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Sample records for niobium tantalum molybdenum

  1. Niobium and tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Klaus J.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Papp, John F.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Niobium and tantalum are transition metals that are almost always found together in nature because they have very similar physical and chemical properties. Their properties of hardness, conductivity, and resistance to corrosion largely determine their primary uses today. The leading use of niobium (about 75 percent) is in the production of high-strength steel alloys used in pipelines, transportation infrastructure, and structural applications. Electronic capacitors are the leading use of tantalum for high-end applications, including cell phones, computer hard drives, and such implantable medical devices as pacemakers. Niobium and tantalum are considered critical and strategic metals based on the potential risks to their supply (because current production is restricted to only a few countries) and the significant effects that a restriction in supply would have on the defense, energy, high-tech industrial, and medical sectors.The average abundance of niobium and tantalum in bulk continental crust is relatively low—8.0 parts per million (ppm) niobium and 0.7 ppm tantalum. Their chemical characteristics, such as small ionic size and high electronic field strength, significantly reduce the potential for these elements to substitute for more common elements in rock-forming minerals and make niobium and tantalum essentially immobile in most aqueous solutions. Niobium and tantalum do not occur naturally as pure metals but are concentrated in a variety of relatively rare oxide and hydroxide minerals, as well as in a few rare silicate minerals. Niobium is primarily derived from the complex oxide minerals of the pyrochlore group ((Na,Ca,Ce)2(Nb,Ti,Ta)2(O,OH,F)7), which are found in some alkaline granite-syenite complexes (that is, igneous rocks containing sodium- or potassium-rich minerals and little or no quartz) and carbonatites (that is, igneous rocks that are more than 50 percent composed of primary carbonate minerals, by volume). Tantalum is derived mostly from the

  2. Niobium and tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polupanova, L.I.; Volkova, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    General mineralogical-geochemical and analytical characteristics of niobium and tantalum are presented. Potentialities of any analytical methods for determining these elements in various geologic samples are estimated. The following specific techniques are described: neutron + activation determination of Ta, fluorescence X-radiometric determination of Nb and Ta, fluorescence X-ray spectral determination of Nb and Ta, spectrographic determination of Nb and Ta, gravimetric determination of Nb and Ta, their extraction-photometric determination with various reagents (crystal violet, rhodamine 6 Y, butylrhodamine B)

  3. Niobium and tantalum: indispensable twins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Klaus; Papp, John

    2014-01-01

    Niobium and tantalum are transition metals almost always paired together in nature. These “twins” are difficult to separate because of their shared physical and chemical properties. In 1801, English chemist Charles Hatchett uncovered an unknown element in a mineral sample of columbite; John Winthrop found the sample in a Massachusetts mine and sent it to the British Museum in London in 1734. The name columbium, which Hatchet named the new element, came from the poetic name for North America—Columbia—and was used interchangeably for niobium until 1949, when the name niobium became official. Swedish scientist Anders Ekberg discovered tantalum in 1802, but it was confused with niobium, because of their twinned properties, until 1864, when it was recognized as a separate element. Niobium is a lustrous, gray, ductile metal with a high melting point, relatively low density, and superconductor properties. Tantalum is a dark blue-gray, dense, ductile, very hard, and easily fabricated metal. It is highly conductive to heat and electricity and renowned for its resistance to acidic corrosion. These special properties determine their primary uses and make niobium and tantalum indispensable.

  4. Niobium Nb and tantalum Ta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busev, A.I.; Tiptsova, V.G.; Ivanov, V.M.

    1978-01-01

    The basic methods for determining niobium and tantalum in various objects are described. Nb and Ta are separated with the aid of N-benzoyl-N-phenylhydroxylamine by precipitating Nb(5) from a tartaric acid solution with subsequent precipitation of Ta from the filtrate. The gravimetric determination of Nb and Ta in steels is based on their quantitative separation from a diluted solution by way of hydrolysis with subsequent after-precipitation with phenylarsonic acid (in the absence of W). The gravimetric determination of Nb in the presence of W is carried out with the aid of Cupferron. To determine Nb in its carbide, Nb(5) reduced to Nb(3) is titrated with a solution of K 2 Cr 2 O 7 in the presence of phenyl-anthranilic acid. The photometric determination of Nb in tungsten-containing steels and in ores containing Ti, W, Mo and Cr is based on the rhodanide method. Nb is determined in alloys with Zr and Ti photometrically with the aid of 4-(2-pyridylazo)-resorcin and in alloyed steels with the aid of benzhydroxamic acid. The latter complex is extracted with chloroform. This method is used to determine Nb in rocks. The photometric determination of Ta in TiCl 4 is carried out with the aid of pyrogallol, in commercial niobium with the aid of methyl violet, and in steel with the aid of 4-(-pyridylazo)-resorcin. Also described is the polarographic determination of Nb in tantalum pentoxide

  5. Solvents extraction of niobium and tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, P.R.G.; Cunha, O.C. da.

    1982-01-01

    The separation process of niobium and tantalum using solvent extraction is evaluated. The use of methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) e tributyl phosphate (TBP), and the distribution of two elements between aqueous and organic phases in function of the fluoridric and sulfuric acids, solvent and diluent is analysed. (M.J.C.) [pt

  6. Review of tantalum and niobium alloy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the current state of niobium- and tantalum-base alloy production. The materials requirements, alloy compositions of interest, and production status are discussed. Finally, a list of developments needed to support the SP-100 program will be identified. A bibliography is included

  7. Electromigration of hydrogen and deuterium in vanadium, niobium, and tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, C.L.

    1977-10-01

    The electric mobility and effective valence of hydrogen and deuterium in vanadium, niobium, tantalum and three niobium-tantalum alloys were measured. A resistance technique was used to directly determine the electric mobility of hydrogen and deuterium at 30 0 C while a steady-state method was used to measure the effective valence. The use of mass spectrographic techniques on a single specimen which contained both hydrogen and deuterium greatly increased the precision with which the isotope effect in the effective valence could be measured

  8. Carbochlorination kinetics of tantalum and niobium pentoxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allain, E.

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available The carbochlorination kinetics of pure Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 by gas mixture (C12 + CO + N2 between 380 and 1,000 °C is studied. A calculation of the standard free energy of the carbochlorination reactions is made. A diagram of the phases stability is drawn. The influence of the gas flow, temperature and the pardal pressure of Cl2 and CO at temperatures below 650 °C on the reaction rate is studied. The apparent activation energy is approximately 75 and 110 kJ/mol for Nb2Os and Ta2O5, respectively. At temperatures above 650°C the Arrhenius diagram presents an anomaly which may be attributed to the decomposition of the COCl2 formed in situ. The apparent reaction order of the carbochlorination of these oxides against Cl2+CO is approximately 2. The carbochlorination rates of these oxides are much greater than those of chlorination by Cl2 + N2. The carbochlorination kinetics of tin furnace slag leaching concentrates containing tantalum and niobium compounds are also studied and compared with the carbochlorination kinetics of the pure oxides.

    En este trabajo se estudia la cinética de carbocloruración del Nb2O5 y del Ta2O5 por la mezcla de gases (Cl2 + CO + N2 entre 380 y 1000°C. Se hace un cálculo de la energía libre estándar de carbocloruración y se dibujan los diagramas de equilibrio de fases. Se estudia la influencia del flujo de gas, la temperatura y la presión parcial de Cl2 y CO a temperaturas por debajo de 650°C sobre la velocidad de reacción. La energía de activación es aproximadamente 75 y 110 kJ/mol para el Nb2O5 y el Ta2O5, respectivamente. A temperaturas por encima de 650°C, el diagrama de Arrhenius presenta una anomalía que puede ser atribuida a la

  9. Solid solutions of hydrogen in niobium, molybdenum and their alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, T.T.

    1981-01-01

    The solubility of hydrogen in niobium, molybdenum and niobium-molybdenum alloys with varying atomic fraction of molybdenum from 0.15 to 0.75 was measured on the temperature range of 673 0 K to 1273 0 k for one atmosphere hydrogen pressure. The experimental technique involved the saturation of the solvent metal or alloy with hydrogen, followed by quenching and analysis of the solid solution. The results obtained of hydrogen solubility are consistent with the quasi-regular model for the dilute interstitial solid solutions. The partial molar enthalpy and partial molar entropy in excess of the dissolved hydrogen atoms were calculated from data of solubility versus reciprocal doping temperature. The variation of the relative partial molar enthalpy of hydrogen dissolved in niobium-molybdenum alloys, with the increase of molybdenum content of the alloy was analized. (Author) [pt

  10. Spectrographic determination of impurities in high-purity tantalum oxide and niobium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, S.T.G.; Russell, G.M.

    1990-01-01

    The development of spectrographic methods by direct current arc excitation and carrier distillation for the determination of impurities in tantalum and niobium oxides are described. Iron, silicon, aluminium, titanium, calcium, silver, tin, magnesium, and manganese can be determined in tantalum oxide and niobium oxide in concentrations ranging from 3 to 300 p.p.m. Niobium can be determined in tantalum oxide in concentrations ranging from 10 to 300 p.p.m. Tantalum cannot be determined in niobium oxide, and tungsten cannot be determined in either matrix as a result of the absence of sensitive lines in the spectra of these elements. Relative standard deviations of analyte element concentrations are in the region of 0,18 for tantalum oxide samples, and 0,13 for niobium oxide samples. A detailed laboratory method is included. 4 figs., 4 tabs., 3 refs

  11. Reduction chlorination of slag containing niobium, tantalum and titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura, F.J.; Brocchi, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    Reduction chlorination experiments were carried out with slag containing niobium, tantalum in order to evaluate the effects of some variables on the behaviour of the material. Kinetic curves were obtained with the main variables being temperature and percentage of reducing agent. The results showed a greater effect of temperature as well as indicated the formation of the non-volatile chlorides (CaCl 2 ) as a factor reducing the reaction rate. Quantitative analyses of the material collected in the condenser indicated the viability of the method to recover the valuable metals. (Author) [pt

  12. Technology of niobium and molybdenum refining by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, R.A.; Pinatti, D.G.; Sandim, H.R.Z.

    1988-01-01

    The uses of metals and alloys in superconductors (Nb46%Ti), aerospatial industry (Ti6Al4V), electroeletronic industry (Nb, Mo, W) and in surgical implants (Ti, Nb) are increasing nowadays. A refining process of niobium and molybdenum by electron beam technique, since the oxides reduction till the obtention of a high purity ingot is presented. (C.G.C.) [pt

  13. Extraction of tantalum (5) and niobium (5) by octanol from fluoride and fluoride-sulfuric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majorov, V.G.; Nikolaev, A.I.; Konkov, V.K.

    2001-01-01

    Extractability of octanol and tributylphosphate in the processes of tantalum (5) and niobium (5) extraction from their concentrated fluoride and fluoride-sulfuric acid solutions, as well as in the course of tantalum (5) and niobium (5) separation and purification, was compared. The use of octanol in the extraction technology of tantalum (5) and niobium (5) separation was shown to be effective. Stability of the extractant in long-time contact with process solutions was pointed out among its important advantages. A flowsheet of extractional separation and purification of niobium (5) and tantalum (5) using octanol, which permits preparation of the elements pure oxides, was proposed [ru

  14. Tantalum(V) impurity extraction by octanol from niobium(V) fluoride solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majorov, V.G.; Nikolaev, A.I.; Kopkov, V.K.

    2002-01-01

    The conditions of the niobium and tantalum extraction separation by octanol in the fluoride solutions, depending on the metals and free hydrofluoric acid concentration as well as on the organic and water phases voluminous relation, are studied for the purpose of developing the technology of niobium deep purification from the tantalum impurities. The technological scheme of the niobium solutions(V) extraction purification from the tantalum impurities(V), which provides for obtaining the niobium oxide(V), containing less than 0.005 mass % Ta 2 O 5 , is proposed on the basis of the established optimal separation conditions. The possibility of using the developed technology by the pyrochlore reprocessing is indicated [ru

  15. The recovery of tin, and the production of niobium pentoxide and potassium tantalum fluoride, from a tin slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iorio, G.; Tyler, M.S.

    1987-01-01

    This report describes the results of testwork on the recovery of tin, niobium, and tantalum from a tin slag. The slag, which consisted mainly of amorphous silica, with varying amounts of calcuim, magnesium, manganese, iron, and aluminium, contained an average of 8,8 per cent niobium pentoxide and 6,2 per cent tantalum pentoxide. The metallic tin-ion phase was removed from the crushed slag by magnetic separation. The slag was then leached with hydrochloric acid to remove magnesium, calcium, aluminium, iron, manganese, and the remainder of the tin. Leaching with sodium hydroxide for the removal of silica and phosphorous was followed by a final leach with hydrochloric acid for the removal of sodium. The upgraded concentrate thus obtained was purified by leaching with hydrofluoric acid, solvent extraction of niobium and tantalum into tri-n-butyl phosphate and methyl isobutyl ketone, and selective stripping of niobium with sulphuric acid and tantalum with ammonium floride. Niobium pentoxide and potassium tantalum fluoride were then precipitated by the addition of ammonium hydroxide and potassium fluoride to the respective strip liquors. The overall recoveries in the upgraded concentrate were 98 per cent for tantalum and 92 per cent for niobium. Dissolutions and recoveries of over 99 per cent were obtained for both tantalum and niobium in the purification steps. The niobium pentoxide and potassium tantalum fluoride precipitates obtained were of high purity

  16. Cost Estimate for Molybdenum and Tantalum Refractory Metal Alloy Flow Circuit Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Robert R.; Martin, James J.; Schmidt, George R.; Godfroy, Thomas J.; Bryhan, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission-Test Facilities (EFF-TF) team at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been tasked by the Naval Reactors Prime Contract Team (NRPCT) to provide a cost and delivery rough order of magnitude estimate for a refractory metal-based lithium (Li) flow circuit. The design is based on the stainless steel Li flow circuit that is currently being assembled for an NRPCT task underway at the EFF-TF. While geometrically the flow circuit is not representative of a final flight prototype, knowledge has been gained to quantify (time and cost) the materials, manufacturing, fabrication, assembly, and operations to produce a testable configuration. This Technical Memorandum (TM) also identifies the following key issues that need to be addressed by the fabrication process: Alloy selection and forming, cost and availability, welding, bending, machining, assembly, and instrumentation. Several candidate materials were identified by NRPCT including molybdenum (Mo) alloy (Mo-47.5 %Re), tantalum (Ta) alloys (T-111, ASTAR-811C), and niobium (Nb) alloy (Nb-1 %Zr). This TM is focused only on the Mo and Ta alloys, since they are of higher concern to the ongoing effort. The initial estimate to complete a Mo-47%Re system ready for testing is =$9,000k over a period of 30 mo. The initial estimate to complete a T-111 or ASTAR-811C system ready for testing is =$12,000k over a period of 36 mo.

  17. Spectrophotometric determination of trace niobium in tantalum with sulfochlorophenol S following anion-exchange separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashitani, Hiroshi; Adachi, Takeo

    1975-01-01

    A sensitive photometric method for the determination of trace of niobium in tantalum with sulfochlorophenol S is proposed. Tantalum was quantitatively separated by an anion-exchange method from nitric acid-hydrofluoric acid medium. Prior to the color development, these acids were removed by fuming with perchloric acid. Sulfuric acid (0.04 to 0.2M) was necessary for the color development. A maximum absorbance was obtained when the solution was kept for 60 minutes at room temperature, or 5 minutes at 60 0 C. Niobium down to 1 ppm in tantalum can be determined (epsilon=4.2x10 4 ) according to the following procedure. Not more than 1 g of tantalum is dissolved in 8 ml of hydrofluoric acid (1:1) and 2 ml of nitric acid (1:1) by heating. The solution is transferred to a column containing 10 ml of strongly basic anion-exchange resin (Diaion SA No.100) in a polyethylene tube, with three 10-ml portions of a mixture of 1M nitric acid-5M hydrofuluoric acid. Niobium is eluted with 100 ml of a mixture of 5M nitric acid-0.2M hydrofluoric acid. The effluent is evaporated to fumes with 1.5 ml of perchloric acid in the presence of 2 ml of sulfuric acid (1:19). The solution is transferred to a volumetric flask with 5 ml of hydrochloric acid (1:1) and small portions of water. Two ml of 0.05% sulfochlorophenol S solution and 2.5 ml of acetone are then added, and the resulting solution is diluted to 25 ml with water. After 60 minutes, the absorbance is measured at 650 nm with a blank as reference. (auth.)

  18. Method of low tantalum amounts determination in niobium and its compounds by ICP-OES technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolik, Marek; Turkowska, Magdalena

    2013-10-15

    A method of determination of low amounts of tantalum in niobium and niobium compounds without its prior separation by means of inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) has been worked out. The method involves dissolution of the analyzed samples of niobium as well as its various compounds (oxides, fluorides, chlorides, niobates(V)) in fluoride environments, precipitation of sparingly soluble niobic(tantalic) acid (Nb2O5(Ta2O5) · xH2O), converting them into soluble complex compounds by means of oxalic acid with addition of hydrogen peroxide and finally analyzing directly obtained solutions by ICP-OES. This method permits determination of Ta in niobium at the level of 10(-3)% with relatively good precision (≤ 8% RSD) and accuracy (recovery factor: 0.9-1.1). Relative differences in the results obtained by two independent methods (ICP-OES and ICP-MS) do not exceed 14%, and other elements present in niobium compounds (Ti, W, Zr, Hf, V, Mo, Fe, Cr) at the level of 10(-2)% do not affect determination. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Study of some regularities of tantalum and niobium sorption from sulfatefluoride media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskorin, B.N.; Vodolazov, L.I.; Fedulov, Yu.N.; Shishkina, E.G.; Petrenko, V.I.

    1979-01-01

    Kinetics, equilibrium and dynamics of tantalum sorption from sulfate-fluoride media at the background of considerable niobium amount are studied. The sorption has been carried out using AMP-p and AM-p anionites. Maximum anionite capacity as to tantalum is established. At AMP-p anionite it equals 364.5, and at AM-p - 337.5 mg/l. Ta sorption rate at AM-p ionite is higher than at AMP-p one. It will take 8-10 degrees of contact for complete extraction of Ta out of solution with the given ionites. Thus, selection of high-base porous ionites for sorption separation of Ta and Nb proved to be quite perspective

  20. Property Optimization in As-Quenched Martensitic Steel by Molybdenum and Niobium Alloying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy Mohrbacher

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Niobium microalloying is the backbone of modern low-carbon high strength low alloy (HSLA steel metallurgy, providing a favorable combination of strength and toughness by pronounced microstructural refinement. Molybdenum alloying is established in medium-carbon quenching and tempering of steel by delivering high hardenability and good tempering resistance. Recent developments of ultra-high strength steel grades, such as fully martensitic steel, can be optimized by using beneficial metallurgical effects of niobium and molybdenum. The paper details the metallurgical principles of both elements in such steel and the achievable improvement of properties. Particularly, the underlying mechanisms of improving toughness and reducing the sensitivity towards hydrogen embrittlement by a suitable combination of molybdenum and niobium alloying will be discussed.

  1. Adhesive wear of iron chromium nickel silicon manganese molybdenum niobium alloys with duplex structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lugscheider, E.; Deppe, E.; Ambroziak, A.; Melzer, A.

    1991-01-01

    Iron nickel chromium manganese silicon and iron chromium nickel manganese silicon molybdenum niobium alloys have a so-called duplex structure in a wide concentration range. This causes an excellent resistance to wear superior in the case of adhesive stress with optimized concentrations of manganese, silicon, molybdenum and niobium. The materials can be used for welded armouring structures wherever cobalt and boron-containing alloy systems are not permissible, e.g. in nuclear science. Within the framework of pre-investigations for manufacturing of filling wire electrodes, cast test pieces were set up with duplex structure, and their wear behavior was examined. (orig.) [de

  2. Reactions of niobium(V) and tantalum(V) chlorides with some aliphatic ketones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, M.S.; Ahuja, H.S.; Rao, G.S.

    1978-01-01

    The reactions of niobium(V) and tantalum(V) chlorides with ethylmethyl ketone (EMK) and diethyl ketone (DEK) have been investigated to study their co-ordination behaviour. When these chlorides and ketones are reacted in 1:1 molar ratio, tantalum(V) chloride forms simple adduct of the type TaCl 5 .L(L = EMK or DEK), whereas in the case of niobium(V) chloride, an oxygen-abstracted product (NbCl 4 ) 2 O.2L is obtained. With excess of the ketone, in all the cases, an oxygen abstracted compound of the type MOCl 3 .2L is obtained. Infrared spectral studies (4000-650 cm -1 ) indicate the co-ordination of the ketones through the oxygen atom of the carbonyl group and that the oxygen abstracted products NOCl 3 .2L and (NbCl 4 ).2O.2L have M-O-M type of bonding. The possible mechanism for oxygen abstraction is discussed. (author)

  3. Upgrading tantalum and niobium oxides content in Bangka tin slag with double leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soedarsono, J. W.; Permana, S.; Hutauruk, J. K.; Adhyputra, R.; Rustandi, A.; Maksum, A.; Widana, K. S.; Trinopiawan, K.; Anggraini, M.

    2018-03-01

    Tantalum has become one of the 14 types of critical materials where the level of its availability is assumed as the midterm critical metal. Benefits of the element tantalum in the electronics field increased the deficit balance of supply / demand, as more variations of electronic products developed. The tantalum experts calculated the level of availability until 2020. Base on the previous studies, tin slag is a secondary source of tantalum and niobium. This study uses tin slag from Bangka, Indonesia, abbreviated, Bangka Tin Slag (BTS). BTS was roasted, water quenched and sieved, abbreviated BTS-RQS.BTS was roasted, water quenched and sieved, abbreviated BTS-RQS.BTS-RQS was roasted at a temperature 700□C given sample code BTS-R700QS, while roasted at 800°C given sample code BTS-R800QS.A variable leaching experiment on BTS-R700QS was solvent concentration variable and on BTS-R800QS was time variable. The entire residue was characterized by X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), and the optimum results are on the BTS-R800QS leaching into 5 M NaOH for 20 min followed by 5M HCl for 50 min, with content of Ta2O5 and Nb2O51.56% and 1.11%, respectively. The result of XRF measurement showed was the increasing of TNO content due to the increasing solvent concentration and time of acid leaching. The discussion of thermodynamics this study used was HSC Chemistry 6 as a supporting data.

  4. Attractive short-range interatomic potential in the lattice dynamics of niobium and tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onwuagba, B.N.; Pal, S.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown in the framework of the pseudopotential approach that there is a sizable attractive short-range component of the interatomic potential due to the s-d interaction which has the same functional form in real space as the Born-Mayer repulsion due to the overlap of core electron wave functions centred on neighbouring ions. The magnitude of this attractive component is such as to completely cancel the conventional Born-Mayer repulsion, making the resultant short-range interatomic potential attractive rather than repulsive. Numerical calculations show that the attractive interatomics potential, which represents the local-field correction, leads to a better understanding of the occurrence of the soft modes in the phonon dispersion curves of niobium and tantalum

  5. Yield strength of molybdenum, tantalum and tungsten at high strain rates and very high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Škoro, G.P.; Bennett, J.R.J.; Edgecock, T.R.; Booth, C.N.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► New experimental data on the yield strength of molybdenum, tantalum and tungsten. ► High strain rate effects at record high temperatures (up to 2700 K). ► Test of the consistency of the Zerilli–Armstrong model at very high temperatures. - Abstract: Recently reported results of the high strain rate, high temperature measurements of the yield strength of tantalum and tungsten have been analyzed along with new experimental results on the yield strength of molybdenum. Thin wires are subjected to high stress by passing a short, fast, high current pulse through a thin wire; the amplitude of the current governs the stress and the repetition rate of the pulses determines the temperature of the wire. The highest temperatures reached in the experiments were 2100 °C (for molybdenum), 2250 °C (for tantalum) and 2450 °C (for tungsten). The strain-rates in the tests were in the range from 500 to 1500 s −1 . The parameters for the constitutive equation developed by Zerilli and Armstrong have been determined from the experimental data and the results have been compared with the data obtained at lower temperatures. An exceptionally good fit is obtained for the deformation of tungsten.

  6. Other Oxides Pre-removed from Bangka Tin Slag to Produce a High Grade Tantalum and Niobium Oxides Concentrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permana, S.; Soedarsono, J. W.; Rustandi, A.; Maksum, A.

    2016-05-01

    Indonesia, as the second largest tin producer in the world, has a byproduct from the production of tin. This byproduct is in the forms of tin slag containing tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) and niobium pentoxide (Nb2O5). This study focuses on the recovery of tantalum pentoxide and niobium pentoxide from the tin slag. In the process, one part of the tin slag sample was sieved only (BTS), and the other was roasted at 900°C, water quenched and then sieved (BTS-RQS). Samples BTS and BTS-RQS were characterized by thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray flourence (XRF). One part of BTS-RQS sample was dissolved in hydrofluoric acid (HF) and the other was dissolved in hydrochloric acid (HCl), washed with distilled water, then dissolved into sodium hydroxide (NaOH). Each sample was characterized by using XRF. The BTS sample produced the highest recovery of 0.3807 and 0.6978% for Ta2O5 and Nb2O5, respectively, from the particle size of -1.00+0.71 and a fraction of 47.29%, while BTS-RQS produced the highest recovery of 0.3931 and 0.8994% for Ta2O5 and Nb2O5, respectively, on the particle size of -0.71+0350 and a fraction of 21%. BTS-RQS, dissolved with 8% hydro fluoride acid, yields tantalum pentoxide and niobium pentoxide with a ratio of 2.01 and 2.09, respectively. For the sample BTS-RQS dissolve first with 6M hydrochloric acid, washed with distilled water, then dissolved with sodium hydroxide 10M, the yield ratios are 1.60 and 1.84 for tantalum pentoxide and niobium pentoxide, respectively. In this study, it is found that the dissolution by using hydrofluoric acid 8% yields the best ratio.

  7. A process for electrodeposition of layers of niobium, vanadium, molybdenum or tungsten, or of their alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diepers, H.; Schmidt, O.

    1976-01-01

    An improvement is proposed for the process for electrodeposition of layers of niobium, vanadium, molybdenum or tungsten or of their alloys from molten-salt electrolytes (fluorid melts) which is to increase the quality of layers in order to obtain regular thickness and smooth surfaces. According to the invention, a pre-separation is executed on an auxiliary cathode before the (preheated) cathode is immersed. The cathode is only charged for separation after the adjustment of a constant anode potential. It is an advantage that the auxiliary cathode is mechanically and electrically connected with the cathode. As an electrolyte, a mixture of niobium fluorides and a eustetic mixture of potassium fluorides, sodium fluorides and lithium fluorides are particularly suitable for the electrodeposition of niobium. (UWI) [de

  8. TiO2 effect on break-down of low-grade tantalum-niobium concentrates in the process of sulphatization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrova, N.V.; Popov, A.D.; Mulenko, V.N.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of TiO 2 additive or materials containing it on tantalum-niobate decomposition in the process of sulphatization is investigated. It is shown that favourable effect of titanium dioxide in the process of sulphatization is especially noticeable in reprocessing of hard-brokening down tantalum-niobium concentrates with low Nb:Ta ratio etc. Chemical composition and type of tantalum-niobium mineralization of enrichment products used in the given investigation is presented. It is stated that the degree of concentrate break-down under similar sulphatization conditions (t=230 deg C; tau=2 h) essentially depends on the quantity of the introduced titanium dioxide. It is shown that sulphatization in the presence of titanium dioxide additive or materials containing it permits to exercise practically complete break-down of lean tantalum-niobium raw material, to avoid application of complexers in leaching of sulphatization products

  9. Multi-physics transient simulation of monolithic niobium dioxide-tantalum dioxide memristor-selector structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevic, John F.; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P.

    2017-10-01

    Self-assembled niobium dioxide (NbO2) thin-film selectors self-aligned to tantalum dioxide (TaO2) memristive memory cells are studied by a multi-physics transient solution of the heat equation coupled to the nonlinear current continuity equation. While a compact model can resolve the quasi-static bulk negative differential resistance (NDR), a self-consistent coupled transport formulation provides a non-equilibrium picture of NbO2-TaO2 selector-memristor operation ab initio. By employing the drift-diffusion transport approximation, a finite element method is used to study the dynamic electrothermal behavior of our experimentally obtained selector-memristor devices, showing that existing conditions are suitable for electroformation of NbO2 selector thin-films. Both transient and steady-state simulations support our theory, suggesting that the phase change due to insulator-metal transition is responsible for NbO2 selector NDR in our as-fabricated selector-memristor devices. Simulation results further suggest that TiN nano-via may play a central role in electroforming, as its dimensions and material properties establish the mutual electrothermal interaction between TiN nano-via and the selector-memristor.

  10. Tantalum, Niobium and Titanium Coatings for Biocompatibility Improvement of Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vajihesadat Mortazavi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Metals have a wide range of applications in implant and prosthetic materials in dentistry.Corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of metals should be improved in order to utilizethem as biomaterials. The aim of this work was to prepare metallic coatings on 316L stainless steel dental implants, to evaluate the corrosion characteristics of the uncoated and metallic coated dentalimplants as an indication of biocompatibility and, to compare the effect of the type of the coatings on biocompatibility.Materials and Methods: In this in vitro evaluation, three types of metallic coatings including tantalum, niobium and titanium coatings were compared using a physical vapor deposition process on 316L stainless steel dental implants. Structural characterization techniques including X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis were utilized to investigatethe microstructure and morphology of the coatings. Electrochemical potentiodynamic tests were performed in two types of physiological solutions at 37±1°C in order to determine and compare the corrosioncurrent density and corrosion potential characteristics. The mean values were statistically compared by ANOVA at a 95% level of confidence.Results: the findings showed that all of the three types of metallic coatings had a positive effect on improvement of the corrosion behavior. The coatings could increase the corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel and this trend was independent of the type of physiological environment.Conclusion: The biocompatible metallic coatings could decrease the corrosion current density and is a distinct advantage for prevention of ion release. Decreasing ion release can improve the biocompatibility of the dental implant, and consequently can prevent tissue damage, tissue inflammation and irritation, and can also lead to obtaining a desirable histopathological response.

  11. The effects of adding molybdenum and niobium on the creep strength of 18Cr-10Ni-20Co austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomono, Yutaka

    1987-01-01

    The decrease in the creep strength of structural materials during service at elevated temperatures is a very important problem that affects the security of plants and machinery. The improvement in the creep strength of 18Cr-10Ni-20Co austenitic steel achieved through the addition of molybdenum and niobium was studied in tests carried out at 973K and 1,073K. The creep strengthening mechanism was examined using transmission electron micrographs, X-ray diffraction, etc. The results obtained are summarized as follows: (1) The creep strength of low C-18Cr-10Ni-20Co austenitic steel with molybdenum was greatly improved by the addition of niobium up to 1% by weight. In the case of long-term creep, no trend toward decreasing creep strength was observed. (2) The creep strength of austenitic steel possessing a matrix strengthened with molybdenum can be improved through the addition of niobium combined with precipitation hardening with fine carbides precipitated in the grains. (author)

  12. Comparative analysis of weld properties of titanium-niobium, titanium molybdenum and stainless steel archwires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Pattabiraman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Ability to achieve sound weld joints is a desirable characteristic for orthodontic archwires. Titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA has been the only truly weldable orthodontic archwire alloy until now. Titanium-niobium (Ti-Nb alloy archwires exhibit similar mechanical properties as TMA. Whether sound weld joints can be produced in these wires has not been evaluated thus far. In this study Ti-Nb alloy archwires were compared with TMA and stainless steel (SS for weld quality, with SS wires serving as the control group. Materials and Methods: Weld joint strength was assessed by subjecting welded samples of TMA, Ti-Nb and SS wires (0.017 Χ 0.025-inch to a tensile load. The weld joints were also qualitatively assessed by studying the surface characteristics under a scanning electron microscope and the metallographic features under an optical microscope. Results: The weld joint of TMA wire was found to be superior in terms of the strength, surface and metallographic characteristics of the weld joint. Weld joints in Ti-Nb wires had higher strength than those of SS though statistically insignificant. Conclusion: The study concluded that TMA wires are superior to Ti-Nb and SS wires in situations where weldability is a desirable characteristic.

  13. Fabrication and use of zircaloy/tantalum-sheathed cladding thermocouples and molybdenum/rhenium-sheathed fuel centerline thermocouples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, S.C.; Sepold, L.K.

    1985-01-01

    The thermocouples described in this report are zircaloy/tantalum-sheathed and molybdenum/rhenium alloy-sheathed instruments intended for fuel rod cladding and fuel centerline temperature measurements, respectively. Both types incorporate beryllium oxide insulation and tungsten/rhenium alloy thermoelements. These thermocouples, operated at temperatures of 2000 0 C and above, were developed for use in the internationally sponsored Severe Fuel Damage test series in the Power Burst Facility. The fabrication steps for both thermocouple types are described in detail. A laser-welding attachment technique for the cladding-type thermocouple is presented, and experience with alternate materials for cladding and fuel therocouples is discussed

  14. Nanoporous titanium niobium oxide and titanium tantalum oxide compositions and their use in anodes of lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Sheng; Guo, Bingkun; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Qiao, Zhenan

    2017-10-31

    Nanoporous metal oxide framework compositions useful as anodic materials in a lithium ion battery, the composition comprising metal oxide nanocrystals interconnected in a nanoporous framework and having interconnected channels, wherein the metal in said metal oxide comprises titanium and at least one metal selected from niobium and tantalum, e.g., TiNb.sub.2-x Ta.sub.xO.sub.y (wherein x is a value from 0 to 2, and y is a value from 7 to 10) and Ti.sub.2Nb.sub.10-vTa.sub.vO.sub.w (wherein v is a value from 0 to 2, and w is a value from 27 to 29). A novel sol gel method is also described in which sol gel reactive precursors are combined with a templating agent under sol gel reaction conditions to produce a hybrid precursor, and the precursor calcined to form the anodic composition. The invention is also directed to lithium ion batteries in which the nanoporous framework material is incorporated in an anode of the battery.

  15. Evaluation of the effect of the partial substituttion of vanadium and molybdenum by niobium in a tool steel DIN W. NR. 1.2714

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isore, A.; Pereira, O.J.; Aleixo, C.

    1982-01-01

    A comparative study of the properties of a steel DIN W. Nr 1.2714 and those of two steels of the same type but with lower amounts of molybdenum and vanadium, higher amounts of silicon and chromium, and with the adition of niobium (0,08 and 0,17%), was carried out. In the three steels with niobium there are niobium carbides wich are aligned in the hot deformation direction, and do not dissolve at the normal austenitizing temperatures. In the steel with higher niobium content, these carbides affect the transverse toughness and its hot ductility (200 - 600 0 C), although sensibly improving the abrasion wear resistance. The results of the fracture toughness and Charpy test, suggest that the niobium carbides do not decrease the crack nucleation resistance. (Author) [pt

  16. Dilatometric study on sintering mechanism of the WC-10wt%Co cemented carbide doped with tantalum carbide and niobium carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manuel, J.B. [Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco (UFRPE), PE (Brazil); Gomes, U.U.; Karimi, M.M. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), RN (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Nanocrystalline WC-10wt.%Co powders were prepared by high energy milling and were liquid phase sintered. The powders were milled at 20 hours and characterized by X-ray diffraction, and Scanning electron microscopy. The particle size distribution and mean diameter analysis were characterized by Granulometro Cilas model 920 L and 1180. After sintering the WC-10wt.%Co cemented carbides doped with tantalum carbide and niobium carbide exhibited ultra fine grain sizes. dilatometer study on sintering mechanism detected phase transformations and degassing. (author)

  17. Effects of combined silicon and molybdenum alloying on the size and evolution of microalloy precipitates in HSLA steels containing niobium and titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlina, Erik J.; Van Tyne, C.J.; Speer, J.G.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of combined silicon and molybdenum alloying additions on microalloy precipitate formation in austenite after single- and double-step deformations below the austenite no-recrystallization temperature were examined in high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steels microalloyed with titanium and niobium. The precipitation sequence in austenite was evaluated following an interrupted thermomechanical processing simulation using transmission electron microscopy. Large (~ 105 nm), cuboidal titanium-rich nitride precipitates showed no evolution in size during reheating and simulated thermomechanical processing. The average size and size distribution of these precipitates were also not affected by the combined silicon and molybdenum additions or by deformation. Relatively fine (< 20 nm), irregular-shaped niobium-rich carbonitride precipitates formed in austenite during isothermal holding at 1173 K. Based upon analysis that incorporated precipitate growth and coarsening models, the combined silicon and molybdenum additions were considered to increase the diffusivity of niobium in austenite by over 30% and result in coarser precipitates at 1173 K compared to the lower alloyed steel. Deformation decreased the size of the niobium-rich carbonitride precipitates that formed in austenite. - Highlights: • We examine combined Si and Mo additions on microalloy precipitation in austenite. • Precipitate size tends to decrease with increasing deformation steps. • Combined Si and Mo alloying additions increase the diffusivity of Nb in austenite

  18. Catalytic applications of niobium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, C.J.; England, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    This article examines the potential uses of niobium, and its compounds, as catalysts in chemical processing. The word potential is deliberately chosen because in 1978 none of the world's twenty-five major catalysts (1) contained niobium. On the other hand, catalysts containing molybdenum and vanadium, neighbors of niobium in the periodic table, realized over 80 x 10 6 of sales in that same year. At the same time many of the patents for niobium catalysts cover applications in which niobium improves the activity of, or substitutes for, molybdenum based compounds. With favorable cost differentials and improvements in understanding, niobium may be able to replace molybdenum in some its traditional uses

  19. Features of soldering of molybdenum a lols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grishin, V.L.; Rybkin, B.V.; Cherkasov, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    Soldering features of complex-alloy molybdenum alloys were investigated in comparison with alloys based on solid solutions. Soldering features of heterogeneous molybdenum base alloys were investigated using samples of 0.5-1.O mm sheets with the strain of about 95% made of ingots which had been smelted in arc vacuum furnaces. The soldering of samples was carried out in 5x1O -5 mm Hg vacuum using different sources of heating: radiation, electron-ray and contact. It was shown that heat-resisting soldered joints of heterogeneous molybdenum alloys could be produced using zirconium and niobium base solders containing the most effective hardeners of the parent material (titanum, vanadium, tantalum, molybdenum, tungsten). To preserve high mechanical properties of heterogeneous alloys it was expedient to use for welding local heating sources which permitted to decrease considerably temperature- time conditions of the process

  20. Implantation of titanium, chromium, yttrium, molybdenum, silver, hafnium, tantalum, tungsten and platinum ions generated by a metal vapor vacuum ion source into 440C stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Jun; Hayashi, Kazunori; Sugiyama, Kenji; Ichiko, Osami; Hashiguchi, Yoshihiro

    1992-01-01

    Titanium, yttrium, molybdenum, silver, chromium, hafnium, tantalum, tungsten and platinum ions generated by a metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source were implanted into 440C stainless steel in the dose region 10 17 ions cm -2 with extraction voltages of up to 70 kV. Glow discharge spectroscopy (GDS), friction coefficient, and Vickers microhardness of the specimens were studied. Grooves made by friction tests were investigated by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). GDS showed incorporation of carbon in the yttrium, hafnium, tantalum, tungsten and platinum implanted specimens, as well as titanium implanted samples. A large amount of oxygen was observed in the yttrium implanted specimen. The friction coefficient was measured by reciprocating sliding of an unimplanted 440C ball without lubricant at a load of 0.245 N. The friction decreased and achieved a stable state after implantation of titanium, hafnium and tantalum. The friction coefficient of the platinum implanted specimen showed a gradual decrease after several cycles of sliding at high friction coefficient. The yttrium implanted sample exhibited a decreased but slightly unstable friction coefficient. Results from EPMA showed that the implanted elements, which gave decreased friction, remained even after sliding of 200 cycles. Implantation of chromium, molybdenum, silver and tungsten did not provide a decrease in friction and the implants were gone from the wear grooves after the sliding tests. (orig.)

  1. Invariability of rate dependences of normalized flow stress in niobium and molybdenum under conditions of shock compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaretsky, E. B.; Kanel, G. I.

    2016-09-01

    The evolution of elastic-plastic shock waves has been studied in pure molybdenum and niobium at normal and elevated temperatures over propagation distances ranging from 0.03 to 5 mm. The experiments revealed that annealing of the metals substantially increases their Hugoniot elastic limits and, to a lesser degree, their spall strengths. Variations in the resistance of both the metals to fracture in tension with the test temperature can be described as modest. Measuring the decay of the elastic precursor waves with a propagation distance in the two metals has allowed a determining of the relationships between a flow stress τ and an initial plastic strain rate γ˙ p . It was found that, at the plastic strain rates greater than 3 ÷4 ×104s-1 , the temperature sensitivity of the transient values of τ is much lower than that at the strain rates below this range. The τ(γ˙ p ) data normalized on shear moduli of the metals have been approximated by simple functions that, despite substantial differences between the moduli and yield stresses, were found to be virtually identical for the two metals.

  2. Development of a capillary electrophoresis method for the analysis in alkaline media as polyoxoanions of two strategic metals: Niobium and tantalum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deblonde, Gauthier J-P; Chagnes, Alexandre; Cote, Gérard; Vial, Jérôme; Rivals, Isabelle; Delaunay, Nathalie

    2016-03-11

    Tantalum (Ta) and niobium (Nb) are two strategic metals essential to several key sectors, like the aerospace, gas and oil, nuclear and electronic industries, but their separation is really difficult due to their almost identical chemical properties. Whereas they are currently produced by hydrometallurgical processes using fluoride-based solutions, efforts are being made to develop cleaner processes by replacing the fluoride media by alkaline ones. However, methods to analyze Nb and Ta simultaneously in alkaline samples are lacking. In this work, we developed a capillary zone electrophoresis (CE) method able to separate and quantify Nb and Ta directly in alkaline media. This method takes advantage of the hexaniobate and hexatantalate ions which are naturally formed at pH>9 and absorb in the UV domain. First, the detection conditions, the background electrolyte (BGE) pH, the nature of the BGE co-ion and the internal standard (IS) were optimized by a systematic approach. As the BGE counter-ion nature modified the speciation of both ions, sodium- and lithium-based BGE were tested. For each alkaline cation, the BGE ionic strength and separation temperature were optimized using experimental designs. Since changes in the migration order of IS, Nb and Ta were observed within the experimental domain, the resolution was not a monotonic function of ionic strength and separation temperature. This forced us to develop an original data treatment for the prediction of the optimum separation conditions. Depending on the consideration of either peak widths or peak symmetries, with or without additional robustness constraints, four optima were predicted for each tested alkaline cation. The eight predicted optima were tested experimentally and the best experimental optimum was selected considering analysis time, resolution and robustness. The best separation was obtained at 31.0°C and in a BGE containing 10mM LiOH and 35mM LiCH3COO.The separation voltage was finally optimized

  3. Introduction to Ingot Niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) technology using niobium accelerating cavities was first applied at large scale in the recirculating electron linear accelerator CEBAF--the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility in Newport News, Virginia, USA, at what is now called Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, or Jefferson Lab. Building on the high quality factors and peak magnetic fields found in low residual resistivity ratio (low-RRR) solid niobium in the 1970s, Jefferson Lab has reintroduced ingot niobium technology. High tantalum content in ingot niobium is not expected to negatively impact cavity performance, but will reduce the cost of accelerator structures considerably. Optimized low-cost CW linear accelerators built with ingot niobium will show the way for future R and D and industrial applications. This paper portrays the Jefferson Lab SRF context, reviews the early history of ingot niobium technology from over a third of a century ago, explains the technical advantages of that technology's recent reintroduction, and presents the outlook for further development.

  4. Comparison of changes in irregularity and transverse width with nickel-titanium and niobium-titanium-tantalum-zirconium archwires during initial orthodontic alignment in adolescents: A double-blind randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordstrom, Barrett; Shoji, Toshihiro; Anderson, W Cameron; Fields, Henry W; Beck, F Michael; Kim, Do-Gyoon; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Deguchi, Toru

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this prospective, double-blind, randomized clinical trial was to compare the clinical efficiency of nickel-titanium (NiTi) and niobium-titanium-tantalum-zirconium (TiNbTaZr) archwires during initial orthodontic alignment. All subjects (ages between 12 and 20 years) underwent nonextraction treatment using 0.022-inch brackets. All patients were randomized into two groups for initial alignment with 0.016-inch NiTi archwires (n = 14), or with 0.016-inch TiNbTaZr archwires (n = 14). Digital scans were taken during the course of treatment and were used to compare the improvement in Little's Irregularity Index and the changes in intercanine and intermolar widths. There was approximately a 27% reduction in crowding during the first month with the use of 0.016-inch TiNbTaZr (Gummetal) wire, and an additional 25% decrease in crowding was observed during the next month. There was no significant difference between the two treatment groups in the decrease in irregularity over time ( P = .29). There was no significant difference between the two groups in the changes in intercanine and intermolar width ( P = .80). It can be concluded that Gummetal wires and conventional NiTi wires possess a similar ability to align teeth, and Gummetal wires have additional advantages over conventional NiTi, such as formability and use in patients with nickel allergy.

  5. Extraction of Tantalum from locally sourced Tantalite using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ability of polyethylene glycol solution to extract tantalum from locally sourced tantalite ore was studied. The amount of tantalum pentoxide extracted increased with increase in concentration of Polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution from 28.08% to 60.23%. However, the amount of niobium pentoxide extracted increased from ...

  6. Niobium and tantalum doped titania particles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štengl, Václav; Houšková, Vendula; Bakardjieva, Snejana; Murafa, Nataliya; Bezdička, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 10 (2010), s. 2015-2024 ISSN 0884-2914 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : anatase TiO2 nanoparticles * photocatalytic degradation * optical-properties Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.395, year: 2010

  7. The System Tantalum (Niobium)-Cobalt-Boron

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wind, J.; Romaniv, O.; Schöllhammer, G.; Buršík, Jiří; Michor, H.; Giester, G.; Rogl, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 1 (2014), s. 43-85 ISSN 1547-7037 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : crystal chemistry * electronic structure * enthalpies of formation Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 0.482, year: 2014

  8. Corrosion resistance of the substrates for the cryogenic gyroscope and electrodeposition of the superconductive niobium coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovskiy, A. R.; Okunev, M. A.; Makarova, O. V.; Kuznetsov, S. A.

    2017-05-01

    The interaction of different materials with the niobium containing melt was investigated. As substrate materials the ceramics, beryllium and carbopyroceram were chosen. Several spherical ceramic and beryllium samples were coated with protective molybdenum and niobium films by magnetron sputtering and PVD, respectively. After the experiment (exposition time 10 min) the exfoliation of molybdenum film from ceramic samples was observed due to interaction of the substrate with the melt. The niobium protective coatings reacted with the melt with niobium oxide formation. The beryllium samples regardless of the shape and the presence of the protective films were dissolved in the niobium containing melt due to more negative electrode potential comparing with niobium one. The carbopyroceram samples were exposed in the melt during 3 and 12 h. It was found that the carbopyroceram not corrodes in the niobium containing melt. The optimal regimes for electrodeposition of smooth uniform niobium coatings with the thickness up to 50 μm on carbopyroceram spheres were found.

  9. Hydro-Metathesis of Long-Chain Olefin (1-decene) using Well-Defined Silica-Supported Tungsten (VI), Molybdenum (VI) and Tantalum (V) Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Saidi, Aya

    2016-11-01

    Nowadays, catalysis lies at the heart of economy growth mainly in the petroleum industry. Catalysis can offer real and potential solutions to the current challenges for a long-term sustainable energy, green chemistry, and environmental protection. In this context, one of the most important and future prosperity promising catalytic applications in the petrochemical field is hydrocarbons metathesis; it consists on the conversion of both renewable and non-petroleum fossil carbon sources to transportation fuels. Olefin metathesis has become one of the standard methodologies for constructing C-C bonds in many organic transformation reactions. This owed to the numerous types of metathesis reactions that have been developed, for example, enyne, ring-opening and closing, self and cross metathesis, etc. But the one step conversion of olefin to alkanes has not been studied much. Recently, only one such a work has been published for the hydro-metathesis of propylene by tantalum hydride supported on KCC-1 in dynamic reactor. With this knowledge, we thought to study the hydro-metathesis using liquid olefin (1-decene). Another aspect of using 1-decene comes from our previous experience on metathesis of n-decane where the first step is the conversion of decane to 1-decene and subsequently to different chain length alkanes with W-alkyl/alkylidene catalyst. In this way, it would be easy for us to use different catalysts and compare them with parent catalyst concerning TON. We found 100% conversion with TON of 1010 using supported WMe6 onto SiO2-700 [(≡Si-O-)WMe5] against the previous results for n-decane showing 20% conversion and TON of 153. In this work, we disclose the hydro-metathesis reaction of 1-decene using well-defined silica supported W(VI), Mo(VI) and Ta(V) alkyl catalysts in batch reactor condition. This work is divided into three major sections; first chapter contains an introduction to the field of catalysis and surface organometallic chemistry. In second chapter

  10. Niobium powder synthesized by calciothermic reduction of niobium hydroxide for use in capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Masahiko; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2015-03-01

    Metallic niobium powder was produced for applications in electric capacitors via calciothermic reduction of niobium hydroxide in molten CaCl2. Sub-micrometer spherical metallic particles with coral-like morphologies reflected the particle size of the starting oxide powder. A fine powder was obtained from the mixtures of niobium hydroxide and CaO or Ca(OH)2, respectively. Sintered pellets of the metallic powder showed a higher capacitance (CV) than those of the simply reduced powder without pre-treatment, because the shrinkage during sintering was smaller. The CV was as large as that of commercially sintered pellets for tantalum capacitors. Therefore, this niobium powder would act as a higher-voltage capacitor by applying chemical anodic treatment at higher voltages, and lower oxygen content in the reduced power could realize a lower leak current.

  11. Potentiometric determination of Tantalum content in ores using an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Flow Injection Chemiluminescence Method, The. Japan Society for Analytical Chemistry. 11. Yang J. X. and Pin C., (2002), Determination of niobium, tantalum, zirconium and hafnium in geological materials by extraction chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry,. Analytica Chimica Acta 458, p.

  12. Spectrophotometric determination of molybdenum (V) by extraction of its 2-(2'-furyl)-3-hydroxychromone complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dass, R.; Mehta, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    A simple method is described for the rapid spectrophotometric determination of molybdenum in synthetic and industrial samples containing 0.1 - 5% Mo. Molybdenum is reduced with ascorbic acid at room temperature in 1 mol·dm -3 H 2 SO 4 and extracted with chloroform after adding 2-(2'-furyl)-3-hydroxychromone (FHC). The yellow colour of the 1:2 Mo-FHC complex is measured at 414 nm against a reagent blank. Beer's law is obeyed over the range 0-2.7 μg Mo cm -3 of solvent phase. The molar absorptivity and Sandell's sensitivity are 5.18 x 10 4 dm 3 mol -1 ·cm -1 and 0.0018 μg Mo cm -2 respectively. Relative standard deviations are 0.2% for solutions and 0.5 - 1.5% for solid samples. Interference from tungsten and tin is removed by adding citrate and EDTA, respectively, while niobium and tantalum are masked by fluoride. Many elements such as V, Fe, Ti, U, Mn, Cr, Co, Ni, Re, Ru, Pt, Rh, Se, Au, Bi, Zr, Th, Ce, As and Al do not interfere even in large amounts, but antimony always interferes. Among the anions and complexing agents, only thiocyanate interferes seriously. (author)

  13. Ideal strength of bcc molybdenum and niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Weidong; Roundy, D.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Morris, J. W.

    2002-09-01

    The behavior of bcc Mo and Nb under large strain was investigated using the ab initio pseudopotential density-functional method. We calculated the ideal shear strength for the {211} and {011} slip systems and the ideal tensile strength in the direction, which are believed to provide the minimum shear and tensile strengths. As either material is sheared in either of the two systems, it evolves toward a stress-free tetragonal structure that defines a saddle point in the strain-energy surface. The inflection point on the path to this tetragonal ``saddle-point'' structure sets the ideal shear strength. When either material is strained in tension along , it initially follows the tetragonal, ``Bain,'' path toward a stress-free fcc structure. However, before the strained crystal reaches fcc, its symmetry changes from tetragonal to orthorhombic; on continued strain it evolves toward the same tetragonal saddle point that is reached in shear. In Mo, the symmetry break occurs after the point of maximum tensile stress has been passed, so the ideal strength is associated with the fcc extremum as in W. However, a Nb crystal strained in becomes orthorhombic at tensile stress below the ideal strength. The ideal tensile strength of Nb is associated with the tetragonal saddle point and is caused by failure in shear rather than tension. In dimensionless form, the ideal shear and tensile strengths of Mo (τ*=τm/G111=0.12, σ*=σm/E100=0.078) are essentially identical to those previously calculated for W. Nb is anomalous. Its dimensionless shear strength is unusually high, τ*=0.15, even though the saddle-point structure that causes it is similar to that in Mo and W, while its dimensionless tensile strength, σ*=0.079, is almost the same as that of Mo and W, even though the saddle-point structure is quite different.

  14. Hydrogen in Niobium-Molybdenum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, J.R.G. da; Ishikawa, T.T.

    1982-01-01

    High purity Nb-Mo single crystal alloys were doped with hydrogen in equilibrium with the gaseous phase at one atmosphere partial pressure at different temperatures. The partial enthalpy Hsup(-)u and the excess partial entropy Su sup(-xs) of the hydrogen atom in the interstitial solid solution were determined. The relative partial enthaplpy Δ Hsup(-)u varies from -6,68 kcal/molH for pure Nb to + 5,16 kcal/molH for pure Mo. The alloy at which the transition from exotheraml (Nb case) to endotheraml (Mo case) behavior occurs with respect to H dissolution is between 50 and 60 atomic percent of Mo. (Author) [pt

  15. Hydrogen in niobium-molybdenum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, J.R.G. da; Ishikawa, T.T.

    1982-01-01

    High purity Nb-Mo single crystal alloys were doped with hydrogen in equilibrium with the gaseous phase at one atmosphere partial pressure at different temperatures. The partial enthalpy H sup(-)u and the excess partial entropy S sup(-)u sup(x5) of the hydrogen atom in the interstitial solid solution were determined. The relative partial enthalpy δH sup(-)u varies from -6,68kcal/molH for pure Nb to + 5,16 kcal/molH for pure Mo. The alloy at which the transition from exothermal (Nb case) to endothermal (Mo case) behavior occurs with respect to H dissolution is between 50 and 60 atomic percent of Mo. (Author) [pt

  16. Vapor deposition of tantalum and tantalum compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trkula, M.

    1996-01-01

    Tantalum, and many of its compounds, can be deposited as coatings with techniques ranging from pure, thermal chemical vapor deposition to pure physical vapor deposition. This review concentrates on chemical vapor deposition techniques. The paper takes a historical approach. The authors review classical, metal halide-based techniques and current techniques for tantalum chemical vapor deposition. The advantages and limitations of the techniques will be compared. The need for new lower temperature processes and hence new precursor chemicals will be examined and explained. In the last section, they add some speculation as to possible new, low-temperature precursors for tantalum chemical vapor deposition

  17. Optical properties of d.c. magneto sputtered tantalum and titanium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    production (Sandrock 1999). Before that several metal powders including titanium, zirconium, niobium and tantalum were commonly processed by the well known hydride–dehydride (HDH) technique (German 1984). There are many different allotropic forms for titanium hydrides (Numakura et al 1984; Woo et al 1985) such ...

  18. Recent developments in high purity niobium metal production at CBMM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, Gustavo Giovanni Ribeiro, E-mail: Gustavo.abdo@cbmm.com.br; Sousa, Clovis Antonio de Faria, E-mail: Clovis@cbmm.com.br; Guimarães, Rogério Contato, E-mail: Rogerio.guimaraes@cbmm.com.br; Ribas, Rogério Marques, E-mail: Rogerio.ribas@cbmm.com.br; Vieira, Alaércio Salvador Martins, E-mail: Alaercio.vieira@cbmm.com.b; Menezes, Andréia Duarte, E-mail: Amenezes@cbmm.com.br; Fridman, Daniel Pallos, E-mail: Daniel.fridman@cbmm.com.br; Cruz, Edmundo Burgos, E-mail: Edmundo@cbmm.com.br [CBMM – Companhia Brasileira de Metalurgia e Mineração Córrego da Mata, s/n Araxá, Minas Gerais 38183-903 Brazil (Brazil)

    2015-12-04

    CBMM is a global supplier of high quality niobium products including pure niobium, the focus of this paper. CBMM’s position has been consolidated over three decades of producing high purity niobium metal ingots. The company supplies, among other products, commercial and reactor grade niobium ingots. One of the main uses of CBMM’s ingots is for the manufacture of particle accelerators (superconducting radio frequency – SRF – cavities), where the purity and homogeneity of niobium metal is essentially important for good performance. CBMM constantly strives to improve process controls and product quality, and is currently implementing innovations in production, research and development to further improve ingot quality. The main aim is to reduce the content of interstitial elements, such as nitrogen (N), oxygen (O), carbon (C), and hydrogen (H), starting with the raw materials through the final step of ingot production. CBMM held the first trial to produce the world’s largest-diameter niobium ingot (as cast 535 mm). The results of this initial trial presented very low levels of interstitial impurities (N, O, C, H), allowing the achievement of residual resistivity ratio (RRR) values very close to 300 in a six-melt process in an electron beam furnace. These values were reached with 850 ppm of tantalum. SRF cavities will be produced with this material in order to study the effect of low impurities and high RRR on the Q factor and accelerating gradient.

  19. Recent developments in high purity niobium metal production at CBMM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdo, Gustavo Giovanni Ribeiro; Sousa, Clovis Antonio de Faria; Guimarães, Rogério Contato; Ribas, Rogério Marques; Vieira, Alaércio Salvador Martins; Menezes, Andréia Duarte; Fridman, Daniel Pallos; Cruz, Edmundo Burgos

    2015-01-01

    CBMM is a global supplier of high quality niobium products including pure niobium, the focus of this paper. CBMM’s position has been consolidated over three decades of producing high purity niobium metal ingots. The company supplies, among other products, commercial and reactor grade niobium ingots. One of the main uses of CBMM’s ingots is for the manufacture of particle accelerators (superconducting radio frequency – SRF – cavities), where the purity and homogeneity of niobium metal is essentially important for good performance. CBMM constantly strives to improve process controls and product quality, and is currently implementing innovations in production, research and development to further improve ingot quality. The main aim is to reduce the content of interstitial elements, such as nitrogen (N), oxygen (O), carbon (C), and hydrogen (H), starting with the raw materials through the final step of ingot production. CBMM held the first trial to produce the world’s largest-diameter niobium ingot (as cast 535 mm). The results of this initial trial presented very low levels of interstitial impurities (N, O, C, H), allowing the achievement of residual resistivity ratio (RRR) values very close to 300 in a six-melt process in an electron beam furnace. These values were reached with 850 ppm of tantalum. SRF cavities will be produced with this material in order to study the effect of low impurities and high RRR on the Q factor and accelerating gradient

  20. Rapid method for determining nitrogen in tantalum and niobium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkle, E. J.; Graab, J. W.; Davis, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    Adaptation of commercial instrument which measures nitrogen and oxygen in steel gave results in less than four minutes. Sample is heated in helium atmosphere in single-use graphite crucible. Platinum flux facilitates melting of sample. Released gases are separated chromatographically and measured in thermal-conductivity cell.

  1. H and D in niobium, tantalum and vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schober, T.

    1990-02-01

    After a general introduction the hydride and deuteride phases of Nb, Ta and V are discussed. Recent phase diagrams of the systems Nb-H(D), Ta-H(D), and V-H(D) are presented. The key diffusivities of H and D in the above metals are also covered. The basic thermodynamic relations required for an understanding of p-c-T data are given. Sieverts and various p-c-T curves pertaining to H and D in Nb, Ta and V are presented. Selected thermodynamic quantities and heats of phase transformations are included. Further topics include a discussion of localized vibrations, hydride morphologies, permeation, resistivity and property changes. (orig.)

  2. Interlaboratory niobium dosimetry comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wille, P.

    1980-01-01

    For an interlaboratory comparison of neutron dosimetry using niobium the 93 sup(m)Nb activities of irradiated niobium monitors were measured. This work was performed to compare the applied techniques of dosimetry with Nb in different laboratories. The niobium monitors were irradiated in the fast breeder EBRII, USA and the BR2, Belgium. The monitors were dissolved and several samples were prepared. Their niobium contents were determined by the 94 Nb-count rates. since the original specific count rate was known. The KX radiations of the 93 sup(m)Nb of the samples and of a calibrated Nb-foil were compared. This foil was measured by PTB, Braunschweig and CBNM, Geel, which we additionally compared with the KX radiation of 88 Sr produced by a thin 88 Y source from a 88 Y-standard solution (PTB). (orig.) [de

  3. Compton profile of tantalum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Compton profile of tantalum (Ta) has been measured using IGP type coaxial photon detector. The target atoms were excited by means of 59.54 keV -rays from Am-241. The measurements were carried out on a high purity thin elemental foil. The data were recoreded in a 4 K multichannel analyzer. These data duly ...

  4. Molybdenum recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.A.; Marquis, E.T.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a process for the preparation of propylene oxide and tertiary butyl alcohol. It comprises: propylene and tertiary butyl hydroperoxide are reacted in an epoxidation reaction zone in solution in tertiary butyl alcohol in the presence of a soluble molybdenum catalyst to provide an epoxidation reaction product comprising unreacted propylene, unreacted tertiary butyl hydroperoxide, propylene oxide, tertiary butyl alcohol, dissolved molybdenum catalyst and impurities, including lower aliphatic C 1 -C 4 carboxylic acids, and wherein the epoxidation reaction product is resolved into product fractions in a distillation zone including a distillate propylene fraction

  5. Bonding of a niobium wire to a niobium thin film

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaszczuk, W.; Jaszczuk, W.; ter Brake, Hermanus J.M.; Flokstra, Jakob; Veldhuis, Dick; Stammis, R.; Rogalla, Horst

    1991-01-01

    A method for bonding a niobium wire to a niobium thin film is described. The bonds are to be used as superconducting connections between wire-wound gradiometers and thin-film coupling coils on DC SQUIDS. The method is characterized by two steps. Firstly, the hardness of the niobium wire is reduced

  6. Method of removing niobium from uranium-niobium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, E.N.; Schlier, D.S.; Shinopulos, G.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a method of removing niobium from a uranium-niobium alloy. It comprises dissolving the uranium-niobium alloy metal pieces in a first aqueous solution containing an acid selected from the group consisting of hydrochloric acid and sulfuric acid and fluoboric acid as a catalyst to provide a second aqueous solution, which includes uranium (U +4 ), acid radical ions, the acids insolubles including uranium oxides and niobium oxides; adding nitric acid to the insolubles to oxidize the niobium oxides to yield niobic acid and to complete the solubilization of any residual uranium; and separating the niobic acid from the nitric acid and solubilized uranium

  7. Incorporation d'éléments réfractaires dans les alliages à base de niobium

    OpenAIRE

    Antoni-Zdziobek , Annie

    1995-01-01

    This thesis presents the thermodynamic, kinetics and physical aspects of the development of metallurgical alloys niobium based with high characteristics. The main event is the incorporation of molybdenum in a ternary alloy niobium-aluminum-titanium. To meet the requirements of purity and structural uniformity, alloying is the major step. The technique of inductive cold crucible is a method well suited to this development. Joined to the cold crucible, a method of measuring the temperature of t...

  8. Tantalum markers in radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronson, A.S.; Jonsson, N.; Alberius, P.

    1985-01-01

    The biocompatibility of two types of radiopaque tantalum markers was evaluated histologically. Reactions to pin markers (99.9% purity) and spherical markers (95.2% purity) were investigated after 3-6 weeks in rabbits and 5-48 weeks in children with abnormal growth. Both marker types were firmly attached to bone trabeculae; this was most pronounced in rabbit bone, and no adverse macroscopic reactions were observed. Microscopically, no reactions or only slight fibrosis of bone tissue were detected, while soft tissues only demonstrated a minor inflammatory reaction. Nevertheless, the need for careful preparation and execution of marker implantations is stressed, and particularly avoidance iof the use of emery in sharpening of cannulae. The bioinertness of tantalum was reconfirmed as was its suitability for use as skeletal and soft tissue radiographic markers. (orig.)

  9. Surface preparation of niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneisel, P.

    1980-01-01

    Any discussion of surface preparation for superconducting rf-surfaces is certainly connected with the question what is the best recipe for achieving high Q-values and high break-down fields. Since the break-down in a cavity is not understood so far and because several mechanisms play a role, it also is not possible to give one recipe which always works. Nevertheless in the past certain preparation techniques for niobium surfaces have been developed and certain rules for preparation can be applied. In the following the to-days state of the art will be described and it is attempted to give a short description of the surface in conjunction with the methods of surface treatments, which generally can be applied to niobium cavities. (orig./WTR)

  10. Catalytic properties of niobium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, K.; Iizuka, T.

    1983-04-01

    The catalytic activity and selectivity of niobium compounds including oxides, salts, organometallic compounds and others are outlined. The application of these compounds as catalysts to diversified reactions is reported. The nature and action of niobium catalysts are characteristic and sometimes anomalous, suggesting the necessity of basic research and the potential use as catalysts for important processes in the chemical industry. (Author) [pt

  11. Hydrogen solid solutions in niobium - molybdenum single crystal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, J.R.G. da; Ishikawa, T.T.

    1981-01-01

    The temperature variation of the hydrogen solubility in a series of single crystal Nb-Mo alloys ('binary solvents') in equilibrium with the gaseous phase at atmospheric pressure is presented. The partial thermodynamic properties of the intersticially dissolved hydrogen atoms were calculated from of solubility versus temperature curves. The hydrogen solution obeys the quasi-regular model at all the compositions of the investigated alloys. The variation of the partial entalphy Hu sup(-) with the solvent alloys composition (Mo/Nb + Mo ratio) is compared with the variation of the electronic structure of the solvent. The non-random solute distribution in the binary solvent lattice is shown, with the H atoms prefering interstitial sites next to Nb atoms. (Author) [pt

  12. Mineral-deposit model for lithium-cesium-tantalum pegmatites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Dwight C.; McCauley, Andrew D.; Stillings, Lisa L.

    2017-06-20

    -order criteria are an orogenic hinterland setting, appropriate regional metamorphic grades, and the presence of evolved granites and common granitic pegmatites. New LCT pegmatites are most likely to be found near known deposits. Pegmatites tend to show a regional mineralogical and geochemical zoning pattern with respect to the inferred parental granite, with the greatest enrichment in the more distal pegmatites. Mineral-chemical trends in common pegmatites that can point toward an evolved LCT pegmatite include: increasing rubidium in potassium feldspar, increasing lithium in white mica, increasing manganese in garnet, and increasing tantalum and manganese in columbite-tantalite. Most LCT pegmatite bodies show a distinctive internal zonation featuring four zones: border, wall, intermediate (where lithium, cesium, and tantalum are generally concentrated), and core. This zonation is expressed both in cross section and map view; thus, what may appear to be a common pegmatite may instead be the edge of a mineralized body.Neither lithium-cesium-tantalum pegmatites nor their parental granites are likely to cause serious environmental concerns. Soils and country rock surrounding a LCT pegmatite, as well as waste from mining operations, may be enriched in characteristic elements relative to global average soil and bedrock values. These elements may include lithium, cesium, tantalum, beryllium, boron, fluorine, phosphorus, manganese, gallium, rubidium, niobium, tin, and hafnium. Among this suite of elements, however, the only ones that might present a concern for environmental health are beryllium and fluorine, which are included in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking-water regulations with maximum contaminant levels of 4 micrograms per liter and 4 milligrams per liter, respectively.

  13. Morphology study of niobium pentoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, R.P.P.; Panta, P.C.; Araujo, A.O. de; Bergmann, C.P.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, Niobium pentoxide (Nb 2 O 5 ) has been studied due to physical properties and their use in obtaining electronic ceramics, optical lenses, pH sensors, special filters for TV receivers, among other applications. This study investigated the morphology of the niobium pentoxide obtained by hydrothermal synthesis from the precursor pentachloride niobium (NbCl 5 ), where the synthesis was carried out at a temperature of 150 and 200 °C for 130 min and the product obtained was calcined at temperatures 600, 800 and 1000 °C for 60 min. The following characterizations were performed for analysis of the material, among them, X-ray diffraction (XRD) for analysis of the crystal structure, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) for detecting the existing functional groups and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for morphology of material. As a result, different morphologies were obtained and consequently different niobium pentoxide properties studied. (author)

  14. Additively manufactured porous tantalum implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wauthle, Ruben; Van Der Stok, Johan; Yavari, Saber Amin; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Kruth, Jean Pierre; Zadpoor, Amir Abbas; Weinans, Harrie; Mulier, Michiel; Schrooten, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The medical device industry's interest in open porous, metallic biomaterials has increased in response to additive manufacturing techniques enabling the production of complex shapes that cannot be produced with conventional techniques. Tantalum is an important metal for medical devices because of

  15. Synthesis of niobium nitride by pyrolysis of niobium pentachloride ammines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebtsova, O.M.; Shulga, Y.M.; Troitskii, V.N.

    1986-01-01

    This paper investigates the conditions for the preparation of niobium nitride in the thermal decomposition of niobium nitride in the thermal decomposition of niobium pentachloride ammines. The synthesis of the ammines was accomplished by the reaction of powdered NbC1 5 with dry ammonia at 210 K. Thermography and x-ray diffraction, spectral, and chemical analyses were used to identify the ammonolysis products. It was established that the products of ammonolysis of NbC1 5 are a mixture of the x-ray-amorphous complex Nb (NH 2 ) /SUB 5-x/ - (NG 3 ) 3 CL 3 (x≅) and 2 moles of NH 4 C1. The steps in the thermal decomposition of this mixture were studied. The phase transition that is observed in the case of further vacuum heat treatment at 1100-1300 K is presented

  16. Spectrographic determination of niobium in uranium - niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbel, M.Y.; Lordello, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    A method for the spectrographic determination of niobium in uranium-niobium alloys in the concentration range 1-10% has been developed. The metallic sample is converted to oxide by calcination in a muffle furnace at 800 0 C for two hours. The standards are prepared synthetically by dry-mixing. One part of the sample or standard is added to nineteen parts of graphite powder and the mixture is excited in a DC arc. Hafnium has been used as internal standard. The precision of the method is + - 4.8%. (Author) [pt

  17. Mechanical strenght and niobium and niobium-base alloys substructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, W.A.; Andrade, A.H.P. de

    1986-01-01

    Niobium and some of its alloys have been used in several fields of technological applications such as the aerospace, chemical and nuclear industries. This is due to its excelent mechanical stringth at high temperatures and reasonable ductility at low temperatures. In this work, we review the main features of the relationship mechanical strength - substructure in niobium and its alloys, taking into account the presence of impurities, the influence of initial thermal and thermo - mechanical treatments as well as the irradiation by energetic particles. (Author) [pt

  18. Niobium LEP 2 accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    An accelerating cavity from LEP. This could be cut open to show the layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities were used in an upgrade of the LEP accelerator to double the energy of the particle beams.

  19. Electrorecovery of tantalum in molten fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinola, A.; Dutra, A.J.B.; Silva, F.T. da

    1988-01-01

    Considering the privileged situation of Brazil as a productor of tantaliferous minerals, the authors have in view the development of a technology for production of metallic tantalum via molten salts electrolysis; this has the advantage of improving the aggregate value of exportation products, additionally to tantalum oxide and tantalum concentrates. Having in view the preliminary determintion of better conditions of temperature, electrolyte composition and current density for this process, electrolysis were conducted with a solvent composed of an eutetic mixture of lithium, sodium and potassium fluoride for dipotassium fluotantalate and occasionally for tantalum oxide. Current efficiencies as high as 83% were obtained in favoured conditions. (author) [pt

  20. Niobium electrodeposition from molten fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, A.F.

    1987-01-01

    Niobium electrodeposition from molten alkali fluorides has been studied aiming the application of this technic to the processes of electrorefining and galvanotechnic of this metal. The effects of current density, temperature, niobium concentration in the bath, electrolysis time, substrate nature, ratio between anodic and cathodic areas, electrodes separation and the purity of anodes were investigated in relation to the cathodic current efficiency, electrorefining, electroplating and properties of the deposit and the electrolytic solution. The work also gives the results of the conctruction and operation of a pilot plant for refractory metals electrodeposition and shows the electrorefining and electroplating compared to those obtained at the laboratory scale. (author) [pt

  1. Characterization of Tantalum Polymer Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Penelope

    2012-01-01

    Overview Reviewed data Caution must be taken when accelerating test conditions Data not useful to establish an acceleration model Introduction of new failure mechanism skewing results Evidence of Anti-Wear-Out De-doping of polymer Decreased capacitance Increased ESR Not dielectric breakdown Needs further investigation Further investigation into tantalum polymer capacitor technology Promising acceleration model for Manufacturer A Possibility for use in high-reliability space applications with suitable voltage derating.

  2. Molybdenum nutriture in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molybdenum is a trace element that functions as a cofactor for at least four enzymes: sulfite oxidase, xanthine oxidase, aldehyde oxidase, and mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component. In each case, molybdenum is bound to a complex, multi-ring organic component called molybdopterin, forming the e...

  3. Molybdenum market in transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutulov, A.

    1980-01-01

    Since the beginning of 1980 - after seven years of constant unbalance between supply and demand of molybdenum, characterized by a demand overhang and after two years of unprecedented spot market prices - clear signals for a consolidation of the molybdenum market can be recognized. (orig.) [de

  4. Preparation of potassium tantalum fluoride from tantalum hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, F.T. da; Espinola, A.; Dutra, A.J.B.

    1987-01-01

    Potassium tantalum fluoride (K 2 TaF 7 ) is an intermediary product in the processing of tantaliferous materials; it is the basic raw material for both reduction processes in use presently: reduction by metallic sodium and electrolysis in molten halides. It is normally obtained from a fluorotantalic acid solution to which potassium ions are added the precipitation of white acicular crystals of K 2 TaF 7 . The conditions for precipitation and recrystallization were studied, and crystal characterization were done by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric and thermodifferential analyses. (Author) [pt

  5. Hydrogen absorption kinetics of niobium with an ion-plated nickel overlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, K.

    1981-01-01

    The hydrogen absorption rate for nickel-ion-plated niobium was measured as a function of hydrogen pressure and temperature. The observed absorption curves of c(mean)/csub(e) against time (c(mean) and csub(e) are the mean and equilibrium hydrogen concentrations respectively) exhibited a marked hydrogen pressure dependence below 628 K but this was less marked above 723 K. The results were analysed on the basis of the proposed model that the rate-determining step is the hydrogen permeation through the nickel overlayer and that the permeation is driven by the hydrogen activity difference between the two interfaces, namely the H 2 -Ni and Ni-Nb interfaces. The marked pressure dependence can be attributed to the fact that the hydrogen activity coefficient in nickel is constant and that in niobium it varies markedly with concentration, i.e. with hydrogen pressure and temperature. It was also found that the change in the nickel overlayer structure caused by the dilatation of bulk niobium during hydrogen absorption enhances the hydrogen absorption rates. The temperature dependence of the hydrogen absorption rate is also discussed in comparison with that for tantalum with a vacuum-deposited nickel overlayer. (Auth.)

  6. Synthesis of niobium carbide (NbC) by powder metallurgy high energy milling technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonello, Rodrigo Tecchio; Urtiga Filho, Severino Leopoldino; Araujo Filho, Oscar Olimpio de; Ambrozio Filho, Francisco; Gonzalez, Cezar Henrique

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work is to obtain and characterize the Niobium Carbide (NbC) by a suitable high energy milling technique using a SPEX Mill vibratory type and niobium and carbon (graphite) powders. Since this carbide is scarce in the national market and it's necessary to apply this NbC as a reinforcement in two molybdenum high speed steels (AISI M2 and AISI M3:2) object of another work motivated this research. The powders were submitted to a high energy milling procedure for suitable times and conditions and then were characterized by means of Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (DRX) techniques. The ball-to-powder weight ratio was 10:1. The analysed samples showed that the high-energy milling is an alternative route of the NbC synthesis. (author)

  7. Process for purifying molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheresnowsky, J.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes a process for purifying molybdenum containing arsenic and phosphorus. The process comprising: adding to an acidic slurry of molybdenum trioxide, a source of magnesium ions in a solid form, with the amount of magnesium and the magnesium ion concentration in the subsequently formed ammonium molybdate solution being sufficient to subsequently form insoluble compounds containing greater than about 80% by weight of the arsenic and greater than about 80% by weight of the phosphorus, and ammonia in an amount sufficient to subsequently dissolve the molybdenum and subsequently form the insoluble compounds, with the source of magnesium ions being added prior to the addition of the ammonia; digesting the resulting ammoniated slurry at a temperature sufficient to dissolve the molybdenum and form an ammonium molybdate solution while the pH is maintained at from bout 9 to about 10 to form a solid containing the insoluble compounds; and separating the solid from the ammonium molybdate solution

  8. Organometallic Chemistry of Molybdenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, C. Robert; Walsh, Kelly A.

    1987-01-01

    Suggests ways to avoid some of the problems students have learning the principles of organometallic chemistry. Provides a description of an experiment used in a third-year college chemistry laboratory on molybdenum. (TW)

  9. Mechanical properties and constitutive relations for tantalum and tantalum alloys under high-rate deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.R.; Gray, G.T. III; Bingert, S.R.

    1996-01-01

    Tantalum and its alloys have received increased interest as a model bcc metal and for defense-related applications. The stress-strain behavior of several tantalums, possessing varied compositions and manufacturing histories, and tantalum alloyed with tungsten, was investigated as a function of temperature from -196 C to 1,000 C, and strain rate from 10 -3 s -1 to 8,000 s -1 . The yield stress for all the Ta-materials was found to be sensitive to the test temperature, the impurity and solute contents; however, the strain hardening remained very similar for various ''pure'' tantalums but increased with alloying. Powder-metallurgy (P/M) tantalum with various levels of oxygen content produced via different processing paths was also investigated. Similar mechanical properties compared to conventionally processed tantalums were achieved in the P/M Ta. This data suggests that the frequently observed inhomogeneities in the mechanical behavior of tantalum inherited from conventional processes can be overcome. Constitutive relations based upon the Johnson-Cook, the Zerilli-Armstrong, and the Mechanical Threshold Stress models were evaluated for all the Ta-based materials. Parameters were also fit for these models to a tantalum-bar material. Flow stresses of a Ta bar stock subjected to a large-strain deformation of var-epsilon = 1.85 via multiple upset forging were obtained. The capabilities and limitations of each model for large-strain applications are examined. The deformation mechanisms controlling high-rate plasticity in tantalum are revisited

  10. Free energy of hydration of niobium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Some of the glasses being formulated by SRTC researchers contain niobium oxide. In this report, the free energy of hydration of the oxide is calculated from the free energies of formation of the oxide, the hydroxide, and water. This value can be used in calculations of the free energy of hydration of glasses containing niobium

  11. Pure niobium sheet formability limits hydroforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collard, J.; Daumas, M.T.

    1986-04-01

    Sheets of niobium of 3 different thicknesses (0.1 mm, 1 mm and 2 mm) are deep-drawn by isostatic forming, influence of plane anisotropy and thickness are studied and deformation of the hydroformed niobium is observed. Forming limit curves are determined [fr

  12. Bibliographic study on molybdenum biokinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erzberger, A.

    1988-05-01

    This bibliographical study compiles and analyzes findings about the metabolism and resorption of molybdenum. Besides including studies on the physiology of molybdenum 99, a general survey is given on molybdenum in the environment and on its physiological behaviour. In particular, information on the dependence of molybdenum resorption on various factors, such as the chemical form, antagonisms etc., are gathered from literature. These factors have to be considered for sensibly carrying out necessary experiments. (orig./MG) [de

  13. Molybdenum solar neutrino experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfsberg, K.; Cowan, G.A.; Bryant, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    The goal of the molybdenum solar neutrino experiment is to deduce the 8 B solar neutrino flux, averaged over the past several million years, from the concentration of 98 Tc in a deeply buried molybdenum deposit. The experiment is important to an understanding of stellar processes because it will shed light on the reason for the discrepancy between theory and observation of the chlorine solar neutrino experiment. Possible reasons for the discrepancy may lie in the properties of neutrinos (neutrino oscillations or massive neutrinos) or in deficiencies of the standard solar model. The chlorine experiment only measures the 8 B neutrino flux in current times and does not address possible temporal variations in the interior of the sun, which are also not considered in the standard model. In the molybdenum experiment, we plan to measure 98 Tc (4.2 Myr), also produced by 8 B neutrinos, and possibly 97 Tc (2.6 Myr), produced by lower energy neutrinos

  14. Method of producing molybdenum-99

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Eric John

    2013-05-28

    Method of producing molybdenum-99, comprising accelerating ions by means of an accelerator; directing the ions onto a metal target so as to generate neutrons having an energy of greater than 10 MeV; directing the neutrons through a converter material comprising techentium-99 to produce a mixture comprising molybdenum-99; and, chemically extracting the molybdenum-99 from the mixture.

  15. Buffered Electrochemical Polishing of Niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Tian, Hui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Corcoran, Sean [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2011-03-01

    The standard preparation of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities made of pure niobium include the removal of a 'damaged' surface layer, by buffered chemical polishing (BCP) or electropolishing (EP), after the cavities are formed. The performance of the cavities is characterized by a sharp degradation of the quality factor when the surface magnetic field exceeds about 90 mT, a phenomenon referred to as 'Q-drop.' In cavities made of polycrystalline fine grain (ASTM 5) niobium, the Q-drop can be significantly reduced by a low-temperature (? 120 °C) 'in-situ' baking of the cavity if the chemical treatment was EP rather than BCP. As part of the effort to understand this phenomenon, we investigated the effect of introducing a polarization potential during buffered chemical polishing, creating a process which is between the standard BCP and EP. While preliminary results on the application of this process to Nb cavities have been previously reported, in this contribution we focus on the characterization of this novel electrochemical process by measuring polarization curves, etching rates, surface finish, electrochemical impedance and the effects of temperature and electrolyte composition. In particular, it is shown that the anodic potential of Nb during BCP reduces the etching rate and improves the surface finish.

  16. Spectrographic determination of zirconium, niobium, rhodium, ruthenium, tantalum, and tungsten in uranium and its compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alduan, F.A.; Capdevila, C.

    1976-01-01

    The determination of Nb, Rh, Ru, Ta, W and Zr in uranium and its compounds has been studied, using the carrier distillation method with either AgCl or AgCl-SrF 2 (4:3) as carrier. In order to get the best sensitivity, the influence of the carrier concentration, the dc arc intensity and several controlled atmospheres on the variation of the line to background ratio of intensities has been considered. With the most suitable conditions, the sensitivities achieved for the considered elements are in the range 1-10 ppm. (author)

  17. Magnetic Properties and Structure of Chromium Niobium Oxide and Iron Tantalum Oxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørlund Christensen, A.; Johansson, T.; Lebech, Bente

    1976-01-01

    Crystal structures were obtained from X-ray powder patterns. The magnetic properties were investigated between 4.2 and 300K by magnetization measurements and neutron diffraction. Both compounds show spin-glass transitions at low temperatures. In CrNbO4, the cusp in the susceptibility is observed ...

  18. A first-principles study of the piezoelectric properties of Niobium and Tantalum Pentoxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga M. Giraldo-Giraldo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 are wide-bandgap semiconductor oxides that have attracted great interest in recent years due to their technological applications, such as in electronics, telecommunications or photocatalysis. Because of this, we present a study based on firstprinciples calculations of the piezoelectric properties of the Z and β phases of Ta2O5 as well as the Z and P phases of Nb2O5 by using the Density Functional Theory and the Generalized Gradient Approximation with PBEsol parameterization. Once the equilibrium geometry was determined for each of these phases, we made a calculation using the linear response theory to determine the piezoelectric tensor associated with each phase. We discovered that the Z phase of both compounds presents good piezoelectric response. Additionally, β-Ta2O5 does not show such response.

  19. Mechanical properties and constitutive relations for tantalum and tantalum alloys under high-rate deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.R.; Gray, G.T. III; Bingert, S.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.

    1996-05-01

    Tantalum and its alloys have received increased interest as a model bcc metal and for defense-related applications. The stress-strain behavior of several tantalums, possessing varied compositions and manufacturing histories, and tantalum alloyed with tungsten, was investigated as a function of temperature from {minus}196 C to 1,000 C, and strain rate from 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1} to 8,000 s{sup {minus}1}. The yield stress for all the Ta-materials was found to be sensitive to the test temperature, the impurity and solute contents; however, the strain hardening remained very similar for various ``pure`` tantalums but increased with alloying. Powder-metallurgy (P/M) tantalum with various levels of oxygen content produced via different processing paths was also investigated. Similar mechanical properties compared to conventionally processed tantalums were achieved in the P/M Ta. This data suggests that the frequently observed inhomogeneities in the mechanical behavior of tantalum inherited from conventional processes can be overcome. Constitutive relations based upon the Johnson-Cook, the Zerilli-Armstrong, and the Mechanical Threshold Stress models were evaluated for all the Ta-based materials. Parameters were also fit for these models to a tantalum-bar material. Flow stresses of a Ta bar stock subjected to a large-strain deformation of {var_epsilon} = 1.85 via multiple upset forging were obtained. The capabilities and limitations of each model for large-strain applications are examined. The deformation mechanisms controlling high-rate plasticity in tantalum are revisited.

  20. In situ ARXPS characterization of tantalum based barrier films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerlich, Lukas

    2012-01-01

    As a consequence of device shrinking the resistivity of the widely used TaN/Ta double barrier layer becomes an increasingly important parameter for device speed beyond the 32 nm technology node. In this study the optimization of the deposition of TaN/Ta stacks was performed in such a way that tantalum nitride layer thickness is minimized and tantalum grows in the favorable conducting alpha-phase. In the first part of the study in situ ARXPS was used to investigate the growth of different tantalum nitride layers on SiO 2 and SiOCH as a function of deposition time, nitrogen flow and deposition power. In the second part the crystalline phase of 20 nm thick tantalum layers deposited on top of the same series of tantalum nitride layers characterized in the growth study was analyzed. The main findings are the appearance of tantalum carbide and tantalum silicide as interface species for the deposition on SiOCH and only tantalum silicide for the deposition on SiO 2 . So alpha-tantalum grows preferably on tantalum carbide and nitrogen rich intermediate layers whereas silicide at the interface promotes the growth of beta-tantalum. To verify these findings two additional modifications of the interface were studied. A lower bias power for a deposition of tantalum nitride on SiO 2 was used to confirm the role of tantalum silicide and a thermal treatment of a thin tantalum layer on SiOCH was applied to confirm the role of tantalum carbide. Finally, the contact resistance in via chains on patterned wafers for four selected processes showed the same trends as the sheet resistance of the corresponding barrier films on blanket wafer experiments.

  1. Electrocrystallisation of tantalum in molten fluoride media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massot, L. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique UMR 5503, Departement Procedes Electrochimiques et Materiaux, Universite Paul Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France)]. E-mail: massot@chimie.ups-tlse.fr; Chamelot, P. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique UMR 5503, Departement Procedes Electrochimiques et Materiaux, Universite Paul Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France); Palau, P. [Pechiney CRV-UR GP, Parc Economique Centr' Alp, BP27, 38340 Voreppe (France); Taxil, P. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique UMR 5503, Departement Procedes Electrochimiques et Materiaux, Universite Paul Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    2005-09-20

    The electrochemical nucleation of tantalum in molten alkaline fluoride media is investigated using chronoamperometry in the 670-750 deg C temperature range to optimize the operating conditions for preparing tantalum coatings for anode materials. Chronoamperometric results show that the electrodeposition process involves progressive nucleation with diffusion-controlled growth of the nuclei, which was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The influence of the temperature and the overpotential on the nucleation site densities is considered. Once the deposit has been obtained, plotting the roughness of the tantalum coatings as a function of the current densities reveals a minimum at about 80 mA/cm{sup 2}. This minimum is considered by the authors as a consequence of the progressive nucleation.

  2. Degreasing and cleaning superconducting RF Niobium cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauchmiller, Michael; Kellett, Ron; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    The purpose and scope of this report is to detail the steps necessary for degreasing and cleaning of superconducting RF Niobium cavities in the A0 clean room. It lists the required equipment and the cleaning procedure.

  3. Chemistry and uses of molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifty-six papers were presented at the Climax Third International Conference on the Chemistry and Uses of Molybdenum. The tremendous importance of the use of molybdenum compounds in industrial catalytic applications is highlighted in these proceedings. The structure and resultant catalytic activity of molybdates and oxides is detailed for the varied reactions of hydrodesulfurization, selective oxidation and oxidative dehydrogenation. The future role that molybdenum compounds will play in coal liquefaction is also stressed; molybdenum catalysts appear to be an essential ingredient in the US energy self-sufficiency program. New insights into fundamental molybdenum chemistry are provided by research directed towards the electronic structure and the thermochemical strength of molybdenum-molybdenum bonds. The synthesis of new organo-molybdenum compounds and the chemistry of Mo-Mo triple bonds in cyclic compounds is described. Model studies of molybdenum enzymes help to illuminate the structure and spectroscopic properties of these compounds. Studies of the molybdenum centers in xanthine oxidase, sulfite oxidase and nitrate reductase are reviewed. Fifteen papers are abstracted separately

  4. Mineral Resource of the Month: Niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Niobium, also called columbium, is a transition metal with a very high melting point. It is in greatest demand in industrialized countries, like the United States, because of its defense-related uses in the aerospace, energy and transportation industries. Niobium is used mostly to make high-strength, low-alloy (HSLA) steel and stainless steel. HSLA steels are used in large-diameter pipes for oil and natural gas pipelines and automobile wheels.

  5. Niobium segregation in the austenitic grain boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei, P.R.; Farah, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    The segregation of niobium and carbon in the boundary of the old austenitic grain (martensitic sample) of a steel 0,4%C/0,03%Nb, homogenized in 1350 0 C for one hour, with the help of the ionic microprobe, using oxygen as primary beam, is studied. The niobium segregation in Fe /0,58Nb homogenized samples at 1300 0 C by 8 hours and cooled in water, using the electronic microprobe is also studied. (E.G.) [pt

  6. Analysis of microstructure constitution and electrochemical characteristics of pitting corrosion in AISI 316-L type stainless steel modified by niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assis, O.B.G. de.

    1986-01-01

    The viability of total or partial substitution of molybdenum by niobium in stainless steel type AISI 316-L was studied. It was analysed the effects caused on the microstructural constitution and the electrochemical characteristics in the formation and stability of superficial oxide films grown on acid chloride solution. The electrochemical parameters were obtained on the potential kinetic polarization curves for two different scanning rates, as well the alloys dissolution rate by the measure of the variation in pitting density current (I p ) on time at a constant potential of + 300 mV (ECS). It was established the characteristics of niobium as stabilizer element of the passive film through inhibition of pitting propagation by the formation of re passivation oxides in the broken sites or actives points in the film. (author)

  7. Development and characterization of the oxidation behavior of various high temperature niobium based alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, Benedict I., II

    The oxidation response of various niobium based refractory alloys from the Nb-Mo-Si-B-X alloy system has been examined at temperatures between 700 and 1400°C in air. The development of these alloys was part of an ongoing effort to develop and discover a new materials system capable of replacing nickel based super alloys. Additions of titanium were found to provide limited oxidation resistance. A discontinuous layer of TiO2 was observed to from at temperatures above 1100°C. Alloys containing titanium additions were observed to suffer from pest oxidation at low and intermediate temperatures due to the development of Nb2O5. Poor oxidation resistance at intermediate temperatures for alloys with titanium additions was attributed to a transformation in the structure of Nb2O5 formed. Additions of chromium were observed to increase oxidation resistance through the development of a layered oxide structure containing SiO2 and CrNbO4. An intermediate oxidation layer was observed to develop along the oxide metal interface in which the solid solution was not oxidized. These alloys were found to be susceptible to pest oxidation at intermediate and low oxidation temperatures between 700 and 1000°C. Boron and molybdenum content was modified and shown to suppress pest oxidation at 700°C. Modified molybdenum content led to the development of molybdenum based primary solid solution instead of niobium. Alloys with modified molybdenum and boron content were found to have the best oxidation resistance surviving 168 hours of cyclic oxidation at 1400°C. Transient oxidation behavior was observed in thermal gravimetric results collected at 1200°C in the alloys with modified boron and molybdenum content and attributed to the preferential oxidation of Nb5Si3. Oxidation behavior was characterized by the weight change per surface area method and by thermal gravimetric analysis. Oxidation products were characterized by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy in several modes

  8. Chemical mechanical polishing of tantalum and tantalum nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjam, Sathish Babu S. V.

    There is a continuing need in the semiconductor industry to clear residual copper (Cu) and planarize the tantalum (Ta)/tantalum nitride (TaN) barrier/etch stop layer with a higher removal rate using the technique of Chemical Mechanical Polishing (CMP). Obtaining high removal rates for Ta/TaN is very challenging as the films are very hard, and hence it is difficult to achieve high Ta/TaN removal rates by just relying on an increase in the mechanical forces (operating pressure) alone during CMP. Ta/TaN is an inert metal, therefore, obtaining high Ta/TaN removal rates by using chemical additives is also challenging. Not only Ta/TaN needs to be removed at a higher rate in the second step of polishing, but also remaining Cu should be cleared. It is important to search for novel chemicals that can form a thin film on the Ta/TaN surface which can be easily abraded by the polishing pad with very less pressure. In this work, oxalic and tartaric acids have been investigated as the complexing agents in slurries for Ta/TaN CMP. Oxalic and tartaric acids appear to be reactive with Ta in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. A dispersion of the Oxalic acid (OA)/Tartaric Acid (TA) - peroxide mixtures with silica (fumed/colloidal) can be used to achieve Ta removal rates that are ˜ 90 nm/min at pH between 3 to 6 by applying a down force of 6.3 psi, where as at a lower down force of 2 psi, a removal rate of ˜ 40 nm/min has been achieved at pH = 3. It was shown earlier that a high Cu removal rate can be obtained using OA-peroxide based slurries with/without the addition of abrasives at pH = 3 [1]. So, in the first step, Cu could be removed at high rates at pH = 3 and by changing the pH to 5 or 6, Ta/TaN can be removed as mentioned above. Hence these slurries could be used as "single dispersion slurries " that could be used for both the first and second steps of Cu CMP. During the second step (barrier layer polish), Cu removal rates are low but not low enough to minimize dishing with

  9. Hafnium radioisotope recovery from irradiated tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Wayne A.; Jamriska, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Hafnium is recovered from irradiated tantalum by: (a) contacting the irradiated tantalum with at least one acid to obtain a solution of dissolved tantalum; (b) combining an aqueous solution of a calcium compound with the solution of dissolved tantalum to obtain a third combined solution; (c) precipitating hafnium, lanthanide, and insoluble calcium complexes from the third combined solution to obtain a first precipitate; (d) contacting the first precipitate of hafnium, lanthanide and calcium complexes with at least one fluoride ion complexing agent to form a fourth solution; (e) selectively adsorbing lanthanides and calcium from the fourth solution by cationic exchange; (f) separating fluoride ion complexing agent product from hafnium in the fourth solution by adding an aqueous solution of ferric chloride to obtain a second precipitate containing the hafnium and iron; (g) dissolving the second precipitate containing the hafnium and iron in acid to obtain an acid solution of hafnium and iron; (h) selectively adsorbing the iron from the acid solution of hafnium and iron by anionic exchange; (i) drying the ion exchanged hafnium solution to obtain hafnium isotopes. Additionally, if needed to remove residue remaining after the product is dried, dissolution in acid followed by cation exchange, then anion exchange, is performed.

  10. Obtainment of tantalum oxide from national ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinatti, D.G.; Ribeiro, S.; Martins, A.H.

    1988-01-01

    The experimental results of tantalum oxides (Ta 2 O 5 ) obtainment from Brazilian ores of tantalite and columbite are described. This study is a part of the technologic and scientific research design of refractory metals (Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo and W) and correlate ceramics. (C.G.C.) [pt

  11. New Sesame equation of state for tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greeff, C. W.; Johnson, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    A new Sesame equation of state (EOS) table has been created for tantalum. This EOS incorporates new high pressure Hugoniot data and diamond anvil cell compression data. The new EOS gives better agreement with this data as well as with sound speeds and Hugoniot curves of porous samples

  12. Niobium based coatings for dental implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, G.; Rodil, S.E.; Arzate, H.; Muhl, S.; Olaya, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Niobium based thin films were deposited on stainless steel (SS) substrates to evaluate them as possible biocompatible surfaces that might improve the biocompatibility and extend the life time of stainless steel dental implants. Niobium nitride and niobium oxide thin films were deposited by reactive unbalanced magnetron sputtering under standard deposition conditions without substrate bias or heating. The biocompatibility of the surfaces was evaluated by testing the cellular adhesion and viability/proliferation of human cementoblasts during different culture times, up to 7 days. The response of the films was compared to the bare substrate and pieces of Ti6Al4V; the most commonly used implant material for orthopedics and osteo-synthesis applications. The physicochemical properties of the films were evaluated by different means; X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. The results suggested that the niobium oxide films were amorphous and of stoichiometric Nb 2 O 5 (a-Nb 2 O 5 ), while the niobium nitride films were crystalline in the FCC phase (c-NbN) and were also stoichiometric with an Nb to N ratio of one. The biological evaluation showed that the biocompatibility of the SS could be improved by any of the two films, but neither was better than the Ti6Al4V alloy. On the other hand, comparing the two films, the c-NbN seemed to be a better surface than the oxide in terms of the adhesion and proliferation of human cemetoblasts.

  13. Josephson tunnel junctions in niobium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiik, Tapio.

    1976-12-01

    A method of fabricating stable Josephson tunnel junctions with reproducible characteristics is described. The junctions have a sandwich structure consisting of a vacuum evaporated niobium film, a niobium oxide layer produced by the glow discharge method and a lead film deposited by vacuum evaporation. Difficulties in producing thin-film Josephson junctions are discussed. Experimental results suggest that the lower critical field of the niobium film is the most essential parameter when evaluating the quality of these junctions. The dependence of the lower critical field on the film thickness and on the Ginzburg-Landau parameter of the film is studied analytically. Comparison with the properties of the evaporated films and with the previous calculations for bulk specimens shows that the presented model is applicable for most of the prepared samples. (author)

  14. Study of niobium corrosion in alkaline medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, S.H. de.

    1987-01-01

    A comparative study of niobium electrochemical behaviour in NaOH and KOH solution, with concentrations between 0,5 and 6,1M is presented. The studies were done through electrochemicals assays, consisting in the corrosion potential and anodic and cathodic polarization curves, complemented by loss of mass experiments. The niobium anodic behaviour in alkaline medium is characterized by passivation occurrence, with a stable film formation. The Na oH solution in alkaline medium are more corrosible to niobium than the KOH solution. The loss of mass assays showed that the corrosion velocit is more dependente of hydroxide concentration in KOH medium than the NaOH medium. (C.G.C.) [pt

  15. Molding of L band niobium superconductor cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Hitoshi; Funahashi, Yoshisato; Saito, Kenji; Noguchi, Shuichi; Koizumi, Susumu [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-07-01

    A cavity to produce high accelerating electron field was developed. The L-band (1.3 GHz) niobium superconductor unit cell cavity was ellipsoid with {phi}217.3 mm outer diameter and 2.5 mm thickness and consisted of two pieces of half cell, two beam pipes and flange. A deep drawing process was adapted. In spite of the first trial manufacture, each good cavity was obtained. Characteristic properties of niobium materials, molding method of cavity, extension of sheet after molding, production of beam pipe, accuracy and the cost were explained. Niobium materials. showed tensile strength 15.6 kg/mm{sup 2}, load-carrying capacity 4.1 kg/mm{sup 2}, density 8.57, extension 42.5% and RRR (resistance residual ratio){>=}200. (S.Y.)

  16. Magnetic flux trapping in superconducting niobium

    CERN Document Server

    Benvenuti, Cristoforo; Campisi, I E; Darriulat, Pierre; Durand, C; Peck, M A; Russo, R; Valente, A M

    1997-01-01

    In a systematic study of the RF response of superconducting niobium cavities operated in their fundamental TM010 mode at 1.5 GHz, magnetic flux trapping has been used as a tool to diagnose the presenc e of pinning centres. In addition to bulk niobium cavities the study covers copper cavities, the inner walls of which are coated with 1.5 µm thick niobium films grown by magnetron sputtering in a nobl e gas atmosphere. The use of different gases (Xe, Kr, Ar and Ne) or gas mixtures has made it possible to vary the concentration of noble gas atoms in the films. Film contamination is characterised by an electron mean free path l calculated from the results of systematic measurements of the penetration depth at T = 0 K, l0, and from RRR measurements made on samples prepared under similar conditions as the cavity films.

  17. Radioactivity analysis in niobium activation foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, G.E.

    1995-06-01

    The motivation for this study was to measure and analyze the activity of six (6) niobium (Nb) foils (the x-rays from an internal transition in Nb-93m) and apply this information with previously obtained activation foil data. The niobium data was used to determine the epithermal to MeV range for the neutron spectrum and fluence. The foil activation data was re-evaluated in a spectrum analysis code (STAY`SL) to provide new estimates of the exposure at the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effect Facility (LASREF). The activity of the niobium foils was measured and analyzed at the University of Missouri-Columbia (UMC) under the direction of Professor William Miller. The spectrum analysis was performed at the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR) by Professor Gary Mueller.

  18. Investigation of superconducting niobium 1170 MHz cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anashin, V.V.; Bibko, S.I.; Fadeyev, E.I.

    1988-01-01

    The design, fabrication and experiments with superconducting L-band single cell cavities are described. These cavities model a cell of an accelerating RF structure. The cavities have been fabricated from technical grade and higher purity grade sheet niobium using deep-drawing, electron beam welding and chemical polishing. They have spherical geometry and are excited in the TM 010 mode. A computerized set-up was used for cavity tests. Qo=1.5 x 10 9 and E acc = 4.3 MV/m were obtained in the cavity made of higher purity grade niobium. 6 references, 8 figures, 3 tables

  19. Design for a superconducting niobium RFQ structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.; Kennedy, W.L.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports a design for a niobium superconducting RFQ operating at 192 Mhz. The structure is of the rod and post type, novel in that each of four rods is supported by two posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. Although the geometry has four-fold rotation symmetry, the dipole-quadrupole mode splitting is large, giving good mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry enables designing for good mechanical stability while minimizing tooling cost for fabrication with niobium. Results of MAFIA numerical modeling, measurements on a copper model, and plans for a beam test are discussed

  20. Design for a superconducting niobium RFQ structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W.; Kennedy, W.L.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-09-01

    This paper reports a design for a niobium superconducting RFQ operating at 192 Mhz. The structure is of the rod and post type, novel in that each of four rods is supported by two posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. Although the geometry has four-fold rotation symmetry, the dipole-quadrupole mode splitting is large, giving good mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry enables designing for good mechanical stability while minimizing tooling cost for fabrication with niobium. Results of MAFIA numerical modeling, measurements on a copper model, and plans for a beam test are discussed.

  1. Design for a superconducting niobium RFQ structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.; Kennedy, W.L.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports a design for a niobium superconducting RFQ operating at 192 Mhz. The structure is of the rod and post type, novel in that each of four rods is supported by two posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. Although the geometry has four-fold rotation symmetry, the dipole-quadrupole mode splitting is large, giving good mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry enables designing for good mechanical stability while minimizing tooling costs for fabrication with niobium. Results of MAFIA numerical modeling, measurements on a copper model, and plans for a beam test are discussed. (Author) fig., 7 refs

  2. Design for a superconducting niobium RFQ structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W.; Kennedy, W.L.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports a design for a niobium superconducting RFQ operating at 192 Mhz. The structure is of the rod and post type, novel in that each of four rods is supported by two posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. Although the geometry has four-fold rotation symmetry, the dipole-quadrupole mode splitting is large, giving good mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry enables designing for good mechanical stability while minimizing tooling cost for fabrication with niobium. Results of MAFIA numerical modeling, measurements on a copper model, and plans for a beam test are discussed.

  3. Niobium-base grain refiner for aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Pontes, P. da; Robert, M.H.; Cupini, N.L.

    1980-01-01

    A new chemical grain refiner for aluminium has been developed, using inoculation of a niobium-base compound. When a bath of molten aluminium is inoculated whith this refiner, an intermetallic aluminium-niobium compound is formed which acts as a powerful nucleant, producing extremely fine structure comparable to those obtained by means of the traditional grain refiner based on titanium and boron. It was found that the refinement of the structure depends upon the weight percentage of the new refiner inoculated as well as the time of holding the bath after inoculation and before pouring, but mainly on the inoculating temperature. (Author) [pt

  4. Production of High Purity Niobium Ingots at CBMM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura, Lourenco de; Faria Sousa, Clovis Antonio de; Burgos Cruz, Edmundo

    2011-01-01

    CBMM is a fully integrated company, from the mine to the end line of the production chain, supplying different niobium products to the world market: ferroniobium, nickelniobium, niobium pentoxide and high purity metallic niobium. This high purity metallic niobium has long been known to exhibit superconductivity below 9.25 Kelvin. This characteristic has the potential to bring technological benefits for many different areas such as medicine, computing and environment. This paper presents the raw material requirements as well as CBMM experience on producing high purity niobium ingots. The results prove that CBMM material can be the best solution for special applications such as low cost superconductive radiofrequency cavities.

  5. Field emission from crystalline niobium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arti Dangwal Pandey

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Appreciable suppression of field emission (FE from metallic surfaces has been achieved by the use of improved surface cleaning techniques. In order to understand the effects of surface preparation on field emission, systematic measurements were performed on five single crystal and three large grain samples of high purity (RRR>300 niobium by means of atomic force microscope, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope (SEM, and dc field emission scanning microscope. The samples were treated with buffered chemical polishing (BCP, half of those for 30  μm and others for 100  μm removal of surface layer, followed by a final high pressure water rinsing. These samples provided the emission at minimum surface fields of 150  MV/m and those with longer BCP treatment showed the onset of field emission at slightly higher fields. A low temperature (∼150°C heat treatment in a high vacuum (10^{-6}  mbar chamber for 14 hours, on a selected large grain Nb sample, gives the evidence for the grain boundary assisted FE at very high fields of 250 and 300  MV/m. Intrinsic field emission measurements on the present Nb surfaces revealed anisotropic values of work function for different orientations. Finally, an interesting correlation between sizes of all investigated emitters derived from SEM images with respect to their respective onset fields has been found, which might facilitate the quality control of superconducting radio-frequency cavities for linear accelerators.

  6. HIP bonding between niobium/copper/stainless steel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Hitoshi; Fujino, Takeo; Hitomi, Nobuteru; Saito, Kenji; Yamada, Masahiro; Shibuya, Junichi; Ota, Tomoko

    2000-01-01

    We have used niobium flanges for the niobium bulk superconducting RF cavities, however, they are expensive. Stainless steel flanges instead of the niobium flanges will be used in the future large scale production of sc cavities like the KEK/JAERI joint project. For a future R and D of the vacuum sealing related to the clean horizontal assembly method or development of cavities welded a helium vessel in the KEK/JAERI joint project, a converter section of niobium material to stainless steel is required. From these requirements we need to develop the converter. We have tried a HIP bonding method between niobium materials and stainless steel or copper material. It was made clear that the technology could offer an enough bonding strength even higher than niobium tensile strength in the joined surface between niobium and stainless steel or copper. (author)

  7. Origins of Beta Tantalum in Sputtered Coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mulligan, C

    2001-01-01

    .... Some of the most recent work has attempted to relate the energetics (i.e., atom/ion energy) of the plasma to the alpha right arrow beta transition. It has been shown that the energetics of the plasma can relate to the most crucial sputtering parameters. The most significant feature of the use of plasma energy to explain the alpha right arrow beta transition is that it relates the formation of beta-tantalum to a quantifiable measure.

  8. Electrodepositions on Tantalum in Alkali Halide Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barner, Jens H. Von; Jensen, Annemette Hindhede; Christensen, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Surface layers of tantalum metal were electrodeposited on steel from K2TaF7-LiF-NaF-KF melts. With careful control of the oxide contents dense and adherent deposits could be obtained by pulse plating. In NaCl-KCl-NaF-Na2CO3 and NaCl-KCl-Na2CO3 melts carbonate ions seems to be reduced to carbon in...

  9. Electrodepositions on Tantalum in alkali halide melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barner, Jens H. Von; Jensen, Annemette Hindhede; Christensen, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Surface layers of tantalum metal were electrodeposited on steel from K 2TaF7-LiF-NaF-KF melts. With careful control of the oxide contents dense and adherent deposits could be obtained by pulse plating. In NaCl-KCl-NaF-Na2CO3 and NaCl-KCl-Na2CO 3 melts carbonate ions seems to be reduced to carbon ...

  10. On molybdenum (6) alcoholates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turova, N.Ya.; Kessler, V.G.

    1990-01-01

    Synthesis techniques for molybdenum (6) alcoholates of MoO(OR) 4 (1) and MoO 2 (OR) 2 (2) series by means of exchange interaction of corresponding oxychloride with MOR (M=Li, Na) are obtained. These techniques have allowed to prepare 1(R=Me, Et, i-Pr) and 2(R=Me, Et) with 70-98 % yield. Methylates are also prepared at ether interchange of ethylates by methyl alcohol. Metal anode oxidation in corresponding alcohol may be used for 1 synthesis. Physicochemical properties of both series alcoholates, solubility in alcohols in particular, depend on their formation conditions coordination polymerism. Alcoholates of 1 are rather unstable and tend to decomposition up to 2 and ether. It is suggested to introduce NaOR microquantities to stabilize those alcoholates

  11. Molybdenum Tube Characterization report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaux II, Miles Frank [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Usov, Igor Olegovich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-07

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques have been utilized to produce free-standing molybdenum tubes with the end goal of nuclear fuel clad applications. In order to produce tubes with properties desirable for this application, deposition rates were lowered requiring long deposition durations on the order of 50 hours. Standard CVD methods as well as fluidized-bed CVD (FBCVD) methods were applied towards these objectives. Characterization of the tubes produced in this manner revealed material suitable for fuel clad applications, but lacking necessary uniformity across the length of the tubes. The production of freestanding Mo tubes that possess the desired properties across their entire length represents an engineering challenge that can be overcome in a next iteration of the deposition system.

  12. The determination of molybdenum and tungsten in resin by x-ray-fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddy, B.T.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes a method using X-ray-fluorescence spectrometry for the determination of molybdenum and tungsten in ion-exchange resins. The dried resin is milled with sand, binder, and an internal-standard mixture before being briquetted. Niobium and zinc are used as the internal standards for molybdenum and tungsten respectively. Intensity measurements are made with the gold anode tube. Corrections are made for the interference of the Mo Kα analytical line on the background intensities used for the Mo Kα and Nb Kα lines. The precision of the analysis for molybdenum ranges from a relative standard deviation 0,02 at 5 mg/g to 0.045 at 55μg/g; for tungsten, the relative standard deviation ranges from 0,04 at 5 mg/g to 0,055 at 55μg/g. The limits of determination in the original resin sample were found to be 40μg/g for molybdenum and 80μg/g for tungsten. The laboratory method is given in an appendix

  13. Dislocation morphology in deformed and irradiated niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.P.

    1977-06-01

    Niobium foils of moderate purity were examined for the morphology of dislocations or defect clusters in the deformed or neutron-irradiated state by transmission electron microscopy. New evidence has been found for the dissociation of screw dislocations into partials on the (211) slip plane according to the Crussard mechanism: (a/2) [111] → (a/3) [111] + (a/6) [111

  14. Growth of anodic films on niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, M.A.B.; Bulhoes, L.O.S.

    1988-01-01

    The analysis of the response of the galvanostatic growth of anodic films on niobium metal in aqueous solutions is shown. The first spark voltage showed a dependence upon value of current density that could be explained as the incorporation of anions into the film. (M.J.C.) [pt

  15. Niobium hyperfine structure in crystal calcium tungstate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, D. L.; Kikuchi, C.

    1972-01-01

    A study of the niobium hyperfine structure in single crystal calcium tungstate was made by the combination of the technique of electron paramagnetic resonance and electron nuclear double resonance (EPR/ENDOR). The microwave frequency was about 9.4 GHz and the radio frequency from 20MHz to 70 MHz. The rare earth ions Nd(3+), U(3+), or Tm(3+) were added as the charge compensator for Nb(5+). To create niobium paramagnetic centers, the sample was irradiated at 77 deg K with a 10 thousand curie Co-60 gamma source for 1 to 2 hours at a dose rate of 200 K rads per hour and then transferred quickly into the cavity. In a general direction of magnetic field, the spectra showed 4 sets of 10 main lines corresponding to 4 nonequivalent sites of niobium with I = 9/2. These 4 sets of lines coalesced into 2 sets of 10 in the ab-plane and into a single set of 10 along the c-axis. This symmetry suggested that the tungsten ions are substituted by the niobium ions in the crystal.

  16. Niobium based coatings for dental implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, G., E-mail: enggiova@hotmail.com [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, CU, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Facultad de Quimica, Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Rodil, S.E. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, CU, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Arzate, H. [Laboratorio de Biologia Celular y Molecular, Facultad de Odontologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, CU, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Muhl, S. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, CU, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Olaya, J.J. [Unidad de Materiales, Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica y Mecatronica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Cra. 30 45-03 Bogota (Colombia)

    2011-01-15

    Niobium based thin films were deposited on stainless steel (SS) substrates to evaluate them as possible biocompatible surfaces that might improve the biocompatibility and extend the life time of stainless steel dental implants. Niobium nitride and niobium oxide thin films were deposited by reactive unbalanced magnetron sputtering under standard deposition conditions without substrate bias or heating. The biocompatibility of the surfaces was evaluated by testing the cellular adhesion and viability/proliferation of human cementoblasts during different culture times, up to 7 days. The response of the films was compared to the bare substrate and pieces of Ti6Al4V; the most commonly used implant material for orthopedics and osteo-synthesis applications. The physicochemical properties of the films were evaluated by different means; X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. The results suggested that the niobium oxide films were amorphous and of stoichiometric Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} (a-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}), while the niobium nitride films were crystalline in the FCC phase (c-NbN) and were also stoichiometric with an Nb to N ratio of one. The biological evaluation showed that the biocompatibility of the SS could be improved by any of the two films, but neither was better than the Ti6Al4V alloy. On the other hand, comparing the two films, the c-NbN seemed to be a better surface than the oxide in terms of the adhesion and proliferation of human cemetoblasts.

  17. 21 CFR 886.3100 - Ophthalmic tantalum clip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3100 Ophthalmic tantalum clip. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic tantalum clip is a malleable metallic device intended to be implanted permanently or temporarily to bring together the edges of a wound to aid healing or prevent bleeding from small...

  18. Human bone ingrowth into a porous tantalum acetabular cup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory N. Haidemenopoulos

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Porous Tantalum is increasingly used as a structural scaffold in orthopaedic applications. Information on the mechanisms of human bone ingrowth into trabecular metal implants is rather limited. In this work we have studied, qualitatively, human bone ingrowth into a retrieved porous tantalum monoblock acetabular cup using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. According to the results and taking into account the short operational life (4 years of the implant, bone ingrowth on the acetabular cup took place in the first two-rows of porous tantalum cells to an estimated depth of 1.5 to 2 mm. The bone material, grown inside the first raw of cells, had almost identical composition with the attached bone on the cup surface, as verified by the same Ca:P ratio. Bone ingrowth has been a gradual process starting with Ca deposition on the tantalum struts, followed by bone formation into the tantalum cells, with gradual densification of the bone tissue into hydroxyapatite. A critical step in this process has been the attachment of bone material to the tantalum struts following the topology of the porous tantalum scaffold. These results provide insight to the human bone ingrowth process into porous tantalum implants.

  19. Tantalum oxide thin films as protective coatings for sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Carsten; Reus, Roger De; Bouwstra, Siebe

    1999-01-01

    Reactively sputtered tantalum oxide thin-films have been investigated as protective coating for aggressive media exposed sensors. Tantalum oxide is shown to be chemically very robust. The etch rate in aqueous potassium hydroxide with pH 11 at 140°C is lower than 0.008 Å/h. Etching in liquids with p...

  20. Tantalum oxide thin films as protective coatings for sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Carsten; Reus, Roger De; Bouwstra, Siebe

    1999-01-01

    Reactively sputtered tantalum oxide thin films have been investigated as protective coatings for aggressive media exposed sensors. Tantalum oxide is shown to be chemically very robust. The etch rate in aqueous potassium hydroxide with pH 11 at 140°C is lower than 0.008 Å h-l. Etching in liquids...

  1. Advances in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of Tantalum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mugabi, James Atwoki; Eriksen, Søren; Christensen, Erik

    2014-01-01

    The chemical stability of tantalum in hot acidic media has made it a key material in the protection of industrial equipment from corrosion under such conditions. The Chemical Vapor Deposition of tantalum to achieve such thin corrosion resistant coatings is one of the most widely mentioned examples...

  2. Fabrication of a tantalum-clad tungsten target for KENS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Masayoshi; Kikuchi, Kenji; Kurishita, Hiroaki; Li, J.-F.; Furusaka, Michihiro

    2001-01-01

    Since the cold neutron source intensity of KENS (the spallation neutron source at High Energy Accelerator Research Organization) was decreased into about a third of the designed value because a cadmium liner at the cold neutron source deformed and obstructed the neutron beam line, the target-moderator-and-reflector assembly (TMRA) has been replaced by a new one aimed at improving the neutron performance and recovering the cold neutron source. The tantalum target has also been replaced by a tantalum-clad tungsten one. In order to bond the tantalum-clad with the tungsten block, a hot isostatic press (HIP) process was applied and optimized. It was found that gaseous interstitial impurity elements severely attacked tantalum and embrittled, and that the getter materials such as zirconium and tantalum were effective to reduce the embrittlement

  3. Purification of molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheresnowsky, M.J.; Brunelli, T.A.; Kim, T.K.

    1987-01-01

    A method for purifying molybdenum is described comprising: (a) adding to an ammoniacal ammonium molybdate solution which is at a pH of from about 8.5 to about 11 and which contains the impurities of phosphorus and arsenic with the phosphorus concentration being from about 0.01 to about 0.12 g/l, a soluble magnesium salt to form a precipitate comprising magnesium ammonium salts of the phosphorus and the arsenic, and to form a purified ammonium molybdate solution, with the amount of the magnesium salt being added in an amount sufficient to result in a concentration of from about 0.005 to about 0.04 moles Mg/l in the ammoniacal ammonium molybdate solution, and the purified solution containing no greater than about 0.01 g P/l; (b) separating the precipitate from the purified ammonium molybdate solution; and (c) contacting the purified ammonium molybdate solution with a chelating cation exchange resin supplying a sufficient amount of ammonium as the cation to remove the major portion of the magnesium ions from the purified solution and form a further purified ammonium molybdate solution

  4. Impurity dependence of superconductivity in niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laa, C.

    1984-04-01

    Jump temperatures, the critical fields Hsubc and Hsubc 2 and specific heats were measured on niobium samples where the impurity content was systematically varied by loading with nitrogen. Quantities could thus be extrapolated to lattice perfection and absolute purity. Comparisons with theories were made and some parameters extracted. Agreement was found with Gorkov theory for small impurities. A new value of the Ginsburg-Landau parameter Ko was determined to be just above 1/sqrt2 which proves that niobium is an elementary Type II semiconductor. By comparisons with the BCS and the CLAC theory the values of the mean Fermi velocity, the London penetration depth, the BCS coherence length and the impurity parameter were extracted. (G.Q.)

  5. Field Emission Measurements from Niobium Electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. BastaniNejad, P.A. Adderley, J. Clark, S. Covert, J. Hansknecht, C. Hernandez-Garcia, R. Mammei, M. Poelker

    2011-03-01

    Increasing the operating voltage of a DC high voltage photogun serves to minimize space charge induced emittance growth and thereby preserve electron beam brightness, however, field emission from the photogun cathode electrode can pose significant problems: constant low level field emission degrades vacuum via electron stimulated desorption which in turn reduces photocathode yield through chemical poisoning and/or ion bombardment and high levels of field emission can damage the ceramic insulator. Niobium electrodes (single crystal, large grain and fine grain) were characterized using a DC high voltage field emission test stand at maximum voltage -225kV and electric field gradient > 10MV/m. Niobium electrodes appear to be superior to diamond-paste polished stainless steel electrodes.

  6. Proposal of a new biokinetic model for niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Roges

    2006-01-01

    There are two niobium isotopes generated in nuclear power plants: 95 Nb and 94 Nb. Workers and members of the public are subjects to intake these radionuclides in accident situation. For dose calculation purpose, it is very important to develop a model that describes in a more realistic way the kinetics of niobium inside of the human body. Presently the model adopted by ICRP (ICRP, 1989) is based on animal studies and describes the behavior of niobium in human being in a simple manner. The new model proposal describes the kinetics of the niobium from the intake into the blood until the excretion, doing this in a more realistic form and considering not only data from animals but data from human beings as well. For this objective, a workers group of a niobium extraction and processing industry exposed to stable niobium (93 Nb) in oxide insoluble form with associated uranium, was monitored for uranium and niobium determination in urinary and fecal excretion, by mass spectrometry. Based in the ratios of the niobium concentration in urinary and faecal excretion of this workers and animal data study, a new biokinetic model for niobium was proposed, with the followings modifications relative to ICRP model: a new compartment that represents muscular tissue; the fractions which are deposited into the compartment are modified; a third component in the retention equation of the bone tissue; introduction of recirculation between organs and blood. The new model was applied for a case of accidental intake and described adequately the experimental data

  7. Development of high purity niobium material for superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umezawa, Hiroaki; Takeuchi, Koichi; Sakita, Kohei; Suzuki, Takafusa; Saito, Kenji; Noguchi, Shuichi.

    1993-01-01

    For the superconducting niobium cavities, issues of thermal quench and field emission have to be solved to achieve a high field gradient (>25MV/m) for TESLA (TeV Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator). In order to overcome the quench, upgrading of thermal conductivity of niobium material at the low temperature is very important. On the reduction of the field emission not only dust particles but also defect, impurity and inhomogeneity should be considered. Therefore development of high purity niobium material is very important to solve these issues. This paper describes the our latest R and D for high purity niobium material. (author)

  8. RF Characterization of Niobium Films for Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Aull† , S; Doebert, S; Junginger, T; Ehiasarian, AP; Knobloch, J; Terenziani, G

    2013-01-01

    The surface resistance RS of superconductors shows a complex dependence on the external parameters such as temperature, frequency or radio-frequency (RF) field. The Quadrupole Resonator modes of 400, 800 and 1200 MHz allow measurements at actual operating frequencies of superconducting cavities. Niobium films on copper substrates have several advantages over bulk niobium cavities. HIPIMS (High-power impulse magnetron sputtering) is a promising technique to increase the quality and therefore the performance of niobium films. This contribution will introduce CERNs recently developed HIPIMS coating apparatus. Moreover, first results of niobium coated copper samples will be presented, revealing the dominant loss mechanisms.

  9. Superconducting parameters of polycrystalline niobium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandyba, P.E.; Kolesnikov, D.P.; Tkachev, V.A.

    1978-01-01

    The niobium semi-crystalline films, having a thickness of 200-5,050 A have been studied. The films have been produced by the electron-beam evaporation in the oilless vacuum and by the ionic plasma spraying with diode and triode methods. Determined have been the coherence length, the magnetic field penetration depth and the Ginsburg-andau parameter. An attempt is made to determine the electron states density of the Fermi surface

  10. Fast-neutron interaction with niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Poenitz, W.P.; Smith, D.L.; Whalen, J.F.; Howerton, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Results of a comprehensive study of the interaction of fast neutrons with niobium are presented, including measurement and interpretation of neutron total, differential-scattering and radiative-capture cross sections. The experimental results are interpreted in the context of the optical-statistical model, with attention to the Fermi-surface anomaly. Experimental results, physical interpretations and rigorous statistical methods are used to provide a comprehensive evaluated nuclear data file suitable for use in a wide range of applied neutronic calculations.

  11. Niobium pentoxide coating replacing zinc phosphate coating

    OpenAIRE

    RODRIGUES, P.R.P.; TERADA, M.; JUNIOR, O.R.A.; LOPES, A.C.; COSTA, I.; BANCZEK, E.P.

    2015-01-01

    A new coating made of niobium pentoxide, obtained through the sol-gel process, was developed for the carbon steel (SAE 1010). The corrosion protection provided by this coating was evaluated through electrochemical tests such as: open circuit potential, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and anodic potentiodynamic polarization in NaCl 0,5 mol L-1 solution. The morphology and composition of the coatings were analyzed using scanning electronic microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X...

  12. Hydrogen solubility in polycrystalline - and nonocrystalline niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, T.T.; Silva, J.R.G. da

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogen solubility in polycrystalline and monocrystalline niobium was measured in the range 400 0 C to 1000 0 C at one atmosphere hydrogen partial pressure. The experimental technique consists of saturation of the solvent metal with hydrogen, followed by quenching and analysis of the solid solution. It is presented solubility curves versus reciprocal of the absolute doping temperature, associated with their thermodynamical equation. (Author) [pt

  13. Defect studies of H+ implanted niobium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prochazka, I.; Čížek, J.; Havránek, Vladimír; Anwand, W.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 645, SI1 (2015), s. 69-71 ISSN 0925-8388. [14th International Symposium on Metal-Hydrogen Systems (MH). Salford, 20.07.2014-25.07.2014] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Niobium * Hydrogen * defects * Positron annihilation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.014, year: 2015

  14. Nitrogen reduction: Molybdenum does it again

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrock, Richard R.

    2011-02-01

    Nature reduces dinitrogen under mild conditions using nitrogenases, the most active of which contains molybdenum and iron. The only abiological dinitrogen reduction catalyst that avoids the harsh conditions of the Haber-Bosch process contains just molybdenum.

  15. Trapping of hydrogen isotopes in molybdenum and niobium predamaged by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottiger, J.; Picraux, S.T.; Rud, N.; Laursen, T.

    1977-01-01

    The trapping of hydrogen isotopes at defects in Mo and Nb have been studied. Ion beams of 11- and 18-keV He + , 55-keV O + and Ne + , and 500-keV Bi + were used to create defects. Subsequently H or D was injected at room temperature by use of molecular beams of 16-keV H + 2 and D + 2 . Appreciable enhancements were observed in the amount of H and D retained within the near-surface region of predamaged samples compared to samples with no prior damage. The total amount of D retained within the near-surface region was measured by means of the nuclear reaction D( 3 He,p) 4 He, and H depth profiles were measured via a resonance in the nuclear reaction 1 H( 19 F,αγ) 16 O. The H profiles correlate with the predicted predamaging ion profiles; however, appreciable tails to deeper depths for the hydrogen profiles are observed for the heavier predamaging ions. For a given predamage ion fluence, the amount of trapped deuterium increases linearly with incident deuterium fluence until a saturation in the enhancement is reached. The amount of deuterium trapped when saturation occurs increases with increasing predamage fluence. The experiments indicate that lighter ions, which create fewer primary displacements, are more effective per displacement in trapping hydrogen. An appreciable release of hydrogen is obtained upon annealing at 200 and 300 degreeC, and a preannealing experiment indicates this is due to detrapping rather than to any loss of traps. These temperatures suggest a much higher binding energy for the trapped hydrogen isotopes (approx.1.5 eV) than the available evidence gives for simple H-defect binding energies (approximately-less-than0.3 eV). The detailed trapping mechanism is not known. However, it is suggested on the basis of the high binding energies and the high concentrations of hydrogen which can be trapped that clusters of hydrogen may be formed

  16. Quadrupole interactions in molybdenum base dilute binary vanadium and niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, L.H.

    1981-01-01

    The 95 Mo resonance in pure Mo after filing and annealing near 1000 0 C consists entirely of the m = 1/2 → -1/2 transition. Decreased absorption intensity and line broadening caused by solute addition can be understood as a direct result of second order perturbation of the m = 1/2 → -1/2 transition. A/h for 95 Mo is roughly 200 Hz for nuclei near either V or Nb in Mo. The data establish the magnitude and the mechanism of the broadening observed in 95 Mo when V and Nb are present as minor alloying elements

  17. Evaluation of Polymer Hermetically Sealed Tantalum Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander A.

    2014-01-01

    Polymer cathode tantalum capacitors have lower ESR (equivalent series resistance) compared to other types of tantalum capacitors and for this reason have gained popularity in the electronics design community. Their use allows improved performance of power supply systems along with substantial reduction of size and weight of the components used. However, these parts have poor thermal stability and can degrade in humid environments. Polymer hermetically sealed (PHS) capacitors avoid problems related to environmental degradation of molded case parts and can potentially replace current wet and solid hermetically sealed capacitors. In this work, PHS capacitors manufactured per DLA LAM DWG#13030 are evaluated for space applications. Several lots of capacitors manufactured over period from 2010 to 2014 were tested for the consistency of performance, electrical and thermal characteristics, highly accelerated life testing, and robustness under reverse bias and random vibration conditions. Special attention was given to analysis of leakage currents and the effect of long-term high temperature storage on capacitors in as is condition and after hermeticity loss. The results show that PHS capacitors might be especially effective for low-temperature applications or for system requiring a cold start-up. Additional screening and qualification testing have been recommended to assure the necessary quality of capacitors for space projects.

  18. Tantalum-based semiconductors for solar water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Jijie; Gong, Jinlong

    2014-07-07

    Solar energy utilization is one of the most promising solutions for the energy crises. Among all the possible means to make use of solar energy, solar water splitting is remarkable since it can accomplish the conversion of solar energy into chemical energy. The produced hydrogen is clean and sustainable which could be used in various areas. For the past decades, numerous efforts have been put into this research area with many important achievements. Improving the overall efficiency and stability of semiconductor photocatalysts are the research focuses for the solar water splitting. Tantalum-based semiconductors, including tantalum oxide, tantalate and tantalum (oxy)nitride, are among the most important photocatalysts. Tantalum oxide has the band gap energy that is suitable for the overall solar water splitting. The more negative conduction band minimum of tantalum oxide provides photogenerated electrons with higher potential for the hydrogen generation reaction. Tantalates, with tunable compositions, show high activities owning to their layered perovskite structure. (Oxy)nitrides, especially TaON and Ta3N5, have small band gaps to respond to visible-light, whereas they can still realize overall solar water splitting with the proper positions of conduction band minimum and valence band maximum. This review describes recent progress regarding the improvement of photocatalytic activities of tantalum-based semiconductors. Basic concepts and principles of solar water splitting will be discussed in the introduction section, followed by the three main categories regarding to the different types of tantalum-based semiconductors. In each category, synthetic methodologies, influencing factors on the photocatalytic activities, strategies to enhance the efficiencies of photocatalysts and morphology control of tantalum-based materials will be discussed in detail. Future directions to further explore the research area of tantalum-based semiconductors for solar water splitting

  19. Method of molybdenum kinetic determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krejngol'd, S.U.; Dzotsenidze, N.E.; Ruseishviyai, T.G.; Nelen', I.M.

    1980-01-01

    The method molybdenum kinetic determination according to oxidation of pyrogallol with bromate in the medium of 0.05-0.15 M perchloric or sulphuric acids is presented. 1 mg of Ni, Co, Mn, Mg, Zn, Cr(3); 100 μg of Ca, Al, Cu, 10 μg of Cr(4), W; 10 μg of Fe in the presence of 22x10 - 4 M solution of EDTA, as well as 10 - 4 M solutions of chlorides and fluorides, 10 - 5 M solutions of bromides do not interfere with molybdenum determination using the given method. The method is rather simple, it takes 30 min to carry out the analysis. Determination limit of molybdenum constitutes 0.01 μg/ml

  20. Isotope analysis of molybdenum in selected minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, S.; Dietze, H.J.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical method is described for the mass spectrometric determination of molybdenum abundance values. The results of analyses of three molybdenum mineral samples are presented and compared with the results of other authors. It is shown that the fine variations of molybdenum in natural minerals cannot be analysed with currently available mass spectrometers

  1. Work hardening and plastic equation of state of tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gypen, L.A.; Aernoudt, E.; Deruyttere, A.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of cold deformation on the thermal and athermal components of the flow stress of tantalum was investigated. Up to high deformation levels the strain hardening is due only to the development of internal stress fields; the effective stress remains almost constant. The athermal strain hardening of tantalum is parabolic at low deformation levels (epsilon < 0.5) and linear at high deformation levels, as for other bcc metals. Hart's plastic equation of state is shown to be valid for tantalum at room temperature in the whole deformation range investigated (from epsilon = 0.005 to epsilon = 2.8). (author)

  2. 2017 NEPP Tasks Update for Ceramic and Tantalum Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander A.

    2017-01-01

    This presentation gives an overview of current NEPP tasks on ceramic and tantalum capacitors and plans for the future. It includes tasks on leakage currents, gas generation and case deformation in wet tantalum capacitors; ESR degradation and acceleration factors in MnO2 and polymer cathode capacitors. Preliminary results on the effect of moisture on degradation of reverse currents in MnO2 tantalum capacitors are discussed. Latest results on mechanical characteristics of MLCCs and modeling of degradation of leakage currents in BME capacitors with defects are also presented.

  3. Electrochemical processing of the metallic wastes of ZhS32 nickel superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palant, A. A.; Levin, A. M.; Levchuk, O. M.; Bryukvin, V. A.

    2013-07-01

    Technological foundations are developed for the electrochemical oxidation of nickel superalloys containing alloying elements Re, Ta, Nb, Co, W, Cr, Mo, and Al. It is shown that nickel, cobalt, and aluminum pass to a sulfuric acid solution when an asymmetric sinusoidal industrial-frequency alternating current is applied and 70-75% tungsten, molybdenum, tantalum, niobium, and rhenium are concentrated in an anode cake. When a nitric acid electrolyte is used, rhenium, nickel, cobalt, aluminum, and chromium pass to a solution and tungsten, molybdenum, tantalum, and niobium are concentrated in an anode cake. Technological versions of the processing of the oxidation products with the formation of marketable products are discussed.

  4. Metal extraction by amides of carboxylic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skorovarov, D.I.; Chumakova, G.M.; Rusin, L.I.; Ul'anov, V.S.; Sviridova, R.A.; Sviridov, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    Extraction ability of various amides was studied. Data on extraction of rare earths, vanadium, molybdenum, rhenium, uranium, niobium, tantalum by N,N-dibutyl-amides of acetic, nonanic acids and fatly synthetic acids of C 7 -C 9 fractions are presented. Effect of salting-out agents, inorganic acid concentrations on extraction process was studied. Potential ability of using amides of carboxylic acids for extractional concentration of rare earths as well as for recovery and separation of iron, rhenium, vanadium, molybdenum, uranium, niobium, and tantalum was shown

  5. Recovery of molybdenum values from dilute solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litchfield, J.; Pemsler, J.

    1980-01-01

    A process is described for concentrating the molybdenum values in an aqueous ammoniacal leach liquor. Ferrous ions are added to the liquor in sufficient quantities to saturate the leach liquor and provide an excess sufficient to precipitate a solid complex whose approximate Fe/Mo ratio is 3.5 or greater. The molybdenum values thereinare precipitated as a ferrous hydroxide ammonium molybdate complex. The molybdenum containing precipitate is separated from the aqueous liquor. Acid is added to the separated molybdenum containing precipitate to resolubilize the molybdenum values

  6. Mining, ore preparation and niobium alloys production at Araxa, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paraiso, O.S.; Fuccio Junior, R. de; Betz, E.W.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed description of the worlds major niobium producer is presented covering mining, concentration by froth flotation, leaching, and production of ferro-alloys. The present exploration of the Araxa deposit, its ore preparation and production of ferro-niobium is described. (E.G.) [pt

  7. Positron Annihilation Lifetime Studies of Deformed and Shock Loaded Tantalum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stepp, David

    1999-01-01

    .... The authors conclude that these results support the theory that deformation in tantalum is controlled by dislocation drag above the Peierls stress and that strain rate effects, which are dearly...

  8. PREPARATION OF TANTALUM CARBIDE FROM AN ORGANOMETALLIC PRECURSOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. SOUZA

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we have synthesized an organometallic oxalic precursor from tantalum oxide. This oxide was solubilized by heating with potassium hydrogen sulfate. In order to precipitate Ta2O5.nH2O, the fused mass obtained was dissolved in a sulfuric acid solution and neutralized with ammonia. The hydrated tantalum oxide precipitated was dissolved in an equimolar solution of oxalic acid/ammonium oxalate. The synthesis and the characterization of the tantalum oxalic precursor are described. Pyrolysis of the complex in a mixture of hydrogen and methane at atmospheric pressure was studied. The gas-solid reaction made it possible to obtain tantalum carbide, TaC, in the powder form at 1000oC. The natural sintering of TaC powder in an inert atmosphere at 1400°C during 10 hours, under inert atmosphere made it possible to densify the carbide to 96% of the theoretical value.

  9. Studies of niobium and development of niobium resonant RF cavities for accelerator driven system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondal, Jayanta

    2013-01-01

    The present approach for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities is to roll and deep draw sheets of polycrystalline high-purity niobium. Jefferson Laboratory pioneered the use of large-grain/single-crystal Nb directly sliced from an ingot for the fabrication of single-crystal high-purity Nb SRF cavities. The large grain/single crystal niobium has several potential advantages over the polycrystalline niobium and has become a viable alternative to the standard fine grain (ASTM grain size>6 μm), high purity (RRR ≥ 250 ) niobium for the fabrication of high-performance SRF cavities for particle accelerators. The present study includes the prototype single cell low beta cavity design, fabrication, EB welding and low temperature RF test at 2K. In this study also the medium field Q-Slope has been analyzed with the help of an added non linear term in Heabel's analytical model and a linear increase of surface resistance Rs with the magnetic field

  10. HYDROGEN VACANCY INTERACTION IN MOLYBDENUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abd El Keriem, M.S.; van der Werf, D.P.; Pleiter, F

    1993-01-01

    Vacancy-hydrogen interaction in molybdenum was investigated by means of the perturbed angular correlation technique, using the isotope In-111 as a probe. The complex InV2 turned out to trap up to two hydrogen atoms: trapping of a single hydrogen atom gives rise to a decrease of the quadrupole

  11. Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murduck, J.M.; Lepetre, Y.J.; Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1989-07-04

    A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources. 8 figs.

  12. Direct atomic absorption determination of silicon in metallic niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinova, Eh.S.; Guzeev, I.D.; Nedler, V.V.; Khokhrin, V.M.

    1984-01-01

    Consideration is being given to realization of the basic advantage of non-flame atomizer-analysis of directly solid samples-for silicon determination in niobium for the content of the first one of less than 1x10 -3 mass %. Analysis technique is described. Diagrams of the dependences of atomic silicon absorption in graphite cells of usual type as well as lined by tungsten carbide and atomic silicon absorption on the value of niobium weighed amount are presented. It is shown that Si determination in metallic niobium according to aqueous reference solutions results in understatement of results 2.4 times. The optimal conditions for Si determination in niobium are the following: 2400 deg C temperature, absence of carbon and oxygen. Different niobium specimens with the known silicon content were used as reference samples

  13. Niobium oxide compositions and methods for using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodenough, John B; Han, Jian-Tao

    2014-02-11

    The disclosure relates a niobium oxide useful in anodes of secondary lithium ion batteries. Such niobium oxide has formula Li.sub.xM.sub.1-yNb.sub.yNb.sub.2O.sub.7, wherein 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.3, 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, and M represents Ti or Zr. The niobium oxide may be in the form of particles, which may be carbon coated. The disclosure also relates to an electrode composition containing at least one or more niobium oxides of formula Li.sub.xM.sub.1-yNb.sub.yNb.sub.2O.sub.7. The disclosure further relates to electrodes, such as anodes, and batteries containing at least one or more niobium oxides of formula Li.sub.xM.sub.1-yNb.sub.yNb.sub.2O.sub.7. Furthermore, the disclosure relates to methods of forming the above.

  14. Gel Fabrication of Molybdenum “Beads”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowden, Richard Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Armstrong, Beth L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Cooley, Kevin M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division

    2016-11-01

    Spherical molybdenum particles or “beads” of various diameters are of interest as feedstock materials for the additive manufacture of targets and assemblies used in the production of 99Mo medical isotopes using accelerator technology. Small metallic beads or ball bearings are typically fabricated from wire; however, small molybdenum spheres cannot readily be produced in this manner. Sol-gel processes are often employed to produce small dense microspheres of metal oxides across a broad diameter range that in the case of molybdenum could be reduced and sintered to produce metallic spheres. These Sol-gel type processes were examined for forming molybdenum oxide beads; however, the molybdenum trioxide was chemically incompatible with commonly used gelation materials. As an alternative, an aqueous alginate process being assessed for the fabrication of oxide spheres for catalyst applications was employed to form molybdenum trioxide beads that were successfully reduced and sintered to produce small molybdenum spheres.

  15. Tantalum recycling from waste of electrical and electronic equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotrowicz Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of tantalum recycling from waste of electrical and electronic equipment was investigated. Study was carried out using basic physical and chemical methods, ie. mechanical separation via crushing, leaching of silver layer in diluted HNO3, grinding and oxidation of anodes and thermic reduction with metallic reducing agent. A recovery rate of anodes was determined at 96%, and recycling efficiency of tantalum to pure form was determined more than 50%. Also was made mass balance.

  16. Charge density wave states in tantalum dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David C.; Mahanti, Subhendra D.; Duxbury, Phillip M.

    2018-01-01

    Using density functional theory, we explore a range of charge density wave states (CDWs) in tantalum-based transition-metal dichalcogenide monolayers. The high-symmetry states of the 1 H phases of Ta X2 (X = S, Se, Te) are lower in total energy compared to the 1 T variants, while the 1 T phases exhibit a much stronger tendency for CDW formation. The stability of several CDWs is found to be stronger as the chalcogenide is changed in the sequence (S, Se, Te), with the tellurium-based systems exhibiting several CDWs with binding energy per formula unit in the range of 100 meV . These 1 T CDW phases are lower in energy than the corresponding 1 H CDW phases. The diversity of CDWs exhibited by these materials suggests that many "hidden" states may occur on ultrafast excitation or photodoping. Changes in electronic structure across the Ta X2 series are also elucidated.

  17. Shock-induced deformation twinning in tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murr, L.E.; Niou, C.S.; Pappu, S.; Kennedy, C.; Meyers, M.A.; Chen, Y.J.

    1997-01-01

    Shock-wave deformation of tantalum to a pressure of 45 GPa and duration of 1.8 micros generates profuse twinning. The post-shock mechanical response is significantly affected, with shock hardening exceeding the expected hardening due to the transient shock strain ε s = (4/3)ln(V/V 0 ); this enhanced hardening, and other alterations in response, are attributed to the barriers presented to plastic deformation by the deformation twins. A constitutive model is proposed that predicts the threshold shock stress for mechanical twinning; it is based on the application of the Swegle-Grady relationship between shock stress and strain rate to constitute equations describing the critical stress for slip and twinning. This constitutive model incorporates grain-size effects and predicts a threshold twinning stress that is a function of temperature and grain size; predictions of the model are in qualitative agreement with experimental results

  18. Characterization of Tri-lab Tantalum Plate.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchheit, Thomas E.; Cerreta, Ellen K.; Deibler, Lisa Anne; Chen, Shu-Rong; Michael, Joseph R.

    2014-09-01

    This report provides a detailed characterization Tri-lab Tantalum (Ta) plate jointly purchased from HCStark Inc. by Sandia, Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Data in this report was compiled from series of material and properties characterization experiments carried out at Sandia (SNL) and Los Alamos (LANL) Laboratories through a leveraged effort funded by the C2 campaign. Results include microstructure characterization detailing the crystallographic texture of the material and an increase in grain size near the end of the rolled plate. Mechanical properties evaluations include, compression cylinder, sub-scale tension specimen, micohardness and instrumented indentation testing. The plate was found to have vastly superior uniformity when compare with previously characterized wrought Ta material. Small but measurable variations in microstructure and properties were noted at the end, and at the top and bottom edges of the plate.

  19. Electron heating by photon-assisted tunneling in niobium terahertz mixers with integrated niobium titanium nitride striplines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leone, B; Gao, [No Value; Klapwijk, TM; Jackson, BD; Laauwen, WM; de Lange, G

    2001-01-01

    We describe the gap voltage depression and current-voltage (I-V) characteristics in pumped niobium superconductor-insulator-superconductor junction with niobium titanium nitride tuning stripline by introducing an electron heating power contribution resulting from the photon-assisted tunneling

  20. Stopping power of C, O and Cl in tantalum oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barradas, Nuno P., E-mail: nunoni@ctn.ist.utl.pt [Centro de Ciências e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10, ao km 139.7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Laboratório de Engenharia Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10, ao km 139.7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Alves, E. [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, Lisboa 1049-001 (Portugal); Fonseca, M. [Dep. Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829- 516 Caparica (Portugal); ISLA Campus Lisboa| Laureate International Universities, 1500-210 Lisboa (Portugal); Siketić, Z.; Bogdanović Radović, I. [Ruđer Bošković Institute, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: •We measured the stopping power of C, O, and Cl in tantalum oxide. •A bulk sample method was used, with Bayesian inference data analysis. •Good agreement was found with SRIM2012 calculations. -- Abstract: Tantalum oxide is used in a variety of applications due to its high bandgap, high-K and high index of refraction. Unintentional impurities can change properties of tantalum oxide, and heavy ion elastic recoil detection is a method that can play a fundamental role in the quantification of those impurities. Furthermore, tantalum oxide is frequently part of the samples that also include other materials, which are often analysed with ion beam techniques. However, there are very few reported stopping power measurements for tantalum oxide, and data analysis relies not only on interpolation from a sparse data base but also on the Bragg rule. As is well known, the Bragg rule is often inaccurate for oxides, particularly when the difference in atomic numbers of the involved elements is very large as is case for Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}. We have used a bulk method, previously developed by us and applied successfully to other systems, to determine experimentally the stopping power of tantalum oxide for three different ion types: C, O and Cl. In the present paper the results of our measurements and bulk method analysis are presented.

  1. Critical unpairing currents in narrow niobium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershenzon, M.E.; Gubankov, V.N.

    1979-01-01

    Investigated are the dependences of critical currents of narrow ( with the width of W=0.5-15 μm) superconducting niobium films on temperature and a magnetic field. The proposed method of film production with the width of the 1μm order and with small edge inhomogeneities ((<=500 A) permitted to realize the Ginsburg-Landau unpairing currents in the wide range of temperatures. The correct comparison with the theory showed that the unpairing currents are observed if W(< or approximately) 2delta, where delta is the effective depth of the penetration of the perpendicular magnetic field

  2. Superconducting niobium cavity with cooling fins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isagawa, Shigeru.

    1978-04-01

    Cooling efficiency of a superconducting cavity is shown to be improved by applying a fin structure. Internal heating can be suppressed in a certain degree and the higher rf field is expected to be reached on surfaces of the cavity which is immersed in superfluid He 4 liquid. The rf measurements were made on a C-band niobium cavity with cylindrical and circular fins around the wall. Fields of 39 mT and 25 MV/m were attained for TM 010 mode cavity after surface treatments including high temperature annealing in a UHV furnace. (auth.)

  3. Evaluated nuclear-data file for niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.B.; Smith, D.L.; Howerton, R.J.

    1985-03-01

    A comprehensive evaluated nuclear-data file for elemental niobium is provided in the ENDF/B format. This file, extending over the energy range 10 -11 -20 MeV, is suitable for comprehensive neutronic calculations, particulary those dealing with fusion-energy systems. It also provides dosimetry information. Attention is given to the internal consistancy of the file, energy balance, and the quantitative specification of uncertainties. Comparisons are made with experimental data and previous evaluated files. The results of integral tests are described and remaining outstanding problem areas are cited. 107 refs

  4. Hydrogen in niobium-titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, J.R.G. da; Cabral, F.A.O.; Florencio, O.

    1985-01-01

    High purity Nb-Ti polycrystalline alloys were doped with hydrogen in equilibrium with the gaseous atmosphere at a pressure of 80 torr. at different temperatures. The partial molar enthalpy and entropy of the hydrogen solution at high dilution, ΔH sup(-) 0 and ΔS sup(-) 0 , were calculated from the equilibrium solubility data. The ΔH sup(-) 0 values are compared with the electron screened proton model of metal-hydrogen solutions. The addition of titanium to niobium has the effect to increase the hydrogen solubility at a given equilibrium temperature. (Author) [pt

  5. Low carbon manganese-nickel-niobium steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heisterkamp, F.; Hulka, K.

    1983-11-01

    Experimental heats of a low carbon-manganese-0.5% nickel-0.15% niobium steel have been rolled to plates between 13.5 and 50 mm thickness and to a 16 mm hot strip. Various combinations of soaking temperatures form 1100 0 C to 1300 0 C and of finish rolling temperatures between 710 0 C and 930 0 C have been investigated. From mechanical properties obtained, one can conclude that the investigated steel composition provides very good properties e.g. for pipe steels X65 to X75. In particular, the toughness at low temperature is outstanding despite relaxed rolling conditions. Metalographic and special investigations such as electron microscopy, texture evaluation and chemical extraction, correlated with applied rolling schedules and the mechanical properties obtained resulted in a comprehensive understanding about the benefits of high niobium metallurgy combined with nickel addition. All practically applied welding processes generated mechanical properties, in particular toughness of the weldment, that meet arctic specifications.(Author) [pt

  6. Mechanical properties of electron-beam-melted molybdenum and dilute molybdenum-rhenium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopp, W. D.; Witzke, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    A study of molybdenum and three dilute molybdenum-rhenium alloys was undertaken to determine the effects of rhenium on the low temperature ductility and other mechanical properties of molybdenum. Alloys containing 3.9, 5.9, and 7.7 atomic percent rhenium exhibited lower ductile-brittle transition temperatures than did the unalloyed molybdenum. The maximum improvement in the annealed condition was observed for molybdenum - 7.7 rhenium, which had a ductile-brittle transition temperature approximately 200 C (360 F) lower than that for unalloyed molybdenum. Rhenium additions also increased the low and high temperature tensile strengths and the high temperature creep strength of molybdenum. The mechanical behavior of dilute molybdenum-rhenium alloys is similar to that observed for dilute tungsten-rhenium alloys.

  7. Neutron scattering and models: molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.B.

    1999-01-01

    A comprehensive interpretation of the fast-neutron interaction with elemental and isotopic molybdenum at energies of le 30 MeV is given. New experimental elemental-scattering information over the incident energy range 4.5 r a rrow 10 MeV is presented. Spherical, vibrational and dispersive models are deduced and discussed, including isospin, energy-dependent and mass effects. The vibrational models are consistent with the ''Lane potential''. The importance of dispersion effects is noted. Dichotomies that exist in the literature are removed. The models are vehicles for fundamental physical investigations and for the provision of data for applied purposes. A ''regional'' molybdenum model is proposed. Finally, recommendations for future work are made

  8. Neutron scattering and models : molybdenum.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.B.

    1999-05-26

    A comprehensive interpretation of the fast-neutron interaction with elemental and isotopic molybdenum at energies of {le} 30 MeV is given. New experimental elemental-scattering information over the incident energy range 4.5 {r_arrow} 10 MeV is presented. Spherical, vibrational and dispersive models are deduced and discussed, including isospin, energy-dependent and mass effects. The vibrational models are consistent with the ''Lane potential''. The importance of dispersion effects is noted. Dichotomies that exist in the literature are removed. The models are vehicles for fundamental physical investigations and for the provision of data for applied purposes. A ''regional'' molybdenum model is proposed. Finally, recommendations for future work are made.

  9. Critical fields of niobium nitride films of various granularity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonova, E.A.; Sukhov, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    The behaviour of lattice parameter, specific electrical resistivity, critical temperature, and temperature dependence of upper critical field near Tsub(cr) of sputtered niobium nitride films is investigated versus the substrate temperature and gas mixture composition in the process of reactive cathode sputtering. The relation between extrapolated value of the upper critical field and granularity of niobium nitride films, close as to composition to the stoichiometric one, has been found. Values of the kappa parameter of the Ginsburg-Landau theory and of the coherence length for niobium nitride films of various granularity are estimated in an approximation of uniform distribution of impurities in a sample

  10. Effect of plastic deformation on the niobium thermal expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savitskij, E.M.; Bychkova, M.I.; Kanikovskij, V.B.

    1978-01-01

    Using dilatometric method the effect of plastic deformation on change of thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of niobium of different purity was studied. It was shown that deformation affected the TEC in different ways. At first the deformation degree rising causes linear decrease of the TEC and then linear increase. Carbon intensifies the TEC decrease of deformed niobium. The linear correlation was established between the TEC and the value of macroscopic stresses in plastic deformed niobium. The expression indicating the metal TEC change under loading was defined for case of strain hardening

  11. CVD molybdenum films of high infrared reflectance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carver, G. E.

    1979-01-01

    Molybdenum thin films of high infrared reflectance have been deposited by pyrolytic decomposition of molybdenum carbonyl (Mo(CO)/sub 6/), and by hydrogen reduction of molybdenum pentachloride (MoCl/sub 5/). Reflectance values within 0.7% of the reflectance of supersmooth bulk molybdenum have been attained by annealing films of lower reflectance in both reducing and non-reducing atmospheres. All depositions and anneals proceed at atmospheric pressure, facilitating a continuous, flow-through fabrication. These reflectors combine the high temperature stability of molybdenum thin films with the infrared reflectance of a material such as aluminum. Deposition from Mo(CO)/sub 6/ under oxidizing conditions, and subsequent anneal in a reducing atmosphere, results in films that combine high solar absorptance with low thermal emittance. If anti-reflected, black molybdenum films can serve as highly selective single layer photothermal converters. Structural, compositional, and crystallographic properties have been measured after both deposition and anneal.

  12. The involvement of molybdenum in life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R. J. P.; Frausto da Silva, J. J. R.

    2002-01-01

    Quite extraordinarily molybdenum is an essential element in life for the uptake of nitrogen from both nitrogen gas and nitrate, yet it is a relatively rare heavy trace element. It also functions in a few extremely important oxygen-atom transfer reactions at low redox potential. This review poses the question ''Why does life depend upon molybdenum?'' The answer has to be based upon the availability of the element and on chemical superiority in carrying out the essential tasks. We illustrate here the peculiarities of molybdenum chemistry and how they have become part of certain enzymes. The uptake and incorporation of molybdenum are dependent on its availability, selective pumps, and carriers (chaperones), but 4.5 x 10 9 years ago molybdenum was not available when both tungsten and vanadium or even iron were possibly used in its place. While these possibilities are explored, they leave many unanswered questions concerning the selection today of molybdenum

  13. Zirconia-molybdenum disilicide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, John J.; Honnell, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    Compositions of matter comprised of molybdenum disilicide and zirconium oxide in one of three forms: pure, partially stabilized, or fully stabilized and methods of making the compositions. The stabilized zirconia is crystallographically stabilized by mixing it with yttrium oxide, calcium oxide, cerium oxide, or magnesium oxide and it may be partially stabilized or fully stabilized depending on the amount of stabilizing agent in the mixture.

  14. Carbon, chromium and molybdenum contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinatora, A; Goldenstein, H.; Mei, P.R.; Albertin, E.; Fuoco, R.; Mariotto, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    This work describes solidification experiments on white cast iron, with 15 and 20% of chromium, 2.3, 3.0 and 3.6 % of carbon and 0.0, 1.5 and 2.5 % of molybdenum in test de samples with 30 mm diameter. Measurements were performed on the austenite and eutectic formation arrests, the number of the eutectic carbide particles relative to the total and the eutectic volumes, and the volume fraction of the primary austenite

  15. Crystallography and Morphology of Niobium Carbide in As-Cast HP-Niobium Reformer Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Karl G.; Kral, Milo V.

    2012-06-01

    The microstructures of two as-cast heats of niobium-modified HP stainless steels were characterized. Particular attention was paid to the interdendritic niobium-rich carbides formed during solidification of these alloys. At low magnifications, these precipitates are grouped in colonies of similar lamellae. Higher magnifications revealed that the lamellae actually obtain two distinct morphologies. The type I morphology exhibits broad planar interfaces with a smooth platelike shape. Type II lamellae have undulating interfaces and an overall reticulated shape. To provide further insight into the origin of these two different morphologies, the microstructure and crystallography of each have been studied in detail using high resolution scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, various electron diffraction methods (electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), selected area diffraction (SAD), and convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED)), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  16. Microstructural evaluation of alumina-niobium and alumina- niobium-zircon ceramics for ballistic application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mota, Juliana Machado da; Lopes, Cristina Moniz Araujo; Melo, Francisco Lourenco Cristovao de

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the microstructural of Alumina- Niobium and Alumina- Niobium-Zircon ceramics. Samples with 3.5 x 4.5 x 34 mm dimensions were prepared by uniaxial pressure (50 MPa) followed by isostatic pressure (300 MPa). The samples were sintered at 1500 ° C for 1 hour. The ceramics obtained were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction, to evaluate the phases and microstructures. In order to analyze the microstructure, by SEM the samples were prepared using two techniques: heat treatment (1350 ° C for 5 minutes) and thermochemical treatment (500 ° C for 8 minutes in a solution of NaOH and KOH) on polished and fractured surfaces. The results showed that despite differences between the two etchings, both were effective to analyze the microstructure. (author)

  17. Study and comparison of analytical methods for dosing molybdenum in uranium-molybdenum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buffereau, M.; Genty, C.; Houin, C.; Lavaud, M.; Leclainche, C.; Levrard, J.; Pichotin, B.; Robichet, J.

    1968-01-01

    Methods to determine molybdenum in uranium-molybdenum alloys are developed by various technic: molecular absorption spectrophotometry, emission spectroscopy, X ray fluorescence, atomic absorption spectrophotometry. After a comparison on samples in which molybdenum content lies between 1 and 10 per cent by weight, one concludes in the interest of some of the exposed methods for routine analysis. (author) [fr

  18. Mechanical properties of molybdenum disilicide based materials consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suryanarayanan, R.; Sastry, S.M.L.; Jerina, K.L.

    1994-01-01

    The influence of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) consolidation parameters on the mechanical properties of molybdenum disilicide (MoSi 2 ) and MoSi 2 reinforced with ductile and brittle reinforcements was studied. MoSi 2 , MoSi 2 -20 vol.% coarse and fine niobium powder and MoSi 2 -20 vol.% silicon carbide whiskers consolidated by HIP at 1,200--1,400 C, 207 MPa, for 1 and 4 h were tested in compression for elevated temperature strength and creep resistance. Single-edge-notched specimens of the three materials were tested in a three-point bend configuration for fracture toughness. Mechanical properties were related with consolidation parameters and post-HIP microstructures

  19. Ab initio Study of Tantalum Nitride and Silver Adatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grumski, Michael

    In 2022, integrated circuit interconnects will approach 10 nm and the diffusion barrier layers needed to ensure long lasting devices will be at 1 nm. This dimension means the interconnect will be dominated by the interface and it has been shown the interface is currently eroding device performance. The standard interconnect system has three layers---a Copper metal core, a Tantalum Adhesion layer and a Tantalum Nitride Diffusion Barrier Layer. An alternate interconnect schema is a Tantalum Nitride barrier layer and Silver as a metal. The adhesion layer is removed from the system along with changing to an alternate, low resistivity metal. First principles are used to assess the interface of the Silver and Tantalum Nitride. Several stoichiometric 1:1 Tantalum Nitride polymorphs are assessed and it is found that the Fe2P crystal structure is actually the most stable crystal structure which is at odds with the published phase diagram for ambient crystal structure. The surface stability of Fe2P-TaN is assessed and the absorption enthalpy of Silver adatoms is calculated. Finally, the thermodynamic stability of the TaN-Ag interconnect system is assessed.

  20. Tantalum strength model incorporating temperature, strain rate and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hojun; Battaile, Corbett; Brown, Justin; Lane, Matt

    Tantalum is a body-centered-cubic (BCC) refractory metal that is widely used in many applications in high temperature, strain rate and pressure environments. In this work, we propose a physically-based strength model for tantalum that incorporates effects of temperature, strain rate and pressure. A constitutive model for single crystal tantalum is developed based on dislocation kink-pair theory, and calibrated to measurements on single crystal specimens. The model is then used to predict deformations of single- and polycrystalline tantalum. In addition, the proposed strength model is implemented into Sandia's ALEGRA solid dynamics code to predict plastic deformations of tantalum in engineering-scale applications at extreme conditions, e.g. Taylor impact tests and Z machine's high pressure ramp compression tests, and the results are compared with available experimental data. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. Corrosion resistance of tantalum base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gypen, L.A.; Brabers, M.; Deruyttre, A.

    1984-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of substitutional Ta-Mo, Ta-W, Ta-Nb, Ta-Hf, Ta-Zr, Ta-Re, Ta-Ni, Ta-V, Ta-W-Mo, Ta-W-Nb, Ta-W-Hf and Ta-W-Re alloys has been investigated in various corrosive media, i.e. (1) concentrated sulfuric acid at 250 0 C and 200 0 C, (2) boiling hydrochloric acid of azeotropic composition, (3) concentrated hydrochloric acid at 150 0 C under pressure, (4) HF-Containing solutions and (5) 0.5% H 2 SO 4 at room temperature (anodisation). In highly corrosive media such as concentrated H 2 SO 4 at 250 0 C and concentrated HCl at 150 0 C tantalum is hydrogen embrittled, probably by stress induced precipitation of β-hydride. Both corrosion rate and hydrogen embrittlement in concentrated H 2 SO 4 at 250 0 C are strongly influenced by alloying elements. Small alloying additions of either Mo or Re decrease the corrosion rate and the hydrogen embrittlement, while Hf has the opposite effect. Hydrogen embrittlement in concentrated H 2 SO 4 at 250 0 C is completely eliminated by alloying Ta with 1 to 3 at % Mo (0.5 to 1.5 wt % Mo). These results can be explained in terms of oxygen deficiency of the Ta 2 O 5 film and the electronic structure of these alloys. (orig.) [de

  2. Thermomechanical characterization of pure polycrystalline tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rittel, D.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Poon, B.; Zhao, J.; Ravichandran, G.

    2007-01-01

    The thermomechanical behavior of pure polycrystalline tantalum has been characterized over a wide range of strain rates, using the recently developed shear compression specimen [D. Rittel, S. Lee, G. Ravichandran, Experimental Mechanics 42 (2002) 58-64]. Dynamic experiments were carried out using a split Hopkinson pressure bar, and the specimen's temperature was monitored throughout the tests using an infrared radiometer. The results of the mechanical tests confirm previous results on pure Ta. Specifically, in addition to its significant strain rate sensitivity, it was observed that pure Ta exhibits very little strain hardening at high strain rates. The measured temperature rise in the specimen's gauge was compared to theoretical predictions which assume a total conversion of the mechanical energy into heat (β = 1) [G.I. Taylor, H. Quinney, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, vol. A, 1934, pp. 307-326], and an excellent agreement was obtained. This result confirms the previous result of Kapoor and Nemat-Nasser [R. Kapoor, S. Nemat-Nasser, Mech. Mater. 27 (1998) 1-12], while a different experimental approach was adopted here. The assumption that β = 1 is found to be justified in this specific case by the lack of dynamic strain hardening of pure Ta. However, this assumption should be limited to non-hardening materials, to reflect the fact that strain hardening implies that part of the mechanical energy is stored into the material's microstructure

  3. High Pressure, Anharmonic Thermoelasticity of Tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlikowski, Daniel; Soderlind, Per; Moriarty, John A.

    2003-03-01

    The elastic moduli for bcc tantalum have been investigated over broad ranges of pressure (10 Mbar) and temperature (12,000 K), using first-principles methods that account for the cold, electron- and ion-thermal contributions. In this approach, the full potential linear muffin-tin orbital (FP-LMTO) method for the cold and electron-thermal contributions is combined with closely coupled atomistic simulations for the ion-thermal contribution, using quantum-based interatomic potentials derived from model generalized pseudopotential theory (MGPT) for the latter. While the harmonic part of the ion-thermal contribution can be readily obtained from strain derivatives of quasi-harmonic phonons, we have developed a more general Monte Carlo (MC) simulation method for the corresponding anharmonic part. The MC method directly calculates the elastic moduli through a fluctuation formula comprised of averages in the canonical distribution. Available results will be compared with ultrasonic measurements and diamond-anvil-cell compression experiments as functions of temperature and pressure. Also, the importance of these results in context to larger-scale constitutive models like the Steinberg-Guinan strength model will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  4. Functionalization of niobium electrodes for the construction of impedimetric biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helali, S.; Abdelghani, A.; Hafaiedh, I.; Martelet, C.; Prodromidis, M.I.; Albanis, T.; Jaffrezic-Renault, N.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an impedimetric immunosensor, based on niobium/niobium oxide (Nb/NbOxHy) electrodes, for the detection of atrazine. Niobium oxide was anodically formed onto niobium electrodes at 25 V in 1 M H 2 SO 4 . Hydrous oxide layers were then silanized with APTES, and using glutaraldehyde as a cross linker, Fab fragment k47 antibody was covalently immobilized onto the surface of the electrodes. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to characterize the building-up of the immunosensors as well as the binding of atrazine to its specific antibody. In presence of ferricyanide redox species and under a cathodic polarization voltage (- 1.2 V versus SCE), the relationship between the concentration of atrazine and the change of the electron transfer resistance value was studied

  5. Progress in the development of niobium alloyed high speed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, J.R.C.

    1987-01-01

    The development of economy-grades of niobium alloyed high speed steel is described. Both the metallurgical concepts behind the steel design and the results of performance tests are presented. (Author) [pt

  6. Utilization of niobium as substitute to vanadium in fast steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, M.H.C. de; Falleiros, I.G.S.; Barbosa, C.A.; Mori, F.Y.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a high speed tool steel containing niobium as substitute of vanadium with the following nominal composition: 1,3%C, 4,25%Cr, 4,5%Mo, 8,0%W, 10,0%Co and 2,7%V is described. It is shown that replacement modifies the carbides in the as cast structure and the morphology of ledeburite. The niobium rich carbides appear as idiomorphic particles or as eutetics. The total replacement of vanadium by niobium originates lower hardness values after tempering. With parcial replacement it is possible to achieve higher hardness than in the vanadium steel. Performance tests show that the niobium steels 'bits' have better life than vanadium steel. (Author) [pt

  7. Developments in niobium steels for linepipe applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heisterkamp, F.; Bergmann, B.; Chaussy, L.

    1982-11-01

    Current niobium containing steels being produced for line pipe applications, developed over the last ten years, demonstrate an excellent respoNse to heavy deformation at low temperatures, which results in an optimum balance of yield strength and toughness. However, it has long been recognized that excessive use of controlled rolling involves production penalties and contributes to the characteristic anisotropy present in rolled products. Thus, changes in rolling procedures would be desirable if they minimized delays or reduced directionality thereby resulting in further improvement of secondary properties, such as through thickness ductility and hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) tendency in sour gas environments. Present steel development is focused on transformation strengthening or increased precipitation hardening. Coupled with the trend to even lower carbon ( [pt

  8. Diffusion of oxygen in niobium during bake-out

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benvenuti, C.; Calatroni, S.; Ruzinov, V.

    2003-01-01

    Bake-outs at temperatures between 100 degC and 150 degC for duration up to two days have become customary for optimising the performance of bulk niobium cavities. This treatment results in the diffusion of oxygen, originating from the surface oxide, into the niobium. The theoretical oxygen profile has been simulated using the diffusion equations, and compared with some experimental results. (author)

  9. Superconducting niobium resonator fabrication at Nuclear Science Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, P.N.; Sonti, S.S.K.; Zacharias, J.; Mistri, K.K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the status of the indigenous fabrication of superconducting niobium cavities for the heavy ion linac at Nuclear Science Centre. In the first phase of the fabrication a quarter wave resonator was successfully electron beam welded and tested. In the second phase two completely indigenous resonators along with the niobium slow tuner bellows have been fabricated. In addition, several critical repairs have been performed. Plans for producing resonators for the second and third linac modules have started. (author)

  10. Electrodeposition of niobium and titanium in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, A.F.; Chagas, H.C.

    1988-01-01

    The electrodeposition of niobium and titanium in molten fluorides from the additions of fluorine niobates and fluorine titanates of potassium is described in laboratory and pilot scale. The temperature influence, the current density and the time deposition over the current efficiency, the deposits structure and the deposits purity are studied. The conditions for niobium coating over copper and carbon steel and for titanium coating over carbon steel are also presented. (C.G.C.) [pt

  11. Behaviour of tantalum- and ceramics implants in the organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, M.

    1987-01-01

    Studies of human and animal tissues after the use of orthopaedic implants were carried out by means of instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), as well as studies on the corrosion behaviour of tantalum by means of tracer techniques. After the use of an Al 2 O 3 -ceramic-metal compound prosthesis of the hip joint samples from the joint capsule and the Fascia Lata of 9 patients were studied. The measured Al amounts in the capsule tissues were greater than the normal values by up to 3 orders of magnitude. The corrosion experiment with tantalum was carried out in Ringer's solution as a model of body fluids. Local and systemic changes because of tantalum implants in animal experiments showed massive local stress of the contact tissue as a result of corrosion. Along with this, increased values of Ta were found in the spleen and the liver. (orig./RB) [de

  12. Surface processing for bulk niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, M. P.; Reid, T.

    2017-04-01

    The majority of niobium cavities for superconducting particle accelerators continue to be fabricated from thin-walled (2-4 mm) polycrystalline niobium sheet and, as a final step, require material removal from the radio frequency (RF) surface in order to achieve performance needed for use as practical accelerator devices. More recently bulk niobium in the form of, single- or large-grain slices cut from an ingot has become a viable alternative for some cavity types. In both cases the so-called damaged layer must be chemically etched or electrochemically polished away. The methods for doing this date back at least four decades, however, vigorous empirical studies on real cavities and more fundamental studies on niobium samples at laboratories worldwide have led to seemingly modest improvements that, when taken together, constitute a substantial advance in the reproducibility for surface processing techniques and overall cavity performance. This article reviews the development of niobium cavity surface processing, and summarizes results of recent studies. We place some emphasis on practical details for real cavity processing systems which are difficult to find in the literature but are, nonetheless, crucial for achieving the good and reproducible cavity performance. New approaches for bulk niobium surface treatment which aim to reduce cost or increase performance, including alternate chemical recipes, barrel polishing and ‘nitrogen doping’ of the RF surface, continue to be pursued and are closely linked to the requirements for surface processing.

  13. Hydrogen evolution activity and electrochemical stability of selected transition metal carbides in concentrated phosphoric acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomás García, Antonio Luis; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Bjerrum, Niels J.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative catalysts based on carbides of Group 5 (niobium and tantalum) and 6 (chromium, molybdenum and tungsten) metals were prepared as films on the metallic substrates. The electrochemical activities of these carbide electrodes towards the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in concentrated......, attributable to the different electronic structures. Tungsten carbide among the studied electrode samples exhibited the highest HER activity. Upon anodic potential scans in the presence of oxygen, chromium, tantalum and tungsten carbides displayed passivation due to the formation of stable surface layers...

  14. Thermodynamic study on vapourization of niobium oxides from slag melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiujin

    The partitioning of niobium to slag and gaseous niobium oxide vapourizing from metal/slag may cause niobium losses and erratic recovery rates in steelmaking practices. Knowledge of the volatility and activities of niobium oxides in slag melts are of great value for both theoretical evaluation and practical applications in niobium microalloyed steels. Because of the multi-valence state of niobium ions in slags, the behaviour of niobium in metallurgical slags is complicated. So far, little systematic attempts have been made and activity data of niobium oxides in slags are extremely scarce. The aim of this study is to determine precise data on the vapour pressures of niobium oxides, and consequently, to obtain information on thermodynamic quantities of niobium oxides in slag melts. The thermodynamic properties of niobium oxide in CaO-SiO2-NbO x and CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-NbOx slag melts were determined by employing the transpiration method from 1800-1873K under a controlled atmosphere. To confirm the validity of the transpiration method for the measurement of thermodynamic properties, the binary alloy system silver-gold was chosen for a comparison with the same property which has been measured by other recognized procedures. The agreement with literature results confirmed that the measurement yields reliable results for thermodynamic activity data by the transpiration method. The vapourization of liquid Nb2O5 was studied as a function of partial pressure of oxygen in the system and this confirms that atmosphere control is the essential condition for the vapourization study. The gaseous niobium oxide species was verified to be NbO2; hence, Nb2O5 vapourizes by the reaction Nb2O 5 (l) =2NbO2(g) +1/202(g). Heat of vapourization was estimated by applying the second law method and comparison with the literature showed a fairly good agreement. The thermodynamic properties of niobium oxide in the slag system of CaO-SiO 2-NbOx and CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-NbO x were measured by varying the

  15. Hydrogen adsorption on skeletal rhodium-tantalum electrodes-catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsinstevich, V.M.; Krejnina, N.M.

    1975-01-01

    Skeleton rhodium-tantalic catalyst electrodes with a tantalum mass percentage of 0 to 100 have been obtained by the methodology of Crupp and others. The hydrogen adsorption is studied through the method of removing the galvano-static and potentiodynamic curves of charging in sulfuric acid and potassium hydroxide. It has been discovered that the maximum adsorption ability relatively to the hydrogen can be observed in an alloy with a 5% tantalum contents. The energetic characteristics of the alloys are higher in alkali than in acid

  16. Change in lattice parameter of tantalum due to dissolved hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyanendra P. Tiwari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The volume expansion of tantalum due to the dissolved hydrogen has been determined using Bragg equation. The hydrogen was dissolved in the pure tantalum metal at constant temperature (360 °C and constant pressure (132 mbar by varying the duration of hydrogen charging. The amount of dissolved hydrogen was within the solid solubility limit. The samples with different hydrogen concentration were analyzed by X-ray diffraction technique. Slight peak shifts as well as peak broadening were observed. The relative changes of lattice parameters plotted against the hydrogen concentration revealed that the lattice parameters varied linearly with the hydrogen concentration.

  17. The Chemical Vapour Deposition of Tantalum - in long narrow channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mugabi, James Atwoki

    use as a construction material for process equipment, with the cheaper alternative being the construction of equipment from steel and then protecting it with a thin but efficacious layer of tantalum. Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) is chosen as the most effective process to apply thin corrosion......Tantalum’s resistance to corrosion in hot acidic environments and its superior metallic properties have made it a prime solution as a construction material or protective coating to equipment intended for use in such harsh chemical and physical conditions. The high price of tantalum metal limits its...

  18. Extraction of molybdenum VI by alpha benzoinoxime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achache, M.; Meklati, M.

    1990-06-01

    The concentration of molybdenum, was studied using alpha benzoinoxime dissolved in chloroform. Several acids and salt at different levels of concentration were investigated as well as other parameters such as (mixing time, extractant to metal ratio, temperature etc.) The molybdenum stippling was also studied in alkaline medium with the subsequent recovery of the extractant and solvent

  19. Process for Functionalizing Biomass using Molybdenum Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention concerns a process for converting biomass into useful organic building blocks for the chemical industry. The process involves the use of molybdenum catalysts of the formula Aa+a(MovXxR1yR2zR3e)a*3-, which may be readily prepared from industrial molybdenum compounds....

  20. The ternary system: Silicon-tantalum-uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogl, Peter, E-mail: peter.franz.rogl@univie.ac.a [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Vienna, A-1090 Wien, Waehringerstrasse 42 (Austria); Noel, Henri [Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide et Materiaux, UMR-CNRS 6226, Universite de Rennes I, Avenue du General Leclerc, F-35042 Rennes, Cedex (France)

    2010-09-01

    Phase equilibria in the ternary system Si-Ta-U have been established in an isothermal section at 1000 {sup o}C by optical microscopy, electron probe microanalysis and X-ray diffraction. Two novel ternary compounds were observed and were characterised by X-ray powder Rietveld refinement: stoichiometric {tau}{sub 1}-U{sub 2}Ta{sub 3}Si{sub 4} (U{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}Si{sub 4}-type, P2{sub 1}/c; a = 0.70011(1), b = 0.70046(1), c = 0.68584(1) nm, ss = 109.38(1); R{sub F} = 0.073, X-ray powder Rietveld refinement) and {tau}{sub 2}-U{sub 2-x}Ta{sub 3+x}Si{sub 4} at x {approx} 0.30 (Sc{sub 2}Re{sub 3}Si{sub 4}-type = partially ordered Zr{sub 5}Si{sub 4}-type, P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2; a = b = 0.69717(3)(1), c = 1.28709(4) nm; R{sub F} = 0.056; X-ray single crystal data). Mutual solubility of U-silicides and Ta-silicides are found to be very small i.e. below about 1 at.%. Due to the equilibrium tie-line Ta{sub 2}Si-U(Ta), no compatibility exists between the U-rich silicides U{sub 3}Si or U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} and tantalum metal. Single crystals obtained from alloys slowly cooled from liquid (2000 {sup o}C), yielded a fully ordered compound U{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}Si{sub 3}C (unique structure type; Pmna, a = 0.68860(1); b = 2.17837(4); c = 0.69707(1) nm; R{sub F2} = 0.048).

  1. Determination of rare and radioactive elements in raw materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemtsova, L.I.; Stepanova, N.A.; Zheleznova, E.M.

    1983-01-01

    A methodical guidance on determination of scandium, rare earth elements, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, tungsten, rhenium, uranium, radium, thorium in mineral raw materials is presented. Geological mineralogical and analytical characteristics are presented for each of these elements. Modern methods of their determination in different geological objects are described. Optimum spheres of application of each method are pointed out

  2. Diffusion of liquid uranium into foils of tantalum metal and tantalum-10 wt% tungsten alloy up to 1350/sup 0/C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznietz, M.; Livne, Z.; Cotler, C.; Erez, G.

    1988-05-01

    Immersion experiments have been performed to investigate the diffusion of liquid uranium into 0.3 mm thick foils of tantalum metal and tantalum-10wt% tungsten alloy in the temperature range of 1160/sup 0/C to 1350/sup 0/C, for reaction times up to 20 h, in zirconia crucibles. The orginal and uranium-reacted foils have been studied microscopically (SEM-EDAX) and a multilayer structure is revealed in the reacted foils. Layers identified for tantalum immersed in uranium: Uranium-tantalum (U/Ta approx. = 1), precipitated columnar tantalum (< 1wt% U), inner uranium, and inner tantalum (with grown grains and uranium along grain boundaries). Layers identified for Ta-10wt% W alloy immersed in uranium: Uranium-tantalum (U/Ta approx. = 1, 0.3wt% W), precipitated tantalum (< 1wt% U, down to 1-2wt% W), and inner Escher-type grains of tantalum-tungsten (up to 18wt% W) and of uranium (< 2wt% Ta, < 0.4wt% W). A mechanism for the multilayer formation and the intrusion of liquid uranium into the solid foils is proposed and substantiated.

  3. Evaluation of niobium dimethylamino-ethoxide for chemical vapour deposition of niobium oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabirian, Ali [Laboratory for Photonic Materials and Characterization, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 17, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Kuzminykh, Yury, E-mail: yury.kuzminykh@empa.ch [Laboratory for Photonic Materials and Characterization, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 17, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, 3602 Thun (Switzerland); Wagner, Estelle; Benvenuti, Giacomo [3D-Oxides, 70 Rue G. Eiffel Technoparc, 01630 St Genis Pouilly (France); ABCD Technology, 12 route de Champ-Colin, 1260 Nyon (Switzerland); Rushworth, Simon [Tyndall National Institute, Lee Maltings, Dyke Parade, Cork (Ireland); Hoffmann, Patrik, E-mail: patrik.hoffmann@empa.ch [Laboratory for Photonic Materials and Characterization, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 17, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, 3602 Thun (Switzerland)

    2014-11-28

    Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) processes depend on the availability of suitable precursors. Precursors that deliver a stable vapour pressure are favourable in classical CVD processes, as they ensure process reproducibility. In high vacuum CVD (HV-CVD) process vapour pressure stability of the precursor is of particular importance, since no carrier gas assisted transport can be used. The dimeric Nb{sub 2}(OEt){sub 10} does not fulfil this requirement since it partially dissociates upon heating. Dimethylamino functionalization of an ethoxy ligand of Nb(OEt){sub 5} acts as an octahedral field completing entity and leads to Nb(OEt){sub 4}(dmae). We show that Nb(OEt){sub 4}(dmae) evaporates as monomeric molecule and ensures a stable vapour pressure and, consequently, stable flow. A set of HV-CVD experiments were conducted using this precursor by projecting a graded molecular beam of the precursor onto the substrate at deposition temperatures from 320 °C to 650 °C. Film growth rates ranging from 8 nm·h{sup −1} to values larger than 400 nm·h{sup −1} can be obtained in this system illustrating the high level of control available over the film growth process. Classical CVD limiting conditions along with the recently reported adsorption–reaction limited conditions are observed and the chemical composition, and microstructural and optical properties of the films are related to the corresponding growth regime. Nb(OEt){sub 4}(dmae) provides a large process window of deposition temperatures and precursor fluxes over which carbon-free and polycrystalline niobium oxide films with growth rates proportional to precursor flux are obtained. This feature makes Nb(OEt){sub 4}(dmae) an attractive precursor for combinatorial CVD of niobium containing complex oxide films that are finding an increasing interest in photonics and photoelectrochemical water splitting applications. The adsorption–reaction limited conditions provide extremely small growth rates comparable to an

  4. Evaluation of niobium dimethylamino-ethoxide for chemical vapour deposition of niobium oxide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabirian, Ali; Kuzminykh, Yury; Wagner, Estelle; Benvenuti, Giacomo; Rushworth, Simon; Hoffmann, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) processes depend on the availability of suitable precursors. Precursors that deliver a stable vapour pressure are favourable in classical CVD processes, as they ensure process reproducibility. In high vacuum CVD (HV-CVD) process vapour pressure stability of the precursor is of particular importance, since no carrier gas assisted transport can be used. The dimeric Nb 2 (OEt) 10 does not fulfil this requirement since it partially dissociates upon heating. Dimethylamino functionalization of an ethoxy ligand of Nb(OEt) 5 acts as an octahedral field completing entity and leads to Nb(OEt) 4 (dmae). We show that Nb(OEt) 4 (dmae) evaporates as monomeric molecule and ensures a stable vapour pressure and, consequently, stable flow. A set of HV-CVD experiments were conducted using this precursor by projecting a graded molecular beam of the precursor onto the substrate at deposition temperatures from 320 °C to 650 °C. Film growth rates ranging from 8 nm·h −1 to values larger than 400 nm·h −1 can be obtained in this system illustrating the high level of control available over the film growth process. Classical CVD limiting conditions along with the recently reported adsorption–reaction limited conditions are observed and the chemical composition, and microstructural and optical properties of the films are related to the corresponding growth regime. Nb(OEt) 4 (dmae) provides a large process window of deposition temperatures and precursor fluxes over which carbon-free and polycrystalline niobium oxide films with growth rates proportional to precursor flux are obtained. This feature makes Nb(OEt) 4 (dmae) an attractive precursor for combinatorial CVD of niobium containing complex oxide films that are finding an increasing interest in photonics and photoelectrochemical water splitting applications. The adsorption–reaction limited conditions provide extremely small growth rates comparable to an atomic layer deposition (ALD) process

  5. Calculation Of Phonon Dispersion Frequencies For Bcc Tantalum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The phonon dispersion frequencies are calculated from first principles for bcc Tantalum using a resonance pseudopotential model. It was also possible, using this scheme, to account for the anomalous feature of the Ta dispersion curve observed experimentally in the (ε,o,o,) direction where the frequencies of the transverse ...

  6. Dissolution and Quantification of Tantalum-Containing Compounds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    The 100 % recovery for both the halide salts clearly indicates the complete dissolution and accurate quantification of the tantalum compounds using nitric acid or a methanol/nitric acid mixture. The small standard deviation also points to good precision in these analyses. The recovery results for Ta2O5 and Ta metal powder ...

  7. Laser welding of a beryllium/tantalum collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lingenfelter, A.C.; Anglin, C.D.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the methods utilized in the fabrication of a collimator from 0.001 inch thick beryllium and tantalum foil. The laser welding process proved to be an acceptable method for joining the beryllium in a standing edge joint configuration

  8. Structural modification of tantalum crystal induced by nitrogen ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M R HANTEHZADEH, M GHORANNEVISS and E DARABI. Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran 16315-835, Iran. MS received 1 September 2015; accepted 4 January 2016. Abstract. This paper investigates the effect of nitrogen ion implantation on tantalum ...

  9. Structural modification of tantalum crystal induced by nitrogen ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    resistance [28], chemical inertness and high mechanical hardness [29,30]. In this study, the results of nitrogen ion implantation into tantalum samples are discussed. The structural, composi- tional changes of modified surfaces as a function of ion dose are studied as well. The aim of this work is to find the optimum condition ...

  10. Study of surge current effects on solid tantalum capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented of a 2,000 hour cycled life test program conducted to determine the effect of short term surge current screening on approximately 47 micron f/volt solid tantalum capacitors. The format provides average values and standard deviations of the parameters, capacitance, dissipation factor, and equivalent series resistance at 120 Hz, 1KHz, abd 40 KHz.

  11. Performance and Reliability of Solid Tantalum Capacitors at Cryogenic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Performance of different types of solid tantalum capacitors was evaluated at room and low temperatures, down to 15 K. The effect of temperature on frequency dependencies of capacitance, effective series resistances (ESR), leakage currents, and breakdown voltages has been investigated and analyzed. To assess thermo-mechanical robustness of the parts, several groups of loose capacitors and those soldered on FR4 boards were subjected to multiple (up to 500) temperature cycles between room temperature and 77 K. Experiments and mathematical modeling have shown that degradation in tantalum capacitors at low temperatures is mostly due to increasing resistance of the manganese cathode layer, resulting in substantial decrease of the roll-off frequency. Absorption currents follow a power law, I approximately t(sup -m), with the exponent m varying from 0.8 to 1.1. These currents do not change significantly at cryogenic conditions and the value of the exponent remains the same down to 15 K. Variations of leakage currents with voltage can be described by Pool-Frenkel and Schottky mechanisms of conductivity, with the Schottky mechanism prevailing at cryogenic conditions. Breakdown voltages of tantalum capacitors increase and the probability of scintillations decreases at cryogenic temperatures. However, breakdown voltages measured during surge current testing decrease at liquid nitrogen (LN) compared to room-temperature conditions. Results of temperature cycling suggest that tantalum capacitors are capable of withstanding multiple exposures to cryogenic conditions, but the probability of failures varies for different part types.

  12. 2014 NEPP Tasks Update for Ceramic and Tantalum Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander A.

    2014-01-01

    Presentation describes recent development in research on MnO2, wet, and polymer tantalum capacitors. Low-voltage failures in multilayer ceramic capacitors and techniques to reveal precious metal electrode (PME) and base metal electrode (BME) capacitors with cracks are discussed. A voltage breakdown technique is suggested to select high quality low-voltage BME ceramic capacitors.

  13. A new mode of clinical failure of porous tantalum rod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh Kwang-Jun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The area of osteonecrosis of the head of femur affected by the disease process varies from a small localized lesion to a global lesion. Without specific treatment 80% of the clinically diagnosed cases will progress, and most will eventually require arthroplasty. Therefore the goal is to diagnose and treat the condition in the earliest stage. A number of surgical procedures have been described to retard or prevent progression of the disease and to preserve the femoral head. An implant made of porous tantalum has been developed to function as a structural graft to provide mechanical support to the subchondral plate of the necrotic femoral head, and possibly allow bone growth into the avascular region. Porous tantalum implant failure with associated radiological progression of the disease is reported in the literature; however, there is no report of clinical failure of the implant without radiological progression of the disease. We report a case of clinical failure of porous tantalum implant, seven months after surgery without any radiological progression of the disease, and with histopathological evidence of new bone formation around the porous tantalum implant. The patient was succesfully treated by total hip arthroplasty.

  14. Physics-Based Crystal Plasticity Modeling of Single Crystal Niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Tias

    Crystal plasticity models based on thermally activated dislocation kinetics has been successful in predicting the deformation behavior of crystalline materials, particularly in face-centered cubic (fcc) metals. In body-centered cubic (bcc) metals success has been limited owing to ill-defined slip planes. The flow stress of a bcc metal is strongly dependent on temperature and orientation due to the non-planar splitting of a/2 screw dislocations. As a consequence of this, bcc metals show two unique deformation characteristics: (a) thermally-activated glide of screw dislocations--the motion of screw components with their non-planar core structure at the atomistic level occurs even at low stress through the nucleation (assisted by thermal activation) and lateral propagation of dislocation kink pairs; (b) break-down of the Schmid Law, where dislocation slip is driven only by the resolved shear stress. Since the split dislocation core has to constrict for a kink pair formation (and propagation), the non-planarity of bcc screw dislocation cores entails an influence of (shear) stress components acting on planes other than the primary glide plane on their mobility. Another consequence of the asymmetric core splitting on the glide plane is a direction-sensitive slip resistance, which is termed twinning/atwinning sense of shear and should be taken into account when developing constitutive models. Modeling thermally-activated flow including the above-mentioned non-Schmid effects in bcc metals has been the subject of much work, starting in the 1980s and gaining increased interest in recent times. The majority of these works focus on single crystal deformation of commonly used metals such as Iron (Fe), Molybdenum (Mo), and Tungsten (W), while very few published studies address deformation behavior in Niobium (Nb). Most of the work on Nb revolves around fitting parameters of phenomenological descriptions, which do not capture adequately the macroscopic multi-stage hardening

  15. Multi-scale Modeling of Plasticity in Tantalum.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Hojun [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Battaile, Corbett Chandler. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carroll, Jay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Buchheit, Thomas E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Boyce, Brad [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weinberger, Christopher [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    In this report, we present a multi-scale computational model to simulate plastic deformation of tantalum and validating experiments. In atomistic/ dislocation level, dislocation kink- pair theory is used to formulate temperature and strain rate dependent constitutive equations. The kink-pair theory is calibrated to available data from single crystal experiments to produce accurate and convenient constitutive laws. The model is then implemented into a BCC crystal plasticity finite element method (CP-FEM) model to predict temperature and strain rate dependent yield stresses of single and polycrystalline tantalum and compared with existing experimental data from the literature. Furthermore, classical continuum constitutive models describing temperature and strain rate dependent flow behaviors are fit to the yield stresses obtained from the CP-FEM polycrystal predictions. The model is then used to conduct hydro- dynamic simulations of Taylor cylinder impact test and compared with experiments. In order to validate the proposed tantalum CP-FEM model with experiments, we introduce a method for quantitative comparison of CP-FEM models with various experimental techniques. To mitigate the effects of unknown subsurface microstructure, tantalum tensile specimens with a pseudo-two-dimensional grain structure and grain sizes on the order of millimeters are used. A technique combining an electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) and high resolution digital image correlation (HR-DIC) is used to measure the texture and sub-grain strain fields upon uniaxial tensile loading at various applied strains. Deformed specimens are also analyzed with optical profilometry measurements to obtain out-of- plane strain fields. These high resolution measurements are directly compared with large-scale CP-FEM predictions. This computational method directly links fundamental dislocation physics to plastic deformations in the grain-scale and to the engineering-scale applications. Furthermore, direct

  16. molybdenum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A [13]). However, the larger size leads to an enhanced Si-C bond length (1.868 A [13]) relative to that of the C-C bond (1.527 Á [13]). This leads to a net cancellation of effects. Consequently the data suggest that the SiMe, and 'Bu appear of similar size when viewed from the centroid of the substituted cyclopentadienyl ligand ...

  17. Chromium-molybdenum steels for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Because ferritic steels have been found to have excellent resistance to swelling when irradiated in a fast-breeder reactor, Cr-Mo steels have recently become of interest for nuclear applications, both as cladding and duct material for fast-breeder reactors and as a first-wall and blanket structural material for fusion reactors. In this paper we will assess the Cr-Mo steels for fusion reactor applications. Possible approaches on how Cr-Mo steels may be further developed for this application will be proposed. Generally, the Cr-Mo steels can be divided into two categories: unmodified, basically Cr-Mo-C steels and Cr-Mo-C steels modified by the addition of carbide-forming elements - in addition to chromium and molybdenum. Extensive research and development efforts have been conducted on the unmodified steels, especially 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo and 12 Cr-Mo steels. Considerable work has also been done on 12 Cr-Mo steels modified with additions of vanadium, niobium, titanium and tungsten. In recent years much of the research effort on this type of alloy has been directed at developing modified Cr-Mo steels with less than 12% Cr (approx. <= 9%) for applications where the 'stainless' properties imparted by chromium additions of at least 12% are not needed. We will examine the unmodified and modified steels in terms of hardenability, precipitation processes (stability at elevated temperatures), strength, and toughness. Where possible, we will discuss the effects of irradiation on these properties. Such a study leads to the types of tradeoffs that may be necessary when choosing between the well-researched unmodified 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel and a high-chromium modified steel. (orig.)

  18. Passive behaviour of zirconium, hafnium and niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornkjoel, S.

    1990-01-01

    The paper deals mainly with the results of stationary and transient polarization measurements together with capacitance measurements on passive electrodes of Zr, Hf and Nb over the entire pH-scale. The passive current densities are exstremely low, and essentially both pH and potential independent, exept for Nb at high pH. The extrapolated potential of zero inverse capacitance seems to be different from the extrapolated potential of zero film thickness for Zr and Hf, but not for Nb. The potential versus time curves at constant current show a downwards bending for Zr and Hf. It is shown that the pitting potentials of Zr and Hf are dependent of the concentration of halide ions and the type of halide ion, but not on pH. It is also shown that the pitting induction is second-order stimulated by chloride ions and first-order hindered by sulphate ions. Results from electron transfer reactions on passive niobium are reported. 9 refs

  19. Sample of superconducting wiring (Niobium Titanium)

    CERN Multimedia

    About NbTi cable: The cable consists of 36 strands of superconducting wire, each strand has a diameter of 0.825 mm and houses 6300 superconducting filaments of niobium-titanium (Nb-Ti, a superconducting alloy). Each filament has a diameter of about 0.006 mm, i.e. 10 times smaller than a typical human hair. The filaments are embedded in a high-purity copper matrix. Copper is a normal conducting material. The filaments are in the superconductive state when the temperature is below about -263ºC (10.15 K). When the filaments leave the superconductive state, the copper acts as conductor transports the electrical current. Each strand of The NbTi cable (at superconducting state) has a current density of up to above 2000 A/mm2 at 9 T and -271ºC (2.15 K). A cable transport a current of about 13000 A at 10 T and -271ºC (2.15 K). About LHC superconducting wiring: The high magnetic fields needed for the LHC can only be reached using superconductors. At very low temperatures, superconductors have no electrical resista...

  20. Sample of superconducting wiring (Niobium Titanium)

    CERN Multimedia

    About NbTi cable: The cable consists of 36 strands of superconducting wire, each strand has a diameter of 0.825 mm and houses 6300 superconducting filaments of niobium-titanium (Nb-Ti, a superconducting alloy). Each filament has a diameter of about 0.006 mm, i.e. 10 times smaller than a typical human hair. The filaments are embedded in a high-purity copper matrix. Copper is a normal conducting material. The filaments are in the superconductive state when the temperature is below about -263ºC (10.15 K). When the filaments leave the superconductive state, the copper acts as conductor transports the electrical current. Each strand of The NbTi cable (at superconducting state) has a current density of up to above 2000 A/mm2 at 9 T and -271ºC (2.15 K). A cable transport a current of about 13000 A at 10 T and -271ºC (2.15 K). About LHC superconducting wiring: The high magnetic fields needed for the LHC can only be reached using superconductors. At very low temperatures, superconductors have no electrical resistan...

  1. Niobium Titanium and Copper wire samples

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Two wire samples, both for carrying 13'000Amperes. I sample is copper. The other is the Niobium Titanium wiring used in the LHC magnets. The high magnetic fields needed for guiding particles around the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ring are created by passing 12’500 amps of current through coils of superconducting wiring. At very low temperatures, superconductors have no electrical resistance and therefore no power loss. The LHC is the largest superconducting installation ever built. The magnetic field must also be extremely uniform. This means the current flowing in the coils has to be very precisely controlled. Indeed, nowhere before has such precision been achieved at such high currents. Magnet coils are made of copper-clad niobium–titanium cables — each wire in the cable consists of 9’000 niobium–titanium filaments ten times finer than a hair. The cables carry up to 12’500 amps and must withstand enormous electromagnetic forces. At full field, the force on one metre of magnet is comparable ...

  2. Metabolic and environmental aspects of fusion reactor activation products: niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Easterly, C.E.; Shank, K.E.

    1977-11-01

    A summary of the metabolic and environmental aspects of niobium is presented. The toxicological symptoms from exposure to niobium are given, along with lethal concentration values for acute and chronic exposures. Existing human data are presented; animal uptake and retention data are analyzed for various routes of administration. Recommended metabolic values are also presented along with comments concerning their use and appropriateness. The natural distribution of niobium is given for freshwater, seawater, and the biosphere. Concentration factors and retention of /sup 95/Nb in the environment are discussed with reference to: plant retention via leaf absorption; plant retention via root uptake; uptake in terrestrial animals from plants; uptake in freshwater organisms; uptake in marine organisms; and movement in soil. Conclusions are drawn regarding needs for future work in these areas. This review was undertaken because niobium is expected to be a key metal in the development of commercial fusion reactors. It is recognized that niobium will likely not be used in the first generation reactors as a structural material but will appear as an alloy in such materials as superconducting wire.

  3. Niobium as an ex-vessel neutron dosimeter for PWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgson, L.M.; Apple, S.C.; Culp, R.R. (Arkansas Technical Univ., Russellville (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The use of niobium as a neutron monitor has generated considerable interest among those doing reactor pressure vessel neutron dosimetry. The product of the {sup 93}Nb(n,n{prime}){sup 93m}Nb reaction has a half-life of 16.1 years. It decays by internal conversion emitting 16.6- and 18.6keV X rays. Niobium's attributes are the similarity of its neutron cross section to the damage cross section of iron and its long half-life and activation sensitivity. Niobium's disadvantages are self-attenuation of the low-energy X rays and X-ray fluorescence induced by other radiation that might be present. Since 1983, several niobium foils have been irradiated along with conventional neutron dosimeters in the two nuclear reactors at Arkansas Nuclear One. The conventional dosimeter set contained copper, titanium, nickel, iron, {sup 238}U, and {sup 237}Np monitors. The niobium foils were analyzed for {sup 93m}Nb activity, correcting for both self-attenuation and fluorescence. Reaction rates were determined for each foil. These reaction rates were compared with reaction rates calculated from the neutron fluence measurements obtained with the conventional dosimeters. This paper discusses the stated disadvantages and the results of the reaction rate comparison.

  4. Precipitation of hydrides in high purity niobium after different treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkov, F.; Romanenko, A.; Trenikhina, Y.; Grassellino, A.

    2013-01-01

    Precipitation of lossy non-superconducting niobium hydrides represents a known problem for high purity niobium in superconducting applications. Using cryogenic optical and laser confocal scanning microscopy we have directly observed surface precipitation and evolution of niobium hydrides in samples after different treatments used for superconducting RF cavities for particle acceleration. Precipitation is shown to occur throughout the sample volume, and the growth of hydrides is well described by the fast diffusion-controlled process in which almost all hydrogen is precipitated at $T=140$~K within $\\sim30$~min. 120$^{\\circ}$C baking and mechanical deformation are found to affect hydride precipitation through their influence on the number of nucleation and trapping centers.

  5. Compatibility of niobium, titanium, and vanadium metals with LMFBR cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.N.

    1975-10-01

    A series of laboratory capsule annealing experiments were conducted to assess the compatibility of niobium, vanadium, and titanium with 316 stainless steel cladding in the temperature range of 700 to 800 0 C. Niobium, vanadium, and titanium are cantidate oxygen absorber materials for control of oxygen chemistry in LMFBR fuel pins. Capsule examination indicated good compatibility between niobium and 316 stainless steel at 800 0 C. Potential compatibility problems between cladding and vanadium or titanium were indicated at 800 0 C under reducing conditions. In the presence of Pu/sub 0.25/U/sub 0.75/O/sub 1.98/ fuel (Δanti G 02 congruent to -160 kcal/mole) no reaction was observed between vanadium or titanium and cladding at 800 0 C

  6. Characterization and sintering of niobium-ATR alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibuya, N.H.; Iwasaki, H.; Suzuki, C.K.; Pinatti, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    In the niobium aluminothermy a slag is produced, composed mostly of alumina and other compounds such as niobium oxide and silica. The phase composition of this ATR alumina was characterized by X-ray powder diffractometry, and afterwards this alumina was subjected to leaching processes. It was noticed that the original content of 70% α-alumina in slag rose to 95% after the calcination. ATR alumina (leached and calcined, and without any treatment) was used to make pressed bodies which were fired in air at 1200 to 1400 0 C for 1 to 10,5 hours; and in vacuum at 1550 to 1800$0C for 2 hours. Characterization was done by density measurements, X-ray diffractometry and ultrasonic analysis. Ultrasonic analysis of some vacuum fired bodies showed londitudinal velocities close to the value found in literature. Correlation of several techniques measurements disclosed the niobium oxide interference in sintering. (Author) [pt

  7. Compatibility of niobium, titanium, and vanadium metals with LMFBR cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, C.N.

    1975-10-01

    A series of laboratory capsule annealing experiments were conducted to assess the compatibility of niobium, vanadium, and titanium with 316 stainless steel cladding in the temperature range of 700 to 800/sup 0/C. Niobium, vanadium, and titanium are cantidate oxygen absorber materials for control of oxygen chemistry in LMFBR fuel pins. Capsule examination indicated good compatibility between niobium and 316 stainless steel at 800/sup 0/C. Potential compatibility problems between cladding and vanadium or titanium were indicated at 800/sup 0/C under reducing conditions. In the presence of Pu/sub 0.25/U/sub 0.75/O/sub 1.98/ fuel (..delta..anti G/sub 02/ congruent to -160 kcal/mole) no reaction was observed between vanadium or titanium and cladding at 800/sup 0/C.

  8. Review of alkali metal and refractory alloy compatibility for Rankine cycle applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiStefano, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    The principal corrosion mechanisms in refractory metal-alkali systems are dissolution, mass transfer, and impurity reactions. In general, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten have low solubilities in the alkali metals, even to very high temperatures, and static corrosion studies have verified that the systems are basically compatible. Loop studies with niobium and tantalum based alloys do not indicate any serious problems due to temperature gradient mass transfer. Above 1000 K, dissimilar metal mass transfer is noted between the refractory metals and iron or nickel based alloys. The most serious corrosion problems encountered are related to impurity reactions associated with oxygen

  9. Large-Batch Reduction of Molybdenum Trioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiggans, Jr, James O. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lowden, Richard Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Menchhofer, Paul A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nunn, Stephen D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bryan, Chris [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Unconverted, isotopically-enriched molybdenum metal must be recovered from the spent radiopharmaceutical solution used in NorthStar’s Technetium-99m generator and reused. The recycle process begins by recovering the metal from the aqueous potassium molybdate (K2MoO4) solutions as molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) employing a process developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The MoO3 powder is subsequently reduced to molybdenum metal powder which can be blended with new powder and further processed into a flowable form to be used to produce target disks for irradiation. The molybdenum oxide reduction process has been examined and scaled to produce kilogram quantities of metal powder suitable for processing into a useable form employing spray drying or similar technique and ultimately used for target fabrication.

  10. Organo molybdenum friction-reducing antiwear additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coupland, K.; Salva, J. M.; Smith, C. R.

    1981-02-03

    A hydrocarbon-soluble molybdenum complex consisting of a hydrocarbon substituted thio-bis-phenol, E.G. is described. The reaction product contains of 1-2 moles of nonyl phenol sulfides and one mole of molybdenum oxide (reacted if desired in the presence of an amine promoter), in combination with a sulfur donor provides lubricity activity to lubricating oils and other hydrocarbons including fuels.

  11. Sorption of niobium on boreal forest soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soederlund, Mervi; Hakanen, Martti; Lehto, Jukka [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Lab. of Radiochemistry

    2015-07-01

    The sorption of niobium (Nb) was investigated on humus and mineral soil samples taken from various depths of a four-metre deep forest soil pit on Olkiluoto Island, southwestern Finland. Mass distribution coefficients, K{sub d}, were determined in batch sorption tests. The steady state of Nb sorption was observed in the mineral soil samples already after one week of equilibration, and sorption decreased with depth from a very high value of 185000 mL/g at 0.7 m to 54000 mL/g at 3.4 m. The reason behind this decrease is probably the tenfold reduction in the specific surface area of the soil at the same depth range. Distribution coefficients were clearly lower in the humus layer (1000 mL/g). The K{sub d} values determined in pure water at a pH range of 4.7-6.5 were at a high level (above 55000 mL/g), but decreased dramatically above pH 6.5, corresponding to the change in the major Nb species from the neutral Nb(OH){sub 5} to the low-sorbing anionic Nb(OH){sub 6}{sup -} and Nb(OH){sub 7}{sup 2-}. However, the K{sub d} values in the model soil solution were in the slightly alkaline range an order of magnitude higher than in pure water, which is probably caused by the formation of calcium niobate surface precipitate or electrostatic interaction between surface-sorbed calcium and solute Nb. Among nine soil constituent minerals kaolinite performed best in retaining Nb in both pure water and model soil solution at pH 8, whereas potassium feldspar showed the poorest sorption. The K{sub d} value for kaolinite was above 500000 mL/g in both solutions, while the respective potassium feldspar values were in the range of 120-220 mL/g.

  12. Elimination of excess molybdenum by cattle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toelgyesi, G.; Elmoty, I.A.

    1967-01-01

    It was found that cattle would ingest spontaneously 5-15 g of molybdenum on one occasion. The uptake of this quantity caused but moderate loss of appetite and mild enteritis, both normalizing in one week. The occurrence of a severe acute molybdenum poisoning can be practically excluded, owing to refusal of the poisoned feed. Spontaneously ingested molybdenum caused on the first day a 30-100 fold rise of ruminal Mo-level, decreasing to the order of the normal value in about one week. But in the urine and faeces, Mo-level was at least 10 fold, in the blood and milk about 4 fold of the normal one, even one or two weeks after ingestion. During this period at least 90% of ingested Mo was eliminated with the faeces, urine and milk. One week after the ingestion of molybdenum, the rumen content showed no evidence on poisoning and no trace of molybdenum. Oral administration of ammonium molybdenate in an amount equivalent to 40 g molybdenum caused no fatality. In fact, cattle would never ingest spontaneously such a large dose.

  13. A Novel Method for Assessment of Polyethylene Liner Wear in Radiopaque Tantalum Acetabular Cups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsen, Anders; Greene, Meridith E; Ayers, David C

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiostereometric analysis (RSA) for wear is not possible in patients with tantalum cups. We propose a novel method for wear analysis in tantalum cups. Wear was assessed by gold standard RSA and the novel method in total hip arthroplasty patients enrolled in a randomized controlled...... to the gold standard in titanium cups. The novel method offered accurate assessment and is a viable solution for assessment of wear in studies with tantalum cups....

  14. Potentials and Barriers for Tantalum Recovery from Waste Electric and Electronic Equipment

    OpenAIRE

    Ueberschaar, Maximilian; Jalalpoor, Daniel Dariusch; Korf, Nathalie; Rotter, Vera Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Circular economy approaches aim to close material cycles along the value chain. As such, the circular economy can be a long-term strategy to mitigate the risks of critical raw material (CRM) supply. Tantalum, with a current end-of-life recycling rate of less than 1%, has been intermittently discussed as critical. Even though the specificity of tantalum applications and high-mass fractions of tantalum in relevant components provide good boundary conditions, recycling barriers hinder the succes...

  15. Evaluating the Surface Characteristics of Stainless Steel, TMA, Timolium, and Titanium-niobium Wires: An in vivo Scanning Electron Microscope Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, K Pradeep; Keerthi, V Naga; Madathody, Deepika; Prasanna, A Laxmi; Gopinath, Vidhya; Kumar, M Senthil; Kumar, A Nanda

    2016-05-01

    Recent metallurgical research and advancement in material science has benefited orthodontists in the selection of an appropriate wire size and alloy type, which is necessary to provide an optimum and predictable treatment results. The purpose of the study was to clinically evaluate and compare the surface characteristics of 16 x 22 stainless steel, Titanium molybdenum alloy, timolium, and titanium-niobium before and after placing them in a patient's mouth for 3 months using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The total sample size was 40, which were divided into four groups (group 1 - stainless steel wires, 10 samples, group 2 - TMA wires, 10 samples, group 3 - timolium wires, 10 samples, and group 4 - titanium-niobium wires, 10 samples), and these were further subdivided into 5 each. The first subgroup of five samples was placed in the patient's mouth and was evaluated under SEM, and another subgroup of five samples was directly subjected to the SEM. Scanning electron microscopic evaluation of surface characteristics of unused 16 x 22 rectangular stainless steel wire under 500 x magnification showed an overall smooth surface. Stainless steel wire samples placed in the patient's mouth showed black hazy patches, which may be interoperated as areas of stress. TMA unused wires showed multiple small voids of areas and small craters with fewer elevated regions. The TMA wire samples placed in the patient's mouth showed black hazy patches and prominent ridges, making the wire rougher. Timolium unused archwires showed heavy roughness and voids, whereas wires tested in the patient's mouth showed homogeneous distribution of deep cracks and craters. Unused titanium-niobium archwires showed uniform prominent striations and ridges with occasional voids, whereas wires used in the patient's mouth showed prominent huge voids that could be interpreted as maximum stress areas. Stainless steel (group 1) used and unused wires showed smooth surface characteristics when compared with

  16. Variation of Mechanical Properties of High RRR And Reactor Grade Niobium With Heat Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganapati Myneni; H. Umezawa

    2003-06-01

    Superconducting rf cavities used as accelerating structures in particle accelerators are made from high purity niobium with residual resistance ratios greater than 250. Reactor grade niobium is also used to make wave-guide and/or end group components for these accelerating structures. The major impurities in this type of niobium are interstitially dissolved gases such as hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen in addition to carbon. After fabricating the niobium accelerating structures, they are subjected to heat treatments for several hours in vacuum at temperatures of up to 900 C for degassing hydrogen or up to 1400 C for improving the thermal conductivity of niobium considerably. These heat treatments are affecting the mechanical properties of niobium drastically. In this paper the variation of the mechanical properties of high purity and reactor grade niobium with heat treatments in a vacuum of {approx} 10{sup -6} Torr and temperatures from 600 C to 1250 C for periods of 10 to 6 hours are presented.

  17. Contact Resistance of Tantalum Coatings in Fuel Cells and Electrolyzers using Acidic Electrolytes at Elevated Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annemette Hindhede; Christensen, Erik; Barner, Jens H. Von

    2014-01-01

    Tantalum has so far been found to be the only construction material with sufficient corrosion resistance for high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane electrolyzers using acidic electrolytes above 100◦C. In this work the interfacial contact resistances of tantalum plates and tantalum coated...... stainless steel were found to be far below the US Department of Energy target value of 10mcm2. The good contact resistance of tantalum was demonstrated by simulating high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane electrolysis conditions by anodization performed in 85% phosphoric acid at 130◦C, followed...... by contact resistance measurements. Upon anodization the contact resistances remained unchanged....

  18. Diffusion of liquid uranium into solid tantalum foils up to 1350C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznietz, M.; Livne, Z.; Cotler, C.

    1986-01-01

    The diffusion of liquid uranium into solid foils, 0.3 mm thick, was investigated in the temperature range 1160-1350C, for reaction times up to 20 h. The tantalum foils were immersed in liquid uranium contained in zirconia crucibles. Uranium was found to cover the tantalum foils and climb upwards in amounts rising with reaction time and temperature. A scanning electron microscope study with microanalysis by EDAX revealed a multilayer structure. On the tantalum-foil surfaces, exposed to liquid uranium, layers form progressively inwards, under the outer uranium layers, in the following sequence: a uranium-tantalum layer (with a U:Ta ratio between 40:60 and 60:40) forms at 1160 C and 1185 C, and disappears completely at 1255 C; a columnar tantalum layer (containing <1W/O U); an inner uranium layer (at 1210 C and above); an inner tantalum-grain layer with uranium along grain boundaries (above 1210 C). The growth of the recrystallized columnar tantalum layer is related to the penetration of uranium as liquid into the solid tantalum foil. Cracks in this layer at 1300 C and above cause tears and failures in the tantalum.

  19. Effect of Mechanical Stresses on Characteristics of Chip Tantalum Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander A.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of compressive mechanical stresses on chip solid tantalum capacitors is investigated by monitoring characteristics of different part types under axial and hydrostatic stresses. Depending on part types, an exponential increase of leakage currents was observed when stresses exceeded 10 MPa to 40 MPa. For the first time, reversible variations of leakage currents (up to two orders of magnitude) with stress have been demonstrated. Mechanical stresses did not cause significant changes of AC characteristics of the capacitors, whereas breakdown voltages measured during the surge current testing decreased substantially indicating an increased probability of failures of stressed capacitors in low impedance applications. Variations of leakage currents are explained by a combination of two mechanisms: stress-induced scintillations and stress-induced generation of electron traps in the tantalum pentoxide dielectric.

  20. Corrosion resistance of high-performance materials titanium, tantalum, zirconium

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion resistance is the property of a material to resist corrosion attack in a particular aggressive environment. Although titanium, tantalum and zirconium are not noble metals, they are the best choice whenever high corrosion resistance is required. The exceptionally good corrosion resistance of these high–performance metals and their alloys results from the formation of a very stable, dense, highly adherent, and self–healing protective oxide film on the metal surface. This naturally occurring oxide layer prevents chemical attack of the underlying metal surface. This behavior also means, however, that high corrosion resistance can be expected only under neutral or oxidizing conditions. Under reducing conditions, a lower resistance must be reckoned with. Only very few inorganic and organic substances are able to attack titanium, tantalum or zirconium at ambient temperature. As the extraordinary corrosion resistance is coupled with an excellent formability and weldability these materials are very valua...

  1. Antimicrobial activity of tantalum oxide coatings decorated with Ag nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Huiliang, E-mail: hlc@mail.sic.ac.cn; Meng, Fanhao; Liu, Xuanyong, E-mail: xyliu@mail.sic.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2016-07-15

    Silver plasma immersion ion implantation was used to decorate silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) on tantalum oxide (TO) coatings. The coatings acted against bacterial cells (Staphylococcus epidermidis) in the dark by disrupting their integrity. The action was independent of silver release and likely driven by the electron storage capability of the Schottky barriers established at the interfaces between Ag NPs and the TO support. Moreover, no apparent side effect on the adhesion and differentiation of rat bone mesenchymal stem cells was detected when using Ag NPs-modified TO coatings. These results demonstrate that decoration of tantalum oxide using Ag NPs could be a promising procedure for improving the antibacterial properties for orthopedic and dental implants.

  2. Tantalum etching in fluorocarbon/oxygen rf glow discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martz, J.C.; Hess, D.W.; Anderson, W.E.

    1990-01-01

    Etch rates of tantalum in tetrafluoromethane-oxygen and hexafluoroethane-oxygen rf glow discharges were measured in situ as functions of pressure, reactor residence time, temperature, and applied plasma power. A dramatic increase in the etch rate was observed as the pressure increased. In addition, two distinct temperature regimes occurred in Arrhenius plots. Such data suggest strong effects due to heat of reaction in the Ta/CF 4 -O 2 etch system. The observed etch-rate pressure dependence can be explained by assuming first-order kinetics for the reaction of fluorine atoms with tantalum. Evidence for etch-rate quenching at high pressures due to an increase in the deposition of an inhibiting fluorocarbon surface layer is presented

  3. Analysis of bone ingrowth on a tantalum cup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D′Angelo F

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trabecular Metal (TM is a new highly porous material made of tantalum (Zimmer, Warsaw, Indiana, USA. Its three-dimensional structure is composed of a series of interconnected dodecahedron pores that are on average 550 μm in diameter. This size is considered optimal for bone ingrowth and is similar to trabecular bone. The elastic modulus of TM (3 GPa is more similar to that of cancellous (0,1-1,5 GPa or cortical (112-18 GPa bone and is significantly less similar to that of Titanium (110 GPa and Co-Cr alloys (220 GPa. These features enable bone apposition and remodeling. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the histology of the bone-implant interface in a human specimen. Materials and Methods: A highly porous tantalum cup (Zimmer, Warsaw, Indiana, USA was removed for recurrent dislocations three years after implantation. In order to obtain a slice of the cup, two cuts were made on the centre using an Exakt cutting machine. Then the slice was embedded in a Technovit resin and a Hematoxylin-eosin stain was used to study the bone tissue. Bone ingrowth was calculated using a method based on simple calculations of planar geometry. Results: The histological evaluation of the periprosthetic tissues revealed a typical chronic inflammation with few particles of polyethylene that were birefringent using polarized light. The quantitative evaluation of bone ingrowth revealed that more than 95% of voids were filled with bone. Discussion: In the literature, a lot of studies focused on tantalum were carried on animal model. Up to now little information is available about the histology of the bone-tantalum interface in a human artificial joint. We had an opportunity to remove a well integrated cup hence this study. The histology confirmed the strong relationship between the structure of this material and bone. The morphometric analysis revealed a high percentage of bone ingrowth.

  4. Structural modification of tantalum crystal induced by nitrogen ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This paper investigates the effect of nitrogen ion implantation on tantalum surface structure. In this experiment, nitrogen ions which had an energy of 30 keV and doses of 1 × 10 17 to 10 × 10 17 ions cm − 2 were used. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) was applied for both the metallic Ta substrate and the study of ...

  5. Hydroxyaromatic compounds of tantalum, tungsten, and the lighter actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gfaller, H.

    1980-01-01

    Some hydroxyaromatic compounds of the elements tantalum, tungsten, thorium and uranium were prepared as well as the basic materials for these synthesis processes, i.e. metal halides and metal alkoxides. The hydroxyaromatic compounds were studied by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, 1 H-NMR spectroscopy (if soluble in suitable solvents) and, in some cases, by X-ray fine structure analysis. (orig./EF) [de

  6. Inter-diffusion study of rhodium and tantalum by RBS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuttens, V.E.; Hubert, R.L.; Bodart, F.; Lucas, S.

    2005-01-01

    The inter-diffusion of rhodium and tantalum has been studied with the goal of synthesizing an alloy acting as a diffusion barrier for high temperature applications. Rh/Ta sandwiched samples were annealed in vacuum at temperature ranging from 800 to 900 deg. C and from 1000 to 1075 deg. C. The diffusion profiles were obtained by RBS. They suggest the formation of two clearly different phases in each temperature range considered

  7. Random Vibration Testing of Advanced Wet Tantalum Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Advanced wet tantalum capacitors allow for improved performance of power supply systems along with substantial reduction of size and weight of the systems that is especially beneficial for space electronics. Due to launch-related stresses, acceptance testing of all space systems includes random vibration test (RVT). However, many types of advanced wet tantalum capacitors cannot pass consistently RVT at conditions specified in MIL-PRF-39006, which impedes their use in space projects. This requires a closer look at the existing requirements, modes and mechanisms of failures, specifics of test conditions, and acceptance criteria. In this work, different lots of advanced wet tantalum capacitors from four manufacturers have been tested at step stress random vibration conditions while their currents were monitored before, during, and after the testing. It has been shown that the robustness of the parts and their reliability are mostly due to effective self-healing processes and limited current spiking or minor scintillations caused by RVT do not increase the risk of failures during operation. A simple model for scintillations events has been used to simulate current spiking during RVT and optimize test conditions. The significance of scintillations and possible effects of gas generation have been discussed and test acceptance criteria for limited current spiking have been suggested.

  8. Microstructures and phase transformations in interstitial alloys of tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahmen, U.

    1979-01-01

    The analysis of microstructures, phases, and possible ordering of interstitial solute atoms is fundamental to an understanding of the properties of metal-interstitial alloys in general. As evidenced by the controversies on phase transformations in the particular system tantalum--carbon, our understanding of this class of alloys is inferior to our knowledge of substitutional metal alloys. An experimental clarification of these controversies in tantalum was made. Using advanced techniques of electron microscopy and ultrahigh vacuum techology, an understanding of the microstructures and phase transformations in dilute interstitial tantalum--carbon alloys is developed. Through a number of control experiments, the role and sources of interstitial contamination in the alloy preparation (and under operating conditions) are revealed. It is demonstrated that all previously published work on the dilute interstitially ordered phase Ta 64 C can be explained consistently in terms of ordering of the interstitial contaminants oxygen and hydrogen, leading to the formation of the phases Ta 12 O and Ta 2 H

  9. Leakage Currents and Gas Generation in Advanced Wet Tantalum Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Currently, military grade, established reliability wet tantalum capacitors are among the most reliable parts used for space applications. This has been achieved over the years by extensive testing and improvements in design and materials. However, a rapid insertion of new types of advanced, high volumetric efficiency capacitors in space systems without proper testing and analysis of degradation mechanisms might increase risks of failures. The specifics of leakage currents in wet electrolytic capacitors is that the conduction process is associated with electrolysis of electrolyte and gas generation resulting in building up of internal gas pressure in the parts. The risk associated with excessive leakage currents and increased pressure is greater for high value advanced wet tantalum capacitors, but it has not been properly evaluated yet. In this work, in Part I, leakages currents in various types of tantalum capacitors have been analyzed in a wide range of voltages, temperatures, and time under bias. Gas generation and the level of internal pressure have been calculated in Part II for different case sizes and different hermeticity leak rates to assess maximal allowable leakage currents. Effects related to electrolyte penetration to the glass seal area have been studied and the possibility of failures analyzed in Part III. Recommendations for screening and qualification to reduce risks of failures have been suggested.

  10. Application of pyrolysis to recycling organics from waste tantalum capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Bo; Chen, Zhenyang; Xu, Zhenming

    2017-08-05

    Tantalum capacitors (TCs) are widely used in electronic appliances. The rapid replacement of electronic products results in generating large amounts of waste TCs (WTCs). WTCs, rich in valuable tantalum, are considered as high quality tantalum resources for recycling. However, environmental pollution will be caused if the organics of WTCs were not properly disposed. Therefore, effectively recycling the organics of WTCs is significant for recovering the valuable parts. This study proposed an argon (Ar) pyrolysis process to recycle the organics from WTCs. The organic decomposition kinetic was first analyzed by thermogravimetry. The results showed that the organics were decomposed in two major steps and the average activation energy was calculated to 234kJ/mol. Then, the suitable pyrolysis parameters were determined as 550°C, 30min and 100ml/min. The organics were effectively decomposed and converted to oils (mainly contained phenol homologs and benzene homologs) and gases (some hydrocarbon). These pyrolysis products could be reutilized as energy sources. Moreover, based on the products and bond energy theory, the pyrolysis mechanisms of the organics were also discussed. Finally, a reasonable technological process for products utilization was presented. This study contributes to the efficient recycling the organics before valuable material recovery from WTCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Design of a superconducting low beta niobium resonator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The proposed high current injector for the superconducting Linac at the InterUniversity Accelerator Centre will have several accelerating structures, including a superconducting module which will contain low beta niobium resonators. A prototype resonator for the low beta module has been designed. The resonator has been ...

  12. Mechanical behaviour of copper 15% volume niobium microcomposite wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Filgueira

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Cu-Nb microcomposites are attractive in magnet pulsed field technology applications due to their anomalous mechanism of mechanical strength and high electrical conductivity. In this sense, recently it was conceived the use of Cu 15% vol. Nb wires to operate as a high tensile strength cable for a diamond cutting tool (diamond wires for marble and granite slabbing. The multifilamentary Cu 15% vol. Nb composite was obtained using a new processing route, starting with niobium bars bundled into copper tubes, without arc melting. Cold working techniques, such as swaging and wire drawing, combined with heat treatments such as sintering and annealing, and tube restacking were employed. The tensile property of the composite was measured as a function of the niobium filaments dimensions and morphology into the copper matrix, in the several processing steps. An ultimate tensile strength (UTS of 960 MPa was obtained for an areal reduction (R = Ao/A, with Ao-initial cross section area, and A-final cross section area of 4x10(8 X, in which the niobium filaments reached thickness less than 20 nm. The anomalous mechanical strength increase is attributed to the fact that the niobium filaments acts as a barrier to copper dislocations.

  13. Effect of substitution of titanium by magnesium and niobium on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Effect of substitution of titanium by magnesium and niobium on structure and piezoelectric properties in (Bi1/2. Na1/2. )TiO3 ceramics. ZHOU CHANG-RONG*, LIU XIN-YU, LI WEI-ZHOU. † and YUAN CHANG-LAI. Department of Information Material Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology,. Guilin ...

  14. Solubility of nitrogen in iron alloys with vanadium and niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomarin, Yu.M.; Grigorenko, G.M.; Lakomskij, V.I.

    1975-01-01

    The solubility of nitrogen in the concentration range under study in Fe-N-V and Fe-N-Nb systems is in compliance with Syverts' law. An equation has been set up so as to estimate the nitrogen solubility in the iron alloys containing up to 10 per cent of vanadium and niobium in the wide temperature range

  15. Manufacturing of the L band 9-cell niobium cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Masanori; Ohkubo, Kohichi; Yamanaka, Toshiyuki; Kako, Eiji; Saito, Kenji; Shishido, Toshio; Ono, Masaaki; Noguchi, Shuichi.

    1993-01-01

    Since 1990, L-band niobium superconducting cavities have been developed with collaboration between our company and National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK). The manufacturing procedure and the performance of 9-cell superconducting cavity are presented. The maximum accelerating gradient of 12 MV/m was attained in a cold test. (author)

  16. Fatigue crack growth behavior in niobium-hydrogen alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, M.C.C.; Salama, K.

    1997-01-01

    Near-threshold fatigue crack growth behavior has been investigated in niobium-hydrogen alloys. Compact tension specimens (CTS) with three hydrogen conditions are used: hydrogen-free, hydrogen in solid solution, and hydride alloy. The specimens are fatigued at a temperature of 296 K and load ratios of 0.05, 0.4, and 0.75. The results at load ratios of 0.05 and 0.4 show that the threshold stress intensity range (ΔK th ) decreases as hydrogen is added to niobium. It reaches a minimum at the critical hydrogen concentration (C cr ), where maximum embrittlement occurs. The critical hydrogen concentration is approximately equal to the solubility limit of hydrogen in niobium. As the hydrogen concentration exceeds C cr , ΔK th increases slowly as more hydrogen is added to the specimen. At load ratio 0.75, ΔK th decreases continuously as the hydrogen concentration is increased. The results provide evidence that two mechanisms are responsible for fatigue crack growth behavior in niobium-hydrogen alloys. First, embrittlement is retarded by hydride transformation--induced and plasticity-induced crack closures. Second, embrittlement is enhanced by the presence of hydrogen and hydride

  17. Acoustic relaxation of some lead niobium tellurite glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Acoustic relaxation of some lead niobium tellurite glasses. M S GAAFAR1,a,∗ and Y A AZZAM2,a. 1Ultrasonic Department, National Institute for Standards, Giza 12211, Egypt. 2National Research Institute of Astronomy & Geophysics, Helwan, Cairo 10104, Egypt. aCurrent address: College of Science, Majmaah University, ...

  18. Design of a superconducting low beta niobium resonator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The proposed high current injector for the superconducting Linac at the Inter-. University Accelerator Centre will have several accelerating structures, including a superconducting module which will contain low beta niobium resonators. A prototype resonator for the low beta module has been designed.

  19. Noburnium: Systems design of niobium superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Abhijeet

    2005-11-01

    A systems-based approach, integrating quantum mechanical calculations with efficient experimentation, was employed to design niobium-based superalloys. The microstructural concept of gamma-gamma' nickel-based superalloys was adopted, where, the coherent gamma ' aluminides act both as the strengthening phase and a source of aluminum for Al2O3 passivation. Building on previous research, the selected bcc-type ordered aluminide was L2 1 structured Pd2HfAl phase. Comprehensive phase relations were measured on Nb-Pd-Hf-Al prototype alloys, and key tie-tetrahedra were identified. Aluminide precipitation in a bcc matrix was demonstrated in designed Nb+Pd2HfAl alloys. Thermodynamic databases were developed by integrating first-principles calculations with measured phase relations. Atomic volume models were developed for the bcc matrix and the Pd2HfAl phase and matrix elements which would reduce lattice misfit were identified. An experimental 2-phase alloy demonstrated a misfit of 3%. A modified Wagner's model was used to predict the required transient properties to form external Al2O3. The principal oxidation design goal was to decrease the oxygen permeability ( NSOx DO ) divided by the aluminum diffusivity (DAl) by 5 orders of magnitude. A multicomponent mobility database was developed to predict the diffusivities. Guided by first-principles calculations the effect of alloying elements on the oxygen diffusivity in Nb was measured, and the mobility database was experimentally validated. Based on the mobility database, it was found that increasing Al solubility in the bcc matrix greatly increased Al diffusivity. Alloying elements were identified that would increase Al solubility in the bcc matrix. Prototype alloys were prepared and the best oxidation performance was exhibited by a bcc+Nb2Al Nb-Hf-Al alloy, which exhibited parabolic oxidation behavior at 1300°C. The alloy was shown to have achieved the required 5 orders of magnitude reduction in the design parameter. The

  20. Molybdenum Metallopharmaceuticals Candidate Compounds - The "Renaissance" of Molybdenum Metallodrugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurowska, Anna; Jurowski, Kamil; Szklarzewicz, Janusz; Buszewski, Boguslaw; Kalenik, Tatiana; Piekoszewski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Metal-based drugs, also called "metallopharmaceuticals" or "metallodrugs", are examples of sophisticated compounds that have been used in inorganic medicinal chemistry as therapeutic agents for a long time. Few of them have shown substantially promising results and many of them have been used in different phases of clinical trials. The Mo-based metallodrugs were successfully applied in the past for treating conditions such as anemia or Wilson's disease. Moreover, Mo complexes are supposed to exert their effect by intercalation/ cleavage of DNA/RNA, arrest of the cell cycle, and alteration of cell membrane functions. However, in the current literature, there are no reliable and in-depth reviews about the hypothetical therapeutic applications of all of the known molybdenum complexes as metallopharmaceuticals/ metallodrugs. The main emphasis was on the in-depth review of the potential applications of Mo-based complexes in medicinal chemistry as metallopharmaceuticals in treating diseases such as cancer and tumors, Wilson's disease, diabetes mellitus, Huntington's disease, atherosclerosis, and anemia. It must be emphasized that today the development of innovative and new Mo-based metalo-pharmaceuticals is not rapid, and hence the aim of this paper was also to inspire colleagues working in the field of Mo compounds who are trying to find "signpost" for research. The authors hope that this article will increase interest and initiate the Renaissance of Mo-compounds among medicinal inorganic chemists. This paper is the first review article in the literature that refers to and emphasizes many different and complex aspects of possible applications and capabilities of Mo-based metallodrugs.

  1. A comparative evaluation of metallurgical properties of stainless steel and TMA archwires with timolium and titanium niobium archwires--an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayalakshmi, R Devaki; Nagachandran, K S; Kummi, Pradeep; Jayakumar, P

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate and compare the mechanical and metallurgical properties of stainless steel and titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA) archwires, with recently introduced timolium and titanium niobium arch wires. Archwires were categorized into four groups (group I to IV) with 10 samples in each group. They were evaluated for tensile strength, yield strength, modulus of elasticity, load deflection, frictional properties and weld characteristics. The results were statistically analyzed using ANOVA test and it indicated that stainless steel has high strength, high stiffness and low friction compared to other arch wires, thereby proving that it is the best choice for both sliding as well as frictionless retraction mechanics. TMA with its high formability, low stiffness and low load deflection property is suited to apply consistent force in malaligned teeth but, high friction limits its use in retraction only with loop mechanics. Timolium possesses comparatively low stiffness, better strength and behaves as an intermediate between stainless steel and TMA and hence can be tried for almost all clinical situations. Low springback and high formability of titanium-niobium archwire allows creation of finishing bends and thus it can be used as finishing archwire.

  2. A comparative evaluation of metallurgical properties of stainless steel and TMA archwires with timolium and titanium niobium archwires - An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayalakshmi R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aims to evaluate and compare the mechanical and metallurgical properties of stainless steel and titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA archwires, with recently introduced timolium and titanium niobium arch wires. Materials and Methods: Archwires were categorized into four groups (group I to IV with 10 samples in each group. They were evaluated for tensile strength, yield strength, modulus of elasticity, load deflection, frictional properties and weld characteristics. Results: The results were statistically analyzed using ANOVA test and it indicated that stainless steel has high strength, high stiffness and low friction compared to other arch wires, thereby proving that it is the best choice for both sliding as well as frictionless retraction mechanics. TMA with its high formability, low stiffness and low load deflection property is suited to apply consistent force in malaligned teeth but, high friction limits its use in retraction only with loop mechanics. Conclusion: Timolium possesses comparatively low stiffness, better strength and behaves as an intermediate between stainless steel and TMA and hence can be tried for almost all clinical situations. Low springback and high formability of titanium-niobium archwire allows creation of finishing bends and thus it can be used as finishing archwire.

  3. First-principles calculations of niobium hydride formation in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Denise C.; Cooley, Lance D.; Seidman, David N.

    2013-09-01

    Niobium hydride is suspected to be a major contributor to degradation of the quality factor of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. In this study, we connect the fundamental properties of hydrogen in niobium to SRF cavity performance and processing. We modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities and present their thermodynamic, electronic, and geometric properties determined from calculations based on density-functional theory. We find that the absorption of hydrogen from the gas phase into niobium is exothermic and hydrogen becomes somewhat anionic. The absorption of hydrogen by niobium lattice vacancies is strongly preferred over absorption into interstitial sites. A single vacancy can accommodate six hydrogen atoms in the symmetrically equivalent lowest-energy sites and additional hydrogen in the nearby interstitial sites affected by the strain field: this indicates that a vacancy can serve as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. Small hydride precipitates may then occur near lattice vacancies upon cooling. Vacancy clusters and extended defects should also be enriched in hydrogen, potentially resulting in extended hydride phase regions upon cooling. We also assess the phase changes in the niobium-hydrogen system based on charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen, the strain field associated with interstitial hydrogen, and the geometry of the hydride phases. The results of this study stress the importance of not only the hydrogen content in niobium, but also the recovery state of niobium for the performance of SRF cavities.

  4. Ceramic material suitable for repair of a space vehicle component in a microgravity and vacuum environment, method of making same, and method of repairing a space vehicle component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedell, James A. (Inventor); Easler, Timothy E. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A precursor of a ceramic adhesive suitable for use in a vacuum, thermal, and microgravity environment. The precursor of the ceramic adhesive includes a silicon-based, preceramic polymer and at least one ceramic powder selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, boron carbide, boron oxide, boron nitride, hafnium boride, hafnium carbide, hafnium oxide, lithium aluminate, molybdenum silicide, niobium carbide, niobium nitride, silicon boride, silicon carbide, silicon oxide, silicon nitride, tin oxide, tantalum boride, tantalum carbide, tantalum oxide, tantalum nitride, titanium boride, titanium carbide, titanium oxide, titanium nitride, yttrium oxide, zirconium diboride, zirconium carbide, zirconium oxide, and zirconium silicate. Methods of forming the ceramic adhesive and of repairing a substrate in a vacuum and microgravity environment are also disclosed, as is a substrate repaired with the ceramic adhesive.

  5. Surface layer softing in mechanically polished molybdenum monocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivashchenko, R.K.; Kostyuchenko, V.G.; Lotsko, D.V.; Lukinov, I.V.; Mil'man, Yu.V.; Novikov, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    Softening of the surface layer together with growth of dislocation density is found in molybdenum single crystals mechanically polished with diamond suspension in water solution of CuSO 4 . The penetration of small amount of copper into molybdenum is observed by SIMS. A supposition has been made about molybdenum solid solution softening influenced by copper penetrating into molybdenum by means of a dynamic dislocation mechanism

  6. Bibliographic study on molybdenum biokinetics. Literaturstudie zur Biokinetik von Molybdaen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erzberger, A.

    1988-05-01

    This bibliographical study compiles and analyzes findings about the metabolism and resorption of molybdenum. Besides including studies on the physiology of molybdenum 99, a general survey is given on molybdenum in the environment and on its physiological behaviour. In particular, information on the dependence of molybdenum resorption on various factors, such as the chemical form, antagonisms etc., are gathered from literature. These factors have to be considered for sensibly carrying out necessary experiments.

  7. Durability of adhesive bonds to uranium alloys, tungsten, tantalum, and thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childress, F.G.

    1975-01-01

    Long-term durability of epoxy bonds to alloys of uranium (U-Nb and Mulberry), nickel-plated uranium, thorium, tungsten, tantalum, tantalum--10 percent tungsten, and aluminum was evaluated. Significant strengths remain after ten years of aging; however, there is some evidence of bond deterioration with uranium alloys and thorium stored in ambient laboratory air

  8. Kinetic Study of the Chemical Vapor Deposition of Tantalum in Long Narrow Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mugabi, James Atwoki; Eriksen, Søren; Petrushina, Irina

    2016-01-01

    A kinetic study of the chemical vapor deposition of tantalum in long narrow channels is done to optimize the industrial process for the manufacture of tantalum coated plate heat exchangers. The developed model fits well at temperatures between 750 and 850 °C, and in the pressure range of25–990 mbar...

  9. Effects of local texture and grain structure on the sputtering performance of tantalum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaluk, C.A. [Cabot Performance Metals, Boyertown, PA (United States); Field, D.P.; Nibur, K.A. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Wright, S.I.; Witt, R.A. [EDX/TSL, Draper, UT (United States)

    2002-07-01

    Tantalum and tantalum-based thin films have gained precedence as the diffusion barrier for copper interconnects used in the latest generation of integrated circuits (ICs). The paper presents insight and observations on the covariance of texture and grain size of wrought tantalum sputtering targets and their influence on sputtering performance. Previous studies involving deposition trials of tantalum targets of varying metallurgical character had demonstrated that both grain size and textural homogeneity is critical for assuring reliable sputtering performance of tantalum. Subsequently, a model had been proposed to prescribe how localized texture bands and orientation clusters in tantalum are effectively resistant to sputter erosion. In this paper, results of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and orientation imaging microscopy (OIM{sup TM}) analyses on the eroded surface of a tantalum sputtering target are presented. Initial findings support the model's hypothesis regarding the erosion mechanics of crystallites with respect to grain size and discrete orientation. However, additional work is necessary to understand the formation and erosion of facet planes in polycrystalline tantalum sputtering targets. (orig.)

  10. Process for fabrication of molybdenum-base wrought products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A process for the fabrication of molybdenum-base wrought products is described comprising the steps of providing a molybdenum material containing at least 50% molybdenum in a substantially fully annealed condition, warming the said material to a temperature in the range of from 500 0 F to 1200 0 F, and deforming the warmed said material into a wrought product. (author)

  11. Bronchography by tantalum aerosols, an experimental investigation of lung clearance and retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Causse, Andre.

    1974-01-01

    Lung clearance of tantalum used as contrast medium has been studied in three animal species: rat, monkey and cat. In rats and monkeys, 80 to 90 percent of the inhaled tantalum was removed with a half life of 10 to 30 hr, but the residual fraction was removed with a half life longer than 100 days; consequently persistent roentgenographic pictures could be observed. These results were in accordance with those obtained by other authors studying dogs and men (accidental inhalation of radioactive tantalum). In cats, about 98 percent was removed with a half life of 15 hr and the remaining fraction with a half life of 18 days. In the three species, the physiological lung clearance mechanisms did not seem disturbed. Microscopic examination showed the peribronchiolar localisation of remaining tantalum in rats and monkeys, with proliferation of granulomes and fibrotic reaction. These results must induce to the greatest care when using tantalum in man in order to outline peripheral airways [fr

  12. Spectrographic analysis of uranium-molybdenum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, M.

    1967-01-01

    A spectrographic method of analysis has been developed for uranium-molybdenum alloys containing up to 10 % Mo. The carrier distillation technique, with gallium oxide and graphite as carriers, is used for the semiquantitative determination of Al, Cr, Fe, Ni and Si, involving the conversion of the samples into oxides. As a consequence of the study of the influence of the molybdenum on the line intensities, it is useful to prepare only one set of standards with 0,6 % MoO 3 . Total burning excitation is used for calcium, employing two sets of standards with 0,6 and 7.5 MoO 3 . (Author) 5 refs

  13. Investigation of iron-bismuth-molybdenum catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ven'yaminov, S.A.; Pitaeva, A.N.; Barannik, G.B.; Plyasova, L.M.; Maksimovskaya, R.I.; Kustova, G.N.

    1977-01-01

    Using the methods of roentgenography, derivatography, EPR-and infrared-spectroscopy, the phase composition of an iron-bismut molybdenum system is investigated. It is shown that the method of introducing iron additives substantially affects the phase composition of the system. Interaction of a mixture of bismuth and iron hydroxides with a molybdic acid solution results in the formation of bismuth and iron molybdates. If iron hydroxide reacts with previously synthesized bismuth molybdate, a compound containing bismuth, molybdenum, and iron (the X-phase) is formed in the specimens along with the bismuth and iron molybdates

  14. Geology, market and supply chain of niobium and tantalum—a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Duncan A. R.; Simandl, George J.

    2014-12-01

    Tantalum (Ta) and niobium (Nb) are essential metals in modern society. Their use in corrosion prevention, micro-electronics, specialty alloys and high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel earns them a strategic designation in most industrialised countries. The Ta market is unstable due in part to historic influx of `conflict' columbite-tantalite concentrate, or "Coltan," that caused Ta mines in Australia and Canada to be placed on care and maintenance. More recently, the growing appetite of modern society for consumer goods made of `conflict-free' minerals or metals has put pressure on suppliers. Pegmatites, rare-element-enriched granites, related placer deposits and weathered crusts overlying carbonatite and peralkaline complexes account for the majority of Ta production. Several carbonatite-related deposits (e.g. Upper Fir and Crevier, Canada) are being considered for potential co-production of Ta and Nb. Pyrochlore (Nb-Ta), columbite-tantalite (Nb-Ta), wodginite (Ta, Nb and Sn) and microlite (Ta and Nb) are the main ore minerals. Approximately 40 % of Ta used in 2012 came from Ta mines, 30 % from recycling, 20 % from tin slag refining and 10 % from secondary mine concentrates. Due to rapid industrialisation and increased use of Nb in steel making in countries such as China and India, demand for Nb is rising. Weathered crusts overlying carbonatite complexes in Brazil and one hard rock carbonatite deposit in Canada account for about 92 and 7 % of Nb world mine production, respectively. Since the bulk of the production is geographically and politically restricted to a single country, security of supply is considered at risk. Other prospective resources of Nb, beside carbonatites and associated weathered crusts, are peralkaline complexes (e.g. Nechalacho; where Nb is considered as a potential co-product of REE and zirconium). Economically, significant deposits of Ta and Nb contain pyrochlore, columbite-tantalite, fersmite, loparite and strüverite. Assuming continued

  15. Corrosion behavior of niobium coated 304 stainless steel in acid solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, T. J.; Chen, Y.; Zhang, B.; Hu, J.; Li, C.

    2016-04-01

    The niobium coating is fabricated on the surface of AISI Type 304 stainless steel (304SS) by using a high energy micro arc alloying technique in order to improvecorrosion resistance of the steel against acidic environments. The electrochemical corrosion resistance of the niobium coating in 0.7 M sulfuric acid solutions is evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, potentiodynamic polarization and the open circuit potential versus time. Electrochemical measurements indicate that the niobium coating increases the free corrosion potential of the substrate by 110 mV and a reduction in the corrosion rate by two orders of magnitude compared to the substrate alone. The niobium coating maintains large impedance and effectively offers good protection for the substrate during the long-term exposure tests, which is mainly ascribed to the niobium coating acting inhibiting permeation of corrosive species. Finally, the corresponding electrochemical impedance models are proposed to elucidate the corrosion resistance behavior of the niobium coating in acid solutions.

  16. Contribution to studies of an industrial alloy uranium-niobium with 6% by weight niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussotte, Gilbert.

    1981-02-01

    This uranium alloy with 6% by weight niobium (U-6% Nb) obtained by fusion in an induction furnace with thermal gradient directed solidification in a mould, exhibits a small amount of minor segregation (less than 1% by weight), little major segregation and small diameter isolated aggregations. Microsegregation can be eliminated by a homogenization heat treatment (8 hours at 1100 0 C). The hot forming temperature for this alloy lies between 800 and 900 0 C. In this temperature range, the deformation resistance is low and the deformation capacity high. Laminated tempered U-6%Nb alloy is of very low hardness (150 Vickers) and has a low elastic limit (180 MPa) at 0.2% suitable for cold forming. Annealing performed at temperatures less than 300 0 C enhance the strength of this alloy when it is in a laminated tempered state without significantly diminishing its ductility properties. Finally, U-6%Nb alloy in the laminated tempered state and welded by electron bombardment does not exhibit differential rupture and retains satisfactory mechanical properties [fr

  17. The Influence of Oxide on the Electrodeposition of Niobium from Alkali Fluoride Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik; Wang, Xingdong; Barner, Jens H. Von

    1994-01-01

    Electrodeposit of niobium metal from K2NbF7-LiF-NaF-KF-Na2O melts at 700-degrees-C has been investigated. It was found that the equilibrium oxidation state of niobium was four for initial O2-/Nb(V) ratios of up to at least one. On the other hand when a niobium metal sheet was used for the reduction...

  18. Influence of Niobium on the Beginning of the Plastic Flow of Material during Cold Deformation

    OpenAIRE

    Rešković, Stoja; Jandrlić, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Investigations were conducted on low-carbon steel and the steel with same chemical composition with addition of microalloying element niobium. While tensile testing was carried out, the thermographic measurement was tacking place simultaneously. A specific behavior of niobium microalloyed steel was noticed. Test results have shown that, in the elastic deformation region, thermoelastic effect occurs, which is more pronounced in niobium microalloyed steel. Start of plastic flow in steel which ...

  19. Thermochemical effect of fission products on sodium - MOX fuel reaction: The case of niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costin, Dan T.; Desgranges, Lionel; Cabello-Ortiga, Victor; Hedberg, Marcus; Halleröd, Jenny; Retegan, Teodora; Ekberg, Christian

    2018-03-01

    The influence of niobium on the sodium MOX fuel chemical interaction was studied by different heat treatments of airtight capsules containing fresh MOX, sodium and a niobium strip. The characterisation results evidenced a two-step process with first MOX oxidation and then MOX reduction. This result was interpreted by considering the formation of sodium niobiate that captures oxygen from the MOX. This interpretation is used to discuss the influence of niobium as fission product on the sodium -irradiated MOX fuel reaction.

  20. Determination of metallic impurities in metallic niobium by AAS and silicon by spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayres, M.J.G.; Silva, G.L.J.P. da; Capri Neto, A.; Grallath, E.

    1988-01-01

    Niobium extraction in fluorhydric solution with methyl isobutyl ketone separates high quantities of refined metal from the impurities. The optimization of the extraction allows separate above 98% in 1000 mg of niobium. The preconcentration of the purified metal traces is get by this way, improving their determination by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. The spectrophotometric determination of silicon in metallic niobium, after the separation by distillation are also studied. (C.G.C.) [pt

  1. Investigation of a thermoplastic-powder metallurgy process for the fabrication of porous niobium rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordin, D.R.

    1978-06-01

    The feasibility of using a thermoplastic-powder metallurgy technique for the fabrication of porous niobium rods was investigated. Some early problems were overcome to successfully extrude the polymer coated niobium powder into long lengths. The effects of certain process variables were investigated. Residual porosity and extrusion pressure were found to be regulated by the polymer fraction. The procedures for taking the extruded polystyrene--niobium rods through the heat treatments to the final, tin infiltrated stage are explained

  2. Niobium superconducting rf cavity fabrication by electrohydraulic forming

    CERN Document Server

    Cantergiani, E.; Léaux, F.; Perez Fontenla, A.T.; Prunet, S.; Dufay-Chanat, L.; Koettig, T.; Bertinelli, F.; Capatina, O.; Favre, G.; Gerigk, F.; Jeanson, A. C.; Fuzeau, J.; Avrillaud, G.; Alleman, D.; Bonafe, J.; Marty, P.

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting rf (SRF) cavities are traditionally fabricated from superconducting material sheets or made of copper coated with superconducting material, followed by trim machining and electron-beam welding. An alternative technique to traditional shaping methods, such as deep-drawing and spinning, is electrohydraulicforming (EHF). InEHF, half-cells areobtainedthrough ultrahigh-speed deformation ofblank sheets, using shockwaves induced in water by a pulsed electrical discharge. With respect to traditional methods, such a highly dynamic process can yield interesting results in terms of effectiveness, repeatability, final shape precision, higher formability, and reduced springback. In this paper, the first results of EHFon high purity niobium are presented and discussed. The simulations performed in order to master the multiphysics phenomena of EHF and to adjust its process parameters are presented. The microstructures of niobium half- cells produced by EHFand by spinning have been compared in terms of damage...

  3. Tensile tests of niobium material for SRF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, G.; Dhanaraj, N.; Cooley, L.; Hicks, D.; Hahn, E.; Burk, D.; Muranyi, W.; Foley, N.; Edwards, H.; Harms, E.; Champion, M.; /Fermilab /Michigan State U.

    2009-06-01

    Mechanical tests of cavity-grade niobium samples were conducted to provide engineering information for the certification of 3rd-harmonic superconducting radio-frequency cavities and cryomodules. Large changes of mechanical properties occur throughout the cavity fabrication process due to the cold work introduced by forming, the heating introduced by electron beam welding, and the recovery of cold work during the anneal used to degas hydrogen after chemical processing. Data is provided here to show the different properties at various stages of fabrication, including both weld regions and samples from the bulk niobium far away from the weld. Measurements of RRR were used to assure that any contamination during annealing was negligible.

  4. Hysteresis phenomena in permalloy–niobium bilayer films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uspenskaya, L.S., E-mail: uspenska@issp.ac.ru; Egorov, S.V.

    2014-02-15

    Kinetics of magnetization reversal is studied in bilayer permalloy–niobium hybrid nanofilms by means of a magneto-optic visualization technique. The Nb-sublayer is found to affect the width of magnetic domain walls, the type of the walls, the orientation of the walls, and the kinetics of magnetization reversal in permalloy. Moreover, the low temperature magnetization reversal dependence upon the high temperature prehistory is revealed for a permalloy layer with domain walls of Bloch type. The niobium retains the information about a magnetic pattern freezed in permalloy and causes its reproduction during magnetization reversal. The “memory” is intact under magnetic field cycling as well as under a current flow. The effect demonstrates the efficiency of magnetic pinning and opens a new method for reversible variation of electromagnetic properties of hybrid devices.

  5. Implantation of D+ ions in niobium and deuterium gas reemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisarev, A.A.; Tel'kovskij, V.G.

    1975-01-01

    This is a study of the implanting and reflex gasoisolation of D ions in niobium. It has been discovered that deutrium scope and gasoisolation are defined by several processes. An assumption is made that in ion bombarding conditions the implanting solutions are possible to exist and that deutrium can be replaced on the basis of niobium and hydrid compounds NbxDy. The portion of the particles entrained in the metal in one or another way depends on the ion energy. The dependence of the scope coefficient of n D + ions from the target temperature in the range of 290-1500 K was registered. An increase of the scope coefficient of the ions at high temperature with an increase of the ion energy was discovered

  6. Investigation of niobium structures for micro-SQUIDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottwals, Sandra [Institut fuer Physik, Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg (Germany); Heyroth, Frank [Interdisziplinaeres Zentrum fuer Materialwissenschaften, MLU Halle-Wittenberg (Germany); Schmidt, Georg [Institut fuer Physik, Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg (Germany); Interdisziplinaeres Zentrum fuer Materialwissenschaften, MLU Halle-Wittenberg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In the presence of the Spin-Nernst-Effect a temperature gradient generates spin accumulations in a metal film. The magnetic moment of these accumulations causes a magnetic field. We intend to measure these low magnetic fields using Nb-based micro-SQUIDs. Superconducting Niobium layers are deposited by e-beam evaporation and protected by capping layers either from Ru or Si. The Niobium layers are patterned by e-beam lithography. We have fabricated test stripes with different width varying from 1000 nm to 20 nm. We will present structural and electrical characterization of Nb stripes patterned by different etching processes. Most of the structures show Ohmic behavior at room temperature. At low temperature a transition to the superconducting state is observed with a transition temperature depending on layer thickness and structures size.

  7. Studies on the dehydration of glycerol over niobium catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Yi; Moon, Dong Ju; Kim, Jong Ho; Park, Nam Cook; Kim, Young Chul

    2011-08-01

    The dehydration of glycerol over nanosize niobium catalysts was conducted in a stainless steel autoclave reactor. The catalysts were prepared by the calcination of niobium oxalate between 200 and 700 degrees C. Catalysts were characterized by N2 Physisorption, XRD and TPD of ammonia to investigate the effect of the calcination temperature and water on catalytic performance, catalysts' structures and acidity. Acrolein was mainly produced about 51-71% with useful by-products such as acetaldehyde and methanol. Amorphous Nb2O5 catalysts calcined at 200-400 degrees C significantly showed higher conversion of glycerol than the crystallized Nb2O5 catalyst calcined at 500-700 degrees C. Also the conversion of glycerol and selectivity of acrolein was increased with increasing the acidity of catalyst, which can be controlled by calcination temperature.

  8. Dislocation mechanism of acoustic anomalies in superconducting niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal-Val, P.P.; Natsik, V.D.; Pal-Val, L.N.; Kustova, T.V.

    1996-01-01

    The temperature and magnetic field dependences of low-frequency ultrasound absorption in niobium single crystals of different purity have been investigated in the temperature range 2 to 12 K. It is shown for the first time that the unusual sound absorption behaviour, which was previously observed in niobium at the transition from the superconducting (s-) to the normal (n-) state (via the mixed (m-) state), can be explained by the presence of an acoustic relaxation peak at these temperatures and by an anomalous shift of this peak during the s-m-n transition. A theory of the relaxation based on the model of resonant interaction of sound with dislocation kink chains, generated in screw dislocations under the action of thermoelastic stresses during rapid sample cooling, is suggested. (orig.)

  9. Crystallization of amorphous phase in niobium alloys with oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekanenko, V.M.; Samojlenko, Z.A.; Revyakin, A.V.

    1982-01-01

    Crystallization and subsequent phase transformations of amorphous phase during annealings in the system Nb-O are studied. It is shown that quenching from liquid state of niobium alloys with oxygen with a rate of 10 5 -10 6 K/s results in partial crystallization of the melt. Phase transition from amorphous to crystal state at 670 K in all probability takes place without the change of chemical composition. After crystallization the decomposition of oversaturated solid solution on the basis of NbO takes place with the separation of low- temperature modification, γ-Nb 2 O 5 . Niobium pentoxide of both modifications during prolong annealings at 770 K and short- time annealings higher 1070 K disappears completely [ru

  10. Producing titanium-niobium alloy by high energy beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharkeev, Yu. P., E-mail: sharkeev@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, SB RAS, 2/4 Akademicheski Prosp., Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Av., Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Golkovski, M. G., E-mail: golkoski@mail.ru [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Akademika Lavrentiev Prosp., Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Glukhov, I. A., E-mail: gia@ispms.tsc.ru; Eroshenko, A. Yu., E-mail: eroshenko@ispms.tsc.ru; Fortuna, S. V., E-mail: s-fortuna@mail.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, SB RAS, 2/4 Akademicheski Prosp., Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Bataev, V. A., E-mail: bataev@vadm.ustu.ru [Novosibirsk State Technical University, 20 K. Marx Prosp., Novosibirsk, 630073 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The research is involved in producing a Ti-Nb alloy surface layer on titanium substrate by high energy beam method, as well as in examining their structures and mechanical properties. Applying electron-beam cladding it was possible to produce a Ti-Nb alloy surface layer of several millimeters, where the niobium concentration was up to 40% at. and the structure itself could be related to martensite quenching structure. At the same time, a significant microhardness increase of 3200-3400 MPa was observed, which, in its turn, is connected with the formation of martensite structure. Cladding material of Ti-Nb composition could be the source in producing alloys of homogeneous microhardness and desired concentration of alloying niobium element.

  11. Protection of molybdenum and molybdenum - alloy thin films against low - temperature oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schintlmeister, A.; Wilhartitz, P.

    2001-01-01

    Molybdenum is an interesting functional material for thin film applications like electrical connections in thin film transistor flat panel displays (TFT-FPD) or thin film solar cells (CIS). Despite its advantageous properties, the use of pure molybdenum has been restricted mainly because of its low stability against corrosion in moist air even at room temperature. In this paper it is described how thin films ( 2 . (author)

  12. Chemical methods for the use of niobium from pressure vessel cladding as a fast neutron dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnani, Hari

    1986-08-01

    the steel samples from the cladding of a pressure vessel of an operating nuclear power reactor were obtained by scraping. The cladding material of the pressure vessel contained about 0.5 % niobium. It was desired to use the niobium as a dosimeter for estimating fast fluences at the pressure vessel. The weak radiation from the reaction product 93m Nb cannot be measured in the presence of other elements and interfering activities. A method was developed to separate niobium from other metals present; the concentration and yield of niobium were determined spectrophotometrically. The irradiated niobium was electrodeposited from aqueous solutions on copper discs. The amount of the deposited niobium was determined by a radiochemical method which makes use of its own radioactivity - measured with a liquid scintillation counter - and the known starting mass of niobium. It was possible to determine the deposited niobium masses (5 to 200 microgram) with a desired degree of accuracy. The absolute emission rate of X-rays could then be measured without any self-absorption or interference from other activities. The mass of niobium on each preparate and its X-ray emission rate, later on, were used as basic experimental data for the estimation of last neutron doses at the pressure vessel

  13. Determination of niobium in rocks by an isotope dilution spectrophotometric method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenland, L.P.; Campbell, E.Y.

    1970-01-01

    Rocks and minerals are fused with sodium peroxide in the presence of carrierfree 95Nb. The fusion cake is leached with water and the precipitate dissolved in hydrofluoric-sulfuric acid mixture. Niobium is extracted into methyl isobutyl ketone and further purified by ion exchange. The amount of niobium is determined spectrophotometrically with 4-(2-pyridylazo)-resorcinol, and the chemical yield of the separations determined by counting 95Nb. This procedure is faster and less sensitive to interferences than previously proposed methods for determining niobium in rocks.The high purity of the separated niobium makes the method applicable to nearly all matrices. ?? 1970.

  14. HIP bonding for the different material between Niobium and Stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, H.; Saito, K.; Abe, K.; Fujino, T.; Hitomi, N.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2000-01-01

    In the future advanced cryomodule for superconducting RF cavities, a helium vessel made from titanium or stainless steel has to be welded directly to the niobium cavity wall in order to be simple structure. For that, we need a transformer from niobium to titanium or stainless steel. Stainless steel will have many benefits if the reliable bonding to the niobium is developed. We have tested the niobium/stainless steel bonding by HIP (Hot Isostatic Pressing) with the heat shock between 1023K and 2K. The bonding interface was also observed by SEM. These test results will be presented. (author)

  15. Preferred orientations in niobium determined by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veno, S.J.M.; Fotedar, J.L.; Oles, A.; Parente, C.B.R.

    1977-01-01

    Neutron diffraction has been utilized to study textures developed in polycrystalline niobium, cold rolled to 60% nd 80% in thickness. The pole figures obtained were analysed in terms of the following ideal orientations (112)/110/, (001)/110/, (113)/110/, (111)/112/, (111)/110/. A comparison of these, with textures in b.c.c metals shows a close similarity [pt

  16. Prototype 350 MHz niobium spoke-loaded cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delayen, J. R.; Kedzie, M.; Mammosser, J.; Piller, C.; Shepard, K. W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports the development of 350 MHz superconducting cavities of a spoke-loaded geometry, intended for the velocity range 0.2 < v/c < 0.6. Two prototype single-cell cavities have been designed, one optimized for velocity v/c = 0.4, and the other for v/c = 0.29. Construction of the prototype niobium cavities is nearly complete. Details of the design and construction are discussed, along with the results of cold tests

  17. Prototype 350 MHz niobium spoke-loaded cavities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delayen, J. R.; Kedzie, M.; Mammosser, J.; Piller, C.; Shepard, K. W.

    1999-05-10

    This paper reports the development of 350 MHz superconducting cavities of a spoke-loaded geometry, intended for the velocity range 0.2 < v/c < 0.6. Two prototype single-cell cavities have been designed, one optimized for velocity v/c = 0.4, and the other for v/c = 0.29. Construction of the prototype niobium cavities is nearly complete. Details of the design and construction are discussed, along with the results of cold tests.

  18. Method for welding chromium molybdenum steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1986-01-01

    Chromium-molybdenum steels exhibit a weakening after welding in an area adjacent to the weld. This invention is an improved method for welding to eliminate the weakness by subjecting normalized steel to a partial temper prior to welding and subsequently fully tempering the welded article for optimum strength and ductility.

  19. Molybdenum-catalyzed deoxydehydration of vicinal diols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dethlefsen, Johannes Rytter; Lupp, Daniel; Oh, Byung Chang

    2014-01-01

    The commercially available (NH4)6Mo7O24 and other molybdenum compounds are shown to be viable substitutes for the typically employed rhenium compounds in the catalytic deoxydehydration of aliphatic diols into the corresponding alkenes. The transformation, which represents a model system for the v...

  20. Reaction of boron carbide with molybdenum disilicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, A.V.; Melekhin, V.F.; Pegov, V.S.

    1989-01-01

    The investigation results of interaction in the B 4 C-MoSi 2 system during sintering in vacuum are presented. Sintering of boron carbide with molybdenum disilicide is shown to lead to the formation of MoB 2 , SiC, Mo 5 Si 3 compounds, the presence of carbon-containing covering plays an important role in sintering

  1. Sulphur-bridged ruthenium–molybdenum complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Ruthenium–molybdenum; 2-(arylazo)pyrimidine; sulphur bridged complexes; metal–ligand charge transfer. 1. Introduction. There has recently .... compound thus precipitated was washed with cold. H2O and dissolved in MeOH. An aqueous .... analysis (table 1) and spectral studies. 3.2 Spectral studies. IR spectra (table 1) of ...

  2. Paraelasticity in electron-irradiated molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuneu, Brigitte; Quere, Yves.

    1981-11-01

    The relaxation of a radiation-induced point defect-most probably the rotation of a dumbell-is observed during isothermal anneals of irradiated molybdenum by resistivity measurements. The recovery of close pairs is not affected, in first analysis, by the presence of a uniaxial stress

  3. Exploring atomic defects in molybdenum disulphide monolayers

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Jinhua

    2015-02-19

    Defects usually play an important role in tailoring various properties of two-dimensional materials. Defects in two-dimensional monolayer molybdenum disulphide may be responsible for large variation of electric and optical properties. Here we present a comprehensive joint experiment-theory investigation of point defects in monolayer molybdenum disulphide prepared by mechanical exfoliation, physical and chemical vapour deposition. Defect species are systematically identified and their concentrations determined by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, and also studied by ab-initio calculation. Defect density up to 3.5 × 10 13 cm \\'2 is found and the dominant category of defects changes from sulphur vacancy in mechanical exfoliation and chemical vapour deposition samples to molybdenum antisite in physical vapour deposition samples. Influence of defects on electronic structure and charge-carrier mobility are predicted by calculation and observed by electric transport measurement. In light of these results, the growth of ultra-high-quality monolayer molybdenum disulphide appears a primary task for the community pursuing high-performance electronic devices.

  4. Process for separation of tungsten and molybdenum by extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelikman, A.N.; Voldman, G.M.; Rumyantsev, V.K.; Ziberov, G.N.; Kagermanian, V.S.

    1976-01-01

    A process for the separation of tungsten and molybdenum by extraction involves the addition of HCl or HNO 3 to an aqueous solution containing tungsten and molybdenum to obtain a pH from 0.5 to 4.3, and introduction of a stabilizer comprising water-soluble phosphorus salts and a complexing agent, hydrogen peroxide, in an amount from 1.5 to 2 mole per 1 g-atom of the total content of tungsten and molybdenum. Then molybdenum is selectively extracted from the resulting aqueous solution with tri-n-butylphosphate with equal volumetric proportioning of the aqueous and organic solutions. Re-extraction of molybdenum and partially tungsten is carried out from the organic extracting agent with an alkali or soda solution. The process makes possible the preparation of tungsten solution containing no more than 0.001 g/l of molybdenum, and an increase in the degree of extraction of tungsten and molybdenum

  5. Indium doped niobium phosphates as intermediate temperature proton conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Yunjie; Li, Qingfeng; Anfimova, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    Indium doped niobium phosphates were prepared from precursors of trivalent indium oxide, pentavalent niobium oxide and phosphoric acid. The obtained materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, impedance spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. It was found...... that the indium doping promoted formation of the cubic Nb2P4O15 phase instead of the monoclinic Nb5P7O30 phase in the pristine niobium phosphates and enhanced the preservation of OH functional groups in the phosphates. The preserved OH functionalities in the phosphates after the heat treatment at 650 °C...... contributed to the anhydrous proton conductivity. The Nb0.9In0.1 phosphate exhibited a proton conductivity of five times higher than that of the un-doped analog at 250 °C. The conductivity was stabilized at a level of above 0.02 S cm−1 under dry atmosphere at 250 °C during the stability evaluation for 3 days....

  6. Field dependent surface resistance of niobium on copper cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Junginger

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The surface resistance R_{S} of superconducting cavities prepared by sputter coating a niobium film on a copper substrate increases significantly stronger with the applied rf field compared to cavities of bulk material. A possible cause is that the thermal boundary resistance between the copper substrate and the niobium film induces heating of the inner cavity wall, resulting in a higher R_{S}. Introducing helium gas in the cavity, and measuring its pressure as a function of applied field allowed to conclude that the inner surface of the cavity is heated up by less than 120 mK when R_{S} increases with E_{acc} by 100  nΩ. This is more than one order of magnitude less than what one would expect from global heating. Additionally, the effects of cooldown speed and low temperature baking have been investigated in the framework of these experiments. It is shown that for the current state of the art niobium on copper cavities there is only a detrimental effect of low temperature baking. A fast cooldown results in a lowered R_{S}.

  7. Steady-state oxygen-solubility in niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, K.; Jehn, H.

    1977-01-01

    During annealing of niobium in oxygen in certain temperature and pressure ranges steady states are established between the absorption of molecular oxygen and the evaporation of volatile oxides. The oxygen concentration in the niobium-oxygen α-solid solution is a function of oxygen pressure and temperature and has been redetermined in the ranges 10 -5 - 10 -2 Pa O 2 and 2,070 - 2,470 K. It follows differing from former results the equation csub(o) = 9.1 x 10 -6 x sub(po2) x exp (502000/RT) with csub(o) in at.-ppm, sub(po2) in Pa, T in K, R = 8.31 J x mol -1 x K -1 . The existence of steady states is limited to a temperature range from 1870 to 2470 K and to oxygen concentrations below the solubility limit given by solidus and solvus lines in the T-c diagram. In the experiments high-purity niobium wires with a specific electrical ratio rho (273 K)/rho(4.2 K) > 5,000 have been gassed under isothermal-isobaric conditions until the steady state has been reached. The oxygen concentration has been determined analytically by vacuum fusion extraction with platinum-flux technique as well as by electrical residual resistivity measurements at 4.2 K. (orig.) [de

  8. Direct electroplating of copper on tantalum from ionic liquids in high vacuum: origin of the tantalum oxide layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaltin, Stijn; D'Urzo, Lucia; Zhao, Qiang; Vantomme, André; Plank, Harald; Kothleitner, Gerald; Gspan, Christian; Binnemans, Koen; Fransaer, Jan

    2012-10-21

    In this paper, it is shown that high vacuum conditions are not sufficient to completely remove water and oxygen from the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride. Complete removal of water demands heating above 150 °C under reduced pressure, as proven by Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA). Dissolved oxygen gas can only be removed by the use of an oxygen scavenger such as hydroquinone, despite the fact that calculations show that oxygen should be removed completely by the applied vacuum conditions. After applying a strict drying procedure and scavenging of molecular oxygen, it was possible to deposit copper directly on tantalum without the presence of an intervening oxide layer.

  9. Development and Applications of Porous Tantalum Trabecular Metal Enhanced Titanium Dental Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencharit, Sompop; Byrd, Warren C.; Altarawneh, Sandra; Hosseini, Bashir; Leong, Austin; Reside, Glenn; Morelli, Thiago; Offenbacher, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Statement of Problem Porous tantalum trabecular metal has recently been incorporated in titanium dental implants as a new form of implant surface enhancement. However, there is little information on the applications of this material in implant dentistry. Methods We, therefore review the current literature on the basic science and clinical uses of this material. Results Porous tantalum metal is used to improve the contact between osseous structure and dental implants; and therefore presumably facilitate osseointegration. Success of porous tantalum metal in orthopedic implants led to the incorporation of porous tantalum metal in the design of root-from endosseous titanium implants. The porous tantalum three-dimensional enhancement of titanium dental implant surface allows for combining bone ongrowth together with bone ingrowth, or osseoincorporation. While little is known about the biological aspect of the porous tantalum in the oral cavity, there seems to be several possible advantages of this implant design. This article reviews the biological aspects of porous tantalum enhanced titanium dental implants, in particular the effects of anatomical consideration and oral environment to implant designs. Conclusions We propose here possible clinical situations and applications for this type of dental implant. Advantages and disadvantages of the implants as well as needed future clinical studies are discussed. PMID:23527899

  10. Synergistic helium and deuterium blistering in tungsten–tantalum composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, M., E-mail: marta.dias@itn.pt [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Mateus, R.; Catarino, N.; Franco, N. [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Nunes, D. [CENIMAT-I3N, Departamento de Ciência dos Materiais, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Correia, J.B. [LNEG, Laboratório Nacional de Energia e Geologia, Estrada do Paço do Lumiar, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); Carvalho, P.A. [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); ICEMS, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Hanada, K. [AIST, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-2-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, 305-8564 Ibaraki (Japan); Sârbu, C. [National Institute of Materials and Physics, 105bis Atomistilor street, 077125 Magurele-Ilfov (Romania); and others

    2013-11-15

    Abstruct: Tungsten–tantalum composites with 10 and 20 at.% Ta were prepared by ball milling W powder with Ta fibers and by consolidating the milled materials with spark plasma sintering. The composites were implanted at room temperature with He{sup +} (30 keV with a fluence 5 × 10{sup 21} at/m{sup 2}) and/or D{sup +} (15 keV with a fluence 5 × 10{sup 21} at/m{sup 2}) ion beams. The materials were studied by scanning and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, both coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and by X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and nuclear reaction analysis. The microstructure observations revealed that the milling operation resulted in severe fragmentation of the Ta fibers. Furthermore, during the consolidation process the Ta phase acted as oxygen getter and reduced the W oxide present in the original material. The surface of the tungsten–tantalum composites implanted with D{sup +} remained essentially unaltered, while the materials implanted with He{sup +} evidenced blisters on the Ta-rich regions. D retention in the composites increased with He{sup +} pre-implantation.

  11. Synergistic helium and deuterium blistering in tungsten–tantalum composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, M.; Mateus, R.; Catarino, N.; Franco, N.; Nunes, D.; Correia, J.B.; Carvalho, P.A.; Hanada, K.; Sârbu, C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstruct: Tungsten–tantalum composites with 10 and 20 at.% Ta were prepared by ball milling W powder with Ta fibers and by consolidating the milled materials with spark plasma sintering. The composites were implanted at room temperature with He + (30 keV with a fluence 5 × 10 21 at/m 2 ) and/or D + (15 keV with a fluence 5 × 10 21 at/m 2 ) ion beams. The materials were studied by scanning and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, both coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and by X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and nuclear reaction analysis. The microstructure observations revealed that the milling operation resulted in severe fragmentation of the Ta fibers. Furthermore, during the consolidation process the Ta phase acted as oxygen getter and reduced the W oxide present in the original material. The surface of the tungsten–tantalum composites implanted with D + remained essentially unaltered, while the materials implanted with He + evidenced blisters on the Ta-rich regions. D retention in the composites increased with He + pre-implantation

  12. Bacterial adherence to tantalum versus commonly used orthopedic metallic implant materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildhauer, Thomas A; Robie, Bruce; Muhr, Gert; Köller, Manfred

    2006-07-01

    Evaluation of bacterial adhesion to pure tantalum and tantalum-coated stainless steel versus commercially pure titanium, titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V), and grit-blasted and polished stainless steel. Experimental in vitro cell culture study using Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis to evaluate qualitatively and quantitatively bacterial adherence to metallic implants. A bacterial adhesion assay was performed by culturing S. aureus (ATCC 6538) and S. epidermidis (clinical isolate) for one hour with tantalum, tantalum-coated stainless steel, titanium, titanium alloy, grit-blasted and polished stainless steel metallic implant discs. Adhered living and dead bacteria were stained using a 2-color fluorescence assay. Adherence was then quantitatively evaluated by fluorescence microscopy and digital image processing. Qualitative adherence of the bacteria was analyzed with a scanning electron microscope. The quantitative data were related to the implant surface roughness (Pa-value) as measured by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Bacterial adherence of S. aureus varied significantly (p = 0.0035) with the type of metallic implant. Pure tantalum presented with significantly (p titanium alloy, polished stainless steel, and tantalum-coated stainless steel. Furthermore, pure tantalum had a lower, though not significantly, adhesion than commercially pure titanium and grit-blasted stainless steel. Additionally, there was a significantly higher S. aureus adherence to titanium alloy than to commercially pure titanium (p = 0.014). S. epidermidis adherence was not significantly different among the tested materials. There was no statistically significant correlation between bacterial adherence and surface roughness of the tested implants. Pure tantalum presents with a lower or similar S. aureus and S. epidermidis adhesion when compared with commonly used materials in orthopedic implants. Because bacterial adhesion is an important predisposing factor in the development of

  13. Synthesis and characterization of tantalum organometallic complexes. Catalytic activity for olefins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baley, A.S.

    1990-11-01

    Synthesis of monoaryloxy (alcoxy) neopentyl compounds is investigated. The tantalum-oxygen bond is formed by two parallel ways from TaCl 5 or TaR 2 Cl 3 with R = neopentyl and the tantalum carbon bond from a neopentyl derivative of the main series. Some compounds were isolated and characterized by NMR, elemental analysis and sometimes X-ray structure, some others are characterized in solution only. Catalytic effect is tested by ethylene dimerization and olefin polymerization. Reactivity of tantalum aryloxy neopentyl in respect to complexing and chelating ligands is studied for preparation of neopentylidene complexes

  14. Spectrochemical determination of tantalum in plutonium metal using direct current plasma emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadeff, S.K.; Morris, W.F.

    1983-01-01

    Tantalum is determined by direct current plasma spectrometry after separation of plutonium from solution as PuF 3 . After centrifugation of the PuF 3 precipitate, a low level of plutonium remains in solution in sufficient quantity to cause spectral interferences. It is necessary to determine the plutonium by dc plasma spectrometry and apply a correction to determine low tantalum concentrations with good accuracy and precision. Tantalum can be determined down to 0.4 ppM in solution with a relative standard deviation of 10 percent. Better precision can be achieved at higher concentrations. The procedure is simple and convenient for glovebox work. 5 references, 1 figure, 1 table

  15. Structural characterisation of oxygen diffusion hardened alpha-tantalum PVD-coatings on titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertl, C; Koll, L; Schmitz, T; Werner, E; Gbureck, U

    2014-08-01

    Titanium substrates were coated with tantalum layers of 5 μm thickness using physical vapour deposition (PVD). The tantalum layers showed a (110)-preferred orientation. The coated samples were hardened by oxygen diffusion. Using X-ray diffraction the crystallographic structure of the tantalum coatings was characterised, comparing untreated and diffusion hardened specimen conditions. Oxygen depth profiles were determined by glow discharge spectrometry. The hardening effect of the heat treatment was examined by Vickers microhardness testing. The increase of surface hardness caused by oxygen diffusion was at least 50%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Tailoring the Edge Structure of Molybdenum Disulfide toward Electrocatalytic Reduction of Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasi, Pedram; Asadi, Mohammad; Liu, Cong; Sharifi-Asl, Soroosh; Sayahpour, Baharak; Behranginia, Amirhossein; Zapol, Peter; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza; Curtiss, Larry A.; Salehi-Khojin, Amin

    2017-01-24

    Electrocatalytic conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) into energy-rich fuels is considered to be the most efficient approach to achieve a carbon neutral cycle. Transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) have recently shown a very promising catalytic performance for CO2 reduction reaction in an ionic liquid electrolyte. Here, we report that the catalytic performance of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), a member of TMDCs, can be significantly improved by using an appropriate dopant. Our electrochemical results indicate that 5% niobium (Nb)-doped vertically aligned MoS2 in ionic liquid exhibits 1 order of magnitude higher CO formation turnover frequency (TOF) than pristine MoS2 at an overpotential range of 50-150 mV. The TOF of this catalyst is also 2 orders of magnitude higher than that of Ag nanoparticles over the entire range of studied overpotentials (100-650 mV). Moreover, the in situ differential electrochemical mass spectrometry experiment shows the onset overpotential of 31 mV for this catalyst, which is the lowest onset potential for CO2 reduction reaction reported so far. Our density functional theory calculations reveal that low concentrations of Nb near the Mo edge atoms can enhance the TOF of CO formation by modifying the binding energies of intermediates to MoS2 edge atoms.

  17. Large Grain Niobium Cavity R&D in Asia and the Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, K; Furuta, F; Saeki, T; Inoue, H; Shim, J; Ahn, J; Kim, E S; Xu, Q; Zong, Z; Gao, J; Kneisel, P; Myneni, G R

    2007-09-01

    The status of the large grain niobium cavity R&D in Asia and the future scope are presented. Recently KEK has received CBMM and NingXia large grain niobium sheets through collaborations. KEK has fabricated 1.3 GHz single cell cavities using these materials and measured the cavity performance. Those results are presented in this paper.

  18. Thermal conductivity of large-grain niobium and its effect on trapped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SRF cavities [1]. The large-grain/single-crystal niobium has several potential advan- tages over the polycrystalline niobium as discussed in ref. [2] and has ..... C heat treatment. The parameter B ∝ 1/a0 increases after the degassing, where a0 is the lattice constant. The increase in B implies that the lattice constant a0 ...

  19. Evaluation of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) molybdenum and molybdenum-rhenium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, A.J.; Bianco, R.; Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) molybdenum alloys being developed for high temperature applications possess excellent high temperature strength and creep resistance. In addition they exhibit a ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBIT) in the worked and stress-relieved condition under longitudinal tensile load well below room temperature. However, in the recrystallized condition, the DBTT maybe near or above room temperature, depending on the volume fraction of oxide dispersion and the amount of prior work. Dilute rhenium additions (7 and 14 wt.%) to ODS molybdenum were evaluated to determine their effect on low temperature ductility. The addition of 7 wt.% rhenium to the ODS molybdenum did not significantly enhance the mechanical properties. However, the addition of 14 wt.% rhenium to the ODS molybdenum resulted in a DBTT well below room temperature in both the stress-relieved and recrystallized condition. Additionally, the tensile strength of ODS Mo-14Re is greater than the base ODS molybdenum at 1,000 to 1,250 C

  20. High temperature high strength molybdenum and molybdenum-tungsten Ti-Zr-Hf-C alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eck, R.; Tinzl, J.

    1989-01-01

    TZM containing 0,5 % titanium, 0,08 % zirconium and 0,01-0,04 % carbon still is the most important molybdenum alloy. During the last years Zr-Hf-C and Hf-C containing alloys have been successfully developed and are in use at prominent consumers. Composition of Zr-Hf-C containing alloys could be optimized considering fabricability, low temperature ductility and required high temperature strength. Thermomechanical processes determine properties of semifinished and final products and are discussed in detail for the powder metallurgical way of production. Mechanical properties for short time and long term application of ZHM alloys are presented and discussed in comparison to the base metal and existing molybdenum based alloys. Demand for higher strength at usual temperature and higher working temperature not achievable with molybdenum base alloys led to the development of Zr-Hf-C and Hf-C dispersion strengthened molybdenum-tungsten alloys. Mechanical data of alloys are presented and advantages and disadvantages discussed in comparison to molybdenum based alloys. 8 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  1. The role of molybdenum in the dissolution and passivation of nickel-molybdenum alloys. Influence of sulphur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moscatelli, Michel

    1987-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the sulphur-molybdenum interactions during dissolution and passivation processes of mono-crystalline nickel-molybdenum alloys. It more particularly addresses the influence of molybdenum and sulphur on the electrochemical behaviour of nickel-base alloys. With the use of radiochemical and electrochemical techniques, it shows the destabilizing effect of molybdenum on the adsorbed sulphur. In the case of doped alloys, increased contents of molybdenum slow down the sulphur surface enrichment, and result in a passive film which can form in conditions under which, in absence of molybdenum, passivation would be stopped by sulphur. Molybdenum therefore increases corrosion resistance of alloys in presence of sulphur. The application of the P. Marcus's theoretical model allows the understanding of the destabilizing effect of molybdenum on sulphur. In absence of sulphur and in the cathodic range, molybdenum accelerates recombination with hydrogen: this could be interesting with respect to hydrogen embrittlement. Sulphur slows down hydrogen release kinetics, but is partially desorbed in presence of molybdenum. Passive films formed on alloy surfaces are studied by RBS, AES and ESCA [fr

  2. PROGRESS ON LARGE GRAIN AND SINGLE GRAIN NIOBIUM: INGOTS AND SHEET AND REVIEW OF PROGRESS ON LARGE GRAIN AND SINGLE GRAIN NIOBIUM CAVITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Kneisel

    2008-02-12

    Large grain and single crystal niobium has been proposed several years ago as an alternative material to poly-crystalline niobium for superconducting cavities, exhibiting potential advantages such as ¿stream-lined¿ procedures, reduced costs and better reproducibility in performance. Several major laboratories have investigated the use of large grain and single crystal material in the past years and the niobium producing industry has responded in providing ingot material with enlarged grain sizes. Besides a large number of single cell and multi-cell cavities from large grain niobium, several single crystal cavities have been fabricated and tested with good performances. This contribution will review the progress since the SRF workshop in 2005 in material processing and handling and in cavity performances.

  3. Influence of niobium on the beginning of the plastic flow of material during cold deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rešković, Stoja; Jandrlić, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Investigations were conducted on low-carbon steel and the steel with same chemical composition with addition of microalloying element niobium. While tensile testing was carried out, the thermographic measurement was tacking place simultaneously. A specific behavior of niobium microalloyed steel was noticed. Test results have shown that, in the elastic deformation region, thermoelastic effect occurs, which is more pronounced in niobium microalloyed steel. Start of plastic flow in steel which is not microalloyed with niobium begins later in comparison to the microalloyed steel, and it is conducted so that, at the point of maximum stress, deformation zone is formed within which stresses grow. In steel microalloyed with niobium after proportionality limit, comes the occurrence of the localized increase in temperature and the occurrence of Lüders band, which propagate along the sample forming a deformation zone.

  4. Influence of Niobium on the Beginning of the Plastic Flow of Material during Cold Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoja Rešković

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations were conducted on low-carbon steel and the steel with same chemical composition with addition of microalloying element niobium. While tensile testing was carried out, the thermographic measurement was tacking place simultaneously. A specific behavior of niobium microalloyed steel was noticed. Test results have shown that, in the elastic deformation region, thermoelastic effect occurs, which is more pronounced in niobium microalloyed steel. Start of plastic flow in steel which is not microalloyed with niobium begins later in comparison to the microalloyed steel, and it is conducted so that, at the point of maximum stress, deformation zone is formed within which stresses grow. In steel microalloyed with niobium after proportionality limit, comes the occurrence of the localized increase in temperature and the occurrence of Lüders band, which propagate along the sample forming a deformation zone.

  5. THE INFLUENCE OF NIOBIUM ON THE ACIDITY AND STRUCTURE OF GAMMA-ALUMINA-SUPPORTED VANADIUM OXIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathler M.N.B.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-alumina-supported niobium oxide was used as a support for vanadium oxides. The influence of the addition of niobium oxide was studied by looking for changes in the structure and acid-base character of superficial species. Vanadium oxide was deposited using the continuous adsorption method; niobium oxide was impregnated using the incipient wetness method. The catalysts were characterized by XPS, UV-visible and IR spectroscopy. Catalytic tests were performed using propane oxidation reaction at 400oC. For coverage below the monolayer, both vanadium and niobium oxides were observed in slightly condensed superficial species. The presence of vanadium oxide on the support was found to increase the Lewis acidity and create some Bronsted acidity. Higher catalytic activity and selectivity for propene were associated with vanadium oxides. The presence of niobium did not contribute to the modification of the chemical properties of superficial vanadium but did decrease the adsorption of vanadium on the alumina.

  6. A clock reaction based on molybdenum blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuenschwander, Ulrich; Negron, Arnaldo; Jensen, Klavs F

    2013-05-30

    Clock reactions are rare kinetic phenomena, so far limited mostly to systems with ionic oxoacids and oxoanions in water. We report a new clock reaction in cyclohexanol that forms molybdenum blue from a noncharged, yellow molybdenum complex as precursor, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Interestingly, the concomitant color change is reversible, enabling multiple clock cycles to be executed consecutively. The kinetics of the clock reaction were experimentally characterized, and by adding insights from quantum chemical calculations, a plausible reaction mechanism was postulated. Key elementary reaction steps comprise sigmatropic rearrangements with five-membered or bicyclo[3.1.0] transition states. Importantly, numerical kinetic modeling demonstrated the mechanism's ability to reproduce the experimental findings. It also revealed that clock behavior is intimately connected to the sudden exhaustion of hydrogen peroxide. Due to the stoichiometric coproduction of ketone, the reaction bears potential for application in alcohol oxidation catalysis.

  7. Electrical resistivity of sputtered molybdenum films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, J.

    1980-01-01

    The electrical resistivity of r.f. sputtered molybdenum films of thickness 5-150 nm deposited on oxidized silicon substrates was resolved into the three electron scattering components: isotropic background scattering, scattering at grain boundaries and scattering at surfaces. It was concluded that the isotropic background scattering is almost equal to that of bulk molybdenum and is not influenced by sputtering and annealing conditions. When the film thickness is sufficient that surface scattering can be ignored, the decrease in film resistivity after annealing is caused by the decrease in scattering at the grain boundaries for zero bias sputtered films, and is caused by an increase of the grain diameter for r.f. bias sputtered films. (Auth.)

  8. Investigation of molybdenum pentachloride interaction with chlorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salyulev, A.B.; Vovkotrub, Eh.G.; Strekalovskij, V.N.

    1993-01-01

    In Raman spectra of molybdenum pentachloride solutions in liquid chlorine lines were recorded in case of 397, 312, 410, 217 and 180 cm - 1 vibrations of ν 1 (A 1 '), ν 2 (A 1 '), ν 5 (E'), ν 6 (E') and ν 8 (E'') monomer (symmetry D 3h ) molecules of MoCl 5 . Interaction of molten molybdenum pentachloride with chlorine at increased (up to 6 MPa) pressures of Cl 2 was studied. In Raman spectra of its vapour distillation in liquid chlorine alongside with MoCl 5 lines appearance of new lines at 363 and 272 cm -1 , similar in their frequency to the ones calculated for the vibrations ν 1 (A 1g ) and ν 2 (E g ) of MoCl 6 molecules (symmetry O h ), was observed

  9. Molybdenum Dichalcogenides for Environmental Chemical Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Zappa, Dario

    2017-01-01

    2D transition metal dichalcogenides are attracting a strong interest following the popularity of graphene and other carbon-based materials. In the field of chemical sensors, they offer some interesting features that could potentially overcome the limitation of graphene and metal oxides, such as the possibility of operating at room temperature. Molybdenum-based dichalcogenides in particular are among the most studied materials, thanks to their facile preparation techniques and promising perfor...

  10. THE QUALITY CONTROL OF ELECTROLYTIC TANTALUM CAPACITORS BY USING THE STRESS TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. L. Kuznetsov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the accelerated method of analysis the electrolytic tantalum capacitors quality on the basis of the change equivalent series resistance forecast while conducting the STRESS TEST.

  11. Sound speed measurements in tantalum using the front surface impact technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigg, P A; Scharff, R J; Hixson, R S

    2014-01-01

    Shock compression experiments were performed on tantalum to determine the longitudinal sound speed on the Hugoniot from 36 to 105 GPa. Tantalum samples were impacted directly on to lithium fluoride windows at velocities ranging from 2.5 to 5.0 km/s and the resulting particle velocity profiles at the sample/window interface were recorded using optical velocimetry techniques. The time of arrival of the rarefaction wave from the back surface of the tantalum sample was then used to determine the longitudinal sound speed at the corresponding impact stress. In contrast to recently reported work, we see no evidence of a phase transition in the tantalum in this stress range.

  12. Vacuum pyrolysis characteristics and parameter optimization of recycling organic materials from waste tantalum capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenyang; Niu, Bo; Zhang, Lingen; Xu, Zhenming

    2018-01-15

    Recycling rare metal tantalum from waste tantalum capacitors (WTCs) is significant to alleviate the shortage of tantalum resource. However, environmental problems will be caused if the organic materials from WTCs are improperly disposed. This study presented a promising vacuum pyrolysis technology to recycle the organic materials from WTCs. The organics removal rate could reach 94.32wt% according to TG results. The optimal parameters were determined as 425°C, 50Pa and 30min on the basis of response surface methodology (RSM). The oil yield and residual rate was 18.09wt% and 74.94wt%, respectively. All pyrolysis products can be recycled through a reasonable route. Besides, to deeply understand the pyrolysis process, the pyrolysis mechanism was also proposed based on the product and free radical theory. This paper provides an efficient process for recycling the organic material from WTCs, which can facilitate the following tantalum recovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Biomass as biosorbent for molybdenum ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaura, Mitiko; Santos, Jacinete L. dos; Damasceno, Marcos O.; Egute, Nayara dos S.; Moraes, Adeniane A.N.; Santos, Bruno Z., E-mail: myamaura@ipen.br, E-mail: jlsantos@ipen.br, E-mail: molidam@ipen.br, E-mail: nayara.egute@usp.br, E-mail: adenianemrs@ig.com.br, E-mail: bzsantos@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Biosorbents have been focused as renewable materials of low cost, and have been used for metal removal from the wastewater by adsorption phenomenon. Biosorbents are prepared of biomass, whose reactive sites in its chemical structure have affinity to bind to metal ions. In this work, performance of corn husk, sugarcane bagasse, coir, banana peel, fish scale, chitin and chitosan as biosorbents of molybdenum (VI) ions in aqueous medium was evaluated. The adsorption experiments were investigated in a batch system varying the pH solution from 0.5 to 12 and the contact time between the phases from 2 min to 70 min. {sup 99}Mo radioisotope was used as radioactive tracer for analysis of molybdenum ions by gamma spectroscopy using a HPGe detector. Results revealed that acidity of the solution favored the adsorption of Mo (VI) ions on the all biosorbents. Adsorption values higher than 85% were found on sugarcane bagasse, coir, corn husk, chitin and chitosan at pH 2.0. Only the chitosan was dissolved at pH 0.5 and a gel was formed. The models of pseudo-second order and external film diffusion described the kinetics of adsorption of Mo ions on the coir. This work showed that the studied biomass has high potential to be used as biosorbent of molybdenum ions from acidic wastewater, and the kinetics of Mo adsorption on the coir suggested high-affinity adsorption governed by chemisorption. (author)

  14. Biomass as biosorbent for molybdenum ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaura, Mitiko; Santos, Jacinete L. dos; Damasceno, Marcos O.; Egute, Nayara dos S.; Moraes, Adeniane A.N.; Santos, Bruno Z.

    2013-01-01

    Biosorbents have been focused as renewable materials of low cost, and have been used for metal removal from the wastewater by adsorption phenomenon. Biosorbents are prepared of biomass, whose reactive sites in its chemical structure have affinity to bind to metal ions. In this work, performance of corn husk, sugarcane bagasse, coir, banana peel, fish scale, chitin and chitosan as biosorbents of molybdenum (VI) ions in aqueous medium was evaluated. The adsorption experiments were investigated in a batch system varying the pH solution from 0.5 to 12 and the contact time between the phases from 2 min to 70 min. 99 Mo radioisotope was used as radioactive tracer for analysis of molybdenum ions by gamma spectroscopy using a HPGe detector. Results revealed that acidity of the solution favored the adsorption of Mo (VI) ions on the all biosorbents. Adsorption values higher than 85% were found on sugarcane bagasse, coir, corn husk, chitin and chitosan at pH 2.0. Only the chitosan was dissolved at pH 0.5 and a gel was formed. The models of pseudo-second order and external film diffusion described the kinetics of adsorption of Mo ions on the coir. This work showed that the studied biomass has high potential to be used as biosorbent of molybdenum ions from acidic wastewater, and the kinetics of Mo adsorption on the coir suggested high-affinity adsorption governed by chemisorption. (author)

  15. Preparation of single phase molybdenum boride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camurlu, Hasan Erdem

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Formation of Mo and a mixture of molybdenum boride phases take place in preparation of molybdenum borides. → It is intricate to prepare single phase molybdenum borides. → Formation of single phase MoB from MoO 3 + B 2 O 3 + Mg mixtures has not been reported previously. → Single phase MoB was successfully prepared through a combination of mechanochemical synthesis and annealing process. - Abstract: The formation of MoB through volume combustion synthesis (VCS), and through mechanochemical synthesis (MCS) followed by annealing has been investigated. MoO 3 , B 2 O 3 and Mg were used as reactants while MgO and NaCl were introduced as diluents. Products were leached in dilute HCl solution and were subjected to X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examinations. Mo was the major phase component in the VCS products under all the experimental conditions. Mo 2 B, MoB, MoB 2 and Mo 2 B 5 were found as minor phases. Products of MCS contained a mixture of Mo 2 B, MoB, MoB 2 and Mo. After annealing the MCS product at 1400 deg. C for 3 h, single phase α-MoB was obtained.

  16. Development of rubidium and niobium containing plastic foams. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botham, R.A.; McClung, C.E.; Schwendeman, J.I.

    1978-01-01

    Rubidium fluoride and niobium metal-containing foam samples (rods and sheets) were prepared using two foam sytems: (1) hydrophilic polyurethanes prepared from W.R. Grace Co.'s Hypol prepolymers and (2) polyimides prepared from Monsanto Company's Skybond polyimide resin. The first system was used only for preparation of rubidium fluoride-containing foams while the second was used for both rubidium fluoride and niobium-containing foams. The niobium metal could readily be incorporated into the polyimide foam during molding, to produce foam sheets of the required dimensions and density. The rubidium fluoride-containing polyimide foams were preferably prepared by first rendering the molded polyimide foam hydrophilic with a postcuring treatment, then absorbing the rubidium fluoride from water solution. Similarly, rubidium fluoride was absorbed into the hydrophilic polyurethanes from water solution. Since the high reactive rubidium metal could not be employed, rubidium fluoride, which is very hygroscopic, was used instead, primarily because of its high rubidium content (approximately 82 weight percent). This was important in view of the low total densities and the high weight percentage rubidium required in the foam samples. In addition, at the later request of LLL, a block of rigid Hypol hydrophilic polyurethane foam (with a density of approximately 0.04 g/cm 3 and cell sizes = or <0.2 mm) was prepared without any metal or metal compounds in it. Two shipments of foam samples, which met or closely approximated the project specifications, were submitted to LLL during the course of this project. Information on these samples is contained in Table 1. A complete description of their preparation is given in the Experimental Results and Discussion Section

  17. Catalysts Promoted with Niobium Oxide for Air Pollution Abatement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendi Xiang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Pt-containing catalysts are currently used commercially to catalyze the conversion of carbon monoxide (CO and hydrocarbon (HC pollutants from stationary chemical and petroleum plants. It is well known that Pt-containing catalysts are expensive and have limited availability. The goal of this research is to find alternative and less expensive catalysts to replace Pt for these applications. This study found that niobium oxide (Nb2O5, as a carrier or support for certain transition metal oxides, promotes oxidation activity while maintaining stability, making them candidates as alternatives to Pt. The present work reports that the orthorhombic structure of niobium oxide (formed at 800 °C in air promotes Co3O4 toward the oxidation of both CO and propane, which are common pollutants in volatile organic compound (VOC applications. This was a surprising result since this structure of Nb2O5 has a very low surface area (about 2 m2/g relative to the more traditional Al2O3 support, with a surface area of 150 m2/g. The results reported demonstrate that 1% Co3O4/Nb2O5 has comparable fresh and aged catalytic activity to 1% Pt/γ-Al2O3 and 1% Pt/Nb2O5. Furthermore, 6% Co3O4/Nb2O5 outperforms 1% Pt/Al2O3 in both catalytic activity and thermal stability. These results suggest a strong interaction between niobium oxide and the active component—cobalt oxide—likely by inducing an oxygen defect structure with oxygen vacancies leading to enhanced activity toward the oxidation of CO and propane.

  18. Effect of low temperature baking on niobium cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Kneisel; Ganapati Myneni; William Lanford; Gianluigi Ciovati

    2003-09-01

    A low temperature (100 C-150 C) ''in situ'' baking under ultra-high vacuum has been successfully applied as final preparation of niobium RF cavities by several laboratories over the last few years. The benefits reported consist mainly of an improvement of the cavity quality factor and a recovery from the so-called ''Q-drop'' without field emission at high field. A series of experiments with a CEBAF single cell cavity have been carried out at Jefferson Lab to carefully investigate the effect of baking at progressively higher temperatures for a fixed time on all the relevant material parameters. Measurements of the cavity quality factor in the temperature range 1.37K-280K and resonant frequency shift between 6K-9.3K provide information about the surface resistance, energy gap, penetration depth and mean free path. The experimental data have been analyzed with the complete BCS theory of superconductivity using a modified version of the computer code originally written by J. Halbritter [1] . Small niobium samples inserted in the cavity during its surface preparation were analyzed with respect to their hydrogen content with a Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA). The single cell cavity has been tested at three different temperatures before and after baking to gain some insight on thermal conductivity and Kapitza resistance and the data are compared with different models. This paper describes the results from these experiments and comments on the existing models to explain the effect of baking on the performance of niobium RF cavities.

  19. A solvent extraction study of molybdenum chloride and molybdenum thiocyanate complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenland, L.P.; Lillie, E.G.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of reducing agents on molybdenum(VI) solutions in hydrochloric acid was studied by a solvent extraction technique to elucidate the composition of the colored molybdenum thiocyanate complex. Neither copper(I) chloride nor ascorbic acid have any effect on the extraction of MoO2Cl2; it is inferred that tin(II) chloride reduces Mo(VI) stepwise to a polynuclear Mo(V)??Mo(VI) complex and then to Mo(V). The colored thiocyanate complex produced by copper(I) and by ascorbic acid differs only slightly in extraction characteristics from the uncolored Mo(VI) complex. It is suggested that the color may be produced by an isomerization reaction of MoO2(SCN)2, and thus that the colored species may be a hexavalent rather than pentavalent molybdenum complex. ?? 1974.

  20. Electrochemical Study of Tantalum in Fluoride and Oxofluoride Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polyakova, L.; Polyakov, E.; Matthiesen, F.

    1994-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of tantalum in the form of K2TaF7 in an LiF-NaF-KF eutectic melt has been studied by linear voltammetry in the temperature range of 560 to 815-degrees-C with and without additions of Na2O. An amperometric titration has been performed by measuring the heights...... of the cathodic and the anodic peaks. It was shown that at a molar ratio Na2O/K2TaF7 = 1 the predominating complex in the melt is TaOF5(2-), whereas with an Na2O/K2TaF7 molar ratio of 2 it is TaO2F(x)(x-1-), probably in the form of TaO2F4(3-). Increase in the Na2O/K2TaF7 molar ratio in excess of two leads...

  1. A tantalum strength model using a multiscale approach: version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, R; Arsenlis, A; Hommes, G; Marian, J; Rhee, M; Yang, L H

    2009-09-21

    A continuum strength model for tantalum was developed in 2007 using a multiscale approach. This was our first attempt at connecting simulation results from atomistic to continuum length scales, and much was learned that we were not able to incorporate into the model at that time. The tantalum model described in this report represents a second cut at pulling together multiscale simulation results into a continuum model. Insight gained in creating previous multiscale models for tantalum and vanadium was used to guide the model construction and functional relations for the present model. While the basic approach follows that of the vanadium model, there are significant departures. Some of the recommendations from the vanadium report were followed, but not all. Results from several new analysis techniques have not yet been incorporated due to technical difficulties. Molecular dynamics simulations of single dislocation motion at several temperatures suggested that the thermal activation barrier was temperature dependent. This dependency required additional temperature functions be included within the assumed Arrhenius relation. The combination of temperature dependent functions created a complex model with a non unique parameterization and extra model constants. The added complexity had no tangible benefits. The recommendation was to abandon the strict Arrhenius form and create a simpler curve fit to the molecular dynamics data for shear stress versus dislocation velocity. Functions relating dislocation velocity and applied shear stress were constructed vor vanadium for both edge and screw dislocations. However, an attempt to formulate a robust continuum constitutive model for vanadium using both dislocation populations was unsuccessful; the level of coupling achieved was inadequate to constrain the dislocation evolution properly. Since the behavior of BCC materials is typically assumed to be dominated by screw dislocations, the constitutive relations were ultimately

  2. Split-Hopkinson pressure bar tests on pure tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dick, Richard D.; Armstrong, Ronald W.; Williams, John D.

    1998-01-01

    Pure tantalum (Ta) was loaded in compression by a split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) to strain rates from 450 to 6350 s -1 . The results are compared with SHPB data for commercial Ta and with predictions from the constitutive model for Ta developed by Zerilli and Armstrong (Z-A). The main conclusions are: (1) the flow stress versus log strain rate agree with the Z-A constitutive model and other reported data, (2) uniform strain exponents computed on a true stress-strain basis for pure Ta are somewhat greater than those determined from SHPB data for commercial Ta, and (3) in both cases the uniform strain exponents versus log strain rate are in good agreement with predictions from the Z-A constitutive model for strain rates above 1500 s -1 without a clear indication of dislocation generation

  3. Monolithic Gyroidal Mesoporous Mixed Titanium–Niobium Nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Mesoporous transition metal nitrides are interesting materials for energy conversion and storage applications due to their conductivity and durability. We present ordered mixed titanium–niobium (8:2, 1:1) nitrides with gyroidal network structures synthesized from triblock terpolymer structure-directed mixed oxides. The materials retain both macroscopic integrity and mesoscale ordering despite heat treatment up to 600 °C, without a rigid carbon framework as a support. Furthermore, the gyroidal lattice parameters were varied by changing polymer molar mass. This synthesis strategy may prove useful in generating a variety of monolithic ordered mesoporous mixed oxides and nitrides for electrode and catalyst materials. PMID:25122534

  4. Reduction kinetics of molecular nitrogen by niobium(3) hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisov, N.T.; Shuvalova, N.I.; Shilov, A.E.

    1987-01-01

    Formation kinetics of hydrazine and ammonia durng nitrogen reduction by niobium(3) hydroxide at 284.5 - 334 K in water-methanol alkaline medium is studied. It is shown that the KOH concentration growth results in the rise of the N 2 H 4 formation rate and the decrease of the NH 3 formation rate. The sequence of reactions with respect to [Nb(3)] and [OH - ], as well as the value of activation energy of hydrazine formation of (50±4 kJ/mole) are determined

  5. Terahertz time-domain transmission and reflection spectroscopy of niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Tae Yoon; Choi, Kyu Jin; Park, Byoung Cheol; Ha, Tae Woo; Sim, Kyung Ik; Kim, Jea Hoon [Dept. of Physics, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Dong Gwang; Chang, Yonuk [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    We have developed a terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) system for transmission and reflection measurements of metallic thin films. Using our THz-TDS system, we studied the conventional superconductor niobium (Nb) in the normal state in the spectral range from 5 to 50 cm{sup -1}. Both the real and imaginary parts of the conductivity are acquired without Kramers-Kronig analysis. Nb exhibits a nearly frequency independent real conductivity spectrum in the terahertz range, with a very small imaginary part.

  6. First prototype Copper-Niobium RF Superconducting Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This is the first RF superconducting cavity made of copper with a very thin layer of pure niobium deposited on the inner wall by sputtering. This new developpment lead to a considerable increase of performance and stability of superconducting cavities and to non-negligible economy. The work was carried out in the ISR workshop. This technique was adopted for the LEP II accelerating cavities. At the centre is Cristoforo Benvenuti, inventor of this important technology, with his assistants, Nadia Circelli and Max Hauer, carrying the sputtering electrode. See also 8209255, 8312339.

  7. Experiments on high power EB evaporation of niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandaswamy, E.; Bhardwaj, R.L.; Ram Gopal; Ray, A.K.; Kulgod, S.V.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The versatility of electron beam evaporation makes the deposition of many new and unusual materials possible. This technique offers freedom from contamination and precise control. High power electron guns are especially used for obtaining high evaporation rates for large area coatings. This paper deals with the coating experiments carried out on an indigenously developed high power strip electron gun with niobium as evaporant at 40 kW on S.S. substrate. The practical problems of conditioning the gun and venting the vacuum system after the high power operation are also discussed. The coating rate was calculated by weight difference method

  8. Examination of temperature-induced shape memory of uranium--5.3-to 6.9 weight percent niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemperly, V.C.

    1976-01-01

    The uranium-niobium alloy system was examined in the range of 5.3-to-6.9 weight percent niobium with respect to shape memory, mechanical properties, metallography, Coefficients of linear thermal expansion, and differential thermal analysis. Shape memory increased with increasing niobium levels in the study range. There were no useful correlations found between shape memory and the other tests. Coefficients of linear thermal expansion tests of as-quenched 5.8 and 6.2 weight percent niobium specimens, but not 5.3 and 6.9 weight percent niobium specimens, had a contraction component on heating, but the phenomenon was not a contributor to shape memory

  9. Prospects and adilities of molybdenum leaching from sulfide ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spivak, A.A.; Korostyshevskij, N.B.; Yudin, I.M.; Lavrenchuk, V.I.; Fridman, I.V.

    1988-01-01

    The conditions and possibilities of using the technology of solution mining during exploration of molybdenum deposits are studied. The possible reacting agents for molybdenum dissolving are studied. Alkali solutions of sodium hypochlorite characterized by high selectivity to molybdenum, activity at low temperatures, simple regeneration by the electrolytic method are considered optimum for technology. Spraying regimes providing favorable sorption conditions are selected. VP-1-P, VP-14K and AM-2B anionites proved to be the best sorbents. The flowsheet of molybdenum ore leaching providing for the preparation of a high-quality industrial product in the form of ammonium paramolybdate is recommended for industrial tests

  10. Sorption of molybdenum by cellulose polyphosphate from acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luneva, N.K.; Oputina, A.G.; Ermolenko, I.N.

    1985-01-01

    The sorption of molybdenum on cellulose polyphosphate from acid solutions of ammonium molybdate depending on the phosphorus content in samples, concentration and pH of the solution, sorption time is studied. It is shown that a maximum molybdenum content on the cellulose samples with different phosphorus content is pointed out at an ammonium molybdate concentration 0.02 M. Saturation of the sorption curve is attained at molar ratio of adsrbed molybdenum to phosphorus 1:4. In case of small fillings the compound with molybdenum to phosphorus ratio 1:10 is formed

  11. Does the Risk of Rerevision Vary Between Porous Tantalum Cups and Other Cementless Designs After Revision Hip Arthroplasty?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laaksonen, Inari; Lorimer, Michelle; Gromov, Kirill

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Earlier results with porous tantalum acetabular cups in revision THA generally have been favorable. Recently there has been some evidence presented that porous tantalum cups might decrease the risk of rerevision in the setting of revision hip surgery performed owing to prosthetic joint...... survival after revision THA compared with other cementless designs? (2) Does the use of porous tantalum cups influence survivorship when rerevision for PJI is the endpoint? METHODS: A total of 2442 first-time THA revisions with porous tantalum cups and 4401 first-time revisions with other uncemented cups......, ± 2.1 years) and 3.4 years (SD, ± 2.3 years), respectively. Concomitant stem revision was more common in the porous tantalum group (43% versus 36%). The use of porous tantalum augments also was analyzed as a proxy for more complex acetabular reconstructions. In an attempt to further reduce selection...

  12. Micro/Nano Structural Tantalum Coating for Enhanced Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Ding

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, tantalum has been attracting much attention for its anticorrosion resistance and biocompatibility, and it has been widely used in surface modification for implant applications. To improve its osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs, a micro/nano structure has been fabricated on the tantalum coating surface through the combination of anodic oxidation and plasma spraying method. The morphology, composition, and microstructure of the modified coating were comprehensively studied by employing scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The effects of hierarchical structures as well as micro-porous structure of tantalum coating on the behavior for human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs were evaluated and compared at both cellular and molecular levels in vitro. The experimental results show that a hierarchical micro/nano structure with Ta2O5 nanotubes spread onto a micro-scale tantalum coating has been fabricated successfully, which is confirmed to promote cell adhesion and spreading. Besides, the hierarchical micro/nano tantalum coating can provide 1.5~2.1 times improvement in gene expression, compared with the micro-porous tantalum coating. It demonstrates that it can effectively enhance the proliferation and differentiation of hBMSCs in vitro.

  13. Micro/Nano Structural Tantalum Coating for Enhanced Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ding; Xie, Youtao; Li, Kai; Huang, Liping; Zheng, Xuebin

    2018-04-03

    Recently, tantalum has been attracting much attention for its anticorrosion resistance and biocompatibility, and it has been widely used in surface modification for implant applications. To improve its osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs), a micro/nano structure has been fabricated on the tantalum coating surface through the combination of anodic oxidation and plasma spraying method. The morphology, composition, and microstructure of the modified coating were comprehensively studied by employing scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effects of hierarchical structures as well as micro-porous structure of tantalum coating on the behavior for human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs) were evaluated and compared at both cellular and molecular levels in vitro. The experimental results show that a hierarchical micro/nano structure with Ta₂O₅ nanotubes spread onto a micro-scale tantalum coating has been fabricated successfully, which is confirmed to promote cell adhesion and spreading. Besides, the hierarchical micro/nano tantalum coating can provide 1.5~2.1 times improvement in gene expression, compared with the micro-porous tantalum coating. It demonstrates that it can effectively enhance the proliferation and differentiation of hBMSCs in vitro.

  14. On the effect of interaction of molybdenum trioxide and magnesium oxide in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunin, V.M.; Karelin, A.I.; Solov'eva, L.N.

    1992-01-01

    Interaction of molybdenum trioxide and magnesium oxide in water was studied. It is shown that molybdenum trioxide forms consecutively magnesium molybdate, dimolybdate and magnesium polymolybdates with magnesium oxide

  15. Joining of alumina via copper/niobium/copper interlayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marks, Robert A.; Chapman, Daniel R.; Danielson, David T.; Glaeser, Andreas M.

    2000-03-15

    Alumina has been joined at 1150 degrees C and 1400 degrees C using multilayer copper/niobium/copper interlayers. Four-point bend strengths are sensitive to processing temperature, bonding pressure, and furnace environment (ambient oxygen partial pressure). Under optimum conditions, joints with reproducibly high room temperature strengths (approximately equal 240 plus/minus 20 MPa) can be produced; most failures occur within the ceramic. Joints made with sapphire show that during bonding an initially continuous copper film undergoes a morphological instability, resulting in the formation of isolated copper-rich droplets/particles at the sapphire/interlayer interface, and extensive regions of direct bonding between sapphire and niobium. For optimized alumina bonds, bend tests at 800 degrees C-1100 degrees C indicate significant strength is retained; even at the highest test temperature, ceramic failure is observed. Post-bonding anneals at 1000 degrees C in vacuum or in gettered argon were used to assess joint stability and to probe the effect of ambient oxygen partial pressure on joint characteristics. Annealing in vacuum for up to 200 h causes no significant decrease in room temperature bend strength or change in fracture path. With increasing anneal time in a lower oxygen partial pressure environment, the fracture strength decreases only slightly, but the fracture path shifts from the ceramic to the interface.

  16. Niobium superconducting rf cavity fabrication by electrohydraulic forming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Cantergiani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Superconducting rf (SRF cavities are traditionally fabricated from superconducting material sheets or made of copper coated with superconducting material, followed by trim machining and electron-beam welding. An alternative technique to traditional shaping methods, such as deep-drawing and spinning, is electrohydraulic forming (EHF. In EHF, half-cells are obtained through ultrahigh-speed deformation of blank sheets, using shockwaves induced in water by a pulsed electrical discharge. With respect to traditional methods, such a highly dynamic process can yield interesting results in terms of effectiveness, repeatability, final shape precision, higher formability, and reduced springback. In this paper, the first results of EHF on high purity niobium are presented and discussed. The simulations performed in order to master the multiphysics phenomena of EHF and to adjust its process parameters are presented. The microstructures of niobium half-cells produced by EHF and by spinning have been compared in terms of damage created in the material during the forming operation. The damage was assessed through hardness measurements, residual resistivity ratio (RRR measurements, and electron backscattered diffraction analyses. It was found that EHF does not worsen the damage of the material during forming and instead, some areas of the half-cell have shown lower damage compared to spinning. Moreover, EHF is particularly advantageous to reduce the forming time, preserve roughness, and to meet the final required shape accuracy.

  17. Niobium superconducting rf cavity fabrication by electrohydraulic forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantergiani, E.; Atieh, S.; Léaux, F.; Perez Fontenla, A. T.; Prunet, S.; Dufay-Chanat, L.; Koettig, T.; Bertinelli, F.; Capatina, O.; Favre, G.; Gerigk, F.; Jeanson, A. C.; Fuzeau, J.; Avrillaud, G.; Alleman, D.; Bonafe, J.; Marty, P.

    2016-11-01

    Superconducting rf (SRF) cavities are traditionally fabricated from superconducting material sheets or made of copper coated with superconducting material, followed by trim machining and electron-beam welding. An alternative technique to traditional shaping methods, such as deep-drawing and spinning, is electrohydraulic forming (EHF). In EHF, half-cells are obtained through ultrahigh-speed deformation of blank sheets, using shockwaves induced in water by a pulsed electrical discharge. With respect to traditional methods, such a highly dynamic process can yield interesting results in terms of effectiveness, repeatability, final shape precision, higher formability, and reduced springback. In this paper, the first results of EHF on high purity niobium are presented and discussed. The simulations performed in order to master the multiphysics phenomena of EHF and to adjust its process parameters are presented. The microstructures of niobium half-cells produced by EHF and by spinning have been compared in terms of damage created in the material during the forming operation. The damage was assessed through hardness measurements, residual resistivity ratio (RRR) measurements, and electron backscattered diffraction analyses. It was found that EHF does not worsen the damage of the material during forming and instead, some areas of the half-cell have shown lower damage compared to spinning. Moreover, EHF is particularly advantageous to reduce the forming time, preserve roughness, and to meet the final required shape accuracy.

  18. Shape memory effects in a uranium + 14 at. % niobium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandermeer, R.A.; Ogle, J.C.; Snyder, W.B. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    There is a class of alloys that, on cooling from elevated temperatures, experience a martensitic phase change. Some of these, when stressed in the martensitic state to an apparently plastic strain, recover their predeformed shape simply by heating. This striking shape recovery is known as the ''shape memory effect'' (SME). Up to a certain limiting strain, epsilon/sub L/, 100% shape recovery may be accomplished. This memory phenomenon seems to be attributable to the thermoelastic nature of and deformational modes associated with the phase transformation in the alloy. Thus, shape recovery results when a stress-biased martensite undergoes a heat-activated reversion back to the parent phase from which it originated. There are uranium alloys that demonstrate SME-behavior. Uranium-rich, uranium--niobium alloys were the first to be documented; New experimental observations of SME in a polycrystalline uranium--niobium alloy are presented. This alloy can exhibit a two-way memory under cetain circumstances. Additional indirect evidence is presented suggesting that the characteristics of the accompanying phase transformation in this alloy meet the criteria or ''selection rules'' deemed essential for SME

  19. Extraction and determination of molybdenum with tributyl phosphate Application to analysis of copper-molybdenum ores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiozzi, M; Zunino, H; Sepúlveda, L

    1969-12-01

    A differential spectrophotometric method is described for the determination of molybdenum by means of solvent extraction with tributylphosphate of the peroxymolybdate complex formed with H(2)O(2) in 3.5N H(2)SO(4). The extraction parameters are studied, and the behaviour of some other ions is reported. The method is used for ore analysis.

  20. Particularities of the recombination electron emission of single crystals of tungsten and niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashtakova, V.A.; Shishkin, B.B.

    1984-01-01

    The volt-ampere characteristics (vac) of vacuum diodes with metal single cr ystal electrodes are measured. Studied were: crystallographic plane (100) of a tungsten single crystal and (110) face of a niobium single crystal. Anomalies o n the initial portions of the vac of diodes with niobium ((110) face) electrodes are discovered. Anomalies appear at cathode temperatures t exceeding characteri stic thermoionic temperatures thetasub(the). The ''steps'' on the vac at t >thetasub(the) for tungsten are considered as voltage jumps. The ''steps'' on th e vac for niobium are considered as diode current jumps due to fluctuation processes resulting in the formation of small amount of slow electrons

  1. Photometric determination of niobium in materials with high content of phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navrotskaya, V.A.; Aleksandrova, E.I.; Kletenik, Yu.B.

    1982-01-01

    To determine niobium in various samples of niobium concentrates with a high phosphorus content, a photometric method with pyridylazoresorcinol (PAR) is used. It is shown that all the elements indicated (Fe, Si, Ti, Al, Ca) including phosphorus do not interfere with the niobium determination with the use of PAR. The method has been tried on artificial samples with different content of the base components. Variation coefficient constitutes 4.5%. No systematic errors, due to a high content of any concomitant element, are detected. The determination threshold is 10 - 2 %

  2. Technical assessment of niobium alloys data base for fusion reactor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pionke, L J; Davis, J W

    1979-08-01

    Refractory metals are one class of material to be developed in the Alloy Development For Irradiation Performance (ADIP) program recently initiated. A principal purpose of the assessment reported herein is to establish the existing data base for niobium alloys in order to help guide the work to be performed in the ADIP program. Major ADIP decisions include alloy selection/modification and irradiated/unirradiated material testing. This Assessment addressed the topics of: (1) niobium alloy development history and niobium metallurgy, (2) unirradiated mechanical properties, (3) irradiated properties, (4) corrosion, and (5) environmental effects.

  3. Reduction of Al2O3 in niobium--lithium systems at 10000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selle, J.E.; DeVan, J.H.

    1977-07-01

    Various grades of aluminum oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) were sealed inside capsules of niobium and niobium-1% zirconium alloy which were then exposed to liquid lithium for 3000 hr at 1000 0 C. Similar unsealed capsules were exposed to a high vacuum. Reduction of the Al 2 O 3 occurred in the lithium-treated capsules, but no reaction occurred in the vacuum-treated capsules. Metallography and electron-microprobe analysis showed that reaction products in the form of compounds of niobium, aluminum, and zirconium were formed. Lithium acted as a sink for oxygen

  4. Investigation into kinetics of sorption of some radionuclides by mixed sorbents based on amorphous niobium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkina, R.M.; Sukharev, Yu.I.; Egorov, Yu.V.; Plotnikov, V.I.

    1977-01-01

    A study has been made of kinetics of sorption of radionuclides 110 Ag, 60 Co, and 51 Cr by samples of amorphous stoichiometric niobium (5) phosphate. Ratios of the concentration conductivity to the mean radius of sorbent particles were calculated which are proportional to diffusivities. Increased specificity towards Cr 3+ ions of samples of ion exchangeable niobium phosphate containing cerium and treated with 0.1N HCl was established. This effect was explained by formation and subsequent destruction of the copolymer oxo-ol matrix of niobium and cerium, as a result of which a gel is formed with mosaic structure being favourable for sorption of three-charged ions

  5. The Effect of Molybdenum Fertilization on Arachis Glabrata Biomass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of molybdenum fertilization on biomass and the number of nodules of Arachis glabrata was assessed at the Teaching and Research Farm of the University of Dschang in 2011 at different periods of mowing. A factorial design comparing four doses of molybdenum as ammonium molybdate (0, 0.75, 1.5 and 2.25 ...

  6. Low-temperature heat capacity of molybdenum borides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolgar, A.S.; Klinder, A.V.; Novoseletskaya, L.M.; Turov, V.P.; Klochkov, L.A.; Lyashchenko, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    Heat capacity of molybdenum borides Mo 2 B, MoB, Mo 2 B 5 is studied for the first time in the 60-300 K range using the adiabatic method. Standard (at 298.15 K) thermodynamic functions (enthalpy, heat capacity, entropy, reduced Gibbs energy) of molybdenum borides are calculated

  7. Tetrathionate reductase of Salmonella thyphimurium: a molybdenum containing enzyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinojosa-Leon, M.; Dubourdieu, M.; Sanchez-Crispin, J.A.; Chippaux, M.

    1986-01-01

    Use of radioactive molybdenum demonstrates that the tetrathionate reductase of Salmonella typhimurium is a molydenum containing enzyme. It is proposed that this enzyme shares with other molybdo-proteins, such as nitrate reductase, a common molybdenum containing cofactor the defect of which leads to the loss of the tetrathionate reductase and nitrate reductase activities

  8. Development and Study of Tantalum and Niobium Carbides as Electrocatalyst Supports for the Oxygen Electrode for PEM Water Electrolysis at Elevated Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikiforov, Aleksey; Petrushina, Irina; Prag, Carsten Brorson

    2013-01-01

    . Resistance to oxidation of the TaC and NbC was investigated by exposing them to air at 84 and 150 °C. Subsequently, their electrical conductivity was measured as the indicator of oxidation. Change in specific surface area and conductivity was measured after different periods of ball milling. We found...... that the TaC was significantly more resistant to oxidation than the NbC. Eventually, both materials retained relatively high electrical conductivity even with the oxidized surface. TaC can thus be recommended as an electrocatalyst support for the oxygen evolution reaction and both materials are proposed...

  9. Development and Study of Tantalum and Niobium Carbides as Electrocatalyst Supports for the Oxygen Electrode for PEM Water Electrolysis at Elevated Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikiforov, Aleksey; Petrushina, Irina; Prag, Carsten Brorson

    2013-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) water electrolysis is a prospective method of producing hydrogen. We focused on one of its issues – the lack of a suitable support material for the anode electrocatalyst. TaC and NbC were studied as possible electrocatalyst supports for the PEM water electrolysis...... to be tested as alternative electrocatalyst supports for the hydrogen evolution reaction...

  10. Kinetics of Molybdenum Reduction to Molybdenum Blue by Bacillus sp. Strain A.rzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Othman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum is very toxic to agricultural animals. Mo-reducing bacterium can be used to immobilize soluble molybdenum to insoluble forms, reducing its toxicity in the process. In this work the isolation of a novel molybdate-reducing Gram positive bacterium tentatively identified as Bacillus sp. strain A.rzi from a metal-contaminated soil is reported. The cellular reduction of molybdate to molybdenum blue occurred optimally at 4 mM phosphate, using 1% (w/v glucose, 50 mM molybdate, between 28 and 30°C and at pH 7.3. The spectrum of the Mo-blue product showed a maximum peak at 865 nm and a shoulder at 700 nm. Inhibitors of bacterial electron transport system (ETS such as rotenone, sodium azide, antimycin A, and potassium cyanide could not inhibit the molybdenum-reducing activity. At 0.1 mM, mercury, copper, cadmium, arsenic, lead, chromium, cobalt, and zinc showed strong inhibition on molybdate reduction by crude enzyme. The best model that fitted the experimental data well was Luong followed by Haldane and Monod. The calculated value for Luong’s constants pmax, Ks, Sm, and n was 5.88 μmole Mo-blue hr−1, 70.36 mM, 108.22 mM, and 0.74, respectively. The characteristics of this bacterium make it an ideal tool for bioremediation of molybdenum pollution.

  11. Molybdenum Dichalcogenides for Environmental Chemical Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Zappa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available 2D transition metal dichalcogenides are attracting a strong interest following the popularity of graphene and other carbon-based materials. In the field of chemical sensors, they offer some interesting features that could potentially overcome the limitation of graphene and metal oxides, such as the possibility of operating at room temperature. Molybdenum-based dichalcogenides in particular are among the most studied materials, thanks to their facile preparation techniques and promising performances. The present review summarizes the advances in the exploitation of these MoX2 materials as chemical sensors for the detection of typical environmental pollutants, such as NO2, NH3, CO and volatile organic compounds.

  12. Molybdenum applications in the electronics market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, John A.; Lipetzky, Pete

    2000-03-01

    Molybdenum’s role in the electronics market has been an important one since the earliest days of vacuum tubes. Common electronic applications include components used to manufacture electrical devices, including setter tiles for sintering ceramic substrates and multilayer ceramic circuits, as well as physical-vapor deposition masks. Molybdenum is also used for thermal-management applications when paired with copper and is a necessary part of high-power diodes and rectifiers as well as field-emitter components in flat-panel displays.

  13. Hot rolling of thick uranium molybdenum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMint, Amy L.; Gooch, Jack G.

    2015-11-17

    Disclosed herein are processes for hot rolling billets of uranium that have been alloyed with about ten weight percent molybdenum to produce cold-rollable sheets that are about one hundred mils thick. In certain embodiments, the billets have a thickness of about 7/8 inch or greater. Disclosed processes typically involve a rolling schedule that includes a light rolling pass and at least one medium rolling pass. Processes may also include reheating the rolling stock and using one or more heavy rolling passes, and may include an annealing step.

  14. Molybdenum protective coatings adhesion to steel substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blesman, A. I.; Postnikov, D. V.; Polonyankin, D. A.; Teplouhov, A. A.; Tyukin, A. V.; Tkachenko, E. A.

    2017-06-01

    Protection of the critical parts, components and assemblies from corrosion is an urgent engineering problem and many other industries. Protective coatings’ forming on surface of metal products is a promising way of corrosionprevention. The adhesion force is one of the main characteristics of coatings’ durability. The paper presents theoretical and experimental adhesion force assessment for coatings formed by molybdenum magnetron sputtering ontoa steel substrate. Validity and reliability of results obtained by simulation and sclerometry method allow applying the developed model for adhesion force evaluation in binary «steel-coating» systems.

  15. Behaviour of helium after implantation in molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viaud, C.; Maillard, S.; Carlot, G.; Valot, C.; Gilabert, E.; Sauvage, T.; Peaucelle, C.; Moncoffre, N.

    2009-01-01

    This study deals with the behaviour of helium in a molybdenum liner dedicated to the retention of fission products. More precisely this work contributes to evaluate the release of implanted helium when the gas has precipitated into nanometric bubbles close to the free surface. A simple model dedicated to calculate the helium release in such a condition is presented. The specificity of this model lays on the assumption that the gas is in equilibrium with a simple distribution of growing bubbles. This effort is encouraging since the calculated helium release fits an experimental dataset with a set of parameters in good agreement with the literature

  16. Single-layer Molybdenum disulfide photodetectors

    OpenAIRE

    López Sánchez, Oriol

    2012-01-01

    Projecte realitzat mitjançant programa de mobilitat. École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne [ANGLÈS] Two-dimensional (2D) materials are very attractive candidates for use in next-generation nanoelectronic devices. Compared to one-dimensional materials, with 2D materials is relatively easy to fabricate complex structures. 2D materials, such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), have attracted increasing attention for their electronic and optoelectronic particular properties and size. MoS2 is a...

  17. Electrochemical ammonia production on molybdenum nitride nanoclusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howalt, Jakob Geelmuyden; Vegge, Tejs

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical investigations of electrochemical production of ammonia at ambient temperature and pressure on nitrogen covered molybdenum nanoparticles are presented. Density functional theory calculations are used in combination with the computational hydrogen electrode approach to calculate the free...... energy profile for electrochemical protonation of N2 and N adatoms on cuboctahedral Mo13 nanoparticles. Pathways for electrochemical ammonia production via direct protonation of N adatoms and N2 admolecules with an onset potential as low as -0.5 V and generally lower than -0.8 V on both a nitrogen...

  18. Investigation of iron-bismuth-molybdenum catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ven'yaminov, S.A.; Barannik, G.B.; Pitaeva, A.N.; Sazonova, N.N.; Plyasova, L.M.

    1977-01-01

    The catalytic properties of an oxide iron-bismuth-molybdenum system in reactions of oxidative ammonolysis of propylene and oxidative dehydrogenation of butene-1 are investigated. It is shown that catalysts containing double molybdate of bismuth and iron (the X-phase) exhibit an increased catalytic activity as compared with bismuth molybdate (Bi 2 O 3 x3MoO 3 ). Preliminary reduction of such specimens increases their activity and selectivity in subsequent work under conditions of a stationary course of the oxidation reaction. The activity and selectivity of catalysts containing only bismuth molybdate and iron molybdate are due to the additivity of the properties of the separate molybdates

  19. A study for an electrolytic reduction of tantalum oxide in a LiCl-Li2O molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Bin; Park, Byung Heung; Seo, Chung Seok; Kang, Dae Seung; Kwon, Seon Gil; Park, Seong Won

    2005-01-01

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has developed the Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process (ACP) to be an innovative technology for handling the PWR spent fuel. As part of ACP, the electrolytic reduction process (ER process) is the electrochemical reduction process of uranium oxide to uranium metal in a molten salt. The ER process has advantages in a technical stability, an economic potential and a good proliferation resistance. KAERI has reported on the good experimental results of an electrochemical reduction of the uranium oxide in a 20 kg HM/batch lab-scale. The ER process can be applicable to the reduction of other metal oxides. Metal tantalum powder has attracted attention for a variety of applications. A tantalum capacitor made from superfine and pliable tantalum powders is very small in size and it has a higher-capacitance part, therefore it is useful for microelectronic devices. By the ER process the metal tantalum can be obtained from tantalum pentoxide. In this work, a 40 g Ta 2 O 5 /batch electrochemical reactor was used for the synthesis of the metal tantalum. From the results of the cyclic voltammograms for the Ta 2 O 5 -LiCl-Li 2 O system, the mechanism of the tantalum reduction in a molten LiCl-Li 2 O salt system was investigated. Tantalum pentoxide is chemically reduced to tantalum metal by the lithium metal which is electrochemically deposited into an integrated cathode assembly in the LiCl-Li 2 O molten salt. The experiments for the tantalum reduction were performed with a chronopotentiometry in the reactor cell, the reduced products were analyzed from an analysis of the X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX). From the results, the electrolytic reduction process is applicable to the synthesis of metal tantalum

  20. Thermophysical and Electronic Properties Information Analysis Center (TEPIAC): A Continuing Systematic Program on Tables of Thermophysical and Electronic Properties of Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-02-01

    64 , 647 Polymers, rubbers , etc. 3,047 Ther mal radiative propertie s 38 , 534 Refrac tories 1,977 Mass diffusivity (to 1972) 28 , 780 Glasses 1,900...mixtures , borldes , bromides , carbides, chlorides , fluorides , nitrate s, nitrides , phosphates , sul- fates , sulfides , ce rmets , minerals and...state. These are cadm ium, chromium , lead , magnesium, molybdenum, nickel , niobium, tantalum, tin , titanium, zinc , zirconium , Acheson graphite

  1. Compatibility of refractory alloys with space reactor system coolants and working fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVan, J.H.; DiStefano, J.R.; Hoffman, E.E.

    1984-01-01

    The bulk of this report deals with compatibility studies in liquid lithium and boiling potassium. Substantial information is also presented concerning the reactivity of niobium and tantalum alloys with residual gases in high and ultrahigh vacuum atmospheres. The remaining information, which is much less extensive, covers the compatibility behavior of molybdenum and tungsten alloys in alkali metals and a qualitative assessment of the use of refractory metals for containing helium in a closed Brayton cycle. 22 references, 29 figures, 14 tables

  2. Annual reports in inorganic and general syntheses 1974

    CERN Document Server

    Niedenzu, Kurt

    1975-01-01

    Annual Reports in Inorganic and General Syntheses-1974 presents an organized annual summary of synthetic developments in inorganic chemistry and its related areas. The book discusses the chemistry of simple and complex metal hydrides of main groups I, II, and III, boron, aluminium, gallium, indium, thallium, silicon, germanium, tin, lead, phosphorus, arsenic, antimony, bismuth, chalcogens, halogens, and pseudohalogens. The text also describes the chemistry of scandium, yttrium, lanthanides, actinides, titanium, zirconium, hafnium, vanadium, niobium, tantalum, chromium, molybdenum, tungsten, ma

  3. Modification of surface properties of copper-refractory metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, J.D.; Gibson, E.D.

    1993-10-12

    The surface properties of copper-refractory metal (CU-RF) alloy bodies are modified by heat treatments which cause the refractory metal to form a coating on the exterior surfaces of the alloy body. The alloys have a copper matrix with particles or dendrites of the refractory metal dispersed therein, which may be niobium, vanadium, tantalum, chromium, molybdenum, or tungsten. The surface properties of the bodies are changed from those of copper to that of the refractory metal.

  4. Boron modified molybdenum silicide and products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, M.K.; Akinc, M.

    1999-01-01

    A boron-modified molybdenum silicide material is disclosed having the composition comprising about 80 to about 90 weight % Mo, about 10 to about 20 weight % Si, and about 0.1 to about 2 weight % B and a multiphase microstructure including Mo 5 Si 3 phase as at least one microstructural component effective to impart good high temperature creep resistance. The boron-modified molybdenum silicide material is fabricated into such products as electrical components, such as resistors and interconnects, that exhibit oxidation resistance to withstand high temperatures in service in air as a result of electrical power dissipation, electrical resistance heating elements that can withstand high temperatures in service in air and other oxygen-bearing atmospheres and can span greater distances than MoSi 2 heating elements due to improved creep resistance, and high temperature structural members and other fabricated components that can withstand high temperatures in service in air or other oxygen-bearing atmospheres while retaining creep resistance associated with Mo 5 Si 3 for structural integrity. 7 figs

  5. High-strength chromium--molybdenum rails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Y.E.; Sawhill, J.M. Jr.; Cias, W.W.; Eldis, G.T.

    1976-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted with the aim of developing an as-rolled rail of over 100 ksi (689 N/mm 2 ) yield strength. A series of compositions providing both pearlitic and bainitic microstructures was evaluated. A fine pearlitic structure was developed in a 0.73 percent C -- 0.83 percent Mn -- 0.16 percent Si -- 0.75 percent Cr -- 0.21 percent Mo steel by simulating the mill cooling rate of 132-lb/yd (65.5-kg/m) rail. Two 100-ton commercial heats were made of this approximate composition and processed into 132-lb/yd (65.5-kg/m) rail. Samples tested in the laboratory ranged from 109 to 125 ksi (750 to 860 N/mm 2 ) in yield strength. The chromium-molybdenum rails also exhibited excellent fracture toughness and fatigue properties. Sections of the rail were joined by both flash-butt welding and thermite welding. The hardness peaks produced in the flash-butt welds could be reduced by applying either a postweld current or an induction heating cycle. The high-strength chromium-molybdenum rails have been in service for over eight months in curved sections of an ore railway that carries over 55 million gross long tons per year. 7 tables, 18 figs

  6. Iron-niobium-aluminum alloy having high-temperature corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Huey S.

    1988-04-14

    An alloy for use in high temperature sulfur and oxygen containing environments, having aluminum for oxygen resistance, niobium for sulfur resistance and the balance iron, is discussed. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. On possibility of fabrication of monolith composite materials on niobium carbide base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploshkin, V.V.; Ul'yanina, I.Yu.; Filonenko, V.P.

    1984-01-01

    An attempt was made to fabricate the composite material on niobium carbide base possessing the elevated heat resistance, erosion and chemical resistance in special media, as well as capable of withstanding sufficient thermal shocks. Powder of niobium carbide of 10 μm fraction was used as base material, the powder of pure copper of 10...12 μm fraction - as binder. It was shown that samples of composite mateiral on niobium carbide base fabricated by the method of hydrostatic pressing possessed the minimal porosity as compared to samples fabricated by usual methods of powder metallurgy. The basic phases of composite material-copper and niobium carbide - distribute uniformly over sample cross-section and don't interact with each other under any conditions. The fabricated composite material possesses sufficient thermal shock resistance and isn't subjected to brittle fracture

  8. Solubility of niobium in austenite in the presence of Nb(C,N)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei, P.R.; Bresciani Filho, E.

    1983-01-01

    It was developed some equations to calculate the solubility of niobium in austenite in the presence of NbC sub(0.87) or NbN. These equations were applied to steels with carbon, nitrogen and niobium content varying from 10 -3 to 1 wt %, and for 800-1300 0 C temperature range. The results obtained were compared with experimental data from literature, and showed a good agreement. Using those equations, it was developed an algorithm to calculate the solubility of niobium in austenite in the presence of niobium carbonitride (NbC sub(x) N sub(y)). The results obtained by this method were compared with experimental data, and also showed a good agreement. (Author) [pt

  9. Reclamation of niobium compounds from ionic liquid electrochemical polishing of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wixtrom, Alex I. [Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA (United States); Buhler, Jessica E. [Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA (United States); Reece, Charles E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M. [Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Recent research has shown that choline chloride (vitamin B4)-based solutions can be used as a greener alternative to acid-based electrochemical polishing solutions. This study demonstrated a successful method for electrochemical deposition of niobium compounds onto the surface of copper substrates using a novel choline chloride-based ionic liquid. Niobium ions present in the ionic liquid solution were dissolved into the solution prior to deposition via electrochemical polishing of solid niobium. A black coating was clearly visible on the surface of the Cu following deposition. This coating was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF). This ionic liquid-based electrochemical deposition method effectively recycles previously dissolved niobium from electrochemical polishing of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities.

  10. Morphology study of niobium pentoxide; Estudo da morfologia do pentoxido de niobio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, R.P.P.; Panta, P.C.; Araujo, A.O. de; Bergmann, C.P., E-mail: pantaromero@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (LACER/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Laboratorio de Materiais Ceramicos

    2016-07-01

    Currently, Niobium pentoxide (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}) has been studied due to physical properties and their use in obtaining electronic ceramics, optical lenses, pH sensors, special filters for TV receivers, among other applications. This study investigated the morphology of the niobium pentoxide obtained by hydrothermal synthesis from the precursor pentachloride niobium (NbCl{sub 5}), where the synthesis was carried out at a temperature of 150 and 200 °C for 130 min and the product obtained was calcined at temperatures 600, 800 and 1000 °C for 60 min. The following characterizations were performed for analysis of the material, among them, X-ray diffraction (XRD) for analysis of the crystal structure, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) for detecting the existing functional groups and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for morphology of material. As a result, different morphologies were obtained and consequently different niobium pentoxide properties studied. (author)

  11. In-house L-band niobium single cell cavities at KEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Yoshiharu; Funahashi, Yoshisato; Koizumi, Susumu; Saito, Kenji; Noguchi, Shuichi; Kako, Eiji; Shishido, Toshio

    1993-01-01

    For the TESLA (TeV Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator) as an energy frontier accelerator of the next generation improving the performance of the niobium superconducting cavities is the most important issue and much reduction of fabrication cost of cavities is another key. Since manufacturing of niobium material requires hard techniques due to the easily oxidizable metal, fabrication of niobium cavities has been conducted in only companies providing enough equipments in Japan. KEK has accumulated the fabrication technics such as forming method by deep drawing, trimming, centering of beam tubes, electron beam welding and measurement of manufacturing error so on. We made in-house L-band single cell cavities using these technologies. In this paper we present these manufacturing of the niobium cavities and estimate the fabrication cost as exactly as possible. The manufacturing error is also described. (author)

  12. Synthesis of coral-like tantalum oxide films via anodization in mixed organic-inorganic electrolytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbin Yu

    Full Text Available We report a simple method to fabricate nano-porous tantalum oxide films via anodization with Ta foils as the anode at room temperature. A mixture of ethylene glycol, phosphoric acid, NH4F and H2O was used as the electrolyte where the nano-porous tantalum oxide could be synthesized by anodizing a tantalum foil for 1 h at 20 V in a two-electrode configuration. The as-prepared porous film exhibited a continuous, uniform and coral-like morphology. The diameters of pores ranged from 30 nm to 50 nm. The pores interlaced each other and the depth was about 150 nm. After calcination, the as-synthesized amorphous tantalum oxide could be crystallized to the orthorhombic crystal system. As observed in photocatalytic experiments, the coral-like tantalum oxide exhibited a higher photocatalytic activity for the degradation of phenol than that with a compact surface morphology, and the elimination rate of phenol increased by 66.7%.

  13. Investigating the oxidation mechanism of tantalum nanoparticles at high heating rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLisio, Jeffery B.; Wang, Xizheng; Wu, Tao; Egan, Garth C.; Jacob, Rohit J.; Zachariah, Michael R.

    2017-12-01

    Reduced diffusion length scales and increased specific surface areas of nanosized metal fuels have recently demonstrated increased reaction rates for these systems, increasing their relevance in a wide variety of applications. The most commonly employed metal fuel, aluminum, tends to oxidize rapidly near its melting point (660 °C) in addition to undergoing a phase change of the nascent oxide shell. To further expand on the understanding of nanosized metal fuel oxidation, tantalum nanoparticles were studied due to their high melting point (3017 °C) in comparison to aluminum. Both traditional slow heating rate and in-situ high heating rate techniques were used to probe the oxidation of tantalum nanoparticles in oxygen containing environments in addition to nanothermite mixtures. When oxidized by gas phase oxygen, the oxide shell of the tantalum nanoparticles rapidly crystallized creating cracks that may attribute to enhanced oxygen diffusion into the particle. In the case of tantalum based nanothermites, oxide shell crystallization was shown to induce reactive sintering with the metal oxide resulting in a narrow range of ignition temperatures independent of the metal oxide used. The oxidation mechanism was modeled using the Deal-Grove model to extract rate parameters, and theoretical burn times for tantalum based nanocomposites were calculated.

  14. Tribological performance of polycrystalline tantalum-carbide-incorporated diamond films on silicon substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Mahtab; Rana, Anwar Manzoor; Ahmed, E.; Malik, Abdul Sattar; Shah, Z. A.; Ahmad, Naseeb; Mehtab, Ujala; Raza, Rizwan

    2018-05-01

    Polycrystalline tantalum-carbide-incorporated diamond coatings have been made on unpolished side of Si (100) wafer by hot filament chemical vapor deposition process. Morphology of the coatings has been found to vary from (111) triangular-facetted to predominantly (111) square-faceted by increasing the concentration of tantalum carbide. The results have been compared to those of a diamond reference coating with no tantalum content. An increase in roughness has been observed with the increase of tantalum carbide (TaC) due to change in morphology of the diamond films. It is noticed that roughness of the coatings increases as grains become more square-faceted. It is found that diamond coatings involving tantalum carbide are not as resistant as diamond films with no TaC content and the coefficient of friction for such coatings with microcrystalline grains can be manipulated to 0·33 under high vacuum of 10-7 Torr. Such a low friction coefficient value enhances tribological behavior of unpolished Si substrates and can possibly be used in sliding applications.

  15. Addition of oxygen to and distribution of oxides in tantalum alloy T-111 at low concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecura, S.

    1975-01-01

    Oxygen was added at 820 and 990 C at an oxygen pressure of about .0003 torr. The technique permitted predetermined and reproducible oxygen doping of the tantalum alloy (T-111). Based on the temperature dependency of the doping reaction, it was concluded that the initial rates of oxygen pickup are probably controlled by solution of oxygen into the T-111 lattice. Although hafnium oxides are more stable than those of tantalum or tungsten, analyses of extracted residues indicate that the tantalum and tungsten oxides predominate in the as-doped specimens, presumably because of the higher concentrations of tantalum and tungsten in the alloy. However, high-temperature annealing promotes gettering of dissolved oxygen and oxygen from other oxides to form hafnium oxides. Small amounts of tantalum and tungsten oxides were still present after high temperature annealing. Tungsten oxide (WO3) volatilizes slightly from the surface of T-111 at 990 C but not at 820 C. The vaporization of WO3 has no apparent effect on the doping reaction.

  16. The influence of tungsten alloying on the mechanical properties of tantalum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourdin, W.H.; Lassila, D.H.; LeBlanc, M.M.; Shields, A.L.

    1994-02-03

    In mechanical tests of tantalum-tungsten alloys with nominal tungsten contents between 0 and 10 wt % for strain rates between 0.000016 and 6800s{sup {minus}1} and temperatures between 77 and 400 K, the addition of tungsten noticeably reduces the strain-rate dependence of the flow stress of tantalum near yield. It also subtly alters the strain-rate behavior of the work hardening, making it more like that of copper, an fcc metal. These effects are reflected in the limiting strains for uniform plastic deformation calculated from our flow curves. For unalloyed tantalum, the instability strain appears to drop dramatically for strain rates in excess of approximately 0.005s{sup {minus}1}, whereas for tungsten bearing alloys, it remains unchanged or increases slightly. Tungsten alloys may therefore be preferable to unalloyed tantalum in applications that demand substantial ductility at high rates of strain. We briefly discuss possible mechanisms for plastic flow in tantalum and how they might be affected by tungsten additions to produce the effects we observe.

  17. Secondary electron emission from plasma processed accelerating cavity grade niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basovic, Milos

    by different techniques. Specifically, this work provides the results of SEY from the plasma cleaned cavity grade niobium (Nb) samples. Pure niobium is currently the material of choice for the fabrication of Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities. The effect of plasma processing with two different gases will be examined in two groups of samples. The first group of samples is made from cavity grade niobium. The second group of samples is made from the same material, but include a welded joint made by electron beam welding, since in niobium SRF cavities the peak electric and magnetic field are seen in close proximity to the welded joints. Both groups of samples will be exposed to nitrogen (N2) and a mixture of argon with oxygen (Ar/O2) plasma. It is the goal of this research to determine the SEY on these two groups of samples before and after plasma processing as a function of the energy of primary electrons. The SEY as a function of the angle of incidence of the primary electrons is tested on the samples treated with Ar/O2 plasma.

  18. Recent Niobium Developments for High Strength Steel Energy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansto, Steven G.

    Niobium-containing high strength steel materials have been developed for oil and gas pipelines, offshore platforms, nuclear plants, boilers and alternative energy applications. Recent research and the commercialization of alternative energy applications such as windtower structural supports and power transmission gear components provide enhanced performance. Through the application of these Nb-bearing steels in demanding energy-related applications, the designer and end user experience improved toughness at low temperature, excellent fatigue resistance and fracture toughness and excellent weldability. These enhancements provide structural engineers the opportunity to further improve the structural design and performance. For example, through the adoption of these Nb-containing structural materials, several design-manufacturing companies are initiating new windtower designs operating at higher energy efficiency, lower cost, and improved overall material design performance.

  19. Niobium Application, Metallurgy and Global Trends in Pressure Vessel Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansto, Steven G.

    Niobium-containing high strength steel materials have been developed for a variety of pressure vessel applications. Through the application of these Nb-bearing steels in demanding applications, the designer and end user experience improved toughness at low temperature, excellent fatigue resistance and fracture toughness and excellent weldability. These enhancements provide structural engineers the opportunity to further improve the pressure vessel design and performance. The Nb-microalloy alloy designs also result in reduced operational production cost at the steel operation, thereby embracing the value-added attribute Nb provides to both the producer and the end user throughout the supply chain. For example, through the adoption of these Nb-containing structural materials, several design-manufacturing companies are considering improved designs which offer improved manufacturability, lower overall cost and better life cycle performance.

  20. Coulometric titration of niobium in 1F sulfuric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pannu, S.S.

    1975-01-01

    A coulometric titration at constant current has been devised for Nb in 1F sulfuric acid. The titration was based on the oxidation of Nb(III) to Nb(V) by Fe(III) electrogenerated at a graphite anode. Both potentiometric and amperometric end points were used. The Nb(V) was prior reduced at a mercury cathode by exhaustive electrolysis at a current density of 15 ma/mc 2 for at least 10 hr. Ta,V,Ti and a working platinum anode interfered, but the separation of the potentials of Nb(V)/Nb(III) and Ti(IV)/Ti(III) permitted the titration of first Nb and then Ti. The average error for the titration of 0.30 to 13.00 mg of niobium in 100 ml of 1F sulfuric acid was + 0.57%. (author)

  1. Modified process for refining niobium by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinatti, D.G.; Takano, C.

    1982-01-01

    The experimental results, thermodynamic equilibrium and kinetic theory of the metal/gas interaction in refractory metals are reviewed. The adsorption and desorption of nitrogen, hydrogen and CO are reversible, whereas those of oxygen are irreversible, with adsorption of an oxygen atom and volatilisation of the metal oxide. Based upon this fact, a new electron beam refining technology is proposed for niobium, consisting of four points: preparation of an electrode by aluminothermic reduction; zone refining in the first melt; kinetic refining in subsequent melts and compact design of the refining plant. Experimental results from a 300 kW pilot plant were in complete agreement with the technology proposed, giving 2.4 times the productivity predicted by the conventional technology. (Author) [pt

  2. The use of niobium based catalysts for liquid fuel production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reguera Frank Martin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic properties of niobium based catalysts were investigated in the conversion of oleic acid to liquid fuels at atmospheric pressure and at 623 K. The catalytic tests were performed in a fixed bed and continuous flow reactor using an acid to catalyst ratio equal to 4 and N2 as carrier gas. The reaction products were analyzed by gas chromatography and acidity measurements. NH3 temperature programmed desorption, N2 adsorption-desorption (BET method and Xray diffraction were also performed in order to determine the structural and acidic properties of the catalysts. From the catalytic tests, it was detected the formation of compounds in the range of gasoline, diesel and lubricant oils. Higher catalytic activity and selectivity for diesel fuel were observed for the catalysts NbOPO4 and H3PO4/Nb2O5 that possesses higher acidities and surface areas.

  3. Fluoride and oxyfluoride compounds and niobium, antimony and tellurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbin, Odile.

    1982-02-01

    This paper is a detailed bibliographic report on fluoride and oxyfluoride compounds and niobium, antimony and tellurium oxides. Compounds identified to date are: NbF 3 , NbF 4 , NbF 5 , NbF 6 , NbO 2 F, NbOF 3 , Nb 3 O 7 F, SbF 3 , SbF 5 , SbOF, SbOF 3 , SbO 2 F, Sb 2 O 3 , Sb 2 O 4 , TeF 4 , Te 2 F 10 , TeF 6 , Te 2 OF 10 , Te 3 O 2 F 14 , Te 6 F 26 O 5 , TeO, TeO 2 , TeO 3 . Synthesis processes, physical properties and chemical properties are given for each of the above compounds [fr

  4. Thermal conductivity of niobium single crystals in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladun, C.; Vinzelberg, H.

    1980-01-01

    The thermal conductivity in longitudinal magnetic fields up to 5 T and in the temperature range 3.5 to 15 K is measured in two high purity niobium single crystals having residual resistivity ratios of 22700 and 19200 and orientations of the rod axis [110] and [100]. The investigations show that by means of the longitudinal magnetic field the thermal conductivity may decrease only to a limiting value. In the crystal directions [110] and [100] for the ratio of the thermal conductivity in zero field and the thermal conductivity in the saturation field the temperature-independent factors 1.92 and 1.27, respectively, are determined. With the aid of these factors the thermal conductivity in the normal state is evaluated from the measured values of thermal conductivity below Tsub(c) in the magnetic field. The different conduction and scattering mechanisms are discussed. (author)

  5. Fast-neutron total and scattering cross sections of niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F.

    1982-07-01

    Neutron total cross sections of niobium were measured from approx. = 0.7 to 4.5 MeV at intervals of less than or equal to 50 keV with broad resolution. Differential-elastic-scattering cross sections were measured from approx. = 1.5 to 4.0 MeV at intervals of 0.1 to 0.2 MeV and at 10 to 20 scattering angles distributed between approx. = 20 and 160 degrees. Inelastically-scattered neutrons, corresponding to the excitation of levels at: 788 +- 23, 982 +- 17, 1088 +- 27, 1335 +- 35, 1504 +- 30, 1697 +- 19, 1971 +- 22, 2176 +- 28, 2456 +- (.), and 2581 +- (.) keV, were observed. An optical-statistical model, giving a good description of the observables, was deduced from the measured differential-elastic-scattering cross sections. The experimental-results were compared with the respective evaluated quantities given in ENDF/B-V

  6. Secondary Electron Emission from Plasma Processed Accelerating Cavity Grade Niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basovic, Milos [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    by different techniques. Specifically, this work provides the results of SEY from the plasma cleaned cavity grade niobium (Nb) samples. Pure niobium is currently the material of choice for the fabrication of Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities. The effect of plasma processing with two different gases will be examined in two groups of samples. The first group of samples is made from cavity grade niobium. The second group of samples is made from the same material, but include a welded joint made by electron beam welding, since in niobium SRF cavities the peak electric and magnetic field are seen in close proximity to the welded joints. Both groups of samples will be exposed to nitrogen (N2) and a mixture of argon with oxygen (Ar/O2) plasma. It is the goal of this research to determine the SEY on these two groups of samples before and after plasma processing as a function of the energy of primary electrons. The SEY as a function of the angle of incidence of the primary electrons is tested on the samples treated with Ar/O2 plasma.

  7. Fast-neutron total and scattering cross sections of niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F.

    1982-07-01

    Neutron total cross sections of niobium were measured from approx. = 0.7 to 4.5 MeV at intervals of less than or equal to 50 keV with broad resolution. Differential-elastic-scattering cross sections were measured from approx. = 1.5 to 4.0 MeV at intervals of 0.1 to 0.2 MeV and at 10 to 20 scattering angles distributed between approx. = 20 and 160 degrees. Inelastically-scattered neutrons, corresponding to the excitation of levels at: 788 +- 23, 982 +- 17, 1088 +- 27, 1335 +- 35, 1504 +- 30, 1697 +- 19, 1971 +- 22, 2176 +- 28, 2456 +- (.), and 2581 +- (.) keV, were observed. An optical-statistical model, giving a good description of the observables, was deduced from the measured differential-elastic-scattering cross sections. The experimental-results were compared with the respective evaluated quantities given in ENDF/B-V.

  8. X-ray spectral analysis of niobium hydroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khabeev, I.A.; Belkina, V.A.; Makarova, R.V.; Mel' nikova, R.A.; Smagunova, A.N.

    1986-02-01

    The authors have derived an x-ray method of determining Ta/sub 2/O/sub 5/, TiO/sub 2/, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Nb/sub 2/O/sub 5/, C1 and SiO2 with a KRF-18 quantometer. The method should provide accuracy in determining these elements characterized by relative derivations. The main components of niobium hydroxide were ground for improved determination. The method allows one to analyze a sample in 30 min. In a six hour working day, an assistant can analyze up to 25 samples. The time required for one sample in the chemical method is about 30 hours.

  9. Metastable decay of photoionized niobium clusters: Evaporation vs fission fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, S.K.; Liu, K.; Riley, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    The metastable decay of photoionized niobium clusters (Nb/sub n/ + ) has been observed in a newly constructed cluster beam machine. The decay manifests itself in the time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrum as an asymmetric broadening of daughter ion peaks. Pulsed ion extraction has been used to measure the decay rate constants and to establish the mechanism of the fragmentation, evaporation and/or fission of the photoionized clusters. It is found that within the experimental time window evaporation dominates for the smaller clusters (n 6 sec -1 . The average kinetic energy release is also determined and is found to be on the order of 5 MeV. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  10. Mechanical Behavior of Additively Manufactured Uranium-6 wt. pct. Niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, A. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wraith, M. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Burke, S. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hamza, A. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brown, D. W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Clausen, B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hsiung, L. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McKeown, J. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lindvall, R. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sedillo, E. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Teslich, N. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Torres, S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Urabe, D. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Freeman, D. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Alexander, P. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Iniguez, M. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ryerson, F. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ancheta, D. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lotscher, J. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Young, E. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Evans, C. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Florando, J. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gallegos, G. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Margraff, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hrousis, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Campbell, G. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-15

    This report describes an effort to process uranium-6 weight% niobium using laser powder bed fusion. The chemistry, crystallography, microstructure and mechanical response resulting from this process are discussed with particular emphasis on the effect of the laser powder bed fusion process on impurities. In an effort to achieve homogenization and uniform mechanical behavior from different builds, as well as to induce a more conventional loading response, we explore post-processing heat treatments on this complex alloy. Elevated temperature heat treatment for recrystallization is evaluated and the effect of recrystallization on mechanical behavior in laser powder bed fusion processed U-6Nb is discussed. Wrought-like mechanical behavior and grain sizes are achieved through post-processing and are reported herein.

  11. Temperature Mapping of Nitrogen-doped Niobium Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makita, Junki [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Dhakal, Pashupati [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    It was recently shown that diffusing nitrogen on the inner surface of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities at high temperature can improve the quality factor of the niobium cavity. However, a reduction of the quench field is also typically found. To better understand the location of rf losses and quench, we used a thermometry system to map the temperature of the outer surface of ingot Nb cavities after nitrogen doping and electropolishing. Surface temperature of the cavities was recorded while increasing the rf power and also during the quenching. The results of thermal mapping showed no precursor heating on the cavities and quenching to be ignited near the equator where the surface magnetic field is maximum. Hot-spots at the equator area during multipacting were also detected by thermal mapping.

  12. Corrosion of alloys of the niobium--titanium--aluminium system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva, V.V.; Alekseeva, E.L.; Dontsov, S.N.; Moiseeva, I.S.

    The mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of niobium--titanium--aluminum alloys in 20 percent HCl and 40--75 percent H 2 SO 4 at 40 and 100 0 C are considered. Current density vs potential and corrosion rate vs potential potentiostatic curves plotted in 75 percent H 2 SO 4 at 140 0 C for the alloys with different titanium contents at a constant content of aluminum and also for alloys with a constant titanium content at different contents of aluminum are given. It was shown that the corrosion resistance of the alloys in 75 percent H 2 SO 4 at 140 0 C is an exponential function of the atomic content of the alloying components (Ti, Al) in them; aluminum vitiates the corrosion resistance very strongly

  13. Characterization and sintering of ATR aluminia from niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, N.H.

    1987-01-01

    The characterization of resultante slag from Aluminothermic Reduction (ATR) process to obtain metallic niobium is presented. The slag was characterized for concentration and phases of aluminia by X-ray diffractometry. The results show that 70% of the slag is constituted by α aluminia. The lixiviation and calcination of the slag increased the α aluminia concentration to 95%, the slag was used for producing samples to be burning in three furnaces: electrical resistance furnace in the air, and two furnaces in the vacuum. The burned samples were characterized by microscopy, ultrasonic analysis, density measurements and X-ray diffractometry. The sintering in the vacuum is possible because the samples burned in vacuum presented major density. The formation of NbO 2 and mullite was observed, by X-ray diffractometry. The data from optical microscopy, density measurements and X-ray diffractometry show high porosity. (M.C.K.) [pt

  14. Porous tantalum coatings prepared by vacuum plasma spraying enhance bmscs osteogenic differentiation and bone regeneration in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze Tang

    Full Text Available Tantalum, as a potential metallic implant biomaterial, is attracting more and more attention because of its excellent anticorrosion and biocompatibility. However, its significantly high elastic modulus and large mechanical incompatibility with bone tissue make it unsuitable for load-bearing implants. In this study, porous tantalum coatings were first successfully fabricated on titanium substrates by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS, which would exert the excellent biocompatibility of tantalum and alleviate the elastic modulus of tantalum for bone tissue. We evaluated cytocompatibility and osteogenesis activity of the porous tantalum coatings using human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs and its ability to repair rabbit femur bone defects. The morphology and actin cytoskeletons of hBMSCs were observed via electron microscopy and confocal, and the cell viability, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation potential of hBMSCs were examined quantitatively by PrestoBlue assay, Ki67 immunofluorescence assay, real-time PCR technology and ALP staining. For in vivo detection, the repaired femur were evaluated by histomorphology and double fluorescence labeling 3 months postoperation. Porous tantalum coating surfaces promoted hBMSCs adhesion, proliferation, osteogenesis activity and had better osseointegration and faster new bone formation rate than titanium coating control. Our observation suggested that the porous tantalum coatings had good biocompatibility and could enhance osseoinductivity in vitro and promote new bone formation in vivo. The porous tantalum coatings prepared by VPS is a promising strategy for bone regeneration.

  15. Durability of adhesive bonds to uranium alloys, tungsten, tantalum, and thorium. [U--Nb; Ta--10 percent W

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childress, F. G.

    1975-06-14

    Long-term durability of epoxy bonds to alloys of uranium (U-Nb and Mulberry), nickel-plated uranium, thorium, tungsten, tantalum, tantalum--10 percent tungsten, and aluminum was evaluated. Significant strengths remain after ten years of aging; however, there is some evidence of bond deterioration with uranium alloys and thorium stored in ambient laboratory air.

  16. Superconducting properties and uniaxial strain characteristics of Nb3Sn fiber-reinforced superconductors with tantalum reinforcement fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Kazuaki; Umeda, Masaichi; Agatsuma, Koh; Tateishi, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    We have been developing fiber-reinforced superconductors (FRS) for high-field and large-scale magnets. Tungsten fibers have been selected as the reinforcement fiber for FRS so far because tungsten has the highest elastic modulus of approximately 400 GPa which can minimize the strain from electromagnetic force. The preparation process of FRS consists of sputtering deposition and heat treatment because it may be difficult to apply drawing methods to materials of high-elastic modulus such as tungsten. Tantalum has high elastic modulus of 178 GPa and its thermal expansion coefficient that is closer to that of Nb 3 Sn than tungsten's, which means prestrain in Nb 3 Sn in FRS is reduced by adopting tantalum fibers. Tantalum has been used as barriers between bronze and copper in conventional Nb 3 Sn superconductors which are usually prepared with drawing process despite of the tantalum's high elastic modulus. That implies drawing process may be applied to prepare FRS with tantalum reinforcement fibers. In this paper, FRS using tantalum fibers prepared with sputtering process are described with making comparison with FRS of tungsten to clarify the basic properties of FRS using tantalum fibers. Depth profiles in Nb 3 Sn layer in FRS were measured to examine reaction between superconducting layers and reinforcement fibers. Superconducting properties including strain and stress characteristics were shown. Those data will contribute to design of FRS using tantalum reinforcement fibers with adopts the drawing processes. (author)

  17. Gradient Nanostructured Tantalum by Thermal-Mechanical Ultrasonic Impact Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Jong-Min; Lee, Keun-Oh; Amanov, Auezhan

    2018-03-20

    Microstructural evolution and wear performance of Tantalum (Ta) treated by ultrasonic nanocrystalline surface modification (UNSM) at 25 and 1000 °C were reported. The UNSM treatment modified a surface along with subsurface layer with a thickness in the range of 20 to 150 µm, which depends on the UNSM treatment temperature, via the surface severe plastic deformation (S²PD) method. The cross-sectional microstructure of the specimens was observed by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) in order to confirm the microstructural alteration in terms of effective depth and refined grain size. The surface hardness measurement results, including depth profile, revealed that the hardness of the UNSM-treated specimens at both temperatures was increased in comparison with those of the untreated ones. The increase in UNSM treatment temperature led to a further increase in hardness. Moreover, both the UNSM-treated specimens with an increased hardness resulted in a higher resistance to wear in comparison with those of the untreated ones under dry conditions. The increase in hardness and induced compressive residual stress that depend on the formation of severe plastically deformed layer with the refined nano-grains are responsible for the enhancement in wear resistance. The findings of this study may be implemented in response to various industries that are related to strength improvement and wear enhancement issues of Ta.

  18. Investigation of Tantalum Recycling by Electron Beam Melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Vutova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Investigations are carried out and obtained experimental and theoretical data for tantalum scrap recycling by electron beam melting (EBM is presented in this paper. Different thermal treatment process conditions are realized and results are discussed. A chemical analysis is performed and refining mechanisms for electron beam (EB refining of Ta are discussed. For the performed experiments the best purification of Ta (99.96 is obtained at 21.6 kW beam power for a melting time of 3 min. A statistical approach is applied for estimation of the material losses and the liquid pool characteristics based on experimentally-obtained data. The aim is to improve the EBM and choosing optimal process conditions, depending on the concrete characteristic requirements. Model-based quality optimization of electron beam melting and refining (EBMR processes of Ta is considered related to the optimization of the molten pool parameters, connected to the occurring refining processes, and to minimal material losses. Optimization of the process of EBM of Ta is based on overall criteria, giving compromised solutions, depending on the requirements concerning the quality of the performed products. The accumulated data, the obtained results, and the optimization statistical approach allow us to formulate requirements on the process parameters.

  19. Hydrocode analysis of lateral stress gauges in shocked tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, E. J.; Winter, R. E.

    2007-01-01

    Experiments published by other workers, on the resistance change of manganin stress gauges embedded in a lateral orientation in tantalum targets shocked to a range of stresses, have been analysed using an adaptive mesh refinement hydrocode. It was found that for all of the four experiments the shape of the time profile of the computed lateral stress in the mounting layer closely matched the shape of the experimental lateral stress profiles. However, the calculated lateral stresses at the gauge location in the mounting layer are significantly less than the lateral stresses that would have been produced in the target if no gauge had been present. The perturbation caused by the gauge increased as the strength of the applied shock increased. When the perturbations are taken into account values of flow stress that are significantly smaller than those reported in the original research paper are derived. The work shows that the lateral gauge technique can give valuable information on strength provided high resolution simulation is used to compensate for the perturbations caused by the gauges

  20. Cross-scale MD simulations of dynamic strength of tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulatov, Vasily

    2017-06-01

    Dislocations are ubiquitous in metals where their motion presents the dominant and often the only mode of plastic response to straining. Over the last 25 years computational prediction of plastic response in metals has relied on Discrete Dislocation Dynamics (DDD) as the most fundamental method to account for collective dynamics of moving dislocations. Here we present first direct atomistic MD simulations of dislocation-mediated plasticity that are sufficiently large and long to compute plasticity response of single crystal tantalum while tracing the underlying dynamics of dislocations in all atomistic details. Where feasible, direct MD simulations sidestep DDD altogether thus reducing uncertainties of strength predictions to those of the interatomic potential. In the specific context of shock-induced material dynamics, the same MD models predict when, under what conditions and how dislocations interact and compete with other fundamental mechanisms of dynamic response, e.g. twinning, phase-transformations, fracture. In collaboration with: Luis Zepeda-Ruiz, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Alexander Stukowski, Technische Universitat Darmstadt; Tomas Oppelstrup, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Short term creep rupture predictions for tantalum alloy T-111

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    A knowledge of the short term creep rupture behavior of Tantalum alloy T-111 is necessary to predict device integrity in the heat source section of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) at the end of service life, in the event of a fuel fire. High pressures exist in RTGs near the end of service life, these are caused by gas generation resulting from radioactive decay of the nuclear fuel. The internal pressure exerts a significant hoop stress on the T-111 alloy structural containment member. This paper analyses the short term creep behavior (rupture times up to ∼2x10 3 hrs.) of cold worked (CW) T-111 alloy, using the existing data of Stephenson (1967). Corellations for the time to rupture, time to 1% strain and minimum creep rate have been obtained from this data using multivariable linear regression analysis. These results are compared to other short term rupture data for T-111 alloy. Finally, at the stress/temperature levels relevant to the RTG fuel fire scenario near the end of service life, the rupture time correlation for T-111 alloy predicts a rupture time of approximately 100 hrs

  2. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of tantalum plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Sidra; Bashir, Shazia; Hayat, Asma; Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M.; Faizan–ul-Haq [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2013-07-15

    Laser Induced Breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of Tantalum (Ta) plasma has been investigated. For this purpose Q-switched Nd: YAG laser pulses (λ∼ 1064 nm, τ∼ 10 ns) of maximum pulse energy of 100 mJ have been employed as an ablation source. Ta targets were exposed under the ambient environment of various gases of Ar, mixture (CO{sub 2}: N{sub 2}: He), O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and He under various filling pressure. The emission spectrum of Ta is observed by using LIBS spectrometer. The emission intensity, excitation temperature, and electron number density of Ta plasma have been evaluated as a function of pressure for various gases. Our experimental results reveal that the optical emission intensity, the electron temperature and density are strongly dependent upon the nature and pressure of ambient environment. The SEM analysis of the ablated Ta target has also been carried out to explore the effect of ambient environment on the laser induced grown structures. The growth of grain like structures in case of molecular gases and cone-formation in case of inert gases is observed. The evaluated plasma parameters by LIBS analysis such as electron temperature and the electron density are well correlated with the surface modification of laser irradiated Ta revealed by SEM analysis.

  3. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of tantalum plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Sidra; Bashir, Shazia; Hayat, Asma; Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M.; Faizan–ul-Haq

    2013-01-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of Tantalum (Ta) plasma has been investigated. For this purpose Q-switched Nd: YAG laser pulses (λ∼ 1064 nm, τ∼ 10 ns) of maximum pulse energy of 100 mJ have been employed as an ablation source. Ta targets were exposed under the ambient environment of various gases of Ar, mixture (CO 2 : N 2 : He), O 2 , N 2 , and He under various filling pressure. The emission spectrum of Ta is observed by using LIBS spectrometer. The emission intensity, excitation temperature, and electron number density of Ta plasma have been evaluated as a function of pressure for various gases. Our experimental results reveal that the optical emission intensity, the electron temperature and density are strongly dependent upon the nature and pressure of ambient environment. The SEM analysis of the ablated Ta target has also been carried out to explore the effect of ambient environment on the laser induced grown structures. The growth of grain like structures in case of molecular gases and cone-formation in case of inert gases is observed. The evaluated plasma parameters by LIBS analysis such as electron temperature and the electron density are well correlated with the surface modification of laser irradiated Ta revealed by SEM analysis

  4. Multistate Memristive Tantalum Oxide Devices for Ternary Arithmetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wonjoo; Chattopadhyay, Anupam; Siemon, Anne; Linn, Eike; Waser, Rainer; Rana, Vikas

    2016-11-01

    Redox-based resistive switching random access memory (ReRAM) offers excellent properties to implement future non-volatile memory arrays. Recently, the capability of two-state ReRAMs to implement Boolean logic functionality gained wide interest. Here, we report on seven-states Tantalum Oxide Devices, which enable the realization of an intrinsic modular arithmetic using a ternary number system. Modular arithmetic, a fundamental system for operating on numbers within the limit of a modulus, is known to mathematicians since the days of Euclid and finds applications in diverse areas ranging from e-commerce to musical notations. We demonstrate that multistate devices not only reduce the storage area consumption drastically, but also enable novel in-memory operations, such as computing using high-radix number systems, which could not be implemented using two-state devices. The use of high radix number system reduces the computational complexity by reducing the number of needed digits. Thus the number of calculation operations in an addition and the number of logic devices can be reduced.

  5. On the stabilization of niobium(V) solutions by zirconium(IV) and hafnium(IV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, E.; Bjerre, A.B.

    1992-01-01

    Niobium cannot be separated from zirconium or hafnium when these elements occur together in solution with common anions such as chloride and sulphate. This is ascribed to the co-polymerization of niobium(V) and the hydrolysed ionic species of zirconium(IV) and hafnium(IV) to form colloidal partic...... particles. In hydrochloric acid the particles are positively charged, whereas in sulphate solution the Zr- and Hf-sulphate complexes confer a negative charge. The two cases are considered separately....

  6. Plasma cleaning: A new possible treatment for niobium superconducting cavity after nitrogen doping

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ziqin; Lu, Xiangyang; Xie, Datao; Lin, Lin; Zhou, Kui; Zhao, Jifei; Yang, Deyu; Tan, Weiwei

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen doping treatment with the subsequent electropolishing (EP) of the niobium superconducting cavity can significantly increase the cavity's quality factor up to a factor of 3. But the process of the EP removal may reintroduce hydrogen in the cavity surface, which may influence the cavity's radio frequency performance. Plasma cleaning study on niobium samples with gas mixtures of argon and oxgen intended to remove contaminations (hydrocarbons and micronicdust particles) from cavity surfa...

  7. 10-fold enhancement in light-driven water splitting using niobium oxynitride microcone array films

    KAUST Repository

    Shaheen, Basamat

    2016-03-26

    We demonstrate, for the first time, the synthesis of highly ordered niobium oxynitride microcones as an attractive class of materials for visible-light-driven water splitting. As revealed by the ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), photoelectrochemical and transient photocurrent measurements, the microcones showed enhanced performance (~1000% compared to mesoporous niobium oxide) as photoanodes for water splitting with remarkable stability and visible light activity. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Initial Assessment of CSA Group Niobium Boron Based Coatings on 4340 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    for protection of high-strength steel . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Niobium-Boron Based Coatings; 4340 Steel ; CSA Group 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...Technical Report ARWSB-TR-17026 Initial Assessment of CSA Group Niobium-Boron Based Coatings on 4340 Steel C.P. Mulligan... Steel 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) C.P. Mulligan 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  9. Niobium quarter-wave cavity for the New Delhi booster linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Roy, A.; Potukuchi, P.N. [Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi (India)

    1997-09-01

    This paper reports the completion of development of a 97 Mhz niobium coaxial quarter-wave cavity to be used in a booster linac for the New Delhi 16UD pellatron electrostatic accelerator. A prototype cavity, which incorporates a niobium-bellows tuning device, has been completed and operated at 4.2 K at accelerating gradients above 4 MV/m for extended periods of time.

  10. Niobium quarter-wave cavity for the New Delhi booster linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.; Roy, A.; Potukuchi, P.N.

    1997-01-01

    This paper reports the completion of development of a 97 Mhz niobium coaxial quarter-wave cavity to be used in a booster linac for the New Delhi 16UD pellatron electrostatic accelerator. A prototype cavity, which incorporates a niobium-bellows tuning device, has been completed and operated at 4.2 K at accelerating gradients above 4 MV/m for extended periods of time

  11. Corrosion behavior of niobium coated 304 stainless steel in acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, T.J., E-mail: tjpan@cczu.edu.cn [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Photovolatic Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Material Surface Technology, Changzhou 213164 (China); Chen, Y.; Zhang, B. [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Photovolatic Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China); Hu, J. [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Photovolatic Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Material Surface Technology, Changzhou 213164 (China); Li, C. [Light Industry College of Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China)

    2016-04-30

    Highlights: • The Nb coating produced by HEMAA offers good protection for 304SS in acid solution. • The coating increases corrosion potential and induces decrease of corrosion rate. • The protection of coating is ascribed to the stability of Nb in acid solution. - Abstract: The niobium coating is fabricated on the surface of AISI Type 304 stainless steel (304SS) by using a high energy micro arc alloying technique in order to improvecorrosion resistance of the steel against acidic environments. The electrochemical corrosion resistance of the niobium coating in 0.7 M sulfuric acid solutions is evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, potentiodynamic polarization and the open circuit potential versus time. Electrochemical measurements indicate that the niobium coating increases the free corrosion potential of the substrate by 110 mV and a reduction in the corrosion rate by two orders of magnitude compared to the substrate alone. The niobium coating maintains large impedance and effectively offers good protection for the substrate during the long-term exposure tests, which is mainly ascribed to the niobium coating acting inhibiting permeation of corrosive species. Finally, the corresponding electrochemical impedance models are proposed to elucidate the corrosion resistance behavior of the niobium coating in acid solutions.

  12. Review of ingot niobium as a material for superconducting radiofrequency accelerating cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneisel, P.; Ciovati, G.; Dhakal, P.; Saito, K.; Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Myneni, G. R.

    2015-02-01

    As a result of collaboration between Jefferson Lab and niobium manufacturer Companhia Brasileira de Metalurgia e Mineração (CBMM), ingot niobium was explored as a possible material for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity fabrication. The first single cell cavity from large-grain high purity niobium was fabricated and successfully tested at Jefferson Lab in 2004. This work triggered research activities in other SRF laboratories around the world. Large-grain (LG) niobium became not only an interesting alternative material for cavity builders, but also material scientists and surface scientists were eager to participate in the development of this technology. Many single cell cavities made from material of different suppliers have been tested successfully and several multi-cell cavities have shown performances comparable to the best cavities made from standard fine-grain niobium. Several 9-cell cavities fabricated by Research Instruments and tested at DESY exceeded the best performing fine grain cavities with a record accelerating gradient of Eacc=45.6 MV/m. The quality factor of those cavities was also higher than that of fine-grain (FG) cavities processed with the same methods. Such performance levels push the state-of-the art of SRF technology and are of great interest for future accelerators. This contribution reviews the development of ingot niobium technology and highlights some of the differences compared to standard FG material and opportunities for further developments.

  13. Behavior of molybdenum in mixed-oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giacchetti, G.; Sari, C.

    1976-01-01

    Metallic molybdenum, Mo--Ru--Rh--Pd alloys, barium, zirconium, and tungsten were added to uranium and uranium--plutonium oxides by coprecipitation and mechanical mixture techniques. This material was treated in a thermal gradient similar to that existing in fuel during irradiation to study the behavior of molybdenum in an oxide matrix as a function of the O/(U + Pu) ratio and some added elements. Result of ceramographic and microprobe analysis shows that when the overall O/(U + Pu) ratio is less than 2, molybdenum and Mo--Ru--Rh--Pd alloy inclusions are present in the uranium--plutonium oxide matrix. If the O/(U + Pu) ratio is greater than 2, molybdenum oxidizes to MoO 2 , which is gaseous at a temperature approximately 1000 0 C. Molybdenum oxide vapor reacts with barium oxide and forms a compound that exists as a liquid phase in the columnar grain region. Molybdenum oxide also reacts with tungsten oxide (tungsten is often present as an impurity in the fuel) and forms a compound that contains approximately 40 wt percent of actinide metals. The apparent solubility of molybdenum in uranium and uranium--plutonium oxides, determined by electron microprobe, was found to be less than 250 ppM both for hypo- and hyperstoichiometric fuels

  14. Preparation of molybdenum oxide thin films by MOCVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, R. Martinez [Depto. de Ingenieria Metalurgica, ESIQIE-IPN, Mexico 07300, D.F. (Mexico); Garcia, J.R. Vargas [Depto. de Ingenieria Metalurgica, ESIQIE-IPN, Mexico 07300, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: rvargasga@ipn.mx; Santes, V. [CIIEMAD-IPN, Miguel Othon de Mendizabal 485, Mexico 07700, D.F. (Mexico); Gomez, E. [Instituto de Quimica-UNAM, Circuito Exterior-Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico 04510, D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-05-31

    In this study, molybdenum oxide films were prepared in a horizontal hot-wall MOCVD apparatus using molybdenum dioxide acetylacetonate as precursor. The molybdenum precursor was synthesized from acetylacetone and molybdenum oxide powder. Thermal gravimetric (TG) and differential thermal analyses (DTA) of the precursor suggested the formation of molybdenum oxides around 430 {sup o}C (703 K). Thus, a range of deposition temperatures varying from 350 to 630 {sup o}C (623-903 K) was explored to investigate the effects on the nature of the molybdenum oxide films. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that the films consisted of {alpha}-MoO{sub 3} phase at deposition temperatures ranging from 400 to 560 {sup o}C (673-833 K). Crystalline {alpha}-MoO{sub 3} films can be obtained from molybdenum dioxide acetylacetonate precursor, without need of a post-annealing treatment. The best crystalline quality was found in films having needle-like crystallites grown at deposition temperature of about 560 {sup o}C (833 K), which exhibit a strong (0 1 0) preferred orientation and a transparent visual appearance.

  15. Atomic layer deposition of molybdenum oxide using bis(tert-butylimido)bis(dimethylamido) molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertuch, Adam; Sundaram, Ganesh; Saly, Mark; Moser, Daniel; Kanjolia, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Molybdenum trioxide films have been deposited using thermal atomic layer deposition techniques with bis(tert-butylimido)bis(dimethylamido)molybdenum. Films were deposited at temperatures from 100 to 300 °C using ozone as the oxidant for the process. The Mo precursor was evaluated for thermal stability and volatility using thermogravimetric analysis and static vapor pressure measurements. Film properties were evaluated with ellipsometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and secondary electron microscopy. The growth rate per cycle was determined to extend from 0.3 to 2.4 Å/cycle with <4% nonuniformity (1-sigma) with-in-wafer across a 150 mm wafer for the investigated temperature range

  16. Recovery of metal values and hydrofluoric acid from tantalum and columbium waste sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielecki, E.; Romberger, K.; Bakke, B.; Hobin, M.A.; Clark, C.

    1992-01-01

    A metallurgical processing system for economically recovering metal values, such as columbium, tantalum, thorium, and uranium from dilute source solids, such as digestion sludges, by a series of steps including: (1) slurrying the source solids with dilute hydrofluoric acid to produce a solid phase and a liquid phase containing dissolved tantalum and columbium, then extracting tantalum and/or columbium from the liquid phase by means of a liquid ion-exchange process and then, additionally; (2) roasting the solid phase with sulfuric acid to recover and recycle hydrofluoric acid, leaching the roasted solids with dilute sulfuric acid to produce a disposable solid phase and a liquid phase containing thorium and uranium, and extracting thorium and uranium from the liquid phase by means of a liquid-liquid amine extraction process.

  17. The use of porous tantalum cages in the treatment of unremitting spondylodiscitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samo Karel Fokter

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Unsuccessful medical treatment of pyogenic multifocal spondylodiscitis including signs of sepsis and unremitting pain is challenging. The aim of our report was to present a case of multilevel spondylodiscitis successfully treated by posterior lumbar interbody fusion using porous tantalum cages. Case presentation: A 59-year-old male was diagnosed with spondylodiscitis at T8-T9 level. Although treated with antibiotics, the patient again presented with worsening of systemic signs of infection and back pain. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging studies revealed spondylodiscitis at L1 to S1 level. Posterior lumbar interbody bone fusion with tantalum cages from L1 to S1 was performed. The inflammation rapidly subsided. Computer tomography studies showed a stable construct at 24 months. Conclusion: Porous tantalum cages used in combination with transpedicular fixation seem to be a sound alternative to interbody devices made from other materials when treating spondylodiscitis cases without definite osseous destruction.

  18. Evaluation of Ferrite Chip Beads as Surge Current Limiters in Circuits with Tantalum Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Limiting resistors are currently required to be connected in series with tantalum capacitors to reduce the risk of surge current failures. However, application of limiting resistors decreases substantially the efficiency of the power supply systems. An ideal surge current limiting device should have a negligible resistance for DC currents and high resistance at frequencies corresponding to transients in tantalum capacitors. This work evaluates the possibility of using chip ferrite beads (FB) as such devices. Twelve types of small size FBs from three manufacturers were used to evaluate their robustness under soldering stresses and at high surge current spikes associated with transients in tantalum capacitors. Results show that FBs are capable to withstand current pulses that are substantially greater than the specified current limits. However, due to a sharp decrease of impedance with current, FBs do not reduce surge currents to the required level that can be achieved with regular resistors.

  19. An exploration in mineral supply chain mapping using tantalum as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Viruet, Yadira; Menzie, W. David; Papp, John F.; Yager, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    This report uses the supply chain of tantalum (Ta) to investigate the complexity of mineral and metal supply chains in general and show how they can be mapped. A supply chain is made up of all the manufacturers, suppliers, information networks, and so forth, that provide the materials and parts that go into making up a final product. The mineral portion of the supply chain begins with mineral material in the ground (the ore deposit); extends through a series of processes that include mining, beneficiation, processing (smelting and refining), semimanufacture, and manufacture; and continues through transformation of the mineral ore into concentrates, refined mineral commodities, intermediate forms (such as metals and alloys), component parts, and, finally, complex products. This study analyses the supply chain of tantalum beginning with minerals in the ground to many of the final goods that contain tantalum.

  20. Assembly of tantalum porous films with graded oxidation profile from size-selected nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vidyadhar; Grammatikopoulos, Panagiotis; Cassidy, Cathal; Benelmekki, Maria; Bohra, Murtaza; Hawash, Zafer; Baughman, Kenneth W.; Sowwan, Mukhles

    2014-05-01

    Functionally graded materials offer a way to improve the physical and chemical properties of thin films and coatings for different applications in the nanotechnology and biomedical fields. In this work, design and assembly of nanoporous tantalum films with a graded oxidation profile perpendicular to the substrate surface are reported. These nanoporous films are composed of size-selected, amorphous tantalum nanoparticles, deposited using a gas-aggregated magnetron sputtering system, and oxidized after coalescence, as samples evolve from mono- to multi-layered structures. Molecular dynamics computer simulations shed light on atomistic mechanisms of nanoparticle coalescence, which govern the films porosity. Aberration-corrected (S) TEM, GIXRD, AFM, SEM, and XPS were employed to study the morphology, phase and oxidation profiles of the tantalum nanoparticles, and the resultant films.

  1. Post-irradiation analysis of the tantalum container of an ISOLDE LBE target

    CERN Document Server

    Noah, E; Bruetsch, R; Catherall, R; Gavillet, D; Krbanjevic, J; Linder, H P; Martin, M; Neuhausen, J; Schumann, D; Stora, T; Zanini, L

    2012-01-01

    CERN-ISOLDE operates a range of oxides, carbides, refractory metal foils and liquid metal targets for the production of radioactive ion beams. Following irradiation with a pulsed beam of 1 GeV and 1.4 GeV protons at temperatures reaching 600 degrees C, the tantalum container of a liquid lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) target was examined. A thin layer of Pb/Bi was observed on the inner surface of the container. A sample of the surface prepared using the focused ion beam technique was investigated using SEM and EDX. Results show a higher concentration of bismuth at the interface with tantalum and micron-sized cracks in the tantalum filled with LBE. Implications of these results for the lifetime of the target container which has been known to fail under pulsed beam operation are discussed. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Amorphous molybdenum sulfides as hydrogen evolution catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Guio, Carlos G; Hu, Xile

    2014-08-19

    Providing energy for a population projected to reach 9 billion people within the middle of this century is one of the most pressing societal issues. Burning fossil fuels at a rate and scale that satisfy our near-term demand will irreversibly damage the living environment. Among the various sources of alternative and CO2-emission-free energies, the sun is the only source that is capable of providing enough energy for the whole world. Sunlight energy, however, is intermittent and requires an efficient storage mechanism. Sunlight-driven water splitting to make hydrogen is widely considered as one of the most attractive methods for solar energy storage. Water splitting needs a hydrogen evolution catalyst to accelerate the rate of hydrogen production and to lower the energy loss in this process. Precious metals such as Pt are superior catalysts, but they are too expensive and scarce for large-scale applications. In this Account, we summarize our recent research on the preparation, characterization, and application of amorphous molybdenum sulfide catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction. The catalysts can be synthesized by electrochemical deposition under ambient conditions from readily available and inexpensive precursors. The catalytic activity is among the highest for nonprecious catalysts. For example, at a loading of 0.2 mg/cm(2), the optimal catalyst delivers a current density of 10 mA/cm(2) at an overpotential of 160 mV. The growth mechanism of the electrochemically deposited film catalysts was revealed by an electrochemical quartz microcrystal balance study. While different electrochemical deposition methods produce films with different initial compositions, the active catalysts are the same and are identified as a "MoS(2+x)" species. The activity of the film catalysts can be further promoted by divalent Fe, Co, and Ni ions, and the origins of the promotional effects have been probed. Highly active amorphous molybdenum sulfide particles can also be prepared

  3. Molybdenum plasma spray powder, process for producing said powder, and coating made therefrom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafferty, W.D.; Cheney, R.F.; Pierce, R.H.

    1979-01-01

    Plasma spray powders of molybdenum particles containing 0.5 to 15 weight percent oxygen and obtained by reacting molybdenum particles with oxygen or oxides in a plasma, form plasma spray coatings exhibiting hardness comparable to flame sprayed coatings formed from molybdenum wire and plasma coatings of molybdenum powders. Such oxygen rich molybdenum powders may be used to form wear resistant coatings, such as for piston rings. (author)

  4. Structure and properties of iron alloys with vanadium and molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benrezhdal', A.; Tatarkina, A.L.; Loboda, T.P.; Raevskaya, M.V.; Sokolova, I.G.

    1984-01-01

    Investigation of the iron-vanadium-molybdenum system using the methods of microscopic, X-ray diffraction analyses as well as the method of hardness measurement has been undertaken. Isothermal cross section of the phase diagram at 1300 deg C is built. A considerable solubility of molybdenum and vanadium in iron is detected and in this connection corrosion behaviour of alloys in 10% sulfuric acid solution is studied. It is established that iron-3at.% vanadium-2at.% molybdenum alloy possesses the highest corrosion resistance

  5. Proposal of a new biokinetic model for niobium; Proposta de um novo modelo biocinetico para o niobio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Roges

    2006-07-01

    There are two niobium isotopes generated in nuclear power plants: 95 Nb and 94 Nb. Workers and members of the public are subjects to intake these radionuclides in accident situation. For dose calculation purpose, it is very important to develop a model that describes in a more realistic way the kinetics of niobium inside of the human body. Presently the model adopted by ICRP (ICRP, 1989) is based on animal studies and describes the behavior of niobium in human being in a simple manner. The new model proposal describes the kinetics of the niobium from the intake into the blood until the excretion, doing this in a more realistic form and considering not only data from animals but data from human beings as well. For this objective, a workers group of a niobium extraction and processing industry exposed to stable niobium (93 Nb) in oxide insoluble form with associated uranium, was monitored for uranium and niobium determination in urinary and fecal excretion, by mass spectrometry. Based in the ratios of the niobium concentration in urinary and faecal excretion of this workers and animal data study, a new biokinetic model for niobium was proposed, with the followings modifications relative to ICRP model: a new compartment that represents muscular tissue; the fractions which are deposited into the compartment are modified; a third component in the retention equation of the bone tissue; introduction of recirculation between organs and blood. The new model was applied for a case of accidental intake and described adequately the experimental data.

  6. Rapid synthesis of tantalum oxide dielectric films by microwave microwave-assisted atmospheric chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ndiege, Nicholas; Subramanian, Vaidyanathan; Shannon, Mark A.; Masel, Richard I.

    2008-01-01

    Microwave-assisted chemical vapor deposition has been used to generate high quality, high-k dielectric films on silicon at high deposition rates with film thicknesses varying from 50 nm to 110 μm using inexpensive equipment. Characterization of the post deposition products was performed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Film growth was determined to occur via rapid formation and accumulation of tantalum oxide clusters from tantalum (v) ethoxide (Ta(OC 2 H 5 ) 5 ) vapor on the deposition surface

  7. Experimental lumbar spine fusion with novel tantalum-coated carbon fiber implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming

    2007-01-01

    the possibility of coating a biocompatible metal layer on top of the carbon fiber material, to improve its biological performance. Tantalum was chosen because of its bone compatibility, based on our previous studies. A novel spinal fusion cage was fabricated by applying a thin tantalum coating on the surface......Implants of carbon fiber composite have been widely used in orthopedic and spinal surgeries. However, studies using carbon fiber-reinforced cages demonstrate frequent appearance of fibrous layer interposed between the implant and the surrounding bone. The aim of the present study was to test...

  8. Production of molybdenum-99 for medical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pervez, S.; Khan, Q.; Mirza, J.A.; Hussain, S.; Asif, M.; Khan, M.M.; Khalidand, U.; Siddique, M.U.

    2012-01-01

    Production of Molybdenum-99 (/sup 99/Mo) was carried out by irradiating 3 HEU targets in the core of Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) for 12 hours. The average radiochemical separation yield from various batches was 60-70%. Radionuclidic purity of final product was determined by gamma, alpha and beta spectrometry, while radiochemical purity was determined by paper chromatography. The produced /sup 99/Mo met all the criteria fixed in various pharmacopoeias. Pakgen /sup 99m/Tc generators were manufactured by indigenous /sup 99/Mo and sent to various medical centers for clinical trials. All the users were quite satisfied with the performance of Pakgen /sup 99m/Tc generators. (orig./A.B.)

  9. Molybdenum-base cermet fuel development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurwell, W.E.; Moss, R.W.; Pilger, J.P.; White, G.D.

    1987-07-01

    Development of a multimegawatt (MMW) space nuclear power system requires identification and resolution of several technical feasibility issues before selecting one or more promising system concepts. Demonstration of reactor fuel fabrication technology is required for cermet-fueled reactor concepts. MMW reactor fuel development activity at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is focused on producing a molybdenum-matrix uranium-nitride (UN) fueled cermet. This cermet is to have a high matrix density (≥95%) for high strength and high thermal conductance coupled with a high particle (UN) porosity (∼25%) for retention of released fission gas at high burnup. Fabrication process development involves the use of porous TiN microspheres as surrogate fuel material until porous UN microspheres become available. Process development has been conducted in the areas of microsphere synthesis, particle sealing/coating, and high-energy-rate forming (HERF) and vacuum hot press consolidation techniques. This paper summarizes the status of these activities

  10. Microplastic relaxations of single and polycrystalline molybdenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichl, W.; Weiss, B. [Wien Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Materialphysik; Chen, D.L.

    1998-05-01

    The microplasticity of high-purity molybdenum single crystals and of Mo polycrystals of technical purity has been investigated by relaxation step tests in uniaxial compression. A new model for the evaluation of relaxation tests in the microplastic range of b.c.c metals is presented which takes into account the decrease of the mobile dislocation density due to exhaustion of non-screw dislocations. The model allows an independent determination of the activation volume and of the microstructure parameters controlling dislocation exhaustion. The results indicate that in the high-purity single crystals the deformation rate is controlled by interactions of non-screw dislocations with the grown-in network. In the polycrystals additional interactions with impurity atoms seem to occur. In the single crystals the activity and subsequent exhaustion of two different glide systems was observed, followed by a gradual onset of screw dislocation motion. (orig.) 26 refs.

  11. Scattering of fast neutrons from elemental molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.

    1982-11-01

    Differential broad-resolution neutron-scattering cross sections of elemental molybdenum were measured at 10 to 20 scattering angles distributed between 20 and 160 degrees and at incident-neutron energy intervals of approx. = 50 to 200 keV from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV. Elastically-scattered neutrons were fully resolved from inelastic events. Lumped-level inelastic-neutron-scattering cross sections were determined corresponding to observed excitation energies of; 789 +- 23, 195 +- 23, 1500 +- 34, 1617 +- 12, 1787, 1874, 1991, 2063 +- 24, 2296, 2569 and 2802 keV. An optical-statistical model was deduced from the measured elastic-scattering results. The experimental values were compared with the respective quantities given in ENDF/B-V

  12. Biological Response of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Commercial Tantalum Coatings with Microscale and Nanoscale Surface Topographies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Shelby A.; Kumar, Girish; Goering, Peter L.; Williams, Brian; Stiglich, Jack; Narayan, Roger J.

    2016-06-01

    Tantalum is a promising orthopaedic implant coating material due to its robust mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, and excellent biocompatibility. Previous studies have demonstrated improved biocompatibility and tissue integration of surface-treated tantalum coatings compared to untreated tantalum. Surface modification of tantalum coatings with biologically inspired microscale and nanoscale features may be used to evoke optimal tissue responses. The goal of this study was to evaluate commercial tantalum coatings with nanoscale, sub-microscale, and microscale surface topographies for orthopaedic and dental applications using human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). Tantalum coatings with different microscale and nanoscale surface topographies were fabricated using a diffusion process or chemical vapor deposition. Biological evaluation of the tantalum coatings using hBMSCs showed that tantalum coatings promote cellular adhesion and growth. Furthermore, hBMSC adhesion to the tantalum coatings was dependent on surface feature characteristics, with enhanced cell adhesion on sub-micrometer- and micrometer-sized surface topographies compared to hybrid nano-/microstructures. Nanostructured and microstructured tantalum coatings should be further evaluated to optimize the surface coating features to promote osteogenesis and enhance osseointegration of tantalum-based orthopaedic implants.

  13. Behaviour of niobium during early Earth’s differentiation: insights from its local structure and oxidation state in silicate melts at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanloup, C.; Cochain, B.; de Grouchy, C.; Glazyrin, K.; Konôpkova, Z.; Liermann, H.-P.; Kantor, I.; Torchio, R.; Mathon, O.; Irifune, T.

    2018-02-01

    Niobium (Nb) is one of the key trace elements used to understand Earth’s formation and differentiation, and is remarkable for its deficiency relative to tantalum in terrestrial rocks compared to the building chondritic blocks. In this context, the local environment of Nb in silica-rich melts and glasses is studied by in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at high pressure (P) up to 9.3 GPa and 1350 K using resistive-heating diamond-anvil cells. Nb is slightly less oxidized in the melt (intermediate valence between  +4 and  +5) than in the glass (+5), an effect evidenced from the shift of the Nb-edge towards lower energies. Changes in the pre-edge features are also observed between melt and glass states, consistently with the observed changes in oxidation state although likely enhanced by temperature (T) effects. The oxidation state of Nb is not affected by pressure neither in the molten nor glassy states, and remains constant in the investigated P-range. The Nb-O coordination number is constant and equal to 6.3+/-0.4 below 5 GPa, and only progressively increases up to 7.1+/-0.4 at 9.3 GPa, the maximum P investigated. If these findings were to similarly apply to basaltic melts, that would rule out the hypothesis of Nb/Ta fractionation during early silicate Earth’s differentiation, thus reinforcing the alternative hypothesis of fractionation during core formation on reduced pre-planetary bodies.

  14. Innovative Molybdenum Alloy for Extreme Operating Conditions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Molybdenum has been identified as a promising material for many high temperature NASA applications due to its high melting temperature, resistance to liquid metals,...

  15. GEMAS: Molybdenum Spatial Distribution Patterns in European Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchella, Domenico; Zuzolo, Daniela; Demetriades, Alecos; De Vivo, Benedetto; Eklund, Mikael; Ladenberger, Anna; Negrel, Philippe; O'Connor, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    Molybdenum is an essential trace element for both plants and animals as well as for human being. It is one such trace element for which potential health concerns have been raised but for which few data exist and little investigation or interpretation of distributions in soils has been made. The main goal of this study was to fill this gap. Molybdenum (Mo) concentrations are reported for the Greece associated with sulfides mineralizations and in Slovenia and Croatia where are probably related to the long weathering history of karstic residual soils. Anomalous concentrations in some areas of Ireland represent a clear example of how an excess of molybdenum has produced potentially toxic pastures. In fact, these give rise to problems particularly in young cattle when excess molybdenum in the herbage acts as an antagonist, which militates against efficient copper absorption by the animal.

  16. Recovering and recycling uranium used for production of molybdenum-99

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Sean Douglas; May, Iain; Copping, Roy; Dale, Gregory Edward

    2017-12-12

    A processes for recycling uranium that has been used for the production of molybdenum-99 involves irradiating a solution of uranium suitable for forming fission products including molybdenum-99, conditioning the irradiated solution to one suitable for inducing the formation of crystals of uranyl nitrate hydrates, then forming the crystals and a supernatant and then separating the crystals from the supernatant, thus using the crystals as a source of uranium for recycle. Molybdenum-99 is recovered from the supernatant using an adsorbent such as alumina. Another process involves irradiation of a solid target comprising uranium, forming an acidic solution from the irradiated target suitable for inducing the formation of crystals of uranyl nitrate hydrates, then forming the crystals and a supernatant and then separating the crystals from the supernatant, thus using the crystals as a source of uranium for recycle. Molybdenum-99 is recovered from the supernatant using an adsorbent such as alumina.

  17. Alkaline elution of uranium and molybdenum and their recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Wenlan; Wu Peisheng; Zhao Pinzhi; Tao Dening; Xie Chaoyan

    1987-01-01

    The uranium and molybdenum can be simultaneously eluted by using eluant (NH 4 ) 2 CO 3 + (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 from resin loaded uranium and molybdenum. The ADU is precipitated from eluant by volatilization of ammonia. The molybdenum is extracted by TFA-TBP-kerosene from the filtrate at pH 3.0-3.2 with molybdenum extraction > 98%. Uranium is nearly not extracted. The precipitation of Mo is reached by sulphuric acid after stripping and the ammonium multimolybdate is obtained. This process can give the total recovery more than 99% for U and 90% for Mo. Because of the use of sulphate salt system, the hazard of NO 3 - can be avoided

  18. Mechanical properties of molybdenum coated with titanium carbide film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikama, T.; Shinno, H.; Fukutomi, M.; Fujitsuka, M.; Okada, M.

    1983-01-01

    TiC-coated molybdenum is mechanically tensile tested. The 6 μm thick TiC-coated molybdenum has a higher 0.2% proof strength with a slight decrease in uniform and rupture elongation than the uncoated one. This strengthening effect of the TiC coating can be explained by the constrained effect of the high strength TiC film. The 1.2 μm thick TiC-coated molybdenum starts its plastic deformation at a lower stress than the uncoated one. Also, the coating makes the stress-strain curve more smooth. These effects are attributed to the surface effect, namely, that the interface between the molybdenum substrate and the strong and brittle TiC film acts as a strong dislocation source. The compressive stress in the TiC film will also help the start of plastic deformation at lower external stresses. (author)

  19. Molybdenum-A Key Component of Metal Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropschot, S.J.

    2010-01-01

    Molybdenum, whose chemical symbol is Mo, was first recognized as an element in 1778. Until that time, the mineral molybdenite-the most important source of molybdenum-was believed to be a lead mineral because of its metallic gray color, greasy feel, and softness. In the late 19th century, French metallurgists discovered that molybdenum, when alloyed (mixed) with steel in small quantities, creates a substance that is remarkably tougher than steel alone and is highly resistant to heat. The alloy was found to be ideal for making tools and armor plate. Today, the most common use of molybdenum is as an alloying agent in stainless steel, alloy steels, and superalloys to enhance hardness, strength, and resistance to corrosion.

  20. Change of mechanical properties of molybdenum after chemical heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skuratov, L.P.; Yatsimirskij, V.K.; Kirillova, N.V.

    1987-01-01

    Gaseous media (argon, ammonia, nitrogen-hydrogen-ammonia mixture) are studied for their effect on mechanical characteristics of molybdenum at temperatures up to 1000 deg C. It is established that the highest hardening occurs when molybdenum is esposed in the nitrogen-hydrogen medium, while the highest lost of strength takes place in the ammonia medium. An increase of the ammonia concentration in nitrogen-hydrogen-ammonia mixture promotes regular increasing of the deformation rate. With ammonia concentration of 33.3% the gaseous mixture acts the same as pure ammonia. Change of physical-and-mechanical properties of molybdenum under the action of nitrogen-containing gaseous media is associated with formation of molybdenum compounds with nitrogen. During nitriding in ammonia an internal (volume) nitriding proceeds while in the medium of nitrogen-hydrogen mixture surface nitride layers form

  1. Effect of addition of tantalum and zirconium on the mechanical behavior of aluminum grain refined by Ti+ B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaid, A.I.O.

    2003-01-01

    Aluminum and its alloys normally solidify in a columnar structure with coarse grains. Therefore, they are normally grain refined by adding either titanium or titanium + boron to their melts to obtain finer grain size and better surface quality. Other elements may be added beside the grain refiners to enhance their grain refinement efficiency and improve the mechanical behavior. Some elements were found to improve the grain refining efficiency of the master alloys e.g., vanadium, molybdenum, while others were found to deteriorate the grain refining efficiency e.g., zirconium and tantalum. The literature reveals that in general, only one element is added in the presence of the binary AI-Ti or the ternary AI-Ti-B grain refining master alloy. It is, therefore, anticipated that the addition of Ta and Zr may have different effect when added together from that if each element is added alone. This formed the main objective of this paper. In this paper, the effect of addition of either Zr, Ta or both of them together, with a percentage of 0.1 %wt each, on the grain size, hardness and mechanical behavior of AI and AI grain refined by Ti+B is investigated. It was found that adding Zr or Ta to commercially pure aluminum resulted in grain refinement of its structure and resulted in slight improvement of its hardness. However, a pronounced improvement was obtained in its mechanical strength and formability. On the other hand, addition of either Zr or Ta to Al grain refined by Ti+B resulted in poisoning effect i.e. reducing the grain refining efficiency of the AI- Ti-B master alloy. Practically, addition of either Zr or Ta has no effect on its hardness but resulted in a pronounced improvement of its mechanical strength. Finally, the addition of Zr + Ta to commercially pure aluminum or to aluminum grain refined by Ti+B resulted in reduction of grain size, little improvement in hardness and pronounced improvement in mechanical strength than when each element was added alone

  2. Comparison of the mechanical properties between tantalum and nickel-titanium foams implant materials for bone ingrowth applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevilla, P. [CREB Dpto. Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB, Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Aparicio, C. [CREB Dpto. Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB, Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Planell, J.A. [CREB Dpto. Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB, Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Gil, F.J. [CREB Dpto. Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB, Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: francesc.xavier.gil@upc.edu

    2007-07-31

    Metallic porous materials are designed to allow the ingrowth of living tissue inside the pores and to improve the mechanical anchorage of the implant. In the present work, tantalum and nickel-titanium porous materials have been characterized. The tantalum foams were produced by vapour chemical deposition (CVD/CVI) and the NiTi foams by self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS). The former exhibited an open porosity ranging between 65 and 73% and for the latter it ranged between 63 and 68%. The pore sizes were between 370 and 440 {mu}m for tantalum and between 350 and 370 {mu}m for nickel-titanium. The Young's modulus in compression of the foams studied, especially for tantalum, were very similar to those of cancellous bone. This similitude may be relevant in order to minimize the stress shielding effect in the load transfer from the implant to bone. The strength values for NiTi foam are higher than for tantalum, especially of the strain to fracture which is about 23% for NiTi and only 8% for tantalum. The fatigue endurance limit set at 10{sup 8} cycles is about 7.5 MPa for NiTi and 13.2 MPa for tantalum. The failure mechanisms have been studied by scanning electron microscopy.

  3. THE STRUCTURE OF NIOBIUM-DOPED MoSe2 AND WSe2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    The syntheses were in silica glass tubes sealed under secondary vacuum (10-6 Torr or 13.32.10-5. Pa). For the synthesis of molybdenum and tungsten diselenides, the ampoule contained a mixture of molybdenum or tungsten powder, Koch-Light, 99.9% pure; and granular selenium,. Koch-Light, 99.999% pure. For doped ...

  4. Tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotube arrays for the degradation of atrazine in vis-Fenton-like process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yingxun; Zhao, Lu; Chang, Yuguang; Su, Yaling

    2012-07-30

    In order to overcome the limitation of the application of nanoparticles, tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotube arrays on a Ta foil were synthesized and introduced in vis (visible light)-Fenton-like system to enhance the degradation of atrazine. At first, the anodization of tantalum foil in a mild electrolyte solution containing ethylene glycol and water (v:v=2:1) plus 0.5wt.% NH(4)F produced tantala nanotubes with an average diameter of 30nm and a length of approximately 1μm. Then the nitridation of tantala nanotube arrays resulted in the replacement of N atoms to O atoms to form tantalum (oxy)nitrides (TaON and Ta(3)N(5)), as testified by XRD and XPS analyses. The synthesized tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotubes absorb well in the visible region up to 600nm. Under visible light, tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotube arrays were catalytically active for Fe(3+) reduction. With tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotube arrays, the degradation of atrazine and the formation of the intermediates in vis/Fe(3+)/H(2)O(2) system were significantly accelerated. This was explained by the higher concentration of Fe(2+) and thus the faster decomposition of H(2)O(2) with tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotubes. In addition, tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotubes exhibited stable performance during atrazine degradation for three runs. The good performance and stability of the tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotubes film with the convenient separation, suggest that this film is a promising catalyst for vis-Fenton-like degradation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Synthesis of Monodispersed Tantalum(V) oxide Nanospheres by an Ethylene Glycol Mediated Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantalum(V) oxide (Ta2O5) nanospheres have been synthesized by a very simple ethylene glycol mediated route. The two-step process involves the formation of glycolate nanoparticles and their subsequent hydrolysis and calcination to generate the final Ta2O5 nanospheres. The synthes...

  6. Effect of Compressive Stresses on Leakage Currents in Microchip Tantalum Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Microchip tantalum capacitors are manufactured using new technologies that allow for production of small size capacitors (down to EIA case size 0402) with volumetric efficiency much greater than for regular chip capacitors. Due to a small size of the parts and leadless design they might be more sensitive to mechanical stresses that develop after soldering onto printed wiring boards (PWB) compared to standard chip capacitors. In this work, the effect of compressive stresses on leakage currents in capacitors has been investigated in the range of stresses up to 200 MPa. Significant, up to three orders of magnitude, variations of currents were observed after the stress exceeds a certain critical level that varied from 10 MPa to 180 MPa for capacitors used in this study. A stress-induced generation of electron traps in tantalum pentoxide dielectric is suggested to explain reversible variations of leakage currents in tantalum capacitors. Thermo-mechanical characteristics of microchip capacitors have been studied to estimate the level of stresses caused by assembly onto PWB and assess the risk of stress-related degradation and failures. Keywords: tantalum capacitors, leakage current, soldering, reliability, mechanical stress.

  7. Effect of oxygen deficiency on electronic properties and local structure of amorphous tantalum oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denny, Yus Rama [Department of Physics Education, University of Sultan Ageng Tirtayasa, Banten 42435 (Indonesia); Firmansyah, Teguh [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Sultan Ageng Tirtayasa, Banten 42435 (Indonesia); Oh, Suhk Kun [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 28644 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hee Jae, E-mail: hjkang@cbu.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 28644 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Dong-Seok [Department of Physics Education, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 28644 (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Sung; Chung, JaeGwan; Lee, Jae Cheol [Analytical Engineering Center, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Suwon 16678 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • The effect of oxygen flow rate on electronic properties and local structure of tantalum oxide thin films was studied. • The oxygen deficiency induced the nonstoichiometric state a-TaOx. • A small peak at 1.97 eV above the valence band side appeared on nonstoichiometric Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films. • The oxygen flow rate can change the local electronic structure of tantalum oxide thin films. - Abstract: The dependence of electronic properties and local structure of tantalum oxide thin film on oxygen deficiency have been investigated by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Reflection Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (REELS), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The XPS results showed that the oxygen flow rate change results in the appearance of features in the Ta 4f at the binding energies of 23.2 eV, 24.4 eV, 25.8, and 27.3 eV whose peaks are attributed to Ta{sup 1+}, Ta{sup 2+}, Ta{sup 3+}/Ta{sup 4+}, and Ta{sup 5+}, respectively. The presence of nonstoichiometric state from tantalum oxide (TaOx) thin films could be generated by the oxygen vacancies. In addition, XAS spectra manifested both the increase of coordination number of the first Ta-O shell and a considerable reduction of the Ta-O bond distance with the decrease of oxygen deficiency.

  8. Use of steel and tantalum apparatus for molten Cd-Mg-Zn alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, G. A.; Burris, L., Jr.; Kyle, M. L.; Nelson, P. A.

    1966-01-01

    Steel and tantalum apparatus contains various ternary alloys of cadmium, zinc, and magnesium used in pyrochemical processes for the recovery of uranium-base reactor fuels. These materials exhibit good corrosion resistance at the high temperatures necessary for fuel separation in liquid metal-molten salt solvents.

  9. Tantalum Coating of Steel, Copper, Aluminum, and Titanium by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik; Bjerrum, Niels

    1998-01-01

    , nickel, copper, titanium and aluminum. Calculation of the equilibrium composition of Ta-Cl-H-systems at 1000 K and 1100 K shows that TaCl4 and TaCl3 are stable at the deposition conditions and that a high yield (>90%) of tantalum is theoretically obtainable at low pressure (5 mbar) and moderate precursor...

  10. Tantalum-modified Stellite 6 thick coatings : microstructure and mechanical performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farnia, A.; Ghaini, F. Malek; Rao, J. C.; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    Thick Co-based coatings with different contents of tantalum were prepared by simultaneous powder feeding laser cladding technique on 304 stainless steel substrate, with the Ta wt% being 0, 2, 7 and 12. Laser processing was carried out with a continuous 3.3 kW Yt:YAG fiber laser. Microstructural

  11. Electrochemical Properties of Transparent Conducting Films of Tantalum-Doped Titanium Dioxide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krýsová, Hana; Mazzolini, P.; Casari, C. S.; Russo, V.; Li Bassi, A.; Kavan, Ladislav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 232, APR 2017 (2017), s. 44-53 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-07724S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : titanium dioxide * tantalum doping * electrochemistry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry OBOR OECD: Electrochemistry (dry cells, batteries, fuel cells, corrosion metals, electrolysis) Impact factor: 4.798, year: 2016

  12. Deformation of Cases in High Capacitance Value Wet Tantalum Capacitors under Environmental Stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Internal gas pressure in hermetic wet tantalum capacitors is created by air, electrolyte vapor, and gas generated by electrochemical reactions at the electrodes. This pressure increases substantially with temperature and time of operation due to excessive leakage currents. Deformation of the case occurs when the internal pressure exceeds pressure of the environments and can raise significantly when a part operates in space. Contrary to the cylinder case wet tantalum capacitors that have external sealing by welding and internal sealing provided by the Teflon bushing and crimping of the case, no reliable internal sealing exists in the button case capacitors. Single seal design capacitors are used for high capacitance value wet tantalum capacitors manufactured per DLA L&M drawings #04003, 04005, and 10011, and require additional analysis to assure their reliable application in space systems. In this work, leakage currents and case deformation of button case capacitors were measured during different environmental test conditions. Recommendations for derating, screening and qualification testing are given. This work is a continuation of a series of NEPP reports related to quality and reliability of wet tantalum capacitors.

  13. Hot pressing of nanocrystalline tantalum using high frequency induction heating and pulse plasma sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowicz, J.; Adamek, G.; Sopata, M.; Koper, J. K.; Siwak, P.

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents the results of nanocrystalline powder tantalum consolidation using hot pressing. The authors used two different heating techniques during hot pressing: high-frequency induction heating (HFIH) and pulse plasma sintering (PPS). A comparison of the structure, microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of the bulk nanocrystalline tantalum obtained in both techniques was performed. The nanocrystalline powder was made to start from the microcrystalline one using the high-energy ball milling process. The nanocrystalline powder was hot-pressed at 1000 °C, whereas, for comparison, the microcrystalline powder was hot pressed up to 1500 °C for proper consolidation. The authors found that during hot pressing, the powder partially reacts with the graphite die covered by boron nitride, which facilitated punches and powder displacement in the die during densification. Tantalum carbide and boride in the nanocrystalline material was found, which can improve the mechanical properties. The hardness of the HFIH and PPS nanocrystalline tantalum was as high as 625 and 615 HV, respectively. The microstructure was more uniform in the PPS nanomaterial. The corrosion resistance in both cases deteriorated, in comparison to the microcrystalline material, while the PPS material corrosion resistance was slightly better than that of the HFIH one.

  14. Morphology, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells cultured on titanium, tantalum, and chromium surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiehler, Maik; Lind, M.; Mygind, Tina

    2007-01-01

    the interactions between human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and smooth surfaces of titanium (Ti), tantalum (Ta), and chromium (Cr). Mean cellular area was quantified using fluorescence microscopy (4 h). Cellular proliferation was assessed by (3)H-thymidine incorporation and methylene blue cell counting assays (4...

  15. Deuterium retention in tungsten and tungsten-tantalum alloys exposed to high-flux deuterium plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zayachuk, Y.; Hoen, M. H. J. 't; van Emmichoven, P. A. Zeijlma; Uytdenhouwen, I.; Van Oost, G.

    2012-01-01

    A direct comparison of deuterium retention in samples of tungsten and two grades of tungsten-tantalum alloys-W-1% Ta and W-5% Ta, exposed to deuterium plasmas (ion flux similar to 10(24) m(-2) s(-1), ion energy at the biased target similar to 50 eV) at the plasma generator Pilot-PSI was performed

  16. Synthesis and magnetic properties of highly dispersed tantalum carbide nanoparticles decorated on carbon spheres

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bhattacharjee, K

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The decoration of carbon spheres (CS) by highly dispersed tantalum carbide nanoparticles (TaC NPs) was achieved, for the first time by a unique carbothermal reduction method at 1350 °C for 30 min under reduced oxygen partial pressure. TaC NPs...

  17. Electrosynthesis of tantalum borides in oxygen-free and oxygen-containing fluoride melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polyakova, L.P.; Polyakov, E.G.; Makarova, O.V.

    2001-01-01

    Results of electrosynthesis of tantalum borides in fluoride and oxyfluoride melts are compared. It is shown that the single-phase X-ray-amorphous micro-layered coatings form only in the latter case. Linear and square-wave voltammetry, complemented by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR spectroscopy...

  18. Electrochemical Properties of Transparent Conducting Films of Tantalum-Doped Titanium Dioxide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krýsová, Hana; Mazzolini, P.; Casari, C. S.; Russo, V.; Li Bassi, A.; Kavan, Ladislav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 232, APR 2017 (2017), s. 44-53 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-07724S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : titanium dioxide * tantalum doping * electrochemistry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry OBOR OECD: Electrochemistry (dry cells , batteries, fuel cells , corrosion metals, electrolysis) Impact factor: 4.798, year: 2016

  19. Spatial and temporal changes in the morphology of preosteoblastic cells seeded on microstructured tantalum surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Jørn; Lorentzen, M.; Andersen, L. K.

    2009-01-01

    It has been widely reported that surface morphology on the micrometer scale affects cell function as well as cell shape. In this study, we have systematically compared the influence of 13 topographically micropatterned tantalum surfaces on the temporal development of morphology, including spreadi...

  20. Activation analysis of trace amounts of rare earth in high purity tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Wataru; Saito, Shinichi; Hirayama, Tooru.

    1975-01-01

    It is necessary to separate rare earth from tantalum by rapid methods in order to remove effects of a strong radioactivity and a short half-life. Tantalum is extracted with 10%N-lauryl (trialkylmethyl) amino-benzene pre-equilibrated with a solution of 9 M hydrochloric and 0.15 M hydrofluoric acid. A non-radioactive rare earth element is added to this aqueous solution, a precipitate of trace amounts of radioactive rare earth in aqueous solution is formed by this addition of rare earth. Some factors in the determination are: 1) the effect of the irradiation position of the sample in the atomic reactor, 2) the effect on the extraction with 10%N-lauryl (trialkylmethyl) amino-benzene for the radioactive rare earth, 3) the effect of the concentration of hydrofluoric acid, ammonia water and nitric acid on co-precipitation. As a result of the investigation we obtained the following satisfactory results: 1) Rare earth was not effected by the extraction of tantalum with 10%N-lauryl (trialkylmethyl) amino-benzene. 2) The recovery of rare earth by co-precipitation increases when an ammonium ion coexists, and when the concentration of hydrofluoric acid decreases, but the recovery decreases with the increase of nitric acid concentration. 3) The time required for the extraction is 9 hours. In case of determination for dysprosium, tantalum extracted with 10%N-lauryl (trialkylmethyl) amino-benzene before activation and the time for separation is 2 hours. (auth.)