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Sample records for nitric oxide-mediated pathway

  1. Nitric Oxide Mediated Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Activation of Multiple Regulatory Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Adil; Mun, Bong-Gyu; Imran, Qari M; Lee, Sang-Uk; Adamu, Teferi A; Shahid, Muhammad; Kim, Kyung-Min; Yun, Byung-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance between the accumulation and removal of nitric oxide and its derivatives is a challenge faced by all plants at the cellular level, and is especially important under stress conditions. Exposure of plants to various biotic and abiotic stresses causes rapid changes in cellular redox tone potentiated by the rise in reactive nitrogen species that serve as signaling molecules in mediating defensive responses. To understand mechanisms mediated by these signaling molecules, we performed a large-scale analysis of the Arabidopsis transcriptome induced by nitrosative stress. We generated an average of 84 and 91 million reads from three replicates each of control and 1 mM S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO)-infiltrated Arabidopsis leaf samples, respectively. After alignment, more than 95% of all reads successfully mapped to the reference and 32,535 genes and 55,682 transcripts were obtained. CysNO infiltration caused differential expression of 6436 genes (3448 up-regulated and 2988 down-regulated) and 6214 transcripts (3335 up-regulated and 2879 down-regulated) 6 h post-infiltration. These differentially expressed genes were found to be involved in key physiological processes, including plant defense against various biotic and abiotic stresses, hormone signaling, and other developmental processes. After quantile normalization of the FPKM values followed by student's T-test (P pathways were verified using quantitative real-time PCR. This study provides comprehensive information about plant responses to nitrosative stress at transcript level and would prove helpful in understanding and incorporating mechanisms associated with nitrosative stress responses in plants.

  2. Nitric oxide mediates the fungal elicitor-induced Taxol biosynthesis of Taxus chinensis suspension cells through the reactive oxygen species-dependent and-independent signal pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Maojun; DONG Jufang

    2006-01-01

    pathways. Moreover, the results of our work show that the elicitor- and nitric oxide-induced Taxol biosynthesis is inhibited by catalase, indicating that H2O2 from the oxidative burst might be the signal molecule involved in induced Taxol production of T. chinensis cells.

  3. Nitric oxide mediates stretch-induced Ca2+ release via activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt pathway in smooth muscle.

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    Bin Wei

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hollow smooth muscle organs such as the bladder undergo significant changes in wall tension associated with filling and distension, with attendant changes in muscle tone. Our previous study indicated that stretch induces Ca(2+ release occurs in the form of Ca(2+ sparks and Ca(2+ waves in urinary bladder myocytes. While, the mechanism underlying stretch-induced Ca2+ release in smooth muscle is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined the transduction mechanism linking cell stretch to Ca(2+ release. The probability and frequency of Ca(2+ sparks induced by stretch were closely related to the extent of cell extension and the time that the stretch was maintained. Experiments in tissues and single myocytes indicated that mechanical stretch significantly increases the production of nitric oxide (NO and the amplitude and duration of muscle contraction. Stretch-induced Ca(2+ sparks and contractility increases were abrogated by the NO inhibitor L-NAME and were also absent in eNOS knockout mice. Furthermore, exposure of eNOS null mice to exogenously generated NO induced Ca(2+ sparks. The soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ did not inhibit SICR, but this process was effectively blocked by the PI3 kinase inhibitors LY494002 and wortmannin; the phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS were up-regulated by 204+/-28.6% and 258+/-36.8% by stretch, respectively. Moreover, stretch significantly increased the eNOS protein expression level. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taking together, these results suggest that stretch-induced Ca2+ release is NO dependent, resulting from the activation of PI3K/Akt pathway in smooth muscle.

  4. Methanolic Extract of Clinacanthus nutans Exerts Antinociceptive Activity via the Opioid/Nitric Oxide-Mediated, but cGMP-Independent, Pathways

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    Mohammad Hafiz Abdul Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the present study were to determine the mechanisms of antinociceptive effect of methanol extract of Clinacanthus nutans (Acanthaceae leaves (MECN using various animal nociceptive models. The antinociceptive activity of orally administered 10% DMSO, 100 mg/kg acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, 5 mg/kg morphine, or MECN (100, 250, and 500 mg/kg was determined using the acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction (ACT, formalin-induced paw licking (FT, and hot plate tests (HPT. The role of opioid and nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO/cGMP systems was also investigated. The results showed that MECN produced a significant (p500 mg/kg or 227.7 mg/kg, respectively. This antinociceptive activity was fully antagonized by naloxone (a nonselective opioid antagonist but was partially reversed by L-arginine (L-arg; a nitric oxide [NO] precursor, Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME; an NO synthase inhibitor, or their combinations thereof. In contrast, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor enhanced the extract’s antinociception. UHPLC analysis revealed the presence of several flavonoid-based compounds with antinociceptive action. In conclusion, MECN exerted the peripherally and centrally mediated antinociceptive activity via the modulation of the opioid/NO-mediated, but cGMP-independent, systems.

  5. Methanolic Extract of Clinacanthus nutans Exerts Antinociceptive Activity via the Opioid/Nitric Oxide-Mediated, but cGMP-Independent, Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Rahim, Mohammad Hafiz; Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin; Mohd Sani, Mohd Hijaz; Omar, Maizatul Hasyima; Yakob, Yusnita; Cheema, Manraj Singh; Ching, Siew Mooi; Ahmad, Zuraini; Abdul Kadir, Arifah

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to determine the mechanisms of antinociceptive effect of methanol extract of Clinacanthus nutans (Acanthaceae) leaves (MECN) using various animal nociceptive models. The antinociceptive activity of orally administered 10% DMSO, 100 mg/kg acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), 5 mg/kg morphine, or MECN (100, 250, and 500 mg/kg) was determined using the acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction (ACT), formalin-induced paw licking (FT), and hot plate tests (HPT). The role of opioid and nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO/cGMP) systems was also investigated. The results showed that MECN produced a significant (p 500 mg/kg or 227.7 mg/kg, respectively. This antinociceptive activity was fully antagonized by naloxone (a nonselective opioid antagonist) but was partially reversed by l-arginine (l-arg; a nitric oxide [NO] precursor), Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME; an NO synthase inhibitor), or their combinations thereof. In contrast, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor) enhanced the extract's antinociception. UHPLC analysis revealed the presence of several flavonoid-based compounds with antinociceptive action. In conclusion, MECN exerted the peripherally and centrally mediated antinociceptive activity via the modulation of the opioid/NO-mediated, but cGMP-independent, systems.

  6. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Posttranslational Modifications: Impacts at the Synapse

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    Sophie A. Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is an important gasotransmitter molecule that is involved in numerous physiological processes throughout the nervous system. In addition to its involvement in physiological plasticity processes (long-term potentiation, LTP; long-term depression, LTD which can include NMDAR-mediated calcium-dependent activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS, new insights into physiological and pathological consequences of nitrergic signalling have recently emerged. In addition to the canonical cGMP-mediated signalling, NO is also implicated in numerous pathways involving posttranslational modifications. In this review we discuss the multiple effects of S-nitrosylation and 3-nitrotyrosination on proteins with potential modulation of function but limit the analyses to signalling involved in synaptic transmission and vesicular release. Here, crucial proteins which mediate synaptic transmission can undergo posttranslational modifications with either pre- or postsynaptic origin. During normal brain function, both pathways serve as important cellular signalling cascades that modulate a diverse array of physiological processes, including synaptic plasticity, transcriptional activity, and neuronal survival. In contrast, evidence suggests that aging and disease can induce nitrosative stress via excessive NO production. Consequently, uncontrolled S-nitrosylation/3-nitrotyrosination can occur and represent pathological features that contribute to the onset and progression of various neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and Huntington’s.

  7. Nitrate tolerance impairs nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jørn Bech; Boesgaard, Søren; Poulsen, Henrik E.;

    1996-01-01

    Nitrates, Nitrate tolerence, Nitric oxide, acetylcholine, N-acetylcholine, N-acetylcysteine, L-NAME, Rat, Anesthetized......Nitrates, Nitrate tolerence, Nitric oxide, acetylcholine, N-acetylcholine, N-acetylcysteine, L-NAME, Rat, Anesthetized...

  8. Hemoglobin Effects on Nitric Oxide Mediated Hypoxic Vasodilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Zimei; Cooper, Chris E

    2016-01-01

    The brain responds to hypoxia with an increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF). However, such an increase is generally believed to start only after the oxygen tension decreases to a certain threshold level. Although many mechanisms (different vasodilator and different generation and metabolism mechanisms of the vasodilator) have been proposed at the molecular level, none of them has gained universal acceptance. Nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed to play a central role in the regulation of oxygen supply since it is a vasodilator whose production and metabolism are both oxygen dependent. We have used a computational model that simulates blood flow and oxygen metabolism in the brain (BRAINSIGNALS) to test mechanism by which NO may elucidate hypoxic vasodilation. The first model proposed that NO was produced by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and metabolized by the mitochondrial enzyme cytochrome c oxidase (CCO). NO production declined with decreasing oxygen concentration given that oxygen is a substrate for nitric oxide synthase (NOS). However, this was balanced by NO metabolism by CCO, which also declined with decreasing oxygen concentration. However, the NOS effect was dominant; the resulting model profiles of hypoxic vasodilation only approximated the experimental curves when an unfeasibly low K m for oxygen for NOS was input into the model. We therefore modified the model such that NO generation was via the nitrite reductase activity of deoxyhemoglobin instead of NOS, whilst keeping the metabolism of NO by CCO the same. NO production increased with decreasing oxygen concentration, leading to an improved reproduction of the experimental CBF versus PaO2 curve. However, the threshold phenomenon was not perfectly reproduced. In this present work, we incorporated a wider variety of oxygen dependent and independent NO production and removal mechanisms. We found that the addition of NO removal via oxidation to nitrate mediated by oxyhemoglobin resulted in the

  9. Nitric oxide mediates gravitropic bending in soybean roots.

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    Hu, Xiangyang; Neill, Steven J; Tang, Zhangcheng; Cai, Weiming

    2005-02-01

    Plant roots are gravitropic, detecting and responding to changes in orientation via differential growth that results in bending and reestablishment of downward growth. Recent data support the basics of the Cholodny-Went hypothesis, indicating that differential growth is due to redistribution of auxin to the lower sides of gravistimulated roots, but little is known regarding the molecular details of such effects. Here, we investigate auxin and gravity signal transduction by demonstrating that the endogenous signaling molecules nitric oxide (NO) and cGMP mediate responses to gravistimulation in primary roots of soybean (Glycine max). Horizontal orientation of soybean roots caused the accumulation of both NO and cGMP in the primary root tip. Fluorescence confocal microcopy revealed that the accumulation of NO was asymmetric, with NO concentrating in the lower side of the root. Removal of NO with an NO scavenger or inhibition of NO synthesis via NO synthase inhibitors or an inhibitor of nitrate reductase reduced both NO accumulation and gravitropic bending, indicating that NO synthesis was required for the gravitropic responses and that both NO synthase and nitrate reductase may contribute to the synthesis of the NO required. Auxin induced NO accumulation in root protoplasts and asymmetric NO accumulation in root tips. Gravistimulation, NO, and auxin also induced the accumulation of cGMP, a response inhibited by removal of NO or by inhibitors of guanylyl cyclase, compounds that also reduced gravitropic bending. Asymmetric NO accumulation and gravitropic bending were both inhibited by an auxin transport inhibitor, and the inhibition of bending was overcome by treatment with NO or 8-bromo-cGMP, a cell-permeable analog of cGMP. These data indicate that auxin-induced NO and cGMP mediate gravitropic curvature in soybean roots.

  10. Nitric oxide mediates the stress response induced by diatom aldehydes in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

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    Giovanna Romano

    Full Text Available Diatoms are ubiquitous and abundant primary producers that have been traditionally considered as a beneficial food source for grazers and for the transfer of carbon through marine food webs. However, many diatom species produce polyunsaturated aldehydes that disrupt development in the offspring of grazers that feed on these unicellular algae. Here we provide evidence that production of the physiological messenger nitric oxide increases after treatment with the polyunsaturated aldehyde decadienal in embryos of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. At high decadienal concentrations, nitric oxide mediates initial apoptotic events leading to loss of mitochondrial functionality through the generation of peroxynitrite. At low decadienal concentrations, nitric oxide contributes to the activation of hsp70 gene expression thereby protecting embryos against the toxic effects of this aldehyde. When nitric oxide levels were lowered by inhibiting nitric oxide synthase activity, the expression of hsp70 in swimming blastula decreased and the proportion of abnormal plutei increased. However, in later pluteus stages nitric oxide was no longer able to exert this protective function: hsp70 and nitric oxide synthase expression decreased with a consequent increase in the expression of caspase-8. Our findings that nitric oxide production increases rapidly in response to a toxic exogenous stimulus opens new perspectives on the possible role of this gas as an important messenger to environmental stress in sea urchins and for understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying toxicity during diatom blooms.

  11. Nitric oxide mediates the stress response induced by diatom aldehydes in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Giovanna; Costantini, Maria; Buttino, Isabella; Ianora, Adrianna; Palumbo, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms are ubiquitous and abundant primary producers that have been traditionally considered as a beneficial food source for grazers and for the transfer of carbon through marine food webs. However, many diatom species produce polyunsaturated aldehydes that disrupt development in the offspring of grazers that feed on these unicellular algae. Here we provide evidence that production of the physiological messenger nitric oxide increases after treatment with the polyunsaturated aldehyde decadienal in embryos of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. At high decadienal concentrations, nitric oxide mediates initial apoptotic events leading to loss of mitochondrial functionality through the generation of peroxynitrite. At low decadienal concentrations, nitric oxide contributes to the activation of hsp70 gene expression thereby protecting embryos against the toxic effects of this aldehyde. When nitric oxide levels were lowered by inhibiting nitric oxide synthase activity, the expression of hsp70 in swimming blastula decreased and the proportion of abnormal plutei increased. However, in later pluteus stages nitric oxide was no longer able to exert this protective function: hsp70 and nitric oxide synthase expression decreased with a consequent increase in the expression of caspase-8. Our findings that nitric oxide production increases rapidly in response to a toxic exogenous stimulus opens new perspectives on the possible role of this gas as an important messenger to environmental stress in sea urchins and for understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying toxicity during diatom blooms.

  12. Nitric oxide mediates the fungal elicitor-induced puerarin biosynthesis in Pueraria thomsonii Benth. suspension cells through a salicylic acid (SA)-dependent and a jasmonic acid (JA)-dependent signal pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Maojun; DONG Jufang; ZHU Muyuan

    2006-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as a key signaling molecule in plant secondary metabolite biosynthesis recently. In order to investigate the molecular basis of NO signaling in elicitor-induced secondary metabolite biosynthesis of plant cells, we determined the contents of NO, salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), and puerarin in Pueraria thomsonii Benth. suspension cells treated with the elicitors prepared from cell walls of Penicillium citrinum. The results showed that the fungal elicitor induced NO burst, SA accumulation and puerarin production of P. thomsonii Benth. cells. The elicitor-induced SA accumulation and puerarin production was suppressed by nitric oxide specific scavenger cPITO, indicating that NO was essential for elicitor-induced SA and puerarin biosynthesis in P. thomsonii Benth. cells. In transgenic NahG P. thomsonii Benth. cells, the fungal elicitor also induced puerarin biosynthesis, NO burst, and JA accumulation, though the SA biosynthesis was impaired. The elicitor-induced JA accumulation in transgenic cells was blocked by cPITO, which suggested that JA acted downstream of NO and its biosynthesis was controlled by NO. External application of NO via its donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) enhanced puerarin biosynthesis in transgenic NahG P. thomsonii Benth. cells, and the NO-triggered puerarin biosynthesis was suppressed by JA inhibitors IBU and NDGA, which indicated that NO induced puerarin production through a JA-dependent signal pathway in the transgenic cells. Exogenous application of SA suppressed the elicitor-induced JA biosynthesis and reversed the inhibition of IBU and NDGA on elicitor-induced puerarin accumulation in transgenic cells, which indicated that SA inhibited JA biosynthesis in the cells and that SA might be used as a substitute for JA to mediate the elicitor- and NO-induced puerarin biosynthesis. It was, therefore, concluded that NO might mediate the elicitor-induced puerarin biosynthesis through SA- and JA-dependent signal

  13. Nitric oxide-mediated endothlium-dependent vasodilation is impaired with borderline high-LDL cholesterol.

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    Diehl, Kyle J; Stauffer, Brian L; Greiner, Jared J; Weil, Brian R; DeSouza, Christopher A

    2012-02-01

    The experimental aims of this study were to determine: (1) whether nitric oxide-mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilation is blunted in adult humans with borderline high plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol compared with adults with optimal/near optimal LDL-cholesterol levels; and, if so: (2) whether the magnitude of impairment in adults with borderline high LDL-cholesterol is similar to adults with high LDL-cholesterol. Forearm blood flow responses to intraarterial infusions of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were measured in 50 middle-aged (43-64 year) adults: 20 in the optimal/near optimal LDL-cholesterol range (<130 mg/dL); 20 with borderline high LDL-cholesterol (130-159 mg/dL); and 10 with high LDL-cholesterol ($160 mg/dL). In addition, blood flow responses to acetylcholine were determined in the absence and presence of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G) -monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA). Vasodilation to acetylcholine was ~20% lower (p < 0.05) in the borderline high (from 4.3 ± 0.2 to 12.3 ± 0.8 mL/100 mL tissue/min) and high (from 4.3 ± 0.3 to 12.0 ± 0.5 mL/100 mL tissue/min) LDL-cholesterol groups compared with the optimal/near optimal (from 4.4 ± 0.2 to 14.5 ± 0.5 mL/100 mL tissue/min) LDL-cholesterol group. L-NMMA significantly reduced (~30%) the vasodilator response to acetylcholine in the optimal/near optimal LDL-cholesterol group but not the borderline high or high LDL-cholesterol groups. Borderline high LDL-cholesterol is associated with impaired nitric oxide-mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilation.

  14. Nitric oxide mediates the survival action of IGF-1 and insulin in pancreatic beta cells.

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    Cahuana, Gladys M; Tejedo, Juan R; Hmadcha, Abdelkrim; Ramírez, Remedios; Cuesta, Antonio L; Soria, Bernat; Martin, Franz; Bedoya, Francisco J

    2008-02-01

    Generation of low levels of nitric oxide (NO) contributes to beta cell survival in vitro. The purpose of this study was to explore the link between NO and the survival pathway triggered by insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and insulin in insulin producing RINm5F cells and in pancreatic islets. Results show that exposure of cells to IGF-1/insulin protects against serum deprivation-induced apoptosis. This action is prevented with inhibitors of NO generation, PI3K and Akt. Moreover, transfection with the negative dominant form of the tyrosine kinase c-Src abrogates the effect of IGF-1 and insulin on DNA fragmentation. An increase in the expression level of NOS3 protein and in the enzyme activity is observed following exposure of serum-deprived RINm5F cells to IGF-1 and insulin. Phosphorylation of IRS-1, IRS-2 and to less extent IRS-3 takes place when serum-deprived RINm5F cells and rat pancreatic islets are exposed to either IGF-1, insulin, or diethylenetriamine nitric oxide adduct (DETA/NO). In human islets, IRS-1 and IRS-2 proteins are present and tyrosine phosphorylated upon exposure to IGF-1, insulin and DETA/NO. Both rat and human pancreatic islets undergo DNA fragmentation when cultured in serum-free medium and IGF-1, insulin and DETA/NO protect efficiently from this damage. We then conclude that generation of NO participates in the activation of survival pathways by IGF-1 and insulin in beta cells.

  15. Antioxidant systems are regulated by nitric oxide-mediated post-translational modifications (NO-PTMs

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    Juan Carlos Begara-Morales

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a biological messenger that orchestrates a plethora of plant functions, mainly through post-translational modifications (PTMs such as S-nitrosylation or tyrosine nitration. In plants, hundreds of proteins have been identified as potential targets of these NO-PTMs under physiological and stress conditions indicating the relevance of NO in plant-signaling mechanisms. Among these NO protein targets, there are different antioxidant enzymes involved in the control of reactive oxygen species (ROS, such as H2O2, which is also a signal molecule. This highlights the close relationship between ROS/NO signaling pathways. The major plant antioxidant enzymes, including catalase, superoxide dismutases (SODs peroxiredoxins (Prx and all the enzymatic components of the ascorbate-glutathione (Asa-GSH cycle, have been shown to be modulated to different degrees by NO-PTMs. This mini-review will update the recent knowledge concerning the interaction of NO with these antioxidant enzymes, with a special focus on the components of the Asa-GSH cycle and their physiological relevance.

  16. Leptin induces nitric oxide-mediated inhibition of lipolysis and glyceroneogenesis in rat white adipose tissue.

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    Niang, Fatoumata; Benelli, Chantal; Ribière, Catherine; Collinet, Martine; Mehebik-Mojaat, Nadia; Penot, Graziella; Forest, Claude; Jaubert, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Leptin is secreted by white adipose tissue (WAT) and induces lipolysis and nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) oxidation. During lipolysis, NEFA efflux is the result of triglyceride breakdown, NEFA oxidation, and re-esterification via glyceroneogenesis. Leptin's effects on glyceroneogenesis remain unexplored. We investigated the effect of a long-term treatment with leptin at a physiological concentration (10 μg/L) on lipolysis and glyceroneogenesis in WAT explants and analyzed the underlying mechanisms. Exposure of rat WAT explants to leptin for 2 h resulted in increased NEFA and glycerol efflux. However, a longer treatment with leptin (18 h) did not affect NEFA release and reduced glycerol output. RT-qPCR showed that leptin significantly downregulated the hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pck1), and PPARγ genes. In agreement with its effect on mRNA, leptin also decreased the levels of PEPCK-C and HSL proteins. Glyceroneogenesis, monitored by [1-(14) C] pyruvate incorporation into lipids, was reduced. Because leptin increases nitric oxide (NO) production in adipocytes, we explored the role of NO in the leptin signaling pathway. Pretreatment of explants with the NO synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester eliminated the effect of leptin on lipolysis, glyceroneogenesis, and expression of the HSL, Pck1, and PPARγ genes. The NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL penicillamine mimicked leptin effects, thus demonstrating the role of NO in these pathways. The inverse time-dependent action of leptin on WAT is consistent with a process that limits NEFA re-esterification and energy storage while reducing glycerol release, thus preventing hypertriglyceridemia.

  17. Nitric oxide-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by heavy-ion microbeam irradiation

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    Tomita, Masanori; Matsumoto, Hideki; Funayama, Tomoo; Yokota, Yuichiro; Otsuka, Kensuke; Maeda, Munetoshi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2015-07-01

    In general, a radiation-induced bystander response is known to be a cellular response induced in non-irradiated cells after receiving bystander signaling factors released from directly irradiated cells within a cell population. Bystander responses induced by high-linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions at low fluence are an important health problem for astronauts in space. Bystander responses are mediated via physical cell-cell contact, such as gap-junction intercellular communication (GJIC) and/or diffusive factors released into the medium in cell culture conditions. Nitric oxide (NO) is a well-known major initiator/mediator of intercellular signaling within culture medium during bystander responses. In this study, we investigated the NO-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by high-LET argon (Ar)-ion microbeam irradiation of normal human fibroblasts. Foci formation by DNA double-strand break repair proteins was induced in non-irradiated cells, which were co-cultured with those irradiated by high-LET Ar-ion microbeams in the same culture plate. Foci formation was suppressed significantly by pretreatment with an NO scavenger. Furthermore, NO-mediated reproductive cell death was also induced in bystander cells. Phosphorylation of NF-κB and Akt were induced during NO-mediated bystander signaling in the irradiated and bystander cells. However, the activation of these proteins depended on the incubation time after irradiation. The accumulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a downstream target of NO and NF-κB, was observed in the bystander cells 6 h after irradiation but not in the directly irradiated cells. Our findings suggest that Akt- and NF-κB-dependent signaling pathways involving COX-2 play important roles in NO-mediated high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander responses. In addition, COX-2 may be used as a molecular marker of high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander cells to distinguish them from directly irradiated cells, although this may depend on the time

  18. Nitric oxide-mediated changes in vascular reactivity in pregnancy in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Z. M.; Beilin, L J

    1993-01-01

    1. To examine the mechanisms which may account for pregnancy-induced vasodilatation in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), we have investigated the changes in vascular reactivity and the effects of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) inhibition in the in situ blood-perfused, mesenteric resistance vessels of 18-20 day pregnant SHR. The effects of NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG) were compared in pregnant and nonpregnant SHR and gestation matched normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. 2. Intra-arteria...

  19. Nitric Oxide Mediates the Stress Response Induced by Diatom Aldehydes in the Sea Urchin Paracentrotus lividus

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanna Romano; Maria Costantini; Isabella Buttino; Adrianna Ianora; Anna Palumbo

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms are ubiquitous and abundant primary producers that have been traditionally considered as a beneficial food source for grazers and for the transfer of carbon through marine food webs. However, many diatom species produce polyunsaturated aldehydes that disrupt development in the offspring of grazers that feed on these unicellular algae. Here we provide evidence that production of the physiological messenger nitric oxide increases after treatment with the polyunsaturated aldehyde decadie...

  20. Nitric oxide mediates low magnesium inhibition of osteoblast-like cell proliferation.

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    Leidi, Marzia; Dellera, Federica; Mariotti, Massimo; Banfi, Giuseppe; Crapanzano, Calogero; Albisetti, Walter; Maier, Jeanette A M

    2012-10-01

    An adequate intake of magnesium (Mg) is important for bone cell activity and contributes to the prevention of osteoporosis. Because (a) Mg is mitogenic for osteoblasts and (b) reduction of osteoblast proliferation is detected in osteoporosis, we investigated the influence of different concentrations of extracellular Mg on osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cell behavior. We found that low Mg inhibited SaOS-2 cell proliferation by increasing the release of nitric oxide through the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Indeed, both pharmacological inhibition with the iNOS inhibitor l-N(6)-(iminoethyl)-lysine-HCl and genetic silencing of iNOS by small interfering RNA restored the normal proliferation rate of the cells. Because a moderate induction of nitric oxide is sufficient to potentiate bone resorption and a relative deficiency in osteoblast proliferation can result in their inadequate activity, we conclude that maintaining Mg homeostasis is relevant to ensure osteoblast function and, therefore, to prevent osteoporosis.

  1. Different sources of nitric oxide mediate neurovascular coupling in the lateral geniculate nucleus of the cat

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    Carmen De Labra

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the link between neuronal responses and metabolic signals is fundamental to our knowledge of brain function and it is a milestone in our efforts to interpret data from modern non invasive optical techniques such as fMRI, which are based on the close coupling between metabolic demand of active neurons and local changes in blood flow. The challenge is to unravel the link. Here we show, using spectrophotometry to record oxyhemoglobin (OxyHb and metahemoglobin (MetHb (surrogate markers of cerebral flow and nitric oxide levels respectively together with extracellular neuronal recordings in vivo and applying a multiple polynomial regression model, that the markers are able to predict up about 80% of variability in neuronal response. Furthermore, we show that the coupling between blood flow and neuronal activity is heavily influenced by nitric oxide (NO. While neuronal responses show the typical saturating response, blood flow shows a linear behaviour during contrast-response curves, with nitric oxide from different sources acting differently for low and high intensity.

  2. Nitric oxide-mediated intracellular growth restriction of pathogenic Rhodococcus equi can be prevented by iron.

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    von Bargen, Kristine; Wohlmann, Jens; Taylor, Gregory Alan; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Haas, Albert

    2011-05-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an intracellular pathogen which causes pneumonia in young horses and in immunocompromised humans. R. equi arrests phagosome maturation in macrophages at a prephagolysosome stage and grows inside a privileged compartment. Here, we show that, in murine macrophages activated with gamma interferon and lipopolysaccharide, R. equi does not multiply but stays viable for at least 24 h. Whereas infection control of other intracellular pathogens by activated macrophages is executed by enhanced phagosome acidification or phagolysosome formation, by autophagy or by the interferon-inducible GTPase Irgm1, none of these mechanisms seems to control R. equi infection. Growth control by macrophage activation is fully mimicked by treatment of resting macrophages with nitric oxide donors, and inhibition of bacterial multiplication by either activation or nitric oxide donors is annihilated by cotreatment of infected macrophages with ferrous sulfate. Transcriptional analysis of the R. equi iron-regulated gene iupT demonstrates that intracellular R. equi encounters iron stress in activated, but not in resting, macrophages and that this stress is relieved by extracellular addition of ferrous sulfate. Our results suggest that nitric oxide is central to the restriction of bacterial access to iron in activated macrophages.

  3. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Intracellular Growth Restriction of Pathogenic Rhodococcus equi Can Be Prevented by Iron▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bargen, Kristine; Wohlmann, Jens; Taylor, Gregory Alan; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Haas, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an intracellular pathogen which causes pneumonia in young horses and in immunocompromised humans. R. equi arrests phagosome maturation in macrophages at a prephagolysosome stage and grows inside a privileged compartment. Here, we show that, in murine macrophages activated with gamma interferon and lipopolysaccharide, R. equi does not multiply but stays viable for at least 24 h. Whereas infection control of other intracellular pathogens by activated macrophages is executed by enhanced phagosome acidification or phagolysosome formation, by autophagy or by the interferon-inducible GTPase Irgm1, none of these mechanisms seems to control R. equi infection. Growth control by macrophage activation is fully mimicked by treatment of resting macrophages with nitric oxide donors, and inhibition of bacterial multiplication by either activation or nitric oxide donors is annihilated by cotreatment of infected macrophages with ferrous sulfate. Transcriptional analysis of the R. equi iron-regulated gene iupT demonstrates that intracellular R. equi encounters iron stress in activated, but not in resting, macrophages and that this stress is relieved by extracellular addition of ferrous sulfate. Our results suggest that nitric oxide is central to the restriction of bacterial access to iron in activated macrophages. PMID:21383050

  4. Inhibition of nitric oxide mediated protein nitration: therapeutic implications in experimental radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong Jae; Kim, Tae Uk; Park, Jeong-Soo; Ra, Jong Yun

    2013-09-15

    Experimental animal study. This study investigated whether nitric oxide (NO) mediated protein nitration is involved in the pathogenesis of radiculopathy and whether the symptoms can be relieved by its suppression. It has been reported that nitration of protein mediated by NO is involved in the degenerative neurological disorders, but its involvement is not clear in the radiculopathy. Two kinds of rat models of radiculopathy were used. Radiculopathy was induced either by ligation of spinal nerve roots or transplantation of autologous nucleus pulposus. In separate groups of rats, aminoguanidine, a potent nitric oxide synthetase inhibitor, was administered just before induction of radiculopathy, to suppress NO production and resultant nitration of protein. Sensation of the hind limb was evaluated by plantar stimulation test, and motor weakness was assessed by observation of gait pattern. Nitrotyrosine, product of protein nitration, was assayed quantitatively by Western immunoblotting. Mechanical allodynia was observed in both compression and nucleus pulposus groups, but motor weakness was observed only in the compression group. Preoperative administration of aminoguanidine attenuated mechanical allodynia and motor weakness. Optical densities of nitrotyrosine bands increased significantly in radiculopathy groups, but they were lowered by administration of aminoguanidine. NO mediated protein nitration contributes to the development of both types of radiculopathies. Suppression of NO production can decrease protein nitration and relieve neural dysfunctions of radiculopathy. N/A.

  5. The endogenous nitric oxide mediates selenium-induced phytotoxicity by promoting ROS generation in Brassica rapa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Chen

    Full Text Available Selenium (Se is suggested as an emerging pollutant in agricultural environment because of the increasing anthropogenic release of Se, which in turn results in phytotoxicity. The most common consequence of Se-induced toxicity in plants is oxidative injury, but how Se induces reactive oxygen species (ROS burst remains unclear. In this work, histofluorescent staining was applied to monitor the dynamics of ROS and nitric oxide (NO in the root of Brassica rapa under Se(IV stress. Se(IV-induced faster accumulation of NO than ROS. Both NO and ROS accumulation were positively correlated with Se(IV-induced inhibition of root growth. The NO accumulation was nitrate reductase (NR- and nitric oxide synthase (NOS-dependent while ROS accumulation was NADPH oxidase-dependent. The removal of NO by NR inhibitor, NOS inhibitor, and NO scavenger could alleviate Se(IV-induced expression of Br_Rbohs coding for NADPH oxidase and the following ROS accumulation in roots, which further resulted in the amelioration of Se(IV-induced oxidative injury and growth inhibition. Thus, we proposed that the endogenous NO played a toxic role in B. rapa under Se(IV stress by triggering ROS burst. Such findings can be used to evaluate the toxic effects of Se contamination on crop plants.

  6. Role of nitric oxide-mediated glutathionylation in neuronal function: potential regulation of energy utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Li-Peng; Garcia, Jerome V; Han, Derick S; Cadenas, Enrique

    2010-04-28

    Excessive generation of nitric oxide radical (NO*) in neuroinflammation, excitotoxicity and during age-related neurodegenerative disorders entails the localized and concerted increase in nitric oxide synthase(s) expression in glial cells and neurons. The aim of the present study was to assess the biological significance of the impact of NO* on the cell's thiol status with emphasis on S-glutathionylation of targeted proteins. Exposure of primary cortical neurons or astrocytes to increasing flow rates of NO* (0.061-0.25 microM/s) resulted in the following. (i) A decrease in GSH (glutathione) in neurons accompanied by formation of GSNO (S-nitrosoglutathione) and GSSG (glutathione disulfide); neurons were far more sensitive to NO* exposure than astrocytes. (ii) A dose-dependent oxidation of the cellular redox status: the neuron's redox potential increased approximately 42 mV and that of astrocytes approximately 23 mV. A good correlation was observed between cell viability and the cellular redox potential. The higher susceptibility of neurons to NO* can be partly explained by a reduced capacity to recover GSH through lower activities of GSNO and GSSG reductases. (iii) S-glutathionylation of a small subset of proteins, among them GAPDH (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), the S-glutathionylation of which resulted in inhibition of enzyme activity. The quantitative analyses of changes in the cell's thiol potential upon NO* exposure and their consequences for S-glutathionylation are discussed in terms of the distinct redox environment of astrocytes and neurons.

  7. Nitric oxide mediates alginate oligosaccharides-induced root development in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunhong; Liu, Hang; Yin, Heng; Wang, Wenxia; Zhao, Xiaoming; Du, Yuguang

    2013-10-01

    Alginate oligosaccharides (AOS), which are marine oligosaccharides, are involved in regulating plant root growth, but the promotion mechanism for AOS remains unclear. Here, AOS (10-80 mg L(-1)) were found to induce the generation of nitric oxide (NO) in the root system of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), which promoted the formation and elongation of wheat roots in a dose-dependent manner. NO inhibitors suggested that nitrate reductase (NR), rather than nitric oxide synthase (NOS), was essential for AOS-induced root development. Further studies confirmed that AOS-induced NO generation in wheat roots by up-regulating the gene expression and enzyme activity of NR at the post-transcriptional level. The anatomy and RT-PCR results showed that AOS accelerated the division and growth of stele cells, leading to an increase in the ratio of stele area to root transverse area. This could be inhibited by the NR inhibitor, sodium tungstate, which indicated that NO catalyzed by the NR was involved in AOS regulation of root development. Taken together, in the early stage of AOS-induced root development, NO generation was a novel mechanism by which AOS regulated plant growth. The results also showed that this marine resource could be widely used for crop development.

  8. Nitric oxide-mediated protein modification in cardiovascular physiology and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gödecke, Axel; Schrader, Jürgen; Reinartz, Michael

    2008-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a key regulator of cardiovascular functions including the control of vascular tone, anti-inflammatory properties of the endothelium, cardiac contractility, and thrombocyte activation and aggregation. Numerous experimental data support the view that NO not only acts via cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent mechanisms but also modulates protein function by nitrosation, nitrosylation, glutathiolation, and nitration, respectively. To understand how NO regulates all of these diverse biological processes on the molecular level a comprehensive assessment of NO-mediated cGMP-dependent and independent targets is required. Novel proteomic approaches allow the simultaneous identification of large quantities of proteins modified in an NO-dependent manner and thereby will considerably deepen our understanding of the role NO plays in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology.

  9. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Mediates Caffeine Antagonism of Alcohol-Induced Cerebral Artery Constriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jennifer; Fedinec, Alexander L; Kuntamallappanavar, Guruprasad; Leffler, Charles W; Bukiya, Anna N; Dopico, Alex M

    2016-01-01

    Despite preventive education, the combined consumption of alcohol and caffeine (particularly from "energy drinks") continues to rise. Physiologic perturbations by separate intake of ethanol and caffeine have been widely documented. However, the biologic actions of the alcohol-caffeine combination and their underlying subcellular mechanisms have been scarcely studied. Using intravital microscopy on a closed-cranial window and isolated, pressurized vessels, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro action of ethanol-caffeine mixtures on cerebral arteries from rats and mice, widely recognized models to address cerebrovascular pathophysiology and pharmacology. Caffeine at concentrations found in human circulation after ingestion of one to two cups of coffee (10 µM) antagonized the endothelium-independent constriction of cerebral arteries evoked by ethanol concentrations found in blood during moderate-heavy alcohol intoxication (40-70 mM). Caffeine antagonism against alcohol was similar whether evaluated in vivo or in vitro, suggesting independence of systemic factors and drug metabolism, but required a functional endothelium. Moreover, caffeine protection against alcohol increased nitric oxide (NO•) levels over those found in the presence of ethanol alone, disappeared upon blocking NO• synthase, and could not be detected in pressurized cerebral arteries from endothelial nitric-oxide synthase knockout (eNOS(-/-)) mice. Finally, incubation of de-endothelialized cerebral arteries with the NO• donor sodium nitroprusside (10 µM) fully restored the protective effect of caffeine. This study demonstrates for the first time that caffeine antagonizes ethanol-induced cerebral artery constriction and identifies endothelial NO• as the critical caffeine effector on smooth muscle targets. Conceivably, situations that perturb endothelial function and/or NO• availability will critically alter caffeine antagonism of alcohol-induced cerebrovascular constriction without

  10. Rat duodenal motility in vitro: Prokinetic effects of DL-homocysteine thiolactone and modulation of nitric oxide mediated inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Marija

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Homocysteine is a significant but modifiable risk factor for vascular diseases. As gastrointestinal smooth musculature is similar to blood vessel muscles, we investigated how elevated homocysteine levels affect nitric oxide-mediated neurotransmission in the gut. There is accumulated evidence that a dysfunction of NO neurons in the myenteric plexus may cause various diseases in the gastrointestinal tract such as achalasia, diabetic gastroparesis and infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. In the present study, we aimed to assess the effects of homocysteine on NO-mediated responses in vitro, and to examine the effects of DL-homocysteine thiolactone on the spontaneous motility of rat duodenum and nitrergic neurotransmission. DL-homocysteine thiolactone concentration of 10 μmol/L leads to the immediate increase in tone, amplitude and frequency of spontaneous movements in isolated rat duodenum. L-NAME (30 μmol/L leads to an increase in basal tone, amplitude and frequency of spontaneous contractions. The relaxations induced by EFS were significantly reduced in duodenal segments incubated in DL-homocysteine thiolactone compared with the control group. EFS-induced relaxations were inhibited by L-NAME in both experimental and control groups. These results suggest that a high level of homocysteine causes an important impairment of non-adrenergic non-cholinergic innervation of the rat duodenum. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175043

  11. Nitric oxide-mediated apoptosis in rat macrophages subjected to Shiga toxin 2 from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronetti, José Luis; Villegas, Natalia Angel; Paraje, María Gabriela; Albesa, Inés

    2011-04-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli are important food-borne pathogens. The main factor conferring virulence on this bacterium is its capacity to secrete Shiga toxins (Stxs), which have been reported to induce apoptosis in several cell types. However, the mechanisms of this apoptosis have not yet been fully elucidated. In addition, Stxs have been shown to stimulate macrophages to produce nitric oxide (NO), a well-known apoptosis inductor.The aim of this study was to investigate the participation of NO in apoptosis of rat peritoneal macrophages induced by culture supernatants or Stx2 from E. coli. Peritoneal macrophages incubated in the presence of E. coli supernatants showed an increase in the amounts of apoptosis and NO production. Furthermore, inhibition of NO synthesis induced by addition of aminoguanidine (AG) was correlated with a reduction in the percentage of apoptotic cells, indicating participation of this metabolite in the apoptotic process. Similarly, treatment of cells with Stx2 induced an increase in NO production and amount of apoptosis, these changes being reversed by addition of AG. In summary, these data show that treatment with E. coli supernatants or Stx2 induces NO-mediated apoptosis of macrophages. © 2011 The Societies and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Endogenous nitric oxide mediates alleviation of cadmium toxicity induced by calcium in rice seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long Zhang; Zhen Chen; Cheng Zhu

    2012-01-01

    The effect of calcium chloride (CaCl2) on rice seedling growth under cadmium chloride (CdCl2) stress,as well as the possible role of endogenous nitric oxide (NO) in this process,was studied.The growth of rice seedlings was seriously inhibited by CdCl2,and the inhibition was significantly mitigated by CaCl2.However,hemoglobin (Hb) and 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) weakened the promotion effect of CaCl2.The resuhs of NO fluorescence localization suggest that growth accelerated by CaCl2 might be associated with elevated NO levels.The content of Cd,protein thiols (PBT),and nonprotein thiols (NPT) in cell walls,cell organelles,and soluble fractions,respectively,of rice seedlings decreased considerably in the presence of CaCl2,whereas the content of pectin,hemicellulose 1 (HC1),and hemicellulose 2 (HC2) increased significantly.Elimination of endogenous NO in Cd+Ca treatment could promote the transportation of Cd2+ to cell organelles and soluble fractions and increase the content of NPT and PBT in leaves.In addition,transportation of Cd2+ to cell organelles and soluble fractions was retarded in roots,the content of NPT increased,and the content of PBT decreased.With elimination of endogenous NO in Cd+Ca treatment,the content of pectin,HC 1,and HC2 decreased significantly.Thus,Ca may alleviate Cd toxicity via endogenous NO with variation in the levels of NPT,PBT,and matrix polysaccharides.

  13. Nitric Oxide Mediates Molybdenum-Induced Antioxidant Defense in Wheat under Drought Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songwei Wu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum (Mo has been reported to alleviate drought stress by enhancing antioxidant defense in plants, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we hypothesized that Mo mediates nitric oxide (NO-induced antioxidant defense through Mo-enzymes, particularly by nitrate reductase (NR in wheat under drought stress. The 30-day-old wheat seedlings cultivated in -Mo (0 μM Mo and +Mo (1 μM Mo Hoagland solutions were detached and then pretreated with Mo-enzyme inhibitors, NO scavengers, NO donors or their combinations according to demands of complementary experiment under 10% polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG-stimulated drought stress (PSD. Mo supplementation increased the activities and transcripts of antioxidant enzymes, decreased H2O2 and MDA contents, and elevated NO production, implying that Mo-induced antioxidant defense may be related to NO signal. Complementary experiment showed that NO production was induced by Mo, while suppressed by Mo-enzyme inhibitors and NO scavengers, but restored by NO donors, suggesting that Mo-induced increase of NO production may be due to the regulation by Mo-enzymes. Further experiment indicated that the increased activities and transcripts of antioxidant enzymes induced by Mo were suppressed by Mo-enzyme inhibitors and NO scavengers, and NO donors could eliminate their suppressing effects. Moreover, Mo application increased NR activity and inhibitors of Mo-enzymes inhibited NR activity in wheat leaves under PSD, suggesting that NR might involve in the regulation of Mo-induced NO production. These results clearly indicate that NO mediates Mo-induced antioxidant defense at least partially through the regulation of NR.

  14. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Maize Root Apex Responses to Nitrate are Regulated by Auxin and Strigolactones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro eManoli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate (NO3- is a key element for crop production but its levels in agricultural soils are limited. Plants have developed mechanisms to cope with these NO3- fluctuations based on sensing nitrate at the root apex. Particularly, the transition zone (TZ of root apex has been suggested as a signalling-response zone. This study dissects cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying NO3- resupply effects on primary root growth in maize, confirming nitric oxide (NO as a putative modulator. Nitrate restoration induced primary root elongation within the first 2 h, corresponding to a stimulation of cell elongation at the basal border of the TZ. Xyloglucans (XGs immunolocalization together with Brefeldin A applications demonstrated that nitrate resupply induces XG accumulation. This effect was blocked by cPTIO (NO scavenger. Transcriptional analysis of ZmXET1 confirmed the stimulatory effect of nitrate on XGs accumulation in cells of the TZ. Immunolocalization analyses revealed a positive effect of nitrate resupply on auxin and PIN1 accumulation, but a transcriptional regulation of auxin biosynthesis/transport/signalling genes was excluded. Short-term nitrate treatment repressed the transcription of genes involved in strigolactones (SLs biosynthesis and transport, mainly in the TZ. Enhancement of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs transcription in presence of cPTIO indicated endogenous NO as a negative modulator of CCDs activity. Finally, treatment with the SLs-biosynthesis inhibitor (TIS108 restored the root growth in the nitrate-starved seedlings. Present report suggests that the NO-mediated root apex responses to nitrate are accomplished in cells of the TZ via integrative actions of auxin, NO and SLs.

  15. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Maize Root Apex Responses to Nitrate are Regulated by Auxin and Strigolactones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoli, Alessandro; Trevisan, Sara; Voigt, Boris; Yokawa, Ken; Baluška, František; Quaggiotti, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate (NO3 (-)) is a key element for crop production but its levels in agricultural soils are limited. Plants have developed mechanisms to cope with these NO3 (-) fluctuations based on sensing nitrate at the root apex. Particularly, the transition zone (TZ) of root apex has been suggested as a signaling-response zone. This study dissects cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying NO3 (-) resupply effects on primary root (PR) growth in maize, confirming nitric oxide (NO) as a putative modulator. Nitrate restoration induced PR elongation within the first 2 h, corresponding to a stimulation of cell elongation at the basal border of the TZ. Xyloglucans (XGs) immunolocalization together with Brefeldin A applications demonstrated that nitrate resupply induces XG accumulation. This effect was blocked by cPTIO (NO scavenger). Transcriptional analysis of ZmXET1 confirmed the stimulatory effect of nitrate on XGs accumulation in cells of the TZ. Immunolocalization analyses revealed a positive effect of nitrate resupply on auxin and PIN1 accumulation, but a transcriptional regulation of auxin biosynthesis/transport/signaling genes was excluded. Short-term nitrate treatment repressed the transcription of genes involved in strigolactones (SLs) biosynthesis and transport, mainly in the TZ. Enhancement of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) transcription in presence of cPTIO indicated endogenous NO as a negative modulator of CCDs activity. Finally, treatment with the SLs-biosynthesis inhibitor (TIS108) restored the root growth in the nitrate-starved seedlings. Present report suggests that the NO-mediated root apex responses to nitrate are accomplished in cells of the TZ via integrative actions of auxin, NO and SLs.

  16. Nitric oxide mediates effects of acute, not chronic, naltrexone on LPS-induced hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhotic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiassy, Bentolhoda; Rahimi, Nastaran; Javadi-Paydar, Mehrak; Gharedaghi, Mohammad Hadi; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Dehpour, Ahmad R

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest endogenous opioids and nitric oxide (NO) are involved in the pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In this study, the interaction between the opioid receptor antagonist and NO was investigated on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced HE in cirrhotic rats. Male rats were divided in the sham- and bile duct ligation (BDL)-operated groups. Animals were treated with saline; naltrexone (10 mg/kg, i.p.); or L-NAME (3 mg/kg, i.p.), alone or in combination with naltrexone. To induce HE, LPS (1 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected 1 h after the final drug treatment. HE scoring, hepatic histology, and plasma NO metabolites levels and mortality rate were recorded. Deteriorated level of consciousness and mortality after LPS administration significantly ameliorated following both acute and chronic treatment with naltrexone in cirrhotic rats. However, acute and chronic administration of L-NAME did not change HE scores in cirrhotic rats. The effects of acute but not chronic treatment of naltrexone on HE parameters were reversed by L-NAME. Plasma NOx concentrations elevated in BDL rats, which were decreased after acute and chronic treatment by naltrexone or L-NAME, significantly. We suggest both acute and chronic treatment with naltrexone improved LPS-induced HE. But, only acute treatment with naltrexone may affect through NO pathway.

  17. α2A-adrenoceptors, but not nitric oxide, mediate the peripheral cardiac sympatho-inhibition of moxonidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobos-Puc, Luis E; Aguayo-Morales, Hilda; Silva-Belmares, Yesenia; González-Zavala, Maria A; Centurión, David

    2016-07-05

    Moxonidine centrally inhibits the sympathetic activity through the I1-imidazoline receptor and nitric oxide. In addition, inhibits the peripheral cardiac sympathetic outflow by α2-adrenoceptors/I1-imidazoline receptors, although the role of α2-adrenoceptor subtypes or nitric oxide in the cardiac sympatho-inhibition induced by moxonidine are unknown. Therefore, the cardiac sympatho-inhibition induced by moxonidine (10μg/kgmin) was evaluated before and after of the treatment with the following antagonists/inhibitor: (1) BRL 44408, (300μg/kg, α2A), imiloxan, (3000μg/kg, α2B), and JP-1302, (300μg/kg, α2C), in animals pretreated with AGN 192403 (3000μg/kg, I1 antagonist); (2) N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; 34, 100, and 340μg/kgmin); and (3) the combinations of the highest dose of l-NAME plus AGN 192403 or BRL 44408. Additionally, the expression of the neuronal (nNOS) and inducible (iNOS) nitric oxide synthase in the stellate ganglion was determined after treatment with moxonidine (i.p. 0.56mg/kg daily, during one week). The cardiac sympatho-inhibition of 10μg/kgmin moxonidine was: (1) unaffected by imiloxan and JP-1302, under pretreatment with AGN 192403, or l-NAME (34, 100 and 340μg/kgmin) given alone; (2) partially antagonized by the combination of 340 μg/kgmin l-NAME plus BRL 44408; and (3) abolished by BRL 44408 under treatment with AGN 192403. Furthermore, moxonidine did not modify the nNOS or iNOS protein expression in the stellate ganglion, the main source of postganglionic sympathetic neurons innervating the heart. In conclusion, our results suggest that the peripheral cardiac sympatho-inhibition induced by moxonidine is mediated by α2A-adrenoceptor subtype but not by nitric oxide.

  18. Nitrated type III collagen as a biological marker of nitric oxide-mediated synovial tissue metabolism in osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardot, P; Charni-Ben Tabassi, N; Toh, L

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Nitric oxide (NO) is a major mediator of joint tissue inflammation and damage in osteoarthritis (OA) and mediates the nitration of tyrosine (Y*) residues in proteins. We investigated the nitration of type III collagen, a major constituent of synovial membrane, in knee OA. METHODS...... in healthy controls and significantly correlated with C-reactive protein values (r=0.40, Pcollagen N-telopeptide is increased in the synovial tissue of patients with knee OA. Measurements of serum IIINys level may be useful for the clinical......: A polyclonal antibody directed against the nitrated QY*DSY*DVKSG sequence from type III collagen N-telopeptide was generated. Synovial tissues from patients with knee OA (n=4) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA, n=4) were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for IIINys. Serum IIINys levels were measured by enzyme...

  19. Ascorbic acid improves brachial artery vasodilation during progressive handgrip exercise in the elderly through a nitric oxide-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinity, Joel D; Wray, D Walter; Witman, Melissa A H; Layec, Gwenael; Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Ives, Stephen J; Conklin, Jamie D; Reese, Van; Zhao, Jia; Richardson, Russell S

    2016-03-15

    The proposed mechanistic link between the age-related attenuation in vascular function and free radicals is an attractive hypothesis; however, direct evidence of free radical attenuation and a concomitant improvement in vascular function in the elderly is lacking. Therefore, this study sought to test the hypothesis that ascorbic acid (AA), administered intra-arterially during progressive handgrip exercise, improves brachial artery (BA) vasodilation in a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent manner, by mitigating free radical production. BA vasodilation (Doppler ultrasound) and free radical outflow [electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy] were measured in seven healthy older adults (69 ± 2 yr) during handgrip exercise at 3, 6, 9, and 12 kg (∼13-52% of maximal voluntary contraction) during the control condition and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition via N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), AA, and coinfusion of l-NMMA + AA. Baseline BA diameter was not altered by any of the treatments, while L-NMMA and L-NMMA + AA diminished baseline BA blood flow and shear rate. AA improved BA dilation compared with control at 9 kg (control: 6.5 ± 2.2%, AA: 10.9 ± 2.5%, P = 0.01) and 12 kg (control: 9.5 ± 2.7%, AA: 15.9 ± 3.7%, P vasodilation compared with control and when combined with AA eliminated the AA-induced improvement in BA vasodilation. Free radical outflow increased with exercise intensity but, interestingly, was not attenuated by AA. Collectively, these results indicate that AA improves BA vasodilation in the elderly during handgrip exercise through an NO-dependent mechanism; however, this improvement appears not to be the direct consequence of attenuated free radical outflow from the forearm.

  20. Medullary ventrolateral nitric oxide mediates the cardiac effect of electroacupuncture at "Neiguan" acupoint on acute myocardial ischemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Juan-Xiu; Zhou, Pei-Hua; Wang, Jin; Li, Xia; Cao, Yin-Xiang; Zhou, Xu; Zhu, Da-Nian

    2004-08-25

    Experiments were performed on male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats anesthetized with a mixture of urethane and chloralose. A rat model of acute myocardial ischemia (AMI) was made by ligation of the left anterior descending branch of the coronary artery (LAD). After the LAD ligation, the ischemia area of the left ventricular wall became somewhat pale immediately. Under a light microscope, the pathological examination revealed that all the cells were swollen and in red color when the cardiac section was stained with hematoxylin basic fuchsin picric acid (HBFP), which indicated a typical change in the myocardial ischemia. In the AMI model, it was found that cardiac functions were markedly attenuated, such as decreases in the heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP), maximal rate for left ventricular pressure rising and declining (+/-dp/dt(max)), velocity of contractile element (V(CE)) and total area of cardiac force loop (L(0)), and an increase in the left ventricular end diastolic pressure (LVEDP). In such AMI rats, application of electroacupuncture (EA) at "Neiguan" acupoints (Pe 6) for 20 min could obviously improve the above-mentioned cardiac functions. After microinjection of nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), was made into the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), the curative effect of EA on myocardial ischemia was reduced significantly or abolished, while after microinjection of normal saline of the same volume was made into the RVLM, the improving effect of EA remained. These results suggest that the effect of EA on myocardial ischemia is possibly mediated by the nitric oxide (NO) in the RVLM.

  1. The mechanism of the nitric oxide-mediated enhancement of tert-butylhydroperoxide-induced DNA single strand breakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidarelli, Andrea; Clementi, Emilio; Sciorati, Clara; Cantoni, Orazio

    1998-01-01

    Caffeine (Cf) enhances the DNA cleavage induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (tB-OOH) in U937 cells via a mechanism involving Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial formation of DNA-damaging species (Guidarelli et al., 1997b). Nitric oxide (NO) is not involved in this process since U937 cells do not express the constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS).Treatment with the NO donors S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP, 10 μM), or S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO, 300 μM), however, potentiated the DNA strand scission induced by 200 μM tB-OOH. The DNA lesions generated by tB-OOH alone, or combined with SNAP, were repaired with superimposable kinetics and were insensitive to anti-oxidants and peroxynitrite scavengers but suppressed by iron chelators.SNAP or GSNO did not cause mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation but their enhancing effects on the tB-OOH-induced DNA strand scission were prevented by ruthenium red, an inhibitor of the calcium uniporter of mitochondria. Furthermore, the enhancing effects of both SNAP and GSNO were identical to and not additive with those promoted by the Ca2+-mobilizing agents Cf or ATP.The SNAP- or GSNO-mediated enhancement of the tB-OOH-induced DNA cleavage was abolished by the respiratory chain inhibitors rotenone and myxothiazol and was not apparent in respiration-deficient cells.It is concluded that, in cells which do not express the enzyme cNOS, exogenous NO enhances the accumulation of DNA single strand breaks induced by tB-OOH via a mechanism involving inhibition of complex III. PMID:9846647

  2. Oleic acid-dependent modulation of Nitric oxide associated 1 protein levels regulates nitric oxide-mediated defense signaling in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The conserved cellular metabolites nitric oxide (NO) and oleic acid (18:1) are well-known regulators of disease physiologies in diverse organism. We show that NO production in plants is regulated via 18:1. Reduction in 18:1 levels, via a genetic mutation in the 18:1-synthesizing gene SUPPRESSOR OF S...

  3. Sinorhizobium meliloti Controls Nitric Oxide-Mediated Post-Translational Modification of a Medicago truncatula Nodule Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanquet, Pauline; Silva, Liliana; Catrice, Olivier; Bruand, Claude; Carvalho, Helena; Meilhoc, Eliane

    2015-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in various plant-microbe interactions. In the symbiosis between soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti and model legume Medicago truncatula, NO is required for an optimal establishment of the interaction but is also a signal for nodule senescence. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms responsible for NO effects in the legume-rhizobium interaction. Here, we investigate the contribution of the bacterial NO response to the modulation of a plant protein post-translational modification in nitrogen-fixing nodules. We made use of different bacterial mutants to finely modulate NO levels inside M. truncatula root nodules and to examine the consequence on tyrosine nitration of the plant glutamine synthetase, a protein responsible for assimilation of the ammonia released by nitrogen fixation. Our results reveal that S. meliloti possesses several proteins that limit inactivation of plant enzyme activity via NO-mediated post-translational modifications. This is the first demonstration that rhizobia can impact the course of nitrogen fixation by modulating the activity of a plant protein.

  4. Contribution of radiation-induced, nitric oxide-mediated bystander effect to radiation-induced adaptive response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, H.; Ohnishi, T.

    There has been a recent upsurge of interest in radiation-induced adaptive response and bystander effect which are specific modes in stress response to low-dose low-dose rate radiation Recently we found that the accumulation of inducible nitric oxide NO synthase iNOS in wt p53 cells was induced by chronic irradiation with gamma rays followed by acute irradiation with X-rays but not by each one resulting in an increase in nitrite concentrations of medium It is suggested that the accumulation of iNOS may be due to the depression of acute irradiation-induced p53 functions by pre-chronic irradiation In addition we found that the radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells against acute irradiation with X-rays was reduced after chronic irradiation with gamma rays This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells was nearly completely suppressed by the addition of NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO to the medium This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells is just radiation-induced adaptive response suggesting that NO-mediated bystander effect may considerably contribute to adaptive response induced by radiation

  5. Salt stress reduces root meristem size by nitric oxide-mediated modulation of auxin accumulation and signaling in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen; Li, Rong-Jun; Han, Tong-Tong; Cai, Wei; Fu, Zheng-Wei; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2015-05-01

    The development of the plant root system is highly plastic, which allows the plant to adapt to various environmental stresses. Salt stress inhibits root elongation by reducing the size of the root meristem. However, the mechanism underlying this process remains unclear. In this study, we explored whether and how auxin and nitric oxide (NO) are involved in salt-mediated inhibition of root meristem growth in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using physiological, pharmacological, and genetic approaches. We found that salt stress significantly reduced root meristem size by down-regulating the expression of PINFORMED (PIN) genes, thereby reducing auxin levels. In addition, salt stress promoted AUXIN RESISTANT3 (AXR3)/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID17 (IAA17) stabilization, which repressed auxin signaling during this process. Furthermore, salt stress stimulated NO accumulation, whereas blocking NO production with the inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine-methylester compromised the salt-mediated reduction of root meristem size, PIN down-regulation, and stabilization of AXR3/IAA17, indicating that NO is involved in salt-mediated inhibition of root meristem growth. Taken together, these findings suggest that salt stress inhibits root meristem growth by repressing PIN expression (thereby reducing auxin levels) and stabilizing IAA17 (thereby repressing auxin signaling) via increasing NO levels. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Lichen metabolites prevent UV light and nitric oxide-mediated plasmid DNA damage and induce apoptosis in human melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, A; Piovano, M; Lombardo, L; Garbarino, J; Cardile, V

    2008-09-26

    In humans both UV-A and UV-B can cause gene mutations and suppress immunity, which leads to skin cancer, including melanoma. Inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) appears particularly promising as ROS and RNS production by both UV-A and UV-B contributes to inflammation, immunosuppression, gene mutation and carcinogenesis. We evaluated the effect of two lichen compounds, sphaerophorin (depside) and pannarin (depsidone) on pBR322 DNA cleavage induced by hydroxyl radicals (()OH), and by nitric oxide (NO), and their superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) scavenging capacity. In addition, we investigated the growth inhibitory activity of these compounds against human melanoma cells (M14 cell line). Sphaerophorin and pannarin showed a protective effect on plasmid DNA and exhibited a superoxide dismutase like effect. The data obtained in cell culture show that these lichen metabolites inhibit the growth of melanoma cells, inducing an apoptotic cell death, demonstrated by the fragmentation of genomic DNA (COMET and TUNEL Assays) and by a significant increase of caspase-3 activity, and correlated, at least in part, to the increase of ROS generation, These results confirm the promising biological properties of sphaerophorin and pannarin and encourage further investigations on their molecular mechanisms.

  7. Nitric oxide mediates strigolactone signaling in auxin and ethylene-sensitive lateral root formation in sunflower seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Niharika; Bhatla, Satish C

    2015-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) play significant role in shaping root architecture whereby auxin-SL crosstalk has been observed in SL-mediated responses of primary root elongation, lateral root formation and adventitious root (AR) initiation. Whereas GR24 (a synthetic strigolactone) inhibits LR and AR formation, the effect of SL biosynthesis inhibitor (fluridone) is just the opposite (root proliferation). Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) leads to LR proliferation but completely inhibits AR development. The diffusive distribution of PIN1 in the provascular cells in the differentiating zone of the roots in response to GR24, fluridone or NPA treatments further indicates the involvement of localized auxin accumulation in LR development responses. Inhibition of LR formation by GR24 treatment coincides with inhibition of ACC synthase activity. Profuse LR development by fluridone and NPA treatments correlates with enhanced [Ca(2+)]cyt in the apical region and differentiating zones of LR, indicating a critical role of [Ca(2+)] in LR development in response to the coordinated action of auxins, ethylene and SLs. Significant enhancement of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (CCD) activity (enzyme responsible for SL biosynthesis) in tissue homogenates in presence of cPTIO (NO scavenger) indicates the role of endogenous NO as a negative modulator of CCD activity. Differences in the spatial distribution of NO in the primary and lateral roots further highlight the involvement of NO in SL-modulated root morphogenesis in sunflower seedlings. Present work provides new report on the negative modulation of SL biosynthesis through modulation of CCD activity by endogenous nitric oxide during SL-modulated LR development.

  8. Enhanced nitric oxide-mediated autophagy contributes to the hepatoprotective effects of ischemic preconditioning during ischemia and reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jun-Kyu; Kang, Jung-Woo; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2016-08-31

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) protects against liver ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Autophagy is an essential cytoprotective system that is rapidly activated by multiple stressors. Nitric oxide (NO) acts as an inducer of IPC. We examined the impact of autophagy in liver IPC and its regulation by NO. Male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to 60 min of hepatic ischemia followed by 6 h of reperfusion. IPC was achieved for 10 min of ischemia followed by 10 min of reperfusion prior to sustained ischemia. N(ω)-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 15 mg/kg, i.v., all NOS inhibitor) and aminoguanidine (AG, 10 mg/kg, i.v., iNOS inhibitor) were injected 10 min before IPC. SB203580 (10 mg/kg, i.p., p38 inhibitor) was injected 30 min before IPC. I/R increased serum alanine aminotransferase activity. IPC attenuated this increase, which was abolished by L-NAME, but not AG. Microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II levels increased and p62 protein levels decreased after I/R; these changes were augmented by IPC and abolished by L-NAME. I/R increased liver protein expression of autophagy-related protein (Atg)12-Atg5 complex and lysosome-associated membrane protein-2. IPC augmented the expression of these proteins, which were abolished by L-NAME, but not AG. IPC also augmented the level of phosphorylated p38 MAPK induced by I/R and this phosphorylation was abolished by L-NAME. Our findings suggest that IPC-mediated NO protects against I/R-induced liver injury by enhancing autophagic flux.

  9. Role of metabolic environment on nitric oxide mediated inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia in type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Monica P; Emond, Zachary M; Wang, Zheng; Martinez, Janet; Jiang, Qun; Kibbe, Melina R

    2014-01-30

    Nitric oxide (NO) is well known to inhibit neointimal hyperplasia following arterial injury. Previously, we reported that NO was more effective at inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in a type 2 diabetic environment than control. We also found that NO was ineffective in an uncontrolled type 1 diabetic environment; however, insulin restored the efficacy of NO. Thus, the goal of this study was to more closely evaluate the effect of insulin and glucose on the efficacy of NO at inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic environments using different doses of insulin as well as pioglitazone. Type 1 diabetes was induced in male lean Zucker (LZ) rats with streptozotocin (60 mg/kg IP). Groups included control, moderate glucose control, and tight glucose control. Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats fed Purina 5008 chow were used as a type 2 diabetic model. Groups included no therapy, insulin therapy, or pioglitazone therapy. After 4 weeks of maintaining group assignments, the carotid artery injury model was performed. Treatment groups included: control, injury and injury plus NO. 2 weeks following arterial injury, in the type 1 diabetic rats, NO most effectively reduced the neointimal area in the moderate and tightly controlled groups (81% and 88% vs. 33%, respectively, p=0.01). In type 2 diabetic rats, the metabolic environment had no impact on the efficacy of NO (81-82% reduction for all groups). Thus, in this study, we show NO is effective at inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic environments. A greater understanding of how the metabolic environment may impact the efficacy of NO may lead to the development of more effective NO-based therapies for patients with diabetes.

  10. Role of Metabolic Environment on Nitric Oxide Mediated Inhibition of Neointimal Hyperplasia in Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Martinez, Janet; Jiang, Qun; Kibbe, Melina R.

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is well known to inhibit neointimal hyperplasia following arterial injury. Previously, we reported that NO was more effective at inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in a type 2 diabetic environment than control. We also found that NO was ineffective in an uncontrolled type 1 diabetic environment; however, insulin restored the efficacy of NO. Thus, the goal of this study was to more closely evaluate the effect of insulin and glucose on the efficacy of NO at inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic environments using different doses of insulin as well as pioglitazone. Type 1 diabetes was induced in male Lean Zucker (LZ) rats with streptozotocin (60mg/kg IP). Groups included control, moderate glucose control, and tight glucose control. Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats fed Purina 5008 chow were used as a type 2 diabetic model. Groups included no therapy, insulin therapy, or pioglitazone therapy. After 4 weeks of maintaining group assignments, the carotid artery injury model was performed. Treatment groups included: control, injury, and injury plus NO. 2 weeks following arterial injury, in the type 1 diabetic rats, NO most effectively reduced the neointimal area in the moderate and tightly controlled groups (81% and 88% vs. 33%, respectively, p=0.01). In type 2 diabetic rats, the metabolic environment had no impact on the efficacy of NO (81%–82% reduction for all groups). Thus, in this study, we show NO is effective at inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic environments. A greater understanding of how the metabolic environment may impact the efficacy of NO may lead to the development of more effective NO-based therapies for patients with diabetes. PMID:24333562

  11. Inhibition of root meristem growth by cadmium involves nitric oxide-mediated repression of auxin accumulation and signalling in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hong-Mei; Huang, Xi

    2016-01-01

    The root is the first plant organ to get in contact with the toxin cadmium (Cd), which is a widespread soil contaminant. Cd inhibits the growth of the primary root, but the mechanisms underlying this inhibition remain elusive. In this study, we used physiological, pharmacological and genetic approaches to investigate the roles of nitric oxide (NO) and auxin in Cd-mediated inhibition of Arabidopsis thaliana root meristem growth. Our study demonstrated that in the first 12 h of exposure, Cd inhibits primary root elongation through a decrease in the sizes of both the elongation and meristematic zones. Following Cd exposure, a decrease in auxin levels is associated with reduced PIN1/3/7 protein accumulation, but not with reduced PIN1/3/7 transcript levels. Additionally, Cd stabilized AXR3/IAA17 protein to repress auxin signalling in this Cd-mediated process. Furthermore, decreasing Cd-induced NO accumulation with either NO-specific scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) or NO synthase inhibitor N(ω) -nitro-l-Arg-methylester (l-NAME) compromised the Cd-mediated inhibition of root meristem development, reduction in auxin and PIN1/3/7 accumulation, as well as stabilization of AXR3/IAA17, indicating that NO participates in Cd-mediated inhibition of root meristem growth. Taken together, our data suggest that Cd inhibits root meristem growth by NO-mediated repression of auxin accumulation and signalling in Arabidopsis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Caveolin-1 is important for nitric oxide-mediated angiogenesis in fibrin gels with human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-ming PAN; Yong-zhong YAO; Zhang-hua ZHU; Xi-tai SUN; Yu-dong QIU; Yi-tao DING

    2006-01-01

    Aim: The role of caveolin-l (Cav-1) in angiogenesis remains poorly understood. The endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS), a caveolin-interacting protein, was demonstrated to play a predominant role in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) -induced angiogenesis. The purpose of our study was to examine the role of Cav-1 and the eNOS complex in NO-mediated angiogenesis. Methods: Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were isolated and cultured in 3-D fibrin gels to form capillary-like tubules by VEGF stimulation. The expression of Cav-1 and eNOS was detected by semiquantitative RT-PCR. The HUVEC were treated with antisense oligonucleotides to downregulate Cav-1 expression. Both transduced and non-infected HUVEC were cultured in fibrin gels in the presence or absence of VEGF (20 ng/mL) and NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 5 mmol/L). NO was measured using a NO assay kit and capillary-like tubules were quantified by tubule formation index using the Image J program. Results: RT-PCR analysis revealed that Cav-1 levels steadily increased in a time-dependent manner and reached their maximum after 5 d of incubation, but there were no obvious changes in eNOS mRNA expression in response to VEGF in the fibrin gel model. VEGF (20 ng/mL) can promote NO production and the formation of capillary-like tubules, and this promoting effect of VEGF was blocked by the addition of L-NAME (5 mmol/L). When transduced HUVEC with the antisense Cav-1 oligonucleotides were plated in the fibrin gels, the capillary-like tubules were significantly fewer than those of the non-infected cells. The capillary-like tubules formation and NO production of transduced HUVEC with the antisense Cav-1 oligonucleotides cultured in fibrin gels showed no responses to the addition of VEGF (20 ng/mL) and L-NAME (5.0 mmol/L). Conclusion: NO was a critical angiogenic mediator in this model. Cav-1 was essential for NO-mediated angiogenesis and may be an important target of anti

  13. High-affinity uptake of kynurenine and nitric oxide-mediated inhibition of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase in bone marrow-derived myeloid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Toshiaki; Ogasawara, Nanako; Akimoto, Hidetoshi; Takikawa, Osamu; Hiramatsu, Rie; Kawabe, Tsutomu; Isobe, Ken-Ichi; Nagase, Fumihiko

    2008-02-15

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO)-initiated tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine (Kyn) pathway in some dendritic cells (DC) such as plasmacytoid DC (pDC) regulates T-cell responses. It is unclear whether bone marrow-derived myeloid DC (BMDC) express functional IDO. The IDO expression was examined in CD11c(+)CD11b(+) BMDC differentiated from mouse bone marrow cells using GM-CSF. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG) induced the expression of IDO protein with the production of nitric oxide (NO) in BMDC in cultures for 24h. In the enzyme assay using cellular extracts of BMDC, the IDO activity of BMDC stimulated with CpG was enhanced by the addition of a NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor, suggesting that IDO activity was suppressed by NO production. On the other hand, the concentration of Kyn in the culture supernatant of BMDC was not increased by stimulation with CpG. Exogenously added Kyn was taken up by BMDC independently of CpG stimulation and NO production, and the uptake of Kyn was inhibited by a transport system L-specific inhibitor or high concentrations of tryptophan. The uptake of tryptophan by BMDC was markedly lower than that of Kyn. In conclusion, IDO activity in BMDC is down-regulated by NO production, whereas BMDC strongly take up exogenous Kyn.

  14. Stimulation of Baroresponsive Parts of the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract Produces Nitric Oxide-mediated Choroidal Vasodilation in Rat Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyan Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Preganglionic parasympathetic neurons of the ventromedial part of the superior salivatory nucleus (SSN mediate vasodilation of orbital and choroidal blood vessels, via their projection to the nitrergic pterygopalatine ganglion (PPG neurons that innervate these vessels. We recently showed that the baroresponsive part of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS innervates choroidal control parasympathetic preganglionic neurons of SSN in rats. As this projection provides a means by which blood pressure signals may modulate ChBF, we investigated if activation of baroresponsive NTS evokes ChBF increases in rat eye, using Laser Doppler flowmetry to measure ChBF transclerally. We found that electrical activation of ipsilateral baroresponsive NTS and its efferent fiber pathway to choroidal SSN increased mean ChBF by about 40-80% above baseline, depending on current level. The ChBF responses obtained with stimulation of baroresponsive NTS were driven by increases in both choroidal blood volume (i.e. vasodilation and choroidal blood velocity (presumed orbital vessel dilation. Stimulation of baroresponsive NTS, by contrast, yielded no significant mean increases in systemic arterial blood pressure. We further found that the increases in ChBF with NTS stimulation were significantly reduced by administration of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nω-propyl-l-arginine (NPA, thus implicating nitrergic PPG terminals in the NTS-elicited ChBF increases. Our results show that NTS neurons projecting to choroidal SSN do mediate increase in ChBF, and thus suggest a role of baroresponsive NTS in the blood pressure-dependent regulation of ChBF.

  15. Stimulation of Baroresponsive Parts of the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract Produces Nitric Oxide-mediated Choroidal Vasodilation in Rat Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunyan; Fitzgerald, Malinda E. C.; Del Mar, Nobel; Reiner, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Preganglionic parasympathetic neurons of the ventromedial part of the superior salivatory nucleus (SSN) mediate vasodilation of orbital and choroidal blood vessels, via their projection to the nitrergic pterygopalatine ganglion (PPG) neurons that innervate these vessels. We recently showed that the baroresponsive part of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) innervates choroidal control parasympathetic preganglionic neurons of SSN in rats. As this projection provides a means by which blood pressure (BP) signals may modulate choroidal blood flow (ChBF), we investigated if activation of baroresponsive NTS evokes ChBF increases in rat eye, using Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF) to measure ChBF transclerally. We found that electrical activation of ipsilateral baroresponsive NTS and its efferent fiber pathway to choroidal SSN increased mean ChBF by about 40–80% above baseline, depending on current level. The ChBF responses obtained with stimulation of baroresponsive NTS were driven by increases in both choroidal blood volume (ChBVol; i.e., vasodilation) and choroidal blood velocity (ChBVel; possibly due to orbital vessel dilation). Stimulation of baroresponsive NTS, by contrast, yielded no significant mean increases in systemic arterial blood pressure (ABP). We further found that the increases in ChBF with NTS stimulation were significantly reduced by administration of the neuronal nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor Nω-propyl-l-arginine (NPA), thus implicating nitrergic PPG terminals in the NTS-elicited ChBF increases. Our results show that the NTS neurons projecting to choroidal SSN do mediate increase in ChBF, and thus suggest a role of baroresponsive NTS in the BP-dependent regulation of ChBF. PMID:27774055

  16. Nitric oxide mediates aortic disease in mice deficient in the metalloprotease Adamts1 and in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oller, Jorge; Méndez-Barbero, Nerea; Ruiz, E Josue; Villahoz, Silvia; Renard, Marjolijn; Canelas, Lizet I; Briones, Ana M; Alberca, Rut; Lozano-Vidal, Noelia; Hurlé, María A; Milewicz, Dianna; Evangelista, Arturo; Salaices, Mercedes; Nistal, J Francisco; Jiménez-Borreguero, Luis Jesús; De Backer, Julie; Campanero, Miguel R; Redondo, Juan Miguel

    2017-02-01

    Heritable thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD), including Marfan syndrome (MFS), currently lack a cure, and causative mutations have been identified for only a fraction of affected families. Here we identify the metalloproteinase ADAMTS1 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) as therapeutic targets in individuals with TAAD. We show that Adamts1 is a major mediator of vascular homeostasis, given that genetic haploinsufficiency of Adamts1 in mice causes TAAD similar to MFS. Aortic nitric oxide and Nos2 levels were higher in Adamts1-deficient mice and in a mouse model of MFS (hereafter referred to as MFS mice), and Nos2 inactivation protected both types of mice from aortic pathology. Pharmacological inhibition of Nos2 rapidly reversed aortic dilation and medial degeneration in young Adamts1-deficient mice and in young or old MFS mice. Patients with MFS showed elevated NOS2 and decreased ADAMTS1 protein levels in the aorta. These findings uncover a possible causative role for the ADAMTS1-NOS2 axis in human TAAD and warrant evaluation of NOS2 inhibitors for therapy.

  17. Arginine and Nitric Oxide Pathways in Obesity-Associated Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Holguin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a comorbidity that adversely affects asthma severity and control by mechanisms that are not fully understood. This review will discuss evidence supporting a role for nitric oxide (NO as a potential mechanistic link between obesity and late-onset asthma (>12 years. Several studies have shown that there is an inverse association between increasing body mass index (BMI and reduced exhaled NO. Newer evidence suggests that a potential explanation for this paradoxical relationship is related to nitric oxide synthase (NOS uncoupling, which occurs due to an imbalance between L-arginine (NOS substrate and its endogenous inhibitor, asymmetric di-methyl arginine (ADMA. The review will propose a theoretical framework to understand the relevance of this pathway and how it may differ between early and late-onset obese asthmatics. Finally, the paper will discuss potential new therapeutic approaches, based on these paradigms, for improving the respiratory health of obese subjects with asthma.

  18. Impaired functions of neural stem cells by abnormal nitric oxide-mediated signaling in an in vitro model of Niemann-Pick type C disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun-Jung Kim; Myung-Sin Lim; Soo-Kyung Kang; Yong-Soon Lee; Kyung-Sun Kang

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in the promotion of neurodegeneration.However,little is known about the relationship between NO and the self-renewal or differentiation capacity of neural stem cells (NSCs) in neurodegenerative disease.In this study,we investigated the effect of NO on self-renewal of NSCs in an animal model for Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease.We found that NO production was significantly increased in NSCs from NPC1-deficient mice (NPC1-/-),which showed reduced NSC self-renewal.The number of nestin-positive cells and the size of neurospheres were both significantly decreased.The expression of NO synthase (NOS) was increased in neurospheres derived from the brain of NPC1-/- mice in comparison to wild-type neurospheres.NO-mediated activation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β(GSK3β) and caspase-3 was also observed in NSCs from NPC1-/- mice.The self-renewal ability of NSCs from NPC1-/- mice was restored by an NOS inhibitor,L-NAME,which resulted in the inhibition of GSK3β and caspase-3.In addition,the differentiation ability of NSCs was partially restored and the number of Fluoro-Jade C-positive degenerating neurons was reduced.These data suggest that overproduction of NO in NPC disease impaired the self-renewal of NSCs.Control of NO production may be key for the treatment of NPC disease.

  19. Salt Stress Reduces Root Meristem Size by Nitric Oxide-Mediated Modulation of Auxin Accumulation and Signaling in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen; Li, Rong-Jun; Han, Tong-Tong; Cai, Wei; Fu, Zheng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The development of the plant root system is highly plastic, which allows the plant to adapt to various environmental stresses. Salt stress inhibits root elongation by reducing the size of the root meristem. However, the mechanism underlying this process remains unclear. In this study, we explored whether and how auxin and nitric oxide (NO) are involved in salt-mediated inhibition of root meristem growth in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using physiological, pharmacological, and genetic approaches. We found that salt stress significantly reduced root meristem size by down-regulating the expression of PINFORMED (PIN) genes, thereby reducing auxin levels. In addition, salt stress promoted AUXIN RESISTANT3 (AXR3)/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID17 (IAA17) stabilization, which repressed auxin signaling during this process. Furthermore, salt stress stimulated NO accumulation, whereas blocking NO production with the inhibitor Nω-nitro-l-arginine-methylester compromised the salt-mediated reduction of root meristem size, PIN down-regulation, and stabilization of AXR3/IAA17, indicating that NO is involved in salt-mediated inhibition of root meristem growth. Taken together, these findings suggest that salt stress inhibits root meristem growth by repressing PIN expression (thereby reducing auxin levels) and stabilizing IAA17 (thereby repressing auxin signaling) via increasing NO levels. PMID:25818700

  20. Nitric oxide-mediated vascular function in sepsis using passive leg movement as a novel assessment: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ashley D; Rossman, Matthew J; Witman, Melissa A; Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Groot, H Jonathan; Garten, Ryan S; Richardson, Russell S

    2016-05-01

    Post-cuff occlusion flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is a proposed indicator of nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and vascular function. FMD is reduced in patients with sepsis and may be a marker of end organ damage and mortality. However, FMD likely does not solely reflect NO-mediated vasodilation, is technically challenging, and often demonstrates poor reproducibility. In contrast, passive leg movement (PLM), a novel methodology to assess vascular function, yields a hyperemic response that is predominately NO-dependent, reproducible, and easily measured. This study evaluated PLM as an approach to assess NO-mediated vascular function in patients with sepsis. We hypothesized that PLM-induced hyperemia, quantified by the increase in leg blood flow (LBF), would be attenuated in sepsis. In a cross-sectional study, 17 subjects in severe sepsis or septic shock were compared with 16 matched healthy controls. Doppler ultrasound was used to assess brachial artery FMD and the hyperemic response to PLM in the femoral artery. FMD was attenuated in septic compared with control subjects (1.1 ± 1.7% vs. 6.8 ± 1.3%; values are means ± SD). In terms of PLM, baseline LBF (196 ± 33 ml/min vs. 328 ± 20 ml/min), peak change in LBF from baseline (133 ± 28 ml/min vs. 483 ± 86 ml/min), and the LBF area under the curve (16 ± 8.3 vs. 143 ± 33) were all significantly attenuated in septic subjects. Vascular function, as assessed by both FMD and PLM, is attenuated in septic subjects compared with controls. These data support the concept that NO bioavailability is attenuated in septic subjects, and PLM appears to be a novel and feasible approach to assess NO-mediated vascular function in sepsis.

  1. Boldo prevents UV light and nitric oxide-mediated plasmid DNA damage and reduces the expression of Hsp70 protein in melanoma cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Alessandra; Cardile, Venera; Caggia, Silvia; Gunther, Germán; Troncoso, Nicolas; Garbarino, Juan

    2011-09-01

    This study was designed to investigate the potential protective effect of a methanolic extract of Peumus boldus leaves on UV light and nitric oxide (NO)-mediated DNA damage. In addition, we investigated the growth inhibitory activity of this natural product against human melanoma cells (M14). Boldine, catechin, quercetin and rutin were identified using a HPLC method. The extract was incubated with plasmid DNA and, before irradiating the samples with UV-R, H(2) O(2) was added. For analysis of DNA single-strand breaks induced by NO, the experiments were performed by incubating the extract with Angeli's salt. In the study on M14 cell line, cell viability was measured using MTT assay. Release of lactate dehydrogenase, a marker of membrane breakdown, was also measured. For the detection of apoptosis, the evaluation of DNA fragmentation (COMET assay) and caspase-3 activity assay were employed. The expression of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) was detected by Western blot analysis. Generation of reactive oxygen species was measured by using a fluorescent probe. The extract (demonstrating the synergistic effect of the constituents boldine and flavonoids), showed a protective effect on plasmid DNA and selectively inhibited the growth of melanoma cells. But a novel finding was that apoptosis evoked by this natural product in M14 cells, appears to be mediated, at least in part, via the inhibition of Hsp70 expression, which may be correlated with a modulation of redox-sensitive mechanisms. These results confirm the promising biological properties of Peumus boldus and encourage in-vivo investigations into its potential anti-cancer activity. © 2011 The Authors. JPP © 2011 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  2. TRPA1, NMDA receptors and nitric oxide mediate mechanical hyperalgesia induced by local injection of magnesium sulfate into the rat hind paw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srebro, Dragana P; Vučković, Sonja M; Savić Vujović, Katarina R; Prostran, Milica Š

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that while magnesium, an antagonist of the glutamate subtype of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, possesses analgesic properties, it can induce writhing in rodents. The aim of this study was to determine the effect and mechanism of action of local (intraplantar) administration of magnesium sulfate (MS) on the paw withdrawal threshold (PWT) to mechanical stimuli. The PWT was evaluated by the electronic von Frey test in male Wistar rats. Tested drugs were either co-administered intraplantarly (i.pl.) with MS or given into the contralateral paw to exclude systemic effects. MS at doses of 0.5, 1.5, 3 and 6.2 mg/paw (i.pl.) induced a statistically significant (as compared to 0.9% NaCl) and dose-dependent mechanical hyperalgesia. Only isotonic MS (250 mmol/l or 6.2% or 6.2 mg/paw) induced mechanical hyperalgesia that lasted at least six hours. Isotonic MS-induced mechanical hyperalgesia was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by co-injection of camphor, a non-selective TRPA1 antagonist (0.3, 1 and 2.5 μg/paw), MK-801, a NMDA receptor antagonist (0.001, 0.025 and 0.1 μg/paw), L-NAME, a non-selective nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor (20, 50 and 100 μg/paw), ARL 17477, a selective neuronal NOS inhibitor (5.7 and 17 μg/paw), SMT, a selective inducible NOS inhibitor (1 and 2.78 μg/paw), and methylene blue, a guanylate cyclase inhibitor (5, 20 and 125 μg/paw). Drugs injected into the contralateral hind paw did not produce significant effects. These results suggest that an i.pl. injection of MS produces local peripheral mechanical hyperalgesia via activation of peripheral TRPA1 and NMDA receptors and peripheral production of NO.

  3. Mechanisms of nitric oxide-mediated inhibition of EMT in cancer: inhibition of the metastasis-inducer Snail and induction of the metastasis-suppressor RKIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baritaki, Stavroula; Huerta-Yepez, Sara; Sahakyan, Anna; Karagiannides, Iordanis; Bakirtzi, Kyriaki; Jazirehi, Ali; Bonavida, Benjamin

    2010-12-15

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in cancer has been controversial and is based on the levels of NO and the responsiveness of the tumor type. It remains unclear whether NO can inhibit the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in cancer cells. EMT induction is mediated, in part, by the constitutive activation of the metastasis-inducer transcription factor, Snail and EMT can be inhibited by the metastasis-suppressor Raf-1 kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) and E-cadherin. Snail is transcriptionally regulated by NF-κB and in turn, Snail represses RKIP transcription. Hence, we hypothesized that high levels of NO, that inhibit NF-κB activity, may also inhibit Snail and induce RKIP and leading to inhibition of EMT. We show that treatment of human prostate metastatic cell lines with the NO donor, DETANONOate, inhibits EMT and reverses both the mesenchymal phenotype and the cell invasive properties. Further, treatment with DETANONOate inhibits Snail expression and DNA-binding activity in parallel with the upregulation of RKIP and E-cadherin protein levels. The pivotal roles of Snail inhibition and RKIP induction in DETANONOate-mediated inhibition of EMT were corroborated by both Snail silencing by siRNA and by ectopic expression of RKIP. The in vitro findings were validated in vivo in mice bearing PC-3 xenografts and treated with DETANONOate. The present findings show, for the first time, the novel role of high subtoxic concentrations of NO in the inhibition of EMT. Thus, NO donors may exert therapeutic activities in the reversal of EMT and metastasis.

  4. Glutathione plays an essential role in nitric oxide-mediated iron-deficiency signaling and iron-deficiency tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Varanavasiappan; Wang, Yi-Wen; Tsednee, Munkhtsetseg; Karunakaran, Krithika; Yeh, Kuo-Chen

    2015-11-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a common agricultural problem that affects both the productivity and nutritional quality of plants. Thus, identifying the key factors involved in the tolerance of Fe deficiency is important. In the present study, the zir1 mutant, which is glutathione deficient, was found to be more sensitive to Fe deficiency than the wild type, and grew poorly in alkaline soil. Other glutathione-deficient mutants also showed various degrees of sensitivity to Fe-limited conditions. Interestingly, we found that the glutathione level was increased under Fe deficiency in the wild type. By contrast, blocking glutathione biosynthesis led to increased physiological sensitivity to Fe deficiency. On the other hand, overexpressing glutathione enhanced the tolerance to Fe deficiency. Under Fe-limited conditions, glutathione-deficient mutants, zir1, pad2 and cad2 accumulated lower levels of Fe than the wild type. The key genes involved in Fe uptake, including IRT1, FRO2 and FIT, are expressed at low levels in zir1; however, a split-root experiment suggested that the systemic signals that govern the expression of Fe uptake-related genes are still active in zir1. Furthermore, we found that zir1 had a lower accumulation of nitric oxide (NO) and NO reservoir S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). Although NO is a signaling molecule involved in the induction of Fe uptake-related genes during Fe deficiency, the NO-mediated induction of Fe-uptake genes is dependent on glutathione supply in the zir1 mutant. These results provide direct evidence that glutathione plays an essential role in Fe-deficiency tolerance and NO-mediated Fe-deficiency signaling in Arabidopsis.

  5. Inhibition of nuclear factor-kappaB or Bax prevents endoplasmic reticulum stress- but not nitric oxide-mediated apoptosis in INS-1E cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonnesen, Morten F; Grunnet, Lars G; Friberg, Josefine

    2009-01-01

    and alternative splicing of the transcription factor Xbp-1 were exclusively activated by TG. TG exposure caused NFkappaB activation, as assessed by IkappaB degradation and NFkappaB DNA binding. Inhibition of NFkappaB or the Bcl-2 family member Bax pathways protected beta-cells against TG- but not SNAP....... Exposure of INS-1E cells to TG or SNAP caused caspase-3 cleavage and apoptosis. Both TG and SNAP induced activation of the proapoptotic transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP). However, other classical ER stress-induced markers such as up-regulation of ER chaperone Bip......-induced beta-cell death. These data suggest that NO generation and direct SERCA2 inhibition cause two quantitative and qualitative different forms of ER stress. In contrast to NO, direct ER stress induced by SERCA inhibition causes activation of ER stress signaling pathways and elicit proapoptotic signaling...

  6. Nitric oxide mediates the vagal protective effect on ventricular fibrillation via effects on action potential duration restitution in the rabbit heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brack, Kieran E; Patel, Vanlata H; Coote, John H; Ng, G André

    2007-09-01

    We have previously shown that direct vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) reduces the slope of action potential duration (APD) restitution while simultaneously protecting the heart against induction of ventricular fibrillation (VF) in the absence of any sympathetic activity or tone. In the current study we have examined the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the effect of VNS. Monophasic action potentials were recorded from a left ventricular epicardial site on innervated, isolated rabbit hearts (n = 7). Standard restitution, effective refractory period (ERP) and VF threshold (VFT) were measured at baseline and during VNS in the presence of the NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NA, 200 microm) and during reversing NO blockade with L-arginine (L-Arg, 1 mm). Data represent the mean +/- S.E.M. The restitution curve was shifted upwards and became less steep with VNS when compared to baseline. L-NA blocked the effect of VNS whereas L-Arg restored the effect of VNS. The maximum slope of restitution was reduced from 1.17 +/- 0.14 to 0.60 +/- 0.09 (50 +/- 5%, P < 0.0001) during control, from 0.98 +/- 0.14 to 0.93 +/- 0.12 (2 +/- 10%, P = NS) in the presence of L-NA and from 1.16 +/- 0.17 to 0.50 +/- 0.10 (41 +/- 9%, P = 0.003) with L-Arg plus L-NA. ERP was increased by VNS in control from 119 +/- 6 ms to 130 +/- 6 ms (10 +/- 5%, P = 0.045) and this increase was not affected by L-NA (120 +/- 4 to 133 +/- 4 ms, 11 +/- 3%, P = 0.0019) or L-Arg with L-NA (114 +/- 4 to 123 +/- 4 ms, 8 +/- 2%, P = 0.006). VFT was increased from 3.0 +/- 0.3 to 5.8 +/- 0.5 mA (98 +/- 12%, P = 0.0017) in control, 3.4 +/- 0.4 to 3.8 +/- 0.5 mA (13 +/- 12%, P = 0.6) during perfusion with L-NA and 2.5 +/- 0.4 to 6.0 +/- 0.7 mA (175 +/- 50%, P = 0.0017) during perfusion with L-Arg plus L-NA. Direct VNS increased VFT and flattened the slope of APD restitution curve in this isolated rabbit heart preparation with intact autonomic nerves. These effects were blocked using L-NA and reversed by replenishing

  7. A novel soluble immune-type receptor (SITR in teleost fish: carp SITR is involved in the nitric oxide-mediated response to a protozoan parasite.

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    Carla M S Ribeiro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The innate immune system relies upon a wide range of germ-line encoded receptors including a large number of immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF receptors. Different Ig-like immune receptor families have been reported in mammals, birds, amphibians and fish. Most innate immune receptors of the IgSF are type I transmembrane proteins containing one or more extracellular Ig-like domains and their regulation of effector functions is mediated intracellularly by distinct stimulatory or inhibitory pathways. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Carp SITR was found in a substracted cDNA repertoire from carp macrophages, enriched for genes up-regulated in response to the protozoan parasite Trypanoplasma borreli. Carp SITR is a type I protein with two extracellular Ig domains in a unique organisation of a N-proximal V/C2 (or I- type and a C-proximal V-type Ig domain, devoid of a transmembrane domain or any intracytoplasmic signalling motif. The carp SITR C-proximal V-type Ig domain, in particular, has a close sequence similarity and conserved structural characteristics to the mammalian CD300 molecules. By generating an anti-SITR antibody we could show that SITR protein expression was restricted to cells of the myeloid lineage. Carp SITR is abundantly expressed in macrophages and is secreted upon in vitro stimulation with the protozoan parasite T. borreli. Secretion of SITR protein during in vivo T. borreli infection suggests a role for this IgSF receptor in the host response to this protozoan parasite. Overexpression of carp SITR in mouse macrophages and knock-down of SITR protein expression in carp macrophages, using morpholino antisense technology, provided evidence for the involvement of carp SITR in the parasite-induced NO production. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We report the structural and functional characterization of a novel soluble immune-type receptor (SITR in a teleost fish and propose a role for carp SITR in the NO-mediated response to a

  8. Nitric oxide promotes survival of cerebellar granule neurons cultured in vitro through the Akt pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Wang; Mei Li; Lihua Zhou

    2011-01-01

    In this study, cerebellar granule neurons were used to examine the role of nitric oxide on cell survival. The N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antagonist, MK-801, and the soluble guanylate cyclase antagonist, 1H-[1, 2, 4]oxadiazolo-[4, 3-a] quinoxalin-1-one, decreased cell viability, induced caspase-3, and decreased phosphorylated-Akt levels, suggesting that blockade of nitric oxide production promotes apoptosis of differentiating cerebellar granule neurons. After administration of sodium nitroprusside, an endogenous nitric oxide donor, cell viability recovered,caspase-3 expression was decreased, and phosphorylated-Akt levels increased. This study provides direct evidence that nitric oxide can sustain the survival of developing cerebellar granule neurons in vitro through the nitric oxide-Akt pathway. Moreover, endogenous nitric oxide exerts these effects in a cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent manner while exogenous nitric oxide does so in a cyclic guanosine monophosphate-independent manner.

  9. Identification of gene variants related to the nitric oxide pathway in patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umman, B; Cakmakoglu, B; Cincin, Z B; Kocaaga, M; Emet, S; Tamer, S; Gokkusu, C

    2015-12-10

    Dysfunction of vascular endothelium is known to have an essential role in the atherosclerotic process by releasing mediators including nitric oxide (NO). Nitric oxide maintains endothelial balance by controlling cellular processes of vascular smooth muscle cells. Evidence suggests that variations in the NO pathway could include atherosclerotic events. The objective of this study was to determine the possible effects of genes on the nitric oxide pathway in the development of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The blood samples of 100 patients with ACS and 100 controls were collected at Istanbul University, Department of Cardiology. DNA samples were genotyped by using Illumina Cyto-SNP-12 BeadChip. The additive model and Correlation/Trend Test were selected for association analysis. Afterwards, a Q-Q graphic was drawn to compare expected and obtained values. A Manhattan plot was produced to display p-values that were generated by -log10(P) function for each SNP. The p-values under 1×10(-4) were selected as statistically significant SNPs while p-values under 5×10(-2) were considered as suspicious biomarker candidates. Nitric oxide pathway analysis was then used to find the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to ACS. As a result, death-associated protein kinase 3 (DAPK) (rs10426955) was found to be most statistically significant SNP. The most suspicious biomarker candidates associated with the nitric oxide pathway analysis were vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MSRA), nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1), and GTP cyclohydrolase I (GCH-1). Further studies with large sample groups are necessary to clarify the exact role of nitric oxide in the development of disease.

  10. The nitric oxide pathway provides innate antiviral protection in conjunction with the type I interferon pathway in fibroblasts.

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    Devangi R Mehta

    Full Text Available The innate host response to virus infection is largely dominated by the production of type I interferon and interferon stimulated genes. In particular, fibroblasts respond robustly to viral infection and to recognition of viral signatures such as dsRNA with the rapid production of type I interferon; subsequently, fibroblasts are a key cell type in antiviral protection. We recently found, however, that primary fibroblasts deficient for the production of interferon, interferon stimulated genes, and other cytokines and chemokines mount a robust antiviral response against both DNA and RNA viruses following stimulation with dsRNA. Nitric oxide is a chemical compound with pleiotropic functions; its production by phagocytes in response to interferon-γ is associated with antimicrobial activity. Here we show that in response to dsRNA, nitric oxide is rapidly produced in primary fibroblasts. In the presence of an intact interferon system, nitric oxide plays a minor but significant role in antiviral protection. However, in the absence of an interferon system, nitric oxide is critical for the protection against DNA viruses. In primary fibroblasts, NF-κB and interferon regulatory factor 1 participate in the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase expression, which subsequently produces nitric oxide. As large DNA viruses encode multiple and diverse immune modulators to disable the interferon system, it appears that the nitric oxide pathway serves as a secondary strategy to protect the host against viral infection in key cell types, such as fibroblasts, that largely rely on the type I interferon system for antiviral protection.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal proton transfer pathways in cytochrome C-dependent nitric oxide reductase.

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    Andrei V Pisliakov

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide reductases (NORs are membrane proteins that catalyze the reduction of nitric oxide (NO to nitrous oxide (N(2O, which is a critical step of the nitrate respiration process in denitrifying bacteria. Using the recently determined first crystal structure of the cytochrome c-dependent NOR (cNOR [Hino T, Matsumoto Y, Nagano S, Sugimoto H, Fukumori Y, et al. (2010 Structural basis of biological N2O generation by bacterial nitric oxide reductase. Science 330: 1666-70.], we performed extensive all-atom molecular dynamics (MD simulations of cNOR within an explicit membrane/solvent environment to fully characterize water distribution and dynamics as well as hydrogen-bonded networks inside the protein, yielding the atomic details of functionally important proton channels. Simulations reveal two possible proton transfer pathways leading from the periplasm to the active site, while no pathways from the cytoplasmic side were found, consistently with the experimental observations that cNOR is not a proton pump. One of the pathways, which was newly identified in the MD simulation, is blocked in the crystal structure and requires small structural rearrangements to allow for water channel formation. That pathway is equivalent to the functional periplasmic cavity postulated in cbb(3 oxidase, which illustrates that the two enzymes share some elements of the proton transfer mechanisms and confirms a close evolutionary relation between NORs and C-type oxidases. Several mechanisms of the critical proton transfer steps near the catalytic center are proposed.

  12. Nitric oxide mediates root K+/Na+ balance in a mangrove plant, Kandelia obovata, by enhancing the expression of AKT1-type K+ channel and Na+/H+ antiporter under high salinity.

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    Juan Chen

    Full Text Available It is well known that nitric oxide (NO enhances salt tolerance of glycophytes. However, the effect of NO on modulating ionic balance in halophytes is not very clear. This study focuses on the role of NO in mediating K(+/Na(+ balance in a mangrove species, Kandelia obovata Sheue, Liu and Yong. We first analyzed the effects of sodium nitroprusside (SNP, an NO donor, on ion content and ion flux in the roots of K. obovata under high salinity. The results showed that 100 μM SNP significantly increased K(+ content and Na(+ efflux, but decreased Na(+ content and K(+ efflux. These effects of NO were reversed by specific NO synthesis inhibitor and scavenger, which confirmed the role of NO in retaining K(+ and reducing Na(+ in K. obovata roots. Using western-blot analysis, we found that NO increased the protein expression of plasma membrane (PM H(+-ATPase and vacuolar Na(+/H(+ antiporter, which were crucial proteins for ionic balance. To further clarify the molecular mechanism of NO-modulated K(+/Na(+ balance, partial cDNA fragments of inward-rectifying K(+ channel, PM Na(+/H(+ antiporter, PM H(+-ATPase, vacuolar Na(+/H(+ antiporter and vacuolar H(+-ATPase subunit c were isolated. Results of quantitative real-time PCR showed that NO increased the relative expression levels of these genes, while this increase was blocked by NO synthesis inhibitors and scavenger. Above results indicate that NO greatly contribute to K(+/Na(+ balance in high salinity-treated K. obovata roots, by activating AKT1-type K(+ channel and Na(+/H(+ antiporter, which are the critical components in K(+/Na(+ transport system.

  13. Integrating nitric oxide into salicylic acid and jasmonic acid/ethylene plant defense pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mur, Luis A J; Prats, Elena; Pierre, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Plant defence against pests and pathogens is known to be conferred by either salicylic acid (SA) or jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET) pathways, depending on infection or herbivore-grazing strategy. It is well attested that SA and JA/ET pathways are mutually antagonistic allowing defence responses...... to be tailored to particular biotic stresses. Nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as a major signal influencing resistance mediated by both signalling pathways but no attempt has been made to integrate NO into established SA/JA/ET interactions. NO has been shown to act as an inducer or suppressor of signalling along...... the cytoplasm to reduce TGA activation. In JA biosynthesis, NO will initiate the expression of JA biosynthetic enzymes, presumably to over-come any antagonistic effects of SA on JA-mediated transcription. NO will also initiate the expression of ET biosynthetic genes but a suppressive role is also observed...

  14. Differential effects of nitric oxide on rod and cone pathways in carp retina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶冰; 杜久林; 杨雄里

    1997-01-01

    The effects of nitric oxide (NO) on electroretinograms and light responses of horizontal cells intra-cellularly recorded from isolated, superfused carp retinas were studied. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP), an NO donor, suppressed scotopic b wave, while enhancing photopic b wave, and the effects could be blocked by hemoglobin, an NO chelator. Furthermore, following SNP application, light responses of rod horizontal cells were reduced in size and those of cone horizontal cells were increased. These results suggest that NO suppresses the activity of rod pathway, but enhances that of cone pathway in the outer retina. Moreover, the effects of methylene blue, an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase, on rod and cone horizontal cells were just opposite to those of SNP, implying that the effects of NO may be mediated by cGMP.

  15. The evidence for nitric oxide synthase immunopositivity in the monosynaptic Ia-motoneuron pathway of the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsala, Jozef; Lukácová, Nadezda; Sulla, Igor; Wohlfahrt, Peter; Marsala, Martin

    2005-09-01

    In this study, nitric oxide synthase immunohistochemistry supported by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase histochemistry was used to demonstrate the nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity in the monosynaptic Ia-motoneuron pathway exemplified by structural components of the afferent limb of the soleus H-reflex in the dog. A noticeable number of medium-sized intensely nitric oxide synthase immunoreactive somata (1000-2000 microm(2) square area) and large intraganglionic nitric oxide synthase immunoreactive fibers, presumed to be Ia axons, was found in the L7 and S1 dorsal root ganglia. The existence of nitric oxide synthase immunoreactive fibers (6-8 microm in diameter, not counting the myelin sheath) was confirmed in L7 and S1 dorsal roots and in the medial bundle of both dorsal roots before entering the dorsal root entry zone. By virtue of the funicular organization of nitric oxide synthase immunoreactive fibers in the dorsal funiculus, the largest nitric oxide synthase immunoreactive fibers represent stem Ia axons located in the deep portion of the dorsal funiculus close to the dorsomedial margin of the dorsal horn. Upon entering the gray matter of L7 and S1 segments and passing through the medial half of the dorsal horn, tapered nitric oxide synthase immunoreactive collaterals of the stem Ia fibers pass through the deep layers of the dorsal horn and intermediate zone, and terminate in the group of homonymous motoneurons in L7 and S1 segments innervating the gastrocnemius-soleus muscles. Terminal fibers issued in the ventral horn intensely nitric oxide synthase immunoreactive terminals with long axis ranging from 0.7 to >or=15.1 microm presumed to be Ia bNOS-IR boutons. This finding is unique in that it focuses directly on nitric oxide synthase immunopositivity in the signalling transmitted by proprioceptive Ia fibers. Nitric oxide synthase immunoreactive boutons were found in the neuropil of Clarke's column of L4 segment, varying greatly in

  16. Multifaceted role of nitric oxide in an in vitro mouse neuronal injury model: transcriptomic profiling defines the temporal recruitment of death signalling cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhao Feng; Chen, Minghui Jessica; Manikandan, Jayapal; Melendez, Alirio J; Shui, Guanghou; Russo-Marie, Françoise; Whiteman, Matthew; Beart, Philip M; Moore, Philip K; Cheung, Nam Sang

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Nitric oxide is implicated in the pathogenesis of various neuropathologies characterized by oxidative stress. Although nitric oxide has been reported to be involved in the exacerbation of oxidative stress observed in several neuropathologies, existent data fail to provide a holistic description of how nitrergic pathobiology elicits neuronal injury. Here we provide a comprehensive description of mechanisms contributing to nitric oxide induced neuronal injury by global transcriptomic profiling. Microarray analyses were undertaken on RNA from murine primary cortical neurons treated with the nitric oxide generator DETA-NONOate (NOC-18, 0.5 mM) for 8–24 hrs. Biological pathway analysis focused upon 3672 gene probes which demonstrated at least a ±1.5-fold expression in a minimum of one out of three time-points and passed statistical analysis (one-way anova, P < 0.05). Numerous enriched processes potentially determining nitric oxide mediated neuronal injury were identified from the transcriptomic profile: cell death, developmental growth and survival, cell cycle, calcium ion homeostasis, endoplasmic reticulum stress, oxidative stress, mitochondrial homeostasis, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, and GSH and nitric oxide metabolism. Our detailed time-course study of nitric oxide induced neuronal injury allowed us to provide the first time a holistic description of the temporal sequence of cellular events contributing to nitrergic injury. These data form a foundation for the development of screening platforms and define targets for intervention in nitric oxide neuropathologies where nitric oxide mediated injury is causative. PMID:21352476

  17. Metabolism via arginase or nitric oxide synthase: two competing arginine pathways in macrophages

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    Meera eRath

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages play a major role in the immune system, both as antimicrobial effector cells and as immunoregulatory cells, which induce, suppress or modulate adaptive immune responses. These key aspects of macrophage biology are fundamentally driven by the phenotype of macrophage arginine metabolism that is prevalent in an evolving or ongoing immune response. M1 macrophages express the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS, which metabolizes arginine to nitric oxide (NO and citrulline. NO can be metabolized to further downstream reactive nitrogen species, while citrulline might be reused for efficient NO synthesis via the citrulline-NO cycle. M2 macrophages are characterized by expression of the enzyme arginase, which hydrolyzes arginine to ornithine and urea. The arginase pathway limits arginine availability for NO synthesis and ornithine itself can further feed into the important downstream pathways of polyamine and proline syntheses, which are important for cellular proliferation and tissue repair. M1 versus M2 polarization leads to opposing outcomes of inflammatory reactions, but depending on the context, M1 and M2 macrophages can be both pro- and antiinflammatory. Notably, M1/M2 macrophage polarization can be driven by microbial infection or innate danger signals without any influence of adaptive immune cells, secondarily driving the T helper (Th1/Th2 polarization of the evolving adaptive immune response. Since both arginine metabolic pathways cross-inhibit each other on the level of the respective arginine break-down products and Th1 and Th2 lymphocytes can drive or amplify macrophage M1/M2 dichotomy via cytokine activation, this forms the basis of a self-sustaining M1/M2 polarization of the whole immune response. Understanding the arginine metabolism of M1/M2 macrophage phenotypes is therefore central to find new possibilities to manipulate immune responses in infection, autoimmune diseases, chronic inflammatory conditions and cancer.

  18. Behavioral despair associated with a mouse model of Crohn's disease: Role of nitric oxide pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydarpour, Pouria; Rahimian, Reza; Fakhfouri, Gohar; Khoshkish, Shayan; Fakhraei, Nahid; Salehi-Sadaghiani, Mohammad; Wang, Hongxing; Abbasi, Ata; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Ghia, Jean-Eric

    2016-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with increased psychiatric co-morbidities. Nitric oxide (NO) is implicated in inflammation and tissue injury in CD, and it may also play a central role in pathogenesis of the accompanying behavioral despair. This study investigated the role of the NO pathway in behavioral despair associated with a mouse model of CD. Colitis was induced by intrarectal (i.r.) injection of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (10mg TNBS in 50% ethanol). Forced swimming test (FST), pharmacological studies and tissues collection were performed 72 h following TNBS administration. To address a possible inflammatory origin for the behavioral despair following colitis induction, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) level was measured in both the hippocampal and colonic tissue samples. In parallel, hippocampal inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nitrite level were evaluated. Pharmacological studies targeting the NO pathway were performed 30-60 min before behavioral test. Colitis was confirmed by increased colonic TNF-α level and microscopic score. Colitic mice demonstrated a significantly higher immobility time in the FST associated to a significant increase of hippocampal TNF-α, iNOS expression and nitrite content. Acute NOS inhibition using either Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (a non-specific NOS inhibitor) or aminoguanidine hydrochloride (a specific iNOS inhibitor) decreased the immobility time in colitic groups. Moreover, acute treatment with both NOS inhibitors decreased the TNF-α level and nitrite content in the hippocampal samples. This study suggests that the NO pathway may be involved in the behavioral effects in the mouse TNBS model of CD. These findings endow new insights into the gut-brain communication during the development of colonic inflammation, which may ultimately lead to improved therapeutic strategies to combat behavior changes associated with gastrointestinal disorders.

  19. Integrating nitric oxide into salicylic acid and jasmonic acid/ ethylene plant defense pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mur, Luis A J; Prats, Elena; Pierre, Sandra; Hall, Michael A; Hebelstrup, Kim H

    2013-01-01

    Plant defense against pests and pathogens is known to be conferred by either salicylic acid (SA) or jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET) pathways, depending on infection or herbivore-grazing strategy. It is well attested that SA and JA/ET pathways are mutually antagonistic allowing defense responses to be tailored to particular biotic stresses. Nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as a major signal influencing resistance mediated by both signaling pathways but no attempt has been made to integrate NO into established SA/JA/ET interactions. NO has been shown to act as an inducer or suppressor of signaling along each pathway. NO will initiate SA biosynthesis and nitrosylate key cysteines on TGA-class transcription factors to aid in the initiation of SA-dependent gene expression. Against this, S-nitrosylation of NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED PROTEINS1 (NPR1) will promote the NPR1 oligomerization within the cytoplasm to reduce TGA activation. In JA biosynthesis, NO will initiate the expression of JA biosynthetic enzymes, presumably to over-come any antagonistic effects of SA on JA-mediated transcription. NO will also initiate the expression of ET biosynthetic genes but a suppressive role is also observed in the S-nitrosylation and inhibition of S-adenosylmethionine transferases which provides methyl groups for ET production. Based on these data a model for NO action is proposed but we have also highlighted the need to understand when and how inductive and suppressive steps are used.

  20. Integrating nitric oxide into salicylic acid and jasmonic acid/ ethylene plant defence pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis A.J. Mur

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Plant defence against pests and pathogens is known to be conferred by either salicylic acid (SA or jasmonic acid (JA/ethylene (ET pathways, depending on infection or herbivore-grazing strategy. It is well attested that SA and JA/ET pathways are mutually antagonistic allowing defence responses to be tailored to particular biotic stresses. Nitric oxide (NO has emerged as a major signal influencing resistance mediated by both signalling pathways but no attempt has been made to integrate NO into established SA/JA/ET interactions. NO has been shown to act as an inducer or suppressor of signalling along each pathway. NO will initiate SA biosynthesis and nitrosylate key cysteines on TGA-class transcription factors to aid in the initiation of SA—dependent gene expression. Against this, S-nitrosylation of NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED PROTEINS1 (NPR1 will promote the NPR1 oligomerisation within the cytoplasm to reduce TGA activation. In JA biosynthesis, NO will initiate the expression of JA biosynthetic enzymes, presumably to over-come any antagonistic effects of SA on JA-mediated transcription. NO will also initiate the expression of ET biosynthetic genes but a suppressive role is also observed in the S –nitrosylation and inhibition of s-adenosylmethionine transferases which provides methyl groups for ethylene production. Based on these data a model for NO action is proposed but we have also highlighted the need to understand when and how inductive and suppressive steps are used.

  1. Mangiferin Prevents Guinea Pig Tracheal Contraction via Activation of the Nitric Oxide-Cyclic GMP Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Aline B.; Coelho, Luciana P.; Insuela, Daniella B. R.; Carvalho, Vinicius F.; dos Santos, Marcelo H.; Silva, Patricia MR.; Martins, Marco A.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have described the antispasmodic effect of mangiferin, a natural glucoside xanthone (2-C-β-Dgluco-pyranosyl-1,3,6,7-tetrahydroxyxanthone) that is present in mango trees and other plants, but its mechanism of action remains unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the potential contribution of the nitric oxide-cyclic GMP pathway to the antispasmodic effect of mangiferin on isolated tracheal rings preparations. The functional effect of mangiferin on allergic and non-allergic contraction of guinea pig tracheal rings was assessed in conventional organ baths. Cultured tracheal rings were exposed to mangiferin or vehicle, and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) 3 and cyclic GMP (cGMP) levels were quantified using western blotting and enzyme immunoassays, respectively. Mangiferin (0.1–10 µM) inhibited tracheal contractions induced by distinct stimuli, such as allergen, histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine or carbachol, in a concentration-dependent manner. Mangiferin also caused marked relaxation of tracheal rings that were precontracted by carbachol, suggesting that it has both anti-contraction and relaxant properties that are prevented by removing the epithelium. The effect of mangiferin was inhibited by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (100 µM), and the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, 1H-[1], [2], [4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) (10 µM), but not the adenylate cyclase inhibitor, 9-(tetrahydro-2-furyl)adenine (SQ22536) (100 µM). The antispasmodic effect of mangiferin was also sensitive to K+ channel blockers, such as tetraethylammonium (TEA), glibenclamide and apamin. Furthermore, mangiferin inhibited Ca2+-induced contractions in K+ (60 mM)-depolarised tracheal rings preparations. In addition, mangiferin increased NOS3 protein levels and cGMP intracellular levels in cultured tracheal rings. Finally, mangiferin-induced increase in cGMP levels was abrogated by co-incubation with either ODQ or L

  2. Mangiferin prevents guinea pig tracheal contraction via activation of the nitric oxide-cyclic GMP pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline B Vieira

    Full Text Available Previous studies have described the antispasmodic effect of mangiferin, a natural glucoside xanthone (2-C-β-Dgluco-pyranosyl-1,3,6,7-tetrahydroxyxanthone that is present in mango trees and other plants, but its mechanism of action remains unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the potential contribution of the nitric oxide-cyclic GMP pathway to the antispasmodic effect of mangiferin on isolated tracheal rings preparations. The functional effect of mangiferin on allergic and non-allergic contraction of guinea pig tracheal rings was assessed in conventional organ baths. Cultured tracheal rings were exposed to mangiferin or vehicle, and nitric oxide synthase (NOS 3 and cyclic GMP (cGMP levels were quantified using western blotting and enzyme immunoassays, respectively. Mangiferin (0.1-10 µM inhibited tracheal contractions induced by distinct stimuli, such as allergen, histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine or carbachol, in a concentration-dependent manner. Mangiferin also caused marked relaxation of tracheal rings that were precontracted by carbachol, suggesting that it has both anti-contraction and relaxant properties that are prevented by removing the epithelium. The effect of mangiferin was inhibited by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME (100 µM, and the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ (10 µM, but not the adenylate cyclase inhibitor, 9-(tetrahydro-2-furyladenine (SQ22536 (100 µM. The antispasmodic effect of mangiferin was also sensitive to K⁺ channel blockers, such as tetraethylammonium (TEA, glibenclamide and apamin. Furthermore, mangiferin inhibited Ca²⁺-induced contractions in K⁺ (60 mM-depolarised tracheal rings preparations. In addition, mangiferin increased NOS3 protein levels and cGMP intracellular levels in cultured tracheal rings. Finally, mangiferin-induced increase in cGMP levels was abrogated by co-incubation with either ODQ

  3. Induction of alternative respiratory pathway involves nitric oxide, hydrogen peroxide and ethylene under salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huahua; Huang, Junjun; Bi, Yurong

    2010-12-01

    Alternative respiratory pathway (AP) plays an important role in plant thermogenesis, fruit ripening and responses to environmental stresses. AP may participate in the adaptation to salt stress since salt stress increased the activity of the AP. Recently, new evidence revealed that ethylene and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) are involved in the salt-induced increase of the AP, which plays an important role in salt tolerance in Arabidopsis callus, and ethylene may be acting downstream of H(2)O(2). Recent observations also indicated both ethylene and nitric oxide (NO) act as signaling molecules in responses to salt stress, and ethylene may be a part of the downstream signal molecular in NO action. In this addendum, a hypothetical model for NO function in regulation of H(2)O(2)- and ethylene-mediated induction of AP under salt stress is presented.

  4. S-nitrosothiols regulate nitric oxide production and storage in plants through the nitrogen assimilation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frungillo, Lucas; Skelly, Michael J; Loake, Gary J; Spoel, Steven H; Salgado, Ione

    2014-11-11

    Nitrogen assimilation plays a vital role in plant metabolism. Assimilation of nitrate, the primary source of nitrogen in soil, is linked to the generation of the redox signal nitric oxide (NO). An important mechanism by which NO regulates plant development and stress responses is through S-nitrosylation, that is, covalent attachment of NO to cysteine residues to form S-nitrosothiols (SNO). Despite the importance of nitrogen assimilation and NO signalling, it remains largely unknown how these pathways are interconnected. Here we show that SNO signalling suppresses both nitrate uptake and reduction by transporters and reductases, respectively, to fine tune nitrate homeostasis. Moreover, NO derived from nitrate assimilation suppresses the redox enzyme S-nitrosoglutathione Reductase 1 (GSNOR1) by S-nitrosylation, preventing scavenging of S-nitrosoglutathione, a major cellular bio-reservoir of NO. Hence, our data demonstrates that (S)NO controls its own generation and scavenging by modulating nitrate assimilation and GSNOR1 activity.

  5. Signal transduction pathway of nitric oxide inducing PC12 cell death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study signal transduction pathway of nitric oxideinducing death of PC12 cells.Methods: Cell survival rate was measured with MTT assay, and caspase-3 activity with caspase-3 assay kits after PC12 cells were incubated with sodium nitroprusside (SNP), caspase-3 inhibitor Ⅱ plus SNP or p38 inhibitor-SB203580 plus SNP.Results: SNP induced death of PC12 cells in dose- and time-dependent manner and enhanced caspase-3 activity gradually. Both caspase-3 inhibitor Ⅱ and SB203580 reduced cell death, but SB203580 reduced caspase-3 activity significantly.Conclusions: NO may induce death of PC12 cells through activation of p38 and caspase-3.

  6. Effect of psychological stress on the L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway and semen quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Eskiocak

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that mental stress causes abnormality of spermiogram parameters. We investigated the effect of psychological stress on the L-arginine-nitric oxide (NO pathway. Semen samples were collected from 29 healthy fourth semester medical students just before (stress and 3 months after (non-stress the final examinations. Psychological stress was measured by the State Anxiety Inventory questionnaire. After standard semen analysis, arginase activity and NO concentration were measured spectrophotometrically in the seminal plasma. Measurements were made in duplicate. During the stress period, sperm concentration (41.28 ± 3.70 vs 77.62 ± 7.13 x 10(6/mL, rapid progressive motility of spermatozoa (8.79 ± 1.66 vs 20.86 ± 1.63% and seminal plasma arginase activity (0.12 ± 0.01 vs 0.22 ± 0.01 U/mL were significantly lower than in the non-stress situation, whereas seminal plasma NO (17.28 ± 0.56 vs 10.02 ± 0.49 µmol/L was higher compared to the non-stress period (P < 0.001 for all. During stress there was a negative correlation between NO concentration and sperm concentration, the percentage of rapid progressive motility and arginase activity (r = -0.622, P < 0.01; r = -0.425, P < 0.05 and r = -0.445, P < 0.05, respectively. These results indicate that psychological stress causes an increase of NO level and a decrease of arginase activity in the L-arginine-NO pathway. Furthermore, poor sperm quality may be due to excessive production of NO under psychological stress. In the light of these results, we suggest that the arginine-NO pathway, together with arginase and NO synthase, are involved in semen quality under stress conditions.

  7. Nitric oxide acts through different signaling pathways in maturation of cumulus cell-enclosed mouse oocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Abbasi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Nitric oxide (NO have a dual action in mouse oocyte meiotic maturation which depends on its concentration, but the mechanisms by which it influences oocyte maturation has not been exactly clarified. In this study different signaling mechanisms which exist for in vitro maturation of meiosis was examined in cumulus cell-enclosed oocytes (CEOs after injection of pregnant mare's serum gonadotropin (PMSG to immature female mice. Methods: The CEOs were cultured in spontaneous maturation and hypoxanthine (HX arrested model. Results: Sodium nitroprusside (SNP, an NO donor, 10mM delayed germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD significantly during the first 5 hrs of incubation and inhibited the formation of first polar body (PB1 at the end of 24 hrs of incubation. SNP (10-5M stimulated the meiotic maturation of oocytes significantly by overcoming the inhibition of HX. Sildenafil (a cGMP stimulator, 100 nM, had a significant inhibitory effects on both spontaneous meiotic maturation and HX-arrested meiotic maturation. Forskolin (an adenylate cyclase stimulator, 6µM and SNP (10mM had the same effects on GVBD. Forskolin reversed the SNP (10-5M stimulated meiotic maturation. Conclusion: These results suggest that differences in pathways are present between SNP-inhibited spontaneous meiotic maturation and SNP-stimulated meiotic maturation in mouse oocytes

  8. Anandamide induces sperm release from oviductal epithelia through nitric oxide pathway in bovines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Osycka-Salut

    Full Text Available Mammalian spermatozoa are not able to fertilize an egg immediately upon ejaculation. They acquire this ability during their transit through the female genital tract in a process known as capacitation. The mammalian oviduct acts as a functional sperm reservoir providing a suitable environment that allows the maintenance of sperm fertilization competence until ovulation occurs. After ovulation, spermatozoa are gradually released from the oviductal reservoir in the caudal isthmus and ascend to the site of fertilization. Capacitating-related changes in sperm plasma membrane seem to be responsible for sperm release from oviductal epithelium. Anandamide is a lipid mediator that participates in the regulation of several female and male reproductive functions. Previously we have demonstrated that anandamide was capable to release spermatozoa from oviductal epithelia by induction of sperm capacitation in bovines. In the present work we studied whether anandamide might exert its effect by activating the nitric oxide (NO pathway since this molecule has been described as a capacitating agent in spermatozoa from different species. First, we demonstrated that 1 µM NOC-18, a NO donor, and 10 mM L-Arginine, NO synthase substrate, induced the release of spermatozoa from the oviductal epithelia. Then, we observed that the anandamide effect on sperm oviduct interaction was reversed by the addition of 1 µM L-NAME, a NO synthase inhibitor, or 30 µg/ml Hemoglobin, a NO scavenger. We also demonstrated that the induction of bull sperm capacitation by nanomolar concentrations of R(+-methanandamide or anandamide was inhibited by adding L-NAME or Hemoglobin. To study whether anandamide is able to produce NO, we measured this compound in both sperm and oviductal cells. We observed that anandamide increased the levels of NO in spermatozoa, but not in oviductal cells. These findings suggest that anandamide regulates the sperm release from oviductal epithelia probably by

  9. Bioactive Fraction of Geopropolis from Melipona scutellaris Decreases Neutrophils Migration in the Inflammatory Process: Involvement of Nitric Oxide Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelo Franchin; Marcos Guilherme da Cunha; Carina Denny; Marcelo Henrique Napimoga; Thiago Mattar Cunha; Bruno Bueno-Silva; Severino Matias de Alencar; Masaharu Ikegaki; Pedro Luiz Rosalen

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of the ethanolic extract of geopropolis (EEGP) from Melipona scutellaris and its fractions on the modulation of neutrophil migration in the inflammatory process, and the participation of nitric oxide (NO) pathway, as well as to check the chemical profile of the bioactive fraction. EEGP and its aqueous fraction decreased neutrophil migration in the peritoneal cavity and also the interaction of leukocytes (rolling and adhesion) with endothelial...

  10. Integrins mediate mechanical compression-induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation through endothelial nitric oxide pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2015-09-01

    Cardiac and skeletal muscle contraction lead to compression of intramuscular arterioles, which, in turn, leads to their vasodilation (a process that may enhance blood flow during muscle activity). Although endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in compression-induced vasodilation, the mechanism whereby arterial compression elicits NO production is unclear. We cannulated isolated swine (n = 39) myocardial (n = 69) and skeletal muscle (n = 60) arteriole segments and exposed them to cyclic transmural pressure generated by either intraluminal or extraluminal pressure pulses to simulate compression in contracting muscle. We found that the vasodilation elicited by internal or external pressure pulses was equivalent; moreover, vasodilation in response to pressure depended on changes in arteriole diameter. Agonist-induced endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation was used to verify endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell viability. Vasodilation in response to cyclic changes in transmural pressure was smaller than that elicited by pharmacological activation of the NO signaling pathway. It was attenuated by inhibition of NO synthase and by mechanical removal of the endothelium. Stemming from previous observations that endothelial integrin is implicated in vasodilation in response to shear stress, we found that function-blocking integrin α5β1 or αvβ3 antibodies attenuated cyclic compression-induced vasodilation and NOx (NO(-)2 and NO(-)3) production, as did an RGD peptide that competitively inhibits ligand binding to some integrins. We therefore conclude that integrin plays a role in cyclic compression-induced endothelial NO production and thereby in the vasodilation of small arteries during cyclic transmural pressure loading.

  11. Dormancy removal in apple embryos by nitric oxide or cyanide involves modifications in ethylene biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gniazdowska, Agnieszka; Krasuska, Urszula; Bogatek, Renata

    2010-11-01

    The connection between classical phytohormone-ethylene and two signaling molecules, nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN), was investigated in dormancy removal and germination "sensu stricto" of apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) embryos. Deep dormancy of apple embryos was removed by short-term (3-6 h) pre-treatment with NO or HCN. NO- or HCN-mediated stimulation of germination was associated with enhanced emission of ethylene by the embryos, coupled with transient increase in ROS concentration in embryos. Ethylene vapors stimulated germination of dormant apple embryos and eliminated morphological anomalies characteristic for young seedlings developed from dormant embryos. Inhibitors of ethylene receptors completely impeded beneficial effect of NO and HCN on embryo germination. NO- and HCN-induced ethylene emission by apple embryo was only slightly reduced by inhibitor of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) oxidase activity during first 4 days of germination. Short-term pre-treatment of the embryos with NO and HCN modified activity of both key enzymes of ethylene biosynthetic pathway: ACC synthase and ACC oxidase. Activity of ACC synthase declined during first 4 days of germination, while activity of ACC oxidase increased markedly at that time. Additional experiments point to non-enzymatic conversion of ACC to ethylene in the presence of ROS (H(2)O(2)). The results indicate that NO and HCN may alleviate dormancy of apple embryos "via" transient accumulation of ROS, leading to enhanced ethylene emission which is required to terminate germination "sensu stricto". Therefore, ethylene seems to be a trigger factor in control of apple embryo dormancy removal and germination.

  12. Detoxification of nitric oxide by flavohemoglobin and the denitrification pathway in the maize pathogen Fusarium verticillioides

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ephemeral nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical, highly reactive, environmentally rare, and a potent signaling molecule in organisms across kingdoms of life. This gaseous small molecule can freely transverse membranes and has been implicated in aspects of pathogenicity both in animal and plant ho...

  13. Nitric oxide detoxification by Fusarium verticillioides involves flavohemoglobins and the denitrification pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a highly mobile and potent signaling molecule, yet as a free radical it can also cause nitrosative stress to cells. To alleviate negative effects from excessive accumulation of endogenous NO or from potential exogenous sources, flavohemoglobin proteins can convert NO into nonto...

  14. Role of inducible nitric oxide synthase pathway on methotrexate-induced intestinal mucositis in rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siqueira Francisco JWS

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methotrexate treatment has been associated to intestinal epithelial damage. Studies have suggested an important role of nitric oxide in such injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO, specifically iNOS on the pathogenesis of methotrexate (MTX-induced intestinal mucositis. Methods Intestinal mucositis was carried out by three subcutaneous MTX injections (2.5 mg/kg in Wistar rats and in inducible nitric oxide synthase knock-out (iNOS-/- and wild-type (iNOS+/+ mice. Rats were treated intraperitoneally with the NOS inhibitors aminoguanidine (AG; 10 mg/Kg or L-NAME (20 mg/Kg, one hour before MTX injection and daily until sacrifice, on the fifth day. The jejunum was harvested to investigate the expression of Ki67, iNOS and nitrotyrosine by immunohistochemistry and cell death by TUNEL. The neutrophil activity by myeloperoxidase (MPO assay was performed in the three small intestine segments. Results AG and L-NAME significantly reduced villus and crypt damages, inflammatory alterations, cell death, MPO activity, and nitrotyrosine immunostaining due to MTX challenge. The treatment with AG, but not L-NAME, prevented the inhibitory effect of MTX on cell proliferation. MTX induced increased expression of iNOS detected by immunohistochemistry. MTX did not cause significant inflammation in the iNOS-/- mice. Conclusion These results suggest an important role of NO, via activation of iNOS, in the pathogenesis of intestinal mucositis.

  15. Evaluation of endothelial function by peripheral arterial tonometry and relation with the nitric oxide pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedetoft, Morten; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is an important component in the development of cardiovascular diseases. Endothelial function may be evaluated by peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT) which measures the vasodilator function in the microvasculature of the fingertip during reactive hyperaemia. The reactive...... by flow-mediated dilation in the brachial artery, but the two methods are not interchangeable. We have reviewed the recent literature in an effort to evaluate peripheral arterial tonometry as a method to assess the function of the endothelium and additionally suggest directions for future research....... Special attention will be directed to the nitric oxide dependency of the reactive hyperaemia index obtained by peripheral arterial tonometry....

  16. Inorganic nitrate promotes the browning of white adipose tissue through the nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lee D; Ashmore, Tom; Kotwica, Aleksandra O; Murfitt, Steven A; Fernandez, Bernadette O; Feelisch, Martin; Murray, Andrew J; Griffin, Julian L

    2015-02-01

    Inorganic nitrate was once considered an oxidation end product of nitric oxide metabolism with little biological activity. However, recent studies have demonstrated that dietary nitrate can modulate mitochondrial function in man and is effective in reversing features of the metabolic syndrome in mice. Using a combined histological, metabolomics, and transcriptional and protein analysis approach, we mechanistically defined that nitrate not only increases the expression of thermogenic genes in brown adipose tissue but also induces the expression of brown adipocyte-specific genes and proteins in white adipose tissue, substantially increasing oxygen consumption and fatty acid β-oxidation in adipocytes. Nitrate induces these phenotypic changes through a mechanism distinct from known physiological small molecule activators of browning, the recently identified nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway. The nitrate-induced browning effect was enhanced in hypoxia, a serious comorbidity affecting white adipose tissue in obese individuals, and corrected impaired brown adipocyte-specific gene expression in white adipose tissue in a murine model of obesity. Because resulting beige/brite cells exhibit antiobesity and antidiabetic effects, nitrate may be an effective means of inducing the browning response in adipose tissue to treat the metabolic syndrome.

  17. The neuropeptide F/nitric oxide pathway is essential for shaping locomotor plasticity underlying locust phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Li; Yang, Pengcheng; Jiang, Feng; Liu, Qing; Wang, Xianhui; Kang, Le

    2017-01-01

    Behavioral plasticity is widespread in swarming animals, but little is known about its underlying neural and molecular mechanisms. Here, we report that a neuropeptide F (NPF)/nitric oxide (NO) pathway plays a critical role in the locomotor plasticity of swarming migratory locusts. The transcripts encoding two related neuropeptides, NPF1a and NPF2, show reduced levels during crowding, and the transcript levels of NPF1a and NPF2 receptors significantly increase during locust isolation. Both NPF1a and NPF2 have suppressive effects on phase-related locomotor activity. A key downstream mediator for both NPFs is nitric oxide synthase (NOS), which regulates phase-related locomotor activity by controlling NO synthesis in the locust brain. Mechanistically, NPF1a and NPF2 modify NOS activity by separately suppressing its phosphorylation and by lowering its transcript level, effects that are mediated by their respective receptors. Our results uncover a hierarchical neurochemical mechanism underlying behavioral plasticity in the swarming locust and provide insights into the NPF/NO axis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22526.001 PMID:28346142

  18. Density Functional Theory Calculations and Analysis of Reaction Pathways for Reduction of Nitric Oxide by Hydrogen on Pt(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farberow, Carrie A.; Dumesic, James A.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2014-10-03

    Reaction pathways are explored for low temperature (e.g., 400 K) reduction of nitric oxide by hydrogen on Pt(111). First-principles electronic structure calculations based on periodic, self-consistent density functional theory(DFT-GGA, PW91) are employed to obtain thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for proposed reaction schemes on Pt(111). The surface of Pt(111) during NO reduction by H₂ at low temperatures is predicted to operate at a high NO coverage, and this environment is explicitly taken into account in the DFT calculations. Maximum rate analyses are performed to assess the most likely reaction mechanisms leading to formation of N₂O, the major product observed experimentally at low temperatures. The results of these analyses suggest that the reaction most likely proceeds via the addition of at least two H atoms to adsorbed NO, followed by cleavage of the N-O bond.

  19. Effects of non-surgical periodontal treatment on the L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway and oxidative status in platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Mariana Alves de Sá; Fischer, Ricardo Guimarães; Pereira, Natália Rodrigues; Martins, Marcela Anjos; Moss, Monique Bandeira; Mendes-Ribeiro, Antônio Cláudio; Figueredo, Carlos Marcelo da Silva; Brunini, Tatiana Marlowe Cunha

    2013-06-01

    Several studies have suggested an increase of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk on periodontitis patients. An enhancement has been demonstrated on both platelet activation and oxidative stress on periodontitis patients, which may contribute for this association. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of non-surgical periodontal treatment on the l-arginine-nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway and oxidative status in platelets. A total of eight periodontitis patients and eight controls were included in this study. Clinical, laboratory and experimental evaluations were performed on baseline and 90 days after periodontal treatment (except for western blot analysis). The clinical periodontal evaluation included measurements of probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment loss (CAL), % of sites with plaque and % of sites with bleeding on probing. We evaluated: l-[(3)H]arginine influx; nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and arginase enzymes activity and expression; expression of guanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase-5 enzymes; cGMP levels; platelet aggregation; oxidative status through superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities, and measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. The initial results showed an activation of both l-arginine influx and via system y (+ )L associated with reduced intraplatelet cGMP levels in periodontitis patients and increased systemic levels of CRP. After periodontal treatment, there was a significant reduction of the % of sites with PPD 4-5mm, % of sites with CAL 4-5 mm, and an enhancement in cGMP levels and SOD activity. Moreover, CRP levels were reduced after treatment. Therefore, alterations in the intraplatelet l-arginine-NO-cGMP pathway and oxidant-antioxidant balance associated with a systemic inflammatory response may lead to platelet dysfunction, which may contribute to a higher risk of CVD in periodontitis.

  20. The Nitric oxide/CGMP/KATP pathway mediates systemic and central antinociception induced by resistance exercise in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdino, Giovane S; Xavier, Carlos H; Almeida, Renato; Silva, Grazielle; Fontes, Marcos A; Menezes, Gustavo; Duarte, Igor D; Perez, Andrea C

    2015-01-01

    Resistance exercise (RE) is characterized to increase strength, tone, mass, and/or muscular endurance and also for produces many beneficial effects, such as blood pressure and osteoporosis reduction, diabetes mellitus control, and analgesia. However, few studies have investigated endogenous mechanisms involved in the RE-induced analgesia. Thus, the aim of this study was evaluate the role of the NO/CGMP/KATP pathway in the antinociception induced by RE. Wistar rats were submitted to acute RE in a weight-lifting model. The nociceptive threshold was measured by mechanical nociceptive test (paw-withdrawal). To investigate the involvement of the NO/CGMP/KATP pathway the following nitric oxide synthase (NOS) non-specific and specific inhibitors were used: N-nitro-l-arginine (NOArg), Aminoguanidine, N5-(1-Iminoethyl)-l-ornithine dihydrocloride (l-NIO), Nω-Propyl-l-arginine (l-NPA); guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, 1H-[1,2,4]oxidiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ); and KATP channel blocker, Glybenclamide; all administered subcutaneously, intrathecally and intracerebroventricularly. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) nitrite levels were determined by spectrophotometry. The RE protocol produced antinociception, which was significantly reversed by NOS specific and unspecific inhibitors, guanylyl cyclase inhibitor (ODQ) and KATP channel blocker (Glybenclamide). RE was also responsible for increasing nitrite levels in both plasma and CSF. These finding suggest that the NO/CGMP/KATP pathway participates in antinociception induced by RE.

  1. Differential role of the nitric oxide pathway on delta(9)-THC-induced central nervous system effects in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, S C; Marsicano, G; Eberlein, I; Putzke, J; Zieglgänsberger, W; Spanagel, R; Lutz, B

    2001-02-01

    This study investigated whether the nitric oxide pathway was involved in the central effects of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC), the major psychoactive constituent of cannabis sativa. Body temperature, nociception and locomotion were measured in neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) knock-out (KO) mice and wild-type (WT) controls after intraperitoneal application of Delta(9)-THC. These Delta(9)-THC-induced effects are known to be mediated through the brain-type cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1). Therefore, in situ hybridization (ISH) experiments were performed in the adult murine brain to determine possible changes in CB1 mRNA levels in nNOS-KO, compared with WT mice, and to reveal brain areas where CB1 and nNOS were coexpressed in the same neurons. We found that an intraperitoneal injection of 10 mg/kg Delta(9)-THC led to the same increase in the hot plate latencies in both genotypes, suggesting that Delta(9)-THC-mediated antinociception does not involve nNOS. In contrast, a significant Delta(9)-THC-induced decrease of body temperature and locomotor activity was only observed in WT, but not in nNOS-KO mice. ISH revealed significantly lower levels of CB1 mRNA in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) and the caudate putamen (Cpu) of the nNOS-KO animals, compared with WT mice. Both areas are known to be among the regions involved in cannabinoid-induced thermoregulation and decrease of locomotion. A numerical evaluation of nNOS/CB1 coexpression showed that approximately half of the nNOS-positive cells in the dorsolateral Cpu also express low levels of CB1. ISH of adjacent serial sections with CB1 and nNOS, revealed expression of both transcripts in VMH, suggesting that numerous nNOS-positive cells of VMH coexpress CB1. Our findings indicate that the nitric oxide pathway is involved in some, but not all of the central effects of Delta(9)-THC.

  2. Metformin attenuates ventricular hypertrophy by activating the AMP-activated protein kinase-endothelial nitric oxide synthase pathway in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng-Xi; Pan, Si-Nian; Meng, Rong-Sen; Peng, Chao-Quan; Xiong, Zhao-Jun; Chen, Bao-Lin; Chen, Guang-Qin; Yao, Feng-Juan; Chen, Yi-Li; Ma, Yue-Dong; Dong, Yu-Gang

    2011-01-01

    1. Metformin is an activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Recent studies suggest that pharmacological activation of AMPK inhibits cardiac hypertrophy. In the present study, we examined whether long-term treatment with metformin could attenuate ventricular hypertrophy in a rat model. The potential involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in the effects of metformin was also investigated. 2. Ventricular hypertrophy was established in rats by transaortic constriction (TAC). Starting 1 week after the TAC procedure, rats were treated with metformin (300 mg/kg per day, p.o.), N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 50 mg/kg per day, p.o.) or both for 8 weeks prior to the assessment of haemodynamic function and cardiac hypertrophy. 3. Cultured cardiomyocytes were used to examine the effects of metformin on the AMPK-endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) pathway. Cells were exposed to angiotensin (Ang) II (10⁻⁶ mol/L) for 24 h under serum-free conditions in the presence or absence of metformin (10⁻³ mol/L), compound C (10⁻⁶ mol/L), L-NAME (10⁻⁶ mol/L) or their combination. The rate of incorporation of [³H]-leucine was determined, western blotting analyses of AMPK-eNOS, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were undertaken and the concentration of NO in culture media was determined. 4. Transaortic constriction resulted in significant haemodynamic dysfunction and ventricular hypertrophy. Myocardial fibrosis was also evident. Treatment with metformin improved haemodynamic function and significantly attenuated ventricular hypertrophy. Most of the effects of metformin were abolished by concomitant L-NAME treatment. L-NAME on its own had no effect on haemodynamic function and ventricular hypertrophy in TAC rats. 5. In cardiomyocytes, metformin inhibited AngII-induced protein synthesis, an effect that was suppressed by the AMPK inhibitor compound C or the eNOS inhibitor L-NAME. The improvement in cardiac structure and

  3. The Function of the Glutamate-Nitric Oxide-cGMP Pathway in Brain in Vivo and Learning Ability Decrease in Parallel in Mature Compared with Young Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedrafita, Blanca; Cauli, Omar; Montoliu, Carmina; Felipo, Vicente

    2007-01-01

    Aging is associated with cognitive impairment, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We have recently reported that the ability of rats to learn a Y-maze conditional discrimination task depends on the function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in brain. The aims of the present work were to assess whether the ability of rats to…

  4. Nitroglycerin enhances proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation in human mesenchymal stem cells via nitric oxide pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li HUANG; Ni QIU; Che ZHANG; Hong-yan WEI; Ya-lin LI; Hong-hao ZHOU; Zhou-sheng XIAO

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of nitroglycerin (NTG) on cell proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HBMSC) and its mechanisms. Methods: Primary HBMSC were cultured in osteogenic differentiation medium consisting of phenol red-free or-minimum es-sential media plus 10% fetal bovine serum (dextran-coated charcoal stripped)supplemented with 10 nmol/L dexamethasone, 50 mg/L ascorbic acid, and l0 mmol/Lβ-glycerophosphate for inducing osteoblastic differentiation. The cells were treated with NTG (0.1-10 μmol/L) alone or concurrent incubation with different nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors. Nitric oxide (NO) production was measured by using a commercial NO kit. Cell proliferation was measured by 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. The osteoblastic differentiation of HBMSC culture was evaluated by measuring cellular alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and calcium deposition, as well as osteoblastic markers by real-time RT-PCR. Results: The treatment of HBMSC with NTG (0.1-10 μmol/L) led to a dose-dependent increase of NO production in the conditional medium. The release of NO by NTG resulted in increased cell proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation of HBMSC, as evi-denced by the increment of the BrdU incorporation, the induction of ALP activity in the early stage, and the calcium deposition in the latter stage. The increment of NO production was also correlated with the upregulation of osteoblastic markers in HBMSC cultures. However, the stimulatory effect of NTG (10 μmol/L) could not be abolished by either NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, an antagonist of endothe-lial NOS, or 1400W, a selective blocker of inducible NOS activity. Conclusion: NTG stimulates cell proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation of HBMSC through a direct release of NO, which is independent on intracellular NOS activity.

  5. The nitric-oxide reductase from Paracoccus denitrificans uses a single specific proton pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Beek, Josy; Krause, Nils; Reimann, Joachim; Lachmann, Peter; Ädelroth, Pia

    2013-10-18

    The NO reductase from Paracoccus denitrificans reduces NO to N2O (2NO + 2H(+) + 2e(-) → N2O + H2O) with electrons donated by periplasmic cytochrome c (cytochrome c-dependent NO reductase; cNOR). cNORs are members of the heme-copper oxidase superfamily of integral membrane proteins, comprising the O2-reducing, proton-pumping respiratory enzymes. In contrast, although NO reduction is as exergonic as O2 reduction, there are no protons pumped in cNOR, and in addition, protons needed for NO reduction are derived from the periplasmic solution (no contribution to the electrochemical gradient is made). cNOR thus only needs to transport protons from the periplasm into the active site without the requirement to control the timing of opening and closing (gating) of proton pathways as is needed in a proton pump. Based on the crystal structure of a closely related cNOR and molecular dynamics simulations, several proton transfer pathways were suggested, and in principle, these could all be functional. In this work, we show that residues in one of the suggested pathways (denoted pathway 1) are sensitive to site-directed mutation, whereas residues in the other proposed pathways (pathways 2 and 3) could be exchanged without severe effects on turnover activity with either NO or O2. We further show that electron transfer during single-turnover reduction of O2 is limited by proton transfer and can thus be used to study alterations in proton transfer rates. The exchange of residues along pathway 1 showed specific slowing of this proton-coupled electron transfer as well as changes in its pH dependence. Our results indicate that only pathway 1 is used to transfer protons in cNOR.

  6. Rho/Rho-kinase pathway in the brainstem contributes to hypertension caused by chronic nitric oxide synthase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Koji; Hirooka, Yoshitaka; Kishi, Takuya; Kimura, Yoshikuni; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Takeshita, Akira

    2004-02-01

    Central nervous system mechanisms are involved in hypertension caused by chronic inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. Chronic inhibition of NO synthesis might also activate the Rho/Rho-kinase pathway in the vasculature. We recently demonstrated that activation of the Rho/Rho-kinase pathway in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) contributes to hypertensive mechanisms in spontaneously hypertensive rats. The aim of the present study was to determine whether activation of this pathway also contributes to neurogenic hypertensive mechanisms caused by chronic NO synthesis inhibition. The NO synthase inhibitor N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) was administered to Wistar-Kyoto rats in their drinking water (1 mg/mL) for 2 weeks. Bilateral microinjection of Y-27632, a specific Rho-kinase inhibitor, into the NTS elicited decreases in arterial pressure, heart rate, and renal sympathetic nerve activity in control rats and L-NAME-treated rats. The magnitude of the decrease, however, was significantly greater in L-NAME-treated than in control rats. In another group of rats, the specific Rho-kinase inhibitor, Y-27632, was administered intracisternally for 2 weeks with a mini-osmotic pump from the beginning of treatment with L-NAME. Y-27632 co-treatment significantly attenuated the increase in arterial pressure. Furthermore, the expression level of membranous RhoA and phosphorylation of the target proteins of Rho-kinase, the ERM (ezrin, radixin, moesin) family members, was significantly greater in L-NAME-treated rats than in control rats. These results indicate that activation of the Rho/Rho-kinase pathway in the NTS contributes to neurogenic hypertension caused by chronic NO synthase inhibition.

  7. Bioactive Fraction of Geopropolis from Melipona scutellaris Decreases Neutrophils Migration in the Inflammatory Process: Involvement of Nitric Oxide Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Franchin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of the ethanolic extract of geopropolis (EEGP from Melipona scutellaris and its fractions on the modulation of neutrophil migration in the inflammatory process, and the participation of nitric oxide (NO pathway, as well as to check the chemical profile of the bioactive fraction. EEGP and its aqueous fraction decreased neutrophil migration in the peritoneal cavity and also the interaction of leukocytes (rolling and adhesion with endothelial cells. The levels of chemokines CXCL1/KC and CXCL2/MIP-2 were not altered after treatment with EEGP and the aqueous fraction. It was found that the injection of NO pathway antagonists abolished the EEGP and the aqueous fraction inhibitory activity on the neutrophil migration. The expression of intercellular adhesion molecule type 1 (ICAM-1 was reduced, and nitrite levels increased after treatment with EEGP and aqueous fraction. In the carrageenan-induced paw edema model, EEGP and the aqueous fraction showed antiedema activity. No pattern of flavonoid and phenolic acid commonly found in propolis samples of Apis mellifera could be detected in the aqueous fraction samples. These data indicate that the aqueous fraction found has promising bioactive substances with anti-inflammatory activity.

  8. Bioactive Fraction of Geopropolis from Melipona scutellaris Decreases Neutrophils Migration in the Inflammatory Process: Involvement of Nitric Oxide Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchin, Marcelo; da Cunha, Marcos Guilherme; Denny, Carina; Napimoga, Marcelo Henrique; Cunha, Thiago Mattar; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; Matias de Alencar, Severino; Ikegaki, Masaharu; Luiz Rosalen, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of the ethanolic extract of geopropolis (EEGP) from Melipona scutellaris and its fractions on the modulation of neutrophil migration in the inflammatory process, and the participation of nitric oxide (NO) pathway, as well as to check the chemical profile of the bioactive fraction. EEGP and its aqueous fraction decreased neutrophil migration in the peritoneal cavity and also the interaction of leukocytes (rolling and adhesion) with endothelial cells. The levels of chemokines CXCL1/KC and CXCL2/MIP-2 were not altered after treatment with EEGP and the aqueous fraction. It was found that the injection of NO pathway antagonists abolished the EEGP and the aqueous fraction inhibitory activity on the neutrophil migration. The expression of intercellular adhesion molecule type 1 (ICAM-1) was reduced, and nitrite levels increased after treatment with EEGP and aqueous fraction. In the carrageenan-induced paw edema model, EEGP and the aqueous fraction showed antiedema activity. No pattern of flavonoid and phenolic acid commonly found in propolis samples of Apis mellifera could be detected in the aqueous fraction samples. These data indicate that the aqueous fraction found has promising bioactive substances with anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:23737853

  9. Nitric Oxide and Brassinosteroids Mediated Fungal Endophyte-Induced Volatile Oil Production Through Protein Phosphorylation Pathways in Atractylodes lancea Plantlets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Gang Ren; Chuan-Chao Dai

    2013-01-01

    Fungal endophytes have been isolated from almost every plant, infecting their hosts without causing visible disease symptoms, and yet have still proved to be involved in plant secondary metabolites accumulation. To decipher the possible physiological mechanisms of the endophytic fungus-host interaction, the role of protein phosphorylation and the relationship between endophytic fungus-induced kinase activity and nitric oxide (NO) and brassinolide (BL) in endophyte-enhanced volatile oil accumulation in Atractylodes lancea plantlets were investigated using pharmacological and biochemical approaches. Inoculation with the endophytic fungus Gilmaniella sp. AL12 enhanced the activities of total protein phosphorylation, Ca2þ-dependent protein kinase, and volatile oil accumulation in A. lancea plantlets. The upregulation of protein kinase activity could be blocked by the BL inhibitor brassinazole. Furthermore, pretreatments with the NO-specific scavenger cPTIO significantly reduced the increased activities of protein kinases in A. lancea plantlets inoculated with endophytic fungus. Pretreatments with different protein kinase inhibitors also reduced fungus-induced NO production and volatile oil accumulation, but had barely no effect on the BL level. These data suggest that protein phosphorylation is required for endophyte-induced volatile oil production in A. lancea plantlets, and that crosstalk between protein phosphorylation and the NO pathway may occur and act as a downstream signaling event of the BL pathway.

  10. Nitric oxide modulates hypoxic pulmonary smooth muscle cell proliferation and apoptosis by regulating carbon monoxide pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-fei WANG; Hong TIAN; Chao-shu TANG; Hong-fang JIN; Jun-bao DU

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To explore the role of carbon monoxide (CO) in the regulation of hypoxic pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation and apoptosis by nitric oxide (NO). Methods: PASMC of Wistar rats was cultured in vitro in the presence of a NO donor, sodium nitroprusside, or an inhibitor of heme oxygenase (HO), zinc protoporphyrin-IX, or under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions.Nitrite and carboxyhemoglobin in PASMC medium were detected with spectrophotometry. The proliferating and apoptotic percentage of PASMC was measured by flow cytometry. The expression of HO-1 mRNA in PASMC was analyzed by fluorescent real-time quantitative PCR, and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen and caspase-3 were examined by immunocytochemical analysis. Results: The results showed that hypoxia suppressed NO generation from PASMC, which promoted hypoxic PASMC proliferation and induced apoptosis. Meanwhile, hy-poxia induced HO-1 expression in PASMC and promoted CO production from PASMC, which inhibited PASMC proliferation and regulated PASMC apoptosis. NO upregulated the expression of HO-1 mRNA in hypoxic PASMC; NO also inhib-ited proliferation and promoted apoptosis of hypoxic PASMC, possibly by regu-lating the production of CO. Conclusion: The results indicated that CO could inhibit proliferation and regulate apoptosis of PASMC, and NO inhibited prolifera-tion and promoted apoptosis of hypoxic PASMC, possibly by regulating the pro-duction of CO.

  11. Nitric Oxide-Related Biological Pathways in Patients with Major Depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Baranyi

    Full Text Available Major depression is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and increased mortality following myocardial infarction. However, biomarkers of depression and increased cardiovascular risk are still missing. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate, whether nitric-oxide (NO related factors for endothelial dysfunction, such as global arginine bioavailability, arginase activity, L-arginine/ADMA ratio and the arginine metabolites asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA and symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA might be biomarkers for depression-induced cardiovascular risk.In 71 in-patients with major depression and 48 healthy controls the Global Arginine Bioavailability Ratio (GABR, arginase activity (arginine/ornithine ratio, the L-arginine/ADMA ratio, ADMA, and SDMA were determined by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Psychiatric and laboratory assessments were obtained at baseline at the time of in-patient admittance and at the time of hospital discharge.The ADMA concentrations in patients with major depression were significantly elevated and the SDMA concentrations were significantly decreased in comparison with the healthy controls. Even after a first improvement of depression, ADMA and SDMA levels remained nearly unchanged. In addition, after a first improvement of depression at the time of hospital discharge, a significant decrease in arginase activity, an increased L-arginine/ADMA ratio and a trend for increased global arginine bioavailability were observed.Our study results are evidence that in patients with major depression ADMA and SDMA might be biomarkers to indicate an increased cardiovascular threat due to depression-triggered NO reduction. GABR, the L-arginine/ADMA ratio and arginase activity might be indicators of therapy success and increased NO production after remission.

  12. Signal transduction pathways in erythrocyte nitric oxide metabolism under high fibrinogen levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldanha, Carlota; Freitas, T.; Lopez de Almeida, J. P.; Silva-Herdade, A.

    2014-05-01

    Previous studies show that the fibrinogen molecule modulates the metabolism of nitric oxide (NO) in erythrocyte. The in vitro induced hiperfibrinogenemia interferes in the metabolism of the NO in the erythrocyte in dependence of the phosphorylation degree of the band 3. The soluble form of fibrinogen binds into CD47 protein present in the erythrocyte membrane. The soluble thrombomodulin is an inflammatory marker that binds to the erythrocyte CD47 in a site with a sequence peptide known as 4N1K. A study done in vitro shows that when hiperfibrinogenemia was induced in the presence of the peptide 4N1K agonist of CD47 it were observed variations in the efflux of NO from erythrocyte and an increase in the concentrations of GSNO, peroxinitrite, nitrite and nitrate of the erythrocytes. The aim of this work was to study the influence of the peptide 4N1K, on the metabolism of NO in the erythrocyte under high fibrinogen concentration and in the presence of inhibitors of the status of phosphorylation of protein band 3. In this in vitro study, whole blood samples were harvested from healthy subjects and NO, peroxynitrite, nitrite, nitrate and S-nitro-glutathione (GSNO) were determined in presence of 4N1K, calpeptine, Syk inhibitor and under high fibrinogen concentrations. The results obtained in erythrocytes under high fibrinogen levels when 4N1K is present with the Syk inhibitor or with calpeptine, showed in relation to the control samples increased significant concentrations of efflux of NO and of peroxynitrite, nitrite, nitrate and GSNO. In conclusion it was verified that in the in vitro model of hiperfibrinogenemia the peptide 4N1K, agonist of CD47, induces mobilization of NO in the erythrocyte in dependence of the status of phosphorylation of protein band 3.

  13. Nitric oxide and nitrous oxide turnover in natural and engineered microbial communities: biological pathways, chemical reactions and novel technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eSchreiber

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous oxide (N2O is an environmentally important atmospheric trace gas because it is an effective greenhouse gas and it leads to ozone depletion through photo-chemical nitric oxide (NO production in the stratosphere. Mitigating its steady increase in atmospheric concentration requires an understanding of the mechanisms that lead to its formation in natural and engineered microbial communities. N2O is formed biologically from the oxidation of hydroxylamine (NH2OH or the reduction of nitrite (NO2- to NO and further to N2O. Our review of the biological pathways for N2O production shows that apparently all organisms and pathways known to be involved in the catabolic branch of microbial N-cycle have the potential to catalyze the reduction of NO2- to NO and the further reduction of NO to N2O, while N2O formation from NH2OH is only performed by ammonia oxidizing bacteria. In addition to biological pathways, we review important chemical reactions that can lead to NO and N2O formation due to the reactivity of NO2-, NH2OH and nitroxyl (HNO. Moreover, biological N2O formation is highly dynamic in response to N-imbalance imposed on a system. Thus, understanding NO formation and capturing the dynamics of NO and N2O build-up are key to understand mechanisms of N2O release. Here, we discuss novel technologies that allow experiments on NO and N2O formation at high temporal resolution, namely NO and N2O microelectrodes and the dynamic analysis of the isotopic signature of N2O with quantum cascade laser based absorption spectroscopy. In addition, we introduce other techniques that use the isotopic composition of N2O to distinguish production pathways and findings that were made with emerging molecular techniques in complex environments. Finally, we discuss how a combination of the presented tools might help to address important open questions on pathways and controls of nitrogen flow through complex microbial communities that eventually lead to N2O build-up.

  14. Study of L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway in ischemia-reperfusion injured limbs in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱立军; 黄耀添; 裴国献

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To observe the change of nitric oxide (NO) levels in the blood and the morphological change of the muscles in the limbs of rats during the (IR) injury and after being intervened by L-arginine (L-Arg) and L-nitroarginine (L-NNA).   Methods: Sixty-six male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were used and grouped into the normal controls, the sham injury controls, the IR injury group and the intervention groups (L-Arg group and L-NNA group). After 6 hours of ischemia, followed by reperfusion for 3, 12 or 24 hours, the samples in the IR injury group were obtained. The rats in the intervention groups were given L-Arg (100 mmol/L) and L-NNA (10 mmol/L), respectively, through the abdominal cavity. Then the anterior tibial muscle in the right limb was obtained for histological examination, the anterior tibial muscle in the left limb for ultrastructure observation and the blood for assay of NO in all the rats. NO was assayed by indirect measurement of NO2/NO3 with Griess method.   Results: There was no significant difference of NO between the normal controls and the sham injury controls (P>0.05). But NO significantly decreased in the IR injury group (P0.05). In the L-NNA group, NO decreased to the undetectable level (P<0.01). Histological examination and ultrastructure observation showed the muscles were normal in the control groups. After 6 hours of ischemia, the skeletal muscles displayed injuries, and they were most severely injured after 12 hours of reperfusion. In the L-Arg group, the skeletal muscles were less injured, while in the L-NNA group, the injury was similar to that in the IR injury group.   Conclusions: When the limbs of the rats sustain IR, NO in the blood decreases. Meanwhile, the muscles in the limbs are injured. When L-Arg is given, NO in the blood is restored and the muscles are protected. When L-NNA completely inhibits NO, no protection of the muscles is shown.

  15. Possible involvement of nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of MK-801(dizocilpine), a NMDA receptor antagonist in mouse forced swim test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhir, Ashish; Kulkarni, S K

    2008-03-01

    L-arginine-nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is an important signaling pathway involved in depression. With this information, the present study aimed to study the involvement of this signaling pathway in the antidepressant-like action of MK-801 (dizocilpine; N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist) in the mouse forced-swim test. Total immobility period was recorded in mouse forced swim test for 6 min. MK-801 (5-25 microg/kg., ip) produced a U-shaped curve in reducing the immobility period. The antidepressant-like effect of MK-801 (10 microg/kg, ip) was prevented by pretreatment with L-arginine (750 mg/kg, ip) [substrate for nitric oxide synthase (NOS)]. Pretreatment of mice with 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) (25 mg/kg, ip) [a specific neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor] produced potentiation of the action of subeffective dose of MK-801 (5 microg/kg, ip). In addition, treatment of mice with methylene blue (10 mg/kg, ip) [direct inhibitor of both nitric oxide synthase and soluble guanylate cyclase] potentiated the effect of MK-801 (5 microg/kg, ip) in the forced-swim test. Further, the reduction in the immobility period elicited by MK-801 (10 microg/kg, ip) was also inhibited by pretreatment with sildenafil (5 mg/kg, ip) [phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor]. The various modulators used in the study and their combination did not produce any changes in locomotor activity per se and in combination with MK-801. MK-801 however, at higher doses (25 microg/kg, ip) produced hyperlocomotion. The results demonstrated the involvement of nitric oxide signaling pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of MK-801 in mouse forced-swim test.

  16. DMPD: Regulation of nitric oxide synthesis and apoptosis by arginase and argininerecycling. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17513437 Regulation of nitric oxide synthesis and apoptosis by arginase and arginin...tion of nitric oxide synthesis and apoptosis by arginase and argininerecycling. A...erecycling. Mori M. J Nutr. 2007 Jun;137(6 Suppl 2):1616S-1620S. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Regulation of nitric oxide synthe...sis and apoptosis by arginase and argininerecycling. PubmedID 17513437 Title Regula

  17. AVE 3085, a novel endothelial nitric oxide synthase enhancer, attenuates cardiac remodeling in mice through the Smad signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yili; Chen, Cong; Feng, Cong; Tang, Anli; Ma, Yuedong; He, Xin; Li, Yanhui; He, Jiangui; Dong, Yugang

    2015-03-15

    AVE 3085 is a novel endothelial nitric oxide synthase enhancer. Although AVE 3085 treatment has been shown to be effective in spontaneously restoring endothelial function in hypertensive rats, little is known about the effects and mechanisms of AVE 3085 with respect to cardiac remodeling. The present study was designed to examine the effects of AVE 3085 on cardiac remodeling and the mechanisms underlying the effects of this compound. Mice were subjected to aortic banding to induce cardiac remodeling and were then administered AVE 3085 (10 mg kg day(-1), orally) for 4 weeks. At the end of the treatment, the aortic banding-treated mice exhibited significant elevations in cardiac remodeling, characterized by an increase in left ventricular weight relative to body weight, an increase in the area of collagen deposition, an increase in the mean myocyte diameter, and increases in the gene expressions of the hypertrophic markers atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and β-MHC. These indexes were significantly decreased in the AVE 3085-treated mice. Furthermore, AVE 3085 treatment reduced the expression and activation of the Smad signaling pathway in the aortic banding-treated mice. Our data showed that AVE 3085 attenuated cardiac remodeling, and this effect was possibly mediated through the inhibition of Smad signaling.

  18. Dengue fever activates the L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway: an explanation for reduced aggregation of human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes-Ribeiro, Antonio C; Moss, Monique B; Siqueira, Mariana As; Moraes, Thalyta L; Ellory, J Clive; Mann, Giovanni E; Brunini, Tatiana Mc

    2008-10-01

    In patients with Dengue fever, a viral inflammatory syndrome, haemorrhage is a significant pathological feature, yet the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Nitric oxide (NO) is an important regulator of platelet function, inhibiting aggregation, recruitment and adhesion to the vascular endothelium. We have investigated whether changes in the activity of the L-arginine-NO pathway in human platelets may account for increased bleeding in patients with Dengue fever. A total of 16 patients with Dengue fever and 18 age-matched healthy volunteers participated in the study. Collagen induced platelet aggregation in a dose-dependent manner in both Dengue patients and controls, but the degree of platelet aggregation was significantly reduced in the patient group. Elevated rates of L-arginine transport in Dengue fever patients were associated with enhanced NO synthase activity and elevated plasma fibrinogen levels. The present study provides the first evidence that Dengue fever is associated with increased L-arginine transport and NO generation and reduced platelet aggregation.

  19. Lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy and vascular function: Role of the nitric oxide-phosphodiesterase type 5-cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Yukihito

    2017-06-01

    It is well known that there is an association of lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy with cardiovascular disease, suggesting that lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy is a risk factor for cardiovascular events. Vascular function, including endothelial function and vascular smooth muscle function, is involved in the pathogenesis, maintenance and development of atherosclerosis, leading to cardiovascular events. Vascular dysfunction per se should also contribute to lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy. Both lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy and vascular dysfunction have cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, aging, obesity and smoking. Inactivation of the phosphodiesterase type 5-cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate-nitric oxide pathway causes lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy through an enhancement of sympathetic nervous activity, endothelial dysfunction, increase in Rho-associated kinase activity and vasoconstriction, and decrease in blood flow of pelvic viscera. Both endogenous nitric oxide and exogenous nitric oxide act as vasodilators on vascular smooth muscle cells through an increase in the content of cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate, which is inactivated by phosphodiesterase type 5. In a clinical setting, phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors are widely used in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors might have beneficial effects on vascular function through not only inhibition of cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate degradation, but also increases in testosterone levels and nitric oxide bioavailability, increase in the number and improvement of the function of endothelial progenitor cells, and decrease in insulin resistance. In the present review, the relationships between lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy, the

  20. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase regulates white matter changes via the BDNF/TrkB pathway after stroke in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Cui

    Full Text Available Stroke induced white matter (WM damage is associated with neurological functional deficits, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we investigate whether endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS affects WM-damage post-stroke. Adult male wild-type (WT and eNOS knockout (eNOS(-/- mice were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion. Functional evaluation, infarct volume measurement, immunostaining and primary cortical cell culture were performed. To obtain insight into the mechanisms underlying the effects of eNOS(-/- on WM-damage, measurement of eNOS, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and its receptor TrkB in vivo and in vitro were also performed. No significant differences were detected in the infarction volume, myelin density in the ipsilateral striatal WM-bundles and myelin-based protein expression in the cerebral ischemic border between WT and eNOS(-/- mice. However, eNOS(-/- mice showed significantly: 1 decreased functional outcome, concurrent with decreases of total axon density and phosphorylated high-molecular weight neurofilament density in the ipsilateral striatal WM-bundles. Correlation analysis showed that axon density is significantly positive correlated with neurological functional outcome; 2 decreased numbers of oligodendrocytes / oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in the ipsilateral striatum; 3 decreased synaptophysin, BDNF and TrkB expression in the ischemic border compared with WT mice after stroke (n = 12/group, p<0.05. Primary cortical cell culture confirmed that the decrease of neuronal neurite outgrowth in the neurons derived from eNOS(-/- mice is mediated by the reduction of BDNF/TrkB (n = 6/group, p<0.05. Our data show that eNOS plays a critical role in WM-damage after stroke, and eNOS(-/--induced decreases in the BDNF/TrkB pathway may contribute to increased WM-damage, and thereby decrease functional outcome.

  1. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase regulates white matter changes via the BDNF/TrkB pathway after stroke in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xu; Chopp, Michael; Zacharek, Alex; Ning, Ruizhuo; Ding, Xiaoshuang; Roberts, Cynthia; Chen, Jieli

    2013-01-01

    Stroke induced white matter (WM) damage is associated with neurological functional deficits, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we investigate whether endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) affects WM-damage post-stroke. Adult male wild-type (WT) and eNOS knockout (eNOS(-/-)) mice were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion. Functional evaluation, infarct volume measurement, immunostaining and primary cortical cell culture were performed. To obtain insight into the mechanisms underlying the effects of eNOS(-/-) on WM-damage, measurement of eNOS, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor TrkB in vivo and in vitro were also performed. No significant differences were detected in the infarction volume, myelin density in the ipsilateral striatal WM-bundles and myelin-based protein expression in the cerebral ischemic border between WT and eNOS(-/-) mice. However, eNOS(-/-) mice showed significantly: 1) decreased functional outcome, concurrent with decreases of total axon density and phosphorylated high-molecular weight neurofilament density in the ipsilateral striatal WM-bundles. Correlation analysis showed that axon density is significantly positive correlated with neurological functional outcome; 2) decreased numbers of oligodendrocytes / oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in the ipsilateral striatum; 3) decreased synaptophysin, BDNF and TrkB expression in the ischemic border compared with WT mice after stroke (n = 12/group, pBDNF/TrkB (n = 6/group, pstroke, and eNOS(-/-)-induced decreases in the BDNF/TrkB pathway may contribute to increased WM-damage, and thereby decrease functional outcome.

  2. Cell-specific expression and immunolocalization of nitric oxide synthase isoforms and the related nitric oxide/cyclic GMP signaling pathway in the ovaries of neonatal and immature rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei ZHANG; Quan-wei WEI; Zheng-chao WANG; Wei DING; Wei WANG; Fang-xiong SHI

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The present study is designed to investigate the cellular expressions and immunolocalizations of three different nitric oxide synthase(NOS)isoforms and the related nitric oxide(NO)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate(cGMP)signaling pathway in the ovaries of neonatal and immature rats.Methods: The ovaries were obtained from ICR(Institute for Cancer Research)female Sprague-Dawley rats at postnatal days 1,5,7,10,and 19.Then we carried out the histologic examination,immunohistochemistry,measurement of NOS activity,and modifications within the NO/cGMP pathway.Results: During postnatal days 1,5,7,10,and 19,all three isoforms of NOS were mainly localized to the oocytes and expressed as a gradual increase in granulosa cells and theca cells within the growing follicle.The ovarian total NOS activities and NO levels were increased at postnatal days 7 and 10 compared with other days.Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the locally produced NO and the NO/NOS signaling systems are involved in the follicular development to puberty.

  3. Involvement of nitric oxide pathways in short term modulation of tyrosine hydroxylase activity by endothelins 1 and 3 in the rat anterior hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgazo, Carolina; Perfume, Guadalupe; Legaz, Guillermina; di Nunzio, Andrea; Hope, Sandra I; Bianciotti, Liliana G; Vatta, Marcelo S

    2005-09-02

    The ability of endothelins 1 and 3 (ET-1 and ET-3) to reduce neuronal norepinephrine release through ETB receptor activation involving nitric oxide (NO) pathways in the rat anterior hypothalamus region (AHR) was previously reported. In the present work, we studied the effects of ET-1 and -3 on tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity and the possible involvement of NO pathways. Results showed that ET-1 and -3 (10 nM) diminished TH activity in AHR and this effect was blocked by a selective ETB receptor antagonist (100 nM BQ-788), but not by a ET(A) receptor antagonist (BQ-610). To confirm these results, 1 microM IRL-1620 (ET(B) agonist) reduced TH activity whereas 300 nM sarafotoxin S6b falled to modify it. N(omega)-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (10 microM), 7-nitroindazole (10 microM), 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-ona (10 microM), KT5823 (2 microM), inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase, neuronal nitric oxide synthase, NO-sensitive-guanylyl cyclase, and protein kinase G, respectively, did not modify the reduction of TH activity produced by ETs. In addition, both 100 microM sodium nitroprusside and 50 microM 8-bromoguanosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (NO donor and guanosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate analog, respectively) diminished TH activity. Present results showed that ET-1 and ET-3 diminished TH activity through the activation of ET(B) receptors involving the NO/guanosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate/protein kinase G pathway. Taken jointly present and previous results it can be concluded that both ETs play an important role as modulators of norepinephrine neurotransmission in the rat AHR.

  4. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induces microglial nitric oxide production and subsequent rat primary cortical neuron apoptosis through p38/JNK MAPK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanye; Chen, Gang; Zhao, Jianya; Nie, Xiaoke; Wan, Chunhua; Liu, Jiao; Duan, Zhiqing; Xu, Guangfei

    2013-10-04

    It has been widely accepted that microglia, which are the innate immune cells in the brain, upon activation can cause neuronal damage. In the present study, we investigated the role of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in regulating microglial nitric oxide production and its role in causing neuronal damage. The study revealed that TCDD stimulates the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) as well as the production of nitric oxide (NO) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Further, a rapid activation of p38 and JNK MAPKs was found in HAPI microglia following TCDD treatment. Blockage of p38 and JNK kinases with their specific inhibitors, SB202190 and SP600125, significantly reduced TCDD-induced iNOS expression and NO production. In addition, it was demonstrated through treating rat primary cortical neurons with media conditioned with TCDD treated microglia that microglial iNOS activation mediates neuronal apoptosis. Lastly, it was also found that p38 and JNK MAPK inhibitors could attenuate the apoptosis of rat cortical neurons upon exposure to medium conditioned by TCDD-treated HAPI microglial cells. Based on these observations, we highlight that the p38/JNK MAPK pathways play an important role in TCDD-induced iNOS activation in rat HAPI microglia and in the subsequent induction of apoptosis in primary cortical neurons.

  5. Growth hormone regulates intestinal ion transport through a modulation of the constitutive nitric oxide synthase-nitric oxide-cAMP pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roberto Berni Canani; Pla Cirillo; Giuseppe Mallardo; Vittoria Buccigrossi; Annalisa Passariello; Serena Ruotolo; Giulio De Marco; Francesco Porcaro; Alfredo Guarino

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Growth hormone (GH) directly interacts with the enterocyte stimulating ion absorption and reducing ion secretion induced by agonists of cAMP.Since nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the regulation of transepithelial ion transport and acts as a second messenger for GH hemodynamic effects, we tested the hypothesis that NO may be involved in the resulting effects of GH on intestinal ion transport.METHODS: Electrical parameters reflecting transepithelial ion transport were measured in Caco-2 cell monolayers mounted in Ussing chambers and exposed to GH and cholera toxin (CT) alone or in combination,in the presence or absence of the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor, Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME).Similar experiments were conducted to determine cAMP and nitrite/nitrate concentrations. NOS expression was assayed by Western blot analysis.RESULTS: L-NAME causes total abrogation of absorptive and anti-secretory effects by GH on intestinal ion transport. In addition, L-NAME was able to inhibit the GH-effects on intracellular cAMP concentration under basal conditions and in response to CT. GH induced a Ca2+-dependent increase of nitrites/nitrates production,indicating the involvement of the constitutive rather than the inducible NOS isoform, which was directly confirmed by Western blot analysis.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the GH effects on intestinal ion transport, either under basal conditions or in the presence of cAMP-stimulated ion secretion, are mediated at an intracellular level by the activity of cMOS.

  6. Role of iron in the nitric oxide-mediated fungicidal mechanism of IFN-gamma-activated murine macrophages against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis conidia Papel do ferro no mecanismo fungicida mediado pelo óxido n��trico de macrófagos murinos ativados com IFN-gama contra conídias do Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Gonzalez

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential growth element of virtually all microorganisms and its restriction is one of the mechanisms used by macrophages to control microbial multiplication. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, the agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, an important systemic mycosis in Latin America, is inhibited in its conidia-to-yeast conversion in the absence of iron. We studied the participation of iron in the nitric oxide (NO-mediated fungicidal mechanism against conidia. Peritoneal murine macrophages activated with 50U/mL of IFN-gamma or treated with 35 µM Deferoxamine (DEX and infected with P. brasiliensis conidia, were co-cultured and incubated for 96 h in the presence of different concentrations of holotransferrin (HOLO and FeS0(4. The supernatants were withdrawn in order to assess NO2 production by the Griess method. The monolayers were fixed, stained and observed microscopically. The percentage of the conidia-to-yeast transition was estimated by counting 200 intracellular propagules. IFN-gamma-activated or DEX-treated Mthetas presented marked inhibition of the conidia-to-yeast conversion (19 and 56%, respectively in comparison with non-activated or untreated Mthetas (80%. IFN-gamma-activated macrophages produced high NO levels in comparison with the controls. Additionally, when the activated or treated-macrophages were supplemented with iron donors (HOLO or FeSO4, the inhibitory action was reversed, although NO production remained intact. These results suggest that the NO-mediated fungicidal mechanism exerted by IFN-gamma-activated macrophages against P. brasiliensis conidia, is dependent of an iron interaction.O ferro é elemento essencial para o crescimento de microrganismos e sua limitação é um dos mecanismos usados por macrófagos para controlar a multiplicação microbiana. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, o agente da paracoccidioidomicose, uma das micoses sistêmicas mais importantes na América Latina, é inibido em sua conversão de con

  7. FACILITATION OF ESTROUS BEHAVIOR BY VAGINAL CERVICAL STIMULATION IN FEMALE RATS INVOLVES α1-ADRENERGIC RECEPTOR ACTIVATION OF THE NITRIC OXIDE PATHWAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Flores, Oscar; Beyer, Carlos; Lima-Hernández, Francisco Javier; Gómora-Arrati, Porfirio; Gómez-Camarillo, Madaí A.; Hoffman, Kurt; Etgen, Anne M.

    2007-01-01

    In estrogen-primed female rats, vaginal cervical stimulation (VCS) provided by male intromissions or by an experimenter enhances estrous behaviors exhibited by females during subsequent mating with a male. We tested the hypothesis that α1-adrenergic receptors, acting via the nitric oxide-cGMPprotein kinase G pathway, mediate VCS- induced facilitation of female reproductive behaviors. Ovariectomized, estradiol-primed rats received intracerebroventricular (icv) infusions of vehicle or pharmacological antagonists 15 or 60 min before VCS. Estrous behaviors (lordosis and proceptivity) in the presence of a male were recorded immediately (0 min), and 120 min following VCS. First we verified that VCS, but not manual flank stimulation alone, enhanced estrous behaviors when females received icv infusion of the vehicles used to administer drugs. Increased estrous behavior was apparent immediately following VCS and persisted for 120 min. We then infused prazosin, phenoxybenzamine (α1-adrenergic receptor antagonists), yohimbine, idaxozan (α2-adrenergic receptor antagonists), or propranolol (β–adrenergic receptor antagonist) 15 min prior to the application of VCS in females primed with 5 μg estradiol benzoate. Only α1-adrenergic antagonists inhibited VCS facilitation of estrous behavior, apparent 120 min after VCS. Finally, we administered specific inhibitors of soluble guanylyl cyclase, nitric oxide synthase or protein kinase G icv 15 or 60 min before VCS. All three agents significantly attenuated VCS facilitation of estrous behavior. These data support the hypothesis that endogenously released norepinephrine, acting via α1-adrenergic receptors, mediates the facilitation of lordosis by VCS, and are consistent with a mechanism involving α1-adrenergic activation of the nitric oxide/cGMP/protein kinase G pathway. PMID:17095102

  8. Antidepressants can treat inflammatory bowel disease through regulation of the nuclear factor-κB/nitric oxide pathway and inhibition of cytokine production:A hypothesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hamid; Reza; Rahimi; Mahdi; Shiri; Ali; Razmi

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a group of inflammatory disorders mainly affecting the colon and small intestine. The main types of IBD are Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). UC is restricted to the large intestine whereas CD can affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract. Treating this disorder depends on the form and level of severity. Common treatment involves an anti-inflammatory drug, such as mesalazine, and an immunosuppressant, such as prednisone. Several signaling pathways, including nuclear factor (NF)-κB and nitric oxide (NO), and genetic and environmental factors are believed to play an important role in IBD. Amitriptyline is a commonly used antidepressant with known anti-inflammatory activities. Amitriptyline also acts on the NF-κB/NO pathway or cytokine production. Therefore, we hypothesize that antidepressants like amitriptyline can be pioneered and considered effective as an innovative and effective therapeutic in the treatment and attenuation of development of IBD in adjusted doses.

  9. Commiphora molmol Modulates Glutamate-Nitric Oxide-cGMP and Nrf2/ARE/HO-1 Pathways and Attenuates Oxidative Stress and Hematological Alterations in Hyperammonemic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman M. Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperammonemia is a serious complication of liver disease and may lead to encephalopathy and death. This study investigated the effects of Commiphora molmol resin on oxidative stress, inflammation, and hematological alterations in ammonium chloride- (NH4Cl- induced hyperammonemic rats, with an emphasis on the glutamate-NO-cGMP and Nrf2/ARE/HO-1 signaling pathways. Rats received NH4Cl and C. molmol for 8 weeks. NH4Cl-induced rats showed significant increase in blood ammonia, liver function markers, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α. Concurrent supplementation of C. molmol significantly decreased circulating ammonia, liver function markers, and TNF-α in hyperammonemic rats. C. molmol suppressed lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide and enhanced the antioxidant defenses in the liver, kidney, and cerebrum of hyperammonemic rats. C. molmol significantly upregulated Nrf2 and HO-1 and decreased glutamine and nitric oxide synthase, soluble guanylate cyclase, and Na+/K+-ATPase expression in the cerebrum of NH4Cl-induced hyperammonemic rats. Hyperammonemia was also associated with hematological and coagulation system alterations. These alterations were reversed by C. molmol. Our findings demonstrated that C. molmol attenuates ammonia-induced liver injury, oxidative stress, inflammation, and hematological alterations. This study points to the modulatory effect of C. molmol on glutamate-NO-cGMP and Nrf2/ARE/HO-1 pathways in hyperammonemia. Therefore, C. molmol might be a promising protective agent against hyperammonemia.

  10. Commiphora molmol Modulates Glutamate-Nitric Oxide-cGMP and Nrf2/ARE/HO-1 Pathways and Attenuates Oxidative Stress and Hematological Alterations in Hyperammonemic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqahtani, Sultan; Othman, Sarah I.; Germoush, Mousa O.; Hussein, Omnia E.; Al-Basher, Gadh; Khim, Jong Seong; Al-Qaraawi, Maha A.; Al-Harbi, Hanan M.; Fadel, Abdulmannan; Allam, Ahmed A.

    2017-01-01

    Hyperammonemia is a serious complication of liver disease and may lead to encephalopathy and death. This study investigated the effects of Commiphora molmol resin on oxidative stress, inflammation, and hematological alterations in ammonium chloride- (NH4Cl-) induced hyperammonemic rats, with an emphasis on the glutamate-NO-cGMP and Nrf2/ARE/HO-1 signaling pathways. Rats received NH4Cl and C. molmol for 8 weeks. NH4Cl-induced rats showed significant increase in blood ammonia, liver function markers, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Concurrent supplementation of C. molmol significantly decreased circulating ammonia, liver function markers, and TNF-α in hyperammonemic rats. C. molmol suppressed lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide and enhanced the antioxidant defenses in the liver, kidney, and cerebrum of hyperammonemic rats. C. molmol significantly upregulated Nrf2 and HO-1 and decreased glutamine and nitric oxide synthase, soluble guanylate cyclase, and Na+/K+-ATPase expression in the cerebrum of NH4Cl-induced hyperammonemic rats. Hyperammonemia was also associated with hematological and coagulation system alterations. These alterations were reversed by C. molmol. Our findings demonstrated that C. molmol attenuates ammonia-induced liver injury, oxidative stress, inflammation, and hematological alterations. This study points to the modulatory effect of C. molmol on glutamate-NO-cGMP and Nrf2/ARE/HO-1 pathways in hyperammonemia. Therefore, C. molmol might be a promising protective agent against hyperammonemia. PMID:28744340

  11. Essential role of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways in protease activated receptor 2-mediated nitric-oxide production from rat primary astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gyu Hwan; Jeon, Se Jin; Ryu, Jae Ryun; Choi, Min Sik; Han, Seol-Heui; Yang, Sung-Il; Ryu, Jong Hoon; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Shin, Chan Young; Ko, Kwang Ho

    2009-09-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) play important roles in the regulation of brain function such as neuroinflammation by transmitting the signal from proteolytic enzymes such as thrombin and trypsin. We and others have reported that a member of the family, PAR-2 is activated by trypsin, whose involvement in the neurophysiological process is increasingly evident, and is involved in the neuroinflammatory processes including morphological changes of astrocytes. In this study, we investigated the role of PAR-2 in the production of nitric oxide (NO) in rat primary astrocytes. Treatment of PAR-2 agonist trypsin increased NO production in a dose-dependent manner, which was mediated by the induction of inducible nitric-oxide synthase. The trypsin-mediated production of NO was mimicked by PAR-2 agonist peptide and reduced by either pharmacological PAR-2 antagonist peptide or by siRNA-mediated inhibition of PAR-2 expression, which suggests the critical role of PAR-2 in this process. NO production by PAR-2 was mimicked by PMA, a PKC activator, and was attenuated by Go6976, a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor. PAR-2 stimulation activated three subtypes of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs): extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 MAPK. NO production by PAR-2 was blocked by inhibition of ERK, p38, and JNK pathways. PAR-2 stimulation also activated nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) DNA binding and transcriptional activity as well as IkappaBalpha phosphorylation. Inhibitors of NF-kappaB pathway inhibited PAR-2-mediated NO production. In addition, inhibitors of MAPK pathways prevented transcriptional activation of NF-kappaB reporter constructs. These results suggest that PAR-2 activation-mediated NO production in astrocytes is transduced by the activation of MAPKs followed by NF-kappaB pathways.

  12. Anti-hyperalgesic effect of systemic magnesium sulfate in carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain in rats: influence of the nitric oxide pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srebro, Dragana P; Vučković, Sonja; Vujović, Katarina Savić; Prostran, Milica

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether systemic magnesium sulfate (an antagonist at the glutamate subtype of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor) affects inflammatory pain, and whether the nitric oxide pathway is involved. Carrageenan (0.5%, 0.1 mL, intraplantar)-induced mechanical hyperalgesia was evaluated using the electronic von Frey test in male Wistar rats. Magnesium sulfate had no effect when injected locally into the inflamed rat paw. However, subcutaneous magnesium sulfate, at doses of 0.5, 5, 15 and 30 mg/kg, reduced the hyperalgesia by 44.4 ± 8.8, 68 ± 8.4, 24.6 ± 6.9 and 45.3 ± 6.7% respectively. N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) (3 and 5 mg/kg, intraperitoneal), a non-selective nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, significantly reduced the effects of magnesium sulfate. Also, L-arginine (0.4 mg/kg, subcutaneously) significantly reversed the effect of L-NAME in the magnesium sulfate-treated rats. A selective inhibitor of neuronal or inducible nitric oxide synthase, N-ω-Propyl-L-arginine hydrochloride (L-NPA) (0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) and S-methylisothiourea (SMT) (0.005, 0.01 and 0.015 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) reduced the effect of magnesium sulfate significantly only at the highest doses tested. When given alone, L-NAME (3 and 5 mg/kg) L-NPA (2 mg/kg) and SMT (0.015 mg/kg) did not have any influence on carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia. The present study revealed that magnesium sulfate is effective against inflammatory pain after systemic, but not after local peripheral administration, and activation of the nitric oxide pathway is probably involved in the anti-hyperalgesic effect of magnesium sulfate. Low doses of systemic magnesium sulfate given as a pretreatment or a treatment might have a beneficial effect in patients with inflammatory somatic pain.

  13. Systems Pharmacology and Rational Polypharmacy: Nitric Oxide−Cyclic GMP Signaling Pathway as an Illustrative Example and Derivation of the General Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmaroudi, Farshid S.; Handy, Diane E.; Liu, Yang-Yu; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Impaired nitric oxide (NO˙)-cyclic guanosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cGMP) signaling has been observed in many cardiovascular disorders, including heart failure and pulmonary arterial hypertension. There are several enzymatic determinants of cGMP levels in this pathway, including soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) itself, the NO˙-activated form of sGC, and phosphodiesterase(s) (PDE). Therapies for some of these disorders with PDE inhibitors have been successful at increasing cGMP levels in both cardiac and vascular tissues. However, at the systems level, it is not clear whether perturbation of PDE alone, under oxidative stress, is the best approach for increasing cGMP levels as compared with perturbation of other potential pathway targets, either alone or in combination. Here, we develop a model-based approach to perturbing this pathway, focusing on single reactions, pairs of reactions, or trios of reactions as targets, then monitoring the theoretical effects of these interventions on cGMP levels. Single perturbations of all reaction steps within this pathway demonstrated that three reaction steps, including the oxidation of sGC, NO˙ dissociation from sGC, and cGMP degradation by PDE, exerted a dominant influence on cGMP accumulation relative to other reaction steps. Furthermore, among all possible single, paired, and triple perturbations of this pathway, the combined perturbations of these three reaction steps had the greatest impact on cGMP accumulation. These computational findings were confirmed in cell-based experiments. We conclude that a combined perturbation of the oxidatively-impaired NO˙-cGMP signaling pathway is a better approach to the restoration of cGMP levels as compared with corresponding individual perturbations. This approach may also yield improved therapeutic responses in other complex pharmacologically amenable pathways. PMID:26985825

  14. Determination of nitric oxide mediating intracellular Ca2+ release on neurons based on confocal microscopy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liqin; Wang, Yuhua; He, Yipeng; Zeng, Yixiu; Zhang, Yanding; Xie, Shusen

    2014-09-01

    The gas NO is a ubiquitous intercellular messenger that modulates a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological functions. But few studies were made to study the role of NO in the Ca2+ release in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons by confocal microscopy. Thus the objective of this study was to assess if NO has a role in Ca2+ signaling in DRG neurons using confocal microscopy combined with special fluorescence probe Fluo-3/AM. A 100 μM concentration of the NO donors (Sodium Nitroprusside, Dihydrate, SNP) and NO synthase inhibitor (NG-Monomethyl-L-arginine, Monoacetate salt, L-NMMA) was used in the study. Results showed that the fluorescence intensity increased rapidly after injecting SNP, which indicated that SNP could enhance intracellular Ca2+ release. And the fluorescence intensity shrank gradually with time and kept at a low level for quite a long period after loading with L-NMMA which indicated that L-NMMA could block intracellular Ca2+ release. All these results demonstrated that NO was involved in the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ release in the DRG neurons.

  15. Novel approaches to improving endothelium-dependent nitric oxide-mediated vasodilatation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Ulf; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Rosalia; Dalsgaard, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    reacting with NO. Endothelial dysfunction is therapeutically reversible and physical exercise, calcium channel blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, and angiotensin receptor antagonists improve flow-evoked endothelium-dependent vasodilation in patients with hypertension and diabetes. We have...... channels and an influx of calcium play an important role in G-protein coupled receptor-evoked release of NO. Thus, all three approaches increase bioavailability of NO in the vascular wall, but it remains to be addressed whether these actions have any direct benefit at a clinical level....

  16. Nitric oxide mediated Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis and protective role of nanoconjugated vancomycin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Subhankari Prasad Chakraborty; Santanu Kar Mahapatra; Sumanta Kumar Sahu; Sourav Chattopadhyay; Panchanan Pramanik; Somenath Roy

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To test the survival ofStaphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) inside lymphocyte that contributes to the pathogenesis of infection and possible anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effect of nanoconjugated vancomycin againstin vivo S. aureus infection in a dose and duration dependent manner.Methods:5×106CFU/mL vancomycin-sensitive S. aureus(VSSA) and vancomycin-resistiveS. aureus (VRSA) were challenged in Swiss male mice for3 days,5 days, 10 days and15days, respectively. Bacteremia and inflammatory parameters were observed to evaluate the duration for development ofVSSA andVRSA infection.100mg/kg bw/day and500 mg/kg bw/day nanoconjugated vancomycin were administrated toVSSA andVRSA infected group for5days. Bacteremia, inflammatory parameters and oxidative stress related parameters were tested to observe the effective dose of nanoconjugated vancomycin againstVSSAandVRSA infection. Nanoconjugated vancomycin was treated at a dose of100 mg/kg bw/day and500 mg/kg bw/day, respectively, toVSSA andVRSA infected group for successive5 days,10 days and 15 days. Bacteremia, inflammatory parameters and oxidative stress related parameters were observed to assess the effective duration of nanoconjugated vancomycin againstVSSAand VRSA infection.Results: The result revealed thatin vivoVSSA andVRSA infection developed after 5 days of challenge by elevating theNO generation in lymphocyte and serum inflammatory markers. Administration with nanoconjugated vancomycin toVSSA andVRSA infected group at a dose of100 mg/kg bw/day and500 mg/kg bw/day, respectively, for successive10 days eliminated bacterimia, decreasedNO generation in lymphocyte, serum inflammatory markers and increased antioxidant enzyme status.Conclusions:These findings suggest,in vivochallenge ofVSSA andVRSA for5 days can produce the highest degree of damage in lymphocyte which can be ameliorated by treatment with nanoconjugated vancomycin for10 successive days.

  17. Infrared Imaging of Nitric Oxide-Mediated Blood Flow in Human Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbach, Alexander M.; Ackerman, Hans C.; Liu, Wei-Min; Meyer, Joseph M.; Littel, Patricia L.; Seamon, Catherine; Footman, Eleni; Chi, Amy; Zorca, Suzana; Krajewski, Megan L.; Cuttica, Michael J.; Machado, Roberto F.; Cannon, Richard O.; Kato, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular dysfunction is an important pathophysiologic manifestation of sickle cell disease (SCD), a condition that increases risk of pulmonary hypertension and stroke. We hypothesized that infrared (IR) imaging would detect changes in cutaneous blood flow reflective of vascular function. We performed IR imaging and conventional strain gauge plethysmography in twenty-five adults with SCD at baseline and during intra-arterial infusions of an endothelium-dependent vasodilator acetylcholine (ACh), an endothelium-independent vasodilator sodium nitroprusside (SNP), and a NOS inhibitor L-NMMA. Skin temperature measured by IR imaging increased in a dose-dependent manner to graded infusions of ACh (+1.1° C, p < 0.0001) and SNP (+0.9° C, p < 0.0001), and correlated with dose-dependent increases in forearm blood flow (ACh: +19.9 mL/min/100mL, p < 0.0001; rs = 0.57, p = 0.003; SNP: +8.6 mL/min/100mL, p < 0.0001; r = 0.70, p = 0.0002). Although IR measurement of skin temperature accurately reflected agonist-induced increases in blood flow, it was less sensitive to decreases in blood flow caused by NOS inhibition. Baseline forearm skin temperature measured by IR imaging correlated significantly with baseline forearm blood flow (31.8±0.2° C, 6.0±0.4 mL/min/100mL; r = 0.58, p = 0.003), and appeared to represent a novel biomarker of vascular function. It predicted a blunted blood flow response to SNP (r = −0.61, p = 0.002), and was independently associated with a marker of pulmonary artery pressure, as well as hemoglobin level, diastolic blood pressure, homocysteine, and cholesterol (R2 = 0.84, p < 0.0001 for the model). IR imaging of agonist-stimulated cutaneous blood flow represents a less cumbersome alternative to plethysmography methodology. Measurement of baseline skin temperature by IR imaging may be a useful new marker of vascular risk in adults with SCD. PMID:22784510

  18. The Development Of RRx-001, A Novel Nitric-Oxide-Mediated Epigenetically Active Anticancer Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Scicinski

    2015-08-01

    Conclusion: Early results in the ROCKET study suggest that RRx-001-mediated resensitization to previously refractory therapies may have a generalized effect, independent of KRAS or p53 status. These early results are intriguing, suggesting improved QOL and overall survival over currently approved therapy in the chemotherapy refractory colorectal cancer.

  19. Immune-relevant thrombocytes of common carp undergo parasite-induced nitric oxide-mediated apoptosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fink, I.R.; Ribeiro, C.M.S.; Forlenza, M.; Taverne-Thiele, J.J.; Rombout, J.H.W.M.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Wiegertjes, G.

    2015-01-01

    Common carp thrombocytes account for 30–40% of peripheral blood leukocytes and are abundant in the healthy animals' spleen, the thrombopoietic organ. We show that, ex vivo, thrombocytes from healthy carp express a large number of immune-relevant genes, among which several cytokines and Toll-like rec

  20. Differential Contribution of the Guanylyl Cyclase-Cyclic GMP-Protein Kinase G Pathway to the Proliferation of Neural Stem Cells Stimulated by Nitric Oxide

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    Bruno P. Carreira

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is an important inflammatory mediator involved in the initial boost in the proliferation of neural stem cells following brain injury. However, the mechanisms underlying the proliferative effect of NO are still unclear. The aim of this work was to investigate whether cyclic GMP (cGMP and the cGMP-dependent kinase (PKG are involved in the proliferative effect triggered by NO in neural stem cells. For this purpose, cultures of neural stem cells isolated from the mouse subventricular zone (SVZ were used. We observed that long-term exposure to the NO donor (24 h, NOC-18, increased the proliferation of SVZ cells in a cGMP-dependent manner, since the guanylate cyclase inhibitor, ODQ, prevented cell proliferation. Similarly to NOC-18, the cGMP analogue, 8-Br-cGMP, also increased cell proliferation. Interestingly, shorter exposures to NO (6 h increased cell proliferation in a cGMP-independent manner via the ERK/MAP kinase pathway. The selective inhibitor of PKG, KT5823, prevented the proliferative effect induced by NO at 24 h but not at 6 h. In conclusion, the proliferative effect of NO is initially mediated by the ERK/MAPK pathway, and at later stages by the GC/cGMP/PKG pathway. Thus, our work shows that NO induces neural stem cell proliferation by targeting these two pathways in a biphasic manner.

  1. The antinociceptive effects of JWH-015 in chronic inflammatory pain are produced by nitric oxide-cGMP-PKG-KATP pathway activation mediated by opioids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Negrete

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cannabinoid 2 receptor (CB2R agonists attenuate inflammatory pain but the precise mechanism implicated in these effects is not completely elucidated. We investigated if the peripheral nitric oxide-cGMP-protein kinase G (PKG-ATP-sensitive K(+ (KATP channels signaling pathway triggered by the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS1 and modulated by opioids, participates in the local antinociceptive effects produced by a CB2R agonist (JWH-015 during chronic inflammatory pain. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In wild type (WT and NOS1 knockout (NOS1-KO mice, at 10 days after the subplantar administration of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA, we evaluated the antiallodynic (von Frey filaments and antihyperalgesic (plantar test effects produced by the subplantar administration of JWH-015 and the reversion of their effects by the local co-administration with CB2R (AM630, peripheral opioid receptor (naloxone methiodide, NX-ME or CB1R (AM251 antagonists. Expression of CB2R and NOS1 as well as the antinociceptive effects produced by a high dose of JWH-015 combined with different doses of selective L-guanylate cyclase (ODQ or PKG (Rp-8-pCPT-cGMPs inhibitors or a KATP channel blocker (glibenclamide, were also assessed. Results show that the local administration of JWH-015 dose-dependently inhibited the mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity induced by CFA which effects were completely reversed by the local co-administration of AM630 or NX-ME, but not AM251. Inflammatory pain increased the paw expression of CB2R and the dorsal root ganglia transcription of NOS1. Moreover, the antinociceptive effects of JWH-015 were absent in NOS1-KO mice and diminished by their co-administration with ODQ, Rp-8-pCPT-cGMPs or glibenclamide. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate that the peripheral antinociceptive effects of JWH-015 during chronic inflammatory pain are mainly produced by the local activation of the nitric oxide-cGMP-PKG-KATP signaling pathway

  2. Activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) signaling pathway in 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Junkang; Duan, Zhiqing; Nie, Xiaoke; Xi, Hanqing; Li, Aihong; Guo, Aisong; Wu, Qiyun; Jiang, Shengyang; Zhao, Jianya; Chen, Gang

    2014-07-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has been reported to cause alterations in cognitive and motor behavior during both development and adulthood. In this study, the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) signaling pathway was investigated in differentiated pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells to better understand the mechanisms of TCDD-induced neurotoxicity. TCDD exposure induced a time- and dose-dependent increase in nNOS expression. High levels of nitric oxide (NO) production by nNOS activation induced mitochondrial cytochrome c (Cyt-c) release and down-regulation of Bcl-2. Additionally, TCDD increased the expression of active caspase-3 and significantly led to apoptosis in PC12 cells. However, these effects above could be effectively inhibited by the addition of 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), a highly selective nNOS inhibitor. Moreover, in the brain cortex of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, nNOS was also found to have certain relationship with TCDD-induced neuronal apoptosis. Together, our findings establish a role for nNOS as an enhancer of TCDD-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells.

  3. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) drives mTOR pathway activation and proliferation of human melanoma by reversible nitrosylation of TSC2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Rivera, Esther; Jayaraman, Padmini; Parikh, Falguni; Davies, Michael A.; Ekmekcioglu, Suhendan; Izadmehr, Sudeh; Milton, Denái R.; Chipuk, Jerry E.; Grimm, Elizabeth A.; Estrada, Yeriel; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio; Sikora, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the cancers of fastest-rising incidence in the world. iNOS is overexpressed in melanoma and other cancers, and previous data suggest that iNOS and nitric oxide (NO) drive survival and proliferation of human melanoma cells. However, specific mechanisms through which this occurs are poorly defined. One candidate is the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, which plays a major role in proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis of melanoma and other cancers. We used the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay to test the hypothesis that melanoma growth is regulated by iNOS-dependent mTOR pathway activation. Both pharmacologic inhibition and siRNA-mediated gene silencing of iNOS suppressed melanoma proliferation and in vivo growth on the CAM in human melanoma models. This was associated with strong downregulation of mTOR pathway activation by Western blot analysis of p-mTOR, p-P70S6K, p-S6RP, and p-4EBP1. iNOS expression and NO were associated with reversible nitrosylation of TSC2, and inhibited dimerization of TSC2 with its inhibitory partner TSC1, enhancing GTPase activity of its target Rheb, a critical activator of mTOR signaling. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor specimens from stage III melanoma patients showed a significant correlation between iNOS expression levels and expression of mTOR pathway members. Exogenously-supplied NO was also sufficient to reverse mTOR pathway inhibition by the B-Raf inhibitor Vemurafenib. In summary, covalent modification of TSC2 by iNOS-derived NO is associated with impaired TSC2/TSC1 dimerization, mTOR pathway activation, and proliferation of human melanoma. This model is consistent with the known association of iNOS overexpression and poor prognosis in melanoma and other cancers. PMID:24398473

  4. Cuminum cyminum, a dietary spice, attenuates hypertension via endothelial nitric oxide synthase and NO pathway in renovascular hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaivani, Periyathambi; Saranya, Ramesh Babu; Ramakrishnan, Ganapathy; Ranju, Vijayan; Sathiya, Sekar; Gayathri, Veeraraghavan; Thiyagarajan, Lakshmi Kantham; Venkhatesh, Jayakothanda Ramaswamy; Babu, Chidambaram Saravana; Thanikachalam, Sadagopan

    2013-01-01

    Cuminum cyminum (CC) is a commonly used spice in South Indian foods. It has been traditionally used for the treatment and management of sleep disorders, indigestion, and hypertension. The present study was carried out to scientifically evaluate the anti-hypertensive potential of standardized aqueous extract of CC seeds and its role in arterial endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression, inflammation, and oxidative stress in renal hypertensive rats. Renal hypertension was induced by the two-kidney one-clip (2K/1C) method in rats. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), plasma nitrate/nitrite, carotid-eNOS, renal-TNF-α, IL-6, Bax, Bcl-2, thioredoxin 1 (TRX1), and thioredoxin reductase 1 (TRXR1) mRNA expressions were studied to demonstrate the anti-hypertensive action of CC. Cuminum cyminum was administered orally (200 mg/kg b.wt) for a period of 9 weeks; it improved plasma nitric oxide and decreased the systolic blood pressure in hypertensive rats. It also up-regulated the gene expression of eNOS, Bcl-2, TRX1, and TRXR1; and down-regulated Bax, TNF-α, and IL-6. These data reveal that CC seeds augment endothelial functions and ameliorate inflammatory and oxidative stress in hypertensive rats. The present report is the first of its kind to demonstrate the mechanism of anti-hypertensive action of CC seeds in an animal model of renovascular hypertension.

  5. Increased contribution of L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway in aorta of mice lacking the gene for vimentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Henrion, D; Ebrahimian, T; Benessiano, J; Colucci-Guyon, E; Langa, F; Lévy, B I; Boulanger, C M

    2001-10-01

    Experiments were designed to investigate endothelial function in the aorta of mice lacking the gene for the cytoskeleton protein vimentin (vim -/- ). Rings with and without endothelium from wild-type (vim +/+ ), heterozygous (vim +/- ), and homozygous (vim -/- ) mice were suspended in organ chambers to record of changes in isometric tension. During phenylephrine contraction, acetylcholine evoked comparable endothelium-dependent relaxations in the three groups. In the presence of Nomega-nitro-L-arginine, acetylcholine caused endothelium-dependent contractions, which were greater in vim -/- than in vim +/+ and vim +/- aortas. Indomethacin did not affect relaxation to acetylcholine in vim +/+ or in vim +/-, but it significantly increased the maximal response in vim -/- (67 +/- 7 vs. 102 +/- 4%). Response to acetylcholine in vim -/- aortas was not affected by cyclooxygenase type 2 inhibitor NS-398, the thromboxane receptor antagonist SQ-29,548, or superoxide dismutase. Relaxations to sodium nitroprusside were not different between vim +/+ and vim -/- mice and were not affected by cyclooxygenase inhibition. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels, which were increased to a comparable level by acetylcholine in vim +/+ and vim -/-, were augmented by indomethacin in vim -/- aortas but not in vim +/+ aortas. Expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase was not different between vim +/+ and vim -/- preparations. These results suggest that despite comparable endothelium-dependent responses to acetylcholine, endothelial cells from vim -/- mice release a cyclooxygenase product that compensates the augmented contribution of nitric oxide.

  6. Functional inhibition of urea transporter UT-B enhances endothelial-dependent vasodilatation and lowers blood pressure via L-arginine-endothelial nitric oxide synthase-nitric oxide pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Lau, Chi-Wai; Jia, Yingli; Li, Yingjie; Wang, Weiling; Ran, Jianhua; Li, Fei; Huang, Yu; Zhou, Hong; Yang, Baoxue

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian urea transporters (UTs), UT-A and UT-B, are best known for their role in urine concentration. UT-B is especially distributed in multiple extrarenal tissues with abundant expression in vascular endothelium, but little is known about its role in vascular function. The present study investigated the physiological significance of UT-B in regulating vasorelaxations and blood pressure. UT-B deletion in mice or treatment with UT-B inhibitor PU-14 in Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKYs) and spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs) reduced blood pressure. Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation was significantly augmented in aortas from UT-B null mice. PU-14 concentration-dependently produced endothelium-dependent relaxations in thoracic aortas and mesenteric arteries from both mice and rats and the relaxations were abolished by Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Both expression and phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were up-regulated and expression of arginase I was down-regulated when UT-B was inhibited both in vivo and in vitro. PU-14 induced endothelium-dependent relaxations to a similar degree in aortas from 12 weeks old SHRs or WKYs. In summary, here we report for the first time that inhibition of UT-B plays an important role in regulating vasorelaxations and blood pressure via up-regulation of L-arginine-eNOS-NO pathway, and it may become another potential therapeutic target for the treatment of hypertension. PMID:26739766

  7. Functional inhibition of urea transporter UT-B enhances endothelial-dependent vasodilatation and lowers blood pressure via L-arginine-endothelial nitric oxide synthase-nitric oxide pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Lau, Chi-Wai; Jia, Yingli; Li, Yingjie; Wang, Weiling; Ran, Jianhua; Li, Fei; Huang, Yu; Zhou, Hong; Yang, Baoxue

    2016-01-07

    Mammalian urea transporters (UTs), UT-A and UT-B, are best known for their role in urine concentration. UT-B is especially distributed in multiple extrarenal tissues with abundant expression in vascular endothelium, but little is known about its role in vascular function. The present study investigated the physiological significance of UT-B in regulating vasorelaxations and blood pressure. UT-B deletion in mice or treatment with UT-B inhibitor PU-14 in Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKYs) and spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs) reduced blood pressure. Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation was significantly augmented in aortas from UT-B null mice. PU-14 concentration-dependently produced endothelium-dependent relaxations in thoracic aortas and mesenteric arteries from both mice and rats and the relaxations were abolished by N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Both expression and phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were up-regulated and expression of arginase I was down-regulated when UT-B was inhibited both in vivo and in vitro. PU-14 induced endothelium-dependent relaxations to a similar degree in aortas from 12 weeks old SHRs or WKYs. In summary, here we report for the first time that inhibition of UT-B plays an important role in regulating vasorelaxations and blood pressure via up-regulation of L-arginine-eNOS-NO pathway, and it may become another potential therapeutic target for the treatment of hypertension.

  8. Hydrogen sulfide defends against the cardiovascular risk of Nw-nitro-L-argininemethyl ester-induced hypertension in rats via the nitric oxide/endothelial nitric oxide synthase pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Wenqiang; Liu Shangyu; Dai Jing; Yang Tao; Jiang Xiangming; Duan Xiaocui; Wu Yuming

    2014-01-01

    Background Dyslipidemia caused by liver injury is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular complications.Previous studies have shown that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) protects against multiple cardiovascular disease states in a similar manner as nitric oxide (NO),and NO/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) pathway is the key route of NO production.The purpose of this study was to investigate whether H2S can ameliorate the high blood pressure and plasma lipid profile in Nw-nitro-L-argininemethyl ester (L-NAME)-induced hypertensive rats by NO/eNOS pathway.Methods Thirty-six 4-week old Sprague-Dawley (SD) male rats were randomly assigned to 6 groups (n=6):control group,L-NAME group,control + glibenclamide group,control + NaHS group,L-NAME + NaHS group,and L-NAME + NaHS + glibenclamide group.Measurements were made of plasma triglycerides (TG),low-density lipoprotein (LDL),high-density lipoprotein (HDL),total cholesterol (CHO),glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (ALT) levels after 5 weeks.Then measurements of NO level and proteins expression of eNOS,P-eNOS,AKT,P-AKT were made in liver tissue.Results After 5 weeks of L-NAME treatment,the blood pressure,plasma TG ((1.22±0.12) mmol/L in L-NAME group vs.(0.68±0.09) mmol/L in control group; P <0.05) and LDL ((0.54±0.04) mmol/L in L-NAME group vs.(0.28±0.02) mmol/L in control group; P <0.05) concentration were significantly increased,and the plasma HDL ((0.26±0.02) mmol/L in L-NAME group vs.(0.69±0.07) mmol/L in control group; P <0.05) concentration significantly decreased.Meanwhile the rats treated with L-NAME exhibit dysfunctional eNOS,diminished NO levels ((1.36±0.09) mmol/g protein in L-NAME group vs.(2.34±0.06) mmol/g protein in control group; P <0.05) and pathological changes of the liver.H2S therapy can markedly decrease the blood pressure ((37.25±4.46) mmHg at the fifth week; P <0.05),and ameliorate the plasma TG ((0.59±0.06) mmHg),LDL ((0.32±0.04) mmHg),and HDL ((0.46±0.03) mmHg) concentration in L

  9. The effects of nitric oxide-cGMP pathway stimulation on dopamine in the medial preoptic area and copulation in DHT-treated castrated male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Satoru M; Wersinger, Scott R; Hull, Elaine M

    2007-08-01

    Dopamine (DA) in the medial preoptic area (MPOA) provides important facilitative influence on male rat copulation. We have shown that the nitric oxide-cGMP (NO-cGMP) pathway modulates MPOA DA levels and copulation. We have also shown that systemic estradiol (E(2)) maintains neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) immunoreactivity in the MPOA of castrates, as well as relatively normal DA levels. This effect of E(2) on nNOS probably accounts for at least some of the previously demonstrated behavioral facilitation by intra-MPOA E(2) administration in castrates. Therefore, we hypothesized that stimulation of the MPOA NO-cGMP pathway in dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-treated castrates should restore DA levels and copulatory behaviors. Reverse-dialysis of a NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), increased extracellular DA in the MPOA of DHT-treated castrates and restored the ability to copulate to ejaculation in half of the animals. A cGMP analog, 8-Br-cGMP, also increased extracellular DA, though not as robustly, but did not restore copulatory ability. The effectiveness of the NO donor in restoring copulation and MPOA DA levels is consistent with our hypothesis. However, the lack of behavioral effects of 8-Br-cGMP, despite its increase in MPOA DA, suggests that NO may have additional mediators in the MPOA in the regulation of copulation. Furthermore, the suboptimal copulation seen in the NO donor-treated animals suggests the importance of extra-MPOA systems in the regulation of copulation.

  10. Inhibition of the NMDA receptor/Nitric Oxide pathway in the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray causes anxiolytic-like effects in rats submitted to the Vogel conflict test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guimarães Francisco S

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies had demonstrated the involvement of the dorsolateral portion of periaqueductal grey matter (dlPAG in defensive responses. This region contains a significant number of neurons containing the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS and previous studies showed that non-selective NOS inhibition or glutamate NMDA-receptor antagonism in the dlPAG caused anxiolytic-like effects in the elevated plus maze. Methods In the present study we verified if the NMDA/NO pathway in the dlPAG would also involve in the behavioral suppression observed in rats submitted to the Vogel conflict test. In addition, the involvement of this pathway was investigated by using a selective nNOS inhibitor, Nω-propyl-L-arginine (N-Propyl, 0.08 nmol/200 nL, a NO scavenger, carboxy-PTIO (c-PTIO, 2 nmol/200 nL and a specific NMDA receptor antagonist, LY235959 (4 nmol/200 nL. Results Intra-dlPAG microinjection of these drugs increased the number of punished licks without changing the number of unpunished licks or nociceptive threshold, as measure by the tail flick test. Conclusion The results indicate that activation of NMDA receptors and increased production of NO in the dlPAG are involved in the anxiety behavior displayed by rats in the VCT.

  11. Antidepressant effect of pramipexole in mice forced swimming test: A cross talk between dopamine receptor and NMDA/nitric oxide/cGMP pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Imran Khan, Muhammad; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2016-07-01

    Pramipexole is a dopamine D2 receptor agonist indicated for treating Parkinson disorder. This study was aimed to investigate the effect of pramipexole in forced swimming test (FST) in mice and the possible involvement of activation of D2 receptors and inhibition of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO-cGMP) on this effect. Intraperitoneal administration of pramipexole (1-3mg/kg) reduced the immobility time in the FST similar to fluoxetine (20mg/kg, i.p.). This effect of pramipexole (1mg/kg, i.p.) was ceased when mice were pretreated with haloperidol (0.15mg/kg, i.p,) and sulpiride (5mg/kg, i.p) as D2 receptor antagonists, NMDA (75mg/kg,i.p.), l-arginine (750mg/kg, i.p., a substrate for nitric oxide synthase) or sildenafil (5mg/kg, i.p., a phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor). The administration of MK-801 (0.05mg/kg, i.p., a NMDA receptor antagonist) l-NG-Nitro arginine methyl ester (l-NAME, 10mg/kg, i.p., a non-specific nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor), 7-nitroindazole (30mg/kg, i.p., a neuronal NOS inhibitor) and methylene blue (10mg/kg, i.p.), an inhibitor of both NOS and soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) in combination with the sub-effective dose of pramipexole (0.3mg/kg, i.p.) reduced the immobility. Altogether, our data suggest that the antidepressant-like effect of pramipexole is dependent on the activation of D2 receptor and inhibition of either NMDA receptors and/or NO-cGMP synthesis. These results contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms underlying the antidepressant-like effect of pramipexole and reinforce the role of D2 receptors, NMDA receptors and l-arginine-NO-GMP pathway in the antidepressant mechanism of this agent.

  12. Leptin protection of salivary gland acinar cells against ethanol cytotoxicity involves Src kinase-mediated parallel activation of prostaglandin and constitutive nitric oxide synthase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomiany, B L; Slomiany, A

    2008-04-01

    Leptin, a pleiotropic cytokine secreted by adipocytes but also identified in salivary glands and saliva, is recognized as an important element of oral mucosal defense. Here, we report that in sublingual salivary glands leptin protects the acinar cells of against ethanol cytotoxicity. We show that ethanol- induced cytotoxicity, characterized by a marked drop in the acinar cell capacity for NO production, arachidonic acid release and prostaglandin generation, was subject to suppression by leptin. The loss in countering capacity of leptin on the ethanol-induced cytotoxicity was attained with cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin and nitric oxide synthase (cNOS) inhibitor, L-NAME, as well as PP2, an inhibitor of Src kinase. Indomethacin, while not affecting leptin-induced arachidonic acid release, caused the inhibition in PGE2 generation, pretreatment with L-NAME led to the inhibition in NO production, whereas PP2 exerted the inhibitory effect on leptin-induced changes in NO, arachidonic acid, and PGE2. The leptin-induced changes in arachidonic acid release and PGE2 generation were blocked by ERK inhibitor, PD98059, but not by PI3K inhibitor, wortmannin. Further, leptin suppression of ethanol cytotoxicity was reflected in the increased Akt and cNOS phosphorylation that was sensitive to PP2. Moreover, the stimulatory effect of leptin on the acinar cell cNOS activity was inhibited not only by PP2, but also by Akt inhibitor, SH-5, while wortmannin had no effect. Our findings demonstrate that leptin protection of salivary gland acinar cells against ethanol cytotoxicity involves Src kinase-mediated parallel activation of MAPK/ERK and Akt that result in up-regulation of the respective prostaglandin and nitric oxide synthase pathways.

  13. Nitric oxide enhances increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) and promotes nicotine-triggered MAPK pathway in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajiwara, Aya; Tsuchiya, Yukihiro; Takata, Tsuyoshi; Nyunoya, Mayumi; Nozaki, Naohito; Ihara, Hideshi; Watanabe, Yasuo

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the roles of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinases (CaMKs), and protein kinase C (PKC) in nicotine-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. Treatment with nicotine stimulated ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation in the PC12 cells expressing nNOS (NPC12 cells) as compared with that in control PC12 cells. An inhibitor of L-type voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) channel suppressed the nicotine-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. The inhibition of CaMK-kinase, the upstream activator of CaMKI and CaMKIV, did not inhibit the enhanced their phosphorylation. ERK1/2 phosphorylation was attenuated by inhibitors of p38 MAPK, PKC, and MAPK-kinase 1/2, indicating the involvement of these protein kinases upstream of ERK1/2. Furthermore, we found that nNOS expression enhances the nicotine-induced increase in the intracellular concentration of Ca(2+), using the Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent probe Fura2. These data suggest that NO promotes nicotine-triggered Ca(2+) transient in PC12 cells to activate possibly CaMKII, leading to sequential phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2.

  14. Genome-scale transcriptome analysis in response to nitric oxide in birch cells: implications of the triterpene biosynthetic pathway.

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    Fansuo Zeng

    Full Text Available Evidence supporting nitric oxide (NO as a mediator of plant biochemistry continues to grow, but its functions at the molecular level remains poorly understood and, in some cases, controversial. To study the role of NO at the transcriptional level in Betula platyphylla cells, we conducted a genome-scale transcriptome analysis of these cells. The transcriptome of untreated birch cells and those treated by sodium nitroprusside (SNP were analyzed using the Solexa sequencing. Data were collected by sequencing cDNA libraries of birch cells, which had a long period to adapt to the suspension culture conditions before SNP-treated cells and untreated cells were sampled. Among the 34,100 UniGenes detected, BLASTX search revealed that 20,631 genes showed significant (E-values≤10-5 sequence similarity with proteins from the NR-database. Numerous expressed sequence tags (i.e., 1374 were identified as differentially expressed between the 12 h SNP-treated cells and control cells samples: 403 up-regulated and 971 down-regulated. From this, we specifically examined a core set of NO-related transcripts. The altered expression levels of several transcripts, as determined by transcriptome analysis, was confirmed by qRT-PCR. The results of transcriptome analysis, gene expression quantification, the content of triterpenoid and activities of defensive enzymes elucidated NO has a significant effect on many processes including triterpenoid production, carbohydrate metabolism and cell wall biosynthesis.

  15. The poly-γ-d-glutamic acid capsule surrogate of the Bacillus anthracis capsule induces nitric oxide production via the platelet activating factor receptor signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae-Ri; Jeon, Jun Ho; Park, Ok-Kyu; Chun, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Jungchan; Rhie, Gi-Eun

    2015-12-01

    The poly-γ-d-glutamic acid (PGA) capsule, a major virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis, confers protection of the bacillus from phagocytosis and allows its unimpeded growth in the host. PGA capsules released from B. anthracis are associated with lethal toxin in the blood of experimentally infected animals and enhance the cytotoxic effect of lethal toxin on macrophages. In addition, PGA capsule itself activates macrophages and dendritic cells to produce proinflammatory cytokine such as IL-1β, indicating multiple roles of PGA capsule in anthrax pathogenesis. Here we report that PGA capsule of Bacillus licheniformis, a surrogate of B. anthracis capsule, induces production of nitric oxide (NO) in RAW264.7 cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages. NO production was induced by PGA in a dose-dependent manner and was markedly reduced by inhibitors of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), suggesting iNOS-dependent production of NO. Induction of NO production by PGA was not observed in macrophages from TLR2-deficient mice and was also substantially inhibited in RAW264.7 cells by pretreatment of TLR2 blocking antibody. Subsequently, the downstream signaling events such as ERK, JNK and p38 of MAPK pathways as well as NF-κB activation were required for PGA-induced NO production. In addition, the induced NO production was significantly suppressed by treatment with antagonists of platelet activating factor receptor (PAFR) or PAFR siRNA, and mediated through PAFR/Jak2/STAT-1 signaling pathway. These findings suggest that PGA capsule induces NO production in macrophages by triggering both TLR2 and PAFR signaling pathways which lead to activation of NF-kB and STAT-1, respectively.

  16. The nitric oxide-cyclic GMP pathway regulates FoxO and alters dopaminergic neuron survival in Drosophila.

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    Tomoko Kanao

    Full Text Available Activation of the forkhead box transcription factor FoxO is suggested to be involved in dopaminergic (DA neurodegeneration in a Drosophila model of Parkinson's disease (PD, in which a PD gene product LRRK2 activates FoxO through phosphorylation. In the current study that combines Drosophila genetics and biochemical analysis, we show that cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP-dependent kinase II (cGKII also phosphorylates FoxO at the same residue as LRRK2, and Drosophila orthologues of cGKII and LRRK2, DG2/For and dLRRK, respectively, enhance the neurotoxic activity of FoxO in an additive manner. Biochemical assays using mammalian cGKII and FoxO1 reveal that cGKII enhances the transcriptional activity of FoxO1 through phosphorylation of the FoxO1 S319 site in the same manner as LRRK2. A Drosophila FoxO mutant resistant to phosphorylation by DG2 and dLRRK (dFoxO S259A corresponding to human FoxO1 S319A suppressed the neurotoxicity and improved motor dysfunction caused by co-expression of FoxO and DG2. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS and soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC also increased FoxO's activity, whereas the administration of a NOS inhibitor L-NAME suppressed the loss of DA neurons in aged flies co-expressing FoxO and DG2. These results strongly suggest that the NO-FoxO axis contributes to DA neurodegeneration in LRRK2-linked PD.

  17. Nitric oxide-sensitive guanylyl cyclase is differentially regulated by nuclear and non-nuclear estrogen pathways in anterior pituitary gland.

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    Jimena P Cabilla

    Full Text Available 17β-estradiol (E2 regulates hormonal release as well as proliferation and cell death in the pituitary. The main nitric oxide receptor, nitric oxide sensitive- or soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC, is a heterodimer composed of two subunits, α and β, that catalyses cGMP formation. α1β1 is the most abundant and widely expressed heterodimer, showing the greater activity. Previously we have shown that E2 decreased sGC activity but exerts opposite effects on sGC subunits increasing α1 and decreasing β1 mRNA and protein levels. In the present work we investigate the mechanisms by which E2 differentially regulates sGC subunits' expression on rat anterior pituitary gland. Experiments were performed on primary cultures of anterior pituitary cells from adult female Wistar rats at random stages of estrous cycle. After 6 h of E2 treatment, α1 mRNA and protein expression is increased while β1 levels are down-regulated. E2 effects on sGC expression are partially dependent on de novo transcription while de novo translation is fully required. E2 treatment decreased HuR mRNA stabilization factor and increased AUF1 p37 mRNA destabilization factor. E2-elicited β1 mRNA decrease correlates with a mRNA destabilization environment in the anterior pituitary gland. On the other hand, after 6 h of treatment, E2-BSA (1 nM and E2-dendrimer conjugate (EDC, 1 nM were unable to modify α1 or β1 mRNA levels, showing that nuclear receptor is involved in E2 actions. However, at earlier times (3 h, 1 nM EDC causes a transient decrease of α1 in a PI3k-dependent fashion. Our results show for the first time that E2 is able to exert opposite actions in the anterior pituitary gland, depending on the activation of classical or non-classical pathways. Thus, E2 can also modify sGC expression through membrane-initiated signals bringing to light a new point of regulation in NO/sGC pathway.

  18. Exercise aggravates cardiovascular risks and mortality in rats with disrupted nitric oxide pathway and treated with recombinant human erythropoietin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meziri, Fayçal; Binda, Delphine; Touati, Sabeur; Pellegrin, Maxime; Berthelot, Alain; Touyz, Rhian M; Laurant, Pascal

    2011-08-01

    Chronic administration of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) can generate serious cardiovascular side effects such as arterial hypertension (HTA) in clinical and sport fields. It is hypothesized that nitric oxide (NO) can protect from noxious cardiovascular effects induced by chronic administration of rHuEPO. On this base, we studied the cardiovascular effects of chronic administration of rHuEPO in exercise-trained rats treated with an inhibitor of NO synthesis (L-NAME). Rats were treated or not with rHuEPO and/or L-NAME during 6 weeks. During the same period, rats were subjected to treadmill exercise. The blood pressure was measured weekly. Endothelial function of isolated aorta and small mesenteric arteries were studied and the morphology of the latter was investigated. L-NAME induced hypertension (197 ± 6 mmHg, at the end of the protocol). Exercise prevented the rise in blood pressure induced by L-NAME (170 ± 5 mmHg). However, exercise-trained rats treated with both rHuEPO and L-NAME developed severe hypertension (228 ± 9 mmHg). Furthermore, in these exercise-trained rats treated with rHuEPO/L-NAME, the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was markedly impaired in isolated aorta (60% of maximal relaxation) and small mesenteric arteries (53%). L-NAME hypertension induced an internal remodeling of small mesenteric arteries that was not modified by exercise, rHuEPO or both. Vascular ET-1 production was not increased in rHuEPO/L-NAME/training hypertensive rats. Furthermore, we observed that rHuEPO/L-NAME/training hypertensive rats died during the exercise or the recovery period (mortality 51%). Our findings suggest that the use of rHuEPO in sport, in order to improve physical performance, represents a high and fatal risk factor, especially with pre-existing cardiovascular risk.

  19. Nitric oxide and oxygen radicals induced apoptosis via bcl-2 and p53 pathway in hypoxia-reoxygenated cardiomyocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN; Jiangang; (沈剑刚); QIU; Xingshen; (丘幸生); JIANG; Bo; (姜; 泊); ZHANG; Deliang; (张德良); XIN; Wenjuan; (忻文娟); Peter; C.W.; Fung; ZHAO; Baolu; (赵保路)

    2003-01-01

    Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were subjected to 24 h of hypoxia 95%N2/5%CO2 and 24 h of hypoxia plus 4 h of reoxygenation 95%O2/5%CO2. 24 h of hypoxia increased the levels of NO, TBARS and LDH. 24 h of hypoxia plus 4 h of reoxygenation decreased the levels of NO, but further increased TBARS and LDH. The hypoxia up-regulated the expression of bcl-2, p53 and p21/waf1/cip1 but the reoxygenation down-regulated the expression of bcl-2, and further up-regulated p53 and p21/waf1/cip1. The hypoxia increased cell apoptosis and reoxygenation further increased both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. NO, TBARS, DNA fragmentation and cell apoptosis were enhanced by SNP and inhibited by L-NAME respectively. In addition, SOD/catalase down-regulated the expression of p53, p21/wafl/cipl and TBARS but up-regulated bcl-2 and increased indirectly the level of NO, and inhibited DNA fragmentation. The results suggest that hypoxia-induced cell death is associated with the activation of NO, bcl-2 and p53 pathway, while hypoxia-reoxygenation induced cell death via the generation of reactive oxygen species and activation of p53 pathway. The present study clarified that NO may be an initiative signal to apoptotic cell death and the activation of bcl-2, p53 and p21/waf1/cip1 pathway in hypoxic and hypoxia-reoxygenated cardiomyocytes.

  20. [Nitric oxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira, I

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide was identified as the relaxing factor derived from the endothelium in 1987. Nitric oxide synthesis allows the vascular system to maintain a state of vasodilation, thereby regulating arterial pressure. Nitric oxide is also found in platelets, where it inhibits adhesion and aggregation; in the immune system, where it is responsible for the cytotoxic action of macrophages; and in the nervous system, where it acts as neurotransmitter. A deficit in endogenous synthesis of nitric oxide contributes to such conditions as essential arterial hypertension, pulmonary hypertension and heart disease. An excess of nitrous oxide induced by endotoxins and cytokinins, meanwhile, is believed to be responsible for hypotension in septic shock and for hyperdynamic circulatory state in cirrhosis of the liver. Nitric oxide has also been implicated in the rejection of transplanted organs and in cell damage after reperfusion. Inhaled nitrous oxide gas reduces pulmonary hypertension without triggering systemic hypotension in both experimental and clinical conditions. It also produces selective vasodilation when used to ventilate specific pulmonary areas, thereby improving the ventilation/perfusion ratio and, hence, oxygenation. Nitric oxide inhalation is effective in pulmonary hypertension-coincident with chronic obstructive lung disease, in persistent neonatal pulmonary hypertension and in pulmonary hypertension with congenital or acquired heart disease. Likewise, it reduces intrapulmonary shunt in acute respiratory failure and improves gas exchange. Under experimental conditions nitric oxide acts as a bronchodilator, although it seems to be less effective for this purpose in clinical use.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Dimethylarginine Dimethylaminohydrolase/Nitric Oxide Synthase Pathway in Liver and Kidney: Protective Effect of Cyanidin 3-O-β-D-Glucoside on Ochratoxin-A Toxicity

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    Rosaria Acquaviva

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of long-term cyanidin 3-O-β-D-glucoside (C3G and/or Ochratoxin A (OTA-exposure on dimethylarginine dimethylamino hydrolase/nitric oxide synthase (DDAH/NOS pathway in rats. The experiments were performed in rats supplemented with C3G (1 g/kg feed, OTA (200 ppb, and OTA + C3G. After 4 weeks of daily treatment, liver and kidneys were processed for eNOS, iNOS and DDAH-1 Western blotting, nitrite levels evaluation and DDAH activity determination. Results show that OTA is able to induce iNOS both in kidney and liver, whereas OTA is able to induce eNOS and DDAH-1 overexpression and DDAH activation only in kidney, resulting in increased nitrite levels. In kidney of OTA + C3G fed rats, iNOS, eNOS and DDAH-1 expression were less pronounced compared with those observed in the OTA-treated group. Coherent with the decreased iNOS, eNOS and DDAH-1 expression a decrease in nitrite levels and DDAH activity was observed in the OTA + C3G group. Results demonstrate that C3G is able to counteract the deleterious effects of chronic consumption of OTA and also suggest a possible involvement of iNOS-eNOS-DDAH impairment in OTA nephrocarcinogenity.

  2. Matrine improved the function of heart failure in rats via inhibiting apoptosis and blocking β3‑adrenoreceptor/endothelial nitric oxide synthase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiangbo; Yang, Shusen; Wang, Xu; Gan, Runtao

    2014-12-01

    Matrine, an alkaloid isolated from the traditional Chinese medicine Sophora flavescens AIT has exhibited a number of therapeutic effects on cardiovascular and liver diseases. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether matrine has a protective effect on heart failure in rats. Coronary artery ligation was used to induce a heart failure (CHF) model in rats. Four weeks following the procedure, the rats were treated with different doses of matrine for one month. Histopathological examination demonstrated that matrine treatment alleviated myocardial hypertrophy and cardiac fibrosis in failing hearts. Furthermore, matrine administration also inhibited the increase of plasma aspartate amino transferase, creatine phosphokinase and lactate dehydrogenase levels in CHF rats. The rats with heart failure exhibited a significant reduction in ejection fraction and fractional shortening, as well as an increase in the left ventricular end systolic dimension, and matrine attenuated this decline in heart function. Further investigation demonstrated that matrine treatment also inhibited the upregulation of Bax and increase in the Bcl‑2 expression in the failing hearts. Furthermore, the upregulation of β3-adrenoreceptor (AR) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase proteins following heart failure were also attenuated by matrine. In conclusion, matrine had a preventive role in heart failure in rats at least in part by inhibiting myocardial apoptosis and the β3-AR pathway.

  3. l-Citrulline ameliorates cerebral blood flow during cortical spreading depression in rats: Involvement of nitric oxide- and prostanoids-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurauchi, Yuki; Mokudai, Koichi; Mori, Asami; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Morita, Masahiko; Kamimura, Ayako; Ishii, Kunio

    2017-02-17

    l-Citrulline is a potent precursor of l-arginine, and exerts beneficial effect on cardiovascular system via nitric oxide (NO) production. Migraine is one of the most popular neurovascular disorder, and imbalance of cerebral blood flow (CBF) observed in cortical spreading depression (CSD) contributes to the mechanism of migraine aura. Here, we investigated the effect of l-citrulline on cardiovascular changes to KCl-induced CSD. in rats. Intravenous injection of l-citrulline prevented the decrease in CBF, monitored by laser Doppler flowmetry, without affecting mean arterial pressure and heart rate during CSD. Moreover, l-citrulline attenuated propagation velocity of CSD induced by KCl. The effect of l-citrulline on CBF change was prevented by l-NAME, an inhibitor of NO synthase, but not by indomethacin, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase. On the other hand, attenuation effect of l-citrulline on CSD propagation velocity was prevented not only by l-NAME but also by indomethacin. In addition, propagation velocity of CSD was attenuated by intravenous injection of NOR3, a NO donor, which was diminished by ODQ, an inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase. These results suggest that NO/cyclic GMP- and prostanoids-mediated pathway differently contribute to the effect of l-citrulline on the maintenance of CBF.

  4. Vasorelaxant Effect of a New Hydrogen Sulfide-Nitric Oxide Conjugated Donor in Isolated Rat Aortic Rings through cGMP Pathway

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    Dan Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelium-dependent vasorelaxant injury leads to a lot of cardiovascular diseases. Both hydrogen sulfide (H2S and nitric oxide (NO are gasotransmitters, which play a critical role in regulating vascular tone. However, the interaction between H2S and NO in vasorelaxation is still unclear. ZYZ-803 was a novel H2S and NO conjugated donor developed by H2S-releasing moiety (S-propyl-L-cysteine (SPRC and NO-releasing moiety (furoxan. ZYZ-803 could time- and dose-dependently relax the sustained contraction induced by PE in rat aortic rings, with potencies of 1.5- to 100-fold greater than that of furoxan and SPRC. Inhibition of the generations of H2S and NO with respective inhibitors abolished the vasorelaxant effect of ZYZ-803. ZYZ-803 increased cGMP level and the activity of vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP in aortic rings, and those effects could be suppressed by the inhibitory generation of H2S and NO. Both the inhibitor of protein kinase G (KT5823 and the inhibitor of KATP channel (glibenclamide suppressed the vasorelaxant effect of ZYZ-803. Our results demonstrated that H2S and NO generation from ZYZ-803 cooperatively regulated vascular tone through cGMP pathway, which indicated that ZYZ-803 had therapeutic potential in cardiovascular diseases.

  5. Vasorelaxant Effect of a New Hydrogen Sulfide-Nitric Oxide Conjugated Donor in Isolated Rat Aortic Rings through cGMP Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Hu, Qingxun; Ma, Fenfen; Zhu, Yi Zhun

    2016-01-01

    Endothelium-dependent vasorelaxant injury leads to a lot of cardiovascular diseases. Both hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and nitric oxide (NO) are gasotransmitters, which play a critical role in regulating vascular tone. However, the interaction between H2S and NO in vasorelaxation is still unclear. ZYZ-803 was a novel H2S and NO conjugated donor developed by H2S-releasing moiety (S-propyl-L-cysteine (SPRC)) and NO-releasing moiety (furoxan). ZYZ-803 could time- and dose-dependently relax the sustained contraction induced by PE in rat aortic rings, with potencies of 1.5- to 100-fold greater than that of furoxan and SPRC. Inhibition of the generations of H2S and NO with respective inhibitors abolished the vasorelaxant effect of ZYZ-803. ZYZ-803 increased cGMP level and the activity of vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) in aortic rings, and those effects could be suppressed by the inhibitory generation of H2S and NO. Both the inhibitor of protein kinase G (KT5823) and the inhibitor of KATP channel (glibenclamide) suppressed the vasorelaxant effect of ZYZ-803. Our results demonstrated that H2S and NO generation from ZYZ-803 cooperatively regulated vascular tone through cGMP pathway, which indicated that ZYZ-803 had therapeutic potential in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26635911

  6. Stimulatory effect of puerarin on bone formation through co-activation of nitric oxide and bone morphogenetic protein-2/mitogen-activated protein kinases pathways in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEU Shiow-yunn; TSAI Chia-chung; SUN Jui-sheng; CHEN Ming-hong; LIU Man-hai; SUN Man-ger

    2012-01-01

    Background Estrogen deficiency results in loss of bone mass.Phytoestrogens are plant-derived non-steroidal compounds with estrogen-like activity that bind to estrogen receptors.The main aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the phytoestrogen puerarin on adult mouse osteoblasts.Methods Osteoblast cells were harvested from 8-month old female imprinting control region (ICR) mice.The effects of puerarin stimulation on the proliferation,differentiation and maturation of osteoblasts were examined.The production of nitric oxide (NO) and the expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2),SMAD4,mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK),core binding factor α1/runt-related transcription factor 2 (Cbfa1/Runx2),osteoprotegerin (OPG),and receptor activator of NF-kB ligand (RANKL) genes were analyzed.The activation of signal pathways was further confirmed by specific pathway inhibitors.Results The osteoblast viability reached its maximum at 10-8 mol/L puerarin.At this concentration,puerarin increases the proliferation and matrix mineralization of osteoblasts and promotes NO synthesis.With 10-8 mol/L puerarin treatment,BMP-2,SMAD4,Cbfa1/Runx2,and OPG gene expression were up-regulated,while the RANKL gene expression is down-regulated.Concurrent treatment involving the (bone morphogenetic protein) BMP antagonist Noggin or the NOS inhibitor L-NAME diminishes puerarin induced cell proliferation,Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity,NO production,as well as the BMP-2,SMAD4,Cbfa1/Runx2,OPG,and RANKL gene expression.Conclusions In this in vitro study,we demonstrate that puerarin is a bone anabolic agent that exerts its osteogenic effects through the induction of BMP-2 and NO synthesis,subsequently regulating Cbfa1/Runx2,OPG,and RANKL gene expression.This effect may contribute to its induction of osteoblast proliferation and differentiation,resulting in bone formation.

  7. Polyamine-induced modulation of genes involved in ethylene biosynthesis and signalling pathways and nitric oxide production during olive mature fruit abscission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra-Lobato, Maria C; Gomez-Jimenez, Maria C

    2011-08-01

    After fruit ripening, many fruit-tree species undergo massive natural fruit abscission. Olive (Olea europaea L.) is a stone-fruit with cultivars such as Picual (PIC) and Arbequina (ARB) which differ in mature fruit abscission potential. Ethylene (ET) is associated with abscission, but its role during mature fruit abscission remains largely uncharacterized. The present study investigates the possible roles of ET and polyamine (PA) during mature fruit abscission by modulating genes involved in the ET signalling and biosynthesis pathways in the abscission zone (AZ) of both cultivars. Five ET-related genes (OeACS2, OeACO2, OeCTR1, OeERS1, and OeEIL2) were isolated in the AZ and adjacent cells (AZ-AC), and their expression in various olive organs and during mature fruit abscission, in relation to interactions between ET and PA and the expression induction of these genes, was determined. OeACS2, OeACO2, and OeEIL2 were found to be the only genes that were up-regulated in association with mature fruit abscission. Using the inhibition of ET and PA biosynthesis, it is demonstrated that OeACS2 and OeEIL2 expression are under the negative control of PA while ET induces their expression in AZ-AC. Furthermore, mature fruit abscission depressed nitric oxide (NO) production present mainly in the epidermal cells and xylem of the AZ. Also, NO production was differentially responsive to ET, PA, and different inhibitors. Taken together, the results indicate that PA-dependent ET signalling and biosynthesis pathways participate, at least partially, during mature fruit abscission, and that endogenous NO and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid maintain an inverse correlation, suggesting an antagonistic action of NO and ET in abscission signalling. © 2011 The Author(s).

  8. L-Arginine/nitric oxide pathway in chronic tension-type headache: relation with serotonin content and secretion and glutamate content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarchielli, Paola; Alberti, Andrea; Floridi, Ardesio; Gallai, Virgilio

    2002-06-15

    Previous research of our group demonstrated an increase in L-arginine/nitric oxide (NO) pathway activity in patients with chronic daily headache (CDH) with a previous history of migraine, which was associated with a reduced platelet serotonin content and increased Ca(2+) levels. In the present work, we assessed the variations in L-arginine/NO pathway activity and platelet cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) levels in 25 patients affected by chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) (8 M, 17 F; age range: 34-54 years). The NO production, shown spectrophotometrically by stoichiometric transformation of oxyhemoglobin to methemoglobin due to NO synthase (NOS) activity, and inter platelet cGMP concentration, assessed with a RIA method, were determined in parallel to variations of aggregation response to 0.3 microg/ml collagen. The intracellular platelet calcium concentrations were also determined using fluorescence polarisation spectrometry. Platelet serotonin content and collagen-induced secretion as well as glutamate content were also determined with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The above parameters were compared with those of an age-matched control group. A reduction in aggregation platelet response was found. The reduction in platelet aggregation was coupled with an increased NO and cGMP production (pmyofascial cranial structures contributing to central sensitization. The increase in NOS activity seems to be associated with a hyposerotonergic status, particularly in patients with analgesic abuse, and this can contribute to central sensitization in CTTH patients. The increase in platelet glutamate content in the same patients suggests the implication of the above excitatory amino acid in spinal and supraspinal structures involved in head pain induction and maintenance.

  9. Adiponectin attenuates angiotensin II-induced vascular smooth muscle cell remodeling through nitric oxide and the RhoA/ROCK pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wared eNour-Eldine

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Adiponectin (APN, an adipocytokine, exerts protective effects on cardiac remodeling, while angiotensin II (Ang II induces hypertension and vascular remodeling. The potential protective role of APN on the vasculature during hypertension has not been fully elucidated yet. Here, we evaluate the molecular mechanisms of the protective role of APN in the physiological response of the vascular wall to Ang II.METHODS AND RESULTS: Rat aortic tissues were used to investigate the effect of APN on Ang II-induced vascular remodeling and hypertrophy. We investigated whether nitric oxide (NO, the RhoA/ROCK pathway, actin cytoskeleton remodeling, and reactive oxygen species (ROS mediate the anti-hypertrophic effect of APN. Ang II-induced protein synthesis was attenuated by pre-treatment with APN, NO donor (SNAP, or cGMP. The hypertrophic response to Ang II was associated with a significant increase in RhoA activation and vascular force production, which were prevented by APN and SNAP. NO was also associated with inhibition of Ang II-induced phosphorylation of cofilin. In addition, immunohistochemistry revealed that 24 hr Ang II treatment increased the F- to G-actin ratio, an effect that was inhibited by SNAP. Ang II-induced ROS formation and upregulation of p22phox mRNA expression were inhibited by APN and NO. Both compounds failed to inhibit Nox1 and p47phox expression. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the anti-hypertrophic effects of APN are due, in part, to NO-dependent inhibition of the RhoA/ROCK pathway and ROS formation.

  10. DMPD: Nitric oxide and cell viability in inflammatory cells: a role for NO inmacrophage function and fate. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15691589 Nitric oxide and cell viability in inflammatory cells: a role for NO inmac...(.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Nitric oxide and cell viability in inflammatory cells: a role for NO inma...ty in inflammatory cells: a role for NO inmacrophage function and fate. Authors Bosca L, Zeini M, Traves PG,

  11. Anti-allodynic effect of mangiferin in neuropathic rats: Involvement of nitric oxide-cyclic GMP-ATP sensitive K(+) channels pathway and serotoninergic system.

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    de Los Monteros-Zuñiga, Antonio Espinosa; Izquierdo, Teresa; Quiñonez-Bastidas, Geovanna Nallely; Rocha-González, Héctor Isaac; Godínez-Chaparro, Beatriz

    The neurobiology of neuropathic pain is caused by injury in the central or peripheral nervous system. Recent evidence points out that mangiferin shows anti-nociceptive effect in inflammatory pain. However, its role in inflammatory and neuropathic pain and the possible mechanisms of action are not yet established. The purpose of this study was to determine the possible anti-allodynic effect of mangiferin in rats with spinal nerve ligation (SNL). Furthermore, we sought to investigate the possible mechanisms of action that contribute to these effects. Mechanical allodynia to stimulation with the von Frey filaments was measured by the up and down method. Intrathecal administration of mangiferin prevented, in a dose-dependent fashion, SNL-induced mechanical allodynia. Mangiferin-induced anti-allodynia was prevented by the intrathecal administration of L-NAME (100μg/rat, non-selective nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), ODQ (10μg/rat, inhibitor of guanylate-cyclase) and glibenclamide (50μg/rat, channel blocker of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels). Moreover, methiothepin (30μg/rat, non-selective 5-HT receptor antagonist), WAY-100635 (6μg/rat, selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist), SB-224289 (5μg/rat, selective 5-HT1B receptor antagonist), BRL-15572 (4μg/rat, selective 5-HT1D receptor antagonist) and SB-659551 (6μg/rat, selective 5-HT5A receptor antagonist), but not naloxone (50μg/rat, non-selective opioid receptor antagonist), were able to prevent mangiferin-induced anti-allodynic effect. These data suggest that the anti-allodynic effect induced by mangiferin is mediated at least in part by the serotoninergic system, involving the activation of 5-HT1A/1B/1D/5A receptors, as well as the nitric oxide-cyclic GMP-ATP-sensitive K(+) channels pathway, but not by the opioidergic system, in the SNL model of neuropathic pain in rats.

  12. Effect of biliary cirrhosis on nonadrenergic noncholinergic-mediated relaxation of rat corpus cavernosum: Role of nitric oxide pathway and endocannabinoid system

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    Dehpour A.R.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Relaxation of the corpus cavernosum plays a major role in penile erection. Nitric oxide (NO is known to be the most important factor mediating relaxation of corpus cavernosum, which is mainly derived from nonadrenergic noncholinergic (NANC nerves. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of biliary cirrhosis on nonadrenergic noncholinergic (NANC-mediated relaxation of rat corpus cavernosum as well as the possible relevant roles of endocannabinoid and nitric oxide systems.Methods: Corporal strips from sham-operated and biliary cirrhotic rats were mounted under tension in a standard oxygenated organ bath with guanethidine sulfate (5 µM and atropine (1 µM to induce adrenergic and cholinergic blockade. The strips were precontracted with phenylephrine hydrochloride (7.5 µM and electrical field stimulation was applied at different frequencies (2, 5, 10, 15 Hz to obtain NANC-mediated relaxation. In separate precontracted strips of the sham and cirrhotic groups, the concentration-dependent relaxant responses to sodium nitroprusside (10 nM-1mM, as an NO donor, were assessed.  Results: The NANC-mediated relaxation was significantly enhanced in cirrhotic animals (P<0.01. Anandamide potentiated the relaxations in both groups (P<0.05. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 (10 µM and the vanilloid receptor antagonist capsazepine (10 µM each significantly prevented the enhanced relaxations in cirrhotic rats (P<0.01. The CB2 receptor antagonist AM630 had no effect on relaxations in the cirrhotic group. In a concentration-dependent manner, L-NAME (30-1000 nM inhibited relaxations in both the sham and cirrhotic groups, although cirrhotic groups were more resistant to the inhibitory effects of L-NAME. The degree of relaxation induced by sodium nitroprusside (10 nM-1 mM was similar in the two groups.Conclusions: Biliary cirrhosis enhances the neurogenic relaxation in rat corpus cavernosum probably via the NO pathway and

  13. Effect of isoproterenol on myocardial perfusion, function, energy metabolism and nitric oxide pathway in the rat heart - a longitudinal MR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrois, Martine; Kober, Frank; Lan, Carole; Dalmasso, Christiane; Cole, Mark; Clarke, Kieran; Cozzone, Patrick J; Bernard, Monique

    2014-05-01

    The chronic administration of the β-adrenoreceptor agonist isoproterenol (IsoP) is used in animals to study the mechanisms of cardiac hypertrophy and failure associated with a sustained increase in circulating catecholamines. Time-dependent changes in myocardial blood flow (MBF), morphological and functional parameters were assessed in rats in vivo using multimodal cardiac MRI. Energy metabolism, oxidative stress and the nitric oxide (NO) pathway were evaluated in isolated perfused rat hearts following 7 days of treatment. Male Wistar rats were infused for 7 days with IsoP or vehicle using osmotic pumps. Cine-MRI and arterial spin labeling were used to determine left ventricular morphology, function and MBF at days 1, 2 and 7 after pump implantation. Isolated hearts were then perfused, and high-energy phosphate compounds and intracellular pH were followed using ³¹P MRS with simultaneous measurement of contractile function. Total creatine and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. The NO pathway was evaluated by NO synthase isoform expression and total nitrate concentration (NO(x)). In IsoP-treated rats, left ventricular mass was increased at day 1 and maintained. Wall thickness was increased with a peak at day 2 and a tendency to return to baseline values at day 7. MBF was markedly increased at day 1 and returned to normal values between days 1 and 2. The rate-pressure product and phosphocreatine/adenosine triphosphate ratio in perfused hearts were reduced. MDA, endothelial NO synthase expression and NO(x) were increased. Sustained high cardiac function and normal MBF after 24 h of IsoP infusion indicate imbalance between functional demand and blood flow, leading to morphological changes. After 1 week, cardiac hypertrophy and decreased function were associated with impaired phosphocreatine, increased oxidative stress and up-regulation of the NO pathway. These results provide supplemental information on the

  14. Nitric oxide production by Biomphalaria glabrata haemocytes: effects of Schistosoma mansoni ESPs and regulation through the extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway

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    Kirk Ruth S

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schistosoma mansoni uses Biomphalaria glabrata as an intermediate host during its complex life cycle. In the snail, the parasite initially transforms from a miracidium into a mother sporocyst and during this process excretory-secretory products (ESPs are released. Nitric oxide (NO and its reactive intermediates play an important role in host defence responses against pathogens. This study therefore aimed to determine the effects of S. mansoni ESPs on NO production in defence cells (haemocytes from schistosome-susceptible and schistosome-resistant B. glabrata strains. As S. mansoni ESPs have previously been shown to inhibit extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK phosphorylation (activation in haemocytes from susceptible, but not resistant, B. glabrata the regulation of NO output by ERK in these cells was also investigated. Results Haemocytes from resistant snails challenged with S. mansoni ESPs (20 μg/ml over 5 h displayed an increase in NO production that was 3.3 times greater than that observed for unchallenged haemocytes; lower concentrations of ESPs (0.1–10 μg/ml did not significantly increase NO output. In contrast, haemocytes from susceptible snails showed no significant change in NO output following challenge with ESPs at any concentration used (0.1–20 μg/ml. Western blotting revealed that U0126 (1 μM or 10 μM blocked the phosphorylation (activation status of ERK in haemocytes from both snail strains. Inhibition of ERK signalling by U0126 attenuated considerably intracellular NO production in haemocytes from both susceptible and resistant B. glabrata strains, identifying ERK as a key regulator of NO output in these cells. Conclusion S. mansoni ESPs differentially influence intracellular NO levels in susceptible and resistant B. glabrata haemocytes, possibly through modulation of the ERK signalling pathway. Such effects might facilitate survival of S. mansoni in its intermediate host.

  15. Investigation of a possible interaction between the heme oxygenase/biliverdin reductase and nitric oxide synthase pathway in murine gastric fundus and jejunum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, Ole; Lefebvre, Romain A

    2008-08-20

    This study investigated the possible interaction between the heme oxygenase (HO)/biliverdin reductase (BVR) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) pathway in murine gastric fundus and jejunum, since previous studies have shown that both HO-2 and BVR are expressed in interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) and co-localized with neuronal NOS in a large proportion of myenteric neurons along the gastrointestinal tract. Neither HO inhibition by chromium mesoporphyrin (CrMP) nor co-incubation with CO or biliverdin/bilirubin affected nitrergic neurotransmission - i.e. relaxations induced by non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) nerve stimulation or exogenous NO - under normal physiological conditions. However, biliverdin/bilirubin reversed the inhibitory effect of the superoxide generator LY83583 on exogenous NO-induced relaxations in both tissues. When gastric fundus muscle strips were depleted of the endogenous antioxidant Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) by the Cu-chelator DETCA, electrically induced NANC relaxations were also affected by LY82583; however, biliverdin/bilirubin could not substitute for the loss of Cu/Zn SOD when this specific antioxidant enzyme was depleted. In jejunal muscle strips, the combination DETCA plus LY83583 nearly abolished contractile phasic activity and, hence, did not allow studying nitrergic relaxation in these experimental conditions. In conclusion, this study does not establish a role for HO/CO in inhibitory NANC neurotransmission in murine gastric fundus and jejunum under normal physiological conditions. However, the antioxidants biliverdin/bilirubin might play an important role in the protection of the nitrergic neurotransmitter against oxidative stress.

  16. Antidepressant-Like Effect of the Leaves of Pseudospondias microcarpa in Mice: Evidence for the Involvement of the Serotoninergic System, NMDA Receptor Complex, and Nitric Oxide Pathway

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    Donatus Wewura Adongo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Depression continues to be a major global health problem. Although antidepressants are used for its treatment, efficacy is often inconsistent. Thus, the search for alternative therapeutic medicines for its treatment is still important. In this study, the antidepressant-like effect of Pseudospondias microcarpa extract (30–300 mg kg−1, p.o. was investigated in two predictive models of depression—forced swimming test and tail suspension test in mice. Additionally, the mechanism(s of action involved were assessed. Acute treatment with the extract dose dependently reduced immobility of mice in both models. The antidepressant-like effect of the extract (100 mg kg−1, p.o. was blocked by p-chlorophenylalanine and cyproheptadine but not prazosin, propranolol, or yohimbine. Concomitant administration of d-cycloserine and the extract potentiated the anti-immobility effect. In contrast, d-serine, a full agonist of glycine/NMDA receptors, abolished the effects. Anti-immobility effects of PME were prevented by pretreatment of mice with L-arginine (750 mg kg−1, i.p. and sildenafil (5 mg kg−1, i.p.. On the contrary, pretreatment of mice with L-NAME (30 mg kg−1, i.p. or methylene blue (10 mg kg−1, i.p. potentiated its effects. The extract produces an antidepressant-like effect in the FST and TST that is dependent on the serotoninergic system, NMDA receptor complex, and the nitric oxide pathway.

  17. Role of nonselective cation channels as Ca2+ entry pathway in endothelin-1-induced contraction and their suppression by nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X F; Komuro, T; Miwa, S; Minowa, T; Iwamuro, Y; Okamoto, Y; Ninomiya, H; Sawamura, T; Masaki, T

    1998-07-10

    The present study was carried out to clarify the role of nonselective cation channels as a Ca2+ entry pathway in the contraction and the increase in [Ca2+]i induced by endothelin- in endothelium-denuded rat thoracic aorta rings, and their suppression by nitric oxide (NO). In Ca2+-free medium, the endothelin-1-induced contraction was suppressed to about 20% of control values, although the increase in [Ca2+]i became negligible. The contraction and the increase in [Ca2+]i monitored by fura 2 fluorescence were unaffected by a blocker of L-type voltage-operated Ca2+ channels nifedipine. A blocker of nonselective cation channels 1-[beta-[3-(4-methoxyphenyl)propoxyl]-4-methoxyphenethyl]-1H-imida zole . HCl(SK&F 96365) suppressed the endothelin-1-induced contraction and increase in [Ca2+]i to the level similar to that after removal of extracellular Ca2+. SK&F 96365 had no further effect on the endothelin-1-induced contraction in the absence of extracellular Ca2+. The endothelin-1-induced contraction and increase in [Ca2+]i were abolished by a donor of NO sodium nitroprusside. The effects of another NO donor 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) were also tested and yielded essentially similar results to those for sodium nitroprusside on the endothelin-1-induced contraction. Furthermore, the inhibitory effects of sodium nitroprusside could be blocked with a guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3,-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) at 30 microM. These findings suggest that Ca2+ entry through nonselective cation channels but not voltage-operated Ca2+ channels plays a critical role in the endothelin-1-induced increase in [Ca2+]i and the resulting contraction and that inhibition by NO of the endothelin-1-induced contraction is mainly the result of blockade of Ca2+ entry through these channels.

  18. Icariin-mediated expression of cardiac genes and modulation of nitric oxide signaling pathway during differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells into cardiomyocytes in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan-yan ZHU; Yi-jia LOU

    2006-01-01

    Aim:To investigate effects of icariin on cardiac gene expression and the modulation of nitric oxide (NO)signal transduction during the differentiation of embryonic stem(ES)cells into cardiomyocytes in vitro.Methods:The expression levels of cardiac developmental-dependent genes were measured using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR).The chronotropic responses of cardiomyocytes to β-adrenoceptor stimulation were determined.The levels of cAMP and cGMP in ES cells were measured using radioimmunoassay.Endogenous NO levels were measured by using the Griess reaction.Aminoguanidine (AG) was used to confirm the influence of icariin on the endogenous NO signal pathway.Results:Icariin significantly elevated mRNA levels of cardiac transcription factors GATA4 and Nkx2.5,and cardiac-specific α-MHC,MLC-2ν and β-AR genes in a concentration-and time-dependent manner (P<0.05).Cardiomyocytes derived from embryoid body (EB)treated with icariin were more sensitive to isoprenaline (P<0.01).Treatment of ES cells with icariin resulted in a continued elevation in the cAMP/cGMP ratio before a shift to the cardiomyocyte phenotype (P<0.05).AG decreased the NO level,and delayed and decreased the incidence of contracting EB to only approximately 35% on d 5+11,an effect that could be rescued by icariin.When cells were cocultured with icariin and AG,the percentage of beating EB reached a peak level of 73% on d 5+11(P<0.05).Conclusion:The inducible effects of icariin were partly related to increase in the expression of cardiac developmental-dependent genes,and elevation of the cAMP/cGMP ratio in ES cells,as well as upregulation of endogenous NO generation during the early stages of cardiac development.

  19. Nitric oxide-dependent activation of CaMKII increases diastolic sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release in cardiac myocytes in response to adrenergic stimulation.

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    Jerry Curran

    Full Text Available Spontaneous calcium waves in cardiac myocytes are caused by diastolic sarcoplasmic reticulum release (SR Ca(2+ leak through ryanodine receptors. Beta-adrenergic (β-AR tone is known to increase this leak through the activation of Ca-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII and the subsequent phosphorylation of the ryanodine receptor. When β-AR drive is chronic, as observed in heart failure, this CaMKII-dependent effect is exaggerated and becomes potentially arrhythmogenic. Recent evidence has indicated that CaMKII activation can be regulated by cellular oxidizing agents, such as reactive oxygen species. Here, we investigate how the cellular second messenger, nitric oxide, mediates CaMKII activity downstream of the adrenergic signaling cascade and promotes the generation of arrhythmogenic spontaneous Ca(2+ waves in intact cardiomyocytes. Both SCaWs and SR Ca(2+ leak were measured in intact rabbit and mouse ventricular myocytes loaded with the Ca-dependent fluorescent dye, fluo-4. CaMKII activity in vitro and immunoblotting for phosphorylated residues on CaMKII, nitric oxide synthase, and Akt were measured to confirm activity of these enzymes as part of the adrenergic cascade. We demonstrate that stimulation of the β-AR pathway by isoproterenol increased the CaMKII-dependent SR Ca(2+ leak. This increased leak was prevented by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase 1 but not nitric oxide synthase 3. In ventricular myocytes isolated from wild-type mice, isoproterenol stimulation also increased the CaMKII-dependent leak. Critically, in myocytes isolated from nitric oxide synthase 1 knock-out mice this effect is ablated. We show that isoproterenol stimulation leads to an increase in nitric oxide production, and nitric oxide alone is sufficient to activate CaMKII and increase SR Ca(2+ leak. Mechanistically, our data links Akt to nitric oxide synthase 1 activation downstream of β-AR stimulation. Collectively, this evidence supports the hypothesis

  20. Enhancement of the proline and nitric oxide synthetic pathway improves fermentation ability under multiple baking-associated stress conditions in industrial baker's yeast

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    Sasano Yu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the bread-making process, industrial baker's yeast, mostly Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is exposed to baking-associated stresses, such as air-drying and freeze-thaw stress. These baking-associated stresses exert severe injury to yeast cells, mainly due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, leading to cell death and reduced fermentation ability. Thus, there is a great need for a baker's yeast strain with higher tolerance to baking-associated stresses. Recently, we revealed a novel antioxidative mechanism in a laboratory yeast strain that is involved in stress-induced nitric oxide (NO synthesis from proline via proline oxidase Put1 and N-acetyltransferase Mpr1. We also found that expression of the proline-feedback inhibition-less sensitive mutant γ-glutamyl kinase (Pro1-I150T and the thermostable mutant Mpr1-F65L resulted in an enhanced fermentation ability of baker's yeast in bread dough after freeze-thaw stress and air-drying stress, respectively. However, baker's yeast strains with high fermentation ability under multiple baking-associated stresses have not yet been developed. Results We constructed a self-cloned diploid baker's yeast strain with enhanced proline and NO synthesis by expressing Pro1-I150T and Mpr1-F65L in the presence of functional Put1. The engineered strain increased the intracellular NO level in response to air-drying stress, and the strain was tolerant not only to oxidative stress but also to both air-drying and freeze-thaw stresses probably due to the reduced intracellular ROS level. We also showed that the resultant strain retained higher leavening activity in bread dough after air-drying and freeze-thaw stress than that of the wild-type strain. On the other hand, enhanced stress tolerance and fermentation ability did not occur in the put1-deficient strain. This result suggests that NO is synthesized in baker's yeast from proline in response to oxidative stresses that induce ROS

  1. Additive effects of low concentrations of estradiol-17β and progesterone on nitric oxide production by human vascular endothelial cells through shared signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yefei; Thomas, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Potential cardiovascular benefits of low-dose formulations of estrogens and progesterone (P4) for treating climacteric symptoms in postmenopausal women remain unclear because information is lacking on their combined vascular effects. Protective effects of low concentrations (5nM) of P4 and estradiol-17β (E2), alone and in combination (P4+E2), were investigated in a nongenomic model of vascular protection which measured acute increases in nitric oxide (NO) production by cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Treatment with 5nM P4+E2 for twenty minutes significantly increased NO production and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation, whereas 5nM treatments with either steroid alone were ineffective. The 5nM P4+E2 treatment also increased phosphorylation of ERK and Akt, mimicking the effects of higher concentrations of P4 and E2 alone. Pre-treatment with inhibitors of PI3K (wortmannin), Akt (ML-9), and MAP kinase (AZD6244 and U0126) completely blocked the NO response to 5nM P4+E2. Combined 5nM treatments with specific estrogen and progesterone receptor agonists showed an involvement of membrane progesterone receptor alpha (mPRα, also known as PAQR7), G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER), and estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), but not ERβ, in P4+E2 stimulation of NO production. P4+E2 also exerted genomic actions, increasing mPRα, GPER, cyclooxygenase-1, and prostacyclin-synthase mRNA levels. Taken together, the results show that a low concentration of P4+E2 rapidly increases NO production in HUVECs through mPRα, ERα, and GPER and involves common signaling pathways, PI3K/Akt and MAP kinase. These in vitro findings suggest that low doses of E2 and P4 may also have some beneficial cardiovascular effects in vivo when administered as hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for post-menopausal women. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Mechanistic Variants in Gas-Phase Metal-Oxide Mediated Activation of Methane at Ambient Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jilai; Zhou, Shaodong; Zhang, Jun; Schlangen, Maria; Usharani, Dandamudi; Shaik, Sason; Schwarz, Helmut

    2016-09-07

    The C-H bond activation of methane mediated by a prototypical heteronuclear metal-oxide cluster, [Al2Mg2O5](•+), was investigated by using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) in conjunction with high-level quantum mechanical calculations. Experimentally, hydrogen-atom abstraction from methane by the cluster ion [Al2Mg2O5](•+) takes place at ambient conditions. As to the mechanism, according to our computational findings, both the proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and the conventional hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) are feasible and compete with each other. This is in distinct contrast to the [XYO2](+) (X, Y = Mg, Al, Si) cluster oxide ions which activate methane exclusively via the PCET route (Li, J.; Zhou, S.; Zhang, J.; Schlangen, M.; Weiske, T.; Usharani, D.; Shaik, S.; Schwarz, H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016, 138, 7973-7981). The electronic origins of the mechanistically rather complex reactivity scenarios of the [Al2Mg2O5](•+)/CH4 couple were elucidated. For the PCET mechanism, in which the Lewis acid-base pair [Al(+)-O(-)] of the cluster acts as the active site, a clear correlation has been established between the nature of the transition state, the corresponding barrier height, the Lewis acidity-basicity of the [M(+)-O(-)] unit, as well as the bond order of the M(+)-O(-) bond. Also addressed is the role of the spin and charge distributions of a terminal oxygen radical site in the direct HAT route. The knowledge of the factors that control the reactivity of PCET and HAT pathways not only deepens our mechanistic understanding of metal-oxide mediated C-H bond activation but may also provide guidance for the rational design of catalysts.

  3. The Effects of Sub-Chronic Treatment with Pioglitazone on the Septic Mice Mortality in the Model of Cecal Ligation and Puncture: Involvement of Nitric Oxide Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Shafaroodi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response syndrome caused by an infection and remains as a major challenge in health care. Many studies have reported that pioglitazone may display anti-inflammatory effects. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of subchronic treatment with pioglitazone on high-grade septic mice survival and nitrergic system involvement. Diffused sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP surgery in male NMRI mice (20-30 g. Pioglitazone (5,10 and 20 mg/kg was administered by gavage daily for 5 days prior to surgery. Nitric oxide involvement was assessed by sub-chronic administration of a non-selective nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, L-NAME and a selective inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, aminoguanidine. TNF-α  and IL-1β plasma levels were measured by ELISA. Pioglitazone (10 and 20 mg/kg significantly improved survival rate in septic mice. The chronic intraperitoneally co-administration of L-NAME (0.5 mg/kg, daily or aminoguanidine (1 mg/kg, daily with a daily dose of pioglitazone, 5 mg/kg, significantly increased the survival rate. This survival improving effect was accompanied by a significant reduction in pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β plasma levels. In conclusion, sub-chronic pioglitazone treatment can improve survival in mouse sepsis model by CLP. Inhibition of nitric oxide release, probably through inducible nitric oxide synthase at least in part is responsible for this effect. Suppression of TNF-α and IL-1β could be another mechanism in pioglitazone-induced survival improving effect in septic mice.

  4. The Effects of Sub-Chronic Treatment with Pioglitazone on the Septic Mice Mortality in the Model of Cecal Ligation and Puncture: Involvement of Nitric Oxide Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafaroodi, Hamed; Hassanipour, Mahsa; Mousavi, Zahra; Rahimi, Nastaran; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2015-10-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response syndrome caused by an infection and remains as a major challenge in health care. Many studies have reported that pioglitazone may display anti-inflammatory effects. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of subchronic treatment with pioglitazone on high-grade septic mice survival and nitrergic system involvement. Diffused sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) surgery in male NMRI mice (20-30 g). Pioglitazone (5,10 and 20 mg/kg) was administered by gavage daily for 5 days prior to surgery. Nitric oxide involvement was assessed by sub-chronic administration of a non-selective nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, L-NAME and a selective inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, aminoguanidine. TNF-α  and IL-1β plasma levels were measured by ELISA. Pioglitazone (10 and 20 mg/kg) significantly improved survival rate in septic mice. The chronic intraperitoneally co-administration of L-NAME (0.5 mg/kg, daily) or aminoguanidine (1 mg/kg, daily) with a daily dose of pioglitazone, 5 mg/kg, significantly increased the survival rate. This survival improving effect was accompanied by a significant reduction in pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β plasma levels. In conclusion, sub-chronic pioglitazone treatment can improve survival in mouse sepsis model by CLP. Inhibition of nitric oxide release, probably through inducible nitric oxide synthase at least in part is responsible for this effect. Suppression of TNF-α and IL-1β could be another mechanism in pioglitazone-induced survival improving effect in septic mice.

  5. Regulation of p53 by activated protein kinase C-delta during nitric oxide-induced dopaminergic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Jin; Kim, Dong-Chan; Choi, Bo-Hwa; Ha, Hyunjung; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2006-01-27

    Selective cell death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra is the major cause of Parkinson disease. Current evidence suggests that this cell death could be mediated by nitric oxide by-products such as nitrate and peroxynitrite. Because protein kinase C (PKC)-delta is implicated in apoptosis of various cell types, we studied its roles and activation mechanisms in nitric oxide (NO)-induced apoptosis of SN4741 dopaminergic cells. When cells were treated with sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a NO donor, endogenous PKC-delta was nitrated and activated. Immunoprecipitation revealed that p53 co-immunoprecipitated with PKC-delta and was phosphorylated at the 15th serine residue in SNP-treated cells. An in vitro kinase assay revealed that p53 was directly phosphorylated by SNP-activated PKC-delta. The p53 Ser-15 phosphorylation was suppressed in SNP-treated cells when the NO-mediated activation of PKC-delta was inhibited by rottlerin or (-)-epigallocatechin gallate. Within 3 h of p53 phosphorylation, its protein levels increased because of decreased ubiquitin-dependent proteosomal proteolysis, whereas the protein levels of MDM2, ubiquitin-protein isopeptide ligase, were down-regulated in a p53 phosphorylation-dependent fashion. Taken together, these results demonstrate that nitration-mediated activation of PKC-delta induces the phosphorylation of the Ser-15 residue in p53, which increases its protein stability, thereby contributing to the nitric oxide-mediated apoptosis-like cell death pathway. These findings may be expanded to provide new insight into the cellular mechanisms of Parkinson disease.

  6. Maternal smoking and impaired endothelium-dependent nitric oxide-mediated relaxation of uterine small arteries in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Malene R; Uldbjerg, Niels; Stender, Steen;

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the endothelium-dependent relaxation of uterine small arteries from pregnant nonsmokers, smokers, and ex-smokers who stopped smoking early in pregnancy.......This study aimed to investigate the endothelium-dependent relaxation of uterine small arteries from pregnant nonsmokers, smokers, and ex-smokers who stopped smoking early in pregnancy....

  7. Nitric oxide: considerations for the treatment of ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terpolilli, Nicole A; Moskowitz, Michael A; Plesnila, Nikolaus

    2012-01-01

    Some 40 years ago it was recognized by Furchgott and colleagues that the endothelium releases a vasodilator, endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF). Later on, several groups identified EDRF to be a gas, nitric oxide (NO). Since then, NO was identified as one of the most versatile and unique molecules in animal and human biology. Nitric oxide mediates a plethora of physiological functions, for example, maintenance of vascular tone and inflammation. Apart from these physiological functions, NO is also involved in the pathophysiology of various disorders, specifically those in which regulation of blood flow and inflammation has a key role. The aim of the current review is to summarize the role of NO in cerebral ischemia, the most common cause of stroke. PMID:22333622

  8. High-Yield Method for Isolation and Culture of Endothelial Cells from Rat Coronary Blood Vessels Suitable for Analysis of Intracellular Calcium and Nitric Oxide Biosynthetic Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nistri Silvia

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe here a method for isolating endothelial cells from rat heart blood vessels by means of coronary microperfusion with collagenase. This methods makes it possible to obtain high amounts of endothelial cells in culture which retain the functional properties of their in vivo counterparts, including the ability to uptake fluorescently-labeled acetylated low-density lipoproteins and to respond to vasoactive agents by modulating intracellular calcium and by upregulating intrinsic nitric oxide generation. The main advantages of our technique are: (i good reproducibility, (ii accurate sterility that can be maintained throughout the isolation procedure and (iii high yield of pure endothelial cells, mainly due to microperfusion and temperature-controlled incubation with collagenase which allow an optimal distribution of this enzyme within the coronary vascular bed.

  9. nitric oxide triggers the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt survival pathway in insulin-producing RINm5F cells by arousing Src to activate insulin receptor substrate-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedo, Juan R; Cahuana, Gladys M; Ramírez, Remedios; Esbert, Margarida; Jiménez, Juan; Sobrino, Francisco; Bedoya, Francisco J

    2004-05-01

    Mechanisms involved in the protective action of nitric oxide (NO) in insulin-producing cells are a matter of debate. We have previously shown that pharmacological inhibition of c-Src cancels the antiapoptotic action of low and sustained concentrations of exogenous NO. In this study, using insulin-producing RINm5F cells that overexpress Src either permanently active (v-Src) or dominant negative (dn-Src) forms, we determine that this tyrosine kinase is the principal mediator of the protective action of NO. We also show that Src-directed activation of insulin receptor substrate-1, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), Akt, and Bad phosphorylation conform a substantial component of the survival route because pharmacological inhibition of PI3K and Akt canceled the antiapoptotic effects of NO. Studies performed with the protein kinase G (PKG) inhibitor KT-5823 revealed that NO-dependent activation of c-Src/ insulin receptor substrate-1 is not affected by PKG activation. By contrast, Akt and Bad activation are partially dependent on PKG activation. Endogenous production of NO after overexpression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in RINm5F cells mimics the effects produced by generation of low amounts of NO from exogenous diethylenetriamine/NO. In addition, we found that NO produces c-Src/PI3K- and PKG-dependent activation of ERK 1/2. The MAPK kinase inhibitor PD 98059 suppresses NO-dependent protection from DNA fragmentation induced by serum deprivation. The protective action of low and sustained concentration of NO is also observed in staurosporine- and Taxol-induced apoptosis. Finally, NO also protects isolated rat islets from DNA fragmentation induced by serum deprivation. These data strengthen the notion that NO production at physiological levels plays a role in protection from apoptosis in pancreatic beta-cells.

  10. Nitric oxide/cGMP/PKG signaling pathway activated by M1-type muscarinic acetylcholine receptor cascade inhibits Na+-activated K+ currents in Kenyon cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasebe, Masaharu; Yoshino, Masami

    2016-06-01

    The interneurons of the mushroom body, known as Kenyon cells, are essential for the long-term memory of olfactory associative learning in some insects. Some studies have reported that nitric oxide (NO) is strongly related to this long-term memory in Kenyon cells. However, the target molecules and upstream and downstream NO signaling cascades are not completely understood. Here we analyzed the effect of the NO signaling cascade on Na(+)-activated K(+) (KNa) channel activity in Kenyon cells of crickets (Gryllus bimaculatus). We found that two different NO donors, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and S-nitroso-N-acetyl-dl-penicillamine (SNAP), strongly suppressed KNa channel currents. Additionally, this inhibitory effect of GSNO on KNa channel activity was diminished by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), and KT5823, an inhibitor of protein kinase G (PKG). Next, we analyzed the role of ACh in the NO signaling cascade. ACh strongly suppressed KNa channel currents, similar to NO donors. Furthermore, this inhibitory effect of ACh was blocked by pirenzepine, an M1 muscarinic ACh receptor antagonist, but not by 1,1-dimethyl-4-diphenylacetoxypiperidinium iodide (4-DAMP) and mecamylamine, an M3 muscarinic ACh receptor antagonist and a nicotinic ACh receptor antagonist, respectively. The ACh-induced inhibition of KNa channel currents was also diminished by the PLC inhibitor U73122 and the calmodulin antagonist W-7. Finally, we found that ACh inhibition was blocked by the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). These results suggested that the ACh signaling cascade promotes NO production by activating NOS and NO inhibits KNa channel currents via the sGC/cGMP/PKG signaling cascade in Kenyon cells.

  11. Nitric oxide synthetic pathway and cGMP levels are altered in red blood cells from end-stage renal disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pietro, Natalia; Giardinelli, Annalisa; Sirolli, Vittorio; Riganti, Chiara; Di Tomo, Pamela; Gazzano, Elena; Di Silvestre, Sara; Panknin, Christina; Cortese-Krott, Miriam M; Csonka, Csaba; Kelm, Malte; Ferdinandy, Péter; Bonomini, Mario; Pandolfi, Assunta

    2016-06-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) enzymatically produce nitric oxide (NO) by a functional RBC-nitric oxide synthase (RBC-NOS). NO is a vascular key regulatory molecule. In RBCs its generation is complex and influenced by several factors, including insulin, acetylcholine, and calcium. NO availability is reduced in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and associated with endothelial dysfunction. We previously demonstrated that, through increased phosphatidylserine membrane exposure, ESRD-RBCs augmented their adhesion to human cultured endothelium, in which NO bioavailability decreased. Since RBC-NOS-dependent NO production in ESRD is unknown, this study aimed to investigate RBC-NOS levels/activation, NO production/bioavailability in RBCs from healthy control subjects (C, N = 18) and ESRD patients (N = 27). Although RBC-NOS expression was lower in ESRD-RBCs, NO, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), RBC-NOS Serine1177 phosphorylation level and eNOS/Calmodulin (CaM)/Heat Shock Protein-90 (HSP90) interaction levels were higher in ESRD-RBCs, indicating increased enzyme activation. Conversely, following RBCs stimulation with insulin or ionomycin, NO and cGMP levels were significantly lower in ESRD- than in C-RBCs, suggesting that uremia might reduce the RBC-NOS response to further stimuli. Additionally, the activity of multidrug-resistance-associated protein-4 (MRP4; cGMP-membrane transporter) was significantly lower in ESRD-RBCs, suggesting a possible compromised efflux of cGMP across the ESRD-RBCs membrane. This study for the first time showed highest basal RBC-NOS activation in ESRD-RBCs, possibly to reduce the negative impact of decreased NOS expression. It is further conceivable that high NO production only partially affects cell function of ESRD-RBCs maybe because in vivo they are unable to respond to physiologic stimuli, such as calcium and/or insulin.

  12. Nitric oxide pathway-mediated relaxant effect of aqueous sesame leaves extract (Sesamum radiatum Schum. & Thonn.) in the guinea-pig isolated aorta smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konan, André B; Datté, Jacques Y; Yapo, Paul A

    2008-05-27

    Sesamum radiatum Schum. & Thonn. (Pedaliaceae) is an annual herbaceous plant, which belongs to the family Pedaliaceae and genus Sesamum. Sesame is used in traditional medicine in Africa and Asia for many diseases treatment. Sesame plant especially the leaves, seed and oil are consumed locally as a staple food by subsistence farmers. The study analyses the relaxation induced by the aqueous extract of leaves from sesame (ESera), compared with those of acetylcholine (ACh) in the guinea-pig aortic preparations (GPAPs), in order to confirm the use in traditional medicine for cardiovascular diseases. The longitudinal strips of aorta of animals were rapidly removed from animals. The aorta was immediately placed in a Mac Ewen solution. Experiments were performed in preparations with intact endothelium as well as in aortae where the endothelium had been removed. The preparations were suspended between two L-shaped stainless steel hooks in a 10 ml organ bath with Mac Ewen solution. The isometric contractile force of the aorta strips of guinea-pig were recorded by using a strain gauge. All both drugs caused concentration-dependent relaxations responses. The aqueous extract of leaves from sesame ESera (1 x 10(-7) - 0.1 microg/ml) caused a graded relaxation in GPAPs with intact endothelium, with a EC50-value of 1 x 10(-4) microg/ml. The same effect was observed with ACh (7 x 10(-2) nM - 7 x 10(-1) microM), which caused relaxation in a concentration-dependent manner. The relaxation in response to ESera and, like that to ACh in GPAPs without endothelium, was fully abolished. Destruction of the endothelium or incubation with the nitric oxyde synthase inhibitor (L-NNA) significantly enhanced the inhibition of the relaxation response to ESera. Moreover, all concentrations induced vasoconstrictions. However, L-NNA produced a significant displacement to the right (about 65-fold) of the relaxation response to ESera. Similar results were obtained with ACh. Both diclofenac and tetra

  13. Arctigenin, a Potent Ingredient of Arctium lappa L., Induces Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase and Attenuates Subarachnoid Hemorrhage-Induced Vasospasm through PI3K/Akt Pathway in a Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Zen Chang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Upregulation of protein kinase B (PKB, also known as Akt is observed within the cerebral arteries of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH animals. This study is of interest to examine Arctigenin, a potent antioxidant, on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and Akt pathways in a SAH in vitro study. Basilar arteries (BAs were obtained to examine phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K, phospho-PI3K, Akt, phospho-Akt (Western blot and morphological examination. Endothelins (ETs and eNOS evaluation (Western blot and immunostaining were also determined. Arctigenin treatment significantly alleviates disrupted endothelial cells and tortured internal elastic layer observed in the SAH groups (p<0.01. The reduced eNOS protein and phospho-Akt expression in the SAH groups were relieved by the treatment of Arctigenin (p<0.01. This result confirmed that Arctigenin might exert dural effects in preventing SAH-induced vasospasm through upregulating eNOS expression via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and attenuate endothelins after SAH. Arctigenin shows therapeutic promise in the treatment of cerebral vasospasm following SAH.

  14. Arctigenin, a Potent Ingredient of Arctium lappa L., Induces Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase and Attenuates Subarachnoid Hemorrhage-Induced Vasospasm through PI3K/Akt Pathway in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Zen; Wu, Shu-Chuan; Chang, Chia-Mao; Lin, Chih-Lung; Kwan, Aij-Lie

    2015-01-01

    Upregulation of protein kinase B (PKB, also known as Akt) is observed within the cerebral arteries of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) animals. This study is of interest to examine Arctigenin, a potent antioxidant, on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and Akt pathways in a SAH in vitro study. Basilar arteries (BAs) were obtained to examine phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), phospho-PI3K, Akt, phospho-Akt (Western blot) and morphological examination. Endothelins (ETs) and eNOS evaluation (Western blot and immunostaining) were also determined. Arctigenin treatment significantly alleviates disrupted endothelial cells and tortured internal elastic layer observed in the SAH groups (p < 0.01). The reduced eNOS protein and phospho-Akt expression in the SAH groups were relieved by the treatment of Arctigenin (p < 0.01). This result confirmed that Arctigenin might exert dural effects in preventing SAH-induced vasospasm through upregulating eNOS expression via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and attenuate endothelins after SAH. Arctigenin shows therapeutic promise in the treatment of cerebral vasospasm following SAH.

  15. Insulin induces the release of vasodilator compounds from platelets by a nitric oxide-G kinase-VAMP-3-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randriamboavonjy, Voahanginirina; Schrader, Jürgen; Busse, Rudi; Fleming, Ingrid

    2004-02-01

    Insulin-induced vasodilatation is sensitive to nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) inhibitors. However, insulin is unable to relax isolated arteries or to activate endothelial NOS in endothelial cells. Since insulin can enhance platelet endothelial NOS activity, we determined whether insulin-induced vasodilatation can be attributed to a NO-dependent, platelet-mediated process. Insulin failed to relax endothelium-intact rings of porcine coronary artery. The supernatant from insulin-stimulated human platelets induced complete relaxation, which was prevented by preincubation of platelets with a NOS inhibitor, the soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, NS 2028, or the G kinase inhibitor, KT 5823, and was abolished by an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist. Insulin induced the release of adenosine trisphosphate (ATP), adenosine, and serotonin from platelet-dense granules in a NO-dependent manner. This response was not detected using insulin-stimulated platelets from endothelial NOS-/- mice, although a NO donor elicited ATP release. Insulin-induced ATP release from human platelets correlated with the association of syntaxin 2 with the vesicle-associated membrane protein 3 but was not associated with the activation of alphaIIbbeta3 integrin. Thus, insulin elicits the release of vasoactive concentrations of ATP and adenosine from human platelets via a NO-G kinase-dependent signaling cascade. The mechanism of dense granule secretion involves the G kinase-dependent association of syntaxin 2 with vesicle-associated membrane protein 3.

  16. Insulin Induces the Release of Vasodilator Compounds From Platelets by a Nitric Oxide–G Kinase–VAMP-3–dependent Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randriamboavonjy, Voahanginirina; Schrader, Jürgen; Busse, Rudi; Fleming, Ingrid

    2004-01-01

    Insulin-induced vasodilatation is sensitive to nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) inhibitors. However, insulin is unable to relax isolated arteries or to activate endothelial NOS in endothelial cells. Since insulin can enhance platelet endothelial NOS activity, we determined whether insulin-induced vasodilatation can be attributed to a NO-dependent, platelet-mediated process. Insulin failed to relax endothelium-intact rings of porcine coronary artery. The supernatant from insulin-stimulated human platelets induced complete relaxation, which was prevented by preincubation of platelets with a NOS inhibitor, the soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, NS 2028, or the G kinase inhibitor, KT 5823, and was abolished by an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist. Insulin induced the release of adenosine trisphosphate (ATP), adenosine, and serotonin from platelet-dense granules in a NO-dependent manner. This response was not detected using insulin-stimulated platelets from endothelial NOS−/− mice, although a NO donor elicited ATP release. Insulin-induced ATP release from human platelets correlated with the association of syntaxin 2 with the vesicle-associated membrane protein 3 but was not associated with the activation of αIIbβ3 integrin. Thus, insulin elicits the release of vasoactive concentrations of ATP and adenosine from human platelets via a NO–G kinase–dependent signaling cascade. The mechanism of dense granule secretion involves the G kinase–dependent association of syntaxin 2 with vesicle-associated membrane protein 3. PMID:14744991

  17. Antinociceptive effect of VSL#3 on visceral hypersensitivity in a rat model of irritable bowel syndrome: a possible action through nitric oxide pathway and enhance barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Cong; Guandalini, Stefano; Zhao, De-Hui; Jiang, Min

    2012-03-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder characterized by visceral hypersensitivity and altered bowel function. There are increasing evidences suggested that VSL#3 probiotics therapy has been recognized as an effective method to relieve IBS-induced symptoms. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of VSL#3 probiotics on visceral hypersensitivity (VH), nitric oxide (NO), fecal character, colonic epithelium permeability, and tight junction protein expression. IBS model was induced by intracolonic instillation of 4% acetic acid and restraint stress in rats. After subsidence of inflammation on the seventh experimental day, the rats were subjected to rectal distension, and then the abdominal withdrawal reflex and the number of fecal output were measured, respectively. Also, colonic permeability to Evans blue was measured in vivo, and tight junction protein expression was studied by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting method. Rats had been pretreated with VSL#3 or aminoguanidine (NOS inhibitor) or VSL#3+ aminoguanidine before measurements. The rats at placebo group showed hypersensitive response to rectal distension (P colonic permeability and increase the expression of tight junction proteins (occludin, ZO-1). As the part of this effect was lowered by NOS inhibitor, NO might play a role in the protective effect of VSL#3 to some extent.

  18. Modulatory role of nitric oxide in cardiac performance

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    Smiljić Sonja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide is produced by almost all cardiac cells, endothelial cells, cardiomyocytes and nerve fibers. It is synthesized by an enzyme, a nitric oxide synthase, which occurs in endothelial, neural and inducible form. The distribution of nitric oxide synthase in the heart is characterized by a pronounced non-uniformity. Nitric oxide exerts its effects in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. The physiological effects of low concentrations of nitric oxide, which is released in the normal conditions under the influence of constituent enzymes, occur via cyclic guanosine monophosphate. The synthesized nitric oxide exhibits its effect in the cells where it is produced, in an autocrine manner, or by diffusing into the neighboring cells, in a paracrine manner. Nitric oxide acts by regulating the coronary vessel tonus, affecting the contractility of cardiomyocytes, generating an inotropic effect in a dose-dependent manner and controlling the cellular respiration. Other effects of nitric oxide in the cardiovascular system include the hyperpolarization of the smooth muscle cells in blood vessels, the inhibition of the monocyte adhesion, the inhibition of platelet migration, adhesion and aggregation and the proliferation of smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts. The anti-atherosclerotic effects of nitric oxide are based on these effects. Nitric oxide is a weak free radical in gaseous state, and the cytotoxic and/or the cytoprotective effects of the higher concentrations of nitric oxide are related to the chemical structure of nitric oxide as a free radical. The excessive production of nitric oxide by the activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase can lead to major irregularities in the function of cardiomyocytes and cardiac insufficiency. Understanding the nitric oxide molecular mechanisms of signaling pathways in the heart can provide a new strategic approach to prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  19. Involvement of NMDA receptors and L-arginine/nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in the antidepressant-like effects of topiramate in mice forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Chamanara, Mohsen; Jazaeri, Farahnaz; Zolfaghari, Samira; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2016-04-01

    Topiramate (TPM) is an agent primarily used in the treatment of epilepsy. Using mice model of forced swimming test (FST) the current study was basically aimed to investigate the influence of TPM on depression by inhibiting NMDA receptor and nitric oxide-cGMP production. When TPM was administered in a dose of 20 and 30 mg/kg by i.p. route it reduced the immobility time during FST. However this effect of TPM (30 mg/kg, i.p.) in the FST was abolished when the mice were pretreated either with NMDA (75 mg/kg, i.p.), or l-arginine (750 mg/kg, i.p. NO precursor), or sildenafil (5mg/kg, i.p. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor). The immobility time in the FST was reduced after administration of L-NAME (10mg/kg, i.p, a non-specific NOS inhibitor), 7-nitoinidazol (30 mg/kg, i.p. a nNOS inhibitor) or MK-801 (0.05 mg/kg, i.p, a NMDA receptor antagonist) in combination with a subeffective dose of TPM (10mg/kg, i.p.) as compared with single use of either drug. Co-administrated of lower doses of MK-801 (0.01 mg/kg) or L-NAME (1mg/kg) failed to effect immobility time. However, simultaneous administration of these two agents in the same doses with subeffective dose of TPM (10mg/kg, i.p.), reduced the immobility time during FST. None of these drugs were found to have a profound effect on the locomotor activity per se during the open field test. Taken together, our data demonstrates that TPM exhibit antidepressant-like effect which is accomplished either due to inhibition of NMDA receptors or NO-cGMP production.

  20. High-intensity interval training prevents oxidant-mediated diaphragm muscle weakness in hypertensive mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, T Scott; Eisenkolb, Sophia; Drobner, Juliane; Fischer, Tina; Werner, Sarah; Linke, Axel; Mangner, Norman; Schuler, Gerhard; Adams, Volker

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension is a key risk factor for heart failure, with the latter characterized by diaphragm muscle weakness that is mediated in part by increased oxidative stress. In the present study, we used a deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt mouse model to determine whether hypertension could independently induce diaphragm dysfunction and further investigated the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT). Sham-treated (n = 11), DOCA-salt-treated (n = 11), and DOCA-salt+HIIT-treated (n = 15) mice were studied over 4 wk. Diaphragm contractile function, protein expression, enzyme activity, and fiber cross-sectional area and type were subsequently determined. Elevated blood pressure confirmed hypertension in DOCA-salt mice independent of HIIT (P HIIT. Myosin heavy chain (MyHC) protein expression tended to decrease (∼30%; P = 0.06) in DOCA-salt vs. sham- and DOCA-salt+HIIT mice, whereas oxidative stress increased (P HIIT further prevented direct oxidant-mediated diaphragm contractile dysfunction (P HIIT.-Bowen, T. S., Eisenkolb, S., Drobner, J., Fischer, T., Werner, S., Linke, A., Mangner, N., Schuler, G., Adams, V. High-intensity interval training prevents oxidant-mediated diaphragm muscle weakness in hypertensive mice.

  1. L-theanine, a Component of Green Tea Prevents 3-Nitropropionic Acid (3-NP)-Induced Striatal Toxicity by Modulating Nitric Oxide Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamwal, Sumit; Kumar, Puneet

    2017-04-01

    L-theanine is unique amino acid which readily crosses blood brain barrier and possesses neuroprotective potential against neurodegenerative disorders including Huntington disease (HD). HD is characterized by selective loss of GABAergic medium spiny neurons. 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP) induces a spectrum of HD-like neuropathology in rat striatum and widely used as experimental tool to study HD. Therefore, the present study was intended to investigate the effect of L-theanine against 3-NP-induced striatal toxicity and to explore its possible mechanism. Rats were administered with 3-NP for 21 days. L-theanine was given once a day, 1 h prior to 3-NP treatment for 21 days and L-NAME (10 mg/kg, i.p.), NO inhibitor and L-arginine (50 mg/kg; i.p.), NO precursor were administered 1 h prior to L-theanine treatment. Body weight and behavioral observation were made on weekly basis. On the 22nd day, animals were sacrificed, and the striatum was isolated for biochemical (LPO, GSH, and nitrite), pro-inflammatory cytokines and neurochemical analysis. 3-NP treatment significantly altered body weight, locomotor activity, motor coordination, mitochondrial complex-II activity, oxidative defense, pro-inflammatory mediators, and striatal neurotransmitters level. L-theanine pre-treatment (25 and 50 mg/kg/day, p.o.) significantly prevented these alterations. In addition, concurrent treatment of L-NAME with L-theanine (25 mg/kg/day, p.o.) significantly enhanced protective effect of L-theanine (25 mg/kg/day, p.o.) whereas concurrent treatment of L-arginine with L-theanine (50 mg/kg/day, p.o.) significantly ameliorated the protective effect of L-theanine (50 mg/kg/day, p.o.). The neuroprotective potential of L-theanine involves inhibition of detrimental nitric oxide production and prevention of neurotransmitters alteration in the striatum.

  2. Effects of quercetin on hyper-proliferation of gastric mucosal cells in rats treated with chronic oral ethanol through the reactive oxygen species-nitric oxide pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-Li Liu; Jun Du; Ling-Ling Fan; Xiao-Yan Liu; Luo Gu; Ying-Bin Ge

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of quercetin (3,3,4',5,7-pentahydroxy flavone),a major flavonoid in human diet,on hyper-proliferation of gastric mucosal cells in rats treated with chronic oral ethanol.METHODS:Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats,weighing 200-250 g,were randomly divided into control group (tap water ad//b/tum),ethanol treatment group (6 mL/L ethanol),quercetin treatment group (intragastric garage with 100 mg/kg of quercetin per day),and ethanol plus quercetin treatment group (quercetin and 6 mL/L ethanol).Expression levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Cyclin D1 were detected by Western blot to assay gastric mucosal cell proliferation in rats.To demonstrate the influence of quercetin on the production of extra-cellular reactive oxygen species/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) in rats,changes in levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBAR5),protein carbonyl,nitrite and nitrate (NOx) and nitrotyrosine (NT) were determined.The activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS) including iNOS and nNOS was also detected by Western blot,RESULTS:Compared to control animals,cell proliferation in the gastric mucosa of animals subjected to ethanol treatment for 7 days was significant increased (increased to 290% for PCNA density P < 0.05,increased to150 for Cyclin D1 density P < 0.05 and 21.6 + 0.8 vs 42.3 + 0.7 for PCNA positive cells per view field),accompanied by an increase in ROS generation (1.298 ± 0.135 μmol vs 1.772 ± 0.078 μmol for TBARS P < 0.05;4.36 + 0.39 mmol vs 7.48 4- 0.40 mmol for carbonyl contents P < 0.05) and decrease in NO generation (11.334 + 0.467 μmol vs 7.978 ± 0.334 μmol P < 0.01 for NOx;8.986 ± 1.351 μmol vs 6.854 ± 0.460 μmol for nitrotyrosine P < 0.01) and nNOS activity (decreased to 43% P < 0.05).This function was abolished by the co-administration of quercetin.CONCLUSION:The antioxidant action of quercetin relies,in part,on its ability to stimulate nNOS and enhance production of NO that

  3. Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitors as Antidepressants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Gregers; Volke, Vallo

    2010-01-01

    been suggested to play major roles in the pathophysiology of mood and stress-related disorders. However, a few clinical and several pre-clinical studies, strongly suggest involvement of the nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway in these disorders. Moreover, several of the conventional neurotransmitters...

  4. Linoleic acid-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase II via p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-kappaB pathway in retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, I-Mo; Yang, Chang-Hao; Yang, Chung-May; Chen, Muh-Shy

    2007-11-01

    High linoleic acid (LA) intake is known to correlate with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), but the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of LA on expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase II (COX-2) and their associated signaling pathways in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. ARPE-19 cells were treated with different concentrations of LA. Expressions of iNOS and COX-2 were examined using semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. Concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) in the culture medium were determined by enzyme-link immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Activation of p42/44, p38, JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factors (NF)-kappaB were evaluated by Western blot analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). We found that LA induced expression of iNOS and COX-2 in RPE cells at the mRNA and protein levels in a time-and dose-dependent manner. Upregulation of iNOS and COX-2 resulted in increased production of NO and PGE(2). Moreover, LA caused degradation of IkappaB and increased NF-kappaB DNA binding activity. Effects of LA-induced iNOS and COX-2 expression were inhibited by a NF-kappaB inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC). LA activated p42/44, but not p38 or JNK MAPK. Inhibition of p42/44 activity by PD98059 significantly reduced LA-induced activation of NF-kappaB. Linoleic acid-induced expression of iNOS and COX-2 as well as PGE(2) and NO release in RPE cells were sequentially mediated through activation of p42/p44, MAPK, then NF-kappaB. These results may provide new insights into both mechanisms of LA action on RPE cells and pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration.

  5. The phytoestrogen ginsensoside Re activates potassium channels of vascular smooth muscle cells through PI3K/Akt and nitric oxide pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, Yutaka; Mawatari, Kazuaki; Takahashi, Akira; Harada, Nagakatsu; Hata, Akiko; Yasui, Sonoko

    2007-08-01

    In vascular smooth muscle cells, large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (K(Ca) channels) play a pivotal role in determining membrane potential, and thereby the vascular tone. Ginsenoside Re, a phytochemical from ginseng, is reported to activate this channel, but its precise mechanism is unsolved. Patch clamp studies showed that ginsenoside Re activates K(Ca) channels in the arterial smooth muscle cell line A10 in a dose-dependent manner. The channel-opening effect of ginsenoside Re was inhibited by 1 microM L-NIO, an inhibitor of eNOS, but not by 3 microM SMTC, an inhibitor of nNOS, indicating that ginsenoside Re activated K(Ca) channels through activation of eNOS. SH-6 (10 microM), an Akt inhibitor, and wortmannin, a PI3-kinase inhibitor, completely blocked activation of K(Ca) channels by ginsenoside Re, indicating that it activates eNOS via a c-Src/PI3-kinase/Akt-dependent mechanism. In addition, the ginsenoside Re-induced activation of eNOS and K(Ca) channel was blocked by 10 microM ICI 182, 780, an inhibitor of membrane estrogen receptor-alpha, suggesting that eNOS activation occurs via a non-genomic pathway of this receptor. In conclusion, ginsenoside Re releases NO via a membrane sex steroid receptors, resulting in K(Ca) channel activation in vascular smooth muscle cells, promoting vasodilation and preventing severe arterial contraction.

  6. JS-K, a nitric oxide pro-drug, regulates growth and apoptosis through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Guobin; Qiu, Mingning; Chen, Lieqian; Zhang, Sai; Ke, Longzhi; Liu, Jianjun

    2017-05-26

    In view of the fact that JS-K might regulate ubiquitin E3 ligase and that ubiquitin E3 ligase plays an important role in the mechanism of CRPC formation, the goal was to investigate the probable mechanism by which JS-K regulates prostate cancer cells. Proliferation inhibition by JS-K on prostate cancer cells was examined usingCCK-8 assays. Caspase 3/7 activity assays and flow cytometry were performed to examine whether JS-K induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. Western blotting and co-immunoprecipitation analyses investigated JS-K's effects on the associated apoptosis mechanism. Real time-PCR and Western blotting were performed to assess JS-K's effect on transcription of specific AR target genes. Western blotting was also performed to detect Siah2 and AR protein concentrations and co-immunoprecipitation to detect interactions of Siah2 and AR, NCoR1 and AR, and p300 and AR. JS-K inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. JS-K increased p53 and Mdm2 concentrations and regulated the caspase cascade reaction-associated protein concentrations. JS-K inhibited transcription of AR target genes and down-regulated PSA protein concentrations. JS-K inhibited Siah2 interactions and also inhibited the ubiquitination of AR. With further investigation, JS-K was found to stabilize AR and NCoR1 interactions and diminish AR and p300 interactions. The present results suggested that JS-K might have been able to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis via regulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome degradation pathway, which represented a promising platform for the development of new compounds for PCa treatments.

  7. Nitric oxide supersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, J; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Thomsen, L L

    1993-01-01

    in a double blind design to 17 migraine patients, 17 age and sex matched healthy controls and 9 subjects with tension-type headache. The nitroglycerin-induced headache was significantly more severe in migraine sufferers, lasted longer and fulfilled diagnostic criteria for migraine more often. We have...... previously shown a similar supersensitivity to histamine which in human cerebral arteries activates endothelial H1 receptors and causes endothelial production of nitric oxide. Migraine patients are thus supersensitive to exogenous nitric oxide from nitroglycerin as well as to endothelially produced nitric...

  8. Nitric Oxide Homeostasis in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide in the pathogenesis and progression of neurodegenerative illnesses such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases has become prominent over the years. Increased activity of the enzymes that produce reactive oxygen species, decreased activity of antioxidant enzymes and imbalances in glutathione pools mediate and mark the neurodegenerative process. Much of the oxidative damage of proteins is brought about by the overproduction of nitric oxide by nitric oxide synthases (NOS) and its subsequent reactivity with reactive oxygen species. Proteomic methods have advanced the field tremendously, by facilitating the quantitative assessment of differential expression patterns and oxidative modifications of proteins and alongside, mapping their non-canonical functions. As a signaling molecule involved in multiple biochemical pathways, the level of nitric oxide is subject to tight regulation. All three NOS isoforms display aberrant patterns of expression in Alzheimer's disease, altering intracellular signaling and routing oxidative stress in directions that are uncompounded. This review discusses the prime factors that control nitric oxide biosynthesis, reactivity footprints and ensuing effects in the development of neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Spectroscopic and electrical sensing mechanism in oxidant-mediated polypyrrole nanofibers/nanoparticles for ammonia gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishpal; Kaur, Amarjeet

    2013-05-01

    Ammonia gas sensing mechanism in oxidant-mediated polypyrrole (PPy) nanofibers/nanoparticles has been studied through spectroscopic and electrical investigations. PPy nanofibers/nanoparticles have been synthesized by chemical oxidation method in the presence of various oxidizing agents such as ammonium persulfate (APS), potassium persulfate (PPS), vanadium pentoxide (V2O5), and iron chloride (FeCl3). Scanning electron microscopy study revealed that PPy nanofibers of about 63, 71 and 79 nm diameters were formed in the presence of APS, PPS, V2O5, respectively, while PPy nanoparticles of about 100-110 nm size were obtained in the presence of FeCl3 as an oxidant. The structural investigations and confirmation of synthesis of PPy were established through Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The gas sensing behavior of the prepared PPy samples is investigated by measuring the electrical resistance in ammonia environment. The observed gas sensing response ( δR R × 100 ) at 100 ppm level of ammonia is 4.5 and 18 % for the samples prepared with oxidizing agents FeCl3 and APS, respectively, and by changing the ammonia level from 50 to 300 ppm, the sensing response varies from 4.5 to 11 % and 10 to 39 %, respectively. Out of all four samples, the PPy nanofibers prepared in the presence of APS have shown the best sensing response. The mechanism of gas sensing response of the PPy samples has been investigated through Raman spectroscopy study. The decrease of charge carrier concentration through reduction of polymeric chains has been recognized through Raman spectroscopic measurements recorded in ammonia environment.

  10. Spectroscopic and electrical sensing mechanism in oxidant-mediated polypyrrole nanofibers/nanoparticles for ammonia gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishpal; Kaur, Amarjeet, E-mail: amarkaur@physics.du.ac.in [University of Delhi, Department of Physics and Astrophysics (India)

    2013-05-15

    Ammonia gas sensing mechanism in oxidant-mediated polypyrrole (PPy) nanofibers/nanoparticles has been studied through spectroscopic and electrical investigations. PPy nanofibers/nanoparticles have been synthesized by chemical oxidation method in the presence of various oxidizing agents such as ammonium persulfate (APS), potassium persulfate (PPS), vanadium pentoxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}), and iron chloride (FeCl{sub 3}). Scanning electron microscopy study revealed that PPy nanofibers of about 63, 71 and 79 nm diameters were formed in the presence of APS, PPS, V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, respectively, while PPy nanoparticles of about 100-110 nm size were obtained in the presence of FeCl{sub 3} as an oxidant. The structural investigations and confirmation of synthesis of PPy were established through Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The gas sensing behavior of the prepared PPy samples is investigated by measuring the electrical resistance in ammonia environment. The observed gas sensing response ({Delta}R/Rx100) at 100 ppm level of ammonia is {approx}4.5 and 18 % for the samples prepared with oxidizing agents FeCl{sub 3} and APS, respectively, and by changing the ammonia level from 50 to 300 ppm, the sensing response varies from {approx}4.5 to 11 % and {approx}10 to 39 %, respectively. Out of all four samples, the PPy nanofibers prepared in the presence of APS have shown the best sensing response. The mechanism of gas sensing response of the PPy samples has been investigated through Raman spectroscopy study. The decrease of charge carrier concentration through reduction of polymeric chains has been recognized through Raman spectroscopic measurements recorded in ammonia environment.

  11. Resveratrol and Endothelial Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Xia

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO derived from the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS has antihypertensive, antithrombotic, anti-atherosclerotic and antiobesogenic properties. Resveratrol is a polyphenol phytoalexin with multiple cardiovascular and metabolic effects. Part of the beneficial effects of resveratrol are mediated by eNOS. Resveratrol stimulates NO production from eNOS by a number of mechanisms, including upregulation of eNOS expression, stimulation of eNOS enzymatic activity and reversal of eNOS uncoupling. In addition, by reducing oxidative stress, resveratrol prevents oxidative NO inactivation by superoxide thereby enhancing NO bioavailability. Molecular pathways underlying these effects of resveratrol involve SIRT1, AMPK, Nrf2 and estrogen receptors.

  12. Activation of Proinflammatory Responses in Cells of the Airway Mucosa by Particulate Matter: Oxidant- and Non-Oxidant-Mediated Triggering Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Øvrevik

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is considered to play a central role in a diverse range of disease outcomes associated with exposure to various types of inhalable particulates. The initial mechanisms through which particles trigger cellular responses leading to activation of inflammatory responses are crucial to clarify in order to understand what physico-chemical characteristics govern the inflammogenic activity of particulate matter and why some particles are more harmful than others. Recent research suggests that molecular triggering mechanisms involved in activation of proinflammatory genes and onset of inflammatory reactions by particles or soluble particle components can be categorized into direct formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS with subsequent oxidative stress, interaction with the lipid layer of cellular membranes, activation of cell surface receptors, and direct interactions with intracellular molecular targets. The present review focuses on the immediate effects and responses in cells exposed to particles and central down-stream signaling mechanisms involved in regulation of proinflammatory genes, with special emphasis on the role of oxidant and non-oxidant triggering mechanisms. Importantly, ROS act as a central second-messenger in a variety of signaling pathways. Even non-oxidant mediated triggering mechanisms are therefore also likely to activate downstream redox-regulated events.

  13. Dispersal of human and plant pathogens biofilms via nitric oxide donors at 4 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvasi, Massimiliano; Durie, Ian A; Henríquez, Tania; Satkute, Aiste; Matuszewska, Marta; Prado, Raphael Carvalho

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that nitric oxide donors capable of manipulating nitric oxide-mediated signaling in bacteria could induce dispersal of biofilms. Encased in extracellular polymeric substances, human and plant pathogens within biofilms are significantly more resistant to sanitizers. This is particularly a problem in refrigerated environments where food is processed. In an exercise aimed to study the potential of nitric oxide donors as biofilm dispersal in refrigerated conditions, we compared the ability of different nitric oxide donors (SNAP, NO-aspirin and Noc-5) to dislodge biofilms formed by foodborne, human and plant pathogens treated at 4 °C. The donors SNAP and Noc-5 were efficient in dispersing biofilms formed by Salmonella enterica, pathogenic Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua. The biomasses were decreased up to 30 % when compared with the untreated controls. When the plant pathogens Pectobacterium sp. and Xanthomonas sp. were tested the dispersion was mainly limited to Pectobacterium carotovorum biofilms, decreasing up to 15 % after exposure to molsidomine. Finally, the association of selected nitric oxide donors with sanitizers (DiQuat, H2O2, peracetic acid and PhenoTek II) was effective in dispersing biofilms. The best dispersal was achieved by pre-treating P. carotovorum with molsidomine and then peracetic acid. The synergistic effect was estimated up to ~35 % in dispersal when compared with peracetic acid alone. The association of nitric oxide donors with sanitizers could provide a foundation for an improved sanitization procedure for cleaning refrigerate environments.

  14. Lower Expression of SLC27A1 Enhances Intramuscular Fat Deposition in Chicken via Down-Regulated Fatty Acid Oxidation Mediated by CPT1A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Fengfang; Xie, Liang; Ma, Jing-e; Luo, Wen; Zhang, Li; Chao, Zhe; Chen, Shaohao; Nie, Qinghua; Lin, Zhemin; Zhang, Xiquan

    2017-01-01

    Intramuscular fat (IMF) is recognized as the predominant factor affecting meat quality due to its positive correlation with tenderness, juiciness, and flavor. Chicken IMF deposition depends on the balance among lipid synthesis, transport, uptake, and subsequent metabolism, involving a lot of genes and pathways, however, its precise molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. In the present study, the breast muscle tissue of female Wenchang chickens (WC) (higher IMF content, 1.24 in D120 and 1.62 in D180) and female White Recessive Rock chickens (WRR; lower IMF content, 0.53 in D120 and 0.90 in D180) were subjected to RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis. Results showed that many genes related to lipid catabolism, such as SLC27A1, LPL, ABCA1, and CPT1A were down-regulated in WC chickens, and these genes were involved in the PPAR signaling pathway and formed an IPA® network related to lipid metabolism. Furthermore, SLC27A1 was more down-regulated in WRR.D180.B than in WRR.D120.B. Decreased cellular triglyceride (TG) and up-regulated CPT1A were observed in the SLC27A1 overexpression QM-7 cells, and increased cellular triglyceride (TG) and down-regulated CPT1A were observed in the SLC27A1 knockdown QM-7 cells. These results suggest that lower lipid catabolism exists in WC chickens but not in WRR chickens, and lower expression of SLC27A1 facilitate IMF deposition in chicken via down-regulated fatty acid oxidation mediated by CPT1A. These findings indicate that reduced lipid catabolism, rather than increased lipid anabolism, contributes to chicken IMF deposition. PMID:28706492

  15. Vascular nitric oxide and superoxide anion contribute to sex-specific programmed cardiovascular physiology in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roghair, Robert D; Segar, Jeffrey L; Volk, Kenneth A; Chapleau, Mark W; Dallas, Lindsay M; Sorenson, Anna R; Scholz, Thomas D; Lamb, Fred S

    2009-03-01

    Intrauterine environmental pertubations have been linked to the development of adult hypertension. We sought to evaluate the interrelated roles of sex, nitric oxide, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in programmed cardiovascular disease. Programming was induced in mice by maternal dietary intervention (DI; partial substitution of protein with carbohydrates and fat) or carbenoxolone administration (CX, to increase fetal glucocorticoid exposure). Adult blood pressure and locomotor activity were recorded by radiotelemetry at baseline, after a week of high salt, and after a week of high salt plus nitric oxide synthase inhibition (by l-NAME). In male offspring, DI or CX programmed an elevation in blood pressure that was exacerbated by N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester administration, but not high salt alone. Mesenteric resistance vessels from DI male offspring displayed impaired vasorelaxation to ACh and nitroprusside, which was blocked by catalase and superoxide dismutase. CX-exposed females were normotensive, while DI females had nitric oxide synthase-dependent hypotension and enhanced mesenteric dilation. Despite the disparate cardiovascular phenotypes, both male and female DI offspring displayed increases in locomotor activity and aortic superoxide production. Despite dissimilar blood pressures, DI and CX-exposed females had reductions in cardiac baroreflex sensitivity. In conclusion, both maternal malnutrition and fetal glucocorticoid exposure program increases in arterial pressure in male but not female offspring. While maternal DI increased both superoxide-mediated vasoconstriction and nitric oxide mediated vasodilation, the balance of these factors favored the development of hypertension in males and hypotension in females.

  16. Inhibition of Nuclear Factor-kappa B or Bax Prevents Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-But Not Nitric Oxide-Mediated Apoptosis in INS-1E Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonnesen, M.F.; Grunnet, L.G.; Friberg, J.;

    2009-01-01

    elicited by NO and ER Ca2+ depletion differ, we here compare the direct effects of NO, in the form of the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D, L-penicillamine (SNAP), with the effects of SERCA2 inhibitor thapsigargin (TG) on MAPK, nuclear factor kappa B (NF kappa B), Bcl-2 proteins, ER stress, and apoptosis...

  17. Serum from achalasia patients alters neurochemical coding in the myenteric plexus and nitric oxide mediated motor response in normal human fundus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    des Varannes, SB; Chevalier, J; Pimont, S; Le Neel, JC; Klotz, M; Schafer, KH; Galmiche, JP; Neunlist, M

    2006-01-01

    Background and aims: Achalasia is a disease of unknown aetiology. An immune mechanism has been suggested on the basis of previous morphological observations. The objective of this study was to test whether the serum of achalasia patients could reproduce the phenotype and functional changes that occu

  18. A novel soluble immune-type receptor (SITR) in teleost fish: carp SITR is involved in the nitric oxide-mediated response to a protozoan parasite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribeiro, C.M.S.; Raes, G.; Ghassabeh, G.H.; Schijns, V.E.J.C.; Pontes, M.J.S.L.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Wiegertjes, G.F.

    2011-01-01

    Background- The innate immune system relies upon a wide range of germ-line encoded receptors including a large number of immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) receptors. Different Ig-like immune receptor families have been reported in mammals, birds, amphibians and fish. Most innate immune receptors of

  19. Graphene oxide-mediated rapid dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride by green rust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Li-Zhi; Hansen, Hans Christian B.; Daasbjerg, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Graphene-based nanomaterials can mediate environmentally relevant abiotic redox reactions of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons. In this study as low amounts as ∼0.007 % of graphene oxide (GO) was found to catalyze the reduction of carbon tetrachloride by layered Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxide (Green....... This study indicates that traces of graphene oxide can affect reaction pathways as well as kinetics for dechlorination processes in anoxic sediments by facilitating a partial dechlorination....

  20. Overexpressed neuroglobin raises threshold for nitric oxide-induced impairment of mitochondrial respiratory activities and stress signaling in primary cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shilpee; Zhuo, Ming; Gorgun, Falih M; Englander, Ella W

    2013-08-01

    Surges of nitric oxide compromise mitochondrial respiration primarily by competitive inhibition of oxygen binding to cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) and are particularly injurious in neurons, which rely on oxidative phosphorylation for all their energy needs. Here, we show that transgenic overexpression of the neuronal globin protein, neuroglobin, helps diminish protein nitration, preserve mitochondrial function and sustain ATP content of primary cortical neurons challenged by extended nitric oxide exposure. Specifically, in transgenic neurons, elevated neuroglobin curtailed nitric oxide-induced alterations in mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates, including baseline oxygen consumption, consumption coupled with ATP synthesis, proton leak and spare respiratory capacity. Concomitantly, activation of genes involved in sensing and responding to oxidative/nitrosative stress, including the early-immediate c-Fos gene and the phase II antioxidant enzyme, heme oxygenase-1, was diminished in neuroglobin-overexpressing compared to wild-type neurons. Taken together, these differences reflect a lesser insult produced by similar concentrations of nitric oxide in neuroglobin-overexpressing compared to wild-type neurons, suggesting that abundant neuroglobin buffers nitric oxide and raises the threshold of nitric oxide-mediated injury in neurons.

  1. A nitric oxide donor (nitroglycerin) triggers genuine migraine attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, L L; Kruuse, C; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    1994-01-01

    Supersensitivity to induction of headache and arterial dilatation by a donor of nitric oxide (nitroglycerin) has recently been demonstrated in migraine sufferers. The aims of the present study were to examine whether the nitric oxide donor nitroglycerin may induce a typical migraine attack.......03). The time pattern of headache and estimated middle cerebral artery dilatation corresponded well. The study therefore demonstrates that activation of the nitric oxide cGMP pathway may cause typical migraine attacks......., to exclude placebo-related effects and to describe the relation between middle cerebral artery dilatation and provoked migraine. Nitroglycerin (0.5 μg/kg/min for 20 min) or placebo was infused into 12 migraine patients in a double-blind cross-over trial. Blood velocity in the middle cerebral artery...

  2. How the location of superoxide generation influences the β-cell response to nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broniowska, Katarzyna A; Oleson, Bryndon J; McGraw, Jennifer; Naatz, Aaron; Mathews, Clayton E; Corbett, John A

    2015-03-20

    Cytokines impair the function and decrease the viability of insulin-producing β-cells by a pathway that requires the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and generation of high levels of nitric oxide. In addition to nitric oxide, excessive formation of reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, has been shown to cause β-cell damage. Although the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide results in the formation of peroxynitrite, we have shown that β-cells do not have the capacity to produce this powerful oxidant in response to cytokines. When β-cells are forced to generate peroxynitrite using nitric oxide donors and superoxide-generating redox cycling agents, superoxide scavenges nitric oxide and prevents the inhibitory and destructive actions of nitric oxide on mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and β-cell viability. In this study, we show that the β-cell response to nitric oxide is regulated by the location of superoxide generation. Nitric oxide freely diffuses through cell membranes, and it reacts with superoxide produced within cells and in the extracellular space, generating peroxynitrite. However, only when it is produced within cells does superoxide attenuate nitric oxide-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, gene expression, and toxicity. These findings suggest that the location of radical generation and the site of radical reactions are key determinants in the functional response of β-cells to reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species. Although nitric oxide is freely diffusible, its biological function can be controlled by the local generation of superoxide, such that when this reaction occurs within β-cells, superoxide protects β-cells by scavenging nitric oxide.

  3. Glucagon-like peptide-1 excites firing and increases GABAergic miniature postsynaptic currents (mPSCs in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons of the male mice via activation of nitric oxide (NO and suppression of endocannabinoid signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imre Farkas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, a metabolic signal molecule, regulates reproduction, although, the involved molecular mechanisms have not been elucidated, yet. Therefore, responsiveness of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons to the GLP-1 analog Exendin-4 and elucidation of molecular pathways acting downstream to the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R have been challenged. Loose patch-clamp recordings revealed that Exendin-4 (100 nM–5 μM elevated firing rate in hypothalamic GnRH-GFP neurons of male mice via activation of GLP-1R. Whole-cell patch-clamp measurements demonstrated increased excitatory GABAergic miniature postsynaptic currents (mPSCs frequency after Exendin-4 administration, which was eliminated by the GLP-1R antagonist Exendin-3(9-39 (1 μM. Intracellular application of the G-protein inhibitor GDP-beta-S (2 mM impeded action of Exendin-4 on mPSCs, suggesting direct excitatory action of GLP-1 on GnRH neurons. Blockade of nitric-oxide (NO synthesis by L-NAME (100 μM or NPLA (1 μM or intracellular scavenging of NO by CPTIO (1 mM partially attenuated the excitatory effect of Exendin-4. Similar partial inhibition was achieved by hindering endocannabinoid pathway using CB1 inverse-agonist AM251 (1 μM. Simultaneous blockade of NO and endocannabinoid signaling mechanisms eliminated action of Exendin-4 suggesting involvement of both retrograde machineries. Intracellular application of the TRPV1-antagonist AMG9810 (10 μM or the FAAH-inhibitor PF3845 (5 μM impeded the GLP-1-triggered endocannabinoid pathway indicating an anandamide-TRPV1-sensitive control of 2-AG production. Furthermore, GLP-1 immunoreactive axons innervated GnRH neurons in the hypothalamus suggesting that GLP-1 of both peripheral and neuronal sources can modulate GnRH neurons. RT-qPCR study confirmed the expression of GLP-1R and nNOS mRNAs in GnRH-GFP neurons. Immuno-electron microscopic analysis revealed the presence of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS protein in Gn

  4. Nitric oxide and cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengel, Atiye; Sahinarslan, Asife

    2006-12-01

    Endothelium has many important functions including the control of blood-tissue permeability and vascular tonus, regulation of vascular surface properties for homeostasis and inflammation. Nitric oxide is the chief molecule in regulation of endothelial functions. Nitric oxide deficiency, which is also known as endothelial dysfunction, is the first step for the occurrence of many disease states in cardiovascular system including heart failure, hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus, hyperhomocysteinemia and smoking. This review deals with the importance of nitric oxide for cardiovascular system. It also includes the latest improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of endothelial dysfunction.

  5. 49 CFR 173.158 - Nitric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nitric acid. 173.158 Section 173.158... Nitric acid. (a) Nitric acid exceeding 40 percent concentration may not be packaged with any other material. (b) Nitric acid in any concentration which does not contain sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid as...

  6. 49 CFR 173.337 - Nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nitric oxide. 173.337 Section 173.337... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.337 Nitric oxide. (a) Nitric oxide must be... valve and valve seat that will not deteriorate in contact with nitric oxide. Cylinders or valves may...

  7. Dietary flavonoids and nitrate: effects on nitric oxide and vascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondonno, Catherine P; Croft, Kevin D; Ward, Natalie; Considine, Michael J; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2015-04-01

    Emerging evidence highlights dietary flavonoids and nitrate as candidates that may explain at least part of the cardioprotective effect of a fruit and vegetable diet. Nitric oxide plays a pivotal role in cardiovascular health. Components of a fruit and vegetable diet that are cardioprotective, in part through effects on nitric oxide status, could substantially reduce the cardiovascular risk profile of the general population with increased intake of such a diet. Epidemiological evidence suggests that dietary flavonoids and nitrate have a cardioprotective effect. Clinical trials with flavonoid- and nitrate-rich foods have shown benefits on measures of vascular health. While the molecular mechanisms by which flavonoids and nitrate are cardioprotective are not completely understood, recent evidence suggests both nonspecific and specific effects through nitric oxide pathways. This review presents an overview of nitric oxide and its key role in cardiovascular health and discusses the possible vascular benefits of flavonoids and nitrate, individually and in combination, through effects on nitric oxide status.

  8. Activin suppresses LPS-induced Toll-like receptor, cytokine and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in normal human melanocytes by inhibiting NF-κB and MAPK pathway activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Il; Park, Seung-Won; Kang, In Jung; Shin, Min Kyung; Lee, Mu-Hyoung

    2015-10-01

    Activins are dimeric growth and differentiation factors that belong to the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β superfamily of structurally related signaling proteins. In the present study, we examined the mechanisms through which activin regulates the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced transcription of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), cytokines and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in human melanocytes, as well as the involvement of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Cell proliferation was analyzed by cell viability assay, mRNA expression was detected by RT-qPCR, and protein expression was measured by western blot analysis. LPS increased the mRNA expression of TLRs (TLR1-10) and cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α], as well as the mRNA and protein expression of iNOS. Activin decreased the LPS-induced TLR and cytokine mRNA expression, as well as the LPS-induced iNOS mRNA and protein expression. In addition, activin suppressed NF-κB p65 activation and blocked inhibitor of NF-κB (IκBα) degradation in LPS-stimulated melanocytes, and reduced LPS-induced p38 MAPK and MEK/ERK activation. On the whole, our results demonstrated that activin inhibited TLR and cytokine expression in LPS-activated normal human melanocytes and suppressed LPS-induced iNOS gene expression. Moreover, the anti-inflammatory effects of activin were shown to be mediated through the suppression of NF-κB and MAPK signaling, resulting in reduced TLR and iNOS expression, and in the inhibition of inflammatory cytokine expression.

  9. Gene expression profiles of vascular smooth muscle show differential expression of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways during captopril therapy of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Frank C; Brozovich, Frank V

    2008-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is characterized by increased vascular tone and an impairment in nitric-oxide-mediated vasodilatation. We have demonstrated that the blunted response to nitric oxide is due, in part, to a reduction in the leucine-zipper-positive isoform of the myosin-targeting subunit (MYPT1) of myosin light-chain phosphatase. Additionally, we have shown that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition, but not afterload reduction with prazosin, preserves leucine-zipper-positive MYPT1 isoform expression in vascular smooth muscle cells and normalizes the sensitivity to cGMP-mediated vasodilatation. We therefore hypothesized that in CHF, growth regulators and cytokines downstream of the angiotensin II receptor are involved in modulating gene expression in vascular tissue. Rats were divided into control and captopril-treated groups following left coronary artery ligation. Gene expression profiles in the aorta and portal vein at baseline and 2 and 4 weeks after myocardial infarction (MI) were analyzed using microarray technology and quantitative real-time PCR. After MI, microarray analysis revealed differential mRNA expression of 21 genes in the aorta of captopril-treated rats 2 and 4 weeks after surgery when compared to gene expression profiles at baseline and without captopril therapy. Real-time PCR demonstrated that captopril suppressed the expression of protein kinases in the angiotensin-II-mediated mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway, including Taok1 and Raf1. These data suggest that in CHF, captopril therapy modulates gene expression in vascular smooth muscle, and some of the beneficial effects of ACE inhibition may be due to differential gene expression in the vasculature.

  10. All-Trans Retinoic Acid Modulates TLR4/NF-κB Signaling Pathway Targeting TNF-α and Nitric Oxide Synthase 2 Expression in Colonic Mucosa during Ulcerative Colitis and Colitis Associated Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafa, Hayet; Benkhelifa, Sarra; AitYounes, Sonia; Saoula, Houria; Belhadef, Said; Belkhelfa, Mourad; Boukercha, Aziza; Toumi, Ryma; Soufli, Imene; de Launoit, Yvan; Mahfouf, Hassen; Nakmouche, M'hamed

    2017-01-01

    Colitis associated cancer (CAC) is the colorectal cancer (CRC) subtype that is associated with bowel disease such as ulcerative colitis (UC). The data on role of NF-κB signaling in development and progression of CAC were derived from preclinical studies, whereas data from human are rare. The aim of this work was to study the contribution of NF-κB pathway during UC and CAC, as well as the immunomodulatory effect of all-trans retinoic acid (AtRA). We analyzed the expression of NOS2, TNF-α, TLR4, and NF-κB, in colonic mucosa. We also studied NO/TNF-α modulation by LPS in colonic mucosa pretreated with AtRA. A marked increase in TLR4, NF-κB, TNF-α, and NOS2 expression was reported in colonic mucosa. The relationship between LPS/TLR4 and TNF-α/NO production, as well as the role of NF-κB signaling, was confirmed by ex vivo experiments and the role of LPS/TLR4 in NOS2/TNF-α induction through NF-κB pathway was suggested. AtRA downregulates NOS2 and TNF-α expression. Collectively, our study indicates that AtRA modulates in situ LPS/TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway targeting NOS2 and TNF-α expression. Therefore, we suggest that AtRA has a potential value in new strategies to improve the current therapy, as well as in the clinical prevention of CAC development and progression.

  11. Kinetics and thermodynamics of oxidation mediated reaction in L-cysteine and its methyl and ethyl esters in dimethyl sulfoxide-d6 by NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Ryan J.; Singh, Jaideep; Krishnan, V. V.

    2017-03-01

    L-Cysteine (L-Cys), L-Cysteine methyl ester (L-CysME) or L-Cysteine ethyl ester (L-CysEE), when dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide, undergoes an oxidation process. This process is slow enough and leads to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral changes that could be monitored in real time. The oxidation mediated transition is modeled as a pseudo-first order kinetics and the thermodynamic parameters are estimated using the Eyring's formulation. L-Cysteine and their esters are often used as biological models due to the remarkable thiol group that can be found in different oxidation states. This oxidation mediated transition is due to the combination of thiol oxidation to a disulfide followed by solvent-induced effects may be relevant in designing cysteine-based molecular models.

  12. The role of nitric oxide in reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCann S.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO plays a crucial role in reproduction at every level in the organism. In the brain, it activates the release of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH. The axons of the LHRH neurons project to the mating centers in the brain stem and by afferent pathways evoke the lordosis reflex in female rats. In males, there is activation of NOergic terminals that release NO in the corpora cavernosa penis to induce erection by generation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP. NO also activates the release of LHRH which reaches the pituitary and activates the release of gonadotropins by activating neural NO synthase (nNOS in the pituitary gland. In the gonad, NO plays an important role in inducing ovulation and in causing luteolysis, whereas in the reproductive tract, it relaxes uterine muscle via cGMP and constricts it via prostaglandins (PG.

  13. Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitors as Antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallo Volke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Affective and anxiety disorders are widely distributed disorders with severe social and economic effects. Evidence is emphatic that effective treatment helps to restore function and quality of life. Due to the action of most modern antidepressant drugs, serotonergic mechanisms have traditionally been suggested to play major roles in the pathophysiology of mood and stress-related disorders. However, a few clinical and several pre-clinical studies, strongly suggest involvement of the nitric oxide (NO signaling pathway in these disorders. Moreover, several of the conventional neurotransmitters, including serotonin, glutamate and GABA, are intimately regulated by NO, and distinct classes of antidepressants have been found to modulate the hippocampal NO level in vivo. The NO system is therefore a potential target for antidepressant and anxiolytic drug action in acute therapy as well as in prophylaxis. This paper reviews the effect of drugs modulating NO synthesis in anxiety and depression.

  14. Impacts of hydrogen sulfide donor on experimental portal hypertension and endogenous nitric oxide/ nitric oxide synthase pathway%硫化氢供体对实验性门静脉高压及内源性一氧化氮/一氧化氮合酶体系的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何春萍; 田德安; 王波; 刘梅; 但自力; 罗敏; 梅凡; 徐湖波; 梁扩寰

    2007-01-01

    目的 探讨硫化氢供体-硫氢化钠(sodium hydrosulfide, NaHS)对大鼠门静脉高压及内源性一氧化氮(nitric monoxide, NO)/一氧化氮合酶(nitricoxide synthase, NOS)体系的影响.方法 将30只健康成年雄性SD大鼠随机分为4组:部分门静脉结扎(partly portal vein ligation,PPVL)组(10只)、PPVL+NaHS组(10只)、假手术组(5只)和正常组(5只).PPVL组和PPVL+NaHS组行部分门静脉结扎术建立门静脉高压的动物模型.模型制作14天后,分别测定各组大鼠的门静脉压力(PVP)和平均动脉压力(MAP);采用免疫组织化学检测大鼠肝细胞中一氧化氮合酶(NOS2、NOSS)的蛋白水平表达情况,RT-PCR方法检测大鼠肝组织中NOS2和NOS3的mRNA水平的表达情况.结果 术后14 d,假手术组和正常组比较,各项检测指标无显著差异,NOS2蛋白及mRNA水平未见明显表达;NOS3蛋白及mRNA表达水平无显著差异.PPVL组与假手术组比较,PVP明显升高(P<0.05),MAP则下降(P<0.05),PPVL+NaHS组与PPVL组相比较,PVP进一步升高(P<0.05),MAP则进一步降低(P<0.05).PPVL组和PPVL+NaHS组NOS2在蛋白及mRNA 水平均有表达,且后者NOS2蛋白及mRNA表达水平减少(P<0.05).4组之间NOS3的蛋白及mRNA表达水平则无显著差异.结论 H2S参与了门静脉高压的形成与发展,NaHS可以加重门静脉高压,其作用可能与NO/NOS2体系有关.

  15. Dietary Nitrate, Nitric Oxide, and Cardiovascular Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondonno, Catherine P; Croft, Kevin D; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2016-09-09

    Emerging evidence strongly suggests that dietary nitrate, derived in the diet primarily from vegetables, could contribute to cardiovascular health via effects on nitric oxide (NO) status. NO plays an essential role in cardiovascular health. It is produced via the classical L-arginine-NO-synthase pathway and the recently discovered enterosalivary nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway. The discovery of this alternate pathway has highlighted dietary nitrate as a candidate for the cardioprotective effect of a diet rich in fruit and vegetables. Clinical trials with dietary nitrate have observed improvements in blood pressure, endothelial function, ischemia-reperfusion injury, arterial stiffness, platelet function, and exercise performance with a concomitant augmentation of markers of NO status. While these results are indicative of cardiovascular benefits with dietary nitrate intake, there is still a lingering concern about nitrate in relation to methemoglobinemia, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. It is the purpose of this review to present an overview of NO and its critical role in cardiovascular health; to detail the observed vascular benefits of dietary nitrate intake through effects on NO status as well as to discuss the controversy surrounding the possible toxic effects of nitrate.

  16. Nitric Oxide Manipulation: A Therapeutic Target for Peripheral Arterial Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth Williams

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality in the Western world. Risk factor modification and endovascular and surgical revascularisation are the main treatment options at present. However, a significant number of patients still require major amputation. There is evidence that nitric oxide (NO and its endogenous inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA play significant roles in the pathophysiology of PAD. This paper reviews experimental work implicating the ADMA-DDAH-NO pathway in PAD, focussing on both the vascular dysfunction and effects within the ischaemic muscle, and examines the potential of manipulating this pathway as a novel adjunct therapy in PAD.

  17. Nitric oxide-induced signalling in rat lacrimal acinar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Looms, Dagnia Karen; Tritsaris, K.; Dissing, S.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the physiological role of nitric oxide (NO) in mediating secretory processes in rat lacrimal acinar cells. In addition, we wanted to determine whether the acinar cells possess endogenous nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity by measuring NO productio...... not by itself causing fast transient increases in [Ca2+]i. In addition, we suggest that endogenously produced NO activated by ß-adrenergic receptor stimulation, plays an important role in signalling to the surrounding tissue.......The aim of the present study was to investigate the physiological role of nitric oxide (NO) in mediating secretory processes in rat lacrimal acinar cells. In addition, we wanted to determine whether the acinar cells possess endogenous nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity by measuring NO production......-adrenergic stimulation and not by a rise in [Ca2+]i alone.   We show that in rat lacrimal acinar cells, NO and cGMP induce Ca2+ release from intracellular stores via G kinase activation. However, the changes in [Ca2+]i are relatively small, suggesting that this pathway plays a modulatory role in Ca2+ signalling, thus...

  18. Over-production of nitric oxide by oxidative stress-induced activation of the TGF-β1/PI3K/Akt pathway in mesangial cells cultured in high glucose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-peng ZHAI; Qian LU; Yao-wu LIU; Qian CHENG; Ya-qin WEI; Fan ZHANG; Cheng-lin LI

    2013-01-01

    Aim:To investigate whether NO over-production in rat mesangial cells cultured in high glucose (HG) is related to activation of the TGF-β1/PI3K/Akt pathway.Methods:Rat mesangial cells line (HBZY-1) was exposed to HG (24.44 mmol/L) or H2O2 (10 μmol/L) for 16 h.NO release was quantified using the Griess assay.The TGF-β1 level was measured using ELISA.The protein expression of p-Akt,t-Akt,Bim,and iNOS was examined by Western blotting.The mRNA levels of TGF-β1 and Bim were measured using RT-PCR.The cell proliferation rate was estimated using a BrdU incorporation assay.Results:Treatment of the cells with HG,H2O2,or TGF-β1 (5 ng/mL) significantly increased the NO level that was substantially inhibited by co-treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium (DPI),TGF-β1 inhibitor SB431542,or PI3K inhibitor LY294002.Both HG and H2O2 significantly increased the protein and mRNA levels of TGF-β1 in the cells,and HG-induced increases of TGF-β1 protein and mRNA were blocked by co-treatment with DPI.Furthermore,the treatment with HG or H2O2 significantly increased the expression of phosphorylated Akt and iNOS and cell proliferation rate,which was blocked by co-treatment with DPI,SB431542,or LY294002.Moreover,the treatment with HG or H2O2 significantly inhibited Bim protein and mRNA expression,which was reversed by co-treatment with DPI,SB431542,or LY294002.Conclusion:The results demonstrate that high glucose causes oxidative stress and NO over-production in rat mesangial cells in vitro via decreasing Bim and increasing iNOS,which are at least partially mediated by the TGF-β1/PI3K/Akt pathway.

  19. Nitric oxide and the enigma of cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, Tibor; Wollert, Kai C

    2004-06-01

    In pathological conditions associated with persistent increases in hemodynamic workload (old myocardial infarction, high blood pressure, valvular heart disease), a number of signalling pathways are activated in the heart, all of which promote hypertrophic growth of the heart, characterised at the cellular level by increases in individual cardiac myocyte size. Some of these pathways are required for a successful adaptation to cardiac injury. Other pathways are maladaptive, however, as they lead to progressive contractile dysfunction and heart failure. The free radical gas nitric oxide and natriuretic peptides, both of which are produced in the heart, have emerged as endogenous inhibitors of maladaptive hypertrophy signalling. Overall, it appears that cardiac hypertrophy is controlled by an interplay of pro- and antihypertrophic signalling networks. This delicate balance can tip towards adaptation or heart failure. In the future, patients living with cardiac disease may benefit from therapeutic strategies targeting maladaptive hypertrophy signalling pathways. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Nitric oxide: promoter or suppressor of programmed cell death?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiqin; Chen, Chen; Loake, Gary J; Chu, Chengcai

    2010-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a short-lived gaseous free radical that predominantly functions as a messenger and effector molecule. It affects a variety of physiological processes, including programmed cell death (PCD) through cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent and - independent pathways. In this field, dominant discoveries are the diverse apoptosis networks in mammalian cells, which involve signals primarily via death receptors (extrinsic pathway) or the mitochondria (intrinsic pathway) that recruit caspases as effector molecules. In plants, PCD shares some similarities with animal cells, but NO is involved in PCD induction via interacting with pathways of phytohormones. NO has both promoting and suppressing effects on cell death, depending on a variety of factors, such as cell type, cellular redox status, and the flux and dose of local NO. In this article, we focus on how NO regulates the apoptotic signal cascade through protein S-nitrosylation and review the recent progress on mechanisms of PCD in both mammalian and plant cells.

  1. Anticancer efficacy of a nitric oxide-modified derivative of bifendate against multidrug-resistant cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhiguang; Gu, Xiaoke; Lu, Bin; Chen, Yaqiong; Chen, Guojiang; Feng, Jiannan; Lin, Jizhen; Zhang, Yihua; Peng, Hui

    2016-06-01

    The development of multidrug resistance (MDR) not only actively transports a wide range of cytotoxic drugs across drug transporters but is also a complex interaction between a number of important cellular signalling pathways. Nitric oxide donors appear to be a new class of anticancer therapeutics for satisfying all the above conditions. Previously, we reported furoxan-based nitric oxide-releasing compounds that exhibited selective antitumour activity in vitro and in vivo. Herein, we demonstrate that bifendate (DDB)-nitric oxide, a synthetic furoxan-based nitric oxide-releasing derivative of bifendate, effectively inhibits the both sensitive and MDR tumour cell viability at a comparatively low concentration. Interestingly, the potency of DDB-nitric oxide is the independent of inhibition of the functions and expressions of three major ABC transporters. The mechanism of DDB-nitric oxide appears to be in two modes of actions by inducing mitochondrial tyrosine nitration and apoptosis, as well as by down-regulating HIF-1α expression and protein kinase B (AKT), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation in MDR cells. Moreover, the addition of a typical nitric oxide scavenger significantly attenuated all the effects of DDB-nitric oxide, indicating that the cytotoxicity of DDB-nitric oxide is as a result of higher levels of nitric oxide release in MDR cancer cells. Given that acquired MDR to nitric oxide donors is reportedly difficult to achieve and genetically unstable, compound like DDB-nitric oxide may be a new type of therapeutic agent for the treatment of MDR tumours.

  2. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion is an extensive problem that affects the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and European Space Agency (ESA). The deleterious effects of corrosion result in steep costs, asset downtime affecting mission readiness, and safety risks to personnel. It is vital to reduce corrosion costs and risks in a sustainable manner. The primary objective of this effort is to qualify citric acid as an environmentally-preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys.

  3. Colonic production of nitric oxide gas in ulcerative colitis, collagenous colitis and uninflamed bowel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Nordgaard, I; Matzen, P

    2002-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced in excess by the inflamed human colon is generally considered a pathway of mucosal damage. In an attempt to quantify colonic mucosal production of NO in various forms of colitis we performed 'steady-state' gas perfusion of whole colon in 11 patients with ulcerative...

  4. The Oxidation of Hydrazine by Nitric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-07-02

    Hydrazine nitrate-nitric acid solutions are used in the ion exchange process for separating Pu-238 and Np-237 and have been found to dissolve plutonium metal in a manner advantageous to SRP metal recovery operations. Laboratory tests on the stability of hydrazine in nitric acid solutions were performed to obtain accurate data, and the results of these tests are reported here. These tests provide sufficient information to specify temperature control for hydrazine-nitric acid solutions in plant processes.

  5. Arginine transport and nitric oxide production: role in the inflammatory response

    OpenAIRE

    Barilli, Amelia

    2008-01-01

    The research concerns the characterization of the pathways responsible for the recruitment of L-arginine, the obliged substrate for nitric oxide biosynthesis, in human cells. Endothelial cells and monocytes/macrophages have been employed, as the cell types more directly linked to NO pathway. As for human endothelium, only system y+ is involved in the inflammatory response: both TNFα and rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor employed in clinical angioplasty, lead to a massive increase of CAT-mediated a...

  6. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Excites Firing and Increases GABAergic Miniature Postsynaptic Currents (mPSCs) in Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) Neurons of the Male Mice via Activation of Nitric Oxide (NO) and Suppression of Endocannabinoid Signaling Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Imre; Vastagh, Csaba; Farkas, Erzsébet; Bálint, Flóra; Skrapits, Katalin; Hrabovszky, Erik; Fekete, Csaba; Liposits, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a metabolic signal molecule, regulates reproduction, although, the involved molecular mechanisms have not been elucidated, yet. Therefore, responsiveness of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons to the GLP-1 analog Exendin-4 and elucidation of molecular pathways acting downstream to the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) have been challenged. Loose patch-clamp recordings revealed that Exendin-4 (100 nM–5 μM) elevated firing rate in hypothalamic GnRH-GFP neurons of male mice via activation of GLP-1R. Whole-cell patch-clamp measurements demonstrated increased excitatory GABAergic miniature postsynaptic currents (mPSCs) frequency after Exendin-4 administration, which was eliminated by the GLP-1R antagonist Exendin-3(9–39) (1 μM). Intracellular application of the G-protein inhibitor GDP-β-S (2 mM) impeded action of Exendin-4 on mPSCs, suggesting direct excitatory action of GLP-1 on GnRH neurons. Blockade of nitric-oxide (NO) synthesis by Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME; 100 μM) or N5-[Imino(propylamino)methyl]-L-ornithine hydrochloride (NPLA; 1 μM) or intracellular scavenging of NO by 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (CPTIO; 1 mM) partially attenuated the excitatory effect of Exendin-4. Similar partial inhibition was achieved by hindering endocannabinoid pathway using cannabinoid receptor type-1 (CB1) inverse-agonist 1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-(1-piperidyl) pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251; 1 μM). Simultaneous blockade of NO and endocannabinoid signaling mechanisms eliminated action of Exendin-4 suggesting involvement of both retrograde machineries. Intracellular application of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-antagonist 2E-N-(2, 3-Dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-6-yl)-3-[4-(1, 1-dimethylethyl)phenyl]-2-Propenamide (AMG9810; 10 μM) or the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH)-inhibitor PF3845 (5 μM) impeded the GLP-1-triggered endocannabinoid

  7. Inducible nitric oxide synthase in renal transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joles, JA; Vos, IH; Grone, HJ; Rabelink, TJ

    2002-01-01

    The importance of the endothelial isoform of nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) has been well established. Endothelium-derived nitric oxide has been shown to be essential for vascular homeostasis and modulation of eNOS has thus become a target in prevention of cardiovascular disease. The role of the induc

  8. Nitric oxide fumigation for postharvest pest control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitric oxide fumigation is effective against all arthropod pests at various life stages tested. Nine insect pests at various life stages and bulb mites were subjected to nitric oxide fumigation treatments under ultralow oxygen conditions of =50 ppm O2 in 1.9L glass jars as fumigation chambers. The ...

  9. Study of the relationship between the antinociception of ketamine mediated by nitric oxide pathway and inhibiting substance P receptors in the spinal cord%氯胺酮通过NO通路介导的抗伤害作用与抑制脊髓P物质受体研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张博; 王宏; 张涤非

    2016-01-01

    目的::观察氯胺酮(Ket)通过一氧化氮(NO)通路介导的抗伤害作用与脊髓P物质(SP)受体的关系及可能机制。方法:通过行为学实验、免疫组织化学技术和分光光度法,记录鞘内注射SP和/或腹腔注射Ket,热板法实验观察小鼠舔后足反应的潜伏期、甲醛实验Ⅰ相和Ⅱ相小鼠舔足时间、脊髓Fos免疫样( FLI)阳性神经元数量和一氧化氮合酶( NOS)活性及NO产量的变化。结果:热板法实验:Ket 20 mg/kg和30 mg/kg腹腔注射可使小鼠热板法痛阈增加(P<0.05~P<0.01),SP 0.5 ng鞘内注射后15 min和20 min均可减少Ket小鼠热板法痛阈(P<0.01和P<0.05)。甲醛实验:Ket 30 mg/kg腹腔注射可减少小鼠舔足时间(P<0.01),鞘内注射SP 0.5 ng可增加Ket小鼠2个时相舔足时间(P<0.01和P<0.05)。对照组小鼠两侧脊髓背角对称分布少量FLI阳性神经元,甲醛注射侧脊髓背角FLI阳性神经元明显高于对照组(P<0.01),腹腔注射Ket显著减少注射侧脊髓背角FLI阳性神经元的数量(P<0.01),而鞘内注射SP可明显对抗Ket对甲醛注射侧脊髓背角FLI阳性神经元的抑制(P<0.01)。 Ket均可抑制脊髓NOS活性和NO水平(P<0.05),鞘内注射SP可显著对抗Ket对NOS活性和NO的抑制(P<0.05)。结论:Ket抗伤害作用与抑制脊髓SP受体有关,这可能通过NO通路介导。%Objective:To investigate the relationship between the antinociception of ketamine(Ket) mediated by nitric oxide(NO) pathway and inhibiting substance P ( SP ) receptor in the spinal cord, and its possible mechanism. Methods:The SP of intrathecal injection and/or Ket of intraperitoneal injection were recorded using behavioral experiment, immunohistochemical staining and spectrophotometry. The incubation period of licking foot reaction in mice and licking time in phaseⅠand phaseⅡmice were detected using hot-plate test and using formaldehyde experiment, respectively. The changes of the number of Fos-like immunoreactive ( FLI

  10. Reduction Rates for Higher Americium Oxidation States in Nitric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, Travis Shane [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mincher, Bruce Jay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schmitt, Nicholas C [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The stability of hexavalent americium was measured using multiple americium concentrations and nitric acid concentrations after contact with the strong oxidant sodium bismuthate. Contrary to our hypotheses Am(VI) was not reduced faster at higher americium concentrations, and the reduction was only zero-order at short time scales. Attempts to model the reduction kinetics using zero order kinetic models showed Am(VI) reduction in nitric acid is more complex than the autoreduction processes reported by others in perchloric acid. The classical zero-order reduction of Am(VI) was found here only for short times on the order of a few hours. We did show that the rate of Am(V) production was less than the rate of Am(VI) reduction, indicating that some Am(VI) undergoes two electron-reduction to Am(IV). We also monitored the Am(VI) reduction in contact with the organic diluent dodecane. A direct comparison of these results with those in the absence of the organic diluent showed the reduction rates for Am(VI) were not statistically different for both systems. Additional americium oxidations conducted in the presence of Ce(IV)/Ce(III) ions showed that Am(VI) is reduced without the typical growth of Am(V) observed in the systems sans Ce ion. This was an interesting result which suggests a potential new reduction/oxidation pathway for Am in the presence of Ce; however, these results were very preliminary, and will require additional experiments to understand the mechanism by which this occurs. Overall, these studies have shown that hexavalent americium is fundamentally stable enough in nitric acid to run a separations process. However, the complicated nature of the reduction pathways based on the system components is far from being rigorously understood.

  11. How to protect liver graft with nitric oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hassen Ben Abdennebi; Mohamed Amine Zaoualí; Izabel Alfany-Fernandez; Donia Tabka; Joan Roselló-Catafau

    2011-01-01

    Organ preservation and ischemia reperfusion injury associated with liver transplantation play an important role in the induction of graft injury. One of the earliest events associated with the reperfusion injury is endothelial cell dysfunction. It is generally accepted that endothelial nitric oxide synthase (e-NOS) is cell-protective by mediating vasodilatation, whereas inducible nitric oxide synthase mediates liver graft injury after transplantation. We conducted a critical review of the literature evaluating the potential applications of regulating and promoting e-NOS activity in liver preservation and transplantation, showing the most current evidence to support the concept that enhanced bioavailability of NO derived from e-NOS is detrimental to ameliorate graft liver preservation, as well as preventing subsequent graft reperfusion injury. This review deals mainly with the beneficial effects of promoting "endogenous" pathways for NO generation, via e-NOS inducer drugs in cold preservation solution, surgical strategies such as ischemic preconditioning, and alternative "exogenous" pathways that focus on the enrichment of cold storage liquid with NO donors. Finally, we also provide a basic bench-to-bed side summary of the liver physiology and cell signalling mechanisms that account for explaining the e-NOS protective effects in liver preservation and transplantation.

  12. Effects of nitric oxide on stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wuchen; Lee, Yugyung; Lee, Chi H

    2015-12-01

    The use of stem cells as a research tool and a therapeutic vehicle has demonstrated their great potential in the treatment of various diseases. With unveiling of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) universally present at various levels in nearly all types of body tissues, the potential therapeutic implication of nitric oxide (NO) has been magnified, and thus scientists have explored new treatment strategies involved with stem cells and NO against various diseases. As the functionality of NO encompasses cardiovascular, neuronal and immune systems, NO is involved in stem cell differentiation, epigenetic regulation and immune suppression. Stem cells trigger cellular responses to external signals on the basis of both NO specific pathways and concerted action with endogenous compounds including stem cell regulators. As potency and interaction of NO with stem cells generally depend on the concentrations of NO and the presence of the cofactors at the active site, the suitable carriers for NO delivery is integral for exerting maximal efficacy of stem cells. The innovative utilization of NO functionality and involved mechanisms would invariably alter the paradigm of therapeutic application of stem cells. Future prospects in NO-involved stem cell research which promises to enhance drug discovery efforts by opening new era to improve drug efficacy, reduce drug toxicity and understand disease mechanisms and pathways, were also addressed.

  13. Nitric oxide and chronic colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Grisham

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is thought to play an important role in modulating the inflammatory response by virtue of its ability to affect bloodflow, leukocyte function and cell viability. The objective of this study was to assess the role that NO may play in mediating the mucosal injury and inflammation in a model of chronic granulomatous colitis using two pharmacologically different inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (NOS. Chronic granulomatous colitis with liver and spleen inflammation was induced in female Lewis rats via the subserosal (intramural injection of peptidoglycan/polysaccharide (PG/PS derived from group A streptococci. Chronic NOS inhibition by oral administration of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME (15 µmol/kg/day or amino-guanidine (AG (15 µmol/ kg/day was found to attenuate the PG/PS-induced increases in macroscopic colonic inflammation scores and colonic myeloperoxidase activity. Only AG -- not L-NAME – attenuated the PG/PS-induced increases in colon dry weight. Both L-NAME and AG significantly attenuated the PG/PS-induced increases in spleen weight whereas neither was effective at significantly attenuating the PG/PS-induced increases in liver weight. Although both L-NAME and AG inhibited NO production in vivo, as measured by decreases in plasma nitrite and nitrate levels, only AG produced significantly lower values (38±3 versus 83±8 µM, respectively, P<0.05. Finally, L-NAME, but not AG, administration significantly increased mean arterial pressure from 83 mmHg in colitic animals to 105 mmHg in the PG/PS+ L-NAME-treated animals (P<0.05. It is concluded that NO may play an important role in mediating some of the pathophysiology associated with this model of chronic granulomatous colitis.

  14. 21 CFR 868.2380 - Nitric oxide analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitric oxide analyzer. 868.2380 Section 868.2380...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2380 Nitric oxide analyzer. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitric oxide...

  15. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breath nitric oxide test system. 862.3080 Section... Systems § 862.3080 Breath nitric oxide test system. (a) Identification. A breath nitric oxide test system is a device intended to measure fractional nitric oxide in human breath. Measurement of changes...

  16. Electrochemical Behavior of Aluminum in Nitric Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Hui; ZHU; Li-yang; LIN; Ru-shan; TAN; Hong-bin; HE; Hui

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum is one of cladding materials for nuclear fuel,it is important to investigate the electrolytic dissolution of aluminum in nitric acid.The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy,polarization curve and cyclic voltammetry cure of anodic aluminum electrode in nitric acid under various conditions were collected(Fig.1).It turns out,under steady state,the thickness of the passivated film of aluminum

  17. Featured Article: Differential regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation by protease-activated receptors in adult human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillery, Lakeisha C; Epperson, Tenille A; Eguchi, Satoru; Motley, Evangeline D

    2016-03-01

    Protease-activated receptors have been shown to regulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase through the phosphorylation of specific sites on the enzyme. It has been established that PAR-2 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Ser-1177 and leads to the production of the potent vasodilator nitric oxide, while PAR-1 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Thr-495 and decreases nitric oxide production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In this study, we hypothesize a differential coupling of protease-activated receptors to the signaling pathways that regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide production in primary adult human coronary artery endothelial cells. Using Western Blot analysis, we showed that thrombin and the PAR-1 activating peptide, TFLLR, lead to the phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 in human coronary artery endothelial cells, which was blocked by SCH-79797 (SCH), a PAR-1 inhibitor. Using the nitrate/nitrite assay, we also demonstrated that the thrombin- and TFLLR-induced production of nitric oxide was inhibited by SCH and L-NAME, a NOS inhibitor. In addition, we observed that TFLLR, unlike thrombin, significantly phosphorylated eNOS-Thr-495, which may explain the observed delay in nitric oxide production in comparison to that of thrombin. Activation of PAR-2 by SLIGRL, a PAR-2 specific ligand, leads to dual phosphorylation of both catalytic sites but primarily regulated eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation with no change in nitric oxide production in human coronary artery endothelial cells. PAR-3, known as the non-signaling receptor, was activated by TFRGAP, a PAR-3 mimicking peptide, and significantly induced the phosphorylation of eNOS-Thr-495 with minimal phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 with no change in nitric oxide production. In addition, we confirmed that PAR-mediated eNOS-Ser-1177 phosphorylation was Ca(2+)-dependent using the Ca(2+) chelator, BAPTA, while eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation was mediated via Rho kinase using the ROCK inhibitor, Y-27632

  18. Nitric oxide inhibits the accumulation of CD4+CD44hiTbet+CD69lo T cells in mycobacterial infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, John E.; Torrado, Egidio; Tighe, Michael; Fountain, Jeffrey J.; Solache, Alejandra; Strutt, Tara; Swain, Susan; Appelberg, Rui; Cooper, Andrea M

    2013-01-01

    Summary Animals lacking the inducible nitric oxide synthase gene (nos2−/−) are less susceptible to M. avium strain 25291 and lack nitric oxide-mediated immunomodulation of CD4+ T cells. Here we show that the absence of nos2 results in increased accumulation of neutrophils and both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells within the M. avium-containing granuloma. Examination of the T-cell phenotype in M. avium-infected mice demonstrated that CD4+CD44hi effector T cells expressing the Th1 transcriptional regulator T-bet (T-bet+) were specifically reduced by the presence of nitric oxide. Importantly, the T-bet+ effector population could be separated into CD69hi and CD69lo populations, with the CD69lo population only able to accumulate during chronic infection within infected nos2−/− mice. Transcriptomic comparison between CD4+CD44hiCD69hi and CD4+CD44hiCD69lo populations revealed that CD4+CD44hiCD69lo cells had higher expression of the integrin itgb1/itga4 (VLA-4, CD49d/CD29). Inhibition of Nos2 activity allowed increased accumulation of the CD4+CD44hiT-bet+CD69lo population in WT mice as well as increased expression of VLA-4. These data support the hypothesis that effector T cells in mycobacterial granulomata are not a uniform effector population but exist in distinct subsets with differential susceptibility to the regulatory effects of nitric oxide. PMID:22890814

  19. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of NASA and the GSDO Program, the objective of this project is to qualify citric acid as an environmentally-preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys. This project is a direct follow-on to United Space Alliance (USA) work at KSC to optimize the parameters for the use of citric acid and verify effectiveness. This project will build off of the USA study to further evaluate citric acids effectiveness and suitability for corrosion protection of a number of stainless steels alloys used by NASA, the Department of Defense (DoD), and the European Space Agency (ESA).

  20. Nitric oxide bioavailability in malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolewski, Peter; Gramaglia, Irene; Frangos, John; Intaglietta, Marcos; van der Heyde, Henri C

    2005-09-01

    Rational development of adjunct or anti-disease therapy for severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria requires cellular and molecular definition of malarial pathogenesis. Nitric oxide (NO) is a potential target for such therapy but its role during malaria is controversial. It has been proposed that NO is produced at high levels to kill Plasmodium parasites, although the unfortunate consequence of elevated NO levels might be impaired neuronal signaling, oxidant damage and red blood cell damage that leads to anemia. In this case, inhibitors of NO production or NO scavengers might be an effective adjunct therapy. However, increasing amounts of evidence support the alternate hypothesis that NO production is limited during malaria. Furthermore, the well-documented NO scavenging by cell-free plasma hemoglobin and superoxide, the levels of which are elevated during malaria, has not been considered. Low NO bioavailability in the vasculature during malaria might contribute to pathologic activation of the immune system, the endothelium and the coagulation system: factors required for malarial pathogenesis. Therefore, restoring NO bioavailability might represent an effective anti-disease therapy.

  1. Endomorphin-suppressed nitric oxide release from mice peritoneal macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balog, Tihomir; Sarić, Ana; Sobocanec, Sandra; Kusić, Borka; Marotti, Tatjana

    2010-02-01

    Endomorphins are newly discovered mu-opioid receptor selective immunocompetent opioid peptides. Endomorphin 1 is predominantly distributed in brain, while endomorphin 2 is widely allocated in the spinal cord. Lately, endomorphins have been investigated as modulators of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Nitric oxide is short lived radical involved in various biological processes such as regulation of blood vessel contraction, inflammation, neurotransmission and apoptosis. The aim of this work was to investigate the in vivo effects of endomorphins on nitric oxide release and NOS 2 isoenzyme upregulation in mice peritoneal macrophages additionally challenged ex vivo with lipopolysaccharide. The results showed that endomorphin 1 or endomorphin 2 in vitro did not change NO release from peritoneal mouse macrophages during a 48 h incubation period. On the other hand in vivo endomorphins had suppressive effect on NO release as well as on NOS 2 and IL-1 protein concentration. The most of suppressive effect in vivo of both endomorphins was blocked with 30 min pretreatment with mu-receptor selective antagonist beta-FNA, which proved involvement of opioid receptor pathway in suppressive effects of endomorphins.

  2. Inducible nitric oxide synthase is responsible for nitric oxide release from murine pituicytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, T H; Rivier, C; Lee, S;

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated whether pituicytes were able to produce and release nitric oxide (NO), and which type of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) would be responsible for this phenomenon. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) 1 micro g/ml was used as inflammatory mediator. Because pituicytes are known to secrete...

  3. Nitric oxide, inducible nitric oxide synthase and inflammation in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Robert P

    2002-12-01

    Inflammation is a process consisting of a complex of cytological and chemical reactions which occur in and around affected blood vessels and adjacent tissues in response to an injury caused by a physical, chemical or biological insult. Much work has been performed in the past several years investigating inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS, EC 1.14.13.39) and nitric oxide in inflammation. This has resulted in a rapid increase in knowledge about iNOS and nitric oxide. Nitric oxide formation from inducible NOS is regulated by numerous inflammatory mediators, often with contradictory effects, depending upon the type and duration of the inflammatory insult. Equine medicine appears to have benefited the most from the increased interest in this small, inflammatory mediator. Most of the information on nitric oxide in traditional veterinary species has been produced using models or naturally occurring inflammatory diseases of this species.

  4. Piper sarmentosum increases nitric oxide production in oxidative stress: a study on human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizah Ugusman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Nitric oxide produced by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS possesses multiple anti-atherosclerotic properties. Hence, enhanced expression of eNOS and increased Nitric oxide levels may protect against the development of atherosclerosis. Piper sarmentosum is a tropical plant with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Piper sarmentosum on the eNOS and Nitric oxide pathway in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. METHODS: HUVECs were divided into four groups: control, treatment with 180 μM hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, treatment with 150 μg/mL aqueous extract of Piper sarmentosum, and concomitant treatment with aqueous extract of PS and H2O2 for 24 hours. Subsequently, HUVECs were harvested and eNOS mRNA expression was determined using qPCR. The eNOS protein level was measured using ELISA, and the eNOS activity and Nitric oxide level were determined by the Griess reaction. RESULTS: Human umbilical vein endothelial cells treated with aqueous extract of Piper sarmentosum showed a marked induction of Nitric oxide. Treatment with PS also resulted in increased eNOS mRNA expression, eNOS protein level and eNOS activity in HUVECs. CONCLUSION: Aqueous extract of Piper sarmentosum may improve endothelial function by promoting NO production in HUVECs.

  5. Piper sarmentosum increases nitric oxide production in oxidative stress: a study on human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugusman, Azizah; Zakaria, Zaiton; Hui, Chua Kien; Nordin, Nor Anita Megat Mohd

    2010-07-01

    Nitric oxide produced by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) possesses multiple anti-atherosclerotic properties. Hence, enhanced expression of eNOS and increased Nitric oxide levels may protect against the development of atherosclerosis. Piper sarmentosum is a tropical plant with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Piper sarmentosum on the eNOS and Nitric oxide pathway in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVECS WERE DIVIDED INTO FOUR GROUPS: control, treatment with 180 microM hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), treatment with 150 microg/mL aqueous extract of Piper sarmentosum, and concomitant treatment with aqueous extract of PS and H(2)O(2) for 24 hours. Subsequently, HUVECs were harvested and eNOS mRNA expression was determined using qPCR. The eNOS protein level was measured using ELISA, and the eNOS activity and Nitric oxide level were determined by the Griess reaction. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells treated with aqueous extract of Piper sarmentosum showed a marked induction of Nitric oxide. Treatment with PS also resulted in increased eNOS mRNA expression, eNOS protein level and eNOS activity in HUVECs. Aqueous extract of Piper sarmentosum may improve endothelial function by promoting NO production in HUVECs.

  6. p53 and nitric oxide are involved in cytokine-induced apoptosis in Kasumi-1 and Molt-4 Leukemics cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharath, Aishath; Fucharoen, Suthat; Tanyong, Dalina I

    2014-06-01

    Immunotherapy has been developed to treat cancers. There are many signaling pathways involved in cytokine induced apoptosis of many cancers but their role remains unclear in some cancers such as leukemia. To investigate the involvement of the nitric oxide (NO) and p53 tumor suppressor gene in apoptotic pathways induced by cytokines in leukemic cell lines. Leukemic cell lines, Kasumi-1 (AML-M2) and Molt- 4 (ALL) were treated with cytokines, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), interferon-γ (IFN-γ). The effect of cytokines on the induction cell apoptosis was analysed by flow cytometry. In addition, nitric oxide production and p53 protein levels were measured by using the Griess method and Western blot, respectively. Upon cytokine treatment, there was a significant increase in the percentage of cell apoptosis in both leukemic cell lines. The highest apoptosis was shown in 40 U/ml IFN-γ treated cells. In addition, nitric oxide and p53 protein increased in IFN-γ treated cells. There was a reduction of apoptosis and p53 level after adding the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, SMT. p53 and nitric oxide are involved in the mediation of apoptosis induced by cytokines in Kasumi-1 and Molt-4 leukemic cell lines.

  7. Nitric oxide counters ethylene effects on ripening fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunatha, Girigowda; Gupta, Kapuganti J; Lokesh, Veeresh; Mur, Luis A J; Neelwarne, Bhagyalakshmi

    2012-04-01

    Ethylene plays a key role in promoting fruit ripening, so altering its biosynthesis/signaling could be an important means to delay this process. Nitric oxide (NO)-generated signals are now being shown to regulate ethylene pathways. NO signals have been shown to transcriptionally repress the expression of genes involved in ethylene biosynthesis enzymes and post-translationally modify methionine adenosyl transferase (MAT) activity through S-nitrosylation to reduce the availably of methyl groups required to produce ethylene. Additionally, NO cross-talks with plant hormones and other signal molecules and act to orchestrate the suppression of ethylene effects by modulating enzymes/proteins that are generally triggered by ethylene signaling at post-climacteric stage. Thus, medication of endogenous NO production is suggested as a strategy to postpone the climacteric stage of many tropical fruits.

  8. Transcriptomic Response to Nitric Oxide Treatment in Larix olgensis Henry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Hu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Larix olgensis Henry is an important coniferous species found in plantation forests in northeastern China, but it is vulnerable to pathogens. Nitric oxide (NO is an important molecule involved in plant resistance to pathogens. To study the regulatory role of NO at the transcriptional level, we characterized the transcriptomic response of L. olgensis seedlings to sodium nitroprusside (SNP, NO donor using Illumina sequencing and de novo transcriptome assembly. A significant number of putative metabolic pathways and functions associated with the unique sequences were identified. Genes related to plant pathogen infection (FLS2, WRKY33, MAPKKK, and PR1 were upregulated with SNP treatment. This report describes the potential contribution of NO to disease resistance in L. olgensis as induced by biotic stress. Our results provide a substantial contribution to the genomic and transcriptomic resources for L. olgensis, as well as expanding our understanding of the involvement of NO in defense responses at the transcriptional level.

  9. Transcriptomic Response to Nitric Oxide Treatment in Larix olgensis Henry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoqing; Yang, Jingli; Li, Chenghao

    2015-12-02

    Larix olgensis Henry is an important coniferous species found in plantation forests in northeastern China, but it is vulnerable to pathogens. Nitric oxide (NO) is an important molecule involved in plant resistance to pathogens. To study the regulatory role of NO at the transcriptional level, we characterized the transcriptomic response of L. olgensis seedlings to sodium nitroprusside (SNP, NO donor) using Illumina sequencing and de novo transcriptome assembly. A significant number of putative metabolic pathways and functions associated with the unique sequences were identified. Genes related to plant pathogen infection (FLS2, WRKY33, MAPKKK, and PR1) were upregulated with SNP treatment. This report describes the potential contribution of NO to disease resistance in L. olgensis as induced by biotic stress. Our results provide a substantial contribution to the genomic and transcriptomic resources for L. olgensis, as well as expanding our understanding of the involvement of NO in defense responses at the transcriptional level.

  10. Useful and harmful effects of nitric oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jović Slavoljub

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In living sistems synthesis of nitric oxide occurs during metabolism from Larginin, nitrite and ascorbate. Being very significant carrier of information within numerous both physiological and pathological proceses in mammals' organisms, nitric oxid could possibly be useful as well as harmful. Nitric oxide synthesis is adjuvant in a healthy organism because it represents the basic molecule for understanding numerous processes in neurology, psychology, immunology and varios related fields. In other words, nitric oxide participate in number of physiological processes, such as: transmission of nerve signals (neurotransmitter role, regulation of smooth muscle tissue relaxation (eg. vasodilatation, peristaltic movements, immunomodulation, mastocyte activation, development of inflammatory response, apoptosis regulation, angiogenesis and glucose metabolism, normal heart functioning and antioxidation role. Besides being useful, nitric oxide can be harmful as well, because it has one unpaired electron, so consequently it is susceptible to oxidation becoming a stable free radical. Being such, it reacts quickly with superoxide-anion radical, givind at first an extremely reactive peroxinitrite anion, and subsequently peroxidnitrite acid. This acid is very dangerous causing thiol groups oxidation, tyrosine and phenylalanine nitrosylation, lipid oxidation, DNK chain splitting, nitrification and nucleic bases deamination. These damages of macromolecules can cause a series of undesirable changes which subsequently distub functions of molecules, and thus of cells, tissues and even organs. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173034 i br. 31085

  11. Equol reverses the inhibition of cyclosporin A on the proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells through estrogen receptor/nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate signal pathway%雌激素受体/一氧化氮/环磷酸鸟苷通路介导雌马酚逆转环孢素抑制骨髓间充质干细胞增殖及向成骨细胞的分化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋丽华; 黄燕; 武翠玲; 石变华

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long term taking cyclosporin A(CsA)can inhibit osteoblastic differentiation and induce osteoporosis.Equol,which has greater binding affinity to estrogen receptors,can stimulate the proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation.OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether equol may protect against the proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation inhibited by CsA in mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells(BMSCs)cultures and analyze signal pathway of protection.METHODS: Primary mouse BMSCs were cultured by using attachment method and assigned to five groups,which respectively treated with equol or/and CsA in the presence or absence of ICI182780,an estrogen receptor antagonist,and Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester.Under an inverted microscope,morphological changes and mineralization ability of BMSCs were observed.The cell proliferation was measured by[3H]-thymidine incorporation.The osteoblastic differentiation and mineralization of extracellular matrix in BMSCs was assessed by measuring alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition,respectively.Nitric oxide production in the conditioned media and cyclic guanosine monophosphata(cGMP)content in BMSCs were determined by using commercial nitric oxide and cGMP kit,respectively.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Equol reversed the decreased[3H]thymidine incorporation(P < 0.05),alkaline phosphatase activity(P < 0.05)and calcium deposition(P < 0.01)of CsA,which was accompanied with the changes of nitric oxide production(P < 0.01)and cGMP content(P < 0.01).The group by co-treatment with equol and CsA possessed higher cells growth density and small mineralized nodes than CsA group on day 12 under an inverted microscope.Moreover,the equol-reversed effect was abolished by ICI182780 and Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester.These indicated that equol can reverse the inhibition of CsA on the proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation of mouse BMSCs through estrogen receptor/nitric oxide/cGMP signal pathway.%背景:长期服用环

  12. [Nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristol, J P; Maggi, M F; Guérin, M C; Torreilles, J; Descomps, B

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical produced enzymatically in biological systems from the guanidino group of L-arginine. Its large spectrum of biological effects is achieved through chemical interactions with different targets including oxygen (O2), superoxide (O2o-) and other oxygen reactive species (ROS), transition metals and thiols. Superoxide anions and other ROS have been reported to react with NO to produce peroxynitrite anions that can decompose to form nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and hydroxyl radial (OHo). Thus, NO has been reported to have a dual effect on lipid peroxidation (prooxidant via the peroxynitrite or antioxydant via the chelation of ROS). In the present study we have investigated in different models the in vitro and in vivo action of NO on lipid peroxidation. Copper-induced LDL oxidation were used as an in vitro model. Human LDL (100 micrograms ApoB/ml) were incubated in oxygene-saturated PBS buffer in presence or absence of Cu2+ (2.5 microM) with increasing concentrations of NO donnors (sodium nitroprussiate or nitroso-glutathione). LDL oxidation was monitored continuously for conjugated diene formation (234 nm) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) accumulation. Exogenous NO prevents in a dose dependent manner the progress of copper-induced oxidation. Ischaemia-reperfusion injury (I/R), characterized by an overproduction of ROS, is used as an in vivo model. Anaesthetized rats were submitted to 1 hour renal ischaemia following by 2 hours of reperfusion. Sham-operated rats (SOP) were used as control. Lipid peroxidation was evaluated by measuring the HNE accumulated in rats kidneys in presence or absence of L-arginine or D-arginine infusion. L-arginine, but not D-arginine, enhances HNE accumulation in I/R but not in SOP (< 0.050 pmol/g tissue in SOP versus 0.6 nmol/g tissue in I/R), showing that, in this experimental conditions, NO produced from L-arginine, enhances the toxicity of ROS. This study shows that the pro- or antioxydant effects of NO are different

  13. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitric oxide administration apparatus. 868.5165... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5165 Nitric oxide administration apparatus. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is a device used to add...

  14. CHANGES OF NITRIC OXIDE AND PROTECTIVE EFFECTS OF NITRIC OXIDE INHIBITORS IN NEWBORN RATS WITH SEPSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史源; 李华强; 潘捷; 沈际皋

    1995-01-01

    In a newborn rat model of sepsis, the changes of nitric oxide and the protective effects of methylene blue or/and dexaraethason were investigated. The results revealed that plasma nitric oxide levels were ele-cted at 6 h and peaked at 12 h after bacterial challenge. The treatment with methylene or/and dexam-etbasone was found to Munt hypoglycenua and hyperlacdcemla, to reduce the occurrence rate of loss ot re-sponse to pain, and to prolong the survival time. Moreover, therapy by dexamethasone was shown to de-crease the 24 h mortality. The results suggested that nitric coide play an important role during the course of fatal P. aeruginosa sepsis, hut it is clear that the clinical value of nitric oxide and its inhibitors need to be further studied.

  15. Circulating nitric oxide products do not solely reflect nitric oxide release in cirrhosis and portal hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzelius, Pia; Bazeghi, Nassim; Bie, Peter;

    2011-01-01

    Patients with cirrhosis often develop a systemic vasodilatation and a hyperdynamic circulation with activation of vasoconstrictor systems such as the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), and vasopressin. Increased nitric oxide (NO) synthesis has been implicated in the development...

  16. Nitric oxide turnover in permeable river sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Frank; Stief, Peter; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2014-01-01

    We measured nitric oxide (NO) microprofiles in relation to oxygen (O2) and all major dissolved N-species (ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide [N2O]) in a permeable, freshwater sediment (River Weser, Germany). NO reaches peak concentrations of 0.13 μmol L-1 in the oxic zone and is consumed...

  17. Nitric Oxide in Mammary Tumor Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    de Miguel L, Monton M, Casado S, Lopez -Farre A: Endothelial cytosolic proteins bind to the 3’-untranslated region of endothelial nitric oxide...Vazquez AM. Cabrera L, Barral AM, Gen- 38. Morgan DA, Ruscetti FW, Gallo R: Selective in vitro delman R, Jondal M: Toxic effects of interleukin-2

  18. Processes regulating nitric oxide emissions from soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a reactive gas that plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry by influencing the production and destruction of ozone and thereby the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. NO also contributes by its oxidation products to the formation of acid rain. The major sources...

  19. Nitric Oxide and the Central Nervous System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Dzoljic (Eleonora)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractDuring the last ten years, several investigators have reported that biological effects of endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF; Furchgott and Zawadzki, 1980) are actually activities of a signal molecule, nitric oxide (NO; Moncada el al., 1988). This molecule is synthesised by endoth

  20. Increased nitric oxide release and expression of endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthases in mildly changed porcine mitral valve leaflets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, Sophia G; Olsen, Lisbeth H; Viuff, Birgitte M

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: Little is known of the local role of nitric oxide (NO) in heart valves in relation to heart valve diseases. The study aim was to examine NO release and the expression of both endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in re...

  1. Increased nitric oxide release and expression of endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthases in mildly changed porcine mitral valve leaflets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, Sophia Gry; Olsen, Lisbeth Høier; Viuff, Birgitte;

    2007-01-01

    Background and aim of the study: Little is known of the local role of nitric oxide (NO) in heart valves in relation to heart valve diseases. The study aim was to examine NO release and the expression of both endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (i...

  2. Treatment Of Sunitinib-Induced Hypertension In Solid Tumors By Nitric Oxid Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís A. Leon

    2015-08-01

    Hypertension (HT is one of the most common adverse effects of angiogenesis inhibitors. Hypertension observed in clinical trials appears to correlate with the potency of VEGF kinase inhibitor against VEGFR-2: agents with higher potency are associated with a higher incidence of hypertension. Although the exact mechanism by TKIs induce hypertension has not yet been completely clarified, two key hypotheses have been postulated. First, some studies have pointed to a VEGF inhibitors-induced decrease in nitric oxide synthase (NOS and nitric oxide (NO production, that can result in vasoconstriction and increased blood pressure. VEGF, mediated by PI3K/Akt and MAPK pathway, upregulates the endothelial nitric oxide synthase enzyme leading to up-regulation of NO production. So inhibition of signaling through the VEGF pathway would lead to a decrease in NO production, resulting in an increase in vascular resistance and blood pressure. Secondly a decrease in the number of microvascular endothelial cells and subsequent depletion of normal microvessel density (rarefaction occurs upon VEGF signaling inhibition.

  3. Treatment of sunitinib-induced hypertension in solid tumor by nitric oxide donors☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Mateos, L.; Mosquera, J.; Antón Aparicio, L.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor (VEGFR) are overexpressed in the majority of renal cell carcinomas. This characteristic has supported the rationale of targeting VEGF-driven tumour vascularization, especially in clear cell RCC. VEGF-inhibiting strategies include the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (sunitinib, axitinib, pazopanib, and sorafenib) and neutralizing antibodies such as bevacizumab. Hypertension (HTN) is one of the most common adverse effects of angiogenesis inhibitors. HTN observed in clinical trials appears to correlate with the potency of VEGF kinase inhibitor against VEGFR-2: agents with higher potency are associated with a higher incidence of HTN. Although the exact mechanism by tyrosine kinase inhibitors induce HTN has not yet been completely clarified, two key hypotheses have been postulated. First, some studies have pointed to a VEGF inhibitors-induced decrease in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and nitric oxide (NO) production, that can result in vasoconstriction and increased blood pressure. VEGF, mediated by PI3K/Akt and MAPK pathway, upregulates the endothelial nitric oxide synthase enzyme leading to up-regulation of NO production. So inhibition of signaling through the VEGF pathway would lead to a decrease in NO production, resulting in an increase in vascular resistance and blood pressure. Secondly a decrease in the number of microvascular endothelial cells and subsequent depletion of normal microvessel density (rarefaction) occurs upon VEGF signaling inhibition. NO donors could be successfully used not only for the treatment of developed angiogenesis-inhibitor-induced hypertension but also for preventive effects. PMID:26386874

  4. Effect of Electrode Configuration on Nitric Oxide Gas Sensor Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Cui

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of electrode configuration on the impedancemetric response of nitric oxide (NO gas sensors was investigated for solid electrochemical cells [Au/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ/Au]. Fabrication of the sensors was carried out at 1050 °C in order to establish a porous YSZ electrolyte that enabled gas diffusion. Two electrode configurations were studied where Au wire electrodes were either embedded within or wrapped around the YSZ electrolyte. The electrical response of the sensors was collected via impedance spectroscopy under various operating conditions where gas concentrations ranged from 0 to 100 ppm NO and 1%–18% O2 at temperatures varying from 600 to 700 °C. Gas diffusion appeared to be a rate-limiting mechanism in sensors where the electrode configuration resulted in longer diffusion pathways. The temperature dependence of the NO sensors studied was independent of the electrode configuration. Analysis of the impedance data, along with equivalent circuit modeling indicated the electrode configuration of the sensor effected gas and ionic transport pathways, capacitance behavior, and NO sensitivity.

  5. CHIP facilitates ubiquitination of inducible nitric oxide synthase and promotes its proteasomal degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Kong, Xiuqin; Fu, Jin; Xu, Yimiao; Fang, Shuping; Hua, Peng; Luo, Lan; Yin, Zhimin

    2009-01-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is responsible for nitric oxide (NO) synthesis from l-arginine in response to inflammatory mediators. It is reported that iNOS is degraded mainly by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in RAW264.7 cells and human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. In this study, we showed that iNOS was ubiquitinated and degraded dependent on CHIP (COOH terminus of heat shock protein 70-interacting protein), a chaperone-dependent ubiquitin ligase. The results from overexpression and RNAi experiments demonstrated that CHIP decreased the protein level of iNOS, shortened the half-life of iNOS and attenuated the production of NO. Furthermore, CHIP promoted ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of iNOS by associating with iNOS. These results suggest that CHIP plays an important role in regulation iNOS activity.

  6. Pharmacology and clinical pharmacology of methylarginines used as inhibitors of nitric oxide synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, Anja; Maas, Renke

    2014-01-01

    The methylarginines asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and monomethylarginine (L-NMMA) are endogenously formed inhibitors of nitric oxide synthases (NOS), which have extensively been investigated as risk markers and used as pharmacological tools to study the L-arginine-nitric oxide (NO) pathway in vitro and in vivo. It is the aim of the present review to summarize the clinical and experimental data on the pharmacological properties that are of relevance when planning and conducting experiments and clinical studies involving methylarginines. Key pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic data including IC50 values of ADMA and L-NMMA for NOS isoforms and transport proteins, as well as metabolism by dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolases (DDAH1 and DDAH2) and alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase 2 (AGXT2) are discussed.

  7. Development of novel agents based on nitric oxide for the control of colon cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vassiliki KOZONI; Theophilos ROSENBERG; Basil RIGAS

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide-donating nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NO-NSAIDs) repre-sent a novel class of compounds that hold promise as agents for the control of colon cancer. They are derivatives of conventional NSAIDs that have been modi-fied by adding to them, via a spacer molecule, a nitric oxide releasing moiety. The expectation is that the combined effects of NO and the NSAID moiety will exceed those of each structural component alone. Extensive work has demonstrated their potency and efficacy in preclinical models of colon cancer. The mechanism of action of NO-NSAIDs involves the modulation of several critical cellular signaling pathways, whereas the induction of a state of oxidative stress, at least by NO-aspirin, appears to be a major proximal event. Clinical trials are needed to assess the role of NO-NSAIDs in the control of colon cancer.

  8. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on diarrhea and gastrointestinal transit in mice: Roles of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Chih Liang; Hung-Jung Liu; Sheng-Hsuan Chen; Chun-Chin Chen; Liang-Shung Chou; Li Hsueh Tsai

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)on the diarrheogenic activity, gastrointestinal transit (GIT),and intestinal fluid content and the possible role of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in gastrointestinal functions of endotoxin-treated mice.METHODS: Diarrheogic activity, GIT, and intestinal fluid content as well as nitric oxide and PGE2 products were measured after intraperitoneal administration of LPS in mice.RESULTS: LPS dose-dependently accumulated abundant fluid into the small intestine, induced diarrhea, but decreased the GIT. Both nitric oxide and PGE2 were found to increase in LPS-treated mice. Western blot analysis indicated that LPS significantly induced the protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 in mice intestines. Pretreatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME, a non-selective NOS inhibitor) or indomethacin (an inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis) significantly attenuated the effects of LPS on the diarrheogenic activity and intestine content, but reversed the GIT.CONCLUSION: The present study suggests that the pathogenesis of LPS treatment may mediate the stimulatory effect of LPS on nitric oxide and PGE2 production and NO/prostaglandin pathway may play an important role on gastrointestinal function.

  9. Monitoring of the tumor response to nano-graphene oxide-mediated photothermal/photodynamic therapy by diffusion-weighted and BOLD MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jianbo; An, Hengqing; Huang, Xinglu; Fu, Guifeng; Zhuang, Rongqiang; Zhu, Lei; Xie, Jin; Zhang, Fan

    2016-05-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) are promising cancer treatment modalities. Because each modality has its own set of advantages and limitations, there has been interest in developing methods that can co-deliver the two regimens for enhanced tumor treatment. Among the efforts, nano-graphene oxide-mediated phototherapies have recently attracted much attention. Nano-graphene oxide has a broad absorbance spectrum and can be loaded with photosensitizers, such as chlorin e6, with high efficiency. Chlorin e6-loaded and PEGylated nano-graphene (GO-PEG-Ce6) can be excited at 660 nm, 808 nm, or both, to induce PDT, PTT, or PDT/PTT combination. Despite the potential of the treatments, there is a lack of a diagnostic tool which can monitor their therapeutic response in a non-invasive and prognostic manner; such an ability is urgently needed for the transformation and translation of the technologies. In this study, we performed diffusion-weighted and blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after GO-PEG-Ce6-mediated PTT, PDT, or PTT/PDT. We found that after efficient PTT, there is a significant increase of the tumor apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value in diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) maps; meanwhile, an efficient PDT led to an increase of in BOLD images. In both the cases, the amplitude of the increase was correlated with the treatment outcomes. More interestingly, a synergistic treatment efficacy was observed when the PTT/PDT combination was applied, and the combination was associated with a greater ADC and increase than when either modality was used alone. In particular, the PTT/PDT condition that induced the most dramatic short-term increase of the ADC value (>70%) caused the most effective tumor control in the long-run, with 60% of the treated animals being tumor-free after 60 days. These results suggest the great promise of the combination of DWI and BOLD MRI as a tool for accurate monitoring and prognosis

  10. Hydrogen sulfide in signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olas, Beata

    2015-01-15

    For a long time hydrogen sulfide (H₂S) was considered a toxic compound, but recently H₂S (at low concentrations) has been found to play an important function in physiological processes. Hydrogen sulfide, like other well-known compounds - nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) is a gaseous intracellular signal transducer. It regulates the cell cycle, apoptosis and the oxidative stress. Moreover, its functions include neuromodulation, regulation of cardiovascular system and inflammation. In this review, I focus on the metabolism of hydrogen sulfide (including enzymatic pathways of H₂S synthesis from l- and d-cysteine) and its signaling pathways in the cardiovascular system and the nervous system. I also describe how hydrogen sulfide may be used as therapeutic agent, i.e. in the cardiovascular diseases.

  11. Therapeutic photobiomodulation: nitric oxide and a novel function of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyton, Robert O; Ball, Kerri A

    2011-02-01

    Currently, light therapies are widely used in both human and veterinarian medicine. The application of light to clinical therapeutics includes: photodynamic therapy, used to kill cancer cells; UVA therapies, used to treat a variety of skin diseases; and photobiomodulation, used to promote cell growth and recovery from injury. Photobiomodu-lation uses light emitting diodes (LEDs) or low energy lasers, which emit light in the visible red to near infrared range. Light in this range penetrates tissue reasonably well, lacks the carcinogenic/mutagenic properties of UV light, and acts on an endogenous photoreceptor which likely acts to initiate light-altered signaling pathways. Although early studies identified mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase as an endogenous photoreceptor for photobiomodulation, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying photobiomodulation have not been clear. Three recent findings provide important new insight. First, nitric oxide has been implicated. Second, cytochrome c oxidase, an enzyme known to reduce oxygen to water at the end of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, has been shown to have a new enzymatic activity--the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide. This nitrite reductase activity is elevated under hypoxic conditions but also occurs under normoxia. And third, low intensity light enhances nitric oxide synthesis by cytochrome c oxidase without altering its ability to reduce oxygen. From these findings, we propose that cytochrome c oxidase functions in photobiomodulation by producing nitric oxide, a signaling molecule which can then function in both intra- and extracellular signaling pathways. We also propose that the effectiveness of photobiomodulation is under the control of tissue oxygen and nitrite levels.

  12. Protective effect of cyclosporin A and FK506 from nitric oxide-dependent apoptosis in activated macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortelano, Sonsoles; López-Collazo, Eduardo; Boscá, Lisardo

    1999-01-01

    Activation of macrophages with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and low doses of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) induced apoptotic death through a nitric oxide-dependent pathway. Treatment of cells with the immunosuppressors cyclosporin A (CsA) or FK506 inhibited the activation-dependent apoptosis. These drugs decreased the up-regulation of p53 and Bax characteristic of activated macrophages. Moreover, incubation of activated macrophages with CsA and FK506 contributed to maintain higher levels of Bcl-2 than in LPS/IFN-γ treated cells. The inhibition of apoptosis exerted by CsA and FK506 in macrophages was also observed when cell death was induced by treatment with chemical nitric oxide donors. Incubation of macrophages with LPS/IFN-γ barely affected caspase-1 but promoted an important activation of caspase-3. Both CsA and FK506 inhibited pathways leading to caspase-3 activation. Moreover, the cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, a well established caspase substrate, was reduced by these immunosuppressive drugs. CsA and FK506 reduced the release of cytochrome c to the cytosol and the activation of caspase-3 in cells treated with nitric oxide donors. These results indicate that CsA and FK506 protect macrophages from nitric oxide-dependent apoptosis and suggest a contribution of the macrophage to innate immunity under conditions of immunosuppression of the host. PMID:10205001

  13. Speciation in aqueous solutions of nitric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlushak, S; Simonin, J P; De Sio, S; Bernard, O; Ruas, A; Pochon, P; Jan, S; Moisy, P

    2013-02-28

    In this study, speciation in aqueous solutions of nitric acid at 25 °C was assessed in two independent ways. First, Raman experiments were carried out and interpreted in terms of free nitrate ions, ion pairs and neutral HNO(3) molecules. In parallel, a model was developed to account for the formation of these two kinds of pairs. It was based on an extension of the binding mean spherical approximation (BiMSA), or associative MSA (AMSA), in which the size and the charge of the ions in the chemical pair may differ from those of the free ions. A simultaneous fit of the osmotic coefficient and of the proportion of free ions (obtained from Raman spectroscopy experiments) led to an estimation of the speciation in nitric acid solutions. The result obtained using this procedure was compared with the estimation obtained from the Raman experiments.

  14. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation Project Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Pattie L.

    2013-01-01

    The standard practice for protection of stainless steel is a process called passivation. This procedure results in the formation of a metal oxide layer to prevent corrosion. Typical passivation procedures call for the use of nitric acid which exhibits excellent corrosion performance; however, there are a number of environmental, worker safety, and operational issues associated with its use. The longtime military specification for the passivation of stainless steel was cancelled in favor of newer specifications which allow for the use of citric acid in place of nitric acid. Citric acid offers a variety of benefits that include increased safety for personnel, reduced environmental impact, and reduced operational costs. There have been few studies, however, to determine whether citric acid is an acceptable alternative for NASA and DoD. This paper details activities to date including development of the joint test plan, on-going and planned testing, and preliminary results.

  15. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xiaohong; Keller, T C Stevenson; Begandt, Daniela; Butcher, Joshua T; Biwer, Lauren; Keller, Alexander S; Columbus, Linda; Isakson, Brant E

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, NOS3) is responsible for producing nitric oxide (NO)--a key molecule that can directly (or indirectly) act as a vasodilator and anti-inflammatory mediator. In this review, we examine the structural effects of regulation of the eNOS enzyme, including post-translational modifications and subcellular localization. After production, NO diffuses to surrounding cells with a variety of effects. We focus on the physiological role of NO and NO-derived molecules, including microvascular effects on vessel tone and immune response. Regulation of eNOS and NO action is complicated; we address endogenous and exogenous mechanisms of NO regulation with a discussion of pharmacological agents used in clinical and laboratory settings and a proposed role for eNOS in circulating red blood cells.

  16. Autoxidation kinetics of aqueous nitric oxide

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    Reports on the kinetics of the autoxidation of aqueous nitric oxide are discussed. It is concluded that the correct rate law is -d[NO]/dt = 4kaq[NO]2 [O2] with kaq = 2 × 106 M-2 · s-1 at 25°C and that a recent report of a rate law zero order in NO is incorrect. © 1993.

  17. Nitric Oxide Scavenging by Red Cell Microparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chen; Zhao, Weixin; George J Christ; Gladwin, Mark T.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    Red cell microparticles form during the storage of red blood cells and in diseases associated with red cell breakdown and asplenia, including hemolytic anemias such as sickle cell disease. These small phospholipid vesicles that are derived from red blood cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of transfusion of aged stored blood and hemolytic diseases, via activation of the hemostatic system and effects on nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Red cell microparticles react with the import...

  18. Oxygen, nitric oxide and articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Fermor

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Molecular oxygen is required for the production of nitric oxide (NO, a pro-inflammatory mediator that is associated with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. To date there has been little consideration of the role of oxygen tension in the regulation of nitric oxide production associated with arthritis. Oxygen tension may be particularly relevant to articular cartilage since it is avascular and therefore exists at a reduced oxygen tension. The superficial zone exists at approximately 6% O2, while the deep zone exists at less than 1% O2. Furthermore, oxygen tension can alter matrix synthesis, and the material properties of articular cartilage in vitro.The increase in nitric oxide associated with arthritis can be caused by pro-inflammatory cytokines and mechanical stress. Oxygen tension significantly alters endogenous NO production in articular cartilage, as well as the stimulation of NO in response to both mechanical loading and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mechanical loading and pro-inflammatory cytokines also increase the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. There is a complex interaction between NO and PGE2, and oxygen tension can alter this interaction. These findings suggest that the relatively low levels of oxygen within the joint may have significant influences on the metabolic activity, and inflammatory response of cartilage as compared to ambient levels. A better understanding of the role of oxygen in the production of inflammatory mediators in response to mechanical loading, or pro-inflammatory cytokines, may aid in the development of strategies for therapeutic intervention in arthritis.

  19. Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 shows no hypersensitivity to nitric oxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J.M.; Thomsen, L.L.; Olesen, J.

    2008-01-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM-1) is a dominantly inherited subtype of migraine with aura and transient hemiplegia associated with mutations in the CACNA1A gene. FHM-1 shares many phenotypical similarities with common types of migraine, indicating common neurobiological pathways....... Experimental studies have established that activation of the nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO-cGMP) pathway plays a crucial role in migraine pathophysiology. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that CACNA1A mutations in patients with FHM-1 are associated with hypersensitivity to NO-cGMP pathway...... (V-meanMCA) by transcranial Doppler; diameter of the superficial temporal artery (STA) by Dermascan. One patient reported migraine without aura 5 h after start of the GTN infusion. No aura was reported. The AUC(headache) in the immediate phase was more pronounced in patients than in controls (P = 0...

  20. Updated role of nitric oxide in disorders of erythrocyte function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Marc J; Maley, Jason H; Lasker, George F; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2013-03-01

    Nitric oxide is a potent vasodilator that plays a critical role in disorders of erythrocyte function. Sickle cell disease, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and banked blood preservation are three conditions where nitric oxide is intimately related to dysfunctional erythrocytes. These conditions are accompanied by hemolysis, thrombosis and vasoocclusion. Our understanding of the interaction between nitric oxide, hemoglobin, and the vasculature is constantly evolving, and by defining this role we can better direct trials aimed at improving the treatments of disorders of erythrocyte function. Here we briefly discuss nitric oxide's interaction with hemoglobin through the hypothesis regarding Snitrosohemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and myoglobin as nitrite reductases. We then review the current understanding of the role of nitric oxide in sickle cell disease, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and banked blood, and discuss therapeutics in development to target nitric oxide in the treatment of some of these disorders.

  1. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Phosphorylation at Threonine 495 and Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Formation in Response to a High H2O2 Concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guterbaum, Thomas Jeremy; Braunstein, Thomas Hartig; Fossum, A;

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) is produced in vessels during ischemia/reperfusion and during inflammation, both leading to vascular dysfunction. We investigated cellular pathways involved in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation at Threonine 495 (Thr(495)) in human umbilical vein end...... endothelial cells (HUVECs) exposed to H₂O₂....

  2. Emerging Role of Nitric Oxide and Heat Shock Proteins in Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Marisa Nile; Ferder, León; Manucha, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is present in pathologies such as diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome, impaired glucose tolerance, hypertension, inflammation, cardiac disease, and dyslipidemias. Population studies show that IR is multifactorial and has genetic components, such as defects in the insulin-signaling pathway (as serine phosphorylation on insulin substrate or decreased activation of signaling molecules) and RAS/MAPK-dependent pathways. IR is connected to mitochondrial dysfunction, overproduction of oxidants, accumulation of fat, and an over-activation of the renin-angiotensin system linked to the NADPH oxidase activity. In addition, nitric oxide (NO), synthesized by nitric oxide synthases (endothelial and inducible), is also associated with IR when both impaired release and reduced bioavailability of all which lead to inflammation and hypertension. However, increased NO may promote vasculoprotection. Moreover, reduced NO release induces heat shock protein 70 kDa (HSP70) expression in IR and diabetes, mediating beneficial effects against oxidative stress injury, inflammation and apoptosis. HSP70 may be used as biomarker of the chronicity of diabetes. Hsp72 (inducible protein) is linked to vascular complications with a high-fat diet by blocking inflammation signaling (cytoprotective and anti-cytotoxicity intracellular role). Elucidating the IR signaling pathways and the roles of NO and HSPs is relevant to the application of new treatments, such as heat shock and thermal therapy, nitrosylated drugs, chemical chaperones or exercise training.

  3. Pyocyanin inhibits both nitric oxide-dependent and -independent relaxation in porcine coronary arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempenstall, Allison; Grant, Gary D; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Shailendra; Johnson, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    The effects of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factor pyocyanin (PCN) on the contractile function of porcine coronary arteries was investigated in vitro. Artery rings (5 mm) were suspended in organ baths containing Krebs' solution for the measurement of isometric tension. The effect of PCN on resting and precontracted coronary arteries was initially investigated with various agents. Arteries were precontracted with prostaglandin (PG) F2α or potassium chloride and endothelium-dependent relaxations were induced by various agents in the presence of PCN. Pyocyanin (0.1-10 μmol/L) evoked small-amplitude, dose-dependent contractions in resting porcine coronary arteries. In addition, PCN amplified the contractile response to PGF2α , but did not alter responses to carbachol. Pyocyanin (0.1-10 μmol/L) significantly inhibited endothelium-dependent relaxations evoked by neurokinin A. Pyocyanin also inhibited relaxations evoked by diethylamine nitric oxide (a nitric oxide donor), forskolin (an adenylate cyclase activator), dibuytyryl-cAMP (a cAMP analogue), 8-bromo-cGMP (a cGMP analogue) and P1075 (a KATP channel activator), but not isoprenaline (β-adrenoceceptor agonist). These results indicate that physiological concentrations of PCN interfere with multiple intracellular processes involved in vascular smooth muscle relaxation, in particular pathways downstream of nitric oxide release. Thus, PCN may alter normal vascular function in patients infected with P. aeruginosa.

  4. Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Induction in the Antitumorigenic and Neurotoxic Effects of 2-Methoxyestradiol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Gorska

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: 2-Methoxyestradiol, one of the natural 17β-estradiol derivatives, is a novel, potent anticancer agent currently being evaluated in advanced phases of clinical trials. The main goal of the study was to investigate the anticancer activity of 2-methoxy-estradiol towards osteosarcoma cells and its possible neurodegenerative effects. We used an experimental model of neurotoxicity and anticancer activity of the physiological agent, 2-methoxyestradiol. Thus, we used highly metastatic osteosarcoma 143B and mouse immortalized hippocampal HT22 cell lines. The cells were treated with pharmacological (1 μM, 10 μM concentrations of 2-methoxyestradiol. Experimental: Neuronal nitric oxide synthase and 3-nitrotyrosine protein levels were determined by western blotting. Cell viability and induction of cell death were measured by MTT and PI/Annexin V staining and a DNA fragmentation ELISA kit, respectively. Intracellular levels of nitric oxide were determined by flow cytometry. Results: Here we demonstrated that the signaling pathways of neurodegenerative diseases and cancer may overlap. We presented evidence that 2-methoxyestradiol, in contrast to 17β-estradiol, specifically affects neuronal nitric oxide synthase and augments 3-nitrotyrosine level leading to osteosarcoma and immortalized hippocampal cell death. Conclusions: We report the dual facets of 2-methoxyestradiol, that causes cancer cell death, but on the other hand may play a key role as a neurotoxin.

  5. Do endogenous opioids and nitric oxide participate in the anticonvulsant action of dipyrone?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M.L. Reis

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available It was previously reported that systemic administration of dipyrone inhibited the tonic component of generalized tonic-clonic seizures in both the electroshock and the audiogenic seizure models. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanisms involved in the anticonvulsant action of dipyrone by assessing the role of nitric oxide and opioids in the electroshock (female 60- to 90-day-old Wistar rats, N = 5-11 and audiogenic seizure (female 60- to 90-day-old Wistar audiogenic rats, N = 5-11 models of epilepsy. Naloxone (5 mg/kg, sc significantly reversed the anticonvulsant effect of dipyrone in rats submitted to the induction of audiogenic seizures (ANOVA/Bonferroni's test, suggesting the involvement of opioid peptides in this action. In the electroshock model no reversal of the anticonvulsant effect of dipyrone by naloxone (5 mg/kg, sc was demonstrable. The acute (120 mg/kg, ip and chronic (25 mg/kg, ip, twice a day/4 days administration of L-NOARG did not reverse the anticonvulsant action of dipyrone in the audiogenic seizure model, suggesting that the nitric oxide pathway does not participate in such effect. Indomethacin (10, 20 and 30 mg/kg, ip used for comparison had no anticonvulsant effect in the audiogenic seizure model. In conclusion, opioid peptides but not nitric oxide seem to be involved in the anticonvulsant action of dipyrone in audiogenic seizures.

  6. Targeting Nitric Oxide with Natural Derived Compounds as a Therapeutic Strategy in Vascular Diseases

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    Maurizio Forte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the family of endogenous gasotransmitters, nitric oxide (NO is the smallest gaseous intercellular messenger involved in the modulation of several processes, such as blood flow and platelet aggregation control, essential to maintain vascular homeostasis. NO is produced by nitric oxide synthases (NOS and its effects are mediated by cGMP-dependent or cGMP-independent mechanisms. Growing evidence suggests a crosstalk between the NO signaling and the occurrence of oxidative stress in the onset and progression of vascular diseases, such as hypertension, heart failure, ischemia, and stroke. For these reasons, NO is considered as an emerging molecular target for developing therapeutic strategies for cardio- and cerebrovascular pathologies. Several natural derived compounds, such as polyphenols, are now proposed as modulators of NO-mediated pathways. The aim of this review is to highlight the experimental evidence on the involvement of nitric oxide in vascular homeostasis focusing on the therapeutic potential of targeting NO with some natural compounds in patients with vascular diseases.

  7. Targeting Nitric Oxide with Natural Derived Compounds as a Therapeutic Strategy in Vascular Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Maurizio; Damato, Antonio; Ambrosio, Mariateresa; Puca, Annibale A.; Sciarretta, Sebastiano; Frati, Giacomo; Vecchione, Carmine

    2016-01-01

    Within the family of endogenous gasotransmitters, nitric oxide (NO) is the smallest gaseous intercellular messenger involved in the modulation of several processes, such as blood flow and platelet aggregation control, essential to maintain vascular homeostasis. NO is produced by nitric oxide synthases (NOS) and its effects are mediated by cGMP-dependent or cGMP-independent mechanisms. Growing evidence suggests a crosstalk between the NO signaling and the occurrence of oxidative stress in the onset and progression of vascular diseases, such as hypertension, heart failure, ischemia, and stroke. For these reasons, NO is considered as an emerging molecular target for developing therapeutic strategies for cardio- and cerebrovascular pathologies. Several natural derived compounds, such as polyphenols, are now proposed as modulators of NO-mediated pathways. The aim of this review is to highlight the experimental evidence on the involvement of nitric oxide in vascular homeostasis focusing on the therapeutic potential of targeting NO with some natural compounds in patients with vascular diseases. PMID:27651855

  8. Disruption of Fas Receptor Signaling by Nitric Oxide in Eosinophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebestreit, Holger; Dibbert, Birgit; Balatti, Ivo; Braun, Doris; Schapowal, Andreas; Blaser, Kurt; Simon, Hans-Uwe

    1998-01-01

    It has been suggested that Fas ligand–Fas receptor interactions are involved in the regulation of eosinophil apoptosis and that dysfunctions in this system could contribute to the accumulation of these cells in allergic and asthmatic diseases. Here, we demonstrate that nitric oxide (NO) specifically prevents Fas receptor–mediated apoptosis in freshly isolated human eosinophils. In contrast, rapid acceleration of eosinophil apoptosis by activation of the Fas receptor occurs in the presence of eosinophil hematopoietins. Analysis of the intracellular mechanisms revealed that NO disrupts Fas receptor–mediated signaling events at the level of, or proximal to, Jun kinase (JNK), but distal to sphingomyelinase (SMase) activation and ceramide generation. In addition, activation of SMase occurs downstream of an interleukin 1 converting enzyme–like (ICE-like) protease(s) that is not blocked by NO. However, NO prevents activation of a protease that targets lamin B1. These findings suggest a role for an additional NO-sensitive apoptotic signaling pathway that amplifies the proteolytic cascade initialized by activation of the Fas receptor. Therefore, NO concentrations within allergic inflammatory sites may be important in determining whether an eosinophil survives or undergoes apoptosis upon Fas ligand stimulation. PMID:9449721

  9. The Role of Nitric Oxide from Neurological Disease to Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Ahmed; Abdel Rahman, Mohamed F; Gad, Mohamed Z

    2017-01-01

    Until the beginning of the 1980s, nitric oxide (NO) was just a toxic molecule of a lengthy list of environmental pollutants such as cigarette smoke and smog. In fact, NO had a very bad reputation of being destroyer of ozone, suspected carcinogen and precursor of acid rain. However, by the early 1990s it was well recognized by the medical research community. Over the last two decades, the picture has been totally changed. Diverse lines of evidence have converged to show that this sometime poison is a fundamental player in the everyday business of the human body. NO activity was probed in the brain, arteries, immune system, liver, pancreas, uterus, peripheral nerves, lungs, and almost every system in the human body. NO is a major player in the cardiovascular system as it is involved in regulating blood pressure. In the CNS, it is involved in memory formation and the regulation of cerebral blood flow to ensure adequate supply of blood to the brain. Because NO is involved in many pathways, it has a role in several diseases related to modern life as hypertension, coronary heart diseases, Alzheimer's Disease, stroke and cancer. This chapter focuses on the discussion of the role of NO in neurological diseases and cancer and how can this Janus-faced molecule play a role in the pathology and personalized treatment of these diseases.

  10. Nitric oxide synthase is induced in sporulation of Physarum polycephalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golderer, Georg; Werner, Ernst R.; Leitner, Stefan; Gröbner, Peter; Werner-Felmayer, Gabriele

    2001-01-01

    The myxomycete Physarum polycephalum expresses a calcium-independent nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) resembling the inducible NOS isoenzyme in mammals. We have now cloned and sequenced this, the first nonanimal NOS to be identified, showing that it shares Physarum macroplasmodia during the 5-day starvation period needed to induce sporulation competence. Induction of both NOS and sporulation competence were inhibited by glucose, a growth signal and known repressor of sporulation, and by l-N6–(1-iminoethyl)-lysine (NIL), an inhibitor of inducible NOS. Sporulation, which is triggered after the starvation period by light exposure, was also prevented by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), an inhibitor of NO-sensitive guanylate cyclase. In addition, also expression of lig1, a sporulation-specific gene, was strongly attenuated by NIL or ODQ. 8-Bromo-cGMP, added 2 h before the light exposure, restored the capacity of NIL-treated macroplasmodia to express lig1 and to sporulate. This indicates that the second messenger used for NO signaling in sporulation of Physarum is cGMP and links this signaling pathway to expression of lig1. PMID:11358872

  11. Nitric oxide and its role in ischaemic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keynes, Robert G; Garthwaite, John

    2004-03-01

    The role of the neural messenger nitric oxide (NO) in cerebral ischaemia has been investigated extensively in the past decade. NO may play either a protective or destructive role in ischaemia and the literature is plagued with contradictory findings. Working with NO presents many unique difficulties and here we review the potential artifacts that may have contributed to discrepancies and cause future problems for the unwary investigator. Recent evidence challenges the idea that NO from neurones builds up to levels (micromolar) sufficient to directly elicit cell death during the post-ischaemic period. Concomitantly, the case is strengthened for a role of NO in delayed death mediated post-ischaemia by the inducible NO synthase. Mechanistically it seems unlikely that NO is released in high enough quantities to inhibit respiration in vivo; the formation of reactive nitrogen species, such as peroxynitrite, represents the more likely pathway to cell death. The protective and restorative properties of NO have become of increasing interest. NO from endothelial cells may, via stimulating cGMP production, protect the ischaemic brain by acutely augmenting blood flow, and by helping to form new blood vessels in the longer term (angiogenesis). Elevated cGMP production may also stop cells dying by inhibiting apoptosis and help repair damage by stimulating neurogenesis. In addition NO may act as a direct antioxidant and participate in the triggering of protective gene expression programmes that underlie cerebral ischaemic preconditioning. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which NO is protective may ultimately identify new potential therapeutic targets.

  12. Nasal nitric oxide in children with recurrent acute otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torretta, S; Marchisio, P; Capaccio, P; Pignataro, L

    2016-01-01

    Recently, reduced Nasal nitric oxide (nNO) nNO levels have been reported in children with adenoidal hypertrophy predisposing to chronic nasosinusal inflammation. Given the strict anatomic and physiopathologic link between the nasopharyngeal and middle ear compartments, and considering the high prevalence of otitis prone children among those affected with chronic adenoiditis, we designed a study aimed to test any possible difference in nNO levels between non-allergic children with and without recurrent acute otitis media (RAOM) associated with chronic adenoiditis. The study involved 54 children with RAOM (44.4% males; mean age= 7.5±3.5 years) and 51 children without RAOM (47.4% males; mean age= 7.0±3.8 years). nNO levels were significantly reduced in children with RAOM compared to children without RAOM (676.9±250.7 ppb vs 831.8±320.4 ppb, respectively; p= 0.02). Our results could be related to reduced NO production by the ciliated paranasal, nasopharyngeal and middle ear epithelium and the impaired sinusal ostial and Eustachian tube patency due to chronic inflammation, and seem to confirm the involvement of NO pathway in recurrent upper airway infections related to impaired ciliated respiratory mucosa.

  13. REGULATION OF OBESITY AND INSULIN RESISTANCE BY NITRIC OXIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansbury, Brian E.; Hill, Bradford G.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease and has quickly become a world-wide pandemic with few tangible and safe treatment options. While it is generally accepted that the primary cause of obesity is energy imbalance, i.e., the calories consumed are greater than are utilized, understanding how caloric balance is regulated has proven a challenge. Many “distal” causes of obesity, such as the structural environment, occupation, and social influences, are exceedingly difficult to change or manipulate. Hence, molecular processes and pathways more proximal to the origins of obesity—those that directly regulate energy metabolism or caloric intake—appear to be more feasible targets for therapy. In particular, nitric oxide (NO) is emerging as a central regulator of energy metabolism and body composition. NO bioavailability is decreased in animal models of diet-induced obesity and in obese and insulin resistant patients, and increasing NO output has remarkable effects on obesity and insulin resistance. This review discusses the role of NO in regulating adiposity and insulin sensitivity and places its modes of action into context with the known causes and consequences of metabolic disease. PMID:24878261

  14. New nitric oxide donors based on ruthenium complexes

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    C.N. Lunardi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO donors produce NO-related activity when applied to biological systems. Among its diverse functions, NO has been implicated in vascular smooth muscle relaxation. Despite the great importance of NO in biological systems, its pharmacological and physiological studies have been limited due to its high reactivity and short half-life. In this review we will focus on our recent investigations of nitrosyl ruthenium complexes as NO-delivery agents and their effects on vascular smooth muscle cell relaxation. The high affinity of ruthenium for NO is a marked feature of its chemistry. The main signaling pathway responsible for the vascular relaxation induced by NO involves the activation of soluble guanylyl-cyclase, with subsequent accumulation of cGMP and activation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase. This in turn can activate several proteins such as K+ channels as well as induce vasodilatation by a decrease in cytosolic Ca2+. Oxidative stress and associated oxidative damage are mediators of vascular damage in several cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. The increased production of the superoxide anion (O2- by the vascular wall has been observed in different animal models of hypertension. Vascular relaxation to the endogenous NO-related response or to NO released from NO deliverers is impaired in vessels from renal hypertensive (2K-1C rats. A growing amount of evidence supports the possibility that increased NO inactivation by excess O2- may account for the decreased NO bioavailability and vascular dysfunction in hypertension.

  15. Nitric oxide destabilizes Pias3 and regulates sumoylation.

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    Jing Qu

    Full Text Available Small ubiquitin-related protein modifiers (SUMO modification is an important mechanism for posttranslational regulation of protein function. However, it is largely unknown how the sumoylation pathway is regulated. Here, we report that nitric oxide (NO causes global hyposumoylation in mammalian cells. Both SUMO E2 conjugating enzyme Ubc9 and E3 ligase protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (Pias3 were targets for S-nitrosation. S-nitrosation did not interfere with the SUMO conjugating activity of Ubc9, but promoted Pias3 degradation by facilitating its interaction with tripartite motif-containing 32 (Trim32, a ubiquitin E3 ligase. On the one hand, NO promoted Trim32-mediated Pias3 ubiquitination. On the other hand, NO enhanced the stimulatory effect of Pias3 on Trim32 autoubiquitination. The residue Cys459 of Pias3 was identified as a target site for S-nitrosation. Mutation of Cys459 abolished the stimulatory effect of NO on the Pias3-Trim32 interaction, indicating a requirement of S-nitrosation at Cys459 for positive regulation of the Pias3-Trim32 interplay. This study reveals a novel crosstalk between S-nitrosation, ubiquitination, and sumoylation, which may be crucial for NO-related physiological and pathological processes.

  16. Nitric Oxide: A Multitasked Signaling Gas in Plants

    KAUST Repository

    Domingos, Patricia

    2014-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a gaseous reactive oxygen species (ROS) that has evolved as a signaling hormone in many physiological processes in animals. In plants it has been demonstrated to be a crucial regulator of development, acting as a signaling molecule present at each step of the plant life cycle. NO has also been implicated as a signal in biotic and abiotic responses of plants to the environment. Remarkably, despite this plethora of effects and functional relationships, the fundamental knowledge of NO production, sensing, and transduction in plants remains largely unknown or inadequately characterized. In this review we cover the current understanding of NO production, perception, and action in different physiological scenarios. We especially address the issues of enzymatic and chemical generation of NO in plants, NO sensing and downstream signaling, namely the putative cGMP and Ca2+ pathways, ion-channel activity modulation, gene expression regulation, and the interface with other ROS, which can have a profound effect on both NO accumulation and function. We also focus on the importance of NO in cell–cell communication during developmental processes and sexual reproduction, namely in pollen tube guidance and embryo sac fertilization, pathogen defense, and responses to abiotic stress.

  17. Hydroalcoholic Extract from Inflorescences of Achyrocline satureioides (Compositae) Ameliorates Dextran Sulphate Sodium-Induced Colitis in Mice by Attenuation in the Production of Inflammatory Cytokines and Oxidative Mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Luisa Mota; Farias, Jaime Antonio Machado; Boeing, Thaise; Somensi, Lincon Bordignon; Beber, Ana Paula; Cury, Benhur Judah

    2016-01-01

    Achyrocline satureioides is a South American herb used to treat inflammatory and gastrointestinal diseases. This study evaluated intestinal anti-inflammatory effects of the hydroalcoholic extract of inflorescences of satureioides (HEAS) in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) induced colitis in mice. Mice were orally treated with vehicle, 5-aminosalicylic acid (100 mg/kg), or HEAS (1–100 mg/kg). Clinical signs of colitis and colonic histopathological parameters were evaluated, along with the determination of levels of reduced glutathione and lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH), the superoxide dismutase (SOD), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in colon. The colonic content of cytokines (TNF, IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10) was measured. Additionally, the effects of the extract on nitric oxide (NO) release by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated macrophages and diphenylpicrylhydrazyl levels were determined. Mucin levels and SOD activity, as well as the LOOH, MPO, TNF, and IL-6 accumulation in colon tissues, were normalized by the HEAS administration. In addition, the extract elicited an increase in IL-4 and IL-10 levels in colon. NO release by macrophages was inhibited by HEAS and its scavenger activity was confirmed. Together these results suggest that preparations obtained from inflorescences from A. satureioides could be used in treatment for IBD. Besides, this work corroborates the popular use of A. satureioides in inflammatory disorders. PMID:27847525

  18. Hydroalcoholic Extract from Inflorescences of Achyrocline satureioides (Compositae Ameliorates Dextran Sulphate Sodium-Induced Colitis in Mice by Attenuation in the Production of Inflammatory Cytokines and Oxidative Mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Mota da Silva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Achyrocline satureioides is a South American herb used to treat inflammatory and gastrointestinal diseases. This study evaluated intestinal anti-inflammatory effects of the hydroalcoholic extract of inflorescences of satureioides (HEAS in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS induced colitis in mice. Mice were orally treated with vehicle, 5-aminosalicylic acid (100 mg/kg, or HEAS (1–100 mg/kg. Clinical signs of colitis and colonic histopathological parameters were evaluated, along with the determination of levels of reduced glutathione and lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH, the superoxide dismutase (SOD, and myeloperoxidase (MPO activity in colon. The colonic content of cytokines (TNF, IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10 was measured. Additionally, the effects of the extract on nitric oxide (NO release by lipopolysaccharide (LPS stimulated macrophages and diphenylpicrylhydrazyl levels were determined. Mucin levels and SOD activity, as well as the LOOH, MPO, TNF, and IL-6 accumulation in colon tissues, were normalized by the HEAS administration. In addition, the extract elicited an increase in IL-4 and IL-10 levels in colon. NO release by macrophages was inhibited by HEAS and its scavenger activity was confirmed. Together these results suggest that preparations obtained from inflorescences from A. satureioides could be used in treatment for IBD. Besides, this work corroborates the popular use of A. satureioides in inflammatory disorders.

  19. A Comparison of the Effects of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition on Cartilage Damage

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    Nevzat Selim Gokay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of selective inducible nitric oxide synthase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on cartilage regeneration. The study involved 27 Wistar rats that were divided into five groups. On Day 1, both knees of 3 rats were resected and placed in a formalin solution as a control group. The remaining 24 rats were separated into 4 groups, and their right knees were surgically damaged. Depending on the groups, the rats were injected with intra-articular normal saline solution, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (50 mg/kg, inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor amino-guanidine (30 mg/kg, or nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (200 mg/kg. After 21 days, the right and left knees of the rats were resected and placed in formalin solution. The samples were histopathologically examined by a blinded evaluator and scored on 8 parameters. Although selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition exhibited significant (P=0.044 positive effects on cartilage regeneration following cartilage damage, it was determined that inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition had no statistically significant effect on cartilage regeneration. It was observed that the nitric oxide synthase activation triggered advanced arthrosis symptoms, such as osteophyte formation. The fact that selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors were observed to have mitigating effects on the severity of the damage may, in the future, influence the development of new agents to be used in the treatment of cartilage disorders.

  20. Nitric oxide in liver inflammation and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Sanz, Paloma; Hortelano, Sonsoles; Callejas, Nuria A; Goren, Nora; Casado, Marta; Zeini, Miriam; Boscá, Lisardo

    2002-12-01

    Hepatocytes express and release inflammatory mediators after challenge with bacterial cell wall molecules and proinflammatory cytokines. Nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS-2) is expressed under these conditions and the high-output NO synthesis that follows contributes to the inflammatory response in this tissue and participates in the onset of several hepatopathies. However, in the course of liver regeneration, for example, after partial hepatectomy, NOS-2 is expressed at moderate levels and contributes to inhibit apoptosis and to favor progression in the cell cycle until the organ size and function are restored. The mechanisms involved in the regulation of NOS-2 expression under these conditions are revised.

  1. Nitric oxide and plant iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buet, Agustina; Simontacchi, Marcela

    2015-03-01

    Like all living organisms, plants demand iron (Fe) for important biochemical and metabolic processes. Internal imbalances, as a consequence of insufficient or excess Fe in the environment, lead to growth restriction and affect crop yield. Knowledge of signals and factors affecting each step in Fe uptake from the soil and distribution (long-distance transport, remobilization from old to young leaves, and storage in seeds) is necessary to improve our understanding of plant mineral nutrition. In this context, the role of nitric oxide (NO) is discussed as a key player in maintaining Fe homeostasis through its cross talk with hormones, ferritin, and frataxin and the ability to form nitrosyl-iron complexes.

  2. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition and cerebrovascular regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iadecola, C; Pelligrino, D A; Moskowitz, M A;

    1994-01-01

    tone and may play an important role in selected vasodilator responses of the cerebral circulation. Furthermore, evidence has been presented suggesting that NO participates in the mechanisms of cerebral ischemic damage. Despite the widespread attention that NO has captured in recent years and the large......There is increasing evidence that nitric oxide (NO) is an important molecular messenger involved in a wide variety of biological processes. Recent data suggest that NO is also involved in the regulation of the cerebral circulation. Thus, NO participants in the maintenance of resting cerebrovascular...

  3. Nitric oxide modulation of the hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system

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    Kadekaro M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO, a free radical gas produced endogenously from the amino acid L-arginine by NO synthase (NOS, has important functions in modulating vasopressin and oxytocin secretion from the hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system. NO production is stimulated during increased functional activity of magnocellular neurons, in parallel with plastic changes of the supraoptic nucleus (SON and paraventricular nucleus. Electrophysiological data recorded from the SON of hypothalamic slices indicate that NO inhibits firing of phasic and non-phasic neurons, while L-NAME, an NOS inhibitor, increases their activity. Results from measurement of neurohypophyseal hormones are more variable. Overall, however, it appears that NO, tonically produced in the forebrain, inhibits vasopressin and oxytocin secretion during normovolemic, isosmotic conditions. During osmotic stimulation, dehydration, hypovolemia and hemorrhage, as well as high plasma levels of angiotensin II, NO inhibition of vasopressin neurons is removed, while that of oxytocin neurons is enhanced. This produces a preferential release of vasopressin over oxytocin important for correction of fluid imbalance. During late pregnancy and throughout lactation, fluid homeostasis is altered and expression of NOS in the SON is down- and up-regulated, respectively, in parallel with plastic changes of the magnocellular system. NO inhibition of magnocellular neurons involves GABA and prostaglandin synthesis and the signal-transduction mechanism is independent of the cGMP-pathway. Plasma hormone levels are unaffected by icv 1H-[1, 2, 4]oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor or 8-Br-cGMP administered to conscious rats. Moreover, cGMP does not increase in homogenates of the neural lobe and in microdialysates of the SON when NO synthesis is enhanced during osmotic stimulation. Among alternative signal-transduction pathways, nitrosylation of target proteins affecting activity of ion

  4. EFFECTS OF NITRIC ACID ON CRITICALITY SAFETY ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, B.

    2011-08-18

    As nitric acid molarity is increased, there are two competing phenomena affecting the reactivity of the system. First, there is interaction between each of the 10 wells in the basket-like insert. As the molarity of the nitric acid solution is increased (it moves from 100% water to 100% HNO{sub 3}), the hydrogen atom density decreases by about 80%. However, it remains a relatively efficient moderator. The moderating ratio of nitric acid is about 90% that of water. As the media between the wells is changed from 100% water to 100% nitric acid, the density of the media increases by 50%. A higher density typically leads to a better reflector. However, when the macroscopic scattering cross sections are considered, nitric acid is a much worse reflector than water. The effectiveness of nitric acid as a reflector is about 40% that of water. Since the media between the wells become a worse reflector and still remains an effective moderator, interaction between the wells increases. This phenomenon will cause reactivity to increase as nitric acid molarity increases. The seond phenomenon is due to the moderating ratio changing in the high concentration fissile-nitric acid solution in the 10 wells. Since the wells contain relatively small volumes of high concentration solutions, a small decrease in moderating power has a large effect on reactivity. This is due to the fact that neutrons are more likely to escape the high concentration fissile solution before causing another fission event. The result of this phenomenon is that as nitric acid molarity increases, reactivity decreases. Recent studies have shown that the second phenomenon is indeed the dominating force in determining reactivity changes in relation to nitric acid molarity changes. When considering the system as a whole, as nitric acid molarity increases, reactivity decreases.

  5. Adrenoceptor-activated nitric oxide synthesis in salivary acinar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Looms, Dagnia; Dissing, Steen; Tritsaris, Katerina

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the cellular regulation of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in isolated acinar cells from rat parotid and human labial salivary glands, using the newly developed fluorescent nitric oxide (NO) indicator, DAF-2. We found that sympathetic stimulation with norepinephrine (NE) caus...

  6. Catalytic abatement of nitrous oxide from nitric and production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oonk, J.

    1998-01-01

    Nitric acid production is identified as a main source of nitrous oxide. Options for emission reduction however are not available. TNO and Hydro Agri studied the technological and economic feasibility of catalytic decomposition of nitrous oxide in nitric acid tail-gases. Although in literature promis

  7. The role of nitric oxide in cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a pleiotropic regulator, critical to numerous biological processes, including va-sodilatation, neurotransmission and macrophage-mediated immunity. The family of nitric oxide synthases(NOS) comprises inducible NOS (iNOS), endothelial NOS (eNOS), and neuronal NOS (nNOS). Interest-ingly, various studies have shown that all three isoforms can be involved in promoting or inhibiting theetiology of cancer. NOS activity has been detected in tumour cells of various histogenetic origins and hasbeen associated with tumour grade, proliferation rate and expression of important signaling componentsassociated with cancer development such as the oestrogen receptor. It appears that high levels of NOSexpression (for example, generated by activated macrophages) may be cytostatic or cytotoxic for tumorcells, whereas low level activity can have the opposite effect and promote tumour growth. Paradoxicallytherefore, NO (and related reactive nitrogen species) may have both genotoxic and angiogenic properties.Increased NO-generation in a cell may select mutant p53 cells and contribute to tumour angiogenesis byupregulating VEGF. In addition, NO may modulate tumour DNA repair mechanisms by upregulating p53,poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). An understand-ing at the molecular level of the role of NO in cancer will have profound therapeutic implications for thediagnosis and treatment of disease.

  8. Metastable Nitric Acid Trihydrate in Ice Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Fabian; Kubel, Frank; Gálvez, Oscar; Hölzel, Markus; Parker, Stewart F.; Baloh, Philipp; Iannarelli, Riccardo; Rossi, Michel J.; Grothe, Hinrich

    2016-04-01

    The composition of high altitude ice clouds is still a matter of intense discussion. The constituents in question are ice and nitric acid hydrates. The identification and formation mechanisms, however, are still unknown but are essential to understand atmospheric processing such as the seasonal ozone depletion in the lower polar stratosphere or the radiation balance of planet Earth. We found conclusive evidence for a long-predicted phase, which has been named alpha nitric acid trihydrate (alpha-NAT). This phase has been proven by combination of X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments allowing a convincing structure solution. Additionally, vibrational spectra (infrared and inelastic neutron scattering) were recorded and compared with theoretical calculations. A strong affinity between water ice and alpha-NAT has been found, which explains the experimental spectra and the phase transition kinetics essential for identification in the atmosphere. On the basis of our results, we propose a new three-step mechanism for NAT-formation in high altitude ice clouds. F. Weiss et al. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2016, accepted, DOI:10.1002/anie.201510841

  9. Expired nitric oxide levels in adult asthmatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiharu Okada

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The expired nitric oxide (NO concentration is known to be higher in asthmatic subjects than in normal subjects. To elucidate the role of NO in asthma, we examined the expired NO concentrations in relation to the type (atopic, mixed, non- atopic, and severity (mild, moderate, severe of asthmatics, as well as the influence of steroid treatment. Twenty-seven normal subjects, 48 asthmatics, 8 subjects with allergic rhinitis, and 13 subjects with pulmonary emphysema participated in the study. The expired NO concentration was significantly higher in asthmatics and patients with allergic rhinitis than in normal subjects (P<0.01. No significant difference was observed between the expired NO concentration in patients with pulmonary emphysema and that of normal subjects. The expired NO concentrations were significantly lower in non- atopic asthma than in atopic asthma. Nitric oxide levels were significantly lower in severe asthma than in mild asthma. High doses of steroid treatment are often used in severe asthma. The dose of inhaled beclomethasone and expired NO concentrations showed a negative correlation (r= −0.51587, P<0.004. Drip infusion of hydrocortisone tended to increase the exhaled NO concentration just after drip infusion, however, it decreased after 24 h. These results suggest that steroid treatment decreases the expired NO concentrations in asthmatics, although it cannot be concluded that NO increases the severity of asthma. The measurement of expired NO concentrations is an easy, non-invasive test, which may be a useful tool for monitoring the condition of asthmatics.

  10. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase-rescue of dystrophin/utrophin double knockout mice does not require nNOS localization to the cell membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Wehling-Henricks

    Full Text Available Survival of dystrophin/utrophin double-knockout (dko mice was increased by muscle-specific expression of a neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS transgene. Dko mice expressing the transgene (nNOS TG+/dko experienced delayed onset of mortality and increased life-span. The nNOS TG+/dko mice demonstrated a significant decrease in the concentration of CD163+, M2c macrophages that can express arginase and promote fibrosis. The decrease in M2c macrophages was associated with a significant reduction in fibrosis of heart, diaphragm and hindlimb muscles of nNOS TG+/dko mice. The nNOS transgene had no effect on the concentration of cytolytic, CD68+, M1 macrophages. Accordingly, we did not observe any change in the extent of muscle fiber lysis in the nNOS TG+/dko mice. These findings show that nNOS/NO (nitric oxide-mediated decreases in M2c macrophages lead to a reduction in the muscle fibrosis that is associated with increased mortality in mice lacking dystrophin and utrophin. Interestingly, the dramatic and beneficial effects of the nNOS transgene were not attributable to localization of nNOS protein at the cell membrane. We did not detect any nNOS protein at the sarcolemma in nNOS TG+/dko muscles. This important observation shows that sarcolemmal localization is not necessary for nNOS to have beneficial effects in dystrophic tissue and the presence of nNOS in the cytosol of dystrophic muscle fibers can ameliorate the pathology and most importantly, significantly increase life-span.

  11. 磷脂酰肌醇3激酶/蛋白激酶B通过上调内皮型一氧化氮合酶参与远端缺血后处理的脑保护作用%Phosphoinositide-3 kinase/protein kinase B pathway participates in the neuroprotection of remote ischemic postconditioning by up-regulating endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭蓓; 郭曲练; 叶治; 王娜; 郑利民

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the roles of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and phosphoinositide-3 kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) pathway in the neuroprotection of remote ischemic postconditioning (RIPoC) on global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in rats. Methods One hundred male adult SD rats weighing 200 g-250 g were randomly divided into 5 groups (n=20 each):group sham,group I/R,group I/R+RIPoC,group L-NAME+I/R+RIPoC,group LY+I/R+RIPoC.Global cerebral I/R was induced by four-vessel occlusion.Group I/R+RIPoC,group L-NAME+I/R+RIPoC and group LY+I/R+RIPoC received 3 cycles of 15 min ischemia in bilateral femoral arteries at the beginning of cerebral reperfusion followed by 15 min repeffusion.The group L-NAME+I/R+RIPoC:4-VO with coinjection of N (ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME),5 mg/kg,in normal saline.intraperitoneslly,10 min before 4-VO,then followed by RIPoC and 48 h and 7 d of reperfusion.The group LY+I/R+RIPoC:I/R+RIPoC with injection of LY294002(a highly selective inhibitor of PI3K,LY,10 μL,10 mol/L,in 3% DMSO,intracerebroventricularly.10 min before 4-VO),then followedby RIPoC and 48 h and 7 d of reperfusion.The rats were sacrificed at 48 h of cerebral rep effusion,and brains were removed for determination of neuronal apoptosis [by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) method] in hippocampal CA1 region and p-eNOS,eNOS,p-Akt and Akt expression (by Western blot)in hippocampal CA1 region.Morris water maze task was used to test the learning and memory function at 4 d of cerebral reperfusion,and the rats were sacrificed at 7 d of cerebral reperfusion,and brains were removed for determination of neuronal density in hippocampal CA1 region.Results Compared with group sham,the number of apoptotic neurons in CA1 region [(0.8±0.8),(84.7±6.8), (52.8±7.8), (74.3±9.0), (79.5±7.3)/mm] increased (P<0.01),learning and memory function decreased (P<0.01) and neuronal density in CA1 region [ (193±7

  12. Direct measurements of nitric oxide release in relation to expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in isolated porcine mitral valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, Sophia Gry; Olsen, Lisbeth Høier; Aasted, Bent;

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the direct release of nitric oxide (NO) from the porcine mitral valve using a NO microelectrode. Furthermore, the expression and localization of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the mitral valve was studied using immunohistochemistry, Western blotting...

  13. Molecular pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine Terra

    2014-01-01

    that 45% of deaths in the developed world are linked to fibrotic disease. Fibrosis and cancer are known to be inextricably linked; however, we are only just beginning to understand the common and overlapping molecular pathways between the two. Here, we discuss what is known about the intersection...... of fibrosis and cancer, with a focus on cancer metastasis, and highlight some of the exciting new potential clinical targets that are emerging from analysis of the molecular pathways associated with these two devastating diseases. Clin Cancer Res; 20(14); 3637-43. ©2014 AACR....

  14. Getting to NO Alzheimer’s Disease: Neuroprotection versus Neurotoxicity Mediated by Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachelle Balez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder involving the loss of neurons in the brain which leads to progressive memory loss and behavioral changes. To date, there are only limited medications for AD and no known cure. Nitric oxide (NO has long been considered part of the neurotoxic insult caused by neuroinflammation in the Alzheimer’s brain. However, focusing on early developments, prior to the appearance of cognitive symptoms, is changing that perception. This has highlighted a compensatory, neuroprotective role for NO that protects synapses by increasing neuronal excitability. A potential mechanism for augmentation of excitability by NO is via modulation of voltage-gated potassium channel activity (Kv7 and Kv2. Identification of the ionic mechanisms and signaling pathways that mediate this protection is an important next step for the field. Harnessing the protective role of NO and related signaling pathways could provide a therapeutic avenue that prevents synapse loss early in disease.

  15. Nitric oxide signals postovulatory aging-induced abortive spontaneous egg activation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premkumar, Karuppanan V; Chaube, Shail K

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an increase of intracellular nitric oxide (NO) level signals postovulatory aging-induced abortive spontaneous egg activation (SEA) in rats. Freshly ovulated eggs (arrested at metaphase-II stage; M-II) were cultured in vitro for 3 hours to induce postovulatory egg aging. The morphological changes, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, NO, cytosolic free Ca(2+), 3',5' cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), cell division cycle 25B (Cdc25B) and Wee1 levels, specific phosphorylation (pThr-14/Tyr-15) as well as total cyclin-dependent kinases-1 (Cdk1) (PSTAIRE) levels were analyzed. Postovulatory aging induced generation of NO possibly through an iNOS-mediated pathway. The increase in NO level was associated with augmented cytosolic free Ca(2+) as well as cGMP levels in aged eggs. A significant increase in Wee1 level and decrease of Cdc25B level were observed in aged eggs. An accumulation of phosphorylated Cdk1 (pThr-14/Tyr-15) level was observed in aged eggs, while total Cdk1 (PSTAIR) level remained unchanged. Our study demonstrates that generation of NO through an iNOS-mediated pathway increases cytosolic free Ca2+and cGMP levels. High levels of these signal molecules trigger the accumulation of phosphorylated Cdk1 in aged eggs. Thus, NO signals the accumulation of phosphorylated Cdk1 and induces postovulatory aging-induced abortive SEA in the rat.

  16. Computational insights on the competing effects of nitric oxide in regulating apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elife Z Bagci

    Full Text Available Despite the establishment of the important role of nitric oxide (NO on apoptosis, a molecular-level understanding of the origin of its dichotomous pro- and anti-apoptotic effects has been elusive. We propose a new mathematical model for simulating the effects of nitric oxide (NO on apoptosis. The new model integrates mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathways with NO-related reactions, to gain insights into the regulatory effect of the reactive NO species N(2O(3, non-heme iron nitrosyl species (FeL(nNO, and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-. The biochemical pathways of apoptosis coupled with NO-related reactions are described by ordinary differential equations using mass-action kinetics. In the absence of NO, the model predicts either cell survival or apoptosis (a bistable behavior with shifts in the onset time of apoptotic response depending on the strength of extracellular stimuli. Computations demonstrate that the relative concentrations of anti- and pro-apoptotic reactive NO species, and their interplay with glutathione, determine the net anti- or pro-apoptotic effects at long time points. Interestingly, transient effects on apoptosis are also observed in these simulations, the duration of which may reach up to hours, despite the eventual convergence to an anti-apoptotic state. Our computations point to the importance of precise timing of NO production and external stimulation in determining the eventual pro- or anti-apoptotic role of NO.

  17. Production of Nitric Oxide and Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase in Ovarian Cystic Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosekeila Simões Nomelini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor sections from nonneoplastic (n=15, benign (n=28, and malignant ovarian tumors (n=20 were obtained from 63 women. Immunohistochemistry of the tumor sections demonstrated that inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression was increased in ovarian cancer samples compared to nonneoplastic or benign tumor samples. Using the Griess method, nitric oxide (NO metabolite levels were also found to be elevated in malignant tumor samples compared to benign tumor samples (P80 μM were more frequent than NO levels <80 μM, and iNOS expression in well-differentiated carcinomas was greater than in moderately/poorly differentiated carcinomas (P<.05. These data suggest an important role for NO in ovarian carcinogenesis.

  18. Nitric oxide in liver fibrosis: The role of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakiri, Yasuko

    2015-12-01

    The inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is expressed in hepatic cells in pathological conditions. Its induction is involved in the development of liver fibrosis, and thus iNOS could be a therapeutic target for liver fibrosis. This review summarizes the role of iNOS in liver fibrosis, focusing on 1) iNOS biology, 2) iNOS-expressing liver cells, 3) iNOS-related therapeutic strategies, and 4) future directions.

  19. Hypoxia tolerance, nitric oxide, and nitrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, Angela; Jensen, Frank Bo

    2015-01-01

    Among vertebrates able to tolerate periods of oxygen deprivation, the painted and red-eared slider turtles (Chrysemys picta and Trachemys scripta) and the crucian carp (Carassius carassius) are the most extreme and can survive even months of total lack of oxygen during winter. The key to hypoxia...... survival resides in concerted physiological responses, including strong metabolic depression, protection against oxidative damage and – in air breathing animals - redistribution of blood flow. Each of these responses is known to be tightly regulated by nitric oxide (NO) and during hypoxia by its metabolite...... nitrite. The aim of this review is to highlight recent work illustrating the widespread roles of NO and nitrite in the tolerance to extreme oxygen deprivation, in particular in the red-eared slider turtle and crucian carp, but also in diving marine mammals. The emerging picture underscores the importance...

  20. Nitric oxide-releasing porous silicon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafshgari, Morteza Hasanzadeh; Cavallaro, Alex; Delalat, Bahman; Harding, Frances J.; McInnes, Steven JP; Mäkilä, Ermei; Salonen, Jarno; Vasilev, Krasimir; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the ability of porous silicon nanoparticles (PSi NPs) to entrap and deliver nitric oxide (NO) as an effective antibacterial agent is tested against different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. NO was entrapped inside PSi NPs functionalized by means of the thermal hydrocarbonization (THC) process. Subsequent reduction of nitrite in the presence of d-glucose led to the production of large NO payloads without reducing the biocompatibility of the PSi NPs with mammalian cells. The resulting PSi NPs demonstrated sustained release of NO and showed remarkable antibacterial efficiency and anti-biofilm-forming properties. These results will set the stage to develop antimicrobial nanoparticle formulations for applications in chronic wound treatment.

  1. Nitric Oxide and Respiratory Helminthic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Muro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a very simple molecule that displays very important functions both in helminths (mainly those involved in respiratory pathology and in mammalian hosts. In this paper we review four issues related to interaction of NO and lung helminthic diseases. Firstly, we evaluated data available on the NO synthesis and release by helminths and their biological role. Next, we summarized the effect of antigens obtained from different phases of the biological cycle on NO production by host mammalian cells (mainly from human sources. Thirdly, we revised the evaluation of NO on the biological activities and/or the viability of respiratory helminths. Lastly, the deleterious consequences of increased production of NO during helminthic human infection are detailed.

  2. Melatonin and its precursors scavenge nitric oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Y.; Mori, A.; Liburdy, R.; Packer, L.

    1998-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) scavenging activity of melatonin, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, serotonin, 5-hydroxytryptophan and L-tryptophan was examined by the Griess reaction using flow injection analysis. 1-Hydroxy-2-oxo-3-(N-methyl-3-aminopropyl)-3-methyl-1-triazene(NOC-7) was used as NO generator. The Griess reagent stoichiometrically reacts with NO2-, which was converted by a cadmium-copper reduction column from the stable end products of NO oxidation. Except for tryptophan, all the compounds examined scavenged NO in a dose-dependent manner. Melatonin, which has a methoxy group in the 5-position and an acetyl side chain, exhibited the most potent scavenging activity among the compounds tested. Serotonin, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, and 5-hydroxytryptophan, respectively, showed moderate scavenging activity compared to melatonin. Tryptophan, which has neither a methoxy nor a hydroxyl group in the 5-position, exhibited the least NO scavenging activity.

  3. Citric Acid Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Pattie L. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of the GSDO Program, the purpose of this project is to demonstratevalidate citric acid as a passivation agent for stainless steel. Successful completion of this project will result in citric acid being qualified for use as an environmentally preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys in NASA and DoD applications.

  4. The nitric oxide synthase of mouse spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, M B; Goin, J C; Boquet, M; Canteros, M G; Franchi, A M; Perez Martinez, S; Polak, J M; Viggiano, J M; Gimeno, M A

    1997-07-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) was evidenced in mature mouse spermatozoa by means of biochemical techniques and Western blot. During 120 min of incubation, 10(7) spermatozoa synthesized 7 +/- 2 pmol of L-[14C]citrulline. Besides, L-citrulline formation depended on the incubation time and on the concentration of L-arginine present in the incubation medium. Different concentrations of N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) but not aminoguanidine, inhibited L-[14C]citrulline formation. Western-blot analysis of solubilized sperm proteins revealed a unique band of M(r)=140 kDa with the neural, endothelial and inducible NOS antisera tested. These results provide evidence that mature mouse sperm contains a NOS isoform and that spermatozoa have the potential ability to synthesize NO, suggesting a role for endogenous NO on mammalian sperm function.

  5. Nitric oxide turnover in permeable river sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Frank; Stief, Peter; Kuypers, Marcel M M;

    2014-01-01

    We measured nitric oxide (NO) microprofiles in relation to oxygen (O2) and all major dissolved N-species (ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide [N2O]) in a permeable, freshwater sediment (River Weser, Germany). NO reaches peak concentrations of 0.13 μmol L-1 in the oxic zone and is consumed...... in the oxic-anoxic transition zone. Apparently, NO is produced by ammonia oxidizers under oxic conditions and consumed by denitrification under microoxic conditions. Experimental percolation of sediment cores with aerated surface water resulted in an initial rate of NO production that was 12 times higher than...... the net NO production rate in steady state. This initial NO production rate is in the same range as the net ammonia oxidation rate, indicating that NO is transiently the main product of ammonia oxidizers. Stable isotope labeling experiments with the 15N-labeled chemical NO donor S...

  6. Hypoxia tolerance, nitric oxide, and nitrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, Angela; Jensen, Frank Bo

    2015-01-01

    Among vertebrates able to tolerate periods of oxygen deprivation, the painted and red-eared slider turtles (Chrysemys picta and Trachemys scripta) and the crucian carp (Carassius carassius) are the most extreme and can survive even months of total lack of oxygen during winter. The key to hypoxia ...... of NO and nitrite signaling in the adaptive response to hypoxia in vertebrate animals....... survival resides in concerted physiological responses, including strong metabolic depression, protection against oxidative damage and – in air breathing animals - redistribution of blood flow. Each of these responses is known to be tightly regulated by nitric oxide (NO) and during hypoxia by its metabolite...... nitrite. The aim of this review is to highlight recent work illustrating the widespread roles of NO and nitrite in the tolerance to extreme oxygen deprivation, in particular in the red-eared slider turtle and crucian carp, but also in diving marine mammals. The emerging picture underscores the importance...

  7. Autotrophic Biofilters for Oxidation of Nitric Oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建孟; 陈浚; LanceHershman; 王家德; DanielP.Y.Chang

    2004-01-01

    Carbon foam—a kind of new engineering material as packing material was adopted in three biofilters with different pore dimensions and adapted autotrophic nitrite nitrobacteria to investigate the purification of nitric oxide (NO) in a gas stream. The biofilm was developed on the surface of carbon foams using nitrite as its only nitric source. The moisture in the filter was maintained by ultrasonic aerosol equipment which can minimize the thickness of the liquid film. The liquid phase nitrification test was conducted to determine the variability and the potential of performance among the three carbon foam biofilters. The investigation showed that during the NO2-—N inlet concentration of 200 g·L-1·min-1 to 800 g·L-1·min-1, the 24PPC (pores per centimeter) carbon foam biofilter had the greatest potential, achieving the NO2-—N removal efficiency of 94% to 98%. The 8PPC and 18PPC carbon foam biofilters achieved the NO2-—N removal efficiency of 15% to 21% and of 30% to 40%, respectively. The potential for this system to remove NO from a gas stream was shown on the basis of a steady removal efficiency of 41% to 50% which was attained for the 24PPC carbon foam biofilter at specified NO inlet concentration of 66.97 mg·m-3 to 267.86mg·m-3 and an empty-bed residence time of 3.5 min.

  8. Nitric oxide in the psychobiology of mental disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altan Eşsizoğlu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide is in a gaseous form and is widespread in the human body. It functions by acting as a secondary messenger in the modulatory activities of neuronal functions of the central nervous system. Nitric oxide is the first identified neurotransmitter of the nontraditional neurotransmitter family.Studies conducted on experimental animals demonstrate that nitric oxide has a neuromodulatory efficacy on the secretions of other neurotransmitters and that it has an effect on learning and memory functions, and on various neuronal mechanisms. Many studies have been conducted to investigate the location of nitric oxide in the central nervous system, its effect on anxiety and depression, its relationship with other neurotransmitters, and also about its role on neurotoxicity. There are clinical studies concerning the level of nitrate, a product of nitric oxide metabolism, and also experimental studies concerning its rewarding effect of alcohol and substance use, in patients with depression and schizophrenia. However, limited studies have been conducted to investigate its relationship with stress, which is an important factor in the etiology of psychiatric disorders. These studies demonstrate that nitric oxide is closely related with stress physiology.Nitric oxide is a neuromodulator, which is frequently being mentioned about nowadays in psychiatry. Clinical and experimental studies play an important role in the psychobiology of psychiatric disorders.

  9. Corrosion studies in fuel element reprocessing environments containing nitric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beavers, J A; White, R R; Berry, W E; Griess, J C

    1982-04-01

    Nitric acid is universally used in aqueous fuel element reprocessing plants; however, in the processing scheme being developed by the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program, some of the equipment will be exposed to nitric acid under conditions not previously encountered in fuel element reprocessing plants. A previous report presented corrosion data obtained in hyperazeotropic nitric acid and in concentrated magnesium nitrate solutions used in its preparation. The results presented in this report are concerned with the following: (1) corrosion of titanium in nitric acid; (2) corrosion of nickel-base alloys in a nitric acid-hydrofluoric acid solution; (3) the formation of Cr(VI), which enhances corrosion, in nitric acid solutions; and (4) corrosion of mechanical pipe connectors in nitric acid. The results show that the corrosion rate of titanium increased with the refreshment rate of boiling nitric acid, but the effect diminished rapidly as the temperature decreased. The addition of iodic acid inhibited attack. Also, up to 200 ppM of fluoride in 70% HNO/sub 3/ had no major effect on the corrosion of either titanium or tantalum. In boiling 8 M HNO/sub 3/-0.05 M HF, Inconel 671 was more resistant than Inconel 690, but both alloys experienced end-grain attack. In the case of Inconel 671, heat treatment was very important; annealed and quenched material was much more resistant than furnace-cooled material.The rate of oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) increased significantly as the nitric acid concentration increased, and certain forms of ruthenium in the solution seemed to accelerate the rate of formation. Mechanical connectors of T-304L stainless steel experienced end-grain attack on the exposed pipe ends, and seal rings of both stainless steel and a titanium alloy (6% Al-4% V) underwent heavy attack in boiling 8 M HNO/sub 3/.

  10. Effect of Blockade of Nitric Oxide Synthesis on the Renin Secretory Response to Frusemide in Conscious Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Ian A.; Chou, Lance

    1995-01-01

    The enzyme nitric oxide synthase is present in the macula densa and may participate in the control of renin secretion by the adjacent juxtagiomerular cells. In the present study, we investigated the effect of inhibiting nitric oxide synthase on the renin secretory response to frusemide, which stimulates renin secretion by blocking Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) co-transport in the macula densa. Injection of frusemide in 12 conscious rabbits elicited a transient increase in mean arterial pressure from 84 +/- 2 to 92 +/-3 mm Hg at 5 min (P less than 0.01) and a sustained increase in heart rate from 246 +/- 6 to 281 +/- 10 beats/min at 45 min (P less than 0.01). Plasma renin activity increased from 8.0 +/- 1.2 to 14.3 +/- 1.8, 12.4 +/- 1.6 and 11.6 +/- 1.5 pmol/2h ml at 15, 30 and 45min respectively (P less than 0.01). There were no changes in plasma sodium and potassium concentrations or osmoiality. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase with N(sup G)-nitro-L- arginine methyl ester increased mean arterial pressure by 9 mm Hg, decreased heart rate and plasma renin activity, and markedly suppressed the renin response to frusemide (from 4.6 +/- 0.7 to 7.6 +/- 1.7, 4.7 +/- 1.0 and 4.6 +/- 0.7pmol/2h ml at 15, 30 and 45 min respectively). By contrast, infusion of an equipressor dose of phenylephrine did not suppress the renin response to frusemide. Histochemical studies with the NADPH diaphorase technique confirmed the presence of nitric oxide synthase in the macula densa, and suggested that enzyme activity is increased by treatment with frusemide. These results are consistent with a role for the L- arginine-nitric oxide pathway in the modulation of renin secretion by the macula densa.

  11. Adverse experiences with nitric acid at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durant, W.S.; Craig, D.K.; Vitacco, M.J.; McCormick, J.A.

    1991-06-01

    Nitric acid is used routinely at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in many processes. However, the site has experienced a number of adverse situations in handling nitric acid. These have ranged from minor injuries to personnel to significant explosions. This document compiles many of these events and includes discussions of process upsets, fires, injuries, and toxic effects of nitric acid and its decomposition products. The purpose of the publication is to apprise those using the acid that it is a potentially dangerous material and can react in many ways as demonstrated by SRS experience. 10 refs.

  12. Effect of acute lithium administration on penile erection: involvement of nitric oxide system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Sandoughdaran

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lithium has been the treatment of choice for bipolar disorder (BD for many years. Although erectile dysfunction is a known adverse effect of this drug, the mechanism of action by which lithium affects erectile function is still unknown. Objective: The aim was to investigate the possible involvement of nitric oxide (NO in modulatory effect of lithium on penile erection (PE. We further evaluated the possible role of Sildenafil in treatment of lithium-induced erectile dysfunction. Materials and Methods: Erectile function was determined using rat model of apomorphine-induced erections. For evaluating the effect of lithium on penile erection, rats received intraperitoneal injection of graded doses of lithium chloride 30 mins before subcutaneous injection of apomorphine. To determine the possible role of NO pathway, sub-effective dose of N (G-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, a nitric oxide synthase (NOS inhibitor, was administered 15 min before administration of sub-effective dose of lithium chloride. In other separate experimental groups, sub- effective dose of the nitric oxide precursor, L-arginine, or Sildenafil was injected into the animals 15 min before administration of a potent dose of lithium. 30 min after administration of lithium chloride, animals were assessed in apomorphine test. Serum lithium levels were measured 30 min after administration of effective dose of lithium. Results: Lithium at 50 and 100 mg/kg significantly decreased number of PE (p<0.001, whereas at lower doses (5, 10 and 30 mg/kg had no effect on apomorphine induced PE. The serum Li+ level of rats receiving 50 mg/kg lithium was 1±0.15 mmol/L which is in therapeutic range of lithium. The inhibitory effect of Lithium was blocked by administration of sub-effective dose of nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (100 mg/kg (p<0.001 and sildenafil (3.5 mg/kg (p<0.001 whereas pretreatment with a low and sub-effective dose of L-NAME (10mg/kg potentiated sub

  13. Role of Nitric Oxide, Nitric Oxide Synthase, Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase, and cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase I in Mouse Stem Cell Cardiac Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Spinelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Aim. Nitric oxide (NO can trigger cardiac differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs, indicating a cardiogenic function of the NO synthetizing enzyme(s (NOS. However, the involvement of the NO/NOS downstream effectors soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC and cGMP activated protein kinase I (PKG-I is less defined. Therefore, we assess the involvement of the entire NO/NOS/sGC/PKG-I pathway during cardiac differentiation process. Methods. Mouse ESCs were differentiated toward cardiac lineages by hanging drop methodology for 21 days. NOS/sGC/PKG-I pathway was studied quantifying genes, proteins, enzymatic activities, and effects of inhibition during differentiation. Percentages of beating embryoid bodies (mEBs were evaluated as an index of cardiogenesis. Results and Discussion. Genes and protein expression of enzymes were increased during differentiation with distinctive kinetics and proteins possessed their enzymatic functions. Exogenous administered NO accelerated whereas the blockade of PKG-I strongly slowed cardiogenesis. sGC inhibition was effective only at early stages and NOS blockade ineffective. Of NOS/sGC/PKG-I pathway, PKG-I seems to play the prominent role in cardiac maturation. Conclusion. We concluded that exogenous administered NO and other pharmacological strategies able to increase the activity of PKG-I provide new tools to investigate and promote differentiation of cardiogenic precursors.

  14. Nitric acid vapor removal by activated, impregnated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, G.O.

    1996-12-31

    Laboratory and industrial workers can be exposed to vapors of nitric acid, especially in accidents, such as spills. Nitric acid can also be a product of incineration for energy production or waste (e.g., CW agent) disposal. Activated carbons containing impregnants for enhancing vapor and gas removal have been tested for effectiveness in removing vapors of nitric acid from air. The nitric acid vapor was generated from concentrated acid solutions and detected by trapping in a water bubbler for pH measurements. Both low and moderate relative humidity conditions were used. All carbons were effective at vapor contact times representative of air-purifying respirator use. One surprising observation was the desorption of low levels of ammonia from impregnated carbons. This was apparently due to residual ammonia from the impregnation processes.

  15. Nitric oxide metabolites in goldfish under normoxic and hypoxic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Marie N.; Jensen, Frank Bo

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), produced by nitric oxide synthases (NOS enzymes), regulates multiple physiological functions in animals. NO exerts its effects by binding to iron (Fe) of heme groups (exemplified by the activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase) and by S-nitrosylation of proteins – and it is metab......Nitric oxide (NO), produced by nitric oxide synthases (NOS enzymes), regulates multiple physiological functions in animals. NO exerts its effects by binding to iron (Fe) of heme groups (exemplified by the activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase) and by S-nitrosylation of proteins...... levels was assessed from metabolic and respiratory variables. In normoxic goldfish, the concentrations of NO metabolites in plasma and tissues were comparable with values reported in mammals, indicative of similar NOS activity. Exposure to hypoxia [at PO2 (partial pressure of O2) values close...

  16. Inducible nitric oxide synthase mediates bone loss in ovariectomized mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuzzocrea, S.; Mazzon, E.; Dugo, L.; Genovese, T.; Paola, R. Di; Ruggeri, Z.; Vegeto, E.; Caputi, A.P.; Loo, F.A.J. van de; Puzzolo, D.; Maggi, A.

    2003-01-01

    Several clinical studies have shown that bone loss may be attributed to osteoclast recruitment induced by mediators of inflammation. In different experimental paradigms we have recently demonstrated that estrogen exhibits antiinflammatory activity by preventing the induction of inducible nitric

  17. The Effect of Nitric Oxide Donor in Diabetic Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Dashti

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is characterized by a nitric oxide deficiency at the wound site. Diabetes is a factor that influences all stages of wound healing. In animals with acute experimental diabetes induced by streptozotocin (STZ, the early inflammatory responses after wounding is impaired, fibroblast and endothelial cell proliferation is reduced as well as accumulation of reparative collagen and gain in wound breaking strenght. This study investigated whether exogenous nitric oxide supplimentation with nitric oxide donor DETA NONOate could reverse impaired healing in diabetes. The results suggest nitric oxide donor DETA NONOate can reverse impaired healing associated with diabetes (P<0.001 and urinary nitrate (NO-3 output may reflect the extent of repair in this wound model (P<0.001.

  18. Inducible nitric oxide synthase mediates bone loss in ovariectomized mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuzzocrea, S.; Mazzon, E.; Dugo, L.; Genovese, T.; Paola, R. Di; Ruggeri, Z.; Vegeto, E.; Caputi, A.P.; Loo, F.A.J. van de; Puzzolo, D.; Maggi, A.

    2003-01-01

    Several clinical studies have shown that bone loss may be attributed to osteoclast recruitment induced by mediators of inflammation. In different experimental paradigms we have recently demonstrated that estrogen exhibits antiinflammatory activity by preventing the induction of inducible nitric oxid

  19. Adhesion Development and the Expression of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Svinarich

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was conducted to determine whether nitric oxide (NO, a potent vasodilator and inhibitor of thrombus formation, is involved in the formation and maintenance of adhesions.

  20. Serum nitric oxide and homocysteine as biomarkers of ectopic pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha Meiyappan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aim of current study was to evaluate the role of serum homocysteine and nitric oxide in the diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy. Methods: The study included 32 patients with ruptured ectopic, 29 miscarriage patients and 30 normal pregnant women as controls. Fasting plasma homocysteine, serum folate, vitamin B12 levels and nitric oxide levels were estimated at the time of admission. Results: Plasma homocysteine levels were significantly lower in patients with ectopic pregnancy than normal pregnancy. Nitric oxide levels were significantly lower in patients with abortion. Conclusions: Patients with abortion have decreased circulating nitric oxide levels in serum while those with ectopic pregnancies have decreased homocysteine levels. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(1.000: 66-70

  1. Nitric oxide damages neuronal mitochondria and induces apoptosis in neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The cytotoxic effect of nitric oxide on primarily cultured rat cerebellar granule cells was studied,and the mechanisms were discussed.The results showed that nitric oxide donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP; 500 μmol/L) could induce apoptosis in immature cultures of cerebellar granule cells.Flow cytometry and HPLC analyses revealed that after treatment with SNAP,the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and the cellular ATP content decreased significantly.Nitric oxide scavenger hemoglobin could effectively prevent the neuronal mitochondria from dysfunction and attenuate apoptosis.The results suggested that nitric oxide activated the apoptotic program by inhibiting the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain and thus decreasing the cellular ATP content.

  2. Nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide alterations in chronically stressed rats: a model for nitric oxide in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shang-Feng; Lu, Yun-Rong; Shi, Li-Gen; Wu, Xue-Yan; Sun, Bo; Fu, Xin-Yan; Luo, Jian-Hong; Bao, Ai-Min

    2014-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and NO synthase-1 (NOS1) are involved in the stress response and in depression. We compared NOS-NO alterations in rats exposed to chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) with alterations in major depressive disorder (MDD) in humans. In the hypothalamus of male CUS rats we determined NOS activity, and in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) we determined NOS1-immunoreactive (ir) cell densities and co-localization of NOS1 with stress-related neuropeptides corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), vasopressin (AVP) or oxytocin (OXT). We measured plasma NO levels and cortisol in male medicine-naïve MDD patients and plasma NO and corticosterone (CORT) in CUS rats. In the CUS rat total NOS activity in the hypothalamus (P=0.018) and NOS1-ir cell density in the PVN were both significantly decreased (P=0.018), while NOS1 staining was mainly expressed in OXT-ir neurons in this nucleus. Interestingly, plasma NO levels were significantly increased both in male CUS rats (P=0.001) and in male MDD patients (Pdepression.

  3. Nitric oxide signalling and neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the heart under stress [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Hua Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is an imperative regulator of the cardiovascular system and is a critical mechanism in preventing the pathogenesis and progression of the diseased heart. The scenario of bioavailable NO in the myocardium is complex: 1 NO is derived from both endogenous NO synthases (endothelial, neuronal, and/or inducible NOSs [eNOS, nNOS, and/or iNOS] and exogenous sources (entero-salivary NO pathway and the amount of NO from exogenous sources varies significantly; 2 NOSs are located at discrete compartments of cardiac myocytes and are regulated by distinctive mechanisms under stress; 3 NO regulates diverse target proteins through different modes of post-transcriptional modification (soluble guanylate cyclase [sGC]/cyclic guanosine monophosphate [cGMP]/protein kinase G [PKG]-dependent phosphorylation, S-nitrosylation, and transnitrosylation; 4 the downstream effectors of NO are multidimensional and vary from ion channels in the plasma membrane to signalling proteins and enzymes in the mitochondria, cytosol, nucleus, and myofilament; 5 NOS produces several radicals in addition to NO (e.g. superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, peroxynitrite, and different NO-related derivatives and triggers redox-dependent responses. However, nNOS inhibits cardiac oxidases to reduce the sources of oxidative stress in diseased hearts. Recent consensus indicates the importance of nNOS protein in cardiac protection under pathological stress. In addition, a dietary regime with high nitrate intake from fruit and vegetables together with unsaturated fatty acids is strongly associated with reduced cardiovascular events. Collectively, NO-dependent mechanisms in healthy and diseased hearts are better understood and shed light on the therapeutic prospects for NO and NOSs in clinical applications for fatal human heart diseases.

  4. Nitrosothiol formation and S-nitrosation signaling through nitric oxide synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynia-Smith, Sarah L; Smith, Brian C

    2017-02-28

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a gaseous signaling molecule impacting many biological pathways. NO is produced in mammals by three nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms: neuronal (nNOS), endothelial (eNOS), and inducible (iNOS). nNOS and eNOS produce low concentrations of NO for paracrine signaling; NO produced and released from one cell diffuses to a neighboring cell where it binds and activates soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC). iNOS produces high concentrations of NO using NO toxicity to amplify the innate immune response. Recent work has also defined protein cysteine S-nitrosation as a pathway of sGC-independent NO signaling. Though many studies have shown that S-nitrosation regulates the activity of NOS isoforms and other proteins in vivo, many issues need to be resolved to establish S-nitrosation as a viable signaling mechanism. Several chemical mechanisms result in S-nitrosation including transition metal-catalyzed pathways, NO oxidation followed by thiolate reaction, and thiyl radical recombination with NO. Once formed, nitrosothiols can be transferred between cellular cysteine residues via transnitrosation reactions. However, it is largely unclear how these chemical processes result in selective S-nitrosation of specific cellular cysteine residues. S-nitrosation site selectivity may be imparted via direct interactions or colocalization with NOS isoforms that focus chemical or transnitrosation mechanisms of nitrosothiol formation or transfer. Here, we discuss chemical mechanisms of nitrosothiol formation, S-nitrosation of NOS isoforms, and potential S-nitrosation signaling cascades resulting from NOS S-nitrosation.

  5. Potassium softens vascular endothelium and increases nitric oxide release

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    In the presence of aldosterone, plasma sodium in the high physiological range stiffens endothelial cells and reduces the release of nitric oxide. We now demonstrate effects of extracellular potassium on stiffness of individual cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells by using the tip of an atomic force microscope as a mechanical nanosensor. An acute increase of potassium in the physiological range swells and softens the endothelial cell and increases the release of nitric oxide. A high physio...

  6. Serum nitric oxide and homocysteine as biomarkers of ectopic pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Kavitha Meiyappan; Pooja Dhiman; Soundravally Rajendiren; Krishnalatha Thayagarajan; Soundara Raghavan S

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aim of current study was to evaluate the role of serum homocysteine and nitric oxide in the diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy. Methods: The study included 32 patients with ruptured ectopic, 29 miscarriage patients and 30 normal pregnant women as controls. Fasting plasma homocysteine, serum folate, vitamin B12 levels and nitric oxide levels were estimated at the time of admission. Results: Plasma homocysteine levels were significantly lower in patients with ectopic pregnancy t...

  7. Diamagnetism and Strucure of Nitric Acid-Treated Bulk Polyethylene

    OpenAIRE

    Ania, F.; Baltá Calleja, F. J.; Cagiao, M.E.

    1982-01-01

    An alternative procedure to examine the nature of the end product of nitric-acid-treated bulk polyethylene involving the measurement of the diamagnetic susceptibility is reported. This simple non-destructive method complements previous results obtained by means of IR spectroscopy. Thus after selectively removing the surface layer of the polyethylene lamellae with nitric acid (t > 50h) the diamagnetic susceptibility substantially decreases to values wich are consistent with tilted paraff...

  8. Acute chemical pneumonitis caused by nitric acid inhalation: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Hyung Shim; Lee, In Jae; Ko, Eun Young; Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Hyun Beom; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Lee, Kwan Seop; Lee, Yul; Bae, Sang Hoon [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-01

    Chemical pneumonitis induced by nitric acid inhalation is a rare clinical condition. The previously reported radiologic findings of this disease include acute permeability pulmonary edema, delayed bronchiolitis obliterans, and bronchiectasis. In very few published rare radiologic reports has this disease manifested as acute alveolar injury; we report a case of acute chemical pneumonitis induced by nitric acid inhalation which at radiography manifested as bilateral perihilar consolidation and ground-glass attenuation, suggesting acute alveolar injury.

  9. Nitric oxide inhibits larval settlement in Amphibalanus amphitrite cyprids by repressing muscle locomotion and molting

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Gen

    2015-08-28

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a universal signaling molecule and plays a negative role in the metamorphosis of many biphasic organisms. Recently, the NO/NO (cyclic guanosine monophosphate) signaling pathway was reported to repress larval settlement in the barnacle Amphibalanus amphitrite. To understand the underlying molecular mechanism, we analyzed changes in the proteome of A. amphitrite cyprids in response to different concentrations of the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 62.5, 250 and 1000 μM) using a label-free proteomics method. Compared with the control, the expression of 106 proteins differed in all three treatments. These differentially expressed proteins were assigned to 13 pathways based on KEGG pathway enrichment analysis. SNP treatment stimulated the expression of heat shock proteins and arginine kinase, which are functionally related to NO synthases, increased the expression levels of glutathione transferases for detoxification, and activated the iron-mediated fatty acid degradation pathway and the citrate cycle through ferritin. Moreover, NO repressed the level of myosins and cuticular proteins, which indicated that NO might inhibit larval settlement in A. amphitrite by modulating the process of muscle locomotion and molting.

  10. Designing pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, John Damm

    2010-01-01

    The theoretical background in this chapter is organizational studies and especially theories about design and design processes in organizations. The concept of design is defined as a particular kind of work aimed at making arrangements in order to change existing situations into desired ones....... The illustrative case example is the introduction of clinical pathways in a psychiatric department. The contribution to a general core of design research is the development of the concept of design work and a critical discussion of the role of technological rules in design work....

  11. Designing pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The theoretical background in this chapter is organizational studies and especially theories about design and design processes in organizations. The concept of design is defined as a particular kind of work aimed at making arrangements in order to change existing situations into desired ones....... The illustrative case example is the introduction of clinical pathways in a psychiatric department. The contribution to a general core of design research is the development of the concept of design work and a critical discussion of the role of technological rules in design work....

  12. Neuropeptide FF activates ERK and NF kappa B signal pathways in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-long; Zhang, Xiao-yuan; He, Ning; Sun, Tao; Zhuang, Yan; Fang, Quan; Wang, Kai-rong; Wang, Rui

    2012-11-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) has been reported to play important roles in regulating diverse biological processes. However, little attention has been focused on the downstream signal transduction pathway of NPFF. Here, we used the differentiated neuroblastoma cell line, dSH-SY5Y, which endogenously expresses hNPFF2 receptor, to investigate the signal transduction downstream of NPFF. In particular we investigated the regulation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathways by NPFF in these cells. NPFF rapidly and transiently stimulated ERK. H89, a selective inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), inhibited the NPFF-activated ERK pathway, indicating the involvement of PKA in the NPFF-induced ERK activation. Down-regulation of nitric oxide synthases also attenuated NPFF-induced ERK activation, suggesting that a nitric oxide synthase-dependent pathway is involved. Moreover, the core upstream components of the NF-κB pathway were also significantly activated in response to NPFF, suggesting that the NF-κB pathway is involved in the signal transduction pathway of NPFF. Collectively, these data demonstrate that nitric oxide synthases are involved in the signal transduction pathway of NPFF, and provide the first evidence for the interaction between NPFF and the NF-κB pathway. These advances in our interpretation of the NPFF pathway mechanism will aid the comprehensive understanding of its function and provide novel molecular insight for further study of the NPFF system.

  13. NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHESIS IN MYOCARDIUM FOLLOWING BURN INJURY IN RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王卫东; 陈宗荣; 李蓉; 楼淑芳

    1998-01-01

    The nitric oxide and cyclic GMP production in myocardium early after burn injury in tats were investigated. Nitric oxide synthase activity was measured in cytosols from the left ventricular wall of burned rats.Cytosols from the control group animals were shown to contain mainly Ca2+ dependent nitric oxide synthase (cNOS) with small amount of Ca2+ independent nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Following burn injury,there was a marked increase in iNOS activity with a peak at 8h post-butyl, however, myocardial cNOS activity was found to decline obviously. Parallel to iNOS induction there was a significant increase in myocardial nitric oxide and cyelic GMP production. All these chenges were alleviated by treatment of the rats with dexamethasone. Since increases in cyclic GMP levels in the heart were associated with reduced myocardial contractility, it is possible that enhanced production of nitric oxide by a Ca2+ independent NO synthase accounts, at least in part, for the depression of myocardial contractility seen in burn animals and patients.

  14. Matrix metalloproteinases in atherosclerosis: role of nitric oxide, hydrogen sulfide, homocysteine, and polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vacek TP

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Thomas P Vacek, Shahnaz Rehman, Diana Neamtu, Shipeng Yu, Srikanth Givimani, Suresh C Tyagi Department of Physiology and Biophysics, School of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USA Abstract: Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory process that involves activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs; MMPs degrade collagen and allow for smooth-muscle cell migration within a vessel. Moreover, this begets an accumulation of other cellular material, resulting in occlusion of the vessel and ischemic events to tissues in need of nutrients. Homocysteine has been shown to activate MMPs via an increase in oxidative stress and acting as a signaling molecule on receptors like the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor- and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor. Nitric oxide has been shown to be beneficial in some cases of deactivating MMPs. However, in other cases, it has been shown to be harmful. Further studies are warranted on the scenarios that are beneficial versus destructive. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S has been shown to decrease MMP activities in all cases in the literature by acting as an antioxidant and vasodilator. Various MMP-knockout and gene-silencing models have been used to determine the function of the many different MMPs. This has allowed us to discern the role that each MMP has in promoting or alleviating pathological conditions. Furthermore, there has been some study into the MMP polymorphisms that exist in the population. The purpose of this review is to examine the role of MMPs and their polymorphisms on the development of atherosclerosis, with emphasis placed on pathways that involve nitric oxide, hydrogen sulfide, and homocysteine. Keywords: homocysteine, matrix metalloproteinases, oxidative stress, bone remodeling, collagen cross-linking, hydrogen sulfide, nitric oxide

  15. Nitric oxide acts as a positive regulator to induce metamorphosis of the ascidian Herdmania momus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuo Ueda

    Full Text Available Marine invertebrates commonly have a biphasic life cycle in which the metamorphic transition from a pelagic larva to a benthic post-larva is mediated by the nitric oxide signalling pathway. Nitric oxide (NO is synthesised by nitric oxide synthase (NOS, which is a client protein of the molecular chaperon heat shock protein 90 (HSP90. It is notable, then, that both NO and HSP90 have been implicated in regulating metamorphosis in marine invertebrates as diverse as urochordates, echinoderms, molluscs, annelids, and crustaceans. Specifically, the suppression of NOS activity by the application of either NOS- or HSP90-inhibiting pharmacological agents has been shown consistently to induce the initiation of metamorphosis, leading to the hypothesis that a negative regulatory role of NO is widely conserved in biphasic life cycles. Further, the induction of metamorphosis by heat-shock has been demonstrated for multiple species. Here, we investigate the regulatory role of NO in induction of metamorphosis of the solitary tropical ascidian, Herdmania momus. By coupling pharmacological treatments with analysis of HmNOS and HmHSP90 gene expression, we present compelling evidence of a positive regulatory role for NO in metamorphosis of this species, in contrast to all existing ascidian data that supports the hypothesis of NO as a conserved negative regulator of metamorphosis. The exposure of competent H. momus larvae to a NOS inhibitor or an NO donor results in an up-regulation of NOS and HSP90 genes. Heat shock of competent larvae induces metamorphosis in a temperature dependent manner, up to a thermal tolerance that approaches 35°C. Both larval/post-larval survival and the appearance of abnormal morphologies in H. momus post-larvae reflect the magnitude of up-regulation of the HSP90 gene in response to heat-shock. The demonstrated role of NO as a positive metamorphic regulator in H. momus suggests the existence of inter-specific adaptations of NO regulation

  16. Irisin prevents high glucose-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell apoptosis via phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-protein kinase B-endothelial nitric oxide synthase signaling pathway%鸢尾素通过激活3-磷酸磷脂酰肌醇激酶-蛋白激酶B-内皮型一氧化氮合酶信号转导途径抗高糖诱导的人脐静脉内皮细胞凋亡

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢俊颜; 向光大; 梅稳; 刘敏; 向林; 董靖

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of irisin on endothelial cells cultured with high glucose and the possible mechanism-involved. Methods Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were pre⁃incubated with inhibitors against phosphatidylinositol⁃3⁃kinase (PI3K) (LY294002) or endothelial nitric oxide synthase(eNOS) (L⁃NAME) for 30 min before irisin was added, then divided into 6 groups: normal glucose (NG) group, high glucose (HG) group, high glucose+irisin (Irisin) group, high glucose+LY294002+irisin (LY) group, high glucose+L⁃NAME+irisin(L⁃NAME) group, high glucose+LY294002+L⁃NAME+irisin (LY+L⁃NAME) group, cultured for 48 h. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin⁃dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining was applied to identify the apoptotic endothelial cells. Reactive oxygen species assay kit and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction(RT⁃PCR) was used to determine the oxidative stress in HUVECs. The expression levels of protein kinase B(Akt), phospheralyted Akt(P-Akt), eNOS and phospheralyted eNOS(P-eNOS) were measured by Western blotting. Moreover, HUVECs were transfected with eNOS⁃siRNA, and cultured in high glucose and then divided into 4 groups:NG+Scr⁃siRNA group, HG+Scr⁃siRNA group, HG+Scr⁃siRNA+irisin group and HG+eNOS⁃siRNA+irisin group, cultured for 48 h. After treatment, the cells were double-stained with fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide (Annexin V⁃FITC/PI) and analyzed by flow cytometry. Data were compared using one⁃way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results The apoptotic rate of HUVECs in HG group were significantly higher than that in NG group (25.6%± 3.2% vs 6.0%± 1.5%, t=-13.55, P<0.01), while it significantly decreased in Irisin group than that in HG group (19.8%± 2.3% vs 25.6%± 3.2%, t=-3.55, P<0.01). The apoptotic rate of HUVECs in LY, L⁃NAME and LY+L⁃NAME group were all significantly higher than that in Irisin group (t=-3.85,-5.19,-7.11, all P<0.01). After eNOS gene silencing in

  17. Nitric oxide negatively regulates mammalian adult neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Michael A.; Stasiv, Yuri; Benraiss, Abdellatif; Chmielnicki, Eva; Grinberg, Alexander; Westphal, Heiner; Goldman, Steven A.; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2003-08-01

    Neural progenitor cells are widespread throughout the adult central nervous system but only give rise to neurons in specific loci. Negative regulators of neurogenesis have therefore been postulated, but none have yet been identified as subserving a significant role in the adult brain. Here we report that nitric oxide (NO) acts as an important negative regulator of cell proliferation in the adult mammalian brain. We used two independent approaches to examine the function of NO in adult neurogenesis. In a pharmacological approach, we suppressed NO production in the rat brain by intraventricular infusion of an NO synthase inhibitor. In a genetic approach, we generated a null mutant neuronal NO synthase knockout mouse line by targeting the exon encoding active center of the enzyme. In both models, the number of new cells generated in neurogenic areas of the adult brain, the olfactory subependyma and the dentate gyrus, was strongly augmented, which indicates that division of neural stem cells in the adult brain is controlled by NO and suggests a strategy for enhancing neurogenesis in the adult central nervous system.

  18. Biomimetic and microbial reduction of nitric oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, W.T.; Le, U.; Ronda, S. [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The biomimetic reduction of nitric oxide (NO) to nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) by dithiothreitol in the presence of cyanocobalamin and cobalt-centered porphyrins has been investigated. Reactions were monitored directly using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy vapor-phase spectra. Reaction rates were twofold faster for the corrin than for the cobalt-centered porphyrins. The stoichiometry showed the loss of two molecules of NO per molecule of N{sub 2}O produced. We have also demonstrated that the facultative anaerobe and chemoautotroph, Thiobacillus denitrificans, can be cultured anoxically in batch reactors using NO as a terminal electron acceptor with reduction to elemental nitrogen (N{sub 2}). We have proposed that the concentrated stream of NO{sub x}, as obtained from certain regenerable processes for the gas desulfurization and NO{sub x} removal, could be converted to N{sub 2} for disposal by contact with a culture of T. denitrificans. Four heterotrophic bacteria have also been identified that may be grown in batch cultures with succinate, yeast extract, or heat and alkali pretreated sewage sludge as carbon and energy sources and NO as a terminal electron acceptor. These are Paracoccus dentrificans, Pseudomonas denitrificans, Alcaligens denitrificans, and Thiophaera pantotropha.

  19. Superhydrophobic nitric oxide-releasing xerogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Wesley L; Youn, Jonghae; Reighard, Katelyn P; Worley, Brittany V; Lodaya, Hetali M; Shin, Jae Ho; Schoenfisch, Mark H

    2014-08-01

    Superhydrophobic nitric oxide (NO)-releasing xerogels were prepared by spray-coating a fluorinated silane/silica composite onto N-diazeniumdiolate NO donor-modified xerogels. The thickness of the superhydrophobic layer was used to extend NO release durations from 59 to 105h. The resulting xerogels were stable, maintaining superhydrophobicity for up to 1month (the longest duration tested) when immersed in solution, with no leaching of silica or undesirable fragmentation detected. The combination of superhydrophobicity and NO release reduced viable Pseudomonas aeruginosa adhesion by >2-logs. The killing effect of NO was demonstrated at longer bacterial contact times, with superhydrophobic NO-releasing xerogels resulting in 3.8-log reductions in adhered viable bacteria vs. controls. With no observed toxicity to L929 murine fibroblasts, NO-releasing superhydrophobic membranes may be valuable antibacterial coatings for implants as they both reduce adhesion and kill bacteria that do adhere. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Hemoglobin: A Nitric-Oxide Dioxygenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul R. Gardner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the hemoglobin superfamily efficiently catalyze nitric-oxide dioxygenation, and when paired with native electron donors, function as NO dioxygenases (NODs. Indeed, the NOD function has emerged as a more common and ancient function than the well-known role in O2 transport-storage. Novel hemoglobins possessing a NOD function continue to be discovered in diverse life forms. Unique hemoglobin structures evolved, in part, for catalysis with different electron donors. The mechanism of NOD catalysis by representative single domain hemoglobins and multidomain flavohemoglobin occurs through a multistep mechanism involving O2 migration to the heme pocket, O2 binding-reduction, NO migration, radical-radical coupling, O-atom rearrangement, nitrate release, and heme iron re-reduction. Unraveling the physiological functions of multiple NODs with varying expression in organisms and the complexity of NO as both a poison and signaling molecule remain grand challenges for the NO field. NOD knockout organisms and cells expressing recombinant NODs are helping to advance our understanding of NO actions in microbial infection, plant senescence, cancer, mitochondrial function, iron metabolism, and tissue O2 homeostasis. NOD inhibitors are being pursued for therapeutic applications as antibiotics and antitumor agents. Transgenic NOD-expressing plants, fish, algae, and microbes are being developed for agriculture, aquaculture, and industry.

  1. Nitric oxide and teratogenesis: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiboni, Gian Mario; Ponzano, Adalisa

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), generated by NO synthase (NOS) enzymes, is an important bioactive molecule involved in the regulation of several biological phenomena that are crucial for organogenesis, including gene expression, cell growth, matrix remolding, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. The expression of NOS isoforms in embryonic tissues is temporally and spatially regulated, and disruption of endogenous NO can lead to developmental defects. Maternal treatment with pan NOS inhibitors during early organogenesis caused severe malformations of the axial skeleton. In utero exposure during the fetal period induced limb reduction defects of vascular origin. Knock-out mice have been used to define the role of the various NOS isoforms on the origin of the abnormal development. Cardiovascular malformations, limb reduction defects, reduced growth and reduced survival have been observed in knock-out mice with targeted disruption of endothelial NOS (eNOS). Limited morphological changes were observed in mice lacking inducible NOS (iNOS) or neuronal NOS n(NOS). Results obtained with in vitro studies suggest that optimal levels of NO are required for neural tube closure. Disregulation of NO production was also recently proposed as a contributing mechanism in the origin of malformations associated with exposure to known environmental teratogens, such as valproic acid, thalidomide, copper deficiency, and diabetes.

  2. Nitric oxide and cardiovascular risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livio Dai Cas

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The endothelium is a dynamic organ with many properties that takes part in the regulation of the principal mechanisms of vascular physiology. Its principal functions include the control of blood-tissue exchange and permeability, the vascular tonus, and the modulation of inflammatory or coagulatory mechanisms. Many vasoactive molecules, produced by the endothelium, are involved in the control of these functions. The most important is nitric oxide (NO, a gaseous molecule electrically neutral with an odd number of electrons that gives the molecule chemically reactive radical properties. Already known in the twentieth century, NO, sometimes considered as a dangerous molecule, recently valued as an important endogenous vasodilator factor. Recently, it was discovered that it is involved in several physiological mechanisms of endothelial protection (Tab. I. In 1992, Science elected it as “molecule of the year”; 6 yrs later three American researchers (Louis Ignarro, Robert Furchgott and Fried Murad obtained a Nobel Prize for Medicine and Physiology “for their discoveries about NO as signal in the cardiovascular system”.

  3. Nitric Oxide Synthases in Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnicer, Ricardo; Crabtree, Mark J.; Sivakumaran, Vidhya

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The regulation of myocardial function by constitutive nitric oxide synthases (NOS) is important for the maintenance of myocardial Ca2+ homeostasis, relaxation and distensibility, and protection from arrhythmia and abnormal stress stimuli. However, sustained insults such as diabetes, hypertension, hemodynamic overload, and atrial fibrillation lead to dysfunctional NOS activity with superoxide produced instead of NO and worse pathophysiology. Recent Advances: Major strides in understanding the role of normal and abnormal constitutive NOS in the heart have revealed molecular targets by which NO modulates myocyte function and morphology, the role and nature of post-translational modifications of NOS, and factors controlling nitroso-redox balance. Localized and differential signaling from NOS1 (neuronal) versus NOS3 (endothelial) isoforms are being identified, as are methods to restore NOS function in heart disease. Critical Issues: Abnormal NOS signaling plays a key role in many cardiac disorders, while targeted modulation may potentially reverse this pathogenic source of oxidative stress. Future Directions: Improvements in the clinical translation of potent modulators of NOS function/dysfunction may ultimately provide a powerful new treatment for many hearts diseases that are fueled by nitroso-redox imbalance. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1078–1099. PMID:22871241

  4. Pathway collages: personalized multi-pathway diagrams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, Suzanne; O'Maille, Paul E; Weaver, Daniel; Karp, Peter D

    2016-12-13

    Metabolic pathway diagrams are a classical way of visualizing a linked cascade of biochemical reactions. However, to understand some biochemical situations, viewing a single pathway is insufficient, whereas viewing the entire metabolic network results in information overload. How do we enable scientists to rapidly construct personalized multi-pathway diagrams that depict a desired collection of interacting pathways that emphasize particular pathway interactions? We define software for constructing personalized multi-pathway diagrams called pathway-collages using a combination of manual and automatic layouts. The user specifies a set of pathways of interest for the collage from a Pathway/Genome Database. Layouts for the individual pathways are generated by the Pathway Tools software, and are sent to a Javascript Pathway Collage application implemented using Cytoscape.js. That application allows the user to re-position pathways; define connections between pathways; change visual style parameters; and paint metabolomics, gene expression, and reaction flux data onto the collage to obtain a desired multi-pathway diagram. We demonstrate the use of pathway collages in two application areas: a metabolomics study of pathogen drug response, and an Escherichia coli metabolic model. Pathway collages enable facile construction of personalized multi-pathway diagrams.

  5. Concentrations of Nitric Oxide in Rat Brain Tissues after Diffuse Brain Injury and Neuroprotection by the Selective Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitor Aminoguanidine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-bao Wang; Shao-wu Ou; Guang-yu Li; Yun-hui Liu

    2005-01-01

    @@ To investigate the effects of nitric oxide (NO) and the selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor aminoguanidine (AG) on trauma, we explored the concentrations of nitric oxide in rat brain tissues at different time stamps after diffuse brain injury (DBI) with or without AG treatment.

  6. Animal models for the study of liver regeneration: role of nitric oxide and prostaglandins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortelano, Sonsoles; Zeini, Miriam; Casado, Marta; Martín-Sanz, Paloma; Boscá, Lisardo

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms that permit adult tissues to regenerate are the object of intense study. Liver regeneration is a research area of considerable interest both from pathological and from physiological perspectives. One of the best models of the regenerative process is the two-thirds partial hepatectomy (PH). After PH, the remnant liver starts a series of timed responses that first favor cell growth and then halts hepatocyte proliferation once liver function is fully restored. The mechanisms regulating this process are complex and involve many cellular events. Initiation of liver regeneration requires the injury-related cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin 6 (IL-6), and involves the activation of cytokine-regulated transcription factors such as NF-kappaB and STAT3. An important event that takes place in the hours immediately after PH is the induction of nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS-2) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), and the consequent release of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins (PGs). NO is involved in the vascular readaptation after PH, favoring a general permeability to growth factors throughout the organ. This review examines the mechanisms that regulate NO release during liver regeneration and the animal models used to identify these pathways.

  7. TRPV1 and TRPA1 mediate peripheral nitric oxide-induced nociception in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Miyamoto

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO can induce acute pain in humans and plays an important role in pain sensitization caused by inflammation and injury in animal models. There is evidence that NO acts both in the central nervous system via a cyclic GMP pathway and in the periphery on sensory neurons through unknown mechanisms. It has recently been suggested that TRPV1 and TRPA1, two polymodal ion channels that sense noxious stimuli impinging on peripheral nociceptors, are activated by NO in heterologous systems. Here, we investigate the relevance of this activation. We demonstrate that NO donors directly activate TRPV1 and TRPA1 in isolated inside-out patch recordings. Cultured primary sensory neurons display both TRPV1- and TRPA1-dependent responses to NO donors. BH4, an essential co-factor for NO production, causes activation of a subset of DRG neurons as assayed by calcium imaging, and this activation is at least partly dependent on nitric oxide synthase activity. We show that BH4-induced calcium influx is ablated in DRG neurons from TRPA1/TRPV1 double knockout mice, suggesting that production of endogenous levels of NO can activate these ion channels. In behavioral assays, peripheral NO-induced nociception is compromised when TRPV1 and TRPA1 are both ablated. These results provide genetic evidence that the peripheral nociceptive action of NO is mediated by both TRPV1 and TRPA1.

  8. Compromised proteasome degradation elevates neuronal nitric oxide synthase levels and induces apoptotic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Philip Y; Cadenas, Enrique

    2008-10-15

    The significance of impairment of proteasome activity in PC12 cells was examined in connection with nitrative/nitrosative stress and apoptotic cell death. Treatment of differentiated PC12 cells with MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, elicited a dose- and time-dependent increase in neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) protein levels, decreased cell viability, and increased cytotoxicity. Viability and cytotoxicity were ameliorated by L-NAME (a broad NOS inhibitor). Nitric oxide/peroxynitrite formation was increased upon treatment of PC12 cells with MG132 and decreased upon treatment with the combination of MG132 and 7-NI (a specific inhibitor of nNOS). The decreases in cell viability appeared to be effected by an activation of JNK and its effect on mitochondrial Bcl-x(L) phosphorylation. These effects are strengthened by the activation of caspase-9 along with increased caspase-3 activity upon treatment of PC12 cells with MG132. These results suggest that impairment of proteasome activity and consequent increases in nNOS levels lead to a nitrative stress that involves the coordinated response of JNK cytosolic signaling and mitochondrion-driven apoptotic pathways.

  9. Nitric Oxide Synthesis Is Increased in Cybrid Cells with m.3243A>G Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Gamba

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a free radical and a signaling molecule in several pathways, produced by nitric oxide synthase (NOS from the conversion of L-arginine to citrulline. Supplementation of L-arginine has been used to treat MELAS (mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke like syndrome, a mitochondrial disease caused by the m.3243A>G mutation. Low levels of serum arginine and endothelium dysfunction have been reported in MELAS and this treatment may increase NO in endothelial cells and promote vasodilation, decreasing cerebral ischemia and strokes. Although clinical benefits have been reported, little is known about NO synthesis in MELAS. In this study we found that osteosarcoma derived cybrid cells with high levels of m.3243A>G had increased nitrite, an NO metabolite, and increased intracellular NO, demonstrated by an NO fluorescent probe (DAF-FM. Muscle vessels from patients with the same mutation had increased staining in NADPH diaphorase, suggestive of increased NOS. These results indicate increased production of NO in cells harboring the m.3243A>G, however no nitrated protein was detected by Western blotting. Further studies are necessary to clarify the exact mechanisms of L-arginine effect to determine the appropriate clinical use of this drug therapy.

  10. Nitric oxide production and nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity in Naegleria fowleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Hernández, Saúl; Rodríguez-Monroy, Marco A; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia; Jarillo-Luna, Adriana; Carrasco-Yepez, Marisela; Miliar-García, Angel; Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael

    2007-07-01

    Free-living ameba Naegleria fowleri produces an acute and fatal infectious disease called primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), whose pathophysiological mechanism is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in PAM. Although NO has a cytotoxic effect on various parasites, it is produced by others as part of the pathology, as is the case with Entamoeba histolytica. To test for the production of NO, we analyzed whether antibodies against mammalian NO synthase isoforms (neuronal, inducible, and endothelial) presented immunoreactivity to N. fowleri proteins. We found that the trophozoites produced NO in vitro. The Western blot results, which showed N. fowleri trophozoites, contained proteins that share epitopes with the three described mammalian NOS, but have relative molecular weights different than those described in the literature, suggesting that N. fowleri may contain undescribed NOS isoforms. Moreover, we found that trophozoites reacted to the NOS2 antibody, in amebic cultures as well as in the mouse brain infected with N. fowleri, suggesting that nitric oxide may participate in the pathogenesis of PAM. Further research aimed at determining whether N. fowleri contains active novel NOS isoforms could lead to the design of new therapies against this parasite.

  11. Extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solutions with CMPO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, B.B.

    1995-08-01

    DOE sponsored development of the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for removing actinides from radioactive wastes. The solvent is a mixture of CMPO and TBP. Since the extraction characteristics of CMPO are not as well understood as those of TBP, the extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate with CMPO (dissolved in n-dodecane) were studied. Results indicate that CMPO extracts nitric acid with a 1:1 stoichiometry; equilibrium constant is 2. 660{plus_minus}0.092 at 25 C, and extraction enthalpy is -5. 46{plus_minus}0.46 kcal/mol. Slope analysis indicates that uranyl nitrate extracts with a mixed equilibria of 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries in nearly equal proportion. Equil. constant of the 2: 1 extraction was 1.213 {times} 10{sup 6}{plus_minus}3.56 {times} 10{sup 4} at 25 C; reaction enthalpy was -9.610{plus_minus}0.594 kcal/mol. Nitration complexation constant is 8.412{plus_minus}0.579, with an enthalpy of -10.72{plus_minus}1.87 kcal/mol. Bismuth nitrate also extracts with a mixed equilibria of (perhaps) 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries. A 2:1 extraction equilibrium and a nitrate complexation adequately model the data. Kinetics and enthalpies were also measured.

  12. Nitric Oxide Functions as a Signal in Ultraviolet-B-Induced Baicalin Accumulation in Scutellaria baicalensis Suspension Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Jie Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Stress induced by ultraviolet-B (UV-B irradiation stimulates the accumulation of various secondary metabolites in plants. Nitric oxide (NO serves as an important secondary messenger in UV-B stress-induced signal transduction pathways. NO can be synthesized in plants by either enzymatic catalysis or an inorganic nitrogen pathway. The effects of UV-B irradiation on the production of baicalin and the associated molecular pathways in plant cells are poorly understood. In this study, nitric oxide synthase (NOS activity, NO release and the generation of baicalin were investigated in cell suspension cultures of Scutellaria baicalensis exposed to UV-B irradiation. UV-B irradiation significantly increased NOS activity, NO release and baicalin biosynthesis in S. baicalensis cells. Additionally, exogenous NO supplied by the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP, led to a similar increase in the baicalin content as the UV-B treatment. The NOS inhibitor, Nω-nitro-l-arginine (LNNA, and NO scavenger, 2-(4-carboxyphenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO partially inhibited UV-B-induced NO release and baicalin accumulation. These results suggest that NO is generated by NOS or NOS-like enzymes and plays an important role in baicalin biosynthesis as part of the defense response of S. baicalensis cells to UV-B irradiation.

  13. Amine oxidation mediated by lysine-specific demethylase 1: quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics insights into mechanism and role of lysine 661.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasulu, Bora; Patil, Mahendra; Thiel, Walter

    2013-09-11

    We report classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations to elucidate the catalytic mechanism of the rate-determining amine oxidation step in the lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1)-catalyzed demethylation of the histone tail lysine (H3K4), with flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) acting as cofactor. The oxidation of substrate lysine (sLys) involves the cleavage of an α-CH bond accompanied by the transfer of a hydride ion equivalent to FAD, leading to an imine intermediate. This hydride transfer pathway is shown to be clearly favored for sLys oxidation over other proposed mechanisms, including the radical (or single-electron transfer) route as well as carbanion and polar-nucleophilic mechanisms. MD simulations on six NVT ensembles (covering different protonation states of sLys and K661 as well as the K661M mutant) identify two possible orientations of the reacting sLys and FAD subunits (called "downward" and "upward"). Calculations at the QM(B3LYP-D/6-31G*)/CHARMM22 level provide molecular-level insights into the mechanism, helping to understand how LSD1 achieves the activation of the rather inert methyl-CH bond in a metal-free environment. Factors such as proper alignment of sLys (downward orientation), transition-state stabilization (due to the protein environment and favorable orbital interactions), and product stabilization via adduct formation are found to be crucial for facilitating the oxidative α-CH bond cleavage. The current study also sheds light on the role of important active-site residues (Y761, K661, and W695) and of the conserved water-bridge motif. The steric influence of Y761 helps to position the reaction partners properly, K661 is predicted to get deprotonated prior to substrate binding and to act as an active-site base that accepts a proton from sLys to enable the subsequent amine oxidation, and the water bridge that is stabilized by K661 and W695 mediates this proton

  14. Sesquiterpenes from Curcuma wenyujin with their inhibitory activities on nitric oxide production in RAW 264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Suyu; Xia, Guiyang; Wang, Liqing; Zhou, Li; Zhao, Feng; Huang, Jian; Chen, Lixia

    2017-03-01

    One new sesquiterpene, 7α,11-epoxy-6α-hydroxy-carabrane-4,8-dione, along with 10 known ones were isolated from the essential oil of Curcuma wenyujin Y.H. Chen et C. Ling. Their structures were established based on extensive spectroscopic analysis. The absolute configuration of compound 1 was determined by the CD analysis of the insitu formed [Rh2(OCOCF3)4] complex, and the CD data analysis based on the octane rule of cyclohexanone. The inhibitory effects of these sesquiterpenes on nitric oxide production in lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages were also evaluated. Furthermore, the biosynthesis pathway of the isolated compounds was proposed.

  15. Integrating nitric oxide, nitrite and hydrogen sulfide signaling in the physiological adaptations to hypoxia: A comparative approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, Angela; Jensen, Frank Bo; Tota, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), nitric oxide (NO) and nitrite (NO2-) are formed in vivo and are of crucial importance in the tissue response to hypoxia, particularly in the cardiovascular system, where these signaling molecules are involved in a multitude of processes including the regulation of vascular...... of the Society for Experimental Biology in 2011 in Glasgow. It also highlights the need and potential for a comparative approach of study and collaborative effort to identify potential link(s) between the signaling pathways involving NO, nitrite and H2S in the whole-body responses to hypoxia....

  16. Transport of nitric oxide by perfluorocarbon emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Daniel; Cabrales, Pedro; Briceño, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    Perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions can transport and release various gases based on concentration gradients. The objective of this study was to determine the possibility of carrying and delivering exogenous nitric oxide (NO) into the circulation by simply loading PFC emulsion with NO prior infusion. PFC was equilibrated with room air (PFC) or 300 ppm NO (PFC-NO) at atmospheric pressure. Isotonic saline solution was used as a volume control (Saline). PFC and PFC-NO were infused at a dose of 3.5 mL/kg in the hamster window chamber model. Blood chemistry, and systemic and microvascular hemodynamic response were measured. Infusion of PFC preloaded with NO reduced blood pressure, induced microvascular vasodilation and increased capillary perfusion; although these changes lasted less than 30 min post infusion. On the other hand, infusion of PFC (without NO) produced vasoconstriction; however, the vasoconstriction was followed by vasodilatation at 30 min post infusion. Plasma nitrite and nitrate increased 15 min after infusion of NO preloaded PFC compared with PFC, 60 min after infusion nitrite and nitrate were not different, and 90 min after infusion plasma S-nitrosothiols increased in both groups. Infusion of NO preloaded PFC resulted in acute vascular relaxation, where as infusion of PFC (without NO) produced vasoconstriction, potentially due to NO sequestration by the PFC micelles. The late effects of PFC infusion are due to NO redistribution and plasma S-nitrosothiols. Gas solubility in PFC can provide a tool to modulate plasma vasoactive NO forms availability and improve microcirculatory function and promote increased blood flow.

  17. Nitric oxide in adaptation to altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, Cynthia M; Laskowski, Daniel; Erzurum, Serpil C

    2012-04-01

    This review summarizes published information on the levels of nitric oxide gas (NO) in the lungs and NO-derived liquid-phase molecules in the acclimatization of visitors newly arrived at altitudes of 2500 m or more and adaptation of populations whose ancestors arrived thousands of years ago. Studies of acutely exposed visitors to high altitude focus on the first 24-48 h with just a few extending to days or weeks. Among healthy visitors, NO levels in the lung, plasma, and/or red blood cells fell within 2h, but then returned toward baseline or slightly higher by 48 h and increased above baseline by 5 days. Among visitors ill with high-altitude pulmonary edema at the time of the study or in the past, NO levels were lower than those of their healthy counterparts. As for highland populations, Tibetans had NO levels in the lung, plasma, and red blood cells that were at least double and in some cases orders of magnitude greater than other populations regardless of altitude. Red blood cell-associated nitrogen oxides were more than 200 times higher. Other highland populations had generally higher levels although not to the degree shown by Tibetans. Overall, responses of those acclimatized and those presumed to be adapted are in the same direction, although the Tibetans have much larger responses. Missing are long-term data on lowlanders at altitude showing how similar they become to the Tibetan phenotype. Also missing are data on Tibetans at low altitude to see the extent to which their phenotype is a response to the immediate environment or expressed constitutively. The mechanisms causing the visitors' and the Tibetans' high levels of NO and NO-derived molecules at altitude remain unknown. Limited data suggest processes including hypoxic upregulation of NO synthase gene expression, hemoglobin-NO reactions, and genetic variation. Gains in understanding will require integrating appropriate methods and measurement techniques with indicators of adaptive function under hypoxic

  18. Anticonvulsant drugs, oxidative stress and nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega Rasgado, L A; Ceballos Reyes, G M; Vega-Diaz, M F

    2011-01-01

    Nitric Oxide (NO) is thought to play a fundamental role in the genesis and the spreading of epileptiform hyperactivity, although its function is unclear and controversial. As a free radical, NO may cause oxidative stress, which is emerging as an important mechanism in the etiology of seizure-induced neuronal death. Here we investigated the role of NO in seizure mechanisms through oxidative stress generation by studying the effect of anticonvulsant drugs such as amino oxyacetic acid (AAOA), valproate (VALP), diazepam (DIAZ) and gabapentin (GBPTNA) on oxidative stress in the brain, estimated as free carbonyls by the method of Dalle and Rossi, and by measuring NO by the indirect method based on the Griess reaction. Results show that, except for AAOA and VALP, anticonvulsants did not significantly affect or decreased free carbonyls, but reversed the oxidative stress produced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced convulsions. Anticonvulsants except AAOA diminished NO levels and with the exception of VALP, counteracted the increase in NO generated by PTZ. Anticonvulsants decreased oxidative stress and NO especially in hippocampus (HI) and cortex (CX), and reversed PTZ effects on both parameters. PTZ diminished NO in HI, which could be explained since PTZ caused an increase on endothelial NO synthase but a decrease in neuronal NOS expression in this brain area. Since the drugs studied are modulating GABA levels, our results suggest that seizures generated by alterations in GABAergic transmission produce oxidative stress caused by NO, which can be reversed by anticonvulsants. The effects described differ among the brain regions studied and the NO synthase isoform affected.

  19. Nitric oxide scavenging by red cell microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen; Zhao, Weixin; Christ, George J; Gladwin, Mark T; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B

    2013-12-01

    Red cell microparticles form during the storage of red blood cells and in diseases associated with red cell breakdown and asplenia, including hemolytic anemias such as sickle cell disease. These small phospholipid vesicles that are derived from red blood cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of transfusion of aged stored blood and hemolytic diseases, via activation of the hemostatic system and effects on nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Red cell microparticles react with the important signaling molecule NO almost as fast as cell-free hemoglobin, about 1000 times faster than red-cell-encapsulated hemoglobin. The degree to which this fast reaction with NO by red cell microparticles influences NO bioavailability depends on several factors that are explored here. In the context of stored blood preserved in ADSOL, we find that both cell-free hemoglobin and red cell microparticles increase as a function of duration of storage, and the proportion of extra erythrocytic hemoglobin in the red cell microparticle fraction is about 20% throughout storage. Normalized by hemoglobin concentration, the NO-scavenging ability of cell-free hemoglobin is slightly higher than that of red cell microparticles as determined by a chemiluminescence NO-scavenging assay. Computational simulations show that the degree to which red cell microparticles scavenge NO will depend substantially on whether they enter the cell-free zone next to the endothelial cells. Single-microvessel myography experiments performed under laminar flow conditions demonstrate that microparticles significantly enter the cell-free zone and inhibit acetylcholine, endothelial-dependent, and NO-dependent vasodilation. Taken together, these data suggest that as little as 5 μM hemoglobin in red cell microparticles, an amount formed after the infusion of one unit of aged stored packed red blood cells, has the potential to reduce NO bioavailability and impair endothelial-dependent vasodilation.

  20. Comparative nitric oxide production by LPS-stimulated monocyte-derived macrophages from Ovis canadensis and Ovis aries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, R E; Waters, W R; Rudolph, K M; Drew, M L

    2006-01-01

    Bighorn sheep are more susceptible to respiratory infection by Mannheimia haemolytica than are domestic sheep. In response to bacterial challenge, macrophages produce a number of molecules that play key roles in the inflammatory response, including highly reactive nitrogen intermediates such as nitric oxide (NO). Supernatants from monocyte-derived macrophages cultured with M. haemolytica LPS were assayed for nitric oxide activity via measurement of the NO metabolite, nitrite. In response to LPS stimulation, bighorn sheep macrophages secreted significantly higher levels of NO compared to levels for non-stimulated macrophages. In contrast, levels of NO produced by domestic sheep macrophages in response to M. haemolytica LPS did not differ from levels detected in non-stimulated cell cultures. Nitrite levels detected in supernatants of LPS-stimulated bighorn macrophage cultures treated with an inducible nitric oxide synthase (INOS) inhibitor, N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine, were similar to that observed in non-stimulated cultures indicating a role for the iNOS pathway.

  1. Nitric Oxide Synthase Regulates Growth Coordination During Drosophila melanogaster Imaginal Disc Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaszczak, Jacob S; Wolpe, Jacob B; Dao, Anh Q; Halme, Adrian

    2015-08-01

    Mechanisms that coordinate growth during development are essential for producing animals with proper organ proportion. Here we describe a pathway through which tissues communicate to coordinate growth. During Drosophila melanogaster larval development, damage to imaginal discs activates a regeneration checkpoint through expression of Dilp8. This both produces a delay in developmental timing and slows the growth of undamaged tissues, coordinating regeneration of the damaged tissue with developmental progression and overall growth. Here we demonstrate that Dilp8-dependent growth coordination between regenerating and undamaged tissues, but not developmental delay, requires the activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the prothoracic gland. NOS limits the growth of undamaged tissues by reducing ecdysone biosynthesis, a requirement for imaginal disc growth during both the regenerative checkpoint and normal development. Therefore, NOS activity in the prothoracic gland coordinates tissue growth through regulation of endocrine signals.

  2. Short-term hypoxic vasodilation in vivo is mediated by bioactive nitric oxide metabolites, rather than free nitric oxide derived from haemoglobin-mediated nitrite reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umbrello, Michele; Dyson, Alex; Pinto, Bernardo Bollen; Fernandez, Bernadette O; Simon, Verena; Feelisch, Martin; Singer, Mervyn

    2014-03-01

    Local increases in blood flow--'hypoxic vasodilation'--confer cellular protection in the face of reduced oxygen delivery. The physiological relevance of this response is well established, yet ongoing controversy surrounds its underlying mechanisms. We sought to confirm that early hypoxic vasodilation is a nitric oxide (NO)-mediated phenomenon and to study putative pathways for increased levels of NO, namely production from NO synthases, intravascular nitrite reduction, release from preformed stores and reduced deactivation by cytochrome c oxidase. Experiments were performed on spontaneously breathing, anaesthetized, male Wistar rats undergoing short-term systemic hypoxaemia, who received pharmacological inhibitors and activators of the various NO pathways. Arterial blood pressure, cardiac output, tissue oxygen tension and the circulating pool of NO metabolites (oxidation, nitrosation and nitrosylation products) were measured in plasma and erythrocytes. Hypoxaemia caused a rapid and sustained vasodilation, which was only partially reversed by non-selective NO synthase inhibition. This was associated with significantly lower plasma nitrite, and marginally elevated nitrate levels, suggestive of nitrite bioinactivation. Administration of sodium nitrite had little effect in normoxia, but produced significant vasodilation and increased nitrosylation during hypoxaemia that could not be reversed by NO scavenging. Methodological issues prevented assessment of the contribution, if any, of reduced deactivation of NO by cytochrome c oxidase. In conclusion, acute hypoxic vasodilation is an adaptive NO-mediated response conferred through bioactive metabolites rather than free NO from haemoglobin-mediated reduction of nitrite.

  3. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide production in the mud-dwelled air-breathing singhi catfish, Heteropneustes fossilis under condition of water shortage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Mahua G; Saha, Nirmalendu

    2012-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is known to be an important regulator molecule for regulating the multiple signaling pathways and also to play diverse physiological functions in mammals including that of adaptation to various stresses. The present study reports on the production of nitric oxide (NO) and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) enzyme that produces NO from l-arginine in the freshwater air-breathing catfish (Heteropneustes fossilis) while dwelling inside the mud peat under semidry conditions. Desiccation stress, due to mud-dwelling for 2 weeks, led to significant increase of NO concentration in different tissues and in plasma of singhi catfish, and also the increase of NO efflux from the perfused liver with an accompanying increase of toxic ammonia level in different tissues. Mud-dwelling also resulted to induction of iNOS activity, expression of iNOS protein in different tissues after 7 days with further increase after 14 days, which otherwise was not detectable in control fish. Further, mud-dwelling also resulted to a significant expression of iNOS mRNA after 7 days with a more increase of mRNA level after 14 days, suggesting that the desiccation stress caused transcriptional regulation of iNOS gene. Immunocytochemical analysis indicated the zonal specific expression of iNOS protein in different tissues. Desiccation stress also led to activation and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor кB (NFкB) in hepatic cells. These results suggest that the activation of iNOS gene under desiccation-induced stresses such as high ammonia load was probably mediated through the activation of one of the major transcription factors, the NFкB. This is the first report of desiccation-induced induction of iNOS gene, iNOS protein expression leading to more generation of NO while living inside the mud peat under condition of water shortage in any air-breathing teleosts. 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved

  4. Nitric oxide synthase-containing projections to the ventrobasal thalamus in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usunoff, K G; Kharazia, V N; Valtschanoff, J G; Schmidt, H H; Weinberg, R J

    1999-09-01

    Microiontophoretic studies of thalamic neurons suggests that nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in mediating somatosensory transmission. The thalamus contains few nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-immunoreactive neurons; thus, the major source of thalamic NO is presumably from NOS-positive axons of extrathalamic origin. The cells of origin of these putative NOS-containing pathways to the ventrobasal thalamus were investigated in rats by combining retrograde tracing with immunocytochemistry for NOS. The location and morphology of double-labeled neurons was compared with that of single-labeled neurons. The most significant sources of NOS-containing afferents to the thalamus were found to be the pedunculopontine (PPN) and laterodorsal tegmental (LDT) nuclei. NOS-immunoreactive neurons in these cholinergic nuclei project bilaterally to the thalamus, most strongly ipsilaterally. The thalamus appears to be a major target of PPN, since even selective thalamic injections result in retrograde labeling of at least one third of its NOS-immunoreactive neurons. A significant number of NOS-negative neurons in both the PPN and LDT also project to the thalamus. Minor sources of NOS-containing thalamic afferents include the lateral hypothalamus, the dorsal, median and pontine raphe nuclei, the parabrachial nuclei, and the pontomedullary reticular formation. In all these structures, NOS-negative thalamopetal neurons greatly outnumber the NOS-positive ones. Ascending sensory pathways to the thalamus, including those from the sensory trigeminal nuclei, the dorsal column nuclei, and the spinal cord, as well as the auditory and vestibular centers, arise exclusively from NOS-negative neurons. The major NOS-positive projections are implicated in affective and alerting systems, supporting that NO may act to modulate attentiveness in thalamic relay nuclei.

  5. Expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the hippocampal formation in affective disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M.W. Oliveira

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal output is increased in affective disorders and is mediated by increased glutamatergic input via N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor and moderated by antidepressant treatment. Activation of NMDA receptors by glutamate evokes the release of nitric oxide (NO by the activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS. The human hippocampus contains a high density of NMDA receptors and nNOS-expressing neurons suggesting the existence of an NMDA-NO transduction pathway which can be involved in the pathogenesis of affective disorders. We tested the hypothesis that nNOS expression is increased in the human hippocampus from affectively ill patients. Immunocytochemistry was used to demonstrate nNOS-expressing neurons in sections obtained from the Stanley Consortium postmortem brain collection from patients with major depression (MD, N = 15, bipolar disorder (BD, N = 15, and schizophrenia (N = 15 and from controls (N = 15. nNOS-immunoreactive (nNOS-IR and Nissl-stained neurons were counted in entorhinal cortex, hippocampal CA1, CA2, CA3, and CA4 subfields, and subiculum. The numbers of Nissl-stained neurons were very similar in different diagnostic groups and correlated significantly with the number of nNOS-IR neurons. Both the MD and the BD groups had greater number of nNOS-IR neurons/400 µm² in CA1 (mean ± SEM: MD = 9.2 ± 0.6 and BD = 8.4 ± 0.6 and subiculum (BD = 6.7 ± 0.4 when compared to control group (6.6 ± 0.5 and this was significantly more marked in samples from the right hemisphere. These changes were specific to affective disorders since no changes were seen in the schizophrenic group (6.7 ± 0.8. The results support the current view of the NMDA-NO pathway as a target for the pathophysiology of affective disorders and antidepressant drug development.

  6. Skeletal Muscle Function during Exercise—Fine-Tuning of Diverse Subsystems by Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelm Bloch

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is responsible for altered acute and chronic workload as induced by exercise. Skeletal muscle adaptations range from immediate change of contractility to structural adaptation to adjust the demanded performance capacities. These processes are regulated by mechanically and metabolically induced signaling pathways, which are more or less involved in all of these regulations. Nitric oxide is one of the central signaling molecules involved in functional and structural adaption in different cell types. It is mainly produced by nitric oxide synthases (NOS and by non-enzymatic pathways also in skeletal muscle. The relevance of a NOS-dependent NO signaling in skeletal muscle is underlined by the differential subcellular expression of NOS1, NOS2, and NOS3, and the alteration of NO production provoked by changes of workload. In skeletal muscle, a variety of highly relevant tasks to maintain skeletal muscle integrity and proper signaling mechanisms during adaptation processes towards mechanical and metabolic stimulations are taken over by NO signaling. The NO signaling can be mediated by cGMP-dependent and -independent signaling, such as S-nitrosylation-dependent modulation of effector molecules involved in contractile and metabolic adaptation to exercise. In this review, we describe the most recent findings of NO signaling in skeletal muscle with a special emphasis on exercise conditions. However, to gain a more detailed understanding of the complex role of NO signaling for functional adaptation of skeletal muscle (during exercise, additional sophisticated studies are needed to provide deeper insights into NO-mediated signaling and the role of non-enzymatic-derived NO in skeletal muscle physiology.

  7. Mechanisms of cell signaling by nitric oxide and peroxynitrite: from mitochondria to MAP kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levonen, A. L.; Patel, R. P.; Brookes, P.; Go, Y. M.; Jo, H.; Parthasarathy, S.; Anderson, P. G.; Darley-Usmar, V. M.

    2001-01-01

    Many of the biological and pathological effects of nitric oxide (NO) are mediated through cell signaling pathways that are initiated by NO reacting with metalloproteins. More recently, it has been recognized that the reaction of NO with free radicals such as superoxide and the lipid peroxyl radical also has the potential to modulate redox signaling. Although it is clear that NO can exert both cytotoxic and cytoprotective actions, the focus of this overview are those reactions that could lead to protection of the cell against oxidative stress in the vasculature. This will include the induction of antioxidant defenses such as glutathione, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in response to blood flow, and modulation of mitochondrial function and its impact on apoptosis. Models are presented that show the increased synthesis of glutathione in response to shear stress and inhibition of cytochrome c release from mitochondria. It appears that in the vasculature NO-dependent signaling pathways are of three types: (i) those involving NO itself, leading to modulation of mitochondrial respiration and soluble guanylate cyclase; (ii) those that involve S-nitrosation, including inhibition of caspases; and (iii) autocrine signaling that involves the intracellular formation of peroxynitrite and the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases. Taken together, NO plays a major role in the modulation of redox cell signaling through a number of distinct pathways in a cellular setting.

  8. Nitric oxide coordinates cell proliferation and cell movements during early development of Xenopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peunova, Natalia; Scheinker, Vladimir; Ravi, Kandasamy; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2007-12-15

    The establishment of a vertebrate body plan during embryogenesis is achieved through precise coordination of cell proliferation and morphogenetic cell movements. Here we show that nitric oxide (NO) suppresses cell division and facilitates cell movements during early development of Xenopus, such that inhibition of NO synthase (NOS) increases proliferation in the neuroectoderm and suppresses convergent extension in the axial mesoderm and neuroectoderm. NO controls cell division and cell movement through two separate signaling pathways. Both rely on RhoA-ROCK signaling but can be distinguished by the involvement of either guanylate cyclase or the planar cell polarity regulator Dishevelled. Through the cGMP-dependent pathway, NO suppresses cell division by negatively regulating RhoA and controlling the nuclear distribution of ROCK and p21WAF1. Through the cGMP-independent pathway, NO facilitates cell movement by regulating the intracellular distribution and level of Dishevelled and the activity of RhoA, thereby controlling the activity of ROCK and regulating actin cytoskeleton remodeling and cell polarization. Concurrent control by NO helps ensure that the crucial processes of cell proliferation and morphogenetic movements are coordinated during early development.

  9. Mechanisms of cell signaling by nitric oxide and peroxynitrite: from mitochondria to MAP kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levonen, A. L.; Patel, R. P.; Brookes, P.; Go, Y. M.; Jo, H.; Parthasarathy, S.; Anderson, P. G.; Darley-Usmar, V. M.

    2001-01-01

    Many of the biological and pathological effects of nitric oxide (NO) are mediated through cell signaling pathways that are initiated by NO reacting with metalloproteins. More recently, it has been recognized that the reaction of NO with free radicals such as superoxide and the lipid peroxyl radical also has the potential to modulate redox signaling. Although it is clear that NO can exert both cytotoxic and cytoprotective actions, the focus of this overview are those reactions that could lead to protection of the cell against oxidative stress in the vasculature. This will include the induction of antioxidant defenses such as glutathione, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in response to blood flow, and modulation of mitochondrial function and its impact on apoptosis. Models are presented that show the increased synthesis of glutathione in response to shear stress and inhibition of cytochrome c release from mitochondria. It appears that in the vasculature NO-dependent signaling pathways are of three types: (i) those involving NO itself, leading to modulation of mitochondrial respiration and soluble guanylate cyclase; (ii) those that involve S-nitrosation, including inhibition of caspases; and (iii) autocrine signaling that involves the intracellular formation of peroxynitrite and the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases. Taken together, NO plays a major role in the modulation of redox cell signaling through a number of distinct pathways in a cellular setting.

  10. Sport physiology, dopamine and nitric oxide - Some speculations and hypothesis generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landers, J G; Esch, Tobias

    2015-12-01

    Elite Spanish professional soccer players surprisingly showed a preponderance of an allele coding for nitric oxide synthase (NOS) that resulted in lower nitric oxide (NO) compared with Spanish endurance and power athletes and sedentary men. The present paper attempts a speculative explanation. Soccer is an "externally-paced" (EP) sport and team work dependent, requiring "executive function skills". We accept that time interval estimation skill is, in part, also an executive skill. Dopamine (DA) is prominent among the neurotransmitters with a role in such skills. Polymorphisms affecting dopamine (especially DRD2/ANKK1-Taq1a which leads to lower density of dopamine D2 receptors in the striatum, leading to increased striatal dopamine synthesis) and COMT val 158 met (which prolongs the action of dopamine in the cortex) feature both in the time interval estimation and the executive skills literatures. Our paper may be a pioneering attempt to stimulate empirical efforts to show how genotypes among soccer players may be connected via neurotransmitters to certain cognitive abilities that predict sporting success, perhaps also in some other externally-paced team sports. Graphing DA levels against time interval estimation accuracy and also against certain executive skills reveals an inverted-U relationship. A pathway from DA, via endogenous morphine and mu3 receptors on endothelia, to the generation of NO in tiny quantities has been demonstrated. Exercise up-regulates DA and this pathway. With somewhat excessive exercise, negative feedback from NO down-regulates DA, hypothetically keeping it near the peak of the inverted-U. Other research, not yet done on higher animals or humans, shows NO "fine-tuning" movement. We speculate that Caucasian men, playing soccer recreationally, would exemplify the above pattern and their nitric oxide synthase (NOS) would reflect the norm of their community, whereas professional players of soccer and perhaps other EP sports, with DA boosted by

  11. Nitric oxide as a carcinogen. Analysis by yeast functional assay of inactivating p53 mutations induced by nitric oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Jun-Ichi; Tada, Mitsuhiro; Sawamura, Yutaka; Shinohe, Yumiko; Abe, Hiroshi [Laboratory for Molecular Brain Research, Department of Neurosurgery, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Iggo, Richard D. [Oncogene group, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research ISREC, Epalinges (Switzerland)

    1997-10-06

    We have used a yeast p53 functional assay to study induction of mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene by nitric oxide and cytosine methylation. The yeast assay identifies only biologically important p53 mutations. p53 cDNA was treated with the nitric oxide donor sydnonimine, PCR-amplified and transfected into yeast. Sydnonimine produced a significant, dose-dependent increase in C:G->A:T transversions. Many important p53 mutational hotspots are postulated to arise by deamination of methylCpG in tumors. We therefore examined nitric oxide induction of mutations in p53 cDNA methylated by PCR-mediated substitution of 5-methylcytosine for cytosine or by treatment with the SssI CpG methylase. Both methylation procedures increased the baseline mutation rate, and nitric oxide treatment produced a further increase in mutation yield. Sequence analysis showed that methylation alone led to C:G->T:A transitions, whereas nitric oxide treatment simply produced more C:G->A:T transversions. Thus the most important factor in C:G->T:A transition at CpG sites identified in this experimental system is cytosine methylation, consistent with spontaneous conversion of 5-methylcytosine to thymine by deamination

  12. Pain modulation by nitric oxide in the spinal cord.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurelio M Freire

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a versatile messenger molecule first associated with endothelial relaxing effects. In the central nervous system (CNS, NO synthesis is primarily triggered by activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors and has a Janus face, with both beneficial and harmful properties, depending on concentration and the identity of its synthetic enzyme isoform. There are three isoforms of the NO synthesizing enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS: neuronal (nNOS, endothelial (eNOS, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, each one involved with specific events in the brain. In CNS, nNOS is involved with modulation of synaptic transmission through long-term potentiation in several regions, including nociceptive circuits in the spinal cord. Here, we review the role played by NO on central pain sensitization.

  13. Photochemical reactions of neptunium in nitric acid solution containing photocatalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukasawa, Tetsuo; Kawamura, Fumio (Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan). Energy Research Lab.)

    1991-01-01

    Photochemical oxidation and reduction behaviors of neptunium were preliminarily investigated in 3 mol/l nitric acid solution. Nitric acid of 3 mol/l simulated the high level waste solution from a spent fuel reprocessing process. Concentrations of Np(V), Np(VI) and nitrous acid were determined with a photospectrometer, and solution potential with an electrode. Without additives, Np(VI) was reduced to Np(V) by nitrous acid which was photolytically generated from nitric acid. With a scavenger for nitrous acid, Np(V) was oxidized to extractable Np(VI) by a photolytically generated oxidizing reagent which were predicted by the solution potential measurement. The reduction rate was higher than the oxidation rate because of the larger quantity and higher reactivity of nitrous acid than an oxidizing reagent. Photocatalyst was proved to be effective for the oxidation of Np(V) to Np(VI). (author).

  14. Nitric oxide: an intermediate in nitrate reduction in Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Abdulla, J.M.; Aleem, M.I.H.

    1977-01-01

    When K. pneumoniae cells were grown anaerobically with nitrate as the final electron acceptor, there was a rapid reduction of nitrate to nitrite. The latter was further reduced to hydroxylamine and finally to ammonia. Nitrate, nitrite and nitric oxide, but not nitrous oxide, could accept electrons from the respiratory chain. During growth of the organism it was possible to trap nitric oxide with alkaline permanganate. The trapped gas represented only a small portion of the reduced electron acceptor. It would appear that a major portion of nitric oxide produced from nitrite reduction must be converted to an unknown nitrogenous intermediate with an oxidation state of +1 before its reduction to hydroxylamine. The possible nature of this elusive intermediate should be discussed.

  15. Nitric Oxide in Astrocyte-Neuron Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Nianzhen [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Astrocytes, a subtype of glial cell, have recently been shown to exhibit Ca2+ elevations in response to neurotransmitters. A Ca2+ elevation can propagate to adjacent astrocytes as a Ca2+ wave, which allows an astrocyte to communicate with its neighbors. Additionally, glutamate can be released from astrocytes via a Ca2+-dependent mechanism, thus modulating neuronal activity and synaptic transmission. In this dissertation, the author investigated the roles of another endogenous signal, nitric oxide (NO), in astrocyte-neuron signaling. First the author tested if NO is generated during astrocytic Ca2+ signaling by imaging NO in purified murine cortical astrocyte cultures. Physiological concentrations of a natural messenger, ATP, caused a Ca2+-dependent NO production. To test the roles of NO in astrocytic Ca2+ signaling, the author applied NO to astrocyte cultures via addition of a NO donor, S-nitrosol-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP). NO induced an influx of external Ca2+, possibly through store-operated Ca2+ channels. The NO-induced Ca2+ signaling is cGMP-independent since 8-Br-cGMP, an agonistic analog of cGMP, did not induce a detectable Ca2+ change. The consequence of this NO-induced Ca2+ influx was assessed by simultaneously monitoring of cytosolic and internal store Ca2+ using fluorescent Ca2+ indicators x-rhod-1 and mag-fluo-4. Blockage of NO signaling with the NO scavenger PTIO significantly reduced the refilling percentage of internal stores following ATP-induced Ca2+ release, suggesting that NO modulates internal store refilling. Furthermore, locally photo-release of NO to a single astrocyte led to a Ca2+ elevation in the stimulated astrocyte and a subsequent Ca2+ wave to neighbors. Finally, the author tested the role of NO inglutamate-mediated astrocyte-neuron signaling by

  16. Nitric Oxide in Astrocyte-Neuron Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nianzhen Li

    2002-06-27

    Astrocytes, a subtype of glial cell, have recently been shown to exhibit Ca{sup 2+} elevations in response to neurotransmitters. A Ca{sup 2+} elevation can propagate to adjacent astrocytes as a Ca{sup 2+} wave, which allows an astrocyte to communicate with its neighbors. Additionally, glutamate can be released from astrocytes via a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent mechanism, thus modulating neuronal activity and synaptic transmission. In this dissertation, the author investigated the roles of another endogenous signal, nitric oxide (NO), in astrocyte-neuron signaling. First the author tested if NO is generated during astrocytic Ca{sup 2+} signaling by imaging NO in purified murine cortical astrocyte cultures. Physiological concentrations of a natural messenger, ATP, caused a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent NO production. To test the roles of NO in astrocytic Ca{sup 2+} signaling, the author applied NO to astrocyte cultures via addition of a NO donor, S-nitrosol-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP). NO induced an influx of external Ca{sup 2+}, possibly through store-operated Ca{sup 2+} channels. The NO-induced Ca{sup 2+} signaling is cGMP-independent since 8-Br-cGMP, an agonistic analog of cGMP, did not induce a detectable Ca{sup 2+} change. The consequence of this NO-induced Ca{sup 2+} influx was assessed by simultaneously monitoring of cytosolic and internal store Ca{sup 2+} using fluorescent Ca{sup 2+} indicators x-rhod-1 and mag-fluo-4. Blockage of NO signaling with the NO scavenger PTIO significantly reduced the refilling percentage of internal stores following ATP-induced Ca{sup 2+} release, suggesting that NO modulates internal store refilling. Furthermore, locally photo-release of NO to a single astrocyte led to a Ca{sup 2+} elevation in the stimulated astrocyte and a subsequent Ca{sup 2+} wave to neighbors. Finally, the author tested the role of NO inglutamate-mediated astrocyte-neuron signaling by recording the astrocyte-evoked glutamate-dependent neuronal slow inward current (SIC

  17. Light activated nitric oxide releasing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muizzi Casanas, Dayana Andreina

    The ability to control the location and dosage of biologically active molecules inside the human body can be critical to maximizing effective treatment of cardiovascular diseases like angina. The current standard of treatment relies on the metabolism of organonitrate drugs into nitric oxide (NO), which are not specific, and also show problems with densitization with long-term use. There is a need then to create a treatment method that gives targeted release of NO. Metal-nitrosyl (M-NO) complexes can be used for delivery of NO since the release of NO can be controlled with light. However, the NO-releasing drug must be activated with red light to ensure maximum penetration of light through tissue. However, the release of NO from M-NO complexes with red-light activation is a significant challenge since the energy required to break the metal-NO bond is usually larger than the energy provided by red light. The goal of this project was to create red- sensitive, NO-releasing materials based on Ru-salen-nitrosyl compounds. Our approach was to first modify Ru salen complexes to sensitize the photochemistry for release of NO after red light irradiation. Next, we pursued polymerization of the Ru-salen complexes. We report the synthesis and quantitative photochemical characterization of a series of ruthenium salen nitrosyl complexes. These complexes were modified by incorporating electron donating groups in the salen ligand structure at key locations to increase electron density on the Ru. Complexes with either an --OH or --OCH3 substituent showed an improvement in the quantum yield of release of NO upon blue light irradiation compared to the unmodified salen. These --OH and --OCH3 complexes were also sensitized for NO release after red light activation, however the red-sensitive complexes were unstable and showed ligand substitution on the order of minutes. The substituted complexes remained sensitive for NO release, but only after blue light irradiation. The Ru

  18. Thyroid disorders and nitric oxide in cardiovascular adaptation to hypovolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogonowski, Natalia; Piro, Giselle; Pessah, Déborah; Arreche, Noelia; Puchulu, Bernardita; Balaszczuk, Ana M; Fellet, Andrea L

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether nitric oxide participates in the cardiovascular function and haemodynamic adaptation to acute haemorrhage in animals with thyroid disorders. Sprague-Dawley rats aged 2months old treated with T3 (hyper, 20μg/100g body weight) or 0.02% methimazole (hypo, w/v) during 28days were pre-treated with N(G) nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and submitted to 20% blood loss. Heart function was evaluated by echocardiography. Measurements of arterial blood pressure, heart rate, nitric oxide synthase activity and protein levels were performed. We found that hypo decreased fractional shortening and ejection fraction and increased left ventricle internal diameter. Hyper decreased ventricle diameter and no changes in cardiac contractility. Haemorrhage elicited a hypotension of similar magnitude within 10min. Then, this parameter was stabilized at about 30-40min and maintained until finalized, 120min. L-NAME rats showed that the immediate hypotension would be independent of nitric oxide. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition blunted the changes of heart rate induced by blood loss. Hyper and hypo had lower atrial enzyme activity associated with a decreased enzyme isoform in hypo. In ventricle, hyper and hypo had a higher enzyme activity, which was not correlated with changes in protein levels. Haemorrhage induced an increased heart nitric oxide production. We concluded that thyroid disorders were associated with hypertrophic remodelling which impacted differently on cardiac function and its adaptation to a hypovolemia. Hypovolemia triggered a nitric oxide synthase activation modulating the heart function to maintain haemodynamic homeostasis. This involvement depends on a specific enzyme isoform, cardiac chamber and thyroid state.

  19. Exhaled nitric oxide in 4-year-old children : relationship with asthma and atopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brussee, JE; Smit, HA; Kerkhof, M; Koopman, LP; Wijga, AH; Postma, DS; Gerritsen, J; Grobee, DE; Brunekreef, B; De Jongste, JC

    Airway inflammation is an early feature of asthma. Early detection and antiinflammatory treatment may have important therapeutic impact. Exhaled nitric oxide is a noninvasive marker of airway inflammation. The current study investigated the association between exhaled nitric oxide and asthma,

  20. Exhaled nitric oxide in 4-year-old children: relationship with asthma and atopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brussee, J.E.; Smit, H.A.; Kerkhof, M.; Koopman, L.P.; Wijga, A.H.; Postma, D.S.; Gerritsen, J.; Grobbee, D.E.; Brunekreef, B.; Jongste, J.C. de

    2005-01-01

    Airway inflammation is an early feature of asthma. Early detection and antiinflammatory treatment may have important therapeutic impact. Exhaled nitric oxide is a noninvasive marker of airway inflammation. The current study investigated the association between exhaled nitric oxide and asthma,

  1. Elevated exhaled nitric oxide in high-risk neonates precedes transient early but not persistent wheeze

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chawes, Bo L K; Buchvald, Frederik; Bischoff, Anne Louise;

    2010-01-01

    Elevated fractional exhaled nitric oxide (Fe(NO)) concentration has been suggested to predict early childhood wheeze and sensitization.......Elevated fractional exhaled nitric oxide (Fe(NO)) concentration has been suggested to predict early childhood wheeze and sensitization....

  2. Nitric oxide switches on glycolysis through the AMP protein kinase and 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida Parra, Ángeles; Moncada, Salvador; Bolaños Hernández, Juan Pedro

    2004-01-01

    El óxido nítrico activa la glucolisis en los astrocitos a través de una cascada de señalización en la que interviene la AMP kinasa, que fosforila (y activa) la fosfofructokinasa-2, enzima responsable de la biosíntesis de fructosa-2, 6-bisfosfato, efector alostérico positivo de la fosfofructokinasa-1. Este mecanismo es citoprotector.

  3. Production of nitric oxide using a microwave plasma torch and its application to fungal cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Young Ho; Kumar, Naresh; Kang, Min-Ho; Cho, Guang Sup; Choi, Eun Ha; Park, Gyungsoon; Uhm, Han Sup

    2015-03-01

    The generation of nitric oxide by a microwave plasma torch is proposed for its application to cell differentiation. A microwave plasma torch was developed based on basic kinetic theory. The analytical theory indicates that nitric oxide density is nearly proportional to oxygen molecular density and that the high-temperature flame is an effective means of generating nitric oxide. Experimental data pertaining to nitric oxide production are presented in terms of the oxygen input in units of cubic centimeters per minute. The apparent length of the torch flame increases as the oxygen input increases. The various levels of nitric oxide are observed depending on the flow rate of nitrogen gas, the mole fraction of oxygen gas, and the microwave power. In order to evaluate the potential of nitric oxide as an activator of cell differentiation, we applied nitric oxide generated from the microwave plasma torch to a model microbial cell (Neurospora crassa: non-pathogenic fungus). Germination and hyphal differentiation of fungal cells were not dramatically changed but there was a significant increase in spore formation after treatment with nitric oxide. In addition, the expression level of a sporulation related gene acon-3 was significantly elevated after 24 h upon nitric oxide treatment. Increase in the level of nitric oxide, nitrite and nitrate in water after nitric oxide treatment seems to be responsible for activation of fungal sporulation. Our results suggest that nitric oxide generated by plasma can be used as a possible activator of cell differentiation and development.

  4. Interleukin 1 beta induces diabetes and fever in normal rats by nitric oxide via induction of different nitric oxide synthases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimers, J I; Bjerre, U; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    1994-01-01

    Substantial in vitro evidence suggests that nitric oxide may be a major mediator of interleukin 1 (IL-1) induced pancreatic beta-cell inhibition and destruction in the initial events leading to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Using NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, an inhibitor of both......, glucagon, corticosterone and leukocyte- and differential-counts in normal rats injected once daily for 5 days with interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta) (0.8 microgram/rat = 4.0 micrograms/kg). Inhibition of both the constitutive and the inducible forms of nitric oxide synthase prevented IL-1 beta-induced fever...

  5. Inducible nitric oxide synthase in heart tissue and nitric oxide in serum of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected rhesus monkeys: association with heart injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Marcelo Espinola Carvalho

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The factors contributing to chronic Chagas' heart disease remain unknown. High nitric oxide (NO levels have been shown to be associated with cardiomyopathy severity in patients. Further, NO produced via inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS/NOS2 is proposed to play a role in Trypanosoma cruzi control. However, the participation of iNOS/NOS2 and NO in T. cruzi control and heart injury has been questioned. Here, using chronically infected rhesus monkeys and iNOS/NOS2-deficient (Nos2(-/- mice we explored the participation of iNOS/NOS2-derived NO in heart injury in T. cruzi infection. METHODOLOGY: Rhesus monkeys and C57BL/6 and Nos2(-/- mice were infected with the Colombian T. cruzi strain. Parasite DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction, T. cruzi antigens and iNOS/NOS2(+ cells were immunohistochemically detected in heart sections and NO levels in serum were determined by Griess reagent. Heart injury was assessed by electrocardiogram (ECG, echocardiogram (ECHO, creatine kinase heart isoenzyme (CK-MB activity levels in serum and connexin 43 (Cx43 expression in the cardiac tissue. RESULTS: Chronically infected monkeys presented conduction abnormalities, cardiac inflammation and fibrosis, which resembled the spectrum of human chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC. Importantly, chronic myocarditis was associated with parasite persistence. Moreover, Cx43 loss and increased CK-MB activity levels were primarily correlated with iNOS/NOS2(+ cells infiltrating the cardiac tissue and NO levels in serum. Studies in Nos2(-/- mice reinforced that the iNOS/NOS2-NO pathway plays a pivotal role in T. cruzi-elicited cardiomyocyte injury and in conduction abnormalities that were associated with Cx43 loss in the cardiac tissue. CONCLUSION: T. cruzi-infected rhesus monkeys reproduce features of CCC. Moreover, our data support that in T. cruzi infection persistent parasite-triggered iNOS/NOS2 in the cardiac tissue and NO overproduction might contribute

  6. Inducible nitric oxide synthase in heart tissue and nitric oxide in serum of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected rhesus monkeys: association with heart injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Marcelo Espinola Carvalho

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The factors contributing to chronic Chagas' heart disease remain unknown. High nitric oxide (NO levels have been shown to be associated with cardiomyopathy severity in patients. Further, NO produced via inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS/NOS2 is proposed to play a role in Trypanosoma cruzi control. However, the participation of iNOS/NOS2 and NO in T. cruzi control and heart injury has been questioned. Here, using chronically infected rhesus monkeys and iNOS/NOS2-deficient (Nos2(-/- mice we explored the participation of iNOS/NOS2-derived NO in heart injury in T. cruzi infection. METHODOLOGY: Rhesus monkeys and C57BL/6 and Nos2(-/- mice were infected with the Colombian T. cruzi strain. Parasite DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction, T. cruzi antigens and iNOS/NOS2(+ cells were immunohistochemically detected in heart sections and NO levels in serum were determined by Griess reagent. Heart injury was assessed by electrocardiogram (ECG, echocardiogram (ECHO, creatine kinase heart isoenzyme (CK-MB activity levels in serum and connexin 43 (Cx43 expression in the cardiac tissue. RESULTS: Chronically infected monkeys presented conduction abnormalities, cardiac inflammation and fibrosis, which resembled the spectrum of human chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC. Importantly, chronic myocarditis was associated with parasite persistence. Moreover, Cx43 loss and increased CK-MB activity levels were primarily correlated with iNOS/NOS2(+ cells infiltrating the cardiac tissue and NO levels in serum. Studies in Nos2(-/- mice reinforced that the iNOS/NOS2-NO pathway plays a pivotal role in T. cruzi-elicited cardiomyocyte injury and in conduction abnormalities that were associated with Cx43 loss in the cardiac tissue. CONCLUSION: T. cruzi-infected rhesus monkeys reproduce features of CCC. Moreover, our data support that in T. cruzi infection persistent parasite-triggered iNOS/NOS2 in the cardiac tissue and NO overproduction might contribute

  7. Familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 does not share hypersensitivity to nitric oxide with common types of migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J.M.; Thomsen, L.L.; Marconi, R.

    2008-01-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 (FHM-2) and common types of migraine show phenotypic similarities which may indicate a common neurobiological background. The nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO-cGMP) pathway plays a crucial role in migraine pathophysiology. Therefore, we tested...... and area under the curve (AUC) for headache score during an immediate phase (0-120 min) and a delayed phase (2-14 h) after start of infusion. We found no difference in the incidence of reported migraine between FHM-2 patients, 25% (two out of eight), and controls, 0% (0 out of nine) (95% confidence......(VmeanMCA) (P = 0.77) or AUC(STA) (P = 0.53) between FHM-2 patients and controls. GTN infusion failed to induce more migraine in FHM-2 patients than in controls. The pathophysiological pathways underlying migraine headache in FHM-2 may be different from the common types of migraine Udgivelsesdato: 2008/4...

  8. Comparison the effects of nitric oxide and spermidin pretreatment on alleviation of salt stress in chamomile plant (Matricaria recutita L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazelian Nasrin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Salt stress is an important environmental stress that produces reactive oxygen species in plants and causes oxidative injuries. In this investigation, salt stress reduced the shoot and root length, while increased the content of malondealdehyde, Hydrogen peroxide, and the activity of Ascorbate peroxidase andguaiacol peroxidase. Pretreatment of chamomile plants under salt stress with sodium nitroprussideand Spermidin caused enhancement of growth parameters and reduction of malondealdehyde and Hydrogen peroxide content. Pretreatment of plants with sodium nitroprusside remarkably increased Ascorbate peroxidase activity, while Spermidin pre-treatment significantly increased guaiacol peroxidase activity. Application of sodium nitroprusside or Spermidin with Methylene blue which is known to block cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling pathway, reduced the protective effects of sodium nitroprussideand Spermidin in plants under salinity condition. The result of this study indicated that Methylene blue could partially and entirely abolish the protective effect of Nitric oxide on some physiological parameter. Methylene blue also has could reduce the alleviation effect of Spermidin on some of parameters in chamomile plant under salt stress, so with comparing the results of this study it seems that Spermidin probably acts through Nitric oxide pathway, but the use of 2-4- carboxyphenyl- 4,4,5,5- tetramethyl-imidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide is better to prove.

  9. Effects of Nephritis No. 3 Recipe on Nitric Oxide, Nitric Oxide Synthase Secreted by Cultured Mesangial Cells in Rats and the Gene Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈志强; 黄怀鹏; 黄文政; 朱小棣; 林清棋

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of the Nephritis No. 3 (N-3) recipe on nitric oxide (NO),nitric oxide synthase (NOS) secreted by cultured mesangial cells (MC) and its gene expression of the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Methods: The drug (nephritis No. 3)-containing serum was prepared with serum pharmacological technique, and then was applied to react on mesangial cells cultured in fetal calf serum (FCS) and cells cultured in FCS plus lipopolysaccharide. To observe the secretion of NO and NOS and the gene expression of iNOS by means of RT-PCR. Results: Under the two kinds of culture conditions, the content of NO and NOS in the groups with drug-containing serum were higher than those without drug-containing serum (P<0.05, P<0.01), and the expression of iNOS mRNA was up-regulated too. Conclusion: The N-3 could significantly promote the secretion of NO and NOS and the mRNA expression of iNOS in rats.

  10. Nitric oxide affects sarcoplasmic calcium release in skeletal myotubes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heunks, L.M.A.; Machiels, H.A.; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.; Prakash, Y.S.; Sieck, G.C.

    2001-01-01

    In the present study, we used real-time confocal microscopy to examine the effects of two nitric oxide (NO) donors on acetylcholine (ACh; 10 microM)- and caffeine (10 mM)-induced intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) responses in C2C12 mouse skeletal myotubes. We hypothesized that NO reduces

  11. NITRIC OXIDE INTERFERES WITH HYPOXIA SIGNALING DURING COLONIC INFLAMMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Rabelo e Paiva CARIA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Context Intestinal inflammation can induce a local reduction in oxygen levels that triggers an adaptive response centered on the expression of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs. Nitric oxide, a well-described inflammatory mediator, may interfere with hypoxia signaling. Objectives We aimed to evaluate the role of nitric oxide in hypoxia signaling during colonic inflammation. Methods Colitis was induced by single (acute or repeated (reactivated colitis trinitrobenzenosulfonic acid administration in rats. In addition, one group of rats with reactivated colitis was also treated with Nw-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride to block nitric oxide synthase. Colitis was assessed by macroscopic score and myeloperoxidase activity in the colon samples. Hypoxia was determined using the oxygen-dependent probe, pimonidazole. The expression of HIF-1α and HIF-induced factors (vascular endothelial growth factor - VEGF and apelin was assessed using Western blotting. Results The single or repeated administration of trinitrobenzenosulfonic acid to rats induced colitis which was characterized by a high macroscopic score and myeloperoxidase activity. Hypoxia was observed with both protocols. During acute colitis, HIF-1α expression was not increased, but VEGF and apelin were increased. HIF-1α expression was inhibited during reactivated colitis, and VEGF and apelin were not increased. Nw-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride blockade during reactivated colitis restored HIF-1α, VEGF and apelin expression. Conclusions Nitric oxide could interfere with hypoxia signaling during reactivated colitis inflammation modifying the expression of proteins regulated by HIF-1α.

  12. Nitric oxide and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity of the lung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, I. van der

    2006-01-01

    The single breath diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) is measure for gas uptake by the lung, and consists of a membrane and a vascular component. Nitric oxide (NO) binds 400 times faster to hemoglobin than carbon monoxide, thus the uptake of NO by the blood is very large.

  13. The levels of nitric oxide in megaloblastic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emin Kaya

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between nitric oxide degradation products (nitrate and nitrite levels and megaloblastic anemia which is treated with cyalocobalamin. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 patients with megaloblastic anemia (16 Male, 14 Female were included in the study. Cyanocobalamin was administered (1.000 µg/day intramuscularly until the reticulocyte crisis occurred to the normal range. The control group consisted of 30 healthy subjects (15 Male, 15 Female. Nitric oxide levels were measured before treatment and compared with the values obtained during peak reticulocyte count. Results: Plasma direct nitrite, total nitrite and nitrate levels were 24,86±3,87, 60.56±7,01 and 36,02±5,24 in before treatment versus 15,48±3,05, 38,92±6,44 and 22,77±6,04 μmol/dl in after treatment, respectively. Plasma direct nitrite, total nitrite and nitrate levels were significantly lower in after treatment compared with the before treatment (p<0.001. Conclusion: Nitric oxide levels are seen to increase in megaloblastic anemia. This study suggested that abnormalities in the nitric oxide levels in megaloblastic anemia are restored by vitamin B12 replacement therapy.

  14. Simulated dry deposition of nitric acid near forest edges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeJong, JJM; Klaassen, W; Jong, J.J.M. de

    1997-01-01

    Dry deposition is simulated to understand and generalize observations of enhanced deposition of air pollution near forest edges. Nitric acid is taken as an example as its deposition velocity is often assumed to be determined by turbulent transport only. The simulations are based on the micro-meteoro

  15. Arginine, citrulline and nitric oxide metabolism in sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arginine has vasodilatory effects, via its conversion by nitric oxide (NO) synthase into NO, and immunomodulatory actions that play important roles in sepsis. Protein breakdown affects arginine availability, and the release of asymmetric dimethylarginine, an inhibitor of NO synthase, may therefore a...

  16. Water vapour and carbon dioxide decrease nitric oxide readings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanderMark, TW; Kort, E; Meijer, RJ; Postma, DS; Koeter, GH

    Measurement of nitric oxide levels in exhaled ah-is commonly performed using a chemiluminescence detector. However, water vapour and carbon dioxide affect the chemiluminescence process, The influence of these gases at the concentrations present in exhaled air has not vet been studied. For this in

  17. Deficiency of nitric oxide in polycation-induced airway hyperreactivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meurs, Herman; Schuurman, F.E; Duyvendak, M; Zaagsma, Hans

    1999-01-01

    Using a perfused guinea-pig tracheal tube preparation, we investigated the role of endogenous nitric oxide (NO) in polycation-induced airway hyperreactivity (AHR) to methacholine. Intraluminal (IL) administration of the NO synthase inhibitor N-omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 100 mu M) c

  18. Evaluation of serum nitric oxide before and after local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hoda Aly Abd-El Moety

    2012-10-06

    Oct 6, 2012 ... Chronic hepatitis C virus is one of the main risk factors for the development of. Hepatocellular carcinoma ... either sub-Saharan Africa or in eastern Asia.1,2 Risk factors that lead to the ..... Yuen Man-Fung, Lai Ching-Lung. Serological .... Nitric oxide of human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines promotes ...

  19. Apple fruit responses following exposure to nitric oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exogenous nitric oxide (.NO) applied as gas or generated from .NO releasing compounds has physiological activity in cut apple fruit tissues. Studies were conducted to characterize .NO production by whole fruit as well as to assess responses of whole fruit to exogenous .NO. .NO and ethylene product...

  20. Cross sections for electron collisions with nitric oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itikawa, Yukikazu

    2016-09-01

    Cross section data are reviewed for electron collisions with nitric oxide. Collision processes considered are total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational, vibrational, and electronic states, ionization, and dissociative electron attachment. After a survey of the literature (up to the end of 2015), recommended values of the cross section are determined, as far as possible.

  1. Generation of nitric oxide from nitrite by carbonic anhydrase:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aamand, Rasmus; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Jensen, Frank Bo;

    2009-01-01

    bicarbonate and nitrite, we hypothesized that CA uses nitrite as a substrate to produce the potent vasodilator nitric oxide (NO) to increase local blood flow to metabolically active tissues. Here we show that CA readily reacts with nitrite to generate NO, particularly at low pH, and that the NO produced...

  2. On EPR detection of nitric oxide in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Faassen, E.E.H.

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO ) is a peculiar radical: Ground state is not paramagnetic (g = 0 since orbital and spin magnetic moments cancel); low reactivity with other molecules except superoxide (O2 ); thermodynamically unstable; dimerizes to N2O2; difficult to detect in-vivo.

  3. Nitric oxide as a potent fumigant for postharvest pest control

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is a great demand for safe and effective alternative fumigants to replace methyl bromide and other toxic fumigants for pest control. Nitric oxide, a common signal molecule in biological systems, was found to be effective and safe to control insects under ultralow oxygen conditions. Fumigatio...

  4. Nitric oxide and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity of the lung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, I. van der

    2006-01-01

    The single breath diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) is measure for gas uptake by the lung, and consists of a membrane and a vascular component. Nitric oxide (NO) binds 400 times faster to hemoglobin than carbon monoxide, thus the uptake of NO by the blood is very large. There

  5. Inhibition of influenza virus replication by nitric oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); M.M.J.W. Baars (Marianne); P. de Lijster; R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractNitric oxide (NO) has been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of influenza virus-induced pneumonia in mouse models. Here we show that replication of influenza A and B viruses in Mabin Darby canine kidney cells is severely impaired by the NO donor,

  6. Effects of glucocorticoid dexamethasone on serum nitric oxide synthase activity and nitric oxide levels in a rat model of lung disease-induced brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huajun Li; Ligang Jiang; Meng Xia; Haiping Li; Fanhua Meng; Wei Li; Lifeng Liu; Zhaohui Wang

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of dexamethasone, pertussis toxin (a Gi protein inhibitor), and actinomycin (a transcription inhibitor) on serum nitric oxide synthase activity and nitric oxide content in a rat model of lung disease-induced brain injury. High-dose dexamethasone (13 mg/kg) and dexamethasone + actinomycin reduced lung water content, increased serum nitric oxide synthase activity and nitric oxide content, diminished inflammatory cell infiltration in pulmonary alveolar interstitium, attenuated meningeal vascular hyperemia, reduced glial cell infiltration, and decreased cerebral edema. These results demonstrate that high-dose glucocorticoid treatment can reduce the severity of lung disease-induced brain injury by increasing nitric oxide synthase activity and nitric oxide levels.

  7. Acute nitric oxide synthase inhibition and endothelin-1-dependent arterial pressure elevation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eRapoport

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Key evidence that endogenous nitric oxide (NO inhibits the continuous, endothelin (ET-1-mediated drive to elevate arterial pressure includes demonstrations that ET-1 mediates a significant component of the pressure elevated by acute exposure to NO synthase (NOS inhibitors. This review examines the characteristics of this pressure elevation in order to elucidate potential mechanisms associated with the negative regulation of ET-1 by NO and, thereby, provide potential insight into the vascular pathophysiology underlying NO dysregulation. We surmise that the magnitude of the ET-1-dependent component of the NOS inhibitor-elevated pressure is 1 independent of underlying arterial pressure and other pressor pathways activated by the NOS inhibitors and 2 dependent on relatively higher NOS inhibitor dose, release of stored and de novo synthesized ET-1, and ETA receptor-mediated increased vascular resistance. Major implications of these conclusions include: 1 the marked variation of the ET-1-dependent component, i.e., from 0-100% of the pressure elevation, reflects the NO-ET-1 regulatory pathway. Thus, NOS inhibitor-mediated, ET-1-dependent pressure elevation in vascular pathophysiologies is an indicator of the level of compromised/enhanced function of this pathway; 2 NO is a more potent inhibitor of ET-1-mediated elevated arterial pressure than other pressor pathways, due in part to inhibition of intravascular pressure-independent release of ET-1. Thus, the ET-1-dependent component of pressure elevation in vascular pathophysiologies associated with NO dysregulation is of greater magnitude at higher levels of compromised NO.

  8. Nitric oxide and pH modulation in gynaecological cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanhueza, Carlos; Araos, Joaquín; Naranjo, Luciano; Barros, Eric; Subiabre, Mario; Toledo, Fernando; Gutiérrez, Jaime; Chiarello, Delia I; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea; Sobrevia, Luis

    2016-12-01

    Nitric oxide plays several roles in cellular physiology, including control of the vascular tone and defence against pathogen infection. Neuronal, inducible and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms synthesize nitric oxide. Cells generate acid and base equivalents, whose physiological intracellular concentrations are kept due to membrane transport systems, including Na(+) /H(+) exchangers and Na(+) /HCO3(-) transporters, thus maintaining a physiological pH at the intracellular (~7.0) and extracellular (~7.4) medium. In several pathologies, including cancer, cells are exposed to an extracellular acidic microenvironment, and the role for these membrane transport mechanisms in this phenomenon is likely. As altered NOS expression and activity is seen in cancer cells and because this gas promotes a glycolytic phenotype leading to extracellular acidosis in gynaecological cancer cells, a pro-inflammatory microenvironment increasing inducible NOS expression in this cell type is feasible. However, whether abnormal control of intracellular and extracellular pH by cancer cells regards with their ability to synthesize or respond to nitric oxide is unknown. We, here, discuss a potential link between pH alterations, pH controlling membrane transport systems and NOS function. We propose a potential association between inducible NOS induction and Na(+) /H(+) exchanger expression and activity in human ovary cancer. A potentiation between nitric oxide generation and the maintenance of a low extracellular pH (i.e. acidic) is proposed to establish a sequence of events in ovarian cancer cells, thus preserving a pro-proliferative acidic tumour extracellular microenvironment. We suggest that pharmacological therapeutic targeting of Na(+) /H(+) exchangers and inducible NOS may have benefits in human epithelial ovarian cancer.

  9. Coordinate Properties of Nitric Oxide in Hemoglobin Solution Containing a Minimal Amount of Nitric Oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has a very important physiological function, and it is the unique small diffusible signaling molecule.When NO molecules bind to heme irons in α subunits in hemoglobin (Hb), they have two coordinate forms for Fe2+: one is 5-coordinate, and the other is 6-coordinate.However, there is only 6-coordinate for Fe2+ when NO molecules bind to heme irons in β subunits.When the amount of NO is at a minimal concentration, NO molecules mainly bind to α subunits.The results show that NO molecules do not transfer from heme irons of nitrosylhemoglobin (HbNO) to the thiol groups of Cysteine residues β93 (Cysβ93) to form s-nitrosohemoglobin (Hb-SNO) in the presence of minimal NO in hemoglobin solution.The presence of minimal NO in hemoglobin solution does not decrease the transportation of oxygen, but it does improve its transport ability.It is still under further research whether this mechanism is underlying in the therapy for the disease of cardiovascular system.

  10. Significance of nitric oxide synthases: Lessons from triple nitric oxide synthases null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Masato; Tanimoto, Akihide; Tamura, Masahito; Mukae, Hiroshi; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Otsuji, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is synthesized by three distinct NO synthases (neuronal, inducible, and endothelial NOSs), all of which are expressed in almost all tissues and organs in humans. The regulatory roles of NOSs in vivo have been investigated in pharmacological studies with non-selective NOS inhibitors. However, the specificity of the inhibitors continues to be an issue of debate, and the authentic significance of NOSs is still poorly understood. To address this issue, we generated mice in which all three NOS genes are completely disrupted. The triple NOSs null mice exhibited cardiovascular abnormalities, including hypertension, arteriosclerosis, myocardial infarction, cardiac hypertrophy, diastolic heart failure, and reduced EDHF responses, with a shorter survival. The triple NOSs null mice also displayed metabolic abnormalities, including metabolic syndrome and high-fat diet-induced severe dyslipidemia. Furthermore, the triple NOSs null mice showed renal abnormalities (nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and pathological renal remodeling), lung abnormalities (accelerated pulmonary fibrosis), and bone abnormalities (increased bone mineral density and bone turnover). These results provide evidence that NOSs play pivotal roles in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of disorders. This review summarizes the latest knowledge on the significance of NOSs in vivo, based on lessons learned from experiments with our triple mutant model.

  11. Discovery of nitric oxide in marine ecological system and the chemical characteristics of nitric oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhengbin; XING Lei; WU Zhenzhen; LIU Chunying; LIN Cai; LIU Liansheng

    2006-01-01

    Nitric oxide was discovered in both the lab and the alga culture pond of Daya Bay (1-300 m3) before the growth of alga reached the maximum. The results included: (1) NO was detectd before the growth of alga reached the maximum in the case of red tide alga and food alga, and the concentration of NO decreased rapidly after the growth maximum; (2) the curve between NO concentration and time indicated that the concentration of NO in the daytime was more than that at night,and the maximal concentration of NO appeared in the midday (1-3 pm); (3) the growth of alga reached the maximum in the alga culture pond of Daya Bay in about 8- 10 d, and NO was discovered in 5-7 d; (4) the measured NO concentration was 10-9 mol/L, 10-9-10-8 mol/L, and 10-8 mol/L for Haeterosigma akashiwo, mixed alga in Daya Bay and Chaetoceros Curvisetus individually; (5) the relation of illumination with NO production was discussed.

  12. Significance of nitric oxide synthases: Lessons from triple nitric oxide synthases null mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Tsutsui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is synthesized by three distinct NO synthases (neuronal, inducible, and endothelial NOSs, all of which are expressed in almost all tissues and organs in humans. The regulatory roles of NOSs in vivo have been investigated in pharmacological studies with non-selective NOS inhibitors. However, the specificity of the inhibitors continues to be an issue of debate, and the authentic significance of NOSs is still poorly understood. To address this issue, we generated mice in which all three NOS genes are completely disrupted. The triple NOSs null mice exhibited cardiovascular abnormalities, including hypertension, arteriosclerosis, myocardial infarction, cardiac hypertrophy, diastolic heart failure, and reduced EDHF responses, with a shorter survival. The triple NOSs null mice also displayed metabolic abnormalities, including metabolic syndrome and high-fat diet-induced severe dyslipidemia. Furthermore, the triple NOSs null mice showed renal abnormalities (nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and pathological renal remodeling, lung abnormalities (accelerated pulmonary fibrosis, and bone abnormalities (increased bone mineral density and bone turnover. These results provide evidence that NOSs play pivotal roles in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of disorders. This review summarizes the latest knowledge on the significance of NOSs in vivo, based on lessons learned from experiments with our triple mutant model.

  13. Protection against ventricular fibrillation via cholinergic receptor stimulation and the generation of nitric oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalla, Manish; Chotalia, Minesh; Coughlan, Charles; Hao, Guoliang; Crabtree, Mark J.; Tomek, Jakub; Bub, Gil; Paterson, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Animal studies suggest an anti‐fibrillatory action of the vagus nerve on the ventricle, although the exact mechanism is controversial.Using a Langendorff perfused rat heart, we show that the acetylcholine analogue carbamylcholine raises ventricular fibrillation threshold (VFT) and flattens the electrical restitution curve.The anti‐fibrillatory action of carbamylcholine was prevented by the nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine, inhibitors of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), and can be mimicked by the nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside.Carbamylcholine increased NO metabolite content in the coronary effluent and this was prevented by mecamylamine.The anti‐fibrillatory action of both carbamylcholine and sodium nitroprusside was ultimately dependent on muscarinic receptor stimulation as all effects were blocked by atropine.These data demonstrate a protective effect of carbamylcholine on VFT that depends upon both muscarinic and nicotinic receptor stimulation, where the generation of NO is likely to be via a neuronal nNOS–sGC dependent pathway. Abstract Implantable cardiac vagal nerve stimulators are a promising treatment for ventricular arrhythmia in patients with heart failure. Animal studies suggest the anti‐fibrillatory effect may be nitric oxide (NO) dependent, although the exact site of action is controversial. We investigated whether a stable analogue of acetylcholine could raise ventricular fibrillation threshold (VFT), and whether this was dependent on NO generation and/or muscarinic/nicotinic receptor stimulation. VFT was determined in Langendorff perfused rat hearts by burst pacing until sustained VF was induced. Carbamylcholine (CCh, 200 nmol l–1, n = 9) significantly (P < 0.05) reduced heart rate from 292 ± 8 to 224 ± 6 b.p.m. Independent of this heart rate change, CCh caused a significant increase in VFT (control 1.5 ± 0.3 mA, CCh 2.4 ± 0.4 mA, wash 1.1

  14. Nitric Oxide Production by the Human Intestinal Microbiota by Dissimilatory Nitrate Reduction to Ammonium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Vermeiren

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The free radical nitric oxide (NO is an important signaling molecule in the gastrointestinal tract. Besides eukaryotic cells, gut microorganisms are also capable of producing NO. However, the exact mechanism of NO production by the gut microorganisms is unknown. Microbial NO production was examined under in vitro conditions simulating the gastrointestinal ecosystem using L-arginine or nitrate as substrates. L-arginine did not influence the microbial NO production. However, NO concentrations in the order of 90 ng NO-N per L feed medium were produced by the fecal microbiota from nitrate. N15 tracer experiments showed that nitrate was mainly reduced to ammonium by the dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA pathway. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing that gastrointestinal microbiota can generate substantial amounts of NO by DNRA and not by the generally accepted denitrification or L-arginine pathway. Further work is needed to elucidate the exact role between NO produced by the gastrointestinal microbiota and host cells.

  15. Nitric oxide induces cell death by regulating anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family members.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen M Snyder

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO activates the intrinsic apoptotic pathway to induce cell death. However, the mechanism by which this pathway is activated in cells exposed to NO is not known. Here we report that BAX and BAK are activated by NO and that cytochrome c is released from the mitochondria. Cells deficient in Bax and Bak or Caspase-9 are completely protected from NO-induced cell death. The individual loss of the BH3-only proteins, Bim, Bid, Puma, Bad or Noxa, or Bid knockdown in Bim(-/-/Puma(-/- MEFs, does not prevent NO-induced cell death. Our data show that the anti-apoptotic protein MCL-1 undergoes ASK1-JNK1 mediated degradation upon exposure to NO, and that cells deficient in either Ask1 or Jnk1 are protected against NO-induced cell death. NO can inhibit the mitochondrial electron transport chain resulting in an increase in superoxide generation and peroxynitrite formation. However, scavengers of ROS or peroxynitrite do not prevent NO-induced cell death. Collectively, these data indicate that NO degrades MCL-1 through the ASK1-JNK1 axis to induce BAX/BAK-dependent cell death.

  16. Sucrose-induced analgesia in mice: Role of nitric oxide and opioid receptor-mediated system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abtin Shahlaee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The mechanism of action of sweet substance-induced analgesia is thought to involve activation of the endogenous opioid system. The nitric oxide (NO pathway has a pivotal role in pain modulation of analgesic compounds such as opioids. Objectives: We investigated the role of NO and the opioid receptor-mediated system in the analgesic effect of sucrose ingestion in mice. Materials and Methods: We evaluated the effect of intraperitoneal administration of 10 mg/kg of NO synthase inhibitor, N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME and 20 mg/kg of opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone on the tail flick response in sucrose ingesting mice. Results: Sucrose ingestion for 12 days induced a statistically significant increase in the latency of tail flick response which was unmodified by L-NAME, but partially inhibited by naltrexone administration. Conclusions: Sucrose-induced nociception may be explained by facilitating the release of endogenous opioid peptides. Contrary to some previously studied pain models, the NO/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP pathway had no role in thermal hyperalgesia in our study. We recommend further studies on the involvement of NO in other animals and pain models.

  17. Nitric Oxide in Plants:Production and Cross-talk with Ca2+ Signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Angélique Besson-Bard; Cécile Courtois; Adrien Gauthier; Jennifer Dahan; Grazyna Dobrowolska; Sylvain Jeandroz; Alain Pugin; David Wendehenne

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a diatomic gas that performs crucial functions in a wide array of physiological processes in animals.The past several years have revealed much about its roles in plants.It is well established that NO is synthesized from nitrite by nitrate reductase (NR) and via chemical pathways.There is increasing evidence for the occurrence of an alternative pathway in which NO production is catalysed from L-arginine by a so far non-identified enzyme.Contradictory results have been reported regarding the respective involvement of these enzymes in specific physiological conditions.Although much remains to be proved,we assume that these inconsistencies can be accounted for by the limited specificity of the pharmacological agents used to suppress NO synthesis but also by the reduced content of L-arginine as well as the inactivity of nitrate-permeable anion channels in nitrate reductase- and/or nitrate/nitrite-deficient plants.Another unresolved issue concerns the molecular mechanisms underlying NO effects in plants.Here,we provide evidence that the second messenger Ca2+,as well as protein kinases including MAPK and SnRK2,are very plausible mediators of the NO signals.These findings open new perspectives about NO-based signaling in plants.

  18. Expression of nitric oxide synthase and guanylate cyclase in the human ciliary body and trabecular meshwork

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ren-yi; MA Ning

    2012-01-01

    Background The role played by the nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway in the aqueous humor dynamics is still unclear.This study was designed to investigate the expression and distribution of NO synthase (NOS) isoforms and guanylate cyclase (GC) in human ciliary body,trabecular meshwork and the Schlemm's canal.Methods Twelve eyes after corneal transplantation were used.Expression of three NOS isoforms (i.e.neuronal NOS (nNOS),inducible NOS (iNOS) and endothelial NOS (eNOS)) and GC were assessed in 10 eyes by immunohistochemical staining using monoclonal or polyclonal antibody of NOS and GC.Ciliary bodies were dissected free and the total proteins were extracted.Western blotting was performed to confirm the protein expression of 3 NOS isoforms and GC.Results Expression of 3 NOS isoforms and GC were observed in the ciliary epithelium,ciliary muscle,trabecular meshwork and the endothelium of the Schlemm's canal.Immunoreactivity of nNOS was detected mainly along the apical cytoplasmic junction of the non-pigmented epithelium (NPE) and pigmented epithelial (PE) cells.Protein expressions of 3 NOS isoforms and GC were confirmed in isolated human ciliary body by Western blotting.Conclusions The expression of NOS isoforms and GC in human ciliary body suggest the possible involvement of NO and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cyclic GMP,cGMP) signaling pathway in the ciliary body,and may play a role in both processes of aqueous humor formation and drainage.

  19. A mechanistic study on the simultaneous elimination of soot and nitric oxide from engine exhaust

    KAUST Repository

    Raj, Abhijeet

    2011-04-01

    The non-catalytic interaction between soot and nitric oxide (NO) resulting in their simultaneous elimination was studied on different types of reactive site present on soot. The reaction mechanism proposed previously was extended by including seven new reaction pathways for which the reaction energetics and kinetics were studied using density functional theory and transition state theory. This has led to the calculation of a new rate for the removal of carbon monoxide (CO) from soot. The new pathways have been added to our polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) growth model and used to simulate the NO-soot interaction to form CO, N2 and N2O. The simulation results show satisfactory agreement with experiment for the new CO removal rate. The NO-soot reaction was found to depend strongly on the soot site type and temperature. For a set of temperatures, computed PAH structures were analysed to determine the functional groups responsible for the decrease in the reactivity of soot with NO with increasing reaction time. In isothermal conditions, it was found that as temperature is increased, the number of oxygen atoms remaining on the soot surface decreases, while the number of nitrogen atoms increases for a given reaction time. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Skeletal muscle nitric oxide (NO) synthases and NO-signaling in "diabesity"--what about the relevance of exercise training interventions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghbalzadeh, Kaveh; Brixius, Klara; Bloch, Wilhelm; Brinkmann, Christian

    2014-02-15

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus associated with obesity, or "diabesity", coincides with an altered nitric oxide (NO) metabolism in skeletal muscle. Three isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) exist in human skeletal muscle tissue. Both neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) are constitutively expressed under physiological conditions, producing low levels of NO, while the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is strongly up-regulated only under pathophysiological conditions, excessively increasing NO concentrations. Due to chronic inflammation, overweight/obese type 2 diabetic patients exhibit up-regulated protein contents of iNOS and concomitant elevated amounts of NO in skeletal muscle. Low muscular NO levels are important for attaining an adequate cellular redox state--thereby maintaining metabolic integrity--while high NO levels are believed to destroy cellular components and to disturb metabolic processes, e.g., through strongly augmented posttranslational protein S-nitrosylation. Physical training with submaximal intensity has been shown to attenuate inflammatory profiles and iNOS protein contents in the long term. The present review summarizes signaling pathways which induce iNOS up-regulation under pathophysiological conditions and describes molecular mechanisms by which high NO concentrations are likely to contribute to triggering skeletal muscle insulin resistance and to reducing mitochondrial capacity during the development and progression of type 2 diabetes. Based on this information, it discusses the beneficial effects of regular physical exercise on the altered NO metabolism in the skeletal muscle of overweight/obese type 2 diabetic subjects, thus unearthing new perspectives on training strategies for this particular patient group.

  1. Inhibition of inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase by a mustard gas analog in murine macrophages

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    Smith Milton

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 2-Chloroethyl ethyl sulphide (CEES is a sulphur vesicating agent and an analogue of the chemical warfare agent 2,2'-dichlorodiethyl sulphide, or sulphur mustard gas (HD. Both CEES and HD are alkylating agents that influence cellular thiols and are highly toxic. In a previous publication, we reported that lipopolysaccharide (LPS enhances the cytotoxicity of CEES in murine RAW264.7 macrophages. In the present investigation, we studied the influence of CEES on nitric oxide (NO production in LPS stimulated RAW264.7 cells since NO signalling affects inflammation, cell death, and wound healing. Murine macrophages stimulated with LPS produce NO almost exclusively via inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS activity. We suggest that the influence of CEES or HD on the cellular production of NO could play an important role in the pathophysiological responses of tissues to these toxicants. In particular, it is known that macrophage generated NO synthesised by iNOS plays a critical role in wound healing. Results We initially confirmed that in LPS stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages NO is exclusively generated by the iNOS form of nitric oxide synthase. CEES treatment inhibited the synthesis of NO (after 24 hours in viable LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages as measured by either nitrite secretion into the culture medium or the intracellular conversion of 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF-2DA or dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA. Western blots showed that CEES transiently decreased the expression of iNOS protein; however, treatment of active iNOS with CEES in vitro did not inhibit its enzymatic activity Conclusion CEES inhibits NO production in LPS stimulated macrophages by decreasing iNOS protein expression. Decreased iNOS expression is likely the result of CEES induced alteration in the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB signalling pathway. Since NO can act as an antioxidant, the CEES induced down-regulation of iNOS in LPS

  2. Nitric oxide in prepubertal rat ovary contribution of the ganglionic nitric oxide synthase system via superior ovarian nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casais, Marilina; Delgado, Silvia Marcela; Vallcaneras, Sandra; Sosa, Zulema; Rastrilla, Ana María

    2007-02-01

    Both peripheral innervation and nitric oxide (NO) participate in ovarian steroidogenesis. Considering the existence of the nitric oxide/ nitric oxide synthase system in the peripheral neural system and in the ovary, the aim of this work was to analyze if the liberation of NO in the ovarian compartment of prepubertal rats is of ovarian and/or ganglionic origin. The analysis is carried out from a physiological point of view using the experimental coeliac ganglion--Superior Ovarian Nerve--ovary model with and without ganglionic cholinergic stimulus Acetylcholine (Ach) 10(-6) M. Non selective and selective inhibitors of the synthase nitric oxide enzyme were added to the ovarian and ganglionic compartment, and the liberation of nitrites (soluble metabolite of the nitric oxide) in the ovarian incubation liquid was measured. We found that the non-selective inhibitor L-nitro-arginina methyl ester (L-NAME) in the ovarian compartment decreased the liberation of nitrites, and that Aminoguanidine (AG) in two concentrations in a non-dose dependent form provoked the same effect. The addition of Ach in ganglion magnified the effect of the inhibitors of the NOS enzyme. The most relevant results after the addition of inhibitors in ganglion were obtained with AG 400 and 800 microM. The inhibition was made evident with and without the joint action of Ach in ganglion. These data suggest that the greatest production of NO in the ovarian compartment comes from the ovary, mainly the iNOS isoform, though the coeliac ganglion also contributes through the superior ovarian nerve but with less quantity.

  3. T Cell Cancer Therapy Requires CD40-CD40L Activation of Tumor Necrosis Factor and Inducible Nitric-Oxide-Synthase-Producing Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marigo, Ilaria; Zilio, Serena; Desantis, Giacomo; Mlecnik, Bernhard; Agnellini, Andrielly H R; Ugel, Stefano; Sasso, Maria Stella; Qualls, Joseph E; Kratochvill, Franz; Zanovello, Paola; Molon, Barbara; Ries, Carola H; Runza, Valeria; Hoves, Sabine; Bilocq, Amélie M; Bindea, Gabriela; Mazza, Emilia M C; Bicciato, Silvio; Galon, Jérôme; Murray, Peter J; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2016-09-12

    Effective cancer immunotherapy requires overcoming immunosuppressive tumor microenvironments. We found that local nitric oxide (NO) production by tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells is important for adoptively transferred CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells to destroy tumors. These myeloid cells are phenotypically similar to inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2)- and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-producing dendritic cells (DC), or Tip-DCs. Depletion of immunosuppressive, colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R)-dependent arginase 1(+) myeloid cells enhanced NO-dependent tumor killing. Tumor elimination via NOS2 required the CD40-CD40L pathway. We also uncovered a strong correlation between survival of colorectal cancer patients and NOS2, CD40, and TNF expression in their tumors. Our results identify a network of pro-tumor factors that can be targeted to boost cancer immunotherapies.

  4. Nitric oxide enhances inhibitory synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability in guinea-pig submucous plexus

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    Joel C Bornstein

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Varicosities immunoreactive for nitric oxide synthase (NOS make synaptic connections with submucosal neurons in the guinea-pig small intestine, but the effects of nitric oxide (NO on these neurons are unknown. We used intracellular recording to characterise effects of sodium nitroprusside (SNP, NO donor and nitro-L-arginine (NOLA, NOS inhibitor, on inhibitory synaptic potentials (IPSPs, slow excitatory synaptic potentials (EPSPs and action potential firing in submucosal neurons of guinea-pig ileum in vitro. Recordings were made from neurons with the characteristic IPSPs of non-cholinergic secretomotor neurons. SNP (100 μM markedly enhanced IPSPs evoked by single stimuli applied to intermodal strands and IPSPs evoked by trains of 2 – 10 pulses (30 Hz. Both noradrenergic (idazoxan-sensitive and non-adrenergic (idazoxan-insensitive IPSPs were affected. SNP enhanced hyperpolarizations evoked by locally applied noradrenaline or somatostatin. SNP did not affect slow EPSPs evoked by single stimuli, but depressed slow EPSPs evoked by stimulus trains. NOLA (100 μM depressed IPSPs evoked by 1-3 stimulus pulses and enhanced slow EPSPs evoked by trains of 2 – 3 stimuli (30 Hz. SNP also increased the number of action potentials and the duration of firing evoked by prolonged (500 or 1000 ms depolarizing current pulses, but NOLA had no consistent effect on action potential firing. We conclude that neurally released NO acts post-synaptically to enhance IPSPs and depress slow EPSPs, but may enhance the intrinsic excitability of these neurons. Thus, NOS neurons may locally regulate several secretomotor pathways ending on common neurons.

  5. Hydrogen Sulfide Increases Nitric Oxide Production and Subsequent S-Nitrosylation in Endothelial Cells

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    Ping-Ho Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S and nitric oxide (NO, two endogenous gaseous molecules in endothelial cells, got increased attention with respect to their protective roles in the cardiovascular system. However, the details of the signaling pathways between H2S and NO in endothelia cells remain unclear. In this study, a treatment with NaHS profoundly increased the expression and the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Elevated gaseous NO levels were observed by a novel and specific fluorescent probe, 5-amino-2-(6-hydroxy-3-oxo-3H-xanthen-9-ylbenzoic acid methyl ester (FA-OMe, and quantified by flow cytometry. Further study indicated an increase of upstream regulator for eNOS activation, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, and protein kinase B (Akt. By using a biotin switch, the level of NO-mediated protein S-nitrosylation was also enhanced. However, with the addition of the NO donor, NOC-18, the expressions of cystathionine-γ-lyase, cystathionine-β-synthase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase were not changed. The level of H2S was also monitored by a new designed fluorescent probe, 4-nitro-7-thiocyanatobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD-SCN with high specificity. Therefore, NO did not reciprocally increase the expression of H2S-generating enzymes and the H2S level. The present study provides an integrated insight of cellular responses to H2S and NO from protein expression to gaseous molecule generation, which indicates the upstream role of H2S in modulating NO production and protein S-nitrosylation.

  6. Inhibition of calcifying nodule formation in cultured porcine aortic valve cells by nitric oxide donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Jennifer A; Hua, Xiang; Mishra, Kumaril; Murphy, Geraldine A; Rosenkranz, Anke C; Horowitz, John D

    2009-01-05

    Calcific aortic stenosis displays some similarities to atherosclerosis including evidence of endothelial dysfunction. Whether nitric oxide (NO), which is produced by valvular endothelium, has direct protective effects extending to calcification processes in aortic valve cells has not previously been examined. In vitro calcifying nodules in porcine aortic valve interstitial cell cultures, formed in response to transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) 5 ng/ml, were inhibited by NO donors DETA-NONOate 5-100 microM, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) 3 microM. Raising intracellular cGMP concentrations, via 8-bromo cGMP 1 mM or via brain natiuretic peptide and C-type natiuretic peptide 0.1 microM, inhibited TGF-beta1-induced nodule formation, potentially implicating the cGMP pathway in the NO effect. Stimulation of interstitial cells with substance P or calcium ionophone (A23187) caused NO release and increased intracellular cGMP respectively. However in the presence of TGF-beta1 basal levels of NO production via nitric oxide synthase (NOS) were insufficient to affect nodule formation. Increased dihydroethidium (DHE) fluorescence in response to TGF-beta1, which was inhibited by DETA-NONOate and TEMPOL, suggested a role for intracellular superoxide in TGF-beta1 signalling. Moreover, nodule formation was suppressed by superoxide scavengers TEMPOL, hydralazine and polyethylene glycol-superoxide dismutase (PEG-SOD), but not SOD. In conclusion, NO donors, or agents raising intracellular cGMP levels, may protect aortic valve interstitial cells from early events leading to calcification.

  7. The capacity of red blood cells to reduce nitrite determines nitric oxide generation under hypoxic conditions.

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    Marcel H Fens

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a key regulator of vascular tone. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS is responsible for NO generation under normoxic conditions. Under hypoxia however, eNOS is inactive and red blood cells (RBC provide an alternative NO generation pathway from nitrite to regulate hypoxic vasodilation. While nitrite reductase activity of hemoglobin is well acknowledged, little is known about generation of NO by intact RBC with physiological hemoglobin concentrations. We aimed to develop and apply a new approach to provide insights in the ability of RBC to convert nitrite into NO under hypoxic conditions. We established a novel experimental setup to evaluate nitrite uptake and the release of NO from RBC into the gas-phase under different conditions. NO measurements were similar to well-established clinical measurements of exhaled NO. Nitrite uptake was rapid, and after an initial lag phase NO release from RBC was constant in time under hypoxic conditions. The presence of oxygen greatly reduced NO release, whereas inhibition of eNOS and xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR did not affect NO release. A decreased pH increased NO release under hypoxic conditions. Hypothermia lowered NO release, while hyperthermia increased NO release. Whereas fetal hemoglobin did not alter NO release compared to adult hemoglobin, sickle RBC showed an increased ability to release NO. Under all conditions nitrite uptake by RBC was similar. This study shows that nitrite uptake into RBC is rapid and release of NO into the gas-phase continues for prolonged periods of time under hypoxic conditions. Changes in the RBC environment such as pH, temperature or hemoglobin type, affect NO release.

  8. The capacity of red blood cells to reduce nitrite determines nitric oxide generation under hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fens, Marcel H; Larkin, Sandra K; Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Morris, Claudia R; Kuypers, Frans A

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a key regulator of vascular tone. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is responsible for NO generation under normoxic conditions. Under hypoxia however, eNOS is inactive and red blood cells (RBC) provide an alternative NO generation pathway from nitrite to regulate hypoxic vasodilation. While nitrite reductase activity of hemoglobin is well acknowledged, little is known about generation of NO by intact RBC with physiological hemoglobin concentrations. We aimed to develop and apply a new approach to provide insights in the ability of RBC to convert nitrite into NO under hypoxic conditions. We established a novel experimental setup to evaluate nitrite uptake and the release of NO from RBC into the gas-phase under different conditions. NO measurements were similar to well-established clinical measurements of exhaled NO. Nitrite uptake was rapid, and after an initial lag phase NO release from RBC was constant in time under hypoxic conditions. The presence of oxygen greatly reduced NO release, whereas inhibition of eNOS and xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) did not affect NO release. A decreased pH increased NO release under hypoxic conditions. Hypothermia lowered NO release, while hyperthermia increased NO release. Whereas fetal hemoglobin did not alter NO release compared to adult hemoglobin, sickle RBC showed an increased ability to release NO. Under all conditions nitrite uptake by RBC was similar. This study shows that nitrite uptake into RBC is rapid and release of NO into the gas-phase continues for prolonged periods of time under hypoxic conditions. Changes in the RBC environment such as pH, temperature or hemoglobin type, affect NO release.

  9. Nitric oxide in the nervous system: biochemical, developmental, and neurobiological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossenza, Marcelo; Socodato, Renato; Portugal, Camila C; Domith, Ivan C L; Gladulich, Luis F H; Encarnação, Thaísa G; Calaza, Karin C; Mendonça, Henrique R; Campello-Costa, Paula; Paes-de-Carvalho, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a very reactive molecule, and its short half-life would make it virtually invisible until its discovery. NO activates soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), increasing 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels to activate PKGs. Although NO triggers several phosphorylation cascades due to its ability to react with Fe II in heme-containing proteins such as sGC, it also promotes a selective posttranslational modification in cysteine residues by S-nitrosylation, impacting on protein function, stability, and allocation. In the central nervous system (CNS), NO synthesis usually requires a functional coupling of nitric oxide synthase I (NOS I) and proteins such as NMDA receptors or carboxyl-terminal PDZ ligand of NOS (CAPON), which is critical for specificity and triggering of selected pathways. NO also modulates CREB (cAMP-responsive element-binding protein), ERK, AKT, and Src, with important implications for nerve cell survival and differentiation. Differences in the regulation of neuronal death or survival by NO may be explained by several mechanisms involving localization of NOS isoforms, amount of NO being produced or protein sets being modulated. A number of studies show that NO regulates neurotransmitter release and different aspects of synaptic dynamics, such as differentiation of synaptic specializations, microtubule dynamics, architecture of synaptic protein organization, and modulation of synaptic efficacy. NO has also been associated with synaptogenesis or synapse elimination, and it is required for long-term synaptic modifications taking place in axons or dendrites. In spite of tremendous advances in the knowledge of NO biological effects, a full description of its role in the CNS is far from being completely elucidated.

  10. Signaling pathways in failing human heart muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, H; Hasenfuss, G; Holubarsch, C

    1997-07-01

    Experimental studies have delineated important signaling pathways in cardiomyocytes and their alterations in heart failure; however, there is now evidence that these observations are not necessarily applicable to human cardiac muscle cells. For example, angiotensin II (A II) does not exert positive inotropic effects in human ventricular muscle cells, in contrast to observation in rats. Thus, it is important to elucidate cardiac signaling pathways in humans in order to appreciate the functional role of neurohumoral or mechanical stimulation in human myocardium in health and disease. In the present article, we review signal pathways in the failing human heart based on studies in human cardiac tissues and in vivo physiological studies related to A II, nitric oxide, and β-adrenergic stimulation. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997; 7:151-160). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  11. Effects of exercise training on stress-induced vascular reactivity alterations: role of nitric oxide and prostanoids

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    Thiago Bruder-Nascimento

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physical exercise may modify biologic stress responses. Objective: To investigate the impact of exercise training on vascular alterations induced by acute stress, focusing on nitric oxide and cyclooxygenase pathways. Method: Wistar rats were separated into: sedentary, trained (60-min swimming, 5 days/week during 8 weeks, carrying a 5% body-weight load, stressed (2 h-immobilization, and trained/stressed. Response curves for noradrenaline, in the absence and presence of L-NAME or indomethacin, were obtained in intact and denuded aortas (n=7-10. Results: None of the procedures altered the denuded aorta reactivity. Intact aortas from stressed, trained, and trained/stressed rats showed similar reduction in noradrenaline maximal responses (sedentary 3.54±0.15, stressed 2.80±0.10*, trained 2.82±0.11*, trained/stressed 2.97± 0.21*, *P<0.05 relate to sedentary. Endothelium removal and L-NAME abolished this hyporeactivity in all experimental groups, except in trained/stressed rats that showed a partial aorta reactivity recovery in L-NAME presence (L-NAME: sedentary 5.23±0,26#, stressed 5.55±0.38#, trained 5.28±0.30#, trained/stressed 4.42±0.41, #P<0.05 related to trained/stressed. Indomethacin determined a decrease in sensitivity (EC50 in intact aortas of trained rats without abolishing the aortal hyporeactivity in trained, stressed, and trained/stressed rats. Conclusions: Exercise-induced vascular adaptive response involved an increase in endothelial vasodilator prostaglandins and nitric oxide. Stress-induced vascular adaptive response involved an increase in endothelial nitric oxide. Beside the involvement of the endothelial nitric oxide pathway, the vascular response of trained/stressed rats involved an additional mechanism yet to be elucidated. These findings advance on the understanding of the vascular processes after exercise and stress alone and in combination.

  12. Endogenous nitric oxide synthesis: biological functions and pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredt, D S

    1999-12-01

    Modern molecular biology has revealed vast numbers of large and complex proteins and genes that regulate body function. By contrast, discoveries over the past ten years indicate that crucial features of neuronal communication, blood vessel modulation and immune response are mediated by a remarkably simple chemical, nitric oxide (NO). Endogenous NO is generated from arginine by a family of three distinct calmodulin- dependent NO synthase (NOS) enzymes. NOS from endothelial cells (eNOS) and neurons (nNOS) are both constitutively expressed enzymes, whose activities are stimulated by increases in intracellular calcium. Immune functions for NO are mediated by a calcium-independent inducible NOS (iNOS). Expression of iNOS protein requires transcriptional activation, which is mediated by specific combinations of cytokines. All three NOS use NADPH as an electron donor and employ five enzyme cofactors to catalyze a five-electron oxidation of arginine to NO with stoichiometric formation of citrulline. The highest levels of NO throughout the body are found in neurons, where NO functions as a unique messenger molecule. In the autonomic nervous system NO functions NO functions as a major non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) neurotransmitter. This NANC pathway plays a particularly important role in producing relaxation of smooth muscle in the cerebral circulation and the gastrointestinal, urogenital and respiratory tracts. Dysregulation of NOS activity in autonomic nerves plays a major role in diverse pathophysiological conditions including migraine headache, hypertrophic pyloric stenosis and male impotence. In the brain, NO functions as a neuromodulator and appears to mediate aspects of learning and memory. Although endogenous NO was originally appreciated as a mediator of smooth muscle relaxation, NO also plays a major role in skeletal muscle. Physiologically muscle-derived NO regulates skeletal muscle contractility and exercise-induced glucose uptake. nNOS occurs at the

  13. Plasma membrane calcium ATPase proteins as novel regulators of signal transduction pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mary; Louisa; Holton; Michael; Emerson; Ludwig; Neyses; Angel; L; Armesilla

    2010-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that plasma membrane calcium ATPases (PMCAs) play a key role as regulators of calcium-triggered signal transduction pathways via interaction with partner proteins. PMCAs regulate these pathways by targeting specific proteins to cellular sub-domains where the levels of intracellular freecalcium are kept low by the calcium ejection properties of PMCAs. According to this model, PMCAs have been shown to interact functionally with the calcium-sensitive proteins neuronal nitric oxide synthase, calmodulindependent serine protein kinase, calcineurin and endothelial nitric oxidase synthase. Transgenic animals with altered expression of PMCAs are being used to evaluate the physiological significance of these interactions. To date, PMCA interactions with calcium-dependent partner proteins have been demonstrated to play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system via regulation of the nitric oxide and calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells pathways. This new evidence suggests that PMCAs play a more sophisticated role than the mere ejection of calcium from the cells, by acting as modulators of signaling transduction pathways.

  14. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation and nitric oxide function: new light through old windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Ian M

    2011-09-01

    The principle mechanisms operating at the level of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) itself to control its activity are phosphorylation, the auto-regulatory properties of the protein itself, and Ca(2)(+)/calmodulin binding. It is now clear that activation of eNOS is greatest when phosphorylation of certain serine and threonine residues is accompanied by elevation of cytosolic [Ca2+](i). While eNOS also contains an autoinhibitory loop, Rafikov et al. (2011) present the evidence for a newly identified 'flexible arm' that operates in response to redox state. Boeldt et al. (2011) also review the evidence that changes in the nature of endothelial Ca(2)(+) signaling itself in different physiologic states can extend both the amplitude and duration of NO output, and a failure to change these responses in pregnancy is associated with preeclampsia. The change in Ca(2)(+) signaling is mediated through altering capacitative entry mechanisms inherent in the cell, and so many agonist responses using this mechanism are altered. The term 'adaptive cell signaling' is also introduced for the first time to describe this phenomenon. Finally NO is classically regarded as a regulator of vascular function, but NO has other actions. One proposed role is regulation of steroid biosynthesis but the physiologic relevance was unclear. Ducsay & Myers (2011) now present new evidence that NO may provide the adrenal with a mechanism to regulate cortisol output according to exposure to hypoxia. One thing all three of these reviews show is that even after several decades of study into NO biosynthesis and function, there are clearly still many things left to discover.

  15. Nasal nitric oxide and nitric oxide synthase expression in primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifferi, M; Bush, A; Maggi, F; Michelucci, A; Ricci, V; Conidi, M E; Cangiotti, A M; Bodini, A; Simi, P; Macchia, P; Boner, A L

    2011-03-01

    No study has evaluated the correlation between different expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms in nasal epithelial cells and nasal NO (nNO) level in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). Gene expression of endothelial (NOS3) and inducible NOS (NOS2) and their correlation with nNO level, ciliary function and morphology were studied in patients with PCD or secondary ciliary dyskinesia (SCD). NOS3 gene polymorphisms were studied in blood leukocytes. A total of 212 subjects were studied (48 with PCD, 161 with SCD and three normal subjects). nNO level correlated with mean ciliary beat frequency (p = 0.044; r = 0.174). The lower the nNO level the higher was the percentage of immotile cilia (p<0.001; r = -0.375). A significant positive correlation between NOS2 gene expression and nNO levels was demonstrated in all children (p = 0.001; r = 0.428), and this correlation was confirmed in patients with PCD (p = 0.019; r = 0.484). NOS2 gene expression was lower in PCD than in SCD (p = 0.04). The NOS3 isoform correlated with missing central microtubules (p = 0.048; r = 0.447). nNO levels were higher in PCD subjects with the NOS3 thymidine 894 mutation, and this was associated with a higher ciliary beat frequency (p = 0.045). These results demonstrate a relationship between nNO level, NOS mRNA expression and ciliary beat frequency.

  16. NITRIC OXIDE AND ENDOTHELIN-1 IN CHILDREN WITH DIGESTIVE DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Panova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The important part in the group of biological compounds, participating in the regulation of the functions of the gastro-intestinal tract, is assigned to endothelial factors because of their impact on the majority of physiological and pathophysiological processes of the digestive system. The article provides information about physiological role of nitric oxide and endothelin-1 and presents a review of scientific data on the participation of nitric oxide and endothelin-1 in the pathogenesis of many digestive system diseases, emphasizing chronic inflammatory disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract. The authors accentuate the importance of endothelium endocrine function research in children with esophagogastroduodenal disorders at the beginning of puberty, which is the critical period of ontogenesis.

  17. Nitric-glycolic flowsheet testing for maximum hydrogen generation rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Newell, J. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Williams, M. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site is developing for implementation a flowsheet with a new reductant to replace formic acid. Glycolic acid has been tested over the past several years and found to effectively replace the function of formic acid in the DWPF chemical process. The nitric-glycolic flowsheet reduces mercury, significantly lowers the chemical generation of hydrogen and ammonia, allows purge reduction in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT), stabilizes the pH and chemistry in the SRAT and the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), allows for effective adjustment of the SRAT/SME rheology, and is favorable with respect to melter flammability. The objective of this work was to perform DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) testing at conditions that would bound the catalytic hydrogen production for the nitric-glycolic flowsheet.

  18. Alterations in Nitric Oxide Synthase in the Aged CNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyang Jung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with neuronal loss, gross weight reduction of the brain, and glial proliferation in the cortex, all of which lead to functional changes in the brain. It is known that oxidative stress is a critical factor in the pathogenesis of aging; additionally, growing evidence suggests that excessive nitric oxide (NO production contributes to the aging process. However, it is still unclear how NO plays a role in the aging process. This paper describes age-related changes in the activity of NADPH-diaphorase (NADPH-d, a marker for neurons containing nitric oxide synthase (NOS, in many CNS regions. Understanding these changes may provide a novel perspective in identifying the aging mechanism.

  19. Nitric oxide-related drug targets in headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jes

    2010-01-01

    -called delayed headache that fulfils criteria for migraine without aura in migraine sufferers. Blockade of nitric oxide synthases (NOS) by L-nitromonomethylarginine effectively treats attacks of migraine without aura. Similar results have been obtained for chronic the tension-type headache and cluster headache....... Inhibition of the breakdown of cyclic guanylate phosphate (cGMP) also provokes migraine in sufferers, indicating that cGMP is the effector of NO-induced migraine. Similar evidence suggests an important role of NO in the tension-type headache and cluster headache. These very strong data from human......SUMMARY: Nitric oxide (NO) is a very important molecule in the regulation of cerebral and extra cerebral cranial blood flow and arterial diameters. It is also involved in nociceptive processing. Glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), a pro-drug for NO, causes headache in normal volunteers and a so...

  20. REACTIVITY OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE RESIN WITH NITRIC ACID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, W; Fernando Fondeur, F; Bill Wilmarth, B; Myra Pettis, M; Shirley Mccollum, S

    2006-06-14

    Solid-state infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and elemental analysis have been used to evaluate the reactivity of resorcinol formaldehyde resin with nitric acid and characterize the solid product. Two distinct reactions were identified within the temperature range 25-55 C. The first reaction is primarily associated with resin nitration, while the second involves bulk oxidation and degradation of the polymer network leading to dissolution and off-gassing. Reaction was confirmed with nitric acid concentrations as low as 3 M at 25 C applied temperature and 0.625 M at 66 C. Although a nitrated resin product can be isolated under appropriate experimental conditions, calorimetry testing indicates no significant hazard associated with handling the dry material.

  1. Reactivity of Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin with Nitric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, William D.; Fondeur, Fernando F.; Wilmarth, William R.; Pettis, Myra E.

    2005-10-25

    Solid-state infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and elemental analysis have been used to evaluate the reactivity of resorcinol formaldehyde resin with nitric acid and characterize the solid product. Two distinct reactions were identified within the temperature range 25-55 C. The first reaction is primarily associated with resin nitration, while the second involves bulk oxidation and degradation of the polymer network leading to dissolution and off-gassing. The threshold conditions promoting reaction have been identified. Reaction was confirmed with nitric acid concentrations as low as 3 M at 25 C applied temperature and 0.625 M at 66 C. Although a nitrated resin product can be isolated under appropriate experimental conditions, calorimetry testing indicates no significant hazard associated with handling the dry material.

  2. Nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in polar stratospheric clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, C; Schreiner, J; Kohlmann, A; Zink, P; Mauersberger, K; Larsen, N; Deshler, T; Kröger, C; Rosen, J; Adriani, A; Cairo, F; Di Donfrancesco, G; Viterbini, M; Ovarlez, J; Ovarlez, H; David, C; Dörnbrack, A

    2000-12-01

    A comprehensive investigation of polar stratospheric clouds was performed on 25 January 2000 with instruments onboard a balloon gondola flown from Kiruna, Sweden. Cloud layers were repeatedly encountered at altitudes between 20 and 24 kilometers over a wide range of atmospheric temperatures (185 to 197 kelvin). Particle composition analysis showed that a large fraction of the cloud layers was composed of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles, containing water and nitric acid at a molar ratio of 3:1; this confirmed that these long-sought solid crystals exist well above ice formation temperatures. The presence of NAT particles enhances the potential for chlorine activation with subsequent ozone destruction in polar regions, particularly in early and late winter.

  3. Nitric oxide in female repro-ductive system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ Nitric oxide (NO), synthesized from L-arginine and oxygen by a family of enzymes known as nitric oxide synthase (NOS), is an effective and intercellular signal transduction molecule, and is ubiquitously present in vertebrates. To date, there are three distinct isoforms of NOS: neural NOS (nNOS), inducible NOS (iNOS), and endothelial NOS (eNOS). Among them, eNOS and nNOS, also called constitutive isoforms (cNOS), require calcium for activity, and are expressed constitutively in the physiological condition. The third isoforms, iNOS, whose activity is not dependent on calcium, are produced only in response to some stimulus, including cytokines and immune stimulating factors, etc.[1].

  4. INSULIN INDUCES NITRIC OXIDE PRODUCTION IN BOVINEAORTIC ENDOTHELIAL CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    200