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Sample records for nifedipine nanoparticle agglomeration

  1. The antihypertensive effect of orally administered nifedipine-loaded nanoparticles in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y I; Fluckiger, L; Hoffman, M; Lartaud-Idjouadiene, I; Atkinson, J; Maincent, P

    1997-02-01

    1. The therapeutic use of nifedipine is limited by the rapidity of the onset of its action and its short biological half-life. In order to produce a form devoid of these disadvantages we made nanoparticles of nifedipine from three different polymers, poly-epsilon-caprolactone (PCL), polylactic and glycolic acid (1:1) copolymers (PLAGA), and Eudragit RL/RS (Eudragit). Nifedipine in polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG) solution was used as a control. 2. The average diameters of the nanoparticles ranged from 0.12 to 0.21 micron; the encapsulation ratio was 82% to 88%. 3. In spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), the initial rapid fall in systolic arterial blood pressure following oral administration of nifedipine in PEG solution (from 193 +/- 3 to 102 +/- 2 mmHg) was not seen following administration of the same dose in Eudragit nanoparticles (from 189 +/- 2 to 156 +/- 2 mmHg); with PCL and PLAGA nanoparticles the initial fall in blood pressure was significantly reduced (nadirs PCL 124 +/- 2 and PLAGA 113 +/- 2 mmHg). Ten hours following administration, blood pressure in rats administered the nifedipine/PEG preparation had returned to normal (183 +/- 3 mmHg) whereas that of animals given nifedipine in nanoparticles (PCL 170 +/- 3, PLAGA 168 +/- 2, Eudragit 160 +/- 3 mmHg) was still significantly reduced. 4. All of the nanoparticle dosage forms decreased Cmax and increased Tmax and the mean residence time (MRT) values. Relative bioavailability was significantly increased with Eudragit nanoparticles compared to the nifedipine/PEG solution. 5. There was an inverse linear correlation between the fall in blood pressure and plasma nifedipine concentration with all preparations. 6. The nanoparticle nifedipine preparations represent sustained release forms with increased bioavailability, a less pronounced initial antihypertensive effect and a long-lasting action.

  2. Heat generation in agglomerated ferrite nanoparticles in an alternating magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, E Jr; De Biasi, E; Mansilla, M Vasquez; Saleta, M E; Granada, M; Troiani, H E; Zysler, R D; Effenberger, F B; Rossi, L M; Rechenberg, H R

    2013-01-01

    The role of agglomeration and magnetic interparticle interactions in heat generation of magnetic ferrofluids in an ac magnetic field is still unclear, with apparent discrepancy between the results presented in the literature. In this work, we measured the heat generating capability of agglomerated ferrite nanoparticles in a non-invasive ac magnetic field with f = 100 kHz and H 0 = 13 kA m -1 . The nanoparticles were morphologically and magnetically characterized, and the specific absorption rate (SAR) for our ac magnetic field presents a clear dependence on the diameter of the nanoparticles, with a maximum SAR = 48 W g -1 for 15 nm. Our agglomerated nanoparticles have large hydrodynamic diameters, thus the mechanical relaxation can be neglected as a heat generation mechanism. Therefore, we present a model that simulates the SAR dependence of the agglomerated samples on the diameter of the nanoparticles based on the hysteresis losses that is valid for the non-linear region (with H 0 comparable to the anisotropy field). Our model takes into account the magnetic interactions among the nanoparticles in the agglomerate. For comparison, we also measured the SAR of non-agglomerated nanoparticles in a similar diameter range, in which Néel and Brown relaxations dominate the heat generation.

  3. Laser-induced agglomeration of gold nanoparticles dispersed in a liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serkov, A.A.; Shcherbina, M.E. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); The Federal State Educational Institution of Higher Professional Education, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuzmin, P.G., E-mail: qzzzma@gmail.com [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kirichenko, N.A. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); The Federal State Educational Institution of Higher Professional Education, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Pulsed laser irradiation of dense gold nanoparticles colloidal solution can result in their agglomeration. • Gas bubbles in-phase pulsation induced by laser radiation accounts for nanoparticles agglomeration. • Time evolution of the size distribution function proceeds in activation mode. • The electrostatic-like model of nanoparticles agglomeration is in good correspondence with the experimental data. - Abstract: Dynamics of gold nanoparticles (NPs) ensemble in dense aqueous solution under exposure to picosecond laser radiation is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Properties of NPs are examined by means of transmission electron microscopy, optical spectroscopy, and size-measuring disk centrifuge. Theoretical investigation of NPs ensemble behavior is based on the analytical model taking into account collisions and agglomeration of particles. It is shown that in case of dense NPs colloidal solutions (above 10{sup 14} particles per milliliter) the process of laser fragmentation typical for nanosecond laser exposure turns into laser-induced agglomeration which leads to formation of the particles with larger sizes. It is shown that there is a critical concentration of NPs: at higher concentrations agglomeration rate increases tremendously. The results of mathematical simulation are in compliance with experimental data.

  4. Magnetic Thermometer: Thermal effect on the Agglomeration of Magnetic Nanoparticles by Magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Daeseong; Kim, Hackjin

    2018-03-01

    We have investigated the agglomeration of magnetite nanoparticles in the aqueous solution under magnetic field by measuring temporal change of magnetic weight. The magnetic weight corresponds to the force due to the magnetization of magnetic materials. Superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles are synthesized and used in this work. When the aqueous solution of magnetite nanoparticle is placed under magnetic field, the magnetic weight of the sample jumps instantaneously by Neel and Brown mechanisms and thereafter increases steadily following a stretched exponential function as the nanoparticles agglomerate, which results from the distribution of energy barriers involved in the dynamics. Thermal motions of nanoparticles in the agglomerate perturb the ordered structure of the agglomerate to reduce the magnetic weight. Fluctuation of the structural order of the agglomerate by temperature change is much faster than the formation of agglomerate and explained well with the Boltzmann distribution, which suggests that the magnetic weight of the agglomerate works as a magnetic thermometer.

  5. Simulation of atomic layer deposition on nanoparticle agglomerates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, W.; van Ommen, J.R.; Kleijn, C.R.

    2016-01-01

    Coated nanoparticles have many potential applications; production of large quantities is feasible by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on nanoparticles in a fluidized bed reactor. However, due to the cohesive interparticle forces, nanoparticles form large agglomerates, which influences the coating

  6. Quantitative characterization of nanoparticle agglomeration within biological media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hondow, Nicole; Brydson, Rik; Wang, Peiyi; Holton, Mark D.; Brown, M. Rowan; Rees, Paul; Summers, Huw D.; Brown, Andy

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of nanoparticle dispersion state within biological media is essential to understanding cellular uptake and the roles of diffusion, sedimentation, and endocytosis in determining nanoparticle dose. The dispersion of polymer-coated CdTe/ZnS quantum dots in water and cell growth medium with and without fetal bovine serum was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. Characterization by TEM of samples prepared by plunge freezing the blotted solutions into liquid ethane was sensitive to the dispersion state of the quantum dots and enabled measurement of agglomerate size distributions even in the presence of serum proteins where DLS failed. In addition, TEM showed a reduced packing fraction of quantum dots per agglomerate when dispersed in biological media and serum compared to just water, highlighting the effect of interactions between the media, serum proteins, and the quantum dots. The identification of a heterogeneous distribution of quantum dots and quantum dot agglomerates in cell growth medium and serum by TEM will enable correlation with the previously reported optical metrology of in vitro cellular uptake of this quantum dot dispersion. In this paper, we present a comparative study of TEM and DLS and show that plunge-freeze TEM provides a robust assessment of nanoparticle agglomeration state.

  7. A complex network approach for nanoparticle agglomeration analysis in nanoscale images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Bruno Brandoli, E-mail: bruno.brandoli@ufms.br; Scabini, Leonardo Felipe, E-mail: leo.scabini@ufms.br; Margarido Orue, Jonatan Patrick, E-mail: jonatan.orue@ufms.br; Arruda, Mauro Santos de, E-mail: m.arruda@ufms.br; Goncalves, Diogo Nunes, E-mail: diogo.goncalves@ufms.br; Goncalves, Wesley Nunes, E-mail: wesley.goncalves@ufms.br [Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul, CS Department (Brazil); Moreira, Raphaell, E-mail: moreira.raphaell@fu-berlin.de [Freie Universitat BerlinTakustr 3 (Germany); Rodrigues-Jr, Jose F, E-mail: junio@usp.br [University of Sao Paulo, CS Department (Brazil)

    2017-02-15

    Complex networks have been widely used in science and technology because of their ability to represent several systems. One of these systems is found in Biochemistry, in which the synthesis of new nanoparticles is a hot topic. However, the interpretation of experimental results in the search of new nanoparticles poses several challenges. This is due to the characteristics of nanoparticle images and due to their multiple intricate properties; one property of recurrent interest is the agglomeration of particles. Addressing this issue, this paper introduces an approach that uses complex networks to detect and describe nanoparticle agglomerates so to foster easier and more insightful analyses. In this approach, each detected particle in an image corresponds to a vertice and the distances between the particles define a criterion for creating edges. Edges are created if the distance is smaller than a radius of interest. Once this network is set, we calculate several discrete measures able to reveal the most outstanding agglomerates in a nanoparticle image. Experimental results using images of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) of gold nanoparticles demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed approach over several samples, as reflected by the separability between particles in three usual settings. The results also demonstrated efficacy for both convex and non-convex agglomerates.

  8. Generation of nanoparticle agglomerates and their dispersion in lung serum simulant or water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, B A; Moss, O R; Nash, D G

    2009-01-01

    Nanoparticles released into the atmosphere, due to their high diffusivity, will likely begin to agglomerate. The state of agglomeration upon inhalation and the potential to disperse back into nanoparticles may affect the toxicity of the inhaled material. In order to investigate particle dispersion, a system was set up to generate aggregates from agglomerates. Primary particles, composed of zinc, were generated using zinc rods in a spark generator (Palas GFG-1000, Karlsrhue, Germany). These particles formed agglomerates which were passed through a room temperature aging chamber or through a tube furnace (Carbolite HST, Derbyshire, UK). Agglomerate size was measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS model 3936, TSI Inc., Shoreview, MN). When furnace temperature was set near the zinc coalescence temperature, instead of decreasing in size, agglomerate size increased up to 30%; a percentage increase duplicated with the room temperature aging chamber. Starting with an aerosol of primary zinc particles, equal concentrations of agglomerate and aggregrate aerosol were produced. The extent of breakup and dispersion of agglomerates and aggregates to individual nanoparticles in lung serum simulant will be assessed using transmission electron microscopy.

  9. A model to estimate the size of nanoparticle agglomerates in gas−solid fluidized beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martín, Lilian de, E-mail: L.DeMartinMonton@tudelft.nl; Ommen, J. Ruud van [Delft University of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering (Netherlands)

    2013-11-15

    The estimation of nanoparticle agglomerates’ size in fluidized beds remains an open challenge, mainly due to the difficulty of characterizing the inter-agglomerate van der Waals force. The current approach is to describe micron-sized nanoparticle agglomerates as micron-sized particles with 0.1–0.2-μm asperities. This simplification does not capture the influence of the particle size on the van der Waals attraction between agglomerates. In this paper, we propose a new description where the agglomerates are micron-sized particles with nanoparticles on the surface, acting as asperities. As opposed to previous models, here the van der Waals force between agglomerates decreases with an increase in the particle size. We have also included an additional force due to the hydrogen bond formation between the surfaces of hydrophilic and dry nanoparticles. The average size of the fluidized agglomerates has been estimated equating the attractive force obtained from this method to the weight of the individual agglomerates. The results have been compared to 54 experimental values, most of them collected from the literature. Our model approximates without a systematic error the size of most of the nanopowders, both in conventional and centrifugal fluidized beds, outperforming current models. Although simple, the model is able to capture the influence of the nanoparticle size, particle density, and Hamaker coefficient on the inter-agglomerate forces.

  10. A model to estimate the size of nanoparticle agglomerates in gas−solid fluidized beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martín, Lilian de; Ommen, J. Ruud van

    2013-01-01

    The estimation of nanoparticle agglomerates’ size in fluidized beds remains an open challenge, mainly due to the difficulty of characterizing the inter-agglomerate van der Waals force. The current approach is to describe micron-sized nanoparticle agglomerates as micron-sized particles with 0.1–0.2-μm asperities. This simplification does not capture the influence of the particle size on the van der Waals attraction between agglomerates. In this paper, we propose a new description where the agglomerates are micron-sized particles with nanoparticles on the surface, acting as asperities. As opposed to previous models, here the van der Waals force between agglomerates decreases with an increase in the particle size. We have also included an additional force due to the hydrogen bond formation between the surfaces of hydrophilic and dry nanoparticles. The average size of the fluidized agglomerates has been estimated equating the attractive force obtained from this method to the weight of the individual agglomerates. The results have been compared to 54 experimental values, most of them collected from the literature. Our model approximates without a systematic error the size of most of the nanopowders, both in conventional and centrifugal fluidized beds, outperforming current models. Although simple, the model is able to capture the influence of the nanoparticle size, particle density, and Hamaker coefficient on the inter-agglomerate forces

  11. Dissolution, agglomerate morphology, and stability limits of protein-coated silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Matthew N; Allen, Andrew J; MacCuspie, Robert I; Hackley, Vincent A

    2014-09-30

    Little is understood regarding the impact that molecular coatings have on nanoparticle dissolution kinetics and agglomerate formation in a dilute nanoparticle dispersion. Dissolution and agglomeration processes compete in removing isolated nanoparticles from the dispersion, making quantitative time-dependent measurements of the mechanisms of nanoparticle loss particularly challenging. In this article, we present in situ ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) results, simultaneously quantifying dissolution, agglomeration, and stability limits of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) coated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein. When the BSA corona is disrupted, we find that the loss of silver from the nanoparticle core is well matched by a second-order kinetic rate reaction, arising from the oxidative dissolution of silver. Dissolution and agglomeration are quantified, and morphological transitions throughout the process are qualified. By probing the BSA-AgNP suspension around its stability limits, we provide insight into the destabilization mechanism by which individual particles rapidly dissolve as a whole rather than undergo slow dissolution from the aqueous interface inward, once the BSA layer is breached. Because USAXS rapidly measures over the entire nanometer to micrometer size range during the dissolution process, many insights are also gained into the stabilization of NPs by protein and its ability to protect the labile metal core from the solution environment by prohibiting the diffusion of reactive species. This approach can be extended to a wide variety of coating molecules and reactive metal nanoparticle systems to carefully survey their stability limits, revealing the likely mechanisms of coating breakdown and ensuing reactions.

  12. Effect of Rubber Nanoparticle Agglomeration on Properties of Thermoplastic Vulcanizates during Dynamic Vulcanization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanguang Wu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that the dispersed rubber microparticles in ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM/polypropylene (PP thermoplastic vulcanizates (TPVs are actually agglomerates of rubber nanoparticles. In this study, based on this new understanding of the microstructure of TPV, we further revealed the microstructure-properties relationship of EPDM/PP TPV during dynamic vulcanization, especially the effect of the size of rubber nanoparticle agglomerates (dn, the thicknesses of PP ligaments (IDpoly and the rubber network on the properties of EPDM/PP TPV. We were able to simultaneously obtain a high tensile strength, elongation at break, elastic modulus, and elasticity for the EPDM/PP TPV by the achievement of a smaller dn, a thinner IDpoly and a denser rubber network. Interestingly, the effect of dn and IDpoly on the elastic modulus of EPDM/PP TPV composed of rubber nanoparticle agglomerates is different from that of EPDM/PP TPVs composed of rubber microparticles reported previously. The deformation behavior of the TPVs during stretching was studied to understand the mechanism for the achievement of good mechanical properties. Interestingly, the rubber nanoparticle agglomerates are oriented along the tensile direction during stretching. The TPV samples with smaller and more numerous rubber nanoparticle agglomerates can slow down the development of voids and cracks more effectively, thus leading to increase in tensile strength and elongation at break of the EPDM/PP TPV.

  13. In situ x-ray imaging of nanoparticle agglomeration in fluidized beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenneson, Paul Michael; Gundogdu, Ozcan

    2006-01-01

    A high spatial (down to 400 nm) and temporal resolution (down to 1 ms) x-ray imaging apparatus has been designed to study the agglomeration of arc plasma synthesized zinc oxide nanoparticles (average diameter of 50 nm) in fluidized beds under different gas flow velocities. The mean volume distribution of the nanoparticle agglomerates was determined with x-ray microtomography and found to correspond to a lognormal distribution with a mean value of 0.70x10 9 μm 3 and a variance of 3.6x10 21 (μm 3 ) 2 . The average density of the agglomerates was found to be 2.9 g cm -3 compared to 5.6 g cm -3 for the individual nanoparticles. The powder assembly was then dynamically imaged using an x-ray image intensifier coupled to a digital camera using a field of view of 24.20 mm by 32.25 mm and a temporal resolution of 40 ms. Sequential frames were captured into computer memory for a range of gas flow velocities from 0.026 ms -1 to 0.313 ms -1 . The breakup energy of the agglomerates was calculated to be approximately 2x10 -8 J using a combination of dynamic observations and physical properties of the agglomerate system extracted from the x-ray microtomographic data

  14. Characterization of size, surface charge, and agglomeration state of nanoparticle dispersions for toxicological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Jingkun; Oberdoerster, Guenter; Biswas, Pratim

    2009-01-01

    Characterizing the state of nanoparticles (such as size, surface charge, and degree of agglomeration) in aqueous suspensions and understanding the parameters that affect this state are imperative for toxicity investigations. In this study, the role of important factors such as solution ionic strength, pH, and particle surface chemistry that control nanoparticle dispersion was examined. The size and zeta potential of four TiO 2 and three quantum dot samples dispersed in different solutions (including one physiological medium) were characterized. For 15 nm TiO 2 dispersions, the increase of ionic strength from 0.001 M to 0.1 M led to a 50-fold increase in the hydrodynamic diameter, and the variation of pH resulted in significant change of particle surface charge and the hydrodynamic size. It was shown that both adsorbing multiply charged ions (e.g., pyrophosphate ions) onto the TiO 2 nanoparticle surface and coating quantum dot nanocrystals with polymers (e.g., polyethylene glycol) suppressed agglomeration and stabilized the dispersions. DLVO theory was used to qualitatively understand nanoparticle dispersion stability. A methodology using different ultrasonication techniques (bath and probe) was developed to distinguish agglomerates from aggregates (strong bonds), and to estimate the extent of particle agglomeration. Probe ultrasonication performed better than bath ultrasonication in dispersing TiO 2 agglomerates when the stabilizing agent sodium pyrophosphate was used. Commercially available Degussa P25 and in-house synthesized TiO 2 nanoparticles were used to demonstrate identification of aggregated and agglomerated samples.

  15. Kinetic and Thermodynamic Effects on the Agglomeration of Magnetite Nanoparticles by Magnetic Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Daeseong; Kim, Hackjin

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of agglomeration of magnetite nanoparticles studied by measuring the magnetic weight shows the kinetics of stretched exponential. During the growth of the magnetic weight, the structure of agglomerate fluctuates by temperature change. This fast relaxation that can be interpreted in terms of Boltzmann distribution indicates that the thermal equilibration is established promptly with the temperature change. Agglomerate of nanoparticles resembles protein in that both of them exist in complex structures of various conformations with different formation energies, which requires the energy landscape for understanding of dynamics in detail

  16. Diffusion mediated agglomeration of CdS nanoparticles via Langmuir–Blodgett technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Nayan Mani; Roy, Dhrubojyoti; Gupta, P.S.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Diffusion mediated agglomeration of CdS nanoparticles are discussed. • Formation of CdS nanoparticles are confirmed by the change of chain length in XRD. • AFM shows the agglomeration of particles with a film swelling of about 5 Å. • UV–vis absorbance suggests that the grown particles show quantum confinement. • Hexagonal form of particle was confirmed by UV–vis reflectivity. - Abstract: We have reported a diffusion mediated agglomeration of cadmium sulphide (CdS) nanoparticles within cadmium arachidate (CdA 2 ) film matrix. The structural morphology and formation of CdS nanoparticles are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray reflectivity (XRR), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy techniques. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results show a change in bilayer difference from 53.04 Å to 43 Å after the sulphidation. An epitaxial growth of the films by ∼5 Å after sulphidation is confirmed from atomic force microscopy studies. The particle size calculated form UV–vis absorption edges are found to be varying from 2.6 nm to 3.3 nm for the different layers. A lateral dimension of 72–80 nm from AFM measurements and a size of 2.6–3.3 nm have confirmed one side flat pseudo two-dimensional disk-like nanoparticles. UV–vis reflectivity peak at E 1 (A) confirms the formation of hexagonal CdS nanoparticles along the c-axis

  17. Effect of sample container morphology on agglomeration dynamics of magnetic nanoparticles under magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Dae Seong; Kim, Hack Jin [Dept. of Chemistry, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles have been used extensively in medical and biological applications, and agglomeration of magnetic nanoparticles is employed in the purification of water and proteins. The magnetic weight can be measured with a conventional electronic balance. Details of the experimental setup have been previously reported. That is, complex energy landscape involved in the agglomeration is changing with progress. Simulation of colloidal magnetic particles under magnetic field shows that the chain of particles is energetically more favorable than the ring and that the transition barrier between the chain and the ring is very low. The energy barriers among entangled nanoparticles of the agglomerate seem to be much more complicated than those among colloidal particles. The energy barrier distributions at 1000 min are similar for the two containers; however, the trend of blue shift and broadening is much more evident in the case of conical tube. These results indicate that the potential energy surface for agglomeration is modified more significantly in the conical tube which makes the agglomerate denser.

  18. Characterisation of the de-agglomeration effects of bovine serum albumin on nanoparticles in aqueous suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantra, Ratna; Tompkins, Jordan; Quincey, Paul

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the use of nanoparticle characterisation tools to evaluate the interaction between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and dispersed nanoparticles in aqueous media. Dynamic light scattering, zeta-potential measurements and scanning electron microscopy were used to probe the state of zinc oxide (ZnO) and titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) nanoparticles in the presence of various concentrations of BSA, throughout a three-day period. BSA was shown to adhere to ZnO but not to TiO(2). The adsorption of BSA led to subsequent de-agglomeration of the sub-micron ZnO clusters into smaller fragments, even breaking them up into individual isolated nanoparticles. We propose that certain factors, such as adsorption kinetics of BSA on to the surface of ZnO, as well as the initial agglomerated state of the ZnO, prior to BSA addition, are responsible for promoting the de-agglomeration process. Hence, in the case of TiO(2) we see no de-agglomeration because: (a) the nanoparticles are more highly agglomerated to begin with and (b) BSA does not adsorb effectively on the surface of the nanoparticles. The zeta-potential results show that, for either ZnO or TiO(2), the presence of BSA resulted in enhanced stability. In the case of ZnO, the enhanced stability is limited to BSA concentrations below 0.5 wt.%. Steric and electrostatic repulsion are thought to be responsible for improved stability of the dispersion.

  19. One-step aerosol synthesis of nanoparticle agglomerate films: simulation of film porosity and thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maedler, Lutz; Lall, Anshuman A; Friedlander, Sheldon K

    2006-01-01

    A method is described for designing nanoparticle agglomerate films with desired film porosity and film thickness. Nanoparticle agglomerates generated in aerosol reactors can be directly deposited on substrates to form uniform porous films in one step, a significant advance over existing technologies. The effect of agglomerate morphology and deposition mechanism on film porosity and thickness are discussed. Film porosity was calculated for a given number and size of primary particles that compose the agglomerates, and fractal dimension. Agglomerate transport was described by the Langevin equation of motion. Deposition enhancing forces such as thermophoresis are incorporated in the model. The method was validated for single spherical particles using previous theoretical studies. An S-shape film porosity dependence on the particle Peclet number typical for spherical particles was also observed for agglomerates, but films formed from agglomerates had much higher porosities than films from spherical particles. Predicted film porosities compared well with measurements reported in the literature. Film porosities increased with the number of primary particles that compose an agglomerate and higher fractal dimension agglomerates resulted in denser films. Film thickness as a function of agglomerate deposition time was calculated from the agglomerate deposition flux in the presence of thermophoresis. The calculated film thickness was in good agreement with measured literature values. Thermophoresis can be used to reduce deposition time without affecting the film porosity

  20. Measuring agglomerate size distribution and dependence of localized surface plasmon resonance absorbance on gold nanoparticle agglomerate size using analytical ultracentrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zook, Justin M; Rastogi, Vinayak; Maccuspie, Robert I; Keene, Athena M; Fagan, Jeffrey

    2011-10-25

    Agglomeration of nanoparticles during measurements in relevant biological and environmental media is a frequent problem in nanomaterial property characterization. The primary problem is typically that any changes to the size distribution can dramatically affect the potential nanotoxicity or other size-determined properties, such as the absorbance signal in a biosensor measurement. Herein we demonstrate analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) as a powerful method for measuring two critical characteristics of nanoparticle (NP) agglomerates in situ in biological media: the NP agglomerate size distribution, and the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) absorbance spectrum of precise sizes of gold NP agglomerates. To characterize the size distribution, we present a theoretical framework for calculating the hydrodynamic diameter distribution of NP agglomerates from their sedimentation coefficient distribution. We measure sedimentation rates for monomers, dimers, and trimers, as well as for larger agglomerates with up to 600 NPs. The AUC size distributions were found generally to be broader than the size distributions estimated from dynamic light scattering and diffusion-limited colloidal aggregation theory, an alternative bulk measurement method that relies on several assumptions. In addition, the measured sedimentation coefficients can be used in nanotoxicity studies to predict how quickly the agglomerates sediment out of solution under normal gravitational forces, such as in the environment. We also calculate the absorbance spectra for monomer, dimer, trimer, and larger gold NP agglomerates up to 600 NPs, to enable a better understanding of LSPR biosensors. Finally, we validate a new method that uses these spectra to deconvolute the net absorbance spectrum of an unknown bulk sample and approximate the proportions of monomers, dimers, and trimers in a polydisperse sample of small agglomerates, so that every sample does not need to be measured by AUC. These results

  1. Filtration behavior of silver nanoparticle agglomerates and effects of the agglomerate model in data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buha, Jelena; Fissan, Heinz; Wang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    In many data evaluation procedures for particle measuring devices and in filtration models, spherical particles are assumed. However, significant fractions of aerosol particles are agglomerates of small primary spheres. The morphology of particles in filtration processes may not be known a priori and if the filtration data are processed with wrong assumption, errors can be induced. In this work, we have quantified such errors for the case of open-structured agglomerates. Filtration efficiency tests with polydisperse silver nanoparticle agglomerates and their sintered spheres were performed. After the sintering process, particles with a compact structure with the shape close to a sphere are obtained, which are referred to as sintered spheres in the present study. The testing method involved generation of particulate forms, passing the particles through the testing section, and measurement of the particle number concentrations and size distributions before and after the filter. Measurements of the aerosols upstream and downstream of the filter were conducted using scanning mobility particle sizers (SMPS, TSI Inc.), which covered the rage from 10 to 480 nm. Particles were additionally characterized from the electron microscopic images and the average primary particle size was determined to be 16.8 nm. The number-size distribution curves were obtained and used for penetration calculation. The penetration was dependent on the particle size and morphology. Silver-sintered spheres were captured with a lower efficiency than agglomerates with the same mobility diameter because of the stronger interception effect for agglomerates. Data analysis of the number-size distribution for agglomerates was processed based on sphere assumption and using the model for open-structured agglomerates developed by Lall and Friedlander. The efficiencies based on total concentrations of number, surface and volume were affected when the agglomerate model was used. The effect was weakest for the

  2. Suppression of gold nanoparticle agglomeration and its separation via nylon membranes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ayyavoo Jayalakshmi; In-Chul Kim; Young-Nam Kwon

    2017-01-01

    Use of ultraporous nylon membrane is one of the most widely employed techniques for removal of hard and soft nanoparticles in the semiconductor industry,and the accurate determination of membrane pore size is necessary in order to avoid manufacturing defects caused by contamination.The gold nanoparticle has several benefits for the evaluation of polymeric membranes;however,the nanoparticles agglomerate easily on the nylon membrane and make it difficult to evaluate the membrane precisely.The properties of 2-amino-2-hydroxymethyl-1,3-propanediol (ADP) ligand in gold nanoparticle solution were systematically investigated,and ADP was utilized for improved evaluation of the nylon membranes.Nylon membrane used in this study was prepared by phase inversion techniques.Ultrathin dense layer on top of the membrane surface and Darcy structures in the microporous membrane support were observed.The gold particle rejection was carried out at various pH values from 4 to 14 and higher rejection was observed at pH 4 and 8.The suppression of gold colloid agglomeration using ADP and monodispersity of gold colloids was also analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM),transmission electron microscopy (TEM),and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).van der Waals interaction energy of the particles was reduced in the addition of ADP.The presence ofADP ligand in the gold solutions prevented the agglomeration of gold nanoparticles and reduced the adsorption of the particles on the nylon membrane surface,leading to precise evaluation of membrane pore sizes.

  3. A Two-Step Methodology to Study the Influence of Aggregation/Agglomeration of Nanoparticles on Young's Modulus of Polymer Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xinyue; Zare, Yasser; Rhee, Kyong Yop

    2017-12-01

    A two-step technique based on micromechanical models is suggested to determine the influence of aggregated/agglomerated nanoparticles on Young's modulus of polymer nanocomposites. The nanocomposite is assumed to include nanoparticle aggregation/agglomeration and effective matrix phases. This method is examined for different samples, and the effects of important parameters on the modulus are investigated. Moreover, the highest and the lowest levels of predicted modulus are calculated based on the current methodology. The suggested technique can correctly predict Young's modulus for the samples assuming the aggregation/agglomeration of nanoparticles. Additionally, the aggregation/agglomeration of nanoparticles decreases Young's modulus of polymer nanocomposites. It is demonstrated that the high modulus of nanoparticles is not sufficient to obtain a high modulus in nanocomposites, and the surface chemistry of components should be adjusted to prevent aggregation/agglomeration and to disperse nano-sized particles in the polymer matrix.

  4. Mobility and settling rate of agglomerates of polydisperse nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyrogianni, Anastasia; Karadima, Katerina S.; Goudeli, Eirini; Mavrantzas, Vlasis G.; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.

    2018-02-01

    Agglomerate settling impacts nanotoxicology and nanomedicine as well as the stability of engineered nanofluids. Here, the mobility of nanostructured fractal-like SiO2 agglomerates in water is investigated and their settling rate in infinitely dilute suspensions is calculated by a Brownian dynamics algorithm tracking the agglomerate translational and rotational motion. The corresponding friction matrices are obtained using the HYDRO++ algorithm [J. G. de la Torre, G. del Rio Echenique, and A. Ortega, J. Phys. Chem. B 111, 955 (2007)] from the Kirkwood-Riseman theory accounting for hydrodynamic interactions of primary particles (PPs) through the Rotne-Prager-Yamakawa tensor, properly modified for polydisperse PPs. Agglomerates are generated by an event-driven method and have constant mass fractal dimension but varying PP size distribution, mass, and relative shape anisotropy. The calculated diffusion coefficient from HYDRO++ is used to obtain the agglomerate mobility diameter dm and is compared with that from scaling laws for fractal-like agglomerates. The ratio dm/dg of the mobility diameter to the gyration diameter of the agglomerate decreases with increasing relative shape anisotropy. For constant dm and mean dp, the agglomerate settling rate, us, increases with increasing PP geometric standard deviation σp,g (polydispersity). A linear relationship between us and agglomerate mass to dm ratio, m/dm, is revealed and attributed to the fast Brownian rotation of such small and light nanoparticle agglomerates. An analytical expression for the us of agglomerates consisting of polydisperse PPs is then derived, us=(1/-{ρf/ρp})g 3 π μ m/dm (ρf is the density of the fluid, ρp is the density of PPs, μ is the viscosity of the fluid, and g is the acceleration of gravity), valid for agglomerates for which the characteristic rotational time is considerably shorter than their settling time. Our calculations demonstrate that the commonly made assumption of monodisperse PPs

  5. Experimental and numerical study on the optical properties and agglomeration of nanoparticle suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otanicar, Todd, E-mail: todd-otanicar@utulsa.edu; Hoyt, Jordan; Fahar, Maryam [University of Tulsa, Department of Mechanical Engineering (United States); Jiang, Xuchuan [University of New South Wales, School of Materials Science and Engineering (Australia); Taylor, Robert A. [University of New South Wales, School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering (Australia)

    2013-11-15

    Nanoparticles have garnered significant interest because of their ability to enhance greatly the optical properties of the base fluid in which they are suspended. The optical properties of nanoparticles are sensitive to the materials used, as well as to the host medium. Most fluids exhibit refractive indices that are highly temperature-dependent, resulting in nanoparticle suspensions which also exhibit temperature-dependent optical properties. Previous work has shown that temperature increases result in decreased absorption in nanoparticle suspensions. Here, we expand previous work to include core–shell particles due to the potential spectral shifts in optical properties that will arise from the base fluid with temperature changes and the role of agglomeration under temperature cycling through both experimental and numerical efforts. Thermal cycling tests for silica and gold, the constituents of the core–shell nanoparticles used in this study, were tested to determine the extent of particle agglomeration resulting from up to 200 accelerated heating cycles. Optical properties were recorded after heating two base fluids (water and ethylene glycol) with multiple surfactants for silver nanospheres and silica–gold core–shell nanoparticles. It was found that the temperature results in a small increase in the transmittance for both particle types and a blue shift in the spectral transmittance for core–shell nanoparticles. Further, the coupling effect of temperature and agglomeration played a significant role in determining both the spectral properties—particularly the resulting transmittance—of the silver nanoparticle suspensions.

  6. Mobility and settling rate of agglomerates of polydisperse nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyrogianni, Anastasia; Karadima, Katerina S; Goudeli, Eirini; Mavrantzas, Vlasis G; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2018-02-14

    Agglomerate settling impacts nanotoxicology and nanomedicine as well as the stability of engineered nanofluids. Here, the mobility of nanostructured fractal-like SiO 2 agglomerates in water is investigated and their settling rate in infinitely dilute suspensions is calculated by a Brownian dynamics algorithm tracking the agglomerate translational and rotational motion. The corresponding friction matrices are obtained using the HYDRO++ algorithm [J. G. de la Torre, G. del Rio Echenique, and A. Ortega, J. Phys. Chem. B 111, 955 (2007)] from the Kirkwood-Riseman theory accounting for hydrodynamic interactions of primary particles (PPs) through the Rotne-Prager-Yamakawa tensor, properly modified for polydisperse PPs. Agglomerates are generated by an event-driven method and have constant mass fractal dimension but varying PP size distribution, mass, and relative shape anisotropy. The calculated diffusion coefficient from HYDRO++ is used to obtain the agglomerate mobility diameter d m and is compared with that from scaling laws for fractal-like agglomerates. The ratio d m /d g of the mobility diameter to the gyration diameter of the agglomerate decreases with increasing relative shape anisotropy. For constant d m and mean d p , the agglomerate settling rate, u s , increases with increasing PP geometric standard deviation σ p,g (polydispersity). A linear relationship between u s and agglomerate mass to d m ratio, m/d m , is revealed and attributed to the fast Brownian rotation of such small and light nanoparticle agglomerates. An analytical expression for the u s of agglomerates consisting of polydisperse PPs is then derived, u s =1-ρ f ρ p g3πμmd m (ρ f is the density of the fluid, ρ p is the density of PPs, μ is the viscosity of the fluid, and g is the acceleration of gravity), valid for agglomerates for which the characteristic rotational time is considerably shorter than their settling time. Our calculations demonstrate that the commonly made assumption of

  7. Laser-induced agglomeration of gold nanoparticles dispersed in a liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serkov, A. A.; Shcherbina, M. E.; Kuzmin, P. G.; Kirichenko, N. A.

    2015-05-01

    Dynamics of gold nanoparticles (NPs) ensemble in dense aqueous solution under exposure to picosecond laser radiation is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Properties of NPs are examined by means of transmission electron microscopy, optical spectroscopy, and size-measuring disk centrifuge. Theoretical investigation of NPs ensemble behavior is based on the analytical model taking into account collisions and agglomeration of particles. It is shown that in case of dense NPs colloidal solutions (above 1014 particles per milliliter) the process of laser fragmentation typical for nanosecond laser exposure turns into laser-induced agglomeration which leads to formation of the particles with larger sizes. It is shown that there is a critical concentration of NPs: at higher concentrations agglomeration rate increases tremendously. The results of mathematical simulation are in compliance with experimental data.

  8. Characterisation of silica nanoparticles prior to in vitro studies: from primary particles to agglomerates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orts-Gil, Guillermo; Natte, Kishore; Drescher, Daniela; Bresch, Harald; Mantion, Alexandre; Kneipp, Janina; Österle, Werner

    2011-01-01

    The size, surface charge and agglomeration state of nanoparticles under physiological conditions are fundamental parameters to be determined prior to their application in toxicological studies. Although silica-based materials are among the most promising candidates for biomedical applications, more systematic studies concerning the characterisation before performing toxicological studies are necessary. This interest is based on the necessity to elucidate the mechanisms affecting its toxicity. We present here TEM, SAXS and SMPS as a combination of methods allowing an accurate determination of single nanoparticle sizes. For the commercial material, Ludox TM50 single particle sizes around 30 nm were found in solution. DLS measurements of single particles are rather affected by polydispersity and particles concentration but this technique is useful to monitor their agglomeration state. Here, the influence of nanoparticle concentration, ionic strength (IS), pH and bath sonication on the agglomeration behaviour of silica particles in solution has been systematically investigated. Moreover, the colloidal stability of silica particles in the presence of BSA has been investigated showing a correlation between silica and protein concentrations and the formation of agglomerates. Finally, the colloidal stability of silica particles in standard cell culture medium has been tested, concluding the necessity of surface modification in order to preserve silica as primary particles in the presence of serum. The results presented here have major implications on toxicity investigations because silica agglomeration will change the probability and uptake mechanisms and thereby may affect toxicity.

  9. Agglomeration of luminescent porous silicon nanoparticles in colloidal solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herynková, Kateřina; Šlechta, Miroslav; Šimáková, Petra; Fučíková, Anna; Cibulka, Ondřej

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, Aug (2016), s. 1-5, č. článku 367. ISSN 1556-276X Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) DAAD-16-18 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : nanocrystalline silicon * porous silicon * nanoparticles * colloids * agglomeration Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.833, year: 2016

  10. Agglomeration of Luminescent Porous Silicon Nanoparticles in Colloidal Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herynková, Kateřina; Šlechta, Miroslav; Šimáková, Petra; Fučíková, Anna; Cibulka, Ondřej

    2016-12-01

    We have prepared colloidal solutions of clusters composed from porous silicon nanoparticles in methanol, water and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Even if the size of the nanoclusters is between 60 and 500 nm, due to their highly porous "cauliflower"-like structure, the porous silicon nanoparticles are composed of interconnected nanocrystals having around 2.5 nm in size and showing strong visible luminescence in the orange-red spectral region (centred at 600-700 nm). Hydrophilic behaviour and good solubility of the nanoclusters in water and water-based solutions were obtained by adding hydrogen peroxide into the etching solution during preparation and 16 min long after-bath in hydrogen peroxide. By simple filtration of the solutions with syringe filters, we have extracted smaller nanoclusters with sizes of approx. 60-70 nm; however, these nanoclusters in water and PBS solution (pH neutral) are prone to agglomeration, as was confirmed by zeta potential measurements. When the samples were left at ambient conditions for several weeks, the typical nanocluster size increased to approx. 330-400 nm and then remained stable. However, both freshly filtered and aged samples (with agglomerated porous silicon nanoparticles) of porous silicon in water and PBS solutions can be further used for biological studies or as luminescent markers in living cells.

  11. Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Agglomeration Influences Dose-Rates and Modulates Oxidative Stress Mediated Dose-Response Profiles In Vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Kodali, Vamsi K.; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Wang, Wei; Minard, Kevin R.; Karin, Norman J.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2013-07-31

    Spontaneous agglomeration of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) is a common problem in cell culture media which can confound interpretation of in vitro nanotoxicity studies. The authors created stable agglomerates of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in conventional culture medium, which varied in hydrodynamic size (276 nm-1.5 μm) but were composed of identical primary particles with similar surface potentials and protein coatings. Studies using C10 lung epithelial cells show that the dose rate effects of agglomeration can be substantial, varying by over an order of magnitude difference in cellular dose in some cases. Quantification by magnetic particle detection showed that small agglomerates of carboxylated IONPs induced greater cytotoxicity and redox-regulated gene expression when compared with large agglomerates on an equivalent total cellular IONP mass dose basis, whereas agglomerates of amine-modified IONPs failed to induce cytotoxicity or redox-regulated gene expression despite delivery of similar cellular doses. Dosimetry modelling and experimental measurements reveal that on a delivered surface area basis, large and small agglomerates of carboxylated IONPs have similar inherent potency for the generation of ROS, induction of stress-related genes and eventual cytotoxicity. The results suggest that reactive moieties on the agglomerate surface are more efficient in catalysing cellular ROS production than molecules buried within the agglomerate core. Because of the dynamic, size and density-dependent nature of ENP delivery to cells in vitro, the biological consequences of agglomeration are not discernible from static measures of exposure concentration (μg/ml) alone, highlighting the central importance of integrated physical characterisation and quantitative dosimetry for in vitro studies. The combined experimental and computational approach provides a quantitative framework for evaluating relationships between the biocompatibility of nanoparticles and their

  12. Iron oxide nanoparticle agglomeration influences dose rates and modulates oxidative stress-mediated dose–response profiles in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Kodali, Vamsi; Gaffrey, Matthew; Wang, Wei; Minard, Kevin R.; Karin, Norman J.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous agglomeration of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) is a common problem in cell culture media which can confound interpretation of in vitro nanotoxicity studies. The authors created stable agglomerates of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in conventional culture medium, which varied in hydrodynamic size (276 nm–1.5 μm) but were composed of identical primary particles with similar surface potentials and protein coatings. Studies using C10 lung epithelial cells show that the dose rate effects of agglomeration can be substantial, varying by over an order of magnitude difference in cellular dose in some cases. Quantification by magnetic particle detection showed that small agglomerates of carboxylated IONPs induced greater cytotoxicity and redox-regulated gene expression when compared with large agglomerates on an equivalent total cellular IONP mass dose basis, whereas agglomerates of amine-modified IONPs failed to induce cytotoxicity or redox-regulated gene expression despite delivery of similar cellular doses. Dosimetry modelling and experimental measurements reveal that on a delivered surface area basis, large and small agglomerates of carboxylated IONPs have similar inherent potency for the generation of ROS, induction of stress-related genes and eventual cytotoxicity. The results suggest that reactive moieties on the agglomerate surface are more efficient in catalysing cellular ROS production than molecules buried within the agglomerate core. Because of the dynamic, size and density-dependent nature of ENP delivery to cells in vitro, the biological consequences of agglomeration are not discernible from static measures of exposure concentration (μg/ml) alone, highlighting the central importance of integrated physical characterisation and quantitative dosimetry for in vitro studies. The combined experimental and computational approach provides a quantitative framework for evaluating relationships between the biocompatibility of nanoparticles and their

  13. Spherical agglomerates of pure drug nanoparticles for improved pulmonary delivery in dry powder inhalers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jun; Dong Yuancai; Pastorin, Giorgia; Ng, Wai Kiong; Tan, Reginald B. H.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to produce micron-sized spherical agglomerates of pure drug nanoparticles to achieve improved aerosol performance in dry powder inhalers (DPIs). Sodium cromoglicate was chosen as the model drug. Pure drug nanoparticles were prepared through a bottom-up particle formation process, liquid antisolvent precipitation, and then rapidly agglomerated into porous spherical microparticles by immediate (on-line) spray drying. Nonporous spherical drug microparticles with similar geometric size distribution were prepared by conventional spray drying of the aqueous drug solution, which together with the mechanically micronized drug particles were used as the control samples. The three samples were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, laser diffraction, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller analysis, density measurement, powder X-ray diffraction, and in vitro aerosol deposition measurement with a multistage liquid impinger. It was found that drug nanoparticles with a diameter of ∼100 nm were precipitated and agglomerated into highly porous spherical microparticles with a volume median diameter (D 50% ) of 2.25 ± 0.08 μm and a specific surface area of 158.63 ± 3.27 m 2 /g. In vitro aerosol deposition studies showed the fine particle fraction of such spherical agglomerates of drug nanoparticles was increased by more than 50 % in comparison with the control samples, demonstrating significant improvements in aerosol performance. The results of this study indicated the potential of the combined particle engineering process of liquid antisolvent precipitation followed by immediate (on-line) spray drying in the development of novel DPI drug products with improved aerosol performance.

  14. Spherical agglomerates of pure drug nanoparticles for improved pulmonary delivery in dry powder inhalers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Jun; Dong Yuancai [Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences (Singapore); Pastorin, Giorgia, E-mail: phapg@nus.edu.sg [National University of Singapore, Department of Pharmacy (Singapore); Ng, Wai Kiong, E-mail: ng_wai_kiong@ices.a-star.edu.sg; Tan, Reginald B. H. [Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences (Singapore)

    2013-04-15

    The aim of this study was to produce micron-sized spherical agglomerates of pure drug nanoparticles to achieve improved aerosol performance in dry powder inhalers (DPIs). Sodium cromoglicate was chosen as the model drug. Pure drug nanoparticles were prepared through a bottom-up particle formation process, liquid antisolvent precipitation, and then rapidly agglomerated into porous spherical microparticles by immediate (on-line) spray drying. Nonporous spherical drug microparticles with similar geometric size distribution were prepared by conventional spray drying of the aqueous drug solution, which together with the mechanically micronized drug particles were used as the control samples. The three samples were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, laser diffraction, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis, density measurement, powder X-ray diffraction, and in vitro aerosol deposition measurement with a multistage liquid impinger. It was found that drug nanoparticles with a diameter of {approx}100 nm were precipitated and agglomerated into highly porous spherical microparticles with a volume median diameter (D{sub 50%}) of 2.25 {+-} 0.08 {mu}m and a specific surface area of 158.63 {+-} 3.27 m{sup 2}/g. In vitro aerosol deposition studies showed the fine particle fraction of such spherical agglomerates of drug nanoparticles was increased by more than 50 % in comparison with the control samples, demonstrating significant improvements in aerosol performance. The results of this study indicated the potential of the combined particle engineering process of liquid antisolvent precipitation followed by immediate (on-line) spray drying in the development of novel DPI drug products with improved aerosol performance.

  15. Magnetic agglomeration method for size control in the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Dale L [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-07-05

    A method for controlling the size of chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles that employs magnetic interaction between particles to control particle size and does not rely on conventional kinetic control of the reaction to control particle size. The particles are caused to reversibly agglomerate and precipitate from solution; the size at which this occurs can be well controlled to provide a very narrow particle size distribution. The size of particles is controllable by the size of the surfactant employed in the process; controlling the size of the surfactant allows magnetic control of the agglomeration and precipitation processes. Agglomeration is used to effectively stop particle growth to provide a very narrow range of particle sizes.

  16. Non-agglomerated silicon nanoparticles on (0 0 1) silicon substrate formed by PLA and their photoluminescence properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Jun; Tu Hailing; Wang Lei

    2009-01-01

    In this work, non-agglomerated silicon nanoparticles formed on Si(0 0 1) substrate were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation (PLA) and their photoluminescence (PL) properties were studied. The controllable parameters in PLA process include mainly pulsed laser energy, target-to-substrate distance and buffer gas pressure. In particular, the effect of buffer gas pressure on the formation of non-agglomerated and size-controlled silicon nanoparticles has been discussed. The results show that non-agglomerated and size-controlled silicon nanoparticles can be fabricated with particle size in the range of 2-10 nm when Ar buffer gas pressure was varied from 50 to 10 Pa. Most of these nanoparticles are in form of single crystal with less surface oxidation in the as-deposited samples. The PL peak positions are located at 581-615 nm for Si nanoparticles with size of 2-10 nm. When exposed to air for up to 60 days, the core/shell structure of Si nanoparticles would be formed, which in turn could be responsible for the blue shift of PL peak position. Pt noble metal coating has passivation effect for surface stabilization of Si nanoparticles and shows relatively satisfied time-stability of PL intensity. These results suggest that the Si nanoparticles prepared by PLA have a large potential for the fabrication of optically active photonic devices based on the Si technology.

  17. Agglomeration of Ni-nanoparticles in the gas phase under gravity and microgravity conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lösch, S; Günther, B H; Iles, G N; Schmitz, B

    2011-01-01

    The agglomeration of metallic nanoparticles can be performed using the well-known inert gas condensation process. Unfortunately, thermal effects such as convection are created by the heating source and as a result the turbulent aerosol avoids ideal conditions. In addition, the sedimentation of large particles and/or agglomerates influences the self-assembly of particles. These negative effects can be eliminated by using microgravity conditions. Here we present the results of the agglomeration of nanoscale Ni-particles under gravity and microgravity conditions, the latter provided by adapted microgravity platforms namely the European sounding rocket MAXUS 8 and the European Parabolic Flight aircraft, Airbus A300 Zero-G.

  18. Agglomeration, isolation and dissolution of commercially manufactured silver nanoparticles in aqueous environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elzey, Sherrie; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing use of manufactured nanoparticles ensures these materials will make their way into the environment. Silver nanoparticles in particular, due to use in a wide range of applications, have the potential to get into water systems, e.g., drinking water systems, ground water systems, estuaries, and/or lakes. One important question is what is the chemical and physical state of these nanoparticles in water? Are they present as isolated particles, agglomerates or dissolved ions, as this will dictate their fate and transport. Furthermore, does the chemical and physical state of the nanoparticles change as a function of size or differ from micron-sized particles of similar composition? In this study, an electrospray atomizer coupled to a scanning mobility particle sizer (ES-SMPS) is used to investigate the state of silver nanoparticles in water and aqueous nitric acid environments. Over the range of pH values investigated, 0.5-6.5, silver nanoparticles with a bimodal primary particle size distribution with the most intense peak at 5.0 ± 7.4 nm, as determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM), show distinct size distributions indicating agglomeration between pH 6.5 and 3 and isolated nanoparticles at pH values from 2.5 to 1. At the lowest pH investigated, pH 0.5, there are no peaks detected by the SMPS, indicating complete nanoparticle dissolution. Further analysis of the solution shows dissolved Ag ions at a pH of 0.5. Interestingly, silver nanoparticle dissolution shows size dependent behavior as larger, micron-sized silver particles show no dissolution at this pH. Environmental implications of these results are discussed.

  19. Agglomeration, isolation and dissolution of commercially manufactured silver nanoparticles in aqueous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elzey, Sherrie; Grassian, Vicki H., E-mail: vicki-grassian@uiowa.ed [University of Iowa, Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering (United States)

    2010-06-15

    The increasing use of manufactured nanoparticles ensures these materials will make their way into the environment. Silver nanoparticles in particular, due to use in a wide range of applications, have the potential to get into water systems, e.g., drinking water systems, ground water systems, estuaries, and/or lakes. One important question is what is the chemical and physical state of these nanoparticles in water? Are they present as isolated particles, agglomerates or dissolved ions, as this will dictate their fate and transport. Furthermore, does the chemical and physical state of the nanoparticles change as a function of size or differ from micron-sized particles of similar composition? In this study, an electrospray atomizer coupled to a scanning mobility particle sizer (ES-SMPS) is used to investigate the state of silver nanoparticles in water and aqueous nitric acid environments. Over the range of pH values investigated, 0.5-6.5, silver nanoparticles with a bimodal primary particle size distribution with the most intense peak at 5.0 {+-} 7.4 nm, as determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM), show distinct size distributions indicating agglomeration between pH 6.5 and 3 and isolated nanoparticles at pH values from 2.5 to 1. At the lowest pH investigated, pH 0.5, there are no peaks detected by the SMPS, indicating complete nanoparticle dissolution. Further analysis of the solution shows dissolved Ag ions at a pH of 0.5. Interestingly, silver nanoparticle dissolution shows size dependent behavior as larger, micron-sized silver particles show no dissolution at this pH. Environmental implications of these results are discussed.

  20. Effect of agglomeration of silver nanoparticle on nanotoxicity depression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Eunjoo; Yi, Jongheop [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byung-Cheun; Choi, Kyunghee [National Institute of Environmental Research, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Younghun [Kwangwoon University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are used commercially in a variety of applications, including textiles, cosmetics, spray cleaning agents, and metal products. AgNP itself, however, is classified as an environmental hazard by Environmental Protection Agency (EPA, USA) Nanotechnology White Paper, due to its toxic, persistent and bioaccumulative characteristics when exposed to the environment. We investigated the cumulative mortality and abnormalities in Japanese medaka (Oryziaslatipes) embryos after exposure to AgNPs. Free AgNPs in solution have a high activity with respect to biological interactions regarding blocking blood flow and distribution of AgNPs into the cells from head to tail of hatched O. latipes. Interestingly, the agglomeration of AgNPs (loss of nanosized characteristics) played an important role in the environmental toxicity. The present study demonstrated that when the AgNPs were exposed in the ecosystem and then formed agglomerates, nanotoxicity was reduced.

  1. Effect of agglomeration of silver nanoparticle on nanotoxicity depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Eunjoo; Yi, Jongheop; Lee, Byung-Cheun; Choi, Kyunghee; Kim, Younghun

    2013-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are used commercially in a variety of applications, including textiles, cosmetics, spray cleaning agents, and metal products. AgNP itself, however, is classified as an environmental hazard by Environmental Protection Agency (EPA, USA) Nanotechnology White Paper, due to its toxic, persistent and bioaccumulative characteristics when exposed to the environment. We investigated the cumulative mortality and abnormalities in Japanese medaka (Oryziaslatipes) embryos after exposure to AgNPs. Free AgNPs in solution have a high activity with respect to biological interactions regarding blocking blood flow and distribution of AgNPs into the cells from head to tail of hatched O. latipes. Interestingly, the agglomeration of AgNPs (loss of nanosized characteristics) played an important role in the environmental toxicity. The present study demonstrated that when the AgNPs were exposed in the ecosystem and then formed agglomerates, nanotoxicity was reduced

  2. Particle agglomeration and properties of nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Yijun; Oztekin, Alparslan, E-mail: alo2@lehigh.edu; Neti, Sudhakar [Lehigh University, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics (United States); Mohapatra, Satish [Dynalene Inc. (United States)

    2012-05-15

    The present study demonstrates the importance of actual agglomerated particle size in the nanofluid and its effect on the fluid properties. The current work deals with 5 to 100 nm nanoparticles dispersed in fluids that resulted in 200 to 800 nm agglomerates. Particle size distributions for a range of nanofluids are measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Wet scanning electron microscopy method is used to visualize agglomerated particles in the dispersed state and to confirm particle size measurements by DLS. Our results show that a combination of base fluid chemistry and nanoparticle type is very important to create stable nanofluids. Several nanofluids resulted in stable state without any stabilizers, but in the long term had agglomerations of 250 % over a 2 month period. The effects of agglomeration on the thermal and rheological properties are presented for several types of nanoparticle and base fluid chemistries. Despite using nanodiamond particles with high thermal conductivity and a very sensitive laser flash thermal conductivity measurement technique, no anomalous increases of thermal conductivity was measured. The thermal conductivity increases of nanofluid with the particle concentration are as those predicted by Maxwell and Bruggeman models. The level of agglomeration of nanoparticles hardly influenced the thermal conductivity of the nanofluid. The viscosity of nanofluids increased strongly as the concentration of particle is increased; it displays shear thinning and is a strong function of the level of agglomeration. The viscosity increase is significantly above of that predicted by the Einstein model even for very small concentration of nanoparticles.

  3. Particle agglomeration and properties of nanofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yijun; Oztekin, Alparslan; Neti, Sudhakar; Mohapatra, Satish

    2012-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the importance of actual agglomerated particle size in the nanofluid and its effect on the fluid properties. The current work deals with 5 to 100 nm nanoparticles dispersed in fluids that resulted in 200 to 800 nm agglomerates. Particle size distributions for a range of nanofluids are measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Wet scanning electron microscopy method is used to visualize agglomerated particles in the dispersed state and to confirm particle size measurements by DLS. Our results show that a combination of base fluid chemistry and nanoparticle type is very important to create stable nanofluids. Several nanofluids resulted in stable state without any stabilizers, but in the long term had agglomerations of 250 % over a 2 month period. The effects of agglomeration on the thermal and rheological properties are presented for several types of nanoparticle and base fluid chemistries. Despite using nanodiamond particles with high thermal conductivity and a very sensitive laser flash thermal conductivity measurement technique, no anomalous increases of thermal conductivity was measured. The thermal conductivity increases of nanofluid with the particle concentration are as those predicted by Maxwell and Bruggeman models. The level of agglomeration of nanoparticles hardly influenced the thermal conductivity of the nanofluid. The viscosity of nanofluids increased strongly as the concentration of particle is increased; it displays shear thinning and is a strong function of the level of agglomeration. The viscosity increase is significantly above of that predicted by the Einstein model even for very small concentration of nanoparticles.

  4. The effect of particle agglomeration on the formation of a surface-connected compartment induced by hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in human monocyte-derived macrophages☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Karin H.; Motskin, Michael; Philpott, Alistair J.; Routh, Alexander F.; Shanahan, Catherine M.; Duer, Melinda J.; Skepper, Jeremy N.

    2014-01-01

    Agglomeration dramatically affects many aspects of nanoparticle–cell interactions. Here we show that hydroxyapatite nanoparticles formed large agglomerates in biological medium resulting in extensive particle uptake and dose-dependent cytotoxicity in human macrophages. Particle citration and/or the addition of the dispersant Darvan 7 dramatically reduced mean agglomerate sizes, the amount of particle uptake and concomitantly cytotoxicity. More surprisingly, agglomeration governed the mode of particle uptake. Agglomerates were sequestered within an extensive, interconnected membrane labyrinth open to the extracellular space. In spite of not being truly intracellular, imaging studies suggest particle degradation occurred within this surface-connected compartment (SCC). Agglomerate dispersion prevented the SCC from forming, but did not completely inhibit nanoparticle uptake by other mechanisms. The results of this study could be relevant to understanding particle–cell interactions during developmental mineral deposition, in ectopic calcification in disease, and during application of hydroxyapatite nanoparticle vectors in biomedicine. PMID:24183166

  5. Impact of alginate concentration on the stability of agglomerates made of TiO{sub 2} engineered nanoparticles: Water hardness and pH effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loosli, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.loosli@unige.ch [University of Geneva, Section des Sciences de la Terre et de l’Environnement, Group of Environmental Physical Chemistry, F.-A. Forel Institute (Switzerland); Coustumer, Philippe Le, E-mail: philippe.le-coustumer@u-bordeaux1.fr [Université Bordeaux 3, EA 4592 Géoressources & Environnement, ENSEGID (France); Stoll, Serge, E-mail: serge.stoll@unige.ch [University of Geneva, Section des Sciences de la Terre et de l’Environnement, Group of Environmental Physical Chemistry, F.-A. Forel Institute (Switzerland)

    2015-01-15

    The stability of engineered nanoparticles in natural aquatic systems is of high interest for environmental risk assessment since an already important quantity of these reactive species is entering aquatic systems. In the present study, an important issue is addressed by investigating (i) the influence of divalent cations and water hardness (Mg{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+}) in agglomerate formation and (ii) alginate concentration effect on the stability TiO{sub 2} agglomerates formed in environmental freshwater conditions (pH and total hardness) representative of Lake Geneva, France/Switzerland. Our results indicate that the presence of alginate at typical natural organic matter concentration strongly modifies the stability of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle agglomerates by inducing their partial disagglomeration. Significant TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles redispersion and formation of small fragments are expected to be induced by alginate adsorbed layer formed at the nanoparticle surfaces within the agglomerates.Graphical Abstract.

  6. Diamond-like-carbon nanoparticle production and agglomeration following UV multi-photon excitation of static naphthalene/helium gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, A. J.; Ruth, A. A., E-mail: a.ruth@ucc.ie [Physics Department and Environmental Research Institute, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Tielens, A. G. G. M. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, 2333-CA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2016-07-14

    We report the formation of nanoparticles with significant diamond character after UV multi-photon laser excitation of gaseous naphthalene, buffered in static helium gas, at room temperature. The nanoparticles are identified in situ by their absorption and scattering spectra between 400 and 850 nm, which are modeled using Mie theory. Comparisons of the particles’ spectroscopic and optical properties with those of carbonaceous materials indicate a sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} hybridization ratio of 8:1 of the particles formed. The particle extinction in the closed static (unstirred) gas-phase system exhibits a complex and quasi-oscillatory time dependence for the duration of up to several hours with periods ranging from seconds to many minutes. The extinction dynamics of the system is based on a combination of transport features and particle interaction, predominantly agglomeration. The relatively long period of agglomeration allows for a unique analysis of the agglomeration process of diamond-like carbon nanoparticles in situ.

  7. Extreme enhancement of blocking temperature by strong magnetic dipoles interaction of α-Fe nanoparticle-based high-density agglomerate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kura, H; Takahashi, M; Ogawa, T

    2011-01-01

    High-volume fraction α-Fe nanoparticle (NP) agglomerates were prepared using chemically synthesized NPs. In the agglomerate, NPs are separated by surfactant and NP superlattice with a hexagonal close-packed structure is locally realized. Volume fractions of NPs at 20% and 42% were obtained in agglomerates consisting of 2.9 nm and 8.2 nm diameter NPs, respectively. The high saturation magnetization of α-Fe NPs and high volume fraction of NPs in the agglomerate provide strong magnetic dipole-dipole interaction. The interaction energy of the agglomerate became much larger than the anisotropic energy of individual NPs. As a result, the blocking temperature of the 8.2 nm NP agglomerate was significantly enhanced from 52.2 K to around 500 K. (fast track communication)

  8. Phosphate-enhanced cytotoxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles and agglomerates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, W Neil; Chern, Christina; Sun, Dazhi; McMahon, Rebecca E; Zhang, Xi; Chen, Wei-Jung A; Hahn, Mariah S; Sue, H-J

    2014-02-10

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) have been found to readily react with phosphate ions to form zinc phosphate (Zn3(PO4)2) crystallites. Because phosphates are ubiquitous in physiological fluids as well as waste water streams, it is important to examine the potential effects that the formation of Zn3(PO4)2 crystallites may have on cell viability. Thus, the cytotoxic response of NIH/3T3 fibroblast cells was assessed following 24h of exposure to ZnO NPs suspended in media with and without the standard phosphate salt supplement. Both particle dosage and size have been shown to impact the cytotoxic effects of ZnO NPs, so doses ranging from 5 to 50 μg/mL were examined and agglomerate size effects were investigated by using the bioinert amphiphilic polymer polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) to generate water-soluble ZnO ranging from individually dispersed 4 nm NPs up to micron-sized agglomerates. Cell metabolic activity measures indicated that the presence of phosphate in the suspension media can led to significantly reduced cell viability at all agglomerate sizes and at lower ZnO dosages. In addition, a reduction in cell viability was observed when agglomerate size was decreased, but only in the phosphate-containing media. These metabolic activity results were reflected in separate measures of cell death via the lactate dehydrogenase assay. Our results suggest that, while higher doses of water-soluble ZnO NPs are cytotoxic, the presence of phosphates in the surrounding fluid can lead to significantly elevated levels of cell death at lower ZnO NP doses. Moreover, the extent of this death can potentially be modulated or offset by tuning the agglomerate size. These findings underscore the importance of understanding how nanoscale materials can interact with the components of surrounding fluids so that potential adverse effects of such interactions can be controlled. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessment of Morphological and Functional Changes in Organs of Rats after Intramuscular Introduction of Iron Nanoparticles and Their Agglomerates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Sizova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The research was performed on male Wistar rats based on assumptions that new microelement preparations containing metal nanoparticles and their agglomerates had potential. Morphological and functional changes in tissues in the injection site and dynamics of chemical element metabolism (25 indicators in body were assessed after repeated intramuscular injections (total, 7 with preparation containing agglomerate of iron nanoparticles. As a result, iron depot was formed in myosymplasts of injection sites. The quantity of muscle fibers having positive Perls’ stain increased with increasing number of injections. However, the concentration of the most chemical elements and iron significantly decreased in the whole skeletal muscle system (injection sites are not included. Consequently, it increased up to the control level after the sixth and the seventh injections. Among the studied organs (liver, kidneys, and spleen, Caspase-3 expression was revealed only in spleen. The expression had a direct dependence on the number of injections. Processes of iron elimination from preparation containing nanoparticles and their agglomerates had different intensity.

  10. Stability of silver nanoparticles: agglomeration and oxidation in biological relevant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Laura E.; Giacomelli, Carla E.

    2017-05-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) are the most used nanomaterial in consumer products due to the intrinsic antimicrobial capacity of silver. However, Ag-NP may be also harmful to algae, aquatic species, mammalian cells, and higher plants because both Ag+ and nanoparticles are responsible of cell damages. The oxidative dissolution of Ag-NP would proceed to completion under oxic conditions, but the rate and extent of the dissolution depend on several factors. This work correlates the effect of the capping agent (albumin and citrate) with the stability of Ag-NP towards agglomeration in simulated body fluid (SBF) and oxidation in the presence of ROS species (H2O2). Capping provides colloidal stability only through electrostatic means, whereas albumin acts as bulky ligands giving steric and electrostatic repulsion, inhibiting the agglomeration in SBF. However, citrate capping protects Ag-NP from dissolution to a major extent than albumin does because of its reducing power. Moreover, citrate in solution minimizes the oxidation of albumin-coated Ag-NP even after long incubation times. H2O2-induced dissolution proceeds to completion with Ag-NP incubated in SBF, while incubation in citrate leads to an incomplete oxidation. In short, albumin is an excellent capping agent to minimize Ag-NP agglomeration whereas citrate provides a mild-reductive medium that prevents dissolution in biological relevant media as well as in the presence of ROS species. These results provide insight into how the surface properties and media composition affect the release of Ag+ from Ag-NP, related to the cell toxicity and relevant to the storage and lifetime of silver-containing nanomaterials.

  11. Stability of silver nanoparticles: agglomeration and oxidation in biological relevant conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenti, Laura E.; Giacomelli, Carla E., E-mail: giacomel@fcq.unc.edu.ar [Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Ciudad Universitaria, Instituto de Investigaciones en Físico Química de Córdoba (INFIQC) CONICET-UNC, Departamento de Fisicoquímica, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas (Argentina)

    2017-05-15

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) are the most used nanomaterial in consumer products due to the intrinsic antimicrobial capacity of silver. However, Ag-NP may be also harmful to algae, aquatic species, mammalian cells, and higher plants because both Ag{sup +} and nanoparticles are responsible of cell damages. The oxidative dissolution of Ag-NP would proceed to completion under oxic conditions, but the rate and extent of the dissolution depend on several factors. This work correlates the effect of the capping agent (albumin and citrate) with the stability of Ag-NP towards agglomeration in simulated body fluid (SBF) and oxidation in the presence of ROS species (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). Capping provides colloidal stability only through electrostatic means, whereas albumin acts as bulky ligands giving steric and electrostatic repulsion, inhibiting the agglomeration in SBF. However, citrate capping protects Ag-NP from dissolution to a major extent than albumin does because of its reducing power. Moreover, citrate in solution minimizes the oxidation of albumin-coated Ag-NP even after long incubation times. H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced dissolution proceeds to completion with Ag-NP incubated in SBF, while incubation in citrate leads to an incomplete oxidation. In short, albumin is an excellent capping agent to minimize Ag-NP agglomeration whereas citrate provides a mild-reductive medium that prevents dissolution in biological relevant media as well as in the presence of ROS species. These results provide insight into how the surface properties and media composition affect the release of Ag{sup +} from Ag-NP, related to the cell toxicity and relevant to the storage and lifetime of silver-containing nanomaterials.

  12. Hydrophilic luminescent silicon nanoparticles in steric colloidal solutions: Their size, agglomeration, and toxicity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herynková, Kateřina; Šimáková, Petra; Cibulka, Ondřej; Fučíková, Anna; Kalbáčová, M.H.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 12 (2017), s. 1-4, č. článku 1700195. ISSN 1862-6351 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) DAAD-16-18 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : silicon nanoparticles * agglomeration * toxicity Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics OBOR OECD: Biophysics

  13. Control of nanoparticle agglomeration through variation of the time-temperature profile in chemical vapor synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djenadic, Ruzica; Winterer, Markus, E-mail: markus.winterer@uni-due.de [Universität Duisburg-Essen, Nanoparticle Process Technology, Faculty of Engineering and CENIDE (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    The influence of the time-temperature history on the characteristics of nanoparticles such as size, degree of agglomeration, or crystallinity is investigated for chemical vapor synthesis (CVS). A simple reaction-coagulation-sintering model is used to describe the CVS process, and the results of the model are compared to experimental data. Nanocrystalline titania is used as model material. Titania nanoparticles are generated from titanium-tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in a hot-wall reactor. Pure anatase particles and mixtures of anatase, rutile (up to 11 vol.%), and brookite (up to 29 vol.%) with primary particle sizes from 1.7 nm to 10.5 nm and agglomerate particle sizes from 24.3 nm to 55.6 nm are formed depending on the particle time-temperature history. An inductively heated furnace with variable inductor geometry is used as a novel system to control the time-temperature profile in the reactor externally covering a large wall temperature range from 873 K to 2023 K. An appropriate choice of inductor geometry, i.e. time-temperature profile, can significantly reduce the degree of agglomeration. Other particle characteristics such as crystallinity are also substantially influenced by the time-temperature profile.

  14. Influence of the nanoparticles agglomeration state in the quantum-confinement effects: Experimental evidences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorite, I., E-mail: lorite@physik.uni-leipzig.de [Electroceramic Department, Instituto de Cerámica y Vidrio, CSIC, Kelsen 5, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Division of Superconductivity and Magnetism, Faculty of Physics and Earth Sciences, Linnestrasse 5, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Romero, J. J.; Fernandez, J. F. [Electroceramic Department, Instituto de Cerámica y Vidrio, CSIC, Kelsen 5, 28049, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-03-15

    The agglomeration state facilitates particle-particle interaction which produces important effects in the phonon confinement effects at the nanoscale. A partial phonon transmission between close nanoparticles yields a lower momentum conservation relaxation than in a single isolated nanoparticle. It means a larger red shift and broadening of the Raman modes than the expected ones for Raman quantum confinement effects. This particle-particle interaction can drive to error when Raman responses are used to estimate the size of the nanoscaled materials. In this work different corrections are suggested to overtake this source of error.

  15. Influence of the nanoparticles agglomeration state in the quantum-confinement effects: Experimental evidences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorite, I.; Romero, J. J.; Fernandez, J. F.

    2015-01-01

    The agglomeration state facilitates particle-particle interaction which produces important effects in the phonon confinement effects at the nanoscale. A partial phonon transmission between close nanoparticles yields a lower momentum conservation relaxation than in a single isolated nanoparticle. It means a larger red shift and broadening of the Raman modes than the expected ones for Raman quantum confinement effects. This particle-particle interaction can drive to error when Raman responses are used to estimate the size of the nanoscaled materials. In this work different corrections are suggested to overtake this source of error

  16. The agglomeration state of nanoparticles can influence the mechanism of their cellular internalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halamoda-Kenzaoui, Blanka; Ceridono, Mara; Urbán, Patricia; Bogni, Alessia; Ponti, Jessica; Gioria, Sabrina; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka

    2017-06-26

    Significant progress of nanotechnology, including in particular biomedical and pharmaceutical applications, has resulted in a high number of studies describing the biological effects of nanomaterials. Moreover, a determination of so-called "critical quality attributes", that is specific physicochemical properties of nanomaterials triggering the observed biological response, has been recognised as crucial for the evaluation and design of novel safe and efficacious therapeutics. In the context of in vitro studies, a thorough physicochemical characterisation of nanoparticles (NPs), also in the biological medium, is necessary to allow a correlation with a cellular response. Following this concept, we examined whether the main and frequently reported characteristics of NPs such as size and the agglomeration state can influence the level and the mechanism of NP cellular internalization. We employed fluorescently-labelled 30 and 80 nm silicon dioxide NPs, both in agglomerated and non-agglomerated form. Using flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy, the inhibitors of endocytosis and gene silencing we determined the most probable routes of cellular uptake for each form of tested silica NPs. We observed differences in cellular uptake depending on the size and the agglomeration state of NPs. Caveolae-mediated endocytosis was implicated particularly in the internalisation of well dispersed silica NPs but with an increase of the agglomeration state of NPs a combination of endocytic pathways with a predominant role of macropinocytosis was noted. We demonstrated that the agglomeration state of NPs is an important factor influencing the level of cell uptake and the mechanism of endocytosis of silica NPs.

  17. De-agglomeration and homogenisation of nanoparticles in coal tar pitch-based carbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubernat, Maciej; Tomala, Janusz; Frohs, Wilhelm; Fraczek-Szczypta, Aneta; Blazewicz, Stanislaw

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the work was to characterise coal tar pitch (CTP) modified with selected nanoparticles as a binder precursor for the manufacture of synthetic carbon materials. Different factors influencing the preliminary preparative steps in the preparation of homogenous nanoparticle/CTP composition were studied. Graphene flakes, carbon black and nano-sized silicon carbide were used to modify CTP. Prior to introducing them into liquid CTP, nanoparticles were subjected to sonication. Various dispersants were used to prepare the suspensions, i.e. water, ethanol, dimethylformamide (DMF) and N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP).The results showed that proper dispersant selection is one of the most important factors influencing the de-agglomeration process of nanoparticles. DMF and NMP were found to be effective dispersants for the preparation of homogenous nanoparticle-containing suspensions. The presence of SiC and carbon black nanoparticles in the liquid pitch during heat treatment up to 2000 °C leads to the inhibition of crystallite growth in carbon residue.

  18. De-agglomeration and homogenisation of nanoparticles in coal tar pitch-based carbon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubernat, Maciej [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics (Poland); Tomala, Janusz [SGL Carbon Polska S.A. (Poland); Frohs, Wilhelm [SGL CARBON GmbH (Germany); Fraczek-Szczypta, Aneta; Blazewicz, Stanislaw, E-mail: blazew@agh.edu.pl [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics (Poland)

    2016-03-15

    The aim of the work was to characterise coal tar pitch (CTP) modified with selected nanoparticles as a binder precursor for the manufacture of synthetic carbon materials. Different factors influencing the preliminary preparative steps in the preparation of homogenous nanoparticle/CTP composition were studied. Graphene flakes, carbon black and nano-sized silicon carbide were used to modify CTP. Prior to introducing them into liquid CTP, nanoparticles were subjected to sonication. Various dispersants were used to prepare the suspensions, i.e. water, ethanol, dimethylformamide (DMF) and N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP).The results showed that proper dispersant selection is one of the most important factors influencing the de-agglomeration process of nanoparticles. DMF and NMP were found to be effective dispersants for the preparation of homogenous nanoparticle-containing suspensions. The presence of SiC and carbon black nanoparticles in the liquid pitch during heat treatment up to 2000 °C leads to the inhibition of crystallite growth in carbon residue.

  19. The agglomeration, coalescence and sliding of nanoparticles, leading to the rapid sintering of zirconia nanoceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocjan, Andraž; Logar, Manca; Shen, Zhijian

    2017-05-31

    Conventional sintering is a time- and energy-consuming process used for the densification of consolidated particles facilitated by atomic diffusion at high temperatures. Nanoparticles, with their increased surface free energy, can promote sintering; however, size reduction also promotes agglomeration, so hampering particle packing and complete densification. Here we show how the ordered agglomeration of zirconia primary crystallites into secondary particle assemblies ensures their homogeneous packing, while also preserving the high surface energy to higher temperatures, increasing the sintering activity. When exposed to intense electromagnetic radiation, providing rapid heating, the assembled crystallites are subjected to further agglomeration, coalescence and sliding, leading to rapid densification in the absence of extensive diffusional processes, cancelling out the grain growth during the initial sintering stages and providing a zirconia nanoceramic in only 2 minutes at 1300 °C.

  20. Effect of hydration repulsion on nanoparticle agglomeration evaluated via a constant number Monte–Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Haoyang Haven; Lanphere, Jacob; Walker, Sharon; Cohen, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    The effect of hydration repulsion on the agglomeration of nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions was investigated via the description of agglomeration by the Smoluchowski coagulation equation using constant number Monte–Carlo simulation making use of the classical DLVO theory extended to include the hydration repulsion energy. Evaluation of experimental DLS measurements for TiO 2 , CeO 2 , SiO 2 , and α-Fe 2 O 3 (hematite) at high IS (up to 900 mM) or low |ζ-potential| (≥1.35 mV) demonstrated that hydration repulsion energy can be above electrostatic repulsion energy such that the increased overall repulsion energy can significantly lower the agglomerate diameter relative to the classical DLVO prediction. While the classical DLVO theory, which is reasonably applicable for agglomeration of NPs of high |ζ-potential| (∼>35 mV) in suspensions of low IS (∼<1 mM), it can overpredict agglomerate sizes by up to a factor of 5 at high IS or low |ζ-potential|. Given the potential important role of hydration repulsion over a range of relevant conditions, there is merit in quantifying this repulsion energy over a wide range of conditions as part of overall characterization of NP suspensions. Such information would be of relevance to improved understanding of NP agglomeration in aqueous suspensions and its correlation with NP physicochemical and solution properties. (paper)

  1. Compound list: nifedipine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nifedipine NIF 00091 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/i...n_vitro/nifedipine.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vi...tro/nifedipine.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liv...er/Single/nifedipine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/arch

  2. Modeling of particle agglomeration in nanofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna, K. Hari; Neti, S.; Oztekin, A.; Mohapatra, S.

    2015-01-01

    Agglomeration strongly influences the stability or shelf life of nanofluid. The present computational and experimental study investigates the rate of agglomeration quantitatively. Agglomeration in nanofluids is attributed to the net effect of various inter-particle interaction forces. For the nanofluid considered here, a net inter-particle force depends on the particle size, volume fraction, pH, and electrolyte concentration. A solution of the discretized and coupled population balance equations can yield particle sizes as a function of time. Nanofluid prepared here consists of alumina nanoparticles with the average particle size of 150 nm dispersed in de-ionized water. As the pH of the colloid was moved towards the isoelectric point of alumina nanofluids, the rate of increase of average particle size increased with time due to lower net positive charge on particles. The rate at which the average particle size is increased is predicted and measured for different electrolyte concentration and volume fraction. The higher rate of agglomeration is attributed to the decrease in the electrostatic double layer repulsion forces. The rate of agglomeration decreases due to increase in the size of nano-particle clusters thus approaching zero rate of agglomeration when all the clusters are nearly uniform in size. Predicted rates of agglomeration agree adequate enough with the measured values; validating the mathematical model and numerical approach is employed

  3. Capillary condensation onto titania (TiO2) nanoparticle agglomerates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonmin; Ehrman, Sheryl H

    2007-02-27

    A capillary condensation process was developed for the purpose of forming interconnections between nanoparticles at low temperatures. The process was performed in a temperature-controlled flow chamber on nanoparticle agglomerates deposited at submonolayer coverage on a transmission electron microscope grid. The partial pressure of the condensing species, tetraethyl orthosilicate, and the temperature of the chamber were adjusted in order to obtain the various saturation conditions for capillary condensation. The modified samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, BET surface area method, and scanning transmission electron microscopy with electron energy-loss spectrometry. Experimental results show that bridge-shaped layers were dominantly formed in the neck region between particles and were composed of amorphous silica. The analysis of TEM micrographs verified that the coverage of the layers is strongly dependent on the saturation ratio. Image analysis of TEM micrographs shows that this dependency is qualitatively in agreement with theoretical predictions based on the classical Kelvin equation for the specific geometries in our system.

  4. Effects of Al(OH)O nanoparticle agglomerate size in epoxy resin on tension, bending, and fracture properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jux, Maximilian, E-mail: maximilian.jux@dlr.de [TU Braunschweig, Institute of Adaptronic and Functional Integration (IAF) (Germany); Finke, Benedikt [TU Braunschweig, Institute for Particle Technology (IPAT) (Germany); Mahrholz, Thorsten [DLR Braunschweig, Institute of Composite Structures and Adaptive Systems (FA) (Germany); Sinapius, Michael [TU Braunschweig, Institute of Adaptronic and Functional Integration (IAF) (Germany); Kwade, Arno; Schilde, Carsten [TU Braunschweig, Institute for Particle Technology (IPAT) (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    Several epoxy Al(OH)O (boehmite) dispersions in an epoxy resin are produced in a kneader to study the mechanistic correlation between the nanoparticle size and mechanical properties of the prepared nanocomposites. The agglomerate size is set by a targeted variation in solid content and temperature during dispersion, resulting in a different level of stress intensity and thus a different final agglomerate size during the process. The suspension viscosity was used for the estimation of stress energy in laminar shear flow. Agglomerate size measurements are executed via dynamic light scattering to ensure the quality of the produced dispersions. Furthermore, various nanocomposite samples are prepared for three-point bending, tension, and fracture toughness tests. The screening of the size effect is executed with at least seven samples per agglomerate size and test method. The variation of solid content is found to be a reliable method to adjust the agglomerate size between 138–354 nm during dispersion. The size effect on the Young’s modulus and the critical stress intensity is only marginal. Nevertheless, there is a statistically relevant trend showing a linear increase with a decrease in agglomerate size. In contrast, the size effect is more dominant to the sample’s strain and stress at failure. Unlike microscaled agglomerates or particles, which lead to embrittlement of the composite material, nanoscaled agglomerates or particles cause the composite elongation to be nearly of the same level as the base material. The observed effect is valid for agglomerate sizes between 138–354 nm and a particle mass fraction of 10 wt%.

  5. Effects of Al(OH)O nanoparticle agglomerate size in epoxy resin on tension, bending, and fracture properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jux, Maximilian; Finke, Benedikt; Mahrholz, Thorsten; Sinapius, Michael; Kwade, Arno; Schilde, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Several epoxy Al(OH)O (boehmite) dispersions in an epoxy resin are produced in a kneader to study the mechanistic correlation between the nanoparticle size and mechanical properties of the prepared nanocomposites. The agglomerate size is set by a targeted variation in solid content and temperature during dispersion, resulting in a different level of stress intensity and thus a different final agglomerate size during the process. The suspension viscosity was used for the estimation of stress energy in laminar shear flow. Agglomerate size measurements are executed via dynamic light scattering to ensure the quality of the produced dispersions. Furthermore, various nanocomposite samples are prepared for three-point bending, tension, and fracture toughness tests. The screening of the size effect is executed with at least seven samples per agglomerate size and test method. The variation of solid content is found to be a reliable method to adjust the agglomerate size between 138–354 nm during dispersion. The size effect on the Young’s modulus and the critical stress intensity is only marginal. Nevertheless, there is a statistically relevant trend showing a linear increase with a decrease in agglomerate size. In contrast, the size effect is more dominant to the sample’s strain and stress at failure. Unlike microscaled agglomerates or particles, which lead to embrittlement of the composite material, nanoscaled agglomerates or particles cause the composite elongation to be nearly of the same level as the base material. The observed effect is valid for agglomerate sizes between 138–354 nm and a particle mass fraction of 10 wt%.

  6. Morphological and Physicochemical Characterization of Agglomerates of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Cell Culture Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Freyre-Fonseca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NP are possible carcinogenic materials (2B-IARC and their toxicity depends on shape, size, and electrical charge of primary NP and on the system formed by NP media. The aim of this work was to characterize agglomerates of three TiO2 NP by evaluating their morphometry, stability, and zeta potential (ζ in liquid media and their changes with time. Sizes of agglomerates by dynamic light scattering (DLS resulted to be 10–50 times larger than those obtained by digital image analysis (DIA given the charged zone around particles. Fractal dimension (FD was highest for agglomerates of spheres and belts in F12K, and in E171 in FBS media. E171 and belts increased FD with time. At time zero, using water as dispersant FD was larger for agglomerates of spheres than for of E171. Belts suspended in water had the smallest values of circularity (Ci which was approximately unchanged with time. All dispersions had ζ values around −30 mV at physiological pH (7.4 and dispersions of NP in water and FBS showed maximum stability (Turbiscan Lab analysis. Results help in understanding the complex NP geometry-size-stability relationships when performing in vivo and in vitro environmental-toxicity works and help in supporting decisions on the usage of TiO2 NP.

  7. Dispersion and Filtration of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) and Measurement of Nanoparticle Agglomerates in Diesel Exhaust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Pui, David Y H

    2013-01-14

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) tend to form bundles due to their geometry and van der Walls forces, which usually complicates studies of the CNT properties. Dispersion plays a significant role in CNT studies and we summarize dispersion techniques to generate airborne CNTs from suspensions or powders. We describe in detail our technique of CNT aerosolization with controlled degree of agglomeration using an electrospray system. The results of animal inhalation studies using the electrosprayed CNTs are presented. We have performed filtration experiments for CNTs through a screen filter. A numerical model has been established to simulate the CNT filtration experiments. Both the modeling and experimental results show that the CNT penetration is less than the penetration for a sphere with the same mobility diameter, which is mainly due to the larger interception length of the CNTs. There is a need for instruments capable of fast and online measurement of gas-borne nanoparticle agglomerates. We developed an instrument Universal NanoParticle Analyzer (UNPA) and the measurement results for diesel exhaust particulates are presented. The results presented here are pertinent to non-spherical aerosol particles, and illustrate the effects of particle morphology on aerosol behaviors.

  8. Effect of the pillar ligand on preventing agglomeration of ZnO nanoparticles prepared from Zn(II metal-organic frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Moeinian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs represent a new class of highly porous materials. On this regard,  two nano porous metal-organic frameworks of [Zn2(1,4-bdc2(H2O2∙(DMF2]n (1 and [Zn2(1,4-bdc2(dabco]·4DMF·1⁄2H2O (2, (1,4-bdc = benzene-1,4-dicarboxylate, dabco = 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane and DMF = N,N-dimethylformamide were synthesized and characterized. They were used for preparation of ZnO nanomaterials. With calcination of 1, agglomerated ZnO nanoparticles could be fabricated, but by the same process on 2, the tendency of ZnO nanoparticles to agglomeration was decreased. In addition, the ZnO nanoparticles prepared from compound 2 had smaller diameter than those obtained from compound 1. In fact, the role of organic dabco ligands in 2 is similar to the role of polymeric stabilizers in formation of nanoparticles. Finally, considering the various applications of ZnO nanomaterials such as light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, photodiodes, gas sensors and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs, it seems that preparation of ZnO nanomaterials from their MOFs could be one of the simple and effective methods which may be applied for preparation of them.

  9. Disentangling the effects of polymer coatings on silver nanoparticle agglomeration, dissolution, and toxicity to determine mechanisms of nanotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zook, Justin M.; Halter, Melissa D.; Cleveland, Danielle; Long, Stephen E.

    2012-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are frequently coated with a variety of polymers, which may affect various interdependent mechanisms of toxicity or antimicrobial action, including agglomeration and dissolution rates. Here, we systematically measure how citrate, dextran, 5 and 20 kDa poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) coatings affect AgNP agglomeration, dissolution, and toxicity. In addition, to disentangle the coatings’ effects on agglomeration from their other effects, we produce multiple stable agglomerate sizes of several of the coated ∼23 nm AgNPs ranging from singly-dispersed to mean agglomerate sizes of several hundred nanometers. These dispersions allow us to independently study the effects of agglomeration and polymer coating on dissolution rate and hemolytic toxicity. We find that both hemolytic toxicity and dissolution rate are highest for the 5 kDa PEG coating, and toxicity and dissolution rate decrease significantly with increasing agglomerate size independent of coating. This correlation between toxicity and dissolution rate suggests that both polymer coating and agglomeration may affect hemolytic toxicity largely through their effects on dissolution. Because both the AgNP dissolution rate and hemolysis decrease only moderately compared to the large increases in agglomerate size, AgNPs’ hemolytic toxicity may be caused by their large surface area and consequently high dissolution rate, rather than from other size-specific effects. At the silver concentrations used in this work, silver dissolved from AgNPs is expected to be primarily in the form of AgCl NPs, which are therefore more likely than Ag + ions to be the primary drivers of hemolytic toxicity. In addition, all AgNPs we tested are much more toxic to horse red blood cells than sheep red blood cells, highlighting the complexity of toxic responses and the need to test toxicity in multiple biological systems.

  10. Disentangling the effects of polymer coatings on silver nanoparticle agglomeration, dissolution, and toxicity to determine mechanisms of nanotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zook, Justin M.; Halter, Melissa D.; Cleveland, Danielle; Long, Stephen E.

    2012-10-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are frequently coated with a variety of polymers, which may affect various interdependent mechanisms of toxicity or antimicrobial action, including agglomeration and dissolution rates. Here, we systematically measure how citrate, dextran, 5 and 20 kDa poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) coatings affect AgNP agglomeration, dissolution, and toxicity. In addition, to disentangle the coatings' effects on agglomeration from their other effects, we produce multiple stable agglomerate sizes of several of the coated 23 nm AgNPs ranging from singly-dispersed to mean agglomerate sizes of several hundred nanometers. These dispersions allow us to independently study the effects of agglomeration and polymer coating on dissolution rate and hemolytic toxicity. We find that both hemolytic toxicity and dissolution rate are highest for the 5 kDa PEG coating, and toxicity and dissolution rate decrease significantly with increasing agglomerate size independent of coating. This correlation between toxicity and dissolution rate suggests that both polymer coating and agglomeration may affect hemolytic toxicity largely through their effects on dissolution. Because both the AgNP dissolution rate and hemolysis decrease only moderately compared to the large increases in agglomerate size, AgNPs' hemolytic toxicity may be caused by their large surface area and consequently high dissolution rate, rather than from other size-specific effects. At the silver concentrations used in this work, silver dissolved from AgNPs is expected to be primarily in the form of AgCl NPs, which are therefore more likely than Ag+ ions to be the primary drivers of hemolytic toxicity. In addition, all AgNPs we tested are much more toxic to horse red blood cells than sheep red blood cells, highlighting the complexity of toxic responses and the need to test toxicity in multiple biological systems.

  11. Disentangling the effects of polymer coatings on silver nanoparticle agglomeration, dissolution, and toxicity to determine mechanisms of nanotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zook, Justin M., E-mail: jzook@nist.gov; Halter, Melissa D.; Cleveland, Danielle; Long, Stephen E. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Material Measurement Laboratory (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are frequently coated with a variety of polymers, which may affect various interdependent mechanisms of toxicity or antimicrobial action, including agglomeration and dissolution rates. Here, we systematically measure how citrate, dextran, 5 and 20 kDa poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) coatings affect AgNP agglomeration, dissolution, and toxicity. In addition, to disentangle the coatings' effects on agglomeration from their other effects, we produce multiple stable agglomerate sizes of several of the coated {approx}23 nm AgNPs ranging from singly-dispersed to mean agglomerate sizes of several hundred nanometers. These dispersions allow us to independently study the effects of agglomeration and polymer coating on dissolution rate and hemolytic toxicity. We find that both hemolytic toxicity and dissolution rate are highest for the 5 kDa PEG coating, and toxicity and dissolution rate decrease significantly with increasing agglomerate size independent of coating. This correlation between toxicity and dissolution rate suggests that both polymer coating and agglomeration may affect hemolytic toxicity largely through their effects on dissolution. Because both the AgNP dissolution rate and hemolysis decrease only moderately compared to the large increases in agglomerate size, AgNPs' hemolytic toxicity may be caused by their large surface area and consequently high dissolution rate, rather than from other size-specific effects. At the silver concentrations used in this work, silver dissolved from AgNPs is expected to be primarily in the form of AgCl NPs, which are therefore more likely than Ag{sup +} ions to be the primary drivers of hemolytic toxicity. In addition, all AgNPs we tested are much more toxic to horse red blood cells than sheep red blood cells, highlighting the complexity of toxic responses and the need to test toxicity in multiple biological systems.

  12. An improved model for estimating fractal structure of silica nano-agglomerates in a vibro-fluidized bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Esmailpour

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A study has been conducted to determine the effects of operating conditions such as vibration frequency, vibration amplitude on the fractal structure of silica (SiO2 nanoparticle agglomerate in a vibro-fluidized bed. An improved model was proposed by assimilation of fractal theory, Richardson-Zaki equation and mass balance. This model has been developed to predict the properties of nanoparticle agglomerate, such as fractal dimension and its size. It has been found out the vibration intensity increase leads to a slight reduction in fractal dimension of agglomerate. This Paper is also indicated that the size of agglomerate has the same behavior as fractal dimension with respect to vibration intensity changes. This study demonstrated that the fractal dimension of Silica nanoparticle agglomerate is in the range of 2.61 to 2.69 and the number of primary particles in the agglomerate is in the order of 1010. The vibration frequency is more impressive than its amplitude on agglomerate size reduction. Calculated Minimum fluidization velocity by applying predicted agglomerate sizes and experimental data are acceptable fitted.

  13. Design of sustained release fine particles using two-step mechanical powder processing: particle shape modification of drug crystals and dry particle coating with polymer nanoparticle agglomerate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Keita; Ito, Natsuki; Niwa, Toshiyuki; Danjo, Kazumi

    2013-09-10

    We attempted to prepare sustained release fine particles using a two-step mechanical powder processing method; particle-shape modification and dry particle coating. First, particle shape of bulk drug was modified by mechanical treatment to yield drug crystals suitable for the coating process. Drug crystals became more rounded with increasing rotation speed, which demonstrates that powerful mechanical stress yields spherical drug crystals with narrow size distribution. This process is the result of destruction, granulation and refinement of drug crystals. Second, the modified drug particles and polymer coating powder were mechanically treated to prepare composite particles. Polymer nanoparticle agglomerate obtained by drying poly(meth)acrylate aqueous dispersion was used as a coating powder. The porous nanoparticle agglomerate has superior coating performance, because it is completely deagglomerated under mechanical stress to form fine fragments that act as guest particles. As a result, spherical drug crystals treated with porous agglomerate were effectively coated by poly(meth)acrylate powder, showing sustained release after curing. From these findings, particle-shape modification of drug crystals and dry particle coating with nanoparticle agglomerate using a mechanical powder processor is expected as an innovative technique for preparing controlled-release coated particles having high drug content and size smaller than 100 μm. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Agglomeration, sedimentation, and cellular toxicity of alumina nanoparticles in cell culture medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Dokyung; Woo, Daekwang; Kim, Jung Heon; Kim, Moon Ki; Kim, Taesung; Hwang, Eung-Soo; Baik, Seunghyun

    2011-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of alumina nanoparticles (NPs) was investigated for a wide range of concentration (25–200 μg/mL) and incubation time (0–72 h) using floating cells (THP-1) and adherent cells (J774A.1, A549, and 293). Alumina NPs were gradually agglomerated over time although a significant portion of sedimentation occurred at the early stage within 6 h. A decrease of the viability was found in floating (THP-1) and adherent (J774A.1 and A549) cells in a dose-dependent manner. However, the time-dependent decrease in cell viability was observed only in adherent cells (J774A.1 and A549), which is predominantly related with the sedimentation of alumina NPs in cell culture medium. The uptake of alumina NPs in macrophages and an increased cell-to-cell adhesion in adherent cells were observed. There was no significant change in the viability of 293 cells. This in vitro test suggests that the agglomeration and sedimentation of alumina NPs affected cellular viability depending on cell types such as monocytes (THP-1), macrophages (J774A.1), lung carcinoma cells (A549), and embryonic kidney cells (293).

  15. Agglomeration, sedimentation, and cellular toxicity of alumina nanoparticles in cell culture medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Dokyung; Woo, Daekwang; Kim, Jung Heon; Kim, Moon Ki; Kim, Taesung; Hwang, Eung-Soo; Baik, Seunghyun

    2011-06-01

    The cytotoxicity of alumina nanoparticles (NPs) was investigated for a wide range of concentration (25-200 μg/mL) and incubation time (0-72 h) using floating cells (THP-1) and adherent cells (J774A.1, A549, and 293). Alumina NPs were gradually agglomerated over time although a significant portion of sedimentation occurred at the early stage within 6 h. A decrease of the viability was found in floating (THP-1) and adherent (J774A.1 and A549) cells in a dose-dependent manner. However, the time-dependent decrease in cell viability was observed only in adherent cells (J774A.1 and A549), which is predominantly related with the sedimentation of alumina NPs in cell culture medium. The uptake of alumina NPs in macrophages and an increased cell-to-cell adhesion in adherent cells were observed. There was no significant change in the viability of 293 cells. This in vitro test suggests that the agglomeration and sedimentation of alumina NPs affected cellular viability depending on cell types such as monocytes (THP-1), macrophages (J774A.1), lung carcinoma cells (A549), and embryonic kidney cells (293).

  16. The effect of agglomeration state of silver and titanium dioxide nanoparticles on cellular response of HepG2, A549 and THP-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankoff, Anna; Sandberg, Wiggo J; Wegierek-Ciuk, Aneta; Lisowska, Halina; Refsnes, Magne; Sartowska, Bożena; Schwarze, Per E; Meczynska-Wielgosz, Sylwia; Wojewodzka, Maria; Kruszewski, Marcin

    2012-02-05

    Nanoparticles (NPs) occurring in the environment rapidly agglomerate and form particles of larger diameters. The extent to which this abates the effects of NPs has not been clarified. The motivation of this study was to examine how the agglomeration/aggregation state of silver (20nm and 200nm) and titanium dioxide (21nm) nanoparticles may affect the kinetics of cellular binding/uptake and ability to induce cytotoxic responses in THP1, HepG2 and A549 cells. Cellular binding/uptake, metabolic activation and cell death were assessed by the SSC flow cytometry measurements, the MTT-test and the propidium iodide assay. The three types of particles were efficiently taken up by the cells, decreasing metabolic activation and increasing cell death in all the cell lines. The magnitude of the studied endpoints depended on the agglomeration/aggregation state of particles, their size, time-point and cell type. Among the three cell lines tested, A549 cells were the most sensitive to these particles in relation to cellular binding/uptake. HepG2 cells showed a tendency to be more sensitive in relation to metabolic activation. THP-1 cells were the most resistant to all three types of particles in relation to all endpoints tested. Our findings suggest that particle features such as size and agglomeration status as well as the type of cells may contribute to nanoparticles biological impact. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of Cationic Surfactant Head Groups on Synthesis, Growth and Agglomeration Behavior of ZnS Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta SK

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Colloidal nanodispersions of ZnS have been prepared using aqueous micellar solution of two cationic surfactants of trimethylammonium/pyridinium series with different head groups i.e., cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC and cetyltrimethylpyridinium chloride (CPyC. The role of these surfactants in controlling size, agglomeration behavior and photophysical properties of ZnS nanoparticles has been discussed. UV–visible spectroscopy has been carried out for determination of optical band gap and size of ZnS nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering were used to measure sizes and size distribution of ZnS nanoparticles. Powder X-ray analysis (Powder XRD reveals the cubic structure of nanocrystallite in powdered sample. The photoluminescence emission band exhibits red shift for ZnS nanoparticles in CTAC compared to those in CPyC. The aggregation behavior in two surfactants has been compared using turbidity measurements after redispersing the nanoparticles in water. In situ evolution and growth of ZnS nanoparticles in two different surfactants have been compared through time-dependent absorption behavior and UV irradiation studies. Electrical conductivity measurements reveal that CPyC micelles better stabilize the nanoparticles than that of CTAC.

  18. Soft- and hard-agglomerate aerosols made at high temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsantilis, Stavros; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2004-07-06

    Criteria for aerosol synthesis of soft-agglomerate, hard-agglomerate, or even nonagglomerate particles are developed on the basis of particle sintering and coalescence. Agglomerate (or aggregate) particles are held together by weak, physical van der Waals forces (soft agglomerates) or by stronger chemical or sintering bonds (hard agglomerates). Accounting for simultaneous gas phase chemical reaction, coagulation, and sintering during the formation and growth of silica (SiO2) nanoparticles by silicon tetrachloride (SiCl4) oxidation and neglecting the spread of particle size distribution, the onset of hard-agglomerate formation is identified at the end of full coalescence, while the onset of soft-agglomerate formation is identified at the end of sintering. Process conditions such as the precursor initial volume fraction, maximum temperature, residence time, and cooling rate are explored, identifying regions for the synthesis of particles with a controlled degree of agglomeration (ratio of collision to primary particle diameters).

  19. Rapid recurrence of pulmonary hypertension following cessation of nifedipine.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, M M

    2012-02-03

    In a young woman with primary pulmonary hypertension, treatment with low-dose nifedipine resulted in resolution of symptoms and of tricuspid regurgitation. On withdrawal of nifedipine, symptomatic pulmonary hypertension recurred within 48 hours and was controlled by reintroduction of low-dose nifedipine.

  20. Photoreactivity of nifedipine in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, H; Beijersbergen van Henegouwen, G M

    1998-06-01

    Side effects of nitroaromatics used as drugs are often assumed to be caused by incomplete enzymatic reduction of the nitro group. However, photoactivation, although usually not considered as a cause of the toxic effects of nitroaromatics, can play a considerable role. Nifedipine, a nitroaromatic as well, is an important drug used in the treatment of myocardial ischaemia and hypertension. It is extremely sensitive to ultraviolet and visible light up to 450 nm and forms a nitroso derivative in vitro. In the present study it is shown that the nitroso compound is a short-lived intermediate in blood and plasma. It reacts with other constituents to form a stable lactam. In vivo, this lactam proves to be rapidly clear from the blood of rats and is excreted almost quantitatively via the bile. The first photoproduct of nifedipine, nitroso nifedipine, is shown to be converted into the lactam mentioned. Beside the lactam, two other products, which are considered to be derivatives of the lactam, are found. One of these two products is also found in the bile of a rat that was exposed to UVA light after intravenous nifedipine administration. This shows that in an in vivo situation, photoproducts can reach organs other than those exposed to the light. In vitro about 45 to 50% of the original amount of nifedipine is not recovered after exposure of nifedipine to UVA in the presence of bovine serum albumin or after incubation of nitroso nifedipine with bovine serum albumin in the dark. As complex binding of nifedipine of plasma proteins is high, the latter finding may have important implications for the situation in vivo.

  1. Structural properties of silver nanoparticle agglomerates based on transmission electron microscopy: relationship to particle mobility analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Weon Gyu; Wang Jing; Mertler, Michael; Sachweh, Bernd; Fissan, Heinz; Pui, David Y. H.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, the structural properties of silver nanoparticle agglomerates generated using condensation and evaporation method in an electric tube furnace followed by a coagulation process are analyzed using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Agglomerates with mobility diameters of 80, 120, and 150 nm are sampled using the electrostatic method and then imaged by TEM. The primary particle diameter of silver agglomerates was 13.8 nm with a standard deviation of 2.5 nm. We obtained the relationship between the projected area equivalent diameter (d pa ) and the mobility diameter (d m ), i.e., d pa = 0.92 ± 0.03 d m for particles from 80 to 150 nm. We obtained fractal dimensions of silver agglomerates using three different methods: (1) D f = 1.84 ± 0.03, 1.75 ± 0.06, and 1.74 ± 0.03 for d m = 80, 120, and 150 nm, respectively from projected TEM images using a box counting algorithm; (2) fractal dimension (D fL ) = 1.47 based on maximum projected length from projected TEM images using an empirical equation proposed by Koylu et al. (1995) Combust Flame 100:621-633; and (3) mass fractal-like dimension (D fm ) = 1.71 theoretically derived from the mobility analysis proposed by Lall and Friedlander (2006) J Aerosol Sci 37:260-271. We also compared the number of primary particles in agglomerate and found that the number of primary particles obtained from the projected surface area using an empirical equation proposed by Koylu et al. (1995) Combust Flame 100:621-633 is larger than that from using the relationship, d pa = 0.92 ± 0.03 d m or from using the mobility analysis.

  2. Nifedipine promotes the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Qing Guo

    Full Text Available Nifedipine is widely used as a calcium channel blocker (CCB to treat angina and hypertension,but it is controversial with respect the risk of stimulation of cancers. In this study, we demonstrated that nifedipine promoted the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells both invivo and invitro. However, verapamil, another calcium channel blocker, didn't exert the similar effects. Nifedipine and high concentration KCl failed to alter the [Ca2+]i in MDA-MB-231 cells, suggesting that such nifedipine effect was not related with calcium channel. Moreover, nifedipine decreased miRNA-524-5p, resulting in the up-regulation of brain protein I3 (BRI3. Erk pathway was consequently activated and led to the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells. Silencing BRI3 reversed the promoting effect of nifedipine on the breast cancer. In a summary, nifedipine stimulated the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells via the axis of miRNA-524-5p-BRI3-Erk pathway independently of its calcium channel-blocking activity. Our findings highlight that nifedipine but not verapamil is conducive for breast cancer growth and metastasis, urging that the caution should be taken in clinic to prescribe nifedipine to women who suffering both hypertension and breast cancer, and hypertension with a tendency in breast cancers.

  3. Modeling of Particle Agglomeration in Nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagala, Hari Krishna

    Nanofluids are colloidal dispersions of nano sized particles (life of these nanofluids. Current research addresses the agglomeration effect and how it can affect the shelf life of a nanofluid. The reasons for agglomeration in nanofluids are attributable to the interparticle interactions which are quantified by the various theories. By altering the governing properties like volume fraction, pH and electrolyte concentration different nanofluids with instant agglomeration, slow agglomeration and no agglomeration can be produced. A numerical model is created based on the discretized population balance equations which analyses the particle size distribution at different times. Agglomeration effects have been analyzed for alumina nanoparticles with average particle size of 150nm dispersed in de-ionized water. As the pH was moved towards the isoelectric point of alumina nanofluids, the particle size distribution became broader and moved to bigger sizes rapidly with time. Particle size distributions became broader and moved to bigger sizes more quickly with time with increase in the electrolyte concentration. The two effects together can be used to create different temporal trends in the particle size distributions. Faster agglomeration is attributed to the decrease in the electrostatic double layer repulsion forces which is due to decrease in the induced charge and the double layer thickness around the particle. Bigger particle clusters show lesser agglomeration due to reaching the equilibrium size. The procedures and processes described in this work can be used to generate more stable nanofluids.

  4. Nonsurgical Management of Nifedipine Induced Gingival Overgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Sam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced gingival overgrowth is frequently associated with three particular drugs: phenytoin, cyclosporin, and nifedipine. As gingival enlargement develops, it affects the normal oral hygiene practice and may interfere with masticatory functions. The awareness in the medical community about this possible side effect of nifedipine is less when compared to the effects of phenytoin and cyclosporin. The frequency of gingival enlargement associated with chronic nifedipine therapy remains controversial. Within the group of patients that develop this unwanted effect, there appears to be variability in the extent and severity of the gingival changes. Although gingival inflammation is considered a primary requisite in their development, few cases with minimal or no plaque induced gingival inflammation have also been reported. A case report of gingival overgrowth induced by nifedipine in a patient with good oral hygiene and its nonsurgical management with drug substitution is discussed in this case report.

  5. Rapid characterization of agglomerate aerosols by in situ mass-mobility measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheckman, Jacob H; McMurry, Peter H; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2009-07-21

    Transport and physical/chemical properties of nanoparticle agglomerates depend on primary particle size and agglomerate structure (size, fractal dimension, and dynamic shape factor). This research reports on in situ techniques for measuring such properties. Nanoparticle agglomerates of silica were generated by oxidizing hexamethyldisiloxane in a methane/oxygen diffusion flame. Upon leaving the flame, agglomerates of known electrical mobility size were selected with a differential mobility analyzer (DMA), and their mass was measured with an aerosol particle mass analyzer (APM), resulting in their mass fractal dimension, D(f), and dynamic shape factor, chi. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM) images were used to determine primary particle diameter and to qualitatively investigate agglomerate morphology. The DMA-APM measurements were reproducible within 5%, as determined by multiple measurements on different days under the same flame conditions. The effects of flame process variables (oxygen flow rate and mass production rate) on particle characteristics (D(f), and chi) were determined. All generated particles were fractal-like agglomerates with average primary particle diameters of 12-93 nm and D(f) = 1.7-2.4. Increasing the oxygen flow rate decreased primary particle size and D(f), while it increased chi. Increasing the production rate increased the agglomerate and primary particle sizes, and decreased chi without affecting D(f). The effects of oxygen flow rate and particle production rate on primary particle size reported here are in agreement with ex situ measurements in the literature, while the effect of process variables on agglomerate shape (chi) is demonstrated for the first time to our knowledge.

  6. Management of preterm labor: atosiban or nifedipine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roel de Heus

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Roel de Heus, Eduard J H Mulder, Gerard H A VisserDepartment of Woman and Baby, University Medical Centre Utrecht, The NetherlandsAbstract: Preterm birth is strongly associated with neonatal death and long-term neurological morbidity. The purpose of tocolytic drug administration is to postpone threatening preterm delivery for 48 hours to allow maximal effect of antenatal corticosteroids and maternal transportation to a center with specialized neonatal care facilities. There is uncertainty about the value of atosiban (oxytocin receptor antagonist and nifedipine (calcium channel blocker as first-line tocolytic drugs in the management of preterm labor. For nifedipine, concerns have been raised about unproven safety, lack of placebo-controlled trials, and its off-label use. The tocolytic efficacy of atosiban has also been questioned because of a lack of reduction in neonatal morbidity. This review discusses the available evidence, the pros and cons of either drug and aims to provide information to support a balanced choice of first-line tocolytic drug: atosiban or nifedipine?Keywords: atosiban, oxytocin receptor antagonist, nifedipine, calcium channel blocker, preterm birth, tocolytic drugs, preterm labor

  7. An empirical study of an agglomeration network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yichao; Zhang, Zhaochun; Guan, Jihong

    2007-01-01

    Recently, researchers have reported many models mimicking real network evolution growth, among which some are based on network aggregation growth. However, until now, relatively few experiments have been reported. Accordingly, in this paper, photomicrographs of real materials (the agglomeration in the filtrate of slurry formed by a GaP-nanoparticle conglomerate dispersed in water) are analyzed within the framework of complex network theory. By data mapping from photomicrographs we generate undirected networks and as a definition of degree we adopt the number of pixel's nearest neighbors while adjacent pixels define a connection or an edge. We study the topological structure of these networks including degree distribution, clustering coefficient and average path length. In addition, we discuss the self-similarity and synchronizability of the networks. We find that the synchronizability of high-concentration agglomeration is better than that of low-concentration agglomeration; we also find that agglomeration networks possess good self-similar features

  8. Manipulation and light-induced agglomeration of carbon nanotubes through optical trapping of attached silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Chao; Zhang Yi; Gu, Claire; Seballos, Leo; Zhang, Jin Z

    2008-01-01

    A simple experimental method has been demonstrated for manipulating multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) bundles through the optical trapping of attached silver nanoparticles (SNPs). In our experiments, without the SNPs, the MWCNTs cannot be trapped due to their irregular shapes and large aspect ratio. However, when mixed with SNPs, the MWCNTs can be successfully trapped along with the SNPs using a TEM 00 mode laser at 532 nm. This is attributed to the optical trapping of the SNPs and attractive interaction or binding between the SNPs and MWCNTs due to electrostatic and van der Waals forces. Therefore, optical manipulation of MWCNT bundles is achieved through the manipulation of the attached silver nanoparticles/aggregates. In addition, we have observed the phenomenon of light-induced further agglomeration of SNPs/MWCNTs which could potentially be exploited for fabricating patterned MWCNT films for future nanoscale devices and other applications

  9. Development of coated nifedipine dry elixir as a long acting oral delivery with bioavailability enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Yoon; Jin, Su-Eon; Park, Youmie; Lee, Hyo-Jong; Park, Yohan; Maeng, Han-Joo; Kim, Chong-Kook

    2011-10-01

    To develop the long acting nifedipine oral delivery with bioavailability enhancement, a nifedipine dry elixir (NDE) containing nifedipine ethanol solution in dextrin shell was prepared using a spray-dryer, and then coated nifedipine dry elixir (CNDE) was prepared by coating NDE with Eudragit acrylic resin. The physical characteristics and bioavailability of NDE and CNDE were evaluated, and then compared to those of nifedipine powder. NDE and CNDE, which were spherical in shape, had about 6.64 and 8.68-8.75 μm of geometric mean diameters, respectively. The amount of nifedipine dissolved from NDE for 60 min increased about 7- and 40-fold compared to nifedipine powder in pH 1.2 simulated gastric fluid and pH 6.8 simulated intestinal fluid, respectively. Nifedipine released from CNDE was retarded in both dissolution media compared with that from NDE. After oral administration of NDE, the C(max) and AUC(0→8h) of nifedipine in rat increased about 13- and 7-fold, respectively, and the Tmax of nifedipine was reduced significantly compared with those after oral administration of nifedipine powder alone. The AUC(0→8h) and T(max) of nifedipine in CNDE increased markedly and the C(max) of nifedipine in CNDE was significantly reduced compared to those in NDE. It is concluded that CNDE, which could lower the initial burst-out plasma concentration and maintain the plasma level of nifedipine over a longer period with bioavailability enhancement, might be one of potential alternatives to the marketed long acting oral delivery system for nifedipine.

  10. Encapsulation of Single Nanoparticle in Fast-Evaporating Micro-droplets Prevents Particle Agglomeration in Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ming; Shi, Xinjian; Lyu, Fengjiao; Levy-Wendt, Ben Louis; Zheng, Xiaolin; Tang, Sindy K Y

    2017-08-09

    This work describes the use of fast-evaporating micro-droplets to finely disperse nanoparticles (NPs) in a polymer matrix for the fabrication of nanocomposites. Agglomeration of particles is a key obstacle for broad applications of nanocomposites. The classical approach to ensure the dispersibility of NPs is to modify the surface chemistry of NPs with ligands. The surface properties of NPs are inevitably altered, however. To overcome the trade-off between dispersibility and surface-functionality of NPs, we develop a new approach by dispersing NPs in a volatile solvent, followed by mixing with uncured polymer precursors to form micro-droplet emulsions. Most of these micro-droplets contain no more than one NP per drop, and they evaporate rapidly to prevent the agglomeration of NPs during the polymer curing process. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate the design and fabrication of TiO 2 NP@PDMS nanocomposites for solar fuel generation reactions with high photocatalytic efficiency and recyclability arising from the fine dispersion of TiO 2 . Our simple method eliminates the need for surface functionalization of NPs. Our approach is applicable to prepare nanocomposites comprising a wide range of polymers embedded with NPs of different composition, sizes, and shapes. It has the potential for creating nanocomposites with novel functions.

  11. "Healing Effect of Topical Nifedipine on Skin Wounds of Diabetic Rats "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Ebadi

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Non-healing foot ulcers in patients with diabetes are the leading causes of complications such as infection and amputation. Ulceration is the most common single precursor to amputation and has been identified as a causative factor in 85% of lower extremity amputations. It seems that poor outcomes are generally associated with infection, peripheral vascular disease and wounds of increasing depth. Nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker that is mainly used for the treatment of cardiovascular disorders has recently been used to treat wounds caused by peripheral vascular disorders. In present study topical Nifedipine 3% has been used to treat skin wounds in normal and diabetic rats. Effects of Nifedipine were evaluated in three different phases of wound healing process. In both experiments (normal and diabetic rats topical Nifedipine significantly improved inflammatory phase. However, maturation phase was only significantly improved in diabetic rats. Nifedipine did not affect proliferation phase in either group significantly. Overall results of this study showed topical Nifedipine improved skin wound healing process in normal and diabetic rats.

  12. Nifedipine and thallium-201 myocardial perfusion in progressive systemic sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahan, A.; Devaux, J.Y.; Amor, B.

    1986-01-01

    Heart disease in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis may be due in part to myocardial ischemia caused by a disturbance of the coronary microcirculation. To determine whether abnormalities of myocardial perfusion in this disorder are potentially reversible, we evaluated the effect of the coronary vasodilator nifedipine on myocardial perfusion assessed by thallium-201 scanning in 20 patients. Thallium-201 single-photon-emission computerized tomography was performed under control conditions and 90 minutes after 20 mg of oral nifedipine. The mean (+/- SD) number of left ventricular segments with perfusion defects decreased from 5.3 +/- 2.0 to 3.3 +/- 2.2 after nifedipine (P = 0.0003). Perfusion abnormalities were quantified by a perfusion score (0 to 2.0) assigned to each left ventricular segment and by a global perfusion score (0 to 18) for the entire left ventricle. The mean perfusion score in segments with resting defects increased from 0.97 +/- 0.24 to 1.26 +/- 0.44 after nifedipine (P less than 0.00001). The mean global perfusion score increased from 11.2 +/- 1.7 to 12.8 +/- 2.4 after nifedipine (P = 0.003). The global perfusion score increased by at least 2.0 in 10 patients and decreased by at least 2.0 in only 1. These observations reveal short-term improvement in thallium-201 myocardial perfusion with nifedipine in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis. The results are consistent with a potentially reversible abnormality of coronary vasomotion in this disorder, but the long-term therapeutic effects of nifedipine remain to be determined

  13. Effect of surface charge and agglomerate degree of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles on KB cellular uptake in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yuqing; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Jingguang; Ma, Ming; He, Shiying; Nie, Fang; Gu, Ning

    2009-10-15

    We synthesized three types of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs), which were meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) coated MNPs (DMSA@MNPs, 17.3+/-4.8 nm, negative charge), chitosan (CS) coated MNPs (CS@MNPs, 16.5+/-6.1 nm, positive charge) and magnetic nanoparticles agglomerates, formed by electronic aggregation between DMSA@MNPs and CS (CS-DMSA@MNPs, 85.7+/-72.9 nm, positive charge) respectively. The interactions of these MNPs with Oral Squamous Carcinoma Cell KB were investigated. The results showed that cellular uptakes of MNPs were on the dependence of incubation time, nanoparticles concentration and nanoparticles properties such as surface charge, size, etc. The cellular uptake was enhanced with the increase of incubation time and nanoparticles concentration. Although all MNPs could enter to cells, we observed apparent differences in the magnitude of nanoparticles uptaken. The cellular uptake of CS-DMSA@MNPs by KB cells was the highest and that of DMSA@MNPs was the lowest among the three types of MNPs. The same conclusions were drawn via the reduction of water proton relaxation times T(2)(*), resulting from the different iron load of labeled cells using a 1.5T clinical MR imager. The finding of this study will have implications in the chemical design of nanomaterials for biomedical applications.

  14. Management of preterm labor: atosiban or nifedipine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heus, Roel; Mulder, Eduard J H; Visser, Gerard H A

    2010-08-09

    Preterm birth is strongly associated with neonatal death and long-term neurological morbidity. The purpose of tocolytic drug administration is to postpone threatening preterm delivery for 48 hours to allow maximal effect of antenatal corticosteroids and maternal transportation to a center with specialized neonatal care facilities. There is uncertainty about the value of atosiban (oxytocin receptor antagonist) and nifedipine (calcium channel blocker) as first-line tocolytic drugs in the management of preterm labor. For nifedipine, concerns have been raised about unproven safety, lack of placebo-controlled trials, and its off-label use. The tocolytic efficacy of atosiban has also been questioned because of a lack of reduction in neonatal morbidity. This review discusses the available evidence, the pros and cons of either drug and aims to provide information to support a balanced choice of first-line tocolytic drug: atosiban or nifedipine?

  15. Nifedipine--a calcium channel blocker--in asthmatic patients. Interaction with terbutaline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svedmyr, K; Löfdahl, C G; Svedmyr, N

    1984-01-01

    Seven asthmatic patients were studied in a single-blind randomized, crossover study after oral administration of 20 mg nifedipine or placebo. Four increasing doses of i.v. terbutaline were then given with 30 min interval. The study was concluded with inhalation of five terbutaline puffs. FEV1 measurements 30 min after intake of nifedipine did not show any difference compared to placebo. During the terbutaline treatment, however, there was a more pronounced bronchodilation after nifedipine than after placebo (P less than 0.05). Terbutaline-induced skeletal muscle tremor was similar after nifedipine and placebo pretreatments. After nifedipine intake there was a decrease of diastolic blood pressure and a reflexogenic tachycardia. Thus, this study showed a small potentiation of the beta 2-adrenoceptor mediated bronchodilation, which is of importance when treating patients with simultaneous asthma and hypertension or angina pectoris.

  16. Molecular modeling study of agglomeration of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester in solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortuza, S M; Banerjee, Soumik

    2012-12-28

    The molecular interactions between solvent and nanoparticles during photoactive layer formation in organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells influence the morphology of the photoactive layer and hence determine the power conversion efficiency. Prediction of optimal synthesis parameters in OPVs, such as choice of solvent, processing temperature, and nanoparticle concentration, requires fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that govern the agglomeration of nanoparticles in solvents. In this study, we used molecular dynamics simulations to simulate a commonly used organic nanoparticle, [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), in various solvents to correlate solvent-nanoparticle interactions with the size of the agglomerate structure of PCBM. We analyzed the effects of concentration of PCBM and operating temperature on the molecular rearrangement and agglomeration of PCBM in three solvents: (i) toluene, (ii) indane, and (iii) toluene-indane mixture. We evaluated the agglomeration behavior of PCBM by determining sizes of the largest clusters of PCBM and the corresponding size distributions. To obtain further insight into the agglomerate structure of PCBMs, we evaluated radial distribution functions (RDFs) and coordination numbers of the various moieties of PCBMs with respect to solvent atoms as well as with respect to that of other PCBMs. Our simulations demonstrate that PCBMs form larger clusters in toluene while they are relatively dispersed in indane, which indicates the greater solubility of PCBM in indane than in toluene. In toluene-indane mixture, PCBMs are clustered to a greater extent than in indane and less than that in toluene. To correlate agglomerate size to nanoparticle-solvent interactions, we also evaluated the potential of mean force (PMF) of the fullerene moiety of PCBM in toluene and indane. Our results also show that the cluster size of PCBM molecules increases with the increase of concentration of PCBM and the processing temperature. To

  17. [Management of pre-term labor: use of nifedipine in Conakry, Guinea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sy, T; Diallo, F B; Diallo, Y; Camara, M K; Diallo, A; Cissoko, M; Lontsi, G R; Diallo, M S

    2010-04-01

    This purpose of this prospective and descriptive study was to evaluate the utility of a calcium-channel inhibitor, i.e. nifedipine, for management of preterm labor in our work setting in terms of safety and cost-effectiveness in comparison with betamimetics classically used for this indication. Study was carried out over a six-month period in the department of Gynecology-Obstetrics Department of Ignace Deen National Hospital in Conakry, Guinea. Pregnant women meeting the following criteria were included: 28 to 33 weeks of amenorrhea, six days of hospitalization either for preterm labor or for another diagnosis that was associated with the occurrence of preterm labor during hospitalization, and absence of contraindications for tocolysis using nifedipine. A total of 42 women were included. Pregnancy was extended for more than 48 hours after the first dose of nifedipine in 86.8% of cases. Administration of nifedipine failed in 5 cases including one case in which it was necessary to change the tocolytic and 4 cases in which delivery occurred less than 48 hours after the first dose of nifedipine. In 68% of cases, 90 mg of nifedipine were sufficient to stop uterine contractions within 48 hours. In 39.5% of cases, no side effects were observed. Adverse effects in the other cases were dizziness (39.5%) and headache (18.4%). The mean term of delivery was 36 weeks +/- 5 days of amenorrhea with a mean extension of 6.2 weeks. Apgar score was low in 30.5% of the newborns and normal in 69.5%. One newborn (2.8%) died. The results of this study indicate that nifedipine is an effective, economical and safe drug for tocolysis and that it can be used as an alternative to betamimetis in countries with limited resources. An information campaign is needed to promote use of nifedipine as a tocolytic in obstetrical facilities of our country.

  18. An improved model for estimating fractal structure of silica nano-agglomerates in a vibro-fluidized bed

    OpenAIRE

    A Esmailpour; N Mostoufi; R Zarghami

    2016-01-01

    A study has been conducted to determine the effects of operating conditions such as vibration frequency, vibration amplitude on the fractal structure of silica (SiO2) nanoparticle agglomerate in a vibro-fluidized bed. An improved model was proposed by assimilation of fractal theory, Richardson-Zaki equation and mass balance. This model has been developed to predict the properties of nanoparticle agglomerate, such as fractal dimension and its size. It has been found out the vibration intensity...

  19. Agglomeration and Co-Agglomeration of Services Industries

    OpenAIRE

    Kolko, Jed

    2007-01-01

    Economic research on industry location and agglomeration has focused nearly exclusively on manufacturing. This paper shows that services are prominent among the most agglomerated industries, especially at the county level. Because traditional measures of knowledge spillovers, natural resource inputs, and labor pooling explain little of agglomeration in services industries, this paper takes an alternative approach and looks at co-agglomeration to assess why industries cluster together. By cons...

  20. Influence of agglomeration of cerium oxide nanoparticles and speciation of cerium(III) on short term effects to the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Röhder, Lena A. [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, Dübendorf 8600 (Switzerland); ETH-Zurich, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, Zürich 8092 (Switzerland); Brandt, Tanja [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, Dübendorf 8600 (Switzerland); Sigg, Laura [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, Dübendorf 8600 (Switzerland); ETH-Zurich, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, Zürich 8092 (Switzerland); Behra, Renata, E-mail: Renata.behra@eawag.ch [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, Dübendorf 8600 (Switzerland)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • Phosphate-dispersed CeO₂ NP did not affect photosynthetic yield in C. reinhardtii. • Agglomerated CeO₂ NP slightly decreased photosynthetic yield. • Cerium(III) was shown to affect photosynthetic yield and intracellular ROS level. • Slight effects of CeO₂ NP were caused by dissolved Ce³⁺ ions present in suspensions. • Wild type and cell wall free mutant of C. reinhardtii showed the same sensitivity. - Abstract: Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO₂ NP) are increasingly used in industrial applications and may be released to the aquatic environment. The fate of CeO₂ NP and effects on algae are largely unknown. In this study, the short term effects of CeO₂ NP in two different agglomeration states on the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were examined. The role of dissolved cerium(III) on toxicity, its speciation and the dissolution of CeO₂ NP were considered. The role of cell wall of C. reinhardtii as a barrier and its influence on the sensitivity to CeO₂ NP and cerium(III) was evaluated by testing both, the wild type and the cell wall free mutant of C. reinhardtii. Characterization showed that CeO₂ NP had a surface charge of ~0 mV at physiological pH and agglomerated in exposure media. Phosphate stabilized CeO₂ NP at pH 7.5 over 24 h. This effect was exploited to test CeO₂ NP dispersed in phosphate with a mean size of 140 nm and agglomerated in absence of phosphate with a mean size of 2000 nm. The level of dissolved cerium(III) in CeO₂ NP suspensions was very low and between 0.1 and 27 nM in all tested media. Exposure of C. reinhardtii to Ce(NO₃)₃ decreased the photosynthetic yield in a concentration dependent manner with EC₅₀ of 7.5 ± 0.84 μM for wild type and EC₅₀ of 6.3 ± 0.53 μM for the cell wall free mutant. The intracellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased upon exposure to Ce(NO₃)₃ with effective concentrations similar to those inhibiting photosynthesis. The agglomerated Ce

  1. A prediction model for the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids considering agglomeration and the radial distribution function of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Z. M.; Wang, B.

    2018-06-01

    Conventional heat transfer fluids usually have low thermal conductivity, limiting their efficiency in many applications. Many experiments have shown that adding nanosize solid particles to conventional fluids can greatly enhance their thermal conductivity. To explain this anomalous phenomenon, many theoretical investigations have been conducted in recent years. Some of this research has indicated that the particle agglomeration effect that commonly occurs in nanofluids should play an important role in such enhancement of the thermal conductivity, while some have shown that the enhancement of the effective thermal conductivity might be accounted for by the structure of nanofluids, which can be described using the radial distribution function of particles. However, theoretical predictions from these studies are not in very good agreement with experimental results. This paper proposes a prediction model for the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids, considering both the agglomeration effect and the radial distribution function of nanoparticles. The resulting theoretical predictions for several sets of nanofluids are highly consistent with experimental data.

  2. Da-Chaihu-Tang alters the pharmacokinetics of nifedipine in rats and a treatment regimen to avoid this.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ju-Xiu; Ohno, Kenji; Tang, Jun; Hattori, Masao; Tani, Tadato; Akao, Teruaki

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the influence of co-administrated Da-Chaihu-Tang (DCT; a traditional Chinese formulation) on the pharmacokinetics of nifedipine, as well as the safe optimal dosing interval to avoid the adverse interactions. A single dose of DCT was administered with nifedipine simultaneously, 2 h before, 30 min before or 30 min after nifedipine administration. Pharmacokinetics of nifedipine with or without DCT were compared. The influences of DCT on nifedipine intestinal mucosal and hepatic metabolism were studied by using rat in-vitro everted jejunal sac model and hepatic microsomes. A simultaneous co-administration of DCT significantly increased the area under concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity (AUC0-inf ) of nifedipine. In-vitro mechanism investigations revealed that DCT inhibited both the intestinal and the hepatic metabolism of nifedipine. Further study on the optimal dosing interval for nifedipine and DCT revealed that administration of DCT 30 min before or after nifedipine did not significantly change the AUC of nifedipine. The bioavailability of nifedipine is significantly increased by a simultaneous oral co-administration of DCT. This increase is caused by the inhibitory effect of DCT on both the intestinal mucosal and the hepatic metabolism of nifedipine. The dose interval between DCT and nifedipine needs to be set for over 30 min to avoid such drug-drug interactions. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  3. Comparison of the Efficacy of Nifedipine and Hydralazine in Hypertensive Crisis in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashar Youefzadeh-Fard

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Intravenous hydralazine is a commonly administered arteriolar vasodilator that is effective for hypertensive emergencies associated with pregnancy. Oral nifedipine is an alternative in management of these patients. In this study the efficacy of nifedipine and hydralazine in pregnancy was compared in a group of Iranian patients. Fifty hypertensive pregnant women were enrolled in the study. A randomized clinical trial was performed, in which patients in two groups received intravenus hydralazine or oral nifedipine to achieve target blood pressure reduction. The primary outcomes measured were the time and doses required for desired blood pressure achievement. Secondary measures included urinary output and maternal and neonatal side effects. The time required for reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure was shorter for oral nifedipine group (24.0±10.0 min than intravenus Hydralazine group (34.8±18.8 min (P≤0.016. Less frequent doses were required with oral nifedipine (1.2±0.5 compared to intravenus hydralazine (2.1±1.0 (P≤0.0005. There were no episodes of hypotension after hydralazine and one after nifedipine. Nifedipine and hydralazine are safe and effective antihypertensive drugs, showing a controlled and comparable blood pressure reduction in women with hypertensive emergencies in pregnancy. Both drugs reduce episodes of persistent severe hypertension. Considering pharmacokinetic properties of nifedipine such as rapid onset and long duration of action, the good oral bioavailability and less frequent side effects, it looks more preferable in hypertension emergencies of pregnancy than hydralazine.

  4. Agglomeration and sedimentation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (n-TiO2) in synthetic and real waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunelli, Andrea; Pojana, Giulio; Callegaro, Sarah; Marcomini, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The recent detection of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (n-TiO 2 ) in wastewaters raised concerns about its fate in the aquatic environment, which is related to its mobility through water bodies. Laboratory experiments of n-TiO 2 (particle size distribution: 10–65 nm) dispersed into both synthetic and real aqueous solutions under environmentally realistic concentrations (0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10 mg/l) were conducted over a time of 50 h to mimic duration of ecotoxicological tests. Agglomeration and sedimentation behaviour were measured under controlled conditions of salinity (0–35 ‰), ionic composition and strength, pH and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Physico-chemical parameters and particle agglomeration in the dispersions were investigated by transmission electron microscopy, Brunauer, Emmett and Teller method and dynamic light scattering. A fluorescence spectrophotometer operating in the nephelometric mode was employed to obtain the sedimentation rates of n-TiO 2 . The overall results showed that agglomeration and sedimentation of n-TiO 2 were affected mainly by the initial concentration. Sedimentation data fitted satisfactorily (R 2 in the range of 0.74–0.98; average R 2 : 0.90) with a first-order kinetic equation.The settling rate constant, k, increased by approx. one order of magnitude by moving from the lowest to the highest concentration, resulting very similar especially for all dispersions at 1(k = 8 × 10 −6 s −1 ) and 10 mg/l (k = 2 × 10 −5 s −1 ) n-TiO 2 , regardless the ionic strength and composition of dispersions. The implication of these results on toxicological testing is discussed.

  5. Safety of nifedipine GITS in stable angina: The ACTION trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Poole-Wilson (Philip); B.A. Kirwan (Bridget Anne); Z. Vokó (Zoltán); S. de Brouwer (Sophie); F.J. van Dalen (Frederik); J. Lubsen (Jacob)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractAim: We describe the safety profile of nifedipine GITS as assessed from adverse events reported in the ACTION trial in which 7,665 patients with stable, symptomatic coronary artery disease were randomly assigned nifedipine GITS or placebo and followed for a mean of 4.9 years. Methods:

  6. Plateau hypoxia attenuates the metabolic activity of intestinal flora to enhance the bioavailability of nifedipine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juanhong; Chen, Yuyan; Sun, Yuemei; Wang, Rong; Zhang, Junmin; Jia, Zhengping

    2018-11-01

    Nifedipine is completely absorbed by the gastrointestinal tract and its pharmacokinetics and metabolism may be influenced by microorganisms. If gut microbes are involved in the metabolism of nifedipine, plateau hypoxia may regulate the bioavailability and the therapeutic effect of nifedipine by altering the metabolic activity of the gut microbiota. We herein demonstrated for the first time that gut flora is involved in the metabolism of nifedipine by in vitro experiments. In addition, based on the results of 16S rRNA analysis of feces in rats after acute plateau, we first confirmed that the plateau environment could cause changes in the number and composition of intestinal microbes. More importantly, these changes in flora could lead to a slower metabolic activity of nifedipine in the body after an acute plateau, resulting in increased bioavailability and therapeutic efficacy of nifedipine. Our research will provide basis and new ideas for changes in the fecal flora of human acutely entering the plateau, and contribute to rational drug use of nifedipine.

  7. Randomized double-blind comparison of metoprolol, nifedipine, and their combination in chronic stable angina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egstrup, K

    1988-01-01

    In a randomized double-blind study, treatment with either metoprolol, nifedipine, or their combination was compared for effects on ischemic variables and heart rate obtained during ambulatory monitoring in 42 patients with chronic stable angina. All patients had severe chronic stable angina...... could be detected during nifedipine monotherapy. It is concluded that metoprolol monotherapy, as well as its combination with nifedipine, effectively reduces total ischemic activity compared with placebo and nifedipine monotherapy. Control of ischemic activity in chronic stable angina may have...

  8. Theoretical studies on aerosol agglomeration processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehtinen, K.E.J. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Use

    1997-12-31

    In this thesis, theoretical modeling of certain aerosol systems has been presented. At first, the aerosol general dynamic equation is introduced, along with a discretization routine for its numerical solution. Of the various possible phenomena affecting aerosol behaviour, this work is mostly focused on aerosol agglomeration. The fundamentals of aerosol agglomeration theory are thus briefly reviewed. The two practical applications of agglomeration studied in this thesis are flue gas cleaning using an electrical agglomerator and nanomaterial synthesis with a free jet reactor. In an electrical agglomerator the aerosol particles are charged and brought into an alternating electric field. The aim is to remove submicron particles from flue gases by collisions with larger particles before conventional gas cleaning devices that have a clear penetration window in the problematic 0.1-1{mu}m size range. A mathematical model was constructed to find out the effects of the different system parameters on the agglomerator`s performance. A crucial part of this task was finding out the collision efficiencies of particles of varying size and charge. The original idea was to use unipolar charging of the particles, and a laboratory scale apparatus was constructed for this purpose. Both theory and experiments clearly show that significant removal of submicron particles can not be achieved by such an arrangement. The theoretical analysis further shows that if the submicron particles and the large collector particles were charged with opposite polarity, significant removal of the submicron particles could be obtained. The second application of agglomeration considered in this thesis is predicting/controlling nanoparticle size in the gas-to-particle aerosol route to material synthesis. In a typical material reactor, a precursor vapor reacts to form molecules of the desired material. In a cooling environment, a particulate phase forms, the dynamics of which are determined by the rates of

  9. Theoretical studies on aerosol agglomeration processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehtinen, K E.J. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Use

    1998-12-31

    In this thesis, theoretical modeling of certain aerosol systems has been presented. At first, the aerosol general dynamic equation is introduced, along with a discretization routine for its numerical solution. Of the various possible phenomena affecting aerosol behaviour, this work is mostly focused on aerosol agglomeration. The fundamentals of aerosol agglomeration theory are thus briefly reviewed. The two practical applications of agglomeration studied in this thesis are flue gas cleaning using an electrical agglomerator and nanomaterial synthesis with a free jet reactor. In an electrical agglomerator the aerosol particles are charged and brought into an alternating electric field. The aim is to remove submicron particles from flue gases by collisions with larger particles before conventional gas cleaning devices that have a clear penetration window in the problematic 0.1-1{mu}m size range. A mathematical model was constructed to find out the effects of the different system parameters on the agglomerator`s performance. A crucial part of this task was finding out the collision efficiencies of particles of varying size and charge. The original idea was to use unipolar charging of the particles, and a laboratory scale apparatus was constructed for this purpose. Both theory and experiments clearly show that significant removal of submicron particles can not be achieved by such an arrangement. The theoretical analysis further shows that if the submicron particles and the large collector particles were charged with opposite polarity, significant removal of the submicron particles could be obtained. The second application of agglomeration considered in this thesis is predicting/controlling nanoparticle size in the gas-to-particle aerosol route to material synthesis. In a typical material reactor, a precursor vapor reacts to form molecules of the desired material. In a cooling environment, a particulate phase forms, the dynamics of which are determined by the rates of

  10. Agglomeration and sedimentation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (n-TiO{sub 2}) in synthetic and real waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunelli, Andrea [University Ca' Foscari Venice, Department of Environmental Sciences, Informatics and Statistics (Italy); Pojana, Giulio [University Ca' Foscari Venice, Department of Philosophy and Cultural Heritage (Italy); Callegaro, Sarah; Marcomini, Antonio, E-mail: marcom@unive.it [University Ca' Foscari Venice, Department of Environmental Sciences, Informatics and Statistics (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    The recent detection of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (n-TiO{sub 2}) in wastewaters raised concerns about its fate in the aquatic environment, which is related to its mobility through water bodies. Laboratory experiments of n-TiO{sub 2} (particle size distribution: 10-65 nm) dispersed into both synthetic and real aqueous solutions under environmentally realistic concentrations (0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10 mg/l) were conducted over a time of 50 h to mimic duration of ecotoxicological tests. Agglomeration and sedimentation behaviour were measured under controlled conditions of salinity (0-35 Per-Mille-Sign ), ionic composition and strength, pH and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Physico-chemical parameters and particle agglomeration in the dispersions were investigated by transmission electron microscopy, Brunauer, Emmett and Teller method and dynamic light scattering. A fluorescence spectrophotometer operating in the nephelometric mode was employed to obtain the sedimentation rates of n-TiO{sub 2}. The overall results showed that agglomeration and sedimentation of n-TiO{sub 2} were affected mainly by the initial concentration. Sedimentation data fitted satisfactorily (R{sup 2} in the range of 0.74-0.98; average R{sup 2}: 0.90) with a first-order kinetic equation.The settling rate constant, k, increased by approx. one order of magnitude by moving from the lowest to the highest concentration, resulting very similar especially for all dispersions at 1(k = 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} s{sup -1}) and 10 mg/l (k = 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} s{sup -1}) n-TiO{sub 2}, regardless the ionic strength and composition of dispersions. The implication of these results on toxicological testing is discussed.

  11. Pharmacokinetic profile of nifedipine GITS in hypertensive patients with chronic renal impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, R; Stolero, D; Griffel, L; Kobelt, R; Brendel, E; Iaina, A

    1994-01-01

    25 hypertensive patients with normal or impaired renal function underwent pharmacokinetic and safety studies after single and multiple dose administration of nifedipine GITS (Gastro-Intestinal Therapeutic System) 60mg tablets. Complete pharmacokinetic data were obtained from 23 of these patients. Blood pressure and heart rate changes were compatible with the known properties of the drug. Impaired renal function did not affect the maximum plasma concentrations or bioavailability of nifedipine after single or multiple dose administration of nifedipine GITS, nor was there any evidence of excessive drug accumulation in the presence of renal impairment.

  12. Anticonvulsant and antiarrhythmic effects of nifedipine in rats prone to audiogenic seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damasceno, D.D.; Ferreira, A.J.; Doretto, M.C.; Almeida, A.P.

    2012-01-01

    Calcium ion participates in the regulation of neural transmission and the presynaptic release of neurotransmitters. It is also involved in epileptic events, cardiac arrhythmias and abnormal conduction of stimuli. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker, on epileptic seizures and on reperfusion arrhythmias in rats prone to audiogenic epileptic seizures (Wistar audiogenic rats, WAR) and in normal Wistar rats (N = 6/group). The seizure severity index was applied after an intraperitoneal injection of 20 or 40 mg/kg nifedipine (N20 and N40 groups, respectively). The Langendorff technique was used to analyze cardiac function, as well as the incidence and severity of the reperfusion arrhythmias after ligature and release of the left coronary artery in rats treated or not with nifedipine. We found that nifedipine treatment decreased seizure severity (0.94 ± 0.02 for WAR; 0.70 ± 0.10 for WAR + N20; 0.47 ± 0.08 for WAR + N40) and increased the latent period (13 ± 2 s for WAR; 35 ± 10 s for WAR + N20; 48 ± 7 s for WAR + N40) for the development of seizures in WAR. Furthermore, the incidence and severity of the reperfusion arrhythmias were lower in WAR and normal Wistar rats injected with nifedipine. In WAR, these effects were mediated, at least in part, by a decrease in heart rate. Thus, our results indicate that nifedipine may be considered to be a potential adjuvant drug for epilepsy treatment, especially in those cases associated with cardiac rhythm abnormalities

  13. Anticonvulsant and antiarrhythmic effects of nifedipine in rats prone to audiogenic seizures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damasceno, D.D. [Departamento de Desenvolvimento Educacional,Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Sudeste de Minas Gerais, Barbacena, MG (Brazil); Departamento de Fisiologia e Biofísica, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Ferreira, A.J. [Departamento de Morfologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Doretto, M.C.; Almeida, A.P. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Biofísica, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2012-07-20

    Calcium ion participates in the regulation of neural transmission and the presynaptic release of neurotransmitters. It is also involved in epileptic events, cardiac arrhythmias and abnormal conduction of stimuli. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker, on epileptic seizures and on reperfusion arrhythmias in rats prone to audiogenic epileptic seizures (Wistar audiogenic rats, WAR) and in normal Wistar rats (N = 6/group). The seizure severity index was applied after an intraperitoneal injection of 20 or 40 mg/kg nifedipine (N20 and N40 groups, respectively). The Langendorff technique was used to analyze cardiac function, as well as the incidence and severity of the reperfusion arrhythmias after ligature and release of the left coronary artery in rats treated or not with nifedipine. We found that nifedipine treatment decreased seizure severity (0.94 ± 0.02 for WAR; 0.70 ± 0.10 for WAR + N20; 0.47 ± 0.08 for WAR + N40) and increased the latent period (13 ± 2 s for WAR; 35 ± 10 s for WAR + N20; 48 ± 7 s for WAR + N40) for the development of seizures in WAR. Furthermore, the incidence and severity of the reperfusion arrhythmias were lower in WAR and normal Wistar rats injected with nifedipine. In WAR, these effects were mediated, at least in part, by a decrease in heart rate. Thus, our results indicate that nifedipine may be considered to be a potential adjuvant drug for epilepsy treatment, especially in those cases associated with cardiac rhythm abnormalities.

  14. Effect of concomitant administration of nifedipine and tacrolimus on the development of gingival overgrowth in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Yi Chen

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: Gingival overgrowth could be induced either by nifedipine or by tacrolimus, although the extent of gingival overgrowth induced by tacrolimus would be less than that by nifedipine. However, a concomitant administration of nifedipine and tacrolimus did not aggravate the induced gingival overgrowth.

  15. Development of membrane filters with nanostructured porous layer by coating of metal nanoparticles sintered onto a micro-filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seok Joo; Park, Young Ok; Lee, Dong Geun; Ryu, Jeong In

    2008-01-01

    The membrane filter adhered with nanostructured porous layer was made by heat treatment after deposition of nanoparticle-agglomerates sintered in aerosol phase onto a conventional micron-fibrous metal filter as a substrate filter. The Sintered-Nanoparticle-Agglomerates-coated NanoStructured porous layer Membrane Filter (SNA-NSMF), whose the filtration performance was improved compared with the conventional metal membrane filters, was developed by adhesion of nanoparticle-agglomerates of dendrite structure sintered onto the micron-fibrous metal filter. The size of nanoparticle-agglomerates of dendrite structure decreased with increasing the sintering temperature because nanoparticle-agglomerates shrank. When shrinking nanoparticle-agglomerates were deposited and treated with heat onto the conventional micron-fibrous metal filter, pore size of nanostructured porous layer decreased. Therefore, pressure drops of SNA-NSMFs increased from 0.3 to 0.516 KPa and filtration efficiencies remarkably increased from 95.612 to 99.9993%

  16. The effect of cyclodextrin on both the agglomeration and the in vitro characteristics of drug loaded and targeted silica nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattabi, Areen M.; Alqdeimat, Diala A.

    2018-02-01

    One of the problems in the use of nanoparticles (NPs) as carriers in drug delivery systems is their agglomeration which mainly appears due to their high surface energy. This results in formation of NPs with different sizes leading to differences in their distribution and bioavailability. The surface coating of NPs with certain compounds can be used to prevent or minimize this problem. In this study, the effect of cyclodextrin (CD) on the agglomeration state and hence on the in vitro characteristics of drug loaded and targeted silica NPs was investigated. A sample of NPs was loaded with anticancer agents, then modified with a long polymer, carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin (CM-β-CD) and folic acid (FA), respectively. Another sample was modified similarly but without CD. The surface modification was characterized using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The polydispersity (PD) was measured using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and was found to be smaller for CD modified NPs. The results of the in vitro drug release showed that the release rate from both samples exhibited similar pattern for the first 5 hours, however the rate was faster from CD modified NPs after 24 hours. The in vitro cell viability assay confirmed that CD modified NPs were about 30% more toxic to HeLa cells. These findings suggest that CD has a clear effect in minimizing the agglomeration of such modified silica NPs, accelerating their drug release rate and enhancing their targeting effect.

  17. Nanoparticle-nanoparticle interactions in biological media by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Blattmann, Christoph O.; Pratsinis, Sotiris; Demokritou, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Particle-particle interactions in physiological media are important determinants for nanoparticle fate and transport. Herein, such interactions are assessed by a novel Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based platform. Industry-relevant CeO2, Fe2O3, and SiO2 nanoparticles of various diameters were made by the flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) based Harvard Versatile Engineering Nanomaterials Generation System (Harvard VENGES). The nanoparticles were fully characterized structurally and morphologically and their properties in water and biological media were also assessed. The nanoparticles were attached on AFM tips and deposited on Si substrates to measure particle–particle interactions. The corresponding force was measured in air, water and biological media that are widely used in toxicological studies. The presented AFM based approach can be used to assess the agglomeration potential of nanoparticles in physiological fluids. The agglomeration potential of CeO2 nanoparticles in water and RPMI 1640 (Roswell Park Memorial Institute formulation 1640) was inversely proportional to their primary particle (PP) diameter, but for Fe2O3 nanoparticles, that potential is independent of PP diameter in these media. Moreover, in RPMI+10% Fetal Bovine Serum (FBS) the corona thickness and dispersibility of the CeO2 is independent of PP diameter while for Fe2O3, the corona thickness and dispersibility were inversely proportional to PP diameter. The present method can be combined with (dynamic light scattering (DLS), proteomics, and computer simulations to understand the nano-bio interactions, with emphasis on the agglomeration potential of nanoparticles and their transport in physiological media. PMID:23978039

  18. Anticonvulsant and antiarrhythmic effects of nifedipine in rats prone to audiogenic seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.D. Damasceno

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Calcium ion participates in the regulation of neural transmission and the presynaptic release of neurotransmitters. It is also involved in epileptic events, cardiac arrhythmias and abnormal conduction of stimuli. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker, on epileptic seizures and on reperfusion arrhythmias in rats prone to audiogenic epileptic seizures (Wistar audiogenic rats, WAR and in normal Wistar rats (N = 6/group. The seizure severity index was applied after an intraperitoneal injection of 20 or 40 mg/kg nifedipine (N20 and N40 groups, respectively. The Langendorff technique was used to analyze cardiac function, as well as the incidence and severity of the reperfusion arrhythmias after ligature and release of the left coronary artery in rats treated or not with nifedipine. We found that nifedipine treatment decreased seizure severity (0.94 ± 0.02 for WAR; 0.70 ± 0.10 for WAR + N20; 0.47 ± 0.08 for WAR + N40 and increased the latent period (13 ± 2 s for WAR; 35 ± 10 s for WAR + N20; 48 ± 7 s for WAR + N40 for the development of seizures in WAR. Furthermore, the incidence and severity of the reperfusion arrhythmias were lower in WAR and normal Wistar rats injected with nifedipine. In WAR, these effects were mediated, at least in part, by a decrease in heart rate. Thus, our results indicate that nifedipine may be considered to be a potential adjuvant drug for epilepsy treatment, especially in those cases associated with cardiac rhythm abnormalities.

  19. Comparative efficacy of tamsulosin versus nifedipine for distal ureteral calculi: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai; Man, Li Bo; Huang, Guang Lin; Li, Gui Zhong; Wang, Jian Wei

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically compare the therapeutic effect and safety of tamsulosin with nifedipine in medical expulsive therapy for distal ureteral calculi. Databases, including PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and Clinical Trial Register Centers, were comprehensively searched. Relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were selected, and quality assessment was performed according to the Cochrane Handbook. RevMan software was used to analyze the outcome measures, which consisted of expulsion rate, expulsion time, and complications. Twelve RCTs consisting of 4,961 patients were included (tamsulosin group, 2,489 cases; nifedipine group, 2,472 cases). Compared with nifedipine, tamsulosin significantly increased the expulsion rate (risk ratio =1.29, 95% CI [1.25, 1.33], Ptamsulosin was associated with fewer complications than nifedipine (risk ratio =0.45, 95% CI [0.28, 0.72], P=0.0008), and further subgroup analysis showed that tamsulosin was associated with a lower risk of both mild and moderate-to-severe complications. On the bias of current evidence, tamsulosin showed an overall superiority to nifedipine for distal ureteral calculi Tamsulosin was supposed to be the first drug to be recommended to patients willing to receive medical expulsive therapy.

  20. Conducting metal oxide and metal nitride nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSalvo, Jr., Francis J.; Subban, Chinmayee V.

    2017-12-26

    Conducting metal oxide and nitride nanoparticles that can be used in fuel cell applications. The metal oxide nanoparticles are comprised of for example, titanium, niobium, tantalum, tungsten and combinations thereof. The metal nitride nanoparticles are comprised of, for example, titanium, niobium, tantalum, tungsten, zirconium, and combinations thereof. The nanoparticles can be sintered to provide conducting porous agglomerates of the nanoparticles which can be used as a catalyst support in fuel cell applications. Further, platinum nanoparticles, for example, can be deposited on the agglomerates to provide a material that can be used as both an anode and a cathode catalyst support in a fuel cell.

  1. Dust Explosion Characteristics of Agglomerated 35 nm and 100 nm Aluminum Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Chun Wu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the experiment, nanoparticles of 35 nm Al and 100 nm Al powders, respectively, formed particles with average sizes of 161 nm and 167 nm in agglomeration. The characteristics of dust cloud explosions with the two powder sizes, 35 nm and 100 nm, revealed considerable differences, as shown here: (dp/dtmax-35 nm = 1254 bar/s, (dp/dtmax-100 nm = 1105 bar/s; Pmax-35 nm = 7.5 bar, Pmax-100 nm = 12.3 bar, and MEC-35 nm = 40 g/m3, MEC-100 nm = 50 g/m3. The reason of Pmax-35 nm value is smaller than Pmax-100 nm may be due to agglomeration. From an analysis of the explosive residue, the study found that nanoparticles of 35 nm Al powder became filamentous strands after an explosion, where most of 100 nm Al nanoparticles maintained a spherical structure, This may be because the initial melting temperature of 35 nm Al is 435.71°C, while that for 100 nm Al is 523.58°C, higher by 87.87°C. This study discovered that explosive property between the 35 nm Al and 100 nm Al powders after agglomeration were different.

  2. Thermal methods for evaluating polymorphic transitions in nifedipine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grooff, D.; De Villiers, M.M.; Liebenberg, W.

    2007-01-01

    The thermal behaviour of nifedipine was studied with the view to understand the various phase transitions between its polymorphs. The focus was on polymorph identification, accompanying morphological changes during crystallization and the nature of the phase transformations. These features were compared to the complexity of the crystallization mechanisms, studied by dynamic differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) heating techniques. DSC, thermogravimetry (TG) established the temperature limits for preparation of amorphous nifedipine from the melt. DSC studies identified that metastable form B, melting point ∼163 deg. C, was enantiotropically related to a third modification, form C, which existed at lower temperatures. Form C converted endothermically to form B at ∼56 deg. C on heating and was shown by hot stage microscopy (HSM) to be accompanied by morphological changes. Modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry (MTDSC) showed discontinuities in the reversing heat flow signal during crystallization of amorphous nifedipine (from ∼92 deg. C) to form B, which suggested that a number of polymorphs may nucleate from the melt prior to form B formation. Identification of the number of nifedipine polymorphs included the use of combined DSC-powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and variable temperature powder X-ray diffraction (VTPXRD). The crystallization kinetics studied by dynamic DSC heating techniques followed by analysis using the Friedman isoconversion method where values of activation energy (E) and frequency factor (A) were estimated as a function of alpha or extent of conversion (α). The variations in E with α, from 0.05 to 0.9, for the amorphous to form B conversion could indicate the formation of intermediate polymorphs prior to form B. The form B to form A conversion showed a constancy in E on kinetic analysis from α 0.05 to 0.9, which suggested that a constant crystallization mechanism operated during formation of the thermodynamically stable

  3. Optical detection of nanoparticle agglomeration in a living system under the influence of a magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, Robert, E-mail: robert.mueller@ipht-jena.de [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Stranik, Ondrej [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Schlenk, Florian; Werner, Sebastian [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Institute of Pharmacy, Friedrich Schiller University, Otto-Schott-Str. 41, 07745 Jena (Germany); Malsch, Daniéll [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Fischer, Dagmar [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Institute of Pharmacy, Friedrich Schiller University, Otto-Schott-Str. 41, 07745 Jena (Germany); Fritzsche, Wolfgang [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 07745 Jena (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Nanoparticles are important in diagnosis and therapy. In order to apply their potential, an understanding of the behavior of particles in the body is crucial. However, in vitro experiments usually do not mimic the dynamic conditions of the in vivo situation. The aim of our work was an in vivo observation of particle transport in chicken egg vessels in the presence of a magnetic field by particle tracking. For that we demonstrate the spatial resolution of our observations in a vein and a temporal resolution by observation of the cardiac cycle in an artery. Microscopic images were recorded in dark field reflection and fluorescence mode. - Highlights: • Optically accessible blood circulation in hen's egg CAV model. • Observation of transport of magnetic particles in chicken egg vessels. • Irreversibility of agglomerates after removing the magnetic field.

  4. Particle Agglomeration in Bipolar Barb Agglomerator Under AC Electric Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Chao; Ma Xiuqin; Sun Youshan; Wang Meiyan; Zhang Changping; Lou Yueya

    2015-01-01

    The development of an efficient technology for removing fine particles in flue gas is essential as the haze is becoming more and more serious. To improve agglomeration effectiveness of fine particles, a dual zone electric agglomeration device consisting of a charging chamber and an agglomeration chamber with bipolar barb electrodes was developed. The bipolar barb electric agglomerator with a polar distance of 200 mm demonstrates good agglomeration effectiveness for particles with a size less than 8.0 μm under applied AC electric field. An optimal condition for achieving better agglomeration effectiveness was found to be as follows: flue gas flow velocity of 3.00 m/s, particle concentration of 2.00 g/m 3 , output voltage of 35 kV and length of the barb of 16 mm. In addition, 4.0–6.0 μm particles have the best effectiveness with the variation of particle volume occupancy of −3.2. (paper)

  5. Particle Agglomeration in Bipolar Barb Agglomerator Under AC Electric Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Ma, Xiuqin; Sun, Youshan; Wang, Meiyan; Zhang, Changping; Lou, Yueya

    2015-04-01

    The development of an efficient technology for removing fine particles in flue gas is essential as the haze is becoming more and more serious. To improve agglomeration effectiveness of fine particles, a dual zone electric agglomeration device consisting of a charging chamber and an agglomeration chamber with bipolar barb electrodes was developed. The bipolar barb electric agglomerator with a polar distance of 200 mm demonstrates good agglomeration effectiveness for particles with a size less than 8.0 μm under applied AC electric field. An optimal condition for achieving better agglomeration effectiveness was found to be as follows: flue gas flow velocity of 3.00 m/s, particle concentration of 2.00 g/m3, output voltage of 35 kV and length of the barb of 16 mm. In addition, 4.0-6.0 μm particles have the best effectiveness with the variation of particle volume occupancy of -3.2. supported by the Key Technology R&D Program of Hebei, China (No. 13211207D)

  6. Isosorbide dinitrate and nifedipine treatment of achalasia: a clinical, manometric and radionuclide evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelfond, M.; Rozen, P.; Gilat, T.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of sublingual isosorbide dinitrate (5 mg) and nifedipine (20 mg) were compared in 15 patients with achalasia. The parameters examined included the manometric measurement of the lower esophageal sphincter pressure, the radionuclide assessment of esophageal emptying and the clinical response. The mean basal lower esophageal sphincter pressure fell significantly after both drugs (p less than 0.01), with a maximum fall of 63.5% 10 min after receiving isosorbide dinitrate, but by only 46.7% 30 min after nifedipine. The esophageal radionuclide test meal retention was significantly less (p less than 0.01) only after receiving isosorbide dinitrate. The drug improved initial esophageal emptying by its effect on the lower esophageal sphincter and by relieving the test meal hold-up noted to occur at the junction of the upper and midesophagus. Eight patients cleared their test meal within 10 min after isosorbide dinitrate administration while only two did so after nifedipine. Subjectively, 13 patients had their dysphagia relieved by isosorbide dinitrate and 8 by nifedipine. However, this relief was not confirmed in 4 patients by the radionuclide study and they, as well as the other 3 patients who did not respond to therapy, were referred to pneumatic dilatation. Side effects were more prominent after nitrates. Three of the patients are currently receiving nifedipine and 5 patients received isosorbide dinitrate therapy for 8-14 mo. The radionuclide test meal is currently the best way of objectively evaluating drug therapy in patients with achalasia. Isosorbide dinitrate is more effective than nifedipine in relieving their symptoms

  7. Isosorbide dinitrate and nifedipine treatment of achalasia: a clinical, manometric and radionuclide evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelfond, M.; Rozen, P.; Gilat, T.

    1982-11-01

    The effects of sublingual isosorbide dinitrate (5 mg) and nifedipine (20 mg) were compared in 15 patients with achalasia. The parameters examined included the manometric measurement of the lower esophageal sphincter pressure, the radionuclide assessment of esophageal emptying and the clinical response. The mean basal lower esophageal sphincter pressure fell significantly after both drugs (p less than 0.01), with a maximum fall of 63.5% 10 min after receiving isosorbide dinitrate, but by only 46.7% 30 min after nifedipine. The esophageal radionuclide test meal retention was significantly less (p less than 0.01) only after receiving isosorbide dinitrate. The drug improved initial esophageal emptying by its effect on the lower esophageal sphincter and by relieving the test meal hold-up noted to occur at the junction of the upper and midesophagus. Eight patients cleared their test meal within 10 min after isosorbide dinitrate administration while only two did so after nifedipine. Subjectively, 13 patients had their dysphagia relieved by isosorbide dinitrate and 8 by nifedipine. However, this relief was not confirmed in 4 patients by the radionuclide study and they, as well as the other 3 patients who did not respond to therapy, were referred to pneumatic dilatation. Side effects were more prominent after nitrates. Three of the patients are currently receiving nifedipine and 5 patients received isosorbide dinitrate therapy for 8-14 mo. The radionuclide test meal is currently the best way of objectively evaluating drug therapy in patients with achalasia. Isosorbide dinitrate is more effective than nifedipine in relieving their symptoms.

  8. Labetalol Versus Nifedipine as Antihypertensive Treatment for Chronic Hypertension in Pregnancy: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Louise M; Myers, Jenny E; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine; Harding, Kate; Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Watt-Coote, Ingrid; Khalil, Asma; Wiesender, Cornelia; Seed, Paul T; Chappell, Lucy C

    2017-11-01

    Data from randomized controlled trials to guide antihypertensive agent choice for chronic hypertension in pregnancy are limited; this study aimed to compare labetalol and nifedipine, additionally assessing the impact of ethnicity on treatment efficacy. Pregnant women with chronic hypertension (12 +0 -27 +6 weeks' gestation) were enrolled at 4 UK centers (August 2014 to October 2015). Open-label first-line antihypertensive treatment was randomly assigned: labetalol- (200-1800 mg/d) or nifedipine-modified release (20-80 mg/d). Analysis included 112 women (98%) who completed the study (labetalol n=55, nifedipine n=57). Maximum blood pressure after randomization was 161/101 mm Hg with labetalol versus 163/105 mm Hg with nifedipine (mean difference systolic: 1.2 mm Hg [-4.9 to 7.2 mm Hg], diastolic: 3.3 mm Hg [-0.6 to 7.3 mm Hg]). Mean blood pressure was 134/84 mm Hg with labetalol and 134/85 mm Hg with nifedipine (mean difference systolic: 0.3 mm Hg [-2.8 to 3.4 mm Hg], and diastolic: -1.9 mm Hg [-4.1 to 0.3 mm Hg]). Nifedipine use was associated with a 7.4-mm Hg reduction (-14.4 to -0.4 mm Hg) in central aortic pressure, measured by pulse wave analysis. No difference in treatment effect was observed in black women (n=63), but a mean 4 mm Hg reduction (-6.6 to -0.8 mm Hg; P =0.015) in brachial diastolic blood pressure was observed with labetalol compared with nifedipine in non-black women (n=49). Labetalol and nifedipine control mean blood pressure to target in pregnant women with chronic hypertension. This study provides support for a larger definitive trial scrutinizing the benefits and side effects of first-line antihypertensive treatment. URL: https://www.isrctn.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN40973936. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Nifedipine-activated Ca(2+) permeability in newborn rat cortical collecting duct cells in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, L; Bidet, M; Martial, S; Sanchez, E; Melendez, E; Tauc, M; Poujeol, C; Martin, D; Namorado, M D; Reyes, J L; Poujeol, P

    2001-05-01

    To characterize Ca(2+) transport in newborn rat cortical collecting duct (CCD) cells, we used nifedipine, which in adult rat distal tubules inhibits the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) increase in response to hormonal activation. We found that the dihydropyridine (DHP) nifedipine (20 microM) produced an increase in [Ca(2+)](i) from 87.6 +/- 3.3 nM to 389.9 +/- 29.0 nM in 65% of the cells. Similar effects of other DHP (BAY K 8644, isradipine) were also observed. Conversely, DHPs did not induce any increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in cells obtained from proximal convoluted tubule. In CCD cells, neither verapamil nor diltiazem induced any rise in [Ca(2+)](i). Experiments in the presence of EGTA showed that external Ca(2+) was required for the nifedipine effect, while lanthanum (20 microM), gadolinium (100 microM), and diltiazem (20 microM) inhibited the effect. Experiments done in the presence of valinomycin resulted in the same nifedipine effect, showing that K(+) channels were not involved in the nifedipine-induced [Ca(2+)](i) rise. H(2)O(2) also triggered [Ca(2+)](i) rise. However, nifedipine-induced [Ca(2+)](i) increase was not affected by protamine. In conclusion, the present results indicate that 1) primary cultures of cells from terminal nephron of newborn rats are a useful tool for investigating Ca(2+) transport mechanisms during growth, and 2) newborn rat CCD cells in primary culture exhibit a new apical nifedipine-activated Ca(2+) channel of capacitive type (either transient receptor potential or leak channel).

  10. Comparative efficacy of tamsulosin versus nifedipine for distal ureteral calculi: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang H

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hai Wang, Li Bo Man, Guang Lin Huang, Gui Zhong Li, Jian Wei WangDepartment of Urology, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Objective: The aim of this study was to systematically compare the therapeutic effect and safety of tamsulosin with nifedipine in medical expulsive therapy for distal ureteral calculi.Methods: Databases, including PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and Clinical Trial Register Centers, were comprehensively searched. Relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs were selected, and quality assessment was performed according to the Cochrane Handbook. RevMan software was used to analyze the outcome measures, which consisted of expulsion rate, expulsion time, and complications.Results: Twelve RCTs consisting of 4,961 patients were included (tamsulosin group, 2,489 cases; nifedipine group, 2,472 cases. Compared with nifedipine, tamsulosin significantly increased the expulsion rate (risk ratio =1.29, 95% CI [1.25, 1.33], P<0.0001 and reduced the expulsion time (standard mean difference =-0.39, 95% CI [−0.72, −0.05], P=0.02. Regarding safety, tamsulosin was associated with fewer complications than nifedipine (risk ratio =0.45, 95% CI [0.28, 0.72], P=0.0008, and further subgroup analysis showed that tamsulosin was associated with a lower risk of both mild and moderate-to-severe complications.Conclusion: On the bias of current evidence, tamsulosin showed an overall superiority to nifedipine for distal ureteral calculi <10 mm in aspects of expulsion rate, expulsion time, and safety. Tamsulosin was supposed to be the first drug to be recommended to patients willing to receive medical expulsive therapy.Keywords: tamsulosin, nifedipine, medical expulsive therapy, MET, lower urinary calculi

  11. Effects of nifedipine on anorectal smooth muscle in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, T A; Brading, A F; Mortensen, N J

    1999-06-01

    Glyceryl trinitrate reduces anal resting pressure and aids the healing of anal fissures. However, some patients develop tachyphylaxis and the fissure fails to heal, suggesting that other agents are needed. This study assesses the effects of nifedipine (a calcium channel antagonist) in modulating resting tone and agonist-induced contractions in human internal anal sphincter (IAS) and rectal circular muscle. Smooth muscle strips from the IAS and rectal circular muscle from ten patients undergoing surgical resection were mounted for isometric tension recording in a superfusion organ bath. The effects of noradrenaline and carbachol were assessed in the presence of various perfusates. LAS strips developed tone and spontaneous activity. Noradrenaline produced dose-dependent contractions. In calcium-free Krebs solution, tone and activity were abolished and no contractions were elicited in response to noradrenaline. Nifedipine also abolished tone and spontaneous activity, but contractions to noradrenaline were only slightly attenuated. In contrast, rectal smooth muscle strips developed spontaneous activity but no resting tone and contracted in response to carbachol. In calcium-free Krebs solution, the spontaneous activity and carbachol contractions were abolished. Addition of nifedipine to the perfusate abolished spontaneous activity and greatly reduced contractions. These data suggest that spontaneous activity and resting tone are dependent on extracellular calcium and flux across the cells. Agonist-induced contraction in the IAS is attributable mainly to the release of calcium from intracellular stores, whereas rectal circular smooth muscle depends principally on extracellular calcium entering the cell for contraction. The attenuation of contractions in both tissues and the abolition of resting tone in the IAS suggest that nifedipine may be useful in the management of patients with anorectal disorders.

  12. Influence of nifedipine on left ventricular perfusion and function in patients with unstable angina: Evaluation with radionuclide techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, E.E. van der; Kerkkamp, H.J.; Simoons, M.L.; Rijk, P.P. van; Reiber, J.H.C.; Bom, N.; Lubsen, J.C.; Lie, K.I.

    1986-04-01

    In 1981, a large, double-blind, randomized trial was started in The Netherlands to evaluate the therapeutic effects of nifedipine and/or metoprolol in patients with unstable angina. This study has been called the Holland Interuniversity Nifedipine/metoprolol Trial (HINT) and required several hundred patients to establish potential therapeutic effects. From December 1982 to January 1984 the effects of nifedipine on left ventricular (LV) performance in a subgroup of 52 HINT patients were studied using radionuclide techniques. All patients (23 on nifedipine, 29 controls) underwent thallium-201 scintigraphy or radionuclide angiography just before and 48 h after the start of experimental medication. The radionuclide angiographic studies were also performed at 1 and 4 h after treatment. Nifedipine did not influence the incidence of disapperance of perfusion defects on the 48-h thallium images. No significant differences in overall LV ejections fraction (EF) were seen at any time between nifedipine-treated patients and controls. However, paired observations in 37 patients showed improvement of LVEF after 48 h in 8 patients on nifedipine and in only 1 control patient. Scintigraphic measurements on admission were not related to clinical outcome after 48 h. Concomitant administration of metoprolol did not influence LVEF in either group. It is concluded that nifedipine improves LVEF after 48 h in a subset of patients with unstable angina without affecting myocardial perfusion. This finding indicates that nifedipine has a predominant effect on afterload reduction in patients with unstable angina. Also, early scintigraphic measurements had no significant predictive value for subsequent cardiac events.

  13. Continuous agglomerate model for identifying the solute- indifferent part of colloid nanoparticle's surface charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfimov, A V; Aryslanova, E M; Chivilikhin, S A

    2016-01-01

    This work proposes an explicit analytical model for the surface potential of a colloidal nano-agglomerate. The model predicts that when an agglomerate reaches a certain critical size, its surface potential becomes independent of the agglomerate radius. The model also provides a method for identifying and quantifying the solute-indifferent charge in nanocolloids, that allows to assess the stability of toxicologically significant parameters of the system. (paper)

  14. "Nifedipine in the treatment of liver toxicity induced by Acetaminophen overdose in mice "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalantari H

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Acetaminophen is an analgesic and antipyretic drug, which is widely used by public and poisoning with this drug, is common. One of the most important adverse effects of acetaminophen poisoning is centrilobullar necrosis in hepatic cells, which depends on activity of microsomal cytochrome P-450 (CYP enzymes. The aim of this investigation was to find out the protective effect of nifedipine against liver toxicity caused by acetaminophen overdose (700 mg/kg as calcium channel blocker. In this study doses of 5, 50, 100, 250, 500 mg/kg of nifedipine were administered to mice orally one hour before acetaminophen administration. The negative control group receive normal saline. The positive control group was administered with acetaminophen at a dose of 700 mg/kg one hour after nifedipine administration. After 24 hours, enzyme activity (ALT, AST, histopathological examination and liver weight were compared with the control groups. The results revealed that nifedipine at dose of 500 mg/kg was the most effective and protected damage from acetaminophen toxicity.

  15. Agglomerate formation and growth mechanisms during melt agglomeration in a rotary processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhelmsen, Thomas; Schaefer, Torben

    2005-11-04

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the binder particle size and the binder addition method on the mechanisms of agglomerate formation and growth during melt agglomeration in a laboratory scale rotary processor. Lactose monohydrate was agglomerated with molten polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3000 by adding the PEG either as solid particles from the size fraction 0-250, 250-500, or 500-750 microm or as droplets with a median size of 25, 48, or 69 microm. It was found that the PEG particle size, the PEG droplet size, and the massing time significantly influenced the agglomerate size and size distribution. Agglomerate formation and growth were found to occur primarily by distribution and coalescence for the PEG size fraction 0-250 microm and mainly by the immersion mechanism for the PEG size fractions 250-500 and 500-750 microm. When the PEG was sprayed upon the lactose, the mechanism of agglomerate formation was supposed to be a mixture of immersion and distribution, and the agglomerate growth was found to occur by coalescence regardless of the PEG mean droplet size. Compared to high shear mixers and conventional fluid bed granulators, the mechanisms of agglomerate formation and growth in the rotary processor resembled mostly those seen in the fluid bed granulator.

  16. Mechanisms of Nifedipine-Downregulated CD40L/sCD40L Signaling in Collagen Stimulated Human Platelets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tso-Hsiao Chen

    Full Text Available The platelet-derived soluble CD40L (sCD40L release plays a critical role in the development of atherosclerosis. Nifedipine, a dihydropyridine-based L-type calcium channel blocker (CCB, has been reported to have an anti-atherosclerotic effect beyond its blood pressure-lowering effect, but the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The present study was designed to investigate whether nifedipine affects sCD40L release from collagen-stimulated human platelets and to determine the potential role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/-γ (PPAR-β/-γ. We found that treatment with nifedipine significantly inhibited the platelet surface CD40L expression and sCD40L release in response to collagen, while the inhibition was markedly reversed by blocking PPAR-β/-γ activity with specific antagonist such as GSK0660 and GW9662. Meanwhile, nifedipine also enhanced nitric oxide (NO and cyclic GMP formation in a PPAR-β/-γ-dependent manner. When the NO/cyclic GMP pathway was suppressed, nifedipine-mediated inhibition of sCD40L release was abolished significantly. Collagen-induced phosphorylation of p38MAPK, ERK1/2 and HSP27, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 expression/activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS formation were significantly inhibited by nifedipine, whereas these alterations were all attenuated by co-treatment with PPAR-β/-γ antagonists. Collectively, these results demonstrate that PPAR-β/-γ-dependent pathways contribute to nifedipine-mediated downregulation of CD40L/sCD40L signaling in activated platelets through regulation of NO/ p38MAPK/ERK1/2/HSP27/MMP-2 signalings and provide a novel mechanism regarding the anti-atherosclerotic effect of nifedipine.

  17. Effect of the primary particle morphology on the micromechanical properties of nanostructured alumina agglomerates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilde, Carsten; Westphal, Bastian; Kwade, Arno

    2012-01-01

    Depending on the application of nanoparticles, certain characteristics of the product quality such as size, morphology, abrasion resistance, specific surface, dispersibility and tendency to agglomeration are important. These characteristics are a function of the physicochemical properties, i.e. the micromechanical properties of the nanostructured material. The micromechanical properties of these nanostructured agglomerates such as the maximum indentation force, the plastic and elastic deformation energy and the strength give information on the product properties, e.g. the efficiency of a dispersion process of the agglomerates, and can be measured by nanoindentation. In this study a Berkovich indenter tip was used for the characterisation of model aggregates out of sol–gel produced silica and precipitated alumina agglomerates with different primary particle morphologies (dimension of 15–40 nm). In general, the effect of the primary particle morphology and the presence or absence of solid bonds can be characterised by the measurement of the micromechanical properties via nanoindentation. The micromechanical behaviour of aggregates containing solid bonds is strongly affected by the elastic–plastic deformation behaviour of the solid bonds and the breakage of solid bonds. Moreover, varying the primary particle morphology for similar particle material and approximately isotropic agglomerate behaviour the particle–particle interactions within the agglomerates can be described by the elementar breaking stress according to the formula of Rumpf.

  18. Measurement of agglomerate strength distributions in agglomerated powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciftcioglu, M.; Aking, M.; Burkhart, L.

    1986-01-01

    Strength distributions of particle agglomerates in six different yttria powders were measured using a calibrated ultrasonic sound field. The density of sintered pellets was directly related to the agglomerate strength of each powder. No systematic relation to the sintered density was observed for bulk densities or pressure-density compaction data for the loose powders, or for pore size distributions or green densities for the pressed compacts

  19. Comparative effects of imipramine, sertraline, nifedipine, furosemide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the comparative effects of imipramine, sertraline, nifedipine, furosemide and bumetanide on ingestive behavior in rodents. Twelve groups (with six in each group) of male mice (25 to 35 g) were used in the experiments. They were housed in labelled plastic cages in the departmental ...

  20. Effects of Atomization Injection on Nanoparticle Processing in Suspension Plasma Spray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-bing Xiong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Liquid atomization is applied in nanostructure dense coating technology to inject suspended nano-size powder materials into a suspension plasma spray (SPS torch. This paper presents the effects of the atomization parameters on the nanoparticle processing. A numerical model was developed to simulate the dynamic behaviors of the suspension droplets, the solid nanoparticles or agglomerates, as well as the interactions between them and the plasma gas. The plasma gas was calculated as compressible, multi-component, turbulent jet flow in Eulerian scheme. The droplets and the solid particles were calculated as discrete Lagrangian entities, being tracked through the spray process. The motion and thermal histories of the particles were given in this paper and their release and melting status were observed. The key parameters of atomization, including droplet size, injection angle and velocity were also analyzed. The study revealed that the nanoparticle processing in SPS preferred small droplets with better atomization and less aggregation from suspension preparation. The injection angle and velocity influenced the nanoparticle release percentage. Small angle and low initial velocity might have more nanoparticles released. Besides, the melting percentage of nanoparticles and agglomerates were studied, and the critical droplet diameter to ensure solid melting was drawn. Results showed that most released nanoparticles were well melted, but the agglomerates might be totally melted, partially melted, or even not melted at all, mainly depending on the agglomerate size. For better coating quality, the suspension droplet size should be limited to a critical droplet diameter, which was inversely proportional to the cubic root of weight content, for given critical agglomerate diameter of being totally melted.

  1. Kinetic energy density and agglomerate abrasion rate during blending of agglomerates into powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemsz, Tofan A; Hooijmaijers, Ricardo; Rubingh, Carina M; Tran, Thanh N; Frijlink, Henderik W; Vromans, Herman; van der Voort Maarschalk, Kees

    2012-01-23

    Problems related to the blending of a cohesive powder with a free flowing bulk powder are frequently encountered in the pharmaceutical industry. The cohesive powder often forms lumps or agglomerates which are not dispersed during the mixing process and are therefore detrimental to blend uniformity. Achieving sufficient blend uniformity requires that the blending conditions are able to break up agglomerates, which is often an abrasion process. This study was based on the assumption that the abrasion rate of agglomerates determines the required blending time. It is shown that the kinetic energy density of the moving powder bed is a relevant parameter which correlates with the abrasion rate of agglomerates. However, aspects related to the strength of agglomerates should also be considered. For this reason the Stokes abrasion number (St(Abr)) has been defined. This parameter describes the ratio between the kinetic energy density of the moving powder bed and the work of fracture of the agglomerate. The St(Abr) number is shown to predict the abrasion potential of agglomerates in the dry-mixing process. It appeared possible to include effects of filler particle size and impeller rotational rate into this concept. A clear relationship between abrasion rate of agglomerates and the value of St(Abr) was demonstrated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of tamsulosin and nifedipine on contractility of pregnant rat ureters in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Lisette; Corriveau, Stéphanie; Rousseau, Eric; Blouin, Simon; Pasquier, Jean-Charles; Ponsot, Yves; Roy-Lacroix, Marie-Ève

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the in vitro effect of tamsulosin and nifedipine on the contractility of pregnant rat ureters and to perform quantitative analysis of the pharmacological effects. Medical expulsive therapy (MET) is commonly used to treat urolithiasis. However, this treatment is seldom used in pregnant women since no studies support this practice. This was an in vitro study on animal tissue derived from pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats. A total of 124 ureteral segments were mounted in an organ bath system and contractile response to methacholine (MCh) was assessed. Tamsulosin or nifedipine were added at cumulative concentrations (0.001-1 μM). The area under the curve (AUC) from isometric tension measurements was calculated. The effect of pharmacological agents and the respective controls were assessed by calculating the AUC for each 5-min interval. Statistical analyses were performed using the Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon nonparametric test. Both drugs displayed statistically significant inhibitory activity at concentrations of 0.1 and 1 μM for tamsulosin and 1 μM for nifedipine when calculated as the AUC as compared to DMSO controls. Tamsulosin and nifedipine directly inhibit MCh-induced contractility of pregnant rat ureters. Further work is needed to determine the clinical efficacy of these medications for MET in pregnancy.

  3. Insight on agglomerates of gold nanoparticles in glass based on surface plasmon resonance spectrum: study by multi-spheres T-matrix method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avakyan, L. A.; Heinz, M.; Skidanenko, A. V.; Yablunovski, K. A.; Ihlemann, J.; Meinertz, J.; Patzig, C.; Dubiel, M.; Bugaev, L. A.

    2018-01-01

    The formation of a localized surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectrum of randomly distributed gold nanoparticles in the surface layer of silicate float glass, generated and implanted by UV ArF-excimer laser irradiation of a thin gold layer sputter-coated on the glass surface, was studied by the T-matrix method, which enables particle agglomeration to be taken into account. The experimental technique used is promising for the production of submicron patterns of plasmonic nanoparticles (given by laser masks or gratings) without damage to the glass surface. Analysis of the applicability of the multi-spheres T-matrix (MSTM) method to the studied material was performed through calculations of SPR characteristics for differently arranged and structured gold nanoparticles (gold nanoparticles in solution, particles pairs, and core-shell silver-gold nanoparticles) for which either experimental data or results of the modeling by other methods are available. For the studied gold nanoparticles in glass, it was revealed that the theoretical description of their SPR spectrum requires consideration of the plasmon coupling between particles, which can be done effectively by MSTM calculations. The obtained statistical distributions over particle sizes and over interparticle distances demonstrated the saturation behavior with respect to the number of particles under consideration, which enabled us to determine the effective aggregate of particles, sufficient to form the SPR spectrum. The suggested technique for the fitting of an experimental SPR spectrum of gold nanoparticles in glass by varying the geometrical parameters of the particles aggregate in the recurring calculations of spectrum by MSTM method enabled us to determine statistical characteristics of the aggregate: the average distance between particles, average size, and size distribution of the particles. The fitting strategy of the SPR spectrum presented here can be applied to nanoparticles of any nature and in various

  4. Pu-rich MOX agglomerate-by-agglomerate model for fuel pellet burnup analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, G.S.

    2004-01-01

    In support of potential licensing of the mixed oxide (MOX) fuel made from weapons-grade (WG) plutonium and depleted uranium for use in United States reactors, an experiment containing WG-MOX fuel is being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The WG-MOX comprises five percent PuO 2 and 95% depleted UO 2 . Based on the Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) observation, the volume fraction (VF) of MOX agglomerates in the fuel pellet is about 16.67%, and PuO 2 concentration of 30.0 = (5 / 16.67 x 100) wt% in the agglomerate. A pressurized water reactor (PWR) unit WG-MOX lattice with Agglomerate-by-Agglomerate Fuel (AbAF) modeling has been developed. The effect of the irregular agglomerate distribution can be addressed through the use of the Monte Carlo AbAF model. The AbAF-calculated cumulative ratio of Agglomerate burnup to U-MAtrix burnup (AG/MA) is 9.17 at the beginning of life, and decreases to 2.88 at 50 GWd/t. The MCNP-AbAF-calculated results can be used to adjust the parameters in the MOX fuel fission gas release modeling. (author)

  5. Development of Sustained-Release Microbeads of Nifedipine and In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Nifedipine microbeads were prepared using sodium alginate and pectin in different ratios by ionic-gelation method. ... Oral sustained release dosage forms provide ... Stability in .... 37oC) in a USP XXII apparatus (Pharma Test,.

  6. Modeling of atomic layer deposition on nanoparticle agglomerates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, W.

    2017-01-01

    Nanoparticles are increasingly applied in a range of fields, such as electronics, catalysis, energy and medicine, due to their small sizes and consequent high surface-volume ratio. In many applications, it is attractive to coat the nanoparticles with a layer of different materials in order to gain

  7. Effect of Nifedipine on Reproductive Functions in Male Rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Nifedipine on Reproductive Functions in Male Rats. ... Background: After life itself, fertility is probably the most highly prized human possession. ... Animals in Group 3 were allowed another 30 days after drug withdrawal for recovery.

  8. Nifedipine treatment reduces resting calcium concentration, oxidative and apoptotic gene expression, and improves muscle function in dystrophic mdx mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Altamirano

    Full Text Available Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD is a recessive X-linked genetic disease, caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin. DMD is characterized in humans and in mdx mice by a severe and progressive destruction of muscle fibers, inflammation, oxidative/nitrosative stress, and cell death. In mdx muscle fibers, we have shown that basal ATP release is increased and that extracellular ATP stimulation is pro-apoptotic. In normal fibers, depolarization-induced ATP release is blocked by nifedipine, leading us to study the potential therapeutic effect of nifedipine in mdx muscles and its relation with extracellular ATP signaling. Acute exposure to nifedipine (10 µM decreased [Ca(2+]r, NF-κB activity and iNOS expression in mdx myotubes. In addition, 6-week-old mdx mice were treated with daily intraperitoneal injections of nifedipine, 1 mg/Kg for 1 week. This treatment lowered the [Ca(2+]r measured in vivo in the mdx vastus lateralis. We demonstrated that extracellular ATP levels were higher in adult mdx flexor digitorum brevis (FDB fibers and can be significantly reduced after 1 week of treatment with nifedipine. Interestingly, acute treatment of mdx FDB fibers with apyrase, an enzyme that completely degrades extracellular ATP to AMP, reduced [Ca(2+]r to a similar extent as was seen in FDB fibers after 1-week of nifedipine treatment. Moreover, we demonstrated that nifedipine treatment reduced mRNA levels of pro-oxidative/nitrosative (iNOS and gp91(phox/p47(phox NOX2 subunits and pro-apoptotic (Bax genes in mdx diaphragm muscles and lowered serum creatine kinase (CK levels. In addition, nifedipine treatment increased muscle strength assessed by the inverted grip-hanging test and exercise tolerance measured with forced swimming test in mdx mice. We hypothesize that nifedipine reduces basal ATP release, thereby decreasing purinergic receptor activation, which in turn reduces [Ca(2+]r in mdx skeletal muscle cells. The results in this work open new

  9. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) inhibits agglomeration and macrophage uptake of toxic amine modified nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Zofi; Kendall, Michaela; Mackay, Rose-Marie; Whitwell, Harry; Elgy, Christine; Ding, Ping; Mahajan, Sumeet; Morgan, Cliff; Griffiths, Mark; Clark, Howard; Madsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The lung provides the main route for nanomaterial exposure. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is an important respiratory innate immune molecule with the ability to bind or opsonise pathogens to enhance phagocytic removal from the airways. We hypothesised that SP-A, like surfactant protein D, may interact with inhaled nanoparticulates, and that this interaction will be affected by nanoparticle (NP) surface characteristics. In this study, we characterise the interaction of SP-A with unmodified (U-PS) and amine-modified (A-PS) polystyrene particles of varying size and zeta potential using dynamic light scatter analysis. SP-A associated with both 100 nm U-PS and A-PS in a calcium-independent manner. SP-A induced significant calcium-dependent agglomeration of 100 nm U-PS NPs but resulted in calcium-independent inhibition of A-PS self agglomeration. SP-A enhanced uptake of 100 nm U-PS into macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner but in contrast inhibited A-PS uptake. Reduced association of A-PS particles in RAW264.7 cells following pre-incubation of SP-A was also observed with coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. Consistent with these findings, alveolar macrophages (AMs) from SP-A(-/-) mice were more efficient at uptake of 100 nm A-PS compared with wild type C57Bl/6 macrophages. No difference in uptake was observed with 500 nm U-PS or A-PS particles. Pre-incubation with SP-A resulted in a significant decrease in uptake of 100 nm A-PS in macrophages isolated from both groups of mice. In contrast, increased uptake by AMs of U-PS was observed after pre-incubation with SP-A. Thus we have demonstrated that SP-A promotes uptake of non-toxic U-PS particles but inhibits the clearance of potentially toxic A-PS particles by blocking uptake into macrophages.

  10. Nifedipine effect on the labelling of blood cells and plasma proteins with Tc-99m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutfilen, B.; Boasquevisque, E.M.; Bernardo Filho, M.

    1988-01-01

    The labeling of red blood cells (RBC) with Tc-99m depends on the presence of stannous ion (Sn) that helps this radionuclide's fixation on the hemoglobin molecule. Nifedipine is an agent capable to block a specific way where calcius (Ca) ion acrosses the cellular membrane and to bind itself on plasma proteins. The effect of nifedipine in the labeling of RBC and plasma proteins with Tc-99m was studied because of similarities between Ca and Sn ions. Blood with anticoagulant was treated with nifedipine concentration of 10 -6 M for 15 min at 37 0 C. The labeling of RBC with Tc-99m was done incubating with Sn ion solution (3 uM) for different times. The % of radioactivity in RBC was determined. Samples of plasma were precipited with trichloroacetic acid and the % of radiocctivity in insoluble fraction was calculated. The same procedure was done using different nifedipine concentrations and the blood was incubated for 60 min with Sn ion. The determination of the % of Tc-99m labeled in RBC and plasma proteins showed that this drug does not have the capability to alter this incorporation because the results are similar to control. It is suggested that the Sn ions passage across RBC is not altered by nifedipine although this drug could bind to plasma protein, it does not modify the Tc-99m fixation on it. (author) [pt

  11. Nifedipine as a uterine relaxant for external cephalic version: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Marjolein; Bais, Joke M; van Lith, Jan M; Papatsonis, Dimitri M; Kleiverda, Gunilla; Hanny, Dahrs; Doornbos, Johannes P; Mol, Ben W; van der Post, Joris A

    2008-08-01

    To estimate the effectiveness of nifedipine as a uterine relaxant during external cephalic version to correct breech presentation. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, women with a singleton fetus in breech presentation and a gestational age of 36 weeks or more were eligible for enrollment. Participating women received two doses of either nifedipine 10 mg or placebo, 30 and 15 minutes before the external cephalic version attempt. The primary outcome was a cephalic-presenting fetus immediately after the procedure. Secondary outcome measures were cephalic presentation at delivery, mode of delivery, and adverse events. A sample size of 292 was calculated to provide 80% power to detect a 17% improvement of the external cephalic version success rate, assuming a placebo group rate of 40% and alpha of .05. Outcome data for 310 of 320 randomly assigned participants revealed no significant difference in external cephalic version success rates between treatment (42%) and control group (37%) (relative risk 1.1, 95%; 95% confidence interval 0.85-1.5). The cesarean delivery rate was 51% in the treatment group and 46% in the control group (relative risk 1.1, 95% confidence interval 0.88-1.4). Nifedipine did not significantly improve the success of external cephalic version. Future use of nifedipine to improve the outcome of external cephalic version should be limited to large clinical trials.

  12. Direct numerical simulations of agglomeration of circular colloidal particles in two-dimensional shear flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Joon; Djilali, Ned

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal agglomeration of nanoparticles in shear flow is investigated by solving the fluid-particle and particle-particle interactions in a 2D system. We use an extended finite element method in which the dynamics of the particles is solved in a fully coupled manner with the flow, allowing an accurate description of the fluid-particle interfaces without the need of boundary-fitted meshes or of empirical correlations to account for the hydrodynamic interactions between the particles. Adaptive local mesh refinement using a grid deformation method is incorporated with the fluid-structure interaction algorithm, and the particle-particle interaction at the microscopic level is modeled using the Lennard-Jones potential. Motivated by the process used in fabricating fuel cell catalysts from a colloidal ink, the model is applied to investigate agglomeration of colloidal particles under external shear flow in a sliding bi-periodic Lees-Edwards frame with varying shear rates and particle fraction ratios. Both external shear and particle fraction are found to have a crucial impact on the structure formation of colloidal particles in a suspension. Segregation intensity and graph theory are used to analyze the underlying agglomeration patterns and structures, and three agglomeration regimes are identified

  13. Hemodynamic effects of metoprolol and nifedipine in angina pectoris measured by isotope technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostroem, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    In order to evaluate the therapeutic effects of metoprolol, nifedipine, and their combination, 11 patients with secondary angina pectoris and with thallium tomographic findings indicating coronary artery disease were studied before and after these three treatment regimes in a single-blind cross-over study. The therapeutic effect was measured by standardized working test and isotope angiocardiography, which enabled evaluation of left ventricular ejection fraction, stroke volume, and phase analysis of left ventricular contraction. Treatment with metoprolol and combination therapy increased work performance. Ejection fraction did not differentiate the treatment regimes, whereas stroke volume was significantly lower at work and heart rate higher at rest and at work during nifedipine treatment compared to either metoprolol or combination treatment (p less than 0.05). Cardiac output was significantly reduced during nifedipine and metoprolol treatment during work (p less than 0.05). Phase improved after all therapeutic regimes, but reached significance only during the metoprolol treatment period at rest (p less than 0.05).

  14. Effect of drug content and agglomerate size on tabletability and drug release characteristics of bromhexine hydrochloridetalc agglomerates prepared by crystallo-co-agglomeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Namdeo; Pawar, Atmaram; Paradkar, Anant

    2010-03-01

    The objective of the investigation was to study the effect of bromhexine hydrochloride (BXH) content and agglomerate size on mechanical, compressional and drug release properties of agglomerates prepared by crystallo-co-agglomeration (CCA). Studies on optimized batches of agglomerates (BXT1 and BXT2) prepared by CCA have showed adequate sphericity and strength required for efficient tabletting. Trend of strength reduction with a decrease in the size of agglomerates was noted for both batches, irrespective of drug loading. However, an increase in mean yield pressure (14.189 to 19.481) with an increase in size was observed for BXT2 having BXH-talc (1:15.7). Surprisingly, improvement in tensile strength was demonstrated by compacts prepared from BXT2, due to high BXH load, whereas BXT1, having a low amount of BXH (BXH-talc, 1:24), showed low tensile strength. Consequently, increased tensile strength was reflected in extended drug release from BXT2 compacts (Higuchi model, R(2) = 0.9506 to 0.9981). Thus, it can be concluded that interparticulate bridges formed by BXH and agglomerate size affect their mechanical, compressional and drug release properties.

  15. Testing of WS2 Nanoparticles Functionalized by a Humin-Like Shell as Lubricant Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagit Sade

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDC have been known to reduce friction and wear when added to oil-type liquid lubricants. Aggregation limits the ability of the nanoparticles to penetrate into the interface between the two rubbing surfaces—an important factor in friction reduction mechanisms. Doping has been successfully used to reduce agglomeration, but it must be done in the production process of the nanoparticles. The use of surface-functionalized nanoparticles is less common than doping. Nonetheless, it has the potential to reduce agglomeration and thereby improve the reduction of friction and wear. In this study, we present the results of preliminary tribological ball-on-flat tests performed with WS2 nanoparticles functionalized by a humin-like conformal shell, as additives to polyalphaolefin-4 (PAO-4 oil. We tested WS2 inorganic nanotubes (INTs and two grades of inorganic fullerene-like nanoparticles (IFs. The shell/coating was found to improve friction reduction for IFs but not for INTs through better dispersion in the oil. The thicker the coating on the IFs, the less agglomerated they were. Coated industrial-grade IFs were found, by far, to be the best additive for friction reduction. We suggest the combination between reduced agglomeration and poor crystallinity as the reason for this result.

  16. Ambiance-dependent agglomeration and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy response of self-assembled silver nanoparticles for plasmonic photovoltaic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwamuri, Jephias; Venkatesan, Ragavendran; Sadatgol, Mehdi; Mayandi, Jeyanthinath; Guney, Durdu O.; Pearce, Joshua M.

    2017-07-01

    The agglomeration/dewetting process of thin silver films provides a scalable method of obtaining self-assembled nanoparticles (SANPs) for plasmonics-based thin-film solar photovoltaic (PV) devices. We show the effect of annealing ambiance on silver SANP average size, particle/cluster finite shape, substrate area coverage/particle distribution, and how these physical parameters influence optical properties and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) responses of SANPs. Statistical analysis performed indicates that generally Ag SANPs processed in the presence of a gas (argon and nitrogen) ambiance tend to have smaller average size particles compared to those processed under vacuum. Optical properties are observed to be highly dependent on particle size, separation distance, and finite shape. The greatest SERS enhancement was observed for the argon-processed samples. There is a correlation between simulation and experimental data that indicate argon-processed AgNPs have a great potential to enhance light coupling when integrated to thin-film PV.

  17. Glycine functionalized alumina nanoparticles stabilize collagen in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Al2O3 nanoparticles thereby suggesting ... 1. Introduction. Collagen is a naturally occurring skin protein in animal tis- ... easily adsorb on the surface of the nanoparticles and amino .... [19,23], agglomeration is prevented by the electrostatic.

  18. Maintenance nifedipine therapy for preterm symptomatic placenta previa: A randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Verspyck

    Full Text Available To assess the impact of maintenance nifedipine therapy on pregnancy duration in women with preterm placenta previa bleeding.PPADAL was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted between 05/2008 and 05/2012 in five French hospitals. The trial included 109 women, aged ≥ 18 years, with at least one episode of placenta previa bleeding, intact membranes and no other pregnancy complication, at gestational age 24 to 34 weeks and after 48 hours of complete acute tocolysis. Women were randomly allocated to receive either 20 mg of slow-release nifedipine three times daily (n = 54 or placebo (n = 55 until 36 + 6 weeks of gestation. The primary outcome for the trial was length of pregnancy measured in days after enrolment. Main secondary outcomes were rates of recurrent bleeding, cesarean delivery due to hemorrhage, blood transfusion, maternal side effects, gestational age at delivery and adverse perinatal outcomes (perinatal death, chronic lung disease, neonatal sepsis, intraventricular hemorrhage > grade 2, perventricular leukomalacia > grade 1, or necrotizing enterocolitis. Analysis was by intention to treat.Mean (SD prolongation of pregnancy was not different between the nifedipine (n = 54 and the placebo (n = 55 group; 42.5 days ± 23.8 versus 44.2 days ± 24.5, p = 0.70. Cesarean due to hemorrhage performed before 37 weeks occurred more frequently in the nifedipine group in comparison with the placebo group (RR, 1.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-2.72. Adverse perinatal outcomes were comparable between groups; 3.8% for nifedipine versus 5.5% for placebo (relative risk, 0.52; 95% confidence interval 0.10-2.61. No maternal mortality or perinatal death occurred.Maintenance oral nifedipine neither prolongs duration of pregnancy nor improves maternal or perinatal outcomes.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00620724.

  19. Metabolic effect of combined telmisartan and nifedipine CR therapy in patients with essential hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimizu Y

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Yuji Shimizu,1,4 Fumiyasu Yamasaki,4 Takashi Furuno,1,4 Toru Kubo,1 Takayuki Sato,3,4 Yoshinori Doi,1 Tetsuro Sugiura21Medicine and Geriatrics, 2Clinical Laboratory, 3Cardiovascular Control, Kochi Medical, School, Nankoku, Japan; 4Section of Cardiology, Inoue Hospital, Takaoka, JapanBackground: In addition to exerting a blood pressure (BP-lowering effect, telmisartan produces favorable metabolic effects via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ activation. While a combination of telmisartan and a calcium channel blocker is often used to achieve a target BP level, the metabolic effects of this drug combination remain unclear. Therefore, this study evaluated the metabolic effects of telmisartan plus nifedipine controlled release (CR therapy, in hypertensive patients without metabolic disease.Methods: Sixteen patients with essential hypertension, who had not undergone antihypertensive therapy in the previous 6 months, were studied. Patients were initiated on telmisartan (40 mg/day. If their office BP was not reduced to 140/90 mmHg after 6 weeks, nifedipine CR (20–40 mg per day was added for 18 weeks. The other patients whose BP had achieved the target of 140/90 mmHg, continued only telmisartan.Results: Telmisartan reduced BP (174 ± 13/92 ± 10 to 143 ± 22/78 ± 11 mmHg; P < 0.01 at 6 weeks in 16 patients, but eight patients did not achieve target BP levels and required addition of nifedipine. Telmisartan also resulted in a reduction in the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR (1.30 ± 0.65 to 1.10 ± 0.42; P < 0.05 at 6 weeks, but did not affect adiponectin or leptin levels. Addition of nifedipine (n = 8 resulted in a reduction in BP (158 ± 18/80 ± 13 to 131 ± 8/73 ± 13 mmHg; P < 0.01 at 18 weeks, but did not affect the HOMA-IR (1.10 ± 0.40 to 1.02 ± 0.56; ns. In patients who did not require addition of nifedipine (n = 8, BP levels remained nearly identical at 18 weeks (127 ± 13/73 ± 9 to 128 ± 13/68 ± 8

  20. Transient myocardial ischemia during nifedipine therapy in stable angina pectoris, and its relation to coronary collateral flow and comparison with metoprolol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egstrup, K; Andersen, P E

    1993-01-01

    There are conflicting results concerning the anti-ischemic effect of nifedipine in patients with chronic stable angina. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess whether the anti-ischemic effect of nifedipine may be related to coronary collateral circulation. Forty-one patients with stable...... of collateral circulation. In 17 patients, angiographically poor or no collateral flow was observed (group 1), and 24 had good collateral flow (group 2). Nifedipine was administered to 20 patients (8 in group 1, and 12 in group 2). In group 1, nifedipine reduced the frequency of total and asymptomatic ischemic...

  1. Metal extraction by solid-liquid agglomerates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, E.F.

    1980-01-01

    Dissolved metal values are extracted from a liquid e.g. uranium from phosphoric acid by contacting the liquid with agglomerates for a time to load the agglomerate with the metal value, separating the loaded agglomerates from the liquid phase and stripping the metal value from the loaded agglomerate. The agglomerate may be made by combining finely divided solid particles with a binding liquid to form a paste, adding a suspending liquid to form a mixture, the suspending liquid and binding liquid being immiscible in each other and the solid particles being insoluble in the suspending liquid and shearing the mixture to form the agglomerate. (author)

  2. Aluminum agglomeration involving the second mergence of agglomerates on the solid propellants burning surface: Experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Wen; Liu, Xin; Rezaiguia, Hichem; Liu, Huan; Wang, Zhixin; Liu, Peijin

    2017-07-01

    The agglomeration of aluminum particles usually occurs on the burning surface of aluminized composite propellants. It leads to low propellant combustion efficiency and high two-phase flow losses. To reach a thorough understanding of aluminum agglomeration behaviors, agglomeration processes, and particles size distribution of Al/AP/RDX/GAP propellants were studied by using a cinephotomicrography experimental technique, under 5 MPa. Accumulation, aggregation, and agglomeration phenomena of aluminum particles have been inspected, as well as the flame asymmetry of burning agglomerates. Results reveals that the dependency of the mean and the maximum agglomeration diameter to the burning rate and the virgin aluminum size have the same trend. A second-time mergence of multiple agglomerates on the burning surface is unveiled. Two typical modes of second mergence are concluded, based upon vertical and level movement of agglomerates, respectively. The latter mode is found to be dominant and sometimes a combination of the two modes may occur. A new model of aluminum agglomeration on the burning surface of composite propellants is derived to predict the particulates size distribution with a low computational amount. The basic idea is inspired from the well-known pocket models. The pocket size of the region formed by adjacent AP particles is obtained through scanning electron microscopy of the propellant cross-section coupled to an image processing method. The second mergence mechanism, as well as the effect of the burning rate on the agglomeration processes, are included in the present model. The mergence of two agglomerates is prescribed to occur only if their separation distance is less than a critical value. The agglomerates size distribution resulting from this original model match reasonably with the experimental data. Moreover, the present model gives superior results for mean agglomeration diameter compared to common empirical and pocket models. The average prediction

  3. Effect of antihypertensive agents - captopril and nifedipine - on the functional properties of rat heart mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Kancirová

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Investigation of acute effect on cellular bioenergetics provides the opportunity to characterize the possible adverse effects of drugs more comprehensively. This study aimed to investigate the changes in biochemical and biophysical properties of heart mitochondria induced by captopril and nifedipine antihypertensive treatment. Materials and Methods: Male, 12-week-old Wistar rats in two experimental models (in vivo and in vitro were used. In four groups, the effects of escalating doses of captopril, nifedipine and combination of captopril + nifedipine added to the incubation medium (in vitro or administered per os to rat (in vivo on mitochondrial ATP synthase activity and membrane fluidity were monitored. Results: In the in vitro model we observed a significant inhibitory effect of treatment on the ATP synthase activity (P

  4. Microbial effects on colloidal agglomeration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hersman, L.

    1995-11-01

    Colloidal particles are known to enhance the transport of radioactive metals through soil and rock systems. This study was performed to determine if a soil microorganism, isolated from the surface samples collected at Yucca Mountain, NV, could affect the colloidal properties of day particles. The agglomeration of a Wyoming bentonite clay in a sterile uninoculated microbial growth medium was compared to the agglomeration in the medium inoculated with a Pseudomonas sp. In a second experiment, microorganisms were cultured in the succinate medium for 50 h and removed by centrifugation. The agglomeration of the clay in this spent was compared to sterile uninoculated medium. In both experiments, the agglomeration of the clay was greater than that of the sterile, uninoculated control. Based on these results, which indicate that this microorganism enhanced the agglomeration of the bentonite clay, it is possible to say that in the presence of microorganisms colloidal movement through a rock matrix could be reduced because of an overall increase in the size of colloidal particle agglomerates. 32 refs

  5. Analysis of nifedipine content in transdermal drug delivery system using non-destructive visible spectrophotometry technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normaizira Hamidi; Normaizira Hamidi; Normaizira Hamidi; Mohd Nasir Taib; Mohd Nasir Taib; Wui, Wong Tin; Wui, Wong Tin

    2008-01-01

    The applicability of visible spectrophotometry technique as a tool to determine the drug content of polymeric film for use as a transdermal drug delivery system was investigated. Hydroxypropylmethycellulose (HPMC) was selected as the matrix polymer and nifedipine as the model drug. Blank and nifedipine-loaded HPMC films were prepared using the solvent evaporation method. The absorbance spectra of these films under the visible wavelengths between 400 and 800 nm were assessed and compared against the drug content values obtained by means of the conventional destructive UV- spectrophotometry technique. The latter required the use of a solvent system which contained methanol, a harmful organic component in pharmaceutical applications. The results indicated that the absorbance values, attributed to nifedipine, at the wavelengths of 545, 585, 638 and 755nm were significantly correlated to the drug content values obtained using the chemical assay method (Pearson correlation value: r = 0.990 and p < 0.01). The visible spectrophotometry technique is potentially suitable for use to determine the nifedipine content of films owing to its nature of characterization of transdermal drug delivery system which does not require sample destruction during the process of measurement. The samples are recoverable from test and analysis of the entire batch of samples is possible without the need of solvents and chemical reagents. (author)

  6. Film Coating of Nifedipine Extended Release Pellets in a Fluid Bed Coater with a Wurster Insert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Franquelin Gomes de Souza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the coating process of nifedipine extended release pellets using Opadry and Opadry II, in a fluid bed coater with a Wurster insert. The coating process was studied using a complete experimental design of two factors at two levels for each polymer. The variables studied were the inlet air temperature and the coating suspension flow rate. The agglomerate fraction and coating efficiency were the analyzed response variables. The air temperature was the variable that most influenced the coating efficiency for both polymers. In addition, a study of the dissolution profiles of coated and uncoated pellets using 0.5% sodium lauryl sulfate in simulated gastric fluid without enzymes (pH 1.2 was conducted. The results showed a prolonged release profile for the coated and uncoated pellets that was very similar to the standards established by the U.S. Pharmacopoeia. The drug content and the release profiles were not significantly affected by storage at 40°C and 75% relative humidity. However, when exposed to direct sunlight and fluorescent light (light from fluorescent bulbs, the coated pellets lost only 5% of the drug content, while the uncoated ones lost more than 35%; furthermore, the dissolution profile of the uncoated pellets was faster.

  7. Film Coating of Nifedipine Extended Release Pellets in a Fluid Bed Coater with a Wurster Insert

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Luciane Franquelin Gomes; Nitz, Marcello; Taranto, Osvaldir Pereira

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the coating process of nifedipine extended release pellets using Opadry and Opadry II, in a fluid bed coater with a Wurster insert. The coating process was studied using a complete experimental design of two factors at two levels for each polymer. The variables studied were the inlet air temperature and the coating suspension flow rate. The agglomerate fraction and coating efficiency were the analyzed response variables. The air temperature was the variable that most influenced the coating efficiency for both polymers. In addition, a study of the dissolution profiles of coated and uncoated pellets using 0.5% sodium lauryl sulfate in simulated gastric fluid without enzymes (pH 1.2) was conducted. The results showed a prolonged release profile for the coated and uncoated pellets that was very similar to the standards established by the U.S. Pharmacopoeia. The drug content and the release profiles were not significantly affected by storage at 40°C and 75% relative humidity. However, when exposed to direct sunlight and fluorescent light (light from fluorescent bulbs), the coated pellets lost only 5% of the drug content, while the uncoated ones lost more than 35%; furthermore, the dissolution profile of the uncoated pellets was faster. PMID:24772426

  8. Zero-valent iron nanoparticles preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oropeza, S.; Corea, M.; Gómez-Yáñez, C.; Cruz-Rivera, J.J.; Navarro-Clemente, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH 3 ) 3 ) 2 ] 2 ] at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. The synthesized nanoparticles were spherical and had diameters less than 5 nm. Highlights: ► Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH 3 ) 3 ) 2 ] 2 ]. ► The conditions of reaction were at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. ► The synthesized nanoparticles were spherical and had diameters less than 5 nm. -- Abstract: Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH 3 ) 3 ) 2 ] 2 ] at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. To monitor the reaction, a stainless steel pressure reactor lined with PTFE and mechanically stirred was designed. This design allowed the extraction of samples at different times, minimizing the perturbation in the system. In this way, the shape and the diameter of the nanoparticles produced during the reaction were also monitored. The results showed the production of zero-valent iron nanoparticles that were approximately 5 nm in diameter arranged in agglomerates. The agglomerates grew to 900 nm when the reaction time increased up to 12 h; however, the diameter of the individual nanoparticles remained almost the same. During the reaction, some byproducts constituted by amino species acted as surfactants; therefore, no other surfactants were necessary.

  9. Formulation of cilostazol spherical agglomerates by crystallo-co-agglomeration technique and optimization using design of experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshkar, Sanjeevani Shekhar; Borde, Govind R; Kale, Rupali N; Waghmare, Balasaheb A; Thomas, Asha Biju

    2017-01-01

    Spherical agglomeration is one of the novel techniques for improvement of flow and dissolution properties of drugs. Cilostazol is a biopharmaceutics classification system Class II drug with poor solubility resulting in limited bioavailability. The present study aims at improving the solubility and dissolution of cilostazol by crystallo-co-agglomeration technique. Cilostazol agglomerates were prepared using various polymers with varying concentration of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose E 50 (HPMC E50), polyvinyl pyrrolidone K30 (PVP K30), and polyethylene glycol 6000. The influence of polymer concentration on spherical agglomerate formation was studied by 3 2 factorial design. Cilostazol agglomerates were evaluated for percent yield, mean particle size, drug content, aqueous solubility, and in vitro dissolution and further characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The agglomeration process resulted in optimized formulation, F3 with mean agglomerate size of 210.0 ± 0.56 μm, excellent flow properties, approximately 15-fold increase in solubility than pure cilostazol and complete drug release in 60 min. Process yield, agglomerate size, and drug release were affected by amount of PVP K 30 and HPMC E50. The presence of drug microcrystal was confirmed by SEM, whereas FTIR study indicated no chemical change. Increase in drug solubility was attributed to change of crystalline drug to amorphous form that is evident in DSC and XRD. Crystallo-co-agglomeration can be adopted as an important approach for increasing the solubility and dissolution of poorly soluble drug.

  10. Pharmacokinetic Study of Nifedipine in Healthy Adult Male Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    obtained from the volunteers. Nifedipine (Adalat® capsules, 10 mg, Bayer. Pharmaceuticals, Karachi, Pakistan) was the drug used. The study was conducted in the same subjects in two phases separated by a washout period of one week. Twelve data sets were obtained. Drug administration and blood sampling. A blank ...

  11. Description of agglomerate growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, S.H; Vonk, P; Segers, P; Kossen, N.W F

    1998-01-01

    Wet agglomeration processes have predominantly been investigated by changing operation variables of process-scale experiments. So far, most fundamental work concentrated on the strength of the liquid bonds in the agglomerate and its relation to the process. Previous studies on the relationship

  12. Multifunctional carbon nanotubes with nanoparticles embedded in their walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattia, D; Korneva, G; Sabur, A; Friedman, G; Gogotsi, Y

    2007-01-01

    Controlled amounts of nanoparticles ranging in size and composition were embedded in the walls of carbon nanotubes during a template-assisted chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process. The encapsulation of gold nanoparticles enabled surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) detection of glycine inside the cavity of the nanotubes. Iron oxide particles are partially reduced to metallic iron during the CVD process giving the nanotubes ferromagnetic behaviour. At high nanoparticle concentrations, particle agglomerates can form. These agglomerates or larger particles, which are only partially embedded in the walls of the nanotubes, are covered by additional carbon layers inside the hollow cavity of the tube producing hillocks inside the nanotubes, with sizes comparable to the bore of the tube

  13. An Automated Processing Method for Agglomeration Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengming Li

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Agglomeration operations are a core component of the automated generalization of aggregated area groups. However, because geographical elements that possess agglomeration features are relatively scarce, the current literature has not given sufficient attention to agglomeration operations. Furthermore, most reports on the subject are limited to the general conceptual level. Consequently, current agglomeration methods are highly reliant on subjective determinations and cannot support intelligent computer processing. This paper proposes an automated processing method for agglomeration areas. Firstly, the proposed method automatically identifies agglomeration areas based on the width of the striped bridging area, distribution pattern index (DPI, shape similarity index (SSI, and overlap index (OI. Next, the progressive agglomeration operation is carried out, including the computation of the external boundary outlines and the extraction of agglomeration lines. The effectiveness and rationality of the proposed method has been validated by using actual census data of Chinese geographical conditions in the Jiangsu Province.

  14. Powder agglomeration in a microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, James D.

    1994-01-01

    This is the final report for NASA Grant NAG3-755 entitled 'Powder Agglomeration in a Microgravity Environment.' The research program included both two types of numerical models and two types of experiments. The numerical modeling included the use of Monte Carlo type simulations of agglomerate growth including hydrodynamic screening and molecular dynamics type simulations of the rearrangement of particles within an agglomerate under a gravitational field. Experiments included direct observation of the agglomeration of submicron alumina and indirect observation, using small angle light scattering, of the agglomeration of colloidal silica and aluminum monohydroxide. In the former class of experiments, the powders were constrained to move on a two-dimensional surface oriented to minimize the effect of gravity. In the latter, some experiments involved mixture of suspensions containing particles of opposite charge which resulted in agglomeration on a very short time scale relative to settling under gravity.

  15. A CONCEPTUAL APPROACH TO ECONOMIC AGGLOMERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mădălina-Ștefania Dîrzu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Technological progress and rapid structural adjustments have characterized a lot of economies in the last century and they still feature pronounced structures. An important observation is that economic activities tend to agglomerate in space as a result of some kind increasing returns, forming eventually economic agglomerations. When various companies gather together, they establish specific forms of interaction. Increasing returns produce when this mutual interplay creates positive externalities for those firms which operate into an agglomeration. In this context, it is crucial to raise a question: what is an economic agglomeration and what do different scientists imply when using the concept? The phenomenon of agglomeration has attracted researchers from various disciplines employing a hybrid set of analytical perspectives. This whole framework is still puzzled with contradictory conceptualizations which are often used in an ambiguous way. Scientists tend to utilize notions such as agglomeration, cluster, territorial network, specialization, concentration somewhat interchangeably and with little concern about how to operationalize them. To shed a light on this issue, the aim of this paper is to provide a comprehensive analyze of different theoretical framework in which economic agglomerations have been debated and researched.

  16. A comparison of nifedipine and tamsulosin as medical expulsive therapy for the management of lower ureteral stones without ESWL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dehong; Yang, Lu; Liu, Liangren; Yuan, Haichao; Qian, Shenqiang; Lv, Xiao; Han, Pin; Wei, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Administration of nifedipine or tamsulosin has been suggested to augment stone expulsion rates. We aimed to compare the stone expulsion rates and adverse effects associated with the use of nifedipine or tamsulosin as medical expulsive therapy (MET) for the management of lower ureteral stones (LUS) without extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) via a literature review and meta-analysis. Relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified from the Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL, and Google Scholar databases. Finally, a total of 7 RCTs with 3897 patients were included. Our meta-analysis showed that tamsulosin could significantly increase the stone expulsion rate relative to nifedipine in patients with LUS (random-effects model; risk ratio [RR] = 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.75–0.88; P tamsulosin was more effective than nifedipine in patients with LUS, as evidenced by the higher stone expulsion rate. Tamsulosin treatment should therefore be considered for patients with LUS. PMID:24919112

  17. Zero-valent iron nanoparticles preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oropeza, S. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, UPALM, Edificio Z-6, Primer Piso, C.P. 07738, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, México D.F. (Mexico); Corea, M., E-mail: mcoreat@yahoo.com.mx [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, UPALM, Edificio Z-6, Primer Piso, C.P. 07738, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, México D.F. (Mexico); Gómez-Yáñez, C. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, UPALM, Edificio Z-6, Primer Piso, C.P. 07738, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, México D.F. (Mexico); Cruz-Rivera, J.J. [Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Instituto de Metalurgia, Sierra Leona 550, San Luis Potosí, C.P. 78210 (Mexico); Navarro-Clemente, M.E., E-mail: mnavarroc@ipn.mx [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, UPALM, Edificio Z-6, Primer Piso, C.P. 07738, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, México D.F. (Mexico)

    2012-06-15

    Graphical abstract: Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}] at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. The synthesized nanoparticles were spherical and had diameters less than 5 nm. Highlights: ► Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}]. ► The conditions of reaction were at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. ► The synthesized nanoparticles were spherical and had diameters less than 5 nm. -- Abstract: Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}] at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. To monitor the reaction, a stainless steel pressure reactor lined with PTFE and mechanically stirred was designed. This design allowed the extraction of samples at different times, minimizing the perturbation in the system. In this way, the shape and the diameter of the nanoparticles produced during the reaction were also monitored. The results showed the production of zero-valent iron nanoparticles that were approximately 5 nm in diameter arranged in agglomerates. The agglomerates grew to 900 nm when the reaction time increased up to 12 h; however, the diameter of the individual nanoparticles remained almost the same. During the reaction, some byproducts constituted by amino species acted as surfactants; therefore, no other surfactants were necessary.

  18. Effect of nifedipine, imipramine and sertraline on the antidepressant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of nifedipine, imipramine and sertraline on the acute and long-term antidepressant-like responses of furosemide in the forced swim (FST) and tail suspension (TST) tests in mice. Groups of mice of six in each group were treated for 30 days with Tween 80, furosemide (10 ...

  19. Effect of agglomerate strength on sintered density for yttria powders containing agglomerates of monosize spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciftcioglu, M.; Akine, M.; Burkhart, L.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of agglomerate strength on sintered density was determined for several yttria powders made by intentionally agglomerating 0.1-μm, monodisperse yttriuim hydrocarbonate precursor spheres and calcining separate portions of the precursor at different temperatures to vary the strength of the intraaglomeate bonds. In this way, the effects of differences in particle morphology and other characteristics among the powders were minimized and the effect of agglomerate strength could be seen more clearly

  20. Urban Planning Problems of Agglomerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olenkov, V. D.; Tazeev, N. T.

    2017-11-01

    The article explores the state of the air basin of the Chelyabinsk agglomeration and gives the examples of solutions for the pollution problems from the point of view of city planning. The main features and structure of the modern urban agglomerations are considered, the methods for determining their boundaries are studied and the main problems are identified. The study of the boundaries and territorial structure of the Chelyabinsk urban agglomeration is conducted, and a general description of the territory is given. The data on the change in the volume of pollutant emissions into the atmosphere and the index of atmospheric pollution for the period 2003-2015 are given basing on the annual comprehensive reports regarding the state of the environment. The review of the world experience of city-planning actions on the decision of ecological problems is carried out. The most suitable ways for the ecological problems solving in the Chelyabinsk agglomeration are considered. The authors give recommendations for the ecological situation improving in the territory of the Chelyabinsk agglomeration.

  1. Agglomeration of ceramic powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, James D.; Larosa, Judith; Dirkse, Fredrick

    1989-01-01

    A research program directed at a critical comparison of numerical models for power agglomeration with experimental observations is currently underway. Central to this program is the quantitative characterization of the distribution of mass within an agglomerate as a function of time. Current experiments are designed to restrict agglomeration to a surface, which is oriented perpendicular to the force of gravity. These experiments are discussed with reference to: their significance to ceramic processing; artifacts which may be avoided in microgravity experiments; and the comparison of information available in real space (from optical microscopy) to that in reciprocal space (from light scattering). The principle machine requirement appears to be a need to obtain information at small scattering angles.

  2. Stability and phase transfer of catalytically active platinum nanoparticle suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriram, Indira; Curtin, Alexandra E.; Chiaramonti, Ann N.; Cuchiaro, J. Hunter; Weidner, Andrew R.; Tingley, Tegan M.; Greenlee, Lauren F.; Jeerage, Kavita M.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present a robust synthesis protocol for platinum nanoparticles that yields a monomodal dispersion of particles that are approximately 100 nm in diameter. We determine that these particles are actually agglomerates of much smaller particles, creating a “raspberry” morphology. We demonstrate that these agglomerates are stable at room temperature for at least 8 weeks by dynamic light scattering. Furthermore, we demonstrate consistent electrocatalytic activity for methanol oxidation. Finally, we quantitatively explore the relationship between dispersion solvent and particle agglomeration; specifically, particles are found to agglomerate abruptly as solvent polarity decreases

  3. Stability and phase transfer of catalytically active platinum nanoparticle suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sriram, Indira; Curtin, Alexandra E.; Chiaramonti, Ann N.; Cuchiaro, J. Hunter; Weidner, Andrew R.; Tingley, Tegan M.; Greenlee, Lauren F.; Jeerage, Kavita M., E-mail: jeerage@boulder.nist.gov [National Instrument of Standards and Technology, Applied Chemicals and Materials Division (United States)

    2015-05-15

    In this work, we present a robust synthesis protocol for platinum nanoparticles that yields a monomodal dispersion of particles that are approximately 100 nm in diameter. We determine that these particles are actually agglomerates of much smaller particles, creating a “raspberry” morphology. We demonstrate that these agglomerates are stable at room temperature for at least 8 weeks by dynamic light scattering. Furthermore, we demonstrate consistent electrocatalytic activity for methanol oxidation. Finally, we quantitatively explore the relationship between dispersion solvent and particle agglomeration; specifically, particles are found to agglomerate abruptly as solvent polarity decreases.

  4. Determination of nifedipine in dog plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xigui; Zhou, Shunchang; Fu, Qinqin; Hu, Xianming; Wu, Jianhong

    2014-07-01

    Nifedipine is a dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker used widely in the management of hypertension and other cardiovascular disorders. In this work, a simple, rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated to determine nifedipine in dog plasma using nimodipine as the internal standard. Chromatographic separation was carried out on a C₈ column. The mobile phase consisted of a mixture of acetonitrile, water and formic acid (60:40:0.2, v/v/v) at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. Detection was performed on a triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer in selected reaction monitoring mode via an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source. The method has a lower limit of quantification of 0.20 ng/mL with consumption of plasma as low as 0.05 mL. The linear calibration curves were obtained in the concentration range of 0.20-50.0 ng/mL (r = 0.9948). The recoveries of the liquid extraction method were 74.5-84.1%. Intra-day and inter-day precisions were 4.1-8.8 and 6.7-7.4%, respectively. The quantification was not interfered with by other plasma components and the method was applied to determine nifedipine in plasma after a single oral administration of two controlled-release nifedipine tablets to beagle dogs. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Effects of droplet size and type of binder on the agglomerate growth mechanisms by melt agglomeration in a fluidised bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Anette; Holm, Per; Schaefer, Torben

    2002-08-01

    This study was performed in order to evaluate the effects of binder droplet size and type of binder on the agglomerate growth mechanisms by melt agglomeration in a fluidised bed granulator. Lactose monohydrate was agglomerated with melted polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3000 or Gelucire 50/13 (esters of polyethylene glycol and glycerol), which was atomised at different nozzle air flow rates giving rise to median droplet sizes of 40, 60, and 80 microm. Different product temperatures were investigated, below the melting range, in the middle of the melting range, and above the melting range for each binder. The agglomerates were found to be formed by initial nucleation of lactose particles immersed in the melted binder droplets. Agglomerate growth occurred by coalescence between nuclei followed by coalescence between agglomerates. Complex effects of binder droplet size and type of binder were seen at low product temperatures. Low product temperatures resulted in smaller agglomerate sizes, because the agglomerate growth was counteracted by very high binder viscosity or solidification of the binder. At higher product temperatures, neither the binder droplet size nor the type of binder had a clear effect on the final agglomerate size.

  6. Shapes of agglomerates in plasma etching reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.Y.; Kushner, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Dust particle contamination of wafers in reactive ion etching (RIE) plasma tools is a continuing concern in the microelectronics industry. It is common to find that particles collected on surfaces or downstream of the etch chamber are agglomerates of smaller monodisperse spherical particles. The shapes of the agglomerates vary from compact, high fractal dimension structures to filamentary, low fractal dimension structures. These shapes are important with respect to the transport of particles in RIE tools under the influence electrostatic and ion drag forces, and the possible generation of polarization forces. A molecular dynamics simulation has been developed to investigate the shapes of agglomerates in plasma etching reactors. We find that filamentary, low fractal dimension structures are generally produced by smaller (<100s nm) particles in low powered plasmas where the kinetic energy of primary particles is insufficient to overcome the larger Coulomb repulsion of a compact agglomerate. This is analogous to the diffusive regime in neutral agglomeration. Large particles in high powered plasmas generally produce compact agglomerates of high fractal dimension, analogous to ballistic agglomeration of neutrals. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  7. Colloidal stability of carbonate-coated silver nanoparticles in synthetic and natural freshwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccapietra, Flavio; Sigg, Laura; Behra, Renata

    2012-01-17

    To gain important information on fate, mobility, and bioavailability of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) in aquatic systems, the influence of pH, ionic strength, and humic substances on the stability of carbonate-coated AgNP (average diameter 29 nm) was systematically investigated in 10 mM carbonate and 10 mM MOPS buffer, and in filtered natural freshwater. Changes in the physicochemical properties of AgNP were measured using nanoparticle tracking analysis, dynamic light scattering, and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. According to the pH-dependent carbonate speciation, below pH 4 the negatively charged surface of AgNP became positive and increased agglomeration was observed. Electrolyte concentrations above 2 mM Ca(2+) and 100 mM Na(+) enhanced AgNP agglomeration in the synthetic media. In the considered concentration range of humic substances, no relevant changes in the AgNP agglomeration state were measured. Agglomeration of AgNP exposed in filtered natural freshwater was observed to be primarily controlled by the electrolyte type and concentration. Moreover, agglomerated AgNP were still detected after 7 days of exposure. Consequently, slow sedimentation and high mobility of agglomerated AgNP could be expected under the considered natural conditions. A critical evaluation of the different methods used is presented as well.

  8. Comparison of antianginal efficacy of nifedipine and isosorbide dinitrate in chronic stable angina: a long-term, randomized, double-blind, crossover study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, C.S.; Coplin, B.; Wellington, K.

    1985-01-01

    Using a double-blind, crossover design, the comparative efficacy and safety of nifedipine and isosorbide dinitrate in the treatment of stable angina were studied in 34 patients. The study included a 2-week placebo washout period and two 6-week periods during which patients were randomized to either nifedipine or isosorbide dinitrate. The doses were titrated for each patient, and mean doses of the 2 drugs were comparable. A time-limited thallium treadmill test was performed at the end of each phase. Ischemic zone count rates were normalized to those of the nonischemic zone, and the change in this ratio with redistribution was calculated as reversible thallium defect. Two patients were discontinued from the study within 1 week after initiation of isosorbide dinitrate because of severe, intolerable headache. Two patients were withdrawn while receiving nifedipine: one had new congestive heart failure and the other had increasing angina. Of the remaining 30 patients who tolerated both drugs for at least 1 week, 4 patients from the isosorbide dinitrate group were either prematurely crossed over or discontinued from the study because of headache. One patient suffered headache from both drugs and was discontinued from the study. In the 30 patients, only nifedipine significantly reduced resting arterial pressure compared with baseline. Further, only nifedipine therapy resulted in significant decreases in the rate-pressure product and systolic pressure at a given workload. However, significant decreases in angina frequency, nitroglycerin consumption and exercise-induced maximum ST-segment depression and reversible thallium perfusion defect were produced by both nifedipine and isosorbide dinitrate

  9. Nifedipine inhibits advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) interaction-mediated proximal tubular cell injury via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, Takanori [Department of Pathophysiology and Therapeutics of Diabetic Vascular Complications, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Yamagishi, Sho-ichi, E-mail: shoichi@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Department of Pathophysiology and Therapeutics of Diabetic Vascular Complications, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Takeuchi, Masayoshi [Department of Pathophysiological Science, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science, Hokuriku University, Kanazawa (Japan); Ueda, Seiji; Fukami, Kei; Okuda, Seiya [Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan)

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} Nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced up-regulation of RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells, which was prevented by GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma}. {yields} GW9662 treatment alone increased RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells. {yields} Nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced reactive oxygen species generation, NF-{kappa}B activation and increases in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and transforming growth factor-{beta} gene expression in tubular cells, all of which were blocked by GW9662. -- Abstract: There is a growing body of evidence that advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) interaction evokes oxidative stress generation and subsequently elicits inflammatory and fibrogenic reactions, thereby contributing to the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. We have previously found that nifedipine, a calcium-channel blocker (CCB), inhibits the AGE-induced mesangial cell damage in vitro. However, effects of nifedipine on proximal tubular cell injury remain unknown. We examined here whether and how nifedipine blocked the AGE-induced tubular cell damage. Nifedipine, but not amlodipine, a control CCB, inhibited the AGE-induced up-regulation of RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells, which was prevented by the simultaneous treatment of GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}). GW9662 treatment alone was found to increase RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells. Further, nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced reactive oxygen species generation, NF-{kappa}B activation and increases in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and transforming growth factor-beta gene expression in tubular cells, all of which were blocked by GW9662. Our present study provides a unique beneficial aspect of nifedipine on diabetic nephropathy; it could work as an anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory agent against AGEs in tubular cells by suppressing RAGE expression

  10. Nifedipine inhibits advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) interaction-mediated proximal tubular cell injury via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Takanori; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Ueda, Seiji; Fukami, Kei; Okuda, Seiya

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced up-regulation of RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells, which was prevented by GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ. → GW9662 treatment alone increased RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells. → Nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced reactive oxygen species generation, NF-κB activation and increases in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and transforming growth factor-β gene expression in tubular cells, all of which were blocked by GW9662. -- Abstract: There is a growing body of evidence that advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) interaction evokes oxidative stress generation and subsequently elicits inflammatory and fibrogenic reactions, thereby contributing to the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. We have previously found that nifedipine, a calcium-channel blocker (CCB), inhibits the AGE-induced mesangial cell damage in vitro. However, effects of nifedipine on proximal tubular cell injury remain unknown. We examined here whether and how nifedipine blocked the AGE-induced tubular cell damage. Nifedipine, but not amlodipine, a control CCB, inhibited the AGE-induced up-regulation of RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells, which was prevented by the simultaneous treatment of GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ). GW9662 treatment alone was found to increase RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells. Further, nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced reactive oxygen species generation, NF-κB activation and increases in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and transforming growth factor-beta gene expression in tubular cells, all of which were blocked by GW9662. Our present study provides a unique beneficial aspect of nifedipine on diabetic nephropathy; it could work as an anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory agent against AGEs in tubular cells by suppressing RAGE expression via PPARγ activation.

  11. Characterization of abrasion-induced nanoparticle release from paints into liquids and air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golanski, L.; Gaborieau, A.; Guiot, A.; Uzu, G.; Chatenet, J.; Tardif, F.

    2011-07-01

    Two standard methods for the characterization of the abrasion nanoparticle release into air and liquid from coatings containing nanoparticles were developed. Details of the abrasion processes and the measurement methods are shown. Paints were formulated in an industrial facility. Standard abrasion conditions in wet environments were simulated. The size distribution of the particles abraded into liquid was analyzed by a laser granulometer: submicrometric and micrometric particles were observed, but no nanometric particles. The nanoparticles released in liquid were deposited on filters for SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) analysis. No free or agglomerated nanoparticles were observed by SEM: nanoparticles seem to remain embedded in the paint matrix. The same coatings were abraded in the air using another standard method. The ELPI (Electrical Low Pressure Impactor) was used to determine the number size distribution of the dust generated. Abrasion is found to produce submicrometric and micrometric particles in the air but no nanoparticles. Further characterizations by SEM confirmed that no free or agglomerated nanoparticles were emitted: nanoparticles seem to remain embedded in the paint matrix.

  12. Characterization of abrasion-induced nanoparticle release from paints into liquids and air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golanski, L; Guiot, A; Uzu, G; Tardif, F; Gaborieau, A; Chatenet, J

    2011-01-01

    Two standard methods for the characterization of the abrasion nanoparticle release into air and liquid from coatings containing nanoparticles were developed. Details of the abrasion processes and the measurement methods are shown. Paints were formulated in an industrial facility. Standard abrasion conditions in wet environments were simulated. The size distribution of the particles abraded into liquid was analyzed by a laser granulometer: submicrometric and micrometric particles were observed, but no nanometric particles. The nanoparticles released in liquid were deposited on filters for SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) analysis. No free or agglomerated nanoparticles were observed by SEM: nanoparticles seem to remain embedded in the paint matrix. The same coatings were abraded in the air using another standard method. The ELPI (Electrical Low Pressure Impactor) was used to determine the number size distribution of the dust generated. Abrasion is found to produce submicrometric and micrometric particles in the air but no nanoparticles. Further characterizations by SEM confirmed that no free or agglomerated nanoparticles were emitted: nanoparticles seem to remain embedded in the paint matrix.

  13. Agglomeration Economies in Classical Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borowiecki, Karol Jan

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates agglomeration effects for classical music production in a wide range of cities for a global sample of composers born between 1750 and 1899. Theory suggests a trade-off between agglomeration economies (peer effects) and diseconomies (peer crowding). I test this hypothesis...

  14. Study of the mobility, surface area, and sintering behavior of agglomerates in the transition regime by tandem differential mobility analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Kuk; Hogan, Christopher J.; Biswas, Pratim

    2007-01-01

    The surface area of nanosized agglomerates is of great importance as the reactivity and health effects of such particles are highly dependent on surface area. Changes in surface area through sintering during nanoparticle synthesis processes are also of interest for precision control of synthesised particles. Unfortunately, information on particle surface area and surface area dynamics is not readily obtainable through traditional particle mobility sizing techniques. In this study, we have experimentally determined the mobility diameter of transition regime agglomerates with 3, 4, and 5 primary particles. Agglomerates were produced by spray drying well-characterised polystyrene latex particles with diameters of 55, 67, 76, and 99 nm. Tandem differential mobility analysis was used to determine agglomerate mobility diameter by selecting monodisperse agglomerates with the same number of primary particles in the first DMA, and subsequently completely sintering the agglomerates in a furnace aerosol reactor. The size distribution of the completely sintered particles was measured by an SMPS system, which allowed for the determination of the number of primary particles in the agglomerates. A simple power law regression was used to express mobility diameter as a function of primary particle size and the number of primary particles, and had an excellent correlation (R 2 = 0.9971) with the experimental data. A scaling exponent was determined from the experimental data to relate measured mobility diameter to surface area for agglomerates. Using this relationship, the sintering characteristics of agglomerates were also examined for varying furnace temperatures and residence times. The sintering data agreed well with the geometric sintering model (GSM) model proposed by Cho and Biswas (2006a) as well as with the model proposed Koch and Friedlander (1990) for sintering by viscous flow

  15. Agglomeration, colloidal stability, and magnetic separation of magnetic nanoparticles: collective influences on environmental engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeap, Swee Pin; Lim, JitKang; Ooi, Boon Seng; Ahmad, Abdul Latif

    2017-11-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) which exhibit magnetic and catalytic bifunctionalities have been widely accepted as one of the most promising nanoagents used in water purification processes. However, due to the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction, MNPs can easily lose their colloidal stability and tend to agglomerate. Thus, it is necessary to enhance their colloidal stability in order to maintain the desired high specific surface area. Meanwhile, in order to successfully utilize MNPs for environmental engineering applications, an effective magnetic separation technology has to be developed. This step is to ensure the MNPs that have been used for pollutant removal can be fully reharvested back. Unfortunately, it was recently highlighted that there exists a conflicting role between colloidal stability and magnetic separability of the MNPs, whereby the more colloidally stable the particle is, the harder for it to be magnetically separated. In other words, attaining a win-win scenario in which the MNPs possess both good colloidal stability and fast magnetic separation rate becomes challenging. Such phenomenon has to be thoroughly understood as the colloidal stability and the magnetic separability of MNPs play a pivotal role on affecting their effective implementation in water purification processes. Accordingly, it is the aim of this paper to provide reviews on (i) the colloidal stability and (ii) the magnetic separation of MNPs, as well as to provide insights on (iii) their conflicting relationship based on recent research findings. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Improving the de-agglomeration and dissolution of a poorly water soluble drug by decreasing the agglomerate strength of the cohesive powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahham, Ayman; Stewart, Peter J; Das, Shyamal C

    2013-11-30

    Influence of ternary, poorly water-soluble components on the agglomerate strength of cohesive indomethacin mixtures during dissolution was studied to explore the relationship between agglomerate strength and extent of de-agglomeration and dissolution of indomethacin (Ind). Dissolution profiles of Ind from 20% Ind-lactose binary mixtures, and ternary mixtures containing additional dibasic calcium phosphate (1% or 10%; DCP), calcium sulphate (10%) and talc (10%) were determined. Agglomerate strength distributions were estimated by Monte Carlo simulation of particle size, work of cohesion and packing fraction distributions. The agglomerate strength of Ind decreased from 1.19 MPa for the binary Ind mixture to 0.84 MPa for 1DCP:20Ind mixture and to 0.42 MPa for 1DCP:2Ind mixture. Both extent of de-agglomeration, demonstrated by the concentration of the dispersed indomethacin distribution, and extent of dispersion, demonstrated by the particle size of the dispersed indomethacin, were in descending order of 1DCP:2Ind>1DCP:20Ind>binary Ind. The addition of calcium sulphate dihydrate and talc also reduced the agglomerate strength and improved de-agglomeration and dispersion of indomethacin. While not definitively causal, the improved de-agglomeration and dispersion of a poorly water soluble drug by poorly water soluble components was related to the agglomerate strength of the cohesive matrix during dissolution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Aqueous Hg(2+) associates with TiO2 nanoparticles according to particle size, changes particle agglomeration, and becomes less bioavailable to zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boran, Halis; Boyle, David; Altinok, Ilhan; Patsiou, Danae; Henry, Theodore B

    2016-05-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (NPs) have unique physicochemistry and potential to interact with other substances in the aqueous phase. Here, gene [metallothionein 2 (mt2)] expression changes in larval zebrafish were used to evaluate the association between aqueous Hg(2+) and TiO2 (NPs and bulk particle size control) to investigate the relationship between changes in Hg(2+) behavior and TiO2 size. During 24h exposures, TiO2 agglomerates increased in size and in the presence of 25μg Hg(2+)/L, greater increases in size were observed. The concentration of Hg(2+) in suspension also decreased in the presence of TiO2-NPs. Mercury increased expression of mt2 in larval zebrafish, but this response was lessened when zebrafish were exposed to Hg(2+) in the presence of TiO2-NPs, and which suggests that TiO2-NPs alter the bioavailability of Hg(2+) to zebrafish larvae. This ameliorative effect of TiO2 was also likely due to surface binding of Hg(2+) because a greater decrease in mt2 expression was observed in the presence of 1mg/L TiO2-NPs than 1mg/L TiO2-bulk. In conclusion, the results show that Hg(2+) will associate with TiO2-NPs, TiO2-NPs that have associated Hg(2+) will settle out of the aqueous phase more rapidly, and agglomerates will deliver associated Hg(2+) to sediment surfaces. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Gold nanoparticles synthesized by gamma radiation and stabilized by bovine serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal, Jessica; Silva, Andressa A.; Geraldes, Adriana N.; Lugao, Ademar B., E-mail: jessicaleal@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Grasselli, Mariano, E-mail: mariano.grasselli@gmail.com [Departamento de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, Bernal (Argentina)

    2015-07-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are a new option for pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries due to their interesting chemical, electrical and catalytic properties. Research for cancer treatments have been developed using this promising radiotherapy agent. The challenge of gold nanoparticles is to keep them stable, due to metallic behavior. It is know that surface plasma resonance promotes agglomeration of metallic nanoparticles, but they are not stable. Stabilizers have been used to reduce agglomeration. The aim of this work is reduction of HAuCl{sub 4} salt to AuNPs performed by gamma radiation {sup 60}Co source and the stabilization of gold nanoparticles using bovine serum albumin (BSA) fraction V as stabilizer agent. AuNPs were characterized by UV-visible to verify the nanoparticles formation. Samples containing BSA and samples obtained by the conventional method (without stabilizer) were monitored for two weeks and analyzed. Results were compared. (author)

  19. Gold nanoparticles synthesized by gamma radiation and stabilized by bovine serum albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leal, Jessica; Silva, Andressa A.; Geraldes, Adriana N.; Lugao, Ademar B.; Grasselli, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are a new option for pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries due to their interesting chemical, electrical and catalytic properties. Research for cancer treatments have been developed using this promising radiotherapy agent. The challenge of gold nanoparticles is to keep them stable, due to metallic behavior. It is know that surface plasma resonance promotes agglomeration of metallic nanoparticles, but they are not stable. Stabilizers have been used to reduce agglomeration. The aim of this work is reduction of HAuCl 4 salt to AuNPs performed by gamma radiation 60 Co source and the stabilization of gold nanoparticles using bovine serum albumin (BSA) fraction V as stabilizer agent. AuNPs were characterized by UV-visible to verify the nanoparticles formation. Samples containing BSA and samples obtained by the conventional method (without stabilizer) were monitored for two weeks and analyzed. Results were compared. (author)

  20. On the role of the colloidal stability of mesoporous silica nanoparticles as gene delivery vectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebrian, Virginia [Hospital Universitario La Paz-IdiPAZ (Spain); Yaguee, Clara; Arruebo, Manuel, E-mail: arruebom@unizar.es [University of Zaragoza, Aragon Nanoscience Institute (INA), C/Mariano Esquillor, Edif. I-D (Spain); Martin-Saavedra, Francisco M. [Hospital Universitario La Paz-IdiPAZ (Spain); Santamaria, Jesus [CIBER de Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina, CIBER-BBN (Spain); Vilaboa, Nuria [Hospital Universitario La Paz-IdiPAZ (Spain)

    2011-09-15

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles have been synthesized and functionalized with four different types of molecules containing amino groups, i.e., with primary amines only, with quaternary amines, with quaternized cyclic amines, or with polyethylenimine (PEI), which is formed by primary, secondary, and tertiary amines. These nanoparticles were then incubated with reporter plasmids and the ability of the resulting complexes to transfect human cells was studied. Only nanoparticles functionalized with PEI were efficient for transfection. The agglomeration behavior and the electrokinetic potential of the nanoparticle-plasmid complexes have been studied, as well as their cell internalization behavior using a fluorescent-labeled plasmid that allows its monitorization by confocal microscopy. The results indicate that the efficiency of PEI-functionalized nanoparticles for transfection resides to some extent in the different characteristics imparted to the nanoparticles regarding agglomeration and surface charge behavior.

  1. Influence of Temperature on the Colloidal Stability of Polymer-Coated Gold Nanoparticles in Cell Culture Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyuzin, Mikhail V; Honold, Tobias; Carregal-Romero, Susana; Kantner, Karsten; Karg, Matthias; Parak, Wolfgang J

    2016-04-06

    The temperature-dependence of the hydrodynamic diameter and colloidal stability of gold-polymer core-shell particles with temperature-sensitive (poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)) and temperature-insensitive shells (polyallylaminine hydrochloride/polystyrensulfonate, poly(isobutylene-alt-maleic anhydride)-graft-dodecyl) are investigated in various aqueous media. The data demonstrate that for all nanoparticle agglomeration, i.e., increase in effective nanoparticle size, the presence of salts or proteins in the dispersion media has to be taken into account. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) coated nanoparticles show a reversible temperature-dependent increase in size above the volume phase transition of the polymer shell when they are dispersed in phosphate buffered saline or in media containing protein. In contrast, the nanoparticles coated with temperature-insensitive polymers show a time-dependent increase in size in phosphate buffered saline or in medium containing protein. This is due to time-dependent agglomeration, which is particularly strong in phosphate buffered saline, and induces a time-dependent, irreversible increase in the hydrodynamic diameter of the nanoparticles. This demonstrates that one has to distinguish between temperature- and time-induced agglomerations. Since the size of nanoparticles regulates their uptake by cells, temperature-dependent uptake of thermosensitive and non-thermosensitive nanoparticles by cells lines is compared. No temperature-specific difference between both types of nanoparticles could be observed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Electroreduction of nifedipine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaithy, M M; Zuman, P

    1992-02-01

    At pH greater than 6, the nitro group of nifedipine is reduced in a four-electron step to a hydroxylamino group. At pH less than 6, the hydroxylamino derivative undergoes an acid-catalyzed dehydration, and the rate of this reaction governs the limiting current. Resulting quinonemethide is further reduced, and a six-electron reduction step results. Formation and reducibility of the quinonemethide is favored by conjugation with the 1,4-dihydropyridine ring. Further reduction of the hydroxylamino derivative is confirmed by the absence of the anodic oxidation peak on the reverse scan at pH less than 6.5. At potentials more negative than that of the nitro group, the protonated form of the hydroxylamino derivative is reduced between pH 4 and 8 in direct current (dc) polarography and between pH 6 and 11 in cyclic voltammetry, the difference resulting from the difference in the measurement time window. The yields and fate of the hydroxylamino derivative obtained in controlled potential electrolysis with a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) differ from those in dc polarography, indicating the presence of different competing reactions. For analyses, pH 2 and 11 are most suitable.

  3. High concentration agglomerate dynamics at high temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, M C; Pratsinis, S E

    2006-11-21

    The dynamics of agglomerate aerosols are investigated at high solids concentrations that are typical in industrial scale manufacture of fine particles (precursor mole fraction larger than 10 mol %). In particular, formation and growth of fumed silica at such concentrations by chemical reaction, coagulation, and sintering is simulated at nonisothermal conditions and compared to limited experimental data and commercial product specifications. Using recent chemical kinetics for silica formation by SiCl4 hydrolysis and neglecting aerosol polydispersity, the evolution of the diameter of primary particles (specific surface area, SSA), hard- and soft-agglomerates, along with agglomerate effective volume fraction (volume occupied by agglomerate) is investigated. Classic Smoluchowski theory is fundamentally limited for description of soft-agglomerate Brownian coagulation at high solids concentrations. In fact, these high concentrations affect little the primary particle diameter (or SSA) but dominate the soft-agglomerate diameter, structure, and volume fraction, leading to gelation consistent with experimental data. This indicates that restructuring and fragmentation should affect product particle characteristics during high-temperature synthesis of nanostructured particles at high concentrations in aerosol flow reactors.

  4. Coagulation of Agglomerates Consisting of Polydisperse Primary Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudeli, E; Eggersdorfer, M L; Pratsinis, S E

    2016-09-13

    The ballistic agglomeration of polydisperse particles is investigated by an event-driven (ED) method and compared to the coagulation of spherical particles and agglomerates consisting of monodisperse primary particles (PPs). It is shown for the first time to our knowledge that increasing the width or polydispersity of the PP size distribution initially accelerates the coagulation rate of their agglomerates but delays the attainment of their asymptotic fractal-like structure and self-preserving size distribution (SPSD) without altering them, provided that sufficiently large numbers of PPs are employed. For example, the standard asymptotic mass fractal dimension, Df, of 1.91 is attained when clusters are formed containing, on average, about 15 monodisperse PPs, consistent with fractal theory and the literature. In contrast, when polydisperse PPs with a geometric standard deviation of 3 are employed, about 500 PPs are needed to attain that Df. Even though the same asymptotic Df and mass-mobility exponent, Dfm, are attained regardless of PP polydispersity, the asymptotic prefactors or lacunarities of Df and Dfm increase with PP polydispersity. For monodisperse PPs, the average agglomerate radius of gyration, rg, becomes larger than the mobility radius, rm, when agglomerates consist of more than 15 PPs. Increasing PP polydispersity increases that number of PPs similarly to the above for the attainment of the asymptotic Df or Dfm. The agglomeration kinetics are quantified by the overall collision frequency function. When the SPSD is attained, the collision frequency is independent of PP polydispersity. Accounting for the SPSD polydispersity in the overall agglomerate collision frequency is in good agreement with that frequency from detailed ED simulations once the SPSD is reached. Most importantly, the coagulation of agglomerates is described well by a monodisperse model for agglomerate and PP sizes, whereas the detailed agglomerate size distribution can be obtained by

  5. Diffusion and reaction in microbead agglomerates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes Kirchner, Carolina; Träuble, Markus; Wittstock, Gunther

    2010-04-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy has been used to analyze the flux of p-aminonophenol (PAP) produced by agglomerates of polymeric microbeads modified with galactosidase as a model system for the bead-based heterogeneous immunoassays. With the use of mixtures of enzyme-modified and bare beads in defined ratio, agglomerates with different saturation levels of the enzyme modification were produced. The PAP flux depends on the intrinsic kinetics of the galactosidase, the local availability of the substrate p-aminophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside (PAPG), and the external mass transport conditions in the surrounding of the agglomerate and the internal mass transport within the bead agglomerate. The internal mass transport is influenced by the diffusional shielding of the modified beads by unmodified beads. SECM in combination with optical microscopy was used to determine experimentally the external flux. These data are in quantitative agreement with boundary element simulation considering the SECM microelectrode as an interacting probe and treating the Michaelis-Menten kinetics of the enzyme as nonlinear boundary conditions with two independent concentration variables [PAP] and [PAPG]. The PAPG concentration at the surface of the bead agglomerate was taken as a boundary condition for the analysis of the internal mass transport condition as a function of the enzyme saturation in the bead agglomerate. The results of this analysis are represented as PAP flux per contributing modified bead and the flux from freely suspended galactosidase-modified beads. These numbers are compared to the same number from the SECM experiments. It is shown that depending on the enzyme saturation level a different situation can arise where either beads located at the outer surface of the agglomerate dominate the contribution to the measured external flux or where the contribution of buried beads cannot be neglected for explaining the measured external flux.

  6. Agglomeration of microparticles in complex plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Cheng-Ran; Thomas, Hubertus M.; Ivlev, Alexei V.; Konopka, Uwe; Morfill, Gregor E.

    2010-01-01

    Agglomeration of highly charged microparticles was observed and studied in complex plasma experiments carried out in a capacitively coupled rf discharge. The agglomeration was caused by strong waves triggered in a particle cloud by decreasing neutral gas pressure. Using a high-speed camera during this unstable regime, it was possible to resolve the motion of individual microparticles and to show that the relative velocities of some particles were sufficiently high to overcome the mutual Coulomb repulsion and hence to result in agglomeration. After stabilizing the cloud again through the increase of the pressure, we were able to observe the aggregates directly with a long-distance microscope. We show that the agglomeration rate deduced from our experiments is in good agreement with theoretical estimates. In addition, we briefly discuss the mechanisms that can provide binding of highly charged microparticles in a plasma.

  7. On the role of the colloidal stability of mesoporous silica nanoparticles as gene delivery vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cebrián, Virginia; Yagüe, Clara; Arruebo, Manuel; Martín-Saavedra, Francisco M.; Santamaría, Jesus; Vilaboa, Nuria

    2011-01-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles have been synthesized and functionalized with four different types of molecules containing amino groups, i.e., with primary amines only, with quaternary amines, with quaternized cyclic amines, or with polyethylenimine (PEI), which is formed by primary, secondary, and tertiary amines. These nanoparticles were then incubated with reporter plasmids and the ability of the resulting complexes to transfect human cells was studied. Only nanoparticles functionalized with PEI were efficient for transfection. The agglomeration behavior and the electrokinetic potential of the nanoparticle–plasmid complexes have been studied, as well as their cell internalization behavior using a fluorescent-labeled plasmid that allows its monitorization by confocal microscopy. The results indicate that the efficiency of PEI-functionalized nanoparticles for transfection resides to some extent in the different characteristics imparted to the nanoparticles regarding agglomeration and surface charge behavior.

  8. A comparison of nifedipine and tamsulosin as medical expulsive therapy for the management of lower ureteral stones without ESWL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dehong; Yang, Lu; Liu, Liangren; Yuan, Haichao; Qian, Shenqiang; Lv, Xiao; Han, Pin; Wei, Qiang

    2014-06-11

    Administration of nifedipine or tamsulosin has been suggested to augment stone expulsion rates. We aimed to compare the stone expulsion rates and adverse effects associated with the use of nifedipine or tamsulosin as medical expulsive therapy (MET) for the management of lower ureteral stones (LUS) without extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) via a literature review and meta-analysis. Relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified from the Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL, and Google Scholar databases. Finally, a total of 7 RCTs with 3897 patients were included. Our meta-analysis showed that tamsulosin could significantly increase the stone expulsion rate relative to nifedipine in patients with LUS (random-effects model; risk ratio [RR] = 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.75-0.88; P < 0.00001). The subgroup analysis indicated no statistically significant difference between the drugs with regard to minor or major adverse effects (fixed-effect model; RR = 1.19, 95% CI = 0.91-1.54, P = 0.20; and RR = 1.63, 95% CI = 0.22-11.82, P = 0.63, respectively). This meta-analysis demonstrated that tamsulosin was more effective than nifedipine in patients with LUS, as evidenced by the higher stone expulsion rate. Tamsulosin treatment should therefore be considered for patients with LUS.

  9. Nanoparticle dispersion in liquid metals by electromagnetically induced acoustic cavitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaldre, Imants; Bojarevičs, Andris; Grants, Ilmārs; Beinerts, Toms; Kalvāns, Matīss; Milgrāvis, Mikus; Gerbeth, Gunter

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this study is to investigate experimentally the effect of magnetically induced cavitation applied for the purpose of nanoparticle dispersion in liquid metals. The oscillating magnetic force due to the azimuthal induction currents and the axial magnetic field excites power ultrasound in the sample. If the fields are sufficiently high then it is possible to achieve the acoustic cavitation threshold in liquid metals. Cavitation bubble collapses are known to create microscale jets with a potential to break nanoparticle agglomerates and disperse them. The samples are solidified under the contactless ultrasonic treatment and later analyzed by electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). It is observed that SiC nanoparticles are dispersed in an aluminum magnesium alloy, whereas in tin the same particles remain agglomerated in micron-sized clusters despite a more intense cavitation.

  10. Preparation and characterization of nano fluids: Influence of variables on its stability, agglomeration state and physical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondragon, R.; Julia, J. E.; Barba, A.; Jarque, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years it has spread the use of suspensions containing nano metre sized particles, known as nano fluids, in many applications owing the good properties having nanocrystalline materials. One of the main advantages of using nano fluids is its high stability, which causes the particles do not settle over long periods of time. This stability depends on the preparation conditions such as pH, the presence of electrolytes or the solids content. Moreover, there are a number of physical properties which are influenced and altered by agglomeration of the particles. This article will analyze all the variables that affect agglomeration of the particles, nano fluids stability and properties from which it can obtain information on the state of suspension. It then lays out the different methods of dispersion of nanoparticles and their effectiveness. (Author)

  11. PROTECTIVE EFFECT OF POLYMYXINE B AND NIFEDIPINE ON DIABETIC COMPLICATIONS IN RAT: ROLE OF PROTEIN KINASE C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mehrani

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM, experience significant morbidity and mortality from microvascular retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy. Hyperglycemia can induce diabetic complications through multiple pathways. Activation of protein kinase C (PKC by hyperglycemia is one of the pathways which causes diabetic complications. Effect of nifedipine (a calcium channel blocker, and polymyxine B sulphate (a Protein kinase C inhibitor was studied in adult male Sprague- dawley rats, who was made diabetic with streptozotocin. PKC activity was determined in tissues and serum enzymes and metabolite level was measured in all controls, diabetic and drug treated animals. The results showed that, levels of the, urea (two –fold, creatinine (60%, triglyceride (two-fold and liver alanine transaminase (ALT activity (two-fold, were significantly increased in diabetic group. In nifedipine, treated diabetic group, although urea and creatinine level was increased, but liver enzymes were not significantly different from those of control group. In diabetic group which was treated with polymyxine, all the measured metabolites and enzyme levels were the same as the control group, except glucose level which was increased and liver glycogen was decreased significantly. Protein kinase C activity in the cytoplasm of diabetic liver was increased comparing to its control group (5.73 ± 0.56 Vs, 4.00 ± 0.62. The enzyme activity in the plasma membranes of untreated and nifedipine treated diabetic groups was significantly increased (6.2 ± 0.42 and 3.66 ± 0.31 Vs 2.38 ± 0.36. These results show that polymyxine is more effective than nifedipine against protein kinase C activity in diabetic complications. In conclusion our results show that, liver and kidney damage in DM are related to PKC activation. The fact that polymyxine prevents diabetic related increase in PKC activity more than nifedipine, support the hypothesis that different PKC isozymes may play different roles

  12. Agglomeration of coal fines for premium fuel application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atalay, A.; Zaman, M.D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on fine coal in liquid suspension, which can be agglomerated in a number of ways. One of the oldest procedures involves the addition of electrolyte to the suspension to cause a reduction in the zeta potential and allow colliding particles to agglomerate. A second method involves the use of polymeric flocculants to bridge between particles. Both of these technologies are being used in the wastewater treatment plants for removal of fine waste particles from contaminated water. A third method involves the addition of a second immiscible liquid preferentially to wet the particles and cause adhesion by capillary interfacial forces. While the bonding forces in the first two methods are small and result in rather weak and voluminous agglomerates, the third method is postulated to produce more dense and much stronger agglomerates. In the case of fine coals, the carbonaceous constituents can be agglomerated and recovered from the aqueous suspension with many different coagulants. Inorganic or ash-forming constituents are also agglomerated along with the fine coal particles. As the froth floatation, agglomeration using coal and colloidal dust to effect a separation. Froth floatation, however, becomes less effective where extremely fine particles of cal must be treated or if there is considerable clay-size particle present. In contrast, there appears to be virtually no lower limit on the particle size suitable for agglomeration uses

  13. A comparison of dispersing media for various engineered carbon nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holian Andrij

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the increased manufacture and use of carbon nanoparticles (CNP there has been increasing concern about the potential toxicity of fugitive CNP in the workplace and ambient environment. To address this matter a number of investigators have conducted in vitro and in vivo toxicity assessments. However, a variety of different approaches for suspension of these particles (culture media, Tween 80, dimethyl sulfoxide, phosphate-buffered saline, fetal calf serum, and others, and different sources of materials have generated potentially conflicting outcomes. The quality of the dispersion of nanoparticles is very dependent on the medium used to suspend them, and this then will most likely affect the biological outcomes. Results In this work, the distributions of different CNP (sources and types have been characterized in various media. Furthermore, the outcome of instilling the different agglomerates, or size distributions, was examined in mouse lungs after one and seven days. Our results demonstrated that CNP suspended in serum produced particle suspensions with the fewest large agglomerates, and the most uniform distribution in mouse lungs. In addition, no apparent clearance of instilled CNP took place from lungs even after seven days. Conclusion This work demonstrates that CNP agglomerates are present in all dispersing vehicles to some degree. The vehicle that contains some protein, lipid or protein/lipid component disperses the CNP best, producing fewer large CNP agglomerates. In contrast, vehicles absent of lipid and protein produce the largest CNP agglomerates. The source of the CNP is also a factor in the degree of particle agglomeration within the same vehicle.

  14. Multifrequency scanning probe microscopy study of nanodiamond agglomerates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravind, Vasudeva; Lippold, Stephen; Li, Qian; Strelcov, Evgheny; Okatan, Baris; Legum, Benjamin; Kalinin, Sergei; Clarion University Team; Oak Ridge National Laboratory Team

    Due to their rich surface chemistry and excellent mechanical properties and non-toxic nature, nanodiamond particles have found applications such as biomedicine, tribology and lubrication, targeted drug delivery systems, tissue scaffolds and surgical implants. Although single nanodiamond particles have diameters about 4-5nm, they tend to form agglomerates. While these agglomerates can be useful for some purposes, many applications of nanodiamonds require single particle, disaggregated nanodiamonds. This work is oriented towards studying forces and interactions that contribute to agglomeration in nanodiamonds. In this work, using multifrequency scanning probe microscopy techniques, we show that agglomerate sizes can vary between 50-100nm in raw nanodiamonds. Extremeties of particles and Interfaces between agglomerates show dissipative forces with scanning probe microscope tip, indicating agglomerates could act as points of increased adhesion, thus reducing lubricating efficiency when nanodiamonds are used as lubricant additives. This research was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which is a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

  15. Volume labeling with Alexa Fluor dyes and surface functionalization of highly sensitive fluorescent silica (SiO2) nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Foster, Carmen M.; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L.; Mortensen, Ninell P.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Gu, Baohua; Retterer, Scott T.

    2013-10-01

    A new synthesis approach is described that allows the direct incorporation of fluorescent labels into the volume or body of SiO2 nanoparticles. In this process, fluorescent Alexa Fluor dyes with different emission wavelengths were covalently incorporated into the SiO2 nanoparticles during their formation by the hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane. The dye molecules were homogeneously distributed throughout the SiO2 nanoparticles. The quantum yields of the Alexa Fluor volume-labeled SiO2 nanoparticles were much higher than nanoparticles labeled using conventional organic dyes. The size of the resulting nanoparticles was controlled using microemulsion reaction media with sizes in the range of 20-100 nm and a polydispersity of cultured macrophages. Differences in particle agglomeration and cell association were clearly associated with differences in observed nanoparticle toxicity. The capacity to maintain particle fluorescence while making significant changes to surface chemistry makes these particles extremely versatile and useful for studies of particle agglomeration, uptake, and transport in environmental and biological systems.A new synthesis approach is described that allows the direct incorporation of fluorescent labels into the volume or body of SiO2 nanoparticles. In this process, fluorescent Alexa Fluor dyes with different emission wavelengths were covalently incorporated into the SiO2 nanoparticles during their formation by the hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane. The dye molecules were homogeneously distributed throughout the SiO2 nanoparticles. The quantum yields of the Alexa Fluor volume-labeled SiO2 nanoparticles were much higher than nanoparticles labeled using conventional organic dyes. The size of the resulting nanoparticles was controlled using microemulsion reaction media with sizes in the range of 20-100 nm and a polydispersity of cultured macrophages. Differences in particle agglomeration and cell association were clearly associated with differences in

  16. Study on magnetite nanoparticles synthesized by chemical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei Wenli; Kumada, H.; Natusme, T.; Saito, H.; Ishio, S.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles with controlled size were synthesized by chemical method. Higher deposition temperature and a rapid-raising temperature procedure are favorable to particle size distribution and fabrication of monodisperse nanoparticles. The larger nanoparticles can be synthesized by the two-step method. The large nanoparticle (up to 25 nm) without agglomeration was successfully produced. The saturation magnetization of 11 nm magnetite particles was 45 emu/g at room temperature, which is smaller than that of bulk magnetite due to surface effect. Hysteresis of the magnetite nanoparticle was very small, indicating superparamagnetic behavior. The magnetic domains of the 11 nm magnetite nanoparticles were successfully observed by MFM

  17. Differential plasma protein binding to metal oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Zhou J; Mortimer, Gysell; Minchin, Rodney F; Schiller, Tara; Musumeci, Anthony; Martin, Darren

    2009-01-01

    Nanoparticles rapidly interact with the proteins present in biological fluids, such as blood. The proteins that are adsorbed onto the surface potentially dictate the biokinetics of the nanomaterials and their fate in vivo. Using nanoparticles with different sizes and surface characteristics, studies have reported the effects of physicochemical properties on the composition of adsorbed plasma proteins. However, to date, few studies have been conducted focusing on the nanoparticles that are commonly exposed to the general public, such as the metal oxides. Using previously established ultracentrifugation approaches, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, the current study investigated the binding of human plasma proteins to commercially available titanium dioxide, silicon dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles. We found that, despite these particles having similar surface charges in buffer, they bound different plasma proteins. For TiO 2 , the shape of the nanoparticles was also an important determinant of protein binding. Agglomeration in water was observed for all of the nanoparticles and both TiO 2 and ZnO further agglomerated in biological media. This led to an increase in the amount and number of different proteins bound to these nanoparticles. Proteins with important biological functions were identified, including immunoglobulins, lipoproteins, acute-phase proteins and proteins involved in complement pathways and coagulation. These results provide important insights into which human plasma proteins bind to particular metal oxide nanoparticles. Because protein absorption to nanoparticles may determine their interaction with cells and tissues in vivo, understanding how and why plasma proteins are adsorbed to these particles may be important for understanding their biological responses.

  18. Influence of material properties on TiO2 nanoparticle agglomeration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongxu Zhou

    Full Text Available Emerging nanomaterials are being manufactured with varying particle sizes, morphologies, and crystal structures in the pursuit of achieving outstanding functional properties. These variations in these key material properties of nanoparticles may affect their environmental fate and transport. To date, few studies have investigated this important aspect of nanoparticles' environmental behavior. In this study, the aggregation kinetics of ten different TiO2 nanoparticles (5 anatase and 5 rutile each with varying size was systematically evaluated. Our results show that, as particle size increases, the surface charge of both anatase and rutile TiO2 nanoparticles shifts toward a more negative value, and, accordingly, the point of zero charge shifts toward a lower value. The colloidal stability of anatase sphere samples agreed well with DLVO theoretical predictions, where an increase in particle size led to a higher energy barrier and therefore greater critical coagulation concentration. In contrast, the critical coagulation concentration of rutile rod samples correlated positively with the specific surface area, i.e., samples with higher specific surface area exhibited higher stability. Finally, due to the large innate negative surface charge of all the TiO2 samples at the pH value (pH = 8 tested, the addition of natural organic matter was observed to have minimal effect on TiO2 aggregation kinetics, except for the smallest rutile rods that showed decreased stability in the presence of natural organic matter.

  19. Advances in food powder agglomeration engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuq, B; Gaiani, C; Turchiuli, C; Galet, L; Scher, J; Jeantet, R; Mandato, S; Petit, J; Murrieta-Pazos, I; Barkouti, A; Schuck, P; Rondet, E; Delalonde, M; Dumoulin, E; Delaplace, G; Ruiz, T

    2013-01-01

    Food powders are used in everyday life in many ways and offer technological solutions to the problem of food production. The natural origin of food powders, diversity in their chemical composition, variability of the raw materials, heterogeneity of the native structures, and physicochemical reactivity under hydrothermal stresses contribute to the complexity in their behavior. Food powder agglomeration has recently been considered according to a multiscale approach, which is followed in the chapter layout: (i) at the particle scale, by a presentation of particle properties and surface reactivity in connection with the agglomeration mechanisms, (ii) at the mechanisms scale, by describing the structuration dynamics of agglomerates, (iii) at the process scale, by a presentation of agglomeration technologies and sensors and by studying the stress transmission mode in the powder bed, and finally (iv) by an integration of the acquired knowledge, thanks to a dimensional analysis carried out at each scale. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of gas conditions on ASH induced agglomeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, T.; Fan, C. G.; Hao, L. F.

    2016-01-01

    Agglomeration is a serious problem for gasification and combustion of biomass in fluidized bed. Agglomeration characteristics may be affected by gas condition, but the literature is quite vague in this regard. This study focuses on the effects of gasification and combustion condition...... on agglomeration tendency with two types of biomass ash, including rice straw and wheat straw ash. The agglomerates are analyzed by SEM-EDS for morphology and elemental composition. Defluidization temperature (Td) in those two types of gas conditions is quite different. Tdin gasification condition is much lower...

  1. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; K. A. Lewandowski; J. A. Gurtler

    2006-09-30

    Heap leaching is one of the methods being used to recover metal from low grade ore deposits. The main problem faced during heap leaching is the migration of fine grained particles through the heap, forming impermeable beds which result in poor solution flow. The poor solution flow leads to less contact between the leach solution and the ore, resulting in low recovery rates. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses prevents fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Currently, there is one facility in the United States which uses agglomeration. This operation agglomerates their ore using leach solution (raffinate), but is still experiencing undesirable metal recovery from the heaps due to agglomerate breakdown. The use of a binder, in addition to the leach solution, during agglomeration would help to produce stronger agglomerates that did not break down during processing. However, there are no known binders that will work satisfactorily in the acidic environment of a heap, at a reasonable cost. As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. Increasing copper recovery in heap leaching by the use of binders and agglomeration would result in a significant decrease in the amount of energy consumed. Assuming that 70% of all the leaching heaps would convert to using agglomeration technology, as much as 1.64*10{sup 12} BTU per year would be able to be saved if a 25% increase in copper recovery was experienced, which is equivalent to saving approximately 18% of the energy currently being used in leaching heaps. For every week a leach cycle was decreased, a savings of as much as 1.23*10{sup 11} BTU per week would result. This project has identified several acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures. These binders and experimental procedures will be able to be used for use in improving the energy efficiency of

  2. Determination and correlation thermodynamic models for solid–liquid equilibrium of the Nifedipine in pure and mixture organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Gang; Hu, Yonghong; Gu, Pengfei; Yang, Wenge; Wang, Chunxiao; Ding, Zhiwen; Deng, Renlun; Li, Tao; Hong, Housheng

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The solubility increased with increasing temperature. • The data were fitted using the modified Apelblat equation in pure solvents. • The data were fitted using the CNIBS/R-K model in binary solvent mixture. - Abstract: Knowledge of thermodynamic parameters on corresponding solid-liquid equilibrium of nifedipine in different solvents is essential for a preliminary study of pharmaceutical engineering and industrial applications. In this paper, a gravimetric method was used to correct the solid-liquid equilibrium of nifedipine in methanol, ethanol, 1-butanol, acetone, acetonitrile, ethyl acetate and tetrahydrofuran pure solvents as well as in the (tetrahydrofuran + acetonitrile) mixture solvents at temperatures from 278.15 K to 328.15 K under 0.1 MPa. For the temperature range investigation, the solubility of nifedipine in the solvents increased with increasing temperature. The solubility of nifedipine in tetrahydrofuran is superior to other selected pure solvents. The modified Apelblat model, the Buchowski-Ksiazaczak λh model, and the ideal model were adopted to describe and predict the change tendency of solubility. Computational results showed that the modified Apelblat model stood out to be more suitable with the higher accuracy. The solubility values were fitted using a modified Apelblat model, a variant of the combined nearly ideal binary solvent/Redich-Kister (CNIBS/R-K) model and Jouyban-Acree model in (tetrahydrofuran + acetonitrile) binary solvent mixture. Computational results showed that the CNIBS/R-K model had more advantages than other models.

  3. Simple synthesis of three primary colour nanoparticle inks of Prussian blue and its analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotoh, Akihito; Uchida, Hiroaki; Ishizaki, Manabu; Satoh, Tetsutaro; Kaga, Shinichi; Okamoto, Shusuke; Ohta, Masaki; Sakamoto, Masatomi; Kawamoto, Tohru; Tanaka, Hisashi; Tokumoto, Madoka; Hara, Shigeo; Shiozaki, Hirofumi; Yamada, Mami; Miyake, Mikio; Kurihara, Masato

    2007-01-01

    Historic Prussian blue (PB) pigment is easily obtained as an insoluble precipitate in quantitative yield from an aqueous mixture of Fe 3+ and [Fe II (CN) 6 ] 4- (Fe 2+ and [Fe III (CN) 6 ] 3- ). It has been found that the PB pigment is inherently an agglomerate of 10-20 nm nanoparticles, based on powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) line broadenings and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. The PB pigment has been revived as both organic-solvent-soluble and water-soluble nanoparticle inks. Through crystal surface modification with aliphatic amines, the nanoparticles are stably dispersed from the insoluble agglomerate into usual organic solvents to afford a transparent blue solution. Identical modification with [Fe(CN) 6 ] 4- yields water-soluble PB nanoparticles. A similar ink preparation is applicable to Ni-PBA and Co-PBA (nickel and cobalt hexacyanoferrates). The PB (blue), Ni-PBA (yellow), and Co-PBA (red) nanoparticles function as three primary colour inks

  4. Microemulsion Transdermal Formulation for Simultaneous Delivery of Valsartan and Nifedipine: Formulation by Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Jatin; Sapra, Bharti; Tiwary, Ashok K

    2017-08-01

    The objective of the study was to optimize the proportion of different components for formulating oil in water microemulsion formulation meant for simultaneous transdermal delivery of two poorly soluble antihypertensive drugs. Surface response methodology of Box-Behnken design was utilized to evaluate the effect of two oils (Captex 500 - x1 and Capmul MCM - x2) and surfactant (Acrysol EL135 - x3) on response y1 (particle size), y2 (solubility of valsartan), and y3 (solubility of nifedipine). The important factors which significantly affected the responses were identified and validated using ANOVA. The model was diagnosed using normal plot of residuals and Box-Cox plot. The design revealed an inverse correlation between particle size and concentration of Capmul MCM and Acrysol EL 135. However, an increase in concentration of Captex 500 led to an increase in particle size of microemulsion. Solubility of valsartan decreased while that of nifedipine increased with increase in concentration of Captex 500. Capmul MCM played a significant role in increasing the solubility of valsartan. The effect of Acrysol EL 135 on solubility of both drugs, although significant, was only marginal as compared to that of Captex 500 and Capmul MCM. The optimized microemulsion was able to provide an enhancement ratio of 27.21 and 63.57-fold for valsartan and nifedipine, respectively, with respect to drug dispersion in aqueous surfactant system when evaluated for permeation studies. The current studies candidly suggest the scope of microemulsion systems for solubilizing as well as promoting the transport of both drugs across rat skin at an enhanced permeation rate.

  5. Nifedipine as a uterine relaxant for external cephalic version: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Marjolein; Bais, Joke M.; van Lith, Jan M.; Papatsonis, Dimitri M.; Kleiverda, Gunilla; Hanny, Dahrs; Doornbos, Johannes P.; Mol, Ben W.; van der Post, Joris A.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the effectiveness of nifedipine as a uterine relaxant during external cephalic version to correct breech presentation. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, women with a singleton fetus in breech presentation and a gestational age of 36 weeks or

  6. New Nanoparticles Dispersing Beads Mill with Ultra Small Beads and its Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inkyo, M; Tahara, T; Imajyo, Y

    2011-01-01

    Two of the major problems related to nanoparticle dispersion with a conventional beads mill are re-agglomeration and damage to the crystalline structure of the particles. The Ultra Apex Mill was developed to solve these problems by enabling the use of ultra-small beads with a diameter of less than 0.1mm. The core of this breakthrough development is centrifugation technology which allows the use of beads as small as 0.015mm. When dispersing agglomerated nanoparticles the impulse of the small beads is very low which means there is little influence on the particles. The surface energy of the nanoparticles remains low so the properties are not likely to change. As a result, stable nanoparticle dispersions can be achieved without re-cohesion. The Ultra Apex Mill is superior to conventional beads mills that are limited to much larger bead sizes. The technology of the Ultra Apex Mill has pioneered practical applications for nanoparticles in various fields: composition materials for LCD screens, ink-jet printing, ceramic condensers and cosmetics.

  7. Three-dimensional simulation of viscous-flow agglomerate sintering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhof, M J; Schmid, H -J; Peukert, W

    2009-08-01

    The viscous-flow sintering of different agglomerate particle morphologies is studied by three-dimensional computer simulations based on the concept of fractional volume of fluid. For a fundamental understanding of particle sintering characteristics, the neck growth kinetics in agglomerate chains and in doublets consisting of differently sized primary particles is investigated. Results show that different sintering contacts in agglomerates even during the first stages are not completely independent from each other, even though differences are small. The neck growth kinetics of differently sized primary particles is determined by the smaller one up to a size difference by a factor of approximately 2, whereas for larger size differences, the kinetics becomes faster. In particular, the agglomerate sintering kinetics is investigated for particle chains of different lengths and for different particle morphologies each having ten primary particles and nine initial sintering contacts. For agglomerate chains, the kinetics approximately can be normalized by using the radius of the fully coalesced sphere. In general, different agglomerate morphologies show equal kinetics during the first sintering stages, whereas during advanced stages, compact morphologies show significantly faster sintering progress than more open morphologies. Hence, the overall kinetics cannot be described by simply using constant morphology correction factors such as fractal dimension or mean coordination number which are used in common sintering models. However, for the first stages of viscous-flow agglomerate sintering, which are the most important for many particle processes, a sintering equation is presented. Although we use agglomerates consisting of spherical primary particles, our methodology can be applied to other aggregate geometries as well.

  8. Acoustic agglomeration methods and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Methods are described for using acoustic energy to agglomerate fine particles on the order of one micron diameter that are suspended in gas, to provide agglomerates large enough for efficient removal by other techniques. The gas with suspended particles, is passed through the length of a chamber while acoustic energy at a resonant chamber mode is applied to set up one or more acoustic standing wave patterns that vibrate the suspended particles to bring them together so they agglomerate. Several widely different frequencies can be applied to efficiently vibrate particles of widely differing sizes. The standing wave pattern can be applied along directions transversed to the flow of the gas. The particles can be made to move in circles by applying acoustic energy in perpendicular directions with the energy in both directions being of the same wavelength but 90 deg out of phase.

  9. Hydrophobic agglomeration of apatite fines induced by sodium oleate in aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingqiao Yang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the hydrophobic agglomeration of apatite fines induced by sodium oleate in aqueous solutions has been investigated through the measurement of agglomeration degree and fractal dimension. The results showed that the agglomeration degree of apatite fines and agglomerates morphology was strongly depended on sodium oleate concentration, pH, stirring speed and time. Better agglomeration degree and more regular agglomerates were achieved at sodium oleate concentration of 5 × 10−5 mol/L under neutral condition. The critical stirring speed for agglomerates rupture was 1000 rev/min, above which, prolonged stirring time would cause breakage and restructure of the agglomerates after a certain stirring time, resulting in lower agglomeration degree and more regular agglomerates. The agglomeration degree of apatite fines could be greatly enhanced with the addition of emulsified kerosene, but only if the apatite surface was hydrophobic enough. Keywords: Hydrophobic agglomeration, Apatite fines, Agglomeration degree, Fractal dimension, Sodium oleate

  10. Reaction products of densified silica fume agglomerates in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, Sidney; Sahu, Sadananda; Thaulow, Niels

    2004-01-01

    Most silica fume currently used in concrete is in the dry densified form and consists of agglomerates of sizes between 10 μm and several millimeters. Many of these agglomerates may break down only partially in normal concrete mixing. Examination of various mature silica-fume-bearing concretes using backscatter mode scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis shows that such agglomerates have reacted in situ and given rise to recognizable types of reaction products filling the space within the original outline of the agglomerate. One type is 'quiescent', and usually shows no evidence of volume instability. EDX spectra indicate that the product formed within such grains is C-S-H of very low Ca/Si ratio, with modest alkali contents. Other silica fume agglomerates may undergo a distinct alkali-silica-type reaction (ASR), with the reaction product found within the original outline of the agglomerate having significantly less calcium and usually much higher alkali contents than the quiescent type. Such reacted agglomerates show evidence of local expansion, shrinkage cracking (on drying), and other features common to ASR. Both types may be found within the same concrete, sometimes in close proximity. It further appears that exposure to seawater may convert previously formed reaction products of silica fume agglomerates to magnesium silicate hydrates

  11. Use of hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin ad polymer matrix for formation of inclusion complex with drug nifedipine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carneiro, Elisa F.; Araujo, Marcia V.G. de; Barbosa, Ronilson V.; Silva, Caroline W.P. da; Barisson, Andersson; Zawadzki, Sonia F.; Andrade, George Ricardo S.; Costa Junior, Nivan B. da

    2009-01-01

    In this work it was prepared and characterized an inclusion complex between the polymeric matrix hydroxypropyl-beta cyclodextrin and nifedipine, a hydrophobic drug calcium antagonistic, used for the cardiovascular diseases treatment. The study of the phase- solubility diagram showed an increase of the aqueous solubility of the drug after inclusion, was observed and The differential scanning calorimetry analysis did not show the melting point temperature of the drug in the formed complex. This fact is considered as an evidence of the encapsulation process. 1 H NMR studies suggested that the non-aromatic ring of the nifedipine would be inserted in the cavity of the hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin.This orientation was also proposed by the used molecular modelling methods. (author)

  12. Characterizing Nanoparticles Reactivity: Structure-Photocatalytic Activity Relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piella, J; Bastús, N G; Casals, E; Puntes, V

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles are reactive, and their final interactions with the surrounding media are ultimately determined by their reactivity, which in turns depends on the nanoparticles morphology, surface chemistry and environment in which they are embedded. One simple and informative approach for the study of the reactivity of nanoparticles is the determination of their photocatalytic activity. In the present work, we briefly summarize the importance of different parameters such as the size, shape and agglomeration state on the photocatalytic activity of colloidal inorganic nanoparticles. The study of the use of nanoparticles as photocatalyts is relevant not only for its potential applications in environmental remediation issues but also it can provide relevant information about the role of these parameters at the nanoscale.

  13. Nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker, inhibits advanced glycation end product (AGE)-elicited mesangial cell damage by suppressing AGE receptor (RAGE) expression via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Takanori; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Ueda, Seiji; Fukami, Kei; Okuda, Seiya

    2009-01-01

    The interaction between advanced glycation end products (AGE) and their receptor RAGE mediates the progressive alteration in renal architecture and loss of renal function in diabetic nephropathy. Oxidative stress generation and inflammation also play a central role in diabetic nephropathy. This study investigated whether and how nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker (CCB), blocked the AGE-elicited mesangial cell damage in vitro. Nifedipine, but not amlodipine, a control CCB, down-regulated RAGE mRNA levels and subsequently reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in AGE-exposed mesangial cells. AGE increased mRNA levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and induced monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) production in mesangial cells, both of which were prevented by the treatment with nifedipine, but not amlodipine. The beneficial effects of nifedipine on AGE-exposed mesangial cells were blocked by the simultaneous treatment of GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ). Although nifedipine did not affect expression levels of PPAR-γ, it increased the PPAR-γ transcriptional activity in mesangial cells. Our present study provides a unique beneficial aspect of nifedipine on diabetic nephropathy; it could work as an anti-inflammatory agent against AGE by suppressing RAGE expression in cultured mesangial cells via PPAR-γ activation.

  14. Evaluation of 89 compounds for identification of substrates for cynomolgus monkey CYP2C76, a new bupropion/nifedipine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosaka, Shinya; Murayama, Norie; Satsukawa, Masahiro; Shimizu, Makiko; Uehara, Shotaro; Fujino, Hideki; Iwasaki, Kazuhide; Iwano, Shunsuke; Uno, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys are widely used in preclinical studies during drug development because of their evolutionary closeness to humans, including their cytochrome P450s (P450s). Most cynomolgus monkey P450s are almost identical (≥90%) to human P450s; however, CYP2C76 has low sequence identity (approximately 80%) to any human CYP2Cs. Although CYP2C76 has no ortholog in humans and is partly responsible for species differences in drug metabolism between cynomolgus monkeys and humans, a broad evaluation of potential substrates for CYP2C76 has not yet been conducted. In this study, a screening of 89 marketed compounds, including human CYP2C and non-CYP2C substrates or inhibitors, was conducted to find potential CYP2C76 substrates. Among the compounds screened, 19 chemicals were identified as substrates for CYP2C76, including substrates for human CYP1A2 (7-ethoxyresorufin), CYP2B6 (bupropion), CYP2D6 (dextromethorphan), and CYP3A4/5 (dextromethorphan and nifedipine), and inhibitors for CYP2B6 (sertraline, clopidogrel, and ticlopidine), CYP2C8 (quercetin), CYP2C19 (ticlopidine and nootkatone), and CYP3A4/5 (troleandomycin). CYP2C76 metabolized a wide variety of the compounds with diverse structures. Among them, bupropion and nifedipine showed high selectivity to CYP2C76. As for nifedipine, CYP2C76 formed methylhydroxylated nifedipine, which was not produced by monkey CYP2C9, CYP2C19, or CYP3A4, as identified by mass spectrometry and estimated by a molecular docking simulation. This unique oxidative metabolite formation of nifedipine could be one of the selective marker reactions of CYP2C76 among the major CYP2Cs and CYP3As tested. These results suggest that monkey CYP2C76 contributes to bupropion hydroxylation and formation of different nifedipine oxidative metabolites as a result of its relatively large substrate cavity. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  15. Studying the Impact of Modified Saccharides on the Molecular Dynamics and Crystallization Tendencies of Model API Nifedipine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminska, E; Tarnacka, M; Wlodarczyk, P; Jurkiewicz, K; Kolodziejczyk, K; Dulski, M; Haznar-Garbacz, D; Hawelek, L; Kaminski, K; Wlodarczyk, A; Paluch, M

    2015-08-03

    Molecular dynamics of pure nifedipine and its solid dispersions with modified carbohydrates as well as the crystallization kinetics of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) above and below the glass transition temperature were studied in detail by means of broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and X-ray diffraction method. It was found that the activation barrier of crystallization increases in molecular dispersions composed of acetylated disaccharides, whereas it slightly decreases in those consisting of modified monocarbohydrates for the experiments carried out above the glass transition temperature. As shown by molecular dynamics simulations it can be related to the strength, character, and structure of intermolecular interactions between API and saccharides, which vary dependently on the excipient. Long-term physical stability studies showed that, in solid dispersions consisting of acetylated maltose and acetylated sucrose, the crystallization of nifedipine is dramatically slowed down, although it is still observable for a low concentration of excipients. With increasing content of modified carbohydrates, the crystallization of API becomes completely suppressed. This is most likely due to additional barriers relating to the intermolecular interactions and diffusion of nifedipine that must be overcome to trigger the crystallization process.

  16. Poly-thiosemicarbazide/gold nanoparticles catalytic membrane: In-situ growth of well-dispersed, uniform and stable gold nanoparticles in a polymeric membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Villalobos, Luis Francisco; Neelakanda, Pradeep; Karunakaran, Madhavan; Cha, Dong Kyu; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a method that achieves the highest loading, published so far, of non-agglomerated and well-distributed gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) inside a polymeric membrane. The method uses poly-thiosemicarbazide (PTSC) as the starting material

  17. Agglomeration economies, competitiveness and entrepreneurial performance

    OpenAIRE

    Páger, Balázs; Komlósi, Éva

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to elaborate the role of agglomeration effects on countries' competitiveness and entrepreneurial performance. Our research contributes to the understanding of the relationship that exists between a country's urban system characterized by spatial agglomeration (concentration) or deglomeration (deconcentration) processes, and its competitiveness and entrepreneurial performance, respectively. Urbanization economies refer to considerable cost savings generated through the locating...

  18. Investigation of bioequivalence of a new fixed-dose combination of nifedipine and candesartan with the corresponding loose combination as well as the drug-drug interaction potential between both drugs under fasting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendel, Erich; Weimann, Boris; Dietrich, Hartmut; Froede, Christoph; Thomas, Dirk

    2013-09-01

    To determine the bioequivalence of a nifedipine and candesartan fixed-dose combination (FDC) with the corresponding loose combination, and to investigate the pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction potential between both drugs. 49 healthy, white, male subjects received: 60 mg nifedipine and 32 mg candesartan FDC, the loose combination of 60 mg nifedipine GITS and 32 mg candesartan, 60 mg nifedipine GITS alone, or 32 mg candesartan alone in a randomized, non-blinded, 4-period, 4-way crossover design with each dosing following overnight fasting. Treatment periods were separated by washout periods of ≥ 5 days. Plasma samples were collected for 48 hours after dosing and assayed using a validated LC-MS/MS method. Bioequivalence between the FDC and the loose combination as well as the impact of combined treatment with both drugs on candesartan pharmacokinetics was evaluated in 47 subjects, while the corresponding impact of treatment with both drugs on nifedipine pharmacokinetics was assessed in 46 patients. For AUC(0-tlast) and Cmax the 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for the ratios of the FDC vs. the corresponding loose combination were within the acceptance range for bioequivalence of 80 - 125%. When comparing AUC(0-tlast) and Cmax of nifedipine and candesartan after dosing with the loose combination vs. each drug alone, the 90% CIs remained within the range of 80 - 125% indicating the absence of a clinically relevant pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction. Nifedipine and candesartan as well as the combinations were well tolerated. The FDC containing 60 mg nifedipine and 32 mg candesartan was bioequivalent to the corresponding loose combination following single oral doses under fasting conditions. No clinically relevant pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction between nifedipine and candesartan was observed.

  19. Aerosol mass deposition: the importance of gravitational agglomeration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamford, G.J.; Ketchell, N.; Dunbar, I.H.

    1992-01-01

    Sedimentation, Brownian agglomeration and gravitational agglomeration timescales are mapped out for a set of simple systems. Analysis of these timescales has highlighted when and why gravitational agglomeration becomes the dominant factor determining overall mass deposition rates in hypothetical severe nuclear reactor accidents. This work was funded by the United Kingdom Department of Trade and Industry as part of the General Nuclear Safety Research Programme. (Author)

  20. Plasma-activated core-shell gold nanoparticle films with enhanced catalytic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llorca, Jordi, E-mail: jordi.llorca@upc.edu; Casanovas, Albert; Dominguez, Montserrat; Casanova, Ignasi [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Institut de Tecniques Energetiques (Spain); Angurell, Inmaculada; Seco, Miquel; Rossell, Oriol [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Quimica Inorganica (Spain)

    2008-03-15

    Catalytically active gold nanoparticle films have been prepared from core-shell nanoparticles by plasma-activation and characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Methane can be selectively oxidized into formic acid with an O{sub 2}-H{sub 2} mixture in a catalytic wall reactor functionalized with plasma-activated gold nanoparticle films containing well-defined Au particles of about 3.5 nm in diameter. No catalytic activity was recorded over gold nanoparticle films prepared by thermal decomposition of core-shell nanoparticles due to particle agglomeration.

  1. Plasma-activated core-shell gold nanoparticle films with enhanced catalytic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llorca, Jordi; Casanovas, Albert; Dominguez, Montserrat; Casanova, Ignasi; Angurell, Inmaculada; Seco, Miquel; Rossell, Oriol

    2008-01-01

    Catalytically active gold nanoparticle films have been prepared from core-shell nanoparticles by plasma-activation and characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Methane can be selectively oxidized into formic acid with an O 2 -H 2 mixture in a catalytic wall reactor functionalized with plasma-activated gold nanoparticle films containing well-defined Au particles of about 3.5 nm in diameter. No catalytic activity was recorded over gold nanoparticle films prepared by thermal decomposition of core-shell nanoparticles due to particle agglomeration

  2. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; K. A. Lewandowski; J. A. Gurtler

    2006-03-31

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily at a reasonable cost. A primary example of this is copper heap leaching, where there are no binders currently encountered in this acidic environment process. As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching. The active involvement of our industrial partners will help to ensure rapid commercialization of any agglomeration technologies developed by this project.

  3. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; J. A. Gurtler; K. Lewandowski

    2005-09-30

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily at a reasonable cost. A primary example of this is copper heap leaching, where there are no binders currently encountered in this acidic environment process. As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching. The active involvement of our industrial partners will help to ensure rapid commercialization of any agglomeration technologies developed by this project.

  4. Investigation of the agglomeration and amorphous transformation effects of neutron irradiation on the nanocrystalline silicon carbide (3C-SiC) using TEM and SEM methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huseynov, Elchin M., E-mail: elchin.h@yahoo.com [Department of Nanotechnology and Radiation Material Science, National Nuclear Research Center, Inshaatchilar pr. 4, AZ 1073 Baku (Azerbaijan); Institute of Radiation Problems of Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, B.Vahabzade 9, AZ 1143 Baku (Azerbaijan)

    2017-04-01

    Nanocrystalline 3C-SiC particles irradiated by neutron flux during 20 h in TRIGA Mark II light water pool type research reactor. Silicon carbide nanoparticles were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) devices before and after neutron irradiation. The agglomeration of nanoparticles was studied comparatively before and after neutron irradiation. After neutron irradiation the amorphous layer surrounding the nanoparticles was analyzed in TEM device. Neutron irradiation defects in the 3C-SiC nanoparticles and other effects investigated by TEM device. The effect of irradiation on the crystal structure of the nanomaterial was studied by selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and electron diffraction patterns (EDP) analysis.

  5. Increase of electrodeposited catalyst stability via plasma grown vertically oriented graphene nanoparticle movement restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanrenterghem, Bart; Hodnik, Nejc; Bele, Marjan; Šala, Martin; Amelinckx, Giovanni; Neukermans, Sander; Zaplotnik, Rok; Primc, Gregor; Mozetič, Miran; Breugelmans, Tom

    2017-08-17

    Beside activity, electrocatalyst stability is gaining in importance. The most common degradation mechanism is the loss of the active surface area due to nanoparticle growth via coalescence/agglomeration. We propose a particle confinement strategy via vertically oriented graphene deposition to overcome degradation of the nanoparticles.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of fluorescence-labelled silica core-shell and noble metal-decorated ceria nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Herrmann

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present review article covers work done in the cluster NPBIOMEM in the DFG priority programme SPP 1313 and focuses on synthesis and characterization of fluorescent silica and ceria nanoparticles. Synthetic methods for labelling of silica and polyorganosiloxane/silica core–shell nanoparticles with perylenediimide derivatives are described, as well as the modification of the shell with thiol groups. Photometric methods for the determination of the number of thiol groups and an estimate for the number of fluorescent molecules per nanoparticles, including a scattering correction, have been developed. Ceria nanoparticles decorated with noble metals (Pt, Pd, Rh are models for the decomposition products of automobile catalytic converters which appear in the exhaust gases and finally interact with biological systems including humans. The control of the degree of agglomeration of small ceria nanoparticles is the basis for their synthesis. Almost monodisperse agglomerates (40 ± 4–260 ± 40 nm diameter can be prepared and decorated with noble metal nanoparticles (2–5 nm diameter. Fluorescence labelling with ATTO 647N gave the model particles which are now under biophysical investigation.

  7. Study on the agglomeration kinetics of uranium peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, M.; Mojica Rodriguez, L.A.; Muhr, H.; Plasari, E.; Auger, F.

    2016-01-01

    Considering the previous study dealing with thermodynamic and kinetic phenomena (nucleation and crystal growth) during the uranium peroxide precipitation, this work focuses on the agglomeration mechanism. It provides the results obtained from the experiments carried out in a mixed suspension - mixed product removal (MSMPR) mixer operating at steady state. The influence of the operating parameters on the uranium peroxide agglomerates was studied in order to identify the agglomeration kernel. The method is based on the resolution of the population balance equation using the method of moments and the experimental particle size distributions. The results lead to a size-independent kernel directly proportional to the crystal growth rate. Under the stirring conditions studied, the agglomeration appears to be significantly reduced by mixing which results in a kernel inversely proportional to the average shear rate. The agglomeration kinetic law obtained in this study will be used for the process modelling in a further study. (authors)

  8. Study on the agglomeration kinetics of uranium peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, M.; Mojica Rodriguez, L.A. [CEA, Centre de Marcoule, Nuclear Energy Division, RadioChemistry and Process Department, 17171, Bagnols-sur-Ceze 30207 (France); Muhr, H.; Plasari, E. [Reaction and Process Engineering Laboratory, CNRS, University of Lorraine. 1 rue Grandville, BP 20451, Nancy 54001 (France); Auger, F. [Areva Mines/SEPA. 2 route de Lavaugrasse, Bessines-sur-Gartempe 87250 (France)

    2016-07-01

    Considering the previous study dealing with thermodynamic and kinetic phenomena (nucleation and crystal growth) during the uranium peroxide precipitation, this work focuses on the agglomeration mechanism. It provides the results obtained from the experiments carried out in a mixed suspension - mixed product removal (MSMPR) mixer operating at steady state. The influence of the operating parameters on the uranium peroxide agglomerates was studied in order to identify the agglomeration kernel. The method is based on the resolution of the population balance equation using the method of moments and the experimental particle size distributions. The results lead to a size-independent kernel directly proportional to the crystal growth rate. Under the stirring conditions studied, the agglomeration appears to be significantly reduced by mixing which results in a kernel inversely proportional to the average shear rate. The agglomeration kinetic law obtained in this study will be used for the process modelling in a further study. (authors)

  9. Solubility enhancement, physicochemical characterization and formulation of fast-dissolving tablet of nifedipine-betacyclodextrin complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Changdeo Jagdale

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the study was to enhance the dissolution of nifedipine, a poorly water soluble drug by betacyclodextrin complexation and to study the effect of the preparation method on the in vitro dissolution profile. The stoichiometric ratio determined by phase solubility analysis for inclusion complexation of nifedipine with β-cyclodextrin was 1:1. Binary complex was prepared by different methods and was further characterized using XRD, DSC and FT-IR. A saturation solubility study was carried out to evaluate the increase in solubility of nifedipine. The optimized complex was formulated into fast-dissolving tablets by using the superdisintegrants Doshion P544, pregelatinized starch, crospovidone, sodium starch glycolate and croscarmellose sodium by direct compression. Tablets were evaluated for friability, hardness, weight variation, disintegration and in vitro dissolution. Tablets showed an enhanced dissolution rate compared to pure nifedipine.Este estudo teve por objetivo principal incrementar a dissolução do nifedipino, fármaco pouco solúvel em água, por meio de sua complexação com β-ciclodextrina e estudar o efeito do método de preparação sobre o perfil de dissolução in vitro. A razão estequiométrica, determinada por ensaio de solubilidade de fase, para a complexação de nifedipino por inclusão em β-ciclodextrina foi 1:1. O complexo binário foi preparado por diferentes métodos, sendo caracterizado utilizando-se difratometria de raios X (XRD, calorimetria diferencial de varredura (DSC e espectroscopia no infravermelho com transformada de Fourier (FT-IR. Realizou-se estudo de solubilidade de saturação para avaliar o incremento da solubilidade do nifedipino. O complexo otimizado foi formulado em comprimidos de dissolução rápida preparados por compressão direta, nos quais se utilizaram os superdesintegrantes Doshion P544, amido pré-gelatinizado, crospovidona, amidoglicolato de sódio e croscarmelose s

  10. CdSe nanoparticles grown via radiolytic methods in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Shalini; Rath, M.C.; Singh, A.K.; Mukherjee, T.; Jayakumar, O.D.; Tyagi, A.K.; Sarkar, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    Cadmium selenide, CdSe, nanoparticles have been synthesized in aqueous solution containing equimolar ammoniated CdSO 4 and Na 2 SeSO 3 as the starting materials without any capping agents, using gamma and electron beam irradiation under a reducing condition. The radiolytic processes occurring in water result in the formation of CdSe nanoparticles through the reactions mediated by hydrated electrons, e aq - . TEM measurements revealed that the CdSe nanoparticles were found to exist in agglomerates of dimension of about 100 nm, consisting of primary nanoparticles of dimensions within 5 nm. The as-grown nanoparticles were of cubic crystalline phase as supported by the XRD measurements. These bare CdSe nanoparticles exhibit room temperature ferromagnetic (RTFM) behavior. However, the RTFM behavior was found to be 30% higher in the case of CdSe nanoparticles prepared on electron beam irradiation as compared to those obtained by gamma irradiation, which was attributed to their relatively smaller size (2-3 nm) and disordered structures as compared to those obtained in the later case (3-5 nm). -- Research highlights: → CdSe nanoparticles could be synthesized in aqueous solutions containing equimolar ammoniated CdSO 4 and Na 2 SeSO 3 as the starting materials using gamma and electron beam irradiation under a reducing condition. → CdSe nanoparticles were found to exist in agglomerates of dimension of about 100 nm, consisting of primary nanoparticles of dimensions within 5 nm. → CdSe nanoparticles exhibit room temperature ferromagnetic (RTFM) behavior. → The RTFM behavior was found to be 30% higher in the case of CdSe nanoparticles prepared on electron beam irradiation as compared to those obtained by gamma irradiation.

  11. Calcination temperature influenced multiferroic properties of Ca-doped BiFeO3 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhir, Gitanjali; Uniyal, Poonam; Verma, N. K.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of Ca-doping and particle size on structural, morphological and magnetic properties of BiFeO 3 nanoparticles has been studied. A sol-gel method was employed for the synthesis of nanoparticles and their particle size was tailored by varying the calcination temperature. Structural analysis revealed a rhombohedral distortion induced by Ca-substitution. The broadening of diffraction peaks with decreasing calcination temperature was indicative of reduction in crystallite size. The morphological analysis revealed the formation of agglomerated nanoparticles having average particle size ranging from 10-15 and 50-55 nm for C4 and C6, respectively. The agglomeration is attributed to high surface energy of nanoparticles. Ferromagnetism has been displayed by all the synthesized nanoparticles. Enhancement of saturation magnetization with Ca-substitution is attributed to suppression of spin cycloid structure by the reduction in size, lattice distortion and creation of oxygen vacancies by the substitution of divalent ion at trivalent site. Further, this value increases as a function of decreasing particle size. Strong particle size effects on magnetic properties of the synthesized nanoparticles are owed to increasing surface to volume ratio. All these observations are indicative of strong dependence of multiferroism on particle size

  12. Effect of process parameters on removal and recovery of Cd(II) and Cu(II) from electroplating wastewater by fixed-bed column of nano-dimensional titanium (IV) oxide agglomerates

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Debnath, S

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Removal performances of Cd(II) and Cu(II) from water was investigated using agglomerated nanoparticle of hydrous titanium(IV) oxide (NTO) packed fixed bed. The parameters varied were the bed depth, flow rate and feed solution concentrations...

  13. Effect of electrolyte valency, alginate concentration and pH on engineered TiO₂ nanoparticle stability in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loosli, Frédéric; Le Coustumer, Philippe; Stoll, Serge

    2015-12-01

    Agglomeration and disagglomeration processes are expected to play a key role on the fate of engineered nanoparticles in natural aquatic systems. These processes are investigated here in detail by studying first the stability of TiO2 nanoparticles in the presence of monovalent and divalent electrolytes at different pHs (below and above the point of zero charge of TiO2) and discussing the importance of specific divalent cation adsorption with the help of the DLVO theory as well as the importance of the nature of the counterions. Then the impact of one polysaccharide (alginate) on the stability of agglomerates formed under pH and water hardness representative of Lake Geneva environmental conditions is investigated. In these conditions the large TiO2 agglomerates (diameter>1μm) are positively charged due to Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) specific adsorption and alginate, which is negatively charged, adsorbs onto the agglomerate surface. Our results indicate that the presence of alginate at typical natural organic matter concentration (1-10 mg L(-1)) strongly modifies the TiO2 agglomerate (50 mg L(-1)) stability by inducing their partial and rapid disagglomeration. The importance of disagglomeration is found dependent on the alginate concentration with maximum of disagglomeration obtained for alginate concentration ≥8 mg L(-1) and leading to 400 nm fragments. From an environmental point of view partial restabilization of TiO2 agglomerates in the presence of alginate constitutes an important outcome. Disagglomeration will enhance their transport and residence time in aquatic systems which is an important step in the current knowledge on risk assessment associated to engineered nanoparticles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The challenges of testing metal and metal oxide nanoparticles in algal bioassays: titanium dioxide and gold nanoparticles as case studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Nanna Isabella Bloch; Engelbrekt, Christian; Zhang, Jingdong

    2013-01-01

    and TiO(2) nanoparticle aggregation/agglomeration increased as a function of concentration. Three biomass surrogate measuring techniques were evaluated (coulter counting, cell counting in haemocytometer, and fluorescence of pigment extracts) and out of these the fluorometric methods was found to be most...

  15. Urban Agglomerations in Regional Development: Theoretical, Methodological and Applied Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Vladimirovich Shmidt

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the analysis of the major process of modern socio-economic development, such as the functioning of urban agglomerations. A short background of the economic literature on this phenomenon is given. There are the traditional (the concentration of urban types of activities, the grouping of urban settlements by the intensive production and labour communications and modern (cluster theories, theories of network society conceptions. Two methodological principles of studying the agglomeration are emphasized: the principle of the unity of the spatial concentration of economic activity and the principle of compact living of the population. The positive and negative effects of agglomeration in the economic and social spheres are studied. Therefore, it is concluded that the agglomeration is helpful in the case when it brings the agglomerative economy (the positive benefits from it exceed the additional costs. A methodology for examination the urban agglomeration and its role in the regional development is offered. The approbation of this methodology on the example of Chelyabinsk and Chelyabinsk region has allowed to carry out the comparative analysis of the regional centre and the whole region by the main socio-economic indexes under static and dynamic conditions, to draw the conclusions on a position of the city and the region based on such socio-economic indexes as an average monthly nominal accrued wage, the cost of fixed assets, the investments into fixed capital, new housing supply, a retail turnover, the volume of self-produced shipped goods, the works and services performed in the region. In the study, the analysis of a launching site of the Chelyabinsk agglomeration is carried out. It has revealed the following main characteristics of the core of the agglomeration in Chelyabinsk (structure feature, population, level of centralization of the core as well as the Chelyabinsk agglomeration in general (coefficient of agglomeration

  16. Microalbuminuria and sRAGE in High-Risk Hypertensive Patients Treated with Nifedipine/Telmisartan Combination Treatment: A Substudy of TALENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colomba Falcone

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Some antihypertensive drugs have also renoprotective and anti-inflammatory properties that go beyond their effect on blood pressure. It has been suggested that microalbuminuria and glomerular filtration rate (GFR are associated with circulating levels of the soluble form of the receptor, sRAGE (soluble receptor for advanced glycation ends-products. In the present analysis, we used data from the TALENT study to evaluate soluble receptor for advanced glycation end-products (sRAGE plasma levels in patients with hypertension and high-cardiovascular risk-treated nifedipine and telmisartan in combination. Treatment with nifedipine-telmisartan significantly decreased mean systolic and diastolic ambulatory blood pressure and resulted in a significant increase in sRAGE plasma concentrations after 24 weeks of therapy. We concluded that in hypertensive patients with early-stage renal disease, sRAGE concentrations are not influenced by either microalbuminuria or GFR. Long-term treatment with a combination of nifedipine-telmisartan may have a beneficial effect increasing sRAGE plasma levels, thus exerting an atheroprotective and anti-inflammatory activity.

  17. Perbandingan Pengaruh Nifedipin 20 mg per Oral 2 Jam Preoperasi dengan Plasebo terhadap Suhu Inti pada Pasien yang Menjalani Operasi Modified Radical Mastectomy dengan Anestesi Umum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Trisnadi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Strategy of prevention the initial redistribution hypothermia is based on the reduction of the heat gradient between the core and perifer before surgery by administering vasodilators. The purpose of this study was to asses the effect of oral nifedipine 20 mg 2 hours before anesthesia in preventing hypothermia in patients undergoing modified radical mastectomy under general anesthesia and to compare the decreased rate of body temperature oral nifedipine with placebo. The research was done with the prospective method, randomized double-blind controlled study in 30 patients aged 18–60 yrs, American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA physical status I-II, underwent modified radical mastectomy surgery, were randomly divided into two groups at Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung during June until August 2012. One group was given oral nifedipine 20 mg 2 hours before general anesthesia and the other group was given placebo. Tymphani temperature was recorded during anesthesia every 10 minutes. Research data was tested statistically by the Mann-Whitney test. The average core temperature in the nifedipine was 36.37 ° C which was higher than the control group 35.61 ° C (p<0.05. It can be concluded that the use of nifedipine can prevent intraoperative hypothermia.

  18. Fragmentation and bond strength of airborne diesel soot agglomerates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messerer Armin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential of diesel soot aerosol particles to break up into smaller units under mechanical stress was investigated by a direct impaction technique which measures the degree of fragmentation of individual agglomerates vs. impact energy. Diesel aerosol was generated by an idling diesel engine used for passenger vehicles. Both the aerosol emitted directly and aerosol that had undergone additional growth by Brownian coagulation ("aging" was investigated. Optionally a thermo-desoption technique at 280°C was used to remove all high-volatility and the majority of low-volatility HC adsorbates from the aerosol before aging. Results It was found that the primary soot agglomerates emitted directly from the engine could not be fragmented at all. Soot agglomerates permitted to grow additionally by Brownian coagulation of the primary emitted particles could be fragmented to a maximum of 75% and 60% respectively, depending on whether adsorbates were removed from their surface prior to aging or not. At most, these aged agglomerates could be broken down to roughly the size of the agglomerates from the primary emission. The energy required for a 50% fragmentation probability of all bonds within an agglomerate was reduced by roughly a factor of 2 when aging "dry" agglomerates. Average bond energies derived from the data were 0.52*10-16 and 1.2*10-16 J, respectively. This is about 2 orders of magnitude higher than estimates for pure van-der-Waals agglomerates, but agrees quite well with other observations. Conclusion Although direct conclusions regarding the behavior of inhaled diesel aerosol in contact with body fluids cannot be drawn from such measurements, the results imply that highly agglomerated soot aerosol particles are unlikely to break up into units smaller than roughly the size distribution emitted as tail pipe soot.

  19. Fragmentation and bond strength of airborne diesel soot agglomerates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenbacher, Sonja; Messerer, Armin; Kasper, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Background The potential of diesel soot aerosol particles to break up into smaller units under mechanical stress was investigated by a direct impaction technique which measures the degree of fragmentation of individual agglomerates vs. impact energy. Diesel aerosol was generated by an idling diesel engine used for passenger vehicles. Both the aerosol emitted directly and aerosol that had undergone additional growth by Brownian coagulation ("aging") was investigated. Optionally a thermo-desoption technique at 280°C was used to remove all high-volatility and the majority of low-volatility HC adsorbates from the aerosol before aging. Results It was found that the primary soot agglomerates emitted directly from the engine could not be fragmented at all. Soot agglomerates permitted to grow additionally by Brownian coagulation of the primary emitted particles could be fragmented to a maximum of 75% and 60% respectively, depending on whether adsorbates were removed from their surface prior to aging or not. At most, these aged agglomerates could be broken down to roughly the size of the agglomerates from the primary emission. The energy required for a 50% fragmentation probability of all bonds within an agglomerate was reduced by roughly a factor of 2 when aging "dry" agglomerates. Average bond energies derived from the data were 0.52*10-16 and 1.2*10-16 J, respectively. This is about 2 orders of magnitude higher than estimates for pure van-der-Waals agglomerates, but agrees quite well with other observations. Conclusion Although direct conclusions regarding the behavior of inhaled diesel aerosol in contact with body fluids cannot be drawn from such measurements, the results imply that highly agglomerated soot aerosol particles are unlikely to break up into units smaller than roughly the size distribution emitted as tail pipe soot. PMID:18533015

  20. Thermally stable silica-coated hydrophobic gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanehara, Masayuki; Watanabe, Yuka; Teranishi, Toshiharu

    2009-01-01

    We have successfully developed a method for silica coating on hydrophobic dodecanethiol-protected Au nanoparticles with coating thickness ranging from 10 to 40 nm. The formation of silica-coated Au nanoparticles could be accomplished via the preparation of hydrophilic Au nanoparticle micelles by cationic surfactant encapsulation in aqueous phase, followed by hydrolysis of tetraethylorthosilicate on the hydrophilic surface of gold nanoparticle micelles. Silica-coated Au nanoparticles exhibited quite high thermal stability, that is, no agglomeration of the Au cores could be observed after annealing at 600 degrees C for 30 min. Silica-coated Au nanoparticles could serve as a template to derive hollow nanoparticles. An addition of NaCN solution to silica-coated Au nanoparticles led the formation of hollow silica nanoparticles, which were redispersible in deionized water. The formation of the hollow silica nanoparticles results from the mesoporous structures of the silica shell and such a mesoporous structure is applicable to both catalyst support and drug delivery.

  1. High-yield synthesis of brookite TiO.sub.2 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Dale L [Albuquerque, NM; Monson, Todd C [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-05-17

    A method for forming non-agglomerated brookite TiO.sub.2 nanoparticles without the use of expensive organic surfactants or high temperature processing. Embodiments of this invention use titanium isopropoxide as the titanium precursor and isopropanol as both the solvent and ligand for ligand-stabilized brookite-phase titania. Isopropanol molecules serve as the ligands interacting with the titania surfaces that stabilize the titania nanoparticles. The isopropanol ligands can be exchanged with other alcohols and other ligands during or after the nanoparticle formation reaction.

  2. Colloidal agglomerates in tank sludge: Impact on waste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunker, B.C.; Martin, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    'Insoluble colloidal sludges in hazardous waste streams such as tank wastes can pose serious problems for waste processing, interfering with retrieval, transport, separation, and solidification procedures. Properties of sediment layers and sludge suspensions such as slurry viscosities, sedimentation rates, and final sediment densities can vary by orders of magnitude depending on the particle types present, the degree to which the particles agglomerate or stick to each other, and on a wide range of processing parameters such as solution shear rates, pH, salt content, and temperature. The objectives of this work are to: (1) understand the factors controlling the nature and extent of colloidal agglomeration under expected waste processing conditions; (2) determine how agglomeration phenomena influence physical properties relevant to waste processing including rheology, sedimentation, and filtration; and (3) develop strategies for optimizing processing conditions via control of agglomeration phenomena. Insoluble colloidal sludges in hazardous waste streams such as tank wastes can pose serious problems for waste processing, interfering with retrieval, transport, separation, and solidification procedures. Properties of sediment layers and sludge suspensions such as slurry viscosities, sedimentation rates, and final sediment densities can vary by orders of magnitude depending on the particle types present, the degree to which the particles agglomerate or stick to each other, and on a wide range of processing parameters such as solution shear rates, pH, salt content, and temperature. The objectives of this work are to: (1) understand the factors controlling the nature and extent of colloidal agglomeration under expected waste processing conditions; (2) determine how agglomeration phenomena influence physical properties relevant to waste processing including rheology, sedimentation, and filtration; and (3) develop strategies for optimizing processing conditions via control

  3. Better microvascular function on long-term treatment with lisinopril than with nifedipine in renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asberg, A; Midtvedt, K; Vassbotn, T; Hartmann, A

    2001-07-01

    The prevalence of hypertension in renal transplant recipients is high but the pathophysiology is poorly defined. Impaired endothelial function may be a factor of major importance. The present study addresses the effects of long-term treatment with either lisinopril or slow-release nifedipine on microvascular function and plasma endothelin in renal transplant recipients on cyclosporin A (CsA). Seventy-five hypertensive renal transplant recipients were double-blind randomized to receive slow-release nifedipine (NIF, n=40) or lisinopril (LIS, n=35). Ten normotensive, age-matched recipients served as controls. All patients received CsA-based immunosuppressive therapy including prednisolone and azathioprine. Microvascular function was assessed in the forearm skin vasculature, using laser Doppler flowmetry in combination with post-occlusive reactive hyperaemia and endothelial-dependent function during local acetylcholine (ACh) stimulation. The analysis of microvascular function (AUC(rh)) showed that nifedipine-treated patients had significantly lower responses compared with lisinopril-treated patients (20+/-17 and 43+/-20 AU x min respectively, P=0.0016). Endothelial function was borderline significantly lower in the NIF group compared with the LIS group (640+/-345 and 817+/-404 AU x min respectively, P=0.056). The responses in the LIS group were comparable with those in non-hypertensive controls (AUC(rh) was 37+/-16 and AUC(ACh) was 994+/-566 AU x min). Plasma endothelin-1 concentrations were significantly higher in the NIF group compared with the LIS group (0.44+/-0.19 vs. 0.34+/-0.10 fmol/ml respectively, P=0.048), and were 0.29+/-0.09 fmol/ml in the control patients. AUC(ACh) was associated with plasma endothelin-1 (P=0.0053), while AUC(rh) was not (P=0.080). The study indicates that long-term treatment with lisinopril, when compared with nifedipine, yields a more beneficial effect on microvascular function in hypertensive renal transplant recipients on CsA. The

  4. Sonochemical coating of magnetite nanoparticles with silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Feng; Enomoto, Naoya; Hojo, Junichi; Enpuku, Keiji

    2010-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles were coated with silica through the hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) under ultrasonic irradiation. The ultrasonic irradiation was used to prevent the agglomeration of the magnetite particles and accelerate the hydrolysis and condensation of TEOS. TEM, DLS, XRF, VSM, TG and sedimentation test were used to characterize the silica-coated magnetite particles. The dispersibility of silica-coated magnetite particles in aqueous solution was improved significantly and the agglomerate particle size was decreased to 110 nm. It was found that the agglomerate particle size of silica-coated magnetite particles was mainly decided by the coating temperature and the pH value in the silica-coating process. The weight ratio of silica in silica-coated magnetite particles was mainly decided by the pH value in the silica-coating process. The dispersibility of silica-coated magnetite particles was mainly decided by the agglomerate particle size of the suspension. The oxidation of magnetite particles in air was limited through the coated silica. The magnetism of silica-coated magnetite particles decreased slightly after silica-coating.

  5. Characterization of size and morphology of ZnO and Fe2O3 nanoparticles in dispersive media by SAXS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bing; Wang Meng; Zhu Motao; Zhao Yuliang; Wu Zhonghua

    2007-01-01

    The size and shape of ZnO and Fe 2 O 3 nano-particles in 1% sodium carboxy methyl cellulose were measured by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) of synchrotron radiation. Compared with the TEM results, the SAXS results indicated that the ZnO and Fe 2 O 3 nano-particles in 1% sodium carboxy methyl cellulose were agglomerated. However, the size and shape of the agglomerated particles were almost unchanged along with the increase of particle concentration, indicating that the particles in 1% sodium carboxy methyl cellulose were stable. (authors)

  6. CdSe nanoparticles grown via radiolytic methods in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Shalini [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Rath, M.C., E-mail: madhab@barc.gov.i [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Singh, A.K. [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Mukherjee, T. [Chemistry Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Jayakumar, O.D.; Tyagi, A.K. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Sarkar, S.K. [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2011-06-15

    Cadmium selenide, CdSe, nanoparticles have been synthesized in aqueous solution containing equimolar ammoniated CdSO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}SeSO{sub 3} as the starting materials without any capping agents, using gamma and electron beam irradiation under a reducing condition. The radiolytic processes occurring in water result in the formation of CdSe nanoparticles through the reactions mediated by hydrated electrons, e{sub aq}{sup -}. TEM measurements revealed that the CdSe nanoparticles were found to exist in agglomerates of dimension of about 100 nm, consisting of primary nanoparticles of dimensions within 5 nm. The as-grown nanoparticles were of cubic crystalline phase as supported by the XRD measurements. These bare CdSe nanoparticles exhibit room temperature ferromagnetic (RTFM) behavior. However, the RTFM behavior was found to be 30% higher in the case of CdSe nanoparticles prepared on electron beam irradiation as compared to those obtained by gamma irradiation, which was attributed to their relatively smaller size (2-3 nm) and disordered structures as compared to those obtained in the later case (3-5 nm). -- Research highlights: {yields} CdSe nanoparticles could be synthesized in aqueous solutions containing equimolar ammoniated CdSO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}SeSO{sub 3} as the starting materials using gamma and electron beam irradiation under a reducing condition. {yields} CdSe nanoparticles were found to exist in agglomerates of dimension of about 100 nm, consisting of primary nanoparticles of dimensions within 5 nm. {yields} CdSe nanoparticles exhibit room temperature ferromagnetic (RTFM) behavior. {yields} The RTFM behavior was found to be 30% higher in the case of CdSe nanoparticles prepared on electron beam irradiation as compared to those obtained by gamma irradiation.

  7. Comparison of nanoparticle measurement instruments for occupational health applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskinen, J.; Joutsensaari, J.; Lyyränen, J.; Koivisto, J.; Ruusunen, J.; Järvelä, M.; Tuomi, T.; Hämeri, K.; Auvinen, A.; Jokiniemi, J.

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles are used in many applications because of their novel properties compared to bulk material. A growing number of employees are working with nanomaterials and their exposure to nanoparticles trough inhalation must be evaluated and monitored continuously. However, there is an ongoing debate in the scientific literature about what are the relevant parameters to measure to evaluate exposure to level. In this study, three types of nanoparticles (ammonium sulphate, synthesised TiO 2 agglomerates and aerosolised TiO 2 powder, modes in a range of 30–140 nm mobility size) were measured with commonly used aerosol measurement instruments: scanning and fast mobility particle sizers (SMPS, FMPS), electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI), condensation particle counter (CPC) together with nanoparticle surface area monitor (NSAM) to achieve information about the interrelations of the outputs of the instruments. In addition, the ease of use of these instruments was evaluated. Differences between the results of different instruments can mainly be attributed to the nature of test particles. For spherical ammonium sulphate nanoparticles, the data from the instruments were in good agreement while larger differences were observed for particles with more complex morphology, the TiO 2 agglomerates and powder. For instance, the FMPS showed a smaller particle size, a higher number concentration and a narrower size distribution compared with the SMPS for TiO 2 particles. Thus, the type of the nanoparticle was observed to influence the data obtained from these different instruments. Therefore, care and expertise are essential when interpreting results from aerosol measurement instruments to estimate nanoparticle concentrations and properties.

  8. Effect of annealing on the structure of chemically synthesized SnO_2 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Kulwinder; Kumar, Akshay; Kumar, Virender; Vij, Ankush; Kumari, Sudesh; Thakur, Anup

    2016-01-01

    Tin oxide (SnO_2) nanoparticles have been synthesized by co-precipitation method. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. XRD analysis confirmed the single phase formation of SnO_2 nanoparticles. The Raman shifts showed the typical feature of the tetragonal phase of the as-synthesized SnO_2 nanoparticles. At low annealing temperature, a strong distortion of the crystalline structure and high degree of agglomeration was observed. It is concluded that the crystallinity of SnO_2 nanoparticles improves with the increase in annealing temperature.

  9. NOVEL BINDERS AND METHODS FOR AGGLOMERATION OF ORE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.K. Kawatra; T.C. Eisele; J.A. Gurtler; C.A. Hardison; K. Lewandowski

    2004-04-01

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily. Primary examples of this are copper heap leaching, where there are no binders that will work in the acidic environment encountered in this process, and advanced ironmaking processes, where binders must function satisfactorily over an extraordinarily large range of temperatures (from room temperature up to over 1200 C). As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching and advanced primary ironmaking.

  10. Particokinetics: computational analysis of the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles deposition process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cárdenas WH

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Walter HZ Cárdenas, Javier B Mamani, Tatiana T Sibov, Cristofer A Caous, Edson Amaro Jr, Lionel F GamarraInstituto do Cérebro, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, BrazilBackground: Nanoparticles in suspension are often utilized for intracellular labeling and evaluation of toxicity in experiments conducted in vitro. The purpose of this study was to undertake a computational modeling analysis of the deposition kinetics of a magnetite nanoparticle agglomerate in cell culture medium.Methods: Finite difference methods and the Crank-Nicolson algorithm were used to solve the equation of mass transport in order to analyze concentration profiles and dose deposition. Theoretical data were confirmed by experimental magnetic resonance imaging.Results: Different behavior in the dose fraction deposited was found for magnetic nanoparticles up to 50 nm in diameter when compared with magnetic nanoparticles of a larger diameter. Small changes in the dispersion factor cause variations of up to 22% in the dose deposited. The experimental data confirmed the theoretical results.Conclusion: These findings are important in planning for nanomaterial absorption, because they provide valuable information for efficient intracellular labeling and control toxicity. This model enables determination of the in vitro transport behavior of specific magnetic nanoparticles, which is also relevant to other models that use cellular components and particle absorption processes.Keywords: magnetite, nanoparticles, diffusion, sedimentation, agglomerates, computational modeling, cellular labeling, magnetic resonance imaging

  11. Spatial Linkage and Urban Expansion: AN Urban Agglomeration View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, L. M.; Tang, X.; Liu, X. P.

    2017-09-01

    Urban expansion displays different characteristics in each period. From the perspective of the urban agglomeration, studying the spatial and temporal characteristics of urban expansion plays an important role in understanding the complex relationship between urban expansion and network structure of urban agglomeration. We analyze urban expansion in the Yangtze River Delta Urban Agglomeration (YRD) through accessibility to and spatial interaction intensity from core cities as well as accessibility of road network. Results show that: (1) Correlation between urban expansion intensity and spatial indicators such as location and space syntax variables is remarkable and positive, while it decreases after rapid expansion. (2) Urban expansion velocity displays a positive correlation with spatial indicators mentioned above in the first (1980-1990) and second (1990-2000) period. However, it exhibits a negative relationship in the third period (2000-2010), i.e., cities located in the periphery of urban agglomeration developing more quickly. Consequently, the hypothesis of convergence of urban expansion in rapid expansion stage is put forward. (3) Results of Zipf's law and Gibrat's law show urban expansion in YRD displays a convergent trend in rapid expansion stage, small and medium-sized cities growing faster. This study shows that spatial linkage plays an important but evolving role in urban expansion within the urban agglomeration. In addition, it serves as a reference to the planning of Yangtze River Delta Urban Agglomeration and regulation of urban expansion of other urban agglomerations.

  12. Room Temperature Co-Precipitation Synthesis of Magnetite Nanoparticles in a Large pH Window with Different Bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascolo, Maria Cristina; Pei, Yongbing; Ring, Terry A

    2013-11-28

    Magnetite nanoparticles (Fe₃O₄) represent the most promising materials in medical applications. To favor high-drug or enzyme loading on the nanoparticles, they are incorporated into mesoporous materials to form a hybrid support with the consequent reduction of magnetization saturation. The direct synthesis of mesoporous structures appears to be of interest. To this end, magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized using a one pot co-precipitation reaction at room temperature in the presence of different bases, such as NaOH, KOH or (C₂H₅)₄NOH. Magnetite shows characteristics of superparamagnetism at room temperature and a saturation magnetization (Ms) value depending on both the crystal size and the degree of agglomeration of individual nanoparticles. Such agglomeration appears to be responsible for the formation of mesoporous structures, which are affected by the pH, the nature of alkali, the slow or fast addition of alkaline solution and the drying modality of synthesized powders.

  13. Preparation and antibacterial properties of hybrid-zirconia films with silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azócar, Ignacio; Vargas, Esteban; Duran, Nicole; Arrieta, Abel; González, Evelyn

    2012-01-01

    The antimicrobial effect of incorporating silver nanoparticles (AgNps) into zirconia matrix–polyether glycol was studied. AgNps of 4–6 nm in size were synthesized using the inverse micelles method, and different doses of metallic nanoparticles were incorporated into zirconia–polyether glycol mixtures during the ageing procedure. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) of the modified hybrid film showed a homogenous distribution of 20–80 nm diameter AgNps, indicating agglomeration of these structures during film modification; such agglomerations were greater when increasing the dosage of the colloidal system. The AgNps-hybrid films showed higher antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria than for Gram-negative bacteria. Hybrid films prepared with dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (AOT) stabilized AgNps presented enhanced antibacterial activity compared to that obtained through the addition of a high AgNO 3 concentration (0.3 wt%). -- Graphical abstract: Atomic Force Micrographs, top and cross section view, showing silver nanoparticles embedded in a zirconia–polyether glycol hybrid film. Highlights: ► Antibacterial activity of films (zirconia–polyether glycol) modified with silver nanoparticles. ► Biofilm formation is prevented. ► High sensibility against gram positive bacteria.

  14. Preparation and antibacterial properties of hybrid-zirconia films with silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azocar, Ignacio, E-mail: manuel.azocar@usach.cl [Departamento de Quimica de los Materiales, Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, USACH, Avenida Bernardo O' Higgins 3363, Casilla 40, Correo 33, Santiago (Chile); Vargas, Esteban [Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Metalurgia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, USACH (Chile); Duran, Nicole [Departamento de Quimica de los Materiales, Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, USACH, Avenida Bernardo O' Higgins 3363, Casilla 40, Correo 33, Santiago (Chile); Arrieta, Abel [Departamento de Biologia, Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, USACH (Chile); Gonzalez, Evelyn [Departamento de Quimica de los Materiales, Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, USACH, Avenida Bernardo O' Higgins 3363, Casilla 40, Correo 33, Santiago (Chile); Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Metalurgia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, USACH (Chile); Departamento de Biologia, Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, USACH (Chile); Departamento de Quimica Farmacologica y Toxicologica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad de Chile, Sergio Livingstone Polhammer 1007, Santiago (Chile); and others

    2012-11-15

    The antimicrobial effect of incorporating silver nanoparticles (AgNps) into zirconia matrix-polyether glycol was studied. AgNps of 4-6 nm in size were synthesized using the inverse micelles method, and different doses of metallic nanoparticles were incorporated into zirconia-polyether glycol mixtures during the ageing procedure. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) of the modified hybrid film showed a homogenous distribution of 20-80 nm diameter AgNps, indicating agglomeration of these structures during film modification; such agglomerations were greater when increasing the dosage of the colloidal system. The AgNps-hybrid films showed higher antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria than for Gram-negative bacteria. Hybrid films prepared with dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (AOT) stabilized AgNps presented enhanced antibacterial activity compared to that obtained through the addition of a high AgNO{sub 3} concentration (0.3 wt%). -- Graphical abstract: Atomic Force Micrographs, top and cross section view, showing silver nanoparticles embedded in a zirconia-polyether glycol hybrid film. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antibacterial activity of films (zirconia-polyether glycol) modified with silver nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biofilm formation is prevented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High sensibility against gram positive bacteria.

  15. Influence of primary-particle density in the morphology of agglomerates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camejo, M D; Espeso, D R; Bonilla, L L

    2014-07-01

    Agglomeration processes occur in many different realms of science, such as colloid and aerosol formation or formation of bacterial colonies. We study the influence of primary-particle density in agglomerate structures using diffusion-controlled Monte Carlo simulations with realistic space scales through different regimes (diffusion-limited aggregation and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation). The equivalence of Monte Carlo time steps to real time scales is given by Hirsch's hydrodynamical theory of Brownian motion. Agglomerate behavior at different time stages of the simulations suggests that three indices (the fractal exponent, the coordination number, and the eccentricity index) characterize agglomerate geometry. Using these indices, we have found that the initial density of primary particles greatly influences the final structure of the agglomerate, as observed in recent experimental works.

  16. Acid agglomeration heap leaching: present status, principle and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Yijun

    2004-01-01

    For extracting valuable metal from clay-bearing acidic ores of poor permeability, agglomerated acid heap leaching appears to be the most effective method, whereas conventional leaching and general heap leaching bring about unsatisfactory recovery and poor economic returns. The present state of research work on acid agglomeration worldwide and its basic principle are discussed. The first commercial application employing acid agglomeration-heap leaching in China is also introduced

  17. Characterization of the geometrical properties of agglomerated aerosol particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, A.P.

    1992-12-01

    A method for the absolute mass determination of agglomerated aerosol particles is presented. Based on this method it is possible to determine simultaneously and in situ mass, exposed surface and mobility diameter. From these measurements the fractal dimension of aerosol particles can be derived. For silver agglomerates produced by spark discharge it was found that they are bifractal. The fractal dimension was 3 in the free molecular regime and 1.9 in the transition regime. By variation of the gas mean free path it was shown that the region where the agglomerate structure changes from close-packed particle to low density agglomerates depends on the Knudsen number. In the free molecular regime the fractal dimension was not at all affected by any change of the generation conditions. Only sintering caused an increase in the density which was attributed to mass transport within the agglomerate. In the transition regime the fractal dimension remained constant with increasing monomer concentration and with increasing flow rate, but it increased with increasing pressure, increasing Ar:He ratio and with increasing sintering temperature. For sintering this effect was explained by the minimization of the surface free energy. It was found that the structure changing rate is proportional to the product of sintering temperature and residence time in the sintering oven. By carefully adjusting the temperature it is possible to produce agglomerates of a well defined structure. In desorption experiments of 136 I from silver and carbon agglomerates it could be shown that the desorption behavior is different. It was found that the desorption enthalpy of iodine from graphite and silver particles were -142 kJ/mol and -184 kJ/mol, respectively. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the 136 I attachment to particles is different for silver agglomerates with the same mobility, but different structures. (author) 41 figs., refs

  18. Use of coal-oil agglomerates for particulate gold recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvez, J.P.S.; Kim, M.J.; Wong, P.L.M.; Tran, T. [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia). School of Chemical Engineering and Industrial Chemistry

    1998-09-01

    The underlying principles by which gold is recovered by coal-oil agglomerates was investigated. The effects of various parameters such as oil:coal ratios, agglomerate:ore ratios, pH and coal particle size on gold recovery were evaluated using synthetic gold bearing samples, bituminous coal, and diesel oil and kerosene. The effects of sulfides on gold recovery and the depth of gold particle penetration within the agglomerates were also investigated. Results showed that gold recovery was increased by increasing agglomerate:ore ratio, decreasing oil:coal ratio and decreasing coal particle size. There was no significant difference in gold recoveries at pH range of 4-12 and at up to 5% sulfides in the feed.

  19. The Physics of Protoplanetesimal Dust Agglomerates. VIII. Microgravity Collisions between Porous SiO2 Aggregates and Loosely Bound Agglomerates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whizin, Akbar D.; Colwell, Joshua E.; Blum, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    We performed laboratory experiments colliding 0.8–1.0 mm and 1.0–1.6 mm SiO 2 dust aggregates with loosely bound centimeter-sized agglomerates of those aggregates in microgravity. This work builds on previous microgravity laboratory experiments examining the collisional properties of porous loosely bound dust aggregates. In centimeter-sized aggregates, surface forces dominate self-gravity and may play a large role in aggregate growth beyond this size range. We characterize the properties of protoplanetary aggregate analogs to help place constraints on initial formation mechanisms and environments. We determined several important physical characteristics of these aggregates in a large number of low-velocity collisions. We observed low coefficients of restitution and fragmentation thresholds near 1 m s −1 for 1–2 cm agglomerates, which are in good agreement with previous findings in the literature. We find the accretion efficiency for agglomerates of loosely bound aggregates to be higher than that for just aggregates themselves. We find sticking thresholds of 6.6 ± 2 cm s −1 , somewhat higher than those in similar studies, which have observed few aggregates stick at speeds of under 3 cm s −1 . Even with highly dissipative collisions, loosely bound agglomerates have difficulty accreting beyond centimeter-sized bodies at typical collision speeds in the disk. Our results indicate agglomerates of porous aggregates have slightly higher sticking thresholds than previously thought, allowing possible growth to decimeter-sized bodies if velocities are low enough.

  20. Colloidal-chemistry based synthesis of quantized CuInS2/Se2 nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abazović Nadica D.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ternary chalcogenide nanoparticles, CuInS2 and CuInSe2, were synthesized in high- temperature boiling organic non-polar solvent. The X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that both materials have tetragonal (chalcopyrite crystal structure. Morphology of the obtained materials was revealed by using transmission electron microscopy. Agglomerated spherical CuInS2 nanoparticles with broad size distribution in the range from 2 to 20 nm were obtained. In the case of CuInSe2, isolated particles with spherical or prismatic shape in the size range from 10 to 25 nm were obtained, as well as agglomerates consisting of much smaller particles with diameter of about 2-5 nm. The particles with the smallest diameters of both materials exhibit quantum size effect.

  1. Safety of the Up-titration of Nifedipine GITS and Valsartan or Low-dose Combination in Uncontrolled Hypertension: the FOCUS Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Bae; Shin, Joon-Han; Kim, Dong-Soo; Youn, Ho-Joong; Park, Seung Woo; Shim, Wan Joo; Park, Chang Gyu; Kim, Dong-Woon; Lee, Hae-Young; Choi, Dong-Ju; Rim, Se-Joong; Lee, Sung-Yun; Kim, Ju-Han

    2016-04-01

    Doubling the dose of antihypertensive drugs is necessary to manage hypertension in patients whose disease is uncontrolled. However, this strategy can result in safety issues. This study compared the safety and efficacy of up-titration of the nifedipine gastrointestinal therapeutic system (GITS) with up-titration of valsartan monotherapy; these were also compared with low-dose combinations of the two therapies. This prospective, open-label, randomized, active-controlled, multicenter study lasted 8 weeks. If patients did not meet the target blood pressure (BP) after 4 weeks of treatment with low-dose monotherapy, they were randomized to up-titration of the nifedipine GITS dose from 30 mg (N30) to 60 mg or valsartan from 80 mg to 160 mg or they were randomized to receive a low-dose combination of N30 and valsartan 80 mg for another 4 weeks. BP variability was assessed by using the SD or the %CV of the short-term BP measured at clinic. Of the 391 patients (20~70 years with stage II or higher hypertension) screened for study inclusion, 362 patients who had 3 BP measurements were enrolled. The reduction in the mean systolic/diastolic BP from baseline to week 4 was similar in both low-dose monotherapy groups with either N30 or valsartan 80 mg. BP variability (SD) was unchanged with either therapy, but the %CV was slightly increased in the N30 group. There was no significant difference in BP variability either in SD or %CV between responders and nonresponders to each monotherapy despite the significant difference in the mean BP changes. The up-titration effect of nifedipine GTS from 30 to 60 mg exhibited an additional BP reduction, but this effect was not shown in the up-titration of valsartan from 80 to 160 mg. Although the difference in BP was obvious between high-dose nifedipine GTS and valsartan, the BP variability was unchanged between the 2 drugs and was similar to the low-dose combinations. There was a low rate of adverse events in all treatment groups. In addition

  2. WP/084 Measuring Industry Agglomeration and Identifying the Driving Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howard, Emma; Tarp, Finn; Newman, Carol

    Understanding industry agglomeration and its driving forces is critical for the formulation of industrial policy in developing countries. Crucial to this process is the definition and measurement of agglomeration. We propose a new measure and examine what it reveals about the importance of transp......Understanding industry agglomeration and its driving forces is critical for the formulation of industrial policy in developing countries. Crucial to this process is the definition and measurement of agglomeration. We propose a new measure and examine what it reveals about the importance...... of transport costs, labour market pooling, and technology transfer for agglomeration processes. We contrast this analysis with insights from existing measures in the literature and find very different underlying stories at work. An exceptionally rich set of data from Vietnam makes us confident that our measure...

  3. Characterization of nanoparticles using Atomic Force Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, A; Schoenenberger, M; Gnecco, E; Glatzel, Th; Meyer, E; Braendlin, D; Scandella, L

    2007-01-01

    Nanoparticles are becoming increasingly important in many areas, including catalysis, biomedical applications, and information storage. Their unique size-dependent properties make these materials superior. Using the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), individual particles and groups of particles can be resolved and unlike other microscopy techniques, the AFM offers visualization and analysis in three dimensions. We prepared titanium oxide, zirconium oxide and alumina nanoparticles and/or agglomerates on different surfaces and characterized them by AFM in the dynamic mode. The goal was to determine the shape, size and/or size distribution of nanoparticles. Different dilutions of nanoparticles were applied on various substrates e.g. clean silicon, mica and chemically treated silicon and imaged at ambient conditions. Nanoparticles deposited on mica appeared to be coagulated as compared to those on silicon. Whereas, on a chemically treated surface the density of the nanoparticles was very low because of the increased hydrophobicity of the surface

  4. A Critical Study of Agglomerated Multigrid Methods for Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Agglomerated multigrid techniques used in unstructured-grid methods are studied critically for a model problem representative of laminar diffusion in the incompressible limit. The studied target-grid discretizations and discretizations used on agglomerated grids are typical of current node-centered formulations. Agglomerated multigrid convergence rates are presented using a range of two- and three-dimensional randomly perturbed unstructured grids for simple geometries with isotropic and stretched grids. Two agglomeration techniques are used within an overall topology-preserving agglomeration framework. The results show that multigrid with an inconsistent coarse-grid scheme using only the edge terms (also referred to in the literature as a thin-layer formulation) provides considerable speedup over single-grid methods but its convergence deteriorates on finer grids. Multigrid with a Galerkin coarse-grid discretization using piecewise-constant prolongation and a heuristic correction factor is slower and also grid-dependent. In contrast, grid-independent convergence rates are demonstrated for multigrid with consistent coarse-grid discretizations. Convergence rates of multigrid cycles are verified with quantitative analysis methods in which parts of the two-grid cycle are replaced by their idealized counterparts.

  5. Room Temperature Co-Precipitation Synthesis of Magnetite Nanoparticles in a Large pH Window with Different Bases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Mascolo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4 represent the most promising materials in medical applications. To favor high-drug or enzyme loading on the nanoparticles, they are incorporated into mesoporous materials to form a hybrid support with the consequent reduction of magnetization saturation. The direct synthesis of mesoporous structures appears to be of interest. To this end, magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized using a one pot co-precipitation reaction at room temperature in the presence of different bases, such as NaOH, KOH or (C2H54NOH. Magnetite shows characteristics of superparamagnetism at room temperature and a saturation magnetization (Ms value depending on both the crystal size and the degree of agglomeration of individual nanoparticles. Such agglomeration appears to be responsible for the formation of mesoporous structures, which are affected by the pH, the nature of alkali, the slow or fast addition of alkaline solution and the drying modality of synthesized powders.

  6. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; K. A. Lewandowski; J. A. Gurtler

    2006-12-31

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily. Primary examples of this are copper heap leaching, where there are no binders that will work in the acidic environment encountered in this process, and advanced ironmaking processes, where binders must function satisfactorily over an extraordinarily large range of temperatures (from room temperature up to over 1200 C). As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching and advanced primary ironmaking. This project has identified several acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures that can be used for improving the energy efficiency of heap leaching, by preventing the ''ponding'' and ''channeling'' effects that currently cause reduced recovery and extended leaching cycle times. Methods have also been developed for iron ore

  7. Synthesis and characterization of dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predescu, Andra Mihaela; Matei, Ecaterina; Berbecaru, Andrei Constantin; Pantilimon, Cristian; Drăgan, Claudia; Vidu, Ruxandra; Predescu, Cristian; Kuncser, Victor

    2018-03-01

    Synthesis and characterization of iron oxide nanoparticles coated with a large molar weight dextran for environmental applications are reported. The first experiments involved the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles which were coated with dextran at different concentrations. The synthesis was performed by a co-precipitation technique, while the coating of iron oxide nanoparticles was carried out in solution. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry. The results demonstrated a successful coating of iron oxide nanoparticles with large molar weight dextran, of which agglomeration tendency depended on the amount of dextran in the coating solution. SEM and TEM observations have shown that the iron oxide nanoparticles are of about 7 nm in size.

  8. Bed agglomeration characteristics of palm shell and corncob combustion in fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaivatamaset, Pawin; Sricharoon, Panchan; Tia, Suvit

    2011-01-01

    Bed particle agglomeration was studied experimentally in an atmospheric laboratory scale fluidized bed combustor using quartz sand as bed material. Palm shell and corncob were tested. The objectives of the study were (i) to describe the contributions of the biomass ash properties and the operating conditions on the bed agglomeration tendency in term of the bed defluidization time (t def ) and the extent of potassium accumulation in the bed (K/Bed) and (ii) to further elucidate the ash inorganic behaviors and the governing bed agglomeration mechanisms. Defluidization caused by the bed agglomeration was experienced in all experiments during combustion of these biomasses, as a consequence of the presence of potassium in biomass. The experimental results indicated that biomass ash characteristics were the significant influence on the bed agglomeration. The increasing bed temperature, bed particle size and static bed height and the decreasing fluidizing air velocity enhanced the bed agglomeration tendency. The SEM/EDS analyses on the agglomerates confirmed that the agglomeration was attributed to the formation of potassium silicate liquid enriched on the surface of quartz sand particles in conjunction with the high surface temperature of the burning biomass char particles. Thermodynamic examination based on the phase diagram analysis confirmed that the molten phase formation was responsible for the agglomeration. In this study, the high molten ash fraction resulting from the high potassium content in biomass promoted the agglomeration and thus defluidization. - Highlights: → Palm shell and corncob of Thailand are tested their bed agglomeration behaviors during fluidized bed combustion. → The increase of bed temperature, bed particle size and static bed height and the decrease of air velocity enhance bed agglomeration. → The formation of ash derived potassium silicate melts enriched on sand surface is the key process. → The collision between char and sand

  9. Direct observation of two-step crystallization in nanoparticle superlattice formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jungwon; Zheng, Haimei; Lee, Won Chul; Geissler, Phillip L.; Rabani, Eran; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2011-10-06

    Direct imaging of nanoparticle solutions by liquid phase transmission electron microscopy has enabled unique in-situ studies of nanoparticle motion and growth. In the present work, we report on real-time formation of two-dimensional nanoparticle arrays in the very low diffusive limit, where nanoparticles are mainly driven by capillary forces and solvent fluctuations. We find that superlattice formation appears to be segregated into multiple regimes. Initially, the solvent front drags the nanoparticles, condensing them into an amorphous agglomerate. Subsequently, the nanoparticle crystallization into an array is driven by local fluctuations. Following the crystallization event, superlattice growth can also occur via the addition of individual nanoparticles drawn from outlying regions by different solvent fronts. The dragging mechanism is consistent with simulations based on a coarse-grained lattice gas model at the same limit.

  10. Biomimetic synthesis of hybrid hydroxyapatite nanoparticles using nanogel template for controlled release of bovine serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jinli; Zhong, Zhenyu; Ma, Jun

    2016-05-01

    A biomimetic method was used to prepare hybrid hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanoparticles with chitosan/polyacrylic acid (CS-PAA) nanogel. The morphology, structure, crystallinity, thermal properties and biocompatibility of the obtained hybrid nanogel-HAP nanoparticles have been characterized. In addition, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as a model protein to study the loading and release behaviors of the hybrid nanogel-HAP nanoparticles. The results indicated that the obtained HAP nanoparticles were agglomerated and the nanogel could regulate the formation of HAP. When the nanogel concentration decreased, different HAP crystal shapes and agglomerate structures were obtained. The loading amount of BSA reached 67.6 mg/g for the hybrid nanoparticles when the mineral content was 90.4%, which decreased when the nanogel concentration increased. The release profile of BSA was sustained in neutral buffer. Meanwhile, an initial burst release was found at pH 4.5 due to the desorption of BSA from the surface, followed by a slow release. The hemolysis percentage of the hybrid nanoparticles was close to the negative control, and these particles were non-toxic to bone marrow stromal stem cells. The results suggest that these hybrid nanogel-HAP nanoparticles are promising candidate materials for biocompatible drug delivery systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. From silver nanoparticles to nanostructures through matrix chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayyad, Omar; Munoz-Rojas, David; Oro-Sole, Judith; Gomez-Romero, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    Direct in situ reduction of silver ions by a biopolymer such as agar, without any other reducing nor capping agent is shown in this article to lead either to nanoparticles (typically 12(2) nm in an optimized case) or to more complex nanostructures depending on the reaction conditions used. This approach takes advantage of the porous polymer lattice acting as a template and leads to hybrid Ag-Agar materials with long-term synergic stability. Silver acts as an antibacterial agent for agar whereas the biopolymer prevents agglomeration of the inorganic nanoparticles leading to a stable nanocomposite formed by a thermoreversible biopolymer from which silver nanoparticles can eventually be recovered.

  12. Coal beneficiation by gas agglomeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelock, Thomas D.; Meiyu, Shen

    2003-10-14

    Coal beneficiation is achieved by suspending coal fines in a colloidal suspension of microscopic gas bubbles in water under atmospheric conditions to form small agglomerates of the fines adhered by the gas bubbles. The agglomerates are separated, recovered and resuspended in water. Thereafter, the pressure on the suspension is increased above atmospheric to deagglomerate, since the gas bubbles are then re-dissolved in the water. During the deagglomeration step, the mineral matter is dispersed, and when the pressure is released, the coal portion of the deagglomerated gas-saturated water mixture reagglomerates, with the small bubbles now coming out of the solution. The reagglomerate can then be separated to provide purified coal fines without the mineral matter.

  13. Free gold recovery by coal-oil agglomeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotze, W.; Petersen, F.W. [Cape Technikon Cape Town (South Africa). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2000-02-01

    The gold mining industry has mainly relied upon the use of highly polluting chemicals, such as mercury and cyanide to recover gold from its ores. The Coal Gold Agglomeration (CGA) process was developed some years ago and has the advantage in that gold is recovered by a procedure which has little or no negative impact on the environment. A gold ore containing liberated gold particles is contacted with coal-oil agglomerates, whereby the gold is recovered into the coal/oil phase. Laboratory scale batch tests were performed on an artificial mixture gold slurry and gold recoveries of up to 85% were found under optimized conditions. By recycling the coal/oil phase, it was found that the gold loading onto the agglomerates was increased. Tests performed on an industrial ore yielded slightly lower gold recoveries, and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis on the coal/oil phase showed that minerals other than gold were recovered into this phase. A comparative study was conducted whereby the CGA process was compared to mercury amalgamation. Gold recoveries obtained through amalgamation were 15% lower than by the agglomeration process, which indicates that this process can be considered favourably as an alternative to amalgamation. 16 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Thermophysical Properties of Nanoparticle-Enhanced Ionic Liquids (NEILs) Heat-Transfer Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Elise B.; Visser, Ann E.; Bridges, Nicholas J.; Amoroso, Jake W.

    2013-06-20

    An experimental investigation was completed on nanoparticle enhanced ionic liquid heat transfer fluids as an alternative to conventional organic based heat transfer fluids (HTFs). These nanoparticle-based HTFs have the potential to deliver higher thermal conductivity than the base fluid without a significant increase in viscosity at elevated temperatures. The effect of nanoparticle morphology and chemistry on thermophysical properties was examined. Whisker shaped nanomaterials were found to have the largest thermal conductivity temperature dependence and were also less likely to agglomerate in the base fluid than spherical shaped nanomaterials.

  15. Pure Insulin Nanoparticle Agglomerates for Pulmonary Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Mark M.; Gorman, Eric M.; Munson, Eric J.; Berkland, Cory J.

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes is a set of diseases characterized by defects in insulin utilization, either through autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing cells (Type I) or insulin resistance (Type II). Treatment options can include regular injections of insulin, which can be painful and inconvenient, often leading to low patient compliance. To overcome this problem, novel formulations of insulin are being investigated, such as inhaled aerosols. Sufficient deposition of powder in the peripheral lung to maximize systemic absorption requires precise control over particle size and density, with particles between 1 and 5 μm in aerodynamic diameter being within the respirable range. Insulin nanoparticles were produced by titrating insulin dissolved at low pH up to the pI of the native protein, and were then further processed into microparticles using solvent displacement. Particle size, crystallinity, dissolution properties, structural stability, and bulk powder density were characterized. We have demonstrated that pure drug insulin microparticles can be produced from nanosuspensions with minimal processing steps without excipients, and with suitable properties for deposition in the peripheral lung. PMID:18959432

  16. Visualization of acoustic particle interaction and agglomeration: Theory evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, T.L.; Koopmann, G.H.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper experimentally observed trajectories of particles undergoing acoustically induced interaction and agglomeration processes are compared to and validated with numerically generated trajectories based on existing agglomeration theories. Models for orthokinetic, scattering, mutual radiation pressure, and hydrodynamic particle interaction are considered in the analysis. The characteristic features of the classical orthokinetic agglomeration hypothesis, such as collision processes and agglomerations due to the relative entrainment motion, are not observed in the digital images. The measured entrainment rates of the particles are found to be consistently lower than the theoretically predicted values. Some of the experiments reveal certain characteristics which may possibly be related to mutual scattering interaction. The study's most significant discovery is the so-called tuning fork agglomeration [T. L. Hoffmann and G. H. Koopmann, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 99, 2130 endash 2141 (1996)]. It is shown that this phenomenon contradicts the theories for mutual scattering interaction and mutual radiation pressure interaction, but agrees with the acoustic wake effect model in its intrinsic feature of attraction between particles aligned along the acoustic axis. A model by Dianov et al. [Sov. Phys. Acoust. 13 (3), 314 endash 319 (1968)] is used to describe this effect based on asymmetric flow fields around particles under Oseen flow conditions. It is concluded that this model is consistent with the general characteristics of the tuning fork agglomerations, but lacks certain refinements with respect to accurate quantification of the effect. copyright 1997 Acoustical Society of America

  17. Advanced physical fine coal cleaning spherical agglomeration. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    The project included process development, engineering, construction, and operation of a 1/3 tph proof-of-concept (POC) spherical agglomeration test module. The POC tests demonstrated that physical cleaning of ultrafine coal by agglomeration using heptane can achieve: (1) Pyritic sulfur reductions beyond that possible with conventional coal cleaning methods; (2) coal ash contents below those which can be obtained by conventional coal cleaning methods at comparable energy recoveries; (3) energy recoveries of 80 percent or greater measured against the raw coal energy content; (4) complete recovery of the heptane bridging liquid from the agglomerates; and (5) production of agglomerates with 3/8-inch size and less than 30 percent moisture. Test results met or exceeded all of the program objectives. Nominal 3/8-inch size agglomerates with less than 20 percent moisture were produced. The clean coal ash content varied between 1.5 to 5.5 percent by weight (dry basis) depending on feed coal type. Ash reductions of the run-of-mine (ROM) coal were 77 to 83 percent. ROM pyritic sulfur reductions varied from 86 to 90 percent for the three test coals, equating to total sulfur reductions of 47 to 72 percent.

  18. Fluid Bed Coating and agglomeration: Scale-up and process optimisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, Peter Dybdahl

    2009-01-01

    gradvist dannes et coatingslag på hver partikeloverflade. De fluidiserede partikler kan vokse i størrelse enten pga. overfladecoating eller pga. partikel-partikel agglomerering. Agglomerering opstår, når våde væskebroer dannes mellem kolliderende partikler. Hvis denne væskebro er stærk nok til at modstå...... efterfølgende partikelseparation, vil væskebroen størkne og et permanent agglomerat hermed være dannet. I coatingsprocesser er agglomerering typisk uønsket, og en række andre problemer i processen inkluderer spraytørringstab af de forstøvede væskedråber, slitage og brud af partikler og af coatingslaget......; agglomererings-tendens under coating og slagstyrke af de færdige granulater. Den udledte agglomererings-model indikerer faldende agglomereringstendens med stigende tørstofindhold af coatings-opløsningen såvel som med stigende dysetryk af atomiseringsluften. Tilsvarende indikerer slagstyrkemodellen stigende...

  19. The characteristics of bed agglomeration during fluidized bed combustion of eucalyptus bark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaivatamaset, Pawin; Tia, Suvit

    2015-01-01

    The bed agglomeration behaviors were investigated experimentally when eucalyptus bark was burning tested in a laboratory scale fluidized bed reactor. The focuses of this work were the influences of operating conditions and bed materials on the bed agglomeration tendency and the elucidation in the behaviors of fuel inorganic elements and the governing mode of the agglomeration. It was found that the defluidization caused by the bed agglomeration was clearly detectable from the decrease in measured bed pressure. The growth of bed particle and accumulation of agglomerates during combustion provided the partial to complete defluidization. The defluidization was promoted by the increase of bed temperature and bed particle size, and the decrease of fluidizing air velocity. The SEM-EDS analyses revealed that the bed agglomeration was mainly attributed to the formation of potassium silicate compounds as liquid phase during the combustion. This was initiated by the chemical reaction between the bed particle and the released ash constituents. In this study, the inorganic migration from fuel particle to bed particle was likely dominated by the condensation/reaction. The thermodynamic examination by ternary phase diagram analysis corroborated that the liquid phase formation of the ash derived materials controlled the agglomeration. The alumina sand prevented the bed agglomeration since it was inactive in the formation of viscous molten substances during combustion at the observed temperatures. - Highlights: • The behaviors of bed agglomeration were studied during the fluidized bed combustion of eucalyptus bark. • The increase in bed temperature and sand size, and the decrease of air velocity promoted bed defluidization. • The formation of molten potassium silicate compounds conduced to the bed agglomeration. • Condensation/reaction was the dominant inorganic migration mechanism from fuel particle to bed particle. • The alumina sand prevented effectively the bed

  20. Electrospray methodologies for characterization and deposition of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modesto Lopez, Luis Balam

    Electrospray is an aerosolization method that generates highly charged droplets from solutions or suspensions and, after a series of solvent evaporation -- droplet fission cycles, it results in particles carrying multiple charges. Highly charged particles are used in a variety of applications, including particle characterization, thin film deposition, nanopatterning, and inhalation studies among several others. In this work, a soft X-ray photoionization was coupled with an electrospray to obtain monodisperse, singly charged nanoparticles for applications in online size characterization with electrical mobility analysis. Photoionization with the soft X-ray charger enhanced the diffusion neutralization rate of the highly charged bacteriophages, proteins, and solid particles. The effect of nanoparticle surface charge and nanoparticle agglomeration in liquids on the electrospray process was studied experimentally and a modified expression to calculate the effective electrical conductivity of nanosuspensions was proposed. The effective electrical conductivity of TiO2 nanoparticle suspensions is strongly dependent on the electrical double layer and the agglomeration dynamics of the particles; and such dependence is more remarkable in liquids with low ionic strength. TiO2 nanoparticle agglomerates with nearly monodisperse sizes in the nanometer and submicrometer ranges were generated, by electrospraying suspensions with tuned effective electrical conductivity, and used to deposit photocatalytic films for water-splitting. Nanostructured films of iron oxide with uniform distribution of particles over the entire deposition area were formed with an electrospray system. The micro-Raman spectra of the iron oxide films showed that transverse and longitudinal optical modes are highly sensitive to the crystallize size of the electrospray-deposited films. The fabrication of films of natural light-harvesting complexes, with the aim of designing biohybrid photovoltaic devices, was

  1. Proceedings, volume 20, The Institute for Briquetting and Agglomeration, September 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, D.L. (ed.)

    1988-01-01

    32 papers are presented covering aspects of briquetting, pelletizing and agglomeration of various materials, including coal, plastics, flue gas gypsum and fertilizers. Papers on coal included the start-up of the Petrofina coal briquetting plant (UK), coal and refuse agglomeration by extrusion, coal dust reduction, agglomeration of Brazilian coal fines, use of coal and briquetting in ancient Chinese metallurgy, cooking briquettes from lignites in developing nations, use of coal-dolomite pellets to eliminate sulphur emissions, extruded coal capsule flow characteristics, and oil agglomeration as a catalyst loading method in coal liquefaction.

  2. Agglomeration Control during Ultrasonic Crystallization of an Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjorn Gielen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Application of ultrasound during crystallization can efficiently inhibit agglomeration. However, the mechanism is unclear and sonication is usually enabled throughout the entire process, which increases the energy demand. Additionally, improper operation results in significant crystal damage. Therefore, the present work addresses these issues by identifying the stage in which sonication impacts agglomeration without eroding the crystals. This study was performed using a commercially available API that showed a high tendency to agglomerate during seeded crystallization. The crystallization progress was monitored using process analytical tools (PAT, including focus beam reflectance measurements (FBRM to track to crystal size and number and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR to quantify the supersaturation level. These tools provided insight in the mechanism by which ultrasound inhibits agglomeration. A combination of improved micromixing, fast crystal formation which accelerates depletion of the supersaturation and a higher collision frequency prevent crystal cementation to occur. The use of ultrasound as a post-treatment can break some of the agglomerates, but resulted in fractured crystals. Alternatively, sonication during the initial seeding stage could assist in generating nuclei and prevent agglomeration, provided that ultrasound was enabled until complete desupersaturation at the seeding temperature. FTIR and FBRM can be used to determine this end point.

  3. Oesophageal food impaction in achalasia treated with Coca-Cola and nifedipine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumi, Andriani; Panos, Marios Zenon

    2010-01-01

    Achalasia is characterised by the loss of peristaltic movement in the distal oesophagus and failure of the lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation, which results in impaired oesophageal emptying. We report a case of a 92-year-old frail woman with a history of achalasia, who presented with acute oesophageal obstruction due to impaction of a large amount of food material. She was treated successfully with nifedipine, in combination with Coca-Cola (original product, not sugar free), so avoiding the risks associated with repeated endoscopic intubation and piecemeal removal of the oesophageal content.

  4. Empirical correlations to estimate agglomerate size and deposition during injection of a polyelectrolyte-modified Fe0 nanoparticle at high particle concentration in saturated sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phenrat, Tanapon; Kim, Hye-Jin; Fagerlund, Fritjof; Illangasekare, Tissa; Lowry, Gregory V

    2010-11-25

    Controlled emplacement of polyelectrolyte-modified nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) particles at high particle concentration (1-10 g/L) is needed for effective in situ subsurface remediation using NZVI. Deep bed filtration theory cannot be used to estimate the transport and deposition of concentrated polyelectrolyte-modified NZVI dispersions (>0.03 g/L) because particles agglomerate during transport which violates a fundamental assumption of the theory. Here we develop two empirical correlations for estimating the deposition and transport of concentrated polyelectrolyte-modified NZVI dispersions in saturated porous media when NZVI agglomeration in porous media is assumed to reach steady state quickly. The first correlation determines the apparent stable agglomerate size formed during NZVI transport in porous media for a fixed hydrogeochemical condition. The second correlation estimates the attachment efficiency (sticking coefficient) of the stable agglomerates. Both correlations are described using dimensionless numbers derived from parameters affecting deposition and agglomeration in porous media. The exponents for the dimensionless numbers are determined from statistical analysis of breakthrough data for polyelectrolyte-modified NZVI dispersions collected in laboratory scale column experiments for a range of ionic strength (1, 10, and 50mM Na(+) and 0.25, 1, and 1.25 mM Ca(2+)), approach velocity (0.8 to 55 × 10(-4)m/s), average collector sizes (d(50)=99 μm, 300 μm, and 880 μm), and polyelectrolyte surface modifier properties. Attachment efficiency depended on approach velocity and was inversely related to collector size, which is contrary to that predicted from classic filtration models. High ionic strength, the presence of divalent cations, lower extended adsorbed polyelectrolyte layer thickness, decreased approach velocity, and a larger collector size promoted NZVI agglomeration and deposition and thus limited its mobility in porous media. These effects

  5. Microstickies agglomeration by electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiaotang Tony; Hsieh, Jeffery S

    2016-01-01

    Microstickies deposits on both paper machine and paper products when it agglomerates under step change in ionic strength, pH, temperature and chemical additives. These stickies increase the down time of the paper mill and decrease the quality of paper. The key property of microstickies is its smaller size, which leads to low removal efficiency and difficulties in measurement. Thus the increase of microstickies size help improve both removal efficiency and reduce measurement difficulty. In this paper, a new agglomeration technology based on electric field was investigated. The electric treatment could also increase the size of stickies particles by around 100 times. The synergetic effect between electric field treatment and detacky chemicals/dispersants, including polyvinyl alcohol, poly(diallylmethylammonium chloride) and lignosulfonate, was also studied.

  6. Agglomerate behaviour of fluticasone propionate within dry powder inhaler formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, V N P; Robins, E; Flament, M P

    2012-04-01

    Due to their small size, the respirable drug particles tend to form agglomerates which prevent flowing and aerosolisation. A carrier is used to be mixed with drug in one hand to facilitate the powder flow during manufacturing, in other hand to help the fluidisation upon patient inhalation. Depending on drug concentration, drug agglomerates can be formed in the mixture. The aim of this work was to study the agglomeration behaviour of fluticasone propionate (FP) within interactive mixtures for inhalation. The agglomerate phenomenon of fluticasone propionate after mixing with different fractions of lactose without fine particles of lactose (smaller than 32 μm) was demonstrated by the optical microscopy observation. A technique measuring the FP size in the mixture was developed, based on laser diffraction method. The FP agglomerate sizes were found to be in a linear correlation with the pore size of the carrier powder bed (R(2)=0.9382). The latter depends on the particle size distribution of carrier. This founding can explain the role of carrier size in de-agglomeration of drug particles in the mixture. Furthermore, it gives more structural information of interactive mixture for inhalation that can be used in the investigation of aerosolisation mechanism of powder. According to the manufacturing history, different batches of FP show different agglomeration intensities which can be detected by Spraytec, a new laser diffraction method for measuring aerodynamic size. After mixing with a carrier, Lactohale LH200, the most cohesive batch of FP, generates a lower fine particle fraction. It can be explained by the fact that agglomerates of fluticasone propionate with very large size was detected in the mixtures. By using silica-gel beads as ball-milling agent during the mixing process, the FP agglomerate size decreases accordingly to the quantity of mixing aid. The homogeneity and the aerodynamic performance of the mixtures are improved. The mixing aid based on ball

  7. Fabrication of Polybenzimidazole/Palladium Nanoparticles Hollow Fiber Membranes for Hydrogen Purification

    KAUST Repository

    Villalobos, Luis Francisco; Hilke, Roland; Akhtar, Faheem Hassan; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2017-01-01

    in the form of ions that coordinate to the imidazole groups of the polymer. This is attractive for membrane production because agglomeration of nanoparticles is minimized and the high-cost metal is incorporated in only the selective layer—where it is required

  8. The Physics of Protoplanetesimal Dust Agglomerates. VIII. Microgravity Collisions between Porous SiO{sub 2} Aggregates and Loosely Bound Agglomerates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whizin, Akbar D.; Colwell, Joshua E. [Dept. of Physics, Center for Microgravity Research, University of Central Florida, 4111 Libra Drive, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Blum, Jürgen, E-mail: Akbar.Whizin@ucf.edu [Institut für Geophysik und extraterrestrische Physik, University of Braunschweig, Mendelssohnstr. 3, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2017-02-10

    We performed laboratory experiments colliding 0.8–1.0 mm and 1.0–1.6 mm SiO{sub 2} dust aggregates with loosely bound centimeter-sized agglomerates of those aggregates in microgravity. This work builds on previous microgravity laboratory experiments examining the collisional properties of porous loosely bound dust aggregates. In centimeter-sized aggregates, surface forces dominate self-gravity and may play a large role in aggregate growth beyond this size range. We characterize the properties of protoplanetary aggregate analogs to help place constraints on initial formation mechanisms and environments. We determined several important physical characteristics of these aggregates in a large number of low-velocity collisions. We observed low coefficients of restitution and fragmentation thresholds near 1 m s{sup −1} for 1–2 cm agglomerates, which are in good agreement with previous findings in the literature. We find the accretion efficiency for agglomerates of loosely bound aggregates to be higher than that for just aggregates themselves. We find sticking thresholds of 6.6 ± 2 cm s{sup −1}, somewhat higher than those in similar studies, which have observed few aggregates stick at speeds of under 3 cm s{sup −1}. Even with highly dissipative collisions, loosely bound agglomerates have difficulty accreting beyond centimeter-sized bodies at typical collision speeds in the disk. Our results indicate agglomerates of porous aggregates have slightly higher sticking thresholds than previously thought, allowing possible growth to decimeter-sized bodies if velocities are low enough.

  9. Numerical study of agglomerate abrasion in a tumbling mixer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thanh Nguyen, [No Value; Willemsz, Tofan; Frijlink, Henderik; Maarschalk, Kees van der Voort

    2014-01-01

    A numerical simulation using the Discrete Element Method (DEM) was performed to investigate the phenomena concerning the abrasion and breakage of agglomerates in a diffusion powder mixer. Agglomerates were created by defining a single structure of particles with bonds of different strengths using

  10. Workplace exposure to nanoparticles from gas metal arc welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Meibian; Jian, Le; Bin, Pingfan; Xing, Mingluan; Lou, Jianlin; Cong, Liming; Zou, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Workplace exposure to nanoparticles from gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process in an automobile manufacturing factory was investigated using a combination of multiple metrics and a comparison with background particles. The number concentration (NC), lung-deposited surface area concentration (SAC), estimated SAC and mass concentration (MC) of nanoparticles produced from the GMAW process were significantly higher than those of background particles before welding (P < 0.01). A bimodal size distribution by mass for welding particles with two peak values (i.e., 10,000–18,000 and 560–320 nm) and a unimodal size distribution by number with 190.7-nm mode size or 154.9-nm geometric size were observed. Nanoparticles by number comprised 60.7 % of particles, whereas nanoparticles by mass only accounted for 18.2 % of the total particles. The morphology of welding particles was dominated by the formation of chain-like agglomerates of primary particles. The metal composition of these welding particles consisted primarily of Fe, Mn, and Zn. The size distribution, morphology, and elemental compositions of welding particles were significantly different from background particles. Working activities, sampling distances from the source, air velocity, engineering control measures, and background particles in working places had significant influences on concentrations of airborne nanoparticle. In addition, SAC showed a high correlation with NC and a relatively low correlation with MC. These findings indicate that the GMAW process is able to generate significant levels of nanoparticles. It is recommended that a combination of multiple metrics is measured as part of a well-designed sampling strategy for airborne nanoparticles. Key exposure factors, such as particle agglomeration/aggregation, background particles, working activities, temporal and spatial distributions of the particles, air velocity, engineering control measures, should be investigated when measuring workplace

  11. Workplace exposure to nanoparticles from gas metal arc welding process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Meibian [Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China); Jian, Le [Curtin University of Technology, School of Public Health, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (Australia); Bin, Pingfan [Wujin District Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China); Xing, Mingluan [Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China); Lou, Jianlin [Zhejiang Academy of Medical Sciences (China); Cong, Liming; Zou, Hua, E-mail: hzou@cdc.zj.cn [Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China)

    2013-11-15

    Workplace exposure to nanoparticles from gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process in an automobile manufacturing factory was investigated using a combination of multiple metrics and a comparison with background particles. The number concentration (NC), lung-deposited surface area concentration (SAC), estimated SAC and mass concentration (MC) of nanoparticles produced from the GMAW process were significantly higher than those of background particles before welding (P < 0.01). A bimodal size distribution by mass for welding particles with two peak values (i.e., 10,000–18,000 and 560–320 nm) and a unimodal size distribution by number with 190.7-nm mode size or 154.9-nm geometric size were observed. Nanoparticles by number comprised 60.7 % of particles, whereas nanoparticles by mass only accounted for 18.2 % of the total particles. The morphology of welding particles was dominated by the formation of chain-like agglomerates of primary particles. The metal composition of these welding particles consisted primarily of Fe, Mn, and Zn. The size distribution, morphology, and elemental compositions of welding particles were significantly different from background particles. Working activities, sampling distances from the source, air velocity, engineering control measures, and background particles in working places had significant influences on concentrations of airborne nanoparticle. In addition, SAC showed a high correlation with NC and a relatively low correlation with MC. These findings indicate that the GMAW process is able to generate significant levels of nanoparticles. It is recommended that a combination of multiple metrics is measured as part of a well-designed sampling strategy for airborne nanoparticles. Key exposure factors, such as particle agglomeration/aggregation, background particles, working activities, temporal and spatial distributions of the particles, air velocity, engineering control measures, should be investigated when measuring workplace

  12. Hotel Performance and Agglomeration of Tourist Districts

    OpenAIRE

    Marco-Lajara, Bartolomé; Claver Cortés, Enrique; Úbeda García, Mercedes; Zaragoza Sáez, Patrocinio del Carmen

    2014-01-01

    This paper measures the impact on profitability of the geographical area where the vacation hotels of the Spanish Mediterranean are situated. It places a special emphasis on analysing the tourist districts existing in this coastal Spanish area and the extent to which the degree of business agglomeration at each destination affects hotel profit. Due to the characteristics of the service sector, and after a revision of the agglomeration literature, a ‘U’-shaped relationship is hypothesized betw...

  13. Experimental study of acoustic agglomeration and fragmentation on coal-fired ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Guoqing; Huang, Xiaoyu; He, Chunlong; Zhang, Shiping; An, Liansuo; Wang, Liang; Chen, Yanqiao; Li, Yongsheng

    2018-02-01

    As the major part of air pollution, inhalable particles, especially fine particles are doing great harm to human body due to smaller particle size and absorption of hazardous components. However, the removal efficiency of current particles filtering devices is low. Acoustic agglomeration is considered as a very effective pretreatment technique for removing particles. Fine particles collide, agglomerate and grow up in the sound field and the fine particles can be removed by conventional particles devices easily. In this paper, the agglomeration and fragmentation of 3 different kinds of particles with different size distributions are studied experimentally in the sound field. It is found that there exists an optimal frequency at 1200 Hz for different particles. The agglomeration efficiency of inhalable particles increases with SPL increasing for the unimodal particles with particle diameter less than 10 μm. For the bimodal particles, the optimal SPLs are 115 and 120 dB with the agglomeration efficiencies of 25% and 55%. A considerable effectiveness of agglomeration could only be obtained in a narrow SPL range and it decreases significantly over the range for the particles fragmentation.

  14. Kinetic energy density and agglomerate abrasion rate during blending of agglomerates into powders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsz, T.A.; Hooijmaijers, R.; Rubingh, C.M.; Tran, T.N.; Frijlink, H.W.; Vromans, H.; Maarschalk, K.V.D.V.

    2012-01-01

    Problems related to the blending of a cohesive powder with a free flowing bulk powder are frequently encountered in the pharmaceutical industry. The cohesive powder often forms lumps or agglomerates which are not dispersed during the mixing process and are therefore detrimental to blend uniformity.

  15. Coating and melt induced agglomeration in a poultry litter fired fluidized bed combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billen, Pieter; Creemers, Benji; Costa, José; Van Caneghem, Jo; Vandecasteele, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    The combustion of poultry litter, which is rich in phosphorus, in a fluidized bed combustor (FBC) is associated with agglomeration problems, which can lead to bed defluidization and consequent shutdown of the installation. Whereas earlier research indicated coating induced agglomeration as the dominant mechanism for bed material agglomeration, it is shown experimentally in this paper that both coating and melt induced agglomeration occur. Coating induced agglomeration mainly takes place at the walls of the FBC, in the freeboard above the fluidized bed, where at the prevailing temperature the bed particles are partially molten and hence agglomerate. In the ash, P 2 O 5 forms together with CaO thermodynamically stable Ca 3 (PO 4 ) 2 , thus reducing the amount of calcium silicates in the ash. This results in K/Ca silicate mixtures with lower melting points. On the other hand, in-bed agglomeration is caused by thermodynamically unstable, low melting HPO 4 2− and H 2 PO 4 − salts present in the fuel. In the hot FBC these salts may melt, may cause bed particles to stick together and may subsequently react with Ca salts from the bed ash, forming a solid bridge of the stable Ca 3 (PO 4 ) 2 between multiple particles. - Highlights: • Coating induced agglomeration not due to K phosphates, but due to K silicates. • Melt induced agglomeration due to H 2 PO 4 − and HPO 4 2− salts in the fuel. • Wall agglomeration corresponds to coating induced mechanism. • In-bed agglomeration corresponds to melt induced mechanism

  16. Does a kampo medicine containing schisandra fruit affect pharmacokinetics of nifedipine like grapefruit juice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Toshiaki; Mizuno, Fumika; Mizukami, Hajime

    2006-10-01

    Herb-drug interaction has attracted attention as medicinal topics recently. However, the drug information is sometimes confusing. Previous in vitro studies revealed that schisandra fruit had strong inhibitory effect on CYP3A4 and claimed the possibilities of its herb-drug interaction. In the present study, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of schisandra fruit and shoseiryuto, an herbal formula in Japanese traditional kampo medicine containing eight herbal medicines including schisandra fruit, on rat CYP3A activity in vitro, and the effect of shoseiryuto on pharmacokinetics of nifedipine in rats, in comparison with those of grapefruit juice, a well-characterized natural CYP3A inhibitor. Shoseiryuto and its herbal constituents, schisandra fruit, ephedra herb and cinnamon bark exhibited in vitro inhibitory effect of CYP3A. Although shoseiryuto inhibited rat CYP3A activity in vitro with a degree comparable to grapefruit juice, shoseiryuto did not significantly affect a plasma concentration profile of nifedipine in rats as grapefruit juice did. These results indicate that in vivo experiments using the extract of herbal medicine prepared with the same dosage form as patients take are necessary to provide proper information about herb-drug interaction.

  17. Effect of silica nanoparticles with variable size and surface functionalization on human endothelial cell viability and angiogenic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnieri, Daniela; Malvindi, Maria Ada; Belli, Valentina; Pompa, Pier Paolo; Netti, Paolo

    2014-02-01

    Silica nanoparticles could be promising delivery vehicles for drug targeting or gene therapy. However, few studies have been undertaken to determine the biological behavior effects of silica nanoparticles on primary endothelial cells. Here we investigated uptake, cytotoxicity and angiogenic properties of silica nanoparticle with positive and negative surface charge and sizes ranging from 25 to 115 nm in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Dynamic light scattering measurements and nanoparticle tracking analysis were used to estimate the dispersion status of nanoparticles in cell culture media, which was a key aspect to understand the results of the in vitro cellular uptake experiments. Nanoparticles were taken up by primary endothelial cells in a size-dependent manner according to their degree of agglomeration occurring after transfer in cell culture media. Functionalization of the particle surface with positively charged groups enhanced the in vitro cellular uptake, compared to negatively charged nanoparticles. However, this effect was contrasted by the tendency of particles to form agglomerates, leading to lower internalization efficiency. Silica nanoparticle uptake did not affect cell viability and cell membrane integrity. More interestingly, positively and negatively charged 25 nm nanoparticles did not influence capillary-like tube formation and angiogenic sprouting, compared to controls. Considering the increasing interest in nanomaterials for several biomedical applications, a careful study of nanoparticle-endothelial cells interactions is of high relevance to assess possible risks associated to silica nanoparticle exposure and their possible applications in nanomedicine as safe and effective nanocarriers for vascular transport of therapeutic agents.

  18. Nanoscale-Agglomerate-Mediated Heterogeneous Nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hyeongyun; Wu, Alex; Kim, Moon-Kyung; Saigusa, Kosuke; Liu, Aihua; Miljkovic, Nenad

    2017-12-13

    Water vapor condensation on hydrophobic surfaces has received much attention due to its ability to rapidly shed water droplets and enhance heat transfer, anti-icing, water harvesting, energy harvesting, and self-cleaning performance. However, the mechanism of heterogeneous nucleation on hydrophobic surfaces remains poorly understood and is attributed to defects in the hydrophobic coating exposing the high surface energy substrate. Here, we observe the formation of high surface energy nanoscale agglomerates on hydrophobic coatings after condensation/evaporation cycles in ambient conditions. To investigate the deposition dynamics, we studied the nanoscale agglomerates as a function of condensation/evaporation cycles via optical and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), microgoniometric contact angle measurements, nucleation statistics, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The FESEM and EDS results indicated that the nanoscale agglomerates stem from absorption of sulfuric acid based aerosol particles inside the droplet and adsorption of volatile organic compounds such as methanethiol (CH 3 SH), dimethyl disulfide (CH 3 SSCH), and dimethyl trisulfide (CH 3 SSSCH 3 ) on the liquid-vapor interface during water vapor condensation, which act as preferential sites for heterogeneous nucleation after evaporation. The insights gained from this study elucidate fundamental aspects governing the behavior of both short- and long-term heterogeneous nucleation on hydrophobic surfaces, suggest previously unexplored microfabrication and air purification techniques, and present insights into the challenges facing the development of durable dropwise condensing surfaces.

  19. Memory effect and super-spin-glass ordering in an aggregated nanoparticle sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cador, O.; Grasset, F.; Haneda, H.; Etourneau, J.

    2004-01-01

    A system consisting of aggregated nonstoichiometric zinc ferrite nanoparticles has been studied using AC and DC magnetization measurements. A superparamagnetic-super-spin-glass phase transition at T g has been identified. The relaxation time diverges at T g and the nonlinear susceptibility shows an abrupt increase. The critical behavior vanishes when the nanoparticles are not in close contact. The observation of the memory effect identical to that which has been already discovered in canonical spin-glass supports the existence of a true thermodynamic transition in agglomerated magnetic nanoparticles

  20. Urban agglomerations and transformations of medium-sized towns in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runge Anna

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This analysis investigates medium-sized towns in Poland, i.e. those with a population between 20–100 thousand, located up to 100 km away from the main city of the agglomeration. The aim of this article is to compare the level of socio-economic development of Polish towns depending on their location in relation to the main city in the largest agglomerations in 1998 and 2013. Three zones of distance from the main city of each agglomeration have been taken into consideration: a. the inner zone, reaching up to 25 km from the main city; b. the outer zone located at a distance of 25 to 50 km from the main city, and c. the peripheral zone, located at a distance of 50 to 100 km from the main city and including the medium-size towns located outside the agglomeration system. This analysis of the distribution of medium-sized towns and their level of socio-economic development has shown various levels of changes which depend on the distance from the main city of the agglomeration. In 1998, the highest level of development of the medium-sized towns was recorded in towns outside of these agglomeration systems, i.e. those located most remotely from the main city (peripheral zone. Most of the medium-sized towns are situated at a distance of 50–100 km from Warszawa, Kraków, Łódź, Lublin, Gdańsk and have developed their own local, or even regional labour markets and some of them have even provided administrative functions in the past as voivodeship capitals. Only in the Poznań agglomeration, the level of development of medium-sized towns was higher in the immediate surroundings of the main city (25 km. The medium-sized towns in all zones of the distance from the main city in the Wrocław agglomeration represented a similar level of development. By 2013, the level of development of the medium-sized towns in the peripheral zone in all investigated settlement systems had decreased, with a significant improvement in the level of development of the towns in

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF ORAL NIFEDIPINE-LOADED POLYMERIC NANOCAPSULES: PHYSICOCHEMICAL CHARACTERISATION, PHOTOSTABILITY STUDIES, IN VITRO AND IN VIVO EVALUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Piazzon Tagliari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, nifedipine (NFP-loaded polymeric nanocapsules were prepared and characterised with a view to protect the drug from degradation. Nanocapsule suspensions were prepared using two different surfactants (pluronic F68 and polyvinyl alcohol. Physicochemical stability and in vivoantihypertensive effect were evaluated. The particle size, zeta potential and entrapment efficiency remained constant during a period of 28 days of exposure under light irradiation. A smaller particle size and a higher zeta potential were obtained for the nanocapsules prepared with Pluronic F68 as surfactant. The solid drug and the nanocapsules were submitted to light exposure for 28 days. After this period of time, the percentage of drug remaining in the PF68NFP and PVANFP nanocapsules was 28.1% and 21.3%, respectively. In contrast, the solid drug was completely degraded after 4 days, suggesting that the nanocapsule suspensions promoted significant protection of the drug against light exposure. In addition, in vivo studies were carried out, which demonstrated that the formulations with polyvinyl alcohol exhibited a very rapid onset of action after oral administration in rats and led to faster drug release. The nanoparticles developed can be considered as an alternative for improving NFP stability in liquid formulations.

  2. Structural, optical, morphological and dielectric properties of cerium oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabaharan, Devadoss Mangalam Durai Manoharadoss; Sadaiyandi, Karuppasamy; Mahendran, Manickam; Sagadevan, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Cerium oxide (CeO 2 ) nanoparticles were prepared by the precipitation method. The average crystallite size of cerium oxide nanoparticles was calculated from the X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern and found to be 11 nm. The FT-IR spectrum clearly indicated the strong presence of cerium oxide nanoparticles. Raman spectrum confirmed the cubic nature of the cerium oxide nanoparticles. The Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis showed that the nanoparticles agglomerated forming spherical-shaped particles. The Transmission Electron Microscopic (TEM) analysis confirmed the prepared cerium oxide nanoparticles with the particle size being found to be 16 nm. The optical absorption spectrum showed a blue shift by the cerium oxide nanoparticles due to the quantum confinement effect. The dielectric properties of cerium oxide nanoparticles were studied for different frequencies at different temperatures. The dielectric constant and the dielectric loss of the cerium oxide nanoparticles decreased with increase in frequency. The AC electrical conductivity study revealed that the conduction depended on both the frequency and the temperature. (author)

  3. Structural, optical, morphological and dielectric properties of cerium oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabaharan, Devadoss Mangalam Durai Manoharadoss [Department of Physics, NPR College of Engineering and Technology, Natham, Dindigul, Tamil Nadu (India); Sadaiyandi, Karuppasamy [Department of Physics, Alagappa Government Arts College, Karaikudi, Sivaganga, Tamil Nadu (India); Mahendran, Manickam [Department of Physics, Thiagarajar College of Engineering, Madurai, Tamil Nadu (India); Sagadevan, Suresh, E-mail: duraiphysics2011@gmail.com [Department of Physics, AMET University (India)

    2016-03-15

    Cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) nanoparticles were prepared by the precipitation method. The average crystallite size of cerium oxide nanoparticles was calculated from the X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern and found to be 11 nm. The FT-IR spectrum clearly indicated the strong presence of cerium oxide nanoparticles. Raman spectrum confirmed the cubic nature of the cerium oxide nanoparticles. The Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis showed that the nanoparticles agglomerated forming spherical-shaped particles. The Transmission Electron Microscopic (TEM) analysis confirmed the prepared cerium oxide nanoparticles with the particle size being found to be 16 nm. The optical absorption spectrum showed a blue shift by the cerium oxide nanoparticles due to the quantum confinement effect. The dielectric properties of cerium oxide nanoparticles were studied for different frequencies at different temperatures. The dielectric constant and the dielectric loss of the cerium oxide nanoparticles decreased with increase in frequency. The AC electrical conductivity study revealed that the conduction depended on both the frequency and the temperature. (author)

  4. Investigation of melt agglomeration process with a hydrophobic binder in combination with sucrose stearate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Wong, Tin Wui; Cheong, Wai See

    2003-08-01

    The melt agglomeration process of lactose powder with hydrogenated cottonseed oil (HCO) as the hydrophobic meltable binder was investigated by studying the physicochemical properties of molten HCO modified by sucrose stearates S170, S770 and S1570. The size, size distribution, micromeritic and adhesion properties of agglomerates as well as surface tension, contact angle, viscosity and specific volume of molten HCO, with and without sucrose stearates, were examined. The viscosity, specific volume and surface tension of molten HCO were found to be modified to varying extents by sucrose stearates which are available in different HLB values and melt properties. The growth of melt agglomerates was promoted predominantly by an increase in viscosity, an increase in specific volume or a decrease in surface tension of the molten binding liquid. The agglomerate growth propensity was higher with an increase in inter-particulate binding strength, agglomerate surface wetness and extent of agglomerate consolidation which enhanced the liquid migration from agglomerate core to periphery leading to an increased surface plasticity for coalescence. The inclusion of high concentrations of completely meltable sucrose stearate S170 greatly induced the growth of agglomerates through increased specific volume and viscosity of the molten binding liquid. On the other hand, the inclusion of incompletely meltable sucrose stearates S770 and S1570 promoted the agglomeration mainly via the reduction in surface tension of the molten binding liquid with declining agglomerate growth propensity at high sucrose stearate concentrations. In addition to being an agglomeration modifier, sucrose stearate demonstrated anti-adherent property in melt agglomeration process. The properties of molten HCO and melt agglomerates were dependent on the type and concentration of sucrose stearate added.

  5. Agglomerated polymer monoliths with bimetallic nano-particles as flow-through micro-reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floris, P.; Twamley, B.; Nesterenko, P.N.; Paull, B.; Connolly, D.

    2012-01-01

    Polymer monoliths in capillary format have been prepared as solid supports for the immobilisation of platinum/palladium bimetallic nano-flowers. Optimum surface coverage of nano-flowers was realised by photografting the monoliths with vinyl azlactone followed by amination with ethylenediamine prior to nano-particle immobilisation. Field emission SEM imaging was used as a characterisation tool for evaluating nano-particle coverage, together with BET surface area analysis to probe the effect of nano-particle immobilisation upon monolith morphology. Ion exchange chromatography was also used to confirm the nature of the covalent attachment of nano-flowers on the monolithic surface. In addition, EDX and ICP analyses were used to quantify platinum and palladium on modified polymer monoliths. Finally the catalytic properties of immobilised bimetallic Pd/Pt nano-flowers were evaluated in flow-through mode, exploiting the porous interconnected flow-paths present in the prepared monoliths (pore diameter ∼ 1-2 μm). Specifically, the reduction of Fe (III) to Fe (II) and the oxidation of NADH to NAD+ were selected as model redox reactions. The use of a porous polymer monolith as an immobilisation substrate (rather than aminated micro-spheres) eliminated the need for a centrifugation step after the reaction. (author)

  6. Agglomeration of amorphous silicon film with high energy density excimer laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Ming; Ishihara, Ryoichi; Metselaar, Wim; Beenakker, Kees

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, agglomeration phenomena of amorphous Si (α-Si) films due to high energy density excimer laser irradiation are systematically investigated. The agglomeration, which creates holes or breaks the continuous Si film up into spherical beads, is a type of serious damage. Therefore, it determines an upper energy limit for excimer laser crystallization. It is speculated that the agglomeration is caused by the boiling of molten Si. During this process, outbursts of heterogeneously nucleated vapor bubbles are promoted by the poor wetting property of molten silicon on the SiO 2 layer underneath. The onset of the agglomeration is defined by extrapolating the hole density as a function of the energy density of the laser pulse. A SiO 2 capping layer (CL) is introduced on top of the α-Si film to investigate its influence on the agglomeration. It is found that effects of the CL depend on its thickness. The CL with a thickness less than 300 nm can be used to suppress the agglomeration. A thin CL acts as a confining layer and puts a constraint on bubble burst, and hence suppresses the agglomeration

  7. Molten salt based nanofluids based on solar salt and alumina nanoparticles: An industrial approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Sánchez, Belén; Nieto-Maestre, Javier; Guerreiro, Luis; Julia, José Enrique; Collares-Pereira, Manuel; García-Romero, Ana

    2017-06-01

    Thermal Energy Storage (TES) and its associated dispatchability is extremely important in Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plants since it represents the main advantage of CSP technology in relation to other renewable energy sources like photovoltaic (PV). Molten salts are used in CSP plants as a TES material because of their high operational temperature and stability of up to 600°C. Their main problems are their relative poor thermal properties and energy storage density. A simple cost-effective way to improve the thermal properties of molten salts is to dope them with nanoparticles, thus obtaining the so-called salt-based nanofluids. Additionally, the use of molten salt based nanofluids as TES materials and Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) has been attracting great interest in recent years. The addition of tiny amounts of nanoparticles to the base salt can improve its specific heat as shown by different authors1-3. The application of these nano-enhanced materials can lead to important savings on the investment costs in new TES systems for CSP plants. However, there is still a long way to go in order to achieve a commercial product. In this sense, the improvement of the stability of the nanofluids is a key factor. The stability of nanofluids will depend on the nature and size of the nanoparticles, the base salt and the interactions between them. In this work, Solar Salt (SS) commonly used in CSP plants (60% NaNO3 + 40% KNO3 wt.) was doped with alumina nanoparticles (ANPs) at a solid mass concentration of 1% wt. at laboratory scale. The tendency of nanoparticles to agglomeration and sedimentation is tested in the molten state by analyzing their size and concentration through the time. The specific heat of the nanofluid at 396 °C (molten state) is measured at different times (30 min, 1 h, 5 h). Further research is needed to understand the mechanisms of agglomeration. A good understanding of the interactions between the nanoparticle surface and the ionic media would provide

  8. A phenomenological model for improving understanding of the ammonium nitrate agglomeration process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Videla Leiva Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium nitrate is intensively used as explosive in the mining industry as the main component of ANFO. The ammonium nitrate is known to be a strong hygroscopic crystal matter which generates problems due to the creation of water bridges between crystals leading later to nucleation and crystallization forming an agglomerated solid cake. The agglomeration process damages the ammonium nitrate performance and is undesirable. Usually either organic or inorganic coatings are used to control agglomeration. In the present work a characterization method of humidity adsorption of the ammonium nitrate crystal was performed under laboratory conditions. Several samples were exposed into a defined humidity in a controlled chamber during 5 hours after which the samples were tested to measure agglomeration as the resistance force to compression. A clear relation was found between coating protection level, humidity and agglomeration. Agglomeration can be then predicted by a phenomenological model based of combination of the mono-layer BET adsorption and CNT nucleation models.

  9. Optimal sample preparation for nanoparticle metrology (statistical size measurements) using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoo, Christopher M.; Doan, Trang; Starostin, Natasha; West, Paul E.; Mecartney, Martha L.

    2010-01-01

    Optimal deposition procedures are determined for nanoparticle size characterization by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Accurate nanoparticle size distribution analysis with AFM requires non-agglomerated nanoparticles on a flat substrate. The deposition of polystyrene (100 nm), silica (300 and 100 nm), gold (100 nm), and CdSe quantum dot (2-5 nm) nanoparticles by spin coating was optimized for size distribution measurements by AFM. Factors influencing deposition include spin speed, concentration, solvent, and pH. A comparison using spin coating, static evaporation, and a new fluid cell deposition method for depositing nanoparticles is also made. The fluid cell allows for a more uniform and higher density deposition of nanoparticles on a substrate at laminar flow rates, making nanoparticle size analysis via AFM more efficient and also offers the potential for nanoparticle analysis in liquid environments.

  10. Preparation of sustained release matrix pellets by melt agglomeration in the fluidized bed: influence of formulation variables and modelling of agglomerate growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli-Bruns, Anette; Knop, Klaus; Lippold, Bernhard C

    2010-03-01

    The one-step preparation of sustained release matrix pellets, using a melting procedure in a fluidized bed apparatus, was tested in a 2(3) full factorial design of experiments, using microcrystalline wax as lipophilic binder, theophylline as model drug and talc as additional matrix forming agent. The three influence parameters were (A) size of binder particles, (B) fraction of theophylline in solid particles and (C) fraction of microcrystalline wax in formulation. The response variables were agglomerate size and size distribution, dissolution time, agglomerate crush resistance, sphericity, yield and porosity. Nearly spherical pellets comprising a smooth, closed surface could be obtained with the used method, exhibiting the hollow core typical for the immersion and layering mechanism. The reproducibility was very good concerning all responses. The size of agglomerates is proportional to the size of the binder particles, which serve as cores for pellet formation in the molten state in the fluidized bed. Additionally, the agglomerate size is influenced by the volume of the solid particles in relation to the binder particles, with more solid particles leading to larger agglomerates and vice versa. Dissolution times vary in a very wide range, resulting from the interplay between amount of drug in relation to the meltable matrix substance microcrystalline wax and the non-meltable matrix substance talc. The change of binder particle size does not lead to a structural change of the matrix; both dissolution times and porosity are not significantly altered. Agglomerate crush resistance is low due to the hollow core of the pellets. However, it is significantly increased if the volume fraction of microcrystalline wax in the matrix is high, which means that the matrix is mechanically better stabilized. A theoretical model has been established to quantitatively explain agglomerate growth and very good accordance of the full particle size distributions between predicted and

  11. Synthesis and characterization of silver nanoparticles: effect on phytopathogen Colletotrichum gloesporioides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Méndez, Miguel A.; San Martín-Martínez, Eduardo; Ortega-Arroyo, Lesli; Cobián-Portillo, Georgina; Sánchez-Espíndola, Esther

    2011-06-01

    Colloidal silver nanoparticles were synthesized by reducing silver nitrate solutions with glucose, in the presence of gelatin as capping agent. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by means of UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The response surface methodology (RSM) was also used to determine the influence of the variables on the size of the nanoparticles. The antifungal activity of the silver nanoparticles was evaluated on the phytopathogen Colletotrichum gloesporioides, which causes anthracnose in a wide range of fruits. The UV-Vis spectra indicated the formation of silver nanoparticles preferably spherical and of relatively small size (silver nanoparticles. By means of FTIR spectroscopy it was determined that gelatin, through their amide and hydroxyl groups, interacts with nanoparticles preventing their agglomeration. The growth of C. gloesporioides in the presence of silver nanoparticles was significantly delayed in a dose dependent manner.

  12. The influence of pH and media composition on suspension stability of Ag, ZnO, and TiO2 nanoparticles and immobilization of Daphnia magna under guideline testing conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cupi, Denisa; Hartmann, Nanna B.; Baun, Anders

    2015-01-01

    In aquatic toxicity testing of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) the process of agglomeration is very important as it may alter the bioavailability of the ENPs and hence their toxicity. In this study we evaluated test conditions that are more favorable in maintaining a stable and low agglomerate si...

  13. Lithium clearance and renal tubular sodium handling during acute and long-term nifedipine treatment in essential hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, N E; Ibsen, H; Skøtt, P

    1988-01-01

    1. In two separate studies the lithium clearance method was used to evaluate the influence of acute and long-term nifedipine treatment on renal tubular sodium reabsorption. 2. In the acute study, after a 4 week placebo period two doses of 20 mg of nifedipine decreased supine blood pressure from 155...... were also unchanged, as were potassium clearance, urine flow and body weight. 3. In the long-term study, lithium clearance, glomerular filtration rate, sodium clearance, potassium clearance, urine flow and body fluid volumes were measured after a 4 weeks placebo period and after 6 and 12 weeks....../101 (20.6/13.5) +/- 11/4 (1.5/0.5) to 139/88 (18.5/11.7) +/- 16/9 (2.1/1.2) mmHg (kPa) (means +/- SD; P less than 0.01). Lithium clearance, glomerular filtration rate and sodium clearance did not change. Therefore the calculated values of absolute proximal and absolute distal sodium reabsorption rates...

  14. Dynamic forces on agglomerated particles caused by high-intensity ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoop, Claas; Fritsching, Udo

    2014-03-01

    In this paper the acoustic forces on particles and agglomerates caused by high-intensity ultrasound in gaseous atmosphere are derived by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Sound induced forces cause an oscillating stress scenario where the primary particles of an agglomerate are alternatingly pressed together and torn apart with the frequency of the applied wave. A comparison of the calculated acoustic forces with respect to the inter particle adhesion forces from Van-der-Waals and liquid bridge interactions reveals that the separation forces may reach the same order of magnitude for 80 μm sized SiO2-particles. Hence, with finite probability acoustically agitated gases may de-agglomerate/disperse solid agglomerate structures. This effect is confirmed by dispersion experiments in an acoustic particle levitation setup. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. FORMULATION AND IN VITRO EVALUATION OF NIFEDIPINE FLOATING MATRIX TABLETS BY USING NATURAL POLYMERS

    OpenAIRE

    Shaik Asha Begum*, Ramya Sri Sura , Bandlamudi.Vineela, Tirumalasetti. V. Siva Naga Sai Bhanu Sree, Moghal. Rafiya Begum, Abdul. Kareemunnisa

    2018-01-01

    In the present research work gastro retentive floating matrix formulation of Nifedipine by using Natural polymers were developed. Initially analytical method development was done for the drug molecule. Absorption maxima was determined based on that calibration curve was developed by using different concentrations. Gas generating agent sodium bicarbonate concentration was optimised. Then the formulation was developed by using different concentrations of polymers Xanthan gum, guar gum and Karay...

  16. Encapsulation of hazardous wastes into agglomerates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guloy, A.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using the cementitious properties and agglomeration characteristics of coal conversion byproducts to encapsulate and immobilize hazardous waste materials. The intention was to establish an economical way of co-utilization and co-disposal of wastes. In addition, it may aid in the eradication of air pollution problems associated with the fine-powdery nature of fly ash. Encapsulation into agglomerates is a novel approach of treating toxic waste. Although encapsulation itself is not a new concept, existing methods employ high-cost resins that render them economically unfeasible. In this investigation, the toxic waste was contained in a concrete-like matrix whereby fly ash and other cementitious waste materials were utilized. The method incorporates the principles of solidification, stabilization and agglomeration. Another aspect of the study is the evaluation of the agglomeration as possible lightweight aggregates. Since fly ash is commercially used as an aggregate, it would be interesting to study the effect of incorporating toxic wastes in the strength development of the granules. In the investigation, the fly ash self-cementation process was applied to electroplating sludges as the toxic waste. The process hoped to provide a basis for delisting of the waste as hazardous and, thereby greatly minimize the cost of its disposal. Owing to the stringent regulatory requirements for hauling and disposal of hazardous waste, the cost of disposal is significant. The current practice for disposal is solidifying the waste with portland cement and dumping the hardened material in the landfill where the cost varies between $700--950/ton. Partially replacing portland cement with fly ash in concrete has proven beneficial, therefore applying the same principles in the treatment of toxic waste looked very promising

  17. Colloidal stability of silver nanoparticles in biologically relevant conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacCuspie, Robert I.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the colloidal stability of nanoparticles (NPs) plays a key role in phenomenological interpretation of toxicological experiments, particularly if single NPs or their aggregates or agglomerates determine the dominant experimental result. This report examines a variety of instrumental techniques for surveying the colloidal stability of aqueous suspensions of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), including atomic force microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and colorimetry. It was found that colorimetry can adequately determine the concentration of single AgNPs that remained in solution if morphological information about agglomerates is not required. The colloidal stability of AgNPs with various surface capping agents and in various solvents ranging from cell culture media to different electrolytes of several concentrations, and in different pH conditions was determined. It was found that biocompatible bulky capping agents, such as bovine serum albumin or starch, that provided steric colloidal stabilization, as opposed to purely electrostatic stabilization such as with citrate AgNPs, provided better retention of single AgNPs in solution over a variety of conditions for up to 64 h of observation.

  18. Effect of Pu-rich agglomerate in MOX fuel on a lattice calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Yamamoto, Toru; Namekawa, Masakazu

    2007-01-01

    The effect of Pu-rich agglomerates in U-Pu mixed oxide (MOX) fuel on a lattice calculation has been demonstrated. The Pu-rich agglomerate parameters are defined based on the measurement data of MIMAS-MOX and the focus is on the highly enriched MOX fuel in accordance with increased burnup resulting in a higher volume fraction of the Pu-rich agglomerates. The lattice calculations with a heterogeneous fuel model and a homogeneous fuel model are performed simulating the PWR 17x17 fuel assembly. The heterogeneous model individually treats the Pu-rich agglomerate and U-Pu matrix, whereas the homogeneous model homogenizes the compositions within the fuel pellet. A continuous-energy Monte Carlo burnup code, MVP-BURN, is used for burnup calculations up to 70 GWd/t. A statistical geometry model is applied in modeling a large number of Pu-rich agglomerates assuming that they are distributed randomly within the MOX fuel pellet. The calculated nuclear characteristics include k-inf, Pu isotopic compositions, power density and burnup of the Pu-rich agglomerates, as well as the pellet-averaged Pu compositions as a function of burnup. It is shown that the effect of Pu-rich agglomerates on the lattice calculation is negligibly small. (author)

  19. Water droplet spreading and recoiling upon contact with thick-compact maltodextrin agglomerates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meraz-Torres, Lesvia Sofía; Quintanilla-Carvajal, María Ximena; Téllez-Medina, Darío I; Hernández-Sánchez, Humberto; Alamilla-Beltrán, Liliana; Gutiérrez-López, Gustavo F

    2011-11-01

    The food and pharmaceutical industries handle a number of compounds in the form of agglomerates which must be put into contact with water for rehydration purposes. In this work, liquid-solid interaction between water and maltodextrin thick-compact agglomerates was studied at different constituent particle sizes for two compression forces (75 and 225 MPa). Rapid droplet spreading was observed which was similar in radius to the expected one for ideal, flat surfaces. Contact angle determinations reported oscillations of this parameter throughout the experiments, being indicative of droplet recoiling on top of the agglomerate. Recoiling was more frequent in samples obtained at 225 MPa for agglomerate formation. Agglomerates obtained at 75 MPa exhibited more penetration of the water. Competition between dissolution of maltodextrin and penetration of the water was, probably, the main mechanism involved in droplet recoiling. Micrographs of the wetting marks were characterized by means of image analysis and the measurements suggested more symmetry of the wetting mark at higher compression force. Differences found in the evaluated parameters for agglomerates were mainly due to compaction force used. No significant effect of particle size in recoiling, penetration of water into the agglomerate, surface texture and symmetry was observed. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Coagulation-agglomeration of fractal-like particles: structure and self-preserving size distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudeli, Eirini; Eggersdorfer, Maximilian L; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2015-02-03

    Agglomeration occurs in environmental and industrial processes, especially at low temperatures where particle sintering or coalescence is rather slow. Here, the growth and structure of particles undergoing agglomeration (coagulation in the absence of coalescence, condensation, or surface growth) are investigated from the free molecular to the continuum regime by discrete element modeling (DEM). Particles coagulating in the free molecular regime follow ballistic trajectories described by an event-driven method, whereas in the near-continuum (gas-slip) and continuum regimes, Langevin dynamics describe their diffusive motion. Agglomerates containing about 10-30 primary particles, on the average, attain their asymptotic fractal dimension, D(f), of 1.91 or 1.78 by ballistic or diffusion-limited cluster-cluster agglomeration, corresponding to coagulation in the free molecular or continuum regimes, respectively. A correlation is proposed for the asymptotic evolution of agglomerate D(f) as a function of the average number of constituent primary particles, n̅(p). Agglomerates exhibit considerably broader self-preserving size distribution (SPSD) by coagulation than spherical particles: the number-based geometric standard deviations of the SPSD agglomerate radius of gyration in the free molecular and continuum regimes are 2.27 and 1.95, respectively, compared to ∼1.45 for spheres. In the transition regime, agglomerates exhibit a quasi-SPSD whose geometric standard deviation passes through a minimum at Knudsen number Kn ≈ 0.2. In contrast, the asymptotic D(f) shifts linearly from 1.91 in the free molecular regime to 1.78 in the continuum regime. Population balance models using the radius of gyration as collision radius underestimate (up to about 80%) the small tail of the SPSD and slightly overpredict the overall agglomerate coagulation rate, as they do not account for cluster interpenetration during coagulation. In the continuum regime, when a recently developed

  1. Nifedipine for the poor-risk elderly patient with achalasia: objective response demonstrated by solid meal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, E.; Lebow, R.A.; Gubler, R.J.; Bryant, L.R.

    1984-01-01

    We described an 84-year-old woman with symptomatic achalasia who refused both dilation and surgical treatment. She was treated with the calcium channel blocking drug nifedipine, with significant relief of symptoms. Objective evidence of response to the drug was confirmed by using an egg salad sandwich meal labeled with 99mTc-DTPA

  2. Nifedipine for the poor-risk elderly patient with achalasia: objective response demonstrated by solid meal study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, E.; Lebow, R.A.; Gubler, R.J.; Bryant, L.R.

    1984-03-01

    We described an 84-year-old woman with symptomatic achalasia who refused both dilation and surgical treatment. She was treated with the calcium channel blocking drug nifedipine, with significant relief of symptoms. Objective evidence of response to the drug was confirmed by using an egg salad sandwich meal labeled with 99mTc-DTPA.

  3. Business agglomeration in tourist districts and hotel performance

    OpenAIRE

    Marco-Lajara, Bartolomé; Claver Cortés, Enrique; Úbeda García, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – The present paper aims to analyze how the performance of hotels located on the Spanish Mediterranean coast (peninsular and Balearic) and Canary coast is affected by the degree of business agglomeration in tourist districts. If agglomeration affects hotels positively, then the externalities generated in tourist districts will be relevant when locating an establishment. Otherwise, the reason why hotels group together geographically would be more related to the suitability of beaches a...

  4. Quantitative analysis of pigment dispersion taking into account the full agglomerate size distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Kiil, Søren

    2017-01-01

    This work concerns the development of simulation tools for mapping of pigment dispersion. Focus has been on the mechanical breakage of pigment agglomerates. The underlying physical mechanism was assumed to be surface erosion of spherical pigment agglomerates, and the full agglomerate particle size distribution was simulated. Data from previous experimental investigations with organic pigments were used for model validation.When the linear rate of agglomerate surface erosion was taken to be pr...

  5. Beneficial effect of low dose Amlodipine vs Nifedipine on serum cholesterol profile of rabbits receiving standard diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bavane DS, Rajesh CS, Gurudatta Moharir, Bharatha Ambadasu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of low dose amlodipine v/s nifedipine on serum cholesterol profile of rabbits receiving standard diet. Methods: Fourty Newzealand rabbits were selected for the study. Their cholesterol profile was estimated at the beginning of the study. Rabbits were grouped into 4 groups receiving standard diet (control group, standard diet + vehicle propylene glycol, standard diet + nifedipine dissolved in propylene glycol and standard diet + amlodipine dissolved in propylene glycol. Along with standard diet they were treated with respective drugs for ten weeks. At the end of ten weeks serum cholesterol profile was estimated. Results: The cholesterol profile was estimated at the beginning and at the end of ten weeks. Total cholesterol in the amlodipine group decreased from 97±4.06 mg/dl to 90±4.2 mg/dl and HDL-Cholesterol increased from 32.01±4.40 mg/dl to 37±4.60 mg/dl after 10 week treatment but these changes were not significant. LDL cholesterol decreased significantly in rabbits with low dose of amlodipine from 55.42±3.32 mg/dl to 32.40±3.22 mg/dl and. In the nifedipine group there was a slight increase in total cholesterol from 102.49±5.16 mg/dl to 106±5.39 mg/dl, HDL cholesterol from 34.10±2.80 to 35.16±2.82 mg/dl and LDL cholesterol also increased from 56.20±2.20 mg/dl to 59.00±2.20 mg/dl after 10 week treatment. Conclusion: The study shows amlodipine produces favorable alterations in serum cholesterol profile

  6. Nanoparticle dispersion effect of laser-surface melting in ZrB{sub 2p}/6061Al composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Yida; Chao, Yuhjin; Luo, Zhen, E-mail: lz-tju@163.com [Tianjin University, School of Material Science and Engineering (China); Huang, Yongxian [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology (China)

    2017-04-15

    Zirconium diboride (ZrB{sub 2p}, 15 vol%)/6061 aluminum (Al) composites were fabricated via in situ reaction. The existence, morphologies, and dispersion degree of the in situ ZrB{sub 2} particles with size from tens to hundreds of nanometers were studied by X-ray diffractometry, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. As the particle-settlement effect becomes dominant during the composite fabrication process, ZrB{sub 2} nanoparticles agglomerate to a certain extent in some areas of the as-cast composites. A laser-surface melting (LSM) strategy was applied to disperse agglomerated ZrB{sub 2} nanoparticles in as-cast composites, and the ZrB{sub 2} nanoparticle dispersion is affected visibly by LSM. After LSM, nanoparticles tend to distribute along the grain boundary. Particle clusters were dispersed in an explosive orientation and the particle diffusion distance varied in terms of its radius and melt-viscosity vicinity. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed the existence of a subgrain structure near the ZrB{sub 2}–Al interface after LSM. This may increase the yield strength when a dislocation tangle forms.

  7. Surface Modification of Magnetic Nanoparticles Using Gum Arabic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Darryl N.; Gold, Katie A.; Holoman, Tracey R. Pulliam; Ehrman, Sheryl H.; Wilson, Otto C.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized and functionalized by coating the particle surfaces with gum arabic (GA) to improve particle stability in aqueous suspensions (i.e. biological media). Particle characterization was performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) to analyze the morphology and quantify the size distribution of the nanoparticles, respectively. The results from DLS indicated that the GA-treated nanoparticles formed smaller agglomerates as compared to the untreated samples over a 30-h time frame. Thermogravimetric analyses indicated an average weight loss of 23%, showing that GA has a strong affinity toward the iron oxide surface. GA most likely contributes to colloid stability via steric stabilization. It was determined that the adsorption of GA onto magnetite exhibits Langmuir behavior

  8. Deposition of metallic nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes via a fast evaporation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Guoqiang; Xing Yangchuan

    2006-01-01

    A new technique was developed for the deposition of colloidal metal nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes. It involves fast evaporation of a suspension containing sonochemically functionalized carbon nanotubes and colloidal nanoparticles. It was demonstrated that metallic nanoparticles with different sizes and concentrations can be deposited on the carbon nanotubes with only a few agglomerates. The technique does not seem to be limited by what the nanoparticles are, and therefore would be applicable to the deposition of other nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes. PtPd and CoPt 3 alloy nanoparticles were used to demonstrate the deposition process. It was found that the surfactants used to disperse the nanoparticles can hinder the nanoparticle deposition. When the nanoparticles were washed with ethanol, they could be well deposited on the carbon nanotubes. The obtained carbon nanotube supported metal nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry

  9. Magnetic nanoparticles: surface effects and properties related to biomedicine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Bashar; Obaidat, Ihab M; Albiss, Borhan A; Haik, Yousef

    2013-10-25

    Due to finite size effects, such as the high surface-to-volume ratio and different crystal structures, magnetic nanoparticles are found to exhibit interesting and considerably different magnetic properties than those found in their corresponding bulk materials. These nanoparticles can be synthesized in several ways (e.g., chemical and physical) with controllable sizes enabling their comparison to biological organisms from cells (10-100 μm), viruses, genes, down to proteins (3-50 nm). The optimization of the nanoparticles' size, size distribution, agglomeration, coating, and shapes along with their unique magnetic properties prompted the application of nanoparticles of this type in diverse fields. Biomedicine is one of these fields where intensive research is currently being conducted. In this review, we will discuss the magnetic properties of nanoparticles which are directly related to their applications in biomedicine. We will focus mainly on surface effects and ferrite nanoparticles, and on one diagnostic application of magnetic nanoparticles as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents.

  10. Nanoparticles Formed Onto/Into Halloysite Clay Tubules: Architectural Synthesis and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinokurov, Vladimir A; Stavitskaya, Anna V; Glotov, Aleksandr P; Novikov, Andrei A; Zolotukhina, Anna V; Kotelev, Mikhail S; Gushchin, Pawel A; Ivanov, Evgenii V; Darrat, Yusuf; Lvov, Yuri M

    2018-01-04

    Nanoparticles, being objects with high surface area are prone to agglomeration. Immobilization onto solid supports is a promising method to increase their stability and it allows for scalable industrial applications, such as metal nanoparticles adsorbed to mesoporous ceramic carriers. Tubular nanoclay - halloysite - can be an efficient solid support, enabling the fast and practical architectural (inside / outside) synthesis of stable metal nanoparticles. The obtained halloysite-nanoparticle composites can be employed as advanced catalysts, ion-conducting membrane modifiers, inorganic pigments, and optical markers for biomedical studies. Here, we discuss the possibilities to synthesize halloysite decorated with metal, metal chalcogenide, and carbon nanoparticles, and to use these materials in various fields, especially in catalysis and petroleum refinery. © 2018 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Oxide nanoparticle-based fabrication and optical properties of Cu(In1−xGax)S2 absorber layer for solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yo-Min; Lee, Young-In; Kim, Bum-Sung; Choa, Yong-Ho

    2013-01-01

    The compound Cu(In 1−x Ga x )S 2 (CIGS) was synthesized using copper oxide, indium oxide and gallium oxide mixture (CIGO) nanoparticles using salt-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (SAUSP). Under this method, CIGS can be produced without the complicated restrictions of a vacuum and an inert atmosphere. The band gap of CIGS can be controlled by introducing the desired stoichiometric quantities of starting materials. In order to synthesize CIGO nanoparticles, various NaCl/precursor ratios were used to accomplish the SAUSP process and ultimately monodisperse CIGO nanoparticles with average particle size of 9 nm without hard agglomeration were obtained. Subsequently, the CIGO nanoparticles were sulfurized to form the CIGS in H 2 S/Ar atmosphere at 500 °C. The CIGS obtained in the present study has the various band gap ranging from 1.67 to 2.34 eV depending on the Ga / (In + Ga) ratio, and those band gap correspond to the respective bulk materials. - Highlights: • CIGS is obtained using Cu, In and Ga oxide mixture (CIGO) nanoparticles. • Salt-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis is used to synthesize CIGO nanoparticles. • Nine nanometers of monodisperse CIGO nanoparticles without hard agglomeration is obtained. • The band gap of CIGS can be controlled by introducing the desired ratio of precursor

  12. Biomass ash-bed material interactions leading to agglomeration in FBC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, H.J.M.; van Lith, Simone Cornelia; Kiel, J.H.A.

    2008-01-01

    -scale installations is "coating-induced" agglomeration. During reactor operation, a coating is formed on the surface of bed material grains and at certain critical conditions (e.g., coating thickness or temperature) sintering of the coatings initiates the agglomeration. In an experimental approach, this work...

  13. Stone Dust Agglomeration for Utilizing as Building Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Borowski

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper we discuss the possibility of using stone dust for utilizing as building material. The tested material was amphibolite, found in the Sudeten Mountains and the Tatra Mountains in Poland. The chemical composition of dust was determined by means of spectrometry methods. Moreover, the basic physical properties of the material were designated. Stone dust was mixed with starch or cement binder. The binder addition was from 5% to 20% by weight. The water content was adjusted to about 25% humidity. The mixture was then compressed in a hydraulic press at 50 MPa. The results of the mechanical toughness of agglomerates were shown. On the basis of the results, acceptable toughness of agglomerates was found, with the addition of cement in mass share 20% and seasoning for 48 hours. However, starch was not suitable as a binder for agglomeration of amphibolite.

  14. Agglomeration during wet milling of LAST (lead-antimony-silver-tellurium) powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, B.D.; Case, E.D.; Ren, F.; Johnson, J.R.; Timm, E.J.

    2009-01-01

    LAST (lead-antimony-silver-tellurium) compounds comprise a family of semiconducting materials with good thermoelectric properties. However, the as-cast form of LAST exhibits large grain size and hence low mechanical strength. Powder processing can produce a fine powder particle size that enhances fracture strength, however the powders tend to agglomerate if the individual powder diameters are less than a few microns across. Dry milling or wet milling (hexane additions of 0 cm 3 and 10 cm 3 ) produced hard agglomerates roughly 40 μm in diameter while wet milling with hexane additions of 25 cm 3 , 30 cm 3 or 50 cm 3 resulted in small, porous agglomerates roughly 20 μm in diameter. Thus, by adjusting the amount of milling liquid used while milling LAST powders, one can shift from hard to soft agglomerates, where the literature shows that soft agglomerates are less harmful to the final, sintered product. Also, in agreement with the results from the literature on other materials, wet milling of LAST powders produced smaller particle sizes but required longer times to reach the grindability limit

  15. Hard and transparent films formed by nanocellulose-TiO2 nanoparticle hybrids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Schütz

    Full Text Available The formation of hybrids of nanofibrillated cellulose and titania nanoparticles in aqueous media has been studied. Their transparency and mechanical behavior have been assessed by spectrophotometry and nanoindentation. The results show that limiting the titania nanoparticle concentration below 16 vol% yields homogeneous hybrids with a very high Young's modulus and hardness, of up to 44 GPa and 3.4 GPa, respectively, and an optical transmittance above 80%. Electron microscopy shows that higher nanoparticle contents result in agglomeration and an inhomogeneous hybrid nanostructure with a concomitant reduction of hardness and optical transmittance. Infrared spectroscopy suggests that the nanostructure of the hybrids is controlled by electrostatic adsorption of the titania nanoparticles on the negatively charged nanocellulose surfaces.

  16. Hard and Transparent Films Formed by Nanocellulose–TiO2 Nanoparticle Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, Christina; Sort, Jordi; Bacsik, Zoltán; Oliynyk, Vitaliy; Pellicer, Eva; Fall, Andreas; Wågberg, Lars; Berglund, Lars; Bergström, Lennart; Salazar-Alvarez, German

    2012-01-01

    The formation of hybrids of nanofibrillated cellulose and titania nanoparticles in aqueous media has been studied. Their transparency and mechanical behavior have been assessed by spectrophotometry and nanoindentation. The results show that limiting the titania nanoparticle concentration below 16 vol% yields homogeneous hybrids with a very high Young’s modulus and hardness, of up to 44 GPa and 3.4 GPa, respectively, and an optical transmittance above 80%. Electron microscopy shows that higher nanoparticle contents result in agglomeration and an inhomogeneous hybrid nanostructure with a concomitant reduction of hardness and optical transmittance. Infrared spectroscopy suggests that the nanostructure of the hybrids is controlled by electrostatic adsorption of the titania nanoparticles on the negatively charged nanocellulose surfaces. PMID:23049689

  17. Nanoparticles formation and deposition in the trichel pulse corona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amirov, R H; Samoylov, I S; Petrov, A A

    2013-01-01

    Cathode erosion in the negative corona discharge has been studied in the point-to-plane electrode configuration with Cu cathodes in the Trichel pulse regime. Redeposition of erosion products has been found on the cathode surface in form of agglomerates of 10-nm nanoparticles. Nanocraters and nanoparticles formation in the negative corona discharge has been considered in frames of electro-explosive mechanism of cathode erosion. According to this mechanism the cathode erosion is performed as a consequence of elementary erosion events each of which is caused by a Trichel pulse. A 1-dimentional model of corona-produced nanoparticles dynamics in the gap was elaborated. According to results of the simulation, the redeposition is explained by charging of the nanoparticles due to positive ions adsorption and thermionic emission. The size, temperature and initial velocity of the aerosol nanoparticles have the decisive action on redeposition in the negative corona discharge.

  18. A predictive model of iron oxide nanoparticles flocculation tuning Z-potential in aqueous environment for biological application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldassarre, Francesca, E-mail: francesca.baldassarre@unisalento.it [University of Salento, Department of Cultural Heritage (Italy); Cacciola, Matteo, E-mail: matteo.cacciola@unirc.it [University “Mediterranea” of Reggio Calabria, DICEAM (Italy); Ciccarella, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe.ciccarella@unisalento.it [University of Salento, Department of Innovation Engineering (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are the most used magnetic nanoparticles in biomedical and biotechnological field because of their nontoxicity respect to the other metals. The investigation of iron oxide nanoparticles behaviour in aqueous environment is important for the biological applications in terms of polydispersity, mobility, cellular uptake and response to the external magnetic field. Iron oxide nanoparticles tend to agglomerate in aqueous solutions; thus, the stabilisation and aggregation could be modified tuning the colloids physical proprieties. Surfactants or polymers are often used to avoid agglomeration and increase nanoparticles stability. We have modelled and synthesised iron oxide nanoparticles through a co-precipitation method, in order to study the influence of surfactants and coatings on the aggregation state. Thus, we compared experimental results to simulation model data. The change of Z-potential and the clusters size were determined by Dynamic Light Scattering. We developed a suitable numerical model to predict the flocculation. The effects of Volume Mean Diameter and fractal dimension were explored in the model. We obtained the trend of these parameters tuning the Z-potential. These curves matched with the experimental results and confirmed the goodness of the model. Subsequently, we exploited the model to study the influence of nanoparticles aggregation and stability by Z-potential and external magnetic field. The highest Z-potential is reached up with a small external magnetic influence, a small aggregation and then a high suspension stability. Thus, we obtained a predictive model of Iron oxide nanoparticles flocculation that will be exploited for the nanoparticles engineering and experimental setup of bioassays.

  19. A predictive model of iron oxide nanoparticles flocculation tuning Z-potential in aqueous environment for biological application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldassarre, Francesca; Cacciola, Matteo; Ciccarella, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are the most used magnetic nanoparticles in biomedical and biotechnological field because of their nontoxicity respect to the other metals. The investigation of iron oxide nanoparticles behaviour in aqueous environment is important for the biological applications in terms of polydispersity, mobility, cellular uptake and response to the external magnetic field. Iron oxide nanoparticles tend to agglomerate in aqueous solutions; thus, the stabilisation and aggregation could be modified tuning the colloids physical proprieties. Surfactants or polymers are often used to avoid agglomeration and increase nanoparticles stability. We have modelled and synthesised iron oxide nanoparticles through a co-precipitation method, in order to study the influence of surfactants and coatings on the aggregation state. Thus, we compared experimental results to simulation model data. The change of Z-potential and the clusters size were determined by Dynamic Light Scattering. We developed a suitable numerical model to predict the flocculation. The effects of Volume Mean Diameter and fractal dimension were explored in the model. We obtained the trend of these parameters tuning the Z-potential. These curves matched with the experimental results and confirmed the goodness of the model. Subsequently, we exploited the model to study the influence of nanoparticles aggregation and stability by Z-potential and external magnetic field. The highest Z-potential is reached up with a small external magnetic influence, a small aggregation and then a high suspension stability. Thus, we obtained a predictive model of Iron oxide nanoparticles flocculation that will be exploited for the nanoparticles engineering and experimental setup of bioassays

  20. Crystal agglomeration of europium oxalate in reaction crystallization using double-jet semi-batch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo-Sik; Kim, Woon-Soo; Kim, Kwang-Seok; Kim, Joon-Soo; Ward, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    The particle agglomeration of europium oxalate was investigated in a double-jet semi-batch reactor over a wide range of operating variables, including the agitation speed, reactant feed rate, and reactant concentration. The size of the agglomerates was directly dictated by the particle collision and supersaturation promoting agglomeration and the fluid shear force inhibiting agglomeration. Thus, with a longer feeding time and higher feed concentration for the reaction crystallization, the mean particle size increased, while the corresponding total particle population decreased due to the enhanced chance of particle agglomeration, resulting from a longer residence time and higher supersaturation in the reactor. Agitation was found to exhibit a rather complicated influence on particle agglomeration. Although both particle collision and turbulent fluid shear were promoted by an increase in the mixing intensity, the crystal agglomeration of europium oxalate was maximized at around 500 rpm of agitation speed due to an optimized balance between particle aggregation and breakage

  1. Interactions between TiO2 nanoparticles and cadmium: consequences for uptake and ecotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, B.; Baun, Anders

    2011-01-01

    As a consequence of the increasing use of engineered nanoparticles in e.g. industrial applications and consumer products, these particles will be released into the aquatic environment. They will be present in the water phase where they are likely to form aggregates/agglomerates. Through sedimenta...

  2. Simulation of deterministic energy-balance particle agglomeration in turbulent liquid-solid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njobuenwu, Derrick O.; Fairweather, Michael

    2017-08-01

    An efficient technique to simulate turbulent particle-laden flow at high mass loadings within the four-way coupled simulation regime is presented. The technique implements large-eddy simulation, discrete particle simulation, a deterministic treatment of inter-particle collisions, and an energy-balanced particle agglomeration model. The algorithm to detect inter-particle collisions is such that the computational costs scale linearly with the number of particles present in the computational domain. On detection of a collision, particle agglomeration is tested based on the pre-collision kinetic energy, restitution coefficient, and van der Waals' interactions. The performance of the technique developed is tested by performing parametric studies on the influence of the restitution coefficient (en = 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8), particle size (dp = 60, 120, 200, and 316 μm), Reynolds number (Reτ = 150, 300, and 590), and particle concentration (αp = 5.0 × 10-4, 1.0 × 10-3, and 5.0 × 10-3) on particle-particle interaction events (collision and agglomeration). The results demonstrate that the collision frequency shows a linear dependency on the restitution coefficient, while the agglomeration rate shows an inverse dependence. Collisions among smaller particles are more frequent and efficient in forming agglomerates than those of coarser particles. The particle-particle interaction events show a strong dependency on the shear Reynolds number Reτ, while increasing the particle concentration effectively enhances particle collision and agglomeration whilst having only a minor influence on the agglomeration rate. Overall, the sensitivity of the particle-particle interaction events to the selected simulation parameters is found to influence the population and distribution of the primary particles and agglomerates formed.

  3. Synthesis of nanoparticles in a flame aerosol reactor with independent and strict control of their size, crystal phase and morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Jingkun; Chen, D-R; Biswas, Pratim

    2007-01-01

    A flame aerosol reactor (FLAR) was developed to synthesize nanoparticles with desired properties (crystal phase and size) that could be independently controlled. The methodology was demonstrated for TiO 2 nanoparticles, and this is the first time that large sets of samples with the same size but different crystal phases (six different ratios of anatase to rutile in this work) were synthesized. The degree of TiO 2 nanoparticle agglomeration was determined by comparing the primary particle size distribution measured by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to the mobility-based particle size distribution measured by online scanning mobility particle spectrometry (SMPS). By controlling the flame aerosol reactor conditions, both spherical unagglomerated particles and highly agglomerated particles were produced. To produce monodisperse nanoparticles, a high throughput multi-stage differential mobility analyser (MDMA) was used in series with the flame aerosol reactor. Nearly monodisperse nanoparticles (geometric standard deviation less than 1.05) could be collected in sufficient mass quantities (of the order of 10 mg) in reasonable time (1 h) that could be used in other studies such as determination of functionality or biological effects as a function of size

  4. Synthesis of nanoparticles in a flame aerosol reactor with independent and strict control of their size, crystal phase and morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Jingkun; Chen, D-R; Biswas, Pratim [Aerosol and Air Quality Research Laboratory, Department of Energy, Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Washington University in St Louis, Campus Box 1180, St Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

    2007-07-18

    A flame aerosol reactor (FLAR) was developed to synthesize nanoparticles with desired properties (crystal phase and size) that could be independently controlled. The methodology was demonstrated for TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, and this is the first time that large sets of samples with the same size but different crystal phases (six different ratios of anatase to rutile in this work) were synthesized. The degree of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle agglomeration was determined by comparing the primary particle size distribution measured by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to the mobility-based particle size distribution measured by online scanning mobility particle spectrometry (SMPS). By controlling the flame aerosol reactor conditions, both spherical unagglomerated particles and highly agglomerated particles were produced. To produce monodisperse nanoparticles, a high throughput multi-stage differential mobility analyser (MDMA) was used in series with the flame aerosol reactor. Nearly monodisperse nanoparticles (geometric standard deviation less than 1.05) could be collected in sufficient mass quantities (of the order of 10 mg) in reasonable time (1 h) that could be used in other studies such as determination of functionality or biological effects as a function of size.

  5. Synthesis, Characterization and Properties of Nanoparticles of Intermetallic Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiSalvo, Francis J. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2015-03-12

    The research program from 2010 to the end of the grant focused on understanding the factors important to the synthesis of single phase intermetallic nano-particles (NPs), their size, crystalline order, surface properties and electrochemical activity. The synthetic method developed is a co-reduction of mixtures of single metal precursors by strong, soluble reducing agents in a non-protic solvent, tetrahydrofuran (THF). With some exceptions, the particles obtained by room temperature reduction are random alloys that need to be annealed at modest temperatures (200 to 600 °C) in order to develop an ordered structure. To avoid significant particle size growth and agglomeration, the particles must be protected by surface coatings. We developed a novel method of coating the metal nanoparticles with KCl, a by-product of the reduction reaction if the proper reducing agents are employed. In that case, a composite product containing individual metal nanoparticles in a KCl matrix is obtained. The composite can be heated to at least 600 °C without significant agglomeration or growth in particle size. Washing the annealed product in the presence of catalyst supports in ethylene glycol removes the KCl and deposits the particles on the support. Six publications present the method and its application to producing and studying new catalyst/support combinations for fuel cell applications. Three publications concern the use of related methods to explore new lithium-sulfur battery concepts.

  6. Two-stage agglomeration of fine-grained herbal nettle waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obidziński, Sławomir; Joka, Magdalena; Fijoł, Olga

    2017-10-01

    This paper compares the densification work necessary for the pressure agglomeration of fine-grained dusty nettle waste, with the densification work involved in two-stage agglomeration of the same material. In the first stage, the material was pre-densified through coating with a binder material in the form of a 5% potato starch solution, and then subjected to pressure agglomeration. A number of tests were conducted to determine the effect of the moisture content in the nettle waste (15, 18 and 21%), as well as the process temperature (50, 70, 90°C) on the values of densification work and the density of the obtained pellets. For pre-densified pellets from a mixture of nettle waste and a starch solution, the conducted tests determined the effect of pellet particle size (1, 2, and 3 mm) and the process temperature (50, 70, 90°C) on the same values. On the basis of the tests, we concluded that the introduction of a binder material and the use of two-stage agglomeration in nettle waste densification resulted in increased densification work (as compared to the densification of nettle waste alone) and increased pellet density.

  7. Quantitative analysis of pigment dispersion taking into account the full agglomerate size distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren

    were in good quantitative agreement with experimental data. The only adjustable parameter used was an apparent rate constant for the linear agglomerate erosion rate. Model simulations, at selected values of time, for the full agglomerate particle size distribution were in good qualitative agreement...... distribution was simulated. Data from previous experimental investigations with organic pigments were used for model validation.When the linear rate of agglomerate surface erosion was taken to be proportional to the external agglomerate surface area, simulations of the volume-moment mean diameter over time...

  8. General Approach to the Evolution of Singlet Nanoparticles from a Rapidly Quenched Point Source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, J.; Huang, Luyi; Ludvigsson, Linus; Messing, Maria; Maiser, A.; Biskos, G.; Schmidt-Ott, A.

    2016-01-01

    Among the numerous point vapor sources, microsecond-pulsed spark ablation at atmospheric pressure is a versatile and environmentally friendly method for producing ultrapure inorganic nanoparticles ranging from singlets having sizes smaller than 1 nm to larger agglomerated structures. Due to its fast

  9. Industrial agglomeration and production costs in Norwegian salmon aquaculture

    OpenAIRE

    Tveterås, Ragnar

    2002-01-01

    During the last decade, empirical evidence of regional agglomeration economies has emerged for some industries. This paper argues that externalities from agglomeration are not only present in some manufacturing and service sectors, but can also occur in primary industries, such as aquaculture. Econometric analyses in this literature have primarily estimated rather restrictive production function specifications on aggregated industry data. Here, cost functions are estimated o...

  10. Application of acoustic agglomeration for removing sulfuric acid mist from air stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Sadighzadeh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of acoustic fields at high sound pressure levels (SPLs for removing sulfuric acid mists from the air stream was studied. An acoustic agglomeration chamber was used to conduct the experiments. The studied SPLs ranged from 115 to 165 decibel (dB, with three inlet concentrations of acid mist at 5–10, 15–20, and 25–30 ppm. The air flow rates for conducting experiments were 20, 30, and 40 L min−1. The concentration of sulfuric acid mist was measured using US Environmental Protection Agency Method 8 at inlet and outlet of the chamber. The resonance frequencies for experiments were found to be 852, 1410, and 3530 Hz. The maximum acoustic agglomeration efficiency of 86% was obtained at optimum frequency of 852 Hz. The analysis of variance test revealed significant differences between agglomeration efficiency at three resonance frequencies (p-value < 0.001. The maximum acoustic agglomeration efficiency was obtained at SPL level of 165 dB. High initial concentrations of acid mists and lower air flow rates enhance the acoustic agglomeration of mists. High removal efficiency of acid mists from air stream could be achieved by the application of acoustic agglomeration method with appropriate range of frequencies and SPLs. Keywords: Sulfuric acid, Mist, Acoustic agglomeration, SPL

  11. Problems of Research, Projects and Mechanisms for Their Implementation in Chelyabinsk City Agglomeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolshakov, V. V.

    2017-11-01

    The article analyzes the research and design methods of urban agglomerations in the context of the Chelyabinsk agglomeration from the point of view of correctness, objectivity and consistency of the results obtained. The completed and approved project of the Chelyabinsk agglomeration is analysed to provide architectural and planning solutions for sustainable social and economic development according to the theories that have been formed to date. The possibility of effectuation and implementation of the approved project of the Chelyabinsk agglomeration taking in account existing specific natural, historical and socio-economic factors characteristic for the territory under consideration is examined. The authors draw the conclusions the project of the Chelyabinsk agglomeration has been developed in line with the town-planning solutions that do not reflect modern approaches based on the competitive advantages of territories and do not form a space providing transition to a modernized and innovative economy. Specific town-planning decisions have a weak justification and an undeveloped methodology for pre-project analysis and methodology for designing urban agglomerations because of absence of a full study of the phenomenon of urban agglomeration and processes occurring in it today. It is necessary to continue research in the field of development of the Chelyabinsk agglomeration with the use of a logical and objective methodology to analyze the territory and design which can lead to the formation of an urban-planning information model that reflects all the system processes and allows for predicting project solutions.

  12. In vitro study revealed different size behavior of different nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaudien, Dirk; Knebel, Jan; Creutzenberg, Otto

    2012-01-01

    Toxicity of nanoparticles is depending not only on the size of the primary particles but on the size of their agglomerates. Therefore, further studies are needed to examine the behavior of nanoparticles after they have gotten in contact with cells. The presented study investigated the change of size of different commercially available nanoparticles after applying them to different cell lines such as A549, Calu-3, 16HBE14o and LK004 representative for the different parts of the human lung. The different nanoparticles exhibited differences in behavior of size. TiO 2 P25 showed a tendency to increase, whereas TiO 2 T805 and Printex ® 90 remained more or less at the same size. In contrast, ZnO < 50 nm particles showed a significant decrease of size.

  13. Impact of biofuel in agglomeration process on production of pollutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesko Jaroslav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Production of agglomerate in the metallurgical company belongs among the largest sources of emissions damaging the environment. Effects of coke breeze substitution by charcoal, pine, and oak sawdust there were sintering performed in a laboratory agglomeration pan with substitution ratios of 14 % and 20 % by the emissions of CO2, CO, NOx and NO. Variations in the gas emissions might have been affected by physical and chemical properties of the input materials and the technological parameters of agglomeration. It is important and necessary to seek other methods and materials with which it would be possible to optimize the production of emissions and protect the environment.

  14. Long-term follow up of children exposed in utero to nifedipine or ritodrine for the management of preterm labour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtzager, B. A.; Hogendoorn, S. M.; Papatsonis, D. N. M.; Samsom, J. F.; van Geijn, H. P.; Bleker, O. P.; van Wassenaer, A. G.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the long-term psychosocial and motor effects on children exposed in utero to nifedipine or ritodrine for the management of preterm labour. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Multicentre study in two university and one primary hospital in the Netherlands. POPULATION:

  15. SUBMICRON PARTICLES EMISSION CONTROL BY ELECTROSTATIC AGGLOMERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Krupa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to develop a device for more effective treatment of flue gases from submicron particles emitted by power plants burning bituminous coal and by this way the reduction of environment pollution. Electrostatic processes were employed to this goal, as the most effective solution. The solutions hitherto applied in electrostatic precipitation techniques were designed for large particles, typically with sizes> 5 µm, which are easily removed by the action of electrostatic force on the electrically charged particles. In submicron size range (0.1-1 µm the collection efficiency of an ESP is minimal, because of the low value of electric charge on such particles. In order to avoid problems with the removal of submicron particles of fly ash from the flue gases electrostatic agglomeration has been used. In this process, by applying an alternating electric field, larger charged particles (> 1 µm oscillate, and the particles "collect" smaller uncharged particles. In the developed agglomerator with alternating electric field, the charging of particles and the coagulation takes place in one stage that greatly simplified the construction of the device, compared to other solutions. The scope of this study included measurements of fractional collection efficiency of particles in the system comprising of agglomerator and ESP for PM1 and PM2.5 ranges, in device made in pilot scale. The collection efficiency for PM2.5 was greater than 90% and PM1 slightly dropped below 90%. The mass collection efficiency for PM2.5 was greater than 95%. The agglomerator stage increases the collection efficiency for PM1 at a level of 5-10%.

  16. Prediction of mass fraction of agglomerated debris in a LWR severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudinov, P.; Davydov, M.

    2011-01-01

    Ex-vessel termination of accident progression in Swedish type Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) is contingent upon efficacy of melt fragmentation and solidification in a deep pool of water below reactor vessel. When liquid melt reaches the bottom of the pool it can create agglomerated debris and “cake” regions that increase hydraulic resistance of the bed and affect coolability of the bed. This paper discusses development and application of a conservative-mechanistic approach to quantify mass fractions of agglomerated debris. Experimental data from the DEFOR-A (Debris Bed Formation and Agglomeration) tests with high superheat of binary oxidic simulant material melt is used for validation of the methods. Application of the approach to plant accident analysis suggests that melt superheat has less significant influence on agglomeration of the debris than jet penetration depth. The paper also discusses the impact of the uncertainty in the jet disintegration and penetration behavior on the agglomeration mode map. (author)

  17. Morphological characterization of diesel soot agglomerates based on the Beer–Lambert law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapuerta, Magín; Expósito, Juan José; Martos, Francisco J

    2013-01-01

    A new method is proposed for the determination of the number of primary particles composing soot agglomerates emitted from diesel engines as well as their individual fractal dimension. The method is based on the Beer–Lambert law and it is applied to micro-photographs taken in high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Differences in the grey levels of the images lead to a more accurate estimation of the geometry of the agglomerate (in this case radius of gyration) than other methods based exclusively on the planar projections of the agglomerates. The method was validated by applying it to different images of the same agglomerate observed from different angles of incidence, and proving that the effect of the angle of incidence is minor, contrary to other methods. Finally, the comparisons with other methods showed that the size, number of primary particles and fractal dimension (the latter depending on the particle size) are usually underestimated when only planar projections of the agglomerates are considered. (paper)

  18. Analysis on the Spatial-Temporal Dynamics of Financial Agglomeration with Markov Chain Approach in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimin Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The standard approach to studying financial industrial agglomeration is to construct measures of the degree of agglomeration within financial industry. But such measures often fail to exploit the convergence or divergence of financial agglomeration. In this paper, we apply Markov chain approach to diagnose the convergence of financial agglomeration in China based on the location quotient coefficients across the provincial regions over 1993–2011. The estimation of Markov transition probability matrix offers more detailed insights into the mechanics of financial agglomeration evolution process in China during the research period. The results show that the spatial evolution of financial agglomeration changes faster in the period of 2003–2011 than that in the period of 1993–2002. Furthermore, there exists a very uneven financial development patterns, but there is regional convergence for financial agglomeration in China.

  19. Synthesis of Yttria-stabilized zirconia nanoparticles by decomposition of metal nitrates coated on carbon powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, S.; Stangle, G.C.; Amarakoon, V.R.; Schulze, W.A.

    1996-01-01

    Weakly agglomerated nanoparticles of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) were synthesized by a novel process which involved the decomposition of metal nitrates that had been coated on ultrafine carbon black powder, after which the carbon black was gasified. The use of ultrafine, high-surface-area carbon black powder apparently allowed the nanocrystalline oxide particles to form and remain separate from each other, after which the carbon black was gasified at a somewhat higher temperature. As a result, the degree of agglomeration was shown to be relatively low. The average crystallite size and the specific surface area of the as-synthesized YSZ nanoparticles were 5∼6 nm and 130 m 2 /g, respectively, for powder synthesized at 650 degree C. The as-synthesized YSZ nanoparticles had a light brown color and were translucent, which differs distinctly from conventional YSZ particles which are typically white and opaque. The mechanism of the synthesis process was investigated, and indicated that the gasification temperature had a direct effect on the crystallite size of the as-synthesized YSZ nanoparticles. High-density and ultrafine-grained YSZ ceramic articles were prepared by fast-firing, using a dwell temperature of 1250 degree C and a dwell time of two minutes or less. copyright 1996 Materials Research Society

  20. Agglomeration economies in manufacturing industries: the case of Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Olga Alonso-Villar; José-María Chamorro-Rivas; Xulia González-Cerdeira

    2001-01-01

    This paper analyses the extent of geographical concentration of Spanish industry between 1993 and 1999, and study the agglomeration economies that could underlie that concentration. The results confirm that there is major geographic concentration in a number of industries with widely varying characteristics, including high-tech businesses and those linked to the provision of natural resources as well as traditional industries. The analysis of the scope of spillovers behind this agglomeration ...

  1. PLA/CS/Nifedipine Nanocomposite Films: Properties and the In Vitro Release of Nifedipine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trang, Nguyen Thi Thu; Chinh, Nguyen Thuy; Giang, Nguyen Vu; Thanh, Dinh Thi Mai; Lam, Tran Dai; Hoang, Thai

    2016-07-01

    The polylactic acid (PLA)/chitosan (CS) films containing a drug, nifedipine (NIF), in the presence of polyethylene oxide (PEO) as a compatibilizer were prepared by the solution method. This method has not been used to form films containing four components (PLA, CS, NIF, PEO) up to now. The CS, PEO, and NIF contents are 25 wt.%, 6-8 wt.%, and 10-50 wt.% in comparison with PLA weight, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) were used to characterize the interactions, properties, and morphology of the PLA/CS/PEO/NIF films. The FTIR, TGA, and DSC results show that NIF carried by PLA/CS/PEO films and PLA, CS, NIF had better interaction and were more compatible when using PEO. The surface morphology of PLA/CS/PEO/NIF films was similar to that of PLA/CS/PEO films. Moreover, this was the first time drug loading and NIF release content from PLA/CS/PEO films were determined by the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy method. The drug loading of PLA/CS/PEO/NIF films was from 80.99% to 93.61%. The in vitro NIF release studies were carried out in pH 2, 6.8, and 7.4 solutions corresponding to the pH of stomach, colon, and duodenum regions in the human body, respectively. The NIF release content in different pH solutions is in the order: pH 2 > pH 6.8 > pH 7.4 and increases when there is increasing NIF loading. The PLA/CS/PEO films are potential materials to apply for long-circulating systems for NIF delivery.

  2. Epigallocatechin gallate enhances treatment efficacy of oral nifedipine against pregnancy-induced severe pre-eclampsia: A double-blind, randomized and placebo-controlled clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, D-D; Guo, J-J; Zhou, L; Wang, N

    2018-02-01

    Oral nifedipine is commonly used to treat pre-eclampsia, one of the most severe complications during pregnancy, but its clinical efficacy is less than ideal. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a natural compound from green tea, could benefit cardiovascular health especially hypertension. We investigated the clinical efficacy of EGCG, when complemented with oral nifedipine, in treating pre-eclampsia. A total of 350 pregnant women with severe pre-eclampsia were recruited and randomized to receive oral nifedipine, together with placebo (NIF+placebo) or EGCG (NIF+EGCG). The primary treatment outcome was the time needed to control blood pressure and interval time before a new hypertensive crisis, whereas the secondary treatment outcome was the number of treatment doses to effectively control blood pressure, maternal adverse effects and neonatal complications. Comparing NIF+EGCG group to NIF+placebo group, the time needed to control blood pressure was significantly shorter (NIF+EGCG 31.2±16.7 minutes, NIF+placebo 45.3±21.9 minutes; 95% CI 9.7-18.5 minutes), whereas interval time before a new hypertensive crisis was significantly prolonged (NIF+EGCG 7.2±2.9 hours, NIF+placebo 4.1±3.7 hours; 95% CI 2.3-3.9 hours), and the number of treatment dosages needed to effectively control blood pressure was also lower. Between the two treatment groups, no differences in incidence rates of maternal adverse effects or neonatal complications were observed. EGCG is both safe and effective in enhancing treatment efficacy of oral nifedipine against pregnancy-induced severe pre-eclampsia, but formal validation is required prior to its recommendation for use outside of clinical trials. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. A STUDY OF ANTICONVULSANT EFFECT OF FLUNARIZINE AND NIFEDIPINE IN COMPARISON WITH SODIUM VALPROATE ON MES AND PTZ MODELS OF EPILEPSY IN ALBINO RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh G.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : CA +2 ions are involved in initiation as well as spread of seizures. Hence current study was undertaken to evaluate the anticonvulsant effect of calcium channel blockers flunarizine, nifedipine and compare their efficacy with that of sodium valproate, the broad spectrum anticonvulsant in MES and PTZ induced seizures in albino rats. MATERIALS AND METHODS : Albino rats were treated with nife dipine 2.5mg/kg, 5mg/kg, flunarizine 7.5mg/kg,15mg/kg and sodium valproate 250mg/kg bodyweight intraperitoneally and the effects were observed in MES and PTZ models of epilepsy. The parameters observed in MES model was , duration of HLTE phase . Convulsive p hase, and post ictal depressive phase. In PTZ model duration of seizure latency, duration of convulsion , and duration post ictal depression were observed. RESULTS : our study demonstrated that both calcium channel blockers afford protection against convulsi ons induced in both models, and flunarizine affords higher degree of protection than nifedipine, with its efficacy almost approaching that of sodium valproate. CONCLUSION : Flunarizine has significant, while nifedipine has moderate degree of anticonvulsant activity as compared to sodium valproate

  4. Comments on an Analytical Thermal Agglomeration for Problems with Surface Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, N. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-03-22

    Up until Dec 2016, the thermal agglomeration was very heuristic, and as such, difficult to define. The lack of predictability became problematic, and the current notes represent the first real attempt to systematize the specification of the agglomerated process parameters.

  5. Multilevel approaches and the firm-agglomeration ambiguity in economic growth studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, F.G. van; Burger, M.J.; Knoben, J.; Raspe, O.

    2012-01-01

    Empirical studies in spatial economics have shown that agglomeration economies may be a source of the uneven distribution of economic activities and economic growth across cities and regions. Both localization and urbanization economies are hypothesized to foster agglomeration and growth, but

  6. Cellulase immobilization on magnetic nanoparticles encapsulated in polymer nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Janaina S; Araújo, Pedro H H; Sayer, Claudia; Souza, Antonio A U; Viegas, Alexandre C; de Oliveira, Débora

    2017-04-01

    Immobilization of cellulases on magnetic nanoparticles, especially magnetite nanoparticles, has been the main approach studied to make this enzyme, economically and industrially, more attractive. However, magnetite nanoparticles tend to agglomerate, are very reactive and easily oxidized in air, which has strong impact on their useful life. Thus, it is very important to provide proper surface coating to avoid the mentioned problems. This study aimed to investigate the immobilization of cellulase on magnetic nanoparticles encapsulated in polymeric nanospheres. The support was characterized in terms of morphology, average diameter, magnetic behavior and thermal decomposition analyses. The polymer nanospheres containing encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles showed superparamagnetic behavior and intensity average diameter about 150 nm. Immobilized cellulase exhibited broader temperature stability than in the free form and great reusability capacity, 69% of the initial enzyme activity was maintained after eight cycles of use. The magnetic support showed potential for cellulase immobilization and allowed fast and easy biocatalyst recovery through a single magnet.

  7. Cell agglomeration in the wells of a 24-well plate using acoustic streaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurashina, Yuta; Takemura, Kenjiro; Friend, James

    2017-02-28

    Cell agglomeration is essential both to the success of drug testing and to the development of tissue engineering. Here, a MHz-order acoustic wave is used to generate acoustic streaming in the wells of a 24-well plate to drive particle and cell agglomeration. Acoustic streaming is known to manipulate particles in microfluidic devices, and even provide concentration in sessile droplets, but concentration of particles or cells in individual wells has never been shown, principally due to the drag present along the periphery of the fluid in such a well. The agglomeration time for a range of particle sizes suggests that shear-induced migration plays an important role in the agglomeration process. Particles with a diameter of 45 μm agglomerated into a suspended pellet under exposure to 2.134 MHz acoustic waves at 1.5 W in 30 s. Additionally, BT-474 cells also agglomerated as adherent masses at the center bottom of the wells of tissue-culture treated 24-well plates. By switching to low cell binding 24-well plates, the BT-474 cells formed suspended agglomerations that appeared to be spheroids, fully fifteen times larger than any cell agglomerates without the acoustic streaming. In either case, the viability and proliferation of the cells were maintained despite acoustic irradiation and streaming. Intermittent excitation was effective in avoiding temperature excursions, consuming only 75 mW per well on average, presenting a convenient means to form fully three-dimensional cellular masses potentially useful for tissue, cancer, and drug research.

  8. Agglomeration of dust in convective clouds initialized by nuclear bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, D. P.; Sarma, R. A.

    Convective clouds initialized by nuclear bursts are modeled using a two-dimensional axisymmetric cloud model. Dust transport through the atmosphere is studied using five different sizes ranging from 1 to 10,000 μm in diameter. Dust is transported in the model domain by advection and sedimentation. Water is allowed to condense onto dust particles in regions of supersaturation in the cloud. The agglomeration of dust particles resulting from the collision of different size dust particles is modeled. The evolution of the dust mass spectrum due to agglomeration is modeled using a numerical scheme which is mass conserving and has low implicit diffusion. Agglomeration moves mass from the small particles with very small fall velocity to the larger sizes which fall to the ground more readily. Results indicate that the dust fallout can be increased significantly due to this process. In preliminary runs using stable and unstable environmental soundings, at 30 min after detonation the total dust in the domain was 11 and 30%, respectively, less than a control case without agglomeration.

  9. A stochastic pocket model for aluminum agglomeration in solid propellants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallier, Stany [SNPE Materiaux Energetiques, Vert le Petit (France)

    2009-04-15

    A new model is derived to estimate the size and fraction of aluminum agglomerates at the surface of a burning propellant. The basic idea relies on well-known pocket models in which aluminum is supposed to aggregate and melt within pocket volumes imposed by largest oxidizer particles. The proposed model essentially relaxes simple assumptions of previous pocket models on propellant structure by accounting for an actual microstructure obtained by packing. The use of statistical tools from stochastic geometry enables to determine a statistical pocket size volume and hence agglomerate diameter and agglomeration fraction. Application to several AP/Al propellants gives encouraging results that are shown to be superior to former pocket models. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Combination therapy with metoprolol and nifedipine versus monotherapy in patients with stable angina pectoris. Results of the International Multicenter Angina Exercise (IMAGE) Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savonitto, S; Ardissiono, D; Egstrup, K

    1996-01-01

    was then added for a further 4 weeks. Exercise tests were performed at weeks 0, 6 and 10. RESULTS: At week 6, both metoprolol and nifedipine increased the mean exercise time to 1-mm ST segment depression in comparison with week 0 (both p ... 10, the groups randomized to combination therapy had a further increase in time to 1-mm ST segment depression (p ... metoprolol to nifedipine showed an increase in exercise tolerance that was greater than the 90th percentile of the distribution of the changes observed in the corresponding monotherapy + placebo groups. However, among these patients, an additive effect was observed only in 1 (14%) of the 7 patients treated...

  11. Factoring-in agglomeration of carbon nanotubes and nanofibers for better prediction of their toxicity versus asbestos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Ashley R

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbon nanotubes (CNT and carbon nanofibers (CNF are allotropes of carbon featuring fibrous morphology. The dimensions and high aspect ratio of CNT and CNF have prompted the comparison with naturally occurring asbestos fibers which are known to be extremely pathogenic. While the toxicity and hazardous outcomes elicited by airborne exposure to single-walled CNT or asbestos have been widely reported, very limited data are currently available describing adverse effects of respirable CNF. Results Here, we assessed pulmonary inflammation, fibrosis, oxidative stress markers and systemic immune responses to respirable CNF in comparison to single-walled CNT (SWCNT and asbestos. Pulmonary inflammatory and fibrogenic responses to CNF, SWCNT and asbestos varied depending upon the agglomeration state of the particles/fibers. Foci of granulomatous lesions and collagen deposition were associated with dense particle-like SWCNT agglomerates, while no granuloma formation was found following exposure to fiber-like CNF or asbestos. The average thickness of the alveolar connective tissue - a marker of interstitial fibrosis - was increased 28 days post SWCNT, CNF or asbestos exposure. Exposure to SWCNT, CNF or asbestos resulted in oxidative stress evidenced by accumulations of 4-HNE and carbonylated proteins in the lung tissues. Additionally, local inflammatory and fibrogenic responses were accompanied by modified systemic immunity, as documented by decreased proliferation of splenic T cells ex vivo on day 28 post exposure. The accuracies of assessments of effective surface area for asbestos, SWCNT and CNF (based on geometrical analysis of their agglomeration versus estimates of mass dose and number of particles were compared as predictors of toxicological outcomes. Conclusions We provide evidence that effective surface area along with mass dose rather than specific surface area or particle number are significantly correlated with toxicological

  12. Factoring-in agglomeration of carbon nanotubes and nanofibers for better prediction of their toxicity versus asbestos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Ashley R; Kisin, Elena R; Tkach, Alexey V; Yanamala, Naveena; Mercer, Robert; Young, Shih-Houng; Fadeel, Bengt; Kagan, Valerian E; Shvedova, Anna A

    2012-04-10

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and carbon nanofibers (CNF) are allotropes of carbon featuring fibrous morphology. The dimensions and high aspect ratio of CNT and CNF have prompted the comparison with naturally occurring asbestos fibers which are known to be extremely pathogenic. While the toxicity and hazardous outcomes elicited by airborne exposure to single-walled CNT or asbestos have been widely reported, very limited data are currently available describing adverse effects of respirable CNF. Here, we assessed pulmonary inflammation, fibrosis, oxidative stress markers and systemic immune responses to respirable CNF in comparison to single-walled CNT (SWCNT) and asbestos. Pulmonary inflammatory and fibrogenic responses to CNF, SWCNT and asbestos varied depending upon the agglomeration state of the particles/fibers. Foci of granulomatous lesions and collagen deposition were associated with dense particle-like SWCNT agglomerates, while no granuloma formation was found following exposure to fiber-like CNF or asbestos. The average thickness of the alveolar connective tissue--a marker of interstitial fibrosis--was increased 28 days post SWCNT, CNF or asbestos exposure. Exposure to SWCNT, CNF or asbestos resulted in oxidative stress evidenced by accumulations of 4-HNE and carbonylated proteins in the lung tissues. Additionally, local inflammatory and fibrogenic responses were accompanied by modified systemic immunity, as documented by decreased proliferation of splenic T cells ex vivo on day 28 post exposure. The accuracies of assessments of effective surface area for asbestos, SWCNT and CNF (based on geometrical analysis of their agglomeration) versus estimates of mass dose and number of particles were compared as predictors of toxicological outcomes. We provide evidence that effective surface area along with mass dose rather than specific surface area or particle number are significantly correlated with toxicological responses to carbonaceous fibrous nanoparticles. Therefore

  13. Nanoparticle growth and surface chemistry changes in cell-conditioned culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Michaela; Hodges, Nikolas J; Whitwell, Harry; Tyrrell, Jess; Cangul, Hakan

    2015-02-05

    When biomolecules attach to engineered nanoparticle (ENP) surfaces, they confer the particles with a new biological identity. Physical format may also radically alter, changing ENP stability and agglomeration state within seconds. In order to measure which biomolecules are associated with early ENP growth, we studied ENPs in conditioned medium from A549 cell culture, using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and linear trap quadrupole electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry. Two types of 100 nm polystyrene particles (one uncoated and one with an amine functionalized surface) were used to measure the influence of surface type. In identically prepared conditioned medium, agglomeration was visible in all samples after 1 h, but was variable, indicating inter-sample variability in secretion rates and extracellular medium conditions. In samples conditioned for 1 h or more, ENP agglomeration rates varied significantly. Agglomerate size measured by DLS was well correlated with surface sequestered peptide number for uncoated but not for amine coated polystyrene ENPs. Amine-coated ENPs grew much faster and into larger agglomerates associated with fewer sequestered peptides, but including significant sequestered lactose dehydrogenase. We conclude that interference with extracellular peptide balance and oxidoreductase activity via sequestration is worthy of further study, as increased oxidative stress via this new mechanism may be important for cell toxicity. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Multilevel approaches and the firm-agglomeration ambiguity in economic growth studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oort, F.G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/107712741; Burger, M.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371741092; Knoben, J.; Raspe, O.

    2012-01-01

    Empirical studies in spatial economics have shown that agglomeration economies may be a source of the uneven distribution of economic activities and economic growth across cities and regions. Both localization and urbanization economies are hypothesized to foster agglomeration and growth, but recent

  15. Mechanical properties of individual MgAl2O4 agglomerates and their effects on densification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rufner, Jorgen F.; Castro, Ricardo H.R.; Holland, Troy B.; Benthem, Klaus van

    2014-01-01

    The presence of agglomerates during nanopowder sintering can be problematic and can limit achievable final densities. Typically, the practical solution is to use high pressures to overcome agglomerate breakdown strengths to reach higher packing fractions. The strength of agglomerates is often difficult to determine and makes processing parameters challenging to optimize. In this work, we used in situ transmission electron microscopy nanoindentation experiments to assess the mechanical properties of individual MgAl 2 O 4 agglomerates under constant indenter head displacement rates. Electron microscopy revealed highly porous agglomerates with pores on both the micron and nanometric length scales. Individual agglomerate strength, at fracture, was calculated from compression tests with deformation behavior correlating well with previously reported modeling results. Macroscopic powder properties were also investigated using green-pressed pellets consolidated at pressures up to 910 MPa. The unexpectedly high strength is indicative of the role agglomerates play in MgAl 2 O 4 nanopowder densification

  16. Design of Agglomerated Crystals of Ibuprofen During Crystallization: Influence of Surfactant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Maghsoodi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(sIbuprofen is a problematic drug in tableting, and dissolution due to its poor solubility, hydrophobicity, and tendency to stick to surface. Because of the bad compaction behavior ibuprofen has to be granulated usually before tableting. However, it would be more satisfactory to obtain directly during the crystallization step crystalline particles that can be directly compressed and quickly dissolved. Materials and Methods Crystallization of ibuprofen was carried out using the quasi emulsion solvent diffusion method in presence of surfactant (sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS, Tween 80. The particles were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, powder X-ray diffraction (XRPD and were evaluated for particle size, flowability, drug release and tableting behavior. ResultsIbuprofen particles obtained in the presence of surfactants consisted of numerous plate- shaped crystals which had agglomerated together as near spherical shape. The obtained agglomerates exhibited significantly improved micromeritic properties as well as tableting behavior than untreated drug crystals. The agglomerates size and size distribution was largely controlled by surfactant concentration, but there was no significant influence found on the tableting properties. The dissolution tests showed that the agglomerates obtained in presence of SLS exhibited enhanced dissolution rate while the agglomerates made in the presence of Tween 80 had no significant impact on dissolution rate of ibuprofen in comparison to untreated sample. The XRPD and DSC results showed that during the agglomeration process, ibuprofen did not undergo any polymorphic changes.Conclusion The study highlights the influence of surfactants on crystallization process leading to modified performance.

  17. Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Task 5, Bench- scale process testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    Under the overall objectives of DOE Contract ``Engineering Development of Selective Agglomeration,`` there were a number of specific objectives in the Task 5 program. The prime objectives of Task 5 are highlighted below: (1) Maximize process performance in pyritic sulfur rejection and BTU recovery, (2) Produce a low ash product, (3) Compare the performance of the heavy agglomerant process based on diesel and the light agglomerant process using heptane, (4) Define optimum processing conditions for engineering design, (5) Provide first-level evaluation of product handleability, and (6) Explore and investigate process options/ideas which may enhance process performance and/or product handleability.

  18. Heating efficiency in magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deatsch, Alison E.; Evans, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles for hyperthermic treatment of cancers have gained significant attention in recent years. In magnetic hyperthermia, three independent mechanisms result in thermal energy upon stimulation: Néel relaxation, Brownian relaxation, and hysteresis loss. The relative contribution of each is strongly dependent on size, shape, crystalline anisotropy, and degree of aggregation or agglomeration of the nanoparticles. We review the effects of each of these physical mechanisms in light of recent experimental studies and suggest routes for progress in the field. Particular attention is given to the influence of the collective behaviors of nanoparticles in suspension. A number of recent studies have probed the effect of nanoparticle concentration on heating efficiency and have reported superficially contradictory results. We contextualize these studies and show that they consistently indicate a decrease in magnetic relaxation time with increasing nanoparticle concentration, in both Brownian- and Néel-dominated regimes. This leads to a predictable effect on heating efficiency and alleviates a significant source of confusion within the field. - Highlights: • Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia. • Heating depends on individual properties and collective properties. • We review recent studies with respect to loss mechanisms. • Collective behavior is a key source of confusion in the field. • We contextualize recent studies to elucidate consistencies and alleviate confusion

  19. Experimental investigation of acoustic agglomeration systems for fine particle control. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, D.T.; Lee, P.; Wegrzyn, J.; Chou, K.H.; Cheng, M.T.; Patel, S.

    1979-10-01

    The feasibility of using an acoustic agglomerator (AA) as a preconditioner in the upstream of conventional devices such as an electrostatic precipitator, a scrubber, a filter, or a cyclone are investigated. The objective is to agglomerate all finer particles into coarser ones in an acoustic agglomerator and then remove them more effectively by one of the conventional devices. Laboratory-scale experiments were performed using NH/sub 4/Cl and fly ash redispersed aerosols. Turbulence caused by intensive sound fields under standing-wave condition has been found to be extremely effective for aerosol agglomeration. The nature and the energy dissipation rate of the acoustic turbulence are determined by using hot-film (or hot-wire) anemometry and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) data processing equipment. The root-mean-square turbulent velocity, which is directly proportional to acoustic agglomeration rate, is experimentally found to have a I/sup 1/2/(I: acoustic intensity) dependence, but is relatively independent of the acoustic frequency. The results obtained from this program show that acoustic agglomeration is effective as a particle pre-conditioner which can increase approximately one order of magnitude in mean particle diameter (2..mu..m ..-->.. 20..mu..m). As a flow-through standing wave device, it can be used to facilitate the removal of dust particles in a subsequent inertia base separation device.

  20. Influence of PVP in magnetic properties of NiSn nanoparticles prepared by polyol method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobadilla, L.F., E-mail: lbobadilla@iciq.es [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica e Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales, Centro mixto Universidad de Sevilla-CSIC, Av. Americo Vespucio, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Garcia, C. [Physics Department, Bogazici University, North Campus KB 331-O, Bebek/Istambul (Turkey); Delgado, J.J. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica y Quimica Inorganica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Rio San Pedro, E-11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Sanz, O. [Grupo de Ingenieria Quimica, Departamento de Quimica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, UPV/EHU, Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal, 3, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Romero-Sarria, F.; Centeno, M.A.; Odriozola, J.A. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica e Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales, Centro mixto Universidad de Sevilla-CSIC, Av. Americo Vespucio, 41092 Sevilla (Spain)

    2012-11-15

    The influence of PVP on the magnetic properties of NiSn nanoparticles prepared by polyol method has been studied. NiSn nanoparticles exhibit superparamagnetic behavior although there is a ferromagnetic contribution due to particles agglomerated below the blocking temperature. The particle size is controlled by the addiction of PVP in varying amounts. The addition of PVP also favours the particles isolation, narrow the particle size distribution and decrease the interparticle interaction strength increasing the superparamagnetic contribution. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ni{sub x}Sn{sub y} alloys nanoparticles have been prepared by polyol method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiSn nanoparticles exhibit superparamagnetic behavior. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The PVP addition favours the particles isolation.

  1. Intense generation of respirable metal nanoparticles from a low-power soldering unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez, Virginia [Department of Chemical Engineering, Nanoscience Institute of Aragon (INA), 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Irusta, Silvia [Department of Chemical Engineering, Nanoscience Institute of Aragon (INA), 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Networking Biomedical Research Center of Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN), 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Balas, Francisco [Networking Biomedical Research Center of Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN), 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Instituto de Carboquímica – Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (ICB-CSIC), 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Santamaria, Jesus, E-mail: Jesus.Santamaria@unizar.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, Nanoscience Institute of Aragon (INA), 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Networking Biomedical Research Center of Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN), 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • Intense generation of nanoparticles in the breathing range from a flux-soldering unit is detected. • Coagulation in the aerosol phase leads to 200-nm respirable nanoparticles up to 30 min after operation. • Nanoparticle concentration in the working environment depends on the presence of ambient air. • Metal-containing nanoparticles are collected in TEM grids and filters in the hundreds of nanometer range. -- Abstract: Evidence of intense nanoparticle generation from a low power (45 W) flux soldering unit is presented. This is a familiar device often used in daily life, including home repairs and school electronic laboratories. We demonstrate that metal-containing nanoparticles may reach high concentrations (ca. 10{sup 6} particles/cm{sup 3}) within the breathing range of the operator, with initial size distributions centered at 35–60 nm The morphological and chemical analysis of nanoparticle agglomerates collected on TEM grids and filters confirms their multiparticle structure and the presence of metals.

  2. Intense generation of respirable metal nanoparticles from a low-power soldering unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez, Virginia; Irusta, Silvia; Balas, Francisco; Santamaria, Jesus

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Intense generation of nanoparticles in the breathing range from a flux-soldering unit is detected. • Coagulation in the aerosol phase leads to 200-nm respirable nanoparticles up to 30 min after operation. • Nanoparticle concentration in the working environment depends on the presence of ambient air. • Metal-containing nanoparticles are collected in TEM grids and filters in the hundreds of nanometer range. -- Abstract: Evidence of intense nanoparticle generation from a low power (45 W) flux soldering unit is presented. This is a familiar device often used in daily life, including home repairs and school electronic laboratories. We demonstrate that metal-containing nanoparticles may reach high concentrations (ca. 10 6 particles/cm 3 ) within the breathing range of the operator, with initial size distributions centered at 35–60 nm The morphological and chemical analysis of nanoparticle agglomerates collected on TEM grids and filters confirms their multiparticle structure and the presence of metals

  3. Preparation of soft-agglomerated nano-sized ceramic powders by sol-gel combustion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Q.; Ma, X.H.; Yan, Q.Z.; Ge, C.C.

    2009-01-01

    The soft-agglomerated Gd 2 BaCuO 5 (Gd211) nano-powders were synthesized by sol-gel combustion process with binary ligand and the special pretreatment on gel. The mechanism of the formation of weakly agglomerated structure was studied in detail. The results showed that network structure in gelation process was found to be a decisive factor for preventing agglomeration of colloidal particles. The removal of free water, coordinated water, and most of hydroxyl groups during pretreatment further inhibited the formation of hydrogen bonds between adjacent particles. The soft-agglomeration of the particles was confirmed by isolated particles in calcined Gd211 powders and in green compact, a narrow monomodal pore size distribution of the green compact and the low agglomeration coefficient of the calcined Gd211 powder. Extension this process to synthesis of BaCeO 3 , BaTiO 3 and Ce 0.8 Sm 0.2 O 1.9 powders, also led to weakly agglomerated nano-powders. It suggests that this method represents a powerful and facile method for the creation of doped and multi-component nano-sized ceramic powders.

  4. A new method to quantify fluidized bed agglomeration in the combustion of biomass fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehman, M. [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-12-31

    The present licentiate thesis is a summary and discussion of four papers, dealing with the development, evaluation and use of a new method to quantify bed agglomeration tendencies for biomass fuels. An increased utilization of biomass related fuels has many environmental benefits, but also requires careful studies of potential new problems associated with these fuels such as bed agglomeration/defluidization during combustion and gasification in fluidized beds. From a thorough literature survey, no suitable methods to determine bed agglomeration tendencies of different fuels, fuel combinations or fuels with additives appeared to be available. It therefore seemed of considerable interest to develop a new method for the quantification of fluidized bed agglomeration tendencies for different fuels. A bench scale fluidized bed reactor (5 kW), specially designed to obtain a homogeneous isothermal bed temperature, is used. The method is based on controlled increase of the bed temperature by applying external heat to the primary air and to the bed section walls. The initial agglomeration temperature is determined by on- or off-line principal component analysis of the variations in measured bed temperatures and differential pressures. Samples of ash and bed material for evaluation of agglomeration mechanisms may also be collected throughout the operation. To determine potential effects of all the process related variables on the determined fuel specific bed agglomeration temperature, an extensive sensitivity analysis was performed according to a statistical experimental design. The results showed that the process variables had only relatively small effects on the agglomeration temperature, which could be determined to 899 deg C with a reproducibility of {+-} 5 deg C (STD). The inaccuracy was determined to be {+-} 30 deg C (STD). The method was also used to study the mechanism of both bed agglomeration using two biomass fuels and prevention of bed agglomeration by co

  5. Synthesis and characterization of silver nanoparticles: effect on phytopathogen Colletotrichum gloesporioides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar-Mendez, Miguel A., E-mail: maguilarme@ipn.mx; San Martin-Martinez, Eduardo; Ortega-Arroyo, Lesli [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada (Mexico); Cobian-Portillo, Georgina [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Centro Interdisciplinario de Investigacion para el Desarrollo Integral Regional (Mexico); Sanchez-Espindola, Esther [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biologicas, Prolongacion Manuel M. Carpio s/n, esq. Plan de Ayala (Mexico)

    2011-06-15

    Colloidal silver nanoparticles were synthesized by reducing silver nitrate solutions with glucose, in the presence of gelatin as capping agent. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by means of UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The response surface methodology (RSM) was also used to determine the influence of the variables on the size of the nanoparticles. The antifungal activity of the silver nanoparticles was evaluated on the phytopathogen Colletotrichum gloesporioides, which causes anthracnose in a wide range of fruits. The UV-Vis spectra indicated the formation of silver nanoparticles preferably spherical and of relatively small size (<20 nm). The above-mentioned was confirmed by TEM, observing a size distribution of 5-24 nm. According to RSM the synthesis variables influenced on the size of the silver nanoparticles. By means of FTIR spectroscopy it was determined that gelatin, through their amide and hydroxyl groups, interacts with nanoparticles preventing their agglomeration. The growth of C. gloesporioides in the presence of silver nanoparticles was significantly delayed in a dose dependent manner.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of silver nanoparticles: effect on phytopathogen Colletotrichum gloesporioides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar-Méndez, Miguel A.; San Martín-Martínez, Eduardo; Ortega-Arroyo, Lesli; Cobián-Portillo, Georgina; Sánchez-Espíndola, Esther

    2011-01-01

    Colloidal silver nanoparticles were synthesized by reducing silver nitrate solutions with glucose, in the presence of gelatin as capping agent. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by means of UV–Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The response surface methodology (RSM) was also used to determine the influence of the variables on the size of the nanoparticles. The antifungal activity of the silver nanoparticles was evaluated on the phytopathogen Colletotrichum gloesporioides, which causes anthracnose in a wide range of fruits. The UV–Vis spectra indicated the formation of silver nanoparticles preferably spherical and of relatively small size (<20 nm). The above-mentioned was confirmed by TEM, observing a size distribution of 5–24 nm. According to RSM the synthesis variables influenced on the size of the silver nanoparticles. By means of FTIR spectroscopy it was determined that gelatin, through their amide and hydroxyl groups, interacts with nanoparticles preventing their agglomeration. The growth of C. gloesporioides in the presence of silver nanoparticles was significantly delayed in a dose dependent manner.

  7. Random Surface Texturing of Silicon Dioxide Using Gold Agglomerates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    a visual indicator of the formation of gold clusters on the SiO2 . The glass would make observing a color change in the gold film easier later in the...unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT A fabrication process for creating a silicon dioxide ( SiO2 ) light-trapping structure as part of...even distribution of irregular agglomerates, also known as “complete islanding”. By using these gold agglomerations as a metal mask, the SiO2 can be

  8. Influential factors of 2-chlorobiphenyl reductive dechlorination by highly dispersed bimetallic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Junrong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly dispersed Pd-Fe0 bimetallic nanoparticles were prepared in the presence of 40 kHz ultrasonic irradiation in order to enhance disparity and reactivity, and simultaneously avoid agglomeration. Influential factors of 2-chlorobiphenyl (2-Cl BP reductive dechlorination by highly dispersed Pd-Fe0 nanoparticles were investigated. Experimental results showed that highly dispersed Pd-Fe0 nanoparticles prepared in the in the presence of ultrasound could further improve the dechlorination efficiency of 2-Cl BP, meanwhile the biphenyl (BP formation rates increased obviously and increased from 47.4% (in the absence of ultrasound to 95.3% (in the presence of ultrasound within 300 min. The catalytic reductive dechlorination effciency of 2-Cl BP was dependent on Pd-Fe0 nanoparticles prepared methods, Pd-Fe0 nanoparticles dosage, Pd loading percentage over Fe0 and initial pH values

  9. Minimum pickup velocity (U{sub pu}) of nanoparticles in gas–solid pneumatic conveying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anantharaman, Aditya [Nanyang Technological University, School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering (Singapore); Ommen, J. Ruud van [Delft University of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering (Netherlands); Chew, Jia Wei, E-mail: JChew@ntu.edu.sg [Nanyang Technological University, School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering (Singapore)

    2015-12-15

    This paper is the first systematic study of the pneumatic conveying of nanoparticles. The minimum pickup velocity, U{sub pu}, of six nanoparticle species of different materials [i.e., silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}), aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2})] and surfaces (i.e., apolar and polar) was determined by the weight loss method. Results show that (1) due to relative lack of hydrogen bonding, apolar nanoparticles had higher mass loss values at the same velocities, mass loss curves with accentuated S-shaped profiles, and lower U{sub pu} values, (2) among the three species, SiO{sub 2}, which has the lowest Hamaker coefficient, exhibited the greatest discrepancy between apolar and polar surfaces with respect to both mass loss curves and U{sub pu} values, (3) U{sub mf,polar}/U{sub mf,apolar} was between 1 and 3.5 times that of U{sub pu,polar}/U{sub pu,apolar} due to greater extents of hydrogen bonding associated with U{sub mf}, (4) U{sub pu} values were at least an order-of-magnitude lower than that expected from the well-acknowledged U{sub pu} correlation (Kalman et al., Powder Technol 160:103–113, 2005) due to agglomeration, (5) although nanoparticles should be categorized as Zone III (Kalman et al. 2005) (or Geldart group C, Powder Technol 7:285–292, 1973), the nanoparticles, and primary and complex agglomerates agreed more with the Zone I (or Geldart group B) correlation.

  10. Coal gold agglomeration: an innovative approach to the recovery of gold in environmentally sensitive areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, N.C.; Hughes-Narborough, C.; Willey, G. [Davy (Stockton) Ltd., Stockton-on-Tees (United Kingdom)

    1994-11-01

    Coal Gold Agglomeration (CGA) was developed by BP Minerals and involves the selective recovery of oleophilic gold particles from an aqueous slurry into coal-oil agglomerates. These agglomerates are allowed to build up to a high gold loading and are then separated from the slurry. The loaded agglomerates are burned and the gold is finally recovered from the ash residue by dissolution and precipitation or by direct smelting. 6 figs.

  11. Controlled agglomeration of Tb-doped Y2O3 nanocrystals studied by x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray excited luminescence, and photoluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soo, Y.L.; Huang, S.W.; Kao, Y.H.; Chhabra, V.; Kulkarni, B.; Veliadis, J.V.; Bhargava, R.N.

    1999-01-01

    Local environment surrounding Y atoms in Y 2 O 3 :Tb nanocrystals under various heat treatment conditions has been investigated by using the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) technique. X-ray excited luminescence (XEL) with the incident x-ray energy near Y K edge and Tb L edges has also been measured to investigate the mechanisms of x-ray-to-visible down conversion in these doped nanoparticles. The observed changes in EXAFS, XEL, and photoluminescent data can be explained on the basis of increased average size of the nanoparticles as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy studies. Our results thus demonstrate that the doped nanoparticles can agglomerate to a controllable degree by varying the heat treatment temperature. At higher temperatures, the local environment surrounding Y atoms in the nanoparticles is found to become similar to that in bulk Y 2 O 3 while the XEL output still shows the characteristics of nanocrystals. These results indicate that appropriate heat treatment can afford an effective means to control the intensity and signal-to-background ratio of green luminescence output of these doped nanocrystal phosphors, potentially useful for some device applications. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  12. Agglomeration effects in the labour market: an empirical analysis for Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marusca De Castris

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Extensive and persistent geographic variability of the unemployment rate within the same region has been attributed to various causes. Some theories identify the “thickness” of markets as the source of positive externalities affecting labour market by improving the ability to match the skills requested by firms with those offered by workers. A recent paper by Gan and Zhang (2006 empirically confirms this hypothesis for the US labour markets. Agglomeration can be defined as aggregation of people, basically measured by city size, or as aggregation of firms, measured by cluster size (employment or number of plants. However, the population location and the industrial location are by far more similar in United States than in Europe and in Italy. Our paper aims to evaluate the effects of agglomeration on the local unemployment rate. The new methodological contribution of the study is the identification of both urban and industrial cluster agglomeration effects, using a wide set of control variables. Adjusting the system for the effects of sectorial and size shocks, as well as those relating to geographic structure and policy interventions, the results of our analysis differ from that for the United States. The study stresses the presence of negative and significant urbanisation externalities. We obtain, instead, positive effects concerning the geographic agglomeration of firms, and their thickness, in a specific area. Furthermore, positive and significant effects can be found in local systems with features of a district. Finally, the model distinguishes the negative effects of urban agglomerations (in terms of population density from positive firm’s agglomerations (in terms of density of local units.

  13. Quasiparticle agglomerates in the Read-Rezayi and anti-Read-Rezayi states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braggio, A; Ferraro, D; Magnoli, N

    2012-01-01

    We calculate the dominant excitations for the k-level (k element of N) Read-Rezayi (RR) states and their particle-hole conjugates, the anti-Read-Rezayi (RR)-bar, proposed for quantum Hall states. These states are supposed to be built over the second Landau level with total filling factor ν = 2 + ν* with ν* = k/(k + 2) for RR and ν* = 2/(k + 2) for (RR)-bar. In the k-level RR states, based on Z k parafermions, the dominant excitations are the fundamental quasiparticles (qps) with fractional charge e* k = e/(k + 2), with e the electron charge, if k = 2,3. For k = 4 the single-qp and the 2-agglomerate, with charge 2e* k , have the same scaling and both dominate, while for k > 4 the 2-agglomerates are dominant. Anyway the dominance of the 2-agglomerates can be affected by the presence of environmental renormalizations. For all the k-level (RR)-bar states, the single-qp and the 2-agglomerate have the same scaling and both dominate. In this case, only the presence of environmental renormalizations can make one dominant over the other. We determine the conditions in which the environmental renormalizations of the charged and neutral modes make the Abelian 2-agglomerates dominant over the non-Abelian single-qps in the two models and for any value of k. We conclude by observing that, according to these predictions, the dominance of 2-agglomerates, at very low energies for the ν = 5/2, can be an interesting indication supporting the validity of the anti-Pfaffian model in comparison with the Pfaffian.

  14. Lyotropic liquid crystal based on zinc oxide nanoparticles obtained by microwave solvothermal synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omelchenko, M.M., E-mail: momelchenko@chem.uw.edu.pl [Department of Chemistry, Warsaw University, Al. Zwirki i Wigury 101, 02-089, Warsaw (Poland); Wojnarowicz, J. [Institute of High Pressure Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Sokolowska 29/37, Warsaw, 01-142 (Poland); Salamonczyk, M. [Department of Chemistry, Warsaw University, Al. Zwirki i Wigury 101, 02-089, Warsaw (Poland); Lojkowski, W. [Institute of High Pressure Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Sokolowska 29/37, Warsaw, 01-142 (Poland)

    2017-05-01

    Abstract: The ZnO nanoparticles, obtained by microwave solvothermal synthesis, were used for the liquid crystal phase preparation. The structure of the material was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), helium pycnometry, specific surface area (SSA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The stability of aqueous suspensions was monitored by Multiple Light Scattering (MLS) technique and the average agglomerate size in suspensions was obtained by dynamic light scattering (DLS) technique. The lyotropic columnar hexagonal phase was formed by doping ZnO nanoparticles into the cetylpiridinium chloride/water/hexanol system. The structure of this phase was confirmed by x-ray diffraction. The luminescent properties of the LC phase were compared with properties of ZnO nanoparticles isolated in solution and analogues lyotropic system without nanoparticles.

  15. Functionalized TiO2 nanoparticle containing isocyanate groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou, Baoli; Li, Duxin; Liu, Qingquan; Zhou, Zhihua; Liao, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Functionalized TiO 2 nanoparticle containing isocyanate groups can extend the TiO 2 nanoparticle chemistry, and may promote their many potential applications such as in polymer composites and coatings. This paper describes a facile method to prepare functionalized TiO 2 nanoparticle with highly reactive isocyanate groups on its surface, via the reaction between toluene-2, 4-diisocyanate (TDI) and hydroxyl on TiO 2 nanoparticle surface. The main effect factors on the reaction of TiO 2 with TDI were studied by determining the reaction extent of hydroxyl groups on TiO 2 surface. Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) confirmed that reactive isocyanate groups were covalently attached to the TiO 2 nanoparticle surface. The dispersion of the TDI-functionalized TiO 2 nanoparticle was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Owing to the TDI molecules covalently bonded on TiO 2 nanoparticle surface, it was established that the TiO 2 nanoparticle can be uniformly dispersed in toluene, thus indicating that this functionalization method can prevent TiO 2 nanoparticle from agglomerating. -- Highlights: ► TiO 2 nanoparticle was functionalized with toluene-2, 4-diisocyanate. ► Functionalized TiO 2 nanoparticle can be uniformly dispersed in xylene. ► Compatibility of TiO 2 nanoparticle and organic solvent is significantly improved. ► TiO 2 containing isocyanate groups can extend the TiO 2 nanoparticle chemistry.

  16. Consolidation of Hierarchy-Structured Nanopowder Agglomerates and Its Application to Net-Shaping Nanopowder Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jai-Sung; Choi, Joon-Phil; Lee, Geon-Yong

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview on our recent investigations on the consolidation of hierarchy-structured nanopowder agglomerates and related applications to net-shaping nanopowder materials. Understanding the nanopowder agglomerate sintering (NAS) process is essential to processing of net-shaped nanopowder materials and components with small and complex shape. The key concept of the NAS process is to enhance material transport through controlling the powder interface volume of nanopowder agglomerates. Based upon this concept, we have suggested a new idea of full density processing for fabricating micro-powder injection molded part using metal nanopowder agglomerates produced by hydrogen reduction of metal oxide powders. Studies on the full density sintering of die compacted- and powder injection molded iron base nano-agglomerate powders are introduced and discussed in terms of densification process and microstructure. PMID:28788317

  17. Consolidation of Hierarchy-Structured Nanopowder Agglomerates and Its Application to Net-Shaping Nanopowder Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geon-Yong Lee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an overview on our recent investigations on the consolidation of hierarchy-structured nanopowder agglomerates and related applications to net-shaping nanopowder materials. Understanding the nanopowder agglomerate sintering (NAS process is essential to processing of net-shaped nanopowder materials and components with small and complex shape. The key concept of the NAS process is to enhance material transport through controlling the powder interface volume of nanopowder agglomerates. Based upon this concept, we have suggested a new idea of full density processing for fabricating micro-powder injection molded part using metal nanopowder agglomerates produced by hydrogen reduction of metal oxide powders. Studies on the full density sintering of die compacted- and powder injection molded iron base nano-agglomerate powders are introduced and discussed in terms of densification process and microstructure.

  18. Technical application of agglomerated acidic heap leaching of clay-bearing uranium ore in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Yijun; Li Jianhua; Li Tieqiu; Zhong Pingru

    2002-01-01

    The permeability of ore mass has a great influence on the leaching period of heap leaching and the leaching efficiency, hence the uranium ores with high content of clay is difficult to acidic heap leaching. The Research Institute of Uranium Mining has engaged several years studies on the cementing agents of acidic agglomeration, agglomeration conditions, as well as the curing measures of agglomerated balls. On the basis of these studies, several types of clay-bearing ores have been tested with good results. The technique of agglomerated acidic heap leaching has been successfully applied in a uranium mine. Since agglomeration has effectively increased the permeability of ore heap, its leaching period is decreased from 200 days to 60 days, the leaching efficiency is increased to 96% from less than 40% comparing with direct heap leaching program

  19. Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Task 5, Bench- scale process testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    Under the overall objectives of DOE Contract Engineering Development of Selective Agglomeration,'' there were a number of specific objectives in the Task 5 program. The prime objectives of Task 5 are highlighted below: (1) Maximize process performance in pyritic sulfur rejection and BTU recovery, (2) Produce a low ash product, (3) Compare the performance of the heavy agglomerant process based on diesel and the light agglomerant process using heptane, (4) Define optimum processing conditions for engineering design, (5) Provide first-level evaluation of product handleability, and (6) Explore and investigate process options/ideas which may enhance process performance and/or product handleability.

  20. Transient myocardial ischemia during daily life in rest and exertional angina pectoris and comparison of effectiveness of metoprolol versus nifedipine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ardissino, D; Savonitto, S; Egstrup, K

    1991-01-01

    life (p less than 0.05) irrespective of the patients' clinical characteristics. Nifedipine was ineffective, particularly in patients with angina predominantly on effort and with a moderate to severe reduction in exercise tolerance. It is concluded that in patients with mixed angina, ischemic episodes...

  1. Stabilization of antimicrobial silver nanoparticles by a polyhydroxyalkanoate obtained from mixed bacterial culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Mayorga, J L; Martínez-Abad, A; Fabra, M J; Olivera, Catarina; Reis, M; Lagarón, J M

    2014-11-01

    The incorporation of antimicrobials into polymer matrices is a promising technology in the food packaging and biomedical areas. Among the most widely used antimicrobials, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have emerged as one of the most researched technologies to prevent microbial outbreaks. However, it is known that AgNPs are rather unstable and present patterns of agglomeration that might limit their application. In this work, AgNPs were produced by chemical reduction in suspensions of an unpurified poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) which was previously obtained from a mixed culture fermentation using a synthetic medium mimicking fermented cheese whey. The synthesis of AgNPs was carried out within the unpurified PHBV suspension (in situ) and by physical mixing (mix). The stability of crystalline and spherical nanoparticles (7±3nm) obtained in situ was found to be stable during at least 40 days. The results suggest that the unpurified PHBV appears to be a very efficient capping agent, preventing agglomeration and, thereby, stabilizing successfully the silver nanoparticles. The in situ obtained AgNP-PHBV materials were also found to exhibit a strong antibacterial activity against Salmonella enterica at low concentration (0.1-1ppm). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. THERMODYNAMIC REASONS OF AGGLOMERATION OF DUST PARTICLES IN THE THERMAL DUSTY PLASMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I.Vishnyakov

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermodynamic equilibrium of thermal dusty plasmas consisting of ionized gas (plasma and solid particles (dust grains, which interact with each other, is studied. The tendency of grains in dusty plasmas to agglomerate corresponds to the tendency of dusty plasmas to balanced states. When grains agglomerate, electrical perturbations generated by each grain concentrate inside the agglomerate. The plasma is perturbed only by the agglomerate's exterior surface. The greater number of possible states for electrons and ions in plasma depends on the volume of perturbation of grains. The fewer are the perturbations the greater is the amount of possible states for electrons and ions in plasma. If the grains collected from a distance smaller than 8 Debye lengths, the total volume of perturbations is minimized; the free energy of the plasma is also minimized.

  3. Silica nanoparticles produced by DC arc plasma from a solid raw materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmachev, P. V.; Vlasov, V. A.; Skripnikova, N. K.

    2017-05-01

    Plasma synthesis of SiO2 nanoparticles in experimental atmospheric pressure plasma reactor on the basis of DC arc plasma generator was presented in this paper. Solid high-silica raw materials such as diatomite from Kamyshlovskoye deposit in Russia, quartzite from Chupinskoye deposit in Russia and milled window glass were used. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized based on their morphology, chemical composition and size distribution. Scanning electron microscopy, laser diffractometry, nitrogen absorption (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to characterize the synthesized products. The obtained silica nanoparticles are agglomerated, have spherical shape and primary diameters between 10-300 nm. All samples of synthesized nanopowders were compared with commercial nanopowders.

  4. Synthesis of Aluminium Nanoparticles in A Water/Polyethylene Glycol Mixed Solvent using μ-EDM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, R. K.; Hiremath, Somashekhar S.

    2017-08-01

    Nanoparticles present a practical way of retaining the results of the property at the atomic or molecular level. Due to the recent use of nanoparticles in scientific, industrial and medical applications, synthesis of nanoparticles and their characterization have become considerably important. Currently, aluminium nanoparticles have attracted significant research attention because of their reasonable cost, unique properties and interdisciplinary emerging applications. The present paper reports the synthesis of aluminium nanoparticles in the mixture of Deionized water (DI water) and Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) using a developed micro-Electrical Discharge Machining (μ-EDM) method. PEG was used as a stabilizer to prevent nanoparticles from agglomeration produced during the μ -EDM process. The synthesized aluminium nanoparticles were examined by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Energy Dispersive Analysis by X-rays (EDAX) and Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED) pattern to determine their size, shape, chemical nature and crystal structure. The average size of the polyhedral aluminium nanoparticles is found to be 196 nm.

  5. Synergistic Effect between Ultra-Small Nickel Hydroxide Nanoparticles and Reduced Graphene Oxide sheets for the Application in High-Performance Asymmetric Supercapacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yonghuan; Wang, Rutao; Yan, Xingbin

    2015-06-08

    Nanoscale electrode materials including metal oxide nanoparticles and two-dimensional graphene have been employed for designing supercapacitors. However, inevitable agglomeration of nanoparticles and layers stacking of graphene largely hamper their practical applications. Here we demonstrate an efficient co-ordination and synergistic effect between ultra-small Ni(OH)2 nanoparticles and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets for synthesizing ideal electrode materials. On one hand, to make the ultra-small Ni(OH)2 nanoparticles work at full capacity as an ideal pseudocapacitive material, RGO sheets are employed as an suitable substrate to anchor these nanoparticles against agglomeration. As a consequence, an ultrahigh specific capacitance of 1717 F g(-1) at 0.5 A g(-1) is achieved. On the other hand, to further facilitate ion transfer within RGO sheets as an ideal electrical double layer capacitor material, the ultra-small Ni(OH)2 nanoparticles are introduced among RGO sheets as the recyclable sacrificial spacer to prevent the stacking. The resulting RGO sheets exhibit superior rate capability with a high capacitance of 182 F g(-1) at 100 A g(-1). On this basis, an asymmetric supercapacitor is assembled using the two materials, delivering a superior energy density of 75 Wh kg(-1) and an ultrahigh power density of 40 000 W kg(-1).

  6. In situ synthesis of copper nanoparticles on SBA-16 silica spheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Tufail Shah

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A chemical method for in situ synthesis of copper nanoparticles on SBA-16 silica spheres under ambient conditions has been reported. The silica support has been introduced into copper precursor solution before chemical reduction. Metal ions diffuse into mesopores (pore diameter 5–7 nm of silica where in situ reduction by hydrazine leads to formation of nanoparticles. These mesopores act as nanoreactor and their walls prevent metal particle’s agglomeration by providing a physical barrier. The obtained copper nanoparticles have been investigated by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV–Visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform Infra-red spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analyzer. SEM, TEM and UV–Visible spectroscopic images revealed that nanosized particles have been successfully synthesized by this method. Thermogravimetric investigations revealed that copper nanoparticles impregnated on silica were thermally more stable compared to unsupported nanoparticles. Silica not only helps in maintaining the particle size but also makes nanoparticles stable at high temperatures due to its thick pore walls. Macro sized silica support also makes separation/handling of nanoparticles easy and simple.

  7. Assessment of silver nanoparticle toxicity for common carp (Cyprinus carpio) fish embryos using a novel method controlling the agglomeration in the aquatic media

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Opršal, J.; Bláha, L.; Pouzar, M.; Knotek, P.; Vlček, Milan; Hrdá, K.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 23 (2015), s. 19124-19132 ISSN 0944-1344 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : nanosilver * agglomeration * fish embryo Subject RIV: DJ - Water Pollution ; Quality Impact factor: 2.760, year: 2015

  8. Application of acoustic agglomerators for emergency use in liquid-metal fast breeder reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, D.T.; Rajendran, N.

    1979-01-01

    The use of acoustic agglomerators for the suppression of sodium-fire aerosols in the case of a hypothetical core disruptive accident of a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor is discussed. The basic principle for the enhancement of agglomeration of airborne particles under the influence of an acoustic field is first discussed, followed by theoretical predictions of the optimum operating conditions for such application. It is found that with an acoustic intensity of 160 dB (approx. 1 W/cm 2 ), acoustic agglomeration is expected to be several hundred times more effective than gravitational agglomeration. For particles with a radius larger than approx. 2 μm, hydrodynamic interaction becomes more important than the inertial capture. For radii between 0.5 and 2 μm, both mechanisms have to included in the theoretical predictions of the acoustic agglomeration rate

  9. Fe Core–Carbon Shell Nanoparticles as Advanced MRI Contrast Enhancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh P. Chaudhary

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to fabricate a hybrid composite of iron (Fe core–carbon (C shell nanoparticles with enhanced magnetic properties for contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. These new classes of magnetic core–shell nanoparticles are synthesized using a one-step top–down approach through the electric plasma discharge generated in the cavitation field in organic solvents by an ultrasonic horn. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM observations revealed the core–shell nanoparticles with 10–85 nm in diameter with excellent dispersibility in water without any agglomeration. TEM showed the structural confirmation of Fe nanoparticles with body centered cubic (bcc crystal structure. Magnetic multi-functional hybrid composites of Fe core–C shell nanoparticles were then evaluated as negative MRI contrast agents, displaying remarkably high transverse relaxivity (r2 of 70 mM−1·S−1 at 7 T. This simple one-step synthesis procedure is highly versatile and produces desired nanoparticles with high efficacy as MRI contrast agents and potential utility in other biomedical applications.

  10. Effects of interactions between powder particle size and binder viscosity on agglomerate growth mechanisms in a high shear mixer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, A; Schaefer, T

    2001-01-01

    A study was performed in order to elucidate the effects of the interactions between powder particle size and binder viscosity on the mechanisms involved in agglomerate formation and growth. Calcium carbonates having mean particle sizes in the range of 5-214 microm and polyethylene glycols having viscosities in the range of approximately 50-100000 mPas were melt agglomerated in a high shear mixer. Agglomerate growth by nucleation and coalescence was found to dominate when agglomerating small powder particles and binders with a low viscosity. Increasing the binder viscosity increased the formation of agglomerates by immersion of powder particles in the surface of the binder droplets. With a larger powder particle size, an increasing binder viscosity was necessary in order to obtain an agglomerate strength being sufficient to avoid breakage. Due to a low agglomerate strength, a satisfying agglomeration of very large particles (214 microm) could not be obtained, even with very viscous binders. The study demonstrated that the optimum agglomerate growth occurred when the agglomerates were of an intermediate strength causing an intermediate deformability of the agglomerates. In order to produce spherical agglomerates (pellets), a low viscosity binder has to be chosen when agglomerating a powder with a small particle size, and a high viscosity binder must be applied in agglomeration of powders with large particles.

  11. Effects of regional agglomeration of salmon : aquaculture on production costs

    OpenAIRE

    Tveterås, Ragnar

    2001-01-01

    During the last decade empirical evidence of regional agglomeration economies has emerged for some industries. This report argues that externalities from agglomeration are not only present in some manufacturing and service sectors, but can also occur in primary industries such as aquaculture. Econometric analyses in this literature have primarily estimated production functions on aggregated industry data. Here, cost functions are estimated on firm level observations of Norwegian salmon aquacu...

  12. CONSOLIDATION OF K BASIN SLUDGE DATA AND EXPERIENCES ON AGGLOMERATE FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HILL SR

    2010-06-10

    The formation of high sludge strength agglomerates is a key concern to the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) to ensure the sludge can be retrieved after planned storage for up to 10 years in Sludge Transport and Storage Containers (STSC) at T Plant. This report addresses observations of agglomerate formation, conditions that the data shows lead to agglomeration, the frequency of agglomerate formation and postulated physiochemical mechanisms that may lead to agglomeration. Although the exact underlying chemistry of K Basin sludge agglomerate formation is not known, the factors that lead to agglomeration formation, based on observations, are as follows: (1) High Total Uranium Content (i.e., sample homogeneity and influence from other constituents); (2) Distribution of Uranium Phases (i.e., extent of conversion from uraninite to uranium oxide hydroxide compounds); (3) Sample Dry-out (loss of cover water); (4) Elevated temperature; (5) Solubility ofU(IV) phases vs. U(VI) phases; and (6) Long storage times. Agglomerated sludge has occurred infrequently and has only been observed in four laboratory samples, five samples subjected to hydrothermal testing (performed for 7 to 10 hours at {approx}185 C and 225 psig), and indirectly during six sampling events in the KE Basin. In the four laboratory samples where agglomerates were observed, the agglomerates exhibited high shear strength and the sample container typically had to be broken to remove the solids. The total uranium content (dry basis) for the four samples (KE Pit, KC-2/3 SS, KC-2/3 M250 and 96-13) were {approx}8 wt%, {approx}59.0 wt%, 68.3 wt% and 82 wt%. The agglomerates that were present during the six sampling events were undoubtedly disturbed and easily broken apart during sample collection, thus no agglomerates were observed in subsequent laboratory analyses. The highest shear strengths measured for K Basin sludge samples were obtained after hydrothermal treatment (7 to 10 hr at 185 C) of high-uranium-content KE

  13. CONSOLIDATION OF K BASIN SLUDGE DATA AND EXPERIENCES ON AGGLOMERATE FORMATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, S.R.

    2010-01-01

    The formation of high sludge strength agglomerates is a key concern to the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) to ensure the sludge can be retrieved after planned storage for up to 10 years in Sludge Transport and Storage Containers (STSC) at T Plant. This report addresses observations of agglomerate formation, conditions that the data shows lead to agglomeration, the frequency of agglomerate formation and postulated physiochemical mechanisms that may lead to agglomeration. Although the exact underlying chemistry of K Basin sludge agglomerate formation is not known, the factors that lead to agglomeration formation, based on observations, are as follows: (1) High Total Uranium Content (i.e., sample homogeneity and influence from other constituents); (2) Distribution of Uranium Phases (i.e., extent of conversion from uraninite to uranium oxide hydroxide compounds); (3) Sample Dry-out (loss of cover water); (4) Elevated temperature; (5) Solubility ofU(IV) phases vs. U(VI) phases; and (6) Long storage times. Agglomerated sludge has occurred infrequently and has only been observed in four laboratory samples, five samples subjected to hydrothermal testing (performed for 7 to 10 hours at ∼185 C and 225 psig), and indirectly during six sampling events in the KE Basin. In the four laboratory samples where agglomerates were observed, the agglomerates exhibited high shear strength and the sample container typically had to be broken to remove the solids. The total uranium content (dry basis) for the four samples (KE Pit, KC-2/3 SS, KC-2/3 M250 and 96-13) were ∼8 wt%, ∼59.0 wt%, 68.3 wt% and 82 wt%. The agglomerates that were present during the six sampling events were undoubtedly disturbed and easily broken apart during sample collection, thus no agglomerates were observed in subsequent laboratory analyses. The highest shear strengths measured for K Basin sludge samples were obtained after hydrothermal treatment (7 to 10 hr at 185 C) of high-uranium-content KE canister sludge

  14. Effect of nifedipine on gastric emptying in normal subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traube, M.; Lange, R.C.; McAllister, R.G.; McCallum, R.W.

    1985-05-01

    Nifedipine (N) inhibits calcium entry into smooth muscle cells and relaxes esophageal smooth muscle. The authors studied N's effect on gastric emptying of liquids and solids. Ten normal subjects underwent radionuclide (In-111-DTPA in water and Tc-99m-sulfur colloid tagged to chicken liver) emptying tests with and without 30 mg N given orally 20 min prior to meal ingestion. Peak plasma N levels were either 30 or 60 min after drug dosing and showed a 3-fold variation (low 145 ng/ml, high 434 ng/ml). Both mean N levels and integral concentration time values were twice as high as those obtained after 30 mg sublingual dosing in normals previously studied in our lab. The authors conclude that plasma N levels which are associated with significant esophageal motility effects do not change gastric emptying in normal subjects. The data also show that N levels are greater after oral than sublingual dosing of 30 mg in normal subjects.

  15. Effect of nifedipine on gastric emptying in normal subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traube, M.; Lange, R.C.; McAllister, R.G.; McCallum, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    Nifedipine (N) inhibits calcium entry into smooth muscle cells and relaxes esophageal smooth muscle. The authors studied N's effect on gastric emptying of liquids and solids. Ten normal subjects underwent radionuclide (In-111-DTPA in water and Tc-99m-sulfur colloid tagged to chicken liver) emptying tests with and without 30 mg N given orally 20 min prior to meal ingestion. Peak plasma N levels were either 30 or 60 min after drug dosing and showed a 3-fold variation (low 145 ng/ml, high 434 ng/ml). Both mean N levels and integral concentration time values were twice as high as those obtained after 30 mg sublingual dosing in normals previously studied in our lab. The authors conclude that plasma N levels which are associated with significant esophageal motility effects do not change gastric emptying in normal subjects. The data also show that N levels are greater after oral than sublingual dosing of 30 mg in normal subjects

  16. Highly stable noble-metal nanoparticles in tetraalkylphosphonium ionic liquids for in situ catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Abhinandan; Theron, Robin; Scott, Robert W J

    2012-01-09

    Gold and palladium nanoparticles were prepared by lithium borohydride reduction of the metal salt precursors in tetraalkylphosphonium halide ionic liquids in the absence of any organic solvents or external nanoparticle stabilizers. These colloidal suspensions remained stable and showed no nanoparticle agglomeration over many months. A combination of electrostatic interactions between the coordinatively unsaturated metal nanoparticle surface and the ionic-liquid anions, bolstered by steric protection offered by the bulky alkylated phosphonium cations, is likely to be the reason behind such stabilization. The halide anion strongly absorbs to the nanoparticle surface, leading to exceptional nanoparticle stability in halide ionic liquids; other tetraalkylphosphonium ionic liquids with non-coordinating anions, such as tosylate and hexafluorophosphate, show considerably lower affinities towards the stabilization of nanoparticles. Palladium nanoparticles stabilized in the tetraalkylphosphonium halide ionic liquid were stable, efficient, and recyclable catalysts for a variety of hydrogenation reactions at ambient pressures with sustained activity. Aerial oxidation of the metal nanoparticles occurred over time and was readily reversed by re-reduction of oxidized metal salts. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Clinical case report of long-term follow-up in type-2 diabetes patient with severe chronic periodontitis and nifedipine-induced gingival overgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibukawa, Yoshihiro; Fujinami, Koushu; Yamashita, Shuichiro

    2012-01-01

    In this case report, we describe the clinical course over a 14-year follow-up in a 47-year-old diabetes patient with severe chronic periodontitis and nifedipine-induced gingival overgrowth. The patient had a history of hypertension for over 5 years and uncontrolled type 2 diabetes. Overgrown gingiva was observed in most of the teeth and was marked in the upper and lower anterior teeth. A probing pocket depth of ≥ 4 mm and bleeding on probing (BOP) were observed in 94 and 90% of sites examined, respectively. At baseline, his hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was 8.5%. The patient received periodontal and diabetic treatment simultaneously. Medication was changed from nifedipine chloride to an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. After initial therapy and subsequent periodontal surgery, gingival overgrowth disappeared and probing depth and BOP showed a significant improvement. No recurrence was observed during supportive periodontal therapy (SPT). The HbA1c level improved from 8.5 to 6.3% after periodontal treatment, subsequently remaining at a good level during SPT over 10 years. This study demonstrated that periodontal treatment, withdrawal of medication and control of diabetes can result in remarkable improvements in type 2 diabetes patients with chronic periodontitis and nifedipine-induced gingival overgrowth. These results suggest that comprehensive periodontal treatment in combination with treatment for diabetes mellitus can exert a positive influence on blood glucose levels and periodontal condition in diabetic patients.

  18. A model for the description of the evolution of PU agglomerates in MOX fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federici, E [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Blanpain, P [FRAMATOME, Lyon (France); Permezel, P [Electricite de France, Moret-sur-Loing (France)

    1997-08-01

    In order to describe the irradiation behavior of Pu agglomerates under LWR steady state conditions in MIMAS MOX fuels, a model including the neutronic evolution of the heavy atoms and their diffusion processes between the agglomerates and the matrix has been developed. It leads to the calculations of Pu enrichment in the two phases and of the agglomerates size evolution during irradiation. The calculated distribution of the fission in the fuel gives access to the local power and burnup heterogeneity factor. Electron probe microanalyses (EPMA) have been carried out on fuels irradiated up to 45000 MWd/tM. Diametral and local distribution of Pu are used to calculate the enrichments of the agglomerates and the matrix, which are then compared to the results of the model. During irradiation, the Pu concentration falls markedly in the agglomerates and increases steadily in the matrix, leading to a homogenization of the fuel on a microstructural scale. Heterogeneity factors give an estimate of the deviation from homogeneity. Knowing the local fission rate and burnup in the agglomerates and the matrix enables the calculation of the local fission gas concentrations, which are compared to the xenon EPMA diametral distribution. Comparison with the calculated matrix xenon concentration at the edge of the pellet where there is no gas release, shows that some fission gas atoms which originated from the agglomerates, have been dissolved in the matrix by recoil. The calculated gas concentrations give an estimate of the quantity of gas dissolved. This work has been performed with the intent to improved fuel rod performance code estimates of fission gas concentrations retained or released in both the matrix and the agglomerates. (author). 4 refs, 7 figs.

  19. A model for the description of the evolution of PU agglomerates in MOX fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federici, E.; Blanpain, P.; Permezel, P.

    1997-01-01

    In order to describe the irradiation behavior of Pu agglomerates under LWR steady state conditions in MIMAS MOX fuels, a model including the neutronic evolution of the heavy atoms and their diffusion processes between the agglomerates and the matrix has been developed. It leads to the calculations of Pu enrichment in the two phases and of the agglomerates size evolution during irradiation. The calculated distribution of the fission in the fuel gives access to the local power and burnup heterogeneity factor. Electron probe microanalyses (EPMA) have been carried out on fuels irradiated up to 45000 MWd/tM. Diametral and local distribution of Pu are used to calculate the enrichments of the agglomerates and the matrix, which are then compared to the results of the model. During irradiation, the Pu concentration falls markedly in the agglomerates and increases steadily in the matrix, leading to a homogenization of the fuel on a microstructural scale. Heterogeneity factors give an estimate of the deviation from homogeneity. Knowing the local fission rate and burnup in the agglomerates and the matrix enables the calculation of the local fission gas concentrations, which are compared to the xenon EPMA diametral distribution. Comparison with the calculated matrix xenon concentration at the edge of the pellet where there is no gas release, shows that some fission gas atoms which originated from the agglomerates, have been dissolved in the matrix by recoil. The calculated gas concentrations give an estimate of the quantity of gas dissolved. This work has been performed with the intent to improved fuel rod performance code estimates of fission gas concentrations retained or released in both the matrix and the agglomerates. (author). 4 refs, 7 figs

  20. Human in vivo and in vitro studies on gastrointestinal absorption of titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kate; Morton, Jackie; Smith, Ian; Jurkschat, Kerstin; Harding, Anne-Helen; Evans, Gareth

    2015-03-04

    The study was designed to conduct human in vivo and in vitro studies on the gastrointestinal absorption of nanoparticles, using titanium dioxide as a model compound, and to compare nanoparticle behaviour with that of larger particles. A supplier's characterisation data may not fully describe a particle formulation. Most particles tested agreed with their supplied characterisation when assessed by particle number but significant proportions of 'nanoparticle formulations' were particles >100nm when assessed by particle weight. Oral doses are measured by weight and it is therefore important that the weight characterisation is taken into consideration. The human volunteer studies demonstrated that very little titanium dioxide is absorbed gastrointestinally after an oral challenge. There was no demonstrable difference in absorption for any of the three particle sizes tested. All tested formulations were shown to agglomerate in simulated gastric fluid, particularly in the smaller particle formulations. Further agglomeration was observed when dispersing formulations in polymeric or elemental foods. Virtually no translocation of titanium dioxide particles across the cell layer was demonstrated. This study found no evidence that nanoparticulate titanium dioxide is more likely to be absorbed in the gut than micron-sized particles. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Agglomeration processes in carbonaceous dusty plasmas, experiments and numerical simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dap, S; Hugon, R; De Poucques, L; Bougdira, J; Lacroix, D; Patisson, F

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with carbon dust agglomeration in radio frequency acetylene/argon plasma. Two studies, an experimental and a numerical one, were carried out to model dust formation mechanisms. Firstly, in situ transmission spectroscopy of dust clouds in the visible range was performed in order to observe the main features of the agglomeration process of the produced carbonaceous dust. Secondly, numerical simulation tools dedicated to understanding the achieved experiments were developed. A first model was used for the discretization of the continuous population balance equations that characterize the dust agglomeration process. The second model is based on a Monte Carlo ray-tracing code coupled to a Mie theory calculation of dust absorption and scattering parameters. These two simulation tools were used together in order to numerically predict the light transmissivity through a dusty plasma and make comparisons with experiments.

  2. Dispersions of silica nanoparticles in ionic liquids investigated with advanced rheology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittmar, Alexandra; Ruiz-Abad, David; Ulbricht, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    The colloidal stabilities of dispersions of unmodified and surface-functionalized SiO 2 nanoparticles in hydrophobic and hydrophilic imidazolium-based ionic liquids were studied with advanced rheology at three temperatures (25, 100, and 200 °C). The rheological behavior of the dispersions was strongly affected by the ionic liquids hydrophilicity, by the nanoparticles surface, by the concentration of the nanoparticles in the dispersion as well as by the temperature. The unmodified hydrophilic nanoparticles showed a better compatibility with the hydrophilic ionic liquid. The SiO 2 surface functionalization with hydrophobic groups clearly improved the colloidal stability of the dispersions in the hydrophobic ionic liquid. The temperature increase was found to lead to a destabilization in all studied systems, especially at higher concentrations. The results of this study imply that ionic liquids with tailored properties could be used in absorbers directly after reactors for gas-phase synthesis of nanoparticles or/and as solvents for their further surface functionalization without agglomeration or aggregation.

  3. Backscattering and negative polarization of agglomerate particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubko, Evgenij; Shkuratov, Yuriy; Hart, Matthew; Eversole, Jay; Videen, Gorden

    2003-09-01

    We used the discrete dipole approximation to study the backscattering of agglomerate particles consisting of oblong monomers. We varied the aspect ratio of the monomers from approximately 1 (sphere) to 4, while we kept the total particle volume equivalent to that of an x = 10 sphere for m = 1.59 + i0 and 1.50 + i0 and considered two values of agglomerate packing density: rho = 0.25 and rho = 0.1. We found that these particles do not display a prominent brightness opposition effect but do produce significant negative polarization over a range of near-backscattering angles. Increasing the monomers' aspect ratio can make the negative polarization much more prominent. We have noted also that decreasing m and p can reduce the amplitude of the negative polarization for these particles.

  4. Synthesis of Pd and Rh metal nanoparticles in the interlayer space of organically modified montmorillonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Hasmukh A.; Bajaj, Hari C.; Jasra, Raksh Vir

    2008-01-01

    This study reports the synthesis of palladium and rhodium metal nanoparticles supported on montmorillonite (MMT) and partially organically modified MMT (POMM) using tetraamine palladium and hexaamine rhodium complex as precursor for palladium and rhodium respectively. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction PXRD and TEM. The PXRD study shows characteristic crystallographic planes for Pd and Rh metal and confirm the formation of metal nanoparticles in MMT and POMM. The TEM images reveal the effect of organic modification of MMT on decreasing particle size of Pd and Rh metal. The Pd and Rh metal nanoparticles are agglomerated in pristine MMT while nanoparticles are well dispersed in POMM. ICP-AES analysis was carried out to estimate quantitative amount of Pd and Rh metal in MMT and POMM

  5. Comparison of diffusion charging and mobility-based methods for measurement of aerosol agglomerate surface area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Bon Ki; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2012-05-01

    We compare different approaches to measure surface area of aerosol agglomerates. The objective was to compare field methods, such as mobility and diffusion charging based approaches, with laboratory approach, such as Brunauer, Emmett, Teller (BET) method used for bulk powder samples. To allow intercomparison of various surface area measurements, we defined 'geometric surface area' of agglomerates (assuming agglomerates are made up of ideal spheres), and compared various surface area measurements to the geometric surface area. Four different approaches for measuring surface area of agglomerate particles in the size range of 60-350 nm were compared using (i) diffusion charging-based sensors from three different manufacturers, (ii) mobility diameter of an agglomerate, (iii) mobility diameter of an agglomerate assuming a linear chain morphology with uniform primary particle size, and (iv) surface area estimation based on tandem mobility-mass measurement and microscopy. Our results indicate that the tandem mobility-mass measurement, which can be applied directly to airborne particles unlike the BET method, agrees well with the BET method. It was also shown that the three diffusion charging-based surface area measurements of silver agglomerates were similar within a factor of 2 and were lower than those obtained from the tandem mobility-mass and microscopy method by a factor of 3-10 in the size range studied. Surface area estimated using the mobility diameter depended on the structure or morphology of the agglomerate with significant underestimation at high fractal dimensions approaching 3.

  6. Biosynthesis of nanoparticles using microbes- a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulkoti, Nasreen I; Taranath, T C

    2014-09-01

    The biosynthesis of nanoparticles by microorganism is a green and eco-friendly technology. This review focuses on the use of consortium of diverse microorganisms belonging to both prokaryotes and eukaryotes for the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles viz. silver, gold, platinum, zirconium, palladium, iron, cadmium and metal oxides such as titanium oxide, zinc oxide, etc. These microorganisms include bacteria, actinomycetes, fungi and algae. The synthesis of nanoparticles may be intracellular or extracellular. The several workers have reported that NADH dependent nitrate reductase enzyme plays a vital role in the conversion of metallic ions to nanoparticles. The FTIR study reveals that diverse biomolecules viz. carboxyl group, primary and secondary amines, amide I, II, and III bands etc serve as a tool for bioreduction and capping agents there by offering stability to particles by preventing agglomeration and growth. The size and shape of the nanoparticles vary with the organism employed and conditions employed during the synthesis which included pH, temperature and substrate concentration. The microorganisms provide diverse environment for biosynthesis of nanoparticles. These particles are safe and eco-friendly with a lot of applications in medicine, agriculture, cosmetic industry, drug delivery and biochemical sensors. The challenges for redressal include optimal production and minimal time to obtain desired size and shape, to enhance the stability of nanoparticles and optimization of specific microorganisms for specific application. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Dispersion stability of nanoparticles in ecotoxicological investigations: the need for adequate measurement tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tantra, Ratna, E-mail: ratna.tantra@npl.co.uk; Jing Shingheng; Pichaimuthu, Sivaraman K. [National Physical Laboratory (United Kingdom); Walker, Nicholas [University of Exeter, School of Biosciences (United Kingdom); Noble, James [National Physical Laboratory (United Kingdom); Hackley, Vincent A. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States)

    2011-09-15

    One of the main challenges in nanoecotoxicological investigations is in the selection of the most suitable measurement methods and protocols for nanoparticle characterisation. Several parameters have been identified as being important as they govern nanotoxicological activity, with some parameters being better defined than others. For example, as a parameter, there is some ambiguity as to how to measure dispersion stability in the context of ecotoxicological investigations; indeed, there is disagreement over which are the best methods to measure nanoparticle dispersion stability. The purpose of this article is to use various commercially available tools to measure dispersion stability and to understand the information given by each tool. In this study, CeO{sub 2} was dispersed in two different types of media: de-ionised water and electrolyte-containing fish medium. The DLS mean particle size of freshly dispersed sample in DI water was {approx}200 nm in diameter. A visual sedimentation experiment showed that nanoparticle dispersion made in the fish medium was less stable compared to corresponding dispersion in de-ionised water. Stability of these dispersions was monitored using various techniques, for a period of 3 days. Our findings have shown that dispersion stability can be suitably assessed by monitoring: (a) surface charge, (b) sedimentation events and (c) presence of agglomerates, through time. The majority of techniques employed here (zeta potential, particle size via DLS, fluorescence and UV-Vis spectroscopy and SEM) were shown to provide useful, complementary information on dispersion stability. Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA) provides useful, quantitative information on the concentration of nanoparticles in suspension, but is limited by its inability to accurately track the motion of large agglomerates found in the fish medium.

  8. Dispersion stability of nanoparticles in ecotoxicological investigations: the need for adequate measurement tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tantra, Ratna; Jing Shingheng; Pichaimuthu, Sivaraman K.; Walker, Nicholas; Noble, James; Hackley, Vincent A.

    2011-01-01

    One of the main challenges in nanoecotoxicological investigations is in the selection of the most suitable measurement methods and protocols for nanoparticle characterisation. Several parameters have been identified as being important as they govern nanotoxicological activity, with some parameters being better defined than others. For example, as a parameter, there is some ambiguity as to how to measure dispersion stability in the context of ecotoxicological investigations; indeed, there is disagreement over which are the best methods to measure nanoparticle dispersion stability. The purpose of this article is to use various commercially available tools to measure dispersion stability and to understand the information given by each tool. In this study, CeO 2 was dispersed in two different types of media: de-ionised water and electrolyte-containing fish medium. The DLS mean particle size of freshly dispersed sample in DI water was ∼200 nm in diameter. A visual sedimentation experiment showed that nanoparticle dispersion made in the fish medium was less stable compared to corresponding dispersion in de-ionised water. Stability of these dispersions was monitored using various techniques, for a period of 3 days. Our findings have shown that dispersion stability can be suitably assessed by monitoring: (a) surface charge, (b) sedimentation events and (c) presence of agglomerates, through time. The majority of techniques employed here (zeta potential, particle size via DLS, fluorescence and UV–Vis spectroscopy and SEM) were shown to provide useful, complementary information on dispersion stability. Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA) provides useful, quantitative information on the concentration of nanoparticles in suspension, but is limited by its inability to accurately track the motion of large agglomerates found in the fish medium.

  9. Parking lots, store chains and spatial agglomeration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Noguera, Jose

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 2 (2005), s. 145-158 ISSN 1056-8190 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : agglomeration * bid -rent * residential district Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.475, year: 2005

  10. Oxide nanoparticle-based fabrication and optical properties of Cu(In{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x})S{sub 2} absorber layer for solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yo-Min [Department of Fusion Chemical Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young-In [Institute of Nanosensor Technology, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bum-Sung [Production Technology R and D Division, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Choa, Yong-Ho, E-mail: choa15@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Fusion Chemical Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Nanosensor Technology, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-01

    The compound Cu(In{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x})S{sub 2} (CIGS) was synthesized using copper oxide, indium oxide and gallium oxide mixture (CIGO) nanoparticles using salt-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (SAUSP). Under this method, CIGS can be produced without the complicated restrictions of a vacuum and an inert atmosphere. The band gap of CIGS can be controlled by introducing the desired stoichiometric quantities of starting materials. In order to synthesize CIGO nanoparticles, various NaCl/precursor ratios were used to accomplish the SAUSP process and ultimately monodisperse CIGO nanoparticles with average particle size of 9 nm without hard agglomeration were obtained. Subsequently, the CIGO nanoparticles were sulfurized to form the CIGS in H{sub 2}S/Ar atmosphere at 500 °C. The CIGS obtained in the present study has the various band gap ranging from 1.67 to 2.34 eV depending on the Ga / (In + Ga) ratio, and those band gap correspond to the respective bulk materials. - Highlights: • CIGS is obtained using Cu, In and Ga oxide mixture (CIGO) nanoparticles. • Salt-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis is used to synthesize CIGO nanoparticles. • Nine nanometers of monodisperse CIGO nanoparticles without hard agglomeration is obtained. • The band gap of CIGS can be controlled by introducing the desired ratio of precursor.

  11. Synthesis and Characterization of Fe3O4 Magnetic Nanoparticles Coated with Carboxymethyl Chitosan Grafted Sodium Methacrylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Asgari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available N-sodium acrylate-O-carboxymethyl chitosan [CMCH-g-PAA(Na] bound Fe3O4 nanoparticles were developed as a novel magnetic nanoparticles with an ionic structure that can be potentially used in many fields. CMCH-g-PAA (Na was obtained by grafting of sodium polyacrylate on O-carboxymethyl chitosan, which is an amphiphilic polyelectrolyte with the biocompatibility and biodegradability properties. According to the great interest for improving the stability of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, CMCH-g-PAA (Na was used as a stabilizer to prepare a well dispersed suspension of magnetic nanoparticle According to the results,the presence of CMCH-g-PAA(Na could eliminate agglomeration of magnetic nanoparticles without destroying the superparamagnetic  properties

  12. How can nanobiotechnology oversight advance science and industry: examples from environmental, health, and safety studies of nanoparticles (nano-EHS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jing; Asbach, Christof; Fissan, Heinz; Hülser, Tim; Kuhlbusch, Thomas A. J.; Thompson, Drew; Pui, David Y. H.

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology has great potential to transform science and industry in the fields of energy, material, environment, and medicine. At the same time, more concerns are being raised about the occupational health and safety of nanomaterials in the workplace and the implications of nanotechnology on the environment and living systems. Studies on environmental, health, and safety (EHS) issues of nanomaterials have a strong influence on public acceptance of nanotechnology and, eventually, affect its sustainability. Oversight and regulation by government agencies and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) play significant roles in ensuring responsible and environmentally friendly development of nanotechnology. The EHS studies of nanomaterials can provide data and information to help the development of regulations and guidelines. We present research results on three aspects of EHS studies: physico-chemical characterization and measurement of nanomaterials; emission, exposure, and toxicity of nanomaterials; and control and abatement of nanomaterial releases using filtration technology. Measurement of nanoparticle agglomerates using a newly developed instrument, the Universal NanoParticle Analyzer (UNPA), is discussed. Exposure measurement results for silicon nanoparticles in a pilot scale production plant are presented, as well as exposure measurement and toxicity study of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Filtration studies of nanoparticle agglomerates are also presented as an example of emission control methods.

  13. Influence of formulation and processing variables on properties of itraconazole nanoparticles made by advanced evaporative precipitation into aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosselmann, Stephanie; Nagao, Masao; Chow, Keat T; Williams, Robert O

    2012-09-01

    Nanoparticles, of the poorly water-soluble drug, itraconazole (ITZ), were produced by the Advanced Evaporative Precipitation into Aqueous Solution process (Advanced EPAS). This process combines emulsion templating and EPAS processing to provide improved control over the size distribution of precipitated particles. Specifically, oil-in-water emulsions containing the drug and suitable stabilizers are sprayed into a heated aqueous solution to induce precipitation of the drug in form of nanoparticles. The influence of processing parameters (temperature and volume of the heated aqueous solution; type of nozzle) and formulation aspects (stabilizer concentrations; total solid concentrations) on the size of suspended ITZ particles, as determined by laser diffraction, was investigated. Furthermore, freeze-dried ITZ nanoparticles were evaluated regarding their morphology, crystallinity, redispersibility, and dissolution behavior. Results indicate that a robust precipitation process was developed such that size distribution of dispersed nanoparticles was shown to be largely independent across the different processing and formulation parameters. Freeze-drying of colloidal dispersions resulted in micron-sized agglomerates composed of spherical, sub-300-nm particles characterized by reduced crystallinity and high ITZ potencies of up to 94% (w/w). The use of sucrose prevented particle agglomeration and resulted in powders that were readily reconstituted and reached high and sustained supersaturation levels upon dissolution in aqueous media.

  14. Physicochemical and antibacterial characterization of ionocity Ag/Cu powder nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, A., E-mail: ana.maria.nowak@gmail.com [A. Chełkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Silesian Center for Education and Interdisciplinary Research, 75 Pułku Piechoty 1A, 41-500 Chorzów (Poland); Szade, J. [A. Chełkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Silesian Center for Education and Interdisciplinary Research, 75 Pułku Piechoty 1A, 41-500 Chorzów (Poland); Talik, E. [A. Chełkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Zubko, M. [Silesian Center for Education and Interdisciplinary Research, 75 Pułku Piechoty 1A, 41-500 Chorzów (Poland); Institute of Material Science, University of Silesia, 75 Pułku Piechoty 1a, 41-500 Chórzow (Poland); Wasilkowski, D. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Silesia, Jagiellońska 28, 40-032 Katowice (Poland); Dulski, M. [Silesian Center for Education and Interdisciplinary Research, 75 Pułku Piechoty 1A, 41-500 Chorzów (Poland); Institute of Material Science, University of Silesia, 75 Pułku Piechoty 1a, 41-500 Chórzow (Poland); Balin, K. [A. Chełkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Silesian Center for Education and Interdisciplinary Research, 75 Pułku Piechoty 1A, 41-500 Chorzów (Poland); and others

    2016-07-15

    Metal ion in bimetallic nanoparticles has shown vast potential in a variety of applications. In this paper we show the results of physical and chemical investigations of powder Ag/Cu nanoparticles obtained by chemical synthesis. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiment indicated the presence of bimetallic nanoparticles in the agglomerated form. The average size of silver and copper nanoparticles is 17.1(4) nm (Ag) and 28.9(2) nm (Cu) basing on the X-ray diffraction (XRD) data. X-ray photoelectron (XPS) and Raman spectroscopies revealed the existence of metallic silver and copper as well as Cu{sub 2}O and CuO being a part of the nanoparticles. Moreover, UV–Vis spectroscopy showed surface alloy of Ag and Cu while Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) showed heterogeneously distributed Ag structures placed on spherical Cu nanoparticles. The tests of antibacterial activity show promising killing/inhibiting growth behaviour for Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. - Highlights: • Ag/Cu nanoparticles were obtained in the powder form. • The average size of nanoparticles is 17.1(4) nm (Ag) and 28.9(2) nm (Cu). • Ag/Cu powder nanoparticle shows promising antibacterial properties.

  15. Synthesis of nanoparticles in helium droplets—A characterization comparing mass-spectra and electron microscopy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thaler, Philipp; Volk, Alexander; Lackner, Florian; Steurer, Johannes; Schnedlitz, Martin; Ernst, Wolfgang E.; Knez, Daniel; Haberfehlner, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Micrometer sized helium droplets provide an extraordinary environment for the growth of nanoparticles. The method promises great potential for the preparation of core-shell particles as well as one-dimensional nanostructures, which agglomerate along quantum vortices, without involving solvents, ligands, or additives. Using a new apparatus, which enables us to record mass spectra of heavy dopant clusters (>10 4 amu) and to produce samples for transmission electron microscopy simultaneously, we synthesize bare and bimetallic nanoparticles consisting of various materials (Au, Ni, Cr, and Ag). We present a systematical study of the growth process of clusters and nanoparticles inside the helium droplets, which can be described with a simple theoretical model

  16. Synthesis of nanoparticles in helium droplets—A characterization comparing mass-spectra and electron microscopy data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thaler, Philipp; Volk, Alexander; Lackner, Florian; Steurer, Johannes; Schnedlitz, Martin; Ernst, Wolfgang E., E-mail: wolfgang.ernst@tugraz.at [Institute of Experimental Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Knez, Daniel; Haberfehlner, Georg [Institute for Electron Microscopy and Nanoanalysis & Graz Centre for Electron Microscopy, TU Graz, Steyrergasse 17, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2015-10-07

    Micrometer sized helium droplets provide an extraordinary environment for the growth of nanoparticles. The method promises great potential for the preparation of core-shell particles as well as one-dimensional nanostructures, which agglomerate along quantum vortices, without involving solvents, ligands, or additives. Using a new apparatus, which enables us to record mass spectra of heavy dopant clusters (>10{sup 4} amu) and to produce samples for transmission electron microscopy simultaneously, we synthesize bare and bimetallic nanoparticles consisting of various materials (Au, Ni, Cr, and Ag). We present a systematical study of the growth process of clusters and nanoparticles inside the helium droplets, which can be described with a simple theoretical model.

  17. Effects of the silica nanoparticles (NPSiO2 on the stabilization and transport of hazardous nanoparticle suspensions into landfill soil columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Mendes de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract This study evaluates the stability and transport behaviors of hazardous nanoparticles into soil landfills using experimental procedures to simulate the effects of natural silica nanoparticle suspensions during their percolation into the soil layers of municipal waste landfills. For this, we prepared stabilized suspensions of nanoparticle oxides containing silicon (NPSiO2, titanium (NPTiO2, copper (NPCuO and zinc (NPZnO, which are recognized as hazardous to the environment, and we conducted leaching experiments within the soil column by simulating landfills layers and simulating the capture and attenuation of nanomaterials into municipal waste landfills. The results demonstrated that the presence of NPSiO2 in suspensions increases the stable concentrations of copper, zinc and titanium oxides and strongly decreases soil layer effectiveness. In contrast, NPZnO improves effectiveness due to its ability to promote agglomeration and setting conditions, allowing further complexation.

  18. PVA stabilized gold nanoparticles by use of unexplored albeit conventional reducing agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanna, P K [Nanomaterials Laboratory, Centre for Materials for Electronics Technology (C-MET), Panchwati, Off Pashan Road, Pune 411008 (India); Gokhale, R [Nanomaterials Laboratory, Centre for Materials for Electronics Technology (C-MET), Panchwati, Off Pashan Road, Pune 411008 (India); Subbarao, V V.V.S. [Nanomaterials Laboratory, Centre for Materials for Electronics Technology (C-MET), Panchwati, Off Pashan Road, Pune 411008 (India); Vishwanath, A Kasi [Nanomaterials Laboratory, Centre for Materials for Electronics Technology (C-MET), Panchwati, Off Pashan Road, Pune 411008 (India); Das, B K [Nanomaterials Laboratory, Centre for Materials for Electronics Technology (C-MET), Panchwati, Off Pashan Road, Pune 411008 (India); Satyanarayana, C V.V. [National Chemical Laboratory, Pashan Road, Pune 41108 (India)

    2005-07-15

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) stabilized gold nanoparticles have been prepared in aqueous medium using two different reducing viz.; hydrazine hydrate, a stronger reducing agent and sodium formaldehydesulfoxylate (SFS), a slightly weaker reducing agent. SFS is used for first ever time for reduction of gold metal salt. The PVA stabilized gold nanoparticles solutions are wine red to blood red coloured and are stable over a long period of time with no indication of aggregation. The solution shows strong visible light absorptions in the range of 520-540 nm, characteristics of gold nanoparticles. Powder X-ray diffraction patterns of freshly prepared films containing gold nanoparticles indicated particles size to be about 15 nm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of a more than two-week-old sample revealed well-defined non-agglomerated spherical particles of about 50 nm diameter in solutions.

  19. PVA stabilized gold nanoparticles by use of unexplored albeit conventional reducing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, P.K.; Gokhale, R.; Subbarao, V.V.V.S.; Vishwanath, A. Kasi; Das, B.K.; Satyanarayana, C.V.V.

    2005-01-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) stabilized gold nanoparticles have been prepared in aqueous medium using two different reducing viz.; hydrazine hydrate, a stronger reducing agent and sodium formaldehydesulfoxylate (SFS), a slightly weaker reducing agent. SFS is used for first ever time for reduction of gold metal salt. The PVA stabilized gold nanoparticles solutions are wine red to blood red coloured and are stable over a long period of time with no indication of aggregation. The solution shows strong visible light absorptions in the range of 520-540 nm, characteristics of gold nanoparticles. Powder X-ray diffraction patterns of freshly prepared films containing gold nanoparticles indicated particles size to be about 15 nm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of a more than two-week-old sample revealed well-defined non-agglomerated spherical particles of about 50 nm diameter in solutions

  20. Influence of dextran coating on the magnetic behaviour of iron oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutz, Silvio; Andrae, Wilfried; Hergt, Rudolf; Mueller, Robert; Oestreich, Christiane; Schmidt, Christopher; Toepfer, Jorg; Zeisberger, Matthias; Bellemann, Matthias E.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with mean diameters in the range from 10 to 30 nm were prepared by modified chemical precipitation routes. The particles were suspended in an aqueous solution by coating of the particles with carboxymethyldextran. A stability against agglomeration was achieved over a period of more than 7 days. In the present investigation, the structural and the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were investigated. The influence of the dextran shell on the strength of the dipole-dipole interactions between the neighbouring particles was determined by investigation of the remanence behaviour (Henkel plot) of coated as well as of uncoated particles

  1. Electrical properties of airborne nanoparticles produced by a commercial spark-discharge generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bau, S., E-mail: sebastien.bau@inrs.fr; Witschger, O. [Laboratoire de Metrologie des Aerosols, Institut National de Recherche et de Securite, INRS (France); Gensdarmes, F. [IRSN, Laboratoire de Physique et de Metrologie des Aerosols, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (France); Thomas, D. [LSGC/CNRS, Nancy Universite, Laboratoire des Sciences du Genie Chimique (France); Borra, J.-P. [Equipe Decharges Electriques et Procedes Aerosols, Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas (France)

    2010-08-15

    A nanoparticle generator based on the principle of electrical discharge (PALAS GFG-1000) was used to produce nanoparticles of different chemical natures. The fractions of electrically neutral particles were then measured by means of a Spectrometre de Mobilite Electrique Circulaire (SMEC, i.e. radial-flow mobility analyzer) for different operating conditions. The experimental results were compared with the theoretical values calculated from the Fuchs extended charge equilibrium model for spherical particles and agglomerates. For the smallest particles (below 20 nm), the deviations observed remain below 10%, and tend towards 20% for larger particles (over 35 nm).

  2. Quantitative characterization of agglomerate abrasion in a tumbling blender by using the Stokes number approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemsz, Tofan A; Nguyen, Tien Thanh; Hooijmaijers, Ricardo; Frijlink, Henderik W; Vromans, Herman; van der Voort Maarschalk, Kees

    2013-03-01

    Removal of microcrystalline cellulose agglomerates in a dry-mixing system (lactose, 100 M) predominantly occurs via abrasion. The agglomerate abrasion rate potential is estimated by the Stokes abrasion (StAbr) number of the system. The StAbr number equals the ratio between the kinetic energy density of the moving powder bed and the work of fracture of the agglomerate. Basically, the StAbr number concept describes the blending condition of the dry-mixing system. The concept has been applied to investigate the relevance of process parameters on agglomerate abrasion in tumbling blenders. Here, process parameters such as blender rotational speed and relative fill volumes were investigated. In this study, the StAbr approach revealed a transition point between abrasion rate behaviors. Below this transition point, a blending condition exists where agglomerate abrasion is dominated by the kinetic energy density of the powder blend. Above this transition point, a blending condition exists where agglomerates show (undesirable) slow abrasion rates. In this situation, the blending condition is mainly determined by the high fill volume of the filler.

  3. Limitations and possibilities of green synthesis and long-term stability of colloidal Ag nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velgosová, Oksana; Mražíková, Anna

    2017-12-01

    In this paper the influence of algae life cycle and the solutions pH on the green synthesis of colloidal Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) as well as effect of different storage conditions on AgNPs long-term stability was investigated. Silver nanoparticles were biologically synthesized using extracts of Parachlorella kessleri algae cultivated 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks. The formation of AgNPs was monitored using a UV-vis spectrophotometer and verified by TEM observation. The results confirmed formation of polyhedron and/or near polyhedron AgNPs, ranging between 5 and 60 nm in diameter. The age of algae influenced the synthesis rate and an amount of AgNPs in solution. The best results were obtained using tree weeks old algae. UV-vis analysis and TEM observation also revealed that the size and the stability of AgNPs depend on the pH of solution. AgNPs formed in solutions of higher pH (8 and 10) are polyhedron, fine, with narrow size interval and stabile. Nanoparticles formed in solutions of low pH (2, 4 and 6) started to lose their stability on 10th day of experiment, and the particle size interval was wide. The long-term stability of AgNPs can be influenced by light and temperature conditions. The most significant stability loss was observed at day light and room temperature (21°C). After 200-days significant amount of agglomerated particles settled on the bottom of the Erlenmeyer flask. AgNPs stored at dark and room temperature showed better long-term stability, weak particles agglomeration was observed. AgNPs stored at dark and at temperature 5°C showed the best long-term stability. Such AgNPs remained spherical, fine (5-20 nm), with narrow size interval and stable (no agglomeration) even after more than six months.

  4. Implications of the stability behavior of zinc oxide nanoparticles for toxicological studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meißner, Tobias; Oelschlägel, Kathrin; Potthoff, Annegret

    2014-08-01

    The increasing use of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles in sunscreens and other cosmetic products demands a risk assessment that has to be done in toxicological studies. Such investigations require profound knowledge of the behavior of ZnO in cell culture media. The current study was performed to get well-dispersed suspensions of a hydrophilic (ZnO-hydro) and a lipophilic coated (ZnO-lipo) ZnO nanomaterial for use in in vitro tests. Therefore, systematic tests were carried out with common dispersants (phosphate, lecithin, proteins) to elucidate chemical and physical changes of ZnO nanoparticles in water and physiological solutions (PBS, DMEM). Non-physiological stock suspensions were prepared using ultrasonication. Time-dependent changes of pH, conductivity, zeta potential, particle size and dissolution were recorded. Secondly, the stock suspensions were added to physiological media with or without albumin (BSA) or serum (FBS), to examine characteristics such as agglomeration and dissolution. Stable stock suspensions were obtained using phosphate as natural and physiological electrostatic stabilizing agent. Lecithin proved to be an effective wetting agent for ZnO-lipo. Although the particle size remained constant, the suspension changed over time. The pH increased as a result of ZnO dissolution and formation of zinc phosphate complexes. The behavior of ZnO in physiological media was found to depend strongly on the additives used. Applying only phosphate as additive, ZnO-hydro agglomerated within minutes. In the presence of lecithin or BSA/serum, agglomeration was inhibited. ZnO dissolution was higher under physiological conditions than in the stock suspension. Serum especially promoted this process. Using body-related dispersants (phosphate, lecithin) non-agglomerating stock suspensions of hydrophilic and lipophilic ZnO were prepared as a prerequisite to perform meaningful toxicological investigation. Both nanomaterials showed a non-negligible dissolution behavior

  5. Which Agglomeration Externalities Matter Most and Why?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, H.L.F.; Poot, J.; Smit, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper revisits the ongoing discussion on the importance of agglomeration externalities – specifically specialization, diversity and competition effects – that may contribute to innovation, productivity and urban employment growth. Previous meta-analyses suggested that the evidence on

  6. Which Agglomeration Externalities Matter Most and Why?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Henri L.F.; Poot, Jacques; Smit, Martijn J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper revisits the ongoing discussion on the importance of agglomeration externalities – specifically specialization, diversity and competition effects – that may contribute to innovation, productivity and urban employment growth. Previous meta‐analyses suggested that the evidence on

  7. Poly-thiosemicarbazide/gold nanoparticles catalytic membrane: In-situ growth of well-dispersed, uniform and stable gold nanoparticles in a polymeric membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Villalobos, Luis Francisco

    2014-11-01

    This work presents a method that achieves the highest loading, published so far, of non-agglomerated and well-distributed gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) inside a polymeric membrane. The method uses poly-thiosemicarbazide (PTSC) as the starting material for fabricating the membranes. This polymer contains one chelate site per monomeric unit, resulting in a high content of adsorption sites. This helps to achieve such high loading without agglomeration, along with the strong interaction of the chelate sites with the metal ions and the fact that they are distributed homogeneously along the membrane structure. The simple and scalable three-step procedure developed in this work resulted in a PTSC membrane containing 33.5 wt.% Au/PTSC in the form of 2.9 nm AuNPs. The membrane demonstrated catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-Nitrophenol (4-NP) to 4-Aminophenol (4-AP). © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  8. Plasmonic angular tunability of gold nanoparticles generated by fs laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace, M.L.; Guarnaccio, A.; Ranù, F. [CNR, ISM UOS Tito Scalo, Zona Industriale, Tito Scalo (PZ) 85050 (Italy); Trucchi, D. [CNR, ISM UOS Montelibretti, Via Salaria km 29.300, Monterotondo Scalo, (RM) 00015 (Italy); Orlando, S., E-mail: stefano.orlando@ism.cnr.it [CNR, ISM UOS Tito Scalo, Zona Industriale, Tito Scalo (PZ) 85050 (Italy); Mollica, D.; Parisi, G.P. [CNR, ISM UOS Tito Scalo, Zona Industriale, Tito Scalo (PZ) 85050 (Italy); Medici, L.; Lettino, A. [CNR, IMAA, Area della Ricerca di Potenza -Zona Industriale, Tito Scalo, (PZ) 85050 (Italy); De Bonis, A.; Teghil, R. [Dipart. di Scienze,Università della Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano 10, Potenza, 85100 (Italy); Santagata, A. [CNR, ISM UOS Tito Scalo, Zona Industriale, Tito Scalo (PZ) 85050 (Italy)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • fs pulsed laser ablation as a technique to produce nanoparticles. • Nanoparticle distribution as an evidence for plasmonic tunable resonances. • Correlation between angular distribution of deposited nanoparticles and specific plasmonic resonances. - Abstract: With the aim to study the influence of deposition parameters on the plasmonic properties of gold (Au) nanoparticles (NPs) deposited by ultra-short ablation, we have focused our attention in evaluating how their size distribution can be varied. In this work, the role played by the NPs’ angular distribution, agglomeration and growth is related to the resulting optical properties. UV–vis-NIR absorption spectra together with Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray microdiffraction observations are presented in order to show how the angular distribution of fs laser ablation and deposition of Au NPs provides different plasmonic properties which can be beneficial for several aims, from optoelectronic to biosensor applications.

  9. Mathematical modeling of pigment dispersion taking into account the full agglomerate particle size distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a mathematical model that can quantify the dispersion of pigments, with a focus on the mechanical breakage of pigment agglomerates. The underlying physical mechanism was assumed to be surface erosion of spherical pigment agglomerates. The full agglomerate pa.......g., in the development of novel dispersion principles and for analysis of dispersion failures. The general applicability of the model, beyond the three pigments considered, needs to be confirmed....

  10. Biomass oxygen/steam gasification in a pressurized bubbling fluidized bed: Agglomeration behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Chunguang; Rosén, Christer; Engvall, Klas

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Dolomite is a superior material in preventing bed agglomeration. • Small molten ash particles deposited on magnesite at bed temperatures above 1000 °C. • The performance, when using magnesite, is sensitive to temperature disturbances. • The anti-agglomeration mechanisms of Ca- and Mg-bearing materials were discussed. - Abstract: In this study, the anti-agglomeration abilities of Ca- and Mg-containing bed materials, including dolomite and magnesite, in a pressurized bubbling fluidized bed gasifier using pine pellets and birch chips as feedstock, is investigated. The most typical bed material—silica sand—was also included as a reference for comparison. The sustainability of the operation was evaluated via analyzing the temperatures at different levels along the bed height. During the performances, the aim was to keep the temperature at the bottom zone of the reactor at around 870 °C. However, the success highly depends on the bed materials used in the bed and the temperature can vary significantly in case of agglomeration or bad mixing of bed materials and char particles. Both Glanshammar and Sala dolomites performed well with no observed agglomeration tendencies. In case of magnesite, the bed exhibited a high agglomeration tendency. Silica sand displayed the most severe agglomeration among a