressure. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS and energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS used to detect the nitrogen concentration in the films, have revealed a composition close to Au3N. The film

  9. On the zinc nitride properties and the unintentional incorporation of oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Nunez, C., E-mail: carlos.garcia@uam.es; Pau, J.L.; Hernandez, M.J.; Cervera, M.; Ruiz, E.; Piqueras, J.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc nitride films were prepared by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering in N{sub 2}/Ar ambient using different substrates (glass and thermally-oxidized-Si) and buffer layers (low-temperature Zn{sub 3}N{sub 2} and ZnO). Resonant Rutherford backscattering (RBS) allowed determining Zn{sub x}N{sub y} stoichiometry and thickness. Despite the sputtering system was operated in high vacuum conditions, unintentional oxygen incorporation during growth was detected. Calculations of the relative oxygen concentration showed that the oxygen content was very dependent on the growth rate. Ex-situ oxidation was also analyzed by resonant RBS and compared with the results of as-grown layers. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction revealed that surface morphology and crystal orientation were strongly dependent on the substrate temperature (T{sub s}). In addition, optical transmission measurements show a reduction of the optical energy band gap from 1.46 to 1.25 eV as T{sub s} increased. The electrical properties were examined as a function of growth rate, total working gas flux and T{sub s} aiming to maximize electron mobility. From those studies, it was found that Hall mobility increased significantly as the growth rate decreased. A maximum mobility of 100 cm{sup 2}/Vs and a minimum carrier concentration of 3.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} were achieved at a T{sub s} of 423 K and a growth rate of 4.44 nm/min.

  10. Single gallium nitride nanowire lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Justin C; Choi, Heon-Jin; Knutsen, Kelly P; Schaller, Richard D; Yang, Peidong; Saykally, Richard J

    2002-10-01

    There is much current interest in the optical properties of semiconductor nanowires, because the cylindrical geometry and strong two-dimensional confinement of electrons, holes and photons make them particularly attractive as potential building blocks for nanoscale electronics and optoelectronic devices, including lasersand nonlinear optical frequency converters. Gallium nitride (GaN) is a wide-bandgap semiconductor of much practical interest, because it is widely used in electrically pumped ultraviolet-blue light-emitting diodes, lasers and photodetectors. Recent progress in microfabrication techniques has allowed stimulated emission to be observed from a variety of GaN microstructures and films. Here we report the observation of ultraviolet-blue laser action in single monocrystalline GaN nanowires, using both near-field and far-field optical microscopy to characterize the waveguide mode structure and spectral properties of the radiation at room temperature. The optical microscope images reveal radiation patterns that correlate with axial Fabry-Perot modes (Q approximately 10(3)) observed in the laser spectrum, which result from the cylindrical cavity geometry of the monocrystalline nanowires. A redshift that is strongly dependent on pump power (45 meV microJ x cm(-2)) supports the idea that the electron-hole plasma mechanism is primarily responsible for the gain at room temperature. This study is a considerable advance towards the realization of electron-injected, nanowire-based ultraviolet-blue coherent light sources.

  11. Nonlinear conductivity in silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncer, Enis

    2017-08-01

    To better comprehend electrical silicon-package interaction in high voltage applications requires full characterization of the electrical properties of dielectric materials employed in wafer and package level design. Not only the packaging but wafer level dielectrics, i.e. passivation layers, would experience high electric fields generated by the voltage applied pads. In addition the interface between the passivation layer and a mold compound might develop space charge because of the mismatch in electrical properties of the materials. In this contribution electrical properties of a thin silicon nitride (Si3N4) dielectric is reported as a function of temperature and electric field. The measured values later analyzed using different temperature dependent exponential expressions and found that the Mott variable range hopping conduction model was successful to express the data. A full temperature/electric field dependency of conductivity is generated. It was found that the conduction in Si3N4 could be expressed like a field ionization or Fowler-Nordheim mechanism.

  12. Gallium nitride electrodes for membrane-based electrochemical biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, T; Steinhoff, G; von Ribbeck, H-G; Stutzmannn, M; Eickhoff, M; Tanaka, M

    2009-10-01

    We report on the deposition of planar lipid bilayers (supported membranes) on gallium nitride (GaN) electrodes for potential applications as membrane-based biosensors. The kinetics of the lipid membrane formation upon vesicle fusion were monitored by simultaneous measurements of resistance and capacitance of the membrane using AC impedance spectroscopy in the frequency range between 50 mHz and 50 kHz. We could identify a two-step process of membrane spreading and self-healing. Despite its relatively low resistance, the membrane can be modeled by a parallel combination of an ideal resistor and capacitor, indicating that the membrane efficiently blocks the diffusion of ions.

  13. Fracture resistance of surface-nitrided zirconia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feder, A.; Casellas, D.; Llanes, L.; Anglada, M. [Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Material Science and Metallurgy

    2002-07-01

    Heat treatments have been conducted at 1650 C for 2 hours in Y-TZP stabilised with 2.5% molar of yttria in two different environments: in air and in nitrogen gas with the specimens embedded in a zirconium nitride powder bed. Relevant microstructural changes were induced by these heat treatments. It is highlighted the formation of a nitrided surface layer of about 400 {mu}m in thickness. Such layer has clear microstructural differences with respect to the bulk, and is formed by different sublayers with cubic and tetragonal phases with distinct degrees of transformability, as revealed by XRD and Raman spectroscopy. The fracture toughness and the hardness of the nitrided surface layer are higher than for the original Y-TZP. (orig.)

  14. Attaining the Steady State of the Nitriding Potential after a Change of NH3 Atmosphere Flow Rate during the Gas Nitriding Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jerzy Michalski; Jan Tacikowski; Piotr Wach; Tomasz Babul; Nabil Tarfa

    2004-01-01

    In single and multi-stage nitriding processes, each stage is characterized by the following parameters:temperature and time, type and composition of incoming atmosphere, as well as the set value of the nitriding potential. In the case of an atmosphere composed of raw ammonia and dissociated ammonia (NH3- NH3diss), the set value of the nitriding potential can be achieved by a change of the incoming atmosphere make-up, while in the case of atmospheres comprising NH3 and NH3 - N2 - by a change of the atmosphere flow rate. The time needed to reach a stabilized state, after the initiation of a change in the atmosphere gas mix can be assessed relatively easily. The problem is much more complex if we want to predict the time of reaching a new stabilized state following a change in atmosphere flow rate. The time of reaching stabilized state is, in this case, a complex function of the flow rate of the atmosphere which forces the potential change, and of temperature. This problem, in the case of the NH3 type atmosphere, is the subject of investigation in this work. Factors are discussed, affecting the rate at which stabilized state is reached by the system after the introduction of a disturbance, necessary to attain the required nitriding potential.

  15. Nitride Fuel Development at the INL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W.E. Windes

    2007-06-01

    A new method for fabricating nitride-based fuels for nuclear applications is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A primary objective of this research is the development of a process that could be operated as an automated or semi-automated technique reducing costs, worker doses, and eventually improving the final product form. To achieve these goals the fabrication process utilizes a new cryo-forming technique to produce microspheres formed from sub-micron oxide powder to improve material handling issues, yield rapid kinetics for conversion to nitrides, and reduced material impurity levels within the nitride compounds. The microspheres are converted to a nitride form within a high temperature particle fluidizing bed using a carbothermic process that utilizes a hydrocarbon – hydrogen - nitrogen gas mixture. A new monitor and control system using differential pressure changes in the fluidizing gas allows for real-time monitoring and control of the spouted bed reactor during conversion. This monitor and control system can provide real-time data that is used to control the gas flow rates, temperatures, and gas composition to optimize the fluidization of the particle bed. The small size (0.5 µm) of the oxide powders in the microspheres dramatically increases the kinetics of the conversion process yielding reduced process times and temperatures. Initial studies using surrogate ZrO2 powder have yielded conversion efficiencies of 90 -95 % nitride formation with only small levels of oxide and carbide contaminants present. Further studies are being conducted to determine optimal gas mixture ratios, process time, and temperature range for providing complete conversion to a nitride form.

  16. Precipitate-Accommodated Plasma Nitriding for Aluminum Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patama Visittipitukul; Tatsuhiko Aizawa; Hideyuki Kuwahara

    2004-01-01

    Reliable surface treatment has been explored to improve the strength and wear resistance of aluminum alloy parts in automotives. Long duration time as well as long pre-sputtering time are required for plasma nitriding of aluminum or its alloys only with the thickness of a few micrometers. New plasma inner nitriding is proposed to realize the fast-rate nitriding of aluminum alloys. Al-6Cu alloy is employed as a targeting material in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of this plasma nitriding. Mechanism of fast-rate nitriding process is discussed with consideration of the role of Al2Cu precipitates.

  17. Microbial adherence to a nonprecious alloy after plasma nitriding process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonugelen, Mehmet; Destan, Uhmut Iyiyapici; Lambrecht, Fatma Yurt; Oztürk, Berran; Karadeniz, Süleyman

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the microbial adherence to the surfaces of a nonprecious metal alloy after plasma nitriding. The plasma-nitriding process was performed to the surfaces of metals prepared from a nickel-chromium alloy. The microorganisms were labeled with technetium-99m. After the labeling procedure, 60 metal disks were treated with a microorganism for each use. The results revealed that the amount of adherence of all microorganisms on surfaces was changed by plasma-nitriding process; adherence decreased substantially (P plasma nitriding time were not significant (P> .05) With the plasma-nitriding process, the surface properties of nonprecious metal alloys can be changed, leading to decreased microbial adherence.

  18. Encapsulation of cisplatin as an anti-cancer drug into boron-nitride and carbon nanotubes: Molecular simulation and free energy calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roosta, Sara [Molecular Simulation Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Iran University of Science & Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemianzadeh, Seyed Majid, E-mail: hashemianzadeh@iust.ac.ir [Molecular Simulation Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Iran University of Science & Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ketabi, Sepideh, E-mail: sepidehketabi@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, East Tehran Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-10-01

    Encapsulation of cisplatin anticancer drug into the single walled (10, 0) carbon nanotube and (10, 0) boron-nitride nanotube was investigated by quantum mechanical calculations and Monte Carlo Simulation in aqueous solution. Solvation free energies and complexation free energies of the cisplatin@ carbon nanotube and cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube complexes was determined as well as radial distribution functions of entitled compounds. Solvation free energies of cisplatin@ carbon nanotube and cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube were − 4.128 kcal mol{sup −1} and − 2457.124 kcal mol{sup −1} respectively. The results showed that cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube was more soluble species in water. In addition electrostatic contribution of the interaction of boron- nitride nanotube complex and solvent was − 281.937 kcal mol{sup −1} which really more than Van der Waals and so the electrostatic interactions play a distinctive role in the solvation free energies of boron- nitride nanotube compounds. On the other hand electrostatic part of the interaction of carbon nanotube complex and solvent were almost the same as Van der Waals contribution. Complexation free energies were also computed to study the stability of related structures and the free energies were negative (− 374.082 and − 245.766 kcal mol{sup −1}) which confirmed encapsulation of drug into abovementioned nanotubes. However, boron-nitride nanotubes were more appropriate for encapsulation due to their larger solubility in aqueous solution. - Highlights: • Solubility of cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube is larger than cisplatin@ carbon nanotube. • Boron- nitride nanotube complexes have larger electrostatic contribution in solvation free energy. • Complexation free energies confirm encapsulation of drug into the nanotubes in aqueous solution. • Boron- nitride nanotubes are appropriate drug delivery systems compared with carbon nanotubes.

  19. Local heating with titanium nitride nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Ndukaife, Justus C.; Naik, Gururaj V.;

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles as local heat sources in the near infrared region, focusing on biological window. Experiments and simulations provide promising results for TiN, which is known to be bio-compatible.......We investigate the feasibility of titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles as local heat sources in the near infrared region, focusing on biological window. Experiments and simulations provide promising results for TiN, which is known to be bio-compatible....

  20. Alkaline Capacitors Based on Nitride Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldissi, Matt

    2003-01-01

    High-energy-density alkaline electrochemical capacitors based on electrodes made of transition-metal nitride nanoparticles are undergoing development. Transition- metal nitrides (in particular, Fe3N and TiN) offer a desirable combination of high electrical conductivity and electrochemical stability in aqueous alkaline electrolytes like KOH. The high energy densities of these capacitors are attributable mainly to their high capacitance densities, which, in turn, are attributable mainly to the large specific surface areas of the electrode nanoparticles. Capacitors of this type could be useful as energy-storage components in such diverse equipment as digital communication systems, implanted medical devices, computers, portable consumer electronic devices, and electric vehicles.

  1. Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Spintronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal B. Dhungana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available With the end of Moore’s law in sight, researchers are in search of an alternative approach to manipulate information. Spintronics or spin-based electronics, which uses the spin state of electrons to store, process and communicate information, offers exciting opportunities to sustain the current growth in the information industry. For example, the discovery of the giant magneto resistance (GMR effect, which provides the foundation behind modern high density data storage devices, is an important success story of spintronics; GMR-based sensors have wide applications, ranging from automotive industry to biology. In recent years, with the tremendous progress in nanotechnology, spintronics has crossed the boundary of conventional, all metallic, solid state multi-layered structures to reach a new frontier, where nanostructures provide a pathway for the spin-carriers. Different materials such as organic and inorganic nanostructures are explored for possible applications in spintronics. In this short review, we focus on the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT, which has recently been explored for possible applications in spintronics. Unlike many organic materials, BNNTs offer higher thermal stability and higher resistance to oxidation. It has been reported that the metal-free fluorinated BNNT exhibits long range ferromagnetic spin ordering, which is stable at a temperature much higher than room temperature. Due to their large band gap, BNNTs are also explored as a tunnel magneto resistance device. In addition, the F-BNNT has recently been predicted as an ideal spin-filter. The purpose of this review is to highlight these recent progresses so that a concerted effort by both experimentalists and theorists can be carried out in the future to realize the true potential of BNNT-based spintronics.

  2. Boron nitride nanotubes for spintronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhungana, Kamal B; Pati, Ranjit

    2014-09-22

    With the end of Moore's law in sight, researchers are in search of an alternative approach to manipulate information. Spintronics or spin-based electronics, which uses the spin state of electrons to store, process and communicate information, offers exciting opportunities to sustain the current growth in the information industry. For example, the discovery of the giant magneto resistance (GMR) effect, which provides the foundation behind modern high density data storage devices, is an important success story of spintronics; GMR-based sensors have wide applications, ranging from automotive industry to biology. In recent years, with the tremendous progress in nanotechnology, spintronics has crossed the boundary of conventional, all metallic, solid state multi-layered structures to reach a new frontier, where nanostructures provide a pathway for the spin-carriers. Different materials such as organic and inorganic nanostructures are explored for possible applications in spintronics. In this short review, we focus on the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT), which has recently been explored for possible applications in spintronics. Unlike many organic materials, BNNTs offer higher thermal stability and higher resistance to oxidation. It has been reported that the metal-free fluorinated BNNT exhibits long range ferromagnetic spin ordering, which is stable at a temperature much higher than room temperature. Due to their large band gap, BNNTs are also explored as a tunnel magneto resistance device. In addition, the F-BNNT has recently been predicted as an ideal spin-filter. The purpose of this review is to highlight these recent progresses so that a concerted effort by both experimentalists and theorists can be carried out in the future to realize the true potential of BNNT-based spintronics.

  3. Ultrahard nanotwinned cubic boron nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yongjun; Xu, Bo; Yu, Dongli; Ma, Yanming; Wang, Yanbin; Jiang, Yingbing; Hu, Wentao; Tang, Chengchun; Gao, Yufei; Luo, Kun; Zhao, Zhisheng; Wang, Li-Min; Wen, Bin; He, Julong; Liu, Zhongyuan

    2013-01-17

    Cubic boron nitride (cBN) is a well known superhard material that has a wide range of industrial applications. Nanostructuring of cBN is an effective way to improve its hardness by virtue of the Hall-Petch effect--the tendency for hardness to increase with decreasing grain size. Polycrystalline cBN materials are often synthesized by using the martensitic transformation of a graphite-like BN precursor, in which high pressures and temperatures lead to puckering of the BN layers. Such approaches have led to synthetic polycrystalline cBN having grain sizes as small as ∼14 nm (refs 1, 2, 4, 5). Here we report the formation of cBN with a nanostructure dominated by fine twin domains of average thickness ∼3.8 nm. This nanotwinned cBN was synthesized from specially prepared BN precursor nanoparticles possessing onion-like nested structures with intrinsically puckered BN layers and numerous stacking faults. The resulting nanotwinned cBN bulk samples are optically transparent with a striking combination of physical properties: an extremely high Vickers hardness (exceeding 100 GPa, the optimal hardness of synthetic diamond), a high oxidization temperature (∼1,294 °C) and a large fracture toughness (>12 MPa m(1/2), well beyond the toughness of commercial cemented tungsten carbide, ∼10 MPa m(1/2)). We show that hardening of cBN is continuous with decreasing twin thickness down to the smallest sizes investigated, contrasting with the expected reverse Hall-Petch effect below a critical grain size or the twin thickness of ∼10-15 nm found in metals and alloys.

  4. Fasting substrate oxidation in relation to habitual dietary fat intake and insulin resistance in non-diabetic women: a case for metabolic flexibility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carstens Madelaine T

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic flexibility described as “the capacity of the body to match fuel oxidation to fuel availability” has been implicated in insulin resistance. We examined fasting substrate oxidation in relation to dietary macronutrient intake, and markers of insulin resistance in otherwise healthy women, with and without a family history of diabetes mellitus (FH DM. Methods We measured body composition (dual x-ray absorptiometry, visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue area (VAT, SAT, using Computerised Tomography, fasting [glucose], [insulin], [free fatty acids], [blood lipids], insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, resting energy expenditure (REE, respiratory exchange ratio(RER and self-reported physical activity in a convenience sample of 180 women (18-45 yrs. A food frequency questionnaire was used to assess energy intake (EI and calculate the RER: Food Quotient (FQ ratio. Only those with EI:REE (1.05 -2.28 were included (N=140. Insulin resistance was defined HOMA-IR (>1.95. Results The Insulin Resistant (IR group had higher energy, carbohydrate and protein intakes (p 2 = 0.50, p  Conclusion In these apparently healthy, weight-stable women, insulin resistance and FH DM were associated with lower fat oxidation in relation to dietary fat intake, suggesting lower metabolic flexibility.

  5. Modeling, Growth and Characterization of III-V and Dilute Nitride Antimonide Materials and Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maros, Aymeric

    III-V multijunction solar cells have demonstrated record efficiencies with the best device currently at 46 % under concentration. Dilute nitride materials such as GaInNAsSb have been identified as a prime choice for the development of high efficiency, monolithic and lattice-matched multijunction solar cells as they can be lattice-matched to both GaAs and Ge substrates. These types of cells have demonstrated efficiencies of 44% for terrestrial concentrators, and with their upright configuration, they are a direct drop-in product for today's space and concentrator solar panels. The work presented in this dissertation has focused on the development of relatively novel dilute nitride antimonide (GaNAsSb) materials and solar cells using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, along with the modeling and characterization of single- and multijunction solar cells. Nitrogen-free ternary compounds such as GaInAs and GaAsSb were investigated first in order to understand their structural and optical properties prior to introducing nitrogen. The formation of extended defects and the resulting strain relaxation in these lattice-mismatched materials is investigated through extensive structural characterization. Temperature- and power-dependent photoluminescence revealed an inhomogeneous distribution of Sb in GaAsSb films, leading to carrier localization effects at low temperatures. Tuning of the growth parameters was shown to suppress these Sb-induced localized states. The introduction of nitrogen was then considered and the growth process was optimized to obtain high quality GaNAsSb films lattice-matched to GaAs. Near 1-eV single-junction GaNAsSb solar cells were produced. The best devices used a p-n heterojunction configuration and demonstrated a current density of 20.8 mA/cm2, a fill factor of 64 % and an open-circuit voltage of 0.39 V, corresponding to a bandgap-voltage offset of 0.57 V, comparable with the state-of-the-art for this type of solar cells. Post-growth annealing

  6. Substrate-mediated sub-diffraction guiding of optical signals through a linear chain of metal nanoparticles : Polarization dependence and the role of the dispersion relation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Compaijen, P.J.; Malyshev, V.A.; Knoester, J.

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the efficiency of transmitting optical signals through a linear chain consisting of identical and equidistantly spaced silver nanoparticles in the presence of a reflecting substrate. The energy exchange between surface plasmon polaritons of the chain and the substrate ca

  7. Spotting 2D atomic layers on aluminum nitride thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekar, Hareesh; Bharadwaj B, Krishna; Vaidyuala, Kranthi Kumar; Suran, Swathi; Bhat, Navakanta; Varma, Manoj; Srinivasan Raghavan

    2015-10-23

    Substrates for 2D materials are important for tailoring their fundamental properties and realizing device applications. Aluminum nitride (AIN) films on silicon are promising large-area substrates for such devices in view of their high surface phonon energies and reasonably large dielectric constants. In this paper epitaxial layers of AlN on 2″ Si wafers have been investigated as a necessary first step to realize devices from exfoliated or transferred atomic layers. Significant thickness dependent contrast enhancements are both predicted and observed for monolayers of graphene and MoS2 on AlN films as compared to the conventional SiO2 films on silicon, with calculated contrast values approaching 100% for graphene on AlN as compared to 8% for SiO2 at normal incidences. Quantitative estimates of experimentally measured contrast using reflectance spectroscopy show very good agreement with calculated values. Transistors of monolayer graphene on AlN films are demonstrated, indicating the feasibility of complete device fabrication on the identified layers.

  8. Water adsorption on fullerene-like carbon nitride overcoats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broitman, E. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)], E-mail: broitman@andrew.cmu.edu; Gueorguiev, G.K.; Furlan, A.; Son, N.T. [IFM, Linkoeping University, SE 581-83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Gellman, A.J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Stafstroem, S.; Hultman, L. [IFM, Linkoeping University, SE 581-83 Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2008-12-01

    Humidity influences the tribological performance of the head-disk interface in magnetic data storage devices. In this work we compare the uptake of water of amorphous carbon nitride (a-CN{sub x}) films, widely used as protective overcoats in computer disk drive systems, with fullerene-like carbon nitride (FL-CN{sub x}) and amorphous carbon (a-C) films. Films with thickness in the range 10-300 nm were deposited on quartz crystal substrates by reactive DC magnetron sputtering. A quartz crystal microbalance placed in a vacuum chamber was used to measure the water adsorption. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has been used to correlate water adsorption with film microstructure and surface defects (dangling bonds). Measurements indicate that the amount of adsorbed water is highest for the pure a-C films and that the FL-CN{sub x} films adsorbed less than a-CN{sub x}. EPR data correlate the lower water adsorption on FL-CN{sub x} films with a possible lack of dangling bonds on the film surface. To provide additional insight into the atomic structure of defects in the FL-CN{sub x}, a-CN{sub x} and a-C compounds, we performed first-principles calculations within the framework of Density Functional Theory. Emphasis was put on the energy cost for formation of vacancy defects and dangling bonds in relaxed systems. Cohesive energy comparison reveals that the energy cost formation for dangling bonds in different configurations is considerably higher in FL-CN{sub x} than for the amorphous films. These simulations thus confirm the experimental results showing that dangling bonds are much less likely in FL-CN{sub x} than in a-CN{sub x} and a-C films.

  9. The physiological substrates of fructosamine-3-kinase-related-protein (FN3KRP) are intermediates of nonenzymatic reactions between biological amines and ketose sugars (fructation products).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szwergold, Benjamin S; Bunker, Richard D; Loomes, Kerry M

    2011-11-01

    The physiological function of fructosamine-3-kinase (FN3K) is relatively well understood. As shown in several studies, most conclusively by data on the FN3K-KO mouse, this enzyme breaks down compounds produced by the non-enzymatic glycation of proteins by D-glucose. In contrast with FN3K, very little is known about the function of the fructosamine-3-kinase-related-protein (FN3KRP) even though it has a 65% amino-acid sequence identity with FN3K. We do know that this enzyme is a kinase as evidenced by its ability to phosphorylate non-physiological compounds such a psicosamines, ribulosamines, erythrulosamines, and glucitolamines. However, FN3KRP does not phosphorylate any of the numerous Amadori products that are the physiological substrates of FN3K. The fact that FN3KRP is highly conserved in all vertebrates and present throughout nature suggests that it plays an important role in cellular metabolism and makes identification of its physiological substrates an important objective. In this paper, we propose that FN3KRP phosphorylates products resulting from a non-enzymatic glycation of amines by ketoses (fructation) that involves a 2,3-enolization and produces the stable Amadori intermediate, 2-amino-2-deoxy-D-ribo-hex-3-ulose (ADRH). This ketosamine is then phosphorylated to 2-amino-2-deoxy-D-ribo-hex-3-ulose-4-phosphate (ADRH-4-P). Since phosphates are much better leaving groups than hydroxyls, this destabilizes the C-2 amine bond and results in a spontaneous β-elimination of the phosphate to regenerate an unmodified amine with the concomitant production of 4-deoxy-2,3-diulose. Consequently, we postulate that the principal physiological function of FN3KRP is the breakdown of nonenzymatic fructation products. If confirmed in future studies, this hypothesis opens up new perspectives for an improved understanding of biological Maillard reactions and mechanisms for their control and/or reversal. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Molten salt-based growth of bulk GaN and InN for substrates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldrip, Karen Elizabeth

    2007-08-01

    An atmospheric pressure approach to growth of bulk group III-nitrides is outlined. Native III-nitride substrates for optoelectronic and high power, high frequency electronics are desirable to enhance performance and reliability of these devices; currently, these materials are available in research quantities only for GaN, and are unavailable in the case of InN. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the reactions associated with traditional crystal growth techniques place these activities on the extreme edges of experimental physics. The novel techniques described herein rely on the production of the nitride precursor (N{sup 3-}) by chemical and/or electrochemical methods in a molten halide salt. This nitride ion is then reacted with group III metals in such a manner as to form the bulk nitride material. The work performed during the period of funding (February 2006-September 2006) focused on establishing that mass transport of GaN occurs in molten LiCl, the construction of a larger diameter electrochemical cell, the design, modification, and installation of a made-to-order glove box (required for handling very hygroscopic LiCl), and the feasibility of using room temperature molten salts to perform nitride chemistry experiments.

  11. Negative Refraction with Superior Transmission in Graphene-Hexagonal Boron Nitride (hBN) Multilayer Hyper Crystal

    OpenAIRE

    Ayed Al Sayem; Md. Masudur Rahman; Mahdy, M. R. C.; Ifat Jahangir; Md. Saifur Rahman

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we have theoretically investigated the performance of graphene-hexagonal Boron Nitride (hBN) multilayer structure (hyper crystal) to demonstrate all angle negative refraction along with superior transmission. hBN, one of the latest natural hyperbolic materials, can be a very strong contender to form a hyper crystal with graphene due to its excellence as a graphene-compatible substrate. Although bare hBN can exhibit negative refraction, the transmission is generally low due to...

  12. Effects of increasing nitrogen concentration on the structure of carbon nitride films deposited by ion beam assisted deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Hammer, P.; Victoria, NM; F Alvarez

    2000-01-01

    Amorphous carbon nitride films containing increasing concentrations of nitrogen were deposited by ion beam assisted deposition at a substrate temperature of 150 degrees C. The relationship between the deposition conditions and the chemical bonding structure was investigated by x-ray photoelectron, ultraviolet photoelectron, infrared, and Raman spectroscopies. Film properties were examined by ultraviolet-vis spectroscopy, conductivity, hardness, density, and internal stress measurements. The e...

  13. Epitaxial Growth of Molecular Crystals on van der Waals Substrates for High-Performance Organic Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    quality rubrene fi lms with large single-crystalline domains were grown on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) layers with an in-plane crystallographic...atomically fl at and clean substrate without much of damage or contamination . During the growth, the chamber was under vacuum (ca. 1 Torr), with fl

  14. Identifying suitable substrates for high-quality graphene-based heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banszerus, L.; Janssen, H.; Otto, M.; Epping, A.; Taniguchi, T.; Watanabe, K.; Beschoten, B.; Neumaier, D.; Stampfer, C.

    2017-06-01

    We report on a scanning confocal Raman spectroscopy study investigating the strain-uniformity and the overall strain and doping of high-quality chemical vapour deposited (CVD) graphene-based heterostuctures on a large number of different substrate materials, including hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), transition metal dichalcogenides, silicon, different oxides and nitrides, as well as polymers. By applying a hBN-assisted, contamination free, dry transfer process for CVD graphene, high-quality heterostructures with low doping densities and low strain variations are assembled. The Raman spectra of these pristine heterostructures are sensitive to substrate-induced doping and strain variations and are thus used to probe the suitability of the substrate material for potential high-quality graphene devices. We find that the flatness of the substrate material is a key figure for gaining, or preserving high-quality graphene.

  15. Deposition of silicon oxynitride films by low energy ion beam assisted nitridation at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youroukov, S.; Kitova, S.; Danev, G.

    2008-05-01

    The possibility is studied of growing thin silicon oxynitride films by e-gun evaporation of SiO and SiO2 together with concurrent bombardment with low energy N2+ ions from a cyclotron resonance (ECR) source at room temperature of substrates. The degree of nitridation and oxidation of the films is investigated by means of X-ray spectroscopy. The optical characteristics of the films, their environmental stability and adhesion to different substrates are examined. The results obtained show than the films deposited are transparent. It is found that in the case of SiO evaporation with concurrent N2+ ion bombardment, reactive implantation of nitrogen within the films takes place at room temperature of the substrate with the formation of a new silicon oxynitride compound even at low ion energy (150-200 eV).

  16. Defects in III-nitride microdisk cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, C. X.; Puchtler, T. J.; Zhu, T.; Griffiths, J. T.; Oliver, R. A.

    2017-03-01

    Nitride microcavities offer an exceptional platform for the investigation of light–matter interactions as well as the development of devices such as high efficiency light emitting diodes (LEDs) and low-threshold nanolasers. Microdisk geometries in particular are attractive for low-threshold lasing applications due to their ability to support high finesse whispering gallery modes (WGMs) and small modal volumes. In this article we review the effect of defects on the properties of nitride microdisk cavities fabricated using photoelectrochemical etching of an InGaN sacrificial superlattice (SSL). Threading dislocations originating from either the original GaN pseudosubstrate are shown to hinder the undercutting of microdisk cavities during the photoelectric chemical etching process resulting in whiskers of unetched material on the underside of microdisks. The unetched whiskers provide a pathway for light to escape, reducing microdisk Q-factor if located in the region occupied by the WGMs. Additionally, dislocations can affect the spectral stability of quantum dot emitters, thus hindering their effective integration in microdisk cavities. Though dislocations are clearly undesirable, the limiting factor on nitride microdisk Q-factor is expected to be internal absorption, indicating that the further optimisation of nitride microdisk cavities must incorporate both the elimination of dislocations and careful tailoring of the active region emission wavelength and background doping levels.

  17. Dynamic Characterization of Silicon Nitride Cantilevers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babaei Gavan, K.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes a series of experiments on dynamical characterization of silicon nitride cantilevers. These devices play an important role in micro-and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS). They consist of a mechanical part, a sensor or actuator, and an electronic part for readout and

  18. Local residual stress measurements on nitride layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mansilla, C.; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, local stresses in different nitrided maraging steel samples of high practical interest for industrial applications were studied through the so-called micro-slit milling method using a focused ion beam. The nitrogen concentration profiles were acquired by glow discharge optical emission

  19. Alkaline fuel cell with nitride membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shen-Huei; Pilaski, Moritz; Wartmann, Jens; Letzkus, Florian; Funke, Benedikt; Dura, Georg; Heinzel, Angelika

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this work is to fabricate patterned nitride membranes with Si-MEMS-technology as a platform to build up new membrane-electrode-assemblies (MEA) for alkaline fuel cell applications. Two 6-inch wafer processes based on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) were developed for the fabrication of separated nitride membranes with a nitride thickness up to 1 μm. The mechanical stability of the perforated nitride membrane has been adjusted in both processes either by embedding of subsequent ion implantation step or by optimizing the deposition process parameters. A nearly 100% yield of separated membranes of each deposition process was achieved with layer thickness from 150 nm to 1 μm and micro-channel pattern width of 1μm at a pitch of 3 μm. The process for membrane coating with electrolyte materials could be verified to build up MEA. Uniform membrane coating with channel filling was achieved after the optimization of speed controlled dip-coating method and the selection of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) as electrolyte solvent. Finally, silver as conductive material was defined for printing a conductive layer onto the MEA by Ink-Technology. With the established IR-thermography setup, characterizations of MEAs in terms of catalytic conversion were performed successfully. The results of this work show promise for build up a platform on wafer-level for high throughput experiments.

  20. Gallium Nitride Crystals: Novel Supercapacitor Electrode Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shouzhi; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Changlong; Shao, Yongliang; Wu, Yongzhong; Lv, Jiaxin; Hao, Xiaopeng

    2016-05-01

    A type of single-crystal gallium nitride mesoporous membrane is fabricated and its supercapacitor properties are demonstrated for the first time. The supercapacitors exhibit high-rate capability, stable cycling life at high rates, and ultrahigh power density. This study may expand the range of crystals as high-performance electrode materials in the field of energy storage.