WorldWideScience

Sample records for nitric oxide-mediated fungicidal

  1. Nitrate tolerance impairs nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jørn Bech; Boesgaard, Søren; Poulsen, Henrik E.;

    1996-01-01

    Nitrates, Nitrate tolerence, Nitric oxide, acetylcholine, N-acetylcholine, N-acetylcysteine, L-NAME, Rat, Anesthetized......Nitrates, Nitrate tolerence, Nitric oxide, acetylcholine, N-acetylcholine, N-acetylcysteine, L-NAME, Rat, Anesthetized...

  2. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Posttranslational Modifications: Impacts at the Synapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie A. Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is an important gasotransmitter molecule that is involved in numerous physiological processes throughout the nervous system. In addition to its involvement in physiological plasticity processes (long-term potentiation, LTP; long-term depression, LTD which can include NMDAR-mediated calcium-dependent activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS, new insights into physiological and pathological consequences of nitrergic signalling have recently emerged. In addition to the canonical cGMP-mediated signalling, NO is also implicated in numerous pathways involving posttranslational modifications. In this review we discuss the multiple effects of S-nitrosylation and 3-nitrotyrosination on proteins with potential modulation of function but limit the analyses to signalling involved in synaptic transmission and vesicular release. Here, crucial proteins which mediate synaptic transmission can undergo posttranslational modifications with either pre- or postsynaptic origin. During normal brain function, both pathways serve as important cellular signalling cascades that modulate a diverse array of physiological processes, including synaptic plasticity, transcriptional activity, and neuronal survival. In contrast, evidence suggests that aging and disease can induce nitrosative stress via excessive NO production. Consequently, uncontrolled S-nitrosylation/3-nitrotyrosination can occur and represent pathological features that contribute to the onset and progression of various neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and Huntington’s.

  3. Hemoglobin Effects on Nitric Oxide Mediated Hypoxic Vasodilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Zimei; Cooper, Chris E

    2016-01-01

    The brain responds to hypoxia with an increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF). However, such an increase is generally believed to start only after the oxygen tension decreases to a certain threshold level. Although many mechanisms (different vasodilator and different generation and metabolism mechanisms of the vasodilator) have been proposed at the molecular level, none of them has gained universal acceptance. Nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed to play a central role in the regulation of oxygen supply since it is a vasodilator whose production and metabolism are both oxygen dependent. We have used a computational model that simulates blood flow and oxygen metabolism in the brain (BRAINSIGNALS) to test mechanism by which NO may elucidate hypoxic vasodilation. The first model proposed that NO was produced by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and metabolized by the mitochondrial enzyme cytochrome c oxidase (CCO). NO production declined with decreasing oxygen concentration given that oxygen is a substrate for nitric oxide synthase (NOS). However, this was balanced by NO metabolism by CCO, which also declined with decreasing oxygen concentration. However, the NOS effect was dominant; the resulting model profiles of hypoxic vasodilation only approximated the experimental curves when an unfeasibly low K m for oxygen for NOS was input into the model. We therefore modified the model such that NO generation was via the nitrite reductase activity of deoxyhemoglobin instead of NOS, whilst keeping the metabolism of NO by CCO the same. NO production increased with decreasing oxygen concentration, leading to an improved reproduction of the experimental CBF versus PaO2 curve. However, the threshold phenomenon was not perfectly reproduced. In this present work, we incorporated a wider variety of oxygen dependent and independent NO production and removal mechanisms. We found that the addition of NO removal via oxidation to nitrate mediated by oxyhemoglobin resulted in the

  4. Nitric oxide mediates gravitropic bending in soybean roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiangyang; Neill, Steven J; Tang, Zhangcheng; Cai, Weiming

    2005-02-01

    Plant roots are gravitropic, detecting and responding to changes in orientation via differential growth that results in bending and reestablishment of downward growth. Recent data support the basics of the Cholodny-Went hypothesis, indicating that differential growth is due to redistribution of auxin to the lower sides of gravistimulated roots, but little is known regarding the molecular details of such effects. Here, we investigate auxin and gravity signal transduction by demonstrating that the endogenous signaling molecules nitric oxide (NO) and cGMP mediate responses to gravistimulation in primary roots of soybean (Glycine max). Horizontal orientation of soybean roots caused the accumulation of both NO and cGMP in the primary root tip. Fluorescence confocal microcopy revealed that the accumulation of NO was asymmetric, with NO concentrating in the lower side of the root. Removal of NO with an NO scavenger or inhibition of NO synthesis via NO synthase inhibitors or an inhibitor of nitrate reductase reduced both NO accumulation and gravitropic bending, indicating that NO synthesis was required for the gravitropic responses and that both NO synthase and nitrate reductase may contribute to the synthesis of the NO required. Auxin induced NO accumulation in root protoplasts and asymmetric NO accumulation in root tips. Gravistimulation, NO, and auxin also induced the accumulation of cGMP, a response inhibited by removal of NO or by inhibitors of guanylyl cyclase, compounds that also reduced gravitropic bending. Asymmetric NO accumulation and gravitropic bending were both inhibited by an auxin transport inhibitor, and the inhibition of bending was overcome by treatment with NO or 8-bromo-cGMP, a cell-permeable analog of cGMP. These data indicate that auxin-induced NO and cGMP mediate gravitropic curvature in soybean roots.

  5. Nitric oxide mediates the stress response induced by diatom aldehydes in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Romano

    Full Text Available Diatoms are ubiquitous and abundant primary producers that have been traditionally considered as a beneficial food source for grazers and for the transfer of carbon through marine food webs. However, many diatom species produce polyunsaturated aldehydes that disrupt development in the offspring of grazers that feed on these unicellular algae. Here we provide evidence that production of the physiological messenger nitric oxide increases after treatment with the polyunsaturated aldehyde decadienal in embryos of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. At high decadienal concentrations, nitric oxide mediates initial apoptotic events leading to loss of mitochondrial functionality through the generation of peroxynitrite. At low decadienal concentrations, nitric oxide contributes to the activation of hsp70 gene expression thereby protecting embryos against the toxic effects of this aldehyde. When nitric oxide levels were lowered by inhibiting nitric oxide synthase activity, the expression of hsp70 in swimming blastula decreased and the proportion of abnormal plutei increased. However, in later pluteus stages nitric oxide was no longer able to exert this protective function: hsp70 and nitric oxide synthase expression decreased with a consequent increase in the expression of caspase-8. Our findings that nitric oxide production increases rapidly in response to a toxic exogenous stimulus opens new perspectives on the possible role of this gas as an important messenger to environmental stress in sea urchins and for understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying toxicity during diatom blooms.

  6. Nitric oxide mediates the stress response induced by diatom aldehydes in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Giovanna; Costantini, Maria; Buttino, Isabella; Ianora, Adrianna; Palumbo, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms are ubiquitous and abundant primary producers that have been traditionally considered as a beneficial food source for grazers and for the transfer of carbon through marine food webs. However, many diatom species produce polyunsaturated aldehydes that disrupt development in the offspring of grazers that feed on these unicellular algae. Here we provide evidence that production of the physiological messenger nitric oxide increases after treatment with the polyunsaturated aldehyde decadienal in embryos of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. At high decadienal concentrations, nitric oxide mediates initial apoptotic events leading to loss of mitochondrial functionality through the generation of peroxynitrite. At low decadienal concentrations, nitric oxide contributes to the activation of hsp70 gene expression thereby protecting embryos against the toxic effects of this aldehyde. When nitric oxide levels were lowered by inhibiting nitric oxide synthase activity, the expression of hsp70 in swimming blastula decreased and the proportion of abnormal plutei increased. However, in later pluteus stages nitric oxide was no longer able to exert this protective function: hsp70 and nitric oxide synthase expression decreased with a consequent increase in the expression of caspase-8. Our findings that nitric oxide production increases rapidly in response to a toxic exogenous stimulus opens new perspectives on the possible role of this gas as an important messenger to environmental stress in sea urchins and for understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying toxicity during diatom blooms.

  7. Nitric oxide-mediated endothlium-dependent vasodilation is impaired with borderline high-LDL cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Kyle J; Stauffer, Brian L; Greiner, Jared J; Weil, Brian R; DeSouza, Christopher A

    2012-02-01

    The experimental aims of this study were to determine: (1) whether nitric oxide-mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilation is blunted in adult humans with borderline high plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol compared with adults with optimal/near optimal LDL-cholesterol levels; and, if so: (2) whether the magnitude of impairment in adults with borderline high LDL-cholesterol is similar to adults with high LDL-cholesterol. Forearm blood flow responses to intraarterial infusions of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were measured in 50 middle-aged (43-64 year) adults: 20 in the optimal/near optimal LDL-cholesterol range (<130 mg/dL); 20 with borderline high LDL-cholesterol (130-159 mg/dL); and 10 with high LDL-cholesterol ($160 mg/dL). In addition, blood flow responses to acetylcholine were determined in the absence and presence of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G) -monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA). Vasodilation to acetylcholine was ~20% lower (p < 0.05) in the borderline high (from 4.3 ± 0.2 to 12.3 ± 0.8 mL/100 mL tissue/min) and high (from 4.3 ± 0.3 to 12.0 ± 0.5 mL/100 mL tissue/min) LDL-cholesterol groups compared with the optimal/near optimal (from 4.4 ± 0.2 to 14.5 ± 0.5 mL/100 mL tissue/min) LDL-cholesterol group. L-NMMA significantly reduced (~30%) the vasodilator response to acetylcholine in the optimal/near optimal LDL-cholesterol group but not the borderline high or high LDL-cholesterol groups. Borderline high LDL-cholesterol is associated with impaired nitric oxide-mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilation.

  8. Role of iron in the nitric oxide-mediated fungicidal mechanism of IFN-gamma-activated murine macrophages against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis conidia Papel do ferro no mecanismo fungicida mediado pelo óxido n��trico de macrófagos murinos ativados com IFN-gama contra conídias do Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Gonzalez

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential growth element of virtually all microorganisms and its restriction is one of the mechanisms used by macrophages to control microbial multiplication. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, the agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, an important systemic mycosis in Latin America, is inhibited in its conidia-to-yeast conversion in the absence of iron. We studied the participation of iron in the nitric oxide (NO-mediated fungicidal mechanism against conidia. Peritoneal murine macrophages activated with 50U/mL of IFN-gamma or treated with 35 µM Deferoxamine (DEX and infected with P. brasiliensis conidia, were co-cultured and incubated for 96 h in the presence of different concentrations of holotransferrin (HOLO and FeS0(4. The supernatants were withdrawn in order to assess NO2 production by the Griess method. The monolayers were fixed, stained and observed microscopically. The percentage of the conidia-to-yeast transition was estimated by counting 200 intracellular propagules. IFN-gamma-activated or DEX-treated Mthetas presented marked inhibition of the conidia-to-yeast conversion (19 and 56%, respectively in comparison with non-activated or untreated Mthetas (80%. IFN-gamma-activated macrophages produced high NO levels in comparison with the controls. Additionally, when the activated or treated-macrophages were supplemented with iron donors (HOLO or FeSO4, the inhibitory action was reversed, although NO production remained intact. These results suggest that the NO-mediated fungicidal mechanism exerted by IFN-gamma-activated macrophages against P. brasiliensis conidia, is dependent of an iron interaction.O ferro é elemento essencial para o crescimento de microrganismos e sua limitação é um dos mecanismos usados por macrófagos para controlar a multiplicação microbiana. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, o agente da paracoccidioidomicose, uma das micoses sistêmicas mais importantes na América Latina, é inibido em sua conversão de con

  9. Nitric oxide-mediated changes in vascular reactivity in pregnancy in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Z. M.; Beilin, L J

    1993-01-01

    1. To examine the mechanisms which may account for pregnancy-induced vasodilatation in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), we have investigated the changes in vascular reactivity and the effects of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) inhibition in the in situ blood-perfused, mesenteric resistance vessels of 18-20 day pregnant SHR. The effects of NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG) were compared in pregnant and nonpregnant SHR and gestation matched normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. 2. Intra-arteria...

  10. Nitric Oxide Mediates the Stress Response Induced by Diatom Aldehydes in the Sea Urchin Paracentrotus lividus

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanna Romano; Maria Costantini; Isabella Buttino; Adrianna Ianora; Anna Palumbo

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms are ubiquitous and abundant primary producers that have been traditionally considered as a beneficial food source for grazers and for the transfer of carbon through marine food webs. However, many diatom species produce polyunsaturated aldehydes that disrupt development in the offspring of grazers that feed on these unicellular algae. Here we provide evidence that production of the physiological messenger nitric oxide increases after treatment with the polyunsaturated aldehyde decadie...

  11. Nitric oxide mediates low magnesium inhibition of osteoblast-like cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidi, Marzia; Dellera, Federica; Mariotti, Massimo; Banfi, Giuseppe; Crapanzano, Calogero; Albisetti, Walter; Maier, Jeanette A M

    2012-10-01

    An adequate intake of magnesium (Mg) is important for bone cell activity and contributes to the prevention of osteoporosis. Because (a) Mg is mitogenic for osteoblasts and (b) reduction of osteoblast proliferation is detected in osteoporosis, we investigated the influence of different concentrations of extracellular Mg on osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cell behavior. We found that low Mg inhibited SaOS-2 cell proliferation by increasing the release of nitric oxide through the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Indeed, both pharmacological inhibition with the iNOS inhibitor l-N(6)-(iminoethyl)-lysine-HCl and genetic silencing of iNOS by small interfering RNA restored the normal proliferation rate of the cells. Because a moderate induction of nitric oxide is sufficient to potentiate bone resorption and a relative deficiency in osteoblast proliferation can result in their inadequate activity, we conclude that maintaining Mg homeostasis is relevant to ensure osteoblast function and, therefore, to prevent osteoporosis.

  12. Different sources of nitric oxide mediate neurovascular coupling in the lateral geniculate nucleus of the cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen De Labra

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the link between neuronal responses and metabolic signals is fundamental to our knowledge of brain function and it is a milestone in our efforts to interpret data from modern non invasive optical techniques such as fMRI, which are based on the close coupling between metabolic demand of active neurons and local changes in blood flow. The challenge is to unravel the link. Here we show, using spectrophotometry to record oxyhemoglobin (OxyHb and metahemoglobin (MetHb (surrogate markers of cerebral flow and nitric oxide levels respectively together with extracellular neuronal recordings in vivo and applying a multiple polynomial regression model, that the markers are able to predict up about 80% of variability in neuronal response. Furthermore, we show that the coupling between blood flow and neuronal activity is heavily influenced by nitric oxide (NO. While neuronal responses show the typical saturating response, blood flow shows a linear behaviour during contrast-response curves, with nitric oxide from different sources acting differently for low and high intensity.

  13. Nitric oxide-mediated intracellular growth restriction of pathogenic Rhodococcus equi can be prevented by iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bargen, Kristine; Wohlmann, Jens; Taylor, Gregory Alan; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Haas, Albert

    2011-05-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an intracellular pathogen which causes pneumonia in young horses and in immunocompromised humans. R. equi arrests phagosome maturation in macrophages at a prephagolysosome stage and grows inside a privileged compartment. Here, we show that, in murine macrophages activated with gamma interferon and lipopolysaccharide, R. equi does not multiply but stays viable for at least 24 h. Whereas infection control of other intracellular pathogens by activated macrophages is executed by enhanced phagosome acidification or phagolysosome formation, by autophagy or by the interferon-inducible GTPase Irgm1, none of these mechanisms seems to control R. equi infection. Growth control by macrophage activation is fully mimicked by treatment of resting macrophages with nitric oxide donors, and inhibition of bacterial multiplication by either activation or nitric oxide donors is annihilated by cotreatment of infected macrophages with ferrous sulfate. Transcriptional analysis of the R. equi iron-regulated gene iupT demonstrates that intracellular R. equi encounters iron stress in activated, but not in resting, macrophages and that this stress is relieved by extracellular addition of ferrous sulfate. Our results suggest that nitric oxide is central to the restriction of bacterial access to iron in activated macrophages.

  14. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Intracellular Growth Restriction of Pathogenic Rhodococcus equi Can Be Prevented by Iron▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bargen, Kristine; Wohlmann, Jens; Taylor, Gregory Alan; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Haas, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an intracellular pathogen which causes pneumonia in young horses and in immunocompromised humans. R. equi arrests phagosome maturation in macrophages at a prephagolysosome stage and grows inside a privileged compartment. Here, we show that, in murine macrophages activated with gamma interferon and lipopolysaccharide, R. equi does not multiply but stays viable for at least 24 h. Whereas infection control of other intracellular pathogens by activated macrophages is executed by enhanced phagosome acidification or phagolysosome formation, by autophagy or by the interferon-inducible GTPase Irgm1, none of these mechanisms seems to control R. equi infection. Growth control by macrophage activation is fully mimicked by treatment of resting macrophages with nitric oxide donors, and inhibition of bacterial multiplication by either activation or nitric oxide donors is annihilated by cotreatment of infected macrophages with ferrous sulfate. Transcriptional analysis of the R. equi iron-regulated gene iupT demonstrates that intracellular R. equi encounters iron stress in activated, but not in resting, macrophages and that this stress is relieved by extracellular addition of ferrous sulfate. Our results suggest that nitric oxide is central to the restriction of bacterial access to iron in activated macrophages. PMID:21383050

  15. Inhibition of nitric oxide mediated protein nitration: therapeutic implications in experimental radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong Jae; Kim, Tae Uk; Park, Jeong-Soo; Ra, Jong Yun

    2013-09-15

    Experimental animal study. This study investigated whether nitric oxide (NO) mediated protein nitration is involved in the pathogenesis of radiculopathy and whether the symptoms can be relieved by its suppression. It has been reported that nitration of protein mediated by NO is involved in the degenerative neurological disorders, but its involvement is not clear in the radiculopathy. Two kinds of rat models of radiculopathy were used. Radiculopathy was induced either by ligation of spinal nerve roots or transplantation of autologous nucleus pulposus. In separate groups of rats, aminoguanidine, a potent nitric oxide synthetase inhibitor, was administered just before induction of radiculopathy, to suppress NO production and resultant nitration of protein. Sensation of the hind limb was evaluated by plantar stimulation test, and motor weakness was assessed by observation of gait pattern. Nitrotyrosine, product of protein nitration, was assayed quantitatively by Western immunoblotting. Mechanical allodynia was observed in both compression and nucleus pulposus groups, but motor weakness was observed only in the compression group. Preoperative administration of aminoguanidine attenuated mechanical allodynia and motor weakness. Optical densities of nitrotyrosine bands increased significantly in radiculopathy groups, but they were lowered by administration of aminoguanidine. NO mediated protein nitration contributes to the development of both types of radiculopathies. Suppression of NO production can decrease protein nitration and relieve neural dysfunctions of radiculopathy. N/A.

  16. The endogenous nitric oxide mediates selenium-induced phytotoxicity by promoting ROS generation in Brassica rapa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Chen

    Full Text Available Selenium (Se is suggested as an emerging pollutant in agricultural environment because of the increasing anthropogenic release of Se, which in turn results in phytotoxicity. The most common consequence of Se-induced toxicity in plants is oxidative injury, but how Se induces reactive oxygen species (ROS burst remains unclear. In this work, histofluorescent staining was applied to monitor the dynamics of ROS and nitric oxide (NO in the root of Brassica rapa under Se(IV stress. Se(IV-induced faster accumulation of NO than ROS. Both NO and ROS accumulation were positively correlated with Se(IV-induced inhibition of root growth. The NO accumulation was nitrate reductase (NR- and nitric oxide synthase (NOS-dependent while ROS accumulation was NADPH oxidase-dependent. The removal of NO by NR inhibitor, NOS inhibitor, and NO scavenger could alleviate Se(IV-induced expression of Br_Rbohs coding for NADPH oxidase and the following ROS accumulation in roots, which further resulted in the amelioration of Se(IV-induced oxidative injury and growth inhibition. Thus, we proposed that the endogenous NO played a toxic role in B. rapa under Se(IV stress by triggering ROS burst. Such findings can be used to evaluate the toxic effects of Se contamination on crop plants.

  17. Role of nitric oxide-mediated glutathionylation in neuronal function: potential regulation of energy utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Li-Peng; Garcia, Jerome V; Han, Derick S; Cadenas, Enrique

    2010-04-28

    Excessive generation of nitric oxide radical (NO*) in neuroinflammation, excitotoxicity and during age-related neurodegenerative disorders entails the localized and concerted increase in nitric oxide synthase(s) expression in glial cells and neurons. The aim of the present study was to assess the biological significance of the impact of NO* on the cell's thiol status with emphasis on S-glutathionylation of targeted proteins. Exposure of primary cortical neurons or astrocytes to increasing flow rates of NO* (0.061-0.25 microM/s) resulted in the following. (i) A decrease in GSH (glutathione) in neurons accompanied by formation of GSNO (S-nitrosoglutathione) and GSSG (glutathione disulfide); neurons were far more sensitive to NO* exposure than astrocytes. (ii) A dose-dependent oxidation of the cellular redox status: the neuron's redox potential increased approximately 42 mV and that of astrocytes approximately 23 mV. A good correlation was observed between cell viability and the cellular redox potential. The higher susceptibility of neurons to NO* can be partly explained by a reduced capacity to recover GSH through lower activities of GSNO and GSSG reductases. (iii) S-glutathionylation of a small subset of proteins, among them GAPDH (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), the S-glutathionylation of which resulted in inhibition of enzyme activity. The quantitative analyses of changes in the cell's thiol potential upon NO* exposure and their consequences for S-glutathionylation are discussed in terms of the distinct redox environment of astrocytes and neurons.

  18. Nitric oxide mediates alginate oligosaccharides-induced root development in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunhong; Liu, Hang; Yin, Heng; Wang, Wenxia; Zhao, Xiaoming; Du, Yuguang

    2013-10-01

    Alginate oligosaccharides (AOS), which are marine oligosaccharides, are involved in regulating plant root growth, but the promotion mechanism for AOS remains unclear. Here, AOS (10-80 mg L(-1)) were found to induce the generation of nitric oxide (NO) in the root system of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), which promoted the formation and elongation of wheat roots in a dose-dependent manner. NO inhibitors suggested that nitrate reductase (NR), rather than nitric oxide synthase (NOS), was essential for AOS-induced root development. Further studies confirmed that AOS-induced NO generation in wheat roots by up-regulating the gene expression and enzyme activity of NR at the post-transcriptional level. The anatomy and RT-PCR results showed that AOS accelerated the division and growth of stele cells, leading to an increase in the ratio of stele area to root transverse area. This could be inhibited by the NR inhibitor, sodium tungstate, which indicated that NO catalyzed by the NR was involved in AOS regulation of root development. Taken together, in the early stage of AOS-induced root development, NO generation was a novel mechanism by which AOS regulated plant growth. The results also showed that this marine resource could be widely used for crop development.

  19. Nitric oxide-mediated protein modification in cardiovascular physiology and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gödecke, Axel; Schrader, Jürgen; Reinartz, Michael

    2008-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a key regulator of cardiovascular functions including the control of vascular tone, anti-inflammatory properties of the endothelium, cardiac contractility, and thrombocyte activation and aggregation. Numerous experimental data support the view that NO not only acts via cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent mechanisms but also modulates protein function by nitrosation, nitrosylation, glutathiolation, and nitration, respectively. To understand how NO regulates all of these diverse biological processes on the molecular level a comprehensive assessment of NO-mediated cGMP-dependent and independent targets is required. Novel proteomic approaches allow the simultaneous identification of large quantities of proteins modified in an NO-dependent manner and thereby will considerably deepen our understanding of the role NO plays in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology.

  20. Nitric oxide mediates the survival action of IGF-1 and insulin in pancreatic beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahuana, Gladys M; Tejedo, Juan R; Hmadcha, Abdelkrim; Ramírez, Remedios; Cuesta, Antonio L; Soria, Bernat; Martin, Franz; Bedoya, Francisco J

    2008-02-01

    Generation of low levels of nitric oxide (NO) contributes to beta cell survival in vitro. The purpose of this study was to explore the link between NO and the survival pathway triggered by insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and insulin in insulin producing RINm5F cells and in pancreatic islets. Results show that exposure of cells to IGF-1/insulin protects against serum deprivation-induced apoptosis. This action is prevented with inhibitors of NO generation, PI3K and Akt. Moreover, transfection with the negative dominant form of the tyrosine kinase c-Src abrogates the effect of IGF-1 and insulin on DNA fragmentation. An increase in the expression level of NOS3 protein and in the enzyme activity is observed following exposure of serum-deprived RINm5F cells to IGF-1 and insulin. Phosphorylation of IRS-1, IRS-2 and to less extent IRS-3 takes place when serum-deprived RINm5F cells and rat pancreatic islets are exposed to either IGF-1, insulin, or diethylenetriamine nitric oxide adduct (DETA/NO). In human islets, IRS-1 and IRS-2 proteins are present and tyrosine phosphorylated upon exposure to IGF-1, insulin and DETA/NO. Both rat and human pancreatic islets undergo DNA fragmentation when cultured in serum-free medium and IGF-1, insulin and DETA/NO protect efficiently from this damage. We then conclude that generation of NO participates in the activation of survival pathways by IGF-1 and insulin in beta cells.

  1. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Mediates Caffeine Antagonism of Alcohol-Induced Cerebral Artery Constriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jennifer; Fedinec, Alexander L; Kuntamallappanavar, Guruprasad; Leffler, Charles W; Bukiya, Anna N; Dopico, Alex M

    2016-01-01

    Despite preventive education, the combined consumption of alcohol and caffeine (particularly from "energy drinks") continues to rise. Physiologic perturbations by separate intake of ethanol and caffeine have been widely documented. However, the biologic actions of the alcohol-caffeine combination and their underlying subcellular mechanisms have been scarcely studied. Using intravital microscopy on a closed-cranial window and isolated, pressurized vessels, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro action of ethanol-caffeine mixtures on cerebral arteries from rats and mice, widely recognized models to address cerebrovascular pathophysiology and pharmacology. Caffeine at concentrations found in human circulation after ingestion of one to two cups of coffee (10 µM) antagonized the endothelium-independent constriction of cerebral arteries evoked by ethanol concentrations found in blood during moderate-heavy alcohol intoxication (40-70 mM). Caffeine antagonism against alcohol was similar whether evaluated in vivo or in vitro, suggesting independence of systemic factors and drug metabolism, but required a functional endothelium. Moreover, caffeine protection against alcohol increased nitric oxide (NO•) levels over those found in the presence of ethanol alone, disappeared upon blocking NO• synthase, and could not be detected in pressurized cerebral arteries from endothelial nitric-oxide synthase knockout (eNOS(-/-)) mice. Finally, incubation of de-endothelialized cerebral arteries with the NO• donor sodium nitroprusside (10 µM) fully restored the protective effect of caffeine. This study demonstrates for the first time that caffeine antagonizes ethanol-induced cerebral artery constriction and identifies endothelial NO• as the critical caffeine effector on smooth muscle targets. Conceivably, situations that perturb endothelial function and/or NO• availability will critically alter caffeine antagonism of alcohol-induced cerebrovascular constriction without

  2. Rat duodenal motility in vitro: Prokinetic effects of DL-homocysteine thiolactone and modulation of nitric oxide mediated inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Marija

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Homocysteine is a significant but modifiable risk factor for vascular diseases. As gastrointestinal smooth musculature is similar to blood vessel muscles, we investigated how elevated homocysteine levels affect nitric oxide-mediated neurotransmission in the gut. There is accumulated evidence that a dysfunction of NO neurons in the myenteric plexus may cause various diseases in the gastrointestinal tract such as achalasia, diabetic gastroparesis and infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. In the present study, we aimed to assess the effects of homocysteine on NO-mediated responses in vitro, and to examine the effects of DL-homocysteine thiolactone on the spontaneous motility of rat duodenum and nitrergic neurotransmission. DL-homocysteine thiolactone concentration of 10 μmol/L leads to the immediate increase in tone, amplitude and frequency of spontaneous movements in isolated rat duodenum. L-NAME (30 μmol/L leads to an increase in basal tone, amplitude and frequency of spontaneous contractions. The relaxations induced by EFS were significantly reduced in duodenal segments incubated in DL-homocysteine thiolactone compared with the control group. EFS-induced relaxations were inhibited by L-NAME in both experimental and control groups. These results suggest that a high level of homocysteine causes an important impairment of non-adrenergic non-cholinergic innervation of the rat duodenum. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175043

  3. Nitric oxide-mediated apoptosis in rat macrophages subjected to Shiga toxin 2 from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronetti, José Luis; Villegas, Natalia Angel; Paraje, María Gabriela; Albesa, Inés

    2011-04-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli are important food-borne pathogens. The main factor conferring virulence on this bacterium is its capacity to secrete Shiga toxins (Stxs), which have been reported to induce apoptosis in several cell types. However, the mechanisms of this apoptosis have not yet been fully elucidated. In addition, Stxs have been shown to stimulate macrophages to produce nitric oxide (NO), a well-known apoptosis inductor.The aim of this study was to investigate the participation of NO in apoptosis of rat peritoneal macrophages induced by culture supernatants or Stx2 from E. coli. Peritoneal macrophages incubated in the presence of E. coli supernatants showed an increase in the amounts of apoptosis and NO production. Furthermore, inhibition of NO synthesis induced by addition of aminoguanidine (AG) was correlated with a reduction in the percentage of apoptotic cells, indicating participation of this metabolite in the apoptotic process. Similarly, treatment of cells with Stx2 induced an increase in NO production and amount of apoptosis, these changes being reversed by addition of AG. In summary, these data show that treatment with E. coli supernatants or Stx2 induces NO-mediated apoptosis of macrophages. © 2011 The Societies and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Antioxidant systems are regulated by nitric oxide-mediated post-translational modifications (NO-PTMs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Begara-Morales

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a biological messenger that orchestrates a plethora of plant functions, mainly through post-translational modifications (PTMs such as S-nitrosylation or tyrosine nitration. In plants, hundreds of proteins have been identified as potential targets of these NO-PTMs under physiological and stress conditions indicating the relevance of NO in plant-signaling mechanisms. Among these NO protein targets, there are different antioxidant enzymes involved in the control of reactive oxygen species (ROS, such as H2O2, which is also a signal molecule. This highlights the close relationship between ROS/NO signaling pathways. The major plant antioxidant enzymes, including catalase, superoxide dismutases (SODs peroxiredoxins (Prx and all the enzymatic components of the ascorbate-glutathione (Asa-GSH cycle, have been shown to be modulated to different degrees by NO-PTMs. This mini-review will update the recent knowledge concerning the interaction of NO with these antioxidant enzymes, with a special focus on the components of the Asa-GSH cycle and their physiological relevance.

  5. Endogenous nitric oxide mediates alleviation of cadmium toxicity induced by calcium in rice seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long Zhang; Zhen Chen; Cheng Zhu

    2012-01-01

    The effect of calcium chloride (CaCl2) on rice seedling growth under cadmium chloride (CdCl2) stress,as well as the possible role of endogenous nitric oxide (NO) in this process,was studied.The growth of rice seedlings was seriously inhibited by CdCl2,and the inhibition was significantly mitigated by CaCl2.However,hemoglobin (Hb) and 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) weakened the promotion effect of CaCl2.The resuhs of NO fluorescence localization suggest that growth accelerated by CaCl2 might be associated with elevated NO levels.The content of Cd,protein thiols (PBT),and nonprotein thiols (NPT) in cell walls,cell organelles,and soluble fractions,respectively,of rice seedlings decreased considerably in the presence of CaCl2,whereas the content of pectin,hemicellulose 1 (HC1),and hemicellulose 2 (HC2) increased significantly.Elimination of endogenous NO in Cd+Ca treatment could promote the transportation of Cd2+ to cell organelles and soluble fractions and increase the content of NPT and PBT in leaves.In addition,transportation of Cd2+ to cell organelles and soluble fractions was retarded in roots,the content of NPT increased,and the content of PBT decreased.With elimination of endogenous NO in Cd+Ca treatment,the content of pectin,HC 1,and HC2 decreased significantly.Thus,Ca may alleviate Cd toxicity via endogenous NO with variation in the levels of NPT,PBT,and matrix polysaccharides.

  6. Nitric Oxide Mediates Molybdenum-Induced Antioxidant Defense in Wheat under Drought Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songwei Wu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum (Mo has been reported to alleviate drought stress by enhancing antioxidant defense in plants, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we hypothesized that Mo mediates nitric oxide (NO-induced antioxidant defense through Mo-enzymes, particularly by nitrate reductase (NR in wheat under drought stress. The 30-day-old wheat seedlings cultivated in -Mo (0 μM Mo and +Mo (1 μM Mo Hoagland solutions were detached and then pretreated with Mo-enzyme inhibitors, NO scavengers, NO donors or their combinations according to demands of complementary experiment under 10% polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG-stimulated drought stress (PSD. Mo supplementation increased the activities and transcripts of antioxidant enzymes, decreased H2O2 and MDA contents, and elevated NO production, implying that Mo-induced antioxidant defense may be related to NO signal. Complementary experiment showed that NO production was induced by Mo, while suppressed by Mo-enzyme inhibitors and NO scavengers, but restored by NO donors, suggesting that Mo-induced increase of NO production may be due to the regulation by Mo-enzymes. Further experiment indicated that the increased activities and transcripts of antioxidant enzymes induced by Mo were suppressed by Mo-enzyme inhibitors and NO scavengers, and NO donors could eliminate their suppressing effects. Moreover, Mo application increased NR activity and inhibitors of Mo-enzymes inhibited NR activity in wheat leaves under PSD, suggesting that NR might involve in the regulation of Mo-induced NO production. These results clearly indicate that NO mediates Mo-induced antioxidant defense at least partially through the regulation of NR.

  7. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Maize Root Apex Responses to Nitrate are Regulated by Auxin and Strigolactones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro eManoli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate (NO3- is a key element for crop production but its levels in agricultural soils are limited. Plants have developed mechanisms to cope with these NO3- fluctuations based on sensing nitrate at the root apex. Particularly, the transition zone (TZ of root apex has been suggested as a signalling-response zone. This study dissects cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying NO3- resupply effects on primary root growth in maize, confirming nitric oxide (NO as a putative modulator. Nitrate restoration induced primary root elongation within the first 2 h, corresponding to a stimulation of cell elongation at the basal border of the TZ. Xyloglucans (XGs immunolocalization together with Brefeldin A applications demonstrated that nitrate resupply induces XG accumulation. This effect was blocked by cPTIO (NO scavenger. Transcriptional analysis of ZmXET1 confirmed the stimulatory effect of nitrate on XGs accumulation in cells of the TZ. Immunolocalization analyses revealed a positive effect of nitrate resupply on auxin and PIN1 accumulation, but a transcriptional regulation of auxin biosynthesis/transport/signalling genes was excluded. Short-term nitrate treatment repressed the transcription of genes involved in strigolactones (SLs biosynthesis and transport, mainly in the TZ. Enhancement of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs transcription in presence of cPTIO indicated endogenous NO as a negative modulator of CCDs activity. Finally, treatment with the SLs-biosynthesis inhibitor (TIS108 restored the root growth in the nitrate-starved seedlings. Present report suggests that the NO-mediated root apex responses to nitrate are accomplished in cells of the TZ via integrative actions of auxin, NO and SLs.

  8. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Maize Root Apex Responses to Nitrate are Regulated by Auxin and Strigolactones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoli, Alessandro; Trevisan, Sara; Voigt, Boris; Yokawa, Ken; Baluška, František; Quaggiotti, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate (NO3 (-)) is a key element for crop production but its levels in agricultural soils are limited. Plants have developed mechanisms to cope with these NO3 (-) fluctuations based on sensing nitrate at the root apex. Particularly, the transition zone (TZ) of root apex has been suggested as a signaling-response zone. This study dissects cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying NO3 (-) resupply effects on primary root (PR) growth in maize, confirming nitric oxide (NO) as a putative modulator. Nitrate restoration induced PR elongation within the first 2 h, corresponding to a stimulation of cell elongation at the basal border of the TZ. Xyloglucans (XGs) immunolocalization together with Brefeldin A applications demonstrated that nitrate resupply induces XG accumulation. This effect was blocked by cPTIO (NO scavenger). Transcriptional analysis of ZmXET1 confirmed the stimulatory effect of nitrate on XGs accumulation in cells of the TZ. Immunolocalization analyses revealed a positive effect of nitrate resupply on auxin and PIN1 accumulation, but a transcriptional regulation of auxin biosynthesis/transport/signaling genes was excluded. Short-term nitrate treatment repressed the transcription of genes involved in strigolactones (SLs) biosynthesis and transport, mainly in the TZ. Enhancement of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) transcription in presence of cPTIO indicated endogenous NO as a negative modulator of CCDs activity. Finally, treatment with the SLs-biosynthesis inhibitor (TIS108) restored the root growth in the nitrate-starved seedlings. Present report suggests that the NO-mediated root apex responses to nitrate are accomplished in cells of the TZ via integrative actions of auxin, NO and SLs.

  9. Nitric Oxide Mediated Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Activation of Multiple Regulatory Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Adil; Mun, Bong-Gyu; Imran, Qari M; Lee, Sang-Uk; Adamu, Teferi A; Shahid, Muhammad; Kim, Kyung-Min; Yun, Byung-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance between the accumulation and removal of nitric oxide and its derivatives is a challenge faced by all plants at the cellular level, and is especially important under stress conditions. Exposure of plants to various biotic and abiotic stresses causes rapid changes in cellular redox tone potentiated by the rise in reactive nitrogen species that serve as signaling molecules in mediating defensive responses. To understand mechanisms mediated by these signaling molecules, we performed a large-scale analysis of the Arabidopsis transcriptome induced by nitrosative stress. We generated an average of 84 and 91 million reads from three replicates each of control and 1 mM S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO)-infiltrated Arabidopsis leaf samples, respectively. After alignment, more than 95% of all reads successfully mapped to the reference and 32,535 genes and 55,682 transcripts were obtained. CysNO infiltration caused differential expression of 6436 genes (3448 up-regulated and 2988 down-regulated) and 6214 transcripts (3335 up-regulated and 2879 down-regulated) 6 h post-infiltration. These differentially expressed genes were found to be involved in key physiological processes, including plant defense against various biotic and abiotic stresses, hormone signaling, and other developmental processes. After quantile normalization of the FPKM values followed by student's T-test (P pathways were verified using quantitative real-time PCR. This study provides comprehensive information about plant responses to nitrosative stress at transcript level and would prove helpful in understanding and incorporating mechanisms associated with nitrosative stress responses in plants.

  10. Leptin induces nitric oxide-mediated inhibition of lipolysis and glyceroneogenesis in rat white adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niang, Fatoumata; Benelli, Chantal; Ribière, Catherine; Collinet, Martine; Mehebik-Mojaat, Nadia; Penot, Graziella; Forest, Claude; Jaubert, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Leptin is secreted by white adipose tissue (WAT) and induces lipolysis and nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) oxidation. During lipolysis, NEFA efflux is the result of triglyceride breakdown, NEFA oxidation, and re-esterification via glyceroneogenesis. Leptin's effects on glyceroneogenesis remain unexplored. We investigated the effect of a long-term treatment with leptin at a physiological concentration (10 μg/L) on lipolysis and glyceroneogenesis in WAT explants and analyzed the underlying mechanisms. Exposure of rat WAT explants to leptin for 2 h resulted in increased NEFA and glycerol efflux. However, a longer treatment with leptin (18 h) did not affect NEFA release and reduced glycerol output. RT-qPCR showed that leptin significantly downregulated the hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pck1), and PPARγ genes. In agreement with its effect on mRNA, leptin also decreased the levels of PEPCK-C and HSL proteins. Glyceroneogenesis, monitored by [1-(14) C] pyruvate incorporation into lipids, was reduced. Because leptin increases nitric oxide (NO) production in adipocytes, we explored the role of NO in the leptin signaling pathway. Pretreatment of explants with the NO synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester eliminated the effect of leptin on lipolysis, glyceroneogenesis, and expression of the HSL, Pck1, and PPARγ genes. The NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL penicillamine mimicked leptin effects, thus demonstrating the role of NO in these pathways. The inverse time-dependent action of leptin on WAT is consistent with a process that limits NEFA re-esterification and energy storage while reducing glycerol release, thus preventing hypertriglyceridemia.

  11. Nitric oxide-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by heavy-ion microbeam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Masanori; Matsumoto, Hideki; Funayama, Tomoo; Yokota, Yuichiro; Otsuka, Kensuke; Maeda, Munetoshi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2015-07-01

    In general, a radiation-induced bystander response is known to be a cellular response induced in non-irradiated cells after receiving bystander signaling factors released from directly irradiated cells within a cell population. Bystander responses induced by high-linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions at low fluence are an important health problem for astronauts in space. Bystander responses are mediated via physical cell-cell contact, such as gap-junction intercellular communication (GJIC) and/or diffusive factors released into the medium in cell culture conditions. Nitric oxide (NO) is a well-known major initiator/mediator of intercellular signaling within culture medium during bystander responses. In this study, we investigated the NO-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by high-LET argon (Ar)-ion microbeam irradiation of normal human fibroblasts. Foci formation by DNA double-strand break repair proteins was induced in non-irradiated cells, which were co-cultured with those irradiated by high-LET Ar-ion microbeams in the same culture plate. Foci formation was suppressed significantly by pretreatment with an NO scavenger. Furthermore, NO-mediated reproductive cell death was also induced in bystander cells. Phosphorylation of NF-κB and Akt were induced during NO-mediated bystander signaling in the irradiated and bystander cells. However, the activation of these proteins depended on the incubation time after irradiation. The accumulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a downstream target of NO and NF-κB, was observed in the bystander cells 6 h after irradiation but not in the directly irradiated cells. Our findings suggest that Akt- and NF-κB-dependent signaling pathways involving COX-2 play important roles in NO-mediated high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander responses. In addition, COX-2 may be used as a molecular marker of high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander cells to distinguish them from directly irradiated cells, although this may depend on the time

  12. α2A-adrenoceptors, but not nitric oxide, mediate the peripheral cardiac sympatho-inhibition of moxonidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobos-Puc, Luis E; Aguayo-Morales, Hilda; Silva-Belmares, Yesenia; González-Zavala, Maria A; Centurión, David

    2016-07-05

    Moxonidine centrally inhibits the sympathetic activity through the I1-imidazoline receptor and nitric oxide. In addition, inhibits the peripheral cardiac sympathetic outflow by α2-adrenoceptors/I1-imidazoline receptors, although the role of α2-adrenoceptor subtypes or nitric oxide in the cardiac sympatho-inhibition induced by moxonidine are unknown. Therefore, the cardiac sympatho-inhibition induced by moxonidine (10μg/kgmin) was evaluated before and after of the treatment with the following antagonists/inhibitor: (1) BRL 44408, (300μg/kg, α2A), imiloxan, (3000μg/kg, α2B), and JP-1302, (300μg/kg, α2C), in animals pretreated with AGN 192403 (3000μg/kg, I1 antagonist); (2) N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; 34, 100, and 340μg/kgmin); and (3) the combinations of the highest dose of l-NAME plus AGN 192403 or BRL 44408. Additionally, the expression of the neuronal (nNOS) and inducible (iNOS) nitric oxide synthase in the stellate ganglion was determined after treatment with moxonidine (i.p. 0.56mg/kg daily, during one week). The cardiac sympatho-inhibition of 10μg/kgmin moxonidine was: (1) unaffected by imiloxan and JP-1302, under pretreatment with AGN 192403, or l-NAME (34, 100 and 340μg/kgmin) given alone; (2) partially antagonized by the combination of 340 μg/kgmin l-NAME plus BRL 44408; and (3) abolished by BRL 44408 under treatment with AGN 192403. Furthermore, moxonidine did not modify the nNOS or iNOS protein expression in the stellate ganglion, the main source of postganglionic sympathetic neurons innervating the heart. In conclusion, our results suggest that the peripheral cardiac sympatho-inhibition induced by moxonidine is mediated by α2A-adrenoceptor subtype but not by nitric oxide.

  13. Nitrated type III collagen as a biological marker of nitric oxide-mediated synovial tissue metabolism in osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardot, P; Charni-Ben Tabassi, N; Toh, L

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Nitric oxide (NO) is a major mediator of joint tissue inflammation and damage in osteoarthritis (OA) and mediates the nitration of tyrosine (Y*) residues in proteins. We investigated the nitration of type III collagen, a major constituent of synovial membrane, in knee OA. METHODS...... in healthy controls and significantly correlated with C-reactive protein values (r=0.40, Pcollagen N-telopeptide is increased in the synovial tissue of patients with knee OA. Measurements of serum IIINys level may be useful for the clinical......: A polyclonal antibody directed against the nitrated QY*DSY*DVKSG sequence from type III collagen N-telopeptide was generated. Synovial tissues from patients with knee OA (n=4) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA, n=4) were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for IIINys. Serum IIINys levels were measured by enzyme...

  14. Ascorbic acid improves brachial artery vasodilation during progressive handgrip exercise in the elderly through a nitric oxide-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinity, Joel D; Wray, D Walter; Witman, Melissa A H; Layec, Gwenael; Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Ives, Stephen J; Conklin, Jamie D; Reese, Van; Zhao, Jia; Richardson, Russell S

    2016-03-15

    The proposed mechanistic link between the age-related attenuation in vascular function and free radicals is an attractive hypothesis; however, direct evidence of free radical attenuation and a concomitant improvement in vascular function in the elderly is lacking. Therefore, this study sought to test the hypothesis that ascorbic acid (AA), administered intra-arterially during progressive handgrip exercise, improves brachial artery (BA) vasodilation in a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent manner, by mitigating free radical production. BA vasodilation (Doppler ultrasound) and free radical outflow [electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy] were measured in seven healthy older adults (69 ± 2 yr) during handgrip exercise at 3, 6, 9, and 12 kg (∼13-52% of maximal voluntary contraction) during the control condition and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition via N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), AA, and coinfusion of l-NMMA + AA. Baseline BA diameter was not altered by any of the treatments, while L-NMMA and L-NMMA + AA diminished baseline BA blood flow and shear rate. AA improved BA dilation compared with control at 9 kg (control: 6.5 ± 2.2%, AA: 10.9 ± 2.5%, P = 0.01) and 12 kg (control: 9.5 ± 2.7%, AA: 15.9 ± 3.7%, P vasodilation compared with control and when combined with AA eliminated the AA-induced improvement in BA vasodilation. Free radical outflow increased with exercise intensity but, interestingly, was not attenuated by AA. Collectively, these results indicate that AA improves BA vasodilation in the elderly during handgrip exercise through an NO-dependent mechanism; however, this improvement appears not to be the direct consequence of attenuated free radical outflow from the forearm.

  15. Medullary ventrolateral nitric oxide mediates the cardiac effect of electroacupuncture at "Neiguan" acupoint on acute myocardial ischemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Juan-Xiu; Zhou, Pei-Hua; Wang, Jin; Li, Xia; Cao, Yin-Xiang; Zhou, Xu; Zhu, Da-Nian

    2004-08-25

    Experiments were performed on male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats anesthetized with a mixture of urethane and chloralose. A rat model of acute myocardial ischemia (AMI) was made by ligation of the left anterior descending branch of the coronary artery (LAD). After the LAD ligation, the ischemia area of the left ventricular wall became somewhat pale immediately. Under a light microscope, the pathological examination revealed that all the cells were swollen and in red color when the cardiac section was stained with hematoxylin basic fuchsin picric acid (HBFP), which indicated a typical change in the myocardial ischemia. In the AMI model, it was found that cardiac functions were markedly attenuated, such as decreases in the heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP), maximal rate for left ventricular pressure rising and declining (+/-dp/dt(max)), velocity of contractile element (V(CE)) and total area of cardiac force loop (L(0)), and an increase in the left ventricular end diastolic pressure (LVEDP). In such AMI rats, application of electroacupuncture (EA) at "Neiguan" acupoints (Pe 6) for 20 min could obviously improve the above-mentioned cardiac functions. After microinjection of nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), was made into the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), the curative effect of EA on myocardial ischemia was reduced significantly or abolished, while after microinjection of normal saline of the same volume was made into the RVLM, the improving effect of EA remained. These results suggest that the effect of EA on myocardial ischemia is possibly mediated by the nitric oxide (NO) in the RVLM.

  16. The mechanism of the nitric oxide-mediated enhancement of tert-butylhydroperoxide-induced DNA single strand breakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidarelli, Andrea; Clementi, Emilio; Sciorati, Clara; Cantoni, Orazio

    1998-01-01

    Caffeine (Cf) enhances the DNA cleavage induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (tB-OOH) in U937 cells via a mechanism involving Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial formation of DNA-damaging species (Guidarelli et al., 1997b). Nitric oxide (NO) is not involved in this process since U937 cells do not express the constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS).Treatment with the NO donors S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP, 10 μM), or S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO, 300 μM), however, potentiated the DNA strand scission induced by 200 μM tB-OOH. The DNA lesions generated by tB-OOH alone, or combined with SNAP, were repaired with superimposable kinetics and were insensitive to anti-oxidants and peroxynitrite scavengers but suppressed by iron chelators.SNAP or GSNO did not cause mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation but their enhancing effects on the tB-OOH-induced DNA strand scission were prevented by ruthenium red, an inhibitor of the calcium uniporter of mitochondria. Furthermore, the enhancing effects of both SNAP and GSNO were identical to and not additive with those promoted by the Ca2+-mobilizing agents Cf or ATP.The SNAP- or GSNO-mediated enhancement of the tB-OOH-induced DNA cleavage was abolished by the respiratory chain inhibitors rotenone and myxothiazol and was not apparent in respiration-deficient cells.It is concluded that, in cells which do not express the enzyme cNOS, exogenous NO enhances the accumulation of DNA single strand breaks induced by tB-OOH via a mechanism involving inhibition of complex III. PMID:9846647

  17. Oleic acid-dependent modulation of Nitric oxide associated 1 protein levels regulates nitric oxide-mediated defense signaling in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The conserved cellular metabolites nitric oxide (NO) and oleic acid (18:1) are well-known regulators of disease physiologies in diverse organism. We show that NO production in plants is regulated via 18:1. Reduction in 18:1 levels, via a genetic mutation in the 18:1-synthesizing gene SUPPRESSOR OF S...

  18. Sinorhizobium meliloti Controls Nitric Oxide-Mediated Post-Translational Modification of a Medicago truncatula Nodule Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanquet, Pauline; Silva, Liliana; Catrice, Olivier; Bruand, Claude; Carvalho, Helena; Meilhoc, Eliane

    2015-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in various plant-microbe interactions. In the symbiosis between soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti and model legume Medicago truncatula, NO is required for an optimal establishment of the interaction but is also a signal for nodule senescence. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms responsible for NO effects in the legume-rhizobium interaction. Here, we investigate the contribution of the bacterial NO response to the modulation of a plant protein post-translational modification in nitrogen-fixing nodules. We made use of different bacterial mutants to finely modulate NO levels inside M. truncatula root nodules and to examine the consequence on tyrosine nitration of the plant glutamine synthetase, a protein responsible for assimilation of the ammonia released by nitrogen fixation. Our results reveal that S. meliloti possesses several proteins that limit inactivation of plant enzyme activity via NO-mediated post-translational modifications. This is the first demonstration that rhizobia can impact the course of nitrogen fixation by modulating the activity of a plant protein.

  19. Contribution of radiation-induced, nitric oxide-mediated bystander effect to radiation-induced adaptive response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, H.; Ohnishi, T.

    There has been a recent upsurge of interest in radiation-induced adaptive response and bystander effect which are specific modes in stress response to low-dose low-dose rate radiation Recently we found that the accumulation of inducible nitric oxide NO synthase iNOS in wt p53 cells was induced by chronic irradiation with gamma rays followed by acute irradiation with X-rays but not by each one resulting in an increase in nitrite concentrations of medium It is suggested that the accumulation of iNOS may be due to the depression of acute irradiation-induced p53 functions by pre-chronic irradiation In addition we found that the radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells against acute irradiation with X-rays was reduced after chronic irradiation with gamma rays This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells was nearly completely suppressed by the addition of NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO to the medium This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells is just radiation-induced adaptive response suggesting that NO-mediated bystander effect may considerably contribute to adaptive response induced by radiation

  20. Nitric oxide mediates effects of acute, not chronic, naltrexone on LPS-induced hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhotic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiassy, Bentolhoda; Rahimi, Nastaran; Javadi-Paydar, Mehrak; Gharedaghi, Mohammad Hadi; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Dehpour, Ahmad R

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest endogenous opioids and nitric oxide (NO) are involved in the pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In this study, the interaction between the opioid receptor antagonist and NO was investigated on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced HE in cirrhotic rats. Male rats were divided in the sham- and bile duct ligation (BDL)-operated groups. Animals were treated with saline; naltrexone (10 mg/kg, i.p.); or L-NAME (3 mg/kg, i.p.), alone or in combination with naltrexone. To induce HE, LPS (1 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected 1 h after the final drug treatment. HE scoring, hepatic histology, and plasma NO metabolites levels and mortality rate were recorded. Deteriorated level of consciousness and mortality after LPS administration significantly ameliorated following both acute and chronic treatment with naltrexone in cirrhotic rats. However, acute and chronic administration of L-NAME did not change HE scores in cirrhotic rats. The effects of acute but not chronic treatment of naltrexone on HE parameters were reversed by L-NAME. Plasma NOx concentrations elevated in BDL rats, which were decreased after acute and chronic treatment by naltrexone or L-NAME, significantly. We suggest both acute and chronic treatment with naltrexone improved LPS-induced HE. But, only acute treatment with naltrexone may affect through NO pathway.

  1. Salt stress reduces root meristem size by nitric oxide-mediated modulation of auxin accumulation and signaling in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen; Li, Rong-Jun; Han, Tong-Tong; Cai, Wei; Fu, Zheng-Wei; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2015-05-01

    The development of the plant root system is highly plastic, which allows the plant to adapt to various environmental stresses. Salt stress inhibits root elongation by reducing the size of the root meristem. However, the mechanism underlying this process remains unclear. In this study, we explored whether and how auxin and nitric oxide (NO) are involved in salt-mediated inhibition of root meristem growth in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using physiological, pharmacological, and genetic approaches. We found that salt stress significantly reduced root meristem size by down-regulating the expression of PINFORMED (PIN) genes, thereby reducing auxin levels. In addition, salt stress promoted AUXIN RESISTANT3 (AXR3)/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID17 (IAA17) stabilization, which repressed auxin signaling during this process. Furthermore, salt stress stimulated NO accumulation, whereas blocking NO production with the inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine-methylester compromised the salt-mediated reduction of root meristem size, PIN down-regulation, and stabilization of AXR3/IAA17, indicating that NO is involved in salt-mediated inhibition of root meristem growth. Taken together, these findings suggest that salt stress inhibits root meristem growth by repressing PIN expression (thereby reducing auxin levels) and stabilizing IAA17 (thereby repressing auxin signaling) via increasing NO levels. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Lichen metabolites prevent UV light and nitric oxide-mediated plasmid DNA damage and induce apoptosis in human melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, A; Piovano, M; Lombardo, L; Garbarino, J; Cardile, V

    2008-09-26

    In humans both UV-A and UV-B can cause gene mutations and suppress immunity, which leads to skin cancer, including melanoma. Inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) appears particularly promising as ROS and RNS production by both UV-A and UV-B contributes to inflammation, immunosuppression, gene mutation and carcinogenesis. We evaluated the effect of two lichen compounds, sphaerophorin (depside) and pannarin (depsidone) on pBR322 DNA cleavage induced by hydroxyl radicals (()OH), and by nitric oxide (NO), and their superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) scavenging capacity. In addition, we investigated the growth inhibitory activity of these compounds against human melanoma cells (M14 cell line). Sphaerophorin and pannarin showed a protective effect on plasmid DNA and exhibited a superoxide dismutase like effect. The data obtained in cell culture show that these lichen metabolites inhibit the growth of melanoma cells, inducing an apoptotic cell death, demonstrated by the fragmentation of genomic DNA (COMET and TUNEL Assays) and by a significant increase of caspase-3 activity, and correlated, at least in part, to the increase of ROS generation, These results confirm the promising biological properties of sphaerophorin and pannarin and encourage further investigations on their molecular mechanisms.

  3. Nitric oxide mediates strigolactone signaling in auxin and ethylene-sensitive lateral root formation in sunflower seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Niharika; Bhatla, Satish C

    2015-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) play significant role in shaping root architecture whereby auxin-SL crosstalk has been observed in SL-mediated responses of primary root elongation, lateral root formation and adventitious root (AR) initiation. Whereas GR24 (a synthetic strigolactone) inhibits LR and AR formation, the effect of SL biosynthesis inhibitor (fluridone) is just the opposite (root proliferation). Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) leads to LR proliferation but completely inhibits AR development. The diffusive distribution of PIN1 in the provascular cells in the differentiating zone of the roots in response to GR24, fluridone or NPA treatments further indicates the involvement of localized auxin accumulation in LR development responses. Inhibition of LR formation by GR24 treatment coincides with inhibition of ACC synthase activity. Profuse LR development by fluridone and NPA treatments correlates with enhanced [Ca(2+)]cyt in the apical region and differentiating zones of LR, indicating a critical role of [Ca(2+)] in LR development in response to the coordinated action of auxins, ethylene and SLs. Significant enhancement of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (CCD) activity (enzyme responsible for SL biosynthesis) in tissue homogenates in presence of cPTIO (NO scavenger) indicates the role of endogenous NO as a negative modulator of CCD activity. Differences in the spatial distribution of NO in the primary and lateral roots further highlight the involvement of NO in SL-modulated root morphogenesis in sunflower seedlings. Present work provides new report on the negative modulation of SL biosynthesis through modulation of CCD activity by endogenous nitric oxide during SL-modulated LR development.

  4. Enhanced nitric oxide-mediated autophagy contributes to the hepatoprotective effects of ischemic preconditioning during ischemia and reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jun-Kyu; Kang, Jung-Woo; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2016-08-31

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) protects against liver ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Autophagy is an essential cytoprotective system that is rapidly activated by multiple stressors. Nitric oxide (NO) acts as an inducer of IPC. We examined the impact of autophagy in liver IPC and its regulation by NO. Male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to 60 min of hepatic ischemia followed by 6 h of reperfusion. IPC was achieved for 10 min of ischemia followed by 10 min of reperfusion prior to sustained ischemia. N(ω)-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 15 mg/kg, i.v., all NOS inhibitor) and aminoguanidine (AG, 10 mg/kg, i.v., iNOS inhibitor) were injected 10 min before IPC. SB203580 (10 mg/kg, i.p., p38 inhibitor) was injected 30 min before IPC. I/R increased serum alanine aminotransferase activity. IPC attenuated this increase, which was abolished by L-NAME, but not AG. Microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II levels increased and p62 protein levels decreased after I/R; these changes were augmented by IPC and abolished by L-NAME. I/R increased liver protein expression of autophagy-related protein (Atg)12-Atg5 complex and lysosome-associated membrane protein-2. IPC augmented the expression of these proteins, which were abolished by L-NAME, but not AG. IPC also augmented the level of phosphorylated p38 MAPK induced by I/R and this phosphorylation was abolished by L-NAME. Our findings suggest that IPC-mediated NO protects against I/R-induced liver injury by enhancing autophagic flux.

  5. Role of metabolic environment on nitric oxide mediated inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia in type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Monica P; Emond, Zachary M; Wang, Zheng; Martinez, Janet; Jiang, Qun; Kibbe, Melina R

    2014-01-30

    Nitric oxide (NO) is well known to inhibit neointimal hyperplasia following arterial injury. Previously, we reported that NO was more effective at inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in a type 2 diabetic environment than control. We also found that NO was ineffective in an uncontrolled type 1 diabetic environment; however, insulin restored the efficacy of NO. Thus, the goal of this study was to more closely evaluate the effect of insulin and glucose on the efficacy of NO at inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic environments using different doses of insulin as well as pioglitazone. Type 1 diabetes was induced in male lean Zucker (LZ) rats with streptozotocin (60 mg/kg IP). Groups included control, moderate glucose control, and tight glucose control. Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats fed Purina 5008 chow were used as a type 2 diabetic model. Groups included no therapy, insulin therapy, or pioglitazone therapy. After 4 weeks of maintaining group assignments, the carotid artery injury model was performed. Treatment groups included: control, injury and injury plus NO. 2 weeks following arterial injury, in the type 1 diabetic rats, NO most effectively reduced the neointimal area in the moderate and tightly controlled groups (81% and 88% vs. 33%, respectively, p=0.01). In type 2 diabetic rats, the metabolic environment had no impact on the efficacy of NO (81-82% reduction for all groups). Thus, in this study, we show NO is effective at inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic environments. A greater understanding of how the metabolic environment may impact the efficacy of NO may lead to the development of more effective NO-based therapies for patients with diabetes.

  6. Role of Metabolic Environment on Nitric Oxide Mediated Inhibition of Neointimal Hyperplasia in Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Martinez, Janet; Jiang, Qun; Kibbe, Melina R.

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is well known to inhibit neointimal hyperplasia following arterial injury. Previously, we reported that NO was more effective at inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in a type 2 diabetic environment than control. We also found that NO was ineffective in an uncontrolled type 1 diabetic environment; however, insulin restored the efficacy of NO. Thus, the goal of this study was to more closely evaluate the effect of insulin and glucose on the efficacy of NO at inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic environments using different doses of insulin as well as pioglitazone. Type 1 diabetes was induced in male Lean Zucker (LZ) rats with streptozotocin (60mg/kg IP). Groups included control, moderate glucose control, and tight glucose control. Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats fed Purina 5008 chow were used as a type 2 diabetic model. Groups included no therapy, insulin therapy, or pioglitazone therapy. After 4 weeks of maintaining group assignments, the carotid artery injury model was performed. Treatment groups included: control, injury, and injury plus NO. 2 weeks following arterial injury, in the type 1 diabetic rats, NO most effectively reduced the neointimal area in the moderate and tightly controlled groups (81% and 88% vs. 33%, respectively, p=0.01). In type 2 diabetic rats, the metabolic environment had no impact on the efficacy of NO (81%–82% reduction for all groups). Thus, in this study, we show NO is effective at inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic environments. A greater understanding of how the metabolic environment may impact the efficacy of NO may lead to the development of more effective NO-based therapies for patients with diabetes. PMID:24333562

  7. Inhibition of root meristem growth by cadmium involves nitric oxide-mediated repression of auxin accumulation and signalling in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hong-Mei; Huang, Xi

    2016-01-01

    The root is the first plant organ to get in contact with the toxin cadmium (Cd), which is a widespread soil contaminant. Cd inhibits the growth of the primary root, but the mechanisms underlying this inhibition remain elusive. In this study, we used physiological, pharmacological and genetic approaches to investigate the roles of nitric oxide (NO) and auxin in Cd-mediated inhibition of Arabidopsis thaliana root meristem growth. Our study demonstrated that in the first 12 h of exposure, Cd inhibits primary root elongation through a decrease in the sizes of both the elongation and meristematic zones. Following Cd exposure, a decrease in auxin levels is associated with reduced PIN1/3/7 protein accumulation, but not with reduced PIN1/3/7 transcript levels. Additionally, Cd stabilized AXR3/IAA17 protein to repress auxin signalling in this Cd-mediated process. Furthermore, decreasing Cd-induced NO accumulation with either NO-specific scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) or NO synthase inhibitor N(ω) -nitro-l-Arg-methylester (l-NAME) compromised the Cd-mediated inhibition of root meristem development, reduction in auxin and PIN1/3/7 accumulation, as well as stabilization of AXR3/IAA17, indicating that NO participates in Cd-mediated inhibition of root meristem growth. Taken together, our data suggest that Cd inhibits root meristem growth by NO-mediated repression of auxin accumulation and signalling in Arabidopsis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Caveolin-1 is important for nitric oxide-mediated angiogenesis in fibrin gels with human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-ming PAN; Yong-zhong YAO; Zhang-hua ZHU; Xi-tai SUN; Yu-dong QIU; Yi-tao DING

    2006-01-01

    Aim: The role of caveolin-l (Cav-1) in angiogenesis remains poorly understood. The endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS), a caveolin-interacting protein, was demonstrated to play a predominant role in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) -induced angiogenesis. The purpose of our study was to examine the role of Cav-1 and the eNOS complex in NO-mediated angiogenesis. Methods: Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were isolated and cultured in 3-D fibrin gels to form capillary-like tubules by VEGF stimulation. The expression of Cav-1 and eNOS was detected by semiquantitative RT-PCR. The HUVEC were treated with antisense oligonucleotides to downregulate Cav-1 expression. Both transduced and non-infected HUVEC were cultured in fibrin gels in the presence or absence of VEGF (20 ng/mL) and NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 5 mmol/L). NO was measured using a NO assay kit and capillary-like tubules were quantified by tubule formation index using the Image J program. Results: RT-PCR analysis revealed that Cav-1 levels steadily increased in a time-dependent manner and reached their maximum after 5 d of incubation, but there were no obvious changes in eNOS mRNA expression in response to VEGF in the fibrin gel model. VEGF (20 ng/mL) can promote NO production and the formation of capillary-like tubules, and this promoting effect of VEGF was blocked by the addition of L-NAME (5 mmol/L). When transduced HUVEC with the antisense Cav-1 oligonucleotides were plated in the fibrin gels, the capillary-like tubules were significantly fewer than those of the non-infected cells. The capillary-like tubules formation and NO production of transduced HUVEC with the antisense Cav-1 oligonucleotides cultured in fibrin gels showed no responses to the addition of VEGF (20 ng/mL) and L-NAME (5.0 mmol/L). Conclusion: NO was a critical angiogenic mediator in this model. Cav-1 was essential for NO-mediated angiogenesis and may be an important target of anti

  9. Nitric oxide mediates the fungal elicitor-induced Taxol biosynthesis of Taxus chinensis suspension cells through the reactive oxygen species-dependent and-independent signal pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Maojun; DONG Jufang

    2006-01-01

    Nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species are two important signal molecules that play key roles in plant defense responses. Nitric oxide generation and oxidative burst and accumulation of reactive oxygen species are the early reactions of Taxus chinensis suspension cells to fungal elicitor prepared from the cell walls of Penicillium citrinum. In order to investigate the relationship and/or interactions of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species in the elicitor-induced Taxol biosynthesis of T. chinensis suspension cells, we treated the cells with nitric oxide specific scavenger 2-4-carboxyphenyl-4,4,5,5-tetra- methylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPITO), nitric oxide synthase inhibitor S,S(-1,3-phenylene-bis(1,2-eth- anediyl)-bis-isothiourea (PBITU), membrane NAD(P) H oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium (DPI), superoxide dismutases (SOD) and catalase. The results show that pretreatment of T. chinensis cells with cPITO and DPI inhibited not only the elicitor-induced nitric oxide biosynthesis and oxidative burst, but also the elicitor-induced Taxol production, suggesting that both nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species are involved in elicitor-induced Taxol biosynthesis. Furthermore, pretreatment of the cells with cPITO and PBITU suppressed the elicitor-induced oxidative burst, indicating that the oxidative burst might be dependent on NO. Application of nitric oxide via its donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) triggered Taxol biosynthesis of T. chinensis cells. The nitric oxide-induced Taxol production was suppressed by DPI, showing that the oxidative burst is involved in NO-triggered Taxol biosynthesis. However, nitric oxide and the fungal elicitor induced Taxol biosynthesis even though the accumulation of reactive oxygen species wass completely abolished in T. chinensis cells. Our data show that nitric oxide may mediate the elicitor-induced Taxol biosynthesis of T. chinensis suspension cells through both reactive oxygen species-dependent and -independent signal

  10. Nitric oxide mediates aortic disease in mice deficient in the metalloprotease Adamts1 and in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oller, Jorge; Méndez-Barbero, Nerea; Ruiz, E Josue; Villahoz, Silvia; Renard, Marjolijn; Canelas, Lizet I; Briones, Ana M; Alberca, Rut; Lozano-Vidal, Noelia; Hurlé, María A; Milewicz, Dianna; Evangelista, Arturo; Salaices, Mercedes; Nistal, J Francisco; Jiménez-Borreguero, Luis Jesús; De Backer, Julie; Campanero, Miguel R; Redondo, Juan Miguel

    2017-02-01

    Heritable thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD), including Marfan syndrome (MFS), currently lack a cure, and causative mutations have been identified for only a fraction of affected families. Here we identify the metalloproteinase ADAMTS1 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) as therapeutic targets in individuals with TAAD. We show that Adamts1 is a major mediator of vascular homeostasis, given that genetic haploinsufficiency of Adamts1 in mice causes TAAD similar to MFS. Aortic nitric oxide and Nos2 levels were higher in Adamts1-deficient mice and in a mouse model of MFS (hereafter referred to as MFS mice), and Nos2 inactivation protected both types of mice from aortic pathology. Pharmacological inhibition of Nos2 rapidly reversed aortic dilation and medial degeneration in young Adamts1-deficient mice and in young or old MFS mice. Patients with MFS showed elevated NOS2 and decreased ADAMTS1 protein levels in the aorta. These findings uncover a possible causative role for the ADAMTS1-NOS2 axis in human TAAD and warrant evaluation of NOS2 inhibitors for therapy.

  11. Methanolic Extract of Clinacanthus nutans Exerts Antinociceptive Activity via the Opioid/Nitric Oxide-Mediated, but cGMP-Independent, Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hafiz Abdul Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the present study were to determine the mechanisms of antinociceptive effect of methanol extract of Clinacanthus nutans (Acanthaceae leaves (MECN using various animal nociceptive models. The antinociceptive activity of orally administered 10% DMSO, 100 mg/kg acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, 5 mg/kg morphine, or MECN (100, 250, and 500 mg/kg was determined using the acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction (ACT, formalin-induced paw licking (FT, and hot plate tests (HPT. The role of opioid and nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO/cGMP systems was also investigated. The results showed that MECN produced a significant (p500 mg/kg or 227.7 mg/kg, respectively. This antinociceptive activity was fully antagonized by naloxone (a nonselective opioid antagonist but was partially reversed by L-arginine (L-arg; a nitric oxide [NO] precursor, Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME; an NO synthase inhibitor, or their combinations thereof. In contrast, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor enhanced the extract’s antinociception. UHPLC analysis revealed the presence of several flavonoid-based compounds with antinociceptive action. In conclusion, MECN exerted the peripherally and centrally mediated antinociceptive activity via the modulation of the opioid/NO-mediated, but cGMP-independent, systems.

  12. Methanolic Extract of Clinacanthus nutans Exerts Antinociceptive Activity via the Opioid/Nitric Oxide-Mediated, but cGMP-Independent, Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Rahim, Mohammad Hafiz; Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin; Mohd Sani, Mohd Hijaz; Omar, Maizatul Hasyima; Yakob, Yusnita; Cheema, Manraj Singh; Ching, Siew Mooi; Ahmad, Zuraini; Abdul Kadir, Arifah

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to determine the mechanisms of antinociceptive effect of methanol extract of Clinacanthus nutans (Acanthaceae) leaves (MECN) using various animal nociceptive models. The antinociceptive activity of orally administered 10% DMSO, 100 mg/kg acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), 5 mg/kg morphine, or MECN (100, 250, and 500 mg/kg) was determined using the acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction (ACT), formalin-induced paw licking (FT), and hot plate tests (HPT). The role of opioid and nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO/cGMP) systems was also investigated. The results showed that MECN produced a significant (p 500 mg/kg or 227.7 mg/kg, respectively. This antinociceptive activity was fully antagonized by naloxone (a nonselective opioid antagonist) but was partially reversed by l-arginine (l-arg; a nitric oxide [NO] precursor), Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME; an NO synthase inhibitor), or their combinations thereof. In contrast, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor) enhanced the extract's antinociception. UHPLC analysis revealed the presence of several flavonoid-based compounds with antinociceptive action. In conclusion, MECN exerted the peripherally and centrally mediated antinociceptive activity via the modulation of the opioid/NO-mediated, but cGMP-independent, systems.

  13. Impaired functions of neural stem cells by abnormal nitric oxide-mediated signaling in an in vitro model of Niemann-Pick type C disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun-Jung Kim; Myung-Sin Lim; Soo-Kyung Kang; Yong-Soon Lee; Kyung-Sun Kang

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in the promotion of neurodegeneration.However,little is known about the relationship between NO and the self-renewal or differentiation capacity of neural stem cells (NSCs) in neurodegenerative disease.In this study,we investigated the effect of NO on self-renewal of NSCs in an animal model for Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease.We found that NO production was significantly increased in NSCs from NPC1-deficient mice (NPC1-/-),which showed reduced NSC self-renewal.The number of nestin-positive cells and the size of neurospheres were both significantly decreased.The expression of NO synthase (NOS) was increased in neurospheres derived from the brain of NPC1-/- mice in comparison to wild-type neurospheres.NO-mediated activation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β(GSK3β) and caspase-3 was also observed in NSCs from NPC1-/- mice.The self-renewal ability of NSCs from NPC1-/- mice was restored by an NOS inhibitor,L-NAME,which resulted in the inhibition of GSK3β and caspase-3.In addition,the differentiation ability of NSCs was partially restored and the number of Fluoro-Jade C-positive degenerating neurons was reduced.These data suggest that overproduction of NO in NPC disease impaired the self-renewal of NSCs.Control of NO production may be key for the treatment of NPC disease.

  14. Salt Stress Reduces Root Meristem Size by Nitric Oxide-Mediated Modulation of Auxin Accumulation and Signaling in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen; Li, Rong-Jun; Han, Tong-Tong; Cai, Wei; Fu, Zheng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The development of the plant root system is highly plastic, which allows the plant to adapt to various environmental stresses. Salt stress inhibits root elongation by reducing the size of the root meristem. However, the mechanism underlying this process remains unclear. In this study, we explored whether and how auxin and nitric oxide (NO) are involved in salt-mediated inhibition of root meristem growth in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using physiological, pharmacological, and genetic approaches. We found that salt stress significantly reduced root meristem size by down-regulating the expression of PINFORMED (PIN) genes, thereby reducing auxin levels. In addition, salt stress promoted AUXIN RESISTANT3 (AXR3)/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID17 (IAA17) stabilization, which repressed auxin signaling during this process. Furthermore, salt stress stimulated NO accumulation, whereas blocking NO production with the inhibitor Nω-nitro-l-arginine-methylester compromised the salt-mediated reduction of root meristem size, PIN down-regulation, and stabilization of AXR3/IAA17, indicating that NO is involved in salt-mediated inhibition of root meristem growth. Taken together, these findings suggest that salt stress inhibits root meristem growth by repressing PIN expression (thereby reducing auxin levels) and stabilizing IAA17 (thereby repressing auxin signaling) via increasing NO levels. PMID:25818700

  15. High-affinity uptake of kynurenine and nitric oxide-mediated inhibition of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase in bone marrow-derived myeloid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Toshiaki; Ogasawara, Nanako; Akimoto, Hidetoshi; Takikawa, Osamu; Hiramatsu, Rie; Kawabe, Tsutomu; Isobe, Ken-Ichi; Nagase, Fumihiko

    2008-02-15

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO)-initiated tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine (Kyn) pathway in some dendritic cells (DC) such as plasmacytoid DC (pDC) regulates T-cell responses. It is unclear whether bone marrow-derived myeloid DC (BMDC) express functional IDO. The IDO expression was examined in CD11c(+)CD11b(+) BMDC differentiated from mouse bone marrow cells using GM-CSF. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG) induced the expression of IDO protein with the production of nitric oxide (NO) in BMDC in cultures for 24h. In the enzyme assay using cellular extracts of BMDC, the IDO activity of BMDC stimulated with CpG was enhanced by the addition of a NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor, suggesting that IDO activity was suppressed by NO production. On the other hand, the concentration of Kyn in the culture supernatant of BMDC was not increased by stimulation with CpG. Exogenously added Kyn was taken up by BMDC independently of CpG stimulation and NO production, and the uptake of Kyn was inhibited by a transport system L-specific inhibitor or high concentrations of tryptophan. The uptake of tryptophan by BMDC was markedly lower than that of Kyn. In conclusion, IDO activity in BMDC is down-regulated by NO production, whereas BMDC strongly take up exogenous Kyn.

  16. Nitric oxide-mediated vascular function in sepsis using passive leg movement as a novel assessment: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ashley D; Rossman, Matthew J; Witman, Melissa A; Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Groot, H Jonathan; Garten, Ryan S; Richardson, Russell S

    2016-05-01

    Post-cuff occlusion flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is a proposed indicator of nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and vascular function. FMD is reduced in patients with sepsis and may be a marker of end organ damage and mortality. However, FMD likely does not solely reflect NO-mediated vasodilation, is technically challenging, and often demonstrates poor reproducibility. In contrast, passive leg movement (PLM), a novel methodology to assess vascular function, yields a hyperemic response that is predominately NO-dependent, reproducible, and easily measured. This study evaluated PLM as an approach to assess NO-mediated vascular function in patients with sepsis. We hypothesized that PLM-induced hyperemia, quantified by the increase in leg blood flow (LBF), would be attenuated in sepsis. In a cross-sectional study, 17 subjects in severe sepsis or septic shock were compared with 16 matched healthy controls. Doppler ultrasound was used to assess brachial artery FMD and the hyperemic response to PLM in the femoral artery. FMD was attenuated in septic compared with control subjects (1.1 ± 1.7% vs. 6.8 ± 1.3%; values are means ± SD). In terms of PLM, baseline LBF (196 ± 33 ml/min vs. 328 ± 20 ml/min), peak change in LBF from baseline (133 ± 28 ml/min vs. 483 ± 86 ml/min), and the LBF area under the curve (16 ± 8.3 vs. 143 ± 33) were all significantly attenuated in septic subjects. Vascular function, as assessed by both FMD and PLM, is attenuated in septic subjects compared with controls. These data support the concept that NO bioavailability is attenuated in septic subjects, and PLM appears to be a novel and feasible approach to assess NO-mediated vascular function in sepsis.

  17. Boldo prevents UV light and nitric oxide-mediated plasmid DNA damage and reduces the expression of Hsp70 protein in melanoma cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Alessandra; Cardile, Venera; Caggia, Silvia; Gunther, Germán; Troncoso, Nicolas; Garbarino, Juan

    2011-09-01

    This study was designed to investigate the potential protective effect of a methanolic extract of Peumus boldus leaves on UV light and nitric oxide (NO)-mediated DNA damage. In addition, we investigated the growth inhibitory activity of this natural product against human melanoma cells (M14). Boldine, catechin, quercetin and rutin were identified using a HPLC method. The extract was incubated with plasmid DNA and, before irradiating the samples with UV-R, H(2) O(2) was added. For analysis of DNA single-strand breaks induced by NO, the experiments were performed by incubating the extract with Angeli's salt. In the study on M14 cell line, cell viability was measured using MTT assay. Release of lactate dehydrogenase, a marker of membrane breakdown, was also measured. For the detection of apoptosis, the evaluation of DNA fragmentation (COMET assay) and caspase-3 activity assay were employed. The expression of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) was detected by Western blot analysis. Generation of reactive oxygen species was measured by using a fluorescent probe. The extract (demonstrating the synergistic effect of the constituents boldine and flavonoids), showed a protective effect on plasmid DNA and selectively inhibited the growth of melanoma cells. But a novel finding was that apoptosis evoked by this natural product in M14 cells, appears to be mediated, at least in part, via the inhibition of Hsp70 expression, which may be correlated with a modulation of redox-sensitive mechanisms. These results confirm the promising biological properties of Peumus boldus and encourage in-vivo investigations into its potential anti-cancer activity. © 2011 The Authors. JPP © 2011 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  18. TRPA1, NMDA receptors and nitric oxide mediate mechanical hyperalgesia induced by local injection of magnesium sulfate into the rat hind paw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srebro, Dragana P; Vučković, Sonja M; Savić Vujović, Katarina R; Prostran, Milica Š

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that while magnesium, an antagonist of the glutamate subtype of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, possesses analgesic properties, it can induce writhing in rodents. The aim of this study was to determine the effect and mechanism of action of local (intraplantar) administration of magnesium sulfate (MS) on the paw withdrawal threshold (PWT) to mechanical stimuli. The PWT was evaluated by the electronic von Frey test in male Wistar rats. Tested drugs were either co-administered intraplantarly (i.pl.) with MS or given into the contralateral paw to exclude systemic effects. MS at doses of 0.5, 1.5, 3 and 6.2 mg/paw (i.pl.) induced a statistically significant (as compared to 0.9% NaCl) and dose-dependent mechanical hyperalgesia. Only isotonic MS (250 mmol/l or 6.2% or 6.2 mg/paw) induced mechanical hyperalgesia that lasted at least six hours. Isotonic MS-induced mechanical hyperalgesia was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by co-injection of camphor, a non-selective TRPA1 antagonist (0.3, 1 and 2.5 μg/paw), MK-801, a NMDA receptor antagonist (0.001, 0.025 and 0.1 μg/paw), L-NAME, a non-selective nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor (20, 50 and 100 μg/paw), ARL 17477, a selective neuronal NOS inhibitor (5.7 and 17 μg/paw), SMT, a selective inducible NOS inhibitor (1 and 2.78 μg/paw), and methylene blue, a guanylate cyclase inhibitor (5, 20 and 125 μg/paw). Drugs injected into the contralateral hind paw did not produce significant effects. These results suggest that an i.pl. injection of MS produces local peripheral mechanical hyperalgesia via activation of peripheral TRPA1 and NMDA receptors and peripheral production of NO.

  19. Nitric oxide mediates stretch-induced Ca2+ release via activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt pathway in smooth muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wei

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hollow smooth muscle organs such as the bladder undergo significant changes in wall tension associated with filling and distension, with attendant changes in muscle tone. Our previous study indicated that stretch induces Ca(2+ release occurs in the form of Ca(2+ sparks and Ca(2+ waves in urinary bladder myocytes. While, the mechanism underlying stretch-induced Ca2+ release in smooth muscle is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined the transduction mechanism linking cell stretch to Ca(2+ release. The probability and frequency of Ca(2+ sparks induced by stretch were closely related to the extent of cell extension and the time that the stretch was maintained. Experiments in tissues and single myocytes indicated that mechanical stretch significantly increases the production of nitric oxide (NO and the amplitude and duration of muscle contraction. Stretch-induced Ca(2+ sparks and contractility increases were abrogated by the NO inhibitor L-NAME and were also absent in eNOS knockout mice. Furthermore, exposure of eNOS null mice to exogenously generated NO induced Ca(2+ sparks. The soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ did not inhibit SICR, but this process was effectively blocked by the PI3 kinase inhibitors LY494002 and wortmannin; the phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS were up-regulated by 204+/-28.6% and 258+/-36.8% by stretch, respectively. Moreover, stretch significantly increased the eNOS protein expression level. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taking together, these results suggest that stretch-induced Ca2+ release is NO dependent, resulting from the activation of PI3K/Akt pathway in smooth muscle.

  20. Mechanisms of nitric oxide-mediated inhibition of EMT in cancer: inhibition of the metastasis-inducer Snail and induction of the metastasis-suppressor RKIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baritaki, Stavroula; Huerta-Yepez, Sara; Sahakyan, Anna; Karagiannides, Iordanis; Bakirtzi, Kyriaki; Jazirehi, Ali; Bonavida, Benjamin

    2010-12-15

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in cancer has been controversial and is based on the levels of NO and the responsiveness of the tumor type. It remains unclear whether NO can inhibit the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in cancer cells. EMT induction is mediated, in part, by the constitutive activation of the metastasis-inducer transcription factor, Snail and EMT can be inhibited by the metastasis-suppressor Raf-1 kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) and E-cadherin. Snail is transcriptionally regulated by NF-κB and in turn, Snail represses RKIP transcription. Hence, we hypothesized that high levels of NO, that inhibit NF-κB activity, may also inhibit Snail and induce RKIP and leading to inhibition of EMT. We show that treatment of human prostate metastatic cell lines with the NO donor, DETANONOate, inhibits EMT and reverses both the mesenchymal phenotype and the cell invasive properties. Further, treatment with DETANONOate inhibits Snail expression and DNA-binding activity in parallel with the upregulation of RKIP and E-cadherin protein levels. The pivotal roles of Snail inhibition and RKIP induction in DETANONOate-mediated inhibition of EMT were corroborated by both Snail silencing by siRNA and by ectopic expression of RKIP. The in vitro findings were validated in vivo in mice bearing PC-3 xenografts and treated with DETANONOate. The present findings show, for the first time, the novel role of high subtoxic concentrations of NO in the inhibition of EMT. Thus, NO donors may exert therapeutic activities in the reversal of EMT and metastasis.

  1. Glutathione plays an essential role in nitric oxide-mediated iron-deficiency signaling and iron-deficiency tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Varanavasiappan; Wang, Yi-Wen; Tsednee, Munkhtsetseg; Karunakaran, Krithika; Yeh, Kuo-Chen

    2015-11-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a common agricultural problem that affects both the productivity and nutritional quality of plants. Thus, identifying the key factors involved in the tolerance of Fe deficiency is important. In the present study, the zir1 mutant, which is glutathione deficient, was found to be more sensitive to Fe deficiency than the wild type, and grew poorly in alkaline soil. Other glutathione-deficient mutants also showed various degrees of sensitivity to Fe-limited conditions. Interestingly, we found that the glutathione level was increased under Fe deficiency in the wild type. By contrast, blocking glutathione biosynthesis led to increased physiological sensitivity to Fe deficiency. On the other hand, overexpressing glutathione enhanced the tolerance to Fe deficiency. Under Fe-limited conditions, glutathione-deficient mutants, zir1, pad2 and cad2 accumulated lower levels of Fe than the wild type. The key genes involved in Fe uptake, including IRT1, FRO2 and FIT, are expressed at low levels in zir1; however, a split-root experiment suggested that the systemic signals that govern the expression of Fe uptake-related genes are still active in zir1. Furthermore, we found that zir1 had a lower accumulation of nitric oxide (NO) and NO reservoir S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). Although NO is a signaling molecule involved in the induction of Fe uptake-related genes during Fe deficiency, the NO-mediated induction of Fe-uptake genes is dependent on glutathione supply in the zir1 mutant. These results provide direct evidence that glutathione plays an essential role in Fe-deficiency tolerance and NO-mediated Fe-deficiency signaling in Arabidopsis.

  2. Stimulation of Baroresponsive Parts of the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract Produces Nitric Oxide-mediated Choroidal Vasodilation in Rat Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyan Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Preganglionic parasympathetic neurons of the ventromedial part of the superior salivatory nucleus (SSN mediate vasodilation of orbital and choroidal blood vessels, via their projection to the nitrergic pterygopalatine ganglion (PPG neurons that innervate these vessels. We recently showed that the baroresponsive part of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS innervates choroidal control parasympathetic preganglionic neurons of SSN in rats. As this projection provides a means by which blood pressure signals may modulate ChBF, we investigated if activation of baroresponsive NTS evokes ChBF increases in rat eye, using Laser Doppler flowmetry to measure ChBF transclerally. We found that electrical activation of ipsilateral baroresponsive NTS and its efferent fiber pathway to choroidal SSN increased mean ChBF by about 40-80% above baseline, depending on current level. The ChBF responses obtained with stimulation of baroresponsive NTS were driven by increases in both choroidal blood volume (i.e. vasodilation and choroidal blood velocity (presumed orbital vessel dilation. Stimulation of baroresponsive NTS, by contrast, yielded no significant mean increases in systemic arterial blood pressure. We further found that the increases in ChBF with NTS stimulation were significantly reduced by administration of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nω-propyl-l-arginine (NPA, thus implicating nitrergic PPG terminals in the NTS-elicited ChBF increases. Our results show that NTS neurons projecting to choroidal SSN do mediate increase in ChBF, and thus suggest a role of baroresponsive NTS in the blood pressure-dependent regulation of ChBF.

  3. Stimulation of Baroresponsive Parts of the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract Produces Nitric Oxide-mediated Choroidal Vasodilation in Rat Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunyan; Fitzgerald, Malinda E. C.; Del Mar, Nobel; Reiner, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Preganglionic parasympathetic neurons of the ventromedial part of the superior salivatory nucleus (SSN) mediate vasodilation of orbital and choroidal blood vessels, via their projection to the nitrergic pterygopalatine ganglion (PPG) neurons that innervate these vessels. We recently showed that the baroresponsive part of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) innervates choroidal control parasympathetic preganglionic neurons of SSN in rats. As this projection provides a means by which blood pressure (BP) signals may modulate choroidal blood flow (ChBF), we investigated if activation of baroresponsive NTS evokes ChBF increases in rat eye, using Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF) to measure ChBF transclerally. We found that electrical activation of ipsilateral baroresponsive NTS and its efferent fiber pathway to choroidal SSN increased mean ChBF by about 40–80% above baseline, depending on current level. The ChBF responses obtained with stimulation of baroresponsive NTS were driven by increases in both choroidal blood volume (ChBVol; i.e., vasodilation) and choroidal blood velocity (ChBVel; possibly due to orbital vessel dilation). Stimulation of baroresponsive NTS, by contrast, yielded no significant mean increases in systemic arterial blood pressure (ABP). We further found that the increases in ChBF with NTS stimulation were significantly reduced by administration of the neuronal nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor Nω-propyl-l-arginine (NPA), thus implicating nitrergic PPG terminals in the NTS-elicited ChBF increases. Our results show that the NTS neurons projecting to choroidal SSN do mediate increase in ChBF, and thus suggest a role of baroresponsive NTS in the BP-dependent regulation of ChBF. PMID:27774055

  4. Nitric oxide mediates the vagal protective effect on ventricular fibrillation via effects on action potential duration restitution in the rabbit heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brack, Kieran E; Patel, Vanlata H; Coote, John H; Ng, G André

    2007-09-01

    We have previously shown that direct vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) reduces the slope of action potential duration (APD) restitution while simultaneously protecting the heart against induction of ventricular fibrillation (VF) in the absence of any sympathetic activity or tone. In the current study we have examined the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the effect of VNS. Monophasic action potentials were recorded from a left ventricular epicardial site on innervated, isolated rabbit hearts (n = 7). Standard restitution, effective refractory period (ERP) and VF threshold (VFT) were measured at baseline and during VNS in the presence of the NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NA, 200 microm) and during reversing NO blockade with L-arginine (L-Arg, 1 mm). Data represent the mean +/- S.E.M. The restitution curve was shifted upwards and became less steep with VNS when compared to baseline. L-NA blocked the effect of VNS whereas L-Arg restored the effect of VNS. The maximum slope of restitution was reduced from 1.17 +/- 0.14 to 0.60 +/- 0.09 (50 +/- 5%, P < 0.0001) during control, from 0.98 +/- 0.14 to 0.93 +/- 0.12 (2 +/- 10%, P = NS) in the presence of L-NA and from 1.16 +/- 0.17 to 0.50 +/- 0.10 (41 +/- 9%, P = 0.003) with L-Arg plus L-NA. ERP was increased by VNS in control from 119 +/- 6 ms to 130 +/- 6 ms (10 +/- 5%, P = 0.045) and this increase was not affected by L-NA (120 +/- 4 to 133 +/- 4 ms, 11 +/- 3%, P = 0.0019) or L-Arg with L-NA (114 +/- 4 to 123 +/- 4 ms, 8 +/- 2%, P = 0.006). VFT was increased from 3.0 +/- 0.3 to 5.8 +/- 0.5 mA (98 +/- 12%, P = 0.0017) in control, 3.4 +/- 0.4 to 3.8 +/- 0.5 mA (13 +/- 12%, P = 0.6) during perfusion with L-NA and 2.5 +/- 0.4 to 6.0 +/- 0.7 mA (175 +/- 50%, P = 0.0017) during perfusion with L-Arg plus L-NA. Direct VNS increased VFT and flattened the slope of APD restitution curve in this isolated rabbit heart preparation with intact autonomic nerves. These effects were blocked using L-NA and reversed by replenishing

  5. Nitric oxide mediates the fungal elicitor-induced puerarin biosynthesis in Pueraria thomsonii Benth. suspension cells through a salicylic acid (SA)-dependent and a jasmonic acid (JA)-dependent signal pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Maojun; DONG Jufang; ZHU Muyuan

    2006-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as a key signaling molecule in plant secondary metabolite biosynthesis recently. In order to investigate the molecular basis of NO signaling in elicitor-induced secondary metabolite biosynthesis of plant cells, we determined the contents of NO, salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), and puerarin in Pueraria thomsonii Benth. suspension cells treated with the elicitors prepared from cell walls of Penicillium citrinum. The results showed that the fungal elicitor induced NO burst, SA accumulation and puerarin production of P. thomsonii Benth. cells. The elicitor-induced SA accumulation and puerarin production was suppressed by nitric oxide specific scavenger cPITO, indicating that NO was essential for elicitor-induced SA and puerarin biosynthesis in P. thomsonii Benth. cells. In transgenic NahG P. thomsonii Benth. cells, the fungal elicitor also induced puerarin biosynthesis, NO burst, and JA accumulation, though the SA biosynthesis was impaired. The elicitor-induced JA accumulation in transgenic cells was blocked by cPITO, which suggested that JA acted downstream of NO and its biosynthesis was controlled by NO. External application of NO via its donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) enhanced puerarin biosynthesis in transgenic NahG P. thomsonii Benth. cells, and the NO-triggered puerarin biosynthesis was suppressed by JA inhibitors IBU and NDGA, which indicated that NO induced puerarin production through a JA-dependent signal pathway in the transgenic cells. Exogenous application of SA suppressed the elicitor-induced JA biosynthesis and reversed the inhibition of IBU and NDGA on elicitor-induced puerarin accumulation in transgenic cells, which indicated that SA inhibited JA biosynthesis in the cells and that SA might be used as a substitute for JA to mediate the elicitor- and NO-induced puerarin biosynthesis. It was, therefore, concluded that NO might mediate the elicitor-induced puerarin biosynthesis through SA- and JA-dependent signal

  6. Nitric oxide mediates root K+/Na+ balance in a mangrove plant, Kandelia obovata, by enhancing the expression of AKT1-type K+ channel and Na+/H+ antiporter under high salinity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Chen

    Full Text Available It is well known that nitric oxide (NO enhances salt tolerance of glycophytes. However, the effect of NO on modulating ionic balance in halophytes is not very clear. This study focuses on the role of NO in mediating K(+/Na(+ balance in a mangrove species, Kandelia obovata Sheue, Liu and Yong. We first analyzed the effects of sodium nitroprusside (SNP, an NO donor, on ion content and ion flux in the roots of K. obovata under high salinity. The results showed that 100 μM SNP significantly increased K(+ content and Na(+ efflux, but decreased Na(+ content and K(+ efflux. These effects of NO were reversed by specific NO synthesis inhibitor and scavenger, which confirmed the role of NO in retaining K(+ and reducing Na(+ in K. obovata roots. Using western-blot analysis, we found that NO increased the protein expression of plasma membrane (PM H(+-ATPase and vacuolar Na(+/H(+ antiporter, which were crucial proteins for ionic balance. To further clarify the molecular mechanism of NO-modulated K(+/Na(+ balance, partial cDNA fragments of inward-rectifying K(+ channel, PM Na(+/H(+ antiporter, PM H(+-ATPase, vacuolar Na(+/H(+ antiporter and vacuolar H(+-ATPase subunit c were isolated. Results of quantitative real-time PCR showed that NO increased the relative expression levels of these genes, while this increase was blocked by NO synthesis inhibitors and scavenger. Above results indicate that NO greatly contribute to K(+/Na(+ balance in high salinity-treated K. obovata roots, by activating AKT1-type K(+ channel and Na(+/H(+ antiporter, which are the critical components in K(+/Na(+ transport system.

  7. Annual Fungicide Loadings

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Pesticides, Herbicides, Fungicides...etc, are used for a variety of purposes, including control of household, lawn, and garden pests; for control of mosquitoes and...

  8. Bacterial degradation of fungicide captan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megadi, Veena B; Tallur, Preeti N; Mulla, Sikandar I; Ninnekar, Harichandra Z

    2010-12-22

    The phthalimide fungicide captan has been widely used to control plant pathogenic fungi. A strain of Bacillus circulans utilized the fungicide captan as sole source of carbon and energy. The organism degraded captan by a pathway involving its initial hydrolysis to yield cis-1,2,3,6-tetrahydrophthalimide, a compound without fungicidal activity. The formation of this compound was confirmed by HPLC, IR, NMR, and mass spectral analysis. The results also revealed that cis-1,2,3,6-tetrahydrophthalimide was further degraded to o-phthalic acid by a protocatechuate pathway. These findings indicated that there was a complete mineralization of fungicide captan by B. circulans.

  9. Fungicide resistance assays for fungal plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secor, Gary A; Rivera, Viviana V

    2012-01-01

    Fungicide resistance assays are useful to determine if a fungal pathogen has developed resistance to a fungicide used to manage the disease it causes. Laboratory assays are used to determine loss of sensitivity, or resistance, to a fungicide and can explain fungicide failures and for developing successful fungicide recommendations in the field. Laboratory assays for fungicide resistance are conducted by measuring reductions in growth or spore germination of fungi in the presence of fungicide, or by molecular procedures. This chapter describes two techniques for measuring fungicide resistance, using the sugarbeet leaf spot fungus Cercospora beticola as a model for the protocol. Two procedures are described for fungicides from two different classes; growth reduction for triazole (sterol demethylation inhibitor; DMI) fungicides, and inhibition of spore germination for quinone outside inhibitor (QoI) fungicides.

  10. Chiral separation of agricultural fungicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Fernández, Virginia; García, Maria Ángeles; Marina, Maria Luisa

    2011-09-23

    Fungicides are very important and diverse environmental and agricultural concern species. Their determination in commercial formulations or environmental matrices, requires highly efficient, selective and sensitive methods. A significant number of these chemicals are chiral with the activity residing usually in one of the enantiomers. The different toxicological and degradation behavior observed in many cases for fungicide enantiomers, results in the need to investigate them separately. For this purpose, separation techniques such as GC, HPLC, supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) and CE have widely been employed although, at present, HPLC still dominates chromatographic chiral analysis of fungicides. This review covers the literature concerning the enantiomeric separation of fungicides usually employed in agriculture grouping the chiral separation methodologies developed for their analysis in environmental, biological, and food samples.

  11. Review of strobilurin fungicide chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balba, Hamdy

    2007-05-01

    Strobilurins are natural products isolated and identified from specific fungi. Natural strobilurins were named in the order of their discovery as strobilurin-A followed by strobilurin-B, C, D etc. Their discovery opened the door for new chemistry of synthetic fungicides. Applying Quantitative Structural Activity Relationship (QSAR) on the structures of the natural strobilurins, many pesticide companies were able to discover many synthetic analogues that are more efficacious and more stable fungicides. At present there are about eight synthetic strobilurins in the fungicides worldwide market. Some of these products are worldwide registered for use as agrochemical and some are in the process of registration. This class of fungicides is relatively new, as crop protection products and information about them is still fairly scarce. In this review, syntheses and chemistry of natural and synthetic strobilurins are discussed. Also, the mode of action, efficacy, biotic/abiotic degradation, analytical methods, and agricultural uses are discussed.

  12. Fungicidal preparations from Inula viscose

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Inula viscosa is a perennial plant native to the Mediterranean Basin. Extracts made from the shoots of this plant exhibited a strong fungicidal activity in vitro and in vivo. TLC analyses revealed at least 7 fungicidal compounds. Most are lipophilic. When such extracts were sprayed on the leaf surface of crop plants they effectively controlled downy mildew in grape, cucumber and tabacco; late blight in potato and tomato; gray mold in cucumber and tomato; and, powdery mildew in cucurbits and c...

  13. Determination of nitric oxide mediating intracellular Ca2+ release on neurons based on confocal microscopy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liqin; Wang, Yuhua; He, Yipeng; Zeng, Yixiu; Zhang, Yanding; Xie, Shusen

    2014-09-01

    The gas NO is a ubiquitous intercellular messenger that modulates a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological functions. But few studies were made to study the role of NO in the Ca2+ release in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons by confocal microscopy. Thus the objective of this study was to assess if NO has a role in Ca2+ signaling in DRG neurons using confocal microscopy combined with special fluorescence probe Fluo-3/AM. A 100 μM concentration of the NO donors (Sodium Nitroprusside, Dihydrate, SNP) and NO synthase inhibitor (NG-Monomethyl-L-arginine, Monoacetate salt, L-NMMA) was used in the study. Results showed that the fluorescence intensity increased rapidly after injecting SNP, which indicated that SNP could enhance intracellular Ca2+ release. And the fluorescence intensity shrank gradually with time and kept at a low level for quite a long period after loading with L-NMMA which indicated that L-NMMA could block intracellular Ca2+ release. All these results demonstrated that NO was involved in the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ release in the DRG neurons.

  14. Novel approaches to improving endothelium-dependent nitric oxide-mediated vasodilatation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Ulf; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Rosalia; Dalsgaard, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    reacting with NO. Endothelial dysfunction is therapeutically reversible and physical exercise, calcium channel blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, and angiotensin receptor antagonists improve flow-evoked endothelium-dependent vasodilation in patients with hypertension and diabetes. We have...... channels and an influx of calcium play an important role in G-protein coupled receptor-evoked release of NO. Thus, all three approaches increase bioavailability of NO in the vascular wall, but it remains to be addressed whether these actions have any direct benefit at a clinical level....

  15. Nitric oxide mediated Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis and protective role of nanoconjugated vancomycin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Subhankari Prasad Chakraborty; Santanu Kar Mahapatra; Sumanta Kumar Sahu; Sourav Chattopadhyay; Panchanan Pramanik; Somenath Roy

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To test the survival ofStaphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) inside lymphocyte that contributes to the pathogenesis of infection and possible anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effect of nanoconjugated vancomycin againstin vivo S. aureus infection in a dose and duration dependent manner.Methods:5×106CFU/mL vancomycin-sensitive S. aureus(VSSA) and vancomycin-resistiveS. aureus (VRSA) were challenged in Swiss male mice for3 days,5 days, 10 days and15days, respectively. Bacteremia and inflammatory parameters were observed to evaluate the duration for development ofVSSA andVRSA infection.100mg/kg bw/day and500 mg/kg bw/day nanoconjugated vancomycin were administrated toVSSA andVRSA infected group for5days. Bacteremia, inflammatory parameters and oxidative stress related parameters were tested to observe the effective dose of nanoconjugated vancomycin againstVSSAandVRSA infection. Nanoconjugated vancomycin was treated at a dose of100 mg/kg bw/day and500 mg/kg bw/day, respectively, toVSSA andVRSA infected group for successive5 days,10 days and 15 days. Bacteremia, inflammatory parameters and oxidative stress related parameters were observed to assess the effective duration of nanoconjugated vancomycin againstVSSAand VRSA infection.Results: The result revealed thatin vivoVSSA andVRSA infection developed after 5 days of challenge by elevating theNO generation in lymphocyte and serum inflammatory markers. Administration with nanoconjugated vancomycin toVSSA andVRSA infected group at a dose of100 mg/kg bw/day and500 mg/kg bw/day, respectively, for successive10 days eliminated bacterimia, decreasedNO generation in lymphocyte, serum inflammatory markers and increased antioxidant enzyme status.Conclusions:These findings suggest,in vivochallenge ofVSSA andVRSA for5 days can produce the highest degree of damage in lymphocyte which can be ameliorated by treatment with nanoconjugated vancomycin for10 successive days.

  16. Infrared Imaging of Nitric Oxide-Mediated Blood Flow in Human Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbach, Alexander M.; Ackerman, Hans C.; Liu, Wei-Min; Meyer, Joseph M.; Littel, Patricia L.; Seamon, Catherine; Footman, Eleni; Chi, Amy; Zorca, Suzana; Krajewski, Megan L.; Cuttica, Michael J.; Machado, Roberto F.; Cannon, Richard O.; Kato, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular dysfunction is an important pathophysiologic manifestation of sickle cell disease (SCD), a condition that increases risk of pulmonary hypertension and stroke. We hypothesized that infrared (IR) imaging would detect changes in cutaneous blood flow reflective of vascular function. We performed IR imaging and conventional strain gauge plethysmography in twenty-five adults with SCD at baseline and during intra-arterial infusions of an endothelium-dependent vasodilator acetylcholine (ACh), an endothelium-independent vasodilator sodium nitroprusside (SNP), and a NOS inhibitor L-NMMA. Skin temperature measured by IR imaging increased in a dose-dependent manner to graded infusions of ACh (+1.1° C, p < 0.0001) and SNP (+0.9° C, p < 0.0001), and correlated with dose-dependent increases in forearm blood flow (ACh: +19.9 mL/min/100mL, p < 0.0001; rs = 0.57, p = 0.003; SNP: +8.6 mL/min/100mL, p < 0.0001; r = 0.70, p = 0.0002). Although IR measurement of skin temperature accurately reflected agonist-induced increases in blood flow, it was less sensitive to decreases in blood flow caused by NOS inhibition. Baseline forearm skin temperature measured by IR imaging correlated significantly with baseline forearm blood flow (31.8±0.2° C, 6.0±0.4 mL/min/100mL; r = 0.58, p = 0.003), and appeared to represent a novel biomarker of vascular function. It predicted a blunted blood flow response to SNP (r = −0.61, p = 0.002), and was independently associated with a marker of pulmonary artery pressure, as well as hemoglobin level, diastolic blood pressure, homocysteine, and cholesterol (R2 = 0.84, p < 0.0001 for the model). IR imaging of agonist-stimulated cutaneous blood flow represents a less cumbersome alternative to plethysmography methodology. Measurement of baseline skin temperature by IR imaging may be a useful new marker of vascular risk in adults with SCD. PMID:22784510

  17. The Development Of RRx-001, A Novel Nitric-Oxide-Mediated Epigenetically Active Anticancer Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Scicinski

    2015-08-01

    Conclusion: Early results in the ROCKET study suggest that RRx-001-mediated resensitization to previously refractory therapies may have a generalized effect, independent of KRAS or p53 status. These early results are intriguing, suggesting improved QOL and overall survival over currently approved therapy in the chemotherapy refractory colorectal cancer.

  18. Immune-relevant thrombocytes of common carp undergo parasite-induced nitric oxide-mediated apoptosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fink, I.R.; Ribeiro, C.M.S.; Forlenza, M.; Taverne-Thiele, J.J.; Rombout, J.H.W.M.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Wiegertjes, G.

    2015-01-01

    Common carp thrombocytes account for 30–40% of peripheral blood leukocytes and are abundant in the healthy animals' spleen, the thrombopoietic organ. We show that, ex vivo, thrombocytes from healthy carp express a large number of immune-relevant genes, among which several cytokines and Toll-like rec

  19. The evolution of fungicide resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, John A; Hawkins, Nichola J; Fraaije, Bart A

    2015-01-01

    Fungicides are widely used in developed agricultural systems to control disease and safeguard crop yield and quality. Over time, however, resistance to many of the most effective fungicides has emerged and spread in pathogen populations, compromising disease control. This review describes the development of resistance using case histories based on four important diseases of temperate cereal crops: eyespot (Oculimacula yallundae and Oculimacula acuformis), Septoria tritici blotch (Zymoseptoria tritici), powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis), and Fusarium ear blight (a complex of Fusarium and Microdochium spp). The sequential emergence of variant genotypes of these pathogens with reduced sensitivity to the most active single-site fungicides, methyl benzimidazole carbamates, demethylation inhibitors, quinone outside inhibitors, and succinate dehydrogenase inhibitors illustrates an ongoing evolutionary process in response to the introduction and use of different chemical classes. Analysis of the molecular mechanisms and genetic basis of resistance has provided more rapid and precise methods for detecting and monitoring the incidence of resistance in field populations, but when or where resistance will occur remains difficult to predict. The extent to which the predictability of resistance evolution can be improved by laboratory mutagenesis studies and fitness measurements, comparison between pathogens, and reconstruction of evolutionary pathways is discussed. Risk models based on fungal life cycles, fungicide properties, and exposure to the fungicide are now being refined to take account of additional traits associated with the rate of pathogen evolution. Experimental data on the selection of specific mutations or resistant genotypes in pathogen populations in response to fungicide treatments can be used in models evaluating the most effective strategies for reducing or preventing resistance. Resistance management based on robust scientific evidence is vital to prolong

  20. Genetics of fungal resistance to systemic fungicides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuyl, van J.M.

    1977-01-01

    Since the introduction of the systemic fungicides, fungicide resistance has become a serious problem in plant disease control. This study was carried out in order to contribute to the knowledge about the genetics of fungal resistance to fungicides both from a practical and a fundamental point of vie

  1. [Nitric oxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira, I

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide was identified as the relaxing factor derived from the endothelium in 1987. Nitric oxide synthesis allows the vascular system to maintain a state of vasodilation, thereby regulating arterial pressure. Nitric oxide is also found in platelets, where it inhibits adhesion and aggregation; in the immune system, where it is responsible for the cytotoxic action of macrophages; and in the nervous system, where it acts as neurotransmitter. A deficit in endogenous synthesis of nitric oxide contributes to such conditions as essential arterial hypertension, pulmonary hypertension and heart disease. An excess of nitrous oxide induced by endotoxins and cytokinins, meanwhile, is believed to be responsible for hypotension in septic shock and for hyperdynamic circulatory state in cirrhosis of the liver. Nitric oxide has also been implicated in the rejection of transplanted organs and in cell damage after reperfusion. Inhaled nitrous oxide gas reduces pulmonary hypertension without triggering systemic hypotension in both experimental and clinical conditions. It also produces selective vasodilation when used to ventilate specific pulmonary areas, thereby improving the ventilation/perfusion ratio and, hence, oxygenation. Nitric oxide inhalation is effective in pulmonary hypertension-coincident with chronic obstructive lung disease, in persistent neonatal pulmonary hypertension and in pulmonary hypertension with congenital or acquired heart disease. Likewise, it reduces intrapulmonary shunt in acute respiratory failure and improves gas exchange. Under experimental conditions nitric oxide acts as a bronchodilator, although it seems to be less effective for this purpose in clinical use.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Mixtures as a fungicide resistance management tactic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bosch, Frank; Paveley, Neil; van den Berg, Femke; Hobbelen, Peter; Oliver, Richard

    2014-12-01

    We have reviewed the experimental and modeling evidence on the use of mixtures of fungicides of differing modes of action as a resistance management tactic. The evidence supports the following conclusions. 1. Adding a mixing partner to a fungicide that is at-risk of resistance (without lowering the dose of the at-risk fungicide) reduces the rate of selection for fungicide resistance. This holds for the use of mixing partner fungicides that have either multi-site or single-site modes of action. The resulting predicted increase in the effective life of the at-risk fungicide can be large enough to be of practical relevance. The more effective the mixing partner (due to inherent activity and/or dose), the larger the reduction in selection and the larger the increase in effective life of the at-risk fungicide. 2. Adding a mixing partner while lowering the dose of the at-risk fungicide reduces the selection for fungicide resistance, without compromising effective disease control. The very few studies existing suggest that the reduction in selection is more sensitive to lowering the dose of the at-risk fungicide than to increasing the dose of the mixing partner. 3. Although there are very few studies, the existing evidence suggests that mixing two at-risk fungicides is also a useful resistance management tactic. The aspects that have received too little attention to draw generic conclusions about the effectiveness of fungicide mixtures as resistance management strategies are as follows: (i) the relative effect of the dose of the two mixing partners on selection for fungicide resistance, (ii) the effect of mixing on the effective life of a fungicide (the time from introduction of the fungicide mode of action to the time point where the fungicide can no longer maintain effective disease control), (iii) polygenically determined resistance, (iv) mixtures of two at-risk fungicides, (v) the emergence phase of resistance evolution and the effects of mixtures during this phase

  3. 1978 Suggested Fungicide Guide: Fungicide Guide for Commercial Vegetable Growers. Circular 999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Barry; Shurtleff, M. C.

    This circular lists suggested uses of insecticides and fungicides for the control of pests and disease by commercial vegetable growers. Suggestions are given for selection, dosage and application of fungicides to control infestation in all crops of commercial importance. (CS)

  4. Adjuvants for spraying of fungicides in wheat

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The foliar diseases and spike can markedly reduce the yield of wheat. Despite prevailing chemical control in the management of disease, studies with adjuvants to improve the performance of fungicides are still incipient. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of adding adjuvants to chemical fungicides to control leaf diseases and spike, as well as on the yield of wheat crop. The experimental design was a randomized block design with 05 treatments: control (no fungicide application i...

  5. PROS AND CONS OF FUNGICIDES: AN OVERVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Anju Rani*, Raj Singh, Permod Kumar, Gyanika Shukla

    2017-01-01

    Many contact and systemic fungicides are used to control plant pathogens to get disease free crop. Farmers use these chemicals to protect their crop like plantation crop, fiber crop, vegetable and fruit crops etc., from plant pathogenic fungi and their toxins which destroy their entire crop and finally economic loss occurred. But these fungicides also affect soil microorganisms like decomposers and mycorrhizal fungi etc. Fungicides also show hazardous affect on human health. Soil and water po...

  6. Can high-risk fungicides be used in mixtures without selecting for fungicide resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikaberidze, Alexey; McDonald, Bruce A; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    2014-04-01

    Fungicide mixtures produced by the agrochemical industry often contain low-risk fungicides, to which fungal pathogens are fully sensitive, together with high-risk fungicides known to be prone to fungicide resistance. Can these mixtures provide adequate disease control while minimizing the risk for the development of resistance? We present a population dynamics model to address this question. We found that the fitness cost of resistance is a crucial parameter to determine the outcome of competition between the sensitive and resistant pathogen strains and to assess the usefulness of a mixture. If fitness costs are absent, then the use of the high-risk fungicide in a mixture selects for resistance and the fungicide eventually becomes nonfunctional. If there is a cost of resistance, then an optimal ratio of fungicides in the mixture can be found, at which selection for resistance is expected to vanish and the level of disease control can be optimized.

  7. The emergence of resistance to fungicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbelen, Peter H F; Paveley, Neil D; van den Bosch, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Many studies exist about the selection phase of fungicide resistance evolution, where a resistant strain is present in a pathogen population and is differentially selected for by the application of fungicides. The emergence phase of the evolution of fungicide resistance--where the resistant strain is not present in the population and has to arise through mutation and subsequently invade the population--has not been studied to date. Here, we derive a model which describes the emergence of resistance in pathogen populations of crops. There are several important examples where a single mutation, affecting binding of a fungicide with the target protein, shifts the sensitivity phenotype of the resistant strain to such an extent that it cannot be controlled effectively ('qualitative' or 'single-step' resistance). The model was parameterized for this scenario for Mycosphaerella graminicola on winter wheat and used to evaluate the effect of fungicide dose rate on the time to emergence of resistance for a range of mutation probabilities, fitness costs of resistance and sensitivity levels of the resistant strain. We also evaluated the usefulness of mixing two fungicides of differing modes of action for delaying the emergence of resistance. The results suggest that it is unlikely that a resistant strain will already have emerged when a fungicide with a new mode of action is introduced. Hence, 'anti-emergence' strategies should be identified and implemented. For all simulated scenarios, the median emergence time of a resistant strain was affected little by changing the dose rate applied, within the range of doses typically used on commercial crops. Mixing a single-site acting fungicide with a multi-site acting fungicide delayed the emergence of resistance to the single-site component. Combining the findings with previous work on the selection phase will enable us to develop more efficient anti-resistance strategies.

  8. Maternal smoking and impaired endothelium-dependent nitric oxide-mediated relaxation of uterine small arteries in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Malene R; Uldbjerg, Niels; Stender, Steen;

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the endothelium-dependent relaxation of uterine small arteries from pregnant nonsmokers, smokers, and ex-smokers who stopped smoking early in pregnancy.......This study aimed to investigate the endothelium-dependent relaxation of uterine small arteries from pregnant nonsmokers, smokers, and ex-smokers who stopped smoking early in pregnancy....

  9. Multifaceted role of nitric oxide in an in vitro mouse neuronal injury model: transcriptomic profiling defines the temporal recruitment of death signalling cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhao Feng; Chen, Minghui Jessica; Manikandan, Jayapal; Melendez, Alirio J; Shui, Guanghou; Russo-Marie, Françoise; Whiteman, Matthew; Beart, Philip M; Moore, Philip K; Cheung, Nam Sang

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Nitric oxide is implicated in the pathogenesis of various neuropathologies characterized by oxidative stress. Although nitric oxide has been reported to be involved in the exacerbation of oxidative stress observed in several neuropathologies, existent data fail to provide a holistic description of how nitrergic pathobiology elicits neuronal injury. Here we provide a comprehensive description of mechanisms contributing to nitric oxide induced neuronal injury by global transcriptomic profiling. Microarray analyses were undertaken on RNA from murine primary cortical neurons treated with the nitric oxide generator DETA-NONOate (NOC-18, 0.5 mM) for 8–24 hrs. Biological pathway analysis focused upon 3672 gene probes which demonstrated at least a ±1.5-fold expression in a minimum of one out of three time-points and passed statistical analysis (one-way anova, P < 0.05). Numerous enriched processes potentially determining nitric oxide mediated neuronal injury were identified from the transcriptomic profile: cell death, developmental growth and survival, cell cycle, calcium ion homeostasis, endoplasmic reticulum stress, oxidative stress, mitochondrial homeostasis, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, and GSH and nitric oxide metabolism. Our detailed time-course study of nitric oxide induced neuronal injury allowed us to provide the first time a holistic description of the temporal sequence of cellular events contributing to nitrergic injury. These data form a foundation for the development of screening platforms and define targets for intervention in nitric oxide neuropathologies where nitric oxide mediated injury is causative. PMID:21352476

  10. Recent Trends in Studies on Botanical Fungicides in Agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Mi-Young Yoon; Byeongjin Cha; Jin-Cheol Kim

    2013-01-01

    Plants are attacked by various phytopathogenic fungi. For many years, synthetic fungicides have been used to control plant diseases. Although synthetic fungicides are highly effective, their repeated use has led to problems such as environmental pollution, development of resistance, and residual toxicity. This has prompted intensive research on the development of biopesticides, including botanical fungicides. To date, relatively few botanical fungicides have been registered and commercialized...

  11. Mycotoxin and fungicide residues in wheat grains from fungicide-treated plants measured by a validated LC-MS method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Luz, Suzane Rickes; Pazdiora, Paulo Cesar; Dallagnol, Leandro José; Dors, Giniani Carla; Chaves, Fábio Clasen

    2017-04-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum) is an annual crop, cultivated in the winter and spring and susceptible to several pathogens, especially fungi, which are managed with fungicides. It is also one of the most consumed cereals, and can be contaminated by mycotoxins and fungicides. The objective of this study was to validate an analytical method by LC-MS for simultaneous determination of mycotoxins and fungicide residues in wheat grains susceptible to fusarium head blight treated with fungicides, and to evaluate the relationship between fungicide application and mycotoxin production. All parameters of the validated analytical method were within AOAC and ANVISA limits. Deoxynivalenol was the prevalent mycotoxin in wheat grain and epoxiconazole was the fungicide residue found in the highest concentration. All fungicidal treatments induced an increase in AFB2 production when compared to the control (without application). AFB1 and deoxynivalenol, on the contrary, were reduced in all fungicide treatments compared to the control.

  12. Nitric oxide: considerations for the treatment of ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terpolilli, Nicole A; Moskowitz, Michael A; Plesnila, Nikolaus

    2012-01-01

    Some 40 years ago it was recognized by Furchgott and colleagues that the endothelium releases a vasodilator, endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF). Later on, several groups identified EDRF to be a gas, nitric oxide (NO). Since then, NO was identified as one of the most versatile and unique molecules in animal and human biology. Nitric oxide mediates a plethora of physiological functions, for example, maintenance of vascular tone and inflammation. Apart from these physiological functions, NO is also involved in the pathophysiology of various disorders, specifically those in which regulation of blood flow and inflammation has a key role. The aim of the current review is to summarize the role of NO in cerebral ischemia, the most common cause of stroke. PMID:22333622

  13. Screening Phytophthora rubi for fungicide resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preliminary results from the survey for fungicide resistance in Phytophthora were reported at the 2016 Washington Small Fruit Conference. Phytophthora was isolated from diseased plants in 28 red raspberry fields and tested against mefenoxam, the active ingredient of Ridomil. Most isolates were ident...

  14. Fungicide and insecticide residues in rice grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Mack Teló

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyse residues of fungicides and insecticides in rice grains that were subjected to different forms of processing. Field work was conducted during three crop seasons, and fungicides and insecticides were applied at different crop growth stages on the aerial portion of the rice plants. Azoxystrobin, difenoconazole, propiconazole, tebuconazole, and trifloxystrobin fungicides were sprayed only once at the R2 growth stage or twice at the R2 and R4 growth stages; cypermethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, permethrin, and thiamethoxam insecticides were sprayed at the R2 growth stage; and permethrin was sprayed at 5-day intervals from the R4 growth stage up to one day prior to harvest. Pesticide residues were analysed in uncooked, cooked, parboiled, polished and brown rice grains as well as rice hulls during the three crop seasons, for a total of 1458 samples. The samples were analysed by gas chromatography with electron capture detection (GC-ECD using modified QuEChERS as the extraction method. No fungicide or insecticide residues were detected in rice grain samples; however, azoxystrobin and cypermethrin residues were detected in rice hull samples.

  15. The 1975 Insecticide, Herbicide, Fungicide Quick Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Bill G.; Thomson, W. T.

    This is a quick guide for choosing a chemical to use to control a certain pest on a specific crop. Information in the book was obtained from manufacturers' labels and from the USDA and FDA pesticide summary. The book is divided into four parts: (1) insecticides, (2) herbicides, (3) fungicides, and (4) conversion tables. Each of the first three…

  16. Delaying selection for fungicide insensitivity by mixing fungicides at a low and high risk of resistance development: a modeling analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbelen, P H F; Paveley, N D; van den Bosch, F

    2011-10-01

    This study used mathematical modeling to predict whether mixtures of a high-resistance-risk and a low-risk fungicide delay selection for resistance against the high-risk fungicide. We used the winter wheat and Mycosphaerella graminicola host-pathogen system as an example, with a quinone outside inhibitor fungicide as the high-risk and chlorothalonil as the low-risk fungicide. The usefulness of the mixing strategy was measured as the "effective life": the number of seasons that the disease-induced reduction of the integral of canopy green area index during the yield forming period could be kept fungicides, (ii) was constant for the low-risk fungicide but could increase for the high-risk fungicide, and (iii) was adjusted for both fungicides but their ratio in the mixture was fixed. The effective life was highest when applying the full label-recommended dose of the low-risk fungicide and adjusting the dose of the high-risk fungicide each season to the level required to maintain effective control. This strategy resulted in a predicted effective life of ≤ 12 years compared with 3 to 4 years when using the high risk fungicide alone.

  17. Field evaluation of fungicides in controlling chickpea Ascochyta blight in Washington, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field evaluation of five fungicides of different fungicide classes showed that the fungicides can reduce disease severity and increase yield of chickpea. Alternative fungicides to traditional strobilurin fungicides were identified, and can be used to prevent development of strobilurin resistance in...

  18. High-intensity interval training prevents oxidant-mediated diaphragm muscle weakness in hypertensive mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, T Scott; Eisenkolb, Sophia; Drobner, Juliane; Fischer, Tina; Werner, Sarah; Linke, Axel; Mangner, Norman; Schuler, Gerhard; Adams, Volker

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension is a key risk factor for heart failure, with the latter characterized by diaphragm muscle weakness that is mediated in part by increased oxidative stress. In the present study, we used a deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt mouse model to determine whether hypertension could independently induce diaphragm dysfunction and further investigated the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT). Sham-treated (n = 11), DOCA-salt-treated (n = 11), and DOCA-salt+HIIT-treated (n = 15) mice were studied over 4 wk. Diaphragm contractile function, protein expression, enzyme activity, and fiber cross-sectional area and type were subsequently determined. Elevated blood pressure confirmed hypertension in DOCA-salt mice independent of HIIT (P HIIT. Myosin heavy chain (MyHC) protein expression tended to decrease (∼30%; P = 0.06) in DOCA-salt vs. sham- and DOCA-salt+HIIT mice, whereas oxidative stress increased (P HIIT further prevented direct oxidant-mediated diaphragm contractile dysfunction (P HIIT.-Bowen, T. S., Eisenkolb, S., Drobner, J., Fischer, T., Werner, S., Linke, A., Mangner, N., Schuler, G., Adams, V. High-intensity interval training prevents oxidant-mediated diaphragm muscle weakness in hypertensive mice.

  19. Can agricultural fungicides accelerate the discovery of human antifungal drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Kyung; Klittich, Carla J R

    2015-01-01

    Twelve drugs from four chemical classes are currently available for treatment of systemic fungal infections in humans. By contrast, more than 100 structurally distinct compounds from over 30 chemical classes have been developed as agricultural fungicides, and these fungicides target many modes of action not represented among human antifungal drugs. In this article we introduce the diverse aspects of agricultural fungicides and compare them with human antifungal drugs. We propose that the information gained from the development of agricultural fungicides can be applied to the discovery of new mechanisms of action and new antifungal agents for the management of human fungal infections.

  20. Recent Trends in Studies on Botanical Fungicides in Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Young Yoon

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Plants are attacked by various phytopathogenic fungi. For many years, synthetic fungicides have been used to control plant diseases. Although synthetic fungicides are highly effective, their repeated use has led to problems such as environmental pollution, development of resistance, and residual toxicity. This has prompted intensive research on the development of biopesticides, including botanical fungicides. To date, relatively few botanical fungicides have been registered and commercialized. However, many scientists have reported isolation and characterization of a variety of antifungal plant derivatives. Here, we present a survey of a wide range of reported plant-derived antifungal metabolites.

  1. Development of biodegradable fungicide by radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youngkeun; Kim, Dongsub

    2012-03-15

    To develop the fungicide which is biodegradable and alternative to chemical pesticide that has an side effect of environmental pollution, Mutant induction of the enhanced antifungal activity was studied by using radiation. Characteristics and structure of antifungal biomaterials derived from these mutants were analysed. Two biomaterials related to the antifungal activity from the above mutant were isolated and purified. Microbial pesticide were manufactured in combination of various additives. Antiphytopathogenic effects were proven by field test and it was promising to prevent Chinese cabbage and radish from phytophthora and root rot.

  2. Development of biodegradable fungicide by radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Keun; Kim, Dong Sub [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    To develop the fungicide which is biodegradable and alternative to chemical pesticide that has an side effect of environmental pollution, Mutant induction of the enhanced antifungal activity was studied by using radiation. Characteristics and structure of antifungal biomaterials derived from these mutants were analysed. Two biomaterials related to the antifungal activity from the above mutant were isolated and purified. Microbial pesticide were manufactured in combination of various additives. Antiphytopathogenic effects were proven by pot experiment and It was promising to prevent pepper, Chinese cabbage and radish from anthrax, phytophthora and root rot

  3. A model for fungicide applications in winter wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørum, Jens Erik; Pinnschmidt, Hans; Jørgensen, Lise Nistrup

    2006-01-01

    A statistical prediction of the opitamal fungicide dose and strategy based on expert knowledge and 5 yers' trial data from Denmark......A statistical prediction of the opitamal fungicide dose and strategy based on expert knowledge and 5 yers' trial data from Denmark...

  4. Synthesis and Fungicidal Activities of Pyrimethanil Heterocyclic Acid Salt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN,Xiao-Hong; LIU,Yuan-Fa; CHEN,Bang; JIA,Ying-Qi; YANG,Jian-Wu

    2007-01-01

    Seven pyrimethanil salts were synthesized by organic base containing nitrogen atom reacting with substituted pyridine acids. They are reported for the first time. Their structures have been confirmed by IR, 1H NMR and elemental analysis. The preliminary toxicity tests indicated that most of them exhibited excellent fungicidal activities.The relationship between the structures and the fungicidal activities of the compounds was discussed.

  5. Interactions between yeasts, fungicides and apple fruit russeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gildemacher, P.R.; Heijne, B.; Silvestri, M.; Houbraken, J.; Hoekstra, E.; Theelen, B.; Boekhout, T.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of inoculations with yeasts occurring on apple surfaces and fungicide treatments on the russeting of Elstar apples was studied. Captan, dithianon and a water treatment were implemented to study the interaction between the fungicides, the inoculated yeast species and Aureobasidium pullulan

  6. Design, synthesis, and fungicidal activities of imino diacid analogs of valine amide fungicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Man; Yang, Hui-Hui; Tian, Lei; Li, Jian-Qiang; Zhao, Wei-Guang

    2015-12-15

    The novel imino diacid analogs of valine amides were synthesized via several steps, including the protection, amidation, deprotection, and amino alkylation of valine, with the resulting structures confirmed by (1)H and (13)C NMR and HRMS. Bioassays showed that some of these compounds exhibited good fungicidal activity. Notably, isopropyl 2-((1-((1-(3-fluorophenyl)ethyl)amino)-3-methyl-1-oxobutan-2-yl)amino)propanoate 5i displayed significant levels of control, at 50%, against Erysiphe graminis at 3.9μM as well as a level of potency very similar to the reference azoxystrobin, which gave 60% activity at this concentration. The present work demonstrates that imino diacid analogs of valine amides could be potentially useful key compounds for the development of novel fungicides against wheat powdery mildew.

  7. A rapid resazurin bioassay for assessing the toxicity of fungicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fai, Patricia Bi; Grant, Alastair

    2009-03-01

    Fungicides are widely used in agriculture, and released in large amounts to the environment. Methods used for antifungal susceptibility testing are cumbersome and time-consuming. As a result, very little attention has been paid to including fungal tests in the routine screening of pesticides and there are no reports in the literature of fungicide focussed effects directed analysis (EDA). In addition very little is known on the toxicity of fungicides to environmentally significant fungi. Here we report a rapid microplate-based resorufin fluorescence inhibition bioassay and compare it with a 24h microplate-based yeast growth inhibition bioassay using eight fungicides. The growth inhibition bioassay was sensitive, giving IC50 and IC90 values comparable to previously reported IC50 or MICs of these fungicides for Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other fungi. The resorufin fluorescence inhibition bioassay was both faster and more sensitive than the growth inhibition bioassay. Inhibitory concentrations obtained just after 30min of incubation with amphotericin B (AMB) and captan were at least a hundred fold lower than IC50s in the literature for fungi. The fluorescence bioassay showed only a small response to pyrazophos and thiabendazole but these only inhibited growth at high concentrations so this may reflect low sensitivity of S. cerevisiae to these particular fungicides. This bioassay can detect toxic effects of a range of fungicides from different chemical classes with different modes of action. It will be valuable for screening chemical libraries for fungicides and as a biomarker for detecting the effects of fungicides to non-target fungi.

  8. Chemosensitization of plant pathogenic fungi to agricultural fungicides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly eDzhavakhiya

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A common consequence of using agricultural fungicides is the development of resistance by fungal pathogens, which undermines reliability of fungicidal effectiveness. A potentially new strategy to aid in overcoming or minimizing this problem is enhancement of pathogen sensitivity to fungicides, or chemosensitization. Chemosensitization can be accomplished by combining a commercial fungicide with a certain non- or marginally fungicidal substance at levels where, alone, neither compound would be effective. Chemosensitization decreases the probability of the pathogen developing resistance, reduces the toxic impact on the environment by lowering effective dosage levels of toxic fungicides, and improves efficacy of antifungal agents. The present study shows that the antifungal activity of azole and strobilurin fungicides can be significantly enhanced through their co-application with certain natural or synthetic products against several economically important plant pathogenic fungi. Quadris (azoxystrobin combined with thymol at a non-fungitoxic concentration produced much higher growth inhibition of Bipolaris sorokiniana, Phoma glomerata, Alternaria sp. and Stagonospora nodorum than the fungicide alone. The effect of Dividend (difenoconazole applied with thymol significantly enhanced antifungal activity against B. sorokiniana and S. nodorum. Folicur (tebuconazole combined with 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (4-HBA, 2,3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde or thymol significantly inhibited growth of A. alternata, at a much greater level than the fungicide alone. In addition, co-application of Folicur and 4-HBA resulted in a similar enhancement of antifungal activity against Fusarium culmorum. Lastly, we discovered that metabolites in the culture liquid of F. sambucinum biocontrol isolate FS-94 also had chemosensitizing activity, increasing S. nodorum sensitivity to Folicur and Dividend.

  9. Chemosensitization of plant pathogenic fungi to agricultural fungicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhavakhiya, Vitaly; Shcherbakova, Larisa; Semina, Yulia; Zhemchuzhina, Natalia; Campbell, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    A common consequence of using agricultural fungicides is the development of resistance by fungal pathogens, which undermines reliability of fungicidal effectiveness. A potentially new strategy to aid in overcoming or minimizing this problem is enhancement of pathogen sensitivity to fungicides, or "chemosensitization." Chemosensitization can be accomplished by combining a commercial fungicide with a certain non- or marginally fungicidal substance at levels where, alone, neither compound would be effective. Chemosensitization decreases the probability of the pathogen developing resistance, reduces the toxic impact on the environment by lowering effective dosage levels of toxic fungicides, and improves efficacy of antifungal agents. The present study shows that the antifungal activity of azole and strobilurin fungicides can be significantly enhanced through their co-application with certain natural or synthetic products against several economically important plant pathogenic fungi. Quadris (azoxystrobin) combined with thymol at a non-fungitoxic concentration produced much higher growth inhibition of Bipolaris sorokiniana, Phoma glomerata, Alternaria sp. and Stagonospora nodorum than the fungicide alone. The effect of Dividend (difenoconazole) applied with thymol significantly enhanced antifungal activity against B. sorokiniana and S. nodorum. Folicur (tebuconazole) combined with 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (4-HBA), 2,3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde or thymol significantly inhibited growth of Alternaria alternata, at a much greater level than the fungicide alone. In addition, co-application of Folicur and 4-HBA resulted in a similar enhancement of antifungal activity against Fusarium culmorum. Lastly, we discovered that metabolites in the culture liquid of Fusarium sambucinum biocontrol isolate FS-94 also had chemosensitizing activity, increasing S. nodorum sensitivity to Folicur and Dividend.

  10. Nitric oxide supersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, J; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Thomsen, L L

    1993-01-01

    in a double blind design to 17 migraine patients, 17 age and sex matched healthy controls and 9 subjects with tension-type headache. The nitroglycerin-induced headache was significantly more severe in migraine sufferers, lasted longer and fulfilled diagnostic criteria for migraine more often. We have...... previously shown a similar supersensitivity to histamine which in human cerebral arteries activates endothelial H1 receptors and causes endothelial production of nitric oxide. Migraine patients are thus supersensitive to exogenous nitric oxide from nitroglycerin as well as to endothelially produced nitric...

  11. Spectrophotometric determination of the fungicide captan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Teresa; Guiberteau, Agustina; Mora, Nielene M; Alvarez, Pedro R; Salinas, Francisco

    2002-11-01

    A spectrophotometric method for the determination of the fungicide captan has been developed based on its reaction with thiosemicarbazide. The absorbance was measured at 315 nm. The effects of the proportion of water, thiosemicarbazide concentration, pH and temperature on this reaction was studied to select the best chemical conditions. The calibration graph was obtained between 1.2 and 30 ppm and the detection limit is 0.5 ppm. The RSD (n = 10) was 1.34%. Possible interference of various pesticides was examined. The method was applied to the determination of captan in agrochemical formulations. Results agree well with the labelled values and also with results that were obtained by a polarographic method.

  12. Environmental fungicides and triazole resistance in Aspergillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, Paul; Denning, David W

    2014-02-01

    Fungal diseases are problematic in both human health and agriculture. Treatment options are limited and resistance may emerge. The relatively recent recognition of triazole resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus has prompted questioning of the origin of resistance. While multiple mechanisms are described in clinical isolates from triazole-treated patients, some de novo resistance is also recognised, especially attributable to TR34 /L98H. Such strains probably arose in the environment, and, indeed, multiple studies have now demonstrated TR(34) /L98H triazole resistance strains of A. fumigatus from soil. Docking and other in vitro studies are consistent with environmental resistance induction through exposure to certain triazole fungicides, notably difenoconazole, propiconazole, epoxiconazole, bromuconazole and tebuconazole. This article addresses the potential implications of this issue for both human health and food security.

  13. KETAHANAN JAMUR TERHADAP FUNGISIDA DI INDONESIA (RESISTANCE OF FUNGI AGAINST FUNGICIDES IN INDONESIA)

    OpenAIRE

    Sumardiyono, Christanti

    2016-01-01

    Plant diseases control with fungicides had been practised for decades in Indonesia. The orientation of consumers to have high quality agriculture product caused the intensif use of pesticides including fungicides. Systemic fungicides were used as therapeutant agens for disease control. Intensively used and sublethal dose of systemic fungicides induced fungi to be resistant. The purpose of this article was to describe the occurrence of developing fungicides resistance strains. Several publicat...

  14. Synthesis and fungicidal activity of a series of novel aryloxylepidines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, N V; Daeuble, J F; Davis, L N; Hannum, A C; Hellwig, K; Lawler, L K; Parker, M H; Pieczko, M E

    2001-09-01

    A series of novel (hetero) aryloxylepidine derivatives was devised as hybrid structures of the phenoxyquinoline and phenethoxyquin(az)oline fungicides. Synthesis of these targets required the development of several new routes to derivatised 4-hydroxymethylquinolines, and subsequent coupling with phenols or haloarenes. The aryloxylepidines generally showed moderate broad-spectrum fungicidal activity across several diseases of cereals. Substitution of the quinoline ring with chlorine at the 7- and/or 5-positions gave molecules with high levels of protectant activity against Erysiphe graminis f sp tritici (powdery mildew of wheat), but this did not improve the level of fungicidal activity against other diseases. In vitro activity against mitochondrial electron transport complex I (MET) derived from Ustilago maydis showed that 8-fluorolepidine analogues were moderately active at this target site, while the more fungicidally active 7- and 5,7-substituted compounds were inactive. This indicates that MET is not the primary target of these highly active powdery mildewicides.

  15. Biochemical changes induced by fungicides in nitrogen fixing Nostoc sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deviram, G V N S; Pant, Gaurav; Prasuna, R Gyana

    2013-01-01

    The present study indicates the effect of fungicides (approved by WHO) and their behavior on nitrogen fixer of rice eco system Nostoc sp. Application of plant protecting chemicals at recommended levels braced up the growth of blue green algae thereby enhancing heterocyst formation and nitrogenase activity. Nostoc sp demoed varying degrees of sensitivity to fungicides. Biomass yield, protein, carbohydrate content reduced after 3pg/mL concentration. Heterocyst damage was observed from 4μg/mL, Proline content increased with increase in fungicide concentration, utmost yellowing of the culture started from 4μg/mL. The decreasing order of the toxicity to Nostoc sp with fungicides was Mancozeb> Ediphenphos> Carbendazim> Hexaconazole.

  16. Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Section 18 Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Section 18 of Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) authorizes EPA to allow an unregistered use of a pesticide for a limited time if EPA...

  17. Sensitivity of Botrytis cinerea Isolates Against Some Fungicides ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Desen

    2012-01-26

    Jan 26, 2012 ... concentrations, in controlling gray mold in fruit infection. In addition, fitness of ... the fungicide resistance problem within this region would ... sterile long and narrow wood strips in sterile plastic boxes contain- ing wetted ...

  18. Effects of Conazole Fungicides on Spontaneous Activity in Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hexaconazole (HEX), Tetraconazole (TET), Fluconazole (FLU), and Triadimefon (TRI) are conazole fungicides, used to control powdery mildews on crops, and as veterinary and clinical treatments. TRI, a demethylation inhibitor, is neurotoxic in vivo, and previous in vitro experiments...

  19. Effects of Conazole Fungicides on Spontaneous Activity in Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hexaconazole (HEX), Tetraconazole (TET), Fluconazole (FLU), and Triadimefon (TRI) are conazole fungicides, used to control powdery mildews on crops, and as veterinary and clinical treatments. TRI, a demethylation inhibitor, is neurotoxic in vivo, and previous in vitro experiments...

  20. Fungicide effects on fungal community composition in the wheat phyllosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Ida; Friberg, Hanna; Steinberg, Christian; Persson, Paula

    2014-01-01

    The fungicides used to control diseases in cereal production can have adverse effects on non-target fungi, with possible consequences for plant health and productivity. This study examined fungicide effects on fungal communities on winter wheat leaves in two areas of Sweden. High-throughput 454 sequencing of the fungal ITS2 region yielded 235 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at the species level from the 18 fields studied. It was found that commonly used fungicides had moderate but significant effect on fungal community composition in the wheat phyllosphere. The relative abundance of several saprotrophs was altered by fungicide use, while the effect on common wheat pathogens was mixed. The fungal community on wheat leaves consisted mainly of basidiomycete yeasts, saprotrophic ascomycetes and plant pathogens. A core set of six fungal OTUs representing saprotrophic species was identified. These were present across all fields, although overall the difference in OTU richness was large between the two areas studied.

  1. Current possibilities and prospects of using fungicides in forestry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okorski Adam

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of using chemicals in European forestry is extremely limited due to the binding legal regulations and specific conditions concerning the market of plant protection products. This is reflected in the limited availability of active fungicides in forestry. Due to this limitation, practitioners using fungicides in forest nurseries and forest cultivation must have substantial knowledge of the biology of pathogens to ensure satisfactorily effective protection.

  2. FUNGICIDE APPLICATION FOR MAINTAINING POSTHARVEST QUALITY IN TOMATO FRUITS

    OpenAIRE

    D. M. Vani; S. M. Bonaldo

    2014-01-01

    Tomato fruits are usually consumed soon after harvest, however, as they are mainly comprised of water, and its walls are fragile, facilitates the emergence of diseases, making necessary the use of preventive measures in the field in order to reduce incidence of disease. The objective is then to evaluate the effect of foliar application of fungicides on the final quality of tomato fruits in postharvest. There were 13 applications of foliar fungicides Azoxystrobin+Cyproconazol and Boscalida, 7 ...

  3. Effects of Fungicides on Aquatic Fungi and Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners, D. E.; Rosemond, A. D.; Black, M. C.

    2005-05-01

    Aquatic microorganisms play an important role in conditioning leaf litter that enters streams and serves as an important base of production for consumers. Contamination of streams by fungicides may adversely affect microorganisms and alter leaf litter processing rates. Unfortunately, microorganisms are rarely used in acute toxicity tests for fungicide evaluation and registration. We adapted the resazurin reduction assay, which is used in medical microbiology, to assess the acute toxicity of four fungicides (azoxystrobin, trifloxystrobin, kresoxim-methyl and chlorothalonil) to aquatic fungi (Articulospora tetracladia) and bacteria (Cytophaga spp.), and investigated the ability of the toxicants to inhibit leaf breakdown in microcosms. Fungi were more sensitive to fungicides than many standard test organisms (cladocerans, green algae, trout), while bacteria were often the least sensitive. All of the fungicides except kresoxim-methyl, when added to microcosms at concentrations that inhibited the fungi by 90 percent in acute tests, reduced leaf breakdown rates by an average of 14.7 percent. Thus, aquatic fungi and their associated functions in streams may be relatively sensitive to fungicides applied terrestrially that enter streams through non-point sources. These data highlight the importance of including aquatic fungi in safety assessments of pesticides for protection of microbial function.

  4. Triazole fungicide tebuconazole disrupts human placental trophoblast cell functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jinghua; Zhang, Jianyun; Li, Feixue; Liu, Jing

    2016-05-05

    Triazole fungicides are one of the top ten classes of current-use pesticides. Although exposure to triazole fungicides is associated with reproductive toxicity in mammals, limited information is available regarding the effects of triazole fungicides on human placental trophoblast function. Tebuconazole (TEB) is a common triazole fungicide that has been extensively used for fungi control. In this work, we showed that TEB could reduce cell viability, disturb normal cell cycle distribution and induce apoptosis of human placental trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo (HTR-8). Bcl-2 protein expression decreased and the level of Bax protein increased after TEB treatment in HTR-8 cells. The results demonstrated that this fungicide induced apoptosis of trophoblast cells via mitochondrial pathway. Importantly, we found that the invasive and migratory capacities of HTR-8 cells decreased significantly after TEB administration. TEB altered the expression of key regulatory genes involved in the modulation of trophoblast functions. Taken together, TEB suppressed human trophoblast invasion and migration through affecting the expression of protease, hormones, angiogenic factors, growth factors and cytokines. As the invasive and migratory abilities of trophoblast are essential for successful placentation and fetus development, our findings suggest a potential risk of triazole fungicides to human pregnancy.

  5. Spectroscopic and electrical sensing mechanism in oxidant-mediated polypyrrole nanofibers/nanoparticles for ammonia gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishpal; Kaur, Amarjeet

    2013-05-01

    Ammonia gas sensing mechanism in oxidant-mediated polypyrrole (PPy) nanofibers/nanoparticles has been studied through spectroscopic and electrical investigations. PPy nanofibers/nanoparticles have been synthesized by chemical oxidation method in the presence of various oxidizing agents such as ammonium persulfate (APS), potassium persulfate (PPS), vanadium pentoxide (V2O5), and iron chloride (FeCl3). Scanning electron microscopy study revealed that PPy nanofibers of about 63, 71 and 79 nm diameters were formed in the presence of APS, PPS, V2O5, respectively, while PPy nanoparticles of about 100-110 nm size were obtained in the presence of FeCl3 as an oxidant. The structural investigations and confirmation of synthesis of PPy were established through Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The gas sensing behavior of the prepared PPy samples is investigated by measuring the electrical resistance in ammonia environment. The observed gas sensing response ( δR R × 100 ) at 100 ppm level of ammonia is 4.5 and 18 % for the samples prepared with oxidizing agents FeCl3 and APS, respectively, and by changing the ammonia level from 50 to 300 ppm, the sensing response varies from 4.5 to 11 % and 10 to 39 %, respectively. Out of all four samples, the PPy nanofibers prepared in the presence of APS have shown the best sensing response. The mechanism of gas sensing response of the PPy samples has been investigated through Raman spectroscopy study. The decrease of charge carrier concentration through reduction of polymeric chains has been recognized through Raman spectroscopic measurements recorded in ammonia environment.

  6. Spectroscopic and electrical sensing mechanism in oxidant-mediated polypyrrole nanofibers/nanoparticles for ammonia gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishpal; Kaur, Amarjeet, E-mail: amarkaur@physics.du.ac.in [University of Delhi, Department of Physics and Astrophysics (India)

    2013-05-15

    Ammonia gas sensing mechanism in oxidant-mediated polypyrrole (PPy) nanofibers/nanoparticles has been studied through spectroscopic and electrical investigations. PPy nanofibers/nanoparticles have been synthesized by chemical oxidation method in the presence of various oxidizing agents such as ammonium persulfate (APS), potassium persulfate (PPS), vanadium pentoxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}), and iron chloride (FeCl{sub 3}). Scanning electron microscopy study revealed that PPy nanofibers of about 63, 71 and 79 nm diameters were formed in the presence of APS, PPS, V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, respectively, while PPy nanoparticles of about 100-110 nm size were obtained in the presence of FeCl{sub 3} as an oxidant. The structural investigations and confirmation of synthesis of PPy were established through Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The gas sensing behavior of the prepared PPy samples is investigated by measuring the electrical resistance in ammonia environment. The observed gas sensing response ({Delta}R/Rx100) at 100 ppm level of ammonia is {approx}4.5 and 18 % for the samples prepared with oxidizing agents FeCl{sub 3} and APS, respectively, and by changing the ammonia level from 50 to 300 ppm, the sensing response varies from {approx}4.5 to 11 % and {approx}10 to 39 %, respectively. Out of all four samples, the PPy nanofibers prepared in the presence of APS have shown the best sensing response. The mechanism of gas sensing response of the PPy samples has been investigated through Raman spectroscopy study. The decrease of charge carrier concentration through reduction of polymeric chains has been recognized through Raman spectroscopic measurements recorded in ammonia environment.

  7. Mechanistic Variants in Gas-Phase Metal-Oxide Mediated Activation of Methane at Ambient Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jilai; Zhou, Shaodong; Zhang, Jun; Schlangen, Maria; Usharani, Dandamudi; Shaik, Sason; Schwarz, Helmut

    2016-09-07

    The C-H bond activation of methane mediated by a prototypical heteronuclear metal-oxide cluster, [Al2Mg2O5](•+), was investigated by using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) in conjunction with high-level quantum mechanical calculations. Experimentally, hydrogen-atom abstraction from methane by the cluster ion [Al2Mg2O5](•+) takes place at ambient conditions. As to the mechanism, according to our computational findings, both the proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and the conventional hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) are feasible and compete with each other. This is in distinct contrast to the [XYO2](+) (X, Y = Mg, Al, Si) cluster oxide ions which activate methane exclusively via the PCET route (Li, J.; Zhou, S.; Zhang, J.; Schlangen, M.; Weiske, T.; Usharani, D.; Shaik, S.; Schwarz, H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016, 138, 7973-7981). The electronic origins of the mechanistically rather complex reactivity scenarios of the [Al2Mg2O5](•+)/CH4 couple were elucidated. For the PCET mechanism, in which the Lewis acid-base pair [Al(+)-O(-)] of the cluster acts as the active site, a clear correlation has been established between the nature of the transition state, the corresponding barrier height, the Lewis acidity-basicity of the [M(+)-O(-)] unit, as well as the bond order of the M(+)-O(-) bond. Also addressed is the role of the spin and charge distributions of a terminal oxygen radical site in the direct HAT route. The knowledge of the factors that control the reactivity of PCET and HAT pathways not only deepens our mechanistic understanding of metal-oxide mediated C-H bond activation but may also provide guidance for the rational design of catalysts.

  8. Morphogenetic Alterations of Alternaria alternata Exposed to Dicarboximide Fungicide, Iprodione

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunji; Lee, Hye Min; Kim, Young Ho

    2017-01-01

    Fungicide-resistant Alternaria alternata impede the practical control of the Alternaria diseases in crop fields. This study aimed to investigate cytological fungicide resistance mechanisms of A. alternata against dicarboximide fungicide iprodione. A. alternata isolated from cactus brown spot was cultured on potato-dextrose agar (PDA) with or without iprodione, and the fungal cultures with different growth characteristics from no, initial and full growth were observed by light and electron microscopy. Mycelia began to grow from one day after incubation (DAI) and continued to be in full growth (control-growth, Con-G) on PDA without fungicide, while on PDA with iprodione, no fungal growth (iprodione-no growth, Ipr-N) occurred for the first 3 DAI, but once the initial growth (iprodione-initial growth, Ipr-I) began at 4–5 DAI, the colonies grew and expanded continuously to be in full growth (iprodione-growth, Ipr-G), suggesting Ipr-I may be a turning moment of the morphogenetic changes resisting fungicidal toxicity. Con-G formed multicellular conidia with cell walls and septa and intact dense cytoplasm. In Ipr-N, fungal sporulation was inhibited by forming mostly undeveloped unicellular conidia with degraded and necrotic cytoplasm. However, in Ipr-I, conspicuous cellular changes occurred during sporulation by forming multicellular conidia with double layered (thickened) cell walls and accumulation of proliferated lipid bodies in the conidial cytoplasm, which may inhibit the penetration of the fungicide into conidial cells, reducing fungicide-associated toxicity, and may be utilized as energy and nutritional sources, respectively, for the further fungal growth to form mature colonies as in Ipr-G that formed multicellular conidia with cell walls and intact cytoplasm with lipid bodies as in Con-G. PMID:28167893

  9. Dispersal of human and plant pathogens biofilms via nitric oxide donors at 4 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvasi, Massimiliano; Durie, Ian A; Henríquez, Tania; Satkute, Aiste; Matuszewska, Marta; Prado, Raphael Carvalho

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that nitric oxide donors capable of manipulating nitric oxide-mediated signaling in bacteria could induce dispersal of biofilms. Encased in extracellular polymeric substances, human and plant pathogens within biofilms are significantly more resistant to sanitizers. This is particularly a problem in refrigerated environments where food is processed. In an exercise aimed to study the potential of nitric oxide donors as biofilm dispersal in refrigerated conditions, we compared the ability of different nitric oxide donors (SNAP, NO-aspirin and Noc-5) to dislodge biofilms formed by foodborne, human and plant pathogens treated at 4 °C. The donors SNAP and Noc-5 were efficient in dispersing biofilms formed by Salmonella enterica, pathogenic Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua. The biomasses were decreased up to 30 % when compared with the untreated controls. When the plant pathogens Pectobacterium sp. and Xanthomonas sp. were tested the dispersion was mainly limited to Pectobacterium carotovorum biofilms, decreasing up to 15 % after exposure to molsidomine. Finally, the association of selected nitric oxide donors with sanitizers (DiQuat, H2O2, peracetic acid and PhenoTek II) was effective in dispersing biofilms. The best dispersal was achieved by pre-treating P. carotovorum with molsidomine and then peracetic acid. The synergistic effect was estimated up to ~35 % in dispersal when compared with peracetic acid alone. The association of nitric oxide donors with sanitizers could provide a foundation for an improved sanitization procedure for cleaning refrigerate environments.

  10. Solarization and biosolarization enhance fungicide dissipation in the soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenoll, José; Ruiz, Encarnación; Hellín, Pilar; Navarro, Simón; Flores, Pilar

    2010-03-01

    Although there is some evidence regarding the effect of solarization and biosolarization on pesticide degradation, information is still scarce. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of these disinfection techniques on the degradation of eight fungicides (azoxystrobin, kresoxin methyl, tebuconazole, hexaconazole, triadimenol, cyprodinil, pyrimethanil and fludioxonil) commonly used in pepper crops under greenhouse cultivation. Seventy-five 17-L pots filled with clay-loam soil were placed in a greenhouse during the summer season and then contaminated with the studied fungicides. Treatments consisted of different disinfection treatments, including a control without disinfection, solarization and biosolarization. For the solarization and biosolarization treatments, low-density polyethylene film was used as cover. Five pots per treatment were sampled periodically up to 90d after the beginning of each treatment and fungicide residues were analyzed by GC/MS. The results showed that both solarization and biosolarization enhanced fungicide dissipation rates with regard to the control treatment, an effect which was attributed to the increased soil temperature. Most of the fungicides studied showed similar behavior under solarization and biosolarization conditions. However, triadimenol was degraded to a greater extent in the biosolarization than in the solarization treatment, while fludioxonil behaved in the opposite way. The results confirm that both solarization and biosolarization contribute to pesticide dissipation and can therefore be considered alongside other soil disinfection techniques, as a bioremediation tool for pesticide-polluted soils.

  11. Reduced fungicide doses in cereals: Which parameters to consider?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lise Nistrup

    2015-01-01

    Abstract:A long tradition for using reduced fungicides rates in cereals have been exploited successfully in Denmark for more than 20 years and a similar trend has also been seen in other Northern European countries. The use of reduced and appropriate dose rates have been driven by field trials wi...... that reduced fungicide rates select less for fungicide resistance and can help to delay development of resistance.......Abstract:A long tradition for using reduced fungicides rates in cereals have been exploited successfully in Denmark for more than 20 years and a similar trend has also been seen in other Northern European countries. The use of reduced and appropriate dose rates have been driven by field trials...... to be controlled successfully at rates down to quarter rates. Fungicides, in general, show highly variable dose responses for specific diseases, which is important to know when specific advice is given. Preventive treatments generally require less input compared with treatments during the latent period or later...

  12. Efficacy of conventional fungicides in controlling tomato grey mold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mavandadi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the important diseases of tomato plants is grey mold, which is caused by Botrytis cinerea. In this research, the effects of 10 fungicides on mycelial growth and conidia germination of B. cinerea were investigated. Results showed that carbendazim with a median inhibitory concentration (IC50 value of 0.1 mg/L had the highest inhibitory effect and bordeaux mixture with an IC50 value of 1096.9 mg/L had the lowest inhibitory effect. Benomyl with an IC50 value of 0.04 mg/L had the most visual effects, after 3 and 7 days, on mycelial growth of B. cinerea. The effect of fungicides on preventing fruit wound development caused by B. cinerea was investigated, too. In benomyl treatment, wound diameter on the fruits was 0.73 mm and in copper oxychloride treatment was 6.16 mm, showing the highest and the lowest effective fungicides in the prevention of wound expansion. Different strains of the fungus were collected from various areas in Isfahan province and the effect of the fungicides on their conidial germination was evaluated. Results revealed that the collected isolates had different susceptibility to the 10 tested fungicides.

  13. Impact of fungal drug transporters on fungicide sensitivity, multidrug resistance and virulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waard, de M.A.; Andrade, A.C.; Hayashi, K.; Schoonbeek, H.; Stergiopoulos, I.; Zwiers, L.H.

    2006-01-01

    Drug transporters are membrane proteins that provide protection for organisms against natural toxic products and fungicides. In plant pathogens, drug transporters function in baseline sensitivity to fungicides, multidrug resistance (MDR) and virulence on host plants. This paper describes drug transp

  14. Synthesis and fungicidal activity of some alkyl – 2,4 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In vitro fungicidal assay of these alkyl sulfenate esters against Aspergillus flavus, Rhizopus stolonifer ... Increase in chain length of the alkyl substituents was found to reduce the fungicidal activity of the alkyl sulfenate esters. ... Article Metrics.

  15. Vascular nitric oxide and superoxide anion contribute to sex-specific programmed cardiovascular physiology in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roghair, Robert D; Segar, Jeffrey L; Volk, Kenneth A; Chapleau, Mark W; Dallas, Lindsay M; Sorenson, Anna R; Scholz, Thomas D; Lamb, Fred S

    2009-03-01

    Intrauterine environmental pertubations have been linked to the development of adult hypertension. We sought to evaluate the interrelated roles of sex, nitric oxide, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in programmed cardiovascular disease. Programming was induced in mice by maternal dietary intervention (DI; partial substitution of protein with carbohydrates and fat) or carbenoxolone administration (CX, to increase fetal glucocorticoid exposure). Adult blood pressure and locomotor activity were recorded by radiotelemetry at baseline, after a week of high salt, and after a week of high salt plus nitric oxide synthase inhibition (by l-NAME). In male offspring, DI or CX programmed an elevation in blood pressure that was exacerbated by N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester administration, but not high salt alone. Mesenteric resistance vessels from DI male offspring displayed impaired vasorelaxation to ACh and nitroprusside, which was blocked by catalase and superoxide dismutase. CX-exposed females were normotensive, while DI females had nitric oxide synthase-dependent hypotension and enhanced mesenteric dilation. Despite the disparate cardiovascular phenotypes, both male and female DI offspring displayed increases in locomotor activity and aortic superoxide production. Despite dissimilar blood pressures, DI and CX-exposed females had reductions in cardiac baroreflex sensitivity. In conclusion, both maternal malnutrition and fetal glucocorticoid exposure program increases in arterial pressure in male but not female offspring. While maternal DI increased both superoxide-mediated vasoconstriction and nitric oxide mediated vasodilation, the balance of these factors favored the development of hypertension in males and hypotension in females.

  16. A novel soluble immune-type receptor (SITR in teleost fish: carp SITR is involved in the nitric oxide-mediated response to a protozoan parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla M S Ribeiro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The innate immune system relies upon a wide range of germ-line encoded receptors including a large number of immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF receptors. Different Ig-like immune receptor families have been reported in mammals, birds, amphibians and fish. Most innate immune receptors of the IgSF are type I transmembrane proteins containing one or more extracellular Ig-like domains and their regulation of effector functions is mediated intracellularly by distinct stimulatory or inhibitory pathways. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Carp SITR was found in a substracted cDNA repertoire from carp macrophages, enriched for genes up-regulated in response to the protozoan parasite Trypanoplasma borreli. Carp SITR is a type I protein with two extracellular Ig domains in a unique organisation of a N-proximal V/C2 (or I- type and a C-proximal V-type Ig domain, devoid of a transmembrane domain or any intracytoplasmic signalling motif. The carp SITR C-proximal V-type Ig domain, in particular, has a close sequence similarity and conserved structural characteristics to the mammalian CD300 molecules. By generating an anti-SITR antibody we could show that SITR protein expression was restricted to cells of the myeloid lineage. Carp SITR is abundantly expressed in macrophages and is secreted upon in vitro stimulation with the protozoan parasite T. borreli. Secretion of SITR protein during in vivo T. borreli infection suggests a role for this IgSF receptor in the host response to this protozoan parasite. Overexpression of carp SITR in mouse macrophages and knock-down of SITR protein expression in carp macrophages, using morpholino antisense technology, provided evidence for the involvement of carp SITR in the parasite-induced NO production. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We report the structural and functional characterization of a novel soluble immune-type receptor (SITR in a teleost fish and propose a role for carp SITR in the NO-mediated response to a protozoan parasite.

  17. Inhibition of nuclear factor-kappaB or Bax prevents endoplasmic reticulum stress- but not nitric oxide-mediated apoptosis in INS-1E cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonnesen, Morten F; Grunnet, Lars G; Friberg, Josefine

    2009-01-01

    and alternative splicing of the transcription factor Xbp-1 were exclusively activated by TG. TG exposure caused NFkappaB activation, as assessed by IkappaB degradation and NFkappaB DNA binding. Inhibition of NFkappaB or the Bcl-2 family member Bax pathways protected beta-cells against TG- but not SNAP....... Exposure of INS-1E cells to TG or SNAP caused caspase-3 cleavage and apoptosis. Both TG and SNAP induced activation of the proapoptotic transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP). However, other classical ER stress-induced markers such as up-regulation of ER chaperone Bip......-induced beta-cell death. These data suggest that NO generation and direct SERCA2 inhibition cause two quantitative and qualitative different forms of ER stress. In contrast to NO, direct ER stress induced by SERCA inhibition causes activation of ER stress signaling pathways and elicit proapoptotic signaling...

  18. Inhibition of Nuclear Factor-kappa B or Bax Prevents Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-But Not Nitric Oxide-Mediated Apoptosis in INS-1E Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonnesen, M.F.; Grunnet, L.G.; Friberg, J.;

    2009-01-01

    elicited by NO and ER Ca2+ depletion differ, we here compare the direct effects of NO, in the form of the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D, L-penicillamine (SNAP), with the effects of SERCA2 inhibitor thapsigargin (TG) on MAPK, nuclear factor kappa B (NF kappa B), Bcl-2 proteins, ER stress, and apoptosis...

  19. Serum from achalasia patients alters neurochemical coding in the myenteric plexus and nitric oxide mediated motor response in normal human fundus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    des Varannes, SB; Chevalier, J; Pimont, S; Le Neel, JC; Klotz, M; Schafer, KH; Galmiche, JP; Neunlist, M

    2006-01-01

    Background and aims: Achalasia is a disease of unknown aetiology. An immune mechanism has been suggested on the basis of previous morphological observations. The objective of this study was to test whether the serum of achalasia patients could reproduce the phenotype and functional changes that occu

  20. A novel soluble immune-type receptor (SITR) in teleost fish: carp SITR is involved in the nitric oxide-mediated response to a protozoan parasite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribeiro, C.M.S.; Raes, G.; Ghassabeh, G.H.; Schijns, V.E.J.C.; Pontes, M.J.S.L.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Wiegertjes, G.F.

    2011-01-01

    Background- The innate immune system relies upon a wide range of germ-line encoded receptors including a large number of immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) receptors. Different Ig-like immune receptor families have been reported in mammals, birds, amphibians and fish. Most innate immune receptors of

  1. Endocrine disrupting properties in vivo of widely used azole fungicides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taxvig, Camilla; Vinggaard, Anne; Hass, Ulla

    2008-01-01

    The endocrine-disrupting potential of four commonly used azole fungicides, propiconazole, tebuconazole, epoxiconazole and ketoconazole, were tested in two short-term in vivo studies. Initially, the antiandrogenic effects of propiconazole and tebuconazole (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg body weight/day eac...... as endocrine disruptors in vivo, although the profile of action in vivo varies. As ketoconazole is known to implicate numerous endocrine-disrupting effects in humans, the concern for the effects of the other tested azole fungicides in humans is growing.......The endocrine-disrupting potential of four commonly used azole fungicides, propiconazole, tebuconazole, epoxiconazole and ketoconazole, were tested in two short-term in vivo studies. Initially, the antiandrogenic effects of propiconazole and tebuconazole (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg body weight/day each...

  2. Combretastatin A-4 and Derivatives: Potential Fungicides Targeting Fungal Tubulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhong-lin; Yan, Xiao-jing; Zhao, Lei; Zhou, Jiu-jiu; Pang, Wan; Kai, Zhen-peng; Wu, Fan-hong

    2016-02-01

    Combretastatin A-4, first isolated from the African willow tree Combretum caffrum, is a tubulin polymerization inhibitor in medicine. It was first postulated as a potential fungicide targeting fungal tubulin for plant disease control in this study. Combretastatin A-4 and its derivatives were synthesized and tested against Rhizoctonia solani and Pyricularia oryzae. Several compounds have EC50 values similar to or better than that of isoprothiolane, which is widely used for rice disease control. Structure-activity relationship study indicated the the cis configuration and hydroxyl group in combretastatin A-4 are crucial to the antifungal effect. Molecular modeling indicated the binding sites of combretastatin A-4 and carbendazim on fungal tubulin are totally different. The bioactivity of combretastatin A-4 and its derivatives against carbendazim-resistant strains was demonstrated in this study. The results provide a new approach for fungicide discovery and fungicide resistance management.

  3. Baseline sensitivity of Brazilian Mycosphaerella fijiensis isolates to protectant and systemic fungicides.

    OpenAIRE

    GOMES, L. I. S.; BIBIANO, L. B. J.; SILVA, G.F. da.; HANADA, R.E.; MIZUBUTI, E. S. G.

    2015-01-01

    Black Sigatoka caused by Mycosphaerella fijiensis is a foliar disease that affects banana plants and large amounts of fungicides are required to prevent crop losses. Intensive applications of single-site fungicides can select for fungicide-resistant isolates. The objective of this study was to assess the sensitivity of 60 isolates of M. fijiensis to commonly used fungicides. Using two different protocols, microtiter and Petri plate tests, the effective concentration at which mycelium growth i...

  4. Acaricide, fungicide and drug interactions in honey bees (Apis mellifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed M Johnson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chemical analysis shows that honey bees (Apis mellifera and hive products contain many pesticides derived from various sources. The most abundant pesticides are acaricides applied by beekeepers to control Varroa destructor. Beekeepers also apply antimicrobial drugs to control bacterial and microsporidial diseases. Fungicides may enter the hive when applied to nearby flowering crops. Acaricides, antimicrobial drugs and fungicides are not highly toxic to bees alone, but in combination there is potential for heightened toxicity due to interactive effects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Laboratory bioassays based on mortality rates in adult worker bees demonstrated interactive effects among acaricides, as well as between acaricides and antimicrobial drugs and between acaricides and fungicides. Toxicity of the acaricide tau-fluvalinate increased in combination with other acaricides and most other compounds tested (15 of 17 while amitraz toxicity was mostly unchanged (1 of 15. The sterol biosynthesis inhibiting (SBI fungicide prochloraz elevated the toxicity of the acaricides tau-fluvalinate, coumaphos and fenpyroximate, likely through inhibition of detoxicative cytochrome P450 monooxygenase activity. Four other SBI fungicides increased the toxicity of tau-fluvalinate in a dose-dependent manner, although possible evidence of P450 induction was observed at the lowest fungicide doses. Non-transitive interactions between some acaricides were observed. Sublethal amitraz pre-treatment increased the toxicity of the three P450-detoxified acaricides, but amitraz toxicity was not changed by sublethal treatment with the same three acaricides. A two-fold change in the toxicity of tau-fluvalinate was observed between years, suggesting a possible change in the genetic composition of the bees tested. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Interactions with acaricides in honey bees are similar to drug interactions in other animals in that P450-mediated detoxication

  5. Acaricide, fungicide and drug interactions in honey bees (Apis mellifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Reed M; Dahlgren, Lizette; Siegfried, Blair D; Ellis, Marion D

    2013-01-01

    Chemical analysis shows that honey bees (Apis mellifera) and hive products contain many pesticides derived from various sources. The most abundant pesticides are acaricides applied by beekeepers to control Varroa destructor. Beekeepers also apply antimicrobial drugs to control bacterial and microsporidial diseases. Fungicides may enter the hive when applied to nearby flowering crops. Acaricides, antimicrobial drugs and fungicides are not highly toxic to bees alone, but in combination there is potential for heightened toxicity due to interactive effects. Laboratory bioassays based on mortality rates in adult worker bees demonstrated interactive effects among acaricides, as well as between acaricides and antimicrobial drugs and between acaricides and fungicides. Toxicity of the acaricide tau-fluvalinate increased in combination with other acaricides and most other compounds tested (15 of 17) while amitraz toxicity was mostly unchanged (1 of 15). The sterol biosynthesis inhibiting (SBI) fungicide prochloraz elevated the toxicity of the acaricides tau-fluvalinate, coumaphos and fenpyroximate, likely through inhibition of detoxicative cytochrome P450 monooxygenase activity. Four other SBI fungicides increased the toxicity of tau-fluvalinate in a dose-dependent manner, although possible evidence of P450 induction was observed at the lowest fungicide doses. Non-transitive interactions between some acaricides were observed. Sublethal amitraz pre-treatment increased the toxicity of the three P450-detoxified acaricides, but amitraz toxicity was not changed by sublethal treatment with the same three acaricides. A two-fold change in the toxicity of tau-fluvalinate was observed between years, suggesting a possible change in the genetic composition of the bees tested. Interactions with acaricides in honey bees are similar to drug interactions in other animals in that P450-mediated detoxication appears to play an important role. Evidence of non-transivity, year-to-year variation

  6. Triazole fungicide tebuconazole disrupts human placental trophoblast cell functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jinghua [Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecological Health, Ministry of Education, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zhang, Jianyun [Research Center for Air Pollution and Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Li, Feixue [Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Organ Development and Regeneration, Institute of Developmental and Regenerative Biology, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 310036 (China); Liu, Jing, E-mail: jliue@zju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecological Health, Ministry of Education, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Research Center for Air Pollution and Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2016-05-05

    Highlights: • Tebuconazole (TEB) inhibited the proliferation of human placental trophoblasts. • TEB changed cell cycle distribution of G1 and G2 phases of trophoblasts. • TEB induced apoptosis of trophoblasts via mitochondrial pathway. • TEB decreased the invasive and migratory capacities of trophoblasts. • TEB altered the mRNA levels of key regulatory genes in trophoblasts - Abstract: Triazole fungicides are one of the top ten classes of current-use pesticides. Although exposure to triazole fungicides is associated with reproductive toxicity in mammals, limited information is available regarding the effects of triazole fungicides on human placental trophoblast function. Tebuconazole (TEB) is a common triazole fungicide that has been extensively used for fungi control. In this work, we showed that TEB could reduce cell viability, disturb normal cell cycle distribution and induce apoptosis of human placental trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo (HTR-8). Bcl-2 protein expression decreased and the level of Bax protein increased after TEB treatment in HTR-8 cells. The results demonstrated that this fungicide induced apoptosis of trophoblast cells via mitochondrial pathway. Importantly, we found that the invasive and migratory capacities of HTR-8 cells decreased significantly after TEB administration. TEB altered the expression of key regulatory genes involved in the modulation of trophoblast functions. Taken together, TEB suppressed human trophoblast invasion and migration through affecting the expression of protease, hormones, angiogenic factors, growth factors and cytokines. As the invasive and migratory abilities of trophoblast are essential for successful placentation and fetus development, our findings suggest a potential risk of triazole fungicides to human pregnancy.

  7. Mode of action of the phenylpyrrole fungicide fenpiclonil in Fusarium sulphureum.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jespers, A.B.K.

    1994-01-01

    In the last few decades, plant disease control has become heavily dependent on fungicides. Most modem fungicides were discovered by random synthesis and empirical optimization of lead structures. In general, these fungicides have specific modes of action and meet modem enviromnental criteria. A disa

  8. An examination of fungicide sensitivity of Cercospora beticola in Michigan and Ontario sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris) (2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf spot caused by Cercospora beticola Sacc. is the major foliar disease of sugarbeet in Michigan. Fungicide applications are one of the most important tools in managing this disease. However, fungicide resistance has developed in C. beticola to several classes of fungicides. To look for the levels...

  9. Occurrence of azoxystrobin, propiconazole, and selected other fungicides in US streams, 2005-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglin, William A.; Sandstrom, Mark W.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Meyer, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    Fungicides are used to prevent foliar diseases on a wide range of vegetable, field, fruit, and ornamental crops. They are generally more effective as protective rather than curative treatments, and hence tend to be applied before infections take place. Less than 1% of US soybeans were treated with a fungicide in 2002 but by 2006, 4% were treated. Like other pesticides, fungicides can move-off of fields after application and subsequently contaminate surface water, groundwater, and associated sediments. Due to the constant pressure from fungal diseases such as the recent Asian soybean rust outbreak, and the always-present desire to increase crop yields, there is the potential for a significant increase in the amount of fungicides used on US farms. Increased fungicide use could lead to increased environmental concentrations of these compounds. This study documents the occurrence of fungicides in select US streams soon after the first documentation of soybean rust in the US and prior to the corresponding increase in fungicide use to treat this problem. Water samples were collected from 29 streams in 13 states in 2005 and/or 2006, and analyzed for 12 target fungicides. Nine of the 12 fungicides were detected in at least one stream sample and at least one fungicide was detected in 20 of 29 streams. At least one fungicide was detected in 56% of the 103 samples, as many as five fungicides were detected in an individual sample, and mixtures of fungicides were common. Azoxystrobin was detected most frequently (45% of 103 samples) followed by metalaxyl (27%), propiconazole (17%), myclobutanil (9%), and tebuconazole (6%). Fungicide detections ranged from 0.002 to 1.15 μ/L. There was indication of a seasonal pattern to fungicide occurrence, with detections more common and concentrations higher in late summer and early fall than in spring. At a few sites, fungicides were detected in all samples collected suggesting the potential for season-long occurrence in some streams

  10. Fungicides for organic cantaloupe production in Oklahoma: An initial assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fungicides that are potentially useful in organic production were evaluated for foliar disease control in cantaloupe (Cucumis melo L. var. reticulates ’Israeli’) during 2009 at Lane, Oklahoma. Milstop (85% potassium bicarbonate), Neem oil, Bonide liquid copper (10% copper octanoate), Serenade (QST ...

  11. Governing principles can guide fungicide-resistance management tactics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bosch, Frank; Oliver, Richard; van den Berg, Femke; Paveley, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Fungicide-resistance management would be more effective if principles governing the selection of resistant strains could be determined and validated. Such principles could then be used to predict whether a proposed change to a fungicide application program would decrease selection for resistant strains. In this review, we assess a governing principle that appears to have good predictive power. The principle states that reducing the product of the selection coefficient (defined as the difference between the per capita rate of increase of the sensitive and resistant strains) and the exposure time of the pathogen to the fungicide reduces the selection for resistance. We show that observations as well as modeling studies agree with the predicted effect (i.e., that a specific change to a fungicide program increased or decreased selection or was broadly neutral in its effect on selection) in 84% of the cases and that only 5% of the experimental results contradict predictions. We argue that the selection coefficient and exposure time principle can guide the development of resistance management tactics.

  12. Analysis of the mutations inducedd by conazole fungicides in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mouse liver tumorigenic conazo1e fungicides triadimefon and propiconazo1e have previously been shown to be in vivo mouse liver mutagens in the Big Blue" transgenic mutation assay when administered in feed at tumorigenic doses, whereas the nontumorigenic conazo1e myc1obutani1 ...

  13. Efficacy of fungicides against Phytophthora cactorum on Viola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blindeman, L; Heungens, K; Goossens, F; Gobin, B

    2009-01-01

    Phytophthora cactorum caused significant losses to pansies during the heat wave at the end of the summer of 2006. Infected plants showed foliage that appeared stunted and chlorotic, with wilting occurring even when soil moisture was adequate. When uprooted, symptomatic plants typically possess a surprisingly healthy looking and well-developed root system, but stem and root tissue at the soil interface is discoloured (purple to dark brown) and soft. Older Leaves turn yellow and when the stem base is attacked, the plant dies. Phytophthora cactorum was identified from stem and root tissue with both morphological and molecular techniques. To evaluate the efficacy of different fungicides against this pathogen, healthy plants were infected with zoospores of a Phytophthora cactorum isolate collected from commercial plants. Eleven fungicides were evaluated and compared to an untreated control. Two fungicides were applied via root drenching, 7 days before inoculation with zoospores of P. cactorum. The other fungicides were applied by spraying 24 hours after inoculation with P. cactorum. Preventive drenching with the combined formulation of fenamidone + fosethyl offered the best protection against P. cactorum, while drenching with dimethomorf also resulted in an obvious reduction in the number of infected plants. Foliar application was less successful, as only a combined formulation of mancozeb + metalaxyl-M gave sufficient protection. In conclusion, preventive drenching appears to be the best solution to prevent infection with P. cactorum, especially during warm weather periods, which are conducive to pathogen and disease development.

  14. A novel bioassay to monitor fungicide sensitivity in Mycosphaerella fijiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngando, Josué E; Rieux, Adrien; Nguidjo, Oscar; Pignolet, Luc; Dubois, Cécile; Mehl, Andreas; Zapater, Marie-Françoise; Carlier, Jean; de Lapeyre de Bellaire, Luc

    2015-03-01

    Black leaf streak disease (BLSD) is the most important disease of bananas for export. The successful control of BLSD requires an intensive use of systemic fungicides, leading to the build-up of resistance and failure of control. Early detection of fungicide resistance is crucial to drive rational chemical strategies. Present methods relying on ascospore germination bioassays have several drawbacks that could be overcome using conidia. Generally, a single genotype is present on the conidial population derived from one lesion. Conidial germination tests with thiabendazole (5 mg L(-1)) enable a clear detection of strains resistant to methyl benzimidazole carbamates. Germination bioassays on azoxystrobin (10 mg L(-1)) enable the detection of most QoI-resistant strains, but their proportion might be underestimated with cut-off limits of germ tube length (L > 120 µm) or growth inhibition (GI < 50%). The level of fungicide resistance differs at different canopy levels of a banana tree, which should be considered for sampling. The ascospore germination bioassay provided more variable estimations of the level of resistance by comparison with the new conidial germination bioassay. Germination bioassays performed with conidia obtained from young lesions overcome most drawbacks encountered with ascospore germination bioassays and could be considered as a new reference method for fungicide resistance monitoring in this species. Different steps are proposed, from sampling to microscopic examinations, for the implementation of this technique. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Comparison of three fungicide spray advisories for lettuce downy mildew

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, B.M.; Subbarao, K.V.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.; Koike, S.T.

    2001-01-01

    Lettuce growers in coastal California have relied mainly on protective fungicide sprays to control downy mildew. Thus, timing of sprays before infection is critical for optimal results. A leaf-wetness-driven, infection-based advisory system, previously developed, did not always perform satisfactoril

  16. Molecular basis of fungicide resistance in Cercospora beticola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cercospora leaf spot (CLS), caused by the fungus Cercospora beticola, is the most important foliar disease of sugarbeet. Control measures include the application of sterol demethylation inhibitor (DMI) and quinone outside inhibitor (QoI) fungicides. Understanding the molecular mechanism of fungici...

  17. [Use of cytochemical methods for diagnosis in fungicide research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, H M; Casperson, G

    1984-01-01

    Cytochemical localization of acid and alkaline phosphatases, cytochrom c-oxidase, peroxidases and catalase was carried out on Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de By. and Mucor mucedo (L.) Fres. First results are obtained about the influence of sublethal dosages of fungicidal compounds on the demonstration of these enzymes in the electron-microscope.

  18. The toxicity of the fungicide Propiconazole to soil flagellates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekelund, Flemming; Westergaard, Kamma; Søe, Dorthe

    2000-01-01

    of bacterivorous flagellates in liquid culture. The fungicide affected a mixed natural population of fungivorous flagellates less than the population of bacterivorous flagellates. Our results indicated that the effects of propiconazole on flagellates are direct toxic effects and not effects mediated via their food...

  19. Does nutrient enrichment compensate fungicide effects on litter decomposition and decomposer communities in streams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Diego; Tummala, Mallikarjun; Schreiner, Verena C; Duarte, Sofia; Pascoal, Cláudia; Winkelmann, Carola; Mewes, Daniela; Muñoz, Katherine; Schäfer, Ralf B

    2016-05-01

    Nutrient and pesticide pollution are widespread agricultural stressors. Fungicides may affect freshwater fungi, which play an important role in litter decomposition (LD), whereas moderate nutrient enrichment can stimulate LD. We examined potential interaction effects of nutrients and fungicides on decomposer communities and LD in a 14-day two-factorial (fungicide and nutrient treatments) mesocosm experiment. Fungicide exposure was limited to 4days to simulate episodic contamination. Only the microbial community responded significantly to the experimental factors, though non-significant increases >20% were found for invertebrate decomposer weight gain and LD under high-nutrient conditions. Fungal community structure responded more strongly to fungicides than sporulation. Sporulation responded strongest to nutrients. Bacterial community structure was affected by both factors, although only nutrients influenced bacterial density. Our results suggest effects from fungicides at field-relevant levels on the microbial community. Whether these changes propagate to invertebrate communities and LD remains unclear and should be analysed under longer and recurrent fungicide exposure.

  20. Overexpressed neuroglobin raises threshold for nitric oxide-induced impairment of mitochondrial respiratory activities and stress signaling in primary cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shilpee; Zhuo, Ming; Gorgun, Falih M; Englander, Ella W

    2013-08-01

    Surges of nitric oxide compromise mitochondrial respiration primarily by competitive inhibition of oxygen binding to cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) and are particularly injurious in neurons, which rely on oxidative phosphorylation for all their energy needs. Here, we show that transgenic overexpression of the neuronal globin protein, neuroglobin, helps diminish protein nitration, preserve mitochondrial function and sustain ATP content of primary cortical neurons challenged by extended nitric oxide exposure. Specifically, in transgenic neurons, elevated neuroglobin curtailed nitric oxide-induced alterations in mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates, including baseline oxygen consumption, consumption coupled with ATP synthesis, proton leak and spare respiratory capacity. Concomitantly, activation of genes involved in sensing and responding to oxidative/nitrosative stress, including the early-immediate c-Fos gene and the phase II antioxidant enzyme, heme oxygenase-1, was diminished in neuroglobin-overexpressing compared to wild-type neurons. Taken together, these differences reflect a lesser insult produced by similar concentrations of nitric oxide in neuroglobin-overexpressing compared to wild-type neurons, suggesting that abundant neuroglobin buffers nitric oxide and raises the threshold of nitric oxide-mediated injury in neurons.

  1. Peptides of the constant region of antibodies display fungicidal activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Polonelli

    Full Text Available Synthetic peptides with sequences identical to fragments of the constant region of different classes (IgG, IgM, IgA of antibodies (Fc-peptides exerted a fungicidal activity in vitro against pathogenic yeasts, such as Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Malassezia furfur, including caspofungin and triazole resistant strains. Alanine-substituted derivatives of fungicidal Fc-peptides, tested to evaluate the critical role of each residue, displayed unaltered, increased or decreased candidacidal activity in vitro. An Fc-peptide, included in all human IgGs, displayed a therapeutic effect against experimental mucosal and systemic candidiasis in mouse models. It is intriguing to hypothesize that some Fc-peptides may influence the antifungal immune response and constitute the basis for devising new antifungal agents.

  2. Method validation for strobilurin fungicides in cereals and fruit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hanne Bjerre; Granby, Kit

    2001-01-01

    Strobilurins are a new class of fungicides that are active against a broad spectrum of fungi. In the present work a GC method for analysis of strobilurin fungicides was validated. The method was based on extraction with ethyl acetate/cyclohexane, clean-up by gel permeation chromatography (GPC......) and determination of the content by gas chromatography (GC) with electron capture (EC-), nitrogen/phosphorous (NP-), and mass spectrometric (MS-) detection. Three strobilurins, azoxystrobin, kresoxim-methyl and trifloxystrobin were validated on three matrices, wheat, apple and grapes. The validation was based...... and reproducibility were within the limits for repeatability and reproducibility given by the Horwitz equation. Validation was not accepted for azoxystrobin in grapes on all three detectors and for azoxystrobin in apple for the MS-detector. A comparison of matrix-matched standards versus standards in solvent showed...

  3. Fungicidal activity of silver nanoparticles against Alternaria brassicicola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Deepika; Chauhan, Pratima

    2016-04-01

    This work highlighted the fungicidal properties of silver nanoparticles against Alternaria brassicicola. Alternaria brassicicola causes Black spot of Cauliflower, radish, cabbage, kale which results in sever agricultural loss. We treat the synthesised silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) of 10, 25, 50, 100 and 110 ppm concentrations against Alternaria brassicicola on PDA containing Petri dish. We calculated inhibitory rate (%) in order to evaluate the antifungal efficacy of silver nanoparticles against pathogens. Treatment with 100ppm AgNPs resulted in maximum inhibition of Alternaria brassicicola i.e.92.2%. 110ppm of AgNPS also shows the same result, therefore 100ppm AgNPs was treated as optimize concentration. AgNPs effectively inhibited the growth of a Alternaria brassicicola, which suggests that AgNPs could be used as fungicide in plant disease management. Further research and development are necessary to translate this technology into plant disease management strategies.

  4. Insecticidal, Repellent and Fungicidal Properties of Novel Trifluoromethylphenyl Amides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Insecticidal, repellent and fungicidal properties of novel trifluoromethylphenyl amidesq Maia Tsikolia a,⇑, Ulrich R. Bernier a, Monique R. Coy a...Swale e, Jeffrey R. Bloomquist e aU.S. Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service, Center for Medical, Agricultural , and Veterinary...dU.S. Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service, Natural Products Utilization Research Unit, The University of Mississippi, University

  5. Curative and eradicant action of fungicides to control Phakopsora pachyrhizi in soybean plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erlei Melo Reis

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Experiments were carried out in a growth chamber and laboratory to quantify the curative and eradicant actions of fungicides in Asian soybean rust control. The experiments were conducted with the CD 214 RR cultivar, assessing the following fungicides, separately or in association, chlorothalonil, flutriafol, cyproconazole + trifloxystrobin, epoxiconazole + pyraclostrobin, cyproconazole + azoxystrobin, and cyproconazole + picoxystrobin. The fungicides were applied at four (curative and nine days after inoculation (eradicant treatment. Treatments were evaluated according to the density of lesions and uredia/cm2, and the eradicant treatment was assessed based on the necrosis of lesions/uredia and on uredospore viability. Except for the fungicide chlorothalonil, there was curative action of latent/virtual infections by the fungicides. Penetrant fungicides that are absorbed have curative and eradicant action to soybean rust.

  6. Sensitivity of Mycosphaerella graminicola isolates to demethylation-inhibiting (DMI) fungicides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronis, Antanas; Jørgensen, Lise Nistrup; Semaskiene, Roma

    2014-01-01

    Mycosphaerella graminicola (Fuckel) J. Schröt. (anamorph Zymoseptoria tritici (Desm.) Quaedvlieg & Crous) causes Septoria leaf blotch disease of wheat. The disease can be responsible for yield losses of 30–50% and, when severe, requires management with a fungicide. Single picnidia isolates...... collected from different locations of Lithuania were tested in vitro for sensitivity to demethylation-inhibiting (DMI) fungicides epoxiconazole, cyproconazole and prothioconazole. Fungicide concentrations were chosen from the proposed Fungicide Resistance Action Committee (FRAC) methods. Microtitre plates...... that fungicides epoxiconazole and prothioconazole significantly reduced the area under the disease progress curve (AUDPC) values of Septoria leaf blotch compared with untreated plots in winter wheat. In most cases, a single fungicide application significantly increased grain yield and a thousand grain weight...

  7. Phytotoxicity: An Overview of the Physiological Responses of Plants Exposed to Fungicides

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Celeste Dias

    2012-01-01

    In the last decades, the use of fungicides in agriculture for fungi diseases control has become crucial. Fungicide research has produced a diverse range of products with novel modes of action. However, the extensive use of these compounds in the agriculture system raises public concern because of the harmful potential of such substances in the environment and human health. Moreover, the phytotoxic effects of some fungicides are already recognized but little is known about the impact of these ...

  8. Nitric oxide and cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengel, Atiye; Sahinarslan, Asife

    2006-12-01

    Endothelium has many important functions including the control of blood-tissue permeability and vascular tonus, regulation of vascular surface properties for homeostasis and inflammation. Nitric oxide is the chief molecule in regulation of endothelial functions. Nitric oxide deficiency, which is also known as endothelial dysfunction, is the first step for the occurrence of many disease states in cardiovascular system including heart failure, hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus, hyperhomocysteinemia and smoking. This review deals with the importance of nitric oxide for cardiovascular system. It also includes the latest improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of endothelial dysfunction.

  9. 49 CFR 173.158 - Nitric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nitric acid. 173.158 Section 173.158... Nitric acid. (a) Nitric acid exceeding 40 percent concentration may not be packaged with any other material. (b) Nitric acid in any concentration which does not contain sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid as...

  10. 49 CFR 173.337 - Nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nitric oxide. 173.337 Section 173.337... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.337 Nitric oxide. (a) Nitric oxide must be... valve and valve seat that will not deteriorate in contact with nitric oxide. Cylinders or valves may...

  11. Phytotoxicity: An Overview of the Physiological Responses of Plants Exposed to Fungicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Celeste Dias

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, the use of fungicides in agriculture for fungi diseases control has become crucial. Fungicide research has produced a diverse range of products with novel modes of action. However, the extensive use of these compounds in the agriculture system raises public concern because of the harmful potential of such substances in the environment and human health. Moreover, the phytotoxic effects of some fungicides are already recognized but little is known about the impact of these compounds on the photosynthetic apparatus. This paper presents a comprehensive overview of the literature considering different classes of fungicides and their effects on plant physiology, with particular emphasis on photosynthesis.

  12. In vivo sensitivity of Phakopsora pachyrhizi to DMI and QoI fungicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erlei Melo Reis

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In in vivo experiments the sensitivity of 18 isolates of Phakopsora pachyrhizi from several regions of Brazil to IDM fungicides (cyproconazole, epoxiconazole and tebuconazole and an IQE (pyraclostrobin were evaluated. The assessments were based on leaflet uredia density. Inhibitory concentration (IC50 and sensitivity reduction factor were determined for all fungicide x strain interactions. Tebuconazole sensitivity reduction was detected for most fungus isolates. In contrast, there was no fungicide shift in sensitivity of the fungus to pyraclostrobin. We conclude that the control failure of soybean rust found in some farms is due to the reduced sensitivity of the fungus to the IDM fungicide and that it remains sensitive to pyraclostrobin.

  13. TOXICITY PROFILES IN MICE TREATED WITH HEPATOTUMORIGENIC AND NON-HEPATOTUMORIGENIC TRIAZOLE CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES: PROPICONAZOLE, TRIADIMEFON, AND MYCLOBUTANIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conazoles comprise a class of fungicides used in agriculture and as pharmaceutical products. The fungicidal properties of conazoles are due to their inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis. Certain conazoles are tumorigenic in rodents; both propiconazole and triadimefon are hepatot...

  14. Insecticidal and fungicidal activity of new synthesized chitosan derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabea, Entsar I; Badawy, Mohamed E I; Rogge, Tina M; Stevens, Christian V; Höfte, Monica; Steurbaut, Walter; Smagghe, Guy

    2005-10-01

    Chitosan, the N-deacetylated derivative of chitin, is a potential biopolysaccharide owing to its specific structure and properties. In this paper, we report on the synthesis of 24 new chitosan derivatives, N-alkyl chitosans (NAC) and N-benzyl chitosans (NBC), that are soluble in dilute aqueous acetic acid. The different derivatives were synthesized by reductive amination and analyzed by 1H NMR spectroscopy. A high degree of substitution (DS) was obtained with N-(butyl)chitosan (DS 0.36) at a 1:1 mole ratio for NAC derivatives and N-(2,4-dichlorobenzyl)chitosan (DS 0.52) for NBC derivatives. Their insecticidal and fungicidal activities were tested against larvae of the cotton leafworm Spodoptera littoralis (Boisduval) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), the grey mould Botrytis cinerea Pers (Leotiales: Sclerotiniaceae) and the rice leaf blast Pyricularia grisea Cavara (Teleomorph: Magnaporthe grisea (Hebert) Barr). The oral feeding bioassay indicated that all the derivatives had significant insecticidal activity at 5 g kg(-1) in artificial diet. The most active was N-(2-chloro-6-fluorobenzyl)chitosan, which caused 100% mortality at 0.625 g kg(-1), with an estimated LC50 of 0.32 g kg(-1). Treated larvae ceased feeding after 2-3 days; the mechanism of action remains unknown. In a radial hyphal growth bioassay with both plant pathogens, all derivatives showed a higher fungicidal action than chitosan. N-Dodecylchitosan, N-(p-isopropylbenzyl)chitosan and N-(2,6-dichlorobenzyl)chitosan were the most active against B cinerea, with EC50 values of 0.57, 0.57 and 0.52 g litre(-1), respectively. Against P grisea, N-(m-nitrobenzyl)chitosan was the most active, with 77% inhibition at 5 g litre(-1). The effect of different substitutions is discussed in relation to insecticidal and fungicidal activity.

  15. FUNGICIDAL PROPERTIES OF ARTEMISIA AROMATIC PLANTS TOWARDS FUSARIUM OXYSPORUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivashchenko Iryna Vіctorovna

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article establishes the fungicidal activity of water extracts of Artemisia maritimа L., Artemisia austriaca Jacq., under the concentration of 100, 50 and 25 mg/ml on dry matter with regard to the phytopathogenic mushroom Fusarium oxysporum. It also shows the fungistatic influence of extract of Artemisia dracunculus L. under concentration 25 and 50 mg/ml, fungicidal – under 100 mg/ml. Concerning Artemisia abrotanum L., the slow growth of mushroom is observed under the concentration 25 mg/ml, fungicidal effect – under 50 and 100 mg/ml. The paper provides the information on the component composition of ethereal oil and phenolic compounds of Artemisia maritimа, Artemisia austriaca, Artemisia abrotanum, Artemisia dracunculus, cultivated in Zhytomyr Polissya. The chief ingredients of ethereal oil which is synthesized by the plant of Artemisia abrotanum are 1,8-cineole (30.44% and camphor (31.92%. A high 1,8-cineole and camphor content determines antimicrobial properties of the plants. Amount of phenolic compounds in the air-dry raw Artemisia abrotanum is 2.98 percent. By the method of highly efficient solution chromatography (HESChr in the grass of Artemisia abrotanum we have detected 23 phenolic compounds, of which we identified such flavonoids as rutin, luteolin-7-glycoside as well as caffeic, chlorogenic and isochlorogenic acids. The main compounds of ethereal oil of Artemisia austriaca are trans-verbenole (30.77 %, pinocarvone (10.77 % and sabinilacetate (18.16 %. In the grass of Artemisia austriaca we have detected 31 phenolic compounds, of which we identified such flavonoids as rutin, apigenin, quercetin-bioside and the following acids: caffeic, chlorogenic, and isochlorogenic. Amount of phenolic compounds in the air-dry raw Austrian wormwood is 27.25 mg / g (2.73 %. The main component of ethereal oil of Artemisia dracunculus is methyleugenol (94.65 %. We have discovered 31 phenolic compounds in the grass of linear-leaved wormwood

  16. Evaluating Headline fungicide on alfalfa production and sensitivity of pathogens to pyraclostrobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headline fungicide was recently registered for management of foliar diseases on alfalfa. The effect of disease control on yield, forage quality, and potential return on investment for fungicide application was determined for field experiments conducted at five locations in 2012, three in Wisconsin a...

  17. Comparative impact of artificial selection for fungicide resistance on Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium brunncum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypocreales fungi such as Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae can be negatively affected by fungicides thereby reducing their biocontrol potential. The overall goal of this study was to investigate the impact of artificial selection for fungicide resistance on two commercial entomopathoge...

  18. Effects of the azole fungicide imazalil on the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) steroidogenesis pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azole fungicides, used for both agriculture and human therapeutic applications may disrupt endocrine function of aquatic life. Azole fungicides are designed to inhibit the fungal enzyme lanosterol 14 á-demethylase (cytochrome P450 [CYP] 51). However, they can also interact...

  19. Bffects of foliar fungicides on the mycoflora of glumes of Triticum aestivum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Błaszkowski

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the years 1983-1984. the effect of three foliar fungicides, i.e.. Bayleton 25 WP. Dithane M-45 and Funaben K on the mycoflora associated with glumus of spring Tritieum aestivum cv. Kolibri cultivated in the field was investigated. During each vegetative period, glumes were collected in the milky ripe of seeds. Fungi species associated with glumes were determined based of colonies isolated from glumes incubated in Petri dishes with potato glucose agar. The fungicide which reduced the most the overall number of fungal isolates was Bayleton 25 WP. The number of species was most reduced following Dithane M-45 application. The mycoflora of glumes which had been untreated and treated with fungicides was compared with fungicides-treated and fungicide-untreated seeds and leaves. The highest similarity in the mycoflora of fungicide-untreated plant parts was found when glumes and seeds were compared. The mycoflora of fungicide-treated glumes, leaves, and seeds varied. depending on the year and fungicide applied.

  20. Development and evaluation of adverse outcome pathways predicting adverse effects of conazole fungicides on avian species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conazoles are a class of fungicides commonly used in agriculture and as pharmaceuticals to prevent the spread of fungus through inhibition of cytochrome P450 14á-demethylase (CYP51). However these fungicides are known to act promiscuously on other cytochrome P450 enzymes (...

  1. Can phyllosphere yeast explain the effect of scab fungicides on russeting of Elstar Apples?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gildemacher, P.R.; Heijne, B.; Houbraken, J.; Vromans, T.; Hoekstra, E.S.; Boekhout, T.

    2004-01-01

    In 1999 and 2000, the effects of scab fungicides on yeast composition and russeting of Elstar apples were assessed. Yeast composition of fungicide-treated and untreated young apple fruit with or without russet symptoms was investigated and enzyme activity of the yeasts was studied. Cryptococcus albi

  2. Cercospora leaf spot: monitoring and managing fungicide resistance in populations of Cercospora beticola in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cercospora leaf spot (CLS, Cercospora beticola) is the most serious foliar disease of sugarbeet in Michigan and Ontario.Management of CLS depends on timely fungicide applications, disease forecasting prediction models and the use of CLS resistant sugar beet varieties. Fungicides have a dominant role...

  3. Fungicide resistance phenotypes in Botrytis cinerea populations from blueberries in California and Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is a major postharvest disease of blueberries grown in the Central Valley of California (CA) and western Washington State (WA). Understanding fungicide- resistant phenotypes of B. cinerea is important to the development of preharvest fungicide programs for contro...

  4. Analysis of Turf Fungicides in Snow Melt Runoff by LC/MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fungicides are applied on turf grass, in autumn, to control snow mold in the north-central United States. Fungicides of varying chemical classes have been detected in snow melt runoff from turf. A multi-residue method for simultaneous sample extraction and analysis is needed to process a large quant...

  5. Effects of azole fungicides on the function of sex and thyroid hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærstad, Mia Birkhøj; Andersen, Helle Raun; Taxvig, Camilla

    Azole-fungicides are frequently used in Denmark. Epoxiconazole, propiconazole, and tebuconazole had endocrine disrupting properties in cell based assays. In rats, epoxiconazole and tebuconazole increased gestational length, maternal progesterone level, and masculinized female-offspring. Besides......, tebuconazole caused feminization of male-offspring. Similar effects were previously demonstrated for prochloraz. The results indicate that azole-fungicides in general have endocrine disrupting properties....

  6. Effect of Fungicides on the Reaction of Sorghum Hybrids to Anthracnose in Burleson County, Texas, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of three fungicides to control grain mold/weathering and anthracnose on two sorghum hybrids NC+7R34 and Warner W851-DR was conducted during the 2012 growing season. Three fungicides Headline, Quilt Xcel, and Topguard were used. On May 26, plots were inoculated by putting 10 Colletotrichum ...

  7. Honey bee gut microbial communities are robust to the fungicide Pristine® consumed in pollen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeybees that consume pollen with sublethal levels of the fungicide Pristine® can have reduced pollen digestion, lower ATP synthesis and in many ways resemble malnourished bees. Reduced nutrient acquisition in bees exposed to Pristine® might be because this fungicide affects the composition of gut ...

  8. Effects of Oral Exposure to Fungicides on Honey Bee Nutrition and Virus Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degrandi-Hoffman, Gloria; Chen, Yanping; Watkins Dejong, Emily; Chambers, Mona L; Hidalgo, Geoffrey

    2015-12-01

    Sublethal exposure to fungicides can affect honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) in ways that resemble malnutrition. These include reduced brood rearing, queen loss, and increased pathogen levels. We examined the effects of oral exposure to the fungicides boscalid and pyraclostrobin on factors affecting colony nutrition and immune function including pollen consumption, protein digestion, hemolymph protein titers, and changes in virus levels. Because the fungicides are respiratory inhibitors, we also measured ATP concentrations in flight muscle. The effects were evaluated in 3- and 7-d-old worker bees at high fungicide concentrations in cage studies, and at field-relevant concentrations in colony studies. Though fungicide levels differed greatly between the cage and colony studies, similar effects were observed. Hemolymph protein concentrations were comparable between bees feeding on pollen with and without added fungicides. However, in both cage and colony studies, bees consumed less pollen containing fungicides and digested less of the protein. Bees fed fungicide-treated pollen also had lower ATP concentrations and higher virus titers. The combination of effects we detected could produce symptoms that are similar to those from poor nutrition and weaken colonies making them more vulnerable to loss from additional stressors such as parasites and pathogens.

  9. Kinetics and thermodynamics of oxidation mediated reaction in L-cysteine and its methyl and ethyl esters in dimethyl sulfoxide-d6 by NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Ryan J.; Singh, Jaideep; Krishnan, V. V.

    2017-03-01

    L-Cysteine (L-Cys), L-Cysteine methyl ester (L-CysME) or L-Cysteine ethyl ester (L-CysEE), when dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide, undergoes an oxidation process. This process is slow enough and leads to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral changes that could be monitored in real time. The oxidation mediated transition is modeled as a pseudo-first order kinetics and the thermodynamic parameters are estimated using the Eyring's formulation. L-Cysteine and their esters are often used as biological models due to the remarkable thiol group that can be found in different oxidation states. This oxidation mediated transition is due to the combination of thiol oxidation to a disulfide followed by solvent-induced effects may be relevant in designing cysteine-based molecular models.

  10. Toxicity, sublethal effects, and potential modes of action of select fungicides on freshwater fish and invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elskus, Adria A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite decades of agricultural and urban use of fungicides and widespread detection of these pesticides in surface waters, relatively few data are available on the effects of fungicides on fish and invertebrates in the aquatic environment. Nine fungicides are reviewed in this report: azoxystrobin, boscalid, chlorothalonil, fludioxonil, myclobutanil, fenarimol, pyraclostrobin, pyrimethanil, and zoxamide. These fungicides were identified as emerging chemicals of concern because of their high or increasing global use rates, detection frequency in surface waters, or likely persistence in the environment. A review of the literature revealed significant sublethal effects of fungicides on fish, aquatic invertebrates, and ecosystems, including zooplankton and fish reproduction, fish immune function, zooplankton community composition, metabolic enzymes, and ecosystem processes, such as leaf decomposition in streams, among other biological effects. Some of these effects can occur at fungicide concentrations well below single-species acute lethality values (48- or 96-hour concentration that effects a response in 50 percent of the organisms, that is, effective concentration killing 50 percent of the organisms in 48 or 96 hours) and chronic sublethal values (for example, 21-day no observed adverse effects concentration), indicating that single-species toxicity values may dramatically underestimate the toxic potency of some fungicides. Fungicide modes of toxic action in fungi can sometimes reflect the biochemical and (or) physiological effects of fungicides observed in vertebrates and invertebrates; however, far more studies are needed to explore the potential to predict effects in nontarget organisms based on specific fungicide modes of toxic action. Fungicides can also have additive and (or) synergistic effects when used with other fungicides and insecticides, highlighting the need to study pesticide mixtures that occur in surface waters. For fungicides that partition to

  11. The Evolution of Fungicide Resistance Resulting from Combinations of Foliar-Acting Systemic Seed Treatments and Foliar-Applied Fungicides: A Modeling Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, James L; van den Bosch, Frank; Paveley, Neil D; Helps, Joseph; van den Berg, Femke

    2016-01-01

    For the treatment of foliar diseases of cereals, fungicides may be applied as foliar sprays or systemic seed treatments which are translocated to leaves. Little research has been done to assess the resistance risks associated with foliar-acting systemic seed treatments when used alone or in combination with foliar sprays, even though both types of treatment may share the same mode of action. It is therefore unknown to what extent adding a systemic seed treatment to a foliar spray programme poses an additional resistance risk and whether in the presence of a seed treatment additional resistance management strategies (such as limiting the total number of treatments) are necessary to limit the evolution of fungicide-resistance. A mathematical model was developed to simulate an epidemic and the resistance evolution of Zymoseptoria tritici on winter wheat, which was used to compare different combinations of seed and foliar treatments by calculating the fungicide effective life, i.e. the number of years before effective disease control is lost to resistance. A range of parameterizations for the seed treatment fungicide and different fungicide uptake models were compared. Despite the different parameterizations, the model consistently predicted the same trends in that i) similar levels of efficacy delivered either by a foliar-acting seed treatment, or a foliar application, resulted in broadly similar resistance selection, ii) adding a foliar-acting seed treatment to a foliar spray programme increased resistance selection and usually decreased effective life, and iii) splitting a given total dose-by adding a seed treatment to foliar treatments, but decreasing dose per treatment-gave effective lives that were the same as, or shorter than those given by the spray programme alone. For our chosen plant-pathogen-fungicide system, the model results suggest that to effectively manage selection for fungicide-resistance, foliar acting systemic seed treatments should be included as

  12. Fungicides and the effects of mycotoxins on milling fractions of irrigated rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dors, Giniani Carla; Caldas, Sergiane Souza; Hackbart, Helen Cristina dos Santos; Primel, Ednei Gilberto; Fagundes, Carlos Alberto Alves; Badiale-Furlong, Eliana

    2013-02-27

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of fungicides on rice cultivation, regarding the occurrence and the distribution of mycotoxins in fractions of the processed grain, by a validated chromatographic method. A method based on extraction with acetonitrile:water, determination by HPLC-DAD, and confirmation by LC-MS was validated before the mycotoxin evaluation. Control samples and samples to which triazole fungicides had been applied were collected from experimental fields for four years. Results showed that 87% of the samples were contaminated with deoxynivalenol or zearalenone, and that all samples treated with fungicide were contaminated with some of these mycotoxins. Aflatoxin B(1) and ochratoxin A were found in 37% of the samples; half of them had been treated with fungicide. Therefore, fungicides tend to be stressors for toxigenic fungi found in the fields.

  13. Emerging resistance against different fungicides in Lasiodiplodia theobromae, the cause of mango dieback in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehman ur Ateeq

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dieback of mango caused by Lasiodiplodia theobromae is among several diseases responsible for low crop production in Pakistan. To further complicate the issue, resistance in L. theobromae is emerging against different fungicides. L. theobromae was isolated from diseased samples of mango plants collected from various orchards in the Multan District. The efficacy of different fungicides viz. copper oxychloride, diethofencarb, pyrachlostrobin, carbendazim, difenoconazole, mancozeb, and thiophanate-methyl was evaluated in vitro using a poison food technique. Thiophanate-methyl at all concentrations was found to be the most effective among five systemic fungicides against L. theobromae, followed by carbendazim, difenoconazole and diethofencarb. The fungicides, i.e., thiophanate-methyl, difenoconazole, carbendazim and diethofencarb showed maximum efficacy with increasing concentration. The isolates of L. theobromae showed some resistance development against the tested fungicides when compared with previous work. These investigations provide new information about chemical selection for the control of holistic disease in mango growing zones of Pakistan.

  14. Fungicide Effect on Glomus Intrarradices in Different Genotypes of Beans (Phaseolus Vulgaris L., OAT (Avena Sativa L., and Wheat (Triticum Aaestivum L. Growth Cultivated in Two Soil Types under Greenhouse Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Khalil Gardezi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of fungicides on the association with Glomus intraradices and soil contamination on three genotypes of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L., one of oat (Avena sativa L., and another one of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.. The study was done under greenhouse conditions at the Montecillo Campus of the Postgraduate College, Mexico. Two soils were used, one irrigated with sewage water and the other one with clean water from a well. Half of the plants were inoculated with Glomus intraradices. Metacaptan was used as a fungicide applied to half of the seeds. The pH of the soil was alkaline. Electric conductivity, and organic matter, nitric and ammoniac nitrogen, phosphorous, copper and nickel quantities were higher on the soils irrigated with sewage water. The soil contamination did not affect significantly plant responses in this study. It is concluded that endomycorrhiza inoculation (Glomus intraradices gave better growth and yield, especially in beans. The application of fungicides improved plant growth.

  15. Sustained release of fungicide metalaxyl by mesoporous silica nanospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanyika, Harrison, E-mail: hwanyika@gmail.com [Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Department of Chemistry (Kenya)

    2013-08-15

    The use of nanomaterials for the controlled delivery of pesticides is nascent technology that has the potential to increase the efficiency of food production and decrease pollution. In this work, the prospect of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) for storage and controlled release of metalaxyl fungicide has been investigated. Mesoporous silica nanospheres with average particle diameters of 162 nm and average pore sizes of 3.2 nm were prepared by a sol-gel process. Metalaxyl molecules were loaded into MSN pores from an aqueous solution by a rotary evaporation method. The loaded amount of metalaxyl as evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis was about 14 wt%. Release of the fungicide entrapped in the MSN matrix revealed sustained release behavior. About 76 % of the free metalaxyl was released in soil within a period of 30 days while only 11.5 and 47 % of the metalaxyl contained in the MSN carrier was released in soil and water, respectively, within the same period. The study showed that MSN can be used to successfully store metalaxyl molecules in its mesoporous framework and significantly delay their release in soil.

  16. Sustained release of fungicide metalaxyl by mesoporous silica nanospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanyika, Harrison

    2013-08-01

    The use of nanomaterials for the controlled delivery of pesticides is nascent technology that has the potential to increase the efficiency of food production and decrease pollution. In this work, the prospect of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) for storage and controlled release of metalaxyl fungicide has been investigated. Mesoporous silica nanospheres with average particle diameters of 162 nm and average pore sizes of 3.2 nm were prepared by a sol-gel process. Metalaxyl molecules were loaded into MSN pores from an aqueous solution by a rotary evaporation method. The loaded amount of metalaxyl as evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis was about 14 wt%. Release of the fungicide entrapped in the MSN matrix revealed sustained release behavior. About 76 % of the free metalaxyl was released in soil within a period of 30 days while only 11.5 and 47 % of the metalaxyl contained in the MSN carrier was released in soil and water, respectively, within the same period. The study showed that MSN can be used to successfully store metalaxyl molecules in its mesoporous framework and significantly delay their release in soil.

  17. 2-hydroxyisocaproic acid is fungicidal for Candida and Aspergillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakko, M; Moore, C; Novak-Frazer, L; Rautemaa, V; Sorsa, T; Hietala, P; Järvinen, A; Bowyer, P; Tjäderhane, L; Rautemaa, R

    2014-04-01

    The amino acid derivative 2-hydroxyisocaproic acid (HICA) is a nutritional additive used to increase muscle mass. Low levels can be detected in human plasma as a result of leucine metabolism. It has broad antibacterial activity but its efficacy against pathogenic fungi is not known. The aim was to test the efficacy of HICA against Candida and Aspergillus species. Efficacy of HICA against 19 clinical and reference isolates representing five Candida and three Aspergillus species with variable azole antifungal sensitivity profiles was tested using a microdilution method. The concentrations were 18, 36 and 72 mg ml(-1) . Growth was determined spectrophotometrically for Candida isolates and by visual inspection for Aspergillus isolates, viability was tested by culture and impact on morphology by microscopy. HICA of 72 mg ml(-1) was fungicidal against all Candida and Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus terreus isolates. Lower concentrations were fungistatic. Aspergillus flavus was not inhibited by HICA. HICA inhibited hyphal formation in susceptible Candida albicans and A. fumigatus isolates and affected cell wall integrity. In conclusion, HICA has broad antifungal activity against Candida and Aspergillus at concentrations relevant for topical therapy. As a fungicidal agent with broad-spectrum bactericidal activity, it may be useful in the topical treatment of multispecies superficial infections.

  18. Ecotoxicity of climbazole, a fungicide contained in antidandruff shampoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Elisabeth; Wick, Arne; Ternes, Thomas A; Coors, Anja

    2013-12-01

    Emerging pollutants such as personal care products can reach the environment via effluents from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and digested sludge. Only recently, the antidandruff agent and antimycotic climbazole was detected for the first time in a WWTP effluent with concentrations up to 0.5 µg/L. Climbazole acts as a C14-demethylase inhibitor (DMI) fungicide and thus has a high efficacy against fungi, but knowledge of its potential environmental impact is lacking. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterize climbazole's ecotoxicity by conducting standard biotests with organisms representing different trophic levels from the aquatic as well as the terrestrial ecosystems. It was found that the toxicity of climbazole is mostly similar to that of other DMI fungicides, whereas it proved to be particularly toxic to primary producers. The lowest median effective concentrations (EC50s) were determined for Lemna minor, at 0.013 mg/L (biomass yield), and Avena sativa, at 18.5 mg/kg soil dry weight (shoot biomass). Reduction of frond size in water lentils and shoot length in higher plants suggested an additional plant growth-retarding mode of action of climbazole. In addition, it was demonstrated here that for an ionizable compound such as climbazole, the soil pH can have a considerable influence on phytotoxicity. © 2013 SETAC.

  19. Molecular mechanism of resistance of Fusarium fujikuroi to benzimidazole fungicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zihao; Gao, Tao; Liang, Shuping; Liu, Kexue; Zhou, Mingguo; Chen, Changjun

    2014-08-01

    Although carbendazim (MBC) and other benzimidazole fungicides have effectively controlled bakanae disease of rice (which is caused by Fusarium fujikuroi, F. proliferatum, and F. verticillioides) in the past, MBC resistance has become common. Previous research has shown that MBC resistance results from a mutation in the β1 -tubulin (β1 tub) gene in F. verticillioides. However, MBC resistance in F. fujikuroi, a predominant species in China, does not result from a mutation in the β1 tub. The molecular mechanism of F. fujikuroi resistance against benzimidazole fungicides is poorly understood. In this study, we determined that although β1 tub and β2 -tubulin (β2 tub) in F. fujikuroi have high homology with β1 tub and β2 tub in F. verticillioides, MBC resistance in F. fujikuroi results from mutations in β2 tub [GAG(Glu)→GTG(Val) at codon 198, TTC(Phe)→TAC(Tyr) at codon 200, and GGC(Gly)→GGT(Gly) at codon 235] but not in β1 tub. Δβ2 tub (β2 tub deletion) mutants were highly sensitive to MBC, produced fewer conidia and were less virulent than parental strains. Complementation of the Δβ2 tub mutants with a copy of the whole β2 tub locus from their parental strains restored the level of MBC resistance (or sensitivity) to that of the parental strain.

  20. Botrytis cinerea Control and the Problem of Fungicide Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brankica Tanović

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Botrytis cinerea, the causal agent of grey mould, greatly affects fruit, grapevine, vegetable and ornamental crops production. It is a common causal agent of diseases in plants grown in protected areas, as well as fruit decay during storage and transport. The fungusinvades almost all parts of the plant in all developmental stages, and the symptoms are usually described as grey mould, grey mildew, brown rot and seedling blight. The paper reviews the current knowledge on control possibilities of this necrotrophic pathogen. Theattention is particularly paid to the mode of action of novel fungicides and to the problem of resistance. It is pointed out that by limiting the number of treatments in the growing season, avoiding the use of only one fungicide with a high risk for resistance development,appropriate application rate and timing, using mixtures of pesticides with different modes of action, as well as by alternative use of pesticides from different resistance groups, a longterm preservation of pesticide efficacy is provided.

  1. Vacuole-targeting fungicidal activity of amphotericin B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira eOgita

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infections are recognized as major threats to patients with immune depression as well as those with cancer chemotherapy. Amphotericin B (AmB, a classical antifungal agent with a polyene macrolide structure, is widely used for the control of serious fungal infections. However, the clinical use of this antibiotic is limited by the treatment-associated side effects and the appearance of resistant strains. AmB lethality has been generally elucidated by the alteration of plasma membrane ion permeability due to its specific binding to plasma membrane ergosterol. While, the recent studies with Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans reveals the vacuole disruptive action as another cause of AmB lethality on the basis of its marked amplification in combination with allicin, an allyl sulfur compound from garlic. Indeed, AmB causes a serious structural damage to the vacuole membrane at a lethal concentration, and even at a non-lethal concentration in combination with allicin. Such an enhancement effect of allicin is dependent on an inhibition of ergosterol-trafficking from the plasma membrane to the vacuole membrane, which is considered to be a cellular response to protect against the vacuole membrane disintegration. Allicin can also decrease the minimum fungicidal concentration of AmB against the pathogenic fungi C. albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus, as is the case of S. cerevisiae. The synergistic fungicidal activities of AmB and allicin may have significant implications in the development of the vacuole-targeting chemotherapy against fungal infections.

  2. Development of competitive immunoassays to hydroxyl containing fungicide metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Kevin C; Jarvis, Shila; Maddison, Ben C

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the isolation of monoclonal antibodies and the development of competitive immunoassays to pesticide metabolites of the fungicides imazalil, carbendazim and thiabendazole. The metabolite specific hydroxyl residues were used as the reactive group with which to link the metabolite to the carrier proteins Keyhole Limpet Haemocyanin (KLH) and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA). In each case immune responses in mice were raised and monoclonal antibodies were produced. Antibodies were developed into competitive ELISAs to the appropriate metabolite. The antibody raised to a metabolite of imazalil was optimised into a competitive ELISA format which had an assay IC50 of 7.5 μg/L and a limit of detection (LOD) of 1.1 μg/L. A single antibody isolated against the metabolite of carbendazim had assay IC50s of 3.2 and 2.7 μg/L for the metabolites of carbendazim and thiabendazole respectively with an LOD of 0.38 μg/L for both. These sensitive immunoassays may have application in the monitoring of human exposure to these fungicide residues either by occupational or non-occupational routes.

  3. FUNGICIDE APPLICATION FOR MAINTAINING POSTHARVEST QUALITY IN TOMATO FRUITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Vani

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Tomato fruits are usually consumed soon after harvest, however, as they are mainly comprised of water, and its walls are fragile, facilitates the emergence of diseases, making necessary the use of preventive measures in the field in order to reduce incidence of disease. The objective is then to evaluate the effect of foliar application of fungicides on the final quality of tomato fruits in postharvest. There were 13 applications of foliar fungicides Azoxystrobin+Cyproconazol and Boscalida, 7 applications Tebuconazol+Trifoxistrobin and 17 applications of Propamocarb+Fluopicolide (Control. We analyzed the incidence of Fusarium sp. in fruits, decay percentage of fruit weight (g and Brix. For incidence of Fusarium sp. in fruits, treatments Tebuconazol+Trifoxistrobin and Azoxistrobin+Ciproconazol reduced by 14.3%, the pathogen in fruits. There was a decrease of 82% in the deterioration of fruits treated with Tebuconazol+Trifoxistrobin and 91% in those treated with Azoxistrobin+Ciproconazol. As for the weight gain, treatments Tebuconazol+Trifoxistrobin, Boscalida and Azoxistrobin+Ciproconazol reduced the weight gain in 8.12%, 20.8% and 38.8%, respectively, compared to the control. ° Brix values of fruits treated with Tebuconazol+Trifoxistrobin and Boscalida were higher than those treated with Azoxistrobin+Ciproconazol and Control (Propamocarb+Fluopicolide. It is concluded that the treatment carried out with Tebuconazol+Trifoxistrobin afforded the greatest benefits in maintaining the tomato fruits in harvest.

  4. The inter-generic fungicidal activity of Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza, Marcelo; Flores, Oriana; Carrasco, Mario; Rozas, Juan Manuel; Oviedo, Vicente; Barahona, Salvador; Cifuentes, Víctor

    2010-12-01

    In this study, the existence of intra-specific and inter-generic fungicidal activity in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous and Phaffia rhodozyma strains isolated from different regions of the earth was examined. Assays were performed under several culture conditions, showing that all the analyzed X. dendrorhous and P. rhodozyma strains have killing activity against Kloeckera apiculata, Rhodotorula sloffiae, and R. minuta. This activity was greater in rich media at a pH from 4.6 to 5.0. Extracellular protein extracts with fungicidal activity were obtained from cultures of all strains, and their characterization suggested that a protein of 33 kDa is the antifungal factor. According to peptide mass fingerprinting and an analysis of the results with the MASCOT search engine, this protein was identified as an aspartic protease. Additionally, extrachromosomal double-stranded DNA elements (dsDNAs) were observed in all X. dendrorhous and P. rhodozyma strains. Although there is a high variability, two dsDNAs of 5.4 and 6.8 kb are present in all strains.

  5. Design, Synthesis and Fungicidal Activities of Some Novel Pyrazole Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Ru Liu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to discover new compounds with good fungicidal activities, 32 pyrazole derivatives were designed and synthesized. The structures of the target compounds were confirmed by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, and high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS, and their fungicidal activities against Botrytis cinerea, Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn, Valsa mali Miyabe et Yamada, Thanatephorus cucumeris (Frank Donk, Fusarium oxysporum (S-chl f.sp. cucumerinum Owen, and Fusarium graminearum Schw were tested. The bioassay results indicated that most of the derivatives exhibited considerable antifungal activities, especially compound 26 containing a p-trifluoromethyl- phenyl moiety showed the highest activity, with EC50 values of 2.432, 2.182, 1.787, 1.638, 6.986, and 6.043 μg/mL against B. cinerea, R. solani, V. mali, T. cucumeris, F. oxysporum, and F. graminearum, respectively. Moreover, the activities of compounds such as compounds 27–32 were enhanced by introducing isothiocyanate and carboxamide moieties to the 5-position of the pyrazole ring.

  6. Desorption and mobilization of three strobilurin fungicides in three types of soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ping; Wu, Wen Zhu; Han, Zhi Hua; Yang, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Phenamacril (JS399-19 with independent intellectual property developed by China), azoxystrobin, and kresoxim-methyl are strobilurin fungicide. Due to their broad spectrum and good control of most of known fungi, strobilurin fungicide has been widely used in agriculture management. Thus, it is important to evaluate their environmental behaviors particularly in soils and underground water. In this study, the sorption/desorption and mobility of strobilurin fungicides in three Chinese soils (Jiangxi red soil, Taihu paddy soil, and Northeast China black soil) were conducted using comprehensively analytic approaches including batch experiment and soil thin-layer chromatography. The strobilurin fungicides were hard to be adsorbed in Jiangxi red soil but had medium adsorption capability in Tanhu paddy soil and Northeast China black soil, while the desorption of three strobilurin fungicides ranked in the order of Jiangxi red soil > Taihu paddy soil > Northeast China black soil. Soil properties including soil organic matter (SOM), pH, and cationic exchange capacity (CEC) affected the adsorption/desorption of the fungicides. Azoxystrobin and kresoxim-methyl had weak mobility in the soils. JS399-19 was moderately mobile in Jiangxi red soil but was not easily moved in Taihu paddy soil and Northeast China black soil. Due to their weak mobility in soils, these strobilurin fungicides tended to remain in the soil phase but not to shift downward to underground water. As azoxystrobin and JS399-19 had a long retention period in soil, there may become persistent residues in the soil environment.

  7. Effects of Fungicides, Time of Application, and Application Method on Control of Sclerotinia Blight in Peanut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason E. Woodward

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Field studies were conducted from 2007 to 2010 to evaluate the response of peanut cultivars to different fungicides, application timings, and methods. Overall, fungicides reduced Sclerotinia blight incidence and increased pod yields when applied to susceptible and partially resistant cultivars. Disease suppression was greater when full fungicide rates were applied preventatively; however, yields between fungicide treated plots were similar. Lower levels of disease and higher yields were achieved with the partially resistant cultivar Tamrun OL07 compared to the susceptible cultivars Flavor Runner 458 and Tamrun OL 02. Despite possessing improved resistance Tamrun OL07 responded to all fungicide applications. While similar levels of disease control were achieved with broadcast or banded applications made during the day or at night, the yield response for the different application methods was inconsistent among years. A negative relationship (slope = −73.8; R2=0.73; P<0.01 was observed between final disease incidence ratings and yield data from studies where a fungicide response was observed. These studies suggest that both boscalid and fluazinam are effective at controlling Sclerotinia blight in peanuts. Alternative management strategies such as nighttime and banded applications could allow for lower fungicide rates to be used; however, additional studies are warranted.

  8. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PATHOGENICITY AND FUNGICIDE TOLERANCE IN THE WHEAT PATHOGEN MYCOSPHAERELLA GRAMINICOLA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siah, A; Deweer, C; Tisserant, B; Randoux, B; Halama, P; Reignault, Ph

    2015-01-01

    Septoria tritici blotch caused by Mycosphaerella graminicola (anamorph: Zymoseptoria tritici) is currently the most devastating disease on wheat crops worldwide, especially in regions with suitable climate conditions such as Western Europe. Pathogen control relies mainly on the use of fungicides and resistant cultivars. However, the durability of chemical and genetic control strategies is increasingly compromised in the field since the fungus frequently develops resistance to fungicides and overcomes host resistance. Here, we assessed the association between pathogenicity and fungicide tolerance in eighteen different M. graminicola strains isolated in 2009 from Northern France. These strains were chosen because they exhibited in preliminary experiments a wide range of in vitro tolerance levels against six demethylation inhibitors (epoxiconazole, cyproconazole, fluquinconazole, propiconazole, prothioconazole and pyrefenox). Inoculation of the Scorpion susceptible wheat cultivar in the greenhouse with these strains revealed a great variability in their pathogenicity levels (disease symptoms ranged from 0 to 66% of leaf area bearing pycnidia). Interestingly, strains with high fungicide tolerance levels caused overall the highest disease symptoms (45% of diseased leaf area on average) when compared to those with low fungicide tolerance levels (22% of diseased leaf area on average), thus confirming the association between pathogenicity level and fungicide tolerance in M. graminicola. The occurrence and selection in the field of fungal genotypes combining both pathogenicity and fungicide resistance should be taken into account in disease management strategies.

  9. The rising threat of fungicide resistance in plant pathogenic fungi: Botrytis as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Matthias

    2014-10-01

    The introduction of site-specific fungicides almost 50 years ago has revolutionized chemical plant protection, providing highly efficient, low toxicity compounds for control of fungal diseases. However, it was soon discovered that plant pathogenic fungi can adapt to fungicide treatments by mutations leading to resistance and loss of fungicide efficacy. The grey mould fungus Botrytis cinerea, a major cause of pre- and post-harvest losses in fruit and vegetable production, is notorious as a 'high risk' organism for rapid resistance development. In this review, the mechanisms and the history of fungicide resistance in Botrytis are outlined. The introduction of new fungicide classes for grey mould control was always followed by the appearance of resistance in field populations. In addition to target site resistance, B. cinerea has also developed a resistance mechanism based on drug efflux transport. Excessive spraying programmes have resulted in the selection of multiresistant strains in several countries, in particular in strawberry fields. The rapid erosion of fungicide activity against these strains represents a major challenge for the future of fungicides against Botrytis. To maintain adequate protection of intensive cultures against grey mould, strict implementation of resistance management measures are required as well as alternative strategies with non-chemical products.

  10. Evaluation of cytotoxic and genotoxic activity of fungicide formulation Tango(®) Super in bovine lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzbacherová, Viera; Wnuk, Maciej; Lewinska, Anna; Potocki, Leszek; Zebrowski, Jacek; Koziorowski, Marek; Holečková, Beáta; Šiviková, Katarína; Dianovský, Ján

    2017-01-01

    Tango(®) Super is a two-compound fungicide formulation widely employed in grain protection. However, details of Tango(®) Super effects on cell cultures have not been fully investigated. In this study, bovine lymphocytes were exposed to a concentration range 0.5; 1.5; 3; 6; and 15 μg mL(-1) for 4 h to assess the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of the fungicide. Our experiments revealed that this fungicide treatment reduced cell viability, decreased cell proliferation and provoked apoptotic cell death. Cell cycle analysis showed predominant accumulation of cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. The fungicide was able to induce mitochondrial superoxide production accompanied by elevated levels of carbonylated proteins and changes in the lipid membrane composition. The fungicide did not induce micronuclei production, but stimulated both DNA double-strand breaks and the formation of p53 binding protein, which is accumulated during the DNA repair process at the site of double-strand breaks. Based on the obtained data we suppose that the fungicide-induced DNA damage is the result of oxidative stress, which may contribute to higher occurrence of apoptotic cell death. Because ergosterol biosynthesis-inhibiting fungicides are widely used in agriculture to ensure higher crop yields and may cause health impairment of animals and humans, there is a need for further testing to elucidate their potential genotoxic effects using in vivo and/or in vitro systems.

  11. Chemical management in fungicide sensivity of Mycosphaerella fijiensis collected from banana fields in México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Aguilar-Barragan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical management of the black leaf streak disease in banana caused by Mycosphaerella fijiensis (Morelet requires numerous applications of fungicides per year. However this has led to fungicide resistance in the field. The present study evaluated the activities of six fungicides against the mycelial growth by determination of EC50 values of strains collected from fields with different fungicide management programs: Rustic management (RM without applications and Intensive management (IM more than 25 fungicide application/year. Results showed a decreased sensitivity to all fungicides in isolates collected from IM. Means of EC50 values in mg L-1 for RM and IM were: 13.25 ± 18.24 and 51.58 ± 46.14 for azoxystrobin, 81.40 ± 56.50 and 1.8575 ± 2.11 for carbendazim, 1.225 ± 0.945 and 10.01 ± 8.55 for propiconazole, 220 ± 67.66 vs. 368 ± 62.76 for vinclozolin, 9.862 ± 3.24 and 54.5 ± 21.08 for fludioxonil, 49.2125 ± 34.11 and 112.25 ± 51.20 for mancozeb. A molecular analysis for β-tubulin revealed a mutation at codon 198 in these strains having an EC50 greater than 10 mg L-1 for carbendazim. Our data indicate a consistency between fungicide resistance and intensive chemical management in banana fields, however indicative values for resistance were also found in strains collected from rustic fields, suggesting that proximity among fields may be causing a fungus interchange, where rustic fields are breeding grounds for development of resistant strains. Urgent actions are required in order to avoid fungicide resistance in Mexican populations of M. fijiensis due to fungicide management practices.

  12. Chemical management in fungicide sensivity of Mycosphaerella fijiensis collected from banana fields in México

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Barragan, Alejandra; García-Torres, Ana Elisa; Odriozola-Casas, Olga; Macedo-Raygoza, Gloria; Ogura, Tetsuya; Manzo-Sánchez, Gilberto; James, Andrew C.; Islas-Flores, Ignacio; Beltrán-García, Miguel J.

    2014-01-01

    The chemical management of the black leaf streak disease in banana caused by Mycosphaerella fijiensis (Morelet) requires numerous applications of fungicides per year. However this has led to fungicide resistance in the field. The present study evaluated the activities of six fungicides against the mycelial growth by determination of EC50 values of strains collected from fields with different fungicide management programs: Rustic management (RM) without applications and Intensive management (IM) more than 25 fungicide application/year. Results showed a decreased sensitivity to all fungicides in isolates collected from IM. Means of EC50 values in mg L−1 for RM and IM were: 13.25 ± 18.24 and 51.58 ± 46.14 for azoxystrobin, 81.40 ± 56.50 and 1.8575 ± 2.11 for carbendazim, 1.225 ± 0.945 and 10.01 ± 8.55 for propiconazole, 220 ± 67.66 vs. 368 ± 62.76 for vinclozolin, 9.862 ± 3.24 and 54.5 ± 21.08 for fludioxonil, 49.2125 ± 34.11 and 112.25 ± 51.20 for mancozeb. A molecular analysis for β-tubulin revealed a mutation at codon 198 in these strains having an EC50 greater than 10 mg L−1 for carbendazim. Our data indicate a consistency between fungicide resistance and intensive chemical management in banana fields, however indicative values for resistance were also found in strains collected from rustic fields, suggesting that proximity among fields may be causing a fungus interchange, where rustic fields are breeding grounds for development of resistant strains. Urgent actions are required in order to avoid fungicide resistance in Mexican populations of M. fijiensis due to fungicide management practices. PMID:24948956

  13. Chemical management in fungicide sensitivity of Mycosphaerella fijiensis collected from banana fields in México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Barragan, Alejandra; García-Torres, Ana Elisa; Odriozola-Casas, Olga; Macedo-Raygoza, Gloria; Ogura, Tetsuya; Manzo-Sánchez, Gilberto; James, Andrew C; Islas-Flores, Ignacio; Beltrán-García, Miguel J

    2014-01-01

    The chemical management of the black leaf streak disease in banana caused by Mycosphaerella fijiensis (Morelet) requires numerous applications of fungicides per year. However this has led to fungicide resistance in the field. The present study evaluated the activities of six fungicides against the mycelial growth by determination of EC50 values of strains collected from fields with different fungicide management programs: Rustic management (RM) without applications and Intensive management (IM) more than 25 fungicide application/year. Results showed a decreased sensitivity to all fungicides in isolates collected from IM. Means of EC50 values in mg L(-1) for RM and IM were: 13.25 ± 18.24 and 51.58 ± 46.14 for azoxystrobin, 81.40 ± 56.50 and 1.8575 ± 2.11 for carbendazim, 1.225 ± 0.945 and 10.01 ± 8.55 for propiconazole, 220 ± 67.66 vs. 368 ± 62.76 for vinclozolin, 9.862 ± 3.24 and 54.5 ± 21.08 for fludioxonil, 49.2125 ± 34.11 and 112.25 ± 51.20 for mancozeb. A molecular analysis for β-tubulin revealed a mutation at codon 198 in these strains having an EC50 greater than 10 mg L(-1) for carbendazim. Our data indicate a consistency between fungicide resistance and intensive chemical management in banana fields, however indicative values for resistance were also found in strains collected from rustic fields, suggesting that proximity among fields may be causing a fungus interchange, where rustic fields are breeding grounds for development of resistant strains. Urgent actions are required in order to avoid fungicide resistance in Mexican populations of M. fijiensis due to fungicide management practices.

  14. Azole fungicides disturb intracellular Ca2+ in an additive manner in dopaminergic PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusinkveld, Harm J; Molendijk, Jeffrey; van den Berg, Martin; Westerink, Remco H S

    2013-08-01

    Humans are exposed to complex mixtures of pesticides and other compounds, mainly via food. Azole fungicides are broad spectrum antifungal compounds used in agriculture and in human and veterinary medicine. The mechanism of antifungal action relies on inhibition of CYP51, resulting in inhibition of fungal cell growth. Known adverse health effects of azole fungicides are mainly linked to CYP inhibition. Additionally, azole fungicide-induced neurotoxicity has been reported, though the underlying mechanism(s) are largely unknown. We therefore investigated the effects of a group of six azole fungicides (imazalil, flusilazole, fluconazole, tebuconazole, triadimefon, and cyproconazole) on cell viability using a combined alamar Blue/CFDA-AM assay and on oxidative stress using a H2-DCFDA fluorescent assay. As calcium plays a pivotal role in neuronal survival and functioning, effects of these six azole fungicides and binary and quaternary mixtures of azole fungicides on the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) were investigated using single-cell fluorescence microscopy in dopaminergic PC12 cells loaded with the calcium-sensitive fluorescent dye Fura-2. Only modest changes in cell viability and ROS production were observed. However, five out of six azole fungicides induced a nonspecific inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs), though with varying potency. Experiments using binary IC20 and quaternary IC10 mixtures indicated that the inhibitory effects on VGCCs are additive. The combined findings demonstrate modulation of intracellular Ca(2+) via inhibition of VGCCs as a novel mode of action of azole fungicides. Furthermore, mixtures of azole fungicides display additivity, illustrating the need to take mixture effects into account in human risk assessment.

  15. Additive and synergistic antiandrogenic activities of mixtures of azol fungicides and vinclozolin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christen, Verena [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Gründenstrasse 40, CH-4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Crettaz, Pierre [Federal Office of Public Health, Division Chemical Products, 3003 Bern (Switzerland); Fent, Karl, E-mail: karl.fent@fhnw.ch [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Gründenstrasse 40, CH-4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Department of Environmental System Sciences, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollution Dynamics, Universitätsstrasse 16, CH-8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2014-09-15

    Objective: Many pesticides including pyrethroids and azole fungicides are suspected to have an endocrine disrupting property. At present, the joint activity of compound mixtures is only marginally known. Here we tested the hypothesis that the antiandrogenic activity of mixtures of azole fungicides can be predicted by the concentration addition (CA) model. Methods: The antiandrogenic activity was assessed in MDA-kb2 cells. Following assessing single compounds activities mixtures of azole fungicides and vinclozolin were investigated. Interactions were analyzed by direct comparison between experimental and estimated dose–response curves assuming CA, followed by an analysis by the isobole method and the toxic unit approach. Results: The antiandrogenic activity of pyrethroids deltamethrin, cypermethrin, fenvalerate and permethrin was weak, while the azole fungicides tebuconazole, propiconazole, epoxiconazole, econazole and vinclozolin exhibited strong antiandrogenic activity. Ten binary and one ternary mixture combinations of five antiandrogenic fungicides were assessed at equi-effective concentrations of EC{sub 25} and EC{sub 50}. Isoboles indicated that about 50% of the binary mixtures were additive and 50% synergistic. Synergism was even more frequently indicated by the toxic unit approach. Conclusion: Our data lead to the conclusion that interactions in mixtures follow the CA model. However, a surprisingly high percentage of synergistic interactions occurred. Therefore, the mixture activity of antiandrogenic azole fungicides is at least additive. Practice: Mixtures should also be considered for additive antiandrogenic activity in hazard and risk assessment. Implications: Our evaluation provides an appropriate “proof of concept”, but whether it equally translates to in vivo effects should further be investigated. - Highlights: • Humans are exposed to pesticide mixtures such as pyrethroids and azole fungicides. • We assessed the antiandrogenicity of

  16. Fungicidal effect of 15 disinfectants against 24 fungal contaminants commonly found in bread and cheese manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard-Nielsen, Kirsten; Nielsen, Per Væggemose

    1996-01-01

    .0 % formaldehyde, 0.1 % potassium hydroxide, 3.0 % hydrogen peroxide or 0.3 % peracetic acid were ineffective as fungicides. The fungicidal effect of quaternary ammonium compounds and chlorine compounds showed great variance between species and among the 6 tested isolates of Penicillium roqueforti var. roqueforti......Resistance of 19 mold- and 6 yeast- species against 15 commercial disinfectants was investigated by a suspension-method in which the fungicidal effect and germination time were determined at 20 °C. Disinfectants containing 0.5 % dodecyldiethylentriaminacetic acid, 10 g/l chloramine-T, 2...

  17. In vitro Toxicity of Fungicides of Different Mode of Action to Agaricus bisporus (Lange Imbach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Potočnik

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Isolates of Agaricus bisporus strains F56 and U3 were tested for sensitivity to several selected fungicides in vitro. The analysis showed that flusilasole + carbendazim and cyproconazole + carbendazim were the most toxic fungicides to A. bisporus strain F56 with respective EC50 values of 0.04 and 0.23 mg/l. The least toxic fungicides were carbendazim (EC50 = 16.58 mg/l and trifloxystrobin (EC50 = 20.69 mg/l to A. bisporus F56 and benomyl (EC50 = 14.99 mg/l to A. bisporus U3.

  18. Sertraline demonstrates fungicidal activity in vitro for Coccidioides immitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Paul

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Coccidioidomycosis causes substantial morbidity in endemic areas. Disseminated coccidioidomycosis is an AIDS defining condition and treatment often requires lifelong antifungal therapy. Sertraline, a widely used serotonin-reuptake inhibitor anti-depressant, has demonstrated activity against Candida and Cryptococcus sp. both in vitro and in vivo. To evaluate if sertraline has activity against Coccidioides, the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC of sertraline for four clinical isolates of C. immitis were determined. Sertraline was observed to have an MIC range of 4–8 µg/ml and MFC also of 4–8 µg/ml for Coccidioides. These MIC and MFC results for C. immitis are similar to those reported for Cryptococcus sp. suggesting sertraline may potentially have utility for the treatment of coccidioidomycosis.

  19. Efficiency of Elite Fungicide for Control of Pistachio Gummosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Moradi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Several species of Phytophthora cause crown and root rot diseases of herbaceous and woody plants. Crown and root rot of pistachio trees cause significant damages in infected orchards. The effect of foliar application with Elite (fosetyl-Al in 2 and 2.5 g/l was evaluated in greenhouse experiments. The frequency of mortality, fresh and dry weight of roots and shoots, height, intensity of crown root colonization using CAMA-PARP medium was determined. Under greenhouse experiments, foliar application with Elite increased height, fresh and dry weight of shoots and root either in inoculation with and without Phytophthora drechsleri. The effects of Elite were more pronounced in roots, which increased the fresh and dry weight of root 1.3 and 2.5 times compared to those not sprayed with Elite, respectively. On the other hand, the application of Elite before or on the day of inoculation significantly reduced the frequency of mortality, which ranged from 35 to 90% (P ≤ 0.01. Crown and root colonization of pistachio seedling was affected by both the concentration of Elite and reduced the frequency of crown and root colonization of seedling. When fungicide and pathogen were applied at the same time, the frequency of colonization reduced to 18% and 36% for 2 and 2.5 g/l, respectively, and 43% and 60% when seedlings were treated with fungicide before P. drechsleri inoculations. The highest effect was seen in foliar application of Elite seven days before inoculation in 2.5 g/l. Further investigations have been conducted to understand the effect of Elite in infected trees as well as modeling of Elite application via soil drench, foliar application or trunk injection.

  20. The fungicide mancozeb induces toxic effects on mammalian granulosa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paro, Rita [Department of Health Sciences, University of L' Aquila, Via Vetoio, L' Aquila (Italy); Tiboni, Gian Mario [Department of Medicine and Aging, Section of Reproductive Sciences, University “G. D' Annunzio”, Chieti-Pescara (Italy); Buccione, Roberto [Tumor Cell Invasion Laboratory, Consorzio Mario Negri Sud, Santa Maria Imbaro, Chieti (Italy); Rossi, Gianna; Cellini, Valerio [Department of Health Sciences, University of L' Aquila, Via Vetoio, L' Aquila (Italy); Canipari, Rita [Department of Anatomy, Histology, Forensic Medicine and Orthopedics, Section of Histology and Embryology, School of Pharmacy and Medicine, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Rome (Italy); Cecconi, Sandra, E-mail: sandra.cecconi@cc.univaq.it [Department of Health Sciences, University of L' Aquila, Via Vetoio, L' Aquila (Italy)

    2012-04-15

    The ethylene-bis-dithiocarbamate mancozeb is a widely used fungicide with low reported toxicity in mammals. In mice, mancozeb induces embryo apoptosis, affects oocyte meiotic spindle morphology and impairs fertilization rate even when used at very low concentrations. We evaluated the toxic effects of mancozeb on the mouse and human ovarian somatic granulosa cells. We examined parameters such as cell morphology, induction of apoptosis, and p53 expression levels. Mouse granulosa cells exposed to mancozeb underwent a time- and dose-dependent modification of their morphology, and acquired the ability to migrate but not to proliferate. The expression level of p53, in terms of mRNA and protein content, decreased significantly in comparison with unexposed cells, but no change in apoptosis was recorded. Toxic effects could be attributed, at least in part, to the presence of ethylenthiourea (ETU), the main mancozeb catabolite, which was found in culture medium. Human granulosa cells also showed dose-dependent morphological changes and reduced p53 expression levels after exposure to mancozeb. Altogether, these results indicate that mancozeb affects the somatic cells of the mammalian ovarian follicles by inducing a premalignant-like status, and that such damage occurs to the same extent in both mouse and human GC. These results further substantiate the concept that mancozeb should be regarded as a reproductive toxicant. Highlights: ► The fungicide mancozeb affects oocyte spindle morphology and fertilization rate. ► We investigated the toxic effects of mancozeb on mouse and human granulosa cells. ► Granulosa cells modify their morphology and expression level of p53. ► Mancozeb induces a premalignant-like status in exposed cells.

  1. Yield of Potato as Influenced by Crop Sanitation and Reduced Fungicidal Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fontem, DA.

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of crop sanitation and reduced sprays of "Ridomil plus®" (12 % metalaxyl + 60 % cuprous oxide on the control of potato (Solanum tuberosum late blight caused by Phytophthora infestans were evaluated in two field experiments in 1993 in Dschang, Cameroon. In the first experiment, sanitation (five weekly removals of blighted leaves and two fungicidal treatments were initiated from first symptoms. In the second experiment, both fungicidal sprays were made at varying rates. Marketable yields increased by 50 % in sanitation-treated plots, by 94 % in plots sprayed with Ridomil plus (2.24 kg a. i./ha, or by 55 % in those exposed to both control methods. The fungicide equivalence of the sanitation treatment was two sprays of Ridomil plus at 0.76 kg a. i./ha. These results suggest that proper removal of diseased leaves or reduced fungicidal protection may be an effective late blight control method in potato farming.

  2. Impact of Fungicides Used for Wheat Treatment on Button Mushroom Cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Potočnik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Little information is currently available on the potential environmental risks that fungicides applied during wheat cultivation and remaining in straw may have for mushroom production. The substrate for many cultivated mushrooms is mostly based on cereal straw. This review aimed to answer the question whether residues of the fungicides commonly used in wheat production and remaining in straw could be directly or indirectly responsible for changes in yields of Agaricus bisporus. Potential chemical risks of eight fungicides (for wheat treatments for A. bisporus: mancozeb, carbendazim, thiophanate-methyl,carbendazim+cyproconazole, carbedazim+flusilasole, captan, chlorothalonil and trifloxystrobinare disscused. Only the value of maximum residue level of flusilasole and its formulation was evaluated as higher than medium effective concentration of the fungicide for A.bisporus. As a conclusion, flusilazole treatment could be a limiting factor for using straw for composting and mushroom cultivation.

  3. The effect of selected fungicides on survival of Agrobacterium tumefaciens in various kinds of soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Barczyński

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of 10 fungicides on survival of A. tumefaciens in various types of soils was studied. In fertile, nonsterile soil Dithane M-45 (mancozeb, Euparen 50 WP (tolyfluanid, Kaptan 50 WP (captan and Ridomil Gold 80 WP (metalaxyl at concentration of 1000 ppm showed the highest antibacterial activity. Similar trends in activity of these fungicides occurred in fertile, sterile soil, however a little lower in case of Kaptan and Euparen. In most of investigated soils Befran 25 SL (imimnoctadyne, Syllit 65 WP (dodine and Thiram Granulfo 80 WG (thiram increased bacteria number. In sandy acidic soil (pH 3,5 all tested fungicides totally eliminated bacteria. On the other hand in sandy neutral soil only Dithane, Euparen, Kaptan and Ridomil showed such activity. Ten fold decrease of fungicides concentration generally did not influence Kaptan and Ridomil effectiveness but it decreased the activity of Dithane and Euparen.

  4. RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY-BASED METABOLOMICS FOR DIFFERENTIATING EXPOSURES TO TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDES USING RAT URINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normal Raman spectroscopy was evaluated as a metabolomic tool for assessing the impacts of exposure to environmental contaminants, using rat urine collected during the course of a toxicological study. Specifically, one of three triazole fungicides, myclobutanil, propiconazole or ...

  5. Gene Expression Profiling in Liver and Testis of Rats to Characterize the Toxicity of Triazole Fungicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four triazole fungicides were studied using toxicogenomic techniques to identify potential mechanisms of action. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed for 14 days by gavage with fluconazole, myclobutanil, propiconazole, or triadimefon. Following exposure, serum was collected ...

  6. USING PHARMACOKINETIC DATA TO INTERPRET METABOLOMIC CHANGES IN CD-1 MICE TREATED WITH TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triazoles are a class of fungicides widely used in both pharmaceutical and agricultural applications. These compounds elicit a variety of toxic effects including disruption of normal metabolic processes such as steroidogenesis. Metabolomics is used to measure dynamic changes in e...

  7. Resistance behaviour of Septoria tritici to some fungicides in the territory of the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludvik Tvaružek

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Reduction of colony diameter using two DMI-fungicides and one strobilurine fungicide was evaluated in the Septoria tritici population. In an in vitro assay, 57 strains of S. tritici originating from different parts of the Czech Republic were grown on agar plates containing different concentrations of fungicides. The mean EC50 values of strains were analysed for flusilazole (Capitain, metconazole (Caramba and one strobilurine fungicide: azoxystrobin (Amistar. ED 50 values for metconazole were low. There were highly significant correlation in reaction of pathogen strains to metconazole and flusilazole. Some isolates showed significant higher level of resistance to azoxystrobin. The data will be used in a continuing survey of resistance development in the S. tritici population originating from the territory of the Czech Republic.

  8. Modulators of membrane drug transporters potentiate the activity of the DMI fungicide oxpoconazole against Botrytis cinerea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayashi, K.; Schoonbeek, H.; Waard, de M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Modulators known to reduce multidrug resistance in tumour cells were tested for their potency to synergize the fungitoxic activity of the fungicide oxpoconazole, a sterol demethylation inhibitor (DMI), against Botrytis cinerea Pers. Chlorpromazine, a phenothiazine compound known as a calmodulin

  9. Effects of fludioxonil and pyrimethanil, two fungicides used against Botrytis cinerea, on carbohydrate physiology in Vitis vinifera L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saladin, Gaëlle; Magné, Christian; Clément, Christophe

    2003-10-01

    In Vitis vinifera L, photosynthesis and photosynthate partitioning are affected in the presence of fludioxonil and pyrimethanil, two fungicides commonly used in vineyards against Botrytis cinerea Pers. However, the effects were found to be different according to the model studied: plantlets (cv Chardonnay) grown in vitro, fruiting cuttings (cv Chardonnay) and plants grown in vineyards (cvs Chardonnay, Pinot noir and Pinot Meunier). In the plantlets grown in vitro, both fungicides decreased gas exchanges, photosynthetic pigment and starch concentrations in the leaves, whereas soluble carbohydrates transiently accumulated, suggesting that plantlets mobilised starch in response to photosynthesis inhibition caused by fungicides. In the fruiting cuttings, the fungicides did not affect photosynthesis, although fludioxonil caused starch decrease in parallel with sucrose accumulation, suggesting that the fungicide effects were of lower intensity than in vitro. Conversely, in vineyard, the two fungicides stimulated photosynthesis and increased pigment concentrations in the three vine cultivars tested. In the meantime, glucose, fructose and starch levels of the leaves declined after fungicide exposure, whereas sucrose accumulated, indicating that sucrose synthesis increased in the leaves following the fungicide treatment. Among the three varieties, Chardonnay was the most sensitive to the fungicides as revealed by the intensity of the responses and the longer period for recovery. In vineyard, the results suggested that the two fungicides, in addition to inhibiting B cinerea development, had a beneficial effect on vine physiology through the stimulation of leaf carbon nutrition, which may further enable the plant to rapidly make use of its defence reactions.

  10. Occurrence and persistence of fungicides in bed sediments and suspended solids from three targeted use areas in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalling, Kelly L; Reilly, Timothy J; Sandstrom, Mark W; Kuivila, Kathryn M

    2013-03-01

    To document the environmental occurrence and persistence of fungicides, a robust and sensitive analytical method was used to measure 34 fungicides and an additional 57 current-use pesticides in bed sediments and suspended solids collected from areas of intense fungicide use within three geographic areas across the United States. Sampling sites were selected near or within agricultural research farms using prophylactic fungicides at rates and types typical of their geographic location. At least two fungicides were detected in 55% of the bed and 83% of the suspended solid samples and were detected in conjunction with herbicides and insecticides. Six fungicides were detected in all samples including pyraclostrobin (75%), boscalid (53%), chlorothalonil (41%) and zoxamide (22%). Pyraclostrobin, a strobilurin fungicide, used frequently in the United States on a variety of crops, was detected more frequently than p,p'-DDE, the primary degradate of p,p'-DDT, which is typically one of the most frequently occurring pesticides in sediments collected within highly agricultural areas. Maximum fungicide concentrations in bed sediments and suspended solids were 198 and 56.7 μg/kg dry weight, respectively. There is limited information on the occurrence, fate, and persistence of many fungicides in sediment and the environmental impacts are largely unknown. The results of this study indicate the importance of documenting the persistence of fungicides in the environment and the need for a better understanding of off-site transport mechanisms, particularly in areas where crops are grown that require frequent treatments to prevent fungal diseases.

  11. Fungi and bacteria. [fungicide and bactericide measures for spacecraft in tropical regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    Spacecraft equipment is usually protected from fungi and bacteria by incorporating a fungicide-bactericide in the material, by a fungicide-bactericide spray, or by reducing the relative humidity to a degree where growth will not take place. A unique method to protect delicate, expensive bearings in equipment was to maintain a pressure (with dry air or nitrogen) slightly above the outside atmosphere (few millibars) within the working parts of the equipment, thus preventing fungi from entering equipment.

  12. Impact of fungicides used for wheat treatment on button mushroom cultivation

    OpenAIRE

    Ivana Potočnik; Jelena Vukojević; Mirjana Stajić; Dejana Kosanović; Emil Rekanović; Miloš Stepanović; Svetlana Milijašević-Marčić

    2012-01-01

    Little information is currently available on the potential environmental risks that fungicides applied during wheat cultivation and remaining in straw may have for mushroom production. The substrate for many cultivated mushrooms is mostly based on cereal straw. This review aimed to answer the question whether residues of the fungicides commonly used in wheat production and remaining in straw could be directly or indirectly responsible for changes in yields ...

  13. Effects of azole fungicides on the function of sex and thyroid hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærstad, Mia Birkhøj; Andersen, Helle Raun; Taxvig, Camilla

    Resumé: Azole-fungicides are frequently used in Denmark. Epoxiconazole, propiconazole, and tebuconazole had endocrine disrupting properties in cell based assays. In rats, epoxiconazole and tebuconazole increased gestational length, maternal progesterone level, and masculinized female......-offspring. Besides, tebuconazole caused feminization of male-offspring. Similar effects were previously demonstrated for prochloraz. The results indicate that azole-fungicides in general have endocrine disrupting properties...

  14. Control of angular leaf spot on dry beans with fungicides and its effect on plant production

    OpenAIRE

    Deman, Luis Alfredo Raue; Maringoni, Antonio Carlos [UNESP

    2012-01-01

    The angular leaf spot of dry bean caused by the fungus Phaeoisairopsis griseola is a very important disease on dry bean crops in Brazil. In propitious weather conditions, susceptible cultivars have significant losses due to this disease. In these conditions, fungicide usage is an important step for angular leaf spot management. Since the effects of this method of control on plant physiology are not known, this study had the following objectives: a) Verify the action of fungicide in physiologi...

  15. Esterase isozymes patterns of grape vine (Vitis vinifera L. are altered in response to fungicide exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleice Ribeiro Orasmo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Current analysis characterizes the effect of different fungicides often applied for pest control on a-and b-esterase patterns of four economically important table-wine grape cultivars (Italia, Rubi, Benitaka and Brasil of Vitis vinifera. The a- and b-esterase patterns in bud leaves of the cultivars were assessed by native PAGE analysis. Cabrio Top® compound inhibited Est-2, Est-5, Est-6, Est-7, Est-8, Est-9 and Est-10 carboxylesterases, whereas Est-4, Est-11, Est-12, Est-13, Est-14 acetylesterases and Est-16 carboxylesterase were detected as weakly stained bands. Carboxylesterases and acetylesterases were also detected as weakly stained bands when exposed to fungicides Orthocide 500®, Positron Duo® and Folicur PM®. No changes in a- and b-esterase patterns were reported when the vines were exposed to the fungicides Rovral SC®, Kumulus DF®, Curzate M®, Score® or Cuprogarb 500®. The evidence of functional changes in carboxylesterase and acetylesterase levels in current study is a warning to grape producers on the dangers inherent in the indiscriminate use of potent and modern fungicides extensively used in agriculture. The inhibition effect of fungicides on esterase isozyme molecules seems to be independent of the fungicide chemical.

  16. Predicting multiple ecotoxicological profiles in agrochemical fungicides: a multi-species chemoinformatic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck-Planche, Alejandro; Kleandrova, Valeria V; Luan, Feng; Cordeiro, M Natália D S

    2012-06-01

    Agriculture is needed to deal with crop losses caused by biotic stresses like pests. The use of pesticides has played a vital role, contributing to improve crop production and harvest productivity, providing a better crop quality and supply, and consequently contributing with the improvement of the human health. An important group of these pesticides is fungicides. However, the use of these agrochemical fungicides is an important source of contamination, damaging the ecosystems. Several studies have been realized for the assessment of the toxicity in agrochemical fungicides, but the principal limitation is the use of structurally related compounds against usually one indicator species. In order to overcome this problem, we explore the quantitative structure-toxicity relationships (QSTR) in agrochemical fungicides. Here, we developed the first multi-species (ms) chemoinformatic approach for the prediction multiple ecotoxicological profiles of fungicides against 20 indicators species and their classifications in toxic or nontoxic. The ms-QSTR discriminant model was based on substructural descriptors and a heterogeneous database of compounds. The percentages of correct classification were higher than 90% for both, training and prediction series. Also, substructural alerts responsible for the toxicity/no toxicity in fungicides respect all ecotoxicological profiles, were extracted and analyzed.

  17. Fate and transport of agriculturally applied fungicidal compounds, azoxystrobin and propiconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Paul G; Murphy, Tracye M; Lydy, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Fungicidal active ingredients azoxystrobin and propiconazole, individually and in combination, have been marketed worldwide in a range of fungicide treatment products for preventative and curative purposes, respectively. Their presence in streams located throughout the midwestern and southeastern United States warrant the need for research into the potential routes of transport of these fungicides in an agricultural field setting. Potential canopy penetration and drift effects of these fungicides during aerial and ground applications were studied in the current project. Canopy penetration was observed for both application types, however drift was associated only with the aerial application of these fungicides. Azoxystrobin and propiconazole persisted in the soil up to 301 d, with peak concentrations occurring approximately 30 d after application. The predominant mode of transport for these compounds was agricultural runoff water, with the majority of the fungicidal active ingredients leaving the target area during the first rain event following application. The timing of application in relation to the first rain event significantly affected the amount of loss that occurred, implying application practices should follow manufacturer recommended guidelines.

  18. Exploitation of genomics in fungicide research: current status and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cools, Hans J; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E

    2013-02-01

    Every year, fungicide use to control plant disease caused by pathogenic fungi increases. The global fungicide market is now worth more than £5.3 billion, second only to the herbicide market in importance. In the UK, over 5500 tonnes of fungicide were applied to crops in 2010 (The Food and Environment Research Agency, Pesticide Usage Statistics), with 95.5% of the wheat-growing area receiving three fungicide sprays. Although dependence on fungicides to produce food securely, reliably and cheaply may be moderated in the future by further developments in crop biotechnology, modern crop protection will continue to require a diversity of solutions, including effective and safe chemical control. Therefore, investment in exploiting the increasingly available genome sequences of the most devastating fungal and oomycete phytopathogenic species should bring an array of new opportunities for chemical intervention. To date, the impact of whole genome research on the development, introduction and stewardship of fungicides has been limited, but ongoing improvements in computational analysis, molecular biology, chemical genetics, genome sequencing and transcriptomics will facilitate the development and registration of the future suite of crop protection chemicals.

  19. Control of Vascular Streak Dieback Disease of Cocoa with Flutriafol Fungicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Febrilia Nur'aini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Vascular streak dieback caused by the fungus Oncobasidium theobromae is one of the important diseases in cocoa crop in Indonesia. One approach to control the disease is by using fungicides. The aim of this research was to determine the effect of class triazole fungicides to the intensity of the vascular streak dieback disease on cocoa seedling phase, immature and mature cocoa. Experiments were conducted in Kotta Blater, PTPN XII and Kaliwining, Indonesian  Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute. Flutriafol 250 g/l with a concentration 0,05%, 0,1% and 0,15% foliar sprayed on cocoa seedlings, immature and mature cocoa. Active compound combination of Azoxystrobin and Difenoconazole with 0,1% concentration used as a comparation fungicides. The result showed that Flutriafol with 0,05%, 0,1% and 0,15% concentration and Azoxystrobin & Difenoconazol with 0,1% concentration could suppress the vascular streak dieback disease on seedlings. On immature plants, the application of Flutriafol was not effectively suppress the vascular streak dieback disease whereas the fungicide comparison could suppress with the efficacy level of 46.22%. On mature plants,both of fungicides could not suppress the vascular streak dieback disease. Key words: Fungicide, cocoa, vascular streak dieback, triazole, flutriafol, azoxystrobin+difenoconazol

  20. New α-Methylene-γ-Butyrolactone Derivatives as Potential Fungicidal Agents: Design, Synthesis and Antifungal Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongling Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In consideration of the fact that the α-methylene-γ-butyrolactone moiety is a major bio-functional group in the structure of carabrone and possesses some agricultural biological activity, forty-six new ester and six new ether derivatives containing α-methylene-γ-butyrolactone moieties were synthesized, and their fungicidal activities against Colletotrichum lagenarium and Botrytis cinerea were investigated. Most of the synthesized compounds showed moderate to significant fungicidal activity. Among them, halogen atom-containing derivatives showed better activity than others, especially compounds 6a,d which exhibited excellent fungicidal activity against C. lagenarium, with IC50 values of 7.68 and 8.17 μM. The structure-activity relationship (SAR analysis indicated that ester derivatives with electron-withdrawing groups on the benzene ring showed better fungicidal activity than those with electron-donating groups. A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR model (R2 = 0.9824, F = 203.01, S2 = 0.0083 was obtained through the heuristic method. The built model revealed a strong correlation of fungicidal activity against C. lagenarium with the molecular structures of these compounds. These results are expected to prove helpful in the design and exploration of low toxicity and high efficiency α-methylene-γ-butyrolactone-based fungicides.

  1. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion is an extensive problem that affects the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and European Space Agency (ESA). The deleterious effects of corrosion result in steep costs, asset downtime affecting mission readiness, and safety risks to personnel. It is vital to reduce corrosion costs and risks in a sustainable manner. The primary objective of this effort is to qualify citric acid as an environmentally-preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys.

  2. Insecticidal, repellent and fungicidal properties of novel trifluoromethylphenyl amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsikolia, Maia; Bernier, Ulrich R; Coy, Monique R; Chalaire, Katelyn C; Becnel, James J; Agramonte, Natasha M; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Wedge, David E; Clark, Gary G; Linthicum, Kenneth J; Swale, Daniel R; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R

    2013-09-01

    Twenty trifluoromethylphenyl amides were synthesized and evaluated as fungicides and as mosquito toxicants and repellents. Against Aedes aegypti larvae, N-(2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-3,5-dinitrobenzamide (1e) was the most toxic compound (24 h LC50 1940 nM), while against adults N-(2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-2,2,2-trifluoroacetamide (1c) was most active (24 h LD50 19.182 nM, 0.5 μL/insect). However, the 24 h LC50 and LD50 values of fipronil against Ae. aegypti larvae and adults were significantly lower: 13.55 nM and 0.787 × 10(-4) nM, respectively. Compound 1c was also active against Drosophila melanogaster adults with 24 h LC50 values of 5.6 and 4.9 μg/cm(2) for the Oregon-R and 1675 strains, respectively. Fipronil had LC50 values of 0.004 and 0.017 μg/cm(2) against the two strains of D. melanogaster, respectively. In repellency bioassays against female Ae. aegypti, 2,2,2-trifluoro-N-(2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)acetamide (4c) had the highest repellent potency with a minimum effective dosage (MED) of 0.039 μmol/cm(2) compared to DEET (MED of 0.091 μmol/cm(2)). Compound N-(2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)hexanamide (4a) had an MED of 0.091 μmol/cm(2) which was comparable to DEET. Compound 4c was the most potent fungicide against Phomopsis obscurans. Several trends were discerned between the structural configuration of these molecules and the effect of structural changes on toxicity and repellency. Para- or meta- trifluoromethylphenyl amides with an aromatic ring attached to the carbonyl carbon showed higher toxicity against Ae. aegypti larvae, than ortho- trifluoromethylphenyl amides. Ortho- trifluoromethylphenyl amides with trifluoromethyl or alkyl group attached to the carbonyl carbon produced higher repellent activity against female Ae. aegypti and Anopheles albimanus than meta- or para- trifluoromethylphenyl amides. The presence of 2,6-dichloro- substitution on the phenyl ring of the amide had an influence on larvicidal and repellent

  3. Fate and activity of fungal BCAs delivered to strawberry flowers and their potential for integration with fungicides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Birgit; Andersen, Birgitte; Thrane, Ulf;

    2013-01-01

    Grey mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is a serious strawberry disease. Yield loss is prevented by repeated fungicide treatments during flowering which increases the risk of pesticide residues in berries. Fruit lesions are typically initiated from B. cinerea infected stamens or from dead infected......) the interaction between BCAs and B. cinerea on strawberry flowers, 2) the sensitivity of BCAs to strawberry fungicides, and 3) the effect of combined BCA+fungicide treatment on BCAs and on the indigenous mycobiota....

  4. The Oxidation of Hydrazine by Nitric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-07-02

    Hydrazine nitrate-nitric acid solutions are used in the ion exchange process for separating Pu-238 and Np-237 and have been found to dissolve plutonium metal in a manner advantageous to SRP metal recovery operations. Laboratory tests on the stability of hydrazine in nitric acid solutions were performed to obtain accurate data, and the results of these tests are reported here. These tests provide sufficient information to specify temperature control for hydrazine-nitric acid solutions in plant processes.

  5. Dissipation of the fungicide hexaconazole in oil palm plantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maznah, Zainol; Halimah, Muhamad; Ismail, Sahid; Idris, Abu Seman

    2015-12-01

    Hexaconazole is a potential fungicide to be used in the oil palm plantation for controlling the basal stem root (BSR) disease caused by Ganoderma boninense. Therefore, the dissipation rate of hexaconazole in an oil palm agroecosystem under field conditions was studied. Two experimental plots were treated with hexaconazole at the recommended dosage of 4.5 g a.i. palm(-1) (active ingredient) and at double the recommended dosage (9.0 g a.i. palm(-1)), whilst one plot was untreated as control. The residue of hexaconazole was detected in soil samples in the range of 2.74 to 0.78 and 7.13 to 1.66 mg kg(-1) at the recommended and double recommended dosage plots, respectively. An initial relatively rapid dissipation rate of hexaconazole residues occurred but reduced with time. The dissipation of hexaconazole in soil was described using first-order kinetics with the value of coefficient regression (r (2) > 0.8). The results indicated that hexaconazole has moderate persistence in the soil and the half-life was found to be 69.3 and 86.6 days in the recommended and double recommended dosage plot, respectively. The results obtained highlight that downward movement of hexaconazole was led by preferential flow as shown in image analysis. It can be concluded that varying soil conditions, environmental factors, and pesticide chemical properties of hexaconazole has a significant impact on dissipation of hexaconazole in soil under humid conditions.

  6. Fungicidal effect of bacteriocins harvested from Bacillus spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adetunji, V. O.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study investigated the ability of bacteriocins isolated from Bacillus spp. (Bacillus species to inhibit fourdifferent yeast isolates obtained from common food products (nono, yoghurt, ogi and cheese commonly consumed byNigerians with minimal heat treatment.Methodology and results: Forty-five Bacillus spp. was isolated and identified from common food products usingcultural, morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics. These isolates were tested for antimicrobialactivity against Salmonella enteritidis (3, Micrococcus luteus (1 and Staphylococcus aureus (2. Eight bacteriocinproducing strains were identified from an over- night broth culture centrifugated at 3500 revolutions for five minutes.Fungicidal effects of these bacteriocins were tested against four yeast strains using the Agar Well Diffusion method. Thebacteriocins produced wide zones of inhibition ranging from 5.9±0.000 to 24.00±0.000 mm against the 4 yeast strainstested. There was a significant difference (at p<0.05 between the yeast organisms and the bacteriocins from theBacillus spp.Conclusion, significance and impact of study: The study reveals the antifungal property of bacteriocins from Bacillusspp. and serves therefore as a base for further studies in its use in the control of diseases and extension of shelf-life ofproducts prone to fungi contamination.

  7. Stereoselective degradation of chiral fungicide myclobutanil in rat liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jin; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Xinru; Wang, Yao; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Wentao

    2014-01-01

    Myclobutanil, (RS)-2-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-(1H-1, 2, 4-triazol-1-ylmethyl)hexanenitrile is a broad-spectrum systemic triazole fungicide which consists of a pair of enantiomers. The stereoselective degradation of myclobutanil was investigated in rat liver microsomes. The concentrations of myclobutanil enantiomers were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a cellulose-tris-(3,5-dimethyl-phenylcarbamate)-based chiral stationary phase (CDMPC-CSP) under reversed phase condition. The t(1/2) of (+)-myclobutanil is 8.49 min, while the t(1/2) of (-)-myclobutanil is 96.27 min. Such consequences clearly indicated that the degradation of myclobutanil in rat liver microsomes was stereoselective and the degradation rate of (+)-myclobutanil was much faster than (-)-myclobutanil. In addition, significant differences between two enantiomers were also observed in enzyme kinetic parameters. The V(max) of (+)-myclobutanil was about 4-fold of (-)-myclobutanil and the CL(int) of (+)-myclobutanil was three times as much as (-)-myclobutanil after incubation in rat liver microsomes. Corresponding consequences may shed light on the environmental and ecological risk assessment for myclobutanil and may improve human health.

  8. Environmental behavior of the fungicide metalaxyl in experimental tobacco field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafyllidis, Vasilios; Hela, Dimitra; Patakioutas, George

    2013-01-01

    The loss of metalaxyl, a systemic fungicide, was determined in runoff water from loamy soil plots of various surface slopes cultivated with tobacco, over a period of 170 days. Conditions were selected to simulate agricultural practices employed in the Mediterranean region. The surface slopes of plots were 0, 2.5, 5, 7.5, 10% and both cultivated and uncultivated (control) areas were simultaneously monitored. The cumulative losses of metalaxyl in surface runoff from tilled and untilled plots with a slope of 10% were estimated at 0.469% and 0.740% of the initial applied active ingredient respectively, while for the plots with a slope 0% they were 0.033% and 0.044%. The dissipation in topsoil was studied for a period of 110 days. The half-lives that were calculated using first-order kinetics ranged from 13.7 to 16.6 days in tobacco soil and from 13.8 to 17 days in non-cropped soil. The dissipation of metalaxyl from the topsoil in cultivation of tobacco was higher in comparison with the untilled plots (46-62% and 52-69% respectively, of the applied dose in 23 days after the second application). The slope of soil surface, the compound solubility and sorption capacities are the main parameters that influenced the transport of metalaxyl residues via surface water in soil-water systems.

  9. EVALUATION OF FUNGICIDAL EFFICIENEY OF IRANIAN MADE BENZALKONIUM CHLORIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Imandel

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available Fungicidal efficiency of Iranian made benzalkonium chloride named Akhgar, Afshang and Hamoon were evaluated on pure culture species of Aspergillus nijer, Candida ablicans and Mucour according to the standard method No. 2442 issued by the Institute of Standards and Industrial Research of Iran, from October 1993 to March 1994. Suspensions were prepared in a way that each cubic centimeter having 3.5×107 condia of Aspergillus nijer, 4×107 Candida albicans yeast cell and 2×107 Mucour spore, and Improved Neubauer slide counting cell were used for enumeration. These laboratory study showed that Lecithine and Tween were the best neutralizers with equal power. Usage of five dilutions of 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1 fungus separately at 6.5 to 6.7 pH, confirmed the correctness of dilution figure of 0.4 percent proposed by producer companies and showed that these fungi are still sensitive against Benzalkonium Chloride disinfectants.

  10. Immunomodulatory effects of the fungicide Mancozeb in agricultural workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsini, Emanuela; Birindelli, Sarah; Fustinoni, Silvia; De Paschale, Gioia; Mammone, Teresa; Visentin, Sara; Galli, Corrado L; Marinovich, Marina; Colosio, Claudio

    2005-10-15

    Available data suggest that ethylenebisdithiocarbamates (EBDCs) may have immunomodulatory effects. This study aimed to investigate the immunological profile of farmers exposed to Mancozeb, an EBDC fungicide, through the determination of several serum, cellular, and functional immune parameters. Twenty-six healthy subjects entered the study, 13 vineyards exposed to Mancozeb and 13 unexposed controls. Exposure was assessed through the determination of ethylentiourea (ETU) in urine. Complete and differential blood count, serum immunoglobulins, complement fractions, autoantibodies, lymphocyte subpopulations, proliferative response to mitogens, natural killer (NK) activity, and cytokine production were measured. Post-exposure samples showed ETU urine concentration significantly higher than pre-exposure and control groups. A significant increase in CD19+ cells, both percentage and absolute number, and a significant decrease in the percentage of CD25+ cells were found in post-exposure samples compared to controls. A statistically significant increase in the proliferative response to phorbol myristate acetate plus ionomycin (PMA + ionomycin) was observed in the post-exposure group compared to controls and baseline, while a significant reduction in LPS-induced TNF-alpha release in post-exposure samples was observed. Overall, our results suggest that low-level exposure to Mancozeb has slight immunomodulatory effects, and point out a method adequate to reveal immune-modifications in workers occupationally exposed to potential immunotoxic compounds, based on a whole blood assay.

  11. Does farm fungicide use induce azole resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Rui; Kohata, Erina; Tateishi, Akira; Murayama, Somay Yamagata; Hirose, Dai; Shibata, Yasuko; Kosuge, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Hiroaki; Kamata, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko

    2015-02-01

    Azole resistance of Aspergillus fumigatus isolates has been reported worldwide and it would appear to be mainly due to a point mutation in the 14α-sterol demethylase (CYP51A) gene, which is the target enzyme for azoles. The mutation has been confirmed in isolates from patients who received long-term itraconazole (ITZ) therapy and from agricultural fields where high levels of azole fungicides were employed. However, the relationship between farm environments and azole-resistant A. fumigatus has not been fully studied. In this investigation, 50 isolates of A. fumigatus were obtained from a farm where tetraconazole has been sprayed twice a year for more than 15 years. The mean minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of isolates was 0.74 (0.19-1.5) mg/L against ITZ, which was below the medical resistance level of ITZ. The sequence of CYP51A from isolates indicated no gene mutations in isolates from the farm. Antifungal susceptibility of isolates to tetraconazole showed that spraying with tetraconazole did not induce resistance to tetraconazole or ITZ in A. fumigatus.

  12. Fenarimol, a Pyrimidine-Type Fungicide, Inhibits Brassinosteroid Biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keimei Oh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The plant steroid hormone brassinosteroids (BRs are important signal mediators that regulate broad aspects of plant growth and development. With the discovery of brassinoazole (Brz, the first specific inhibitor of BR biosynthesis, several triazole-type BR biosynthesis inhibitors have been developed. In this article, we report that fenarimol (FM, a pyrimidine-type fungicide, exhibits potent inhibitory activity against BR biosynthesis. FM induces dwarfism and the open cotyledon phenotype of Arabidopsis seedlings in the dark. The IC50 value for FM to inhibit stem elongation of Arabidopsis seedlings grown in the dark was approximately 1.8 ± 0.2 μM. FM-induced dwarfism of Arabidopsis seedlings could be restored by brassinolide (BL but not by gibberellin (GA. Assessment of the target site of FM in BR biosynthesis by feeding BR biosynthesis intermediates indicated that FM interferes with the side chain hydroxylation of BR biosynthesis from campestanol to teasterone. Determination of the binding affinity of FM to purified recombinant CYP90D1 indicated that FM induced a typical type II binding spectrum with a Kd value of approximately 0.79 μM. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of the expression level of the BR responsive gene in Arabidopsis seedlings indicated that FM induces the BR deficiency in Arabidopsis.

  13. Interactions among cooling, fungicide and postharvest ripening temperature on peaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Trujillo, J. Pablo; Cano, Antonio; Artes, Francisco [Postharvest and refrigeration Lab., Dept. of Food Science and Technology, CEBAS-CSIC, Murcia (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Peach fruit (Prunus persica L. cv. 'Miraflores') harvested at the firm-ripe stage, treated or not with 2 g l{sup -1} iprodione, were cooled or not at 1{sup o}C and ripened at 15 or 20{sup o}C and 95% RH for 10 days. During ripening, weight loss, fungal development and changes in quality parameters (firmness, soluble solids content, titratable acidity, pH and ground and flesh color), and carbon dioxide and ethylene production were monitored. Cooling alone or combined with iprodione avoided Rhizopus nigricans decay during ripening at either ripening temperatures. A skin damage not previously reported on fungicide treated peach was observed at 20{sup o}C. Cooled fruit ripened at 15{sup o}C showed an anomalous respiration rate and ethylene production after the climacteric peak, a loss of firmness and a drop in titratable acidity after 7 days of storage, and reduced endo-polygalacturonase activity in presence of continuous pectinmethylesterase activity during the first week. Cooling before ripening at 20{sup o}C led to the best flavor without excessive total losses. These results helped in the optimization of warming cycles during cold storage used to avoid chilling injuries development on peaches. (Author)

  14. Sensitivity of four Yeasts to Fungicides and CO2 Concentrations and Their Antagonistic Ability in Combination with Fungicide to pathogenic Fungi in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Shi-ping; YAO Hong-jie; QIN Guo-zheng; XU Yong; FENG Xiao-yuan

    2004-01-01

    The yeasts Cryptococcus laurentii,Trichosporon pullulans,Rhodotorula glutinis and Trichosporon sp.were used to investigate their sensitivity to four fungicides and different concentrations of CO2,as well as their antagonistic ability to Penicilliumexpansum and Alternaria alternata in vitro when applied with fungicide.There were significant differences in sensitivity to the fungicides among the different yeasts(P = 0.05).R.glutinis was more sensitive to Deccocil,Iprodione and Stroby as compared to other yeasts.Combination antagonistic yeasts with fungicide could more significantly enhance biocontrol ability of the yeasts against the pathogenic fungi in vitro(P = 0.05).C.laurentii was the most effective antagonist among the four yeasts and could completely control spore germination of P.expansum and A.alternata when combined with Stroby at the concentration of 100 μL L-1.The yeasts,except R.glutinis,could grow well on nutrient yeast dextrose agar (NYDA) after 8 d incubation even at 20% CO2 concentration at 25℃.Particularly Trichosporon sp.showeda better adaptability to low temperature as compared to other antagonists.

  15. Nitric oxide-dependent activation of CaMKII increases diastolic sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release in cardiac myocytes in response to adrenergic stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry Curran

    Full Text Available Spontaneous calcium waves in cardiac myocytes are caused by diastolic sarcoplasmic reticulum release (SR Ca(2+ leak through ryanodine receptors. Beta-adrenergic (β-AR tone is known to increase this leak through the activation of Ca-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII and the subsequent phosphorylation of the ryanodine receptor. When β-AR drive is chronic, as observed in heart failure, this CaMKII-dependent effect is exaggerated and becomes potentially arrhythmogenic. Recent evidence has indicated that CaMKII activation can be regulated by cellular oxidizing agents, such as reactive oxygen species. Here, we investigate how the cellular second messenger, nitric oxide, mediates CaMKII activity downstream of the adrenergic signaling cascade and promotes the generation of arrhythmogenic spontaneous Ca(2+ waves in intact cardiomyocytes. Both SCaWs and SR Ca(2+ leak were measured in intact rabbit and mouse ventricular myocytes loaded with the Ca-dependent fluorescent dye, fluo-4. CaMKII activity in vitro and immunoblotting for phosphorylated residues on CaMKII, nitric oxide synthase, and Akt were measured to confirm activity of these enzymes as part of the adrenergic cascade. We demonstrate that stimulation of the β-AR pathway by isoproterenol increased the CaMKII-dependent SR Ca(2+ leak. This increased leak was prevented by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase 1 but not nitric oxide synthase 3. In ventricular myocytes isolated from wild-type mice, isoproterenol stimulation also increased the CaMKII-dependent leak. Critically, in myocytes isolated from nitric oxide synthase 1 knock-out mice this effect is ablated. We show that isoproterenol stimulation leads to an increase in nitric oxide production, and nitric oxide alone is sufficient to activate CaMKII and increase SR Ca(2+ leak. Mechanistically, our data links Akt to nitric oxide synthase 1 activation downstream of β-AR stimulation. Collectively, this evidence supports the hypothesis

  16. Development of a novel multiplex DNA microarray for Fusarium graminearum and analysis of azole fungicide responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deising Holger B

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The toxigenic fungal plant pathogen Fusarium graminearum compromises wheat production worldwide. Azole fungicides play a prominent role in controlling this pathogen. Sequencing of its genome stimulated the development of high-throughput technologies to study mechanisms of coping with fungicide stress and adaptation to fungicides at a previously unprecedented precision. DNA-microarrays have been used to analyze genome-wide gene expression patterns and uncovered complex transcriptional responses. A recently developed one-color multiplex array format allowed flexible, effective, and parallel examinations of eight RNA samples. Results We took advantage of the 8 × 15 k Agilent format to design, evaluate, and apply a novel microarray covering the whole F. graminearum genome to analyze transcriptional responses to azole fungicide treatment. Comparative statistical analysis of expression profiles uncovered 1058 genes that were significantly differentially expressed after azole-treatment. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis for 31 selected genes indicated high conformity to results from the microarray hybridization. Among the 596 genes with significantly increased transcript levels, analyses using GeneOntology and FunCat annotations detected the ergosterol-biosynthesis pathway genes as the category most significantly responding, confirming the mode-of-action of azole fungicides. Cyp51A, which is one of the three F. graminearum paralogs of Cyp51 encoding the target of azoles, was the most consistently differentially expressed gene of the entire study. A molecular phylogeny analyzing the relationships of the three CYP51 proteins in the context of 38 fungal genomes belonging to the Pezizomycotina indicated that CYP51C (FGSG_11024 groups with a new clade of CYP51 proteins. The transcriptional profiles for genes encoding ABC transporters and transcription factors suggested several involved in mechanisms alleviating the impact of the fungicide

  17. Sterol-inhibiting fungicide impacts on soil microbial ecology in Atlantic Coastal Plain soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, P. M.; Potter, T. L.; Strickland, T. C.

    2008-12-01

    Seventy-five percent of the peanuts (Arachus hypogaia) produced in the United States are grown in the Atlantic Coastal Plain region. Portions of this area, including Alabama and Georgia, exhibit a subtropical climate that promotes soil-borne plant fungal diseases. Most fields receive repeated fungicide applications during the growing season to suppress the disease causing organisms, such as Sclerotium rolfsii, Rhizoctonia solani, and Cylindrocladium parasiticum. Information regarding fungicide effects on the soil microbial community, with components principally responsible for transformation and fate of fungicides and other soil-applied pesticides, is limited. The objectives of the study were to assess soil microbial community response to (1) varying rates of the sterol-inhibiting fungicide tebuconazole (0, single application, season max, 2x season max), and (2) field rates of the sterol-inhibitors cyproconazole, prothioconazole, tebuconazole, and flutriafol, and thiol-competitor chlorothalonil. The sterol-inhibitors exhibited different half lives, as listed in the FOOTPRINT database, ranging from 1300 d. Chlorothalonil was chosen because it is the most frequently applied fungicide to peanut. Shifts in the fungi, gram positive and gram negative bacteria, were monitored during the experiments using phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiles. Ergosterol levels and pesticide decay rates were also monitored to evaluate the effectiveness of the fungicide and soil residence time, respectively. In the rate study, the highest rate of tebuconazole reduced the fungal biomarker 18:2ω6,9c to 2.6 nmol g-1 dry soil at 17 d, as compared to the control (4.1 nmol g-1 dry soil). However, levels of the fungal PLFA biomarker were similar regardless of rate at 0 and 32 d. The gram negative bacterial PLFA mole percent was greater at 17 d for the two highest rates of tebuconazole, but was similar at 0 and 32 d. Gram positive and fungal mole percents were not affected at any time point

  18. Control of Fusarium head blight of winter wheat by artificial and natural infection using new fungicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Treikale

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In Latvia, climatic factors are influential in spreading of Fusarium head blight of cereals caused by Fusarium species. The most significant factor affecting the incidence of the disease in winter wheat is hightened temperature at the time of wheat anthesis. Field trials for the control of the disease in winter wheat were done in 2003-2004 using new fungicides applied at various rates by natural infection and artificial inoculation. Three species of causative agents: Fusarium avenaceum var. herbarum, F. gibbosum, F. culmorum were collected from infected seeds of wheat and used for inoculation of experimental plots at the concentration 106 conidia ml-1 (1:1:1 at the stage of full anthesis. Effective control of the disease was obtained through application of new fungicides with different active ingredient: Prosaro 250 EC (tebuconazole 125 G, prothioconazole 125 G L-1, Input 460 EC (spiroxamine 300 G, prothioconazole 160 G L-1. In conditions of artificial infection by severe attack of Fusarium spp. the application of fungicides containing tebuconazole at T3 gave significant influence on yield of winter wheat through plumpness of grains increase. High efficacy of fungicides against leaf infection with Erysiphe graminis and Drechslera tritici-repentis was also in the trial achieved. Application of fungicide containing cyproconazole and trifloxystrobin at T1 in the trial 2004 gave good control of Septoria tritici, E. graminis and D. triticirepentis.

  19. Synthesis and fungicidal activity of aryl carbamic acid-5-aryl-2-furanmethyl ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Li, Bao-Ju; Ling, Yun; Miao, Hong-Jian; Shi, Yan-Xia; Yang, Xin-Ling

    2010-03-10

    Chitin, a major structural component of insect cuticle and fungus cell wall but absent in plants and vertebrates, is regarded as a safe and selective target for pest control agents. Chitin synthesis inhibitors (CSIs) have been well-known as insect growth regulators (IGRs) but rarely found as fungicides in agriculture. To find novel CSIs with good activity, benzoylphenylurea, a typical kind of CSIs, was chosen as the lead compound and 26 novel aryl carbamic acid-5-aryl-2-furanmethyl esters were designed by converting the urea linkages of benzoylphenylureas to carbamic acid esters and changing the aniline parts into furanmethyl groups. The title compounds were synthesized and their structures confirmed by IR, (1)H NMR, and elemental analysis. Preliminary insecticidal and fungicidal bioassays were carried out. The results indicated that the title compounds had no insecticidal effect on Culex pipiens pallens and Plutella xylostella Linnaeus , but most compounds exhibited good fungicidal activities against Corynespora cassiicola , Thanatephorus cucumeris , Botrytis cinerea , and Fusarium oxysporum . In particular, compounds V-4, V-6, V-7, and V-8 showed better activities against the four strains than those of the commercialized fungicides. The morphologic result suggested that compound V-21 had disturbed the cell wall formation of C. cassiicola. The results indicated that modification on the urea linkage of benzoylphenylurea was an effective way to discover new candidates for fungicides.

  20. Effectiveness of Different Classes of Fungicides on Botrytis cinerea Causing Gray Mold on Fruit and Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon-Oh Kim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Botrytis cinerea is a necrotrophic pathogen causing a major problem in the export and post-harvest of strawberries. Inappropriate use of fungicides leads to resistance among fungal pathogens. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the sensitivity of B. cinerea to various classes of fungicide and to determine the effectiveness of different concentrations of commonly used fungicides. We thus evaluated the effectiveness of six classes of fungicide in inhibiting the growth and development of this pathogen, namely, fludioxonil, iprodione, pyrimethanil, tebuconazole, fenpyrazamine, and boscalid. Fludioxonil was the most effective (EC₅₀ < 0.1 μg/ml, and pyrimethanil was the least effective (EC₅₀ = 50 μg/ml, at inhibiting the mycelial growth of B. cinerea. Fenpyrazamine and pyrimethanil showed relatively low effectiveness in inhibiting the germination and conidial production of B. cinerea. Our results are useful for the management of B. cinerea and as a basis for monitoring the sensitivity of B. cinerea strains to fungicides.

  1. Fungicide residues in grapes determined the dynamics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains during spontaneous wine fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čuš Franc

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Impact of three fungicides against B. cinerea (iprodione, pyrimethanil and f ludioxonil plus cyprodinil on the population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains during the spontaneous alcoholic fermentation was studied. With regard to the use of fungicides in the vineyard at two stages of the grapevine growth we followed four different spontaneous fermentations: control, iprodione, pyrimethanil and f ludioxonil plus cyprodinil. The fungicide residues in the grapes were determined by GC/MS system and the fermentations were followed by changes in yeast, sugar, and ethanol concentrations using colony counting and HPLC. The karyotype analysis of 473 isolates was done by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The fungicide residues in the grapes at the harvest were below the maximum residue limits. Isolates of S. cerevisiae were classified into 15 karyotype groups. The duration of the processes and the populations of the karyotypes differed between the fermentations. The iprodione and control fermentations lasted 36 days with the prevalence of karyotype A while the fludioxonil plus cyprodinil fermentation lasted 50 days and karyotype D led the process. In the pyrimethanil fermentation, none of the karyotypes prevailed in the must and the fermentation lasted much longer than others did (68 days. The results showed that the fungicide residues have an influence on the fermentation kinetics and selection of S. cerevisiae strains during the spontaneous alcoholic fermentation and therefore should be considered as an important factor that may indirectly influence the formation of fermentation aroma in the wine produced by such process.

  2. Synthesis and anti-fungicidal activity of some transition metal complexes with benzimidazole dithiocarbamate ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Gehad G.; Ibrahim, Nasser A.; Attia, Hanaa A. E.

    2009-04-01

    Seven transition metal complexes of benzimidazole ligand (HL) are reported and characterized based on elemental analyses, IR, solid reflectance, magnetic moment, molar conductance and thermal analyses (TGA and DTA). From the obtained data, the complexes were proposed to have the general formulae [MX 2(HL)(H 2O)]· yH 2O, where M = Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cr(III); X = Cl -, SO 42- and y = 0-4. The molar conductance data revealed that all the metal chelates were non-electrolytes. From the magnetic and solid reflectance spectra, it was found that the geometrical structure of these complexes is octahedral. The thermal behaviour of these chelates showed that the hydrated complexes loss water molecules of hydration in the first step followed immediately by decomposition of the anions and ligand molecules in the subsequent steps. Fungicidal activity of the prepared complexes and free ligand was evaluated against three soil borne fungi. Data obtained showed the higher biological activity of the prepared complexes than the parent Schiff base ligand. Formulation of the most potent complex was carried out in the form of 25% WP. Fungicidal activity of the new formulation was evaluated and compared with the standard fungicide Pencycuron (Monceren 25% WP). In most cases, the new formulation possessed higher fungicidal activity than the standard fungicide under the laboratory conditions.

  3. Effect of fungicide on Fusarium verticillioides mycelial morphology and fumonisin B 1 production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel, Tatiana de Á.; Bordini, Jaqueline G.; Saito, Gervásio H.; Andrade, Célia G.T. de J.; Ono, Mario A.; Hirooka, Elisa Y.; Vizoni, Édio; Ono, Elisabete Y.S.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of fludioxonil + metalaxyl-M on the mycelial morphology, sporulation and fumonisin B 1 production by Fusarium verticillioides 103 F was evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that the fungicide caused inhibition of hyphal growth and defects on hyphae morphology such as cell wall disruption, withered hyphae, and excessive septation. In addition, extracellular material around the hyphae was rarely observed in the presence of fludioxonil + metalaxyl-M. While promoting the reduction of mycelial growth, the fungicide increased sporulation of F. verticillioides compared to the control, and the highest production occurred on the 14 th day in the treatments and on the 10 th day in the control cultures. Fumonisin B 1 production in the culture media containing the fungicide (treatment) was detected from the 7 th day incubation, whereas in cultures without fungicide (control) it was detected on the 10 th day. The highest fumonisin B 1 production occurred on the 14 th day, both for the control and for the treatment. Fludioxonil + metalaxyl - M can interfere in F. verticillioides mycelial morphology and sporulation and increase fumonisin B 1 levels. These data indicate the importance of understanding the effects of fungicide to minimize the occurrence of toxigenic fungi and fumonisins. PMID:26221120

  4. Effect of fungicide on Fusarium verticillioidesmycelial morphology and fumonisin B1 production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana de Á. Miguel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of fludioxonil + metalaxyl-M on the mycelial morphology, sporulation and fumonisin B1 production by Fusarium verticillioides 103 F was evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that the fungicide caused inhibition of hyphal growth and defects on hyphae morphology such as cell wall disruption, withered hyphae, and excessive septation. In addition, extracellular material around the hyphae was rarely observed in the presence of fludioxonil + metalaxyl-M. While promoting the reduction of mycelial growth, the fungicide increased sporulation of F. verticillioides compared to the control, and the highest production occurred on the 14th day in the treatments and on the 10th day in the control cultures. Fumonisin B1production in the culture media containing the fungicide (treatment was detected from the 7th day incubation, whereas in cultures without fungicide (control it was detected on the 10th day. The highest fumonisin B1 production occurred on the 14th day, both for the control and for the treatment. Fludioxonil + metalaxyl - M can interfere in F. verticillioides mycelial morphology and sporulation and increase fumonisin B1 levels. These data indicate the importance of understanding the effects of fungicide to minimize the occurrence of toxigenic fungi and fumonisins.

  5. Fungicide baseline for mycelial sensitivity of Exserohilum turcicum, causal agent of northern corn leaf blight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Luis De Rossi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Northern corn leaf blight, caused by Exserohilum turcicum (Et, is one of the major corn diseases which can reduce grain yield and quality. The aim of this study was to determine the mycelial sensitivity of ten Et isolates, five from Argentina and five from Brazil, to six fungicides (carbendazim, captan, fludioxinil, metalaxyl, iprodione and thiram used in seed treatment. The inhibitory concentration (IC50 was determined by using seven concentrations of the fungicides supplemented to the agar medium. The mycelial colony diameter was measured with a digital caliper. Experimental design was completely randomized with four replicates. Data on the percent mycelial growth inhibition were analyzed by logarithmic regression and the IC50 was calculated. The fungicide iprodione was the most potent, with IC50 50 mg/L for all isolates. Although iprodione is the most potent fungicide, it is not used for corn seed treatment. The IC50s obtained in this study can be used as baseline for future monitoring studies of Et sensitivity to fungicides.

  6. Control Efficacy of Fungicides on Chinese Cabbage Clubroot under Several Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Yong Eom

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available To develop the efficient screening methods for antifungal compound active to Chinese cabbage clubroot caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae, the control efficacy of three fungicides fluazinam, ethaboxam, and cyazofamid on the disease was tested under several conditions such as soil types, cultivars of Chinese cabbage, growth stages of the host, and inoculum concentrations. The in vivo antifungal activities of the fungicides on clubroot of two Chinese cabbage cultivars were hardly different. At 7- and 14-day-old seedlings, the fungicides were more effective to control of clubroot than at 21-day-old seedlings. In a commercial horticulture media soil (CNS, disease severity of untreated controls was higher and control activity of the fungicides was less than in a mixture of CNS and upland soil (1:1, v/v. Disease development of the seedlings inoculated with P. brassicae at 1.8×10(7 spores/pot to 1.1×10(9 spores/pot was almost same, but control efficacy of the fungicides was negatively correlated with inoculum dosages. To effectively select in vivo antifungal compound on Chinese cabbage clubroot, 14-day-old seedlings need to be inoculated with P. brassicae by drenching the spore suspension to give 1×10(8 spores/pot 1 day after chemical treatment. To develop clubroot, the inoculated plants are incubated in a growth chamber at 20℃ for 2 days, and then cultivated in a greenhouse (20±5℃ for four weeks.

  7. Biochemical and Genetic Responses of Fungi to the Toxic Effect of Synthetic and Natural Fungicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Elena Baez-Flores

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present review is to analyze the molecular basis of fungicide resistance mechanism to both synthetic fungicides and the natural fungicides isothiocyanates. The review is focused mainly on Alternaria sp., but whenever available, similar studies in other fungi have been included. Fungal resistant strains to dicarboximide and phenylpyrrole fungicides have been found to contain mutations in one of the proteins involved in the signal transduction pathway that regulates the fungal response to osmotic stress. By the other hand, it was found that isothiocyanates induce enzymes like glutathione S-transferase, cyanide hydratase, heat shock proteins, membrane transporters and proteins associated with the oxidative stress response. Also, inter simple sequence repeats polymorphism was recorded as a response to the isothiocyanates treatment. The knowledge about the genetic basis of the response mechanism of Alternaria sp. to the isothiocyanates is scarce. Therefore, studies by DNA recombinant technology to analyze the fungi responses to fungicides, will allow knowing the metabolic pathways involved in the phenomena to permit the design of strategies to inhibit key reactions involved in the fungal resistance, reaching a better and sustainable fungal infections control.

  8. Effect of Maize Hybrid and Foliar Fungicides on Yield Under Low Foliar Disease Severity Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallowa, Sally O; Esker, Paul D; Paul, Pierce A; Bradley, Carl A; Chapara, Venkata R; Conley, Shawn P; Robertson, Alison E

    2015-08-01

    Foliar fungicide use in the U.S. Corn Belt increased in the last decade; however, questions persist pertaining to its value and sustainability. Multistate field trials were established from 2010 to 2012 in Illinois, Iowa, Ohio, and Wisconsin to examine how hybrid and foliar fungicide influenced disease intensity and yield. The experimental design was in a split-split plot with main plots consisting of hybrids varying in resistance to gray leaf spot (caused by Cercospora zeae-maydis) and northern corn leaf blight (caused by Setosphaera turcica), subplots corresponding to four application timings of the fungicide pyraclostrobin, and sub-subplots represented by inoculations with either C. zeae-maydis, S. turcica, or both at two vegetative growth stages. Fungicide application (VT/R1) significantly reduced total disease severity relative to the control in five of eight site-years (Pfungicide-treated in three site-years. Fungicide application increased the yield by approximately 6% at Ohio in 2010, 5% at Wisconsin in 2010 and 6% in 2011. Yield differences ranged from 8,403 to 8,890 kg/ha in Wisconsin 2011 to 11,362 to 11,919 kg/ha in Wisconsin 2010. Results suggest susceptibility to disease and prevailing environment are important drivers of observed differences. Yield increases as a result of the physiological benefits of plant health benefits under low disease were not consistent.

  9. Resistance Mechanisms and Molecular Docking Studies of Four Novel QoI Fungicides in Peronophythora litchii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuxin; Chen, Lei; Hu, Jian; Duan, Hongxia; Lin, Dong; Liu, Pengfei; Meng, Qingxiao; Li, Bin; Si, Naiguo; Liu, Changling; Liu, Xili

    2015-12-14

    Peronophythora litchii is the causal agent of litchi downy blight. Enestroburin, SYP-1620, SYP-2815 and ZJ0712 are four novel QoI fungicides developed by China. Eight mutants of P. litchii resistant to these QoI fungicides and azoxystrobin (as a known QoI fungicide) were obtained in our preliminary work. In this study, the full length of the cytochrome b gene in P. litchii, which has a full length of 382 amino acids, was cloned from both sensitive isolates and resistant mutants, and single-site mutations G142A, G142S, Y131C, or F128S were found in resistant mutants. Molecular docking was used to predict how the mutations alter the binding of the five QoI fungicides to the Qo-binding pockets. The results have increased our understanding of QoI fungicide-resistance mechanisms and may help in the development of more potent inhibitors against plant diseases in the fields.

  10. APPLICATION OF FOLIAR FERTILIZER AND FUNGICIDES ON WHITE SPOT DISEASE CONTROL AND DEVELOPMENT OF MAIZE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Brito

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effect of forms of application of foliar fertilizers and fungicides to control fungus causing white maize spot, Phaeosphaeria maydis, and the growth and development of hybrids maize. The design had randomized blocks, with the use two sources hybrids maize with different reaction to white maize spot: resistant and susceptive and application with moisture of foliar chemical fungicide + cobalt foliar + molybdenum foliar + manganese and control treatment, without application consisting of four treatments and five replications. In the treatments with application of moisture were done on vegetative maize growth stage V8 (stage that determine that the number of kernel rows, VT (stage that arrives when the last branch of the tassel is completely visible and reproductive maize growth stage R2 (kernels are white on the outside and resemble a blister. The evaluation of variables of growth of maize plants: grain dry mass, cob dry mass, leaf dry mass, culm dry mass and modificated leaf ear and total plant dry mass. Harvest was carried out when the grains were 20% humidity. The application of fungicides and foliar fertilizers increased the leaves, culm, ear modificated, cobs and shoot dry mass plants maize. The application of fungicides and foliar fertilizers providing returning of 11.409,5 kg ha-1 of shoot dry mass plants with increased of 1.296 kg ha-1 on soil(12,81%. In the susceptive hybrid maize the application of fungicides and foliar fertilizers provide higher dry mass grains and shoot of plants.

  11. Inducible nitric oxide synthase in renal transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joles, JA; Vos, IH; Grone, HJ; Rabelink, TJ

    2002-01-01

    The importance of the endothelial isoform of nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) has been well established. Endothelium-derived nitric oxide has been shown to be essential for vascular homeostasis and modulation of eNOS has thus become a target in prevention of cardiovascular disease. The role of the induc

  12. Nitric oxide fumigation for postharvest pest control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitric oxide fumigation is effective against all arthropod pests at various life stages tested. Nine insect pests at various life stages and bulb mites were subjected to nitric oxide fumigation treatments under ultralow oxygen conditions of =50 ppm O2 in 1.9L glass jars as fumigation chambers. The ...

  13. Identification of Metabolites of the Fungicide Penconazole in Human Urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadante, R; Polledri, E; Scurati, S; Moretto, A; Fustinoni, S

    2016-07-18

    Penconazole (PEN) is a fungicide used in agriculture that has been classified as hazardous to humans and the environment. The objective of this work was to identify PEN urinary metabolites in humans and propose a biomarker for PEN exposure. Five urine samples were collected from agricultural workers who worked with and were exposed to PEN. Samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with hybrid triple quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometry, with the source operating in the electrospray ionization mode. Metabolites previously identified in animal studies were searched as possible metabolites in humans. Candidate metabolites were first identified by multiple reaction monitoring following the protonated molecular ions that generated the protonated triazole moiety, which is expected to be present in all PEN metabolites; second, the isotopic patterns of the molecular ions were checked for consistency with the presence of two chlorine atoms; third, the full mass spectra were evaluated for consistency with the molecular structure. Seven different oxidized metabolites were found, both in the free and glucuronide conjugate forms. The major metabolite was the monohydroxyl-derivative PEN-OH (median molar fraction approximately 0.92 as a sum of free and glucuronide conjugated form). The product of further oxidation was the carboxyl-derivate PEN-COOH (median molar fraction approximately 0.03). After hydrolysis with β-glucuronidase, the free compounds were quantified in the presence of deuterated PEN as an internal standard; PEN-OH levels ranged from 230 to 460 μg/L, and PEN-COOH levels ranged from 5.2 to 16.7 μg/L. We propose a pathway for PEN metabolism in humans and suggest PEN-OH, after hydrolysis of glucuronide conjugates, as a biomarker for monitoring human exposure to PEN.

  14. TENACITY AND PERSISTENCE OF COPPER FUNGICIDES IN CITRUS SEEDLINGS UNDER SIMULATED RAINFALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANTONIO EDUARDO FONSECA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The amount of fungicide that adheres to the leaf during spraying and the amount that remain on the leaf after weathering are the main factors that defines the amount of active residue on the leaf surface to effectively control plant pathogens. Thus, the objective of this work was to evaluate the tenacity and persistence of copper in citrus seedling leaves under simulated rainfall in Jaboticabal, State of São Paulo, Brazil. The evaluated variables were copper content, solution retention, surface tension and drop spectrum. A significant and inversely proportional linear relationship to drops <100 μm was found. The percentage of copper retained in leaves of citrus seedlings with copper fungicides of suspension concentrate (SC formulations after simulated rainfall was greater than 80%. Copper fungicides of SC formulations presented the lowest surface tension, allowing greater tenacity and persistence of copper on seedlings of citrus leaves after simulated rainfall and increased contact between the drops and leaf surface.

  15. Contamination of vineyard soils with fungicides: a review of environmental and toxicological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komárek, Michael; Cadková, Eva; Chrastný, Vladislav; Bordas, François; Bollinger, Jean-Claude

    2010-01-01

    The contamination of agricultural soils with inorganic (Cu-based) and organic pesticides (including their residues) presents a major environmental and toxicological concern. This review summarizes available studies published on the contamination of vineyard soils throughout the world with Cu-based and synthetic organic fungicides. It focuses on the behavior of these contaminants in vineyard soils and the associated environmental and toxicological risks. The concentrations of Cu in soils exceed the legislative limits valid in the EU in the vast majority of the studied vineyards. Regarding the environmental and toxicological hazards associated with the extensive use of fungicides, the choice of fungicides should be performed carefully according to the physico-chemical properties of the soils and climatic and hydrogeological characteristics of the vine-growing regions.

  16. Ranking of fungicides according to risk assessments for health and environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lise Nistrup; Ørum, Jens Erik

    2014-01-01

    Denmark has introduced a new indicator for ranking the potential impact of pesticides on health and environment. The new Pesticide Load (PL) makes it possible for farmers to choose the least harmful fungicides and substitute between products which have an equally good efficacy profile. In practic...... system it is expected that the system could lead to more problems related to pesticide resistance.......Denmark has introduced a new indicator for ranking the potential impact of pesticides on health and environment. The new Pesticide Load (PL) makes it possible for farmers to choose the least harmful fungicides and substitute between products which have an equally good efficacy profile. In practice...... PL varies for fungicide standard rates by a factor of 10. Products including epoxiconazole generally have higher PL's due to the human health profile of this active. PL's per area, crop or product will supplement the previous pesticide statistics based on treatment frequency index (TFI). PL has also...

  17. Field screening method for above-tolerance residues of dithiocarbamate fungicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, D E; Gunther, F A

    1982-07-01

    A field screening method has been developed for detecting above-tolerance residues of dithiocarbamate (DTC) fungicides on fruits and vegetables. A harvested crop might be condemned as unfit for market if above-tolerance DTC residues are present; however, by using this screening method, a grower might be able to postpone harvesting a crop until the screening test indicates that residues have dissipated below the tolerance level. The method depends on carbon disulfide generated from DTC fungicides at an elevated temperature into the headspace gas above the contents of a septum-sealed reaction flask, with hydrochloric acid and stannous chloride present. The syringe-withdrawn, headspace carbon disulfide then reacts with the appropriate chromophore reagent already in the syringe. The lower limit of detectability is about 2 ppm DTC fungicide from 30 g chopped crop. A single test can be completed in about 90 min; the average time per test when several are conducted sequentially is considerably shorter.

  18. Predictive value of cell assays for developmental toxicity and embryotoxicity of conazole fungicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreisig, Karin; Taxvig, Camilla; Birkhøj Kjærstad, Mia; Nellemann, Christine; Hass, Ulla; Vinggaard, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    This paper evaluates in vivo predictability of a battery of in vitro tests covering developmental toxicity and embryotoxicity of five widely used conazole fungicides. The conazoles were investigated in the embryonic stem cell test, and data were compared to in vivo embryotoxicity data. The same conazoles were evaluated on the basis of data from a battery of cell assays for endocrine activity, including assays for AR, ER, AhR, and sex hormone synthesis, and data were compared to in vivo developmental toxicity data. Overall, the ranking of the five conazole fungicides based on in vitro data were in reasonably good agreement with available in vivo effects. Ketoconazole and epoxiconazole are the most potent embryotoxic compounds, whereas prochloraz belongs to the most potent developmental toxicants. In conclusion, a rough prediction of the ranking of these conazole fungicides for in vivo toxicity data was possible by a holistic evaluation of data from a panel of cell-based assays.

  19. Rainfall thresholds as support for timing fungicide applications in the control of potato late blight in Ecuador and Peru

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann, Peter; Taipe, Arturo; Perez, Willmer G.

    2009-01-01

    Accumulated rainfall thresholds were studied in seven field experiments conducted in Ecuador and Peru for their value in timing applications of fungicide to control potato late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans. Fungicide regimes based on accumulated rainfall thresholds ranging from 10 to ...

  20. QSAR model toward the rational design of new agrochemical fungicides with a defined resistance risk using substructural descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck-Planche, Alejandro; Kleandrova, Valeria V; Rojas-Vargas, Julio A

    2011-11-01

    The increasing resistance of several phytopathogenic fungal species to the existing agrochemical fungicides has alarmed to the worldwide scientific community. There is no available methodology to predict in an efficient way if a new fungicide will have resistance risk due to fungal species which cause considerable crop losses. In an attempt to overcome this problem, a multi-resistance risk QSAR model, based on substructural descriptors was developed from a heterogeneous database of compounds. The purpose of this model is the classification, design, and prediction of agrochemical fungicides according to resistance risk categories. The QSAR model classified correctly 85.11% of the fungicides and the 85.07% of the inactive compounds in the training series, for an accuracy of 85.08%. In the prediction series, the percentages of correct classification were 85.71 and 86.55% for fungicides and inactive compounds, respectively, with an accuracy of 86.39%. Some fragments were extracted and their quantitative contributions to the fungicidal activity were calculated taking into consideration the different resistance risk categories for agrochemical fungicides. In the same way, some fragments present in molecules with fungicidal activity and with negative contributions were analyzed like structural alerts responsible of resistance risk.

  1. Baseline sensitivity to fluopyram and fungicide resistance phenotypes of botrytis cinerea populations from table grapes in california

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is a major postharvest disease of table grapes grown in the Central Valley of California. Understanding fungicide-resistant phenotypes of B. cinerea is important to the development of pre-harvest fungicide programs for control of postharvest gray mold. Baseline s...

  2. Potential of Cerbera odollam as a bio-fungicide for post-harvest pathogen Penicilium digitatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harbant; Yin-Chu, Sue; Al-Samarrai, Ghassan; Syarhabil, Muhammad

    2015-05-01

    Postharvest diseases due to fungal infection contribute to economic losses in agriculture industry during storage, transportation or in the market. Penicillium digitatum is one of the common pathogen responsible for the postharvest rot in fruits. This disease is currently being controlled by synthetic fungicides such as Guazatine and Imazalil. However, heavy use of fungicides has resulted in environmental pollution, such as residue in fruit that expose a significant risk to human health. Therefore, there is a strong need to develop alternatives to synthetic fungicide to raise customer confidence. In the current research, different concentrations (500 to 3000 ppm) of ethanol extract of Cerbera odollam or commonly known as Pong-pong were compared with Neem and the controls (Positive control/Guazatine; Negative control/DMSO) for the anti-fungicide activity in PDA media contained in 10 cm diameter Petri dishes, using a modification of Ruch and Worf's method. The toxicity (Lc50) of the C.odollam extract was determined by Brine-shrimp test (BST). The results of the research indicated that crude extraction from C.odollam showed the highest inhibition rate (93%) and smallest colony diameter (0.63 cm) at 3000 ppm in vitro compared with Neem (inhibition rate: 88%; colony diameter: 1.33 cm) and control (Positive control/Guazatine inhibition rate: 79%, colony diameter: 1.9 cm; Negative control/DMSO inhibition rate: 0%, colony diameter: 9.2 cm). C.odollam recorded Lc50 value of 5 µg/ml which is safe but to be used with caution (unsafe level: below 2 µg/ml). The above anti-microbial activity and toxicity value results indicate that C.odollam has a potential of being a future bio-fungicide that could be employed as an alternative to synthetic fungicide.

  3. Effects of Fungicide Treatment on Free Amino Acid Concentration and Acrylamide-Forming Potential in Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Tanya Y; Powers, Stephen J; Halford, Nigel G

    2016-12-28

    Acrylamide forms from free asparagine and reducing sugars during frying, baking, roasting, or high-temperature processing, and cereal products are major contributors to dietary acrylamide intake. Free asparagine concentration is the determining factor for acrylamide-forming potential in cereals, and this study investigated the effect of fungicide application on free asparagine accumulation in wheat grain. Free amino acid concentrations were measured in flour from 47 varieties of wheat grown in a field trial in 2011-2012. The wheat had been supplied with nitrogen and sulfur and treated with growth regulators and fungicides. Acrylamide formation was measured after the flour had been heated at 180 °C for 20 min. Flour was also analyzed from 24 (of the 47) varieties grown in adjacent plots that were treated in identical fashion except that no fungicide was applied, resulting in visible infection by Septoria tritici, yellow rust, and brown rust. Free asparagine concentration in the fungicide-treated wheat ranged from 1.596 to 3.987 mmol kg(-1), with a significant (p acrylamide formation, which ranged from 134 to 992 μg kg(-1). There was a significant (p acrylamide formation. Both free asparagine concentration and acrylamide formation increased in response to a lack of fungicide treatment, the increases in acrylamide ranging from 2.7 to 370%. Free aspartic acid concentration also increased, whereas free glutamic acid concentration increased in some varieties but decreased in others, and free proline concentration decreased. The study showed disease control by fungicide application to be an important crop management measure for mitigating the problem of acrylamide formation in wheat products.

  4. The Synergistic Effects of Almond Protection Fungicides on Honey Bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Forager Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Adrian; Coleman, Chet; Hoffmann, Clint; Fritz, Brad; Rangel, Juliana

    2017-06-01

    The honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) contributes ∼$17 billion annually to the United States economy, primarily by pollinating major agricultural crops including almond, which is completely dependent on honey bee pollination for nut set. Almond growers face constant challenges to crop productivity owing to pests and pathogens, which are often controlled with a multitude of agrochemicals. For example, fungicides are often applied in combination with other products to control fungal pathogens during almond bloom. However, the effects of fungicides on honey bee health have been so far understudied. To assess the effects of some of the top fungicides used during the 2012 California almond bloom on honey bee forager mortality, we collected foragers from a local apiary and exposed them to fungicides (alone and in various combinations) at the label dose, or at doses ranging from 0.25 to 2 times the label dose rate. These fungicides were Iprodione 2SE Select, Pristine, and Quadris. We utilized a wind tunnel and atomizer set up with a wind speed of 2.9 m/s to simulate field-relevant exposure of honey bees to these agrochemicals during aerial application in almond fields. Groups of 40-50 foragers exposed to either untreated controls or fungicide-laden treatments were monitored daily over a 10-d period. Our results showed a significant decrease in forager survival resulting from exposure to simulated tank mixes of Iprodione 2SE Select, as well as synergistic detrimental effects of Iprodione 2SE Select in combination with Pristine and Quadris on forager survival. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Fungicide leaching from golf greens: effects of root zone composition and surfactant use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsbo, Mats; Aamlid, Trygve S; Persson, Lave; Jarvis, Nick

    2008-01-01

    Soil water repellency in golf putting greens may induce preferential "finger flow," leading to enhanced leaching of surface applied fungicides. We examined the effects of root zone composition, treatment with a non-ionic surfactant, and the use of the fungicide iprodion or a combination of azoxystrobin and propiconazole on soil water repellency, soil water content distributions, fungicide leaching, and turf quality during 1 yr. Soil water repellency was measured using the water drop penetration time (WDPT) test and tension infiltrometers. Our study was made on a 3-yr-old experimental green seeded with creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) 'Penn A-4' at Landvik in southeast Norway. The facility consists of 16 lysimeters with two different root zone materials: (i) straight sand (1% gravel, 96% sand, 3% silt and clay, 4 g kg(-1) organic matter) (SS) and (ii) straight sand mixed with garden compost to an organic matter content of 21 g kg(-1) (Green Mix [GM]). Surfactant treatment resulted in 96% lower average WDPTs at 1 cm depth, three times higher water infiltration rates at the soil surface, and reduced spatial variation in soil water contents. Fungicide leaching was close to zero for the GM lysimeters probably due to stronger sorption. Concentrations in the drainage water from SS lysimeters often exceeded surface water guideline values for all three fungicides, but surfactant treatment dramatically reduced fungicide leaching from these lysimeters. In autumn and winter, surfactant-treated plots were more infected with fungal diseases probably because of higher water content in the turfgrass thatch layer.

  6. The effect of foliar fungicides on the mycoflora of seeds of Triticum aestivum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Błaszkowski

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of three foliar fungicides. i.e., Bayloton 25 WP, Dithane M-45, and Funaben K. on the mycoflora associated with the seeds of spring Triticum aestivum cv. Kolibri cultivated in the field was investigated. The fungicide which highly reduced the number of both fungal colonies and species was Funaben K. Of the fungi most frequently occurring. Only Funaben K applied on the seeds reduced the proportion of seeds with Alternaria alternata, Cladosporium spp.. and Septoria nodorum. In contrast. seeds from plants traeted with Funaben K harboured significantly more colonies of non-sporulating fungi.

  7. Ranking of fungicides according to risk assessments for health and environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lise Nistrup; Ørum, Jens Erik

    2014-01-01

    Denmark has introduced a new indicator for ranking the potential impact of pesticides on health and environment. The new Pesticide Load (PL) makes it possible for farmers to choose the least harmful fungicides and substitute between products which have an equally good efficacy profile. In practice...... PL varies for fungicide standard rates by a factor of 10. Products including epoxiconazole generally have higher PL's due to the human health profile of this active. PL's per area, crop or product will supplement the previous pesticide statistics based on treatment frequency index (TFI). PL has also...

  8. Ranking of fungicides according to risk assessments for health and environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lise Nistrup; Ørum, Jens Erik

    2014-01-01

    Denmark has introduced a new indicator for ranking the potential impact of pesticides on health and environment. The new Pesticide Load (PL) makes it possible for farmers to choose the least harmful fungicides and substitute between products which have an equally good efficacy profile. In practice...... PL varies for fungicide standard rates by a factor of 10. Products including epoxiconazole generally have higher PL's due to the human health profile of this active. PL's per area, crop or product will supplement the previous pesticide statistics based on treatment frequency index (TFI). PL has also...

  9. Synthesis and fungicidal activity of tubulin polymerisation promoters. Part 3: imidazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberth, Clemens; Dumeunier, Raphael; Trah, Stephan; Wendeborn, Sebastian; Godwin, Jeremy; Schneiter, Peter; Corran, Andy

    2013-01-01

    A novel class of experimental fungicides has been discovered, which consists of special tetrasubstituted imidazoles. They are highly active against important phytopathogens, such as Botrytis cinerea (grey mould), Uncinula necator (grape powdery mildew), Mycosphaerella graminicola (wheat leaf blotch) and Alternaria solani (potato and tomato early blight). Their fungicidal efficacy is due to their ability to promote fungal tubulin polymerization, which leads to a disruption of microtubule dynamics. These imidazoles are five-membered ring analogs of similar substituted triazolopyrimidines and pyridazines with the same mode of action. A concise four-step synthesis route has been used to prepare them from commercially available starting materials. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Resveratrol and Endothelial Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Xia

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO derived from the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS has antihypertensive, antithrombotic, anti-atherosclerotic and antiobesogenic properties. Resveratrol is a polyphenol phytoalexin with multiple cardiovascular and metabolic effects. Part of the beneficial effects of resveratrol are mediated by eNOS. Resveratrol stimulates NO production from eNOS by a number of mechanisms, including upregulation of eNOS expression, stimulation of eNOS enzymatic activity and reversal of eNOS uncoupling. In addition, by reducing oxidative stress, resveratrol prevents oxidative NO inactivation by superoxide thereby enhancing NO bioavailability. Molecular pathways underlying these effects of resveratrol involve SIRT1, AMPK, Nrf2 and estrogen receptors.

  11. Regulation of p53 by activated protein kinase C-delta during nitric oxide-induced dopaminergic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Jin; Kim, Dong-Chan; Choi, Bo-Hwa; Ha, Hyunjung; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2006-01-27

    Selective cell death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra is the major cause of Parkinson disease. Current evidence suggests that this cell death could be mediated by nitric oxide by-products such as nitrate and peroxynitrite. Because protein kinase C (PKC)-delta is implicated in apoptosis of various cell types, we studied its roles and activation mechanisms in nitric oxide (NO)-induced apoptosis of SN4741 dopaminergic cells. When cells were treated with sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a NO donor, endogenous PKC-delta was nitrated and activated. Immunoprecipitation revealed that p53 co-immunoprecipitated with PKC-delta and was phosphorylated at the 15th serine residue in SNP-treated cells. An in vitro kinase assay revealed that p53 was directly phosphorylated by SNP-activated PKC-delta. The p53 Ser-15 phosphorylation was suppressed in SNP-treated cells when the NO-mediated activation of PKC-delta was inhibited by rottlerin or (-)-epigallocatechin gallate. Within 3 h of p53 phosphorylation, its protein levels increased because of decreased ubiquitin-dependent proteosomal proteolysis, whereas the protein levels of MDM2, ubiquitin-protein isopeptide ligase, were down-regulated in a p53 phosphorylation-dependent fashion. Taken together, these results demonstrate that nitration-mediated activation of PKC-delta induces the phosphorylation of the Ser-15 residue in p53, which increases its protein stability, thereby contributing to the nitric oxide-mediated apoptosis-like cell death pathway. These findings may be expanded to provide new insight into the cellular mechanisms of Parkinson disease.

  12. Nitric oxide and chronic colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Grisham

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is thought to play an important role in modulating the inflammatory response by virtue of its ability to affect bloodflow, leukocyte function and cell viability. The objective of this study was to assess the role that NO may play in mediating the mucosal injury and inflammation in a model of chronic granulomatous colitis using two pharmacologically different inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (NOS. Chronic granulomatous colitis with liver and spleen inflammation was induced in female Lewis rats via the subserosal (intramural injection of peptidoglycan/polysaccharide (PG/PS derived from group A streptococci. Chronic NOS inhibition by oral administration of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME (15 µmol/kg/day or amino-guanidine (AG (15 µmol/ kg/day was found to attenuate the PG/PS-induced increases in macroscopic colonic inflammation scores and colonic myeloperoxidase activity. Only AG -- not L-NAME – attenuated the PG/PS-induced increases in colon dry weight. Both L-NAME and AG significantly attenuated the PG/PS-induced increases in spleen weight whereas neither was effective at significantly attenuating the PG/PS-induced increases in liver weight. Although both L-NAME and AG inhibited NO production in vivo, as measured by decreases in plasma nitrite and nitrate levels, only AG produced significantly lower values (38±3 versus 83±8 µM, respectively, P<0.05. Finally, L-NAME, but not AG, administration significantly increased mean arterial pressure from 83 mmHg in colitic animals to 105 mmHg in the PG/PS+ L-NAME-treated animals (P<0.05. It is concluded that NO may play an important role in mediating some of the pathophysiology associated with this model of chronic granulomatous colitis.

  13. The effect of the Falcon 460 EC fungicide on soil microbial communities, enzyme activities and plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baćmaga, Małgorzata; Wyszkowska, Jadwiga; Kucharski, Jan

    2016-10-01

    Fungicides are considered to be effective crop protection chemicals in modern agriculture. However, they can also exert toxic effects on non-target organisms, including soil-dwelling microbes. Therefore, the environmental fate of fungicides has to be closely monitored. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the Falcon 460 EC fungicide on microbial diversity, enzyme activity and resistance, and plant growth. Samples of sandy loam with pHKCl 7.0 were collected for laboratory analyses on experimental days 30, 60 and 90. Falcon 460 EC was applied to soil in the following doses: control (soil without the fungicide), dose recommended by the manufacturer, 30-fold higher than the recommended dose, 150-fold higher than the recommended dose and 300-fold higher than the recommended dose. The observed differences in the values of the colony development index and the eco-physiological index indicate that the mixture of spiroxamine, tebuconazole and triadimenol modified the biological diversity of the analyzed groups of soil microorganisms. Bacteria of the genus Bacillus and fungi of the genera Penicillium and Rhizopus were isolated from fungicide-contaminated soil. The tested fungicide inhibited the activity of dehydrogenases, catalase, urease, acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase. The greatest changes were induced by the highest fungicide dose 300-fold higher than the recommended dose. Dehydrogenases were most resistant to soil contamination. The Phytotoxkit test revealed that the analyzed fungicide inhibits seed germination capacity and root elongation. The results of this study indicate that excessive doses of the Falcon 460 EC fungicide 30-fold higher than the recommended dose to 300-fold higher than the recommended dose) can induce changes in the biological activity of soil. The analyzed microbiological and biochemical parameters are reliable indicators of the fungicide's toxic effects on soil quality.

  14. Effect of dose rate and mixtures of fungicides on selection for QoI resistance in populations of Plasmopara viticola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genet, Jean-Luc; Jaworska, Grazyna; Deparis, Francine

    2006-02-01

    Resistance to QoI fungicides (strobilurins, famoxadone and fenamidone) in populations of Plasmopara viticola (Berk & Curt) Berlese & de Toni developed soon after their introduction in France and Italy. Current resistance management strategies include limitation of the number of applications, use of mixtures and alternation of fungicides with different modes of action. The selection pressure resulting from QoI fungicides applied alone or in mixtures with non-QoI fungicides was investigated in whole plant experiments under controlled conditions. QoI-resistant populations of P. viticola gradually reverted to full sensitivity following consecutive transfers to untreated plants, suggesting that resistant phenotypes were less competitive than sensitive ones. When cycled on QoI-treated plants, reduction in sensitivity was greater for the QoI fungicide which had greater intrinsic activity on P. viticola. Sensitivity decreased at each subsequent cycle, resulting in almost full resistance after four generations. Mixture experiments indicated that selection pressure was affected most by the dose of the QoI fungicide and the nature of the partner fungicide. Folpet delayed selection pressure most effectively when it was associated with famoxadone or azoxystrobin. Mancozeb was least effective at reducing the rate of selection compared with the QoI alone, and fosetyl-aluminium was intermediate. Higher rates of selection were recorded when the dose of the QoI fungicide, solo or in a mixture, was increased from 1 to 4 microg ml(-1). Increasing the dose of the non-QoI partner fungicide in the mixture from 10 to 30 microg ml(-1) resulted in reduced selection pressure. These results suggest that the choice of the fungicide partner and its dosage in the mixture can significantly affect the success of QoI resistance management strategies under practical conditions.

  15. 21 CFR 868.2380 - Nitric oxide analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitric oxide analyzer. 868.2380 Section 868.2380...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2380 Nitric oxide analyzer. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitric oxide...

  16. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breath nitric oxide test system. 862.3080 Section... Systems § 862.3080 Breath nitric oxide test system. (a) Identification. A breath nitric oxide test system is a device intended to measure fractional nitric oxide in human breath. Measurement of changes...

  17. Effects of current-use fungicides and their mixtures on the feeding and survival of the key shredder Gammarus fossarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrod, J P; Baudy, P; Schulz, R; Bundschuh, M

    2014-05-01

    Fungicides are frequently applied in agriculture and are subsequently detected in surface waters in total concentrations of up to several tens of micrograms per liter. These concentrations imply potential effects on aquatic communities and fundamental ecosystem functions such as leaf litter breakdown. In this context, the present study investigates sublethal and lethal effects of organic (azoxystrobin, carbendazim, cyprodinil, quinoxyfen, and tebuconazole) and inorganic (three copper (Cu)-based substances and sulfur) current-use fungicides and their mixtures on the key leaf-shredding invertebrate Gammarus fossarum. The feeding activity of fungicide-exposed gammarids was quantified as sublethal endpoint using a static (organic fungicides; 7 d test duration) or a semi-static (inorganic fungicides; 6 d test duration with a water exchange after 3 d) approach (n=30). EC50-values of organic fungicides were generally observed at concentrations resulting in less than 20% mortality, with the exception of carbendazim. With regard to feeding, quinoxyfen was the most toxic organic fungicide, followed by cyprodinil, carbendazim, azoxystrobin, and tebuconazole. Although all tested organic fungicides have dissimilar (intended) modes of action, a mixture experiment revealed a synergistic effect on gammarids' feeding at high concentrations when using "independent action" as the reference model (∼35% deviation between predicted and observed effect). This may be explained by the presence of a synergizing azole fungicide (i.e. tebuconazole) in this mixture. Furthermore, lethal concentrations of all Cu-based fungicides assessed in this study were comparable amongst one another. However, they differed markedly in their effective concentrations when using feeding activity as the endpoint, with Cu-sulfate being most toxic, followed by Cu-hydroxide and Cu-octanoate. In contrast, sulfur neither affected survival nor the feeding activity of gammarids (up to ∼5 mg/L) but reduced Cu

  18. Fungicidal effect of 15 disinfectants against 24 fungal contaminants commonly found in bread and cheese manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard-Nielsen, Kirsten; Nielsen, Per Væggemose

    1996-01-01

    Resistance of 19 mold- and 6 yeast- species against 15 commercial disinfectants was investigated by a suspension-method in which the fungicidal effect and germination time were determined at 20 °C. Disinfectants containing 0.5 % dodecyldiethylentriaminacetic acid, 10 g/l chloramine-T, 2...

  19. Predictive value of cell assays for developmental toxicity and embryotoxicity of conazole fungicides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karin Dreisig; Taxvig, Camilla; Kjærstad, Mia Birkhøj

    2013-01-01

    This paper evaluates in vivo predictability of a battery of in vitro tests covering developmental toxicity and embryotoxicity of five widely used conazole fungicides. The conazoles were investigated in the embryonic stem cell test, and data were compared to in vivo embryotoxicity data. The same...

  20. Understanding the molecular basis of the resistance of Phytophthora infestans to fungicides by functional genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development of resistance to fungicides is a major concern in managing potato late blight disease caused by Phytophthora infestans. The problem is P. infestans is capable of sexual recombination contributing to increased strain variability and high adaptability that hastens the development of resis...

  1. Production of biocontrol traits by banana field fluorescent Pseudomonads and comparison with chemical fungicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, S S; Patel, P R; Patel, S S; Nikam, S D; Rane, T U; Sayyed, R Z

    2014-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from banana field rhizosphere produced different antifungal metabolites like bactriocin, hydrogen cyanide and siderophore. Bacteriocinogenic, siderophoregenic, and HCN rich broth of isolate inhibited the growth of phytopathogen like Aspergilus niger, Aspergilus flavus, Fusarium oxysporum and Alternaria alternata. The isolate exhibited more antifungal activity and comparatively low MIC vis-a-vis commonly used copper based systemic chemical fungicide;bil cop.

  2. Assessing effects of the fungicide tebuconazole to heterotrophic microbes in aquatic microcosms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dimitrov, M.R.; Kosol, Sujitra; Smidt, H.; Brink, van den P.J.; Wijngaarden, van R.P.A.; Brock, T.C.M.; Maltby, L.

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic ecological risk assessment of fungicides in Europe under Regulation 1107/2009/EC does not currently assess risk to non-target bacteria and fungi. Rather, regulatory acceptable concentrations based on ecotoxicological data obtained from studies with fish, invertebrates and primary producers

  3. Studies on the response of soil microflora to the application of the fungicide fenhexamid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Azhari, Najoi

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the impact of the fungicide fenhexamid (FEX) on the genetic structure of soil bacterial communities using the Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis molecular technique. Using real-time PCR, we also tried to quantify the pcaH sequences which encode the dioxygena...

  4. Toxicity evaluation of new agricultural fungicides in primary cultured cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regueiro, Jorge; Olguín, Nair; Simal-Gándara, Jesús; Suñol, Cristina

    2015-07-01

    Fungicides are crucial for food protection as well as for the production of crops of suitable quality and quantity to provide a viable economic return. Like other pesticides, fungicides are widely sprayed on agricultural land, especially in wine-growing areas, from where they can move-off after application. Furthermore, residues of these agrochemicals can remain on crops after harvest and even after some food processing operations, being a major exposure pathway. Although a relatively low toxicity has been claimed for this kind of compounds, information about their neurotoxicity is still scarce. In the present study, nine fungicides recently approved for agricultural uses in the EU - ametoctradin, boscalid, cyazofamid, dimethomorph, fenhexamid, kresoxim-methyl, mepanipyrim, metrafenone and pyraclostrobin - have been evaluated for their toxicity in primary cultured mouse cortical neurons. Exposure to 0.1-100µM for 7 days in vitro resulted in a dose-dependent toxicity in the MTT cell viability assay. Strobilurin fungicides kresoxim-methyl (KR) and pyraclostrobin (PY) were the most neurotoxic compounds (lethal concentration 50 were in the low micromolar and nanomolar levels, respectively) causing a rapid raise in intracellular calcium [Ca(2+)]i and strong depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential. KR- and PY-induced cell death was reversed by the calcium channels blockers MK-801 and verapamil, suggesting that calcium entry through NMDA receptors and voltage-operated calcium channels are involved in KR- and PY-induced neurotoxicity. These results highlight the need for further evaluation of their neurotoxic effects in vivo.

  5. The implications of copper fungicide usage in vineyards for earthworm activity and resulting sustainable soil quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijsackers, H.J.P.; Beneke, P.; Maboeta, M.; Louw, J.P.E.; Reinecke, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the impact of copper-containing fungicides (copper oxychloride) on earthworms in South African vineyards, field inventories of earthworms in and between vine rows were carried out and compared to directly adjacent grassland. Also copper content, pH, organic matter content, and soil po

  6. Modeling losses of copper-based fungicide foliar sprays in wash-off under simulated rain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pérez-Rodríguez, P.; Paradelo Pérez, Marcos; Soto-Gómez, D.

    2015-01-01

    Wash-off experiments of three Cu-based fungicides were conducted with a single raindrop simulator with known drop size and fall height. Losses were quantified as total Cu (CuT), in solution (CuL), and particulate (CuP). Cu wash-off time course was modeled for two different drop sizes using a stoc...

  7. THE FUNGICIDE PROCHLORAZ: IN VITRO ANDROGEN ANTAGONISM, PARTURITION DELAYS, AND MALE REPRODUCTIVE MALFORMATIONS IN RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Fungicide Prochloraz: In vitro Androgen Antagonism, Parturition Delays, and Male Reproductive Malformations in Rats.Nigel C. Noriega, Joseph Ostby, Christy Lambright, Vickie S. Wilson, and L. Earl Gray Jr., noriega.nigel@epa.govUS EPAProchloraz (PZ) is an imid...

  8. Analysis of Fungicide Sensitivity and Genetic Diversity among Colletotrichum Species in Sweet Persimmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Geun-Hye; Cho, Hyun Ji; Kim, Hye Sun; Kwack, Yong-Bum; Kwak, Youn-Sig

    2015-06-01

    Anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (C. gloeosporioides; Teleomorph: Glomerella cingulata), is the most destructive disease that affects sweet persimmon production worldwide. However, the biology, ecology, and genetic variations of C. gloeosporioides remain largely unknown. Therefore, in this study, the development of fungicide resistance and genetic diversity among an anthracnose pathogen population with different geographical origins and the exposure of this population to different cultivation strategies were investigated. A total of 150 pathogen isolates were tested in fungicide sensitivity assays. Five of the tested fungicides suppressed mycelial pathogen growth effectively. However, there were significant differences in the sensitivities exhibited by the pathogen isolates examined. Interestingly, the isolates obtained from practical management orchards versus organic cultivation orchards showed no differences in sensitivity to the same fungicide. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses were performed to detect internal transcribed spacer regions and the β-tubulin and glutamine synthetase genes of the pathogens examined. Both the glutamine synthetase and β-tubulin genes contained a complex set of polymorphisms. Based on these results, the pathogens isolated from organic cultivation orchards were found to have more diversity than the isolates obtained from the practical management orchards.

  9. Interaction of basal foliage removal and late season fungicide applications in management of Hop powdery mildew

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experiments were conducted over three years to evaluate whether fungicide applications could be ceased after the most susceptible stages of cone development (late July) without unduly affecting crop yield and quality when disease pressure was moderated with varying levels of basal foliage removal. I...

  10. Evaluating fungicide sensitivity of regional Blumeria graminis f.sp. tritici populations in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumeria graminis f.sp. tritici (Bgt), cause of wheat powdery mildew, has a high likelihood of developing fungicide resistance because of the large quantity of spores produced along with the mixed mode of reproduction. Additionally, once reduced sensitivity appears in a population it can influence n...

  11. The fungicidal properties of the carbon materials obtained from chitin and chitosan promoted by copper salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilnicka, Anna, E-mail: annakucinska@o2.pl; Walczyk, Mariusz; Lukaszewicz, Jerzy P.

    2015-07-01

    Renewable raw materials chitin and chitosan (N-deacetylated derivative of chitin) were subjected to action of different copper modifiers that were carbonized in the atmosphere of the N{sub 2} inert gas. As a result of the novel manufacturing procedure, a series of carbon materials was obtained with developed surface area and containing copper derivatives of differentiated form, size, and dispersion. The copper modifier and manufacturing procedure (concentration, carbonization temperature) influence the physical–chemical and fungicide properties of the carbons. The received carbons were chemically characterized using several methods like low-temperature adsorption of nitrogen, X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, cyclic voltammetry, elemental analysis, and bioassay. Besides chemical testing, some biological tests were performed and let to select carbons with the highest fungicidal activity. Such carbons were characteristic of the specific form of copper derivatives occurring in them, i.e., nanocrystallites of Cu{sup 0} and/or Cu{sub 2}O of high dispersion on the surface of carbon. The carbons may find an application as effective contact fungistatic agents in cosmetology, medicine, food industry, etc. - Highlights: • The novel manufacturing procedure yields new functional carbon materials. • Two biopolymers chitin and chitosan can undergo copper(II) ion modification. • The Cu-modified carbon materials exhibit high fungicidal activity. • The fungicidal activity results from the presence of Cu{sup 0} and Cu{sub 2}O nano-crystallites.

  12. Adsorption behaviors of fungicide-derived copper onto various size fractions of aggregates from orchard soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quan-Ying; Hu, Bo; Yu, Hong-Wen

    2016-12-01

    Although the gradual accumulations of Cu in orchard soils due to the application of Cu-based fungicides have been widely reported, limited information is available about the retention characteristics of fungicide-derived Cu in soil, especially in various size soil aggregates. This study described the adsorption characteristics of Cu from commonly used fungicide, Bordeaux mixture (CuSO4 + Ca(OH)2), onto various aggregate fractions (2000-1000, 1000-500, 500-250, 250-106, and orchard soil. The Cu(NO3)2 was selected as a comparison. Two different types of adsorption experiments were conducted as follows: variable pH and variable Cu concentration experiments. The adsorption processes of Bordeaux mixture and Cu(NO3)2 onto the studied soil samples followed well with the Freundlich isotherm, and the adsorption isotherms were the S shaped. The adsorption amounts of Cu from different Cu compounds differed, and Bordeaux mixture can result in more Cu retention in soil than Cu(NO3)2. The adsorption ability of different size soil aggregates varied, and it was mainly governed by soil properties. The findings of this study suggested that both the chemical compositions of Cu compounds and the soil physical structure should be taken into account when performing soil Cu retention experiments with fungicide-derived Cu.

  13. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma risk and insecticide, fungicide and fumigant use in the Agricultural Health Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farming and pesticide use have previously been linked to non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and multiple myeloma (MM). We evaluated agricultural use of specific insecticides, fungicides, and fumigants and risk of NHL and NHL-subtypes (including CLL an...

  14. Determination of fungicide resistance in Botrytis cinerea from strawberry in the Central Coast Region of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was conducted in 2013 to investigate the occurrence of fungicide resistance in Botrytis cinerea populations in California’s northern strawberry growing region; specifically in Watsonville and Salinas. In mid-May, 59 samples consisting of a single diseased fruit or plant part with gray mold s...

  15. In vitro metabolism of the anti-androgenic fungicide vinclozolin by rat liver microsomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinclozolin (V) is a fungicide used in agricultural settings. V administered to rats is hydrolyzed to 2-[[(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-carbamoyl]oxy]-2-methyl-3-butenoic acid (Ml) and 3',5'-dichloro-2-hydroxy-2-methylbut-3-enanilide (M2). V, Ml and M2 have antiandrogenic properties by in...

  16. Control of speck rot in apple fruit caused by Phacidiopycnis washingtonensis with pre- and postharvest fungicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck rot caused by Phacidiopycnis washingtonensis is a recently reported postharvest fruit rot disease of apple. Infection of apple fruit by the fungus occurs in the orchard, but symptoms develop during storage. In this study, selected pre- and postharvest fungicides were evaluated for control of s...

  17. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma risk and insecticide, fungicide and fumigant use in the Agricultural Health Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farming and pesticide use have previously been linked to non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and multiple myeloma (MM). We evaluated agricultural use of specific insecticides, fungicides, and fumigants and risk of NHL and NHL-subtypes (including CLL an...

  18. Activation of stress signalling pathways enhances tolerance of fungi to chemical fungicides and antifungal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Brigitte M E; Anderson, Marilyn A; Traven, Ana; van der Weerden, Nicole L; Bleackley, Mark R

    2014-07-01

    Fungal disease is an increasing problem in both agriculture and human health. Treatment of human fungal disease involves the use of chemical fungicides, which generally target the integrity of the fungal plasma membrane or cell wall. Chemical fungicides used for the treatment of plant disease, have more diverse mechanisms of action including inhibition of sterol biosynthesis, microtubule assembly and the mitochondrial respiratory chain. However, these treatments have limitations, including toxicity and the emergence of resistance. This has led to increased interest in the use of antimicrobial peptides for the treatment of fungal disease in both plants and humans. Antimicrobial peptides are a diverse group of molecules with differing mechanisms of action, many of which remain poorly understood. Furthermore, it is becoming increasingly apparent that stress response pathways are involved in the tolerance of fungi to both chemical fungicides and antimicrobial peptides. These signalling pathways such as the cell wall integrity and high-osmolarity glycerol pathway are triggered by stimuli, such as cell wall instability, changes in osmolarity and production of reactive oxygen species. Here we review stress signalling induced by treatment of fungi with chemical fungicides and antifungal peptides. Study of these pathways gives insight into how these molecules exert their antifungal effect and also into the mechanisms used by fungi to tolerate sub-lethal treatment by these molecules. Inactivation of stress response pathways represents a potential method of increasing the efficacy of antifungal molecules.

  19. TOXICITY PROFILES IN RATS TREATED WITH TUMORIGENIC AND NONTUMORIGENIC TRIAZOLE CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES: PROPICONAZOLE, TRIADIMEFON, AND MYCLOBUTANIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conazoles are a class of azole based fungicides used in agriculture and as pharmaceutical products. They have a common mode of antifungal action through inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis. Some members of this class have been shown to be hepatotoxic and will induce mouse hepa...

  20. Conazole fungicides inhibit Leydig cell testosterone secretion and androgen receptor activation in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, Maarke J.E.; Temming, A. Roberto; Piersma, Aldert H.; van den Berg, Martin; van Duursen, Majorie B.M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Conazole fungicides are widely used in agriculture despite their suspected endocrine disrupting properties. In this study, the potential (anti-)androgenic effects of ten conazoles were assessed and mutually compared with existing data. Effects of cyproconazole (CYPRO), fluconazole (FLUC), f

  1. EFFECTS OF CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES ON DEVELOPMENT AND PARTURITION IN THE RAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conazoles are fungicides used extensively in agriculture and as pharmaceuticals. As part of an effort to evaluate the changes in gene expression corresponding to reproductive toxicity, we examined the effects of three conazoles on pregnancy and neonates. Wistar Han rats were expo...

  2. Direct analysis of dithiocarbamate fungicides in fruit by ambient mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cajka, T.; Riddelova, K.; Zomer, P.; Mol, J.G.J.; Hajslova, J.

    2011-01-01

    Dithiocarbamates (DTCs) are fungicides that require a specific single-residue method for detection and verification of compliance with maximum residue limits (MRLs) as established for fruit and vegetables in the EU. In this study, the use of ambient mass spectrometry was investigated for specific de

  3. Fate and distribution of pyrimethanil, metalaxyl, dichlofluanid and penconazol fungicides from treated grapes intended for winemaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero-Fernández, L; Sanz-Asensio, J; López-Alonso, M; Martínez-Soria, M T

    2009-02-01

    Tempranillo grapes were immersed in solutions of pyrimethanil, metalaxyl, dichlofluanid and penconazol fungicides at different concentrations for several different times. Determinations of the fungicide residues was carried out by GC-NPD, with an additional confirmation by GC-MS. The percentage absorption was determined as well as the distribution between surface, skin and pulp of the grapes. The percentage absorption ranged from 7.2 to 85.5%. These values depended on the time the grapes were in contact with the fungicide solutions. Residues were mainly found in skins, with percentages in skins ranging from 66.3 to 90.3% of total residues. In pulp, these values ranged from 3.5 to 31.0%. The overall methodology was applied to the determination of pyrimethanil in Tempranillo grapes treated with the recommended doses, respecting the safety period. Pyrimethanil residues found in treated grapes were higher in the skin. In grapes collected within the safety period (21 days), the levels found for fungicide residues were below maximum residues levels.

  4. The effects of humic substances on the activity of metalaxyl+mancozeb, fungicide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, C.; Li, S.; Li, B.; Zhang, Q. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan (China). State Key Lab of Coal Conversion

    1999-07-01

    The effects of three dissolved humic substances on the activity of the fungicide metalaxy+mancozeb against the phytophthora were studied. The zone of inhibition technique was used. A synergistic effect was observed and the mechanism of the interaction is discussed. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Significance of soil properties in the adsorption and mobility of the fungicide metalaxyl in vineyard soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrades, M S; Sánchez-Martín, M J; Sánchez-Camazano, M

    2001-05-01

    Adsorption and mobility of the fungicide metalaxyl were studied in 16 vineyard soils from the La Rioja region (Spain), with organic matter (OM) contents in the 0.31--1.37% range, and in 7 natural soils with OM contents in the 3.30--8.24% range. Adsorption isotherms were obtained using the batch equilibrium technique, and mobility was studied by soil thin-layer chromatography (soil-TLC). In all cases, the adsorption isotherms fit the Freundlich equation. The values of the K(f) constants were low in the vineyard soils (0.01--0.64) and increased in the natural soils (1.05--2.83). The n(f) values were in general lower than unity. K(f) constants were significantly correlated (p metalaxyl with soil-TLC indicated that in vineyard soils the fungicide has the potential for being highly mobile in 19% of the soils and mobile in 81% of them. In natural soils, the fungicide has the potential for being moderately mobile or mobile in 86 and 14% of the soils, respectively. This type of behavior of metalaxyl indicates that in vineyards soils of the La Rioja region (Spain) with low OM contents, where application of the compound is continuous, a leaching of the fungicide from the soil to groundwaters could potentially occur. These results should be borne in mind when metalaxyl is to be used in the soils of this region.

  6. Effect of fungicide Euparen Multi (Tolylfluanid) on the induction of chromosomal aberations in cultivated bovine lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosová, Martina; Holečková, Beáta; Siviková, Katarína; Dianovský, J

    2010-12-01

    The effect of the fungicide Euparen Multi (containing 50% tolylfluanid) was investigated on the induction of chromosomal aberrations (CA) in cultured bovine peripheral lymphocytes. Cultures from two healthy donors were treated with tolylfluanid-based fungicide at concentrations ranging from 1.7 to 17.5 μg/ml for the last 24 and 48 hours of cultivation. Conventional cytogenetic method (CA assay) with Giemsa staining as well as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole bovine chromosomes 1 and 5 painting probes were used in the experiment. In the CA assay, no clastogenic effect of the fungicide was found after Euparen Multi treatment for 24 hours. On the contrary, significant elevation in polyploidy induction was observed with dose-dependence in one of the donors. Using prolonged time of exposure to the fungicide (the last 48 h of the cultivation), a slight clastogenic effect was detected at the doses of 8.75 and 17.5 μg/ml (P lymphocytes by two-colour FISH (48 h exposure) using bovine chromosome painting probes revealed the presence of nonreciprocal translocations at two examined concentrations (3.5 μg/ml and 8.75 μg/ml).

  7. Comparative in vitro-in vivo percutaneous penetration of the fungicide ortho-phenylphenol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cnubben, N.H.P.; Elliott, G.R.; Hakkert, B.C.; Meuling, W.J.A.; Sandt, J.J.M. van de

    2002-01-01

    The validity of in vitro and in vivo methods for the prediction of percutaneous penetration in humans was assessed using the fungicide ortho-phenylphenol (OPP) (log Po/w 3.28, MW 170.8, solubility in water 0.7 g/L). In vivo studies were performed in rats and human volunteers, applying the test compo

  8. Effects of the fungicide metiram in outdoor freshwater microcosms: responses of invertebrates, primany producers and microbes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronghua, Lin; Buijse-Bogdan, L.L.; Rocha Dimitrov, M.; Dohmen, P.; Kosol, Sujitra; Maltby, L.; Roessink, I.; Sinkeldam, J.A.; Smidt, H.; Wijngaarden, van R.P.A.; Brock, T.C.M.

    2012-01-01

    The ecological impact of the dithiocarbamate fungicide metiram was studied in outdoor freshwater microcosms, consisting of 14 enclosures placed in an experimental ditch. The microcosms were treated three times (interval 7 days) with the formulated product BAS 222 28F (Polyram®). Intended metiram con

  9. Chitosan and fungicides on postharvest control of Guignardia citricarpa and on quality of 'Pêra Rio' oranges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Canale Rappussi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Citrus fruits are affected by the black spot disease caused by the fungus Guignardia citricarpa. Chitosan can be used as covering for fruits and may delay the ripening process and inhibit the growth of some fungi. Thus, the control of citrus black spot using chitosan and the fungicides thiabendazole and imazalil was assessed in addition to the physicochemical quality of 'Pêra Rio' oranges. The oranges were immersed into chitosan, thiabendazole or imazalil, and in chitosan mixed with both fungicides. The fruits were then stored at 25 °C, 80% RH, for 7 days and, after this storage period, subjected to physicochemical analyses. Chitosan in association with the fungicides reduced black spot in 'Pêra Rio' oranges and delayed the change in the orange skin colour from green to yellow during the postharvest storage. Total soluble solids, titratable acidity, pH, ascorbic acid content and ratio were not influenced by the treatments. Thus, chitosan applied with the fungicides thiabendazole and imazalil showed potential to control the development of black spot lesions on 'Pêra Rio' oranges during the postharvest period.

  10. Efficacy of Fungicides for Control of Rosette and Post-harvest Fruit Diseases of Blackberries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosette disease (caused by the fungus Cercosporella rubi) is often severe on erect blackberries grown in the southeastern U.S. and, if not controlled, may limit fruit production. A series of trials were conducted in south Mississippi to determine fungicide efficacy and optimum timing of applications...

  11. METABOLOMIC EVALUATION OF RAT LIVER AND TESTIS TO CHARACTERIZE THE TOXICITY OF TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of two triazole fungicides, myclobutanil and triadimefon, on endogenous rat metabolite profiles in blood serum, liver, and testis was assessed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed daily by gavage for...

  12. Ranking of fungicides according to risk assessments for health and environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lise Nistrup; Ørum, Jens Erik

    2014-01-01

    Denmark has introduced a new indicator for ranking the potential impact of pesticides on health and environment. The new Pesticide Load (PL) makes it possible for farmers to choose the least harmful fungicides and substitute between products which have an equally good efficacy profile. In practice...

  13. Field evaluation of fungicides for control of Ascochyta blight of chickpea, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascochyta blight of chickpea caused by the fungal pathogen Ascochyta rabiei is one of the most important foliar diseases of chickpea in the United State and elsewhere. Management of the disease is through using moderately resistant cultivars and application of fungicides. In order to evaluate foli...

  14. Effect of nitrogen fertilization and fungicides on Botryosphaeria stem blight lesion development on detached blueberry stems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botryosphaeria stem blight is a destructive disease of blueberries. Field observations indicate stem blight is more severe on vigorous plants than on slower growing plants. Two studies compared the effect of two types of fertilizers applied at four rates and nine fungicides on lesion development fo...

  15. Oxidative damages in isolated rat hepatocytes treated with the organochlorine fungicides captan, dichlofluanid and chlorothalonil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Toshihide; Nojiri, Hisao; Isono, Hideo; Ochi, Takafumi

    2004-11-15

    The cytotoxicity and lipid peroxidative potency of the organochlorine fungicides captan (N-(trichloromethylthio)-4-cyclohexene-1,2-dicarboximide), dichlofluanid (N-dichlorofluoromethylthio-N'N'-dimethyl-N-phenylsulfamide) and chlorothalonil (2,4,5,6-tetrachloro-isophthalonitrile) were studied in isolated rat hepatocytes. These fungicides induced cytotoxicity and lipid peroxidation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Considerable cytotoxicity and lipid peroxidation occurred after cells were treated with 25 microM and more of fungicide. The phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxide (PCOOH) content increased more than 300 times by captan (250-1000 microM), 400 times by dichlofluanid (250-1000 microM) and 20 times by chlorothalonil (25-1000 microM) after 1h of incubation, as compared with untreated control. Significant cytotoxicity occurred after 20 min (captan), 30 min (dichlofluanid) and 60 min (chlorothalonil) of incubation and lipid peroxidation was induced prior to cytotoxicity. The antioxidant alpha-tocopherol and cytochrome P450 inhibitor SKF-525A effectively prevented cytotoxicity and lipid peroxidation. Our results suggest that metabolites of these fungicides produced by the microsomal cytochrome P450 system, induced membrane phospholipid peroxidation that caused cytotoxicity.

  16. Exposure to fungicides in fruit growing: Re-entry time as a predictor for dermal exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tielemans, E.; Louwerse, E.; Cock, J. de; Brouwer, D.; Zielhuis, G.; Heederik, D.

    1999-01-01

    As part of a European Concerted Action on Male Reproduction Capability an exposure assessment survey was conducted among seasonal workers in the fruit growing sector in the Netherlands. Dermal exposure to the fungicides captan and tolylfluanid was measured using cotton gloves (12 persons) and skin p

  17. Fungicides efficiency on wheat diseases control in response to the application with different spray nozzles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Rafael Garcés Fiallos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the efficiency of fungicides to leaf control diseases of wheat, when applied to different models of spray nozzles. The experiment was conducted in a randomized block design with four replicates of factorial (4 x 3+1. Data were subjected to analysis of variance and means compared by Tukey test at 5% probability. The fungicides used were: Opera® (pyraclostrobin+epoxiconazole 0.75 L.ha-1 , Opera® 0.75 L.ha-1 +Folicur® (tebuconazole 0.3 L.ha-1 , Priori Xtra® (azoxystrobin+cyproconazole 0.3 L.ha-1 , Priori Xtra® 0.3 L.ha-1 +Tilt® (propiconazole 0.3 L.ha-1 . These fungicides were applied with three models of spray nozzles jet planes: XR 11 001 (fine drop, AIRMIX 11,001 (average drop and AVI 11,001 (coarse drop. We evaluated the incidence and severity (damage per plant leaf of yellow spot (Drechslera tritici-repentis, spot blotch (Bipolaris sorokiniana, leaf rust (Puccinia triticina and grain yield (kg.ha-1 culture. The results show that the application of fungicides for control of leaf diseases in wheat resulted in increases in grain yield, and yield higher values were observed with the application of Opera®, using the XR 11001.

  18. Fungicide spray coverage from ground-based sprayers in mature pecan trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air-blast sprayers are widely used to control pecan scab (Fusicladium effusum) on pecan trees. Good spray coverage is critical to ensure disease control and to minimize risk of fungicide resistance. Spray coverage from an air-blast sprayer, typical of the sprayer used by commercial producers, was me...

  19. Analysis of Fungicide Sensitivity and Genetic Diversity among Colletotrichum Species in Sweet Persimmon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geun-Hye Gang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (C. gloeosporioides; Teleomorph: Glomerella cingulata, is the most destructive disease that affects sweet persimmon production worldwide. However, the biology, ecology, and genetic variations of C. gloeosporioides remain largely unknown. Therefore, in this study, the development of fungicide resistance and genetic diversity among an anthracnose pathogen population with different geographical origins and the exposure of this population to different cultivation strategies were investigated. A total of 150 pathogen isolates were tested in fungicide sensitivity assays. Five of the tested fungicides suppressed mycelial pathogen growth effectively. However, there were significant differences in the sensitivities exhibited by the pathogen isolates examined. Interestingly, the isolates obtained from practical management orchards versus organic cultivation orchards showed no differences in sensitivity to the same fungicide. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP analyses were performed to detect internal transcribed spacer regions and the β-tubulin and glutamine synthetase genes of the pathogens examined. Both the glutamine synthetase and β-tubulin genes contained a complex set of polymorphisms. Based on these results, the pathogens isolated from organic cultivation orchards were found to have more diversity than the isolates obtained from the practical management orchards.

  20. Fungicide resistance status in French populations of the wheat eyespot fungi Oculimacula acuformis and Oculimacula yallundae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, Pierre; Gredt, Michel; Remuson, Florent; Micoud, Annie; Walker, Anne-Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Eyespot, caused by Oculimacula acuformis and Oculimacula yallundae, is the major foot disease of winter wheat in several European countries, including France. It can be controlled by chemical treatment between tillering and the second node stage. The fungicides used include antimicrotubule toxicants (benzimidazoles), inhibitors of sterol 14α-demethylation (DMIs) or of succinate dehydrogenase (SDHIs), the anilinopyrimidines cyprodinil and the benzophenone metrafenone. Since the early 1980s, a long-term survey has been set up in France to monitor changes in the sensitivity of eyespot populations to fungicides. Resistance to benzimidazoles has become generalised since the early 1990s, in spite of the withdrawal of this class of fungicides. In the DMI group, resistance to triazoles is generalised, whereas no resistance to the triazolinethione prothioconazole has yet developed. Resistance to the imidazole prochloraz evolved successively in O. acuformis and O. yallundae and is now well established. Specific resistance to cyprodinil has also been detected, but its frequency has generally remained low. Finally, since the early 2000s, a few strains of O. yallundae displaying multidrug resistance (MDR) have been detected. These strains display low levels of resistance to prothioconazole and SDHIs, such as boscalid. Knowledge of the spatiotemporal distribution in France of O. acuformis and O. yallundae field strains resistant to fungicides allows resistance management strategies for eyespot fungi in winter wheat to be proposed.

  1. A reassessment of the risk of rust fungi developing resistance to fungicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Richard P

    2014-11-01

    Rust fungi are major pathogens of many annual and perennial crops. Crop protection is largely based on genetic and chemical control. Fungicide resistance is a significant issue that has affected many crop pathogens. Some pathogens have rapidly developed resistance and hence are regarded as high-risk species. Rust fungi have been classified as being low risk, in spite of sharing many relevant features with high-risk pathogens. An examination of the evidence suggests that rust fungi may be wrongly classified as low risk. Of the nine classes of fungicide to which resistance has developed, six are inactive against rusts. The three remaining classes are quinone outside inhibitors (QoIs), demethylation inhibitors (DMIs) and succinate dehydrogenase inhibitors (SDHIs). QoIs have been protected by a recently discovered intron that renders resistant mutants unviable. Low levels of resistance have developed to DMIs, but with limited field significance. Older SDHI fungicides were inactive against rusts. Some of the SDHIs introduced since 2003 are active against rusts, so it may be that insufficient time has elapsed for resistance to develop, especially as SDHIs are generally sold in mixtures with other actives. It would therefore seem prudent to increase the level of vigilance for possible cases of resistance to established and new fungicides in rusts.

  2. The effect of fungicidal treatment on selected quality parameters of barley and malt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havlová, Pavla; Lancová, Katerina; Vánová, Marie; Havel, Josef; Hajslová, Jana

    2006-02-22

    Protection of barley grain against contamination by fungi such as Fusarium spp., particularly by those producing mycotoxins, secondary metabolites with adverse health effects, is of principal importance. Fungicides applied immediately after full heading of spring barley is one method of direct protection. In this work, extensive two-year field experiments combined with a detailed chemical laboratory analysis (barley and malt) were performed with the aim to study the effect of previous crops, different fungicides, and other conditions on the selected barley and malt quality parameters (content of beta-glucans, pentosans, oxalic acid, deoxynivalenol, and gushing), while the main task was to follow the effect of the fungicide (used as a treatment to protect against pathogens, mostly Fusarium) on changes of the chemical composition in barley and malt, and gushing. It was found that the relationship between the studied factors and the parameters usually applied to the evaluation of barley and malt quality is quite complex and not straightforward. The responses show typical features of a multifactorial influence with both positive and negative correlations resulting in a decrease or increase in grain quality (concentrations of beta-glucans, pentosans, deoxynivalenol, and other studied parameters). The role of previous crops was also found to be important. The fungicides should be applied at the time of heading but not at the very beginning of this period.

  3. Controlled release fungicide, soil amendments and biofumigation effects on cotton root rot suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cotton root rot pathogen (Phymatotrichopsis ominora) causes major losses in cotton produced in the Southwest. Granular controlled release formulations (CRF) of the fungicide, Propiconazole, developed to be soil applied at planting were studied at 1.0 and 3.0 lb a.i./ac. applications and with tw...

  4. Evaluation of natural products as potential agrochemical agents with insecticide, fungicide and herbicide activities

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dumontet, V

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The International Congress on Natural Products Research, New York City, 28 July - 1 August 2012 Evaluation of natural products as potential agrochemical agents with insecticide, fungicide and herbicide activities V Dumontet 1, M Litaudon 1, F Olivon 1, C...

  5. Control of clavicipitaceous anamorphic endophytes with fungicides, aerated steam and supercritical fluid CO2-seed extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Dan Wilson; Donald G. Lester; Brian K. Luckenbill

    2008-01-01

    The effects of soil drenches with systemic fungicides on viability of clavicipitaceous anamorphic endophytes, non-choke inducing endosymbiotic fungi of the genus Neotyphodium that systemically infect grasses, were tested in endophyte-infected seedlings of Hordeum brevisubulatum subsp. violaceum, Lolium perenne...

  6. Non-target effects of fungicides on nectar-inhabiting fungi of almond flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Robert N; Vannette, Rachel L; Brittain, Claire; Williams, Neal M; Fukami, Tadashi

    2017-04-01

    Nectar mediates interactions between plants and pollinators in natural and agricultural systems. Specialized microorganisms are common nectar inhabitants, and potentially important mediators of plant-pollinator interactions. However, their diversity and role in mediating pollination services in agricultural systems are poorly characterized. Moreover, agrochemicals are commonly applied to minimize crop damage, but may present ecological consequences for non-target organisms. Assessment of ecological risk has tended to focus on beneficial macroorganisms such as pollinators, with less attention paid to microorganisms. Here, using culture-independent methods, we assess the impact of two widely-used fungicides on nectar microbial community structure in the mass-flowering crop almond (Prunus dulcis). We predicted that fungicide application would reduce fungal richness and diversity, whereas competing bacterial richness would increase, benefitting from negative effects on fungi. We found that fungicides reduced fungal richness and diversity in exposed flowers, but did not significantly affect bacterial richness, diversity, or community composition. The relative abundance of Metschnikowia OTUs, nectar specialists that can impact pollination, was reduced by both fungicides. Given growing recognition of the importance of nectar microorganisms as mediators of plant-pollinator mutualisms, future research should consider the impact of management practices on plant-associated microorganisms and consequences for pollination services in agricultural landscapes. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Inhibition of fungal plant pathogens by synergistic action of chito-oligosaccharides and commercially available fungicides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Hafizur Rahman

    Full Text Available Chitosan is a linear heteropolymer consisting of β 1,4-linked N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc and D-glucosamine (GlcN. We have compared the antifungal activity of chitosan with DPn (average degree of polymerization 206 and FA (fraction of acetylation 0.15 and of enzymatically produced chito-oligosaccharides (CHOS of different DPn alone and in combination with commercially available synthetic fungicides, against Botrytis cinerea, the causative agent of gray mold in numerous fruit and vegetable crops. CHOS with DPn in the range of 15-40 had the greatest anti-fungal activity. The combination of CHOS and low dosages of synthetic fungicides showed synergistic effects on antifungal activity in both in vitro and in vivo assays. Our study shows that CHOS enhance the activity of commercially available fungicides. Thus, addition of CHOS, available as a nontoxic byproduct of the shellfish industry, may reduce the amounts of fungicides that are needed to control plant diseases.

  8. Effect of nitrogen fertilization and fungicides on Botryosphaeria stem blight lesion development on detached stems

    Science.gov (United States)

    : Botryosphaeria stem blight is a destructive disease of blueberries that has not been well managed with fungicides. Field observations showed that stem blight is more severe on vigorously growing plants than on slower growing plants. Detached stem assays were used to compare the effect of fertil...

  9. Irrigation and fungicide application on disease occurrence and yield of early and late sown sunflower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan C. Maldaner

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of irrigation and fungicide application on the occurrence of diseases and cypsela yield of two genotypes of sunflower. The experiments were carried out in Santa Maria-RS, during the regular season in 2007 and the late season, in 2008. Plants were sown on 04/09/2007 and 21/01/2008, in a completely randomized design, with four replicates. A 2 x 6 factorial scheme was used, with the sunflower genotypes Aguará 03 and Hélio 358 and six fungicide application schemes, which were determined by the FAST forecasting system, as follows: FAST 16, FAST 22 and FAST 28, without irrigation, FAST 16 IRR under irrigated condition, in addition to irrigated control (CONTROL IRR and control (CONTROL. Disease progress was analyzed based on weekly observations of the severity of the symptoms. It was verified that irrigation increases sunflower cypsela yield in the regular season, provided that weather conditions are not favorable for the occurrence of alternaria and septoria leaf blights or that fungicides are applied. In the late season, under irrigated condition, fungicide application is necessary to control alternaria and septoria leaf blights.

  10. Electrochemical Behavior of Aluminum in Nitric Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Hui; ZHU; Li-yang; LIN; Ru-shan; TAN; Hong-bin; HE; Hui

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum is one of cladding materials for nuclear fuel,it is important to investigate the electrolytic dissolution of aluminum in nitric acid.The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy,polarization curve and cyclic voltammetry cure of anodic aluminum electrode in nitric acid under various conditions were collected(Fig.1).It turns out,under steady state,the thickness of the passivated film of aluminum

  11. Alternative Fungicide Spraying for the Control of Powdery Mildew Caused by Sphaerotheca fusca on Greenhouse Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo-Jung Kang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Alternative spraying was developed using fungicides and potassium phosphonate to control watermelon powdery mildew (WPM caused by Sphaerotheca fusca under greenhouse condition. In 2010 trial, a total of 9 combinations of 6 fungicides which are legally registered in Korea and currently used on watermelon farms were tested for the control efficacy against WPM. Though the combination of chlorothalonil (Chl-myclobutanil (My-fenarimol (Fen-hexaconazole (Hex was the most effective (82.6% in the first-year trial, it had the problem that My, Fen and Hex have the same mode of action. Therefore, in the second-year trial to improve the fungicide combination and to reduce fungicide application, fungicides and potassium phosphonate (P combinations were tested for WPM control using 500 ppm aqueous potassium phosphonate solution which is both eco-friendly and showing different mode of action from the fungicides tested. The P-My-Fen-Hex applied at 10-day intervals provided relatively high control (75.6%, whereas Chl-My-Fen-P provided 31.8% control. To improve the control, fungicides and P were applied at 7-day intervals in the third-year trial. Though Chl-My-Fen-Hex provided the highest control (89.6%, P-My-Fen-Hex also provided relatively high control (83.5% compared to 65.9 % control with Chl-My-Fen-P, which suggests that Chl-My-Fen-Hex could be replaced with P-My-Fen-Hex for WPM control.

  12. Colonies of Bumble Bees (Bombus impatiens Produce Fewer Workers, Less Bee Biomass, and Have Smaller Mother Queens Following Fungicide Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia M. Bernauer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bees provide vital pollination services to the majority of flowering plants in both natural and agricultural systems. Unfortunately, both native and managed bee populations are experiencing declines, threatening the persistence of these plants and crops. Agricultural chemicals are one possible culprit contributing to bee declines. Even fungicides, generally considered safe for bees, have been shown to disrupt honey bee development and impair bumble bee behavior. Little is known, however, how fungicides may affect bumble bee colony growth. We conducted a controlled cage study to determine the effects of fungicide exposure on colonies of a native bumble bee species (Bombus impatiens. Colonies of B. impatiens were exposed to flowers treated with field-relevant levels of the fungicide chlorothalonil over the course of one month. Colony success was assessed by the number and biomass of larvae, pupae, and adult bumble bees. Bumble bee colonies exposed to fungicide produced fewer workers, lower total bee biomass, and had lighter mother queens than control colonies. Our results suggest that fungicides negatively affect the colony success of a native bumble bee species and that the use of fungicides during bloom has the potential to severely impact the success of native bumble bee populations foraging in agroecosystems.

  13. Interactive Role of Fungicides and Plant Growth Regulator (Trinexapac on Seed Yield and Oil Quality of Winter Rapeseed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ijaz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the role of growth regulator trinexapac and fungicides on growth, yield, and quality of winter rapeseed (Brassica napus L.. The experiment was conducted simultaneously at different locations in Germany using two cultivars of rapeseed. Five different fungicides belonging to the triazole and strobilurin groups, as well as a growth regulator trinexapac, were tested in this study. A total of seven combinations of these fungicides and growth regulator trinexapac were applied at two growth stages of rapeseed. These two stages include green floral bud stage (BBCH 53 and the course of pod development stage (BBCH 65. The results showed that plant height and leaf area index were affected significantly by the application of fungicides. Treatments exhibited induced photosynthetic ability and delayed senescence, which improved the morphological characters and yield components of rape plants at both locations. Triazole, in combination with strobilurin, led to the highest seed yield over other treatments at both experimental locations. Significant effects of fungicides on unsaturated fatty acids of rapeseed oil were observed. Fungicides did not cause any apparent variation in the values of free fatty acids and peroxide of rapeseed oil. Results of our study demonstrate that judicious use of fungicides in rapeseed may help to achieve sustainable farming to obtain higher yield and better quality of rapeseed.

  14. Evaluation of some fungicides on mycorrhizal symbiosis between two Glomus species from commercial inocula and Allium porrum L. seedlings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Dorrego, A.; Mestre Pares, J.

    2010-07-01

    This paper reports the effect of twenty-five commonly used fungicides in agriculture on two arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) present in commercial products of ATENS, S.L.: Glomus intra radices (Schenck and Smith) and Glomus mosseae [(Nicol. and Gerd.) Gerdemann and Trappe], forming the symbiosis with leek plants. Systemic fungicides (Aliette, Beltanol, Caddy 10, Forum, Moncut, Ortiva, Previcur, Ridomil Gold MZ, Ridomil Gold SL, Rubigan, Sinthane, Stroby, Swich, Tachigarem, Teldor, Topas 10 EC, Frupica) and non systemic fungicides (Daconil 75%, Ditiver, Euparem, INACOP, Octagon, Parmex, Terrazole and Metaram), started to be applied to soil and leaves at recommended concentrations and frequencies 4 weeks after transplant and AMF inoculation. The effect of the fungicides was assessed by comparing treated and untreated plants that were inoculated with the AMF through quantification of root mycorrhizal colonization. Among the fungicides applied to the soil, Octagon, Ditiver, Parmex and Metaram virtually eliminated the mycorrhizal symbiosis in treated plants, while the mycorrhizal colonization was not affected by the soil treatment with Beltanol, INACOP and Previcur. Three fungicides of foliar recommended application: Rubigan, Frupica, and Sinthane, strongly inhibited mycorrhizal colonization, but Aliette, Forum, Teldor, Swich and Ortiva, did not seem to reduce it substantially. In addition, the work describes the individual effect of each fungicide applied on both, foliage and soil. (Author) 29 refs.

  15. Efficacy of combined formulations of fungicides with different modes of action in controlling botrytis gray mold disease in chickpea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, M H; Hossain, M Ashraf; Kashem, M A; Kumar, Shiv; Rafii, M Y; Latif, M A

    2014-01-01

    Botrytis gray mold (BGM) caused by Botrytis cinerea Pers. Ex. Fr. is an extremely devastating disease of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) and has a regional as well as an international perspective. Unfortunately, nonchemical methods for its control are weak and ineffective. In order to identify an effective control measure, six fungicides with different modes of action were evaluated on a BGM susceptible chickpea variety BARIchhola-1 at a high BGM incidence location (Madaripur) in Bangladesh for three years (2008, 2009, and 2010). Among the six fungicides tested, one was protectant [Vondozeb 42SC, a.i. mancozeb (0.2%)], two systemic [Bavistin 50 WP, a.i. carbendazim (0.2%), and Protaf 250EC, propiconazole (0.05%)], and three combination formulations [Acrobat MZ690, dimethomorph 9% + mancozeb 60%, (0.2%); Secure 600 WG, phenomadone + mancozeb (0.2%); and Companion, mancozeb 63% + carbendazim 12% (0.2%)]. The results showed superiority of combination formulations involving both protectant and systemic fungicides over the sole application of either fungicide separately. Among the combination fungicides, Companion was most effective, resulting in the lowest disease severity (3.33 score on 1-9 scale) and the highest increase (38%) of grain yield in chickpea. Therefore, this product could be preferred over the sole application of either solo protectant or systemic fungicides to reduce yield losses and avoid fungicide resistance.

  16. Efficacy of Combined Formulations of Fungicides with Different Modes of Action in Controlling Botrytis Gray Mold Disease in Chickpea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Rashid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Botrytis gray mold (BGM caused by Botrytis cinerea Pers. Ex. Fr. is an extremely devastating disease of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. and has a regional as well as an international perspective. Unfortunately, nonchemical methods for its control are weak and ineffective. In order to identify an effective control measure, six fungicides with different modes of action were evaluated on a BGM susceptible chickpea variety BARIchhola-1 at a high BGM incidence location (Madaripur in Bangladesh for three years (2008, 2009, and 2010. Among the six fungicides tested, one was protectant [Vondozeb 42SC, a.i. mancozeb (0.2%], two systemic [Bavistin 50 WP, a.i. carbendazim (0.2%, and Protaf 250EC, propiconazole (0.05%], and three combination formulations [Acrobat MZ690, dimethomorph 9% + mancozeb 60%, (0.2%; Secure 600 WG, phenomadone + mancozeb (0.2%; and Companion, mancozeb 63% + carbendazim 12% (0.2%]. The results showed superiority of combination formulations involving both protectant and systemic fungicides over the sole application of either fungicide separately. Among the combination fungicides, Companion was most effective, resulting in the lowest disease severity (3.33 score on 1–9 scale and the highest increase (38% of grain yield in chickpea. Therefore, this product could be preferred over the sole application of either solo protectant or systemic fungicides to reduce yield losses and avoid fungicide resistance.

  17. Relationship between IC50 determined in vitro/in vivo and the fungicide rate used in the Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erlei Melo Reis

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Published data containing fungicide concentrations that control 50% (IC50 of a given fungus were analyzed. In the analysis we considered: (i the IC50 determined in vitro and in vivo for a given fungicide and for a specific fungus; (ii the concentration (g/ha of active ingredient for the fungicide indicated to control a specific disease in the field; (iii water volume of 120/L used in the spray; (iv the fungicide a.i. concentration (mg/L in 120 L volume; (v and the ratio of the concentration used in the field with that determined in the laboratory. The analysis were performed by using IC50 data for DMIs, QoIs, a carbamate and a benzimidazol against the following fungi Bipolaris sorokiniana, Drechslera tritici-repentis, D. siccans, Fusarium graminearum, Puccinia triticina, Exserohilum turcicum, Phakopsora pachyrhizi and Corynespora cassiicola. The fungicide concentrations sprayed in the field were 33.9 (D. siccans and trifloxystrobin to 500,000.0 (E. turcicum and iprodione times higher than that determined in the laboratory. It was concluded that the IC50 was not related to the concentration used in the field and therefore should be used to compare the power among fungicides and to monitor the fungal sensitivity shift towards fungicides

  18. Signum, a new fungicide for control of leaf diseases in outdoor vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callens, D; Sarrazyn, R; Evens, W

    2005-01-01

    During three years, the new fungicide Signum, containing 6.7% pyraclostrobine + 26.7 % boscalid and developed by BASF. has been evaluated in leek, carrots and cabbages in several outdoor field experiments under practical conditions and during one year in outdoor lettuce. In leek, Phytophthora porri is one of the major leaf diseases causing lesions on differ ent places on the leaves, resulting in at least extra labour costs for trimming or even worse sometimes resulting in complete crop loss. So far, crop protection consists of repeated applications of fungicides especially during autumn and winter. Pyraclostrobin + boscalid has been evaluated in comparison with the fungicides mancozeb, mancozeb + metalaxyl-M and azoxystrobin. The progress of the disease during the growth season is discussed. For all parameters evaluated, pyraclostrobin + boscalid gave comparable or even better results than reference products. Especially during 2003, a small drop of the activity of benalaxyl against P. porri has been observed after repeated applications. In carrots, Erisiphe heraclei and Alternaria dauci are both the most common leaf diseases causing yield and quality loss. During periods of very high pressure of A. dauci, pyraclostrobin + boscalid, applied in a three weeks interval, revealed a superior activity compared with triazole references or compared with azoxystrobin. Against E. heraclei, a good control but also a clear dose response activity have been observed with pyraclostrobin + boscalid. Yield gain was approximately 30 ton /ha compared wih untreated. In Brussels sprouts, good efficacy was obtained against Mycosphaerella spp., Albugo candida and Alternaria spp. In outdoor lettuce Botrytis cinerea and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum are the most important diseases causing crop damage and reducing the quality of the heads. Pyraclostrobin + boscalid was evaluated in comparison with the standard fungicide iprodione. The plant protection was better with the new fungicide

  19. Disease control by chemical and biological fungicides in cultivated mushrooms: button mushroom, oyster mushroom and shiitake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Potočnik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The most commonly cultivated basidiomycetes worldwide and in Serbia are button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus, oyster mushroom (Pleurotus sp. and shiitake (Lentinus edodes. Production of their fruiting bodies is severely afflicted by fungal, bacterial, and viral pathogens that are able to cause diseases which affect yield and quality. Major A. bisporus fungal pathogens include Mycogone perniciosa, Lecanicillium fungicola, and Cladobotryum spp., the causal agents of dry bubble, wet bubble, and cobweb disease, respectively. Various Trichoderma species, the causal agents of green mould, also affect all three kinds of edible mushrooms. Over the past two decades, green mould caused by T. aggressivum has been the most serious disease of button mushroom. Oyster mushroom is susceptible to T. pleurotum and shiitake to T. harzianum. The bacterial brawn blotch disease, caused by Pseudomonas tolaasii, is distributed globally. Disease control on mushroom farms worldwide is commonly based on the use of fungicides. However, evolution of pathogen resistance to fungicides after frequent application, and host sensitivity to fungicides are serious problems. Only a few fungicides are officially recommended in mushroom production: chlorothalonil and thiabendazol in North America and prochloraz in the EU and some other countries. Even though decreased sensitivity levels of L. fungicola and Cladobotryum mycophilum to prochloraz have been detected, disease control is still mainly provided by that chemical fungicide. Considering such resistance evolution, harmful impact to the environment and human health, special attention should be focused on biofungicides, both microbiological products based on Bacillus species and various natural substances of biological origin, together with good programs of hygiene. Introduction of biofungicides has created new possibilities for crop protection with reduced application of chemicals.

  20. Sensitivity to four systemic fungicides of Colombian isolates of Phytophthora infestans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hibert Giovani García

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Potato late blight caused by Phytophthora infestans is the most restrictive disease of this crop in Colombia , where environmental conditions are optimal conditions for its epidemic development. This situation leads to an excessive use of fungicides by farmers, which besides representing near 10% of production costs, causes a serious damage of environment and public health. This research pretends to support IPM programs by monitoring the sensitivity levels of 15 isolates of P. infestans obtained from crops in Antioquia, Cundinamarca and Boyacá, to fungicides Ridomil® Gold, Curzate® M-8, Previcur® N SL and Mildex® 711 WG as a tool of the risk analysis that permit to offer to the farmers the technical recommendations based on the generation of sensitivity lines. Evaluations of sensitivity were carried out using the immersion of leaf discs methodology with seven doses of each commercial product. Results show that the studied population presents high levels of sensitivity to these fungicides. In the case of Curzate® M-8, the average EC50 value was 0.28 mg·L-1, while the EC50 for Previcur® N SL reached 0.71 mg·L- . Intests with fungicides Ridomil® Gold and Mildex® 711 WG, these values were 0.62 and 0.54 mg·L-1, respectively. Finally, sporangia production decreased from an average of 41,181 sporangia/mL in control treatment to less than 500 sporangia/mL when the maximum doses of four fungicides were evaluated.

  1. The effect of fungicides on seed yield and disease control in Italian ryegrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijckaert, G

    2009-01-01

    Under Belgian climatic conditions, the incidence of fungal diseases like mildew, crown rust and stem rust is much lower in seed crops of Italian ryegrass than crops of perennial ryegrass, because of the cleaning effect of the preceding forage cut and the much quicker growing rate of Italian ryegrass. However, in some mild and warm seasons, above diseases can give detrimental effects on seed yield, so a preventive fungicide programme would be very recommended in order to obtain consistently high seed yields over the years. Six different fungicides and an untreated control were tested on two tetraploid varieties of Italian ryegrass, namely cv. Meroa and cv. Salomé (more tolerant to crown rust); one fungicide application took place at early ear emergence for all three trials (2006-07-08). Only in the 2007-trial with very severe rust pressure, the most efficient fungicides increased seed yield by 22-25 % against the control (100%) and the tebuconazol-treatment (106.6%). Yield differences could be attributed to a healthier seed crop, i.e., less withered flag leaf and to a higher thousand seed weight. As both years 2006 and 2008 had very little disease pressure throughout the season, the best treatments (Allegro and Opera) resulted in a moderate seed yield increase of 6-7% in 2006, while 2008 did not give any yield response at all between the fungicide treatments and the untreated check. Seed yield, yield components and disease development are discussed and explained in relation to the seasonal meteorological conditions.

  2. Mechanisms and significance of fungicide resistance Mecanismos e significância da resistência a fungicidas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger B. Deising

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In this review article, we show that occurrence of fungicide resistance is one of the most important issues in modern agriculture. Fungicide resistance may be due to mutations of genes encoding fungicide targets (qualitative fungicide resistance or to different mechanisms that are induced by sub-lethal fungicide stress. These mechanisms result in different and varying levels of resistance (quantitative fungicide resistance. We discuss whether or not extensive use of fungicides in agricultural environments is related to the occurrence of fungicide resistance in clinical environments. Furthermore, we provide recommendations of how development of fungicide resistant pathogen populations may be prevented or delayed.A ocorrência de resistência a fungicidas é uma das mais importantes conseqüências da agricultura moderna. Este fato pode ser resultado de mutações em genes codificadores de resistência a fungicidas (resistência quantitativa ou a diferentes mecanismos que são induzidos por stresse devido a doses subletais dos produtos utilizados. Estes mecanismos produzem diferentes e variados níveis de resistência (resistência quantitativa. Também é discutido se o uso extensivo de fungicidas em ambientes agricultáveis é relacionado ou não com a ocorrência de resistência em ambientes clínicos. Além disso, também são fornecidas recomendações de como prevenir ou mesmo retardar o desenvolvimento de resistência a fungicidas em patógenos.

  3. Nitric oxide inhibits the accumulation of CD4+CD44hiTbet+CD69lo T cells in mycobacterial infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, John E.; Torrado, Egidio; Tighe, Michael; Fountain, Jeffrey J.; Solache, Alejandra; Strutt, Tara; Swain, Susan; Appelberg, Rui; Cooper, Andrea M

    2013-01-01

    Summary Animals lacking the inducible nitric oxide synthase gene (nos2−/−) are less susceptible to M. avium strain 25291 and lack nitric oxide-mediated immunomodulation of CD4+ T cells. Here we show that the absence of nos2 results in increased accumulation of neutrophils and both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells within the M. avium-containing granuloma. Examination of the T-cell phenotype in M. avium-infected mice demonstrated that CD4+CD44hi effector T cells expressing the Th1 transcriptional regulator T-bet (T-bet+) were specifically reduced by the presence of nitric oxide. Importantly, the T-bet+ effector population could be separated into CD69hi and CD69lo populations, with the CD69lo population only able to accumulate during chronic infection within infected nos2−/− mice. Transcriptomic comparison between CD4+CD44hiCD69hi and CD4+CD44hiCD69lo populations revealed that CD4+CD44hiCD69lo cells had higher expression of the integrin itgb1/itga4 (VLA-4, CD49d/CD29). Inhibition of Nos2 activity allowed increased accumulation of the CD4+CD44hiT-bet+CD69lo population in WT mice as well as increased expression of VLA-4. These data support the hypothesis that effector T cells in mycobacterial granulomata are not a uniform effector population but exist in distinct subsets with differential susceptibility to the regulatory effects of nitric oxide. PMID:22890814

  4. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of NASA and the GSDO Program, the objective of this project is to qualify citric acid as an environmentally-preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys. This project is a direct follow-on to United Space Alliance (USA) work at KSC to optimize the parameters for the use of citric acid and verify effectiveness. This project will build off of the USA study to further evaluate citric acids effectiveness and suitability for corrosion protection of a number of stainless steels alloys used by NASA, the Department of Defense (DoD), and the European Space Agency (ESA).

  5. Nitric oxide bioavailability in malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolewski, Peter; Gramaglia, Irene; Frangos, John; Intaglietta, Marcos; van der Heyde, Henri C

    2005-09-01

    Rational development of adjunct or anti-disease therapy for severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria requires cellular and molecular definition of malarial pathogenesis. Nitric oxide (NO) is a potential target for such therapy but its role during malaria is controversial. It has been proposed that NO is produced at high levels to kill Plasmodium parasites, although the unfortunate consequence of elevated NO levels might be impaired neuronal signaling, oxidant damage and red blood cell damage that leads to anemia. In this case, inhibitors of NO production or NO scavengers might be an effective adjunct therapy. However, increasing amounts of evidence support the alternate hypothesis that NO production is limited during malaria. Furthermore, the well-documented NO scavenging by cell-free plasma hemoglobin and superoxide, the levels of which are elevated during malaria, has not been considered. Low NO bioavailability in the vasculature during malaria might contribute to pathologic activation of the immune system, the endothelium and the coagulation system: factors required for malarial pathogenesis. Therefore, restoring NO bioavailability might represent an effective anti-disease therapy.

  6. Presence of Fungicides Used to Control Asian Soybean Rust in Streams in Agricultural Areas in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandstrom, M. W.; Battaglin, W. A.

    2007-05-01

    Concentrations of 11 fungicides were measured in stream samples during 2 years in agricultural areas in the United States that grow predominantly corn and soybean. The fungicides are registered for control of Asian Soybean Rust (ASR), which entered the United States in 2004. Many of these fungicides were registered under an emergency exemption because evaluation of environmental risks related to their widespread use on soybeans had not been completed. Some of these fungicides are considered moderately to highly toxic to fish and aquatic invertebrates. We developed a solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method for determining the fungicides at low concentrations (ng/L). Stream samples were collected 2 to 4 times at study areas during the late spring through fall season when fungicides are applied. Six fungicides registered for control of ASR (Phakospora pachyrhizi) in 2005 were measured in streams in Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Mississippi during August-November, 2005. One or more fungicides were detected in 8 of the 12 streams sampled. Azoxystrobin, pyraclostrobin, propiconazole, tebuconazole, and myclobutanil were found in at least one of the 40 samples collected, while chlorothalonil was not found. Azoxystrobin was detected most frequently, in 35 percent of the samples. In 2006, five additional fungicides registered for use in control of ASR were included in the analytical method. One or more of the fungicides (azoxystrobin, pyraclostrobin, trifloxystrobin, metconazole, propiconazole, tebuconazole, tetraconazole, myclobutanil) were detected in 12 of the 16 streams sampled from areas in the South and Midwest during May-September, 2006. Azoxystrobin was detected most frequently (40 percent of the samples) and the highest concentration was 1.1 μg/L in a small predominantly cotton and soybean watershed. The highest concentrations of azoxystrobin were measured prior to the spread of ASR in 2006, and the detections

  7. PATHOGENICITY TESTS AND EVALUATION OF EFFICACY OF FUNGICIDES AGAINST RHIZOCTONIA BATATICOLA, THE CAUSAL AGENT OF DRY ROOT ROT OF CHICKPEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Amrutha Veena

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The pathogen was identified based on its mycelial and sclerotial characters and pathogenicity test was proved by soil inoculation method. Efficacy of two non systemic fungicides (copper oxychloride and captan, two systemic fungicides (hexaconazole and tebuconazole and one antifungal antibiotic validamycin each at different concentrations were tested against Rhizoctonia bataticola, incitant of dry root rot of chickpea under in vitro conditions. The fungicides copper oxychloride, captan, hexaconazole and tebuconazole were found to be highly effective (100% in inhibiting the mycelial growth of the highly virulent pathogen at all the concentrations tested.

  8. Occurrence and Environmental Effects of Boscalid and Other Fungicides in Three Targeted Use Areas in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, T. J.; Smalling, K. L.; Wilson, E. R.

    2011-12-01

    Fungicides are typically used to control the outbreak of persistent, historically significant plant diseases like late blight (caused by Phytophthora infestans and responsible for the Irish Potato famine of 1846) and newer plant diseases like Asian Soy Rust, both of which are potentially devastating if not controlled. Of the more than 67,000 pesticide products currently registered for use in the United States, over 3,600 are used to combat fungal diseases. Although they are widely used, relatively little is known about the fate and potential secondary effects of fungicides in the aquatic environment. Even less is known about the fate and environmental occurrence of recently registered fungicides including boscalid, which was first registered for use in the US in 2003. Unlike most other pesticides, multiple fungicides are typically applied as a prophylactic crop protectant upwards of ten times per season (depending upon conditions and crop type), but at lower application rates than herbicides or insecticides. This difference in usage increases the likelihood of chronic exposure of aquatic ecosystems to low concentrations of fungicides. Using a newly developed analytical method, the U.S. Geological Survey measured 33 fungicides in surface water and shallow groundwater in three geographic areas of intense fungicide use across the US. Sampling sites were selected near or within farms using prophylactic fungicides at rates and types typical of the crop type and their geographic location. At least one fungicide was detected in 75% of the surface waters (n=60) and 58% of the groundwater (n=12) samples. Twelve fungicides were detected in surface- and groundwater including boscalid (72%), azoxystrobin (51%), pyraclostrobin (40%), chlorothalonil (38%) and pyrimethanil (28%). Boscalid was the most frequently detected pesticide and has not been previously documented in the aquatic environment. In this study, an average of 44% of the pesticide concentration in a water sample

  9. Inducible nitric oxide synthase is responsible for nitric oxide release from murine pituicytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, T H; Rivier, C; Lee, S;

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated whether pituicytes were able to produce and release nitric oxide (NO), and which type of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) would be responsible for this phenomenon. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) 1 micro g/ml was used as inflammatory mediator. Because pituicytes are known to secrete...

  10. Activation of Proinflammatory Responses in Cells of the Airway Mucosa by Particulate Matter: Oxidant- and Non-Oxidant-Mediated Triggering Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Øvrevik

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is considered to play a central role in a diverse range of disease outcomes associated with exposure to various types of inhalable particulates. The initial mechanisms through which particles trigger cellular responses leading to activation of inflammatory responses are crucial to clarify in order to understand what physico-chemical characteristics govern the inflammogenic activity of particulate matter and why some particles are more harmful than others. Recent research suggests that molecular triggering mechanisms involved in activation of proinflammatory genes and onset of inflammatory reactions by particles or soluble particle components can be categorized into direct formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS with subsequent oxidative stress, interaction with the lipid layer of cellular membranes, activation of cell surface receptors, and direct interactions with intracellular molecular targets. The present review focuses on the immediate effects and responses in cells exposed to particles and central down-stream signaling mechanisms involved in regulation of proinflammatory genes, with special emphasis on the role of oxidant and non-oxidant triggering mechanisms. Importantly, ROS act as a central second-messenger in a variety of signaling pathways. Even non-oxidant mediated triggering mechanisms are therefore also likely to activate downstream redox-regulated events.

  11. Nitric oxide, inducible nitric oxide synthase and inflammation in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Robert P

    2002-12-01

    Inflammation is a process consisting of a complex of cytological and chemical reactions which occur in and around affected blood vessels and adjacent tissues in response to an injury caused by a physical, chemical or biological insult. Much work has been performed in the past several years investigating inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS, EC 1.14.13.39) and nitric oxide in inflammation. This has resulted in a rapid increase in knowledge about iNOS and nitric oxide. Nitric oxide formation from inducible NOS is regulated by numerous inflammatory mediators, often with contradictory effects, depending upon the type and duration of the inflammatory insult. Equine medicine appears to have benefited the most from the increased interest in this small, inflammatory mediator. Most of the information on nitric oxide in traditional veterinary species has been produced using models or naturally occurring inflammatory diseases of this species.

  12. ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF FUNGICIDE APPLICATION ON TARO (Colocasia esculenta LEAF BLIGHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarla D N

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Taro is an important crop in Cameroon but yields of the crop has severely affected by pests and diseases especially leaf blight. An economic evaluation of fungicide applications on taro blight was conducted in Dschang, Cameroon, during the 2012 cropping season. A split-plot design was used, with two factors; fungicide and cultivar, replicated three times. Whole plots were assigned to five fungicide spray schedules (7, 14, 21, 28-day, and non-treated while sub-plots were assigned to two taro cultivars; the dark green petioles (“Ibo coco” cultivar and the light green petioles small leaves (“Ehkoueh’lah” cultivar. A fungicide, Plantomil 72 WP was applied at 3.33 kgha-1 . Blight severity was scored weekly in every sub-plot, and yields were obtained at harvest. Data was subjected to the analysis of variance. Standardized area under disease progress curve (SAUDPC was high (p = 0.005 in control plots compared to sprayed plots of the cultivars. The high SAUDPC values were correlated with low yields (16.11 t/ha in control plots of “Ibo coco” compared to high yields (60.44 to 62.11 t/ha in sprayed plots. For “Ehkoueh’lah”, yield differences between control and sprayed plots were not high, 33.11 tha-1 in the control compared to 46.83 to 49.06 tha-1 in sprayed plots. The highest yield increase of 74.06 and 32.51 % for “Ibo coco” and “Ehkoueh’lah”, respectively was obtained from 7-day sprayed plots. Economic analysis revealed that a 28-day fungicide spray frequency had the highest rate of return, 13.78 and 6.63 and net benefits of 8.26 and 4.76 million FCFAha-1 for “Ibo coco” and “Ehkoueh’lah”, respectively. Thus, taro leaf blight can be managed with monthly applications of fungicide.

  13. RESULTS OF SUGAR BEET PRODUCTION DEPENDING ON THE HYBRIDS SELECTION AND THE NUMBER OF FUNGICIDE APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrija Kristek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of the production values of 10 sugar beet hybrids was conducted on chernozem soil type in Eastern Croatia (Tovarniklocation. The used treatments with and without fungicides application were investigated in 2013 and 2014. Sugar beet hybrids used in the study originate from three market-leading sugar beet seed companies in Croatia, whose varieties provide disease tolerance to C. beticola. The years of the study were quite warm with higher mean monthly air temperature (°C and increased amount of rainfall, as compared to the long-term mean. In the second year of the study, due to increased amount of rainfall (mm in July and August, as well as the total loss ofstrobilurin efficiency and low effectiveness ofthe cyproconazole treatment, the destruction ofthe leaves by C. beticola Sacc. was significantly higher. The results of the study showed a huge coherence of sugar beet yield and quality with leaf conservation through the vegetation (the number of treatment, and with the hybrids. Due to leaves destruction on control treatments, as compared to fungicide application three times, the sugar beet root yield was reduced on the average by 9.79 t ha'1 (10.03%, sugar content by 0.69% (rel. 4.89% and sugar yield by 2.041 ha1 (17.04%. On the other hand, three fungicide applications increased the root yield by 4.881 ha1 (5.26%, sugar content by 0.52% and sugar yield by 0.99 t ha1 (9.01% as compared to one fungicide application. All sugar beet hybrids of the study were strongly negatively affected the control treatment, indicating repeated fungicide application against C. beticola as a regular agricultural practices. On the average, for all variations of fungicides applications, the sugar beet hybrid Jadranka had significantly higher root yield in comparison with other hybrids included in the study. Moreover, the highest sugar content achieved Sandor, Marianka and Kundera. Significantly higher sugar yield had a hybrid Jadranka.

  14. COMPARATIVE LIVER P450 ENZYME ACTIVITY AND HISTOPATHOLOGY IN MICE TREATED WITH THE CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES: MYCLOBUTANIL, PROPICONAZOLE AND TRIADIMETON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conazoles used in agriculture and pharmaceutical products comprise a class of chemicals which inhibit ergosterol biosynthesis to act as fungicides. Both propiconazole and triadimefon are hepatotoxic and hepatotumorigenic in mice, while myclobutanil is not a mouse liver tumorigen....

  15. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING IN THE LIVER OF CD-1 MICE TO CHARACTERIZE THE HEPATOTOXICITY OF TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four triazole fungicides used in agricultural or pharmaceutical applications were examined for hepatotoxic effects in mouse liver. Besides organ weight, histopathology, and cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme induction, DNA microarrays were used to generate gene expression profiles and ...

  16. TRANSCRIPTIONAL PROFILES IN LIVER FROM MICE TREATED WITH HEPATOTUMORIGENIC AND NON-HEPATOTUMORIGENIC TRIAZOLE CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES: PROPICONAZOLE, TRIADIMEFON, AND MYCLOBUTANIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conazoles are environmental and pharmaceutical fungicides. The present study relates the toxicological effects of conazoles to alterations of gene and pathway transcription and identifies potential modes of tumorigenic action. In a companion study (Allen et al. 2006) under...

  17. Fungicide-driven evolution and molecular basis of multidrug resistance in field populations of the grey mould fungus Botrytis cinerea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kretschmer, M.; Leroch, M.; Mosbach, A.; Walker, A.S.; Fillinger, S.; Mernke, D.; Schoonbeek, H.J.; Pradier, J.M.; Leroux, P.; Waard, de M.A.; Hahn, M.

    2009-01-01

    The grey mould fungus Botrytis cinerea causes losses of commercially important fruits, vegetables and ornamentals worldwide. Fungicide treatments are effective for disease control, but bear the risk of resistance development. The major resistance mechanism in fungi is target protein modification

  18. Nitric Oxide Homeostasis in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide in the pathogenesis and progression of neurodegenerative illnesses such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases has become prominent over the years. Increased activity of the enzymes that produce reactive oxygen species, decreased activity of antioxidant enzymes and imbalances in glutathione pools mediate and mark the neurodegenerative process. Much of the oxidative damage of proteins is brought about by the overproduction of nitric oxide by nitric oxide synthases (NOS) and its subsequent reactivity with reactive oxygen species. Proteomic methods have advanced the field tremendously, by facilitating the quantitative assessment of differential expression patterns and oxidative modifications of proteins and alongside, mapping their non-canonical functions. As a signaling molecule involved in multiple biochemical pathways, the level of nitric oxide is subject to tight regulation. All three NOS isoforms display aberrant patterns of expression in Alzheimer's disease, altering intracellular signaling and routing oxidative stress in directions that are uncompounded. This review discusses the prime factors that control nitric oxide biosynthesis, reactivity footprints and ensuing effects in the development of neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Useful and harmful effects of nitric oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jović Slavoljub

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In living sistems synthesis of nitric oxide occurs during metabolism from Larginin, nitrite and ascorbate. Being very significant carrier of information within numerous both physiological and pathological proceses in mammals' organisms, nitric oxid could possibly be useful as well as harmful. Nitric oxide synthesis is adjuvant in a healthy organism because it represents the basic molecule for understanding numerous processes in neurology, psychology, immunology and varios related fields. In other words, nitric oxide participate in number of physiological processes, such as: transmission of nerve signals (neurotransmitter role, regulation of smooth muscle tissue relaxation (eg. vasodilatation, peristaltic movements, immunomodulation, mastocyte activation, development of inflammatory response, apoptosis regulation, angiogenesis and glucose metabolism, normal heart functioning and antioxidation role. Besides being useful, nitric oxide can be harmful as well, because it has one unpaired electron, so consequently it is susceptible to oxidation becoming a stable free radical. Being such, it reacts quickly with superoxide-anion radical, givind at first an extremely reactive peroxinitrite anion, and subsequently peroxidnitrite acid. This acid is very dangerous causing thiol groups oxidation, tyrosine and phenylalanine nitrosylation, lipid oxidation, DNK chain splitting, nitrification and nucleic bases deamination. These damages of macromolecules can cause a series of undesirable changes which subsequently distub functions of molecules, and thus of cells, tissues and even organs. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173034 i br. 31085

  20. Evaluation of fungicides enestroburin and SYP1620 on their inhibitory activities to fungi and oomycetes and systemic translocation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengfei; Wang, Haiqiang; Zhou, Yuxin; Meng, Qingxiao; Si, Naiguo; Hao, Jianjun J; Liu, Xili

    2014-06-01

    Enestroburin and SYP1620 are newly developed strobilurin chemicals carrying fungicidal activity and need to be fully characterized in activities of anti-oomycete or anti-fungi, disease prevention and systemic translocation in planta. Their inhibitory activities were examined by amending the chemical in agar media, on which selected plant pathogens were grown and mycelial growth were measured. Effective concentrations for 50% inhibition (EC50) of mycelial growth were calculated to determine the level of fungicide sensitivity of the pathogen. Azoxystrobin was used as control. To examine the prevention and systemic translocation in plants, the fungicides were either sprayed on wheat leaves or dipped on wheat roots, which then were detected using high performance liquid chromatography. All the three fungicides inhibited mycelial growth of Sphacelotheca reiliana, Phytophthora infestans, Peronophythora litchi, and Magnaporthe oryzae, with EC50 values ranging from 0.02 to 2.84μg/ml; EC50 of SYP1620 was significantly lower than that of azoxystrobin and enestroburin on Valsa mali, Gaeumannomyces graminis, Alternaria solani, and Colletotrichun orbiculare. The three QoI fungicides showed strong inhibitory activities on spore germination against the 13 pathogens tested and were highly effective on biotrophic pathogens tested. Enestroburin and SYP1620 penetrated and spread in wheat leaves, but the penetration and translocation levels were lower compared to azoxystrobin. The three fungicides were all rapidly taken up by wheat roots and transported upwards, with greater fungicide concentrations in roots than in stems and leaves. The results indicate that enestroburin and SYP1620 are systemic fungicides that inhibit a broad spectrum of fungi and oomycetes.

  1. REPCO 501452 : Replacement of copper fungicides in organic production of grapevine and apple in Europe : publishable final activity report

    OpenAIRE

    Köhl, J

    2007-01-01

    Final Activity Report: The objective of REPCO was to contribute to the replacement of copper fungicides in organic agriculture by new measures for control of downy mildew (Plasmopara viticola) in grapevine and scab (Venturia inaequalis) in apple. Both major European organic crops strongly depend on copper fungicides. Permitted amounts will be reduced stepwise in the years ahead (Council Regulation (EEC) 2092/91, Annex II) to avoid environmental risks. In European countries where copper fungic...

  2. Development of forecasting elements for minimization of fungicide treatment in potato protection against early blight in Moscow region

    OpenAIRE

    Penjkin Roman V.; Doroškina Ljudmila A.; Smirnov Aleksej N.

    2013-01-01

    Early blight of potato (the agent is imperfect fungus Alternaria alternata (Fr.) Keissl.) is a serious disease of potatoes under hot conditions. This disease is important in the regions of Eastern and Southern Europe, Asia and Africa. It is controlled with intensive application of fungicides commonly used against late blight. However, currently fungicides cause undesirable damage to humans and the environment. Elements of forecasting the early blight have been developed in order to mini...

  3. Simultaneous removal of five triazole fungicides from synthetic solutions on activated carbons and cyclodextrin-based adsorbents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégorio Crini

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an adsorption-oriented process for the removal of fungicides from polycontaminated aqueous solutions was applied. To remove triazole fungicides from aqueous mixtures of propiconazole (PROPI, tebuconazole (TEBU, epoxiconazole (EPOXI, bromuconazole (BROMU and difenoconazole (DIFENO, several materials used as adsorbents were compared using batch experiments, namely two conventional activated carbons (ACs and five nonconventional cross-linked cyclodextrin (CD-based materials (α-CDP, β-CDP, γ-CDP, αβγ-CDP mixture, and hydroxypropyl-β-CDP. This article presents the abatements obtained. As expected, ACs exhibited the highest levels of triazole fungicide removal: the treatment lowered the five azoles by more than 99%, and adsorption was non-selective. Concerning CD-based materials employed for the first time for the removal of fungicides from polycontaminated aqueous solutions, results were interesting in particular for hydroxypropyl-β-CDP: 1 g of adsorbent placed in 1 L of solution containing 1 mg of each of five triazoles (5 mg in total was able to remove over half of the fungicide amount (2.97 mg. The order obtained was the following: BROMU << PROPI ≅ EPOXI < TEBU << DIFENO. This indicates that, in the mixture studied, strong competition prevailed among fungicides for the binding sites.

  4. Dithiocarbamate fungicides increase intracellular Zn(2+) levels by increasing influx of Zn(2+) in rat thymic lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemoto-Kataoka, Yumiko; Oyama, Tomohiro M; Ishibashi, Hitoshi; Oyama, Yasuo

    2015-07-25

    Dithiocarbamate fungicides are used as alternative antifouling agents to highly toxic organotin antifouling agents, such as tri-n-butyltin and triphenyltin. There are some concerns regarding their environmental and health risks. It has been shown that tri-n-butyltin increases intracellular Zn(2+) levels of mammalian lymphocytes. Therefore, we examined the effects of dithiocarbamate fungicides (Ziram, Thiram, and Zineb) on rat thymic lymphocytes using a flow-cytometric technique to elucidate how these fungicides affect intracellular Zn(2+) levels. We further determined whether the agents increase intracellular Zn(2+) and/or Ca(2+), because both Zn(2+) and Ca(2+) are intracellular signals in lymphocytes, and excessive increases in their intracellular concentrations can have adverse effects. Dithiocarbamate fungicides increased intracellular Zn(2+) levels, without affecting intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Ziram was the most potent compound, increasing intracellular Zn(2+) levels via Zn(2+) influx. Ziram (1μM) greatly decreased the cellular nonprotein thiol content, and Zn(2+) chelators attenuated the Ziram-induced decrease. Ziram increased the population of annexin V-positive cells in a Zn(2+)-dependent manner. Therefore, we propose that dithiocarbamate fungicides induce Zn(2+) influx, resulting in an excessive elevation of intracellular Zn(2+) levels, leading to the induction of apoptosis. This study gives a basic insight into the mechanisms of dithiocarbamate fungicide-induced adverse events.

  5. Evolution of cross-resistance to medical triazoles in Aspergillus fumigatus through selection pressure of environmental fungicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianhua; van den Heuvel, Joost; Debets, Alfons J M; Verweij, Paul E; Melchers, Willem J G; Zwaan, Bas J; Schoustra, Sijmen E

    2017-09-27

    Resistance to medical triazoles in Aspergillus fumigatus is an emerging problem for patients at risk of aspergillus diseases. There are currently two presumed routes for medical triazole-resistance selection: (i) through selection pressure of medical triazoles when treating patients and (ii) through selection pressure from non-medical sterol-biosynthesis-inhibiting (SI) triazole fungicides which are used in the environment. Previous studies have suggested that SI fungicides can induce cross-resistance to medical triazoles. Therefore, to assess the potential of selection of resistance to medical triazoles in the environment, we assessed cross-resistance to three medical triazoles in lineages of A. fumigatus from previous work where we applied an experimental evolution approach with one of five different SI fungicides to select for resistance. In our evolved lines we found widespread cross-resistance indicating that resistance to medical triazoles rapidly arises through selection pressure of SI fungicides. All evolved lineages showed similar evolutionary dynamics to SI fungicides and medical triazoles, which suggests that the mutations inducing resistance to both SI fungicides and medical triazoles are likely to be the same. Whole-genome sequencing revealed that a variety of mutations were putatively involved in the resistance mechanism, some of which are in known target genes. © 2017 The Author(s).

  6. Evaluating the combined efficacy of polymers with fungicides for protection of museum textiles against fungal deterioration in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Kareem, Omar

    2010-01-01

    Fungal deterioration is one of the highest risk factors for damage of historical textile objects in Egypt. This paper represents both a study case about the fungal microflora deteriorating historical textiles in the Egyptian Museum and the Coptic museum in Cairo, and evaluation of the efficacy of several combinations of polymers with fungicides for the reinforcement of textiles and their prevention against fungal deterioration. Both cotton swab technique and biodeteriorated textile part technique were used for isolation of fungi from historical textile objects. The plate method with the manual key was used for identification of fungi. The results show that the most dominant fungi isolated from the tested textile samples belong to Alternaria, Aspergillus, Chaetomium, Penicillium and Trichoderma species. Microbiological testing was used for evaluating the usefulness of the suggested conservation materials (polymers combined with fungicides) in prevention of the fungal deterioration of ancient Egyptian textiles. Textile samples were treated with 4 selected polymers combined with two selected fungicides. Untreated and treated textile samples were deteriorated by 3 selected active fungal strains isolated from ancient Egyptian textiles. This study reports that most of the tested polymers combined with the tested fungicides prevented the fungal deterioration of textiles. Treatment of ancient textiles by suggested polymers combined with the suggested fungicides not only reinforces these textiles, but also prevents fungal deterioration and increases the durability of these textiles. The tested polymers without fungicides reduce the fungal deterioration of textiles but do not prevent it completely.

  7. [Nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristol, J P; Maggi, M F; Guérin, M C; Torreilles, J; Descomps, B

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical produced enzymatically in biological systems from the guanidino group of L-arginine. Its large spectrum of biological effects is achieved through chemical interactions with different targets including oxygen (O2), superoxide (O2o-) and other oxygen reactive species (ROS), transition metals and thiols. Superoxide anions and other ROS have been reported to react with NO to produce peroxynitrite anions that can decompose to form nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and hydroxyl radial (OHo). Thus, NO has been reported to have a dual effect on lipid peroxidation (prooxidant via the peroxynitrite or antioxydant via the chelation of ROS). In the present study we have investigated in different models the in vitro and in vivo action of NO on lipid peroxidation. Copper-induced LDL oxidation were used as an in vitro model. Human LDL (100 micrograms ApoB/ml) were incubated in oxygene-saturated PBS buffer in presence or absence of Cu2+ (2.5 microM) with increasing concentrations of NO donnors (sodium nitroprussiate or nitroso-glutathione). LDL oxidation was monitored continuously for conjugated diene formation (234 nm) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) accumulation. Exogenous NO prevents in a dose dependent manner the progress of copper-induced oxidation. Ischaemia-reperfusion injury (I/R), characterized by an overproduction of ROS, is used as an in vivo model. Anaesthetized rats were submitted to 1 hour renal ischaemia following by 2 hours of reperfusion. Sham-operated rats (SOP) were used as control. Lipid peroxidation was evaluated by measuring the HNE accumulated in rats kidneys in presence or absence of L-arginine or D-arginine infusion. L-arginine, but not D-arginine, enhances HNE accumulation in I/R but not in SOP (< 0.050 pmol/g tissue in SOP versus 0.6 nmol/g tissue in I/R), showing that, in this experimental conditions, NO produced from L-arginine, enhances the toxicity of ROS. This study shows that the pro- or antioxydant effects of NO are different

  8. Preliminary Trials on Treatment of Esca-Infected Grapevines with Trunk Injection of Fungicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Dula

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available An increase in trunk diseases (due to esca, Agrobacterium, rugose wood virus, leaf roll viruses, phytoplasma etc. leading to young vines death is a very serious worry in vineyards in Hungary, as it is in other countries. In response to a demand expressed by grapevine growers, a method was tested for the direct treatment of pathogens in wood tissue. An experiment based on trunk injection was carried out in an esca infected vineyard. The various fungicides (propiconazole, difenoconazole, thiabendazole; propiconazole+ thiabendazole were injected into the trunk before the beginning of the xylem sap flow at high pressure. As a result the number of symptomatic plants was decreased, and the vigour of the plants was not impaired by the fungicide ingredients. The combination difenoconazole+ thiabendazole showed the best result.

  9. Histological Alterations in Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio Linnaeus, 1758 Gills as Potential Biomarkers for Fungicide Contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stela Stoyanova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe present study aimed to investigate the histological alterations in common carp gills caused by a fosetyl-Al and fenamidone based fungicide tested in laboratory conditions at 30, 38 and 50 mg/L concentration. In general, all the tested concentrations activated compensatory-adaptive mechanisms, which caused pathological changes in the fish gills. Results showed different histological alterations in the gill structure, which included lamellar lifting, edema, proliferation of the glandular cells and epithelium, covering the gill filament, fusion and degenerative alterations. Blood circulatory system showed vasodilatation of the secondary lamellae and aneurysms. Overall, there was enhancement of the gill histological changes, which was dose-dependent, i.e., proportional to the increasing fungicide concentrations. Thus, based on the results, it was concluded that the histological alterations in common carp gills could be applied as possible biomarkers in risk assessment and monitoring programs for pesticide contamination of aquatic ecosystems.

  10. Binding characteristics of molecularly imprinted polymers based on fungicides in hydroalcoholic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitar, Manal; Bou-Maroun, Elias; Lerbret, Adrien; Ouaini, Naim; Cayot, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    An iprodione-imprinted polymer was prepared by copolymerization of methacrylamide and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate using a noncovalent imprinting approach. Methacrylamide was chosen using molecular dynamics simulations. To concentrate iprodione from hydro-alcoholic solutions, batch sorption of iprodione on the imprinted polymer were conducted. The equilibrium time for iprodione sorption is 20 min, and the corresponding kinetic mechanism follows the pseudo-second order indicating a strong interaction between iprodione and the imprinted polymer. Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich models were used to fit the isotherm of iprodione sorption. The imprinted polymer was found to be more efficient than the nonimprinted polymer for the uptake of iprodione, as revealed by its higher adsorption energy, affinity, and capacity. Finally, a selectivity study was conducted on the imprinted and the nonimprinted polymers to sorb three fungicides. It shows that the imprinted polymer could be used as a preconcentration phase in a multiresidue analysis of fungicides in hydroalcoholic medium.

  11. Effect of microelement and chemical fungicides on biocontrol effect of Trichoderma T23

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUANG Jing-hua; GAO Zeng-gui; YANG Chang-cheng; LIU Xian; CHEN Jie

    2004-01-01

    @@ Recently there have been many reports about soil diseases controlled by Trichoderma, but few could be applied on agriculture production in large areas. T23 isolated from soil around plant roots in the field by Biopesticide Engineering Center of Shenyang Agricultural University could control effectively Cucurbits Fusarium Wilt. The effects of 9 microelements which include copper, zinc, iron, boron,molybdenum, calcium, manganese, magnesium, potassium and frequently-used chemical fungicides,such as-carbendazim, thiram, thiophanate-methyl, chlorothalonil and hymexazol on the growth and the amounts of spores of Fusarium oxysporum FJ and Trichoderma T23 were studied. The effects of those factors on control effect of T23 to melon diseases were discussed and gave basis for the screening of synergistic agents and fungicides in controlling synergistically the pathogen.

  12. Bioconcentration and Elimination of the Dithiocarbamate Fungicide Polycarbamate in Marine Teleost Fish and Polychaete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hano, Takeshi; Ohkubo, Nobuyuki; Kono, Kumiko; Tanaka, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the bioconcentration and elimination of polycarbamate, a popular antifoulant classified as a dithiocarbamate fungicide, in a marine teleost fish, mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus), and a polychaete (Perinereis nuntia). Following polycarbamate exposure and depuration, the calculated bioconcentration factor (BCF) and elimination rate constant (k2) were 3.1 and 0.17 day(-1) in fish and 1.5-7.8 and 0.13-0.18 day(-1) in the polychaete, indicating that the fungicide has low bioconcentration potential in both organisms. Given the BCF of 3.1, the permissible environmental concentration level of polycarbamate in water was calculated to be 6.1 µg L(-1) to satisfy the threshold pesticide residue levels in fish permitted by law, which is far below the permissible levels in Hiroshima Bay, Japan. Therefore, we consider that the current polycarbamate contamination level in terms of bioconcentration is not likely to be an alarming issue in coastal environments.

  13. Enantioselective degradation of the chiral fungicides metalaxyl and furalaxyl by Brevibacillus brevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulimma, Lutz; Bullach, Anke; Kusari, Souvik; Lamshöft, Marc; Zühlke, Sebastian; Spiteller, Michael

    2013-06-01

    For almost four decades, the chiral fungicides metalaxyl and furalaxyl have been in use in plant protection on a global scale. Both substances are distributed as racemic mixtures, yet the desirable interference in nucleic acid synthesis of harmful fungi only occurs by the (-)-R-enantiomer. As enantioselective degradation in Scheyern (Germany) and Yaoundé (Cameroon) soils has been documented, the influence of 50 isolated microorganisms on the R/S ratio was investigated. A high-pressure liquid chromatography method with a chiral column to separate enantiomers of metalaxyl and furalaxyl, and subsequent detection by tandem mass spectrometry, was employed. Only one of these microorganisms, a strain of Brevibacillus brevis, showed an enantioselective degradation pattern in liquid culture; the respective (-)-R-enantiomers were preferably degraded. Moreover, (-)-R-furalaxyl was degraded faster in cultures supplemented simultaneously with both fungicides of the same concentration. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Efficacy of fungicides on the progress of early blight and yield of potato in Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fontera, DA.

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Five fungicides were evaluated during the 1990 and 1991 growing seasons in two locations in Cameroon for efficacy on the progress of early blight and yield of potato. Disease-progress curves fitted the logistic transformation better than the Gompertz. Fungicidal treatments reduced the rate of early blight progress and area under disease-progress curve (AUDPC. Early blight was more severe in the 1991 season and yields recorded in this season were lower than those in 1990. In both seasons, high yields were obtained in plots receiving six sprays maneb or mancozeb. Two sprays of Ridomil plus (12 % metalaxyl + 60 % cuprous oxide and six of cupric hydroxide also produced appreciable yields, while fosetyl-AI (three sprays provided the least yield increase. Yield losses in non-sprayed plots were estimated at 15.7-53.6 %. Yields were negatively correlated to AUDPC.

  15. Anthracnose: A new strawberry disease in Serbia and its control by fungicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović Mirko S.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthracnose is a destructive disease of strawberry fruits in warm and continental climate. During 2004, in the vicinity of Valjevo, there were severe losses in two strawberry plantations due to fruit anthracnose. Two fungal isolates, GG-6A and GG-JUP were recovered from strawberry stolons and fruits showing severe anthracnose symptoms. Based on morphological and pathological characteristics, and PCR analyses with specific primers of reference species, isolate GG-6A was identified as Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, and GG-JUP isolate as C. acutatum. This is the first identification of C. acutatum in strawberry in Serbia. In order to control strawberry anthracnose, five fungicides and their combinations were applied four times during the flowering. The best fruit protection was achieved by fungicides Metiram + piraclostrobin (Cabrio top, Captan FL and Fludioksinil + ciprodinil (Swich. Less effective were Benomil (Benlate and Krezoksim-metil (Stroby. Pathogen is transmitted by planting material, so phytosanitary measures are extremely important in preventing the disease.

  16. [INFLUENCE OF FUNGICIDES COMPLEX INOCULUM EKOVITAL ON RHIZOSPHERE MICROBIOCENOSIS, DISEASES RESISTANCE AND SOYBEEN PRODUCTIVITY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vozniuk, S V; Tytova, L V; Lyaska, S I; Iutynska, G O

    2015-01-01

    It has been investigated the effect of fungicide with systemic action of Vitavaks 200 FF, Maxim Star 025 FS, Kinto duo and the complex inoculum Ekovital on rhizospheric microbial communities, diseases resistance and soybean productivity of Annushka biovar. The combined use of fungicides and inoculation has contributed to better formation of nodulation apparatus (the number of nodules on the roots was increased in 1.3-2.8 times), resistance increase to soybean pathogens septoriosis and ascochitosis, plant productivity increase on 17.4-32.1% relatively to the variant with Ekovital. The efficiency of the combined treatment of seeds against septoriosis and ascochitosis has become 45.8-64.1% and 82.0-95.1% respectively, in the flowering-early fruiting stage and 38.1-60.6% and 70.3-82.1% respectively, in the loading beans phase.

  17. Using Operational Weather Data to Schedule Fungicide Sprays on Tomatoes in Southern Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, T. J.; Srivastava, B.; Pitblado, R. E.

    1993-03-01

    A fungicide-spray scheduling scheme for tomatoes called TOM-CAST (tomato forecaster) was adapted for use with operational weather data in order to increase the number of users by eliminating the need for in-field measurements of hourly temperature and leaf wetness duration. Such schemes reduce cost, environmental risk, and the development of resistance to the fungicide. Duration of wetness was estimated as the length of time that the dewpoint depression (TTd) remained between two specified limits, indicating the onset and offset of wetness. Several methods of obtaining the necessary temperature and dewpoint data were investigated. The preferred method, considering accuracy and simplicity, involved synthesis of hourly temperatures from locally observed daily maximum and minimum temperatures, and estimation of dewpoints from two Environment Canada hourly weather stations. With appropriate calibration, the scheme was able to match the number of sprays required by TOM-CAST exactly or within one spray.

  18. Fungicidal control of Lophodermium seditiosum on Pinus sylvestris seedlings in Swedish forest nurseries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenstroem, Elna [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Mycology and Pathology; Arvidsson, Bernt [Svenska Skogsplantor AB, Joenkoeping (Sweden)

    2001-07-01

    During the 1990s, there were serious outbreaks of the pathogen Lophodermium seditiosum on pine seedlings in Swedish forest nurseries, even though the seedlings had been treated with the fungicide propiconazole. The present experiment was carried out to evaluate two other fungicides, fluazinam and azoxystrobin, as possible alternatives to propiconazole. In the tests, which were all carried out in the same forest nursery, seedlings were treated with either propiconazole, fluazinam. or azoxystrobin, and the proportion of needles with ascocarps of L. seditiosum and the number of ascocarps per needle were recorded over the following 2 yrs. Seedlings treated with azoxystrobin already appeared healthier than control seedlings in September of the first year, and by November all azoxystrobin-treated seedlings had fewer ascocarps per needle compared with control seedlings. In autumn of the second year, there were no ascocarps on seedlings treated with fluazinam or azoxystrobin, whereas seedlings treated with propiconazole had similar numbers of ascocarps to non-treated control seedlings.

  19. Phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of red wine made from grapes treated with different fungicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulero, J; Martínez, G; Oliva, J; Cermeño, S; Cayuela, J M; Zafrilla, P; Martínez-Cachá, A; Barba, A

    2015-08-01

    The effect of treating grapes with six fungicides, applied under critical agricultural practices (CAP) on levels of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of red wines of Monastrell variety was studied. Vinifications were performed through addition of active dry yeast (ADY). Measurement of phenolic compounds was made with HPLC-DAD. Determination of antioxidant activity was through reaction of the wine sample with the DPPH radical. The wine prepared from grapes treated with quinoxyfen shows a greater increase of phenolic compounds than the control wine. In contrast, the wine obtained from grapes treated with trifloxystrobin showed lower total concentration of phenolic compounds, including stilbenes, whilst treatments with kresoxim-methyl, fluquinconazole, and famoxadone slightly reduced their content. Hence, the use of these last four fungicides could cause a decrease in possible health benefits to consumers. Antioxidant activity hardly varied in the assays with quinoxyfen, fluquinconazole and famoxadone, and decreased in the other wines.

  20. The effect of stereochemistry on the biological activity of natural phytotoxins, fungicides, insecticides and herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evidente, Antonio; Cimmino, Alessio; Andolfi, Anna

    2013-02-01

    Phytotoxins are secondary microbial metabolites that play an essential role in the development of disease symptoms induced by fungi on host plants. Although phytotoxins can cause extensive-and in some cases devastating-damage to agricultural crops, they can also represent an important tool to develop natural herbicides when produced by fungi and plants to inhibit the growth and spread of weeds. An alternative strategy to biologically control parasitic plants is based on the use of plant and fungal metabolites, which stimulate seed germination in the absence of the host plant. Nontoxigenic fungi also produce bioactive metabolites with potential fungicide and insecticide activity, and could be applied for crop protection. All these metabolites represent important tools to develop eco-friendly pesticides. This review deals with the relationships between the biological activity of some phytotoxins, seed germination stimulants, fungicides and insecticides, and their stereochemistry.

  1. In vitro and in vivo screening of azole fungicides for antiandrogenic effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taxvig, Camilla; Vinggaard, Anne; Hass, Ulla

    and antiandrogenic effects both in vitro and in vivo. Two other azole fungicides, tebuconazole and epoxiconazole, have now been investigated for antiandrogenic effects in vitro and in vivo as well. The fungicides were screened in two well-established cell assays, including testing for agonistic and antagonistic...... effects on AR in transfected CHO cells, using an AR reporter gene assay. The compounds were also analyzed for effects on steroidogenesis in H295R cells, a human adrenocorticocarcinoma cell line, used to detect effects on steroid production. In vitro tebuconazole and epoxiconazole proved to be antagonists...... signs of feminization of the male offspring were investigated. Tebuconazole caused an increase in testicular 17alfa-hydroxyprogesterone and progesterone levels, and a decrease in testosterone levels in male fetuses. Epoxiconazole had no effect on any of the mesured hormonelevels. Furthermore...

  2. Fungicide application and phosphorus uptake by hyphae of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi into field-grown peas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweiger, P.F.; Spliid, N.H.; Jakobsen, I.

    2001-01-01

    P uptake were not affected by fungicide applications apart from application of the propiconazole/fenpropimorph mixture at 100 x the recommended rate. This rate completely inhibited plant growth. AM root colonisation was reduced by the high rate of carbendazim application only. This reduction had...... no effect on plant growth which may be due to the fertile soil conditions at the field site. It is concluded that the testing for side effects of pesticides on non-target organisms should include functional parameters such as P uptake by AM fungi. Such measures may be more sensitive to harmful effects than...... from overall P uptake, Fungicides were added to the soil inside the HCs at concentrations assumed to reflect their concentration in the surrounding soil. At two harvests, plant growth, total P and P-32 uptake as well as root length density and AM root colonisation were measured. Length of hyphae inside...

  3. Modeling the interaction of the carbamate fungicide Maneb, with bovine albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Victor Carvalho; Escobar, Marta Araujo Cyrino; da Costa Marques, Monica Regina; Silva, Dilson

    2016-12-01

    In the present work we modeled the interaction of Maneb (manganous ethylenebis), a carbamate fungicide, with bovine serum albumin using results from fluorescence spectroscopic measurements. Carbamates are widely used in numerous applications as pesticides and are often involved in poisonings. They are part of a large group of synthetic pesticides derived from carbamic acid esters. They have been developed and used in a large scale along the past forty years in over fifty known commercial formulations. Our results have shown that Maneb does not present fluorescence, does not form complex with albumin structure and has low quenching capacity. Furthermore only a few amount of the fungicide, near 3%, is absorbed by the bovine organism, once bound to albumin. The binding constants are 5500(±400)/M, at 37 °C, and 3100(±200) × 103 /M, at 25 °C.

  4. Fungicides, seed dresser adjuvants and storage time in the control of Drechslera teres in barley seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erlei Melo Reis

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In experiments conducted in laboratory, the effect of fungicides, seed dresser adjuvants and storage time in the control of Drechslera teres in seeds of barley cultivar BRS Elis, with 58% incidence, was quantified. Fungicides indicated by barley research (carboxin + thiram, difenoconazole and triadimenol compared with the mixture carbendazim + iprodione were tested. As seed dresser adjuvants, water (500m mL/100 Kg and a polymer (150 mL/100 Kg were used. Treated seeds were stored in paper bags and kept in the refrigerator at 5ºC. At 30-day intervals during six months, seeds were plated on semi-selective Reis's medium (1983. The best control was obtained by the mixtures carboxin + thiram and carbendazim + iprodione and the polymer as seed dresser. The control efficiency was improved by the storage time without negatively affecting seed germination. Due to the transmission efficiency, the fungus eradication in seeds should be pursued.

  5. Cytochrome b gene structure and consequences for resistance to Qo inhibitor fungicides in plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Valeria; Palermo, Simona; Sierotzki, Helge; Garibaldi, Angelo; Gisi, Ulrich

    2006-06-01

    The cytochrome b (cyt b) gene structure was characterized for different agronomically important plant pathogens, such as Puccinia recondita f sp tritici (Erikss) CO Johnston, P graminis f sp tritici Erikss and Hennings, P striiformis f sp tritici Erikss, P coronata f sp avenae P Syd & Syd, P hordei GH Otth, P recondita f sp secalis Roberge, P sorghi Schwein, P horiana Henn, Uromyces appendiculatus (Pers) Unger, Phakopsora pachyrhizi Syd & P Syd, Hemileia vastatrix Berk & Broome, Alternaria solani Sorauer, A alternata (Fr) Keissl and Plasmopara viticola (Berk & Curt) Berlese & de Toni. The sequenced fragment included the two hot spot regions in which mutations conferring resistance to QoI fungicides may occur. The cyt b gene structure of these pathogens was compared with that of other species from public databases, including the strobilurin-producing fungus Mycena galopoda (Pers) P Kumm, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Meyer ex Hansen, Venturia inaequalis (Cooke) Winter and Mycosphaerella fijiensis Morelet. In all rust species, as well as in A solani, resistance to QoI fungicides caused by the mutation G143A has never been reported. A type I intron was observed directly after the codon for glycine at position 143 in these species. This intron was absent in pathogens such as A alternata, Blumeria graminis (DC) Speer, Pyricularia grisea Sacc, Mycosphaerella graminicola (Fuckel) J Schröt, M fijiensis, V inaequalis and P viticola, in which resistance to QoI fungicides has occurred and the glycine is replaced by alanine at position 143 in the resistant genotype. The present authors predict that a nucleotide substitution in codon 143 would prevent splicing of the intron, leading to a deficient cytochrome b, which is lethal. As a consequence, the evolution of resistance to QoI fungicides based on G143A is not likely to evolve in pathogens carrying an intron directly after this codon.

  6. The presence of bromuconazole fungicide pollutant in organic waste anaerobic fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariyadi, H. R.

    2017-03-01

    The presence of bromuconazole fungicide pollutant in organic waste anaerobic fermentation was carried out as well as the influence phenol and benzoate, and biodegradation of bromuconazole. Bromuconazole is a fungicide effective against Ascomycetes, Basidiomycetes and fungi imperfecti in cereals, grapes, top fruits and vegetables. It is also effective against Alternaria and Fusarium sp. The remaining fungicide in leaves might contaminates landfill. One month of organic waste added with bromuconazole was anaerobically incubated in 500 mL bottles at 30°C without shaking in dark room. High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) with UV detector and a 100 RP 185μm Lichrosphere column was used to determine bromuconazole concentration. Methane content was determined by Gas Chromatography (GC) method equipped with a flame ionization detector and a metal column packed with 5% neopentyl glycol sebacate and 1% H3PO4 on Chromosorb W-AW (mesh 80-100). After incubation for 225 days, bromuconazole of 200 mg/L inhibited the production of methane (99.5 mM) significantly, but did not inhibit the production of volatile fatty acids. The addition of 100 mg/L phenol or 146 mg/L benzoate increased the production of methane, 143 mM and 135.2 mM, respectively compared with control (121.8 mM). In anaerobic conditions, the presence of toxic pollutants such as fungicide bromuconazole in landfills sites may cause further problems with the accumulation of volatile fatty acids in leachate. Further study to determine the threshold, the presence of bromconazole in low concentration (less than 200 mg/L) on the methane production is recommended.

  7. Antiandrogenic effects in vitro and in vivo of the fungicide prochloraz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, A.M.; Nellemann, Christine Lydia; Dalgaard, M.

    2002-01-01

    The commonly used imidazole fungicide prochloraz was tested for antiandrogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. Prochloraz, but not the metabolites 2,4,6-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid or 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, inhibited the R1881-induced response in an androgen receptor reporter gene assay. In the Her......, to the effects of flutamide. However, differential effects on levels of FSH, T-4, and TSH indicate that other modes of action apart from the pure AR antagonism might play a role in vivo....

  8. Fitness and Competitive Ability of Botrytis cinerea Isolates with Resistance to Multiple Chemical Classes of Fungicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S N; Luo, C X; Hu, M J; Schnabel, G

    2016-09-01

    Resistance to multiple chemical classes of fungicides in Botrytis cinerea isolates from eastern United States strawberry fields is common and strategies to control them are needed. In this study, we compared fitness and competitive ability of eight sensitive isolates (S), eight isolates resistant to five or six chemical classes of fungicides but not to phenylpyrroles (5CCR), and eight isolates resistant to six or seven chemical classes including phenylpyrroles (6CCR/MDR1h). The latter included the MDR1h phenotype due to overexpression of atrB based on Δ497V/L in mrr1. The 6CCR/MDR1h isolates grew more slowly at 4°C on potato dextrose agar, and both 5CCR and 6CCR/MDR1h isolates were hypersensitive to osmotic stress compared with S isolates. In contrast, no differences were found in oxidative sensitivity, aggressiveness, and spore production in vivo, and sclerotia production and viability in vitro. In competition experiments, the 5CCR and 6CCR/MDR1h isolates were both outcompeted by S isolates and 6CCR/MDR1h isolates were outcompeted by 5CCR isolates in the absence of fungicide pressure. Under selective pressure of a fludioxonil/pyraclostrobin rotation, the 6CCR/MDR1h isolates dominated after coinoculation with 5CCR and S isolates. The competitive disadvantage of 5CCR and especially 6CCR/MDR1h isolates suggest that, in the absence of fungicide selection pressure, S isolates may reduce inoculum potential of multifungicide-resistant isolates under field conditions.

  9. Joint use of fungicides, insecticides and inoculants in the treatment of soybean seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yara Cristiane Buhl Gomes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The interference of the joint application of pesticides with seed inoculation on the survival of Bradyrhizobium has been reported in the last years. So, the objective of this study was to evaluate the joint use of fungicides, insecticides and inoculant in the treatment of soybean seeds on various parameters of Bradyrhizobium nodulation in soybean as well as on crop productivity parameters. The experiment was conducted during the 2013/2014 crop in the experimental field of the Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia de Mato Grosso - Campo Novo do Parecis Campus. The seeds of TMG 133 RR variety were sown in pots. It was used a randomized block design in a 4 x 4 + 1 factorial, four fungicides (1: fludioxonil + metalaxyl-M, 2: carboxine + thiram, 3: difeconazole and 4: carbendazim + thiram, four insecticides (1: fipronil 250 SC, 2: thiamethoxam, 3: imidacloprid + thiodicarpe and 4: imodacloprid 600 FC and an inoculant (SEMIA 5079 and SEMIA 5080, common to all treatments, with three replications. The experiment was not repeated. The joint application of fungicide and insecticide with inoculant does not affect nodulation, foliar N content and vegetative growth of the plants as well as the masses of grains per plant and 100-grain mass. The use of the carbendazim + thiram mixed with fipronil and carbendazim + thiram mixed with imidacloprid provides less number of pods per plant and grains per plant, reflecting in reductions in the production of soybean grains. In this way, the fungicide carbendazim + thiram, regardless of the combined applied insecticide, is the most harmful to Bradyrhizobium spp.

  10. Synthesis and Fungicidal Activity of 1-(Carbamoylmethyl-2-aryl-3,1-benzoxazines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi-Long Tang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A series of new 1-(carbamoylmethyl-2-aryl-3,1-benzoxazines were prepared in moderate to good yields by BF3·OEt2-catalyzed reactions of aromatic aldehydes with 2-(N-substituted carbamoylmethylaminobenzyl alcohols. The structures of the target compounds were confirmed by IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, and elemental analyses. The fungicidal activities of the target compounds against plant fungi were preliminarily evaluated, and some of them exhibited good activity.

  11. Proteomic profile of the plant-pathogenic oomycete Phytophthora capsici in response to the fungicide pyrimorph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Zhili; Chen, Lei; Miao, Jianqiang; Wang, Zhiwen; Bulone, Vincent; Liu, Xili

    2015-09-01

    Pyrimorph is a novel fungicide from the carboxylic acid amide (CAA) family used to control plant-pathogenic oomycetes such as Phytophthora capsici. The proteomic response of P. capsici to pyrimorph was investigated using the iTRAQ technology to determine the target site of the fungicide and potential biomarker candidates of drug efficacy. A total of 1336 unique proteins were identified from the mycelium of wild-type P. capsici isolate (Hd3) and two pyrimorph-resistant mutants (R3-1 and R3-2) grown in the presence or absence of pyrimorph. Comparative analysis revealed that the three P. capsici isolates Hd3, R3-1, and R3-2 produced 163, 77, and 13 unique proteins, respectively, which exhibited altered levels of abundance in response to the pyrimorph treatment. Further investigations, using Cluster of Orthologous Groups of Proteins (COG) analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis identified 35 proteins related to the mode of action of pyrimorph against P. capsici and 62 proteins involved in the stress response of P. capsici to pyrimorph. Many of the proteins with altered expression were associated with glucose and energy metabolism. Biochemical analysis using d-[U-(14) C]glucose verified the proteomics data, suggesting that the major mode of action of pyrimorph in P. capsici is the inhibition of cell wall biosynthesis. These results also illustrate that proteomics approaches are useful tools for determining the pathways targeted by novel fungicides as well as for evaluating the tolerance of plant pathogens to environmental challenges, such as the presence of fungicides.

  12. Fungicidal activity of AKWATON and in vitro assessment of its toxic effects on animal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulé, Mathias Kégnon; Staines, Kenton; Lightly, Tasia; Roberts, Loren; Traoré, Yannick Léandre; Dickman, Michael; Bernier, Anne-Marie; Diop, Lamine

    2015-01-01

    Acquired superficial fungal infections are among the most common infections. It is necessary to create new effective and non-toxic disinfectants. AKWATON is a new disinfectant of the polymeric guanidine family. Its fungicidal activity against Trichophyton mentagrophytes and its in vitro toxicity assessment were determined in this study. The MIC, minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) and time required for its fungicidal activity at the MFC were evaluated using the official methods of analysis of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists, with modifications as recommended by the Canadian General Standards Board. The toxic effects of AKWATON and of four commercial disinfectants were evaluated on rat pancreatic (C2C12) and muscle (RnM5F) cells, using the trypan blue and MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] methods. The MIC, MFC and time required for the fungicidal activity of AKWATON at the MFC were 0.025 % (w/v), 0.045 % (w/v) and 2.5 min, respectively. Cell cultures and the different tests carried out showed that the AKWATON-based disinfectant killed fewer cells than the commercial disinfectants, sparing 80 % of C2C12 cells and 65 % of RnM5F cells, whilst some of the well-known disinfectants currently on the market killed 85-100 % of cells. This study demonstrates that AKWATON has great potential as an odourless, colourless, non-corrosive and safe disinfectant for use in hospitals, the agriculture industry, farming and household facilities.

  13. Predictive value of cell assays for developmental toxicity and embryotoxicity of conazole fungicides.

    OpenAIRE

    Sørensen, Karin Dreisig; Taxvig, Camilla; Kjærstad, Mia Birkhøj; Nellemann, Christine Lydia; Hass, Ulla; Vinggaard, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    This paper evaluates in vivo predictability of a battery of in vitro tests covering developmental toxicity and embryotoxicity of five widely used conazole fungicides. The conazoles were investigated in the embryonic stem cell test, and data were compared to in vivo embryotoxicity data. The same conazoles were evaluated on the basis of data from a battery of cell assays for endocrine activity, including assays for AR, ER, AhR, and sex hormone synthesis, and data were compared to in vivo develo...

  14. Mechanisms of action underlying the antiandrogenic effects of the fungicide prochloraz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laier, Peter; Metzdorff, Stine Broeng; Boberg, Julie

    2006-01-01

    The fungicide prochloraz has got multiple mechanisms of action that may influence the demasculinizing and reproductive toxic effects of the compound. In the present study, Wistar rats were dosed perinatally with prochloraz (50 and 150 mg/kg/day) from gestational day (GD) 7 to postnatal day (PND) ...... acts directly on the fetal testis to inhibit steroidogenesis and that this effect is exhibited at protein, and not at genomic, level. (c) 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  15. Impact of Fungicides Chlorothalonil and Propiconazole on Microbial Activities in Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramudu, A C; Mohiddin, G Jaffer; Srinivasulu, M; Madakka, M; Rangaswamy, V

    2011-01-01

    Introduction of agrochemicals (fungicides) into soil may have lasting effects on soil microbial activities and thus affect soil health. In order to determine the changes in microbial activity in a black clay and red sandy loam soils of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) cultivated fields, a case study was conducted with propiconazole and chlorothalonil to evaluate its effects on soil enzymes (cellulase and invertase) throughout 40 days of incubation under laboratory conditions with different concentrations (1.0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10.0 kg ha(-1)). Individual application of the two fungicides at 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 kg ha(-1) to the soil distinctly enhanced the activities of cellulase and invertase but at higher concentrations of 7.5 and 10 kg ha(-1) was toxic or innocuous to both cellulase and invertase activities. In soil samples receiving 2.5-5.0 kg ha(-1) of the fungicides, the accumulation of reducing sugar was pronounced more at 20 days, and the activity of the cellulase and invertase was drastically decreased with increasing period of incubation up to 30 and 40 days.

  16. [Effects of bio-organic fertilizer and fungicide application on continuous cropping obstacles of cut chrysanthemum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Zhao, Shuang; Yao, Jian-jun; Ye, Yan-ping; Song, Ai-ping; Chen, Fa-di; Chen, Su-mei; Dong, Xue-na

    2015-04-01

    Abstract: Fusarium wilt is a soil borne disease caused by plant continuous cropping in monoculture Chrysanthemum morifolium 'Youxiang' monoculture not only declines plant quality and yield but also decreases soil enzymes and soil microbial diversity over successive cultivation. In this article, the effects of fungicide (Carbendazim MBC), antifungal enhanced bio-organic fertilizer (BOF), and their combined application on the quality and soil enzymes activities of Chrysanthemum morifolium 'Youxiang' in continuous cropping systems were investigated. The results showed that both bioorganic fertilizer (BOF) and fungicide (MBC) single application could effectively prevent the occurrence of Fusarium wilt disease of cut chrysanthemum. Bio-organic fertilizer application was more effective on root activity, soil enzymes activities and quality (shoot height, stem diameter, leaf SPAD value, ray floret number, shoot fresh mass) improvement of cut chrysanthemum, while fungicide single application was responsible for soil enzymatic activities suppression to some extent. The combined application treatment (MBC+BOF) showed the best effects on quality improvement and soil enzyme activities promotion.

  17. Contamination of apple orchard soils and fruit trees with copper-based fungicides: sampling aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quanying; Liu, Jingshuang; Liu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Accumulations of copper in orchard soils and fruit trees due to the application of Cu-based fungicides have become research hotspots. However, information about the sampling strategies, which can affect the accuracy of the following research results, is lacking. This study aimed to determine some sampling considerations when Cu accumulations in the soils and fruit trees of apple orchards are studied. The study was conducted in three apple orchards from different sites. Each orchard included two different histories of Cu-based fungicides usage, varying from 3 to 28 years. Soil samples were collected from different locations varying with the distances from tree trunk to the canopy drip line. Fruits and leaves from the middle heights of tree canopy at two locations (outer canopy and inner canopy) were collected. The variation in total soil Cu concentrations between orchards was much greater than the variation within orchards. Total soil Cu concentrations had a tendency to increase with the increasing history of Cu-based fungicides usage. Moreover, total soil Cu concentrations had the lowest values at the canopy drip line, while the highest values were found at the half distances between the trunk and the canopy drip line. Additionally, Cu concentrations of leaves and fruits from the outer parts of the canopy were significantly higher than from the inner parts. Depending on the findings of this study, not only the between-orchard variation but also the within-orchard variation should be taken into consideration when conducting future soil and tree samplings in apple orchards.

  18. Effects of the hydrogen potential and fungicide treatment on Pitaya seed germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Alberto Ortiz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate pitaya seed germination under different hydrogen potentials, with or without fungicide treatment. A completely randomized design was employed under a 3 x 13 x 2 factorial scheme, corresponding to three pitaya species (white pitaya, pitaya hybrid I, pitaya hybrid II, thirteen hydrogen potentials (3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, 5.0, 5.5, 6.0, 6.5, 7.0, 7.5, 8.0, 8.5, and 9.0 and two fungicide conditions (presence and absence, with four replications. The percentage of germination, germination speed index and mean germination time were evaluated. The data were subjected to ANOVA, and the means were compared using the Scott-Knott test (p < 0.05. The pH influenced the germination speed index in white pitaya. The mean germination time was affected by the pH levels for white pitaya and pitaya hybrid II. The fungicide did not increase the germination percentage in the evaluated species.

  19. Fungicides transport in runoff from vineyard plot and catchment: contribution of non-target areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrancq, Marie; Payraudeau, Sylvain; García Verdú, Antonio Joaquín; Maillard, Elodie; Millet, Maurice; Imfeld, Gwenaël

    2014-04-01

    Surface runoff and erosion during the course of rainfall events are major processes of pesticides transport from agricultural land to aquatic ecosystem. These processes are generally evaluated either at the plot or the catchment scale. Here, we compared at both scales the transport and partitioning in runoff water of two widely used fungicides, i.e., kresoxim-methyl (KM) and cyazofamid (CY). The objective was to evaluate the relationship between fungicides runoff from the plot and from the vineyard catchment. The results show that seasonal exports for KM and CY at the catchment were larger than those obtained at the plot. This underlines that non-target areas within the catchment largely contribute to the overall load of runoff-associated fungicides. Estimations show that 85 and 62 % of the loads observed for KM and CY at the catchment outlet cannot be explained by the vineyard plots. However, the partitioning of KM and CY between three fractions, i.e., the suspended solids (>0.7 μm) and two dissolved fractions (i.e., between 0.22 and 0.7 µm and catchment and the plot scales enable to evaluate the sources areas of pesticide off-site transport.

  20. Occurrence of current-use fungicides and bifenthrin in Rainwater Basin wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimbs, William H; Cusaac, J Patrick W; Smith, Loren M; McMurry, Scott T; Belden, Jason B

    2016-09-01

    Wetlands in the Rainwater Basin (RWB) of Nebraska are commonly in close proximity to or embedded within row-crop agriculture. Several fungicides and bifenthrin are applied aerially to corn throughout the RWB during tassel stage. Thus, aerial spray drift and runoff may result in pesticide contamination of wetlands. The primary objective of this study was to determine water concentrations of five fungicides and bifenthrin in wetlands located in and near fields during a heavy application period (July 16th-26th 2014) to evaluate the influence of distance from crop field on wetland contamination. In addition, the sampling sites were grouped based upon the type of water body sampled and environmental concentrations were compared to relevant "levels of concern" (LOCs) from invertebrates, fish, and amphibians selected from the literature based upon relevant toxicity data. Bifenthrin was the most frequently detected analyte, appearing in 83% of the samples. The 95th percentile concentrations across all wetlands were found to be 0.07 μg/L for bifenthrin, 0.28 μg/L for pyraclostrobin, 0.28 μg/L for azoxystrobin, and fungicides were lower than LOCs, indicating limited acute toxicity risk. However, bifenthrin concentrations were frequently higher than LOCs for aquatic arthropods. Because the water samples included particulate bound pesticides, further work is needed to determine if this bifenthrin is bioavailable and contamination levels within the sediment.

  1. Evaluation of the toxicity of fungicides to flight muscle mitochondria of bumblebee (Bombus terrestris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syromyatnikov, Mikhail Y; Kokina, Anastasia V; Lopatin, Alexey V; Starkov, Anatoly A; Popov, Vasily N

    2017-01-01

    Insects pollinate 75% of crops used for human consumption. Over the last decade, a substantial reduction in the abundance of pollinating insects has been recorded and recognized as a severe matter for food supply security. Many of the important food crops destined for human consumption are grown in greenhouses. A unique feature of greenhouse agriculture is the extensive use of fungicides to curb multiple fungal infections. The most widely used pollinating insects in greenhouses are commercially reared bumblebees. However, there is no data regarding the toxicity of fungicides to bumblebee mitochondria. To fill this gap in knowledge, we examined the effects of 16 widely used fungicides on the energetics of the flight muscles mitochondria of Bombus terrestris. We found that diniconazole and fludioxonil uncoupled the respiration of mitochondria; dithianon and difenoconazole inhibited it. By analyzing the action of these inhibitors on mitochondrial respiration and generation of reactive oxygen species, we concluded that difenoconazole inhibited electron transport at the level of Complex I and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Dithianon strongly inhibited succinate dehydrogenase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. It also strongly inhibited mitochondrial oxidation of NAD-linked substrates or glycerol 3-phosphate, but it had no effect on the enzymatic activity of Complex I. It may be suggested that dithianon inhibits electron transport downstream of Complex I, likely at multiply sites.

  2. Detachment of sprayed colloidal copper oxychloride-metalaxyl fungicides by a shallow water flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pose-Juan, Eva; Paradelo-Pérez, Marcos; Rial-Otero, Raquel; Simal-Gándara, Jesus; López-Periago, José E

    2009-06-01

    Flow shear stress induced by rainfall promotes the loss of the pesticides sprayed on crops. Some of the factors influencing the losses of colloidal-size particulate fungicides are quantified by using a rotating shear system model. With this device it was possible to analyse the flow shear influencing washoff of a commercial fungicide formulation based on a copper oxychloride-metalaxyl mixture that was sprayed on a polypropylene surface. A factor plan with four variables, i.e. water speed and volume (both variables determining flow boundary stress in the shear device), formulation dosage and drying temperature, was set up to monitor colloid detachment. This experimental design, together with sorption experiments of metalaxyl on copper oxychloride, and the study of the dynamics of metalaxyl and copper oxychloride washoff, made it possible to prove that metalaxyl washoff from a polypropylene surface is controlled by transport in solution, whereas that of copper oxychloride occurs by particle detachment and transport of particles. Average losses for metalaxyl and copper oxychloride were, respectively, 29 and 50% of the quantity applied at the usual recommended dosage for crops. The key factors affecting losses were flow shear and the applied dosage. Empirical models using these factors provided good estimates of the percentage of fungicide loss. From the factor analysis, the main mechanism for metalaxyl loss induced by a shallow water flow is solubilisation, whereas copper loss is controlled by erosion of copper oxychloride particles.

  3. Fungicide sensitivity of Trichoderma spp. from Agaricus bisporus farms in Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosanović, Dejana; Potočnik, Ivana; Vukojević, Jelena; Stajić, Mirjana; Rekanović, Emil; Stepanović, Miloš; Todorović, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    Trichoderma species, the causal agents of green mould disease, induce great losses in Agaricus bisporus farms. Fungicides are widely used to control mushroom diseases although green mould control is encumbered with difficulties. The aims of this study were, therefore, to research in vitro toxicity of several commercial fungicides to Trichoderma isolates originating from Serbian and Bosnia-Herzegovina farms, and to evaluate the effects of pH and light on their growth. The majority of isolates demonstrated optimal growth at pH 5.0, and the rest at pH 6.0. A few isolates also grew well at pH 7. The weakest mycelial growth was noted at pH 8.0-9.0. Generally, light had an inhibitory effect on the growth of tested isolates. The isolates showed the highest susceptibility to chlorothalonil and carbendazim (ED50 less than 1 mg L(-1)), and were less sensitive to iprodione (ED50 ranged 0.84-6.72 mg L(-1)), weakly resistant to thiophanate-methyl (ED50 = 3.75-24.13 mg L(-1)), and resistant to trifloxystrobin (ED50 = 10.25-178.23 mg L(-1)). Considering the toxicity of fungicides to A. bisporus, carbendazim showed the best selective toxicity (0.02), iprodione and chlorothalonil moderate (0.16), and thiophanate-methyl the lowest (1.24), while trifloxystrobin toxicity to A. bisporus was not tested because of its inefficiency against Trichoderma isolates.

  4. Triazole fungicides and the selection of resistance to medical triazoles in the opportunistic mould Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verweij, Paul E; Kema, Gert H J; Zwaan, Bas; Melchers, Willem J G

    2013-02-01

    Azole resistance is an emerging problem in the opportunistic mould Aspergillus fumigatus. The triazoles are the most important agents for the management of Aspergillus diseases in humans. Selection for acquired resistance may occur in the hospital setting through exposure to high doses of azoles during azole therapy, but evidence is accumulating that A. fumigatus may become resistant to medical triazoles through environmental exposure to fungicides. The recovery of A. fumigatus isolates resistant to the medical triazoles from azole-naive patients as well as from the environment strongly indicates an environmental route of resistance selection. Molecule alignment studies have identified five fungicides that share a very similar molecule structure with the medical triazoles, and thus may have selected for mechanisms that confer resistance to both groups of compounds. It is important to explore further the presumed fungicide-driven route of resistance selection in order to implement effective preventive measures as the prevalence of azole resistance in A. fumigatus continues to increase and causes major challenges in the management of azole-resistant Aspergillus diseases.

  5. Fungicidal Drugs Induce a Common Oxidative-Damage Cellular Death Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Belenky

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Amphotericin, miconazole, and ciclopirox are antifungal agents from three different drug classes that can effectively kill planktonic yeast, yet their complete fungicidal mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we employ a systems biology approach to identify a common oxidative-damage cellular death pathway triggered by these representative fungicides in Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This mechanism utilizes a signaling cascade involving the GTPases Ras1 and Ras2 and protein kinase A, and it culminates in death through the production of toxic reactive oxygen species in a tricarboxylic-acid-cycle- and respiratory-chain-dependent manner. We also show that the metabolome of C. albicans is altered by antifungal drug treatment, exhibiting a shift from fermentation to respiration, a jump in the AMP/ATP ratio, and elevated production of sugars; this coincides with elevated mitochondrial activity. Lastly, we demonstrate that DNA damage plays a critical role in antifungal-induced cellular death and that blocking DNA-repair mechanisms potentiates fungicidal activity.

  6. Late Blight of Potato (Phytophthora infestans I: Fungicides Application and Associated Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Majeed

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Potato (Solanum tuberosum L. has been remained an important agricultural crop in resolving global food issues through decades. The crop has experienced enormous growth in terms of production throughout the world in recent decades because of improvement in agricultural mechanization, fertilizers application and irrigation practices. Nevertheless, a significant proportion of this valuable crop is still vulnerable to losses due to prevalence of different viral, bacterial, fungal and nematodes infestations. Late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans (Mont. de Bary, is one of the most threatening pathogenic diseases which not only results in direct crop losses but also cause farmers to embrace huge monetary expenses for disease control and preventive measures. The disease is well known for notorious ‘Irish Famine’ which resulted in drop of Irish population by more than 20% as result of hunger and potato starvation. Globally, annual losses of crop and money spend on fungicides for late blight control exceeds one trillion US dollars. This paper reviews the significance of late blight of potato and controlling strategies adopted for minimizing yield losses incurred by this disease by the use of synthetic fungicides. Advantages and disadvantages of fungicides application are discussed.

  7. Modeling fungicides mobility in undisturbed vineyard soil cores unamended and amended with spent mushroom substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Benito, Jesús María; Rodríguez-Cruz, María Sonia; Sánchez-Martín, María Jesús; Mamy, Laure

    2015-09-01

    The performance of the pesticide fate model PRZM to predict the fate of two fungicides, penconazole and metalaxyl, and the major metabolite of metalaxyl (CGA-62826), in amended and unamended vineyard soils was tested from undisturbed soils columns experiments. Three different treatments were tested in two soils: control soil (unamended), and soil amended with fresh or composted spent mushroom substrates, which correspond to common agricultural practices in Spain. Leaching experiments were performed under non-saturated flow conditions. The model was parameterized with laboratory and literature data, and using pedotransfer functions. It was first calibrated for water flow against chloride breakthrough curves. The key parameter was the hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient (DISP). No leaching of penconazole, the most hydrophobic fungicide, was observed. It remained in the top 0-8 cm of the column. In any case, simulations were highly correlated to the experimental results. On the contrary, metalaxyl and its metabolite were consistently found in the leachates. A calibration step of the Kd of metalaxyl and CGA-62826 and of DISP for CGA-62826 was necessary to obtain good prediction of the leaching of both compounds. PRZM generally simulated acceptable metalaxyl vertical distribution in the soil profiles although results were overestimated for its metabolite. Nevertheless, PRZM can be reasonably used to assess the leaching (through breakthrough curves) and vertical distribution of fungicides in amended soils, knowing their DISP values. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Antifungal effectiveness of fungicide and peroxyacetic acid mixture on the growth of Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoub, Fatima; Ben Oujji, Najwa; Chebli, Bouchra; Ayoub, Mohamed; Hafidi, Athman; Salghi, Rachid; Jodeh, Shehdeh

    2017-04-01

    In the attempt to reduce the negative impacts of chemical pesticides on environment and consumer's health, a new plant treatment practice minimizing the amount of pesticides needed during pests and diseases treatments has been developed. Our approach is based on combining the biocide effects of fungicide with the peroxyacetic acid (PAA) one. In this paper, we focused on the in vitro study of the antifungal activity of this combination against Botrytis cinerea, the most redoubtable threat of tomatoes plants in Morocco. First, different concentrations of a peroxyacetic acid product (PERACLEAN(®)5) and two commercially available fungicides SWITCH and SIGNUM were tested separately for their inhibitory effects on the mycelial growth and spores germination of B. cinerea. 100% inhibition of fungal growth was achieved using 16.77 and 14.47 μg/ml of SIGNUM and SWITCH respectively and 1.5% of PERACLEAN(®)5. When combined with 0.5% of the peroxyacetic acid mixture (PERACLEAN(®)5), the pesticides 100% effective concentrations decreased to 0.5 μg/ml for both pesticides. Hence, this approach allowed us to suppress the pathogen while minimizing the amounts of applied fungicides by more than 95%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Enantioselective bioactivity, acute toxicity and dissipation in vegetables of the chiral triazole fungicide flutriafol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing; Hua, Xiu-de; Shi, Hai-yan; Liu, Ji-song; Tian, Ming-ming; Wang, Ming-hua

    2015-03-02

    The enantioselective bioactivity, acute toxicity and stereoselective degradation of the chiral triazole fungicide flutriafol in vegetables were investigated for the first time using the (R)-, (S)- and rac-flutriafol. The order of the bioactivity against five target pathogens (Rhizoctonia solani, Alternaria solani, Pyricularia grisea, Gibberella zeae, Botrytis cinerea) was found to be (R)-flutriafol>rac-flutriafol>(S)-flutriafol. The fungicidal activity of (R)-flutriafol was 1.49-6.23 times higher than that of (S)-flutriafol. The (R)-flutriafol also showed 2.17-3.52 times higher acute toxicity to Eisenia fetida and Scenedesmus obliquus than (S)-flutriafol. The stereoselective degradation of flutriafol in tomato showed that the active (R)-flutriafol degraded faster, resulting in an enrichment of inactive (S)-form, and the half-lives were 9.23 d and 10.18 d, respectively. Inversely, the (S)-flutriafol, with a half-life of 4.76 d, was preferentially degraded in cucumber. In conclusion, the systemic assessments of the triazole fungicide flutriafol stereoisomers on the enantioselective bioactivity, acute toxicity and environmental behavior may have implications for better environmental and ecological risk assessment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Target-orientated and precise, real-time fungicide application in cereals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl-Heinz Dammer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Real-time application technologies based on the target crop, crop surface area and biomass using non-contact sensors for precise fungicide spraying in winter wheat have been developed in a joint research project. The decision support system proPlant expert.classic and the internet-version proPlant expert.com (proPlant GmbH suggest appropriate fungicides and dosages for certain infection scenarios of eight important leaf and ear diseases of winter wheat. The Precision Farming Module “Fungicide”, which runs on the on-board terminal in the tractor cabin, controls the spraying process. During the spraying process, the module defines the local target application amount using a local ultrasonic sensor value as an input parameter.Winter wheat field experiments were conducted in 2013 and 2014 (Agri Con Co., ATB to analyse the relationship between the sensor values (ultrasonic and camera and the leaf area index (LAI and biomass crop parameters that are important for a locally adapted and variable fungicide application rate. Measurements were performed several times during the vegetation period at sampling points that were visually selected based on crop density. Regression analyses showed that after technical changes in 2014, a linear relationship was obtained between the sensor values and the two crop parameters.

  11. Effect of foliar fertilizer and fungicidal protection against leaf spot diseases on winter wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Mączyńska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments were carried out in the seasons 2000/2001 and 2001/2002 in Plant Protection Institute, Sooenicowice Branch to assess the influence of foliar fertilizers such as Ekolist PK 1, Ekolist Mg, Mikrosol Z and Urea on healthiness of winter wheat. Foliar fertilizers were mixed with fungicides. The fungicides were applied at full or half recommended doses. The effect of the disease on wheat leaves was evaluated three times in each vegetation season. Remaining green leaf area (GLA of leaves was also determined. GLA of the leaves F-1 was not significantly different for each combination with different fertilization and different levels of chemical treatment. The application of foliar fertilizer only had no effect on green leaf area (GLA. The results indicate that foliar fertilization of all experimental plots improved leaf condition and therefore halted the development of wheat leaf diseases. The increases of 1000 grain mass and yield was high for each plot where a fertilizer and a full or half dose of a fungicide was applied. Foliar fertilizing with no chemical control had no proven effect on studied parameters.

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL RISK ASSESSMENT OF SOME COPPER BASED FUNGICIDES ACCORDING TO THE REQUIREMENTS OF GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marga GRĂDILĂ

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents data demonstrating the functionality of biological systems reconstituted with aquatic organisms developed under Good Laboratory Practice testing facility within Research - Development Institute for Plant Protection Bucharest for environmental risk assessment of four fungicides based on copper, according to Good Laboratory Practice requirements. For risk assessment, according to GLP were made the following steps: Good Laboratory Practice test facility was established, we have ensured adequate space for growth, acclimatization and testing for each test species, it was installed a complex water production instalation needed to perform tests, it was achieved control system for checking environmental conditions and have developed specific operating procedures that have been accredited according to Good Laboratory Practice.The results showed that biological systems model of the Good Laboratory Practice test facility in Research - Development Institute for Plant Protection meet the requirements of Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Guidelines regarding GLP, and after testing copper-based fungicides in terms of acute toxicity Cyprinus carpio and to Daphnia magna revealed that three of them (copper oxychloride, copper hydroxide and copper sulphate showed ecological efficiency, ie low toxicity. Metallic copper based fungicides showed a higher toxicity, resulting in fish toxicity symptoms: sleep, sudden immersion, faded, weakness, swimming in spiral, lack of balance, breathing slow and cumbersome, spasms and mortality.

  13. Lower Expression of SLC27A1 Enhances Intramuscular Fat Deposition in Chicken via Down-Regulated Fatty Acid Oxidation Mediated by CPT1A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Fengfang; Xie, Liang; Ma, Jing-e; Luo, Wen; Zhang, Li; Chao, Zhe; Chen, Shaohao; Nie, Qinghua; Lin, Zhemin; Zhang, Xiquan

    2017-01-01

    Intramuscular fat (IMF) is recognized as the predominant factor affecting meat quality due to its positive correlation with tenderness, juiciness, and flavor. Chicken IMF deposition depends on the balance among lipid synthesis, transport, uptake, and subsequent metabolism, involving a lot of genes and pathways, however, its precise molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. In the present study, the breast muscle tissue of female Wenchang chickens (WC) (higher IMF content, 1.24 in D120 and 1.62 in D180) and female White Recessive Rock chickens (WRR; lower IMF content, 0.53 in D120 and 0.90 in D180) were subjected to RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis. Results showed that many genes related to lipid catabolism, such as SLC27A1, LPL, ABCA1, and CPT1A were down-regulated in WC chickens, and these genes were involved in the PPAR signaling pathway and formed an IPA® network related to lipid metabolism. Furthermore, SLC27A1 was more down-regulated in WRR.D180.B than in WRR.D120.B. Decreased cellular triglyceride (TG) and up-regulated CPT1A were observed in the SLC27A1 overexpression QM-7 cells, and increased cellular triglyceride (TG) and down-regulated CPT1A were observed in the SLC27A1 knockdown QM-7 cells. These results suggest that lower lipid catabolism exists in WC chickens but not in WRR chickens, and lower expression of SLC27A1 facilitate IMF deposition in chicken via down-regulated fatty acid oxidation mediated by CPT1A. These findings indicate that reduced lipid catabolism, rather than increased lipid anabolism, contributes to chicken IMF deposition. PMID:28706492

  14. Interactions between crop biomass and development of foliar diseases in winter wheat and the potential to graduate the fungicide dose according to crop biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Kryger; Jørgensen, Lise Nistrup

    2016-01-01

    is typically carried out using a constant fungicide dose in the entire field although there may be large differences in crop development and biomass across the field. The objective of the study reported in this paper was to test whether the fungicide dose response curve controlling septoria leaf blotch...... and other foliar diseases in winter wheat was dependent on crop development and biomass level. If such a biomass dependent dose response was found it was further the purpose to evaluate the potential to optimize fungicide inputs in winter wheat crops applying a site-specific crop density dependent fungicide...... dose. The study was carried out investigating fungicide dose response controlling foliar diseases in winter wheat at three biomass densities obtained growing the crop at three nitrogen levels and using variable seed rates. Further the field experiments included three fungicide dose rates at each...

  15. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitric oxide administration apparatus. 868.5165... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5165 Nitric oxide administration apparatus. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is a device used to add...

  16. CHANGES OF NITRIC OXIDE AND PROTECTIVE EFFECTS OF NITRIC OXIDE INHIBITORS IN NEWBORN RATS WITH SEPSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史源; 李华强; 潘捷; 沈际皋

    1995-01-01

    In a newborn rat model of sepsis, the changes of nitric oxide and the protective effects of methylene blue or/and dexaraethason were investigated. The results revealed that plasma nitric oxide levels were ele-cted at 6 h and peaked at 12 h after bacterial challenge. The treatment with methylene or/and dexam-etbasone was found to Munt hypoglycenua and hyperlacdcemla, to reduce the occurrence rate of loss ot re-sponse to pain, and to prolong the survival time. Moreover, therapy by dexamethasone was shown to de-crease the 24 h mortality. The results suggested that nitric coide play an important role during the course of fatal P. aeruginosa sepsis, hut it is clear that the clinical value of nitric oxide and its inhibitors need to be further studied.

  17. Circulating nitric oxide products do not solely reflect nitric oxide release in cirrhosis and portal hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzelius, Pia; Bazeghi, Nassim; Bie, Peter;

    2011-01-01

    Patients with cirrhosis often develop a systemic vasodilatation and a hyperdynamic circulation with activation of vasoconstrictor systems such as the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), and vasopressin. Increased nitric oxide (NO) synthesis has been implicated in the development...

  18. Nitric oxide turnover in permeable river sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Frank; Stief, Peter; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2014-01-01

    We measured nitric oxide (NO) microprofiles in relation to oxygen (O2) and all major dissolved N-species (ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide [N2O]) in a permeable, freshwater sediment (River Weser, Germany). NO reaches peak concentrations of 0.13 μmol L-1 in the oxic zone and is consumed...

  19. Nitric Oxide in Mammary Tumor Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    de Miguel L, Monton M, Casado S, Lopez -Farre A: Endothelial cytosolic proteins bind to the 3’-untranslated region of endothelial nitric oxide...Vazquez AM. Cabrera L, Barral AM, Gen- 38. Morgan DA, Ruscetti FW, Gallo R: Selective in vitro delman R, Jondal M: Toxic effects of interleukin-2

  20. Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitors as Antidepressants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Gregers; Volke, Vallo

    2010-01-01

    been suggested to play major roles in the pathophysiology of mood and stress-related disorders. However, a few clinical and several pre-clinical studies, strongly suggest involvement of the nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway in these disorders. Moreover, several of the conventional neurotransmitters...

  1. Processes regulating nitric oxide emissions from soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a reactive gas that plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry by influencing the production and destruction of ozone and thereby the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. NO also contributes by its oxidation products to the formation of acid rain. The major sources...

  2. Nitric Oxide and the Central Nervous System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Dzoljic (Eleonora)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractDuring the last ten years, several investigators have reported that biological effects of endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF; Furchgott and Zawadzki, 1980) are actually activities of a signal molecule, nitric oxide (NO; Moncada el al., 1988). This molecule is synthesised by endoth

  3. Increased nitric oxide release and expression of endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthases in mildly changed porcine mitral valve leaflets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, Sophia G; Olsen, Lisbeth H; Viuff, Birgitte M

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: Little is known of the local role of nitric oxide (NO) in heart valves in relation to heart valve diseases. The study aim was to examine NO release and the expression of both endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in re...

  4. Increased nitric oxide release and expression of endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthases in mildly changed porcine mitral valve leaflets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, Sophia Gry; Olsen, Lisbeth Høier; Viuff, Birgitte;

    2007-01-01

    Background and aim of the study: Little is known of the local role of nitric oxide (NO) in heart valves in relation to heart valve diseases. The study aim was to examine NO release and the expression of both endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (i...

  5. Modulatory role of nitric oxide in cardiac performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smiljić Sonja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide is produced by almost all cardiac cells, endothelial cells, cardiomyocytes and nerve fibers. It is synthesized by an enzyme, a nitric oxide synthase, which occurs in endothelial, neural and inducible form. The distribution of nitric oxide synthase in the heart is characterized by a pronounced non-uniformity. Nitric oxide exerts its effects in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. The physiological effects of low concentrations of nitric oxide, which is released in the normal conditions under the influence of constituent enzymes, occur via cyclic guanosine monophosphate. The synthesized nitric oxide exhibits its effect in the cells where it is produced, in an autocrine manner, or by diffusing into the neighboring cells, in a paracrine manner. Nitric oxide acts by regulating the coronary vessel tonus, affecting the contractility of cardiomyocytes, generating an inotropic effect in a dose-dependent manner and controlling the cellular respiration. Other effects of nitric oxide in the cardiovascular system include the hyperpolarization of the smooth muscle cells in blood vessels, the inhibition of the monocyte adhesion, the inhibition of platelet migration, adhesion and aggregation and the proliferation of smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts. The anti-atherosclerotic effects of nitric oxide are based on these effects. Nitric oxide is a weak free radical in gaseous state, and the cytotoxic and/or the cytoprotective effects of the higher concentrations of nitric oxide are related to the chemical structure of nitric oxide as a free radical. The excessive production of nitric oxide by the activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase can lead to major irregularities in the function of cardiomyocytes and cardiac insufficiency. Understanding the nitric oxide molecular mechanisms of signaling pathways in the heart can provide a new strategic approach to prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  6. Waterborne toxicity and diet-related effects of fungicides in the key leaf shredder Gammarus fossarum (Crustacea: Amphipoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrod, J P; Englert, D; Wolfram, J; Wallace, D; Schnetzer, N; Baudy, P; Konschak, M; Schulz, R; Bundschuh, M

    2015-12-01

    Animals involved in leaf litter breakdown (i.e., shredders) play a central role in detritus-based stream food webs, while their fitness and functioning can be impaired by anthropogenic stressors. Particularly fungicides can affect shredders via both waterborne exposure and their diet, namely due to co-ingestion of adsorbed fungicides and shifts in the leaf-associated fungal community, on which shredders' nutrition heavily relies. To understand the relevance of these effect pathways, we used a full 2×2-factorial test design: the leaf material serving as food was microbially colonized for 12 days either in a fungicide-free control or exposed to a mixture of five current-use fungicides (sum concentration of 62.5μg/L). Similarly, the amphipod shredder Gammarus fossarum was subjected to the same treatments but for 24 days. Waterborne exposure reduced leaf consumption by ∼20%, which did not fully explain the reduction in feces production (∼30%), indicating an enhanced utilization of food to compensate for detoxification mechanisms. This may also explain the reduced feces production (∼10%) of gammarids feeding on fungicide-exposed leaves. The reduction may, however, also be caused by a decreased nutritious quality of the leaves indicated by a reduced species richness (∼40%) of leaf-associated fungi. However, compensation for these effects by Gammarus was seemingly incomplete, since both waterborne exposure and the consumption of the fungicide-affected diet drastically reduced gammarid growth (∼110% and ∼40%, respectively). Our results thus indicate that fungicide mixtures have the potential for detrimental implications in aquatic ecosystem functioning by affecting shredders via both effect pathways.

  7. Effects of the boscalid fungicide Filan® on the marine amphipod Allorchestes compressa at environmentally relevant concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Hung T; Keough, Michael J; Long, Sara M; Pettigrove, Vincent J

    2016-05-01

    Fungicides are widely used in agriculture to control fungal diseases. After application, fungicides can be transported offsite to surface and groundwater and ultimately enter estuarine and marine environments. The presence of fungicides in the marine environment may pose risks to marine organisms, but little is known about fungicide effects on these organisms, especially invertebrates. The present study investigated the effects of the commonly used boscalid fungicide Filan® on life history traits, feeding rate, and energy reserves (lipid, glycogen, and protein content) of the marine amphipod Allorchestes compressa over 6 wk under laboratory conditions. Amphipods were exposed to 3 concentrations of Filan (1 μg, 10 μg, and 40 μg active ingredient [a.i.]/L), with 5 replicates per treatment. Lipid content and reproduction were the most sensitive measures of effect, with lipid content reduced by 53.8% at the highest concentration. Survival, growth, and other energy reserves of amphipods were also negatively affected by Filan, and the effects were concentration dependent. Antennal deformities were incidentally observed on the amphipods at a concentration of 40 μg a.i./L. The results of the present study indicate comprehensive effects of the boscalid fungicide Filan on A. compressa at environmentally relevant concentrations. The decline or absence of A. compressa in marine ecosystems could impair the ecosystem function because of their important role in trophic transfer and nutrient recycling. The authors' results suggest that even though the use of fungicides is often regarded as posing only a minor risk to aquatic organisms, the assessment of their long-term effects is critical.

  8. Monitoring of the tumor response to nano-graphene oxide-mediated photothermal/photodynamic therapy by diffusion-weighted and BOLD MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jianbo; An, Hengqing; Huang, Xinglu; Fu, Guifeng; Zhuang, Rongqiang; Zhu, Lei; Xie, Jin; Zhang, Fan

    2016-05-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) are promising cancer treatment modalities. Because each modality has its own set of advantages and limitations, there has been interest in developing methods that can co-deliver the two regimens for enhanced tumor treatment. Among the efforts, nano-graphene oxide-mediated phototherapies have recently attracted much attention. Nano-graphene oxide has a broad absorbance spectrum and can be loaded with photosensitizers, such as chlorin e6, with high efficiency. Chlorin e6-loaded and PEGylated nano-graphene (GO-PEG-Ce6) can be excited at 660 nm, 808 nm, or both, to induce PDT, PTT, or PDT/PTT combination. Despite the potential of the treatments, there is a lack of a diagnostic tool which can monitor their therapeutic response in a non-invasive and prognostic manner; such an ability is urgently needed for the transformation and translation of the technologies. In this study, we performed diffusion-weighted and blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after GO-PEG-Ce6-mediated PTT, PDT, or PTT/PDT. We found that after efficient PTT, there is a significant increase of the tumor apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value in diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) maps; meanwhile, an efficient PDT led to an increase of in BOLD images. In both the cases, the amplitude of the increase was correlated with the treatment outcomes. More interestingly, a synergistic treatment efficacy was observed when the PTT/PDT combination was applied, and the combination was associated with a greater ADC and increase than when either modality was used alone. In particular, the PTT/PDT condition that induced the most dramatic short-term increase of the ADC value (>70%) caused the most effective tumor control in the long-run, with 60% of the treated animals being tumor-free after 60 days. These results suggest the great promise of the combination of DWI and BOLD MRI as a tool for accurate monitoring and prognosis

  9. Effect of the spray volume adjustment model on the efficiency of fungicides and residues in processing tomato

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratajkiewicz, H.; Kierzek, R.; Raczkowski, M.; Hołodyńska-Kulas, A.; Łacka, A.; Wójtowicz, A.; Wachowiak, M.

    2016-11-01

    This study compared the effects of a proportionate spray volume (PSV) adjustment model and a fixed model (300 L/ha) on the infestation of processing tomato with potato late blight (Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary) (PLB) and azoxystrobin and chlorothalonil residues in fruits in three consecutive seasons. The fungicides were applied in alternating system with or without two spreader adjuvants. The proportionate spray volume adjustment model was based on the number of leaves on plants and spray volume index. The modified Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe (QuEChERS) method was optimized and validated for extraction of azoxystrobin and chlorothalonil residue. Gas chromatography with a nitrogen and phosphorus detector and an electron capture detector were used for the analysis of fungicides. The results showed that higher fungicidal residues were connected with lower infestation of tomato with PLB. PSV adjustment model resulted in lower infestation of tomato than the fixed model (300 L/ha) when fungicides were applied at half the dose without adjuvants. Higher expected spray interception into the tomato canopy with the PSV system was recognized as the reasons of better control of PLB. The spreader adjuvants did not have positive effect on the biological efficacy of spray volume application systems. The results suggest that PSV adjustment model can be used to determine the spray volume for fungicide application for processing tomato crop. (Author)

  10. Effect of the spray volume adjustment model on the efficiency of fungicides and residues in processing tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henryk Ratajkiewicz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the effects of a proportionate spray volume (PSV adjustment model and a fixed model (300 L/ha on the infestation of processing tomato with potato late blight (Phytophthora infestans (Mont. de Bary (PLB and azoxystrobin and chlorothalonil residues in fruits in three consecutive seasons. The fungicides were applied in alternating system with or without two spreader adjuvants. The proportionate spray volume adjustment model was based on the number of leaves on plants and spray volume index. The modified Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe (QuEChERS method was optimized and validated for extraction of azoxystrobin and chlorothalonil residue. Gas chromatography with a nitrogen and phosphorus detector and an electron capture detector were used for the analysis of fungicides. The results showed that higher fungicidal residues were connected with lower infestation of tomato with PLB. PSV adjustment model resulted in lower infestation of tomato than the fixed model (300 L/ha when fungicides were applied at half the dose without adjuvants. Higher expected spray interception into the tomato canopy with the PSV system was recognized as the reasons of better control of PLB. The spreader adjuvants did not have positive effect on the biological efficacy of spray volume application systems. The results suggest that PSV adjustment model can be used to determine the spray volume for fungicide application for processing tomato crop.

  11. Occurrence of mycotoxins in wheat grains exposed to fungicides on fusarium head blight control in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Leandro N; Pizzutti, Ionara R; Balardin, Ricardo S; Dos Santos, Ingrid D; Dias, Jonatan V; Stefanello, Marlon T; Serafini, Pablo T

    2017-01-12

    Mycotoxins occurrence in wheat grains impose risks to human and animal health. The southern Brazil has favorable weather conditions for Fusarium graminearum infections and consequently for mycotoxins accumulation on grains. The goal of this study was to evaluate the behavior of new wheat commercial genotypes to Fusarium Head Blight (FHB), to control performance of new fungicide formulations and their relationship with mycotoxins concentration in grains. The manly mycotoxin occurrence on wheat grains in southern Brazil was deoxynivalenol (DON). Two cultivars showed high DON concentration above the tolerance limits (>3000 μg kg(-1)). Many other mycotoxins monitored presented concentrations below method detection limit. Satisfactory levels of fungicide effectiveness were achieved against F. graminearum. Some fungicides promoted a satisfactory decrease on DON accumulation in grains. The best results were obtained when prothioconazole was present. SDHI (Succinate dehydrogenase inhibitors) + QoI (Quinone outside inhibitors) fungicides showed benefic effects at FHB control at field, but it did not promote satisfactory reduction on DON contamination. Fungicides can be used satisfactory for FHB control and reduce DON contamination in grains in southern Brazil. The presence of prothioconazole should be recommended. Some genotypes showed high DON concentration and it was not directly related with FHB severity at field.

  12. Development Status and Prospect of Agricultural Fungicide%农用杀菌剂发展现状及展望

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶燕

    2014-01-01

    Agriculture was one of the largest field where the most amount and kinds of fungicide were used. Agricultural fungicide referred to a class of pesticides for control of plant diseases caused by a variety of pathogenic microorganisms, which can kill the pathogen spores, mycelium or inhibit the growth.The structure and biological activity of agricultural fungicide were summarized, such as triazole, pyridines, imidazole fungicides and so on.The prospect of the research direction in the development of fungicides was look forward.%农业是杀菌剂使用量最大,所用品种最多,使用范围最广的一个领域。农用杀菌剂是指用于防治由各种病原微生物引起的植物病害的一类农药,一般指杀真菌剂,具有杀死病菌孢子、菌丝体或者抑制其发育、生长的作用。文章综述了三唑类、吡啶类、噁(咪)唑类等农用杀菌剂的结构及其生物活性,并展望了今后杀菌剂开发的研究方向。

  13. Probing the molecular interaction of triazole fungicides with human serum albumin by multispectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Zhuang, Shulin; Tong, Changlun; Liu, Weiping

    2013-07-31

    Triazole fungicides, one category of broad-spectrum fungicides, are widely applied in agriculture and medicine. The extensive use leads to many residues and casts potential detrimental effects on aquatic ecosystems and human health. After exposure of the human body, triazole fungicides may penetrate into the bloodstream and interact with plasma proteins. Whether they could have an impact on the structure and function of proteins is still poorly understood. By using multispectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling, the interaction of several typical triazole fungicides with human serum albumin (HSA), the major plasma protein, was investigated. The steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectra manifested that static type, due to complex formation, was the dominant mechanism for fluorescence quenching. Structurally related binding modes speculated by thermodynamic parameters agreed with the prediction of molecular modeling. For triadimefon, hydrogen bonding with Arg-218 and Arg-222 played an important role, whereas for imazalil, myclobutanil, and penconazole, the binding process was mainly contributed by hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Via alterations in three-dimensional fluorescence and circular dichroism spectral properties, it was concluded that triazoles could induce slight conformational and some microenvironmental changes of HSA. It is anticipated that these data can provide some information for possible toxicity risk of triazole fungicides to human health and be helpful in reinforcing the supervision of food safety.

  14. Microscopy reveals disease control through novel effects on fungal development: a case study with an early-generation benzophenone fungicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Mark R; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Cotter, H Van T; O'Connell, Richard; Hollomon, Derek

    2006-05-01

    The benzophenones are a new class of agricultural fungicides that demonstrate protectant, curative and eradicative/antisporulant activity against powdery mildews. The chemistry is represented in the marketplace by the fungicide metrafenone, recently introduced by BASF and discussed in the following paper. The benzophenones show no evidence of acting by previously identified biochemical mechanisms, nor do they show cross-resistance with existing fungicides. The value of microscopy in elucidating fungicide mode of action is demonstrated through identification of the effects of an early benzophenone, eBZO, on mildew development. eBZO caused profound alterations in the morphology of powdery mildews of both monocotyledons and dicotyledons, affecting multiple stages of fungal development, including spore germination, appressorial formation, penetration, surface hyphal morphology and sporogenesis. Identification of analogous effects of eBZO on sporulation in the model organism Aspergillus nidulans (Eidam) Winter provides a unique opportunity to elucidate important morphogenetic regulatory sites in the economically important obligate pathogens, the powdery mildews. Benzophenones provide a further example of the benefits of whole-organism testing in the search for novel fungicide modes of action. Copyright 2006 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel fluorine-containing stilbene derivatives as fungicidal agents against phytopathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Weilin; He, Daohang; Xi, Pinggen; Li, Xinwei

    2015-11-18

    The rising development of resistance to conventional fungicides is driving the search for new alternative candidates to control plant diseases. In this study, a series of new fluorine-containing stilbene derivatives was synthesized on the basis of our previous quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis results. Bioassays in vivo revealed that the title compounds exhibited potent fungicidal activities against phytopathogenic fungi (Colletotrichum lagenarium and Pseudoperonospora cubensis) from cucumber plants. In comparison to the previous results, the introduction of a fluorine moiety showed improved activities of some compounds against those fungi. Notably, compound 9 exhibited a control efficacy against C. lagenarium (83.4 ± 1.3%) comparable to that of commercial fungicide (82.7 ± 1.7%). For further understanding the possible mode of action of the stilbene against C. lagenarium, the effects on hyphal morphology, electrolyte leakage, and respiration of mycelial cell suspension were studied. Microscopic observation showed considerably deformed mycelial morphology. The conductivity of mycelial suspension increased in the presence of compound 9, whereas no significantly inhibitory effect on respiration was observed. Taken together, the fungicidal mechanism of this stilbene is associated with its membrane disruption effect, resulting in increased membrane permeability. These results provide important clues for mechanistic study and derivatization of stilbenes as alternative sources of fungicidal agents for plant disease control.

  16. Different toxicity of the strobilurin fungicides kresoxim-methyl and trifloxistrobin to Venturia inaequalis isolates from Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stević, Milan; Tamaš, Nenad; Miletić, Novica; Vukša, Petar

    2015-01-01

    Sensitivity of monosporial isolates of V. inaequalis, originated from apple orchards previously exposed (commercial and experimental) and those originated from location where fungicides had never been used (wild type), to strobilurin fungicides kresoxim-methyl and trifloxistrobin was investigated in this study. The experiments were carried out in laboratory using in vitro and in vivo methods. Mycelia growth inhibition on PDA medium with kresoxim-methyl and trifloxistrobin was monitored and sensitivity parameters (EC50 values) were determined using probit analysis. The isolates sensitivity in vivo was tested on apple seedlings using inoculation method. The EC50 values were ranging from 0.066-2.033 and 0.011-0.323 µg mL(-1) for kresoxim-methyl and trifloxistrobin, respectively. The wild type of isolates showed a normal susceptibility to kresoxim-methyl and trifloxistrobin, while isolates originated from experimental and commercial orchard where those fungicides had been used extensively, showed significantly lower sensitivity to the both strobilurin fungicides. The isolate that showed the resistance to kresoxim-methyl and trifloxistrobin in vitro test, also showed reduced sensitivity in vivo test and could not been controlled satisfactory by fungicide concentrations that are commercially used, as well as by double higher, after apple seedlings inoculation.

  17. Fungicide efflux and the MgMFS1 transporter contribute to the multidrug resistance phenotype in Zymoseptoria tritici field isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omrane, Selim; Sghyer, Hind; Audéon, Colette; Lanen, Catherine; Duplaix, Clémentine; Walker, Anne-Sophie; Fillinger, Sabine

    2015-08-01

    Septoria leaf blotch is mainly controlled by fungicides. Zymoseptoria tritici, which is responsible for this disease, displays strong adaptive capacity to fungicide challenge. It developed resistance to most fungicides due to target site modifications. Recently, isolated strains showed cross-resistance to fungicides with unrelated modes of action, suggesting a resistance mechanism known as multidrug resistance (MDR). We show enhanced prochloraz efflux, sensitive to the modulators amitryptiline and chlorpromazine, for two Z. tritici strains, displaying an MDR phenotype in addition to the genotypes CYP51(I381V Y461H) or CYP51(I381V ΔY459/) (G460) , respectively, hereafter named MDR6 and MDR7. Efflux was also inhibited by verapamil in the MDR7 strain. RNA sequencing lead to the identification of several transporter genes overexpressed in both MDR strains. The expression of the MgMFS1 gene was the strongest and constitutively high in MDR field strains. Its inactivation in the MDR6 strain abolished resistance to fungicides with different modes of action supporting its involvement in MDR in Z. tritici. A 519 bp insert in the MgMFS1 promoter was detected in half of the tested MDR field strains, but absent from sensitive field strains, suggesting that the insert is correlated with the observed MDR phenotype. Besides MgMfs1, other transporters and mutations may be involved in MDR in Z. tritici.

  18. Effect of prothioconazole-based fungicides on Fusarium head blight, grain yield and deoxynivalenol accumulation in wheat under field conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam HAIDUKOWSKI

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of triazole-based treatments on Fusarium head blight (FHB, grain yields and the accumulation of deoxynivalenol (DON in harvested wheat kernels was evaluated by means of twenty multi-site field experiments performed during five consecutive growing seasons (from 2004‒2005 to 2008‒2009 in Italy. Fungicide treatments were carried out on different cultivars of common wheat (cv. Serio, Blasco, Genio and Savio and durum wheat (cv. Orobel, Saragolla, San Carlo, Levante, Duilio, Karur and Derrik after artificial inoculation with a mixture of toxigenic Fusarium graminearum and F. culmorum strains. The application of fungicides containing prothioconazole (Proline® or Prosaro® at the beginning of anthesis (BBCH 61 resulted in a consistent reduction of FHB disease severity (by between 39 and 93% and DON levels in wheat kernels (by between 40 and 91% and increased wheat yields (from 0.4 to 5.6 t ha-1, average 2.2 t ha-1, as compared to the untreated/inoculated control. Fungicides containing tebuconazole (Folicur® SE and cyproconazole plus prochloraz (Tiptor® Xcell showed a reduced effectiveness compared with prothioconazole-based treatments. All fungicide treatments were more effective in reducing DON and increasing grain yields of common wheat than durum wheat. Results showed that the application of fungicides containing prothioconazole at the beginning of anthesis provided a strong reduction of FHB disease, allowing both an increase in grain yields and a considerable reduction of DON content in wheat kernels.

  19. Effect of simulated rain on the efficiency of fungicides in potato late blight and early blight control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Guerino Tofoli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rainfastness of fungicides used in the control of late blight (Phytophthora infestans and early blight (Alternaria solani of potato was evaluated under green house and laboratory conditions. ‘Agata’ and ‘Monalisa’ plants treated with fungicides against both diseases were subjected to 20 mm controlled rain simulation for 6 min at 30 min, 1, 2, and 4 h after application. Once all leaves had dried, foliar discs were transferred to Petri dishes and inoculated with the respective pathogens. The plates were then incubated in a BOD chamber for a 12-h photoperiod at 18°C and 25°C, respectively. Disease severity was evaluated by determining the area (% of the foliar discs affected by disease on 5 and 7 days post-inoculation. The results suggest that systemic or inherent tenacity fungicides were less influenced by the simulated rain as compared to contact fungicides. An increase in drying time promoted higher control levels of both diseases, indicating a better retention and absorption of the tested fungicides.

  20. Observations on the Behaviour of Different Populations of Plasmopara viticola Resistant to QoI Fungicides in Italian Vineyards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L. Gullino

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Grapevine downy mildew, caused by Plasmopara viticola, is probably the most damaging fungal disease of grapevine world-wide. Among the fungicides recently developed for downy mildew control is the QoI class of fungicides, which inhibits mitochondrial respiration. Since 1999, selected P. viticola populations in northern Italy have been monitored for resistance to QoI fungicides. Detached leaf discs and whole potted plants were used under controlled conditions to test the sampled populations. QoI-resistant populations of P. viticola were found in all the vineyards sampled in 2001 and 2002 in Trentino Alto Adige and Friuli Venezia Giulia, where failure in QoI control was reported. Many of the populations had minimum inhibition concentration (MIC values 3– 30 times higher than those of sensitive reference populations. Populations of P. viticola sampled from vineyards in Piedmont, where no QoI fungicides had previously been used, showed MIC values equal to, or lower than those of the reference populations. Most of the P. viticola populations collected in Trentino Alto Adige in 2001 showed high virulence in leaf disc test and were not controlled by QoI fungicides, applied both at field and double field rates in the whole plant test. Most of these populations retained their virulence in the subsequent leaf disc test in water.

  1. Role of fungicides, application of nozzle types, and the resistance level of wheat varieties in the control of Fusarium head blight and deoxynivalenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesterházy, Akos; Tóth, Beáta; Varga, Monika; Bartók, Tibor; Szabó-Hevér, Agnes; Farády, László; Lehoczki-Krsjak, Szabolcs

    2011-11-01

    Fungicide application is a key factor in the control of mycotoxin contamination in the harvested wheat grain. However, the practical results are often disappointing. In 2000-2004, 2006-2008 and 2007 and 2008, three experiments were made to test the efficacy of fungicide control on Fusarium Head Blight (FHB) in wheat and to find ways to improve control of the disease and toxin contamination. In a testing system we have used for 20 years, tebuconazole and tebuconazole + prothioconazole fungicides regularly reduced symptoms by about 80% with a correlating reduction in toxin contamination. Averages across the years normally show a correlation of r = 0.90 or higher. The stability differences (measured by the stability index) between the poorest and the best fungicides are about 10 or more times, differing slightly in mycotoxin accumulation, FHB index (severity) and Fusarium damaged kernels (FDK). The weak fungicides, like carbendazim, were effective only when no epidemic occurred or epidemic severity was at a very low level. Similar fungicide effects were seen on wheat cultivars which varied in FHB resistance. In this study, we found three fold differences in susceptibility to FHB between highly susceptible and moderately resistant cultivars when treated with fungicides. In the moderately resistant cultivars, about 50% of the fungicide treatments lowered the DON level below the regulatory limit. In the most susceptible cultivars, all fungicides failed to reduce mycotoxin levels low enough for grain acceptance, in spite of the fact that disease was significantly reduced. The results correlated well with the results of the large-scale field tests of fungicide application at the time of natural infection. The Turbo FloodJet nozzle reduced FHB incidence and DON contamination when compared to the TeeJet XR nozzle. Overall, the data suggest that significant decreases in FHB incidence and deoxynivalenol contamination in field situations are possible with proper fungicide

  2. Role of Fungicides, Application of Nozzle Types, and the Resistance Level of Wheat Varieties in the Control of Fusarium Head Blight and Deoxynivalenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabolcs Lehoczki-Krsjak

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Fungicide application is a key factor in the control of mycotoxin contamination in the harvested wheat grain. However, the practical results are often disappointing. In 2000–2004, 2006–2008 and 2007 and 2008, three experiments were made to test the efficacy of fungicide control on Fusarium Head Blight (FHB in wheat and to find ways to improve control of the disease and toxin contamination. In a testing system we have used for 20 years, tebuconazole and tebuconazole + prothioconazole fungicides regularly reduced symptoms by about 80% with a correlating reduction in toxin contamination. Averages across the years normally show a correlation of r = 0.90 or higher. The stability differences (measured by the stability index between the poorest and the best fungicides are about 10 or more times, differing slightly in mycotoxin accumulation, FHB index (severity and Fusarium damaged kernels (FDK. The weak fungicides, like carbendazim, were effective only when no epidemic occurred or epidemic severity was at a very low level. Similar fungicide effects were seen on wheat cultivars which varied in FHB resistance. In this study, we found three fold differences in susceptibility to FHB between highly susceptible and moderately resistant cultivars when treated with fungicides. In the moderately resistant cultivars, about 50% of the fungicide treatments lowered the DON level below the regulatory limit. In the most susceptible cultivars, all fungicides failed to reduce mycotoxin levels low enough for grain acceptance, in spite of the fact that disease was significantly reduced. The results correlated well with the results of the large-scale field tests of fungicide application at the time of natural infection. The Turbo FloodJet nozzle reduced FHB incidence and DON contamination when compared to the TeeJet XR nozzle. Overall, the data suggest that significant decreases in FHB incidence and deoxynivalenol contamination in field situations are possible with

  3. Effects of Insecticides and Fungicides Commonly Used in Tomato Production on Phytoseiulus persimilis (Acari: Phtyoseiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditillo, J L; Kennedy, G G; Walgenbach, J F

    2016-12-01

    The twospotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae), is an important pest of tomatoes in North Carolina. Resident populations of the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis have recently been detected on field-grown tomatoes in central North Carolina, and potentially can be a useful biological control agent against T. urticae Laboratory bioassays were used to assess lethal and reproductive effects of 10 insecticides and five fungicides commonly used in commercial tomato production (chlorantraniliprole, spinetoram, permethrin, imidacloprid, dimethoate, dinotefuran, thiamethoxam, bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, azoxystrobin, chlorothalonil, boscalid, cyazofamid, and mancozeb) on P. persimilis adult females and eggs. Insecticides were tested using concentrations equivalent to 1×, 0.5×, and 0.1× of the recommended field rates. Fungicides were tested at the 1× rate only. Dimethoate strongly impacted P. persimilis with high adult mortality, reduced fecundity, and reduced hatch of eggs laid by treated adults, particularly at high concentrations. The pyrethroids lambda-cyhalothrin, bifenthrin, and fenpropathrin were associated with repellency and reproductive effects at high concentrations. Bifenthrin additionally caused increased mortality at high concentrations. Chlorantraniliprole, dinotefuran, and permethrin did not significantly affect mortality or reproduction. Imidacloprid significantly reduced fecundity and egg viability, but was not lethal to adult P. persimilis Thiamethoxam negatively impacted fecundity at the 1× rate. There were no negative effects associated with fungicide exposure with the exception of mancozeb, which impacted fecundity. Field trials were conducted to explore the in vivo impacts of screened insecticides on P. persimilis populations in the field. Field trials supported the incompatibility of dimethoate with P. persimilis populations. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf

  4. Structures of trihydroxynaphthalene reductase-fungicide complexes: implications for structure-based design and catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, D.-I.; Basarab, G.S.; Gatenby, A.A.; Valent, B.; Jordan, D.B. (DuPont)

    2010-03-08

    Trihydroxynaphthalene reductase catalyzes two intermediate steps in the fungal melanin biosynthetic pathway. The enzyme, a typical short-chain dehydrogenase, is the biochemical target of three commercial fungicides. The fungicides bind preferentially to the NADPH form of the enzyme. Three X-ray structures of the Magnaporthe grisea enzyme complexed with NADPH and two commercial and one experimental fungicide were determined at 1.7 {angstrom} (pyroquilon), 2.0 {angstrom} (2,3-dihydro-4-nitro-1H-inden-1-one, 1), and 2.1 {angstrom} (phthalide) resolutions. The chemically distinct inhibitors occupy similar space within the enzyme's active site. The three inhibitors share hydrogen bonds with the side chain hydroxyls of Ser-164 and Tyr-178 via a carbonyl oxygen (pyroquilon and 1) or via a carbonyl oxygen and a ring oxygen (phthalide). Active site residues occupy similar positions among the three structures. A buried water molecule that is hydrogen bonded to the NZ nitrogen of Lys-182 in each of the three structures likely serves to stabilize the cationic form of the residue for participation in catalysis. The pro S hydrogen of NADPH (which is transferred as a hydride to the enzyme's naphthol substrates) is directed toward the carbonyl carbon of the inhibitors that mimic an intermediate along the reaction coordinate. Modeling tetrahydroxynaphthalene and trihydroxynaphthalene in the active site shows steric and electrostatic repulsion between the extra hydroxyl oxygen of the former substrate and the sulfur atom of Met-283 (the C-terminal residue), which accounts, in part, for the 4-fold greater substrate specificity for trihydroxynaphthalene over tetrahydroxynaphthalene.

  5. Combined effects of drought and the fungicide tebuconazole on aquatic leaf litter decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, Stéphane; Zoghlami, Olfa; Margoum, Christelle; Artigas, Joan; Chaumot, Arnaud; Foulquier, Arnaud

    2016-04-01

    Loss of biodiversity and altered ecosystem functioning are driven by the cumulative effects of multiple natural and anthropogenic stressors affecting both quantity and quality of water resources. Here we performed a 40-day laboratory microcosm experiment to assess the individual and combined effects of drought and the model fungicide tebuconazole (TBZ) on leaf litter decomposition (LLD), a fundamental biogeochemical process in freshwater ecosystems. Starting out from a worst-case scenario perspective, leaf-associated microbial communities were exposed to severe drought conditions (four 5-day drought periods alternated with 4-day immersion periods) and/or a chronic exposure to TBZ (nominal concentration of 20μgL(-1)). We assessed the direct effects of drought and fungicide on the structure (biomass, diversity) and activity (extracellular enzymatic potential) of fungal and bacterial assemblages colonizing leaves. We also investigated indirect effects on the feeding rates of the amphipod Gammarus fossarum on leaves previously exposed to drought and/or TBZ contamination. Results indicate a stronger effect of drought stress than fungicide contamination under the experimental conditions applied. Indeed, the drought stress strongly impacted microbial community structure and activities, inhibiting the LLD process and leading to cascading effects on macroinvertebrate feeding. However, despite the lack of significant effect of TBZ applied alone, the effects of drought on microbial functions (i.e., decrease in LLD and in enzymatic activities) and on Gammarus feeding rates were more pronounced when drought and TBZ stresses were applied together. In a perspective of ecological risk assessment and ecosystem management for sustainability, these findings stress the need for deeper insight into how multiple stressors can affect the functioning of aquatic ecosystems and associated services.

  6. Non-target impact of fungicide tetraconazole on microbial communities in soils with different agricultural management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sułowicz, Sławomir; Cycoń, Mariusz; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2016-08-01

    Effect of the fungicide tetraconazole on microbial community in silt loam soils from orchard with long history of triazole application and from grassland with no known history of fungicide usage was investigated. Triazole tetraconazole that had never been used on these soils before was applied at the field rate and at tenfold the FR. Response of microbial communities to tetraconazole was investigated during 28-day laboratory experiment by determination of changes in their biomass and structure (phospholipid fatty acids method-PLFA), activity (fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis-FDA) as well as changes in genetic (DGGE) and functional (Biolog) diversity. Obtained results indicated that the response of soil microorganisms to tetraconazole depended on the management of the soils. DGGE patterns revealed that both dosages of fungicide affected the structure of bacterial community and the impact on genetic diversity and richness was more prominent in orchard soil. Values of stress indices-the saturated/monounsaturated PLFAs ratio and the cyclo/monounsaturated precursors ratio, were almost twice as high and the Gram-negative/Gram-positive ratio was significantly lower in the orchard soil compared with the grassland soil. Results of principal component analysis of PLFA and Biolog profiles revealed significant impact of tetraconazole in orchard soil on day 28, whereas changes in these profiles obtained for grassland soil were insignificant or transient. Obtained results indicated that orchards soil seems to be more vulnerable to tetraconazole application compared to grassland soil. History of pesticide application and agricultural management should be taken into account in assessing of environmental impact of studied pesticides.

  7. Copper oxychloride fungicide and its effect on growth and oxidative stress of potato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Leonardo Cesar; Scavroni, Joseane; da Silva, João Renato Vaz; Cataneo, Ana Catarina; Martins, Dagoberto; Boaro, Carmen Sílvia Fernandes

    2014-06-01

    Excess copper in plants causes physiological alterations that lead to crop productivity losses. However, cupric fungicides have been utilized in the control of Alternaria solani and Phytophthora infestans fungi, which cause early blight and late blight in potato, respectively. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the effect of different copper oxychloride levels on potato plants through some biochemical and physiological parameters. The fungicide was applied at the recommended level (2.50gL(-1)), at a reduced level (1.25gL(-1)), and at 5.00gL(-1), to simulate spraying in the field twice during the same period with the recommended level. The results revealed that superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) protected plants against oxidative stress at the beginning of the cycle since lipoperoxide levels were low in that period. In addition, increased SOD activity positively correlated with increased usable leaf area for photosynthesis (leaf area ratio, LAR), photosynthetic effectiveness (net assimilation rate, NAR), and growth relative to pre-existing dry matter (relative growth rate, RGR). Concomitantly, there was a negative correlation between lipoperoxide levels and LAR and RGR. Plants randomly sprayed twice in the same period with the level recommended for potato crop protection in the field do not present damage regarding their development. However, additional studies are needed in order to reduce the use of copper fungicides in the control of early and late blight in potato crop production, then decreasing the release of copper in the environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of Fungicide Residues on Polymerase Chain Reaction and on Yeast Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gildo Almeida da Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The indiscriminate use of pesticides on grape crops is harmful for consumers´ healthin “in natura” consumption and in the ingestion of wine and grape juice. During winemaking, a rapid and efficient fermentation stage is critical to avoid proliferation of contaminating microorganisms and to guarantee the product´s quality. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR has the advantage of detecting these contaminants in the early stages of fermentation. However,this enzymatic reaction may also be susceptible to specific problems, reducing its efficiency. Agricultural practices, such as fungicide treatments, may be a source of PCR inhibiting factors and may also interfere in the normal course of fermentation.The action of the pesticides captan and folpet on PCR and on yeast metabolism was evaluated, once these phthalimide compounds are widely employed in Brazilian vineyards. DNA amplification was only observed at 75 and 37.5 µg/mL of captan concentrations, whereas with folpet, amplification was observed only in the two lowest concentrations tested (42.2 and 21.1µg/mL.Besides the strong inhibition on Taq polymerase activity, phthalimides also inhibited yeast metabolism at all concentrations analyzed.Grape must containing captan and folpet residues could not be transformed into wine due to stuck fermentation caused by the inhibition of yeast metabolism. Non-compliance with the waiting period for phthalimide fungicides may result in financial liabilities to the viticulture sector.The use of yeasts with high fungicide sensitivity should be selected for must fermentation as a strategy for sustainable wine production and to assure that products comply with health and food safety standards.

  9. Disruption of quercetin metabolism by fungicide affects energy production in honey bees (Apis mellifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Wenfu; Schuler, Mary A; Berenbaum, May R

    2017-02-13

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450) in the honey bee, Apis mellifera, detoxify phytochemicals in honey and pollen. The flavonol quercetin is found ubiquitously and abundantly in pollen and frequently at lower concentrations in honey. Worker jelly consumed during the first 3 d of larval development typically contains flavonols at very low levels, however. RNA-Seq analysis of gene expression in neonates reared for three days on diets with and without quercetin revealed that, in addition to up-regulating multiple detoxifying P450 genes, quercetin is a negative transcriptional regulator of mitochondrion-related nuclear genes and genes encoding subunits of complexes I, III, IV, and V in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway. Thus, a consequence of inefficient metabolism of this phytochemical may be compromised energy production. Several P450s metabolize quercetin in adult workers. Docking in silico of 121 pesticide contaminants of American hives into the active pocket of CYP9Q1, a broadly substrate-specific P450 with high quercetin-metabolizing activity, identified six triazole fungicides, all fungal P450 inhibitors, that dock in the catalytic site. In adults fed combinations of quercetin and the triazole myclobutanil, the expression of five of six mitochondrion-related nuclear genes was down-regulated. Midgut metabolism assays verified that adult bees consuming quercetin with myclobutanil metabolized less quercetin and produced less thoracic ATP, the energy source for flight muscles. Although fungicides lack acute toxicity, they may influence bee health by interfering with quercetin detoxification, thereby compromising mitochondrial regeneration and ATP production. Thus, agricultural use of triazole fungicides may put bees at risk of being unable to extract sufficient energy from their natural food.

  10. Effects of fungicides and biofungicides on population density and community structure of soil oribatid mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Assiuty, Abdel-Naieem I M; Khalil, Mohamed A; Ismail, Abdel-Wahab A; van Straalen, Nico M; Ageba, Mohamed F

    2014-01-01

    To compare the side-effects of chemical versus biofungicides on non-target organisms in agricultural soil, a study of population structure, spatial distribution and fecundity of oribatid mites, a diverse and species-rich group of microarthropods indicative of decomposer activity in soil was done. Plots laid out in agricultural fields of a research station in Egypt, were cultivated with cucumber and treated with two chemical fungicides: Ridomil Plus 50% wp (active ingredients=metalaxyl and copper oxychloride) and Dithane M-45 (active ingredient=mancozeb), and two biofungicides: Plant Guard (containing the antagonistic fungus Trichoderma harzianum) and Polyversum (containing the fungi-parasitic oomycete Pythium oligandrum). All treatments were done using both low-volume and high-volume spraying techniques to check whether any effects were dependent on the method of application. Oribatid mite communities were assessed from soil core samples collected during the growing season. Total abundance of oribatids was not different across the plots, but some species decreased in number, while one species increased. Species diversity and community equitability decreased with the application of chemical and biofungicides especially when using high-volume spraying. In control plots most oribatid species showed a significant degree of aggregation, which tended to decrease under fungicide treatment. Ridomil Plus, Plant Guard and Polyversum had a negative effect on the gravid/ungravid ratio of some species. Egg number averaged over the whole adult population was not directly related to the application of chemical and biofungicides but it showed a species-specific relationship with population density. In general biofungicides had a smaller effect on population size and community structure of oribatid mite species than chemical fungicides. The results indicate that biofungicides may be the preferred option when aiming to prevent side-effects on sensitive groups among the species

  11. Speciation in aqueous solutions of nitric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlushak, S; Simonin, J P; De Sio, S; Bernard, O; Ruas, A; Pochon, P; Jan, S; Moisy, P

    2013-02-28

    In this study, speciation in aqueous solutions of nitric acid at 25 °C was assessed in two independent ways. First, Raman experiments were carried out and interpreted in terms of free nitrate ions, ion pairs and neutral HNO(3) molecules. In parallel, a model was developed to account for the formation of these two kinds of pairs. It was based on an extension of the binding mean spherical approximation (BiMSA), or associative MSA (AMSA), in which the size and the charge of the ions in the chemical pair may differ from those of the free ions. A simultaneous fit of the osmotic coefficient and of the proportion of free ions (obtained from Raman spectroscopy experiments) led to an estimation of the speciation in nitric acid solutions. The result obtained using this procedure was compared with the estimation obtained from the Raman experiments.

  12. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation Project Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Pattie L.

    2013-01-01

    The standard practice for protection of stainless steel is a process called passivation. This procedure results in the formation of a metal oxide layer to prevent corrosion. Typical passivation procedures call for the use of nitric acid which exhibits excellent corrosion performance; however, there are a number of environmental, worker safety, and operational issues associated with its use. The longtime military specification for the passivation of stainless steel was cancelled in favor of newer specifications which allow for the use of citric acid in place of nitric acid. Citric acid offers a variety of benefits that include increased safety for personnel, reduced environmental impact, and reduced operational costs. There have been few studies, however, to determine whether citric acid is an acceptable alternative for NASA and DoD. This paper details activities to date including development of the joint test plan, on-going and planned testing, and preliminary results.

  13. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xiaohong; Keller, T C Stevenson; Begandt, Daniela; Butcher, Joshua T; Biwer, Lauren; Keller, Alexander S; Columbus, Linda; Isakson, Brant E

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, NOS3) is responsible for producing nitric oxide (NO)--a key molecule that can directly (or indirectly) act as a vasodilator and anti-inflammatory mediator. In this review, we examine the structural effects of regulation of the eNOS enzyme, including post-translational modifications and subcellular localization. After production, NO diffuses to surrounding cells with a variety of effects. We focus on the physiological role of NO and NO-derived molecules, including microvascular effects on vessel tone and immune response. Regulation of eNOS and NO action is complicated; we address endogenous and exogenous mechanisms of NO regulation with a discussion of pharmacological agents used in clinical and laboratory settings and a proposed role for eNOS in circulating red blood cells.

  14. Impact of fungicide and insecticide use on non-target aquatic organisms in rice paddy fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alana Cristina Dorneles Wandscheer

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The intensive use of plant protection products in rice paddy fields ( Oryza sativa L. has caused concern about the environmental impact on communities of non-target organisms that are natural inhabitants in these agroecosystems. The purpose of this review is to analyze the data currently available in the literature about some important fungicides and insecticides (such as trifloxystrobin, tebuconazole, tricyclazole, lambda-cyhalothrin, and thiamethoxam, which are currently used to control pests and diseases in rice paddy fields, as well as their effects on the community of non-target aquatic organisms.

  15. Triazole fungicides can induce cross-resistance to medical triazoles in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eveline Snelders

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Azoles play an important role in the management of Aspergillus diseases. Azole resistance is an emerging global problem in Aspergillus fumigatus, and may develop through patient therapy. In addition, an environmental route of resistance development has been suggested through exposure to 14α-demethylase inhibitors (DMIs. The main resistance mechanism associated with this putative fungicide-driven route is a combination of alterations in the Cyp51A-gene (TR(34/L98H. We investigated if TR(34/L98H could have developed through exposure to DMIs. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Thirty-one compounds that have been authorized for use as fungicides, herbicides, herbicide safeners and plant growth regulators in The Netherlands between 1970 and 2005, were investigated for cross-resistance to medical triazoles. Furthermore, CYP51-protein homology modeling and molecule alignment studies were performed to identify similarity in molecule structure and docking modes. Five triazole DMIs, propiconazole, bromuconazole, tebuconazole, epoxiconazole and difenoconazole, showed very similar molecule structures to the medical triazoles and adopted similar poses while docking the protein. These DMIs also showed the greatest cross-resistance and, importantly, were authorized for use between 1990 and 1996, directly preceding the recovery of the first clinical TR(34/L98H isolate in 1998. Through microsatellite genotyping of TR(34/L98H isolates we were able to calculate that the first isolate would have arisen in 1997, confirming the results of the abovementioned experiments. Finally, we performed induction experiments to investigate if TR(34/L98H could be induced under laboratory conditions. One isolate evolved from two copies of the tandem repeat to three, indicating that fungicide pressure can indeed result in these genomic changes. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings support a fungicide-driven route of TR(34/L98H development in A. fumigatus. Similar molecule structure

  16. Survey and Screening of Fungicide for the Control of Tomato Black Leaf Mold Pseudocercospora fuligena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mun Haeng Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tomato black leaf molds were collected from the six metropolitan cities, which were occurred mainly from the end of August until November. There was no significant difference on the fungal growth between potato dextrose agar and tomato-oatmeal agar media. The mycelial growth of the fungus was robust at a relatively high temperature, from 28 to 30°C. The suppression rates of hyphal growth ranged from 17-98% on the media supplemented with four different chemicals such as difenoconazole, fluquinconazole and prochloraz manganese complex, metconazole, and flutianil and there is no different suppression rates of the fungicides on the tested Pseudocercospora fuligena isolates.

  17. Autoxidation kinetics of aqueous nitric oxide

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    Reports on the kinetics of the autoxidation of aqueous nitric oxide are discussed. It is concluded that the correct rate law is -d[NO]/dt = 4kaq[NO]2 [O2] with kaq = 2 × 106 M-2 · s-1 at 25°C and that a recent report of a rate law zero order in NO is incorrect. © 1993.

  18. Nitric Oxide Scavenging by Red Cell Microparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chen; Zhao, Weixin; George J Christ; Gladwin, Mark T.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    Red cell microparticles form during the storage of red blood cells and in diseases associated with red cell breakdown and asplenia, including hemolytic anemias such as sickle cell disease. These small phospholipid vesicles that are derived from red blood cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of transfusion of aged stored blood and hemolytic diseases, via activation of the hemostatic system and effects on nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Red cell microparticles react with the import...

  19. Fate and activity of fungal BCAs delivered to strawberry flowers and their potential for integration with fungicides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Birgit; Andersen, Birgitte; Thrane, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Grey mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is a serious strawberry disease. Yield loss is prevented by repeated fungicide treatments during flowering which increases the risk of pesticide residues in berries. Fruit lesions are typically initiated from B. cinerea infected stamens or from dead infected...... petals adhering to the fruit or trapped under the calyx. To implement biological control agents (BCAs) as an alternative control measure, it is crucial that the BCAs are able to colonize flower parts rapidly to combat B. cinerea. The combination of fungicides with BCAs may enhance and stabilise...... the efficacy of BCAs. The underlying mechanism for such positive combination effects may be related to an improved establishment of the BCAs when their natural competitors have been adversely affected by the fungicide or that the B. cinerea infection has been slowed down. The present work report results on 1...

  20. Chlorophyll fluorescence of epiphytic lichens under acid, ammonium and fungicide stress - a comparison of laboratory and field results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luebke, K.; Tremp, H. [Hohenheim Univ., Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. for Landscape and Plant Ecology

    2002-07-01

    Fungicide treatment (dithiocarbamate) caused a significant reduction of the quantum yield of photochemical energy conversion of the tested lichen species Parmelia sulcata and Parmelia subrudecta under laboratory conditions. Especially P. subrudecta showed a rapid decrease of photosynthetic capacity in between one week and was more susceptible to fungicide stress compared to Parmelia sulcata. Over the time span of four weeks, sulphuric acid and ammonium sulphate induced no significant changes of fluorescence parameters. At natural stands (lichens on apple tree bark) the same fungicide was applied. Here no vitality-decline (visual verification, yield parameter) was detectable. So results from laboratory are not transferable on lichen living under natural habitat conditions, because removing lichens from tree bark causes additional stress to species. Results obtained from ecotoxicological laboratory experiments should be carefully proven and if possible completed and verified under more realistic background situations. (orig.)

  1. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Different Fungicide for the Management of Alternaria Leaf Spot Disease of Chilli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kumar Yadav

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Alternaria leaf spot of chilli caused by Alternaria alternate is an important disease affecting chilly production areas in India. The disease is primarily controlled through the use of fungicidal seed treatments. In this study, different fungicides viz. Captol, Captan, Ziram, Captofol, Thiram, Indofill Z 78 and Indofill Z 45 were assessed for their ability to reduce the growth of Alternaria alternata under laboratory conditions. Maximum inhibition (100% was achieved by Captol and capton followed by captofol (89.5 % while 0.1 % dose given. This paper reports the efficacy of fungicides that can be used under field conditions to control alternaria leaf spot in tropical regions and demonstrates the use of a method of application that could significantly improve the efficacy of disease control.

  2. Screening fungicides for use in fish culture: Evaluation of the agar plug transfer, cellophane transfer, and agar dilution methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Tom A.

    1983-01-01

    The reliability, reproducibility, and usefulness of three screening methods -- the cellophane transfer, the agar plug transfer, and the agar dilution -- to screen aquatic fungicides were evaluated. Achlya flagellata and Saprolegnia hypogyna were exposed to 1, 10, and 100 mg/L of malachite green to test each method. The cellophane transfer and agar plug transfer techniques had similar reliability and reproducibility in rating fungicidal activity, and were both superior to the agar dilution technique. The agar plug transfer and agar dilution techniques adequately projected in vivo activity of malachite green, but the cellophane transfer technique overestimated its activity. Overall, the agar plug transfer technique most accurately rated the activity of malachite green and was the easiest test to perform. It therefore appears to be the method of choice for testing aquatic fungicides.

  3. Identification of the Fungal Pathogen that Causes Strawberry Anthracnose in Bangladesh and Evaluation of In Vitro Fungicide Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Md. Shamim; Alam, Shahidul; Islam, Md. Shafiqul

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify the Colletotrichum species causing anthracnose disease of strawberry in Balgladesh and to evaluate in vitro activity of commercial fungicides it. Based on morphological and cultural characteristics, all 22 isolates were identified as Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. They developed white or glittery colonies with grey to dark grey reverse colony colors and they produced cylindrical conidia. The efficacy of five commercial fungicides, Bavistin DF, Dithane M-45, Sulcox 50 WP, Corzim 50 WP and Rovral 50 WP, were tested against the fungus. Bavistin inhibited radial growth completely and was followed in efficacy by Dithane M-45. In Bavistin DF treated media, the fungus did not produce conidia. The percent inhibition of radial growth of the fungus was increased with the increasing concentrations of fungicide. PMID:23983513

  4. Determination of Six Pyrazole Fungicides in Grape Wine by Solid-Phase Extraction and Gas Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yan; Li, Zhou; Ma, Qiang; Wang, Chuanxian; Chen, Xiangzhun; Miao, Qian; Han, Chao

    2016-05-18

    A gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) method was developed for the first simultaneous identification and quantification of six pyrazole fungicides (furametpyr, rabenzazole, fluxapyroxad, penflufen, bixafen, and isopyrazam) in grape wine samples. The grape wine samples were first diluted with water, then purified by solid-phase extraction, and finally examined by GC-MS/MS in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. Matrix-matched calibration curves were used to correct the matrix effects. The limits of quantification (LOQs), calculated as 10 times the standard deviation, were 0.2-0.8 μg kg(-1) for the six pyrazole fungicides. The average recoveries were in the range of 74.3-94.5%, with relative standard deviations (RSDs) below 5.8%, measured at three concentration levels. The proposed method is suitable for the simultaneous determination of six pyrazole fungicides in grape wine samples.

  5. Identification of Multiple Cryptococcal Fungicidal Drug Targets by Combined Gene Dosing and Drug Affinity Responsive Target Stability Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-Dong Park

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogenic fungus that is responsible for up to half a million cases of meningitis globally, especially in immunocompromised individuals. Common fungistatic drugs, such as fluconazole, are less toxic for patients but have low efficacy for initial therapy of the disease. Effective therapy against the disease is provided by the fungicidal drug amphotericin B; however, due to its high toxicity and the difficulty in administering its intravenous formulation, it is imperative to find new therapies targeting the fungus. The antiparasitic drug bithionol has been recently identified as having potent fungicidal activity. In this study, we used a combined gene dosing and drug affinity responsive target stability (GD-DARTS screen as well as protein modeling to identify a common drug binding site of bithionol within multiple NAD-dependent dehydrogenase drug targets. This combination genetic and proteomic method thus provides a powerful method for identifying novel fungicidal drug targets for further development.

  6. Oxygen, nitric oxide and articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Fermor

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Molecular oxygen is required for the production of nitric oxide (NO, a pro-inflammatory mediator that is associated with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. To date there has been little consideration of the role of oxygen tension in the regulation of nitric oxide production associated with arthritis. Oxygen tension may be particularly relevant to articular cartilage since it is avascular and therefore exists at a reduced oxygen tension. The superficial zone exists at approximately 6% O2, while the deep zone exists at less than 1% O2. Furthermore, oxygen tension can alter matrix synthesis, and the material properties of articular cartilage in vitro.The increase in nitric oxide associated with arthritis can be caused by pro-inflammatory cytokines and mechanical stress. Oxygen tension significantly alters endogenous NO production in articular cartilage, as well as the stimulation of NO in response to both mechanical loading and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mechanical loading and pro-inflammatory cytokines also increase the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. There is a complex interaction between NO and PGE2, and oxygen tension can alter this interaction. These findings suggest that the relatively low levels of oxygen within the joint may have significant influences on the metabolic activity, and inflammatory response of cartilage as compared to ambient levels. A better understanding of the role of oxygen in the production of inflammatory mediators in response to mechanical loading, or pro-inflammatory cytokines, may aid in the development of strategies for therapeutic intervention in arthritis.

  7. Long-term effects of fungicides on leaf-associated microorganisms and shredder populations-an artificial stream study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrod, Jochen P; Englert, Dominic; Wolfram, Jakob; Rosenfeldt, Ricki R; Feckler, Alexander; Bundschuh, Rebecca; Seitz, Frank; Konschak, Marco; Baudy, Patrick; Lüderwald, Simon; Fink, Patrick; Lorke, Andreas; Schulz, Ralf; Bundschuh, Mirco

    2017-02-04

    Leaf litter is a major source of carbon and energy for stream food webs, while both leaf-decomposing microorganisms and macroinvertebrate leaf shredders can be affected by fungicides. Despite the potential for season-long fungicide exposure for these organisms, however, such chronic exposures have not yet been considered. Using an artificial stream facility, effects of a chronic (lasting up to 8 wk) exposure to a mixture of 5 fungicides (sum concentration 20 μg/L) on leaf-associated microorganisms and the key leaf shredder Gammarus fossarum were therefore assessed. While bacterial density and microorganism-mediated leaf decomposition remained unaltered, fungicide exposure reduced fungal biomass (≤71%) on leaves from day 28 onward. Gammarids responded to the combined stress from consumption of fungicide-affected leaves and waterborne exposure with a reduced abundance (≤18%), which triggered reductions in final population biomass (18%) and in the number of precopula pairs (≤22%) but could not fully explain the decreased leaf consumption (19%), lipid content (≤43%; going along with an altered composition of fatty acids), and juvenile production (35%). In contrast, fine particulate organic matter production and stream respiration were unaffected. Our results imply that long-term exposure of leaf-associated fungi and shredders toward fungicides may result in detrimental implications in stream food webs and impairments of detrital material fluxes. These findings render it important to understand decomposer communities' long-term adaptational capabilities to ensure that functional integrity is safeguarded. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;9999:1-12. © 2017 SETAC.

  8. A review of current knowledge of resistance aspects for the next-generation succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor fungicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierotzki, Helge; Scalliet, Gabriel

    2013-09-01

    The new broad-spectrum fungicides from the succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor (SDHI) class have been quickly adopted by the market, which may lead to a high selection pressure on various pathogens. Cases of resistance have been observed in 14 fungal pathogens to date and are caused by different mutations in genes encoding the molecular target of SDHIs, which is the mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) enzyme. All of the 17 marketed SDHI fungicides bind to the same ubiquinone binding site of the SDH enzyme. Their primary biochemical mode of action is the blockage of the TCA cycle at the level of succinate to fumarate oxidation, leading to an inhibition of respiration. Homology models and docking simulations explain binding behaviors and some peculiarities of the cross-resistance profiles displayed by different members of this class of fungicides. Furthermore, cross-resistance patterns among SDHIs is complex because many mutations confer full cross resistance while others do not. The nature of the mutations found in pathogen populations varies with species and the selection compound used but cross resistance between all SDHIs has to be assumed at the population level. In most of the cases where resistance has been reported, the frequency is still too low to impact field performance. However, the Fungicide Resistance Action Committee has developed resistance management recommendations for pathogens of different crops in order to reduce the risk for resistance development to this class of fungicides. These recommendations include preventative usage, mixture with partner fungicides active against the current pathogen population, alternation in the mode of action of products used in a spray program, and limitations in the total number of applications per season or per crop.

  9. Fungicide-driven evolution and molecular basis of multidrug resistance in field populations of the grey mould fungus Botrytis cinerea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Kretschmer

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The grey mould fungus Botrytis cinerea causes losses of commercially important fruits, vegetables and ornamentals worldwide. Fungicide treatments are effective for disease control, but bear the risk of resistance development. The major resistance mechanism in fungi is target protein modification resulting in reduced drug binding. Multiple drug resistance (MDR caused by increased efflux activity is common in human pathogenic microbes, but rarely described for plant pathogens. Annual monitoring for fungicide resistance in field isolates from fungicide-treated vineyards in France and Germany revealed a rapidly increasing appearance of B. cinerea field populations with three distinct MDR phenotypes. All MDR strains showed increased fungicide efflux activity and overexpression of efflux transporter genes. Similar to clinical MDR isolates of Candida yeasts that are due to transcription factor mutations, all MDR1 strains were shown to harbor activating mutations in a transcription factor (Mrr1 that controls the gene encoding ABC transporter AtrB. MDR2 strains had undergone a unique rearrangement in the promoter region of the major facilitator superfamily transporter gene mfsM2, induced by insertion of a retrotransposon-derived sequence. MDR2 strains carrying the same rearranged mfsM2 allele have probably migrated from French to German wine-growing regions. The roles of atrB, mrr1 and mfsM2 were proven by the phenotypes of knock-out and overexpression mutants. As confirmed by sexual crosses, combinations of mrr1 and mfsM2 mutations lead to MDR3 strains with higher broad-spectrum resistance. An MDR3 strain was shown in field experiments to be selected against sensitive strains by fungicide treatments. Our data document for the first time the rising prevalence, spread and molecular basis of MDR populations in a major plant pathogen in agricultural environments. These populations will increase the risk of grey mould rot and hamper the effectiveness of

  10. Fungicide-driven evolution and molecular basis of multidrug resistance in field populations of the grey mould fungus Botrytis cinerea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Kretschmer

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The grey mould fungus Botrytis cinerea causes losses of commercially important fruits, vegetables and ornamentals worldwide. Fungicide treatments are effective for disease control, but bear the risk of resistance development. The major resistance mechanism in fungi is target protein modification resulting in reduced drug binding. Multiple drug resistance (MDR caused by increased efflux activity is common in human pathogenic microbes, but rarely described for plant pathogens. Annual monitoring for fungicide resistance in field isolates from fungicide-treated vineyards in France and Germany revealed a rapidly increasing appearance of B. cinerea field populations with three distinct MDR phenotypes. All MDR strains showed increased fungicide efflux activity and overexpression of efflux transporter genes. Similar to clinical MDR isolates of Candida yeasts that are due to transcription factor mutations, all MDR1 strains were shown to harbor activating mutations in a transcription factor (Mrr1 that controls the gene encoding ABC transporter AtrB. MDR2 strains had undergone a unique rearrangement in the promoter region of the major facilitator superfamily transporter gene mfsM2, induced by insertion of a retrotransposon-derived sequence. MDR2 strains carrying the same rearranged mfsM2 allele have probably migrated from French to German wine-growing regions. The roles of atrB, mrr1 and mfsM2 were proven by the phenotypes of knock-out and overexpression mutants. As confirmed by sexual crosses, combinations of mrr1 and mfsM2 mutations lead to MDR3 strains with higher broad-spectrum resistance. An MDR3 strain was shown in field experiments to be selected against sensitive strains by fungicide treatments. Our data document for the first time the rising prevalence, spread and molecular basis of MDR populations in a major plant pathogen in agricultural environments. These populations will increase the risk of grey mould rot and hamper the effectiveness of

  11. The effect of selected fungicides on the chemical composition of strawberry fruits and contamination with dithiocarbamate residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wysocki Karol

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In a four-year field experiment, fenhexamid, iprodione, pyrimethanil and thiram were applied in four different series as fungicides recommended for the control of grey mold (Botrytis cinerea in strawberries. The plant protection products had no significant effect on the chemical composition of strawberry fruits of the Kent and Senga Sengana cultivars with the exception of an increase in the vitamin C level in ‘Kent’ strawberries. They also contributed to minor variations in the content of extract, total sugars, organic acids, polyphenols and anthocyanins. Dithiocarbamate residues were detected in all samples from the first harvest of strawberries that had been treated with the thiram fungicide

  12. Integrated control of white rot disease on beans caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum using Contans® and reduced fungicides application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsheshtawi, Mohamed; Elkhaky, Maged T; Sayed, Shaban R; Bahkali, Ali H; Mohammed, Arif A; Gambhir, Dikshit; Mansour, Aref S; Elgorban, Abdallah M

    2017-02-01

    This study was conducted to determine the compatibility of Contans® (Coniothyrium minitans) with fungicides against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Results showed that both Contans® and Topsin® significantly reduced the disease incidence caused by S. sclerotiorum by 90% and 95% survival plants, respectively when they were individually applied and compared to control. While, soil application of Contans® and Sumisclex mixture was the most effective in suppressing the white rot disease incidence that produced 100% survival plants, application of C. minitans combined with the reduced doses of fungicides would be advantageous in saving labor cost, thus increasing production efficiency of bean.

  13. Orchard factors associated with resistance and cross resistance to sterol demethylation inhibitor fungicides in populations of Venturia inaequalis from Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeufer, Emily E; Ngugi, Henry K

    2012-03-01

    Orchard management practices, such as destroying of overwintered inoculum and limiting the number of fungicide applications, are often recommended as tactics for slowing the development of resistance to sterol demethylation-inhibitor (DMI) fungicides in populations of Venturia inaequalis. However, there is little quantitative evidence relating the use of such practices to levels of resistance in orchards. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of V. inaequalis isolates from Pennsylvania to DMI fungicides, and to identify orchard management factors related to the incidence of resistant isolates. In total, 644 single-spore V. inaequalis cultures obtained from 20 apple orchards in 2008 or 2009 were tested for sensitivity to myclobutanil, fenbuconazole, or difenoconazole. Growers provided management history of the sampled plots. Widespread shifts toward resistance to the three fungicides were noted, with mean effective concentration for 50% inhibition (EC(50)) values of 2.136, 0.786, and 0.187 μg/ml for myclobutanil, fenbuconazole, and difenoconazole, respectively. Cross resistance to the three fungicides was documented in high correlation (Spearman's r > 0.6) between mean EC(50) values for 14 orchards. Based on a 0.5-μg/ml threshold, 66 and 26% of isolates were resistant to myclobutanil and fenbuconazole, respectively, and 22% were cross resistant to the two fungicides. A significant between-year shift toward increased resistance was noted in two of three orchards surveyed in both years. Failure to use dormant copper sprays, older trees, larger orchards, orchards with ≤10 cultivars, and application of >4 DMI sprays were positively correlated (0.0001 resistant isolates. Isolates from orchards with >4 DMI sprays were four times as likely to be resistant to fenbuconazole (odds ratio = 4.57; P = 0.015). Isolates from orchards without dormant copper sprays were twice as likely to be cross-shifted toward resistance to all three fungicides (odds ratio = 1

  14. Updated role of nitric oxide in disorders of erythrocyte function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Marc J; Maley, Jason H; Lasker, George F; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2013-03-01

    Nitric oxide is a potent vasodilator that plays a critical role in disorders of erythrocyte function. Sickle cell disease, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and banked blood preservation are three conditions where nitric oxide is intimately related to dysfunctional erythrocytes. These conditions are accompanied by hemolysis, thrombosis and vasoocclusion. Our understanding of the interaction between nitric oxide, hemoglobin, and the vasculature is constantly evolving, and by defining this role we can better direct trials aimed at improving the treatments of disorders of erythrocyte function. Here we briefly discuss nitric oxide's interaction with hemoglobin through the hypothesis regarding Snitrosohemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and myoglobin as nitrite reductases. We then review the current understanding of the role of nitric oxide in sickle cell disease, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and banked blood, and discuss therapeutics in development to target nitric oxide in the treatment of some of these disorders.

  15. The fungicide triadimefon affects beer flavor and composition by influencing Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Zhiqiang; Li, Minmin; An, Jingjing; Chen, Jieying; Bao, Yuming; Francis, Frédéric; Dai, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that beer is produced on a large scale, the effects of pesticide residues on beer have been rarely investigated. In this study, we used micro-brewing settings to determine the effect of triadimefon on the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and beer flavor. The yeast growth in medium was significantly inhibited (45%) at concentrations higher than 5 mg L−1, reaching 80% and 100% inhibition at 10 mg L−1 and 50 mg L−1, respectively. There were significant differences in sensory quality between beer samples fermented with and without triadimefon based on data obtained with an electronic tongue and nose. Such an effect was most likely underlain by changes in yeast fermentation activity, including decreased utilization of maltotriose and most amino acids, reduced production of isobutyl and isoamyl alcohols, and increased ethyl acetate content in the fungicide treated samples. Furthermore, yeast metabolic profiling by phenotype microarray and UPLC/TOF-MS showed that triadimefon caused significant changes in the metabolism of glutathione, phenylalanine and sphingolipids, and in sterol biosynthesis. Thus, triadimefon negatively affects beer sensory qualities by influencing the metabolic activity of S. cerevisiae during fermentation, emphasizing the necessity of stricter control over fungicide residues in brewing by the food industry. PMID:27629523

  16. The effect of the fungicide captan on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and wine fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scariot Fernando J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungicides, particularly those used during grape maturation, as captan, can affect the natural yeast population of grapes, and can reach grape must affecting wine fermentation. The objective of the present work was to study the effect of captan on the viability and fermentative behavior of S. cerevisiae. S. cerevisiae (BY4741 on exponential phase was treated with captan (0 to 40 μM for different periods, and their cell viability analyzed. Cell membrane integrity, thiols concentration, and reactive oxygen species (ROS accumulation was determined. The fermentation experiments were conducted in synthetic must using wine yeast strain Y904. The results showed that under aerobic conditions, 20 μM of captan reduce 90% of yeast viability in 6 hours. Captan treated cells exhibited alteration of membrane integrity, reduction of thiol compounds and increase in intracellular ROS concentration, suggesting a necrotic and pro-oxidant activity of the fungicide. Fermentative experiments showed that concentrations above 2.5 μM captan completely inhibited fermentation, while a dose dependent fermentation delay associated with the reduction of yeast viability was detected in sub-inhibitory concentrations. Petit mutants increase was also observed. In conclusion, the captan induces yeast necrotic cell death on both aerobic and anaerobic conditions causing fermentation delay and/or sucking fermentations.

  17. The fungicide triadimefon affects beer flavor and composition by influencing Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Zhiqiang; Li, Minmin; An, Jingjing; Chen, Jieying; Bao, Yuming; Francis, Frédéric; Dai, Xiaofeng

    2016-09-01

    Despite the fact that beer is produced on a large scale, the effects of pesticide residues on beer have been rarely investigated. In this study, we used micro-brewing settings to determine the effect of triadimefon on the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and beer flavor. The yeast growth in medium was significantly inhibited (45%) at concentrations higher than 5 mg L-1, reaching 80% and 100% inhibition at 10 mg L-1 and 50 mg L-1, respectively. There were significant differences in sensory quality between beer samples fermented with and without triadimefon based on data obtained with an electronic tongue and nose. Such an effect was most likely underlain by changes in yeast fermentation activity, including decreased utilization of maltotriose and most amino acids, reduced production of isobutyl and isoamyl alcohols, and increased ethyl acetate content in the fungicide treated samples. Furthermore, yeast metabolic profiling by phenotype microarray and UPLC/TOF-MS showed that triadimefon caused significant changes in the metabolism of glutathione, phenylalanine and sphingolipids, and in sterol biosynthesis. Thus, triadimefon negatively affects beer sensory qualities by influencing the metabolic activity of S. cerevisiae during fermentation, emphasizing the necessity of stricter control over fungicide residues in brewing by the food industry.

  18. Double edge Sword Behavior of Carbendazim: A Potent Fungicide With Anti-Cancer Therapeutic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Karan; Sharma, Ajay; Arya, Ridhima; Sharma, Rohit; Gupta, Girish K; Sharma, Anil K

    2016-12-21

    A number of benzimidazole derivatives such as benomyl and carbendazim have been known for their potential role as agricultural fungicides. Simultaneously carbendazim has also been found to inhibit proliferation of mammalian tumor cells specifically drug and multidrug resistant cell lines. Studies carried out with fungal and mammalian cells have highlighted the potential role of carbendazim in inhibiting proliferation of cells, thereby exhibiting therapeutic implications against cancer. Because of its promising preclinical antitumor activity, Carbendazim had undergone phase I clinical trials and is under further clinical investigations for treatment of cancer. A number of theoretical interactions have been pinpointed. There are many anticancer drugs in the market, but their usefulness is limited because of drug resistance in a significant proportion of patients. The hunger for newer drugs drives anticancer drug discovery research on a global platform and requires innovations to ensure a sustainable pipeline of lead compounds. Current review highlights the dual role of carbendazim as a fungicide and an anticancer agent. We also discuss about the harmful effects of carbendazim and emphasize upon the need for more pharmacokinetic studies and pharmacovigilance data to ascertain its clinical significance.

  19. Variation in Sensitivity Among Some Isolates of Macrophomina phaseolina Isolated from Cotton Roots to Flutolanil Fungicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Yehia A G; Aly, A A; Omar, M R; Ismail, Abdel-Wahab A

    2006-06-01

    Toxicity of the fungicide Flutolanil was in vitro tested against 20 isolates of Macrophomina phaseolina and cotton seedlings of ten commercial cotton cultivars. The isolates were recovered from roots of cotton plants obtained from different cotton-growing areas in Egypt. Most of the tested isolates were sensitive to Flutolanil; however, they varied in sensitivity. Twenty-five percent of the isolates were highly sensitive where IC50 ranged from 100 µg/ml. Flutolanil was very safe on both shoots and roots of the tested cultivars (IC50 > 100 µg/ml). Treating cotton seeds with Flutolanil resulted in highly significant (P < 0.01) reductions in pathogenicity of 18 isolates and a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in pathogenicity of isolate M29. M1 was the only isolate, which was insensitive to the application of Flutolanil. In vivo toxicity to Flutolanil was not correlated with its in vitro toxicity. However, a highly significant correlation (r = 0.60, P < 0.01) was observed between pathogenicity of isolates and the in vivo toxicity of the fungicide.

  20. Fungicides and Application Timing for Control of Early Leafspot, Southern Blight, and Sclerotinia Blight of Peanut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. James Grichar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Field studies were conducted in 2013 and 2014 in south Texas near Yoakum and from 2008 to 2011 in central Texas near Stephenville to evaluate various fungicides for foliar and soilborne disease control as well as peanut yield response under irrigation. Control of Sclerotinia blight caused by Sclerotinia minor Jagger with penthiopyrad at 1.78 L/ha was comparable to fluazinam or boscalid; however, the 1.2 L/ha dose of penthiopyrad did not provide consistent control. Peanut yield was reduced with the lower penthiopyrad dose when compared with boscalid, fluazinam, or the high dose of penthiopyrad. Control of early leaf spot, caused by Cercospora arachidicola S. Hori or southern blight, caused by Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc., with penthiopyrad in a systems approach was comparable with propiconazole, prothioconazole, or pyraclostrobin systems and resulted in disease control that was higher than the nontreated control. Peanut yield was also comparable with the penthiopyrad, propiconazole, prothioconazole, or pyraclostrobin systems and reflects the ability of the newer fungicides to control multiple diseases found in Texas peanut production.