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Sample records for nicotine transdermal therapy

  1. Population pharmacokinetic model of transdermal nicotine delivered from a matrix-type patch.

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    Linakis, Matthew W; Rower, Joseph E; Roberts, Jessica K; Miller, Eleanor I; Wilkins, Diana G; Sherwin, Catherine M T

    2017-12-01

    Nicotine addiction is an issue faced by millions of individuals worldwide. As a result, nicotine replacement therapies, such as transdermal nicotine patches, have become widely distributed and used. While the pharmacokinetics of transdermal nicotine have been extensively described using noncompartmental methods, there are few data available describing the between-subject variability in transdermal nicotine pharmacokinetics. The aim of this investigation was to use population pharmacokinetic techniques to describe this variability, particularly as it pertains to the absorption of nicotine from the transdermal patch. A population pharmacokinetic parent-metabolite model was developed using plasma concentrations from 25 participants treated with transdermal nicotine. Covariates tested in this model included: body weight, body mass index, body surface area (calculated using the Mosteller equation) and sex. Nicotine pharmacokinetics were best described with a one-compartment model with absorption based on a Weibull distribution and first-order elimination and a single compartment for the major metabolite, cotinine. Body weight was a significant covariate on apparent volume of distribution of nicotine (exponential scaling factor 1.42). After the inclusion of body weight in the model, no other covariates were significant. This is the first population pharmacokinetic model to describe the absorption and disposition of transdermal nicotine and its metabolism to cotinine and the pharmacokinetic variability between individuals who were administered the patch. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. Liquid crystalline systems containing Vitamin E TPGS for the controlled transdermal nicotine delivery

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    Lívia Neves Borgheti-Cardoso

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Transdermal nicotine patches have been used in smoking cessation therapy, suggested for the treatment of skin disorders with eosinophilic infiltration and have been found to improve attention performance in patients with Alzheimer's disease and age-associated memory impairment. However, skin irritation with extended patch use is still a problem. The aim of this work was to develop a simple to prepare liquid crystalline system containing vitamin E TPGS that would be able to control nicotine delivery and reduce irritation and sensitization problems. The liquid crystalline phases were macroscopically characterized by visual analysis and examined microscopically under a polarized light microscope. Topical and transdermal delivery of nicotine were investigated in vitro using porcine ear skin mounted on a Franz diffusion cell. Nicotine skin permeation from the developed cubic phase followed zero-order kinetics (r = 0.993 and was significantly enhanced after 12 h when compared to the control formulation (nicotine solution (p < 0.05 (138.86 ± 20.44 and 64.91 ± 4.06 μg/cm2, respectively. Cubic phase was also able to target viable skin layers in comparison to control solution (8.18 ± 1.89 and 2.63 ± 2.51 μg/cm2, respectively. Further studies to evaluate skin sensitization and irritation are now necessary.

  3. In vitro evaluation of transdermal nicotine delivery systems commercially available in Brazil

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    André Luís Morais Ruela

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop and validate a method for evaluating the release and skin permeation from transdermal nicotine patches using the vertical diffusion cell (VDC. The VDC is an experimental apparatus employed in research, development, and the pharmaceutical field because it can simulate conditions closest to those established in clinical trials. Two transdermal nicotine delivery systems marketed in Brazil to release 14 mg over 24 hours were evaluated. Release studies were carried out using a regenerated cellulose dialysis membrane and permeation studies were carried out using excised porcine ear skin. The results indicated that nicotine release from both evaluated patches follows Higuchi's release kinetics, while skin permeation studies indicated zero-order release kinetics. Nicotine release rates were different between both evaluated patches, but drug permeation rates were not significantly different. According to validation studies, the method was appropriate for evaluating in vitro performance of nicotine patches. The proposed method can be applied to in vitro comparative studies between different commercial nicotine patches and may be used as an auxiliary tool in the design of new transdermal nicotine delivery systems.

  4. Carbon Nanotube Membranes for use in the Transdermal Treatment of Nicotine Addiction and Opioid Withdrawal Symptoms

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    Caroline L. Strasinger

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal systems are attractive methods of drug administration specifically when treating patients for drug addiction. Current systems however are deficient in therapies that allow variable flux values of drug, such as nicotine for smoking cessation or complex dosing regimens using clonidine when treating opioid withdrawal symptoms. Through the use of functionalized carbon nanotube (CNT membranes, drug delivery to the skin can be controlled by applying a small electrical bias to create a programmable drug delivery system. Clearly, a transdermal patch system that can be tailored to an individual's needs will increase patient compliance as well as provide much more efficient therapy. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the applicability of using carbon nanotube membranes in transdermal systems for treatment of drug abuse.

  5. Carbon Nanotube Membranes for use in the Transdermal Treatment of Nicotine Addiction and Opioid Withdrawal Symptoms

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    Audra L. Stinchcomb

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal systems are attractive methods of drug administration specifically when treating patients for drug addiction. Current systems however are deficient in therapies that allow variable flux values of drug, such as nicotine for smoking cessation or complex dosing regimens using clonidine when treating opioid withdrawal symptoms. Through the use of functionalized carbon nanotube (CNT membranes, drug delivery to the skin can be controlled by applying a small electrical bias to create a programmable drug delivery system. Clearly, a transdermal patch system that can be tailored to an individual’s needs will increase patient compliance as well as provide much more efficient therapy. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the applicability of using carbon nanotube membranes in transdermal systems for treatment of drug abuse.

  6. The effect of transdermal nicotine patches on sleep and dreams.

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    Page, F; Coleman, G; Conduit, R

    2006-07-30

    This study was undertaken to determine the effect of 24-h transdermal nicotine patches on sleep and dream mentation in 15 smokers aged 20 to 33. Utilising a repeated measures design, it was found that more time awake and more ASDA micro-arousals occurred while wearing the nicotine patch compared to placebo. Also, the percentage of REM sleep decreased, but REM latency and the proportion of time spent in NREM sleep stages did not change significantly. Dream reports containing visual imagery, visual imagery ratings and the number of visualizable nouns were significantly greater from REM compared to Stage 2 awakenings, regardless of patch condition. However, a general interaction effect was observed. Stage 2 dream variables remained equivalent across nicotine and placebo conditions. Within REM sleep, more dream reports containing visual imagery occurred while wearing the nicotine patch, and these were rated as more vivid. The greater frequency of visual imagery reports and higher imagery ratings specifically from REM sleep suggests that previously reported dreaming side effects from 24-h nicotine patches may be specific to REM sleep. Combined with previous animal studies showing that transdermally delivered nicotine blocks PGO activity in REM sleep, the current results do no appear consistent with PGO-based hypotheses of dreaming, such as the Activation-Synthesis (AS) or Activation, Input and Modulation (AIM) models.

  7. Transdermal nicotine absorption handling e-cigarette refill liquids.

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    Maina, Giovanni; Castagnoli, Carlotta; Passini, Valter; Crosera, Matteo; Adami, Gianpiero; Mauro, Marcella; Filon, Francesca Larese

    2016-02-01

    The concentrated nicotine in e-cigarette refill liquids can be toxic if inadvertently ingested or absorbed through the skin. Reports of poisonings due to accidental ingestion of nicotine on refill liquids are rapidly increasing, while the evaluation of nicotine dermally absorbed still lacks. For that reason we studied transdermal nicotine absorption after the skin contamination with e-liquid. Donor chambers of eight Franz diffusion cells were filled with 1 mL of 0.8 mg/mL nicotine e-liquid for 24 h. The concentration of nicotine in the receiving phase was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (LOD:0.1 μg/mL). Nicotine was detectable in receiving solution 2 h after the start of exposure and increased progressively. The medium flux calculated was 4.82 ± 1.05 μg/cm(2)/h with a lag time of 3.9 ± 0.1 h. After 24 h, the nicotine concentration in the receiving compartment was 101.02 ± 22.35 μg/cm(2) corresponding to 3.04 mg of absorbed nicotine after contamination of a skin surface of 100 cm(2). Skin contamination with e-liquid can cause nicotine skin absorption: caution must be paid when handling refill e-liquids. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Nicotine replacement therapy

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    Smoking cessation - nicotine replacement; Tobacco - nicotine replacement therapy ... Before you start using a nicotine replacement product, here are some things to know: The more cigarettes you smoke, the higher the dose you may need to ...

  9. On the Road to Development of an in Vitro Permeation Test (IVPT) Model to Compare Heat Effects on Transdermal Delivery Systems: Exploratory Studies with Nicotine and Fentanyl.

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    Shin, Soo Hyeon; Ghosh, Priyanka; Newman, Bryan; Hammell, Dana C; Raney, Sam G; Hassan, Hazem E; Stinchcomb, Audra L

    2017-09-01

    At elevated temperatures, the rate of drug release and skin permeation from transdermal delivery systems (TDS) may be higher than at a normal skin temperature. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of heat on the transdermal delivery of two model drugs, nicotine and fentanyl, from matrix-type TDSs with different formulations, using in vitro permeation tests (IVPT). IVPT experiments using pig skin were performed on two nicotine and three fentanyl TDSs. Both continuous and transient heat exposures were investigated by applying heat either for the maximum recommended TDS wear duration or for short duration. Continuous heat exposure for the two nicotine TDSs resulted in different effects, showing a prolonged heat effect for one product but not the other. The J max enhancement ratio due to the continuous heat effect was comparable between the two nicotine TDS, but significantly different (p drug from the skin depot after TDS removal differently for two drugs, with fentanyl exhibiting a longer heat effect. This exploratory work suggests that an IVPT study may be able to discriminate differences in transdermal drug delivery when different TDS are exposed to elevated temperatures. However, the clinical significance of IVPT heat effects studies should be further explored by conducting in vivo clinical studies with similar study designs.

  10. Transdermal nicotine mixed natural rubber-hydroxypropylmethylcellulose film forming systems for smoking cessation: in vitro evaluations.

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    Pichayakorn, Wiwat; Suksaeree, Jirapornchai; Boonme, Prapaporn; Taweepreda, Wirach; Amnuaikit, Thanaporn; Ritthidej, Garnpimol C

    2014-08-27

    Abstract Novel film forming polymeric dispersions for transdermal nicotine delivery were prepared from deproteinized natural rubber latex (DNRL) blended with hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) and dibutyl phthalate (DBP) or glycerin (GLY) as plasticizer. The preliminary molecular compatibility of ingredients was observed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffractometry characterizations. All film forming polymeric dispersions were elegant in appearance and smooth in texture without agglomeration. Their pH was 7-8. In addition, their viscosity and spreadability showed good characteristics depended on HPMC and plasticizers blended. The transparent in situ dry films with good strength and elasticity were also confirmed by peeling-off. The nicotine release from them revealed an initial fast release that was similar to the release from a concentrated nicotine solution, and followed by slow release pattern from the in situ films. GLY blended formulation produced a higher amount of nicotine permeation through the in vitro pig skin than DBP blends. Ethanol mixing also enhanced nicotine permeation, but it affected the integrity of in situ films. The nicotine release and skin permeation kinetics were by a diffusion mechanism that was confirmed by the Higuchi's model. These formulations were safe without producing any severe skin irritation. However, for the stability they needed to be stored at 4 °C in tightly sealed containers.

  11. Nicotine increases brain functional network efficiency.

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    Wylie, Korey P; Rojas, Donald C; Tanabe, Jody; Martin, Laura F; Tregellas, Jason R

    2012-10-15

    Despite the use of cholinergic therapies in Alzheimer's disease and the development of cholinergic strategies for schizophrenia, relatively little is known about how the system modulates the connectivity and structure of large-scale brain networks. To better understand how nicotinic cholinergic systems alter these networks, this study examined the effects of nicotine on measures of whole-brain network communication efficiency. Resting state fMRI was acquired from fifteen healthy subjects before and after the application of nicotine or placebo transdermal patches in a single blind, crossover design. Data, which were previously examined for default network activity, were analyzed with network topology techniques to measure changes in the communication efficiency of whole-brain networks. Nicotine significantly increased local efficiency, a parameter that estimates the network's tolerance to local errors in communication. Nicotine also significantly enhanced the regional efficiency of limbic and paralimbic areas of the brain, areas which are especially altered in diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. These changes in network topology may be one mechanism by which cholinergic therapies improve brain function. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. The impact of advertising on nicotine replacement therapy demand.

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    Tauras, John A; Chaloupka, Frank J; Emery, Sherry

    2005-05-01

    While much is known about the economic determinants of tobacco use, very little is known about the economic determinants of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) use. This paper is the first econometric study to examine the impact of advertising on NRT demand. Pooled cross-sectional time-series scanner-based data for 50 major metropolitan markets in the USA covering the period between the second quarter of 1996 and the second quarter of 2002 are used in the analysis. Fixed-effects modeling is employed to estimate the NRT demand equation. The estimates indicate that increased advertising of Nicoderm CQ transdermal patches and Nicotrol transdermal patches increases per-capita sales of established Nicoderm CQ and Nicotrol products, respectively. However, increased advertising of Nicorette polacrilex (gum) was found not to significantly increase sales of established Nicorette products. Moreover, decreases in the price of NRT and increases in the price of cigarettes were found to increase per-capita sales of NRT products. Given the documented efficacy of NRT, measures to increase peoples' awareness of NRT products through advertising, measures to decrease the price of NRT, and measures to increase the price of cigarettes would be effective means to increase the use of NRT, likely leading to decreased cigarette smoking and reductions in the future public health burden caused by tobacco use.

  13. Nicotine patches improve mood and response speed in a lexical decision task.

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    Gentry, M V; Hammersley, J J; Hale, C R; Nuwer, P K; Meliska, C J

    2000-01-01

    The effects of smoking a cigarette or wearing a transdermal nicotine patch on mood and lexical decision-making were tested in eight smokers. Each participant was tested after 4 hours of smoking abstinence, under 4 conditions: placebo (very low nicotine) cigarette, nicotine cigarette, placebo patch, and nicotine patch. Relative to placebo, wearing the nicotine patch reduced Profile of Mood States (POMS) Total Mood Disturbance and Fatigue/Inertia scores, while increasing the speed of some types of lexical decisions. Smoking a nicotine cigarette did not affect reaction times, but unexpectedly decreased the accuracy of Word/ Nonword lexical decisions. Thus, transdermal nicotine may improve mood and facilitate longterm memory search and/or attentional processes in nicotine-deprived smokers.

  14. Transdermal hormone therapy in postmenopausal women: A review of metabolic effects and drug delivery technologies

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    Nathan W Kopper

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Nathan W Kopper, Jennifer Gudeman, Daniel J ThompsonKV Pharmaceutical, St. Louis, MO, USAAbstract: Vasomotor symptoms (VMS associated with menopause can cause significant discomfort and decrease the quality of life for women in the peri-menopausal and post-menopausal stages of life. Hormone therapy (HT is the mainstay of treatment for menopausal symptoms and is currently the only therapy proven effective for VMS. Numerous HT options are available to treat VMS, including estrogen-only and estrogen-progestogen combination products to meet the needs of both hysterectomized and nonhysterectomized women. In addition to selecting an appropriate estrogen or estrogen-progestogen combination, consideration should be given to the route of administration to best suit the needs of the patient. Delivery systems for hormone therapy include oral tablets, transdermal patches, transdermal topical (nonpatch products, and intravaginal preparations. Oral is currently the most commonly utilized route of administration in the United States. However, evidence suggests that oral delivery may lead to some undesirable physiologic effects caused by significant gut and hepatic metabolism. Transdermal drug delivery may mitigate some of these effects by avoiding gut and hepatic first-pass metabolism. Advantages of transdermal delivery include the ability to administer unmetabolized estradiol directly to the blood stream, administration of lower doses compared to oral products, and minimal stimulation of hepatic protein production. Several estradiol transdermal delivery technologies are available, including various types of patches, topical gels, and a transdermal spray.Keywords: estradiol, hormone therapy, menopause, transdermal drug delivery, vasomotor symptoms

  15. Transdermal testosterone replacement therapy in men

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    Ullah MI

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available M Iftekhar Ullah,1 Daniel M Riche,1,2 Christian A Koch1,31Department of Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center, 2Department of Pharmacy Practice, The University of Mississippi, 3GV (Sonny Montgomery VA Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USAAbstract: Androgen deficiency syndrome in men is a frequently diagnosed condition associated with clinical symptoms including fatigue, decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, and metabolic syndrome. Serum testosterone concentrations decline steadily with age. The prevalence of androgen deficiency syndrome in men varies depending on the age group, known and unknown comorbidities, and the respective study group. Reported prevalence rates may be underestimated, as not every man with symptoms of androgen deficiency seeks treatment. Additionally, men reporting symptoms of androgen deficiency may not be correctly diagnosed due to the vagueness of the symptom quality. The treatment of androgen deficiency syndrome or male hypogonadism may sometimes be difficult due to various reasons. There is no consensus as to when to start treating a respective man or with regards to the best treatment option for an individual patient. There is also lack of familiarity with treatment options among general practitioners. The formulations currently available on the market are generally expensive and dose adjustment protocols for each differ. All these factors add to the complexity of testosterone replacement therapy. In this article we will discuss the general indications of transdermal testosterone replacement therapy, available formulations, dosage, application sites, and recommended titration schedule.Keywords: hypogonadism, transdermal, testosterone, sexual function, testosterone replacement therapy, estradiol

  16. Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Two Nicotine Patches in Smokers.

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    Rasmussen, Scott; Horkan, Kathleen Halabuk; Kotler, Mitchell

    2018-02-02

    Smoking continues to be a major preventable cause of early mortality worldwide, and nicotine replacement therapy has been demonstrated to increase rates of abstinence among smokers attempting to quit. Nicotine transdermal systems (also known as nicotine patches) attach to the skin via an adhesive layer composed of a mixture of different-molecular-weight polyisobutylenes (PIBs) in a specific ratio. This randomized, single-dose, 2-treatment, crossover pharmacokinetic (PK) trial assessed the bioequivalence of nicotine patches including a replacement PIB adhesive (test) compared with the PIB adhesive historically used on marketed patches (reference). The test and reference patches were bioequivalent, as determined by the PK parameters of C max and AUC 0-t . In addition, the parameters T max and t 1/2 did not significantly differ between the 2 patches, supporting the bioequivalence finding from the primary analysis. The tolerability profiles of the patches containing the replacement and previously used PIB adhesives were similar; application-site adverse events did not significantly differ between test and reference patches. Overall, these data establish the bioequivalence of the nicotine patch with the replacement PIB adhesive formulation and the previously utilized PIB adhesive formulation. © 2018 The Authors. Clinical Pharmacology in Drug Development published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  17. Nicotine dependence and psychiatric disorders.

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    Salín-Pascual, Rafael J; Alcocer-Castillejos, Natasha V; Alejo-Galarza, Gabriel

    2003-01-01

    , concentration, and memory. Finally there are several strategies to deal with nicotine dependence, Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT), which are nicotine chewing-gum, transdermal nicotine patches, and nicotine inhalators device. Also some antidepressants like bupropion has shown to be effective in smoking cessation treatment. To know more about nicotine phenomenon would be important, because that will allow a more mature perspective about the damage and beneficial effects of that substance.

  18. Association of nicotine metabolism and sex with relapse following varenicline and nicotine replacement therapy.

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    Glatard, Anaïs; Dobrinas, Maria; Gholamrezaee, Mehdi; Lubomirov, Rubin; Cornuz, Jacques; Csajka, Chantal; Eap, Chin B

    2017-10-01

    Nicotine is metabolized into cotinine and then into trans-3'-hydroxycotinine, mainly by cytochrome P450 2A6. Recent studies reported better effectiveness of varenicline in women and in nicotine normal metabolizers phenotypically determined by nicotine-metabolite ratio. Our objective was to study the influence of nicotine-metabolite ratio, CYP2A6 genotype and sex on the response to nicotine replacement therapy and varenicline. Data were extracted from a longitudinal study which included smokers participating in a smoking cessation program. Response to treatment was defined by the absence of relapse when a set threshold of reduction in cigarettes per day relative to the week before the study was no more reached. The analysis considered total and partial reduction defined by a diminution of 100% and of 90% in cigarettes per day, respectively. The hazard ratio of relapsing was estimated in multivariate Cox regression models including the sex and the nicotine metabolism determined by the phenotype or by CYP2A6 genotyping (rs1801272 and rs28399433). In the normal metabolizers determined by phenotyping and in women, the hazard ratio for relapsing was significantly lower with varenicline for a partial decrease (HR = 0.33, 95% CI [0.12, 0.89] and HR = 0.20, 95% CI [0.04, 0.91], respectively) and nonsignificantly lower for a total cessation (HR = 0.45, 95% CI [0.20, 1.0] and HR = 0.38, 95% CI [0.14, 1.0]). When compared with the normal metabolizers determined by phenotyping, the hazard ratio for a partial decrease was similar in the normal metabolizers determined by genotyping (HR = 0.42, 95% CI [0.18, 0.94]) while it was significantly lower with varenicline for a total cessation (HR = 0.50, 95% CI [0.26, 0.98]). Women and normal nicotine metabolizers may benefit more from varenicline over nicotine replacement therapy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Knowledge and Perceptions about Nicotine, Nicotine Replacement Therapies and Electronic Cigarettes among Healthcare Professionals in Greece

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    Anastasia Moysidou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and perceptions of Greek healthcare professionals about nicotine, nicotine replacement therapies and electronic cigarettes. Methods. An online survey was performed, in which physicians and nurses working in private and public healthcare sectors in Athens-Greece were asked to participate through email invitations. A knowledge score was calculated by scoring the correct answers to specific questions with 1 point. Results. A total of 262 healthcare professionals were included to the analysis. Most had daily contact with smokers in their working environment. About half of them considered that nicotine has an extremely or very important contribution to smoking-related disease. More than 30% considered nicotine replacement therapies equally or more addictive than smoking, 76.7% overestimated their smoking cessation efficacy and only 21.0% would recommend them as long-term smoking substitutes. For electronic cigarettes, 45.0% considered them equally or more addictive than smoking and 24.4% equally or more harmful than tobacco cigarettes. Additionally, 35.5% thought they involve combustion while the majority responded that nicotine in electronic cigarettes is synthetically produced. Only 14.5% knew about the pending European regulation, but 33.2% have recommended them to smokers in the past. Still, more than 40% would not recommend electronic cigarettes to smokers unwilling or unable to quit smoking with currently approved medications. Cardiologists and respiratory physicians, who are responsible for smoking cessation therapy in Greece, were even more reluctant to recommend electronic cigarettes to this subpopulation of smokers compared to all other participants. The knowledge score of the whole study sample was 7.7 (SD: 2.4 out of a maximum score of 16. Higher score was associated with specific physician specialties. Conclusions. Greek healthcare professionals appear to overestimate

  20. Thermoresponsive Hydrogels and Their Biomedical Applications: Special Insight into Their Applications in Textile Based Transdermal Therapy

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    Sudipta Chatterjee

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Various natural and synthetic polymers are capable of showing thermoresponsive properties and their hydrogels are finding a wide range of biomedical applications including drug delivery, tissue engineering and wound healing. Thermoresponsive hydrogels use temperature as external stimulus to show sol-gel transition and most of the thermoresponsive polymers can form hydrogels around body temperature. The availability of natural thermoresponsive polymers and multiple preparation methods of synthetic polymers, simple preparation method and high functionality of thermoresponsive hydrogels offer many advantages for developing drug delivery systems based on thermoresponsive hydrogels. In textile field applications of thermoresponsive hydrogels, textile based transdermal therapy is currently being applied using drug loaded thermoresponsive hydrogels. The current review focuses on the preparation, physico-chemical properties and various biomedical applications of thermoresponsive hydrogels based on natural and synthetic polymers and especially, their applications in developing functionalized textiles for transdermal therapies. Finally, future prospects of dual responsive (pH/temperature hydrogels made by these polymers for textile based transdermal treatments are mentioned in this review.

  1. A Critical Evaluation of Nicotine Replacement Therapy for Teenage Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, Christi A.

    2000-01-01

    Evaluates the appropriateness and feasibility of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) in teenage smokers. Available forms of NRT, theoretical rationale and efficacy of NRT, ethical considerations, and the feasibility of NRT in teenage smokers are addressed. Several characteristics similar to adult nicotine dependent smokers have been found in teen…

  2. Transdermal testosterone replacement therapy in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, M Iftekhar; Riche, Daniel M; Koch, Christian A

    2014-01-01

    Androgen deficiency syndrome in men is a frequently diagnosed condition associated with clinical symptoms including fatigue, decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, and metabolic syndrome. Serum testosterone concentrations decline steadily with age. The prevalence of androgen deficiency syndrome in men varies depending on the age group, known and unknown comorbidities, and the respective study group. Reported prevalence rates may be underestimated, as not every man with symptoms of androgen deficiency seeks treatment. Additionally, men reporting symptoms of androgen deficiency may not be correctly diagnosed due to the vagueness of the symptom quality. The treatment of androgen deficiency syndrome or male hypogonadism may sometimes be difficult due to various reasons. There is no consensus as to when to start treating a respective man or with regards to the best treatment option for an individual patient. There is also lack of familiarity with treatment options among general practitioners. The formulations currently available on the market are generally expensive and dose adjustment protocols for each differ. All these factors add to the complexity of testosterone replacement therapy. In this article we will discuss the general indications of transdermal testosterone replacement therapy, available formulations, dosage, application sites, and recommended titration schedule. PMID:24470750

  3. Microdose transdermal estrogen therapy for relief of vulvovaginal symptoms in postmenopausal women.

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    Bachmann, Gloria A; Schaefers, Matthias; Uddin, Alkaz; Utian, Wulf H

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of microdose transdermal 17beta-estradiol (E2) therapy in postmenopausal women with moderate to severe vulvovaginal symptoms. This report is based on a subset of 121 women who reported most bothersome moderate or severe vulvovaginal symptoms at baseline, from a previous randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study of 425 healthy, symptomatic, postmenopausal women. Recruits had experienced at least 7 moderate or severe hot flushes daily for at least 1 week or at least 50 moderate or severe hot flushes per week for at least 1 week. Effects on coprimary efficacy variables have been reported previously. Participants received low-dose transdermal E2 plus levonorgestrel (n = 43; nominal delivery 0.023 mg/d E2/0.0075 mg/d levonorgestrel), microdose E2 (n = 42; nominal delivery 0.014 mg/d), or placebo (n = 36) for 12 weeks. Secondary efficacy variables reported herein include mean change from baseline in vaginal pH and vaginal maturation index, the proportion of women with symptoms of vulvar and vaginal atrophy at baseline and week 12, and the proportion of women with moderate-to-severe symptoms of vulvar and vaginal atrophy. Microdose transdermal E2 treatment was associated with a consistent benefit versus placebo in women with vulvovaginal atrophy. There was a statistically significant difference between both E2 versus placebo for changes in vaginal pH and vaginal maturation index. Microdose transdermal E2 offers a useful addition to the therapeutic armamentarium for postmenopausal women in whom vulvovaginal symptoms are particularly troublesome.

  4. Real-time UV imaging of nicotin release from transdermal patch

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    Østergaard, Jesper; Meng-Lund, Emil; Larsen, Susan Weng

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study was conducted to characterize UV imaging as a platform for performing in vitro release studies using Nicorette® nicotine patches as a model drug delivery system. METHODS: The rate of nicotine release from 2 mm diameter patch samples (Nicorette®) into 0.067 M phosphate buffer, p......H 7.40, was studied by UV imaging (Actipix SDI300 dissolution imaging system) at 254 nm. The release rates were compared to those obtained using the paddle-over-disk method. RESULTS: Calibration curves were successfully established which allowed temporally and spatially resolved quantification...... of nicotine. Release profiles obtained from UV imaging were in qualitative agreement with results from the paddle-over-disk release method. CONCLUSION: Visualization as well as quantification of nicotine concentration gradients was achieved by UV imaging in real time. UV imaging has the potential to become...

  5. Local transdermal therapy to the breast for breast cancer prevention and DCIS therapy: preclinical and clinical evaluation.

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    Lee, Oukseub; Ivancic, David; Allu, Subhashini; Shidfar, Ali; Kenney, Kara; Helenowski, Irene; Sullivan, Megan E; Muzzio, Miguel; Scholtens, Denise; Chatterton, Robert T; Bethke, Kevin P; Hansen, Nora M; Khan, Seema A

    2015-12-01

    Women at high risk of breast cancer and those with carcinoma in situ need non-toxic, well-tolerated preventive interventions. One promising approach is drug delivery through the breast skin (local transdermal therapy, LTT). Our goal was to test novel drugs for LTT, to establish that LTT is applicable to non-steroidal drugs. Athymic nude rats were treated with oral tamoxifen, transdermal 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT) or endoxifen gel applied daily to the axillary mammary gland for 6 weeks (Study 1). Study 2 was identical to Study 1, testing transdermal telapristone acetate (telapristone) gel versus subcutaneous implant. At euthanasia, mammary glands and blood were collected. In Study 3, consenting women requiring mastectomy were randomized to diclofenac patch applied to the abdomen or the breast for 3 days preoperatively. At surgery, eight tissue samples per breast were collected from predetermined locations, along with venous blood. Drug concentrations were measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy. Mammary tissue concentrations of 4-OHT, endoxifen, and telapristone were significantly higher in the axillary glands of the gel-treated animals, compared to inguinal glands or to systemically treated animals. Plasma concentrations were similar in gel and systemically treated animals. The clinical trial showed significantly higher mammary concentrations when diclofenac was applied to the breast skin versus the abdominal skin, but concentrations were variable. These results demonstrate that lipophilic drugs can be developed for LTT; although the nude rat is suitable for testing drug permeability, delivery is systemic. In human, however, transdermal application to the breast skin provides local delivery.

  6. Being a long-term user of nicotine replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Gitte; Nørgaard, Lotte Stig; Tønnesen, Philip

    Background During recent years a gradual shift in the application of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) has taken place from NRT-products only being recommended to achieve smoking cessation, to now including smoking reduction, and long-term substitution of tobacco with NRT has taken place. This has...... been promoted as a way of achieving harm-reduction in highly nicotine dependent smokers who are unwilling or incapable of quitting all nicotine products, as continued use of NRT is widely accepted as being far less hazardous than continued smoking. To our knowledge no previous research has been done...... of feeling addicted, cost of NRT products and fear of adverse health consequences. Aim of study • To get a thorough understanding of the lived experiences of nicotine dependent long-term NRT users. • To investigate what motivates or discourages quitting NRT. Method Semi-structured interviews with long...

  7. Nanostructured transdermal hormone replacement therapy for relieving menopausal symptoms: a confocal Raman spectroscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Botelho

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the safety and efficacy of a transdermal nanostructured formulation of progesterone (10% combined with estriol (0.1% + estradiol (0.25% for relieving postmenopausal symptoms. METHODS: A total of 66 postmenopausal Brazilian women with climacteric symptoms of natural menopause received transdermal nanostructured formulations of progesterone and estrogens in the forearm daily for 60 months to mimic the normal ovarian secretory pattern. Confocal Raman spectroscopy of hormones in skin layers was performed. Clinical parameters, serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone, blood pressure, BI-RADS classification from bilateral mammography, and symptomatic relief were compared between baseline and 60 months post-treatment. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02033512. RESULTS: An improvement in climacteric symptoms was reported in 92.5% of women evaluated before and after 60 months of treatment. The serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone changed significantly (p<0.05 after treatment; the values of serum follicle-stimulating hormone decreased after 60 months from 82.04±4.9 to 57.12±4.1 IU/mL. A bilateral mammography assessment of the breasts revealed normal results in all women. No adverse health-related events were attributed to this hormone replacement therapy protocol. CONCLUSION: The nanostructured formulation is safe and effective in re-establishing optimal serum levels of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone and relieving the symptoms of menopause. This transdermal hormone replacement therapy may alleviate climacteric symptoms in postmenopausal women.

  8. Nanostructured transdermal hormone replacement therapy for relieving menopausal symptoms: a confocal Raman spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, Marco Antonio; Queiroz, Dinalva Brito; Barros, Gisele; Guerreiro, Stela; Umbelino, Sonia; Lyra, Arao; Borges, Boniek; Freitas, Allan; Almeida, Jackson Guedes; Quintans Junior, Lucindo

    2014-01-01

    Objective:to determine the safety and efficacy of a transdermal nanostructured formulation of progesterone (10%) combined with estriol (0.1%) + estradiol (0.25%) for relieving postmenopausal symptoms. Methods: a total of 66 postmenopausal Brazilian women with climacteric symptoms of natural menopause received transdermal nanostructured formulations of progesterone and estrogens in the forearm daily for 60 months to mimic the normal ovarian secretory pattern. Confocal Raman spectroscopy of hormones in skin layers was performed. Clinical parameters, serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone, blood pressure, BI-RADS classification from bilateral mammography, and symptomatic relief were compared between baseline and 60 months post-treatment. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02033512. Results: an improvement in climacteric symptoms was reported in 92.5% of women evaluated before and after 60 months of treatment. The serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone changed significantly (p<0.05) after treatment; the values of serum follicle-stimulating hormone decreased after 60 months from 82.04 ± 4.9 to 57.12 ± 4.1 IU/mL. A bilateral mammography assessment of the breasts revealed normal results in all women. No adverse health-related events were attributed to this hormone replacement therapy protocol. Conclusion: the nanostructured formulation is safe and effective in re-establishing optimal serum levels of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone and relieving the symptoms of menopause. This transdermal hormone replacement therapy may alleviate climacteric symptoms in postmenopausal women. (author)

  9. Nanostructured transdermal hormone replacement therapy for relieving menopausal symptoms: a confocal Raman spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botelho, Marco Antonio; Queiroz, Dinalva Brito; Barros, Gisele; Guerreiro, Stela; Umbelino, Sonia; Lyra, Arao; Borges, Boniek; Freitas, Allan, E-mail: marcobotelho@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Potiguar, Natal, RN (Brazil). Lab. de Nanotecnologia; Fechine, Pierre [Universidade Federal do Ceara (GQMAT/UFCE), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Analitica. Grupo Avancado de Biomateriais em Quimica; Queiroz, Danilo Caldas de [Instituto Federal de Ciencia e Tecnologia (IFCT), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Lab. de Biotecnologia; Ruela, Ronaldo [Instituto de Biotecnologia Aplicada (INBIOS), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Almeida, Jackson Guedes [Universidade Federal do Vale de Sao Francisco (UNIVALE), Petrolina, PE (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Farmaceuticas; Quintans Junior, Lucindo [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFSE), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisiologia

    2014-06-01

    Objective:to determine the safety and efficacy of a transdermal nanostructured formulation of progesterone (10%) combined with estriol (0.1%) + estradiol (0.25%) for relieving postmenopausal symptoms. Methods: a total of 66 postmenopausal Brazilian women with climacteric symptoms of natural menopause received transdermal nanostructured formulations of progesterone and estrogens in the forearm daily for 60 months to mimic the normal ovarian secretory pattern. Confocal Raman spectroscopy of hormones in skin layers was performed. Clinical parameters, serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone, blood pressure, BI-RADS classification from bilateral mammography, and symptomatic relief were compared between baseline and 60 months post-treatment. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02033512. Results: an improvement in climacteric symptoms was reported in 92.5% of women evaluated before and after 60 months of treatment. The serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone changed significantly (p<0.05) after treatment; the values of serum follicle-stimulating hormone decreased after 60 months from 82.04 ± 4.9 to 57.12 ± 4.1 IU/mL. A bilateral mammography assessment of the breasts revealed normal results in all women. No adverse health-related events were attributed to this hormone replacement therapy protocol. Conclusion: the nanostructured formulation is safe and effective in re-establishing optimal serum levels of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone and relieving the symptoms of menopause. This transdermal hormone replacement therapy may alleviate climacteric symptoms in postmenopausal women. (author)

  10. Transdermal patches: history, development and pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Michael N; Kalia, Yogeshvar N; Horstmann, Michael; Roberts, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Transdermal patches are now widely used as cosmetic, topical and transdermal delivery systems. These patches represent a key outcome from the growth in skin science, technology and expertise developed through trial and error, clinical observation and evidence-based studies that date back to the first existing human records. This review begins with the earliest topical therapies and traces topical delivery to the present-day transdermal patches, describing along the way the initial trials, devices and drug delivery systems that underpin current transdermal patches and their actives. This is followed by consideration of the evolution in the various patch designs and their limitations as well as requirements for actives to be used for transdermal delivery. The properties of and issues associated with the use of currently marketed products, such as variability, safety and regulatory aspects, are then described. The review concludes by examining future prospects for transdermal patches and drug delivery systems, such as the combination of active delivery systems with patches, minimally invasive microneedle patches and cutaneous solutions, including metered-dose systems. PMID:25560046

  11. Characteristics of Australian smokers using bupropion and nicotine-replacement therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Christopher; Stafford, Jennifer; Shanahan, Marian; Mattick, Richard P

    2007-02-01

    Smokers were surveyed using a computer-assisted telephone interview to explore behaviors associated with the use of bupropion and nicotine-replacement therapies, using a convenient sample of Australian smokers. With assistance from the Pharmacy Guild of Australia, smokers were recruited through pharmacies and interviewed at baseline and after 3 months. A total of 508 smokers were recruited, 396 were interviewed at baseline and 318 completed a 3-month computer-assisted telephone interview. At 3 months, over two-thirds of participants were still smoking, the majority daily. However, the number of cigarettes smoked per week reduced and the time taken before smoking the first cigarette after waking increased. Nearly all participants started their medication (94%), while only 39% completed the full course. The main reasons for not completing the full course were adverse side effects, such as abnormal dreams and sleep disturbance. Despite Australian guidelines for bupropion and nicotine-replacement therapies to be used within a comprehensive treatment program, only 11% of patients were recommended behavioral support for nicotine dependence by their doctor or pharmacist. The results of the study shed light on patient utilization of the medication in terms of uptake and completion, possible side effects experienced and use of adjuncts. A better understanding of the use and experience of bupropion and nicotine-replacement therapies, and the lack of behavioral support offered with these, provides policy makers with a stronger evidence base to refine and improve the use of such pharmacotherapies.

  12. Transdermal and transbuccal drug delivery systems: enhancement using iontophoretic and chemical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Longsheng; Silva, Sérgio M C; Damaj, Bassam B; Martin, Richard; Michniak-Kohn, Bozena B

    2011-12-12

    We investigated the enhancement effect of chemical enhancers and iontophoresis on the in vitro transdermal and transbuccal delivery of lidocaine HCl (LHCl), nicotine hydrogen tartrate (NHT), and diltiazem HCl (DHCl) using porcine skin and buccal tissues. Dodecyl 2-(N,N-dimethylamino) propionate (DDAIP), dodecyl-2-(N,N-dimethylamino) propionate hydrochloride (DDAIP HCl), N-(4-bromobenzoyl)-S,S-dimethyliminosulfurane (Br-iminosulfurane), and azone (laurocapram) were used as chemical enhancers. The study results showed that the application of iontophoresis at either 0.1 mA or 0.3 mA significantly enhanced transdermal and transmucosal delivery of LHCl, NHT and DHCl. It was also demonstrated that iontophoresis had a more pronounced enhancement effect on transdermal delivery than on transbuccal delivery of LHCl, NHT and DHCl. In addition, DDAIP HCl was found to be the most effective enhancer for transbuccal delivery of LHCl and NHT. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Smoking and nicotine in inflammatory bowel disease: good or bad for cytokines?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Zijlstra

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Smoking has either a beneficial or harmful effect on the course and recurrence of ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease respectively. Transdermal application of nicotine had similar effects in ulcerative colitis and therefore was considered to be an effective basic drug which could be further developed in the search for new compounds in the treatment of acute exacerbations of corticosteroid resistant ulcerative colitis. In this communication the short-term use of nicotine in ulcerative colitis is reviewed.

  14. A Randomized Trial of Adjunct mHealth Abstinence Reinforcement With Transdermal Nicotine and Counseling for Smoking Cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessi, Sheila M; Rash, Carla J; Petry, Nancy M

    2017-03-01

    Abstinence reinforcement is efficacious for improving smoking treatment outcomes, but practical constraints related to the need for multiple in-person carbon monoxide (CO) breath tests daily to verify smoking abstinence have limited its use. This study tested an mHealth procedure to remotely monitor and reinforce smoking abstinence in individuals' natural environment. Eligible treatment-seeking smokers (N = 90) were randomized to (1) usual care and ecological monitoring with abstinence reinforcement (mHealth reinforcement) or (2) without reinforcement (mHealth monitoring). Usual care was 8 weeks of transdermal nicotine and twice-weekly telephone counseling. Following training, an interactive voice response system prompted participants to conduct CO tests 1-3 daily at pseudorandom times (7 am to 10 pm) for 4 weeks. When prompted, participants used a study cell phone and CO monitor to complete a CO self-test, video record the process, and submit videos using multimedia messaging. mHealth reinforcement participants could earn prizes for smoking-negative on-time CO tests. The interactive voice response generated preliminary earnings immediately. Earnings were finalized by comparing video records against participants' self-reports. mHealth reinforcement was associated with a greater proportion of smoking-negative CO tests, longest duration of prolonged abstinence, and point-prevalence abstinence during the monitoring/reinforcement phase compared to mHealth monitoring (p mHealth reinforcement has short-term efficacy. Research on methods to enhance and sustain benefits is needed. This study suggests that mHealth abstinence reinforcement is efficacious and may present temporal and spatial opportunities to research, engage, and support smokers trying to quit that do not exist with conventional (not technology-based) reinforcement interventions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights

  15. Transdermal estrogen gel and oral aspirin combination therapy improves fertility prognosis via the promotion of endometrial receptivity in moderate to severe intrauterine adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yugang; He, Ping; Lei, Li; Lan, Yi; Hu, Jianguo; Meng, Ying; Hu, Lina

    2018-01-01

    Intrauterine adhesion (IUA) is one of the most common gynecological diseases in women of reproductive age. IUA, particularlyin moderate to severe forms, accounts for a large percentage of infertility cases. Clinically, the first-line treatment strategy for IUA is transcervical resection of adhesion (TCRA), followed by adjuvant postoperative treatment. Estrogen is one of the classic chemotherapies used following TCRA and contributes to preventing re-adhesion following surgery. However, estrogen has limited effects in promoting pregnancy, which is the ultimate goal for IUA management. In the present study, a transdermal estrogen gel and oral aspirin combination therapy was used in patients with IUA following TCRA. Compared with in the control group (transdermal estrogen only therapy), the combination therapy significantly increased endometrial receptivity marker (αvβ٣ and laminin) expression in endometrium tissues. Additionally, ultrasonic examination revealed the pulsatility index and resistant index of the uterine artery were lower in the combination therapy group. Combination therapy promoted angiogenesis and prevented fibrosis following TCRA more effectively than estrogen-only therapy. Collectively, the evaluation indices, including American Fertility Society score, endometrial parameters and pregnancy rate, indicated that patients with combination therapy had better prognoses in endometrial repair and pregnancy. In conclusion, postoperative combination therapy with transdermal estrogen gel and oral aspirin may be more efficacious in enhancing endometrial receptivity by increasing uterine blood and angiogenesis, contributing to improved fertility prognosis. The findings of the present study may provide novel guidance to the clinical treatment of IUA. PMID:29512784

  16. Genetic and pharmacokinetic determinants of response to transdermal nicotine in white, black, and Asian nonsmokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, D A; St Helen, G; Jacob, P; Tyndale, R F; Benowitz, N L

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to examine genetic, pharmacokinetic, and demographic factors that influence sensitivity to nicotine in never-smokers. Sixty never-smokers, balanced for gender and race (white, black, and Asian), wore 7-mg nicotine skin patches for up to 8 h. Serial plasma nicotine concentrations and subjective and cardiovascular effects were measured, and genetic variation in the CYP2A6 gene, encoding the primary enzyme responsible for nicotine metabolism, was assessed. Nicotine toxicity requiring patch removal developed in nine subjects and was strongly associated with rate of increase and peak concentrations of plasma nicotine. Toxicity and subjective and cardiovascular effects of nicotine were associated with the presence of reduced-function CYP2A6 alleles, presumably reflecting slow nicotine metabolic inactivation. This study has implications for understanding individual differences in responses to nicotine medications, particularly when they are used for treating medical conditions in nonsmokers, and possibly in vulnerability to developing nicotine dependence.

  17. Perceived efficacy of e-cigarettes versus nicotine replacement therapy among successful e-cigarette users: a qualitative approach

    OpenAIRE

    Barbeau, Amanda M; Burda, Jennifer; Siegel, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background Nicotine is widely recognized as an addictive psychoactive drug. Since most smokers are bio-behaviorally addicted, quitting can be very difficult and is often accompanied by withdrawal symptoms. Research indicates that nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) can double quit rates. However, the success rate for quitting remains low. E-cigarettes (electronic cigarettes) are battery-powered nicotine delivery devices used to inhale doses of vaporized nicotine from a handheld device similar ...

  18. Rapidly Dissolving Microneedle Patches for Transdermal Iron Replenishment Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Abhijeet; Nanjappa, Shivakumar H; Honnavar, Swati; Salwa, M; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2018-02-17

    The prevalence of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is predominant in women and children especially in developing countries. The disorder affects cognitive functions and physical activity. Although oral iron supplementation and parenteral therapy remains the preferred choice of treatment, gastric side effects and risk of iron overload decreases adherence to therapy. Transdermal route is an established approach, which circumvents the side effects associated with conventional therapy. In this project, an attempt was made to investigate the use of rapidly dissolving microneedles loaded with ferric pyrophosphate (FPP) as a potential therapeutic approach for management of IDA. Microneedle array patches were made using the micromolding technique and tested in vitro using rat skin to check the duration required for dissolution/disappearance of needles. The ability of FPP-loaded microneedles to replenish iron was investigated in anemic rats. Rats were fed iron-deficient diet for 5 weeks to induce IDA following which microneedle treatment was initiated. Recovery of rats from anemic state was monitored by measuring hematological and biochemical parameters. Results from in vivo study displayed significant improvements in hemoglobin and serum iron levels after 2-week treatment with FPP-loaded microneedles. The study effectively demonstrated the potential of microneedle-mediated iron replenishment for treatment of IDA. Copyright © 2018 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Formulation Design and Development of a Unani Transdermal Patch for Antiemetic Therapy and Its Pharmaceutical Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Nauman Saleem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Transdermal Drug Delivery System (TDDS is one of the novel routes for systemic delivery of drugs through intact skin. A transdermal patch (TP is a medicated patch that is placed on skin for delivery of medication through skin into the blood stream. The aim of present study was to formulate and evaluate a Unani transdermal patch that could be used for antiemetic therapy. The incorporation of Unani ingredients, namely, Khardal (Brassica nigra, Zanjabeel (Zingiber officinale, Podina (Mentha arvensis, and Sirka (Vinegar were envisaged. The TP was prepared by solvent evaporation technique and was evaluated for organoleptic characteristics and other physicochemical properties, such as thickness, weight uniformity, folding endurance, moisture content, drug content, and tolerability and acceptability of patch. The in vitro permeation study of the patch was carried out through Franz diffusion cell using egg shell membrane as barrier membrane. Phosphate buffer pH 7.4 was used as dissolution medium and the temperature was maintained at 37 ± 1°C. The in vitro permeation study of the prepared TP indicated a time dependent increase in drug release throughout the study. The percentage of cumulative drug release was found to be 77.38% in 24 hours. The study shows a new approach to work in Unani pharmaceutics.

  20. Electronic cigarettes: health impact, nicotine replacement therapy, regulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zygmunt Zdrojewicz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available While the adverse effects of conventional cigarettes on human health have been thoroughly examined, in the last 15 years we have witnessed the birth of electronic cigarettes. There are many types of these devices available on the market. Studies are still underway to determine their negative impact on the human body. Electronic cigarettes comprise of power supply and a vaporising system. The user inhales the aerosol produced by heating up the liquid containing nicotine. In contrast with conventional cigarettes, the tobacco is not combusted, thus the compositions of the aerosol and cigarette smoke are considerably different. Out of 93 chemical substances present in the e-cigarette smoke, the aerosol contains only acetaldehyde, acetone, acrolein, formaldehyde and nicotine. More toxic substances, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heavy metals, are not present. The amount of evidence suggesting electronic cigarettes’ harmful effects on the human body is constantly increasing. Some reports imply that the electronic cigarettes negatively influence pregnancy, human psyche, respiratory and cardiovascular systems. They might also be involved in oncogenesis. With electronic cigarettes constantly gaining popularity, the question about the adverse effects of passive smoking becomes increasingly more relevant. Although various methods of helping people cease smoking or delivering nicotine to their bodies without burning toxic substances are being explored, electronic cigarettes are not recommended in nicotine substitution therapy. Legal regulations regarding electronic cigarettes are still being worked on. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effects electronic cigarettes have on the human’s health.

  1. Nicotine Vapor Method to Induce Nicotine Dependence in Rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallupi, Marsida; George, Olivier

    2017-07-05

    Nicotine, the main addictive component of tobacco, induces potentiation of brain stimulation reward, increases locomotor activity, and induces conditioned place preference. Nicotine cessation produces a withdrawal syndrome that can be relieved by nicotine replacement therapy. In the last decade, the market for electronic cigarettes has flourished, especially among adolescents. The nicotine vaporizer or electronic nicotine delivery system is a battery-operated device that allows the user to simulate the experience of tobacco smoking without inhaling smoke. The device is designed to be an alternative to conventional cigarettes that emits vaporized nicotine inhaled by the user. This report describes a procedure to vaporize nicotine in the air to produce blood nicotine levels in rodents that are clinically relevant to those that are observed in humans and produce dependence. We also describe how to construct the apparatus to deliver nicotine vapor in a stable, reliable, and consistent manner, as well as how to analyze air for nicotine content. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Developmental hippocampal neuroplasticity in a model of nicotine replacement therapy during pregnancy and breastfeeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Mahar

    Full Text Available The influence of developmental nicotine exposure on the brain represents an important health topic in light of the popularity of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT as a smoking cessation method during pregnancy.In this study, we used a model of NRT during pregnancy and breastfeeding to explore the consequences of chronic developmental nicotine exposure on cerebral neuroplasticity in the offspring. We focused on two dynamic lifelong phenomena in the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus that are highly sensitive to the environment: granule cell neurogenesis and long-term potentiation (LTP.Pregnant rats were implanted with osmotic mini-pumps delivering either nicotine or saline solutions. Plasma nicotine and metabolite levels were measured in dams and offspring. Corticosterone levels, DG neurogenesis (cell proliferation, survival and differentiation and glutamatergic electrophysiological activity were measured in pups.Juvenile (P15 and adolescent (P41 offspring exposed to nicotine throughout prenatal and postnatal development displayed no significant alteration in DG neurogenesis compared to control offspring. However, NRT-like nicotine exposure significantly increased LTP in the DG of juvenile offspring as measured in vitro from hippocampal slices, suggesting that the mechanisms underlying nicotine-induced LTP enhancement previously described in adult rats are already functional in pups.These results indicate that synaptic plasticity is disrupted in offspring breastfed by dams passively exposed to nicotine in an NRT-like fashion.

  3. Skin contamination as pathway for nicotine intoxication in vapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, Giovanni; Castagnoli, Carlotta; Ghione, Giordana; Passini, Valter; Adami, Gianpiero; Larese Filon, Francesca; Crosera, Matteo

    2017-06-01

    Growing warnings on health effects related to electronic cigarettes have met inconclusive findings at present. This study analyzed the in vitro percutaneous absorption of nicotine resulting by skin contamination with two e-liquids (refill 1 and 2) containing nicotine at 1.8%. Donor chambers of 6 Franz cells for each refill liquid were filled with 1mL of nicotine e-liquid for 24h; at selected intervals, 1.5mL of the receptor solutions were collected for nicotine concentration analysis by mean gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (LOD: 0.01μg/mL). The experiment was repeated removing the nicotine donor solution after 10min from the application and rinsing the skin surface three times with 3.0mL of milliQ water. A total of 12 cells with 24h exposure and 12 cells washed were studied. The mean concentration of nicotine in the receiving phase at the end of the experiment was 54.9±29.5 and 30.2±18.4μg/cm 2 for refill 1 and 2 respectively and significantly lower in washed cells (4.7±2.4 and 3.5±1.3μg/cm 2 ). The skin absorption of nicotine can lead to minor health illness in vapers, while caution must be paid to dermal contamination by e liquids in children. The skin cleaning significantly reduced the transdermal absorption kinetic and intradermal deposition of nicotine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of transdermally administered nicotine on aspects of attention, task load, and mood in women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimmel, Michael; Wittberger, Susanne

    2004-07-01

    This double-blind placebo-controlled study was conducted to determine nicotine effects on diverse types of attentional performance, task load, and mood considering sex effects as suggested by animal studies. Twelve smokers, 12 deprived smokers and 12 nonsmokers (6 females, 6 males in each group) were investigated. Participants were treated either by 5 mg/16 h nicotine patches (Nicorette) or placebo. Effects of treatment were examined by a computerized attention-test battery; mood was assessed by the Berliner-Alltagssprachliches-Stimmungs-Inventar and task load by the NASA Task Load Index (NASA-TLX). Results showed that nicotine significantly increased the number of hits and decreased reaction time (RT) in the vigilance task. In the selective attention task combined with irrelevant speech as background noise, nicotine enhanced rate of hits. Although it was indicated that nicotine leads to a generally higher accuracy in attention tasks, response time of visual search was prolonged, contradicting a universal facilitation by nicotine. Participants experienced mental demand and temporal demand lower and rated alertness higher when in the nicotine condition. These effects were independent of smoking status, indicating "true" nicotine effects. Females took significant advantage of nicotine in the vigilance task, reaching the performance level of males, accompanied by a higher rated alertness. Results indicate task- and sex-dependent nicotine effects.

  5. Pros and Cons of Long-Term use of Nicotine Replacement Therapies: A Qualitative Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Gitte; Kaae, Susanne; Nørgaard, Lotte Stig

    2016-01-01

    , intrapersonal processes, the social environment of smoking vs. NRTs and finances. None of the ex-smokers feared to relapse to smoking, and few were motivated to quit NRTs. Non-nicotinic factors were found to have an important role in developing an addiction to NRTs. The use of NRTs yields some of the expected......, including perceived pros and cons of using NRTs, the risk of relapse to smoking and their motivation to quit using NRTs. The results identified five major themes that entailed pros and cons of the long-term use of NRTs. These were the non-nicotinic factors of NRTs, health risks of NRTs vs. smoking......In the last decade, harm reduction has been increasingly suggested as a method to reduce the harm caused by smoking in smokers who are unable or unwilling to quit all nicotine products. One of these methods includes long-term substitution of tobacco with nicotine replacement therapies (NRTs...

  6. Transdermal drug delivery: feasibility for treatment of superficial bone stress fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghazadeh-Habashi, Ali; Yang, Yang; Tang, Kathy; Lőbenberg, Raimar; Doschak, Michael R

    2015-12-01

    Transdermal drug delivery offers the promise of effective drug therapy at selective sites of pathology whilst reducing systemic exposure to the pharmaceutical agents in off-target organs and tissues. However, that strategy is often limited to cells comprising superficial tissues of the body (rarely to deeper bony structures) and mostly indicated with small hydrophobic pharmacological agents, such as steroid hormones and anti-inflammatory gels to skin, muscle, and joints. Nonetheless, advances in transdermal liposomal formulation have rendered the ability to readily incorporate pharmacologically active hydrophilic drug molecules and small peptide biologics into transdermal dosage forms to impart the effective delivery of those bioactive agents across the skin barrier to underlying superficial tissue structures including bone, often enhanced by some form of electrical, chemical, and mechanical facilitation. In the following review, we evaluate transdermal drug delivery systems, with a particular focus on delivering therapeutic agents to treat superficial bone pain, notably stress fractures. We further introduce and discuss several small peptide hormones active in bone (such as calcitonins and parathyroid hormone) that have shown potential for transdermal delivery, often under the added augmentation of transdermal drug delivery systems that employ lipo/hydrophilicity, electric charge, and/or microprojection facilitation across the skin barrier.

  7. Maternal use of nicotine replacement therapy during pregnancy and offspring birthweight: a study within the Danish National Birth Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Tina H; Madsen, Mia; Skovgaard, Lene T

    2010-01-01

    Smoking is a well-established risk factor for fetal growth restriction and other adverse pregnancy outcomes, and nicotine may be one of the chemical compounds that drive these associations. Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) is a smoking cessation aid, which can facilitate smoking cessation. It is...

  8. Effects of Transdermal Tulobuterol in Pediatric Asthma Patients on Long-Term Leukotriene Receptor Antagonist Therapy: Results of a Randomized, Open-Label, Multicenter Clinical Trial in Japanese Children Aged 4–12 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Katsunuma

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: These results suggest that short-term use of a transdermal β2 agonist is an effective therapy for pediatric asthma without inducing airway inflammation in children on long-term LTRA therapy.

  9. The Effect of Nicotine Replacement Therapy Advertising on Youth Smoking

    OpenAIRE

    Henry Saffer; Melanie Wakefield; Yvonne Terry-McElrath

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) advertising on youth smoking. NRT advertising could decrease smoking by informing smokers that the product can make quitting easier and thus inducing more smokers to try and quit. However, a moral hazard is created because NRT advertising increases the expectation that cessation is relatively easy. NRT advertising could thus induce youth to smoke, to smoke more and/or to delay quit attempts. Data from Nielsen Media Research ...

  10. A randomized, open-label, crossover study comparing the effects of oral versus transdermal estrogen therapy on serum androgens, thyroid hormones, and adrenal hormones in naturally menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shifren, Jan L; Desindes, Sophie; McIlwain, Marilyn; Doros, Gheorghe; Mazer, Norman A

    2007-01-01

    To compare the changes induced by oral versus transdermal estrogen therapy on the total and free serum concentrations of testosterone (T), thyroxine (T4), and cortisol (C) and the concentrations of their serum binding globulins sex hormone-binding globulin, thyroxine-binding globulin, and cortisol-binding globulin in naturally menopausal women. Randomized, open-label, crossover. Interventions included a 6-week withdrawal from previous hormone therapy (baseline), followed in randomized order by 12 weeks of oral conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) (0.625 mg/d) and 12 weeks of transdermal estradiol (TD E2) (0.05 mg/d), with oral micronized progesterone (100 mg/d) given continuously during both transdermal estrogen therapy regimens. Twenty-seven women were enrolled in the study, and 25 completed both treatment periods. The mean(SD) percentage changes from baseline of sex hormone-binding globulin, total T, and free T with oral CEE were +132.1% (74.5%), +16.4% (43.8%), and -32.7% (25.9%), respectively, versus +12.0% (25.1%), +1.2% (43.7%), and +1.0% (45.0%) with TD E2. The mean (SD) percentage changes of thyroxine-binding globulin, total T4, and free T4 with oral CEE were +39.9% (20.1%), +28.4% (29.2%), and -10.4% (22.3%), respectively, versus +0.4% (11.1%), -0.7% (16.5%), and +0.2% (26.6%) with TD E2. The mean (SD) percentage changes of cortisol-binding globulin, total C, and free C with oral CEE were +18.0% (19.5%), +29.2% (46.3%), and +50.4% (126.5%), respectively, versus -2.2% (11.3%), -6.7% (30.8%), and +1.8% (77.1%) with TD E2. Concentrations of all hormones and binding globulins were significantly different (P < or = 0.003) during administration of oral versus transdermal estrogen therapy, except for free T4 and free C. Compared with oral CEE, TD E2 exerts minimal effects on the total and free concentrations of T, T4, and C and their binding proteins.

  11. Performance effects of nicotine during selective attention, divided attention, and simple stimulus detection: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Britta; Ross, Thomas J; Wolkenberg, Frank A; Shakleya, Diaa M; Huestis, Marilyn A; Stein, Elliot A

    2009-09-01

    Attention-enhancing effects of nicotine appear to depend on the nature of the attentional function. Underlying neuroanatomical mechanisms, too, may vary depending on the function modulated. This functional magnetic resonance imaging study recorded blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) activity in minimally deprived smokers during tasks of simple stimulus detection, selective attention, or divided attention after single-blind application of a transdermal nicotine (21 mg) or placebo patch. Smokers' performance in the placebo condition was unimpaired as compared with matched nonsmokers. Nicotine reduced reaction time (RT) in the stimulus detection and selective attention but not divided attention condition. Across all task conditions, nicotine reduced activation in frontal, temporal, thalamic, and visual regions and enhanced deactivation in so-called "default" regions. Thalamic effects correlated with RT reduction selectively during stimulus detection. An interaction with task condition was observed in middle and superior frontal gyri, where nicotine reduced activation only during stimulus detection. A visuomotor control experiment provided evidence against nonspecific effects of nicotine. In conclusion, although prefrontal activity partly displayed differential modulation by nicotine, most BOLD effects were identical across tasks, despite differential performance effects, suggesting that common neuronal mechanisms can selectively benefit different attentional functions. Overall, the effects of nicotine may be explained by increased functional efficiency and downregulated task-independent "default" functions.

  12. Granisetron Transdermal Patch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granisetron transdermal patches are used to prevent nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy. Granisetron is in a class of medications called 5HT3 ... Granisetron transdermal comes as a patch to apply to the skin. It is usually applied 24 to ...

  13. TRANSDERMAL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM: REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Vishvakarama Prabhakar; Agarwal Shivendra; Sharma Ritika; Saurabh Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Various new technologies have been developed for the transdermal delivery of some important drugs. Today about 74% of drugs are taken orally and are found not to be as effective as desired. To improve such characters transdermal drug delivery system was emerged. Drug delivery through the skin to achieve a systemic effect of a drug is commonly known as transdermal drug delivery and differs from traditional topical drug delivery. Transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDS) are dosage forms involve...

  14. Transdermal and Topical Drug Administration in the Treatment of Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Leppert

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The comprehensive treatment of pain is multidimodal, with pharmacotherapy playing a key role. An effective therapy for pain depends on the intensity and type of pain, the patients’ age, comorbidities, and appropriate choice of analgesic, its dose and route of administration. This review is aimed at presenting current knowledge on analgesics administered by transdermal and topical routes for physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and other health care professionals dealing with patients suffering from pain. Analgesics administered transdermally or topically act through different mechanisms. Opioids administered transdermally are absorbed into vessels located in subcutaneous tissue and, subsequently, are conveyed in the blood to opioid receptors localized in the central and peripheral nervous system. Non–steroidal anti–inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs applied topically render analgesia mainly through a high concentration in the structures of the joint and a provision of local anti–inflammatory effects. Topically administered drugs such as lidocaine and capsaicin in patches, capsaicin in cream, EMLA cream, and creams containing antidepressants (i.e., doxepin, amitriptyline act mainly locally in tissues through receptors and/or ion channels. Transdermal and topical routes offer some advantages over systemic analgesic administration. Analgesics administered topically have a much better profile for adverse effects as they relieve local pain with minimal systemic effects. The transdermal route apart from the above-mentioned advantages and provision of long period of analgesia may be more convenient, especially for patients who are unable to take drugs orally. Topically and transdermally administered opioids are characterised by a lower risk of addiction compared to oral and parenteral routes.

  15. Systemic delivery of β-blockers via transdermal route for hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahad, Abdul; Al-Jenoobi, Fahad I.; Al-Mohizea, Abdullah M.; Akhtar, Naseem; Raish, Mohammad; Aqil, Mohd.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is the most common cardiovascular disease worldwide. Moreover, management of hypertension requires long-term treatment that may result in poor patient compliance with conventional dosage forms due to greater frequency of drug administration. Although there is availability of a plethora of therapeutically effective antihypertensive molecules, inadequate patient welfare is observed; this arguably presents an opportunity to deliver antihypertensive agents through a different route. Ever since the transdermal drug delivery came into existence, it has offered great advantages including non-invasiveness, prolonged therapeutic effect, reduced side effects, improved bioavailability, better patient compliance and easy termination of drug therapy. Attempts were made to develop the transdermal therapeutic system for various antihypertensive agents, including β-blockers, an important antihypertensive class. β-blockers are potent, highly effective in the management of hypertension and other heart ailments by blocking the effects of normal amounts of adrenaline in the heart and blood vessels. The shortcomings associated with β-blockers such as more frequent dose administration, extensive first pass metabolism and variable bioavailability, make them an ideal candidate for transdermal therapeutic systems. The present article gives a brief view of different β-blockers formulated as transdermal therapeutic system in detail to enhance the bioavailability as well as to improve patient compliance. Constant improvement in this field holds promise for the long-term success in technologically advanced transdermal dosage forms being commercialized sooner rather than later. PMID:26702253

  16. Knowledge and Perceptions Regarding Nicotine Replacement Therapy among Dental Students in Karnataka

    OpenAIRE

    Ajagannanavar, Sunil Lingaraj; Alshahrani, Obaid Abdullah; Jhugroo, Chitra; Tashery, Hamed Mohammed; Mathews, Jacob; Chavan, Khechari

    2015-01-01

    Background: Organized dentistry has recognized the role of oral health professionals in discouraging tobacco use. Unexplored level of knowledge regarding the benefits and prescription of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) have aroused interest among us which initiated us to assess the knowledge and perception of dental students toward NRT among various dental colleges in Karnataka, South India. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire survey was done among 16 selected colleges in Karnataka. It ...

  17. Transdermal granisetron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Sean T; Curran, Monique P

    2009-01-01

    Granisetron is a highly selective serotonin 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. The transdermal granisetron system delivers continuous granisetron (3.1 mg/day) into the systemic circulation (via passive diffusion) for up to 7 days. In a large phase III trial in cancer patients receiving multi-day (3-5 days) moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy, transdermal granisetron applied 24-48 hours prior to chemotherapy and remaining in place for 7 days was noninferior to oral granisetron 2 mg once daily administered for 3-5 days 1 hour prior to chemotherapy. Efficacy was assessed according to the proportion of patients achieving complete response (no vomiting and/or retching, no more than mild nausea, no rescue medication) from the first day, until 24 hours after the start of the last day, of administration of the chemotherapy regimen. In a phase II trial in patients with cancer receiving single-day, moderately-emetogenic chemotherapy, transdermal granisetron applied at least 24 hours prior to chemotherapy and removed after 5 days was as effective as a single oral dose of granisetron 2 mg in achieving total control (no nausea, no vomiting/retching, no use of rescue medication and no study withdrawal) during the delayed (24-120 hours; primary endpoint) period after chemotherapy. Transdermal granisetron was generally well tolerated in clinical trials, with few adverse events being treatment related.

  18. Challenges and opportunities in dermal/transdermal delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Kalpana S; Milewski, Mikolaj; Swadley, Courtney L; Brogden, Nicole K; Ghosh, Priyanka; Stinchcomb, Audra L

    2010-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery is an exciting and challenging area. There are numerous transdermal delivery systems currently available on the market. However, the transdermal market still remains limited to a narrow range of drugs. Further advances in transdermal delivery depend on the ability to overcome the challenges faced regarding the permeation and skin irritation of the drug molecules. Emergence of novel techniques for skin permeation enhancement and development of methods to lessen skin irritation would widen the transdermal market for hydrophilic compounds, macromolecules and conventional drugs for new therapeutic indications. As evident from the ongoing clinical trials of a wide variety of drugs for various clinical conditions, there is a great future for transdermal delivery of drugs. PMID:21132122

  19. Nicotine, Carcinogen, and Toxin Exposure in Long-Term E-Cigarette and Nicotine Replacement Therapy Users: A Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahab, Lion; Goniewicz, Maciej L; Blount, Benjamin C; Brown, Jamie; McNeill, Ann; Alwis, K Udeni; Feng, June; Wang, Lanqing; West, Robert

    2017-03-21

    Given the rapid increase in the popularity of e-cigarettes and the paucity of associated longitudinal health-related data, the need to assess the potential risks of long-term use is essential. To compare exposure to nicotine, tobacco-related carcinogens, and toxins among smokers of combustible cigarettes only, former smokers with long-term e-cigarette use only, former smokers with long-term nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) use only, long-term dual users of both combustible cigarettes and e-cigarettes, and long-term users of both combustible cigarettes and NRT. Cross-sectional study. United Kingdom. The following 5 groups were purposively recruited: combustible cigarette-only users, former smokers with long-term (≥6 months) e-cigarette-only or NRT-only use, and long-term dual combustible cigarette-e-cigarette or combustible cigarette-NRT users (n = 36 to 37 per group; total n = 181). Sociodemographic and smoking characteristics were assessed. Participants provided urine and saliva samples and were analyzed for biomarkers of nicotine, tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines (TSNAs), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). After confounders were controlled for, no clear between-group differences in salivary or urinary biomarkers of nicotine intake were found. The e-cigarette-only and NRT-only users had significantly lower metabolite levels for TSNAs (including the carcinogenic metabolite 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol [NNAL]) and VOCs (including metabolites of the toxins acrolein; acrylamide; acrylonitrile; 1,3-butadiene; and ethylene oxide) than combustible cigarette-only, dual combustible cigarette-e-cigarette, or dual combustible cigarette-NRT users. The e-cigarette-only users had significantly lower NNAL levels than all other groups. Combustible cigarette-only, dual combustible cigarette-NRT, and dual combustible cigarette-e-cigarette users had largely similar levels of TSNA and VOC metabolites. Cross-sectional design with self-selected sample. Former

  20. Myth or Reality-Transdermal Magnesium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröber, Uwe; Werner, Tanja; Vormann, Jürgen; Kisters, Klaus

    2017-07-28

    In the following review, we evaluated the current literature and evidence-based data on transdermal magnesium application and show that the propagation of transdermal magnesium is scientifically unsupported. The importance of magnesium and the positive effects of magnesium supplementation are extensively documented in magnesium deficiency, e.g., cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus. The effectiveness of oral magnesium supplementation for the treatment of magnesium deficiency has been studied in detail. However, the proven and well-documented oral magnesium supplementation has become questioned in the recent years through intensive marketing for its transdermal application (e.g., magnesium-containing sprays, magnesium flakes, and magnesium salt baths). In both, specialist and lay press as well as on the internet, there are increasing numbers of articles claiming the effectiveness and superiority of transdermal magnesium over an oral application. It is claimed that the transdermal absorption of magnesium in comparison to oral application is more effective due to better absorption and fewer side effects as it bypasses the gastrointestinal tract.

  1. Switching Therapy from Intravenous Landiolol to Transdermal Bisoprolol in a Patient with Thyroid Storm Complicated by Decompensated Heart Failure and Gastrointestinal Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godo, Shigeo; Kawazoe, Yu; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Fujita, Motoo; Kudo, Daisuke; Nomura, Ryosuke; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Kushimoto, Shigeki

    2017-10-01

    Thyroid storm is a life-threatening disorder that remains a therapeutic challenge. Although β-blockers are the mainstay for treatment, their use can be challenging in cases complicated by rapid atrial fibrillation and decompensated heart failure. We present a case of thyroid storm-associated atrial fibrillation and decompensated heart failure complicated by gastrointestinal dysfunction secondary to diffuse peritonitis that was successfully managed by a switching therapy, in which the continuous intravenous administration of landiolol was changed to bisoprolol via transdermal patch, in the acute phase treatment. This switching therapy may offer a promising therapeutic option for this potentially lethal disorder.

  2. Alghedon Fentanyl Transdermal System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romualdi, Patrizia; Santi, Patrizia; Candeletti, Sanzio

    2017-04-01

    The efficacy of transdermal fentanyl for cancer pain and chronic non-cancer pain (chronic lower back pain, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, neuropathic pain) is well established. Several formulations of fentanyl transdermal systems have been developed to improve the drug delivery and prevent misuse of the active principle. The addition of a rate controlling membrane to the matrix system represented an important advance. The design and functional features of Alghedon patch are compared with other approved generic fentanyl transdermal systems, emphasizing the distinctiveness of Alghedon patch. Alghedon patch has no liquid component in the finished product, therefore no leakage of active ingredient from the system can occur. A rate-controlling membrane provides controlled release of the active substance from the matrix reservoir, ensuring that fentanyl delivery and entry into the microcirculation is not solely controlled by the skin's permeability to this active substance. Alghedon patch contains part of the drug (approximately 15%) in the skin-contact adhesive: this innovative solution allows to overcome a typical drawback of transdermal patches, i.e. the long lag-time before the drug appears in plasma after the first administration, and provides rapid analgesia during the first hours of administration. Alghedon Fentanyl Transdermal System employs materials commonly used in other transdermal applications and having established safety profiles. For each strength level, the fentanyl content - and, thus, the resulting residual fentanyl remaining in the patch after use - is at the lowest end of the range used in commercially available fentanyl patches, minimizing the potential for abuse and misuse.

  3. Enhanced Transdermal Permeability via Constructing the Porous Structure of Poloxamer-Based Hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Yi Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A major concern for transdermal drug delivery systems is the low bioavailability of targeted drugs primarily caused by the skin’s barrier function. The resistance to the carrier matrix for the diffusion and transport of drugs, however, is routinely ignored. This study reports a promising and attractive approach to reducing the resistance to drug transport in the carrier matrix, to enhance drug permeability and bioavailability via enhanced concentration-gradient of the driving force for transdermal purposes. This approach simply optimizes and reconstructs the porous channel structure of the carrier matrix, namely, poloxamer 407 (P407-based hydrogel matrix blended with carboxymethyl cellulose sodium (CMCs. Addition of CMCs was found to distinctly improve the porous structure of the P407 matrix. The pore size approximated to normal distribution as CMCs were added and the fraction of pore number was increased by over tenfold. Transdermal studies showed that P407/CMCs saw a significant increase in drug permeability across the skin. This suggests that P407/CMC with improved porous structure exhibits a feasible and promising way for the development of transdermal therapy with high permeability and bioavailability, thereby avoiding or reducing use of any chemical enhancers.

  4. Transdermal drug delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Prausnitz, Mark R.; Langer, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery has made an important contribution to medical practice, but has yet to fully achieve its potential as an alternative to oral delivery and hypodermic injections. First-generation transdermal delivery systems have continued their steady increase in clinical use for delivery of small, lipophilic, low-dose drugs. Second-generation delivery systems using chemical enhancers, non-cavitational ultrasound and iontophoresis have also resulted in clinical products; the ability ...

  5. Sindrome confusional agudo por abstinencia aguda de nicotina Delirium due to acute nicotine withdrawal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Klein

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome confusional agudo (SCA o delirium en pacientes hospitalizados es un problema frecuente y grave. Se caracteriza por síntomas de comienzo agudo y curso fluctuante con inatención, pensamiento desorganizado, y con distintos niveles de alteración de la conciencia.En la bibliografía consultada, el SCA como manifestación de un síndrome de abstinencia aguda nicotínica fue descripto en solo ocho casos. Presentamos el caso de un tabaquista grave que, internado por una reagudización de su enfermedad pulmonar obstructiva crónica (EPOC, presentó un cuadro de SCA al tercer día de abstinencia tabacal, cediendo los síntomas tras la administración de un parche de nicotina. Lo descripto sugiere que en pacientes internados que presentan SCA y agitación, con fuertes antecedentes de tabaquismo, un simple ensayo con un parche de nicotina puede ofrecer en pocas horas una notable respuesta terapéutica y a su vez un test confirmatorio. El reconocimiento del SCA como forma de presentación de la abstinencia nicotínica permitirá identificar casos habitualmente complejos en los que se podrá implementar una sencilla y eficaz alternativa terapéutica.Delirium or acute confusional state among hospitalized patients is a frequent and serious problem. It is characterized by acute onset symptoms, fluctuating course, impaired attention, unorganized thinking, and altered level of conciousness. Delirium, as a manifestation of acute nicotine withdrawal syndrome has been reported in the reviewed literature only in eight cases. We report the case of a heavy smoker admitted because of a reagudization of his chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. At the third day of nicotine abstinence, he developed delirium with a rapid improvement of his symptoms after treatment with a transdermal nicotine patch. This description suggests that in hospitalized heavy smokers who develop delirium with agitation, a simple trial with a nicotine patch can offer a dramatic

  6. Design, formulation and evaluation of nicotine chewing gum

    OpenAIRE

    Abolfazl Aslani; Sahar Rafiei

    2012-01-01

    Background: Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) can help smokers to quit smoking. Nicotine chewing gum has attracted the attention from pharmaceutical industries to offer it to consumers as an easily accessible NRT product. However, the bitter taste of such gums may compromise their acceptability by patients. This study was, therefore, designed to develop 2 and 4 mg nicotine chewing gums of pleasant taste, which satisfy the consumers the most. Materials and Methods: Nicotine, sugar, liquid...

  7. Challenges and opportunities in dermal/transdermal delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Paudel, Kalpana S; Milewski, Mikolaj; Swadley, Courtney L; Brogden, Nicole K; Ghosh, Priyanka; Stinchcomb, Audra L

    2010-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery is an exciting and challenging area. There are numerous transdermal delivery systems currently available on the market. However, the transdermal market still remains limited to a narrow range of drugs. Further advances in transdermal delivery depend on the ability to overcome the challenges faced regarding the permeation and skin irritation of the drug molecules. Emergence of novel techniques for skin permeation enhancement and development of methods to lessen skin i...

  8. Nicotine and caffeine modulate haloperidol-induced changes in postsynaptic density transcripts expression: Translational insights in psychosis therapy and treatment resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bartolomeis, Andrea; Iasevoli, Felice; Marmo, Federica; Buonaguro, Elisabetta Filomena; Avvisati, Livia; Latte, Gianmarco; Tomasetti, Carmine

    2018-04-01

    Caffeine and nicotine are widely used by schizophrenia patients and may worsen psychosis and affect antipsychotic therapies. However, they have also been accounted as augmentation strategies in treatment-resistant schizophrenia. Despite both substances are known to modulate dopamine and glutamate transmission, little is known about the molecular changes induced by these compounds in association to antipsychotics, mostly at the level of the postsynaptic density (PSD), a site of dopamine-glutamate interplay. Here we investigated whether caffeine and nicotine, alone or combined with haloperidol, elicited significant changes in the levels of both transcripts and proteins of the PSD members Homer1 and Arc, which have been implicated in synaptic plasticity, schizophrenia pathophysiology, and antipsychotics molecular action. Homer1a mRNA expression was significantly reduced by caffeine and nicotine, alone or combined with haloperidol, compared to haloperidol. Haloperidol induced significantly higher Arc mRNA levels than both caffeine and caffeine plus haloperidol in the striatum. Arc mRNA expression was significantly higher by nicotine plus haloperidol vs. haloperidol in the cortex, while in striatum gene expression by nicotine was significantly lower than that by both haloperidol and nicotine plus haloperidol. Both Homer1a and Arc protein levels were significantly increased by caffeine, nicotine, and nicotine plus haloperidol. Homer1b mRNA expression was significantly increased by nicotine and nicotine plus haloperidol, while protein levels were unaffected. Locomotor activity was not significantly affected by caffeine, while it was reduced by nicotine. These data indicate that both caffeine and nicotine trigger relevant molecular changes in PSD sites when given in association with haloperidol. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  9. Nicotine-induced activation of caudate and anterior cingulate cortex in response to errors in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Lauren V; Stoeckel, Luke E; Wang, Kristina; Caine, Carolyn E; Villafuerte, Rosemond; Calderon, Vanessa; Baker, Justin T; Ongur, Dost; Janes, Amy C; Evins, A Eden; Pizzagalli, Diego A

    2018-03-01

    Nicotine improves attention and processing speed in individuals with schizophrenia. Few studies have investigated the effects of nicotine on cognitive control. Prior functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) research demonstrates blunted activation of dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) in response to error and decreased post-error slowing in schizophrenia. Participants with schizophrenia (n = 13) and healthy controls (n = 12) participated in a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study of the effects of transdermal nicotine on cognitive control. For each drug condition, participants underwent fMRI while performing the stop signal task where participants attempt to inhibit prepotent responses to "go (motor activation)" signals when an occasional "stop (motor inhibition)" signal appears. Error processing was evaluated by comparing "stop error" trials (failed response inhibition) to "go" trials. Resting-state fMRI data were collected prior to the task. Participants with schizophrenia had increased nicotine-induced activation of right caudate in response to errors compared to controls (DRUG × GROUP effect: p corrected  state functional connectivity analysis, relative to controls, participants with schizophrenia had significantly decreased connectivity between the right caudate and dACC/bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortices. In sum, we replicated prior findings of decreased post-error slowing in schizophrenia and found that nicotine was associated with more adaptive (i.e., increased) post-error reaction time (RT). This proof-of-concept pilot study suggests a role for nicotinic agents in targeting cognitive control deficits in schizophrenia.

  10. Spray-on transdermal drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Sarah A

    2015-02-01

    Transdermal drug delivery possesses superior advantages over other routes of administration, particularly minimizing first-pass metabolism. Transdermal drug delivery is challenged by the barrier nature of skin. Numerous technologies have been developed to overcome the relatively low skin permeability, including spray-on transdermal systems. A transdermal spray-on system (TSS) usually consists of a solution containing the drug, a volatile solvent and in many cases a chemical penetration enhancer. TSS promotes drug delivery via the complex interplay between solvent evaporation and drug-solvent drag into skin. The volatile solvent carries the drug into the upper layers of the stratum corneum, and as the volatile solvent evaporates, an increase in the thermodynamic activity of the drug occurs resulting in an increased drug loading in skin. TSS is easily applied, delivering flexible drug dosage and associated with lower incidence of skin irritation. TSS provides a fast-drying product where the volatile solvent enables uniform drug distribution with minimal vehicle deposition on skin. TSS ensures precise dose administration that is aesthetically appealing and eliminates concerns of residual drug associated with transdermal patches. Furthermore, it provides a better alternative to traditional transdermal products due to ease of product development and manufacturing.

  11. Nicotine and tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ease your withdrawal symptoms. Health experts warn that e-cigarettes are not a replacement therapy for cigarette smoking. ... not known exactly how much nicotine is in e-cigarette cartridges, because information on labels is often wrong.

  12. Transdermal drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prausnitz, Mark R.; Langer, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery has made an important contribution to medical practice, but has yet to fully achieve its potential as an alternative to oral delivery and hypodermic injections. First-generation transdermal delivery systems have continued their steady increase in clinical use for delivery of small, lipophilic, low-dose drugs. Second-generation delivery systems using chemical enhancers, non-cavitational ultrasound and iontophoresis have also resulted in clinical products; the ability of iontophoresis to control delivery rates in real time provides added functionality. Third-generation delivery systems target their effects to skin’s barrier layer of stratum corneum using microneedles, thermal ablation, microdermabrasion, electroporation and cavitational ultrasound. Microneedles and thermal ablation are currently progressing through clinical trials for delivery of macromolecules and vaccines, such as insulin, parathyroid hormone and influenza vaccine. Using these novel second- and third-generation enhancement strategies, transdermal delivery is poised to significantly increase impact on medicine. PMID:18997767

  13. Nicotine during pregnancy: changes induced in neurotransmission, which could heighten proclivity to addict and induce maladaptive control of attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlmeier, K A

    2015-06-01

    Prenatal exposure to nicotine, occurring either via maternal smoking or via use of transdermal nicotine patches to facilitate cigarette abstinence by pregnant women, is associated with ∼ 13% of pregnancies worldwide. Nicotine exposure during gestation has been correlated with several negative physiological and psychosocial outcomes, including heightened risk for aberrant behaviors involving alterations in processing of attention as well as an enhanced liability for development of drug dependency. Nicotine is a terotogen, altering neuronal development of various neurotransmitter systems, and it is likely these alterations participate in postnatal deficits in attention control and facilitate development of drug addiction. This review discusses the alterations in neuronal development within the brain's major neurotransmitter systems, with special emphasis placed on alterations within the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus, in light of the role this cholinergic nucleus plays in attention and addiction. Changes induced within this nucleus by gestational exposure to nicotine, in combination with changes induced in other brain regions, are likely to contribute to the transgenerational burden imposed by nicotine. Although neuroplastic changes induced by nicotine are not likely to act in isolation, and are expected to interact with epigenetic changes induced by preconception exposure to drugs of abuse, unraveling these changes within the developing brain will facilitate eventual development of targeted treatments for the unique vulnerability for arousal disorders and development of addiction within the population of individuals who have been prenatally exposed to nicotine.

  14. Anti-cancer vaccination by transdermal delivery of antigen peptide-loaded nanogels via iontophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Mao; Hama, Susumu; Ikeda, Yutaka; Nagasaki, Yukio; Kogure, Kentaro

    2015-04-10

    Transdermal vaccination with cancer antigens is expected to become a useful anti-cancer therapy. However, it is difficult to accumulate enough antigen in the epidermis for effective exposure to Langerhans cells because of diffusion into the skin and muscle. Carriers, such as liposomes and nanoparticles, may be useful for the prevention of antigen diffusion. Iontophoresis, via application of a small electric current, is a noninvasive and efficient technology for transdermal drug delivery. Previously, we succeeded in the iontophoretic transdermal delivery of liposomes encapsulating insulin, and accumulation of polymer-based nanoparticle nanogels in the stratum corneum of the skin. Therefore, in the present study, we examined the use of iontophoresis with cancer antigen gp-100 peptide KVPRNQDWL-loaded nanogels for anti-cancer vaccination. Iontophoresis resulted in the accumulation of gp-100 peptide and nanogels in the epidermis, and subsequent increase in the number of Langerhans cells in the epidermis. Moreover, tumor growth was significantly suppressed by iontophoresis of the antigen peptide-loaded nanogels. Thus, iontophoresis of the antigen peptide-loaded nanogels may serve as an effective transdermal delivery system for anti-cancer vaccination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Functionalization of Cotton Fabrics with Polycaprolactone Nanoparticles for Transdermal Release of Melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Massella

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Drug delivery by means of transdermal patches raised great interest as a non-invasive and sustained therapy. The present research aimed to design a patch for transdermal delivery of melatonin, which was encapsulated in polycaprolactone (PCL nanoparticles (NPs by employing flash nanoprecipitation (FNP technique. Melatonin-loaded PCL nanoparticles were successfully prepared with precise control of the particle size by effectively tuning process parameters. The effect of process parameters on the particle size was assessed by dynamic light scattering for producing particles with suitable size for transdermal applications. Quantification of encapsulated melatonin was performed by mean of UV spectrophotometry, obtaining the estimation of encapsulation efficiency (EE% and loading capacity (LC%. An EE% higher than 80% was obtained. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC analysis of NPs was performed to confirm effective encapsulation in the solid phase. Cotton fabrics, functionalized by imbibition with the nano-suspension, were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy to check morphology, adhesion and distribution of the NPs on the surface; melatonin transdermal release from the functionalized fabric was performed via Franz’s cells by using a synthetic membrane. NPs were uniformly distributed on cotton fibres, as confirmed by SEM observations; the release test showed a continuous and controlled release whose kinetics were satisfactorily described by Baker–Lonsdale model.

  16. Perspectives on Transdermal Electroporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ita, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery offers several advantages, including avoidance of erratic absorption, absence of gastric irritation, painlessness, noninvasiveness, as well as improvement in patient compliance. With this mode of drug administration, there is no pre-systemic metabolism and it is possible to increase drug bioavailability and half-life. However, only a few molecules can be delivered across the skin in therapeutic quantities. This is because of the hindrance provided by the stratum corneum. Several techniques have been developed and used over the last few decades for transdermal drug delivery enhancement. These include sonophoresis, iontophoresis, microneedles, and electroporation. Electroporation, which refers to the temporary perturbation of the skin following the application of high voltage electric pulses, has been used to increase transcutaneous flux values by several research groups. In this review, transdermal electroporation is discussed and the use of the technique for percutaneous transport of low and high molecular weight compounds described. This review also examines our current knowledge regarding the mechanisms of electroporation and safety concerns arising from the use of this transdermal drug delivery technique. Safety considerations are especially important because electroporation utilizes high voltage pulses which may have deleterious effects in some cases. PMID:26999191

  17. The effects of compounded bioidentical transdermal hormone therapy on hemostatic, inflammatory, immune factors; cardiovascular biomarkers; quality-of-life measures; and health outcomes in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Kenna; Neuenschwander, Pierre F; Kurdowska, Anna K

    2013-01-01

    Menopause impacts 25 million women world wide each year, and the World Health Organization estimates 1.2 billion women will be postmenopausal by 2030. Menopause has been associated with symptoms of hot flashes, night sweats, dysphoric mood, sleep disturbance, and conditions of cardiovascular disease, depression, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, depression, dementia, and frailty. Conventional hormone replacement therapy results in increased thrombotic events, and an increased risk of breast cancer and dementia as evidenced in large prospective clinical trials including Heart and Estrogen/Progestin Replacement Study I and the Women's Health Initiative. A possible mechanism for these adverse events is the unfavorable net effects of conjugated equine estrogens and medroxyprogesterone acetate on the hemostatic balance and inflammatory and immune factors. Physiologic sex steroid therapy with transdermal delivery for peri/postmenopausal women may offer a different risk/benefit profile, yet long-term studies of this treatment model are lacking. The objective of this study was to examine the long-term effects of compounded bioidentical transdermal sex steroid therapy including estriol, estradiol, progesterone, DHEA, and testosterone on cardiovascular biomarkers, hemostatic, inflammatory, immune signaling factors; quality-of-life measures; and health outcomes in peri/postmenopausal women within the context of a hormone restoration model of care. A prospective, cohort, closed-label study received approval from the Human Subjects Committee. Recruitment from outpatient clinics at an academic medical center and the community at large resulted in three hundred women giving signed consent. Seventy-five women who met strict inclusion/exclusion criteria were enrolled. Baseline hormone evaluation was performed along with baseline experimental measures. Following this, women received compounded transdermal bioidentical hormone therapy of BiEst (80%Estriol/20%Estradiol), and

  18. Current advances in transdermal delivery of drugs for Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Giau, Vo Van; Vo, Tuong Kha

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common, progressive, fatal neurodegenerative disorder, which will play an increasingly important role both socially and financially in the aging populations. Treatments for AD show modest improvements in cognition and global functioning among patients. Furthermore, the oral administration of treating AD has had some drawbacks that decrease the medication adherence and efficacy of the therapy. Transdermal drugs are proposed as an alternative remedy to overcome the disadvantages of current pharmaceutical dosage options for this chronic disorder. They could have different strengths, such as offering a stable diffusion of active substance, avoiding the first pass metabolism, and reducing system adverse reactions. This article reviews the technical principles, novel techniques of transdermal delivery drug, and prospects for future development for the management of cognitive and behavioral dysfunctions in AD patients. PMID:28706327

  19. Current advances in transdermal delivery of drugs for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Giau, Vo Van; Vo, Tuong Kha

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common, progressive, fatal neurodegenerative disorder, which will play an increasingly important role both socially and financially in the aging populations. Treatments for AD show modest improvements in cognition and global functioning among patients. Furthermore, the oral administration of treating AD has had some drawbacks that decrease the medication adherence and efficacy of the therapy. Transdermal drugs are proposed as an alternative remedy to overcome the disadvantages of current pharmaceutical dosage options for this chronic disorder. They could have different strengths, such as offering a stable diffusion of active substance, avoiding the first pass metabolism, and reducing system adverse reactions. This article reviews the technical principles, novel techniques of transdermal delivery drug, and prospects for future development for the management of cognitive and behavioral dysfunctions in AD patients.

  20. Encapsulated Curcumin for Transdermal Administration

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop a proniosomal carrier system of curcumin for transdermal delivery. Methods: Proniosomes of curcumin were prepared by encapsulation of the drug in a mixture of Span 80, cholesterol and diethyl ether by ether injection method, and then investigated as a transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS).

  1. Nicotine induces resistance to chemotherapy by modulating mitochondrial signaling in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingmei; Kamdar, Opal; Le, Wei; Rosen, Glenn D; Upadhyay, Daya

    2009-02-01

    Continued smoking causes tumor progression and resistance to therapy in lung cancer. Carcinogens possess the ability to block apoptosis, and thus may induce development of cancers and resistance to therapy. Tobacco carcinogens have been studied widely; however, little is known about the agents that inhibit apoptosis, such as nicotine. We determine whether mitochondrial signaling mediates antiapoptotic effects of nicotine in lung cancer. A549 cells were exposed to nicotine (1 muM) followed by cisplatin (35 muM) plus etoposide (20 muM) for 24 hours. We found that nicotine prevented chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, improved cell survival, and caused modest increases in DNA synthesis. Inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt prevented the antiapoptotic effects of nicotine and decreased chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. Small interfering RNA MAPK kinase-1 blocked antiapoptotic effects of nicotine, whereas small interfering RNA MAPK kinase-2 blocked chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. Nicotine prevented chemotherapy-induced reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential and caspase-9 activation. Antiapoptotic effects of nicotine were blocked by mitochondrial anion channel inhibitor, 4,4'diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'disulfonic acid. Chemotherapy enhanced translocation of proapoptotic Bax to the mitochondria, whereas nicotine blocked these effects. Nicotine up-regulated Akt-mediated antiapoptotic X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein and phosphorylated proapoptotic Bcl2-antagonist of cell death. The A549-rho0 cells, which lack mitochondrial DNA, demonstrated partial resistance to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, but blocked the antiapoptotic effects of nicotine. Accordingly, we provide evidence that nicotine modulates mitochondrial signaling and inhibits chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in lung cancer. The mitochondrial regulation of nicotine imposes an important mechanism that can critically impair the treatment of lung cancer, because many cancer

  2. Acute Intoxication by Transdermal Opium Application in Infants: Two Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj Sedighi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute opium intoxication is one of the most common causes of poisoning in children in Iran. Although most cases are accidental, traditional misuse of opium for symptomatic therapy of various childhood diseases also contributes to high rate of opium intoxication in Iran. Cases: Here, we report two cases of opium intoxication in infants resulted from transdermal application of opium on burned skin. To our knowledge this is the first case report of intoxication from transdermal misuse of opium. Conclusion: Health care providers should be aware about signs and symptoms of opium intoxication in children. Opium intoxication should be suspected in each child with history of a recent burn injury that presented with decreased level of consciousness.

  3. Transdermal hyoscine induced unilateral mydriasis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, Breffni

    2012-03-20

    The authors present a case of unilateral mydriasis in a teenager prescribed transdermal hyoscine hydrobromide (scopolamine) for chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting. The authors discuss the ocular side-effects associated with this particular drug and delivery system and the potential use of transdermal hyoscine as an antiemetic agent in this group.

  4. Nicotinic receptor blockade decreases fos immunoreactivity within orexin/hypocretin-expressing neurons of nicotine-exposed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Steven J; Gentile, Taylor A; Mo, Lili; Tran, Fionya H; Ma, Sisi; Muschamp, John W

    2016-11-01

    Tobacco smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in the United States. Nicotine is the principal psychoactive ingredient in tobacco that causes addiction. The structures governing nicotine addiction, including those underlying withdrawal, are still being explored. Nicotine withdrawal is characterized by negative affective and cognitive symptoms that enhance relapse susceptibility, and suppressed dopaminergic transmission from ventral tegmental area (VTA) to target structures underlies behavioral symptoms of nicotine withdrawal. Agonist and partial agonist therapies help 1 in 4 treatment-seeking smokers at one-year post-cessation, and new targets are needed to more effectively aid smokers attempting to quit. Hypothalamic orexin/hypocretin neurons send excitatory projections to dopamine (DA)-producing neurons of VTA and modulate mesoaccumbal DA release. The effects of nicotinic receptor blockade, which is commonly used to precipitate withdrawal, on orexin neurons remain poorly investigated and present an attractive target for intervention. The present study sought to investigate the effects of nicotinic receptor blockade on hypothalamic orexin neurons using mecamylamine to precipitate withdrawal in rats. Separate groups of rats were treated with either chronic nicotine or saline for 7-days at which point effects of mecamylamine or saline on somatic signs and anxiety-like behavior were assessed. Finally, tissue from rats was harvested for immunofluorescent analysis of Fos within orexin neurons. Results demonstrate that nicotinic receptor blockade leads to reduced orexin cell activity, as indicated by lowered Fos-immunoreactivity, and suggest that this underlying cellular activity may be associated with symptoms of nicotine withdrawal as effects were most prominently observed in rats given chronic nicotine. We conclude from this study that orexin transmission becomes suppressed in rats upon nicotinic receptor blockade, and that behavioral symptoms associated

  5. Perceived efficacy of e-cigarettes versus nicotine replacement therapy among successful e-cigarette users: a qualitative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbeau, Amanda M; Burda, Jennifer; Siegel, Michael

    2013-03-05

    Nicotine is widely recognized as an addictive psychoactive drug. Since most smokers are bio-behaviorally addicted, quitting can be very difficult and is often accompanied by withdrawal symptoms. Research indicates that nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) can double quit rates. However, the success rate for quitting remains low. E-cigarettes (electronic cigarettes) are battery-powered nicotine delivery devices used to inhale doses of vaporized nicotine from a handheld device similar in shape to a cigarette without the harmful chemicals present in tobacco products. Anecdotal evidence strongly suggests that e-cigarettes may be effective in helping smokers quit and preventing relapse, but there have been few published qualitative studies, especially among successful e-cigarette users, to support this evidence. Qualitative design using focus groups (N = 11); 9 men and 2 women. Focus groups were conducted by posing open-ended questions relating to the use of e-cigarettes, comparison of effectiveness between NRTs and e-cigarettes, barriers to quitting, and reasons for choosing e-cigarettes over other methods. Five themes emerged that describe users' perceptions of why e-cigarettes are efficacious in quitting smoking: 1) bio-behavioral feedback, 2) social benefits, 3) hobby elements, 4) personal identity, and 5) distinction between smoking cessation and nicotine cessation. Additionally, subjects reported their experiences with NRTs compared with e-cigarettes, citing negative side effects of NRTs and their ineffectiveness at preventing relapse. These findings suggest tobacco control practitioners must pay increased attention to the importance of the behavioral and social components of smoking addiction. By addressing these components in addition to nicotine dependence, e-cigarettes appear to help some tobacco smokers transition to a less harmful replacement tool, thereby maintaining cigarette abstinence.

  6. Some Recent Advances in Transdermal Drug Delivery Systems ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some Recent Advances in Transdermal Drug Delivery Systems. ... Advances in Transdermal Drug Delivery Systems. EC Ibezim, B Kabele-Toge, CO Anie, C Njoku. Abstract. Transdermal delivery systems are forms of drug delivery involving the dermis, as distinct from topical, oral or other forms of parenteral dosage forms.

  7. Smokers making a quit attempt using e-cigarettes with or without nicotine or prescription nicotine replacement therapy: Impact on cardiovascular function (ISME-NRT) - a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonizakis, Markos; Crank, Helen; Gumber, Anil; Brose, Leonie S

    2017-04-04

    The estimated number of cigarette smokers in the world is 1.3 billion, expected to rise to 1.7 billion by 2025, with 10 million smokers living in the U.K. Smoking is the leading, preventable death-cause worldwide, being responsible for almost 650,000 deaths in the E.U. annually. A combination of pharmacological interventions, including nicotine replacement therapy, bupropion and varenicline, and behavioural support is the most effective approach to smoking cessation. However, even the best methods have high relapse rates of approximately 75% within 6 months. Electronic (or "e-") cigarettes use battery power to disperse a solution that usually contains propylene glycol or glycerine, water, flavouring and nicotine. E-cigarettes have become the most popular smoking cessation aid in England, however, information on their effects on cardiovascular function is limited and contradictory. As e-cigarettes are not solely nicotine-based products, existing research exploring the effects of nicotine on the cardio-vasculature provides only limited information, while their extensive uptake urges the need of evidence to inform the general public, smokers and policy-makers. This is a pragmatic, 3-group, randomised, assessor-blinded, single-centre trial exploring the cardiovascular physiological effects of the use of e-cigarettes (nicotine-free and nicotine-inclusive, assessed separately) combined with behavioural support as a smoking cessation method in comparison to the combination of NRT and behavioural support. The primary outcome will be macro-vascular function, determined by a Flow Mediated Dilatation ultrasound assessment, 6 months following participants' "quit date". Participants will be assessed at baseline, 3 days following their self-determined "quit date", at intervention end (3 months) and 6 months following their "quite date". Findings are expected to give an indication of the cardiovascular effects of e-cigarettes both in the short- and in the medium-term period

  8. Nicotine replacement therapy decision based on fuzzy multi-criteria analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarmudi, Zamali; Matmali, Norfazillah; Abdullah, Mohd Lazim

    2017-08-01

    It has been observed that Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) is one of the alternatives to control and reduce smoking addiction among smokers. Since the decision to choose the best NRT alternative involves uncertainty, ambiguity factors and diverse input datasets, thus, this paper proposes a fuzzy multi-criteria analysis (FMA) to overcome these issues. It focuses on how the fuzzy approach can unify the diversity of datasets based on NRT's decision-making problem. The analysis done employed the advantage of the cost-benefit criterion to unify the mixture of dataset input. The performance matrix was utilised to derive the performance scores. An empirical example regarding the NRT's decision-making problem was employed to illustrate the proposed approach. Based on the calculations, this analytical approach was found to be highly beneficial in terms of usability. It was also very applicable and efficient in dealing with the mixture of input datasets. Hence, the decision-making process can easily be used by experts and patients who are interested to join the therapy/cessation program.

  9. Permeation enhancer strategies in transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwah, Harneet; Garg, Tarun; Goyal, Amit K; Rath, Goutam

    2016-01-01

    Today, ∼74% of drugs are taken orally and are not found to be as effective as desired. To improve such characteristics, transdermal drug delivery was brought to existence. This delivery system is capable of transporting the drug or macromolecules painlessly through skin into the blood circulation at fixed rate. Topical administration of therapeutic agents offers many advantages over conventional oral and invasive techniques of drug delivery. Several important advantages of transdermal drug delivery are prevention from hepatic first pass metabolism, enhancement of therapeutic efficiency and maintenance of steady plasma level of the drug. Human skin surface, as a site of drug application for both local and systemic effects, is the most eligible candidate available. New controlled transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDS) technologies (electrically-based, structure-based and velocity-based) have been developed and commercialized for the transdermal delivery of troublesome drugs. This review article covers most of the new active transport technologies involved in enhancing the transdermal permeation via effective drug delivery system.

  10. E-cigarettes for the management of nicotine addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knight-West O

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Oliver Knight-West, Christopher Bullen The National Institute for Health Innovation, School of Population Health, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand Abstract: In this review, we discuss current evidence on electronic cigarettes (ECs, a rapidly evolving class of nicotine delivery system, and their role in managing nicotine addiction, specifically in helping smokers to quit smoking and/or reduce the amount of tobacco they smoke. The current evidence base is limited to three randomized trials (only one compares ECs with nicotine replacement therapy and a growing number of EC user surveys (n=6, case reports (n=4, and cohort studies (n=8. Collectively, these studies suggest modest cessation efficacy and a few adverse effects, at least with the short-term use. On this basis, we provide advice for health care providers on providing balanced information for patients who enquire about ECs. More research, specifically well-conducted large efficacy trials comparing ECs with standard smoking cessation management (eg, nicotine replacement therapy plus behavioral support and long-term prospective studies for adverse events, are urgently needed to fill critical knowledge gaps on these products. Keywords: tobacco, smoking, nicotine, electronic cigarettes, cessation, addiction

  11. The Effect of Transdermal Scopolamine for the Prevention of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Antor

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative nausea and vomiting is one of the most common and undesirable complaints recorded in as many as 70%-80% of high-risk surgical patients. The current prophylactic therapy recommendations for PONV management stated in the Society of Ambulatory Anesthesia guidelines should start with monotherapy and patients at moderate to high risk, a combination of antiemetic medication should be considered. Consequently, if rescue medication is required, the antiemetic drug chosen should be from a different therapeutic class and administration mode than the drug used for prophylaxis. The guidelines restrict the use of dexamethasone, transdermal scopolamine, aprepitant, and palonosetron as rescue medication 6 hours after surgery. In an effort to find a safer and reliable therapy for postoperative nausea and vomiting, new drugs with antiemetic properties and minimal side effects are needed, and scopolamine may be considered an effective alternative. Scopolamine is a belladonna alkaloid, α-(hydroxymethyl benzene acetic acid 9-methyl-3-oxa-9-azatricyclo non-7-yl ester, acting as a nonselective muscarinic antagonist and producing both peripheral antimuscarinic and central sedative, antiemetic, and amnestic effects. The empirical formula is C17H21NO4 and its structural formula is a tertiary amine L-(2-scopolamine (tropic acid ester with scopine; MW = 303.4. Scopolamine became the first drug commercially available as a transdermal therapeutic system used for extended continuous drug delivery during 72 hours. Clinical trials with transdermal scopolamine have consistently demonstrated its safety and efficacy in postoperative nausea and vomiting. Thus, scopolamine is a promising candidate for the management of postoperative nausea and vomiting in adults as a first line monotherapy or in combination with other drugs. In addition, transdermal scopolamine might be helpful in preventing postoperative discharge nausea and vomiting owing to its long

  12. How do consumers perceive differences in risk across nicotine products? A review of relative risk perceptions across smokeless tobacco, e-cigarettes, nicotine replacement therapy and combustible cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czoli, Christine D; Fong, Geoffrey T; Mays, Darren; Hammond, David

    2017-03-01

    To systematically review the literature regarding relative risk perceptions (RRPs) across non-combustible nicotine products. MEDLINE and PsycINFO databases were searched for articles published up to October 2014. Of the 5266 records identified, articles not published in English that did not quantitatively assess RRPs across categories of non-combustible nicotine products were excluded, yielding 55 records. One reviewer extracted measures and findings of RRPs for product comparisons of smokeless tobacco (SLT), e-cigarettes (ECs) and nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) to one another, and to combustible cigarettes (CCs). A total of 157 samples from 54 studies were included in the analyses. The accuracy of RRPs differed based on the products being compared: although the accuracy of RRPs was variable across studies, substantial proportions of respondents reported inaccurate beliefs about the relative harmfulness of SLT versus CCs, as well as of ECs versus NRT. In addition, in most studies, respondents did not know the relative harmfulness of SLT versus NRT. In contrast, respondents in many studies correctly perceived NRT and ECs as less harmful than CCs. Cigarette smokers and users of non-combustible nicotine products tended to correctly perceive the relative harmfulness of products more often than non-users. Measures used to assess RRPs varied across studies, with different approaches characterised by certain strengths and limitations. The highly variable and context-specific nature of non-combustible nicotine product RRPs have direct implications for researchers and present several challenges for policymakers working with modified risk products, including issues of measurement, health risk communication and behaviour change. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Current advances in transdermal delivery of drugs for alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Thuy Trang Nguyen; Vo Van Giau; Tuong Kha Vo

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common, progressive, fatal neurodegenerative disorder, which will play an increasingly important role both socially and financially in the aging populations. Treatments for AD show modest improvements in cognition and global functioning among patients. Furthermore, the oral administration of treating AD has had some drawbacks that decrease the medication adherence and efficacy of the therapy. Transdermal drugs are proposed as an alternative remedy to overcome the...

  14. Drug profile: transdermal rivastigmine patch in the treatment of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emre, Murat; Bernabei, Roberto; Blesa, Rafael; Bullock, Roger; Cunha, Luis; Daniëls, Hugo; Dziadulewicz, Edward; Förstl, Hans; Frölich, Lutz; Gabryelewicz, Tomasz; Levin, Oleg; Lindesay, James; Martínez-Lage, Pablo; Monsch, Andreas; Tsolaki, Magda; van Laar, Teus

    2010-08-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors constitute one of the mainstays of treatment of Alzheimer disease (AD). Gastrointestinal side effects, difficulty accessing therapeutic doses and poor patient compliance have been identified as barriers to effective treatment with these substances. The rivastigmine transdermal patch provides continuous delivery of drug through the skin into the bloodstream, avoiding the fluctuations in plasma concentration associated with oral administration. This pharmacokinetic profile is associated with reduced side effects, resulting in easier access to expected target doses. These benefits, along with other practical advantages of the transdermal patch, may contribute to enhanced patient compliance. Here, we present a review of the current literature on rivastigmine patch, and offer advice based on our own collective clinical experience. Rivastigmine patch provides an efficient option for managing patients with AD, to be considered among the first line therapies for the disease.

  15. Smokers making a quit attempt using e-cigarettes with or without nicotine or prescription nicotine replacement therapy: Impact on cardiovascular function (ISME-NRT - a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markos Klonizakis

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The estimated number of cigarette smokers in the world is 1.3 billion, expected to rise to 1.7 billion by 2025, with 10 million smokers living in the U.K. Smoking is the leading, preventable death-cause worldwide, being responsible for almost 650,000 deaths in the E.U. annually. A combination of pharmacological interventions, including nicotine replacement therapy, bupropion and varenicline, and behavioural support is the most effective approach to smoking cessation. However, even the best methods have high relapse rates of approximately 75% within 6 months. Electronic (or “e-“ cigarettes use battery power to disperse a solution that usually contains propylene glycol or glycerine, water, flavouring and nicotine. E-cigarettes have become the most popular smoking cessation aid in England, however, information on their effects on cardiovascular function is limited and contradictory. As e-cigarettes are not solely nicotine-based products, existing research exploring the effects of nicotine on the cardio-vasculature provides only limited information, while their extensive uptake urges the need of evidence to inform the general public, smokers and policy-makers. Methods This is a pragmatic, 3-group, randomised, assessor-blinded, single-centre trial exploring the cardiovascular physiological effects of the use of e-cigarettes (nicotine-free and nicotine-inclusive, assessed separately combined with behavioural support as a smoking cessation method in comparison to the combination of NRT and behavioural support. The primary outcome will be macro-vascular function, determined by a Flow Mediated Dilatation ultrasound assessment, 6 months following participants’ “quit date”. Discussion Participants will be assessed at baseline, 3 days following their self-determined “quit date”, at intervention end (3 months and 6 months following their “quite date”. Findings are expected to give an indication of the cardiovascular

  16. The role of transdermal estrogen sprays and estradiol topical emulsion in the management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M Egras

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Amy M Egras, Elena M UmlandJefferson School of Pharmacy, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Vasomotor symptoms (VMS are among the most bothersome complaints of postmenopausal women. To date, the most widely studied and effective treatment for VMS is hormone replacement therapy, consisting of estrogen (in women without a uterus or estrogen plus progestin (in women with a uterus. Traditionally, oral estrogens have been used for treatment. However, over the years, additional estrogen formulations have been developed including transdermal patches; vaginal rings, creams, and tablets; and injectable preparations. Two newer formulations are transdermal estrogen spray and estradiol topical emulsion. This review evaluates the current literature assessing the use of these two newer formulations for the treatment of VMS associated with menopause.Keywords: menopause, vasomotor symptoms, transdermal estrogen spray, estradiol topical emulsion

  17. Waterpipe tobacco products: nicotine labelling versus nicotine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vansickel, Andrea R; Shihadeh, Alan; Eissenberg, Thomas

    2012-05-01

    Waterpipe tobacco package labelling typically indicates "0.0% tar" and "0.05% or 0.5% nicotine". To determine the extent to which nicotine labeling is related to nicotine delivery. 110 waterpipe smokers engaged in a 45-minute waterpipe smoking session. Puff topography and plasma nicotine were measured. Three waterpipe tobacco brands were used: Nakhla (0.5% nicotine), Starbuzz (0.05% nicotine), and Al Fakher (0.05% nicotine). Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. Topography did not differ across brands. Peak plasma nicotine varied significantly across brands. Al Fakher had the highest nicotine delivery (11.4 ng/ml) followed by Nakhla (9.8 ng/ml) and Starbuzz (5.8 ng/ml). Nicotine labelling on waterpipe tobacco products does not reflect delivery; smoking a brand with a "0.05% nicotine" label led to greater plasma nicotine levels than smoking a brand with a "0.5% nicotine" label. Waterpipe tobacco products should be labelled in a manner that does not mislead consumers.

  18. Correlates of use of electronic cigarettes versus nicotine replacement therapy for help with smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Pallav; Little, Melissa A; Fagan, Pebbles; Kawamoto, Crissy T; Herzog, Thaddeus A

    2014-12-01

    Electronic- or e-cigarettes are nicotine-delivery devices commonly used by smokers to quit or reduce smoking. At present, not much is known about the characteristics of smokers who specifically try e-cigarettes to quit smoking compared to the nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) products approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Determining the characteristics of smokers who are likely to choose e-cigarettes as cessation aids would help develop strategies to impart valid information about e-cigarettes to such smokers as facts regarding the safety and utility of e-cigarettes emerge. This study is based on 834 daily smokers [mean age=45.8 (standard deviation=13)] from Hawaii. Demographic, smoking- and cessation-related variables were examined as correlates of ever use of e-cigarette only or any FDA-approved NRT product only or both as cessation aids. Results indicated that younger smokers, non-White smokers, and smokers reporting higher income, lower nicotine dependence, shorter smoking history, and higher lifetime quit attempts were more likely to have tried e-cigarettes but not NRT products for help with smoking cessation. Smokers who are attracted to use e-cigarettes but not FDA-approved NRT products may differ from smokers who are likely to have used NRT products but not e-cigarettes in terms of demographic (e.g., age, ethnicity) and smoking- or cessation-related characteristics (e.g., nicotine dependence, quit attempts). Given the lack of knowledge regarding the health effects of e-cigarettes and their efficacy as cessation aids, future research needs to continue characterizing smokers who are likely to use e-cigarettes for smoking cessation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Peptide-chaperone-directed transdermal protein delivery requires energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Renquan; Jin, Peipei; Zhang, Li; Wang, Changli; Chen, Chuanjun; Ding, Weiping; Wen, Longping

    2014-11-03

    The biologically inspired transdermal enhanced peptide TD1 has been discovered to specifically facilitate transdermal delivery of biological macromolecules. However, the biological behavior of TD1 has not been fully defined. In this study, we find that energy is required for the TD1-mediated transdermal protein delivery through rat and human skins. Our results show that the permeation activity of TD1-hEGF, a fusion protein composed of human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) and the TD1 sequence connected with a glycine-serine linker (GGGGS), can be inhibited by the energy inhibitor, rotenone or oligomycin. In addition, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the essential energetic molecule in organic systems, can effectively facilitate the TD1 directed permeation of the protein-based drug into the skin in a dose-dependent fashion. Our results here demonstrate a novel energy-dependent permeation process during the TD1-mediated transdermal protein delivery that could be valuable for the future development of promising new transdermal drugs.

  20. A Transdermal Measurement Platform Based on Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ying Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Franz diffusion cell is one of the most widely used devices to evaluate transdermal drug delivery. However, this static and nonflowing system has some limitations, such as a relatively large solution volume and skin area and the development of gas bubbles during sampling. To overcome these disadvantages, this study provides a proof of concept for miniaturizing models of transdermal delivery by using a microfluidic chip combined with a diffusion cell. The proposed diffusion microchip system requires only 80 μL of sample solution and provides flow circulation. Two model compounds, Coomassie Brilliant Blue G-250 and potassium ferricyanide, were successfully tested for transdermal delivery experiments. The diffusion rate is high for a high sample concentration or a large membrane pore size. The developed diffusion microchip system, which is feasible, can be applied for transdermal measurement in the future.

  1. A Comprehensive Review on: Transdermal drug delivery systems.

    OpenAIRE

    Kharat, Rekha; Bathe, Ritesh Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery system was introduced to overcome the difficulties of drug delivery through oral route. Despite their relatively higher costs, transdermal delivery systems have proved advantageous for delivery of selected drugs, such as estrogens, testosterone, clonidine and nitro-glycerine. Transdermal delivery provides a leading edge over injectable and oral routes by increasing patient compliance and avoiding first pass metabolism respectively. Topical  administration  of  therap...

  2. Chemical Penetration Enhancers for Transdermal Drug Delivery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for transdermal administration. The permeation of drug through skin can be enhanced by both chemical penetration enhancement and physical methods. In this review, we have discussed the chemical penetration enhancement technology for transdermal drug delivery as well as the probable mechanisms of action.

  3. Extended nicotine self-administration increases sensitivity to nicotine, motivation to seek nicotine and the reinforcing properties of nicotine-paired cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Kelly J; Lay, Belinda P P; Holmes, Nathan M

    2017-03-01

    An array of pharmacological and environmental factors influence the development and maintenance of tobacco addiction. The nature of these influences likely changes across the course of an extended smoking history, during which time drug seeking can become involuntary and uncontrolled. The present study used an animal model to examine the factors that drive nicotine-seeking behavior after either brief (10 days) or extended (40 days) self-administration training. In Experiment 1, extended training increased rats' sensitivity to nicotine, indicated by a leftward shift in the dose-response curve, and their motivation to work for nicotine, indicated by an increase in the break point achieved under a progressive ratio schedule. In Experiment 2, extended training imbued the nicotine-paired cue with the capacity to maintain responding to the same high level as nicotine itself. However, Experiment 3 showed that the mechanisms involved in responding for nicotine or a nicotine-paired cue are dissociable, as treatment with the partial nicotine receptor agonist, varenicline, suppressed responding for nicotine but potentiated responding for the nicotine-paired cue. Hence, across extended nicotine self-administration, pharmacological and environmental influences over nicotine seeking increase such that nicotine seeking is controlled by multiple sources, and therefore highly resistant to change. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  4. A commentary on transdermal drug delivery systems in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkinson, Adam C

    2013-09-01

    The number of drugs available as marketed transdermal products is limited to those that exhibit the correct physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties that enable their effective delivery across the skin. In this respect, there are less than 20 drugs that are currently marketed in the US and EU as products that deliver systemic levels of their active ingredients. An analysis of clinical trials conducted in the transdermal sector shows a similar picture with only nine drugs accounting for approximately 80% of all transdermal clinical trials listed on ClinicalTrials.gov. Those drugs for which there are very few transdermal trials listed consist mostly of molecules that are inherently unsuitable for transdermal delivery and serve as a clear warning to drug developers that the science that governs transdermal drug delivery is well reflected by the successes and failures of drugs in development as well as those that make it to the market. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Estradiol Transdermal Patch

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... menopause (change of life; the end of monthly menstrual periods). Transdermal estradiol is also used to prevent ... patch. Ask your pharmacist or doctor for a copy of the manufacturer's information for the patient.

  6. Prediction of Human Pharmacokinetic Profile After Transdermal Drug Application Using Excised Human Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Syunsuke; Karashima, Masatoshi; Arai, Yuta; Tohyama, Kimio; Amano, Nobuyuki

    2017-09-01

    Although several mathematical models have been reported for the estimation of human plasma concentration profiles of drug substances after dermal application, the successful cases that can predict human pharmacokinetic profiles are limited. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the prediction of human plasma concentrations after dermal application using in vitro permeation parameters obtained from excised human skin. The in vitro skin permeability of 7 marketed drug products was evaluated. The plasma concentration-time profiles of the drug substances in humans after their dermal application were simulated using compartment models and the clinical pharmacokinetic parameters. The transdermal process was simulated using the in vitro skin permeation rate and lag time assuming a zero-order absorption. These simulated plasma concentration profiles were compared with the clinical data. The result revealed that the steady-state plasma concentration of diclofenac and the maximum concentrations of nicotine, bisoprolol, rivastigmine, and lidocaine after topical application were within 2-fold of the clinical data. Furthermore, the simulated concentration profiles of bisoprolol, nicotine, and rivastigmine reproduced the decrease in absorption due to drug depletion from the formulation. In conclusion, this simple compartment model using in vitro human skin permeation parameters as zero-order absorption predicted the human plasma concentrations accurately. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Opioid Analgesics and Nicotine: More Than Blowing Smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jin H; Lane, Scott D; Weaver, Michael F

    2015-09-01

    Practitioners are highly likely to encounter patients with concurrent use of nicotine products and opioid analgesics. Smokers present with more severe and extended chronic pain outcomes and have a higher frequency of prescription opioid use. Current tobacco smoking is a strong predictor of risk for nonmedical use of prescription opioids. Opioid and nicotinic-cholinergic neurotransmitter systems interact in important ways to modulate opioid and nicotine effects: dopamine release induced by nicotine is dependent on facilitation by the opioid system, and the nicotinic-acetylcholine system modulates self-administration of several classes of abused drugs-including opioids. Nicotine can serve as a prime for the use of other drugs, which in the case of the opioid system may be bidirectional. Opioids and compounds in tobacco, including nicotine, are metabolized by the cytochrome P450 enzyme system, but the metabolism of opioids and tobacco products can be complicated. Accordingly, drug interactions are possible but not always clear. Because of these issues, asking about nicotine use in patients taking opioids for pain is recommended. When assessing patient tobacco use, practitioners should also obtain information on products other than cigarettes, such as cigars, pipes, smokeless tobacco, and electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS, or e-cigarettes). There are multiple forms of behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy available to assist patients with smoking cessation, and opioid agonist maintenance and pain clinics represent underutilized opportunities for nicotine intervention programs.

  8. In vivo interactions between α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α: Implication for nicotine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Asti; Bagdas, Deniz; Muldoon, Pretal P; Lichtman, Aron H; Carroll, F Ivy; Greenwald, Mark; Miles, Michael F; Damaj, M Imad

    2017-05-15

    Chronic tobacco use dramatically increases health burdens and financial costs. Limitations of current smoking cessation therapies indicate the need for improved molecular targets. The main addictive component of tobacco, nicotine, exerts its dependency effects via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Activation of the homomeric α7 nAChR reduces nicotine's rewarding properties in conditioned place preference (CPP) test and i.v. self-administration models, but the mechanism underlying these effects is unknown. Recently, the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor type-α (PPARα) has been implicated as a downstream signaling target of the α7 nAChR in ventral tegmental area dopamine cells. The present study investigated PPARα as a possible mediator of the effect of α7 nAChR activation in nicotine dependence. Our results demonstrate the PPARα antagonist GW6471 blocks actions of the α7 nAChR agonist PNU282987 on nicotine reward in an unbiased CPP test in male ICR adult mice. These findings suggests that α7 nAChR activation attenuates nicotine CPP in a PPARα-dependent manner. To evaluate PPARα activation in nicotine dependence we used the selective and potent PPARα agonist, WY-14643 and the clinically used PPARα activator, fenofibrate, in nicotine CPP and we observed attenuation of nicotine preference, but fenofibrate was less potent. We also studied PPARα in nicotine dependence by evaluating its activation in nicotine withdrawal. WY-14643 reversed nicotine withdrawal signs whereas fenofibrate had modest efficacy. This suggests that PPARα plays a role in nicotine reward and withdrawal and that further studies are warranted to elucidate its function in mediating the effects of α7 nAChRs in nicotine dependence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Film forming systems for topical and transdermal drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashmira Kathe

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Skin is considered as an important route of administration of drugs for both local and systemic effects. The effectiveness of topical therapy depends on the physicochemical properties of the drug and adherence of the patient to the treatment regimen as well as the system's ability to adhere to skin during the therapy so as to promote drug penetration through the skin barrier. Conventional formulations for topical and dermatological administration of drugs have certain limitations like poor adherence to skin, poor permeability and compromised patient compliance. For the treatment of diseases of body tissues and wounds, the drug has to be maintained at the site of treatment for an effective period of time. Topical film forming systems are such developing drug delivery systems meant for topical application to the skin, which adhere to the body, forming a thin transparent film and provide delivery of the active ingredients to the body tissue. These are intended for skin application as emollient or protective and for local action or transdermal penetration of medicament for systemic action. The transparency is an appreciable feature of this polymeric system which greatly influences the patient acceptance. In the current discussion, the film forming systems are described as a promising choice for topical and transdermal drug delivery. Further the various types of film forming systems (sprays/solutions, gels and emulsions along with their evaluation parameters have also been reviewed.

  10. Patient-controlled analgesia: therapeutic interventions using transdermal electro-activated and electro-modulated drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indermun, Sunaina; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; Du Toit, Lisa C; Modi, Girish; Luttge, Regina; Pillay, Viness

    2014-02-01

    Chronic pain poses a major concern to modern medicine and is frequently undertreated, causing suffering and disability. Patient-controlled analgesia, although successful, does have limitations. Transdermal delivery is the pivot to which analgesic research in drug delivery has centralized, especially with the confines of needle phobias and associated pain related to traditional injections, and the existing limitations associated with oral drug delivery. Highlighted within is the possibility of further developing transdermal drug delivery for chronic pain treatment using iontophoresis-based microneedle array patches. A concerted effort was made to review critically all available therapies designed for the treatment of chronic pain. The drug delivery systems developed for this purpose and nondrug routes are elaborated on, in a systematic manner. Recent developments and future goals in transdermal delivery as a means to overcome the individual limitations of the aforementioned delivery routes are represented as well. The approval of patch-like devices that contain both the microelectronic-processing mechanism and the active medicament in a small portable device is still awaited by the pharmaceutical industry. This anticipated platform may provide transdermal electro-activated and electro-modulated drug delivery systems a feasible attempt in chronic pain treatment. Iontophoresis has been proven an effective mode used to administer ionized drugs in physiotherapeutic, diagnostic, and dermatological applications and may be an encouraging probability for the development of devices and aids in the treatment of chronic pain. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  11. Effect of oral and transdermal hormone therapy on hyaluronic acid in women with and without a history of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomikoski, Pauliina; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Mikkola, Tomi S; Ropponen, Anne; Ylikorkala, Olavi

    2008-04-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy predisposes women to liver disorders years after affected pregnancy. We compared the basal levels and responses of hyaluronic acid, a marker of liver fibrosis, and liver transaminases to postmenopausal hormone therapy in women with (n = 20) and without (n = 20) a history of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial. Basal levels of hyaluronic acid were similar in both groups. Two weeks of oral estradiol 2.0 mg/day led to significant but similar (10.9% to 15.4%) rises in hyaluronic acid in both groups. Increasing the dose of oral estradiol to 4.0 mg/day resulted in normalization of the levels, whereas the addition of medroxyprogesterone acetate led to falls (11.0% to 10.7 %) in hyaluronic acid. Transdermal estradiol 50 microg led to a rise (3.2 %) in hyaluronic acid only in the control group. Other liver markers were normal at baseline and during hormone therapy. Normal basal levels and/or normal responses of hyaluronic acid and other liver markers to hormone therapy in women with previous intrahepatic cholestasis suggest that this therapy does not predispose these women to liver diseases.

  12. Discontinuation of nicotine replacement therapy among smoking-cessation attempters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Emily K; Levinson, Arnold H

    2008-03-01

    Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) doubles successful quitting, but more than half of NRT users do not comply with optimal treatment regimens. From the 2005 Colorado state tobacco survey, quit attempters who utilized NRT (N=366) were analyzed in spring 2007. Descriptive and regression analyses were used to examine reasons for discontinuing NRT, length of time on NRT, and quit intentions. The reasons for discontinuing NRT were resuming smoking (34%), side effects (17%), NRT not helping with quitting (14%), quitting smoking (10%), and cost (5%). Poverty, age, and non-Latino minority status were associated with reasons for discontinuation other than quitting smoking. Having side effects was associated with a short duration of NRT use and 95% lower odds of intending to quit in the next month. In the first population-level study examining reasons for discontinuing NRT, general-population smokers who initiate NRT use when attempting to quit are highly likely to discontinue NRT prematurely. Age and culturally-appropriate medication management interventions may increase NRT compliance and improve cessation outcomes.

  13. Investigations on the viscoelastic performance of pressure sensitive adhesives in drug-in-adhesive type transdermal films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Hans-Michael; Irsan; Dodou, Kalliopi

    2014-08-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of solubility parameter and drug concentration on the rheological behaviour of drug-in-adhesive films intended for transdermal application. Films were prepared over a range of drug concentrations (5%, 10% and 20% w/w) using ibuprofen, benzoic acid, nicotinic acid and lidocaine as model drugs in acrylic (Duro-Tak 87-4287 and Duro-Tak 87900A) or silicone (Bio-PSA 7-4301 and Bio-PSA 7-4302) pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs). Saturation status of films was determined using light microscopy. Viscoelastic parameters were measured in rheology tests at 32°C. Subsaturated films had lower viscoelastic moduli whereas saturated films had higher moduli than the placebo films and/or a concentration-dependent increase in their modulus. Saturation concentration of each drug in the films was reflected by decreasing/increasing viscoelastic patterns. The viscoelastic windows (VWs) of the adhesive and drug-in-adhesive films clearly depicted the effect of solubility parameter differences, molar concentration of drug in the adhesive film and differences in PSA chemistry. Drug solubility parameters and molar drug concentrations have an impact on rheological patterns and thus on the adhesive performance of tested pressure sensitive adhesives intended for use in transdermal drug delivery systems. Use of the Flory equation in its limiting form was appropriate to predict drug solubility in the tested formulations.

  14. Belief about nicotine Modulates subjective craving and insula activity in Deprived smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, X. S.; Lohrenz, Terry; Salas, Ramiro

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the specific neural mechanisms through which cognitive factors influence craving and associated brain responses, despite the initial success of cognitive therapies in treating drug addiction. In this study, we investigated how cognitive factors such as beliefs influence...... subjective craving and neural activities in nicotine-addicted individuals using model-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and neuropharmacology. Deprived smokers (N = 24) participated in a two-by-two balanced placebo design, which crossed beliefs about nicotine (told "nicotine" vs. told "no......, smokers demonstrated significantly reduced craving after smoking when told "nicotine in cigarette" but showed no change in craving when told "no nicotine." Second, neural activity in the insular cortex related to craving was only significant when smokers were told "nicotine" but not when told "no nicotine...

  15. Safety and tolerability of prolonged-release nicotinic acid in statin-treated patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Birjmohun, R. S.; Kastelein, J. J. P.; Poldermans, D.; Stroes, E. S. G.; Hostalek, U.; Assmann, G.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and tolerability of prolonged -release nicotinic acid (Niaspan*) added to statin therapy in patients at increased cardiovascular risk. Methods: This was a 6-month, prospective, observational, multicentre, open-label evaluation of prolonged-release nicotinic acid

  16. Reduced-Nicotine Cigarettes in Young Smokers: Impact of Nicotine Metabolism on Nicotine Dose Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Paul; Ghahremani, Dara G; Tyndale, Rachel F; Cox, Chelsea M; Kazanjian, Ari S; Paterson, Neil; Lotfipour, Shahrdad; Hellemann, Gerhard S; Petersen, Nicole; Vigil, Celia; London, Edythe D

    2017-07-01

    The use of cigarettes delivering different nicotine doses allows evaluation of the contribution of nicotine to the smoking experience. We compared responses of 46 young adult smokers to research cigarettes, delivering 0.027, 0.110, 0.231, or 0.763 mg nicotine, and conventional cigarettes. On five separate days, craving, withdrawal, affect, and sustained attention were measured after overnight abstinence and again after smoking. Participants also rated each cigarette, and the nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR) was used to identify participants as normal or slow metabolizers. All cigarettes equally alleviated craving, withdrawal, and negative affect in the whole sample, but normal metabolizers reported greater reductions of craving and withdrawal than slow metabolizers, with dose-dependent effects. Only conventional cigarettes and, to a lesser degree, 0.763-mg nicotine research cigarettes increased sustained attention. Finally, there were no differences between ratings of lower-dose cigarettes, but the 0.763-mg cigarettes and (even more so) conventional cigarettes were rated more favorably than lower-dose cigarettes. The findings indicate that smoking-induced relief of craving and withdrawal reflects primarily non-nicotine effects in slow metabolizers, but depends on nicotine dose in normal metabolizers. By contrast, relief of withdrawal-related attentional deficits and cigarette ratings depend on nicotine dose regardless of metabolizer status. These findings have bearing on the use of reduced-nicotine cigarettes to facilitate smoking cessation and on policy regarding regulation of nicotine content in cigarettes. They suggest that normal and slow nicotine metabolizers would respond differently to nicotine reduction in cigarettes, but that irrespective of metabolizer status, reductions to <0.763 mg/cigarette may contribute to temporary attentional deficits.

  17. Slower nicotine metabolism among postmenopausal Polish smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmider, Leon; Delijewski, Marcin; Koszowski, Bartosz; Sobczak, Andrzej; Benowitz, Neal L; Goniewicz, Maciej L

    2018-06-01

    A non-invasive phenotypic indicator of the rate of nicotine metabolism is nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR) defined as a ratio of two major metabolites of nicotine - trans-3'-hydroxycotinine/cotinine. The rate of nicotine metabolism has important clinical implications for the likelihood of successful quitting with nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). We conducted a study to measure NMR among Polish smokers. In a cross-sectional study of 180 daily cigarette smokers (42% men; average age 34.6±13.0), we collected spot urine samples and measured trans-3'-hydroxycotinine (3-HC) and cotinine levels with LC-MS/MS method. We calculated NMR (molar ratio) and analyzed variations in NMR among groups of smokers. In the whole study group, an average NMR was 4.8 (IQR 3.4-7.3). The group of women below 51 years had significantly greater NMR compared to the rest of the population (6.4; IQR 4.1-8.8 vs. 4.3; IQR 2.8-6.4). No differences were found among group ages of male smokers. This is a first study to describe variations in nicotine metabolism among Polish smokers. Our findings indicate that young women metabolize nicotine faster than the rest of population. This finding is consistent with the known effects of estrogen to induce CYP2A6 activity. Young women may require higher doses of NRT or non-nicotine medications for most effective smoking cessation treatment. Copyright © 2017 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Multiscale modeling of transdermal drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Jee Eun

    2006-04-01

    This study addresses the modeling of transdermal diffusion of drugs, to better understand the permeation of molecules through the skin, and especially the stratum corneum, which forms the main permeation barrier of the skin. In transdermal delivery of systemic drugs, the drugs diffuse from a patch placed on the skin through the epidermis to the underlying blood vessels. The epidermis is the outermost layer of the skin and can be further divided into the stratum corneum (SC) and the viable epidermis layers. The SC consists of keratinous cells (corneocytes) embedded in the lipid multi-bilayers of the intercellular space. It is widely accepted that the barrier properties of the skin mostly arises from the ordered structure of the lipid bilayers. The diffusion path, at least for lipophilic molecules, seems to be mainly through the lipid bilayers. Despite the advantages of transdermal drug delivery compared to other drug delivery routes such as oral dosing and injections, the low percutaneous permeability of most compounds is a major difficulty in the wide application of transdermal drug delivery. In fact, many transdermal drug formulations include one or more permeation enhancers that increase the permeation of the drug significantly. During the last two decades, many researchers have studied percutaneous absorption of drugs both experimentally and theoretically. However, many are based on pharmacokinetic compartmental models, in which steady or pseudo-steady state conditions are assumed, with constant diffusivity and partitioning for single component systems. This study presents a framework for studying the multi-component diffusion of drugs coupled with enhancers through the skin by considering the microstructure of the stratum corneum (SC). A multiscale framework of modeling the transdermal diffusion of molecules is presented, by first calculating the microscopic diffusion coefficient in the lipid bilayers of the SC using molecular dynamics (MD). Then a

  19. Nicotine poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotine is found in: Chewing tobacco Cigarettes E-cigarettes Liquid nicotine Nicotine gum (Nicorette) Nicotine patches (Habitrol, Nicoderm) Pipe tobacco Some insecticides Tobacco leaves Note: This list may not be all-inclusive.

  20. Adverse effects of perinatal nicotine exposure on reproductive outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Michael K; Barra, Nicole G; Alfaidy, Nadia; Hardy, Daniel B; Holloway, Alison C

    2015-12-01

    Nicotine exposure during pregnancy through cigarette smoking, nicotine replacement therapies or e-cigarette use continues to be a widespread public health problem, impacting both fetal and postnatal health. Yet, at this time, there remains limited data regarding the safety and efficacy in using these nicotine products during pregnancy. Notably, reports assessing the effect of nicotine exposure on postnatal health outcomes in humans, including reproductive health, are severely lacking. Our current understanding regarding the consequences of nicotine exposure during pregnancy is limited to a few animal studies, which do not comprehensively address the underlying cellular mechanisms involved. This paper aims to critically review the current knowledge from human and animal studies regarding the direct and indirect effects (e.g. obesity) of maternal nicotine exposure, regardless of its source, on reproductive outcomes in pregnancy and postnatal life. Furthermore, this review highlights several key cellular mechanisms involved in these adverse reproductive deficits including oxidative stress, inflammation, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. By understanding the interplay of the cellular mechanisms involved, further strategies could be developed to prevent the reproductive abnormalities resulting from exposure to nicotine in utero and influence informed clinical guidelines for pregnant women. © 2015 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  1. Effect of nicotine on melanogenesis and antioxidant status in HEMn-LP melanocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delijewski, Marcin; Beberok, Artur; Otręba, Michał; Wrześniok, Dorota; Rok, Jakub; Buszman, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine is a natural ingredient of tobacco plants and is responsible for the addictive properties of tobacco. Nowadays nicotine is also commonly used as a form of smoking cessation therapy. It is suggested that nicotine may be accumulated in human tissues containing melanin. This may in turn affect biochemical processes in human cells producing melanin. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of nicotine on melanogenesis and antioxidant status in cultured normal human melanocytes HEMn-LP. Nicotine induced concentration-dependent loss in melanocytes viability. The value of EC 50 was determined to be 7.43 mM. Nicotine inhibited a melanization process in human light pigmented melanocytes and caused alterations of antioxidant defense system. Significant changes in cellular antioxidant enzymes: superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and in hydrogen peroxide content were stated. The obtained results may explain a potential influence of nicotine on biochemical processes in melanocytes in vivo during long term exposition to nicotine. - Graphical abstract: Nicotine inhibits melanogenesis and induces oxidative stress in HEMn-LP melanocytes. - Highlights: • Nicotine induces concentration-dependent loss in melanocytes viability. • Nicotine in non-cytotoxic concentrations inhibits melanogenesis. • Nicotine in higher concentrations induces oxidative stress

  2. Effect of nicotine on melanogenesis and antioxidant status in HEMn-LP melanocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delijewski, Marcin; Beberok, Artur; Otręba, Michał; Wrześniok, Dorota; Rok, Jakub; Buszman, Ewa, E-mail: ebuszman@sum.edu.pl

    2014-10-15

    Nicotine is a natural ingredient of tobacco plants and is responsible for the addictive properties of tobacco. Nowadays nicotine is also commonly used as a form of smoking cessation therapy. It is suggested that nicotine may be accumulated in human tissues containing melanin. This may in turn affect biochemical processes in human cells producing melanin. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of nicotine on melanogenesis and antioxidant status in cultured normal human melanocytes HEMn-LP. Nicotine induced concentration-dependent loss in melanocytes viability. The value of EC{sub 50} was determined to be 7.43 mM. Nicotine inhibited a melanization process in human light pigmented melanocytes and caused alterations of antioxidant defense system. Significant changes in cellular antioxidant enzymes: superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and in hydrogen peroxide content were stated. The obtained results may explain a potential influence of nicotine on biochemical processes in melanocytes in vivo during long term exposition to nicotine. - Graphical abstract: Nicotine inhibits melanogenesis and induces oxidative stress in HEMn-LP melanocytes. - Highlights: • Nicotine induces concentration-dependent loss in melanocytes viability. • Nicotine in non-cytotoxic concentrations inhibits melanogenesis. • Nicotine in higher concentrations induces oxidative stress.

  3. Chronic nicotine differentially alters spontaneous recovery of contextual fear in male and female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumolo, Jessica M; Kutlu, Munir Gunes; Gould, Thomas J

    2018-04-02

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a devastating disorder with symptoms such as flashbacks, hyperarousal, and avoidance of reminders of the traumatic event. Exposure therapy, which attempts to extinguish fear responses, is a commonly used treatment for PTSD but relapse following successful exposure therapy is a frequent problem. In rodents, spontaneous recovery (SR), where extinguished fear responses resurface following extinction treatment, is used as a model of fear relapse. Previous studies from our lab showed that chronic nicotine impaired fear extinction and acute nicotine enhanced SR of contextual fear in adult male mice. In addition, we showed that acute nicotine's effects were specific to SR as acute nicotine did not affect recall of contextual fear conditioning in the absence of extinction. However, effects of chronic nicotine administration on SR are not known. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated if chronic nicotine administration altered SR or recall of contextual fear in adult male and female C57BL/6J mice. Our results showed that chronic nicotine significantly enhanced SR in female mice and significantly decreased SR in males. Chronic nicotine had no effect on recall of contextual fear in males or females. Female sham mice also had significantly less baseline SR than male sham mice. Overall, these results demonstrate sex differences in SR of fear memories and that chronic nicotine modulates these effects on SR but nicotine does not alter recall of contextual fear. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. TRANSDERMAL DRUG DELIVERY AND METHODS TO ENHANCE IT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Kuznetsova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the common methods employed in recent years for enhancing transdermal delivery of drug substances when applying transdermal therapeutic delivery systems. The chemical, physical and mechanical methods to enhance the transport of macromolecular compounds through the skin are considered in details. 

  5. 3D printing applications for transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economidou, Sophia N; Lamprou, Dimitrios A; Douroumis, Dennis

    2018-06-15

    The role of two and three-dimensional printing as a fabrication technology for sophisticated transdermal drug delivery systems is explored in literature. 3D printing encompasses a family of distinct technologies that employ a virtual model to produce a physical object through numerically controlled apparatuses. The applicability of several printing technologies has been researched for the direct or indirect printing of microneedle arrays or for the modification of their surface through drug-containing coatings. The findings of the respective studies are presented. The range of printable materials that are currently used or potentially can be employed for 3D printing of transdermal drug delivery (TDD) systems is also reviewed. Moreover, the expected impact and challenges of the adoption of 3D printing as a manufacturing technique for transdermal drug delivery systems, are assessed. Finally, this paper outlines the current regulatory framework associated with 3D printed transdermal drug delivery systems. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Tobacco Industry Research on Nicotine Replacement Therapy: "If Anyone Is Going to Take Away Our Business It Should Be Us".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apollonio, Dorie; Glantz, Stanton A

    2017-10-01

    Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) is recommended for tobacco cessation on the basis of pharmaceutical industry research showing its effectiveness when combined with counseling. The tobacco industry opposed NRT when it first appeared in the 1980s but by 2016 was marketing its own NRT products. We used internal tobacco industry documents dated 1960 through 2010 to identify the industry's perceptions of NRT. As early as the 1950s, tobacco companies developed nonsmoked nicotine replacements for cigarettes, but they stopped out of concern that marketing such products would trigger Food and Drug Administration regulation of cigarettes. In the 1990s, after pharmaceutical companies began selling prescription NRT, tobacco companies found that many smokers used NRT to supplement smoking rather than to quit. In 2009, once the Food and Drug Administration began regulating tobacco, tobacco companies restarted their plans to capture the nicotine market. Although the tobacco industry initially viewed NRT as a threat, it found that smokers often combined NRT with smoking rather than using it as a replacement and began marketing their own NRT products.

  7. Kefir protective effects against nicotine cessation-induced anxiety and cognition impairments in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Noori

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: This study revealed that Kefir had a potential effect on the treatment of nicotine cessation-induced depression, anxiety and cognition impairment in the animal model. Kefir may be useful for adjunct therapy for nicotine abandonment treatment protocols.

  8. [Comparative study on transdermal osmosis in vitro of Aconitum brachypodium liniment, gel and patcher].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ya-ping; Zhao, Ying; Zhang, Yong-ping; Liang, Guang-yi

    2007-02-01

    To study the transdermal osmosis process of Aconitum brachypodum's liniment, gel and patcher to provide basis for selecting dosage form and controlling the quality. Taking the cumulate rate of transdermal as index, a imitated Fick's diffusion device was used for the investigating the transdermal osmosis course of the three preparations. The best transdermal mathematics models are obtained and the relations between the transdermal course and the release course are analysed. The three preparations have different characteristics of transdermal osmosis course. The liniment meets dynamics 0 order process, the gel and the patcher meet dynamic 0 order process of non-corroded drug system. And the relation is good cubic equation between their transdermal course and release course. The transdermal osmosis experiment in vitro for three preparations can provide basis for selecting dosage form and the quality control in future studies.

  9. Long-term effectiveness of mailed nicotine replacement therapy: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial 5-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, Vladyslav; Selby, Peter; Zawertailo, Laurie; Tyndale, Rachel F; Leatherdale, Scott T; Cunningham, John A

    2017-07-18

    Our group recently completed a randomized controlled trial, evaluating the efficacy of providing 5 weeks of free nicotine replacement therapy (NRT; in the form of the nicotine patch) by expedited postal mail without behavioral assistance to regular adult smokers interested in receiving it. The findings revealed that mailed provision of nicotine patches resulted in more than a doubling of quit rates at a six-month follow-up compared to a no intervention control group. While this trial provided evidence for the effectiveness of mailed nicotine patches in promoting cessation, the findings speak only to the short term effectiveness of this approach. As relapse to smoking is known to occur beyond the 6 month period, it is important to evaluate whether the net benefit of NRT in naturalistic settings can be maintained long-term. The present study aims to perform a 5-year follow-up survey of participants in the original trial to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of mailed NRT. Trained interviewers will contact participants in the randomized controlled trial 5 years post-enrollment. A total of 924 participants will be eligible to be contacted. Interviewers will first assess participants' smoking status and their level of nicotine dependence. Participants reporting not currently smoking will be asked whether they have smoked tobacco, even a puff, in the last 30 days (primary outcome measure: 30-day point prevalence abstinence), past 6 months (secondary outcome measure: prolonged 6-month abstinence), and since the 8-week follow-up survey (secondary outcome measure: > 4 year continuous abstinence). Interviewers will be blind to experimental condition at the time the primary outcome measure will be assessed. It is hypothesized that participants who received nicotine patches at baseline will display significantly higher quit rates at the 5-year follow-up as compared to participants who did not receive nicotine patches at baseline. If the study finds that the mailed

  10. Reduction of Aggressive Episodes after Repeated Transdermal Nicotine Administration in a Hospitalized Adolescent with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Schalkwyk, Gerrit I.; Lewis, Alan S.; Qayyum, Zheala; Koslosky, Kourtney; Picciotto, Marina R.; Volkmar, Fred R.

    2015-01-01

    Aggression remains a major cause of morbidity in patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Current pharmacotherapy for aggression is not always effective and is often associated with morbidity. Nicotinic acetylcholinergic neurotransmission may play a prominent role in ASD pathophysiology based on human and animal studies, and preclinical…

  11. Use of Nicotine in Electronic Nicotine and Non-Nicotine Delivery Systems by US Adults, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Scott R; Kemp, Catherine B; Heath, J Wesley; Pechacek, Terry F; Eriksen, Michael P

    Nicotine in electronic nicotine and non-nicotine delivery systems (ENDS/ENNDS) may present a risk of harm to those with cardiovascular disease and the fetuses of pregnant women. We assessed the extent to which adult users of ENDS/ENNDS used these products with nicotine. We obtained data for this study from a national probability survey of 6051 US adults that was conducted in August and September 2015. Of 399 adult ENDS/ENNDS users who were current smokers, 337 (80.7%) used ENDS/ENNDS containing nicotine, whereas only 29 of 71 (36.9%) ENDS/ENNDS users who were never smokers used ENDS/ENNDS containing nicotine. Assessments of the population health impact of ENDS/ENNDS use among never smokers should take into account the extent to which use involves nicotine.

  12. Rotigotine transdermal patch for the treatment of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Lloret, Santiago; Rey, María Verónica; Ratti, Pietro Lucca; Rascol, Olivier

    2013-02-01

    Rotigotine, a non-ergot dopamine agonist, has been developed as a novel transdermal formulation. The rotigotine transdermal patch has received EMEA marketing authorization for the treatment of adult patients with early or advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) or with moderate to severe restless legs syndrome (RLS). FDA originally granted a marketing authorization for early PD, which was later suspended, and is now studying the authorization for RLS. The aim of this review is to review the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics as well as the clinical efficacy and tolerability of the rotigotine transdermal patch in PD. Source material was identified using a PubMed search for the term 'rotigotine' and PD. Articles published up to January 2011 or abstract submitted to most relevant international neurology congresses were reviewed. The rotigotine transdermal patch is efficacious for the treatment of PD. Tolerability profile appears to be well within the range of that observed with other non-ergot dopamine agonists in PD. Application-site reactions were the most frequent adverse event, and they were considered mild to moderate in the majority of cases. The rotigotine transdermal patch offers a safe and efficacious alternative for the treatment of PD. Further studies should focus on the possibility that continuous dopamine stimulation by means of the transdermal patch has any influence on levodopa-related motor complications. © 2012 The Authors Fundamental and Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  13. Effects of Nicotine Metabolites on Nicotine Withdrawal Behaviors in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhassan, Sagi; Bagdas, Deniz; Damaj, M Imad

    2017-06-01

    Rodent studies suggest that nicotine metabolites and minor tobacco alkaloids such as nornicotine and cotinine may promote cigarette smoking by enhancing nicotine rewarding and reinforcing effects. However, there is little information on the effects of these minor tobacco alkaloids on nicotine withdrawal. The present studies were conducted to determine whether the minor tobacco alkaloids nornicotine and cotinine exhibit nicotine-like behavioral effects in a mouse model of spontaneous nicotine withdrawal. Mice were infused with nicotine or saline for 14 days. Experiments were conducted on day 15, 18-24 hours after minipump removal. Ten minutes prior to testing, nicotine-dependent ICR male mice received an acute injection of nicotine (0.05 and 0.5 mg/kg), nornicotine (2.5 and 25 mg/kg), or cotinine (5 and 50 mg/kg) to determine effects on somatic signs, anxiety-like behaviors, and hyperalgesia spontaneous signs of withdrawal. Nicotine and the minor tobacco alkaloid nornicotine, but not cotinine, produced dose-dependent reversal of nicotine withdrawal signs in the mouse. The minor tobacco alkaloid and nicotine metabolite nornicotine at high doses have nicotinic like effects that may contribute to tobacco consumption and dependence. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Nicotine pharmacokinetic profiles of the Tobacco Heating System 2.2, cigarettes and nicotine gum in Japanese smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossard, Patrick; Weitkunat, Rolf; Poux, Valerie; Lama, Nicola; Haziza, Christelle; Picavet, Patrick; Baker, Gizelle; Lüdicke, Frank

    2017-10-01

    Two open-label randomized cross-over studies in Japanese smokers investigated the single-use nicotine pharmacokinetic profile of the Tobacco Heating System (THS) 2.2, cigarettes (CC) and nicotine replacement therapy (Gum). In each study, one on the regular and one on the menthol variants of the THS and CC, both using Gum as reference, 62 subjects were randomized to four sequences: Sequence 1: THS - CC (n = 22); Sequence 2: CC - THS (n = 22); Sequence 3: THS - Gum (n = 9); Sequence 4: Gum - THS (n = 9). Plasma nicotine concentrations were measured in 16 blood samples collected over 24 h after single use. Maximal nicotine concentration (C max ) and area under the curve from start of product use to time of last quantifiable concentration (AUC 0-last ) were similar between THS and CC in both studies, with ratios varying from 88 to 104% for C max and from 96 to 98% for AUC 0-last . Urge-to-smoke total scores were comparable between THS and CC. The THS nicotine pharmacokinetic profile was close to CC, with similar levels of urge-to-smoke. This suggests that THS can satisfy smokers and be a viable alternative to cigarettes for adult smokers who want to continue using tobacco. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Efficacy of biorhythmic transdermal combined hormone treatment in relieving climacteric symptoms: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Formby

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available B Formby, F SchmidtThe Rasmus Institute for Medical Research, Program in Reproductive Endocrinology, Santa Barbara, CA, USAObjective: To evaluate the efficacy of a combination of bioidentical combined 17β-estradiol and progesterone transdermal delivery system (lipophilic emulsion-type base to relieve climacteric symptoms. The hormonal replacement was given during a period of 6 months at four different cyclic doses to mimic the normal ovary secretory pattern.Design: An open, randomized, comparative, between-patient trial conducted over 6 months in 29 menopausal women with climacteric symptoms assessed with the Kupperman index at baseline and during treatments. Saliva and serum values of 17β-estradiol and progesterone were quantitated before treatment and after 3 and 6 months. Pharmacokinetic data following transdermal administration of 17β-estradiol (0.3 mg, daily and progesterone (100 mg, daily were calculated from saliva levels using high-performance liquid chromatography analysis.Results: Improvement in climacteric symptoms was reported in 93% of women evaluated before and after 3 and 6 months of treatment. Values of saliva 17β-estradiol increased after 6 months from 0.6 ± 0.3 pg/mL to 14.1 ± 3.3 pg/mL, and the values of serum 17β-estradiol increased from 3.3 ± 2.8 pg/mL to 80.6 ± 21.9 pg/mL. Of responders, 88% characterized symptom relief as complete. No adverse health-related events were attributed to the bioidentical hormone therapy. Time to maximum saliva concentrations (Tmax, in all experimental cases, was observed after 6 hours. Baseline values were reached within 24 hours, indicating a diurnal rhythm of 17β-estradiol seen in normally cyclic women over the 24-hour period, ie, its daily biological rhythm.Conclusion: Percutaneous absorption of 17β-estradiol, as well as the absorption of progesterone, was associated with relief of climacteric symptoms. The cyclical transdermal delivery of combined bioidentical hormones may be

  16. Validation of a LC-MS/MS method for quantifying urinary nicotine, six nicotine metabolites and the minor tobacco alkaloids--anatabine and anabasine--in smokers' urine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E McGuffey

    Full Text Available Tobacco use is a major contributor to premature morbidity and mortality. The measurement of nicotine and its metabolites in urine is a valuable tool for evaluating nicotine exposure and for nicotine metabolic profiling--i.e., metabolite ratios. In addition, the minor tobacco alkaloids--anabasine and anatabine--can be useful for monitoring compliance in smoking cessation programs that use nicotine replacement therapy. Because of an increasing demand for the measurement of urinary nicotine metabolites, we developed a rapid, low-cost method that uses isotope dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS for simultaneously quantifying nicotine, six nicotine metabolites, and two minor tobacco alkaloids in smokers' urine. This method enzymatically hydrolyzes conjugated nicotine (primarily glucuronides and its metabolites. We then use acetone pretreatment to precipitate matrix components (endogenous proteins, salts, phospholipids, and exogenous enzyme that may interfere with LC-MS/MS analysis. Subsequently, analytes (nicotine, cotinine, hydroxycotinine, norcotinine, nornicotine, cotinine N-oxide, nicotine 1'-N-oxide, anatabine, and anabasine are chromatographically resolved within a cycle time of 13.5 minutes. The optimized assay produces linear responses across the analyte concentrations typically found in urine collected from daily smokers. Because matrix ion suppression may influence accuracy, we include a discussion of conventions employed in this procedure to minimize matrix interferences. Simplicity, low cost, low maintenance combined with high mean metabolite recovery (76-99%, specificity, accuracy (0-10% bias and reproducibility (2-9% C.V. make this method ideal for large high through-put studies.

  17. Future of the transdermal drug delivery market--have we barely touched the surface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkinson, Adam C; Kearney, Mary-Carmel; Quinn, Helen L; Courtenay, Aaron J; Donnelly, Ryan F

    2016-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery is the movement of drugs across the skin for absorption into the systemic circulation. Transfer of the drug can occur via passive or active means; passive transdermal products do not disrupt the stratum corneum to facilitate delivery whereas active technologies do. Due to the very specific physicochemical properties necessary for successful passive transdermal drug delivery, this sector of the pharmaceutical industry is relatively small. There are many well-documented benefits of this delivery route however, and as a result there is great interest in increasing the number of therapeutic substances that can be delivered transdermally. This review discusses the various transdermal products that are currently/have been marketed, and the paths that led to their success, or lack of. Both passive and active transdermal technologies are considered with the advantages and limitations of each highlighted. In addition to marketed products, technologies that are in the investigative stages by various pharmaceutical companies are reviewed. Passive transdermal drug delivery has made limited progress in recent years, however with the ongoing intense research into active technologies, there is great potential for growth within the transdermal delivery market. A number of active technologies have already been translated into marketed products, with other platforms including microneedles, rapidly progressing towards commercialisation.

  18. The Effect and Mechanism of Transdermal Penetration Enhancement of Fu's Cupping Therapy: New Physical Penetration Technology for Transdermal Administration with Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei-Jie; Zhang, Yong-Ping; Xu, Jian; Sun, Xiao-Bo; Yang, Fang-Fang

    2017-03-27

    In this paper, a new type of physical penetration technology for transdermal administration with traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) characteristics is presented. Fu's cupping therapy (FCT), was established and studied using in vitro and in vivo experiments and the penetration effect and mechanism of FCT physical penetration technology was preliminarily discussed. With 1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methylindole-3-ylacetic acid (indomethacin, IM) as a model drug, the establishment of high, medium, and low references was completed for the chemical permeation system via in vitro transdermal tests. Furthermore, using chemical penetration enhancers (CPEs) and iontophoresis as references, the percutaneous penetration effect of FCT for IM patches was evaluated using seven species of in vitro diffusion kinetics models and in vitro drug distribution; the IM quantitative analysis method in vivo was established using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry technology (UPLC-MS/MS), and pharmacokinetic parameters: area under the zero and first moment curves from 0 to last time t (AUC 0-t , AUMC 0-t ), area under the zero and first moment curves from 0 to infinity (AUC 0-∞ , AUMC 0-∞ ), maximum plasma concentration (C max ) and mean residence time (MRT), were used as indicators to evaluate the percutaneous penetration effect of FCT in vivo. Additionally, we used the 3 K factorial design to study the joint synergistic penetration effect on FCT and chemical penetration enhancers. Through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) imaging, micro- and ultrastructural changes on the surface of the stratum corneum (SC) were observed to explore the FCT penetration mechanism. In vitro and in vivo skin permeation experiments revealed that both the total cumulative percutaneous amount and in vivo percutaneous absorption amount of IM using FCT were greater than the amount using CPEs and iontophoresis. Firstly, compared with

  19. Pharmacokinetic characteristics of formulated alendronate transdermal delivery systems in rats and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ahyoung; Gang, Hyesil; Whang, Jiae; Gwak, Hyesun

    2010-05-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the absorption of alendronate from formulated transdermal delivery systems in rats and humans. When alendronate was applied to rats by transdermal delivery systems (7.2 mg) and oral administration (30 mg/kg), a statistically significant difference was found in the amount remaining to be excreted at time t (Ae(t)) and the amount remaining to be excreted at time 0 (Ae(infinity)) (p transdermal delivery systems. There was a linear relationship (r(2) = 0.9854) between the drug loading dose and Ae(infinity). The Ae(infinity) values from the transdermal delivery system containing 6% caprylic acid (53.8 mg as alendronate) and an oral product (Fosamax), 70 mg as alendronate) in humans were 127.0 +/- 34.2 microg and 237.2 +/- 56.3 microg, respectively. The dose-adjusted relative Ae(infinity) ratio of the transdermal delivery system to oral product was calculated to be 69.7%. The long half-life of alendronate in the transdermal delivery system (50.6 +/- 6.4 h), compared to that of the oral product (3.5 +/- 1.1 h) could allow less-frequent dosing. In conclusion, this study showed that a transdermal delivery system containing 6% caprylic acid in PG could be a favorable alternative for alendronate administration.

  20. Effects of hormone therapy on blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Zeinab; Seely, Ellen W; Rahme, Maya; El-Hajj Fuleihan, Ghada

    2015-04-01

    Although hormone therapy remains the most efficacious option for the management of vasomotor symptoms of menopause, its effects on blood pressure remain unclear. This review scrutinizes evidence of the mechanisms of action of hormone therapy on signaling pathways affecting blood pressure and evidence from clinical studies. Comprehensive Ovid MEDLINE searches were conducted for the terms "hypertension" and either of the following "hormone therapy and menopause" or "selective estrogen receptor modulator" from year 2000 to November 2013. In vitro and physiologic studies did not reveal a clear deleterious effect of hormone therapy on blood pressure. The effect of oral therapy was essentially neutral in large trials conducted in normotensive women with blood pressure as primary outcome. Results from all other trials had several limitations. Oral therapy had a neutral effect on blood pressure in hypertensive women. Transdermal estrogen and micronized progesterone had a beneficial effect on blood pressure in normotensive women and, at most, a neutral effect on hypertensive women. In general, tibolone and raloxifene had a neutral effect on blood pressure in both hypertensive and normotensive women. Large randomized trials are needed to assess the effect of oral hormone therapy on blood pressure as a primary outcome in hypertensive women and the effect of transdermal preparations on both normotensive and hypertensive women. Transdermal preparations would be the preferred mode of therapy for hypertensive women, in view of their favorable physiologic and clinical profiles. The decision regarding the use of hormone therapy should be individualized, and blood pressure should be monitored during the course of treatment.

  1. Pharmacokinetic characterization of three novel 4-mg nicotine lozenges
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhija, Manpreet; Srivastava, Reena; Kaushik, Aditya

    2018-03-01

    Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) increases the probability of smoking cessation. This study was conducted to determine if three prototype 4-mg nicotine lozenges produced locally in India were bioequivalent to a globally marketed reference product, Nicorette® 4-mg nicotine lozenge. Healthy adult smokers (N = 39) were treated with three prototype 4-mg nicotine lozenges in comparison with a reference 4-mg lozenge in this single-center, randomized, open-label, single-dose, 4-way crossover study. Pharmacokinetic sampling was obtained to test for bioequivalence using maximal plasma concentration (Cmax) and extent of absorption (AUC0-t). Secondarily, AUC;0-∞, time to maximal plasma concentration (tmax), half-life (T1/2), elimination rate constant (Kel), and safety of the prototype lozenges versus the reference lozenge were compared. Each prototype 4-mg nicotine lozenge was found to be bioequivalent to the reference 4-mg nicotine lozenge based on the ratio of geometric means and 90% confidence intervals for Cmax, AUC0-t, and AUC;0-∞. Although tmax; was significantly longer for prototype III, all four lozenges achieved maximum plasma nicotine concentrations at a median of 1.5 hours. The safety profiles of the three prototype 4-mg lozenges did not differ from that of the 4-mg reference product. Each prototype 4-mg nicotine lozenge was bioequivalent to the reference 4-mg nicotine lozenge and was well tolerated. Furthermore, as these bioequivalent prototypes differed in in-vitro dissolution profiles, these data suggest that performance from the in -vitro method deployed is not a firm predictor of pharmacokinetic behavior.
.

  2. Design, formulation and evaluation of nicotine chewing gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Abolfazl; Rafiei, Sahar

    2012-01-01

    Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) can help smokers to quit smoking. Nicotine chewing gum has attracted the attention from pharmaceutical industries to offer it to consumers as an easily accessible NRT product. However, the bitter taste of such gums may compromise their acceptability by patients. This study was, therefore, designed to develop 2 and 4 mg nicotine chewing gums of pleasant taste, which satisfy the consumers the most. Nicotine, sugar, liquid glucose, glycerin, different sweetening and taste-masking agents, and a flavoring agent were added to the gum bases at appropriate temperature. The medicated gums were cut into pieces of suitable size and coated by acacia aqueous solution (2% w/v), sugar dusting, followed by acacia-sugar-calcium carbonate until a smooth surface was produced. The gums' weight variation and content uniformity were determined. The release of nicotine was studied in pH 6.8 phosphate buffer using a mastication device which simulated the mastication of chewing gum in human. The Latin Square design was used for the evaluation of organoleptic characteristics of the formulations at different stages of development. Most formulations released 79-83% of their nicotine content within 20 min. Nicotine-containing sugar-coated gums in which aspartame as sweetener and cherry and eucalyptus as flavoring agents were incorporated (i.e. formulations F(19-SC) and F(20-SC), respectively) had optimal chewing hardness, adhering to teeth, and plumpness characteristics, as well as the most pleasant taste and highest acceptability to smokers. Taste enhancement of nicotine gums was achieved where formulations comprised aspartame as the sweetener and cherry and eucalyptus as the flavoring agents. Nicotine gums of pleasant taste may, therefore, be used as NRT to assist smokers quit smoking.

  3. Cigarette nicotine yields and nicotine intake among Japanese male workers

    OpenAIRE

    Ueda, K; Kawachi, I; Nakamura, M; Nogami, H; Shirokawa, N; Masui, S; Okayama, A; Oshima, A

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To analyse brand nicotine yield including "ultra low" brands (that is, cigarettes yielding ≤ 0.1 mg of nicotine by Federal Trade Commission (FTC) methods) in relation to nicotine intake (urinary nicotine, cotinine and trans-3'-hydroxycotinine) among 246 Japanese male smokers.

  4. Nicotine Lozenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotine lozenges are used to help people stop smoking. Nicotine lozenges are in a class of medications called smoking cessation aids. They work by providing nicotine to your body to decrease the withdrawal symptoms ...

  5. Transdermal deferoxamine prevents pressure-induced diabetic ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duscher, Dominik; Neofytou, Evgenios; Wong, Victor W; Maan, Zeshaan N; Rennert, Robert C; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Januszyk, Michael; Rodrigues, Melanie; Malkovskiy, Andrey V; Whitmore, Arnetha J; Walmsley, Graham G; Galvez, Michael G; Whittam, Alexander J; Brownlee, Michael; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2015-01-06

    There is a high mortality in patients with diabetes and severe pressure ulcers. For example, chronic pressure sores of the heels often lead to limb loss in diabetic patients. A major factor underlying this is reduced neovascularization caused by impaired activity of the transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). In diabetes, HIF-1α function is compromised by a high glucose-induced and reactive oxygen species-mediated modification of its coactivator p300, leading to impaired HIF-1α transactivation. We examined whether local enhancement of HIF-1α activity would improve diabetic wound healing and minimize the severity of diabetic ulcers. To improve HIF-1α activity we designed a transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS) containing the FDA-approved small molecule deferoxamine (DFO), an iron chelator that increases HIF-1α transactivation in diabetes by preventing iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen stress. Applying this TDDS to a pressure-induced ulcer model in diabetic mice, we found that transdermal delivery of DFO significantly improved wound healing. Unexpectedly, prophylactic application of this transdermal delivery system also prevented diabetic ulcer formation. DFO-treated wounds demonstrated increased collagen density, improved neovascularization, and reduction of free radical formation, leading to decreased cell death. These findings suggest that transdermal delivery of DFO provides a targeted means to both prevent ulcer formation and accelerate diabetic wound healing with the potential for rapid clinical translation.

  6. Key issues surrounding the health impacts of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) and other sources of nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drope, Jeffrey; Cahn, Zachary; Kennedy, Rosemary; Liber, Alex C; Stoklosa, Michal; Henson, Rosemarie; Douglas, Clifford E; Drope, Jacqui

    2017-11-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Over the last decade, the use of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), including the electronic cigarette or e-cigarette, has grown rapidly. More youth now use ENDS than any tobacco product. This extensive research review shows that there are scientifically sound, sometimes competing arguments about ENDS that are not immediately and/or completely resolvable. However, the preponderance of the scientific evidence to date suggests that current-generation ENDS products are demonstrably less harmful than combustible tobacco products such as conventional cigarettes in several key ways, including by generating far lower levels of carcinogens and other toxic compounds than combustible products or those that contain tobacco. To place ENDS in context, the authors begin by reviewing the trends in use of major nicotine-containing products. Because nicotine is the common core-and highly addictive-constituent across all tobacco products, its toxicology is examined. With its long history as the only nicotine product widely accepted as being relatively safe, nicotine-replacement therapy (NRT) is also examined. A section is also included that examines snus, the most debated potential harm-reduction product before ENDS. Between discussions of NRT and snus, ENDS are extensively examined: what they are, knowledge about their level of "harm," their relationship to smoking cessation, the so-called gateway effect, and dual use/poly-use. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:449-471. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  7. Nicotine self-administration and reinstatement of nicotine-seeking in male and female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltenstein, Matthew W; Ghee, Shannon M; See, Ronald E

    2012-03-01

    Tobacco addiction is a relapsing disorder that constitutes a substantial worldwide health problem, with evidence suggesting that nicotine and nicotine-associated stimuli play divergent roles in maintaining smoking behavior in men and women. While animal models of tobacco addiction that utilize nicotine self-administration have become more widely established, systematic examination of the multiple factors that instigate relapse to nicotine-seeking have been limited. Here, we examined nicotine self-administration and subsequent nicotine-seeking in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats using an animal model of self-administration and relapse. Rats lever pressed for nicotine (0.03 and 0.05 mg/kg/infusion, IV) during 15 daily 2-h sessions, followed by extinction of lever responding. Once responding was extinguished, we examined the ability of previously nicotine-paired cues (tone+light), the anxiogenic drug yohimbine (2.5mg/kg, IP), a priming injection of nicotine (0.3mg/kg, SC), or combinations of drug+cues to reinstate nicotine-seeking. Both males and females readily acquired nicotine self-administration and displayed comparable levels of responding and intake at both nicotine doses. Following extinction, exposure to the previously nicotine-paired cues or yohimbine, but not the nicotine-prime alone, reinstated nicotine-seeking in males and females. Moreover, when combined with nicotine-paired cues, both yohimbine and nicotine enhanced reinstatement. No significant sex differences or estrous cycle dependent changes were noted across reinstatement tests. These results demonstrate the ability to reinstate nicotine-seeking with multiple modalities and that exposure to nicotine-associated cues during periods of a stressful state or nicotine can increase nicotine-seeking. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Expectancies for cigarettes, e-cigarettes, and nicotine replacement therapies among e-cigarette users (aka vapers).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, Paul T; Marquinez, Nicole S; Correa, John B; Meltzer, Lauren R; Unrod, Marina; Sutton, Steven K; Simmons, Vani N; Brandon, Thomas H

    2015-02-01

    Use of e-cigarettes has been increasing exponentially, with the primary motivation reported as smoking cessation. To understand why smokers choose e-cigarettes as an alternative to cigarettes, as well as to US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)--approved nicotine replacement therapies (NRT), we compared outcome expectancies (beliefs about the results of drug use) for the three nicotine delivery systems among vapers, i.e., e-cigarette users, who were former smokers. Vapers (N = 1,434) completed an online survey assessing 14 expectancy domains as well as perceived cost and convenience. We focused on comparisons between e-cigarettes and cigarettes to determine the attraction of e-cigarettes as a smoking alternative and between e-cigarettes and NRT to determine perceived advantages of e-cigarettes over FDA-approved pharmacotherapy. Participants believed that e-cigarettes, in comparison to conventional cigarettes, had fewer health risks; caused less craving, withdrawal, addiction, and negative physical feelings; tasted better; and were more satisfying. In contrast, conventional cigarettes were perceived as better than e-cigarettes for reducing negative affect, controlling weight, providing stimulation, and reducing stress. E-cigarettes, compared to NRT, were perceived to be less risky, cost less, cause fewer negative physical feelings, taste better, provide more satisfaction, and be better at reducing craving, negative affect, and stress. Moderator analyses indicated history with ad libitum forms of NRT was associated with less positive NRT expectancies. The degree to which expectancies for e-cigarettes differed from expectancies for either tobacco cigarettes or NRT offers insight into the motivation of e-cigarette users and provides guidance for public health and clinical interventions to encourage smoking-related behavior change. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved

  9. Recent trends in challenges and opportunities of Transdermal drug delivery system

    OpenAIRE

    P.M.Patil; P.D.Chaudhari; Jalpa K.Patel; K.A.Kedar; P.P.Katolkar

    2012-01-01

    Drug delivery system relates to the production of a drug, its delivery medium, and the way of administration. Drug delivery systems are even used for administering nitroglycerin. Transdermal drug delivery system is the system in which the delivery of the active ingredients of the drug occurs by the means of skin. Various types of transdermal patches are used. There are various methods to enhance the transdermal drug delivery system. But using microfabricated microneedles drugs are delivered v...

  10. Current advances in the fabrication of microneedles for transdermal delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Indermun, S.; Luttge, R.; Choonara, Y.E.; Kumar, Pradeep; Toit, Du L.C.; Modi, G.; Pillay, V.

    2014-01-01

    The transdermal route is an excellent site for drug delivery due to the avoidance of gastric degradation and hepatic metabolism, in addition to easy accessibility. Although offering numerous attractive advantages, many available transdermal systems are not able to deliver drugs and other compounds

  11. Transdermal fentanyl matrix patches Matrifen and Durogesic DTrans are bioequivalent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kress, Hans G; Boss, Hildegard; Delvin, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    AIM: The pharmacokinetic profiles of the two commercially available transdermal fentanyl patches Matrifen (100 microg/h) and Durogesic DTrans (100 microg/h), used to manage severe chronic pain, were compared regarding their systemic exposure, rate of absorption, and safety. METHODS: Transdermal m...

  12. Cue Reactivity in Nicotine and Alcohol Addiction: A Cross-Cultural View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Wanwan; Wu, Qichao; Liu, Xiaoming; Chen, Ying; Song, Hongwen; Yang, Lizhuang; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2016-01-01

    A wealth of research indicates that cue reactivity is critical to understanding the neurobiology of nicotine and alcohol addiction and developing treatments. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalograph (EEG) studies have shown abnormal cue reactivity in various conditions between nicotine or alcohol addicts and the healthy. Although the causes of these abnormalities are still unclear, cultural effect can not be ignored. We conduct an review of fMRI and EEG studies about the cue reactivity in nicotine and alcohol addiction and highlight the cultural perspective. We suggest that cultural cue reactivity is a field worth of exploring which may has an effect on addictive behavior through emotion and attention. The cultural role of nicotine and alcohol addiction would provide new insight into understanding the mechanisms of nicotine and alcohol addiction and developing culture-specific therapies. We consider that culture as a context may be a factor that causes confusing outcomes in exploring nicotine and alcohol addiction which makes it possible to control the cultural influences and further contribute to the more consistent results. PMID:27635123

  13. How can lipid nanocarriers improve transdermal delivery of olanzapine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Nimra; Vitorino, Carla; Taylor, Kevin M G

    2017-06-01

    The development of a transdermal nanocarrier drug delivery system with potential for the treatment of psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, is described. Lipid nanocarriers (LN), encompassing various solid:liquid lipid compositions were formulated and assessed as potential nanosystems for transdermal delivery of olanzapine. A previously optimized method of hot high pressure homogenization (HPH) was adopted for the production of the LN, which comprised solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) and nanoemulsions (NE). Precirol  ® was selected as the solid lipid for progression of studies. SLN exhibited the best performance for transdermal delivery of olanzapine, based on in vitro release and permeation studies, coupled with results from physicochemical characterization of several solid:liquid lipid formulations. Stability tests, performed to give an indication of long-term storage behavior of the formulations, were in good agreement with previous studies for the best choice of solid:liquid lipid ratio. Overall, these findings highlight the SLN-based formulation as promising for the further inclusion in and production of transdermal patches, representing an innovative therapeutic approach.

  14. Sustained transdermal release of diltiazem hydrochloride through electron beam irradiated different PVA hydrogel membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhunia, Tridib [Department of Polymer Science and Technology, University of Calcutta, 92 A.P.C. Road, Calcutta 700009 (India); Goswami, Luna [KIIT School of Biotechnology, KIIT University Campus XI, Patia, Bhubaneswar 751024, Orissa (India); Chattopadhyay, Dipankar [Department of Polymer Science and Technology, University of Calcutta, 92 A.P.C. Road, Calcutta 700009 (India); Bandyopadhyay, Abhijit, E-mail: abpoly@caluniv.ac.in [Department of Polymer Science and Technology, University of Calcutta, 92 A.P.C. Road, Calcutta 700009 (India)

    2011-08-15

    Extremely fast release of diltiazem hydrochloride (water soluble, anti anginal drug used to treat chest pain) together with its faster erosion has been the primary problem in conventional oral therapy. It has been addressed in this paper by encapsulating the drug in electron beam irradiated various poly (vinyl alcohol) hydrogel membranes and delivering it through transdermal route. Results show excellent control over the release of diltiazem hydrochloride through these membranes subject to their physico-mechanicals.

  15. Sustained transdermal release of diltiazem hydrochloride through electron beam irradiated different PVA hydrogel membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhunia, Tridib; Goswami, Luna; Chattopadhyay, Dipankar; Bandyopadhyay, Abhijit

    2011-08-01

    Extremely fast release of diltiazem hydrochloride (water soluble, anti anginal drug used to treat chest pain) together with its faster erosion has been the primary problem in conventional oral therapy. It has been addressed in this paper by encapsulating the drug in electron beam irradiated various poly (vinyl alcohol) hydrogel membranes and delivering it through transdermal route. Results show excellent control over the release of diltiazem hydrochloride through these membranes subject to their physico-mechanicals.

  16. Sustained transdermal release of diltiazem hydrochloride through electron beam irradiated different PVA hydrogel membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhunia, Tridib; Goswami, Luna; Chattopadhyay, Dipankar; Bandyopadhyay, Abhijit

    2011-01-01

    Extremely fast release of diltiazem hydrochloride (water soluble, anti anginal drug used to treat chest pain) together with its faster erosion has been the primary problem in conventional oral therapy. It has been addressed in this paper by encapsulating the drug in electron beam irradiated various poly (vinyl alcohol) hydrogel membranes and delivering it through transdermal route. Results show excellent control over the release of diltiazem hydrochloride through these membranes subject to their physico-mechanicals.

  17. Evaluation of nicotine in tobacco-free-nicotine commercial products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellinghausen, Garrett; Lee, Jauh T; Weatherly, Choyce A; Lopez, Diego A; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2017-06-01

    Recently, a variety of new tobacco-free-nicotine, TFN, products have been commercialized as e-liquids. Tobacco-derived nicotine contains predominantly (S)-(-)-nicotine, whereas TFN products may not. The TFN products are said to be cleaner, purer substances, devoid of toxic components that come from the tobacco extraction process. A variety of commercial tobacco and TFN products were analyzed to identify the presence and composition of each nicotine enantiomer. A rapid and effective enantiomeric separation of nicotine has been developed using a modified macrocyclic glycopeptide bonded to superficially porous particles. The enantiomeric assay can be completed in nicotine, which is present in much greater quantities in commercial TFN products compared to commercial tobacco-derived products. Such studies are required by the FDA for new enantiomeric pharmacological products. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. The Efficacy and Tolerability of the Clonidine Transdermal Patch in the Treatment for Children with Tic Disorders: A Prospective, Open, Single-Group, Self-Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Pan-Pan; Jiang, Li; Li, Xiu-Juan; Hong, Si-Qi; Li, Shuang-Zi; Hu, Yue

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of a clonidine transdermal patch in the treatment of children with tic disorders (TD) and to establish a predictive model for patients. Forty-one patients who met the inclusion criteria entered into 12 weeks of prospective, open, single-group, self-controlled treatment with a clonidine transdermal patch. The Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS) was employed before therapy (baseline) and at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after therapy. (1) The total effect rates of treatment with a clonidine transdermal patch were 29.27, 53.66, and 63.41% at 4, 8, and 12 weeks, respectively. Compared with the baseline, the differences were significant at three different observation periods. (2) Compared to the level of 25% reduction, there were significant decreases in the score-reducing rate of motor tic and total tic severities at 12 weeks. (3) If the disease course was ≤24 months and the motor tic score was tic score was >16, there was an effective rate of 57.1%. If the disease course was >24 months and the clinical classification was chronic TD, there was an effective rate of 62.5%. If the disease course was >24 months and the clinical classification was Tourette's syndrome, 90% of the patients were invalid. (4) The main adverse events were rash, slight dizziness, and headache. (1) When patients were pretreated with a D2-dopamine receptor antagonist that was ineffective or not tolerated well, switching to a clonidine transdermal patch treatment was effective and safe. (2) A clonidine transdermal patch could be a first-line medication for mild and moderate TD cases that are characterized by motor tics.

  19. Effect of urinary pH and nicotine excretion rate on plasma nicotine during cigarette smoking and chewing nicotine gum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyerabend, C.; Russell, M. A. H.

    1978-01-01

    1 Plasma nicotine levels produced by chewing nicotine gum were compared with those obtained by cigarette smoking under conditions of controlled urinary pH. 2 Although absorption was slower, plasma levels comparable to cigarette smoking were built up on 4 mg (but not 2 mg) nicotine gum. 3 Urinary excretion of nicotine was influenced markedly by pH and the rate of urine flow. 4 Plasma nicotine was higher under alkaline compared to acidic conditions (P < 0.001) but the rate of urinary nicotine excretion appeared to have little effect on the plasma level.

  20. Transdermal deferoxamine prevents pressure-induced diabetic ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duscher, Dominik; Neofytou, Evgenios; Wong, Victor W.; Maan, Zeshaan N.; Rennert, Robert C.; Januszyk, Michael; Rodrigues, Melanie; Malkovskiy, Andrey V.; Whitmore, Arnetha J.; Galvez, Michael G.; Whittam, Alexander J.; Brownlee, Michael; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    There is a high mortality in patients with diabetes and severe pressure ulcers. For example, chronic pressure sores of the heels often lead to limb loss in diabetic patients. A major factor underlying this is reduced neovascularization caused by impaired activity of the transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). In diabetes, HIF-1α function is compromised by a high glucose-induced and reactive oxygen species-mediated modification of its coactivator p300, leading to impaired HIF-1α transactivation. We examined whether local enhancement of HIF-1α activity would improve diabetic wound healing and minimize the severity of diabetic ulcers. To improve HIF-1α activity we designed a transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS) containing the FDA-approved small molecule deferoxamine (DFO), an iron chelator that increases HIF-1α transactivation in diabetes by preventing iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen stress. Applying this TDDS to a pressure-induced ulcer model in diabetic mice, we found that transdermal delivery of DFO significantly improved wound healing. Unexpectedly, prophylactic application of this transdermal delivery system also prevented diabetic ulcer formation. DFO-treated wounds demonstrated increased collagen density, improved neovascularization, and reduction of free radical formation, leading to decreased cell death. These findings suggest that transdermal delivery of DFO provides a targeted means to both prevent ulcer formation and accelerate diabetic wound healing with the potential for rapid clinical translation. PMID:25535360

  1. Transdermal rivastigmine for HIV-associated cognitive impairment: A randomized pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose A Muñoz-Moreno

    Full Text Available To assess the efficacy and safety of transdermal rivastigmine for the treatment of HIV-associated cognitive impairment.We recruited HIV-infected patients with cognitive impairment on stable antiretroviral therapy in a randomized controlled pilot trial with a 48-week follow-up. An additional assessment was held at 12 weeks. Participants received transdermal rivastigmine (9.5 mg daily, lithium (400 mg twice daily, titrated progressively, or remained in a control group (no new medication. The primary efficacy endpoint was change in a global cognitive score (NPZ-7. Secondary endpoints included change in specific cognitive measures, domains, and functional parameters. Safety covered the frequency of adverse events and changes in laboratory results.Seventy-six subjects were screened, and 29 were finally enrolled. Better cognitive outcomes were observed in all groups, although there were no significant differences between the arms (mean NPZ-7 change [SD]: rivastigmine, 0.35 (0.14; lithium, 0.25 (0.40; control, 0.20 (0.44 (p = 0.78. The rivastigmine group showed the highest positive trend (mean NPZ-7 [SD], baseline vs week 48: rivastigmine, -0.47 (0.22 vs -0.11 (0.29, p = 0.06; lithium, -0.50 (0.40 vs -0.26 (0.21, p = 0.22; control, -0.52 (0.34 vs -0.32 (0.52, p = 0.44. The cognitive domains with the highest positive trends were information processing speed at week 12 and executive function at week 48 (rivastigmine vs control: information processing speed, 0.35 (0.64 vs -0.13 (0.25, p = 0.17, d = 0.96; and executive functioning, 0.73 (0.33 vs 0.03 (0.74, p = 0.09, d = 1.18. No relevant changes were observed regarding functional outcomes. A total of 12 (41% individuals dropped out of the study: 2 (20% were due to medication-related effects in the rivastigmine group and 4 (36% in the lithium group. No severe adverse events were reported.The results from this small randomized trial indicate that transdermal rivastigmine did not provide significant

  2. First trimester nicotine exposure and the risk of infantile colic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milidou, Ioanna; Henriksen, Tine Brink; Jensen, Morten Søndergaard

    Background: Although prenatal exposure to maternal smoking has been associated with infantile colic (IC), to date no published studies have reported on the relationship between the prenatal use of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) and IC. Aim: We aimed to assess the relationship between fetal...... exposure to nicotine, coming from both cigarette smoking and use of NRT early in pregnancy, and IC. Methods: The study population consisted of 63,883 pregnancies that resulted in live born singletons enrolled in the Danish National Birth Cohort between 1997 and 2002. Mother’s smoking habits and use of NRT......: The results indicate that prenatal exposure to nicotine from any source during the first trimester of the pregnancy increases the risk of infantile colic....

  3. [Matrix transdermal systems for caffeine delivery based on polymer and emulsion compounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, E G; Kuryleva, O M; Salomatina, L A; Sevast'ianov, V I

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this work was to develop and test transdermal therapeutic systems for caffeine delivery. In vitro experiments showed that the rate of caffeine diffusion through untreated rabbit skin from a transdermal therapeutic systems based on polymer compound containing 50 mg medicine was 67.2 (9.1 microg/cm2h; for a system based on emulsion compound it was 173 (19 microg/cm2h. Methods for studying the caffeine release rate and quantitative measurement of caffeine content in the emulsion-based transdermal therapeutic system were developed. These methods are required to obtain data for standard drug documentation. The results of in vivo experiments in rabbits showed the absence of irritating effect of the emulsion-based transdermal therapeutic system. The obtained data on the specific efficiency of the transdermal therapeutic systems for caffeine delivery (50 mg) in healthy volunteers showed that this medicine could be used as a nonnarcotic psychoactivator for improving mental and physical activities and attention concentration.

  4. Nicotine response and nicotinic receptors in long-sleep and short-sleep mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Fiebre, C M; Medhurst, L J; Collins, A C

    1987-01-01

    Nicotine response and nicotinic receptor binding were characterized in long-sleep (LS) and short-sleep (SS) mice which have been selectively bred for differential "sleep-time" following ethanol administration. LS mice are more sensitive than SS mice to nicotine as measured by a battery of behavioral and physiological tests and as measured by sensitivity to nicotine-induced seizures. The greater sensitivity of the LS mice is not due to differences in binding of [3H]nicotine. Unlike inbred mouse strains which differ in sensitivity to nicotine-induced seizures, these selected mouse lines do not differ in levels of binding of [125I]alpha-bungarotoxin (BTX) in the hippocampus. Significant differences in BTX binding were found in the cerebellum and striatum. Although these two mouse lines do not differ in blood levels of nicotine following nicotine administration, they differ slightly in brain levels of nicotine indicating differential distribution of the drug. Since this distribution difference is much smaller than the observed behavioral differences, these mice probably differ in CNS sensitivity to nicotine; however, follow-up studies are necessary to test whether the differential response of these mice is due to subtle differences in distribution of nicotine to the brain.

  5. Effect of stratum corneum heterogeneity, anisotropy, asymmetry and follicular pathway on transdermal penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbero, Ana M; Frasch, H Frederick

    2017-08-28

    The impact of the complex structure of the stratum corneum on transdermal penetration is not yet fully described by existing models. A quantitative and thorough study of skin permeation is essential for chemical exposure assessment and transdermal delivery of drugs. The objective of this study is to analyze the effects of heterogeneity, anisotropy, asymmetry, follicular diffusion, and location of the main barrier of diffusion on percutaneous permeation. In the current study, the solution of the transient diffusion through a two-dimensional-anisotropic brick-and-mortar geometry of the stratum corneum is obtained using the commercial finite element program COMSOL Multiphysics. First, analytical solutions of an equivalent multilayer geometry are used to determine whether the lipids or corneocytes constitute the main permeation barrier. Also these analytical solutions are applied for validations of the finite element solutions. Three illustrative compounds are analyzed in these sections: diethyl phthalate, caffeine and nicotine. Then, asymmetry with depth and follicular diffusion are studied using caffeine as an illustrative compound. The following findings are drawn from this study: the main permeation barrier is located in the lipid layers; the flux and lag time of diffusion through a brick-and-mortar geometry are almost identical to the values corresponding to a multilayer geometry; the flux and lag time are affected when the lipid transbilayer diffusivity or the partition coefficients vary with depth, but are not affected by depth-dependent corneocyte diffusivity; and the follicular contribution has significance for low transbilayer lipid diffusivity, especially when flux between the follicle and the surrounding stratum corneum is involved. This study demonstrates that the diffusion is primarily transcellular and the main barrier is located in the lipid layers. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Effects of nicotine versus placebo e-cigarette use on symptom relief during initial tobacco abstinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Kenneth A; Karelitz, Joshua L; Michael, Valerie C

    2017-08-01

    Because electronic cigarettes (e-cigs) containing nicotine may relieve smoking abstinence symptoms similar to nicotine replacement therapy medication, we used within-subjects designs to test these effects with a first-generation e-cig in nonquitting and quitting smokers. In Study 1, 28 nontreatment-seeking smokers abstained overnight prior to each of 3 sessions. Minnesota Nicotine Withdrawal Scale (MNWS) withdrawal (and craving item) relief was assessed following 4 exposures (each 10 puffs) over 2 hr to e-cigs that either did (36 mg/ml) or did not (i.e., placebo, 0 mg/ml) contain nicotine or after no e-cig. Relief was greater after nicotine versus placebo e-cig (p < .05) but not after placebo versus no e-cig, showing relief was due to nicotine per se and not simple e-cig use behavior. Using a crossover design in Study 2, smokers preparing to quit soon engaged in 2 experimental 4-day quit periods on separate weeks. In weeks 1 and 3, all received a nicotine or placebo e-cig on Monday to use ad libitum while trying to abstain from smoking on Tuesday through Friday. (Week 2 involved resumption of ad libitum smoking.) MNWS and Questionnaire of Smoking Urges (QSU) craving were assessed at daily visits following 24-hr abstinence. Of 17 enrolled, 12 quit for ≥24 hr at least once, allowing test of relief because of e-cig use on quit days. Withdrawal and craving were reduced because of nicotine versus placebo e-cig use (both p < .05). In sum, compared with placebo e-cigs, nicotine e-cigs can relieve smoking abstinence symptoms, perhaps in a manner similar to Food and Drug Administration-approved nicotine replacement therapy products, although much more research with larger samples is needed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Cost-effectiveness of raising HDL cholesterol by adding prolonged-release nicotinic acid to statin therapy in the secondary prevention setting: a French perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roze, S; Ferrières, J; Bruckert, E; Van Ganse, E; Chapman, M J; Liens, D; Renaudin, C

    2007-11-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of raising high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) with add-on nicotinic acid in statin-treated patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and low HDL-C, from the French healthcare system perspective. Computer simulation economic modelling incorporating two decision analytic submodels was used. The first submodel generated a cohort of 2000 patients and simulated lipid changes using baseline characteristics and treatment effects from the ARterial Biology for the Investigation of the Treatment Effects of Reducing cholesterol (ARBITER 2) study. Prolonged-release (PR) nicotinic acid (1 g/day) was added in patients with HDL-C costs were accounted from a third party payer perspective [2004 Euros (euro)] and discounted by 3%. Addition of PR nicotinic acid to statin therapy resulted in substantial health gain and increased life expectancy, at a cost well within the threshold (cost-effective in France at a level considered to represent good value for money by reimbursement authorities in Europe. This strategy was highly cost-effective in CHD patients with type 2 diabetes.

  8. Acute effects of nicotine amplify accumbal neural responses during nicotine-taking behavior and nicotine-paired environmental cues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Guillem

    Full Text Available Nicotine self-administration (SA is maintained by several variables, including the reinforcing properties of nicotine-paired cues and the nicotine-induced amplification of those cue properties. The nucleus accumbens (NAc is implicated in mediating the influence of these variables, though the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms are not yet understood. In the present study, Long-Evans rats were trained to self-administer nicotine. During SA sessions each press of a lever was followed by an intravenous infusion of nicotine (30 µg/kg paired with a combined light-tone cue. Extracellular recordings of single-neuron activity showed that 20% of neurons exhibited a phasic change in firing during the nicotine-directed operant, the light-tone cue, or both. The phasic change in firing for 98% of neurons was an increase. Sixty-two percent of NAc neurons additionally or alternatively showed a sustained decrease in average firing during the SA session relative to a presession baseline period. These session decreases in firing were significantly less prevalent in a group of neurons that were activated during either the operant or the cue than in a group of neurons that were nonresponsive during those events (referred to as task-activated and task-nonactivated neurons, respectively. Moreover, the session decrease in firing was dose-dependent for only the task-nonactivated neurons. The data of the present investigation provide supportive correlational evidence for two hypotheses: (1 excitatory neurophysiological mechanisms mediate the NAc role in cue-maintenance of nicotine SA, and (2 a differential nicotine-induced inhibition of task-activated and task-nonactivated neurons mediates the NAc role in nicotine-induced amplification of cue effects on nicotine SA.

  9. Effects of nicotine and nicotine expectancy on attentional bias for emotional stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Sally; Attwood, Angela S; Munafò, Marcus R

    2015-06-01

    Nicotine's effects on mood are thought to enhance its addictive potential. However, the mechanisms underlying the effects of nicotine on affect regulation have not been reliably demonstrated in human laboratory studies. We investigated the effects of nicotine abstinence (Experiment 1), and nicotine challenge and expectancy (Experiment 2) on attentional bias towards facial emotional stimuli differing in emotional valence. In Experiment 1, 46 nicotine-deprived smokers were randomized to either continue to abstain from smoking or to smoke immediately before testing. In Experiment 2, 96 nicotine-deprived smokers were randomized to smoke a nicotinized or denicotinized cigarette and to be told that the cigarette did or did not contain nicotine. In both experiments participants completed a visual probe task, where positively valenced (happy) and negatively valenced (sad) facial expressions were presented, together with neutral facial expressions. In Experiment 1, there was evidence of an interaction between probe location and abstinence on reaction time, indicating that abstinent smokers showed an attentional bias for neutral stimuli. In Experiment 2, there was evidence of an interaction between probe location, nicotine challenge and expectation on reaction time, indicating that smokers receiving nicotine, but told that they did not receive nicotine, showed an attentional bias for emotional stimuli. Our data suggest that nicotine abstinence appears to disrupt attentional bias towards emotional facial stimuli. These data provide support for nicotine's modulation of attentional bias as a central mechanism for maintaining affect regulation in cigarette smoking. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Engineering approaches to transdermal drug delivery: a tribute to contributions of prof. Robert Langer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitragotri, S

    2013-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery continues to provide an advantageous route of drug administration over injections. While the number of drugs delivered by passive transdermal patches has increased over the years, no macromolecule is currently delivered by the transdermal route. Substantial research efforts have been dedicated by a large number of researchers representing varied disciplines including biology, chemistry, pharmaceutics and engineering to understand, model and overcome the skin's barrier properties. This article focuses on engineering contributions to the field of transdermal drug delivery. The article pays tribute to Prof. Robert Langer, who pioneered the engineering approach towards transdermal drug delivery. Over a period spanning nearly 25 years since his first publication in the field of transdermal drug delivery, Bob Langer has deeply impacted the field by quantitative analysis and innovative engineering. At the same time, he has inspired several generations of engineers by collaborations and mentorship. His scientific insights, innovative technologies, translational efforts and dedicated mentorship have transformed the field. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Effectiveness and tolerability of transdermal rivastigmine in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease in daily practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seibert J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Johannes Seibert1, Ferenc Tracik2,3, Konstantin Articus2, Stefan Spittler41Outpatient Clinic, Heidelberg, Germany; 2Novartis Pharma, Nürnberg, Germany; 3Department of Neurology, Heinrich-Heine University, Düsseldorf, Germany; 4Alexianer Krefeld, Maria Hilf Clinic, Krefeld, GermanyBackground: Oral cholinesterase inhibitors at doses efficacious for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD are often prematurely discontinued due to gastrointestinal side effects. In controlled clinical trials, transdermal rivastigmine demonstrated less such effects at similar efficacy. The current study aimed to verify the validity of this data in daily practice.Methods: This was a prospective, multicenter, observational study on transdermal rivastigmine in Germany. Eligible patients were those with AD who had not yet been treated with rivastigmine. Outcome measures were changes in clock-drawing test, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, Caregiver Burden Scale, Clinical Global Impression (CGI, physicians’ assessments of tolerability, and the incidence of adverse events (AEs over 4 months of treatment.Results: In 257 centers 1113 patients were enrolled; 614 women and 499 men, mean age 76.5 years. In 58% of patients AD was treated for the first time and in 42% therapy was switched to transdermal rivastigmine, mostly due to lack of tolerability (13.6% or effectiveness (26.9%. After 4 months, 67.4% of patients were on the target dose of 9.5 mg/day and 21.8% were still on 4.6 mg/day. MMSE significantly improved in patients with and without pretreatment (ΔMMSE, 0.9 ± 3.4 and 0.8 ± 3.4, respectively, both P < 0.001; the CGI score improved in 60.9% and 61.3% of patients, respectively. Overall 11.7% of patients had AEs, mainly affecting the skin or the gastrointestinal tract; in 1.1% of cases AEs were serious; 14.7% of patients discontinued therapy, 6.0% due to AEs. With rivastigmine treatment the percentage of patients taking psychotropic comedication decreased

  12. Opioids Switching with Transdermal Systems in Chronic Cancer Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbarisi M

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to tolerance development and adverse side effects, chronic pain patients frequently need to be switched to alternative opioid therapy Objective To assess the efficacy and tolerability of an alternative transdermally applied (TDS opioid in patients with chronic cancer pain receiving insufficient analgesia using their present treatment. Methods A total of 32 patients received alternative opioid therapy, 16 were switched from buprenorphine to fentanyl and 16 were switched from fentanyl to buprenorphine. The dosage used was 50% of that indicated in equipotency conversion tables. Pain relief was assessed at weekly intervals for the next 3 weeks Results Pain relief as assessed by VAS, PPI, and PRI significantly improved (p Conclusion Opioid switching at 50% of the calculated equianalgesic dose produced a significant reduction in pain levels and rescue medication. The incidence of side effects decreased and no new side effects were noted. Further studies are required to provide individualized treatment for patients according to their different types of cancer.

  13. Nicotinic plant poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schep, Leo J; Slaughter, Robin J; Beasley, D Michael G

    2009-09-01

    A wide range of plants contain nicotinic and nicotinic-like alkaloids. Of this diverse group, those that have been reported to cause human poisoning appear to have similar mechanisms of toxicity and presenting patients therefore have comparable toxidromes. This review describes the taxonomy and principal alkaloids of plants that contain nicotinic and nicotinic-like alkaloids, with particular focus on those that are toxic to humans. The toxicokinetics and mechanisms of toxicity of these alkaloids are reviewed and the clinical features and management of poisoning due to these plants are described. This review was compiled by systematically searching OVID MEDLINE and ISI Web of Science. This identified 9,456 papers, excluding duplicates, all of which were screened. Reviewed plants and their principal alkaloids. Plants containing nicotine and nicotine-like alkaloids that have been reported to be poisonous to humans include Conium maculatum, Nicotiana glauca and Nicotiana tabacum, Laburnum anagyroides, and Caulophyllum thalictroides. They contain the toxic alkaloids nicotine, anabasine, cytisine, n-methylcytisine, coniine, n-methylconiine, and gamma-coniceine. These alkaloids act agonistically at nicotinic-type acetylcholine (cholinergic) receptors (nAChRs). The nicotinic-type acetylcholine receptor can vary both in its subunit composition and in its distribution within the body (the central and autonomic nervous systems, the neuromuscular junctions, and the adrenal medulla). Agonistic interaction at these variable sites may explain why the alkaloids have diverse effects depending on the administered dose and duration of exposure. Nicotine and nicotine-like alkaloids are absorbed readily across all routes of exposure and are rapidly and widely distributed, readily traversing the blood-brain barrier and the placenta, and are freely distributed in breast milk. Metabolism occurs predominantly in the liver followed by rapid renal elimination. Following acute exposure

  14. Transdermal microneedles for drug delivery applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, Ai Ling; Shearwood, Christopher; Ng, Kian Chye; Lu Jia; Moochhala, Shabbir

    2006-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery (TDD) has many advantages, the main one being the ability to maintain the prolonged release of drugs to attain optimal blood concentrations. Unfortunately, nature has provided a very effective protective barrier, the stratum corneum (sc), which limits TDD to certain types of drugs with specific properties. In order to enhance TDD, the idea of using microneedles to painlessly penetrate the sc barrier has previously been proposed. In this paper, we will review the different microneedles that are currently being developed as well as our own efforts in this area. Based on our experiences, we will offer our view on the key parameters for effective transdermal microneedle design as well as future directions in this area

  15. Transdermal microneedles for drug delivery applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teo, Ai Ling [Defence Medical and Environmental Research Institute, DSO National Laboratories (Kent Ridge), 27 Medical Drive, 12-00, Singapore 117510 (Singapore); Shearwood, Christopher [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Ng, Kian Chye [Defence Medical and Environmental Research Institute, DSO National Laboratories (Kent Ridge), 27 Medical Drive, 12-00, Singapore 117510 (Singapore); Lu Jia [Defence Medical and Environmental Research Institute, DSO National Laboratories (Kent Ridge), 27 Medical Drive, 12-00, Singapore 117510 (Singapore); Moochhala, Shabbir [Defence Medical and Environmental Research Institute, DSO National Laboratories (Kent Ridge), 27 Medical Drive, 12-00, Singapore 117510 (Singapore)]. E-mail: mshabbir@dso.org.sg

    2006-07-25

    Transdermal drug delivery (TDD) has many advantages, the main one being the ability to maintain the prolonged release of drugs to attain optimal blood concentrations. Unfortunately, nature has provided a very effective protective barrier, the stratum corneum (sc), which limits TDD to certain types of drugs with specific properties. In order to enhance TDD, the idea of using microneedles to painlessly penetrate the sc barrier has previously been proposed. In this paper, we will review the different microneedles that are currently being developed as well as our own efforts in this area. Based on our experiences, we will offer our view on the key parameters for effective transdermal microneedle design as well as future directions in this area.

  16. Minimization of CYP2D6 Polymorphic Differences and Improved Bioavailability via Transdermal Administration: Latrepirdine Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Marci L; Mordenti, Joyce; Yeoh, Thean; Ranade, Gautam; Qiu, Ruolun; Fang, Juanzhi; Liang, Yali; Corrigan, Brian

    2016-08-01

    Transdermal delivery has the potential to offer improved bioavailability by circumventing first-pass gut and hepatic metabolism. This study evaluated the pharmacokinetics of oral immediate release and transdermal latrepirdine in extensive and poor CYP2D6 metabolizers (EM/PM). Latrepirdine transdermal solution was prepared extemporaneously. The solution was applied with occlusive dressing to upper or middle back for 24 h. Each subject received a single dose of 8.14 mg oral, 5 mg transdermal, and 10 mg transdermal (EMs only) latrepirdine free base in a fixed sequence. Twelve EMs and 7 PMs (50-79 years) enrolled and completed the study. Latrepirdine was well tolerated following both routes of administration. Dose-normalized latrepirdine total exposures were approximately 11-fold and 1.5-fold higher in EMs and PMs, respectively following administration of transdermal relative to oral. Differences between EM and PM latrepirdine exposures were decreased, with PMs having 1.9- and 2.7-fold higher peak and total exposures, respectively, following transdermal administration compared to 11- and 20-fold higher exposures, respectively, following oral administration. Transdermal delivery can potentially mitigate the large intersubject differences observed with compounds metabolized primarily by CYP2D6. Transdermal delivery was readily accomplished in the clinic using an extemporaneously prepared solution [NCT00990613].

  17. Heat: A Highly Efficient Skin Enhancer for Transdermal Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szunerits, Sabine; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2018-01-01

    Advances in materials science and bionanotechnology have allowed the refinements of current drug delivery systems, expected to facilitate the development of personalized medicine. While dermatological topical pharmaceutical formulations such as foams, creams, lotions, gels, etc., have been proposed for decades, these systems target mainly skin-based diseases. To treat systemic medical conditions as well as localized problems such as joint or muscle concerns, transdermal delivery systems (TDDSs), which use the skin as the main route of drug delivery, are very appealing. Over the years, these systems have shown to offer important advantages over oral as well as intravenous drug delivery routes. Besides being non-invasive and painless, TDDSs are able to deliver drugs with a short-half-life time more easily and are well adapted to eliminate frequent administrations to maintain constant drug delivery. The possibility of self-administration of a predetermined drug dose at defined time intervals makes it also the most convenient personalized point-of-care approach. The transdermal market still remains limited to a narrow range of drugs. While small and lipophilic drugs have been successfully delivered using TDDSs, this approach fails to deliver therapeutic macromolecules due to size-limited transport across the stratum corneum , the outermost layer of the epidermis. The low permeability of the stratum corneum to water-soluble drugs as well as macromolecules poses important challenges to transdermal administration. To widen the scope of drugs for transdermal delivery, new procedures to enhance skin permeation to hydrophilic drugs and macromolecules are under development. Next to iontophoresis and microneedle-based concepts, thermal-based approaches have shown great promise to enhance transdermal drug delivery of different therapeutics. In this inaugural article for the section "Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology," the advances in this field and the handful of

  18. Pharmacokinetics of 2 Formulations of Transdermal Fentanyl in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Amy M; Kelly, Richard; Fetterer, David P; Rico, Pedro J; Bailey, Emily J

    2016-01-01

    Fentanyl is a μ-opioid agonist that often is used as the analgesic component for balanced anesthesia in both human and veterinary patients. Minimal information has been published regarding appropriate dosing, and the pharmacokinetics of fentanyl are unknown in NHP. The pharmacokinetic properties of 2 transdermal fentanyl delivery methods, a solution (2.6 and 1.95 mg/kg) and a patch (25 µg/h), were determined when applied topically to the dorsal scapular area of cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Serum fentanyl concentrations were analyzed by using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. Compared with the patch, the transdermal fentanyl solution generated higher drug concentrations over longer time. Adverse reactions occurred in the macaques that received the transdermal fentanyl solution at 2.6 mg/kg. Both preparations showed significant interanimal variability in the maximal serum drug levels, time to achieve maximal fentanyl levels, elimination half-life, and AUC values. Both the maximal concentration and the time at which this concentration occurred were increased in macaques compared with most other species after application of the transdermal fentanyl patch and compared with dogs after application of the transdermal fentanyl solution. The pharmacokinetic properties of transdermal fentanyl in macaques are markedly different from those in other veterinary species and preclude its use as a long-acting analgesic drug in NHP. PMID:27423151

  19. Transdermal nitroglycerine enhances postoperative analgesia of intrathecal neostigmine following abdominal hysterectomies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fareed Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to assess the effect of nitroglycerine (transdermal on intrathecal neostigmine with bupivacaine on postoperative analgesia and note the incidence of adverse effects, if any. After taking informed consent, 120 patients of ASA Grade I and II were systematically randomised into four groups of 30 each. Patients were premedicated with midazolam 0.05 mg/kg intravenously and hydration with Ringer′s lactate solution 10ml/kg preoperatively in the holding room. Group I patients received Intrathecal injection of 15 mg bupivacaine with 1ml of normal saline and transdermal placebo patch. Group II patients received Intrathecal injection of 15 mg bupivacaine with 5 mcg of neostigmine and transdermal placebo patch. Group III patients received Intrathecal injection of 15 mg bupivacaine with 1ml of normal saline with transdermal nitroglycerine patch (5 mg/24 hours. Group IV patients received Intrathecal injection of 15 mg bupivacaine with 5mcg of neostigmine and transdermal nitroglycerine patch (5 mg/24 hours, applied on a non anaesthetised area after 20 minutes. Groups were demographically similar and did not differ in intraoperative characteristics like sensory block, motor block, haemodynamic parameters and SpO 2 . The mean duration of analgesia was 202.17 minutes, 407.20 minutes, 207.53 minutes and 581.63 minutes in control group (I, neostigmine group (II, nitroglycerine group (III and nitroglycerine neostigmine group (IV respectively (P< 0.01. To conclude, our results show that transdermal nitroglycerine itself does not show any analgesic potential but it enhances the analgesic potential of intrathecal neostigmine.

  20. R-Modafinil Attenuates Nicotine-Taking and Nicotine-Seeking Behavior in Alcohol-Preferring Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Fei; Bi, Guo-Hua; He, Yi; Yang, Hong-Ju; Gao, Jun-Tao; Okunola-Bakare, Oluyomi M; Slack, Rachel D; Gardner, Eliot L; Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Newman, Amy Hauck

    2015-01-01

    (±)-Modafinil (MOD) is used clinically for the treatment of sleep disorders and has been investigated as a potential medication for the treatment of psychostimulant addiction. However, the therapeutic efficacy of (±)-MOD for addiction is inconclusive. Herein we used animal models of self-administration and in vivo microdialysis to study the pharmacological actions of R-modafinil (R-MOD) and S-modafinil (S-MOD) on nicotine-taking and nicotine-seeking behavior, and mechanisms underlying such actions. We found that R-MOD is more potent and effective than S-MOD in attenuating nicotine self-administration in Long–Evans rats. As Long–Evans rats did not show a robust reinstatement response to nicotine, we used alcohol-preferring rats (P-rats) that display much higher reinstatement responses to nicotine than Long–Evans rats. We found that R-MOD significantly inhibited intravenous nicotine self-administration, nicotine-induced reinstatement, and nicotine-associated cue-induced drug-seeking behavior in P-rats. R-MOD alone neither sustained self-administration in P-rats previously self-administering nicotine nor reinstated extinguished nicotine-seeking behavior. The in vivo brain microdialysis assays demonstrated that R-MOD alone produced a slow-onset moderate increase in extracellular DA. Pretreatment with R-MOD dose-dependently blocked nicotine-induced dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in both naive and nicotine self-administrating rats, suggesting a DA-dependent mechanism underlying mitigation of nicotine's effects. In conclusion, the present findings support further investigation of R-MOD for treatment of nicotine dependence in humans. PMID:25613829

  1. Chronic agmatine treatment prevents behavioral manifestations of nicotine withdrawal in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotagale, Nandkishor R; Chopde, Chandrabhan T; Umekar, Milind J; Taksande, Brijesh G

    2015-05-05

    Smoking cessation exhibits an aversive withdrawal syndrome characterized by both increases in somatic signs and affective behaviors including anxiety and depression. In present study, abrupt withdrawal of daily nicotine injections (2mg/kg, s.c., four times daily, for 10 days) significantly increased somatic signs viz. rearing, grooming, jumping, genital licking, leg licking, head shakes with associated depression (increased immobility in forced swim test) as well as anxiety (decreased the number of entries and time spent in open arm in elevated plus maze) in nicotine dependent animals. The peak effect was observed at 24h time point of nicotine withdrawal. Repeated administration of agmatine (40-80µg/mouse, i.c.v.) before the first daily dose of nicotine from day 5 to 10 attenuated the elevated scores of somatic signs and abolished the depression and anxiety like behavior induced by nicotine withdrawal in dependent animals. However, in separate groups, its acute administration 30min before behavior analysis of nicotine withdrawal was ineffective. This result clearly shows the role of agmatine in development of nicotine dependence and its withdrawal. In extension to behavioral experiments, brain agmatine analyses, carried out at 24h time point of nicotine withdrawal demonstrated marked decrease in basal brain agmatine concentration as compared to control animals. Taken together, these data support the role of agmatine as common biological substrate for somatic signs and affective symptoms of nicotine withdrawal. This data may project therapies based on agmatine in anxiety, depression and mood changes associated with tobacco withdrawal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Treatment with subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl: results from a population pharmacokinetic study in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosten, Astrid W; Abrantes, João A; Jönsson, Siv; de Bruijn, Peter; Kuip, Evelien J M; Falcão, Amílcar; van der Rijt, Carin C D; Mathijssen, Ron H J

    2016-04-01

    Transdermal fentanyl is effective for the treatment of moderate to severe cancer-related pain but is unsuitable for fast titration. In this setting, continuous subcutaneous fentanyl may be used. As data on the pharmacokinetics of continuous subcutaneous fentanyl are lacking, we studied the pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl. Furthermore, we evaluated rotations from the subcutaneous to the transdermal route. Fifty-two patients treated with subcutaneous and/or transdermal fentanyl for moderate to severe cancer-related pain participated. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed and evaluated using non-linear mixed-effects modelling. For rotations from subcutaneous to transdermal fentanyl, a 1:1 dose conversion ratio was used while the subcutaneous infusion was continued for 12 h (with a 50 % tapering after 6 h). A 6-h scheme with 50 % tapering after 3 h was simulated using the final model. A one-compartment model with first-order elimination and separate first-order absorption processes for each route adequately described the data. The estimated apparent clearance of fentanyl was 49.6 L/h; the absorption rate constant for subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl was 0.0358 and 0.0135 h(-1), respectively. Moderate to large inter-individual and inter-occasion variability was found. Around rotation from subcutaneous to transdermal fentanyl, measured and simulated plasma fentanyl concentrations rose and increasing side effects were observed. We describe the pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl in one patient cohort and report several findings that are relevant for clinical practice. Further research is warranted to study the optimal scheme for rotations from the subcutaneous to the transdermal route.

  3. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid drug delivery systems through transdermal pathway: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naves, Lucas; Dhand, Chetna; Almeida, Luis; Rajamani, Lakshminarayanan; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Soares, Graça

    2017-05-01

    In past few decades, scientists have made tremendous advancement in the field of drug delivery systems (DDS), through transdermal pathway, as the skin represents a ready and large surface area for delivering drugs. Efforts are in progress to design efficient transdermal DDS that support sustained drug release at the targeted area for longer duration in the recommended therapeutic window without producing side-effects. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) is one of the most promising Food and Drug Administration approved synthetic polymers in designing versatile drug delivery carriers for different drug administration routes, including transdermal drug delivery. The present review provides a brief introduction over the transdermal drug delivery and PLGA as a material in context to its role in designing drug delivery vehicles. Attempts are made to compile literatures over PLGA-based drug delivery vehicles, including microneedles, nanoparticles, and nanofibers and their role in transdermal drug delivery of different therapeutic agents. Different nanostructure evaluation techniques with their working principles are briefly explained.

  4. Effect of components (polymer, plasticizer and solvent as a variable in fabrication of diclofenac transdermal patch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetna Modi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal drug delivery influence consumer acceptance and marked increase in bioavailability of some drugs which undergoes hepatic first-pass metabolism. Fabrication of transdermal patch requires lots of attention regarding the amount of components used for it. Because of varied nature of polymer and plasticizer, transdermal patches have different properties and different drug release. This study is on the basis to evaluate the amount to be needed for fabrication of diclofenac transdermal patch. Study shows that Hydroxy Propyl Methyl Cellulose has great influence on transdermal patch, if it is used alone in combination with glycerin or PEG-4000 plasticizer.

  5. Assessment of simvastatin niosomes for pediatric transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ahmed S; Hosny, Khaled M; Ahmed, Osama A A; Fahmy, Usama A

    2016-06-01

    The prevalence of childhood dyslipidemia increases and is considered as an important risk factor for the incidence of cardiovascular disease in the adulthood. To improve dosing accuracy and facilitate the determination of dosing regimens in function of the body weight, the proposed study aims at preparing transdermal niosomal gels of simvastatin as possible transdermal drug delivery system for pediatric applications. Twelve formulations were prepared to screen the influence of formulation and processing variables on critical niosomal characteristics. Nano-sized niosomes with 0.31 μm number-weighted size displayed highest simvastatin release rate with 8.5% entrapment capacity. The niosomal surface coverage by negative charges was calculated according to Langmuir isotherm with n = 0.42 to suggest that the surface association was site-independent, probably producing surface rearrangements. Hypolipidemic activities after transdermal administration of niosomal gels to rats showed significant reduction in cholesterol and triglyceride levels while increasing plasma high-density lipoproteins concentration. Bioavailability estimation in rats revealed an augmentation in simvastatin bioavailability by 3.35 and 2.9 folds from formulation F3 and F10, respectively, compared with oral drug suspension. Hence, this transdermal simvastatin niosomes not only exhibited remarkable potential to enhance its bioavailability and hypolipidemic activity but also considered a promising pediatric antihyperlipidemic formulation.

  6. Efficient Transdermal Delivery of Benfotiamine in an Animal Model

    OpenAIRE

    Varadi, Gyula; Zhu, Zhen; G. Carter, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    We designed a transdermal system to serve as a delivery platform for benfotiamine utilizing the attributes of passive penetration enhancing molecules to penetrate through the outer layers of skin combined with the advance of incorporating various peripherally-acting vasodilators to enhance drug uptake.  Benfotiamine, incorporated into this transdermal formulation, was applied to skin in an animal model in order to determine the ability to deliver this thiamine pro-drug effectively to the sub-...

  7. Development, characterization & invivo evaluation of proniosomal based transdermal delivery system of Atenolol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ramkanth

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The potential of proniosomes as a transdermal drug delivery system for Atenolol was investigated by encapsulating the drug in various formulations of proniosomal gel composed of various ratios of sorbitan fatty acid esters, cholesterol, lecithin prepared by Coacervation-phase separation method. The objectives of the present study were to define effects on the antihypertension activity and pharmacokinetics of a novel transdermal Proniosomal gel incorporating Atenolol. The formulated systems were characterized in vitro for size, drug entrapment, In vitro and in vivo drug permeation profiles and vesicular stability at different storage conditions. The optimized Atenolol proniosomes (AT8 showed nanometric vesicle size, high entrapment efficiency and marked enhancement in transdermal permeation. The prepared Proniosomal gel showed the relative bioavailability of 365.38 fold increased for AT8 than oral. The maximal concentrations (Cmax, of drug were significantly reduced while the areas under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC, and mean residence times (MRT, t1/2 were evidently increased and extended, respectively. The results suggest that proniosomes can act as promising carrier which offers an alternative approach for transdermal delivery of Atenolol. Keywords: Proniosomes, Atenolol, Niosomes, Pharmacokinetic study, Transdermal delivery

  8. Recent Advances in Skin Penetration Enhancers for Transdermal Gene and Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amjadi, Morteza; Mostaghaci, Babak; Sitti, Metin

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing interest in transdermal delivery systems because of their noninvasive, targeted, and on-demand delivery of gene and drugs. However, efficient penetration of therapeutic compounds into the skin is still challenging largely due to the impermeability of the outermost layer of the skin, known as stratum corneum. Recently, there have been major research activities to enhance the skin penetration depth of pharmacological agents. This article reviews recent advances in the development of various strategies for skin penetration enhancement. We show that approaches such as ultrasound waves, laser, and microneedle patches have successfully been employed to physically disrupt the stratum corneum structure for enhanced transdermal delivery. Rather than physical approaches, several non-physical route have also been utilized for efficient transdermal delivery across the skin barrier. Finally, we discuss some clinical applications of transdermal delivery systems for gene and drug delivery. This paper shows that transdermal delivery devices can potentially function for diverse healthcare and medical applications while further investigations are still necessary for more efficient skin penetration of gene and drugs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Transdermal carbamate poisoning – a case of misuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalit Kumar Rajbanshi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pesticide poisoning is a common mode of intentional self harm. Oral ingestion is the usual mode of poisoning. However, inhalation, accidental or occupational transdermal exposure leading to acute or chronic poisoning can be the other route of poisoning. It has been seen that the purpose of poising is suicidal intensity in most of the cases. We report an unusual case where the victim had acute pesticide poisoning through transdermal route that was intended for non suicidal purpose. The patient was managed successfully with immediate decontamination and adequate antidote.

  10. Nicotine Acutely Enhances Reinforcement from Non-Drug Rewards in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth A. Perkins

    2017-05-01

    smoking, potential individual differences in these effects, and the possibility that nicotine via nicotine replacement therapy and non-nicotine quit medications may attenuate loss of these effects upon quitting. Further study with humans of nicotine’s reinforcement-enhancing effects may provide a more complete understanding of smoking persistence and added mechanisms of cessation medication efficacy.

  11. The Influence of Puff Characteristics, Nicotine Dependence, and Rate of Nicotine Metabolism on Daily Nicotine Exposure in African American Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kathryn C; Dempsey, Delia A; St Helen, Gideon; Delucchi, Kevin; Benowitz, Neal L

    2016-06-01

    African American (AA) smokers experience greater tobacco-related disease burden than Whites, despite smoking fewer cigarettes per day (CPD). Understanding factors that influence daily nicotine intake in AA smokers is an important step toward decreasing tobacco-related health disparities. One factor of interest is smoking topography, or the study of puffing behavior. (i) to create a model using puff characteristics, nicotine dependence, and nicotine metabolism to predict daily nicotine exposure, and (ii) to compare puff characteristics and nicotine intake from two cigarettes smoked at different times to ensure the reliability of the puff characteristics included in our model. Sixty AA smokers smoked their preferred brand of cigarette at two time points through a topography device. Plasma nicotine, expired CO, and changes in subjective measures were measured before and after each cigarette. Total nicotine equivalents (TNE) was measured from 24-hour urine collected during ad libitum smoking. In a model predicting daily nicotine exposure, total puff volume, CPD, sex, and menthol status were significant predictors (R(2) = 0.44, P smokers. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(6); 936-43. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Transdermal Delivery of Drugs with Microneedles—Potential and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Ita

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal drug delivery offers a number of advantages including improved patient compliance, sustained release, avoidance of gastric irritation, as well as elimination of pre-systemic first-pass effect. However, only few medications can be delivered through the transdermal route in therapeutic amounts. Microneedles can be used to enhance transdermal drug delivery. In this review, different types of microneedles are described and their methods of fabrication highlighted. Microneedles can be fabricated in different forms: hollow, solid, and dissolving. There are also hydrogel-forming microneedles. A special attention is paid to hydrogel-forming microneedles. These are innovative microneedles which do not contain drugs but imbibe interstitial fluid to form continuous conduits between dermal microcirculation and an attached patch-type reservoir. Several microneedles approved by regulatory authorities for clinical use are also examined. The last part of this review discusses concerns and challenges regarding microneedle use.

  13. Predictors of treatment success in smoking cessation with varenicline combined with nicotine replacement therapy v varenicline alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Noor

    2018-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Identification of the predictors of treatment success in smoking cessation may help healthcare workers to improve the effectiveness of attempts at quitting.Objective. To identify the predictors of success in a randomised controlled trial comparing varenicline alone or in combination with nicotine replacement therapy (NRT.Methods. A post-hoc analysis of the data of 435 subjects who participated in a 24-week, multicentre trial in South Africa was performed. Logistic regression was used to analyse the effect of age, sex, age at smoking initiation, daily cigarette consumption, nicotine dependence, and reinforcement assessment on abstinence rates at 12 and 24 weeks. Point prevalence and continuous abstinence rates were self-reported and confirmed biochemically with exhaled carbon monoxide readings.Results. The significant predictors of continuous abstinence at 12 and 24 weeks on multivariate analysis were lower daily cigarette consumption (odds ratio (OR 1.86, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.21 - 2.87, p=0.005 and OR 1.83, 95% CI 1.12 - 2.98, p=0.02, respectively and older age (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.00 - 2.31, p=0.049 and OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.13 - 2.84, p=0.01, respectively. There was no difference in the predictors of success in the univariate analysis, except that older age predicted point prevalence abstinence at 12 weeks (OR 1.47, 95% CI 1.00 - 2.15, p=0.049. The findings were inconclusive for an association between abstinence and lower nicotine dependence, older age at smoking initiation and positive reinforcement.Conclusion. Older age and lower daily cigarette consumption are associated with a higher likelihood of abstinence in patients using varenicline, regardless of the addition of NRT.

  14. Microneedle-based drug delivery systems for transdermal route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Maria Bernadete Riemma; Rossetti, Fabia Cristina

    2014-03-01

    Transdermal delivery offers an attractive, noninvasive administration route but it is limited by the skin's barrier to penetration. Minimally invasive techniques, such as the use of microneedles (MNs), bypass the stratum corneum (SC) barrier to permit the drug's direct access to the viable epidermis. These novel micro devices have been developed to puncture the skin for the transdermal delivery of hydrophilic drugs and macromolecules, including peptides, DNA and other molecules, that would otherwise have difficulty passing the outermost layer of the skin, the SC. Using the tools of the microelectronics industry, MNs have been fabricated with a range of sizes, shapes and materials. MNs have been shown to be robust enough to penetrate the skin and dramatically increase the skin permeability of several drugs. Moreover, MNs have reduced needle insertion pain and tissue trauma and provided controlled delivery across the skin. This review focuses on the current state of the art in the transdermal delivery of drugs using various types of MNs and developments in the field of microscale devices, as well as examples of their uses and clinical safety.

  15. Development and evaluation of transdermal organogels containing nicorandil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, J R; Sagar, Banode; Chellappan, Dinesh K; Dua, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to formulate a transdermal product containing Nicorandil as a model drug, because it has been first drug of choice to treat angina and hypertension. A further objective was to reduce its side effects. The transdermal product was prepared using various synthetic and natural gelling agents such as Carbopol 934p, Carbopol 974p, HPMC K15M and HPMC K100M. Various penetration enhancers were incorporated to enhance the diffusion across the rat skin. A further objective was to formulate organogels and minimize the concentration of penetration enhancer to 50% of the concentration used in gels and yet to achieve the maximum drug release. The prepared formulations were evaluated for their physical appearance, viscosity, spreadability, drug content and freeze thaw cycle. Based on in vitro studies across rat skin and human cadaver skin it was concluded that Nicrorandil transdermal organogel formulation using HPMC K100M with 2% w/w Transcutol-P shows increase in cumulative diffusion of Nicorandil amongst all other formulations.

  16. Transdermal Spray in Hormone Delivery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    market for the delivery system and ongoing development of transdermal sprays for hormone ... (DOAJ), African Journal Online, Bioline International, Open-J-Gate and Pharmacy Abstracts ... patches and gels have been very popular owing ... This product was developed for ... In a safety announcement, the US Food and.

  17. Heat: A Highly Efficient Skin Enhancer for Transdermal Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Szunerits

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Advances in materials science and bionanotechnology have allowed the refinements of current drug delivery systems, expected to facilitate the development of personalized medicine. While dermatological topical pharmaceutical formulations such as foams, creams, lotions, gels, etc., have been proposed for decades, these systems target mainly skin-based diseases. To treat systemic medical conditions as well as localized problems such as joint or muscle concerns, transdermal delivery systems (TDDSs, which use the skin as the main route of drug delivery, are very appealing. Over the years, these systems have shown to offer important advantages over oral as well as intravenous drug delivery routes. Besides being non-invasive and painless, TDDSs are able to deliver drugs with a short-half-life time more easily and are well adapted to eliminate frequent administrations to maintain constant drug delivery. The possibility of self-administration of a predetermined drug dose at defined time intervals makes it also the most convenient personalized point-of-care approach. The transdermal market still remains limited to a narrow range of drugs. While small and lipophilic drugs have been successfully delivered using TDDSs, this approach fails to deliver therapeutic macromolecules due to size-limited transport across the stratum corneum, the outermost layer of the epidermis. The low permeability of the stratum corneum to water-soluble drugs as well as macromolecules poses important challenges to transdermal administration. To widen the scope of drugs for transdermal delivery, new procedures to enhance skin permeation to hydrophilic drugs and macromolecules are under development. Next to iontophoresis and microneedle-based concepts, thermal-based approaches have shown great promise to enhance transdermal drug delivery of different therapeutics. In this inaugural article for the section “Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology,” the advances in this field

  18. Heat: A Highly Efficient Skin Enhancer for Transdermal Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szunerits, Sabine; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2018-01-01

    Advances in materials science and bionanotechnology have allowed the refinements of current drug delivery systems, expected to facilitate the development of personalized medicine. While dermatological topical pharmaceutical formulations such as foams, creams, lotions, gels, etc., have been proposed for decades, these systems target mainly skin-based diseases. To treat systemic medical conditions as well as localized problems such as joint or muscle concerns, transdermal delivery systems (TDDSs), which use the skin as the main route of drug delivery, are very appealing. Over the years, these systems have shown to offer important advantages over oral as well as intravenous drug delivery routes. Besides being non-invasive and painless, TDDSs are able to deliver drugs with a short-half-life time more easily and are well adapted to eliminate frequent administrations to maintain constant drug delivery. The possibility of self-administration of a predetermined drug dose at defined time intervals makes it also the most convenient personalized point-of-care approach. The transdermal market still remains limited to a narrow range of drugs. While small and lipophilic drugs have been successfully delivered using TDDSs, this approach fails to deliver therapeutic macromolecules due to size-limited transport across the stratum corneum, the outermost layer of the epidermis. The low permeability of the stratum corneum to water-soluble drugs as well as macromolecules poses important challenges to transdermal administration. To widen the scope of drugs for transdermal delivery, new procedures to enhance skin permeation to hydrophilic drugs and macromolecules are under development. Next to iontophoresis and microneedle-based concepts, thermal-based approaches have shown great promise to enhance transdermal drug delivery of different therapeutics. In this inaugural article for the section “Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology,” the advances in this field and the handful of

  19. Dissolving polymeric microneedle arrays for electrically assisted transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Martin J; Caffarel-Salvador, Ester; Migalska, Katarzyna; Woolfson, A David; Donnelly, Ryan F

    2012-04-10

    It has recently been proposed that the combination of skin barrier impairment using microneedles (MNs) coupled with iontophoresis (ITP) may broaden the range of drugs suitable for transdermal delivery, as well as enabling the rate of delivery to be achieved with precise electronic control. However, no reports exist on the combination of ITP with in situ drug loaded polymeric MN delivery systems. Furthermore, although a number of studies have highlighted the importance of MN design for transdermal drug delivery enhancement, to date, there has been no systematic investigation of the influence of MN geometry on the performance of polymeric MN arrays which are designed to remain in contact with the skin during the period of drug delivery. As such, for the first time, this study reports on the effect of MN heigth and MN density upon the transdermal delivery of small hydrophilic compounds (theophylline, methylene blue, and fluorescein sodium) across neonatal porcine skin in vitro, with the optimised MN array design evaluated for its potential in the electrically faciliatated delivery of peptide (bovine insulin) and protein (fluorescein isothiocyanate-labelled bovine serum albumin (FTIC-BSA)) macromolecules. The results of the in vitro drug release investigations revealed that the extent of transdermal delivery was dependent upon the design of the MN array employed, whereby an increase in MN height and an increase in MN density led to an increase in the extent of transdermal drug delivery achieved 6h after MN application. Overall, the in vitro permeation studies revealed that the MN design containing 361 MNs/cm(2) of 600 μm height resulted in the greatest extent of transdermal drug delivery. As such, this design was evaluated for its potential in the MN mediated iontophoretic transdermal delivery. Whilst the combination of MN and ITP did not further enhance the extent of small molecular weight solute delivery, the extent of peptide/protein release was significantly

  20. T-type calcium channel antagonism decreases motivation for nicotine and blocks nicotine- and cue-induced reinstatement for a response previously reinforced with nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uslaner, Jason M; Vardigan, Joshua D; Drott, Jason M; Uebele, Victor N; Renger, John J; Lee, Ariel; Li, Zhaoxia; Lê, A D; Hutson, Pete H

    2010-10-15

    Recent evidence suggests an involvement of T-type calcium channels in the effects of drugs of abuse. We examined the influence of the novel, potent, and selective T-type calcium channel antagonist [2-(4-cyclopropylphenyl)-N-((1R)-1-{5-[2,2,2-trifluoroethyl]oxo}pyridine-2-yl)ethyl]acetamide] (TTA-A2) (.3, 1, or 3 mg/kg) on motivation for nicotine, as measured by nicotine self-administration on a progressive ratio (PR) schedule, and nicotine- and cue-induced reinstatement for a response previously reinforced with nicotine delivery (n = 11 or 12 Long Evans rats/group). Furthermore, we examined the specificity of the TTA-A2 effects by characterizing its influence on PR responding for food (in the absence or presence of nicotine-potentiated responding), food- versus nicotine-induced cue-potentiated reinstatement for a response previously reinforced by food administration (n = 11 or 12 Wistar Hannover rats/group), and its ability to induce a conditioned place aversion. TTA-A2 dose-dependently decreased self-administration of nicotine on a PR schedule and the ability of both nicotine and a cue paired with nicotine to reinstate responding. The effects were specific for nicotine's incentive motivational properties, as TTA-A2 did not influence responding for food on a PR schedule but did attenuate the ability of nicotine to potentiate responding for food. Likewise, TTA-A2 did not alter food-induced cue-potentiated reinstatement for a response previously reinforced by food but did decrease nicotine-induced cue-potentiated reinstatement. Finally, TTA-A2 did not produce an aversive state, as indicated by a lack of ability to induce conditioned place aversion. These data suggest that T-type calcium channel antagonists have potential for alleviating nicotine addiction by selectively decreasing the incentive motivational properties of nicotine. Copyright © 2010 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Conductive polymer nanotube patch for fast and controlled ex vivo transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thao M; Lee, Sebin; Lee, Sang Bok

    2014-10-01

    To uptake and release hydrophilic model drugs and insulin in a novel conductive polymer (CP) nanotube transdermal patch. The externally controlled transdermal delivery of model drugs and insulin were tested ex vivo and results were compared with CP films. The unique intrinsic properties of CPs provide electrostatic interaction between the model drugs and polymer backbone. When a pulsed potential was applied, the drug delivery release profile mimics that of injection delivery. With a constant potential applied, the release rate constants of the patch system were up to three-times faster than the control (0 V) and released approximately 80% more drug molecules over 24 h. The CP nanotube transdermal patch represents a new and promising drug method, specifically for hydrophilic molecules, which have been a large obstacle for conventional transdermal drug delivery systems.

  2. Nicotine Withdrawal Disrupts Contextual Learning but Not Recall of Prior Contextual Associations: Implications for Nicotine Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Portugal, George S.; Gould, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    Interactions between nicotine and learning could contribute to nicotine addiction. Although previous research indicates that nicotine withdrawal disrupts contextual learning, the effects of nicotine withdrawal on contextual memories acquired before withdrawal are unknown. The present study investigated whether nicotine withdrawal disrupted recall of prior contextual memories by examining the effects of nicotine withdrawal on recall of nicotine conditioned place preference (CPP) and contextual...

  3. Thermochemical Properties of Nicotine Salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riggs DM

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC results presented in this report clearly show that the thermal stability and the endothermic peak nicotine release temperatures are different for different nicotine salts and these temperatures appear to be linked to the general microstructural details of the salt itself. In addition, the peak nicotine release temperatures are highly dependent upon the sample size used. The heat of vaporization for neat (non-protonated nicotine is also sample-size dependent. The TGA data showed that the least stable of the salts tested at elevated temperatures was the liquid salt nicotine triacetate followed by the crystalline materials (e.g., nicotine gallate and finally, the amorphous salts (e.g., nicotine alginate. The DSC results revealed that the liquid and crystalline salts exhibit nicotine release endotherms that are strongly related to the sample weight being tested. The amorphous salts show nicotine endotherm peak temperatures that are nearly independent of the sample weight. The range of peak nicotine release temperatures varied depending upon the specific salts and the sample size from 83 oC to well over 200 oC. Based on these results, the evolution of nicotine from the nicotine salt should be expected to vary based on the composition of the salt, the details of its microstructure, and the amount of nicotine salt tested.

  4. Withdrawal-oriented therapy for smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek, P

    1989-06-01

    The treatment approach of the Maudsley Hospital Smokers Clinic is described. It stems from the notion that smokers seeking help are dependent on nicotine, and that withdrawal discomfort is a major block to their success in quitting. Accordingly, therapy focuses on helping clients overcome nicotine deprivation. It uses nicotine replacement and a special format of group treatment. Details are given of preparation of clients, use of nicotine chewing gum, use of group-oriented groupwork, use of information about withdrawal, and training in withdrawal-oriented therapy. Data are presented concerning characteristics of the clientele, treatment adherence, and treatment results. A number of controversial issues are addressed, such as the optimal duration of treatment, timing of the quit date, the value of educational input, and the value of individualization of treatment goals.

  5. Efficacy of a single dose of a transdermal diclofenac patch as pre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: We compared the analgesic efficacy of a transdermal diclofenac patch 100 mg (NuPatch® 100, Zydus Cadila, Ahmedabad, India) and intramuscular diclofenac sodium 75 mg (Voveran®, Novartis, India) for postoperative analgesia, and the associated side-effects of the transdermal diclofenac patch. Method: ...

  6. A prospective randomized comparative study of the effects of intranasal and transdermal 17 β-estradiol on postmenopausal symptoms and vaginal cytology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odabasi A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Investigating the adverse effects of oral hormone replacement therapy (HRT, the clinical effectiveness of alternative combinations and route of administrations. Aim: To compare the effects of intranasal and transdermal 17β-estradiol combined with vaginal progesterone on vasomotor symptoms and vaginal cytology. Settings and Design: A 12-week, prospective, randomized comparative study was conducted between July 2005 and September 2006. Materials and Methods: Eighty postmenopausal women aged between 42-57 years, who had scores of ≥1.7 on the menopause rating scale-I (MRS-I items "1-6", were randomly assigned to receive intranasal (300 µg/day, n =40 or transdermal (50 µg/day, n =40 17β-estradiol continuously. All patients also received a vaginal progesterone gel twice weekly. Vasomotor symptoms were evaluated at weeks 0, 4, 8 and 12. Vaginal maturation index (VMI was evaluated at weeks 0 and 12 of the study. Statistical Analyses: The Mann-Whitney U and the Wilcoxon tests were used. P < 0.05 was regarded as significant. Results: Thirty-two women in the intranasal and 29 women in the transdermal group completed the study. The total score of the MRS, the sum-scores of Factor 1 "HOT FLUSHES" and Factor 2 "PSYCHE" significantly decreased in both groups at week 4. Factor 3 "ATROPHY" scores significantly decreased only in the transdermal group at week 12. The VMI showed no changes within and between the two groups at the end of the study. Conclusion: Intranasal and transdermal 17β-estradiol combined with vaginal progesterone gel as a continuous HRT caused a similar decrease in vasomotor symptoms but did not have any significant effect on VMI after 12 weeks of treatment in this study population.

  7. Nicotine enhances proliferation, migration, and radioresistance of human malignant glioma cells through EGFR activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, A.A.; Jameson, M.J.; Broaddus, W.C.; Lin, P.S.; Chung, T.D.

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that continued tobacco use during radiation therapy contributes to maintenance of neoplastic growth despite treatment with radiation. Nicotine is a cigarette component that is an established risk factor for many diseases, neoplastic and otherwise. The hypothesis of this work is that nicotine promotes the proliferation, migration, and radioresistance of human malignant glioma cells. The effect of nicotine on cellular proliferation, migration, signaling, and radiation sensitivity were evaluated for malignant glioma U87 and GBM12 cells by use of the AlamarBlue, scratch healing, and clonogenic survival assays. Signal transduction was assessed by immunoblotting for activated EGFR, extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), and AKT. At concentrations comparable with those found in chronic smokers, nicotine induced malignant glioma cell migration, growth, colony formation, and radioresistance. Nicotine increased phosphorylation of EGFR tyr992 , AKT ser473 , and ERK. These molecular effects were reduced by pharmacological inhibitors of EGFR, PI3K, and MEK. It was therefore concluded that nicotine stimulates the malignant behavior of glioma cells in vitro by activation of the EGFR and downstream AKT and ERK pathways. (author)

  8. Nicotine Dependence and Urinary Nicotine, Cotinine and Hydroxycotinine Levels in Daily Smokers

    OpenAIRE

    Van Overmeire, Ilse P. I.; De Smedt, Tom; Dendale, Paul; Nackaerts, Kristiaan; Vanacker, Hilde; Vanoeteren, Jan F. A.; Van Laethem, Danny M. G.; Van Loco, Joris; De Cremer, Koen A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotine dependence and smoking frequency are critical factors for smoking cessation. The aims of this study are (1) to determine if nicotine dependence Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND) scores are associated with urinary levels of nicotine metabolites, (2) to assess the relationship of hydroxycotinine/cotinine ratio with FTND score and cigarettes smoked per day (CPD), and (3) to identify significant predictors of cigarettes per day among biomarker concentrations and individual F...

  9. For Nicotine, Dose Matters | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) is frequently part of a person’s regimen for smoking cessation. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved use of this approach for 12 weeks in supervised quitting programs. Unfortunately for some patients, though, this length of time is not long enough to break their addiction to tobacco. 

  10. The effect of nicotine on reproduction and attachment of human gingival fibroblasts in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, M E; Sutherland, D E; Schuster, G S; Brennan, W A; O'Neal, R B; Strong, S L; Van Dyke, T E

    1993-07-01

    The ability of fibroblasts to reproduce and attach to teeth is of paramount importance in re-establishing the lost connective tissue attachment after periodontal therapy. This study examined the effect of nicotine, a major component of the particulate phase of tobacco smoke, on human gingival fibroblast (HGF) reproduction and attachment to tissue culture surfaces. Pooled HGF cultures made from explants of gingival biopsies were utilized between passages 5 and 10 and plated in 96-well plates at 1.0 x 10(4) cells per well. Cell numbers were determined using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-y)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT), which is a reflection of mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity. The concentrations of nicotine used were 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 microM, the average serum concentration for a smoker being approximately 0.1 microM. The effect of continuous nicotine exposure on HGF reproduction was determined by incubating cell cultures and media containing nicotine for up to 48 hours. Residual toxicity was determined by preincubating cells with nicotine for 1 or 6 hours. HGF suspensions and increasing concentrations of nicotine were added together to determine the effect on attachment. Results showed an enhanced effect of nicotine on HGF attachment, with increasing numbers of cells attaching with increasing nicotine concentrations, compared to the control. Low concentrations of nicotine had a stimulatory effect on cell replication, while higher concentrations of nicotine appear to have no significant effect on HGF reproduction. The responses of cells to some concentrations of nicotine may persist after its removal.

  11. Transferosomes - A vesicular transdermal delivery system for enhanced drug permeation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshmy Rajan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal administration of drugs is generally limited by the barrier function of the skin. Vesicular systems are one of the most controversial methods for transdermal delivery of active substances. The interest in designing transdermal delivery systems was relaunched after the discovery of elastic vesicles like transferosomes, ethosomes, cubosomes, phytosomes, etc. This paper presents the composition, mechanisms of penetration, manufacturing and characterization methods of transferosomes as transdermal delivery systems of active substances. For a drug to be absorbed and distributed into organs and tissues and eliminated from the body, it must pass through one or more biological membranes/barriers at various locations. Such a movement of drug across the membrane is called as drug transport. For the drugs to be delivered to the body, they should cross the membranous barrier. The concept of these delivery systems was designed in an attempt to concentrate the drug in the tissues of interest, while reducing the amount of drug in the remaining tissues. Hence, surrounding tissues are not affected by the drug. In addition, loss of drug does not happen due to localization of drug, leading to get maximum efficacy of the medication. Therefore, the phospholipid based carrier systems are of considerable interest in this era.

  12. Microneedle Coating Techniques for Transdermal Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Haj-Ahmad

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Drug administration via the transdermal route is an evolving field that provides an alternative to oral and parenteral routes of therapy. Several microneedle (MN based approaches have been developed. Among these, coated MNs (typically where drug is deposited on MN tips are a minimally invasive method to deliver drugs and vaccines through the skin. In this review, we describe several processes to coat MNs. These include dip coating, gas jet drying, spray coating, electrohydrodynamic atomisation (EHDA based processes and piezoelectric inkjet printing. Examples of process mechanisms, conditions and tested formulations are provided. As these processes are independent techniques, modifications to facilitate MN coatings are elucidated. In summary, the outcomes and potential value for each technique provides opportunities to overcome formulation or dosage form limitations. While there are significant developments in solid degradable MNs, coated MNs (through the various techniques described have potential to be utilized in personalized drug delivery via controlled deposition onto MN templates.

  13. Racial differences in the relationship between rate of nicotine metabolism and nicotine intake from cigarette smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kathryn C; Gubner, Noah R; Tyndale, Rachel F; Hawk, Larry W; Lerman, Caryn; George, Tony P; Cinciripini, Paul; Schnoll, Robert A; Benowitz, Neal L

    2016-09-01

    Rate of nicotine metabolism has been identified as an important factor influencing nicotine intake and can be estimated using the nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR), a validated biomarker of CYP2A6 enzyme activity. Individuals who metabolize nicotine faster (higher NMR) may alter their smoking behavior to titrate their nicotine intake in order to maintain similar levels of nicotine in the body compared to slower nicotine metabolizers. There are known racial differences in the rate of nicotine metabolism with African Americans on average having a slower rate of nicotine metabolism compared to Whites. The goal of this study was to determine if there are racial differences in the relationship between rate of nicotine metabolism and measures of nicotine intake assessed using multiple biomarkers of nicotine and tobacco smoke exposure. Using secondary analyses of the screening data collected in a recently completed clinical trial, treatment-seeking African American and White daily smokers (10 or more cigarettes per day) were grouped into NMR quartiles so that the races could be compared at the same NMR, even though the distribution of NMR within race differed. The results indicated that rate of nicotine metabolism was a more important factor influencing nicotine intake in White smokers. Specifically, Whites were more likely to titrate their nicotine intake based on the rate at which they metabolize nicotine. However, this relationship was not found in African Americans. Overall there was a greater step-down, linear type relationship between NMR groups and cotinine or cotinine/cigarette in African Americans, which is consistent with the idea that differences in blood cotinine levels between the African American NMR groups were primarily due to differences in CYP2A6 enzyme activity without titration of nicotine intake among faster nicotine metabolizers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Use of pharmacy data to evaluate smoking regulations' impact on sales of nicotine replacement therapies in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Kristina B; Mostashari, Farzad; Kerker, Bonnie D

    2005-06-01

    Recently, New York City and New York State increased cigarette excise taxes and New York City implemented a smoke-free workplace law. To assess the impact of these policies on smoking cessation in New York City, we examined over-the-counter sales of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) products. Pharmacy sales data were collected in real time as part of nontraditional surveillance activities. We used Poisson generalized estimating equations to analyze the effect of smoking-related policies on pharmacy-specific weekly sales of nicotine patches and gum. We assessed effect modification by pharmacy location. We observed increases in NRT product sales during the weeks of the cigarette tax increases and the smoke-free workplace law. Pharmacies in low-income areas generally had larger and more persistent increases in response to tax increases than those in higher-income areas. Real-time monitoring of existing nontraditional surveillance data, such as pharmacy sales of NRT products, can help assess the effects of public policies on cessation attempts. Cigarette tax increases and smoke-free workplace regulations were associated with increased smoking cessation attempts in New York City, particularly in low-income areas.

  15. Comparative In Vitro Toxicity Profile of Electronic and Tobacco Cigarettes, Smokeless Tobacco and Nicotine Replacement Therapy Products: E-Liquids, Extracts and Collected Aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Misra

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigs continues to increase worldwide in parallel with accumulating information on their potential toxicity and safety. In this study, an in vitro battery of established assays was used to examine the cytotoxicity, mutagenicity, genotoxicity and inflammatory responses of certain commercial e-cigs and compared to tobacco burning cigarettes, smokeless tobacco (SLT products and a nicotine replacement therapy (NRT product. The toxicity evaluation was performed on e-liquids and pad-collected aerosols of e-cigs, pad-collected smoke condensates of tobacco cigarettes and extracts of SLT and NRT products. In all assays, exposures with e-cig liquids and collected aerosols, at the doses tested, showed no significant activity when compared to tobacco burning cigarettes. Results for the e-cigs, with and without nicotine in two evaluated flavor variants, were very similar in all assays, indicating that the presence of nicotine and flavors, at the levels tested, did not induce any cytotoxic, genotoxic or inflammatory effects. The present findings indicate that neither the e-cig liquids and collected aerosols, nor the extracts of the SLT and NRT products produce any meaningful toxic effects in four widely-applied in vitro test systems, in which the conventional cigarette smoke preparations, at comparable exposures, are markedly cytotoxic and genotoxic.

  16. Chronic Nicotine Treatment During Adolescence Attenuates the Effects of Acute Nicotine in Adult Contextual Fear Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Erica D; Gould, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    Adolescent onset of nicotine abuse is correlated with worse chances at successful abstinence in adulthood. One reason for this may be due to enduring learning deficits resulting from nicotine use during adolescence. Previous work has indicated that chronic nicotine administration beginning in late adolescence (PND38) caused learning deficits in contextual fear when tested in adulthood. The purpose of this study was to determine if chronic nicotine treatment during adolescence would alter sensitivity to nicotine's cognitive enhancing properties in adulthood. C57BL/6J mice received saline or chronic nicotine (12.6mg/kg/day) during adolescence (postnatal day 38) or adulthood (postnatal day 54) for a period of 12 days. Following a 30-day protracted abstinence, mice received either an acute injection of saline or nicotine (0.045, 0.18, and 0.36mg/kg) prior to training and testing a mouse model of contextual fear. It was found that chronic nicotine administration in adult mice did not alter sensitivity to acute nicotine following a protracted abstinence. In adolescent mice, chronic nicotine administration disrupted adult learning and decreased sensitivity to acute nicotine in adulthood as only the highest dose tested (0.36mg/kg) was able to enhance contextual fear learning. These results suggest that adolescent nicotine exposure impairs learning in adulthood, which could increase the risk for continued nicotine use in adulthood by requiring administration of higher doses of nicotine to reverse learning impairments caused by adolescent nicotine exposure. Results from this study add to the growing body of literature suggesting chronic nicotine exposure during adolescence leads to impaired learning in adulthood and demonstrates that nicotine exposure during adolescence attenuates the cognitive enhancing effects of acute nicotine in adulthood, which suggests altered cholinergic function. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for

  17. Dextromethorphan interactions with histaminergic and serotonergic treatments to reduce nicotine self-administration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Scott A; Hall, Brandon J; Wells, Corinne; Slade, Susan; Jaskowski, Paul; Morrison, Margaret; Rezvani, Amir H; Rose, Jed E; Levin, Edward D

    2016-03-01

    Combining effective treatments with diverse mechanisms of action for smoking cessation may provide better therapy by targeting multiple points of control in the neural circuits underlying addiction. Previous research in a rat model has shown that dextromethorphan, which has α3β4 nicotinic and NMDA glutamatergic antagonist actions, significantly decreases nicotine self-administration. We have found in the rat model that the H1 histamine antagonist pyrilamine and the serotonin 5HT2C agonist lorcaserin also significantly reduce nicotine self-administration. The current studies were conducted to determine the interactive effects of dextromethorphan with pyrilamine and lorcaserin on nicotine self-administration in rats. Young adult female rats were fitted with jugular IV catheters and trained to self-administer a nicotine infusion dose of 0.03-mg/kg/infusion. In an initial dose-effect function study of dextromethorphan, we found a monotonic decrease in nicotine self-administration over a dose range of 1 to 30-mg/kg with the lowest effective dose of 3-mg/kg. Then, with two separate cohorts of rats, dextromethorphan (0, 3.3, and 10-mg/kg) interactions with pyrilamine (0, 4.43, and 13.3-mg/kg) were investigated as well as interactions with lorcaserin (0, 0.3125 and 0.625-mg/kg). In the pyrilamine-dextromethorphan interaction study, an acute dose of pyrilamine (13.3-mg/kg) as well as an acute dose of dextromethorphan caused a significant decrease in nicotine self-administration. There were mutually augmenting effects of these two drugs. The combination of dextromethorphan (10-mg/kg) and pyrilamine (13.3-mg/kg) significantly lowered nicotine self-administration relative to either 10-mg/kg of dextromethorphan alone (pdextromethorphan study, an acute dose of lorcaserin (0.312-mg/kg) as well as an acute dose of dextromethorphan (10-mg/kg) caused a significant decrease in nicotine self-administration replicating previous findings. Augmenting interactions were observed with

  18. Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walley, Susan C; Jenssen, Brian P

    2015-11-01

    Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) are rapidly growing in popularity among youth. ENDS are handheld devices that produce an aerosolized mixture from a solution typically containing concentrated nicotine, flavoring chemicals, and propylene glycol to be inhaled by the user. ENDS are marketed under a variety of names, most commonly electronic cigarettes and e-cigarettes. In 2014, more youth reported using ENDS than any other tobacco product. ENDS pose health risks to both users and nonusers. Nicotine, the major psychoactive ingredient in ENDS solutions, is both highly addictive and toxic. In addition to nicotine, other toxicants, carcinogens, and metal particles have been detected in solutions and aerosols of ENDS. Nonusers are involuntarily exposed to the emissions of these devices with secondhand and thirdhand aerosol. The concentrated and often flavored nicotine in ENDS solutions poses a poisoning risk for young children. Reports of acute nicotine toxicity from US poison control centers have been increasing, with at least 1 child death reported from unintentional exposure to a nicotine-containing ENDS solution. With flavors, design, and marketing that appeal to youth, ENDS threaten to renormalize and glamorize nicotine and tobacco product use. There is a critical need for ENDS regulation, legislative action, and counter promotion to protect youth. ENDS have the potential to addict a new generation of youth to nicotine and reverse more than 50 years of progress in tobacco control. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. Transdermal granisetron: a guide to its use in preventing nausea and vomiting induced by chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Gillian M; Duggan, Sean T; Curran, Monique P

    2012-09-01

    Transdermal granisetron (Sancuso®) is effective in the prevention of nausea and vomiting in patients with cancer who are receiving moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy for 3-5 days. Transdermal granisetron is noninferior to oral granisetron in this indication, and is generally well tolerated in this indication. Thus, transdermal granisetron provides a convenient option for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, with the potential to improve patient compliance.

  20. Brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are involved in stress-induced potentiation of nicotine reward in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Parastoo; Rezayof, Ameneh; Sardari, Maryam; Ghasemzadeh, Zahra

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the possible role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors of the dorsal hippocampus (CA1 regions), the medial prefrontal cortex or the basolateral amygdala in the effect of acute or sub-chronic stress on nicotine-induced conditioned place preference. Our results indicated that subcutaneous administration of nicotine (0.2 mg/kg) induced significant conditioned place preference. Exposure to acute or sub-chronic elevated platform stress potentiated the response of an ineffective dose of nicotine. Pre-conditioning intra-CA1 (0.5-4 µg/rat) or intra-medial prefrontal cortex (0.2-0.3 µg/rat) microinjection of mecamylamine (a non-selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist) reversed acute stress-induced potentiation of nicotine reward as measured in the conditioned place preference paradigm. By contrast, pre-conditioning intra-basolateral amygdala microinjection of mecamylamine (4 µg/rat) potentiated the effects of acute stress on nicotine reward. Our findings also showed that intra-CA1 or intra-medial prefrontal cortex, but not intra-basolateral amygdala, microinjection of mecamylamine (4 µg/rat) prevented the effect of sub-chronic stress on nicotine reward. These findings suggest that exposure to elevated platform stress potentiates the rewarding effect of nicotine which may be associated with the involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. It seems that there is a different contribution of the basolateral amygdala, the medial prefrontal cortex or the CA1 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in stress-induced potentiation of nicotine-induced conditioned place preference.

  1. Transdermal optogenetic peripheral nerve stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimon, Benjamin E.; Zorzos, Anthony N.; Bendell, Rhys; Harding, Alexander; Fahmi, Mina; Srinivasan, Shriya; Calvaresi, Peter; Herr, Hugh M.

    2017-06-01

    Objective: A fundamental limitation in both the scientific utility and clinical translation of peripheral nerve optogenetic technologies is the optical inaccessibility of the target nerve due to the significant scattering and absorption of light in biological tissues. To date, illuminating deep nerve targets has required implantable optical sources, including fiber-optic and LED-based systems, both of which have significant drawbacks. Approach: Here we report an alternative approach involving transdermal illumination. Utilizing an intramuscular injection of ultra-high concentration AAV6-hSyn-ChR2-EYFP in rats. Main results: We demonstrate transdermal stimulation of motor nerves at 4.4 mm and 1.9 mm depth with an incident laser power of 160 mW and 10 mW, respectively. Furthermore, we employ this technique to accurately control ankle position by modulating laser power or position on the skin surface. Significance: These results have the potential to enable future scientific optogenetic studies of pathologies implicated in the peripheral nervous system for awake, freely-moving animals, as well as a basis for future clinical studies.

  2. Comparative enhancing effects of electret with chemical enhancers on transdermal delivery of meloxicam in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, L L; Hou, X M; Li, G D; Jiang, J; Liang, Y Y; Xin, X

    2008-01-01

    Electret offers enhancing effect in transdermal drug delivery for altering of the arrangement of lipid molecules in the stratum corneum, forming many transient permeable apertures and enhancing the transdermal drug delivery. In this paper, meloxicam patch formulations were developed to make the comparative study of transdermal drug delivery between electret and chemical enhancers. Patches were made into control, electret, chemical enhancer and electret with chemical enhancer ones, according to the preparation procedure. The electret combined with chemical enhancer patch was designed to probe the incorporation between electret and chemical enhancer in transdermal drug delivery. The meloxicam release from the patch was found to increase in order of blank, chemical enhancer, electret and electret with chemical enhancer patch, in general.

  3. Randomized controlled trial of a web-based computer-tailored smoking cessation program as a supplement to nicotine patch therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strecher, Victor J; Shiffman, Saul; West, Robert

    2005-05-01

    To assess the efficacy of World Wide Web-based tailored behavioral smoking cessation materials among nicotine patch users. Two-group randomized controlled trial. World Wide Web in England and Republic of Ireland. A total of 3971 subjects who purchased a particular brand of nicotine patch and logged-on to use a free web-based behavioral support program. Web-based tailored behavioral smoking cessation materials or web-based non-tailored materials. Twenty-eight-day continuous abstinence rates were assessed by internet-based survey at 6-week follow-up and 10-week continuous rates at 12-week follow-up. Using three approaches to the analyses of 6- and 12-week outcomes, participants in the tailored condition reported clinically and statistically significantly higher continuous abstinence rates than participants in the non-tailored condition. In our primary analyses using as a denominator all subjects who logged-on to the treatment site at least once, continuous abstinence rates at 6 weeks were 29.0% in the tailored condition versus 23.9% in the non-tailored condition (OR = 1.30; P = 0.0006); at 12 weeks continuous abstinence rates were 22.8% versus 18.1%, respectively (OR = 1.34; P = 0.0006). Moreover, satisfaction with the program was significantly higher in the tailored than in the non-tailored condition. The results of this study demonstrate a benefit of the web-based tailored behavioral support materials used in conjunction with nicotine replacement therapy. A web-based program that collects relevant information from users and tailors the intervention to their specific needs had significant advantages over a web-based non-tailored cessation program.

  4. In vitro human skin permeation of endoxifen: potential for local transdermal therapy for primary prevention and carcinoma in situ of the breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee O

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Oukseub Lee1, David Ivancic1, Robert T Chatterton Jr2, Alfred W Rademaker3, Seema A Khan11Department of Surgery, 2Department of Obstetrics/Gynecology, 3Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAPurpose: Oral tamoxifen, a triphenylethylene (TPE, is useful for breast cancer prevention, but its adverse effects limit acceptance by women. Tamoxifen efficacy is related to its major metabolites 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT and N-desmethyl-4-hydroxytamoxifen (endoxifen [ENX]. Transdermal delivery of these to the breast may avert the toxicity of oral tamoxifen while maintaining efficacy. We evaluated the relative efficiency of skin permeation of 4-OHT and ENX in vitro, and tested oleic acid (OA as a permeation-enhancer.Methods: 4-OHT, ENX, and estradiol (E2 (0.2 mg/mL of 0.5 µCi 3H/mg were dissolved in 60% ethanol-phosphate buffer, ±OA (0.1%–5%. Permeation through EpiDermTM (Matek Corp, Ashland, MA and split-thickness human skin was calculated based on the amount of the agents recovered from the receiver fluid and skin using liquid scintillation counting over 24 hours.Results: In the EpiDerm model, the absorption of 4-OHT and ENX was 10%–11%; total penetration (TP was 26%–29% at 24 hours and was decreased by OA. In normal human skin, the absorption of 4-OHT and ENX was 0.3%; TP was 2%–4% at 24 hours. The addition of 1% OA improved the permeation of ENX significantly more than that of 4-OHT (P < 0.004; further titration of OA at 0.25%–0.5% further improved the permeation of ENX to a level similar to that of estradiol.Conclusion: The addition of OA to ENX results in a favorable rapid delivery equivalent to that of estradiol, a widely used transdermal hormone. The transdermal delivery of ENX to the breast should be further developed in preclinical and clinical studies.Keywords: endoxifen, breast cancer prevention, human skin, transdermal, oleic acid

  5. Nicotine Dependence and Urinary Nicotine, Cotinine and Hydroxycotinine Levels in Daily Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Overmeire, Ilse P I; De Smedt, Tom; Dendale, Paul; Nackaerts, Kristiaan; Vanacker, Hilde; Vanoeteren, Jan F A; Van Laethem, Danny M G; Van Loco, Joris; De Cremer, Koen A J

    2016-09-01

    Nicotine dependence and smoking frequency are critical factors for smoking cessation. The aims of this study are (1) to determine if nicotine dependence Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND) scores are associated with urinary levels of nicotine metabolites, (2) to assess the relationship of hydroxycotinine/cotinine ratio with FTND score and cigarettes smoked per day (CPD), and (3) to identify significant predictors of cigarettes per day among biomarker concentrations and individual FTND items. Urine samples and questionnaire data of 239 daily smokers were obtained. Nicotine, cotinine and hydroxycotinine urinary levels were determined by UPLC MS/MS.Multiple linear regression models were developed to explore the relationship between nicotine, cotinine, hydroxycotinine levels and separate FTND scores (for all six items). We found significant correlations between the different urinary biomarker concentrations, and the FTND score. The time before the first cigarette after waking (TTFC) was significantly associated with the nicotine, cotinine and hydroxycotinine concentrations. No association was found between the ratio of hydroxycotinine to cotinine and either the FTND or the CPD. A model including four FTND questions, sex, age, and the cotinine concentration, accounted for 45% of the variance of CPD. There are significant relationships between urinary levels of nicotine, cotinine, and hydroxycotinine and the FTND score. Especially the FTND question about TTFC is relevant for explaining the biomarker concentrations. CPD (below 15) was significantly explained by four FTND dependence items and urinary cotinine levels in a regression model. We investigated associations between urinary levels of nicotine, cotinine, and hydroxycotinine in daily smokers and the FTND scores for nicotine dependence. We did not find association between the hydroxycotinine/cotinine ratio and CPD. We developed a model that explains the cigarettes smoked daily (CPD) in a group of light

  6. MICRONEEDLES AS A WAY TO INCREASE THE TRANSDERMAL INSULIN DELIVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Kuznetsova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to prove the possibility of increasing the diffusion of insulin through the skin in vitro with pre-applying microneedles.Materials and methods. Microemulsion for transdermal therapeutic system of insulin has been used in vitro studies. Genetically engineered human insulin has been used in this research. Applicators with silicon microneedles (40 and 150 microns long have been used to enhance the diffusion fl ux of drug substance. The dynamics of insulin release from the transdermal therapeutic systems through the rabbit skin has been studied in glass Franz diffusion cells in analyzer diffusion of drugs HDT 1000 (Copley Scientifi c Ltd., UK. Insulin has been labeled with fl uorescein isothiocyanate to separate the insulin absorption spectrum from the spectra of native skin proteins at spectrophotometer measurements.Results. The amounts of insulin delivered through the skin in vitro after previous application of microneedles of 40 and 150 microns are 282.5 ± 61.1 and 372.3 ± 7.0 microgram, respectively. This is 1.4 and 1.9 times more than in the transdermal system without microneedles.Conclusion. The conditions for increasing the diffusion of insulin through the skin in a model transdermal therapeutic system with microneedles (length – 150 microns, duration of pre-application – 1 hour have been found.

  7. Formulation, in vitro and in vivo evaluation of transdermal patches containing risperidone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Geeta; Dhawan, Sanju; Hari Kumar, S L

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of oral risperidone treatment in prevention of schizophrenia is well known. However, oral side effects and patient compliance is always a problem for schizophrenics. In this study, risperidone was formulated into matrix transdermal patches to overcome these problems. The formulation factors for such patches, including eudragit RL 100 and eudragit RS 100 as matrix forming polymers, olive oil, groundnut oil and jojoba oil in different concentrations as enhancers and amount of drug loaded were investigated. The transdermal patches containing risperidone were prepared by solvent casting method and characterized for physicochemical and in vitro permeation studies through excised rat skin. Among the tested preparations, formulations with 20% risperidone, 3:2 ERL 100 and ERS 100 as polymers, mixture of olive oil and jojoba oil as enhancer, exhibited greatest cumulative amount of drug permeated (1.87 ± 0.09 mg/cm(2)) in 72 h, so batch ROJ was concluded as optimized formulation and assessed for pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and skin irritation potential. The pharmacokinetic characteristics of the optimized risperidone patch were determined using rabbits, while orally administered risperidone in solution was used for comparison. The calculated relative bioavailability of risperidone transdermal patch was 115.20% with prolonged release of drug. Neuroleptic efficacy of transdermal formulation was assessed by rota-rod and grip test in comparison with control and marketed oral formulations with no skin irritation. This suggests the transdermal application of risperidone holds promise for improved bioavailability and better management of schizophrenia in long-term basis.

  8. Status of surfactants as penetration enhancers in transdermal drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iti Som

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfactants are found in many existing therapeutic, cosmetic, and agro-chemical preparations. In recent years, surfactants have been employed to enhance the permeation rates of several drugs via transdermal route. The application of transdermal route to a wider range of drugs is limited due to significant barrier to penetration across the skin which is associated with the outermost stratum corneum layer. Surfactants have effects on the permeability characteristics of several biological membranes including skin. They have the potential to solubilize lipids within the stratum corneum. The penetration of the surfactant molecule into the lipid lamellae of the stratum corneum is strongly dependent on the partitioning behavior and solubility of surfactant. Surfactants ranging from hydrophobic agents such as oleic acid to hydrophilic sodium lauryl sulfate have been tested as permeation enhancer to improve drug delivery. This article reviews the status of surfactants as permeation enhancer in transdermal drug delivery of various drugs.

  9. Conductive polymer nanotube patch for fast and controlled in vivo transdermal drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thao M.

    Transdermal drug delivery has created new applications for existing therapies and offered an alternative to the traditional oral route where drugs can prematurely metabolize in the liver causing adverse side effects. Opening the transdermal delivery route to large hydrophilic drugs is one of the greatest challenges due to the hydrophobicity of the skin. However, the ability to deliver hydrophilic drugs using a transdermal patch would provide a solution to problems of other delivery methods for hydrophilic drugs. The switching of conductive polymers (CP) between redox states cause simultaneous changes in the polymer charge, conductivity, and volume—properties that can all be exploited in the biomedical field of controlled drug delivery. Using the template synthesis method, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT) nanotubes were synthesized electrochemically and a transdermal drug delivery patch was successfully designed and developed. In vitro and in vivo uptake and release of hydrophilic drugs were investigated. The relationship between the strength of the applied potential and rate of drug release were also investigated. Results revealed that the strength of the applied potential is proportional to the rate of drug release; therefore one can control the rate of drug release by controlling the applied potential. The in vitro studies focused on the kinetics of the drug delivery system. It was determined that the drug released mainly followed zero-order kinetics. In addition, it was determined that applying a releasing potential to the transdermal drug delivery system lead to a higher release rate constant (up to 7 times greater) over an extended period of time (˜24h). In addition, over 24 hours, an average of 80% more model drug molecules were released with an applied potential than without. The in vivo study showed that the drug delivery system was capable of delivering model hydrophilic drugs molecules through the dermis layer of the skin within 30 minutes

  10. Use of granisetron transdermal system in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuca, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Until now only intravenous and oral formulations of 5HT 3 receptor antagonists have been available. Recently a new formulation of a 5HT 3 receptor antagonist, transdermal granisetron, has been developed, and approved by the FDA. Three phase I studies to evaluate its pharmacokinetic profile have shown that granisetron administered by a transdermal delivery system is absorbed by passive diffusion and maximal concentration is reached 48 hours after patch application. The patch of 52 cm 2 , which contains 34.3 mg of granisetron, releases 3.3 mg of the drug every day and maintains a stable average plasma concentration of 2.2 ng/mL over 6 days, similar to levels obtained with 2 mg of oral granisetron, administered every day during the same period of time. Two randomized as yet unpublished clinical trials (phase II/III) have been conducted to evaluate the antiemetic efficacy of transdermal granisetron in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, in patients receiving moderately and highly emetogenic chemotherapy, compared with 2 mg of oral granisetron. More than 800 cancer patients were included in the trials. The rate of complete control of acute emesis was 49% for the phase II trial and 60% for the phase III trial. Neither trial showed a statistically significant difference between transdermal and oral granisetron. The control of delayed emesis was observed in 46% of patients, and there were no statistically significant differences between transdermal and oral granisetron. The most common adverse effects in both trials were constipation (<7%) and headache (<1%); there were no statistically significant differences between transdermal and oral granisetron. These data show that transdermal granisetron is effective and safe in controlling acute emesis induced by chemotherapy with both moderate and high emetogenic potential. Efficacy and safety of transdermal granisetron are fully comparable with that of oral granisetron. More clinical trials using regimens of 2 or 3 drugs

  11. Electronic cigarettes and nicotine clinical pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Megan J; Hoffman, Allison C

    2014-05-01

    To review the available literature evaluating electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) nicotine clinical pharmacology in order to understand the potential impact of e-cigarettes on individual users, nicotine dependence and public health. Literature searches were conducted between 1 October 2012 and 30 September 2013 using key terms in five electronic databases. Studies were included in the review if they were in English and publicly available; non-clinical studies, conference abstracts and studies exclusively measuring nicotine content in e-cigarette cartridges were excluded from the review. Nicotine yields from automated smoking machines suggest that e-cigarettes deliver less nicotine per puff than traditional cigarettes, and clinical studies indicate that e-cigarettes deliver only modest nicotine concentrations to the inexperienced e-cigarette user. However, current e-cigarette smokers are able to achieve systemic nicotine and/or cotinine concentrations similar to those produced from traditional cigarettes. Therefore, user experience is critically important for nicotine exposure, and may contribute to the products' ability to support and maintain nicotine dependence. Knowledge about e-cigarette nicotine pharmacology remains limited. Because a user's e-cigarette experience may significantly impact nicotine delivery, future nicotine pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies should be conducted in experienced users to accurately assess the products' impact on public health.

  12. Electronic cigarettes and nicotine clinical pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Megan J; Hoffman, Allison C

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the available literature evaluating electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) nicotine clinical pharmacology in order to understand the potential impact of e-cigarettes on individual users, nicotine dependence and public health. Methods Literature searches were conducted between 1 October 2012 and 30 September 2013 using key terms in five electronic databases. Studies were included in the review if they were in English and publicly available; non-clinical studies, conference abstracts and studies exclusively measuring nicotine content in e-cigarette cartridges were excluded from the review. Results Nicotine yields from automated smoking machines suggest that e-cigarettes deliver less nicotine per puff than traditional cigarettes, and clinical studies indicate that e-cigarettes deliver only modest nicotine concentrations to the inexperienced e-cigarette user. However, current e-cigarette smokers are able to achieve systemic nicotine and/or cotinine concentrations similar to those produced from traditional cigarettes. Therefore, user experience is critically important for nicotine exposure, and may contribute to the products’ ability to support and maintain nicotine dependence. Conclusions Knowledge about e-cigarette nicotine pharmacology remains limited. Because a user's e-cigarette experience may significantly impact nicotine delivery, future nicotine pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies should be conducted in experienced users to accurately assess the products’ impact on public health. PMID:24732160

  13. Decreased sensitivity to nicotine-induced seizures as a consequence of nicotine pretreatment in long-sleep and short-sleep mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fiebre, C M; Collins, A C

    1988-01-01

    Male and female long-sleep (LS) and short-sleep (SS) mice were pretreated with a subseizure-producing dose of nicotine (2.0 mg/kg) 7.5, 15 and 30 minutes prior to challenge with seizure-producing doses of this drug. Nicotine pretreated animals were less susceptible to nicotine-induced seizures than were saline pretreated animals. The latency to seizure following nicotine challenge was greater in nicotine pretreated animals than in saline controls. Nicotine pretreated LS mice show a greater decrease in nicotine-induced seizure susceptibility than do nicotine pretreated SS mice. This decrease in seizure susceptibility is consistent with induction of nicotinic receptor desensitization via nicotine pretreatment. It is hypothesized that LS and SS mice might differ in sensitivity to nicotine in part because they differ in baseline levels of desensitized versus functional nicotinic receptors.

  14. Effect of ispronicline, a neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist, in subjects with age associated memory impairment (AAMI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Geoffrey C; Inglis, Fraser; Kuchibhatla, Ramana; Sharma, Tonmoy; Tomlinson, Mark; Wamsley, James

    2007-03-01

    Cognitive decline seen in the normal elderly is associated with selective loss of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Nicotine given either by inhalation or transdermally helps cognition, but unacceptable side effects limit its utility. The present study assessed the safety, tolerability and effect on cognition of ispronicline, a highly selective partial agonist at the 4beta2 nAChR, in elderly subjects (n =76) with age associated memory impairment (AAMI). This double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study explored ascending oral doses of ispronicline in the range 50-150 mg given as a single morning dose for a period of 3 weeks. Pharmacokinetics (PK) were assessed, as well as cognitive function measured by means of the Cognitive Drug Research (CDR) computerized test battery. Ispronicline had a favourable safety profile and was well tolerated at doses below 150 mg. No effect of clinical importance was seen on biochemistry, haematology, urine analysis, vital signs, electrocardiogram (ECG) or Holter monitoring. The most frequent drug induced adverse event was light-headedness (dizziness). A beneficial effect was seen on cognition across the dose range. This was most marked at 50 mg on factors measuring attention and episodic memory. PK analysis indicated a plasma Cmax range of 5-25/35 ng/ml ispronicline was associated with the most beneficial effect. These early results demonstrate ispronicline was well tolerated and did not display the side effects typical of nicotine. Ispronicline also had a beneficial effect on cognition in subjects with AAMI. This was seen most strongly in a Cmax range that had been predicted from pre-clinical animal studies.

  15. [Using dynamic magnetotherapy and transdermal electroneurostimulation in the combined treatment of patients with mandibular fractures and concomitant periodontal inflammatory diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepilin, A V; Erokina, N L; Rogatina, T V; Khlusov, I Iu

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare results of dynamic magnetotherapy (DMT), transdermal electroneurostimulation (TDENS), and traditional ultrahigh frequency (UHF) therapy in 473 patients with mandibular fractures and concomitant inflammatory diseases of paradontium. The parameters measured in the study included hygienic and paradontal indices, microcirculation patterns (using laser Doppler flowmetry), and the degree of mandibular fragment consolidation. It was shown that combined treatment with DMT and TDENS using an AMO-ATOS-E apparatus permits to eliminate clinical symptoms of paradontal inflammatory diseases twice as fast as traditional ultrahigh frequency therapy and ensures a two-fold reduction in the frequency of complications.

  16. CHRNA3 genotype, nicotine dependence, lung function and disease in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Bojesen, Stig E

    2012-01-01

    The CHRNA3 rs1051730 polymorphism has been associated to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), lung cancer and nicotine dependence in case-control studies with high smoking exposure; however, its influence on lung function and COPD severity in the general population is largely unknown. We...... genotyped 57,657 adult individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study, of whom 34,592 were ever-smokers. Information on spirometry, hospital admissions, smoking behaviour and use of nicotinic replacement therapy was recorded. In homozygous (11%), heterozygous (44%) and noncarrier (45%) ever...

  17. Sympathomimetic Effects of Acute E-Cigarette Use: Role of Nicotine and Non-Nicotine Constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moheimani, Roya S; Bhetraratana, May; Peters, Kacey M; Yang, Benjamin K; Yin, Fen; Gornbein, Jeffrey; Araujo, Jesus A; Middlekauff, Holly R

    2017-09-20

    Chronic electronic (e) cigarette users have increased resting cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and increased susceptibility to oxidative stress. The purpose of the present study is to determine the role of nicotine versus non-nicotine constituents in e-cigarette emissions in causing these pathologies in otherwise healthy humans. Thirty-three healthy volunteers who were not current e-cigarette or tobacco cigarette smokers were studied. On different days, each participant used an e-cigarette with nicotine, an e-cigarette without nicotine, or a sham control. Cardiac sympathetic nerve activity was determined by heart rate variability, and susceptibility to oxidative stress was determined by plasma paraoxonase activity. Following exposure to the e-cigarette with nicotine, but not to the e-cigarette without nicotine or the sham control, there was a significant and marked shift in cardiac sympathovagal balance towards sympathetic predominance. The decrease in high-frequency component and the increases in the low-frequency component and the low-frequency to high-frequency ratio were significantly greater following exposure to the e-cigarette with nicotine compared with exposure to the e-cigarette without nicotine or to sham control. Oxidative stress, as estimated by plasma paraoxonase, did not increase following any of the 3 exposures. The acute sympathomimetic effect of e-cigarettes is attributable to the inhaled nicotine, not to non-nicotine constituents in e-cigarette aerosol, recapitulating the same heart rate variability pattern associated with increased cardiac risk in multiple populations with and without known cardiac disease. Evidence of oxidative stress, as estimated by plasma paraoxonase activity, was not uncovered following acute e-cigarette exposure. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  18. Kefir protective effects against nicotine cessation-induced anxiety and cognition impairments in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noori, Negin; Bangash, Mohammad Yasan; Motaghinejad, Majid; Hosseini, Pantea; Noudoost, Behshad

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine as one of the potent psychostimulant drugs is characterized by its parasympathomimetic activity. Upon the abrupt discontinuation of nicotine intake, a number of symptoms such as anxiety, depression and cognition impairment develop. Kefir as a food supplement is rich in tryptophan. In this study, we have evaluated the effects of Kefir on nicotine cessation-induced anxiety, depression and cognition impairment. Forty adult male rats were divided into four groups. All the groups received 6 mg/kg/day of nicotine for 17 days and then the negative control groups got 5 mg/kg/day of normal saline. The positive control groups were given 40 mg/kg/day of Sertraline HCl for 7 days. The group treated with Cow Milk Kefir (CMK) and Soy Milk Kefir (SMK) received 5 mg/kg/day for 7 days. On the 25(th) day, Elevated Plus Maze (EPM), Open Field Test (OFT) and Forced Swim Test (FST) were used to investigate anxiety and depression. In addition, Moris Water Maze was applied to evaluate learning and memory in the animals between the 20(th) and 25(th) days. The results showed that administration of CMK, SMK and Sertraline had higher anti-depression and anxiolytic effects on nicotine withdrawal-induced depression and anxiety in rats (P Kefir had a potential effect on the treatment of nicotine cessation-induced depression, anxiety and cognition impairment in the animal model. Kefir may be useful for adjunct therapy for nicotine abandonment treatment protocols.

  19. Topical and transdermal drug delivery: principles and practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Benson, Heather A. E; Watkinson, Adam C

    2012-01-01

    .... Providing an overview of the current science in drug and cosmetic application to and through the skin, Topical and Transdermal Drug Delivery includes treatment of skin conditions, skin permeation...

  20. 'Real-world' compensatory behaviour with low nicotine concentration e-liquid: subjective effects and nicotine, acrolein and formaldehyde exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawkins, Lynne; Cox, Sharon; Goniewicz, Maciej; McRobbie, Hayden; Kimber, Catherine; Doig, Mira; Kośmider, Leon

    2018-06-07

    To compare the effects of i) high versus low nicotine concentration e-liquid, ii) fixed versus adjustable power and iii) the interaction between the two on: a) vaping behaviour, b) subjective effects, c) nicotine intake, and d) exposure to acrolein and formaldehyde in e-cigarette users vaping in their everyday setting. Counterbalanced, repeated measures with four conditions: i) low nicotine (6 mg/mL)/fixed power; ii) low nicotine/adjustable power; iii) high nicotine (18 mg/mL)/fixed power; iv) high nicotine/adjustable power. London and the South East, England. Twenty experienced e-cigarette users (recruited between September 2016 and February 2017) vaped ad libitum using an eVic Supreme™ with a 'Nautilus Aspire' tank over four weeks (one week per condition). Puffing patterns (daily puff number [PN], puff duration [PD], inter-puff interval [IPI]), mL of e-liquid consumed, changes to power (where permitted), and subjective effects (urge to vape, nicotine withdrawal symptoms) were measured in each condition. Nicotine intake was measured via salivary cotinine. 3-hydroxypropylmercapturic acid (3-HPMA), a metabolite of the toxicant acrolein, and formate, a metabolite of the carcinogen formaldehyde, were measured in urine. There was a significant nicotine concentration x power interaction for PD (p<0.01). PD was longer with low nicotine/fixed power compared with i) high nicotine/fixed power (p< 0.001 and ii) low nicotine/adjustable power (p< 0.01). PN and liquid consumed were higher in the low versus high nicotine condition (main effect of nicotine, p<0.05). Urge to vape and withdrawal symptoms were lower, and nicotine intake was higher, in the high nicotine condition (main effects of nicotine: p<0.01). Whilst acrolein levels did not differ, there was a significant nicotine x power interaction for formaldehyde (p<0.05). Use of a lower nicotine concentration e-liquid may be associated with compensatory behaviour (e.g., higher number and duration of puffs) and increases

  1. Predictors of the nicotine reinforcement threshold, compensation, and elasticity of demand in a rodent model of nicotine reduction policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenstein, Patricia E; Burroughs, Danielle; Roiko, Samuel A; Pentel, Paul R; LeSage, Mark G

    2015-06-01

    The FDA is considering reducing the nicotine content in tobacco products as a population-based strategy to reduce tobacco addiction. Research is needed to determine the threshold level of nicotine needed to maintain smoking and the extent of compensatory smoking that could occur during nicotine reduction. Sources of variability in these measures across sub-populations also need to be identified so that policies can take into account the risks and benefits of nicotine reduction in vulnerable populations. The present study examined these issues in a rodent nicotine self-administration model of nicotine reduction policy to characterize individual differences in nicotine reinforcement thresholds, degree of compensation, and elasticity of demand during progressive reduction of the unit nicotine dose. The ability of individual differences in baseline nicotine intake and nicotine pharmacokinetics to predict responses to dose reduction was also examined. Considerable variability in the reinforcement threshold, compensation, and elasticity of demand was evident. High baseline nicotine intake was not correlated with the reinforcement threshold, but predicted less compensation and less elastic demand. Higher nicotine clearance predicted low reinforcement thresholds, greater compensation, and less elastic demand. Less elastic demand also predicted lower reinforcement thresholds. These findings suggest that baseline nicotine intake, nicotine clearance, and the essential value of nicotine (i.e. elasticity of demand) moderate the effects of progressive nicotine reduction in rats and warrant further study in humans. They also suggest that smokers with fast nicotine metabolism may be more vulnerable to the risks of nicotine reduction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Predictors of the nicotine reinforcement threshold, compensation, and elasticity of demand in a rodent model of nicotine reduction policy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenstein, Patricia E.; Burroughs, Danielle; Roiko, Samuel A.; Pentel, Paul R.; LeSage, Mark G.

    2015-01-01

    Background The FDA is considering reducing the nicotine content in tobacco products as a population-based strategy to reduce tobacco addiction. Research is needed to determine the threshold level of nicotine needed to maintain smoking and the extent of compensatory smoking that could occur during nicotine reduction. Sources of variability in these measures across sub-populations also need to be identified so that policies can take into account the risks and benefits of nicotine reduction in vulnerable populations. Methods The present study examined these issues in a rodent nicotine self- administration model of nicotine reduction policy to characterize individual differences in nicotine reinforcement thresholds, degree of compensation, and elasticity of demand during progressive reduction of the unit nicotine dose. The ability of individual differences in baseline nicotine intake and nicotine pharmacokinetics to predict responses to dose reduction was also examined. Results Considerable variability in the reinforcement threshold, compensation, and elasticity of demand was evident. High baseline nicotine intake was not correlated with the reinforcement threshold, but predicted less compensation and less elastic demand. Higher nicotine clearance predicted low reinforcement thresholds, greater compensation, and less elastic demand. Less elastic demand also predicted lower reinforcement thresholds. Conclusions These findings suggest that baseline nicotine intake, nicotine clearance, and the essential value of nicotine (i.e. elasticity of demand) moderate the effects of progressive nicotine reduction in rats and warrant further study in humans. They also suggest that smokers with fast nicotine metabolism may be more vulnerable to the risks of nicotine reduction. PMID:25891231

  3. Transdermal rivastigmine: management of cutaneous adverse events and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenspoon, Jill; Herrmann, Nathan; Adam, David N

    2011-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder resulting in part from the degeneration of cholinergic neurons in the brain. Rivastigmine, a cholinesterase inhibitor, is commonly used as a treatment for dementia due to its ability to moderate cholinergic neurotransmission; however, treatment with oral rivastigmine can lead to gastrointestinal adverse effects such as nausea and vomiting. Transdermal administration of rivastigmine can minimize these adverse effects by providing continuous delivery of the medication, while maintaining the effectiveness of the oral treatment. While the transdermal form of rivastigmine has been found to have fewer systemic adverse effects compared with the oral form, cutaneous reactions, such as contact dermatitis, can lead to discontinuation of the drug in its transdermal form. Lack of patient compliance with regard to applying the patch to the designated site, applying the patch for the correct length of time or rotating patch application sites increases the risk of cutaneous adverse reactions. This article outlines the diagnosis and management of irritant contact dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis secondary to transdermal rivastigmine. The large majority of reactions to transdermal patches are of an irritant type, which can be diagnosed clinically by the presence of a pruritic, erythematous, eczematous plaque strictly confined to the borders of the patch. In contrast, an allergic reaction can be differentiated by the presence of vesicles and/or oedema, erythema beyond the boundaries of the transdermal patch and lack of improvement of the lesion 48 hours after removal of the offending treatment. By encouraging the patient to follow a regular rotation schedule for the patch, and using lipid-based emollients for irritant dermatitis and pre- and post-treatment topical corticosteroids for allergic dermatitis, cutaneous reactions can often be alleviated and patients can continue with their medication regimen. Other

  4. Synthesis and characterization of modified starch/polybutadiene as novel transdermal drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saboktakin, Mohammad Reza; Akhyari, Shahab; Nasirov, Fizuli A

    2014-08-01

    Transdermal drug delivery systems are topically administered medicaments in the form of patches that deliver drugs for systemic effects at a predetermined and controlled rate. It works very simply in which drug is applied inside the patch and it is worn on skin for long period of time. Polymer matrix, drug, permeation enhancers are the main components of transdermal drug delivery systems. The objective of the present study was to develop the modified starch and 1,4-cis polybutadiene nanoparticles as novel polymer matrix system. We have been studied the properties of a novel transdermal drug delivery system with clonidine as drug model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Optimization of Biopolymer Based Transdermal Films of Metoclopramide as an Alternative Delivery Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betül Aktar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to develop and to characterize sodium alginate based matrix-type transdermal films of metoclopramide hydrochloride (MTC in order to improve patient compliance to treatment. The suitability of sodium alginate was shown to be a natural film former in terms of the physicochemical, mechanical, and bioadhesive features of the MTC loaded transdermal films. Terpinolene provided the highest drug release among the different terpenes (nerolidol, eucalyptol, dl-limonene, or terpinolene assessed as enhancer. Attenuated Total Reflectance Infrared (ATR-FTIR spectroscopy analysis performed to evaluate the effect of the transdermal films on skin barrier confirmed enhancer induced lipid bilayer disruption in stratum corneum, indicating its permeation enhancement effect.

  6. Recent trends in the transdermal delivery of therapeutic agents used for the management of neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ita, Kevin

    2017-06-01

    With the increasing proportion of the global geriatric population, it becomes obvious that neurodegenerative diseases will become more widespread. From an epidemiological standpoint, it is necessary to develop new therapeutic agents for the management of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and other neurodegenerative disorders. An important approach in this regard involves the use of the transdermal route. With transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDS), it is possible to modulate the pharmacokinetic profiles of these medications and improve patient compliance. Transdermal drug delivery has also been shown to be useful for drugs with short half-life and low or unpredictable bioavailability. In this review, several transdermal drug delivery enhancement technologies are being discussed in relation to the delivery of medications used for the management of neurodegenerative disorders.

  7. Use of granisetron transdermal system in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Tuca

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Albert TucaPalliative Care Hospital Team, Palliative Care Department, Institut Català d’Oncologia, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: Until now only intravenous and oral formulations of 5HT3 receptor antagonists have been available. Recently a new formulation of a 5HT3 receptor antagonist, transdermal granisetron, has been developed, and approved by the FDA. Three phase I studies to evaluate its pharmacokinetic profile have shown that granisetron administered by a transdermal delivery system is absorbed by passive diffusion and maximal concentration is reached 48 hours after patch application. The patch of 52 cm2, which contains 34.3 mg of granisetron, releases 3.3 mg of the drug every day and maintains a stable average plasma concentration of 2.2 ng/mL over 6 days, similar to levels obtained with 2 mg of oral granisetron, administered every day during the same period of time. Two randomized as yet unpublished clinical trials (phase II/III have been conducted to evaluate the antiemetic efficacy of transdermal granisetron in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, in patients receiving moderately and highly emetogenic chemotherapy, compared with 2 mg of oral granisetron. More than 800 cancer patients were included in the trials. The rate of complete control of acute emesis was 49% for the phase II trial and 60% for the phase III trial. Neither trial showed a statistically significant difference between transdermal and oral granisetron. The control of delayed emesis was observed in 46% of patients, and there were no statistically significant differences between transdermal and oral granisetron. The most common adverse effects in both trials were constipation (<7% and headache (<1%; there were no statistically significant differences between transdermal and oral granisetron. These data show that transdermal granisetron is effective and safe in controlling acute emesis induced by chemotherapy with both moderate and high

  8. Turning theory into practice: the development of modern transdermal drug delivery systems and future trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perumal, O; Murthy, S N; Kalia, Y N

    2013-01-01

    Despite its remarkable barrier function, the skin remains an attractive site for systemic drug delivery given its easy accessibility, large surface area and the possibility to bypass the gastrointestinal tract and the liver and so modify drug absorption kinetics. The pioneering work of Scheuplein, Higuchi and others in the 1960s helped to explain the processes involved in passive percutaneous absorption and led to the development of mathematical models to describe transdermal drug delivery. The intervening years have seen these theories turned to practice and a significant number of transdermal systems are now available including some that employ active drug delivery. This review briefly discusses the evolution of transdermal therapeutic systems over the years and the potential of newer transdermal technologies to deliver hydrophilic drugs and macromolecules through the skin. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Toward a comprehensive long term nicotine policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, N; Henningfield, J E; Benowitz, N L; Connolly, G N; Dresler, C; Fagerstrom, K; Jarvis, M J; Boyle, P

    2005-06-01

    Global tobacco deaths are high and rising. Tobacco use is primarily driven by nicotine addiction. Overall tobacco control policy is relatively well agreed upon but a long term nicotine policy has been less well considered and requires further debate. Reaching consensus is important because a nicotine policy is integral to the target of reducing tobacco caused disease, and the contentious issues need to be resolved before the necessary political changes can be sought. A long term and comprehensive nicotine policy is proposed here. It envisages both reducing the attractiveness and addictiveness of existing tobacco based nicotine delivery systems as well as providing alternative sources of acceptable clean nicotine as competition for tobacco. Clean nicotine is defined as nicotine free enough of tobacco toxicants to pass regulatory approval. A three phase policy is proposed. The initial phase requires regulatory capture of cigarette and smoke constituents liberalising the market for clean nicotine; regulating all nicotine sources from the same agency; and research into nicotine absorption and the role of tobacco additives in this process. The second phase anticipates clean nicotine overtaking tobacco as the primary source of the drug (facilitated by use of regulatory and taxation measures); simplification of tobacco products by limitation of additives which make tobacco attractive and easier to smoke (but tobacco would still be able to provide a satisfying dose of nicotine). The third phase includes a progressive reduction in the nicotine content of cigarettes, with clean nicotine freely available to take the place of tobacco as society's main nicotine source.

  10. Transport efficiency in transdermal drug delivery: What is the role of fluid microstructure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liuzzi, Roberta; Carciati, Antonio; Guido, Stefano; Caserta, Sergio

    2016-03-01

    Interaction of microstructured fluids with skin is ubiquitous in everyday life, from the use of cosmetics, lotions, and drugs, to personal care with detergents or soaps. The formulation of microstructured fluids is crucial for the control of the transdermal transport. In biomedical applications transdermal delivery is an efficient approach, alternative to traditional routes like oral and parenteral administration, for local release of drugs. Poor skin permeability, mainly due to its outer layer, which acts as the first barrier against the entry of external compounds, greatly limits the applicability of transdermal delivery. In this review, we focus on recent studies on the improvement of skin transport efficiency by using microemulsions (ME). Quantitative techniques, which are able to investigate both skin morphology and penetration processes, are also reviewed. ME are increasingly used as transdermal systems due to their low preparation cost, stability and high bioavailability. ME may act as penetration enhancers for many active principles, but ME microstructure should be chosen appropriately considering several factors such as ratio and type of ingredients and physic-chemical properties of the active components. ME microstructure is strongly affected by the flow conditions applied during processing, or during spreading and rubbing onto skin. Although the role played by ME microstructure has been generally recognized, the skin transport mechanisms associated with different ME microstructures are still to be elucidated and further investigations are required to fully exploit the potential of ME in transdermal delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Fractional Ablative Laser Followed by Transdermal Acoustic Pressure Wave Device to Enhance the Drug Delivery of Aminolevulinic Acid: In Vivo Fluorescence Microscopy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waibel, Jill S; Rudnick, Ashley; Nousari, Carlos; Bhanusali, Dhaval G

    2016-01-01

    Topical drug delivery is the foundation of all dermatological therapy. Laser-assisted drug delivery (LAD) using fractional ablative laser is an evolving modality that may allow for a greater precise depth of penetration by existing topical medications, as well as more efficient transcutaneous delivery of large drug molecules. Additional studies need to be performed using energy-driven methods that may enhance drug delivery in a synergistic manner. Processes such as iontophoresis, electroporation, sonophoresis, and the use of photomechanical waves aid in penetration. This study evaluated in vivo if there is increased efficacy of fractional CO2 ablative laser with immediate acoustic pressure wave device. Five patients were treated and biopsied at 4 treatment sites: 1) topically applied aminolevulinic acid (ALA) alone; 2) fractional ablative CO2 laser and topical ALA alone; 3) fractional ablative CO2 laser and transdermal acoustic pressure wave device delivery system; and 4) topical ALA with transdermal delivery system. The comparison of the difference in the magnitude of diffusion with both lateral spread of ALA and depth diffusion of ALA was measured by fluorescence microscopy. For fractional ablative CO2 laser, ALA, and transdermal acoustic pressure wave device, the protoporphyrin IX lateral fluorescence was 0.024 mm on average vs 0.0084 mm for fractional ablative CO2 laser and ALA alone. The diffusion for the acoustic pressure wave device was an order of magnitude greater. We found that our combined approach of fractional ablative CO2 laser paired with the transdermal acoustic pressure wave device increased the depth of penetration of ALA.

  12. Insight into nicotine addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahil Handa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of the epidemic of nicotine addiction in India and other nations is a global public health tragedy of untoward proportions. Smoking or chewing tobacco can seriously affect general, as well as oral health. Smoking-caused disease is a consequence of exposure to toxins in tobacco smoke and addiction to nicotine is the proximate cause of these diseases. This article focuses on nicotine as a determinant of addiction to tobacco and the pharmacologic effects of nicotine that sustain cigarette smoking. The pharmacologic reasons for nicotine use are an enhancement of mood, either directly or through relief of withdrawal symptoms and augmentation of mental or physical functions. Tobacco cessation is necessary to reduce morbidity and mortality related to tobacco use. Strategies for tobacco cessation involves 5A's and 5R's approach and pharmacotherapy. Dental professionals play an important role in helping patients to quit tobacco at the community and national levels, to promote tobacco prevention and control nicotine addiction. Dentists are in a unique position to educate and motivate patients concerning the hazards of tobacco to their oral and systemic health, and to provide intervention programs as a part of routine patient care.

  13. Surveillance of smokeless tobacco nicotine, pH, moisture, and unprotonated nicotine content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Patricia; Spierto, Francis W

    2003-12-01

    Smokeless tobacco is a complex chemical mixture, including not only the components of the tobacco leaf but also chemicals added during the manufacturing process. Smokeless tobacco contains the addictive chemical nicotine and more than 20 cancer-causing chemicals, including the potent tobacco-specific nitrosamines. The National Toxicology Program of the National Institutes of Health has concluded that oral use of smokeless tobacco is a human carcinogen. Therefore, smokeless tobacco is not a safe alternative to cigarettes. In fact, smokeless tobacco use begins primarily during early adolescence and can lead to nicotine dependence and increased risk of becoming a cigarette smoker. Under the Comprehensive Smokeless Tobacco Health Education Act of 1986 (15 U.S.C. 4401 et seq., Pub. L. 99-252), tobacco manufacturers report annually to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on the total nicotine, unprotonated nicotine, pH, and moisture content of their smokeless tobacco products. This information is considered "trade secret," or confidential, in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(4) and 18 U.S.C. 1905 and cannot be released to the public. In an effort to provide consumers and researchers with information on the nicotine content of smokeless tobacco, CDC arranged for the analysis of popular brands of smokeless tobacco. The results of this CDC study show that pH is a primary factor in the amount of nicotine that is in the most readily absorbable, unprotonated form. Furthermore, this study found that the brands of moist snuff smokeless tobacco with the largest amount of unprotonated nicotine also are the most frequently sold brands.

  14. The effects of nicotine and non-nicotine smoking factors on working memory and associated brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClernon, Francis Joseph; Froeliger, Brett; Rose, Jed E; Kozink, Rachel V; Addicott, Merideth A; Sweitzer, Maggie M; Westman, Eric C; Van Wert, Dana M

    2016-07-01

    Smoking abstinence impairs executive function, which may promote continued smoking behavior and relapse. The differential influence of nicotine and non-nicotine (i.e. sensory, motor) smoking factors and related neural substrates is not known. In a fully factorial, within-subjects design, 33 smokers underwent fMRI scanning following 24 hours of wearing a nicotine or placebo patch while smoking very low nicotine content cigarettes or remaining abstinent from smoking. During scanning, blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal was acquired while participants performed a verbal N-back task. Following 24-hour placebo (versus nicotine) administration, accuracy on the N-back task was significantly worse and task-related BOLD signal lower in dorsomedial frontal cortex. These effects were observed irrespective of smoking. Our data provide novel evidence that abstinence-induced deficits in working memory and changes in underlying brain function are due in large part to abstinence from nicotine compared with non-nicotine factors. This work has implications both for designing interventions that target abstinence-induced cognitive deficits and for nicotine-reduction policy. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  15. Activation of Peripheral κ-Opioid Receptors Normalizes Caffeine Effects Modified in Nicotine-Dependent Rats during Nicotine Withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudakov, S K; Bogdanova, N G

    2016-10-01

    The study examined the effect of peripheral (intragastric) ICI-204,448, an agonist of gastric κ-opioid receptors, on the psychostimulating and anxiolytic effects of caffeine in nicotinedependent rats at the stage of nicotine withdrawal. In these rats, the effects of caffeine (10 mg/kg) were perverted. In nicotine-dependent rats, caffeine produced an anxiolytic effect accompanied by pronounced stimulation of motor activity, in contrast to anxiogenic effect induced by caffeine in intact rats without nicotine dependence. During nicotine withdrawal, nicotine-dependent rats demonstrated enhanced sensitivity to nicotine. Intragastric administration of κ-opioid receptor agonist ICI-204,448 normalized the effect of caffeine in nicotinedependent rats. We have previously demonstrated that activation of peripheral κ-opioid receptors inhibited central κ-opioid activity and eliminated manifestations of nicotine withdrawal syndrome in nicotine-dependent rats, e.g. metabolism activation, stimulation of motor activity, and enhancement of food consumption. In its turn, inhibition of central κ-opioid structures activates the brain adenosine system, which can attenuate the caffeine-induced effects in nicotine-dependent rats.

  16. Promotion of the transdermal delivery of protein drugs by N-trimethyl chitosan nanoparticles combined with polypropylene electret.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Ye; Wang, Xinxia; Lu, Ying; Zhang, He; Yu, Yuan; Chen, Yan; Liu, Junjie; Sun, Zhiguo; Cui, Lili; Gao, Jing; Zhong, Yanqiang

    We recently reported that electret, which was prepared by a corona charging system with polypropylene film, could enhance the transdermal delivery of several drugs of low molecular weight. The aim of this study was to investigate whether electret could enhance the transdermal delivery of protein drugs by N -trimethyl chitosan nanoparticles (TMC NPs) prepared by an ionic gelation method. A series of experiments were performed, including in vitro skin permeation assays and anti-inflammatory effects, to evaluate the transdermal delivery of protein drugs by TMC NPs in the presence of electret. The results showed that in the presence of electret, the transdermal delivery of protein drugs in TMC NPs was significantly enhanced, as demonstrated by in vitro permeation studies and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Notably, superoxide dismutase-loaded TMC NPs combined with electret exhibited the best inhibitory effect on the edema of the mouse ear. TMC NPs combined with electret represent a novel platform for the transdermal delivery of protein drugs.

  17. [11C]diclofenac sodium: synthesis and PET assessment of transdermal penetration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petroni, Debora; Menichetti, Luca; Sorace, Oreste; Poli, Michela; Vanasia, Massimo; Salvadori, Piero A.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the feasibility of using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging as a new tool to detect transdermal penetration of topical drugs in human subjects. The compound used in the study is sodium 2-[(2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino]phenyl]acetate, better known as diclofenac sodium. This molecule belongs to the family of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and is considered one of the first choices among non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of inflammatory diseases; it is widely used and commercially present in a large number of pharmaceutical forms and formulations. 11 C-labeled diclofenac has been synthesized and coformulated, as an internal indicator, with a proprietary preparation based on the use of a sprayer. The radiolabeled preparation was topically administered to healthy volunteers, and PET imaging was used to evaluate transdermal penetration. Results obtained have demonstrated the efficacy of PET and radiolabeled tracers for the evaluation of transdermal penetration of active pharmaceutical ingredients as topical formulations.

  18. Protection against soman and sarin exposure by transdermal physostigmine and scopolamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meshulam, Y.; Davidovici, R.; Levy, A.

    1993-05-13

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prophylactic efficacy of physostigmine (physo), administered via sustained release (SR) methods, with and without scopolamine, against soman and sarin exposure in guinea-pigs. Transdermal physo pad (3 sq cm/kg; 60-80 ug/sq cm), containing a vehicle based on propionic acid, was applied onto the dorsal back of the animals, 24 hours before exposure to the cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitors. At the time of exposure, physo concentrations in brain and plasma were 3.6 ng/g and 4.1 ng/ml respectively. Brain and whole blood ChE activity were inhibited to 70% and 57% of their original activity. Transdermal physo by itself protected up to 70% of the animals exposed to 1.5 LD(50) of soman or sarin (100% mortality was recorded in the control group). Combining transdermal physo with Scopoderm (by Ciba Geigy Inc.) provided full protection against 1.5 LD(50).

  19. Treatment of Severe Cancer Pain by Transdermal Fentanyl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dženita Ljuca

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The goal of research was to determine the frequency, intensity, time of occurrence, duration and causes of breakthrough pain (BTP in patients whose carcinoma pain was treated by transdermal fentanyl. (TDF. A prospective study was conducted in a hospice for recumbent patients of the Centre for Palliative Care (hospice University Clinical Centre Tuzla from October 2009 to December 2010. 33 patients in terminal stage of carcinoma, who had been treated by transdermal fentanyl due to their excruciating pain (7-10 mark on numerica! scale with initial dosage of 25 μg as a strong opiate analgesic, were monitored within the time period of 10 days. In the statistics we used the even T - test, the Wilcox test and Mann -Whitney test. The difference was seen to be significant at p < 0,05. Treatment by transdermal fentanyl significantly reduces the intensity of strong carcinoma pain (p < 0.0001, with a frequent requirement for dose increase with bone metastasis. The intensity of BTP is higher compared to the pain experienced upon reception. The frequency and intensity of BTP are significantly reduced already in the second day of treatment by transdermal fentanyl (p = 0,0024. The BTP is most intense in patients with neck and head tumours (9,26 ± 0,66, and most frequent with abdomen and pelvic tumour. The biggest number of BTP (68.3 % occurs within first three days of treatment. BTP most frequently occurs in the evening or at night (between 18:00 and 06:00 h in 62,2 % of the cases, with the duration of usually less than 15 minutes (65,2% of the cases. In 61,6 % cases the occurrence of BTP is related to physical activities or psychosocial incidents, while the cause is undetermined in 38,4 % of examinees.BTP is most frequent within first three days of treatment by TDF. Using the optimal dosage a good control of carcinoma pain is enabled, regardless of the occurrence of bone metastasis, while it also helps reduce the frequency and intensity of BTP.

  20. Nicotine induces fibrogenic changes in human liver via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on hepatic stellate cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soeda, Junpei; Morgan, Maelle; McKee, Chad; Mouralidarane, Angelina; Lin, ChingI [University College London, Centre for Hepatology, Royal Free Hospital, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Roskams, Tania [Department of Morphology and Molecular Pathology, University of Leuven (Belgium); Oben, Jude A., E-mail: j.oben@ucl.ac.uk [University College London, Centre for Hepatology, Royal Free Hospital, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cigarette smoke may induce liver fibrosis via nicotine receptors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine induces proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine activates hepatic fibrogenic pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine receptor antagonists attenuate HSC proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotinic receptor antagonists may have utility as novel anti-fibrotic agents. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Cigarette smoke (CS) may cause liver fibrosis but possible involved mechanisms are unclear. Among the many chemicals in CS is nicotine - which affects cells through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). We studied the effects of nicotine, and involved pathways, on human primary hepatic stellate cells (hHSCs), the principal fibrogenic cells in the liver. We then determined possible disease relevance by assaying nAChR in liver samples from human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods: hHSC were isolated from healthy human livers and nAChR expression analyzed - RT-PCR and Western blotting. Nicotine induction of hHSC proliferation, upregulation of collagen1-{alpha}2 and the pro-fibrogenic cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) was determined along with involved intracellular signaling pathways. nAChR mRNA expression was finally analyzed in whole liver biopsies obtained from patients diagnosed with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Results: hHSCs express muscle type ({alpha}1, {beta}1, delta and epsilon) and neuronal type ({alpha}3, {alpha}6, {alpha}7, {beta}2 and {beta}4) nAChR subunits at the mRNA level. Among these subunits, {alpha}3, {alpha}7, {beta}1 and {epsilon} were predominantly expressed as confirmed by Western blotting. Nicotine induced hHSC proliferation was attenuated by mecamylamine (p < 0.05). Additionally, collagen1-{alpha}2 and TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression were significantly upregulated by nicotine and inhibited by

  1. Nicotine induces fibrogenic changes in human liver via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on hepatic stellate cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soeda, Junpei; Morgan, Maelle; McKee, Chad; Mouralidarane, Angelina; Lin, ChingI; Roskams, Tania; Oben, Jude A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cigarette smoke may induce liver fibrosis via nicotine receptors. ► Nicotine induces proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). ► Nicotine activates hepatic fibrogenic pathways. ► Nicotine receptor antagonists attenuate HSC proliferation. ► Nicotinic receptor antagonists may have utility as novel anti-fibrotic agents. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Cigarette smoke (CS) may cause liver fibrosis but possible involved mechanisms are unclear. Among the many chemicals in CS is nicotine – which affects cells through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). We studied the effects of nicotine, and involved pathways, on human primary hepatic stellate cells (hHSCs), the principal fibrogenic cells in the liver. We then determined possible disease relevance by assaying nAChR in liver samples from human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods: hHSC were isolated from healthy human livers and nAChR expression analyzed – RT-PCR and Western blotting. Nicotine induction of hHSC proliferation, upregulation of collagen1-α2 and the pro-fibrogenic cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) was determined along with involved intracellular signaling pathways. nAChR mRNA expression was finally analyzed in whole liver biopsies obtained from patients diagnosed with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Results: hHSCs express muscle type (α1, β1, delta and epsilon) and neuronal type (α3, α6, α7, β2 and β4) nAChR subunits at the mRNA level. Among these subunits, α3, α7, β1 and ε were predominantly expressed as confirmed by Western blotting. Nicotine induced hHSC proliferation was attenuated by mecamylamine (p < 0.05). Additionally, collagen1-α2 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression were significantly upregulated by nicotine and inhibited by mecamylamine. α1 and α3-nAChR mRNA expression was significantly upregulated in NASH fibrosis compared to normal livers. Conclusion: Nicotine at levels in smokers’ blood is pro-fibrogenic, through

  2. Transdermal delivery of isoniazid and rifampin in guinea pigs by electro-phonophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Suting; Han, Yi; Yu, Daping; Huo, Fengmin; Wang, Fen; Li, Yunxu; Dong, Lingling; Liu, Zhidong; Huang, Hairong

    2017-11-01

    Electro-phonophoresis (EP) has been used as a drug delivery approach in clinical fields. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the skin permeability of isoniazid and rifampin in guinea pigs by EP to provide reference basis for clinical applications of such transdermal delivery system in the treatment of patients with superficial tuberculosis. Isoniazid and rifampin solutions were delivered transdermally with or without EP in health guinea pigs for 0.5 h. Local skin and blood samples were collected serially at 0, 1/2, 1, 2, 4, 6 and 24 h after dosing. Drug concentrations in local skin and blood were evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography. Isoniazid concentrations in local skin of guinea pigs receiving isoniazid through EP transdermal delivery were significantly higher than in animals receiving only isoniazid with transdermal patch. However, for rifampin, patches alone group presented almost uniform concentration versus time curve with that of EP group, and both groups had concentrations much higher than the therapeutic concentration of the drug over sustainable time. After EP transdermal delivery, the mean peak concentrations of isoniazid and rifampin in skin were 771.0 ± 163.4 μg/mL and 81.2 ± 17.3 μg/mL respectively. Neither isoniazid nor rifampin concentration in blood could be detected (below the lower detection limit of 1 μg/mL) at any time point. The present study showed that application of EP significantly enhanced INH penetration through skin in guinea pigs, while RIF patch alone obtained therapeutic concentration in local skin. Our work suggests several possible medication approaches for efficient treatment of superficial tuberculosis.

  3. Modular reservoir concept for MEMS-based transdermal drug delivery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantwell, Cara T; Wei, Pinghung; Ziaie, Babak; Rao, Masaru P

    2014-01-01

    While MEMS-based transdermal drug delivery device development efforts have typically focused on tightly-integrated solutions, we propose an alternate conception based upon a novel, modular drug reservoir approach. By decoupling the drug storage functionality from the rest of the delivery system, this approach seeks to minimize cold chain storage volume, enhance compatibility with conventional pharmaceutical practices, and allow independent optimization of reservoir device design, materials, and fabrication. Herein, we report the design, fabrication, and preliminary characterization of modular reservoirs that demonstrate the virtue of this approach within the application context of transdermal insulin administration for diabetes management. (technical note)

  4. Modular reservoir concept for MEMS-based transdermal drug delivery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantwell, Cara T.; Wei, Pinghung; Ziaie, Babak; Rao, Masaru P.

    2014-11-01

    While MEMS-based transdermal drug delivery device development efforts have typically focused on tightly-integrated solutions, we propose an alternate conception based upon a novel, modular drug reservoir approach. By decoupling the drug storage functionality from the rest of the delivery system, this approach seeks to minimize cold chain storage volume, enhance compatibility with conventional pharmaceutical practices, and allow independent optimization of reservoir device design, materials, and fabrication. Herein, we report the design, fabrication, and preliminary characterization of modular reservoirs that demonstrate the virtue of this approach within the application context of transdermal insulin administration for diabetes management.

  5. Biomaterials as novel penetration enhancers for transdermal and dermal drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Wang, Manli; Fang, Liang

    2013-01-01

    The highly organized structure of the stratum corneum provides an effective barrier to the drug delivery into or across the skin. To overcome this barrier function, penetration enhancers are always used in the transdermal and dermal drug delivery systems. However, the conventional chemical enhancers are often limited by their inability to delivery large and hydrophilic molecules, and few to date have been routinely incorporated into the transdermal formulations due to their incompatibility and local irritation issues. Therefore, there has been a search for the compounds that exhibit broad enhancing activity for more drugs without producing much irritation. More recently, the use of biomaterials has emerged as a novel method to increase the skin permeability. In this paper, we present an overview of the investigations on the feasibility and application of biomaterials as penetration enhancers for transdermal or dermal drug delivery systems.

  6. A Multi-Route Model of Nicotine-Cotinine Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Brain Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding in Humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Housand, Conrad; Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Gunawan, Rudy; Timchalk, Charles

    2013-02-01

    The pharmacokinetics of nicotine, the pharmacologically active alkaloid in tobacco responsible for addiction, are well characterized in humans. We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model of nicotine pharmacokinetics, brain dosimetry and brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) occupancy. A Bayesian framework was applied to optimize model parameters against multiple human data sets. The resulting model was consistent with both calibration and test data sets, but in general underestimated variability. A pharmacodynamic model relating nicotine levels to increases in heart rate as a proxy for the pharmacological effects of nicotine accurately described the nicotine related changes in heart rate and the development and decay of tolerance to nicotine. The PBPK model was utilized to quantitatively capture the combined impact of variation in physiological and metabolic parameters, nicotine availability and smoking compensation on the change in number of cigarettes smoked and toxicant exposure in a population of 10,000 people presented with a reduced toxicant (50%), reduced nicotine (50%) cigarette Across the population, toxicant exposure is reduced in some but not all smokers. Reductions are not in proportion to reductions in toxicant yields, largely due to partial compensation in response to reduced nicotine yields. This framework can be used as a key element of a dosimetry-driven risk assessment strategy for cigarette smoke constituents.

  7. Transdermal administration of radiolabelled [14C]rotigotine by a patch formulation: A mass balance trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cawello, W.; Wolff, H.M.; Meuling, W.J.A.; Horstmann, R.; Braun, M.

    2007-01-01

    Background and objective: The dopamine agonist rotigotine has been formulated in a silicone-based transdermal system for once-daily administration. The objective of the present study was to characterise the mass balance of rotigotine in humans after administration of a single transdermal patch

  8. Hybrid electrospun chitosan-phospholipids nanofibers for transdermal drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendes, Ana Carina Loureiro; Gorzelanny, Christian; Halter, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan (Ch) polysaccharide was mixed with phospholipids (P) to generate electrospun hybrid nanofibers intended to be used as platforms for transdermal drug delivery. Ch/P nanofibers exibithed average diameters ranging from 248 +/- 94 nm to 600 +/- 201 nm, depending on the amount of phospholipids...... used. Fourier Transformed Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) data suggested the occurrence of electrostatic interactions between amine groups of chitosan with the phospholipid counterparts. The nanofibers were shown to be stable for at least 7 days in Phosphate Buffer...... culture plate (control). The release of curcumin, diclofenac and vitamin B12, as model drugs, from Ch/P hybrid nanofibers was investigated, demonstrating their potential utilization as a transdermal drug delivery system....

  9. Penetration Enhancement Effect of Turpentine Oil on Transdermal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    inflammation drastically affect the quality of life after SCI. ... inhibitors may reduce spinal cord ischemic injury. [11]. Various .... Healthy male Wistar rats (200-250 g) were used ..... Guy RH. Transdermal science and technology an update.

  10. Low Nicotine Content Descriptors Reduce Perceived Health Risks and Positive Cigarette Ratings in Participants Using Very Low Nicotine Content Cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denlinger-Apte, Rachel L; Joel, Danielle L; Strasser, Andrew A; Donny, Eric C

    2017-10-01

    Understanding how smokers perceive reduced nicotine content cigarettes will be important if the FDA and global regulatory agencies implement reduced nicotine product standards for cigarettes. Prior research has shown that some smokers incorrectly believe "light" cigarettes are less harmful than regular cigarettes. Similar misunderstandings of health risk could also apply to reduced nicotine cigarettes. To date, most studies of reduced nicotine cigarettes have blinded subjects to the nicotine content. Therefore, little is known about how smokers experience reduced nicotine content cigarettes when they are aware of the reduced content, and how use may be impacted. The present study was a within-subjects experiment with 68 adult daily smokers who smoked two identical very low nicotine content Quest 3 (0.05 mg nicotine yield) cigarettes. Subjects were told that one cigarette contained "average" nicotine content, and the other contained "very low" nicotine content. After smoking each cigarette, subjects completed subjective measures about their smoking experience. Subjects rated the "very low" nicotine cigarette as less harmful to their health overall compared to the "average" nicotine cigarette; this effect held true for specific smoking-related diseases. Additionally, they rated the "very low" nicotine cigarette as having less desirable subjective effects than the "average" nicotine cigarette and predicted having greater interest in quitting smoking in the future if only the "very low" nicotine cigarette was available. Explicit knowledge of very low nicotine content changes smokers' perceptions of very low nicotine content cigarettes, resulting in reduced predicted harm, subjective ratings and predicted future use. Before a reduced nicotine product standard for cigarettes can be implemented, it is important to understand how product information impacts how smokers think about and experience very low nicotine content cigarettes. Prior research has shown that smokers

  11. Microneedles array with biodegradable tips for transdermal drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliescu, Ciprian; Chen, Bangtao; Wei, Jiashen; Tay, Francis E. H.

    2008-12-01

    The paper presented an enhancement solution for transdermal drug delivery using microneedles array with biodegradable tips. The microneedles array was fabricated by using deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) and the biodegradable tips were made to be porous by electrochemical etching process. The porous silicon microneedle tips can greatly enhance the transdermal drug delivery in a minimum invasion, painless, and convenient manner, at the same time; they are breakable and biodegradable. Basically, the main problem of the silicon microneedles consists of broken microneedles tips during the insertion. The solution proposed is to fabricate the microneedle tip from a biodegradable material - porous silicon. The silicon microneedles are fabricated using DRIE notching effect of reflected charges on mask. The process overcomes the difficulty in the undercut control of the tips during the classical isotropic silicon etching process. When the silicon tips were formed, the porous tips were then generated using a classical electrochemical anodization process in MeCN/HF/H2O solution. The paper presents the experimental results of in vitro release of calcein and BSA with animal skins using a microneedle array with biodegradable tips. Compared to the transdermal drug delivery without any enhancer, the microneedle array had presented significant enhancement of drug release.

  12. Natural oils as skin permeation enhancers for transdermal delivery of olanzapine: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Geeta; Dhawan, Sanju; HariKumar, S L

    2012-03-01

    The feasibility of development of transdermal delivery system of olanzapine utilizing natural oils as permeation enhancers was investigated. Penetration enhancing potential of corn (maize) oil, groundnut oil and jojoba oil on in vitro permeation of olanzapine across rat skin was studied. The magnitude of flux enhancement factor with corn oil, groundnut oil and jojoba oil was 7.06, 5.31 and 1.9 respectively at 5mg/ml concentration in solvent system. On the basis of in vitro permeation studies, eudragit based matrix type transdermal patches of olanzapine were fabricated using optimized concentrations of natural oils as permeation enhancers. All transdermal patches were found to be uniform with respect to physical characteristics. The interaction studies carried out by comparing the results of ultraviolet, HPLC and FTIR analyses for the pure drug, polymers and mixture of drug and polymers indicated no chemical interaction between the drug and excipients. Corn oil containing unsaturated fatty acids was found to be promising natural permeation enhancer for transdermal delivery of olanzapine with greatest cumulative amount of drug permeated (1010.68 μg/cm²/h) up to 24 h and caused no skin irritation. The fabricated transdermal patches were found to be stable. The pharmacokinetic characteristics of the final optimized matrix patch (T2) were determined after transdermal application to rabbits. The calculated relative bioavailability of TDDS was 113.6 % as compared to oral administration of olanzapine. The therapeutic effectiveness of optimized transdermal system was confirmed by tranquillizing activity in rotarod and grip mice model.

  13. Nicotine concentration of e-cigarettes used by adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morean, Meghan E; Kong, Grace; Cavallo, Dana A; Camenga, Deepa R; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra

    2016-10-01

    E-cigarettes are popular among youth, but little is known about the nicotine concentrations of e-liquids used by adolescents. In Spring, 2014, we conducted cross-sectional surveys in four Connecticut high schools and two middle schools. Among past-30-day e-cigarette users (n=513, 45% female, mean age 15.9 [SD=1.4]), we examined what nicotine concentration adolescents typically used in their e-cigarettes (range 0-30mg/mL and "I don't know"). We first examined whether age, sex, smoking status, e-cigarette use frequency, and/or e-cigarette acquisition source were associated with using nicotine-free e-liquid, nicotine e-liquid, or not knowing the e-liquid nicotine concentration. Among nicotine users (n=185), we then examined whether the aforementioned variables were associated with using higher nicotine concentrations. Adolescents reported using nicotine-free e-liquid (28.5%), nicotine e-liquid (37.4%), or not knowing their e-liquid nicotine concentration (34.1%). Nicotine users comprised more smokers and heavier e-cigarette users compared to nicotine-free e-liquid users and those who did not know their nicotine concentration. Nicotine users also comprised more males and were more likely to purchase e-cigarettes online or from tobacco shops compared to those who did not know their nicotine concentration. Among nicotine users, cigarette smoking, male sex, and purchasing e-cigarettes from tobacco shops predicted using higher nicotine concentrations. Adolescents reported using e-liquids with variable nicotine concentrations. Smokers, males, and those who purchased their own e-cigarettes reported using the highest nicotine levels. Of concern, many adolescents were unaware of the nicotine concentration in their e-liquid, raising concerns about inadvertent nicotine exposure among youth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Preparation and characterization of metoprolol tartrate containing matrix type transdermal drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malipeddi, Venkata Ramana; Awasthi, Rajendra; Ghisleni, Daniela Dal Molim; de Souza Braga, Marina; Kikuchi, Irene Satiko; de Jesus Andreoli Pinto, Terezinha; Dua, Kamal

    2017-02-01

    The present study aimed to develop matrix-type transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS) of metoprolol tartrate using polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The transdermal films were evaluated for physical parameters, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), in vitro drug release, in vitro skin permeability, skin irritation test and stability studies. The films were found to be tough, non-sticky, easily moldable and possess good tensile strength. As the concentration of PVA was increased, the tensile strength of the films was also increased. Results of FTIR spectroscopy and DSC revealed the absence of any drug-polymer interactions. In vitro release of metoprolol followed zero-order kinetics and the mechanism of release was found to be diffusion rate controlled. In vitro release studies of metoprolol using Keshary-Chein (vertical diffusion cell) indicated 65.5 % drug was released in 24 h. In vitro skin permeation of metoprolol transdermal films showed 58.13 % of the drug was released after 24 h. In vitro skin permeation of metoprolol followed zero-order kinetics in selected formulations. The mechanism of release was found to be diffusion rate controlled. In a 22-day skin irritation test, tested formulation of transdermal films did not exhibit any allergic reactions, inflammation, or contact dermatitis. The transdermal films showed good stability in the 180-day stability study. It can be concluded that the TDDS of MPT can help in bypassing the first-pass effect and will provide patient improved compliance, without sacrificing the therapeutic advantages of the drugs.

  15. Nicotine reward and affective nicotine withdrawal signs are attenuated in calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV knockout mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kia J Jackson

    Full Text Available The influx of Ca(2+ through calcium-permeable nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs leads to activation of various downstream processes that may be relevant to nicotine-mediated behaviors. The calcium activated protein, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV phosphorylates the downstream transcription factor cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB, which mediates nicotine responses; however the role of CaMKIV in nicotine dependence is unknown. Given the proposed role of CaMKIV in CREB activation, we hypothesized that CaMKIV might be a crucial molecular component in the development of nicotine dependence. Using male CaMKIV genetically modified mice, we found that nicotine reward is attenuated in CaMKIV knockout (-/- mice, but cocaine reward is enhanced in these mice. CaMKIV protein levels were also increased in the nucleus accumbens of C57Bl/6 mice after nicotine reward. In a nicotine withdrawal assessment, anxiety-related behavior, but not somatic signs or the hyperalgesia response are attenuated in CaMKIV -/- mice. To complement our animal studies, we also conducted a human genetic association analysis and found that variants in the CaMKIV gene are associated with a protective effect against nicotine dependence. Taken together, our results support an important role for CaMKIV in nicotine reward, and suggest that CaMKIV has opposing roles in nicotine and cocaine reward. Further, CaMKIV mediates affective, but not physical nicotine withdrawal signs, and has a protective effect against nicotine dependence in human genetic association studies. These findings further indicate the importance of calcium-dependent mechanisms in mediating behaviors associated with drugs of abuse.

  16. Neonatal Nicotine Exposure Increases Excitatory Synaptic Transmission and Attenuates Nicotine-stimulated GABA release in the Adult Rat Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damborsky, Joanne C.; Griffith, William H.; Winzer-Serhan, Ursula H.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental exposure to nicotine has been linked to long-lasting changes in synaptic transmission which may contribute to behavioral abnormalities seen in offspring of women who smoke during pregnancy. Here, we examined the long-lasting effects of developmental nicotine exposure on glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission, and on acute nicotine-induced glutamate and GABA release in the adult hippocampus, a structure important in cognitive and emotional behaviors. We utilized a chronic neonatal nicotine treatment model to administer nicotine (6 mg/kg/day) to rat pups from postnatal day (P) 1–7, a period that falls developmentally into the third human trimester. Using whole-cell voltage clamp recordings from CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slices, we measured excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents in neonatally control- and nicotine-treated young adult males. Neonatal nicotine exposure significantly increased AMPA receptor-mediated spontaneous and evoked excitatory signaling, with no change in glutamate release probability in adults. Conversely, there was no increase in spontaneous GABAergic neurotransmission in nicotine-males. Chronic neonatal nicotine treatment had no effect on acute nicotine-stimulated glutamate release in adults, but acute nicotine-stimulated GABA release was significantly attenuated. Thus, neonatal nicotine exposure results in a persistent net increase in excitation and a concurrent loss of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mediated regulation of presynaptic GABA but not glutamate release, which would exacerbate excitation following endogenous or exogenous nAChR activation. Our data underscore an important role for nAChRs in hippocampal excitatory synapse development, and suggest selective long-term changes at specific presynaptic nAChRs which together could explain some of the behavioral abnormalities associated with maternal smoking. PMID:24950455

  17. Nicotine affects hydrogen sulfide concentrations in mouse kidney and heart but not in brain and liver tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiliński, Jerzy; Wiliński, Bogdan; Somogyi, Eugeniusz; Piotrowska, Joanna; Kameczura, Tomasz; Zygmunt, Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Nicotine, a potent parasympathomimetic alkaloid with stimulant effects, is contributing to addictive properties of tobacco smoking and is though used in the smoking cessation therapy. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is involved in physiology and pathophysiology of various systems in mammals. The interactions between nicotine and H2S are not fully recognized. The aim of the study is to assess the influence of nicotine on the H2S tissue concentrations in different mouse organs. Adult CBA male mice were administered intraperitoneally 1.5 mg/kg b.w. per day of nicotine (group D1, n = 10) or 3 mg/ kg b.w. per day of nicotine (group D2, n = 10). The control group (n = 10) received physiological saline. The measurements of the free and acid-labile H2S tissue concentrations were performed with the Siegel spectrophotometric modi ed method. ere was a significant increase in H2S concentrations in both nicotine doses groups in the kidney (D1 by 54.2%, D2 by 40.0%). In the heart the higher nicotine dose caused a marked decrease in H2S tissue level (by 65.4%), while the lower dose did not affect H2S content. Nicotine administration had no effect on H2S concentrations in the brain and liver. In conclusion, nicotine affects H2S tissue concentrations in kidney and heart but not in the liver and brain tissues.

  18. Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: Common molecular substrates of nicotine and alcohol dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linzy M. Hendrickson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol and nicotine are often co-abused. As many as 80-95% of alcoholics are also smokers, suggesting that ethanol and nicotine, the primary addictive component of tobacco smoke, may functionally interact in the central nervous system and/or share a common mechanism of action. While nicotine initiates dependence by binding to and activating neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs, ligand-gated cation channels normally activated by endogenous acetylcholine (ACh, ethanol is much less specific with the ability to modulate multiple gene products including those encoding voltage-gated ion channels, and excitatory/inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors. However, emerging data indicate that ethanol interacts with nAChRs, both directly and indirectly, in the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic (DAergic reward circuitry to affect brain reward systems. Like nicotine, ethanol activates DAergic neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA which project to the nucleus accumbens (NAc. Blockade of VTA nAChRs reduces ethanol-mediated activation of DAergic neurons, NAc DA release, consumption, and operant responding for ethanol in rodents. Thus, ethanol may increase ACh release into the VTA driving activation of DAergic neurons through nAChRs. In addition, ethanol potentiates distinct nAChR subtype responses to ACh and nicotine in vitro and in DAergic neurons. The smoking cessation therapeutic and nAChR partial agonist, varenicline, reduces alcohol consumption in heavy drinking smokers and rodent models of alcohol consumption. Finally, single nucleotide polymorphisms in nAChR subunit genes are associated with alcohol dependence phenotypes and smoking behaviors in human populations. Together, results from preclinical, clinical, and genetic studies indicate that nAChRs may have an inherent role in the abusive properties of ethanol, as well as in nicotine and alcohol co-dependence.

  19. Modified Transdermal Technologies: Breaking the Barriers of Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In-depth analysis, formulation approaches, applications, advantages and disadvantages of these newer technologies are discussed. Keywords: Transdermal drug delivery, microneedles, macroflux, iontophoresis, ultrasound, powderject, skin abrasion. > Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research Vol. 6 (1) 2007: pp. 633- ...

  20. Genotoxicity study on nicotine and nicotine-derived nitrosamine by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.S.; Wang, H.F.; Shi, J.Y.; Wang, X.Y.; Liu, Y.F.; Li, K.; Lu, X.Y.; Wang, J.J.; Liu, K.X.; Guo, Z.Y.

    1997-01-01

    The authors have studied DNA adduction with 14 C-labelled nicotine and nicotine-derived nitrosamine, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in mouse liver at doses equivalent to low-level exposure of humans. The dose ranges of nicotine and NNK administered were from 0.4 μg to 4.0 x 10 2 μg·kg -1 , and from 0.1 μg to 2.0 x 10 4 μg·kg -1 , respectively. In the exposure of mice to either nicotine or NNK, the number of DNA adducts increased linearly with increasing dose. The detection limit of DNA adducts was 1 adduct per 10 11 nucleotide molecules. This limit is 1-4 orders of magnitude lower than that of other techniques used for quantification of DNA adducts. The results of the animal experiments enabled us to speculate that nicotine is a potential carcinogen. According to the procedure for 14 C-labelled-NNK synthesis, the authors discuss the ultimate chemical speciation of NNK bound to DNA. From the animal tests the authors derived a directly perceivable relation between tobacco consumption and DNA adduction as the carcinogenic risk assessment

  1. Pathogenesis of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Role of Nicotine and Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zong-Zhuang Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation, proteolysis, smooth muscle cell apoptosis, and angiogenesis have been implicated in the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs, although the well-defined initiating mechanism is not fully understood. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs such as MMP-2 and -9 and other proteinases degrading elastin and extracellular matrix are the critical pathogenesis of AAAs. Among the risk factors of AAAs, cigarette smoking is an irrefutable one. Cigarette smoke is practically involved in various aspects of the AAA pathogenesis. Nicotine, a major alkaloid in tobacco leaves and a primary component in cigarette smoke, can stimulate the MMPs expression by vascular SMCs, endothelial cells, and inflammatory cells in vascular wall and induce angiogenesis in the aneurysmal tissues. However, for the inflammatory and apoptotic processes in the pathogenesis of AAAs, nicotine seems to be moving in just the opposite direction. Additionally, the effects of nicotine are probably dose dependent or associated with the exposure duration and may be partly exerted by its receptors—nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs. In this paper, we will mainly discuss the pathogenesis of AAAs involving inflammation, proteolysis, smooth muscle cell apoptosis and angiogenesis, and the roles of nicotine and nAChRs.

  2. [Studies on transdermal delivery of ferulic acid through rat skin treated by microneedle arrays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bing; Du, Shou-ying; Bai, Jie; Shang, Ke-xin; Lu, Yang; Li, Peng-yue

    2014-12-01

    In order to investigate the characteristics of transdermal delivery of ferulic acid under the treated of microneedle arrays and the influence on permeability of rat skin capillaries, improved Franz-cells were used in the transdermal delivery experiment with the rat skin of abdominal wall and the length of microneedle arrays, different insertion forces, retention time were studied in the influence of characteristics of transdermal delivery of FA. The amount of FA was determined by HPLC system. Intravenous injection Evans blue and FA was added after microneedle arrays treated. Established inflammation model was built by daubing dimethylbenzene. The amount of Evans blue in the rat skin was read at 590 nm wavelength with a Multiskan Go microplate reader. Compared with passive diffusion group the skin pretreated with microneedle arrays had a remarkable enhancement of FA transport (P Microneedle arrays with different length had a remarkable enhancement of FA transport, but was not related to the increase of the length. The research of FA on the reduce of permeability of rat skin capillaries indicated that the skin pretreated with microneedle arrays could reduce the content of Evans blue in the skins of rat significantly compared with the untreated group. The permeation rate of ferulic acid transdermal delivery had remarkable increase under the treated of microneedle arrays and the length of microneedle arrays ,the retention time so as to the insertion force were important to the transdermal delivery of ferulic acid.

  3. Avanafil Liposomes as Transdermal Drug Delivery for Erectile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Avanafil is slightly soluble in ethanol, practically insoluble in water ... transdermal permeability and bioavailability for the treatment of .... Table 1 shows that the EE had higher values for the MLVs .... reason is the lower solubility of avanafil at pH.

  4. Habenular expression of rare missense variants of the β4 nicotinic receptor subunit alters nicotine consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta A Ślimak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4 gene cluster, encoding the α5, α3 and β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR subunits, has been linked to nicotine dependence. The habenulo-interpeduncular (Hb-IPN tract is particularly enriched in α3β4 nAChRs. We recently showed that modulation of these receptors in the medial habenula (MHb in mice altered nicotine consumption. Given that β4 is rate-limiting for receptor activity and that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in CHRNB4 have been linked to altered risk of nicotine dependence in humans, we were interested in determining the contribution of allelic variants of β4 to nicotine receptor activity in the MHb. We screened for missense SNPs with allele frequencies > 0.0005 and introduced the corresponding substitutions in Chrnb4. Fourteen variants were analyzed by co-expression with α3. We found that β4A90I and β4T374I variants, previously shown to associate with reduced risk of smoking, and an additional variant β4D447Y, significantly increased nicotine-evoked current amplitudes, while β4R348C, the mutation most frequently encountered in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (sALS, showed reduced nicotine currents. We employed lentiviruses to express β4 or β4 variants in the MHb. Immunoprecipitation studies confirmed that β4 lentiviral-mediated expression leads to specific upregulation of α3β4 but not β2 nAChRs in the Mhb. Mice injected with the β4-containing virus showed pronounced aversion to nicotine as previously observed in transgenic Tabac mice overexpressing Chrnb4 at endogenous sites including the MHb. Habenular expression of the β4 gain-of-function allele T374I also resulted in strong aversion, while transduction with the β4 loss-of function allele R348C failed to induce nicotine aversion. Altogether, these data confirm the critical role of habenular β4 in nicotine consumption, and identify specific SNPs in CHRNB4 that modify nicotine-elicited currents and alter nicotine

  5. [{sup 11}C]diclofenac sodium: synthesis and PET assessment of transdermal penetration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petroni, Debora, E-mail: debora.petroni@ifc.cnr.i [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Menichetti, Luca; Sorace, Oreste; Poli, Michela [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Vanasia, Massimo [Gienne Pharma, Via Lorenteggio 270/A, 20152 Milan (Italy); Salvadori, Piero A. [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2011-02-15

    The aim of this work was to study the feasibility of using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging as a new tool to detect transdermal penetration of topical drugs in human subjects. The compound used in the study is sodium 2-[(2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino]phenyl]acetate, better known as diclofenac sodium. This molecule belongs to the family of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and is considered one of the first choices among non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of inflammatory diseases; it is widely used and commercially present in a large number of pharmaceutical forms and formulations. {sup 11}C-labeled diclofenac has been synthesized and coformulated, as an internal indicator, with a proprietary preparation based on the use of a sprayer. The radiolabeled preparation was topically administered to healthy volunteers, and PET imaging was used to evaluate transdermal penetration. Results obtained have demonstrated the efficacy of PET and radiolabeled tracers for the evaluation of transdermal penetration of active pharmaceutical ingredients as topical formulations.

  6. Nanoparticle enabled transdermal drug delivery systems for enhanced dose control and tissue targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Brian C.; DeLouise, Lisa A.

    2017-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery systems have been around for decades, and current technologies (e.g. patches, ointments, and creams) enhance the skin permeation of low molecular weight, lipophilic drugs that are efficacious at low doses. The objective of current transdermal drug delivery research is to discover ways to enhance skin penetration of larger, hydrophilic drugs and macromolecules for disease treatment and vaccination. Nanocarriers made of lipids, metals, or polymers have been successfully used to increase penetration of drugs or vaccines, control drug release, and target drugs to specific areas of skin in vivo. While more research is needed to identify the safety of nanocarriers, this technology has the potential to expand the use of transdermal routes of administration to a wide array of therapeutics. Here, we review the current state of nanoparticle skin delivery systems with special emphasis on targeting skin diseases. PMID:27983701

  7. Nanoparticle-Enabled Transdermal Drug Delivery Systems for Enhanced Dose Control and Tissue Targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Brian C; DeLouise, Lisa A

    2016-12-15

    Transdermal drug delivery systems have been around for decades, and current technologies (e.g., patches, ointments, and creams) enhance the skin permeation of low molecular weight, lipophilic drugs that are efficacious at low doses. The objective of current transdermal drug delivery research is to discover ways to enhance skin penetration of larger, hydrophilic drugs and macromolecules for disease treatment and vaccination. Nanocarriers made of lipids, metals, or polymers have been successfully used to increase penetration of drugs or vaccines, control drug release, and target drugs to specific areas of skin in vivo. While more research is needed to identify the safety of nanocarriers, this technology has the potential to expand the use of transdermal routes of administration to a wide array of therapeutics. Here, we review the current state of nanoparticle skin delivery systems with special emphasis on targeting skin diseases.

  8. NICOTINE EFFECTS ON THE MOTOR ACTIVITY OF MICE EXPOSED PRENATALLY TO THE NICOTINIC AGONIST ANATOXIN-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several studies in the literature have shown that exposure of mice and rats to nicotine early in development alters its effects when the rodents are subsequently challenged with nicotine. Anatoxin-a is a nicotinic agonist produced by several genera of cyanobacteria, and has caus...

  9. Orthosteric and Allosteric Ligands of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors for Smoking Cessation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasnim S. Mohamed

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nicotine addiction, the result of tobacco use, leads to over six million premature deaths world-wide, a number that is expected to increase by a third within the next two decades. While more than half of smokers want and attempt to quit, only a small percentage of smokers are able to quit without pharmacological interventions. Therefore, over the past decades, researchers in academia and the pharmaceutical industry have focused their attention on the development of more effective smoking cessation therapies, which is now a growing 1.9 billion dollar market. Because the role of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR in nicotine addiction is well established, nAChR based therapeutics remain the leading strategy for smoking cessation. However, the development of neuronal nAChR drugs that are selective for a nAChR subpopulation is challenging, and only few neuronal nAChR drugs are clinically available. Among the many neuronal nAChR subtypes that have been identified in the brain, the α4β2 subtype is the most abundant and plays a critical role in nicotine addiction. Here, we review the role of neuronal nAChRs, especially the α4β2 subtype, in the development and treatment of nicotine addiction. We also compare available smoking cessation medications and other nAChR orthosteric and allosteric ligands that have been developed with emphasis on the difficulties faced in the development of clinically useful compounds with high nAChR subtype selectivity.

  10. Evaluation of mesotherapy as a transdermal drug delivery tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S; Kye, J; Lee, M; Park, B

    2016-05-01

    There has been no research about the exact mechanism of transdermal drug delivery during mesotherapy. We aimed to evaluate whether the commercial mesogun can be an appropriate technique for a transdermal drug delivery. We injected blue ink into the polyurethane foam or pig skin with three types of mesotherapy using a commercial mesogun, or local made intradermal injector, or a manual injection of syringe. To assess the internal pressure of the cylinder and drug delivery time, we designed the evaluation setup using a needle tip pressure transducer. All types of injectors induced adequate penetration of blue ink into the polyurethane foam without backflow. In the pig skin, blue ink leaked out rapidly with the backward movement of the needle in the commercial mesogun in contrast to the local made injector or the manual injection of syringe. When the time for backward movement of the syringe approaches 1000 ms, the cylinder pressure of the syringe is saturated at around 25 mmHg which can be translated into the dermal pressure of the pig skin. There should be sufficient time between the insertion and withdrawal of the needle of injector for the adequate transdermal drug delivery and it must be considered for mesotherapy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Microneedles for Transdermal Biosensing: Current Picture and Future Direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventrelli, Letizia; Marsilio Strambini, Lucanos; Barillaro, Giuseppe

    2015-12-09

    A novel trend is rapidly emerging in the use of microneedles, which are a miniaturized replica of hypodermic needles with length-scales of hundreds of micrometers, aimed at the transdermal biosensing of analytes of clinical interest, e.g., glucose, biomarkers, and others. Transdermal biosensing via microneedles offers remarkable opportunities for moving biosensing technologies and biochips from research laboratories to real-field applications, and envisages easy-to-use point-of-care microdevices with pain-free, minimally invasive, and minimal-training features that are very attractive for both developed and emerging countries. In addition to this, microneedles for transdermal biosensing offer a unique possibility for the development of biochips provided with end-effectors for their interaction with the biological system under investigation. Direct and efficient collection of the biological sample to be analyzed will then become feasible in situ at the same length-scale of the other biochip components by minimally trained personnel and in a minimally invasive fashion. This would eliminate the need for blood extraction using hypodermic needles and reduce, in turn, related problems, such as patient infections, sample contaminations, analysis artifacts, etc. The aim here is to provide a thorough and critical analysis of state-of-the-art developments in this novel research trend, and to bridge the gap between microneedles and biosensors. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Assessment of nicotine concentration in electronic nicotine delivery system (ENDS) liquids and precision of dosing to aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmider, Leon; Sobczak, Andrzej; Szołtysek-Bołdys, Izabela; Prokopowicz, Adam; Skórka, Agnieszka; Abdulafeez, Oluyadi; Koszowski, Bartosz

    2015-01-01

    Global use of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS; also called electronic cigarettes, e-cigarettes) has increased dramatically in recent years. However, due to the limited safety studies and growing concerns on the potential toxicity from long term use of ENDS, many national and international governments have employed regulatory measures to curtail its use. One of the most significant challenges regulators of ENDS encounter is the lack of quality standards to assess ENDS, e-liquid (solution used with ENDS which contain nicotine--a highly toxic and addictive substance), and amount of nicotine delivery to aerosol during ENDS use. Aims of the study were to (1) measure and compare nicotine concentration in e-liquids to values reported by manufacturers on packaging labels; (2) assess the precision of nicotine delivery from tank during aerosol formation. Methods: Nine popular Polish e-liquids (based on the market share data from October 2014) were purchased for the study. The labelled nicotine concentration for the selected e-liquids ranged between 11-25 mg/mL. All e-liquids were aerosolized in the laboratory using a smoking simulation machine (Palaczbot). Each e-liquid was aerosolized in a series of 6 consecutive bouts. A single bout consisted of 15 puffs with the following puff topography: 65 mL puff volume, 2.8 sec. puff duration, and 19 sec. interpuff interval. A total of 90 puffs were generated from each e-liquid. Nicotine content in the e-liquids and the aerosol generated were determined by gas chromatography with thermionic sensitive detection (GC-TSD). For seven of nine analyzed e-liquids, the difference between measured and manufacturer labeled nicotine concentration was less than 10%. Nicotine dose in aerosol per bout ranged between 0.77-1.49 mg (equivalent to one-half the nicotine a smoker inhales from a single combustible cigarette). Our analysis showed the high consistency between the labeled and measured nicotine concentration for popular on the

  13. A Two-Day Continuous Nicotine Infusion Is Sufficient to Demonstrate Nicotine Withdrawal in Rats as Measured Using Intracranial Self-Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muelken, Peter; Schmidt, Clare E.; Shelley, David; Tally, Laura; Harris, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Avoidance of the negative affective (emotional) symptoms of nicotine withdrawal (e.g., anhedonia, anxiety) contributes to tobacco addiction. Establishing the minimal nicotine exposure conditions required to demonstrate negative affective withdrawal signs in animals, as well as understanding moderators of these conditions, could inform tobacco addiction-related research, treatment, and policy. The goal of this study was to determine the minimal duration of continuous nicotine infusion required to demonstrate nicotine withdrawal in rats as measured by elevations in intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) thresholds (anhedonia-like behavior). Administration of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist mecamylamine (3.0 mg/kg, s.c.) on alternate test days throughout the course of a 2-week continuous nicotine infusion (3.2 mg/kg/day via osmotic minipump) elicited elevations in ICSS thresholds beginning on the second day of infusion. Magnitude of antagonist-precipitated withdrawal did not change with further nicotine exposure and mecamylamine injections, and was similar to that observed in a positive control group receiving mecamylamine following a 14-day nicotine infusion. Expression of a significant withdrawal effect was delayed in nicotine-infused rats receiving mecamylamine on all test days rather than on alternate test days. In a separate study, rats exhibited a transient increase in ICSS thresholds following cessation of a 2-day continuous nicotine infusion (3.2 mg/kg/day). Magnitude of this spontaneous withdrawal effect was similar to that observed in rats receiving a 9-day nicotine infusion. Our findings demonstrate that rats exhibit antagonist-precipitated and spontaneous nicotine withdrawal following a 2-day continuous nicotine infusion, at least under the experimental conditions studied here. Magnitude of these effects were similar to those observed in traditional models involving more prolonged nicotine exposure. Further development of these models

  14. Nicotine Impairs Macrophage Control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiyuan; Stitzel, Jerry A; Bai, An; Zambrano, Cristian A; Phillips, Matthew; Marrack, Philippa; Chan, Edward D

    2017-09-01

    Pure nicotine impairs macrophage killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), but it is not known whether the nicotine component in cigarette smoke (CS) plays a role. Moreover, the mechanisms by which nicotine impairs macrophage immunity against MTB have not been explored. To neutralize the effects of nicotine in CS extract, we used a competitive inhibitor to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mecamylamine-as well as macrophages derived from mice with genetic disruption of specific subunits of nAChR. We also determined whether nicotine impaired macrophage autophagy and whether nicotine-exposed T regulatory cells (Tregs) could subvert macrophage anti-MTB immunity. Mecamylamine reduced the CS extract increase in MTB burden by 43%. CS extract increase in MTB was also significantly attenuated in macrophages from mice with genetic disruption of either the α7, β2, or β4 subunit of nAChR. Nicotine inhibited autophagosome formation in MTB-infected THP-1 cells and primary murine alveolar macrophages, as well as increased the intracellular MTB burden. Nicotine increased migration of THP-1 cells, consistent with the increased number of macrophages found in the lungs of smokers. Nicotine induced Tregs to produce transforming growth factor-β. Naive mouse macrophages co-cultured with nicotine-exposed Tregs had significantly greater numbers of viable MTB recovered with increased IL-10 production and urea production, but no difference in secreted nitric oxide as compared with macrophages cocultured with unexposed Tregs. We conclude that nicotine in CS plays an important role in subverting macrophage control of MTB infection.

  15. A systematic review of possible serious adverse health effects of nicotine replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Peter N; Fariss, Marc W

    2017-04-01

    We conducted a systematic literature review to identify and critically evaluate studies of serious adverse health effects (SAHEs) in humans using nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) products. Serious adverse health effects refer to adverse events, leading to substantial disruption of the ability to conduct normal life functions. Strength of evidence evaluations and conclusions were also determined for the identified SAHEs. We evaluated 34 epidemiological studies and clinical trials, relating NRT use to cancer, reproduction/development, CVD, stroke and/or other SAHEs in patients, and four meta-analyses on effects in healthy populations. The overall evidence suffers from many limitations, the most significant being the short-term exposure (≤12 weeks) and follow-up to NRT product use in most of the studies, the common failure to account for changes in smoking behaviour following NRT use, and the sparse information on SAHEs by type of NRT product used. The only SAHE from NRT exposure we identified was an increase in respiratory congenital abnormalities reported in one study. Limited evidence indicated a lack of effect between NRT exposure and SAHEs for CVD and various reproduction/developmental endpoints. For cancer, stroke and other SAHEs, the evidence was inadequate to demonstrate any association with NRT use. Our conclusions agree with recent statements from authoritative bodies.

  16. Gutkha Addiction: Nicotine Dependence or a Conditioned Reflex?

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Prathamesh Satish; Prashant, M C; Nagpal, Neelu; Patil, Atulkumar A; Ahuja, Rinky; Mathur, Vidhi

    2015-01-01

    Background: A pre-packaged mixture of areca nut, tobacco, slaked lime, catechu, and flavoring agents is popularly known as Gutkha. Aim of study is to analyze the addiction biology of Gutkha chewing and to assess efficacy of a cessation program based on nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). Materials and Methods: Patterns of addiction of 400 Gutkha chewers were analyzed with a questionnaire-based survey. Urine cotinine levels of 60 subjects undergoing NRT were periodically estimated using gas ch...

  17. Measurement of nicotine in household dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sungroul; Aung, Ther; Berkeley, Emily; Diette, Gregory B.; Breysse, Patrick N.

    2008-01-01

    An analytical method of measuring nicotine in house dust was optimized and associations among three secondhand smoking exposure markers were evaluated, i.e., nicotine concentrations of both house dust and indoor air, and the self-reported number of cigarettes smoked daily in a household. We obtained seven house dust samples from self-reported nonsmoking homes and 30 samples from smoking homes along with the information on indoor air nicotine concentrations and the number of cigarettes smoked daily from an asthma cohort study conducted by the Johns Hopkins Center for Childhood Asthma in the Urban Environment. House dust nicotine was analyzed by isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Using our optimized method, the median concentration of nicotine in the dust of self-reported nonsmoking homes was 11.7 ng/mg while that of smoking homes was 43.4 ng/mg. We found a substantially positive association (r=0.67, P<0.0001) between house dust nicotine concentrations and the numbers of cigarettes smoked daily. Optimized analytical methods showed a feasibility to detect nicotine in house dust. Our results indicated that the measurement of nicotine in house dust can be used potentially as a marker of longer term SHS exposure

  18. Transdermal drug delivery: approaches and significance

    OpenAIRE

    Murthy, SATHYANARAYANA

    2012-01-01

    S Narasimha MurthyDepartment of Pharmaceutics, The University of Mississippi, USATransdermal drug delivery systems deliver drugs through the skin as an alternative to oral, intravascular, subcutaneous, and transmucosal routes. Potential advantages of transdermal delivery include, but are not limited to, elimination of first-pass metabolism, steady delivery/blood levels, better patient compliance, reduced systemic drug interactions, possible dose intervention, avoidance of medically assisted d...

  19. Rationalization of a nanoparticle-based nicotine nanovaccine as an effective next-generation nicotine vaccine: A focus on hapten localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zongmin; Hu, Yun; Harmon, Theresa; Pentel, Paul; Ehrich, Marion; Zhang, Chenming

    2017-09-01

    A lipid-polymeric hybrid nanoparticle-based next-generation nicotine nanovaccine was rationalized in this study to combat nicotine addiction. A series of nanovaccines, which had nicotine-haptens localized on carrier protein (LPKN), nanoparticle surface (LPNK), or both (LPNKN), were designed to study the impact of hapten localization on their immunological efficacy. All three nanovaccines were efficiently taken up and processed by dendritic cells. LPNKN induced a significantly higher immunogenicity against nicotine and a significantly lower anti-carrier protein antibody level compared to LPKN and LPNK. Meanwhile, it was found that the anti-nicotine antibodies elicited by LPKN and LPNKN bind nicotine stronger than those elicited by LPKN, and LPNK and LPNKN resulted in a more balanced Th1-Th2 immunity than LPKN. Moreover, LPNKN exhibited the best ability to block nicotine from entering the brain of mice. Collectively, the results demonstrated that the immunological efficacy of the hybrid nanoparticle-based nicotine vaccine could be enhanced by modulating hapten localization, providing a promising strategy to combatting nicotine addiction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of Tat-Conjugated Dendrimer for Transdermal DNA Vaccine Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadoran, Azadeh; Moeini, Hassan; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    In order to enhance cellular uptake and to facilitate transdermal delivery of DNA vaccine, polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers conjugated with HIV transactivator of transcription (TAT) was developed. First, the plasmid DNA (pIRES-H5/GFP) nanoparticle was formulated using PAMAM dendrimer and TAT peptide and then characterized for surface charge, particle size, DNA encapsulation and protection of the pIRES-H5/GFP DNA plasmid to enzymatic digestion. Subsequently, the potency of the TAT-conjugated dendrimer for gene delivery was evaluated through in vitro transfection into Vero cells followed by gene expression analysis including western blotting, fluorescent microscopy and PCR. The effect of the TAT peptide on cellular uptake of DNA vaccine was studied by qRT-PCR and flow cytometry. Finally, the ability of TAT-conjugated PAMAM dendrimer for transdermal delivery of the DNA plasmid was assessed through artificial membranes followed by qRT-PCR and flow cytometry. TAT-conjugated PAMAM dendrimer showed the ability to form a compact and nanometre-sized polyplexes with the plasmid DNA, having the size range of 105 to 115 nm and a positive charge of +42 to +45 mV over the N/P ratio of 6:1(+/-).  In vitro transfection analysis into Vero cells confirms the high potency of TAT-conjugated PAMAM dendrimer to enhance the cellular uptake of DNA vaccine.  The permeability value assay through artificial membranes reveals that TAT-conjugated PAMAM has more capacity for transdermal delivery of the DNA compared to unmodified PAMAM dendrimer (Pdendrimer is a promising non-viral vector for transdermal use.This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page.

  1. Fetal and neonatal nicotine exposure in Wistar rats causes progressive pancreatic mitochondrial damage and beta cell dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E Bruin

    Full Text Available Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT is currently recommended as a safe smoking cessation aid for pregnant women. However, fetal and neonatal nicotine exposure in rats causes mitochondrial-mediated beta cell apoptosis at weaning, and adult-onset dysglycemia, which we hypothesize is related to progressive mitochondrial dysfunction in the pancreas. Therefore in this study we examined the effect of fetal and neonatal exposure to nicotine on pancreatic mitochondrial structure and function during postnatal development. Female Wistar rats were given saline (vehicle control or nicotine bitartrate (1 mg/kg/d via subcutaneous injection for 2 weeks prior to mating until weaning. At 3-4, 15 and 26 weeks of age, oral glucose tolerance tests were performed, and pancreas tissue was collected for electron microscopy, enzyme activity assays and islet isolation. Following nicotine exposure mitochondrial structural abnormalities were observed beginning at 3 weeks and worsened with advancing age. Importantly the appearance of these structural defects in nicotine-exposed animals preceded the onset of glucose intolerance. Nicotine exposure also resulted in significantly reduced pancreatic respiratory chain enzyme activity, degranulation of beta cells, elevated islet oxidative stress and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion compared to saline controls at 26 weeks of age. Taken together, these data suggest that maternal nicotine use during pregnancy results in postnatal mitochondrial dysfunction that may explain, in part, the dysglycemia observed in the offspring from this animal model. These results clearly indicate that further investigation into the safety of NRT use during pregnancy is warranted.

  2. Transdermal delivery and cutaneous targeting of antivirals using a penetration enhancer and lysolipid prodrugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diblíková, Denisa; Kopečná, Monika; Školová, Barbora; Krečmerová, Marcela; Roh, Jaroslav; Hrabálek, Alexandr; Vávrová, Kateřina

    2014-04-01

    In this work, we investigate prodrug and enhancer approaches for transdermal and topical delivery of antiviral drugs belonging to the 2,6-diaminopurine acyclic nucleoside phosphonate (ANP) group. Our question was whether we can differentiate between transdermal and topical delivery, i.e., to control the delivery of a given drug towards either systemic absorption or retention in the skin. The in vitro transdermal delivery and skin concentrations of seven antivirals, including (R)- and (S)-9-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl]-2,6-diaminopurine (PMPDAP), (S)-9-[3-hydroxy-2-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl]-2,6-diaminopurine ((S)-HPMPDAP), its 8-aza analog, and their cyclic and hexadecyloxypropyl (HDP) prodrugs, was investigated with and without the penetration enhancer dodecyl-6-(dimethylamino)hexanoate (DDAK) using human skin. The ability of ANPs to cross the human skin barrier was very low (0.5-1.4 nmol/cm(2)/h), and the majority of the compounds were found in the stratum corneum, the uppermost skin layer. The combination of antivirals and the penetration enhancer DDAK proved to be a viable approach for transdermal delivery, especially in case of (R)-PMPDAP, an anti-HIV effective drug (30.2 ± 2.3 nmol/cm(2)/h). On the other hand, lysophospholipid-like HDP prodrugs, e.g., HDP-(S)-HPMPDAP, reached high concentrations in viable epidermis without significant systemic absorption. By using penetration enhancers or lysolipid prodrugs, it is possible to effectively target systemic diseases by the transdermal route or to target cutaneous pathologies by topical delivery.

  3. Contingency management for alcohol use reduction: a pilot study using a transdermal alcohol sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Nancy P; Tidey, Jennifer; Murphy, James G; Swift, Robert; Colby, Suzanne M

    2011-11-01

    Contingency management (CM) has not been thoroughly evaluated as a treatment for alcohol abuse or dependence, in part because verification of alcohol use reduction requires frequent in-person breath tests. Transdermal alcohol sensors detect alcohol regularly throughout the day, providing remote monitoring and allowing for rapid reinforcement of reductions in use. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of CM for reduction in alcohol use, using a transdermal alcohol sensor to provide a continuous measure of alcohol use. Participants were 13 heavy drinking adults who wore the Secure Continuous Remote Alcohol Monitoring (SCRAM) bracelet for three weeks and provided reports of alcohol and drug use using daily web-based surveys. In Week 1, participants were asked to drink as usual; in Weeks 2 and 3, they were reinforced on an escalating schedule with values ranging from $5 to $17 per day on days when alcohol use was not reported or detected by the SCRAM. Self-reports of percent days abstinent and drinks per week, and transdermal measures of average and peak transdermal alcohol concentration and area under the curve declined significantly in Weeks 2-3. A nonsignificant but large effect size for reduction in days of tobacco use also was found. An adjustment to the SCRAM criteria for detecting alcohol use provided an accurate but less conservative method for use with non-mandated clients. Results support the efficacy of CM for alcohol use reductions and the feasibility of using transdermal monitoring of alcohol use for clinical purposes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Contingency Management for Alcohol Use Reduction: A Pilot Study using a Transdermal Alcohol Sensor*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Nancy P.; Tidey, Jennifer; Murphy, James G.; Swift, Robert; Colby, Suzanne M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Contingency management (CM) has not been thoroughly evaluated as a treatment for alcohol abuse or dependence, in part because verification of alcohol use reduction requires frequent in-person breath tests. Transdermal alcohol sensors detect alcohol regularly throughout the day, providing remote monitoring and allowing for rapid reinforcement of reductions in use. Methods The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of CM for reduction in alcohol use, using a transdermal alcohol sensor to provide a continuous measure of alcohol use. Participants were 13 heavy drinking adults who wore the Secure Continuous Remote Alcohol Monitoring (SCRAM) bracelet for three weeks and provided reports of alcohol and drug use using daily web-based surveys. In Week 1, participants were asked to drink as usual; in Weeks 2 and 3, they were reinforced on an escalating schedule with values ranging from $5-$17 per day on days when alcohol use was not reported or detected by the SCRAM. Results Self-reports of percent days abstinent and drinks per week, and transdermal measures of average and peak transdermal alcohol concentration and area under the curve declined significantly in Weeks 2-3. A nonsignificant but large effect size for reduction in days of tobacco use also was found. An adjustment to the SCRAM criteria for detecting alcohol use provided an accurate but less conservative method for use with non-mandated clients. Conclusion Results support the efficacy of CM for alcohol use reductions and the feasibility of using transdermal monitoring of alcohol use for clinical purposes. PMID:21665385

  5. Current and emerging lipid-based systems for transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Sumeet K; Sachdeva, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Developing a transdermal drug delivery system is a challenging task considering the selective permeability of the skin and the physicochemical properties the drug must possess to permeate through the skin. Lipid-based drug delivery systems have contributed a great deal in this direction in the last few decades, and thereby have helped to expand the range of therapeutic molecules that can be delivered through the skin in a safe and effective manner. Additionally, vesicular delivery systems such as nanoparticles and emulsions have also played important roles in providing alternative novel approaches for drug delivery. In this article, we will discuss some of the current and future lipid-based systems for transdermal drug delivery along with the associated challenges.

  6. Effects of simultaneous exposure to stress and nicotine on nicotine-induced locomotor activation in adolescent and adult rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zago, A. [Laboratório de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Leão, R.M.; Carneiro-de-Oliveira, P.E. [Laboratório de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Programa Interinstitucional de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Fisiológicas, Universidade Federal de São Carlos/Universidade Estadual de São Paulo, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Marin, M.T.; Cruz, F.C. [Laboratório de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Planeta, C.S. [Laboratório de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Programa Interinstitucional de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Fisiológicas, Universidade Federal de São Carlos/Universidade Estadual de São Paulo, Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2011-11-18

    Preclinical studies have shown that repeated stress experiences can result in an increase in the locomotor response to the subsequent administration of drugs of abuse, a phenomenon that has been termed behavioral cross-sensitization. Behavioral sensitization reflects neuroadaptive processes associated with drug addiction and drug-induced psychosis. Although crosssensitization between stress- and drug-induced locomotor activity has been clearly demonstrated in adult rats, few studies have evaluated this phenomenon in adolescent rats. In the present study, we determined if the simultaneous exposure to stress and nicotine was capable of inducing behavioral sensitization to nicotine in adolescent and adult rats. To this end, adolescent (postnatal day (P) 28-37) and adult (P60-67) rats received nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, sc) or saline (0.9% NaCl, sc) and were immediately subjected to restraint stress for 2 h once a day for 7 days. The control group for stress was undisturbed following nicotine or saline injections. Three days after the last exposure to stress and nicotine, rats were challenged with a single dose of nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, sc) or saline and nicotine-induced locomotion was then recorded for 30 min. In adolescent rats, nicotine caused behavioral sensitization only in animals that were simultaneously exposed to stress, while in adult rats nicotine promoted sensitization independently of stress exposure. These findings demonstrate that adolescent rats are more vulnerable to the effects of stress on behavioral sensitization to nicotine than adult rats.

  7. Effects of simultaneous exposure to stress and nicotine on nicotine-induced locomotor activation in adolescent and adult rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zago, A.; Leão, R.M.; Carneiro-de-Oliveira, P.E.; Marin, M.T.; Cruz, F.C.; Planeta, C.S.

    2011-01-01

    Preclinical studies have shown that repeated stress experiences can result in an increase in the locomotor response to the subsequent administration of drugs of abuse, a phenomenon that has been termed behavioral cross-sensitization. Behavioral sensitization reflects neuroadaptive processes associated with drug addiction and drug-induced psychosis. Although crosssensitization between stress- and drug-induced locomotor activity has been clearly demonstrated in adult rats, few studies have evaluated this phenomenon in adolescent rats. In the present study, we determined if the simultaneous exposure to stress and nicotine was capable of inducing behavioral sensitization to nicotine in adolescent and adult rats. To this end, adolescent (postnatal day (P) 28-37) and adult (P60-67) rats received nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, sc) or saline (0.9% NaCl, sc) and were immediately subjected to restraint stress for 2 h once a day for 7 days. The control group for stress was undisturbed following nicotine or saline injections. Three days after the last exposure to stress and nicotine, rats were challenged with a single dose of nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, sc) or saline and nicotine-induced locomotion was then recorded for 30 min. In adolescent rats, nicotine caused behavioral sensitization only in animals that were simultaneously exposed to stress, while in adult rats nicotine promoted sensitization independently of stress exposure. These findings demonstrate that adolescent rats are more vulnerable to the effects of stress on behavioral sensitization to nicotine than adult rats

  8. Effects of simultaneous exposure to stress and nicotine on nicotine-induced locomotor activation in adolescent and adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zago

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical studies have shown that repeated stress experiences can result in an increase in the locomotor response to the subsequent administration of drugs of abuse, a phenomenon that has been termed behavioral cross-sensitization. Behavioral sensitization reflects neuroadaptive processes associated with drug addiction and drug-induced psychosis. Although cross-sensitization between stress- and drug-induced locomotor activity has been clearly demonstrated in adult rats, few studies have evaluated this phenomenon in adolescent rats. In the present study, we determined if the simultaneous exposure to stress and nicotine was capable of inducing behavioral sensitization to nicotine in adolescent and adult rats. To this end, adolescent (postnatal day (P 28-37 and adult (P60-67 rats received nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, sc or saline (0.9% NaCl, sc and were immediately subjected to restraint stress for 2 h once a day for 7 days. The control group for stress was undisturbed following nicotine or saline injections. Three days after the last exposure to stress and nicotine, rats were challenged with a single dose of nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, sc or saline and nicotine-induced locomotion was then recorded for 30 min. In adolescent rats, nicotine caused behavioral sensitization only in animals that were simultaneously exposed to stress, while in adult rats nicotine promoted sensitization independently of stress exposure. These findings demonstrate that adolescent rats are more vulnerable to the effects of stress on behavioral sensitization to nicotine than adult rats.

  9. Prefrontal gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor insertion controls cue-induced relapse to nicotine seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubbers, Bart R; van Mourik, Yvar; Schetters, Dustin; Smit, August B; De Vries, Taco J; Spijker, Sabine

    2014-11-01

    Current smoking cessation therapies offer limited success, as relapse rates remain high. Nicotine, which is the major component of tobacco smoke, is thought to be primarily responsible for the addictive properties of tobacco. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying nicotine relapse, hampering development of more effective therapies. The objective of this study was to elucidate the role of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic receptors in controlling relapse to nicotine seeking. Using an intravenous self-administration model, we studied glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor regulation in the synaptic membrane fraction of the rat mPFC following extinction and cue-induced relapse to nicotine seeking. Subsequently, we locally intervened at the level of GABAergic signaling by using a mimetic peptide of the GABA receptor associated protein-interacting domain of GABA type A (GABAA) receptor subunit γ2 (TAT-GABAγ2) and muscimol, a GABAA receptor agonist. Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors were not regulated after the 30-min relapse test. However, GABAA receptor subunits α1 and γ2 were upregulated, and interference with GABAA receptor insertion in the cell membrane using the TAT-GABAγ2 peptide in the dorsal mPFC, but not the ventral mPFC, significantly increased responding during relapse. Increasing GABAA transmission with muscimol in the dorsal and ventral mPFC attenuated relapse. These data indicate that cue-induced relapse entails a GABAergic plasticity mechanism that limits nicotine seeking by restoring inhibitory control in the dorsal mPFC. GABAA receptor-mediated neurotransmission in the dorsal mPFC constitutes a possible future therapeutic target for maintaining smoking abstinence. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. High-affinity α4β2 nicotinic receptors mediate the impairing effects of acute nicotine on contextual fear extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlu, Munir Gunes; Holliday, Erica; Gould, Thomas J

    2016-02-01

    Previously, studies from our lab have shown that while acute nicotine administered prior to training and testing enhances contextual fear conditioning, acute nicotine injections prior to extinction sessions impair extinction of contextual fear. Although there is also strong evidence showing that the acute nicotine's enhancing effects on contextual fear conditioning require high-affinity α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), it is unknown which nAChR subtypes are involved in the acute nicotine-induced impairment of contextual fear extinction. In this study, we investigated the effects of acute nicotine administration on contextual fear extinction in knock-out (KO) mice lacking α4, β2 or α7 subtypes of nAChRs and their wild-type (WT) littermates. Both KO and WT mice were first trained and tested for contextual fear conditioning and received a daily contextual extinction session for 4 days. Subjects received intraperitoneal injections of nicotine (0.18 mg/kg) or saline 2-4 min prior to each extinction session. Our results showed that the mice that lack α4 and β2 subtypes of nAChRs showed normal contextual fear extinction but not the acute nicotine-induced impairment while the mice that lack the α7 subtype showed both normal contextual extinction and nicotine-induced impairment of contextual extinction. In addition, control experiments showed that acute nicotine-induced impairment of contextual fear extinction persisted when nicotine administration was ceased and repeated acute nicotine administrations alone did not induce freezing behavior in the absence of context-shock learning. These results clearly demonstrate that high-affinity α4β2 nAChRs are necessary for the effects of acute nicotine on contextual fear extinction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Renal transport and metabolism of nicotinic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuette, S.; Rose, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    Renal metabolism and brush-border transport of nicotinic acid were studied in renal cortical slices and brush-border membrane vesicles exposed to a physiological concentration of vitamin (2.2-3.5 microM). Vesicle transport of [ 3 H]nicotinic acid was found to be Na+ dependent and concentrative. The presence of a Na+ gradient resulted in a fivefold increase in the rate of nicotinic acid uptake over that observed with mannitol and caused a transient nicotinic acid accumulation two- to fourfold above the equilibrium value. The effects of membrane potential, pH, and elimination of Na+-H+ exchange were also studied. Cortical slices and isolated tubules exposed to 2.2 microM [ 14 C]nicotinic acid took up vitamin and rapidly metabolized most of it to intermediates in the Preiss-Handler pathway for NAD biosynthesis; little free nicotinic acid was detectable intracellularly. The replacement of Na+ with Li+ in the bathing medium reduced total accumulation of 14 C label primarily as a result of reduced nicotinic acid uptake. Cortical tissue concentrated free nicotinic acid only when the involved metabolic pathways were saturated by levels of nicotinic acid far in excess of what occurs in vivo

  12. Attenuated nicotine‐like effects of varenicline but not other nicotinic ACh receptor agonists in monkeys receiving nicotine daily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Colin S; Moerke, Megan J; Javors, Martin A; Carroll, F Ivy

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Chronic treatment can differentially impact the effects of pharmacologically related drugs that differ in receptor selectivity and efficacy. Experimental Approach The impact of daily nicotine treatment on the effects of nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR) agonists was examined in two groups of rhesus monkeys discriminating nicotine (1.78 mg·kg−1 base weight) from saline. One group received additional nicotine treatment post‐session (1.78 mg·kg−1 administered five times daily, each dose 2 h apart; i.e. Daily group), and the second group did not (Intermittent group). Key Results Daily repeated nicotine treatment produced a time‐related increase in saliva cotinine. There was no significant difference in the ED50 values of the nicotine discriminative stimulus between the Daily and Intermittent group. Mecamylamine antagonized the effects of nicotine, whereas dihydro‐β‐erythroidine did not. Midazolam produced 0% nicotine‐lever responding. The nAChR agonists epibatidine, RTI‐36, cytisine and varenicline produced >96% nicotine‐lever responding in the Intermittent group. The respective maximum effects in the Daily group were 100, 72, 59 and 28%, which shows that the ability of varenicline to produce nicotine‐like responding was selectively decreased in the Daily as compared with the Intermittent group. When combined with nicotine, both varenicline and cytisine increased the potency of nicotine to produce discriminative stimulus effects. Conclusion and Implications Nicotine treatment has a greater impact on the sensitivity to the effects of varenicline as compared with some other nAChR agonists. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that varenicline differs from nicotine in its selectivity for multiple nAChR subtypes. PMID:27667659

  13. Dendrimer-coupled sonophoresis-mediated transdermal drug-delivery system for diclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bin; Dong, Wei-Jiang; Yang, Gao-Yi; Wang, Wei; Ji, Cong-Hua; Zhou, Fei-Ni

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a novel transdermal drug-delivery system comprising a polyamidoamine dendrimer coupled with sonophoresis to enhance the permeation of diclofenac (DF) through the skin. The novel transdermal drug-delivery system was developed by using a statistical Plackett-Burman design. Hairless male Wistar rat skin was used for the DF-permeation study. Coupling media concentration, ultrasound-application time, duty cycle, distance from probe to skin, and a third-generation polyamidoamine-dendrimer concentration were selected as independent variables, while in vitro drug release was selected as a dependent variable. Independent variables were found to be statistically significant (Pdelivery, run 13) showed 56.69 µg/cm(2) cumulative drug permeated through the skin, while the DF-dendrimer gel without sonophoresis treatment (run 14) showed 257.3 µg/cm(2) cumulative drug permeated through the skin after 24 hours. However, when the same gel was applied to sonophoresis-treated skin, drastic permeation enhancement was observed. In the case of run 3, the cumulative drug that permeated through the skin was 935.21 µg/cm(2). It was concluded that dendrimer-coupled sonophoresis-mediated transdermal drug delivery system has the potential to enhance the permeation of DF through the skin.

  14. Ultrasound in Biomedical Engineering: Ultrasound Microbubble Contrast Agents Promote Transdermal Permeation of Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Ai-Ho Liao

    2016-01-01

    This report discusses a new development in the use of ultrasound microbubble contrast agents on transdermal drug delivery. The medium surrounding the microbubbles at the optimum concentration from liquid to gel can be modified and it can still achieve the same enhancement for transdermal drug permeation as liquid medium. It was also found that under the same ultrasound power density, microbubbles of larger particle sizes can extend the penetration depths of dye at the phantom surface.

  15. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid drug delivery systems through transdermal pathway: an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Naves, Lucas; Dhand, Chetna; Almeida, Luis; Rajamani, Lakshminarayanan; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Soares, Gra?a

    2017-01-01

    In past few decades, scientists have made tremendous advancement in the field of drug delivery systems (DDS), through transdermal pathway, as the skin represents a ready and large surface area for delivering drugs. Efforts are in progress to design efficient transdermal DDS that support sustained drug release at the targeted area for longer duration in the recommended therapeutic window without producing side-effects. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) is one of the most promising Food and ...

  16. Electron beam processed transdermal delivery system for administration of an anti-anginal agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotiyan, P. N.; Vavia, P. R.; Bharadwaj, Y. K.; Sabarwal, S.; Majali, A. B.

    2002-12-01

    Electron beam irradiation was used to synthesize a matrix type transdermal system of isosorbide dinitrate, an effective anti-anginal agent. The drug was dissolved in two monomeric systems, 2-ethylhexyl acrylate (EHA) and 2-ethylhexyl acrylate : methyl methacrylate (9 : 1). The solutions were then directly irradiated on a backing membrane (Scotchpak ®1006) at different doses to get transdermal patches. The developed systems were evaluated for residual monomer content, equilibrium weight swelling ratio, weight uniformity, thickness uniformity, drug content, peel strength, in vitro release and skin permeation kinetics. They possessed excellent tack and adhesive properties. In the case of isosorbide dinitrate-EHA systems, an increase in the peel strength values with respect to the skin was observed with increasing radiation doses. The systems exhibited promising skin permeation kinetics favorable for transdermal drug delivery. The radiation stability of the drug in the pure solid state form was also assessed.

  17. Electron beam processed transdermal delivery system for administration of an anti-anginal agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotiyan, P.N. E-mail: pramila-kotiyan@uiowa.edu; Vavia, P.R.; Bharadwaj, Y.K.; Sabarwal, S.; Majali, A.B

    2002-12-01

    Electron beam irradiation was used to synthesize a matrix type transdermal system of isosorbide dinitrate, an effective anti-anginal agent. The drug was dissolved in two monomeric systems, 2-ethylhexyl acrylate (EHA) and 2-ethylhexyl acrylate : methyl methacrylate (9 : 1). The solutions were then directly irradiated on a backing membrane (Scotchpak[reg]1006) at different doses to get transdermal patches. The developed systems were evaluated for residual monomer content, equilibrium weight swelling ratio, weight uniformity, thickness uniformity, drug content, peel strength, in vitro release and skin permeation kinetics. They possessed excellent tack and adhesive properties. In the case of isosorbide dinitrate-EHA systems, an increase in the peel strength values with respect to the skin was observed with increasing radiation doses. The systems exhibited promising skin permeation kinetics favorable for transdermal drug delivery. The radiation stability of the drug in the pure solid state form was also assessed.

  18. Nanoparticle-Enabled Transdermal Drug Delivery Systems for Enhanced Dose Control and Tissue Targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian C. Palmer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal drug delivery systems have been around for decades, and current technologies (e.g., patches, ointments, and creams enhance the skin permeation of low molecular weight, lipophilic drugs that are efficacious at low doses. The objective of current transdermal drug delivery research is to discover ways to enhance skin penetration of larger, hydrophilic drugs and macromolecules for disease treatment and vaccination. Nanocarriers made of lipids, metals, or polymers have been successfully used to increase penetration of drugs or vaccines, control drug release, and target drugs to specific areas of skin in vivo. While more research is needed to identify the safety of nanocarriers, this technology has the potential to expand the use of transdermal routes of administration to a wide array of therapeutics. Here, we review the current state of nanoparticle skin delivery systems with special emphasis on targeting skin diseases.

  19. Electron beam processed transdermal delivery system for administration of an anti-anginal agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotiyan, P.N.; Vavia, P.R.; Bharadwaj, Y.K.; Sabarwal, S.; Majali, A.B.

    2002-01-01

    Electron beam irradiation was used to synthesize a matrix type transdermal system of isosorbide dinitrate, an effective anti-anginal agent. The drug was dissolved in two monomeric systems, 2-ethylhexyl acrylate (EHA) and 2-ethylhexyl acrylate : methyl methacrylate (9 : 1). The solutions were then directly irradiated on a backing membrane (Scotchpak[reg]1006) at different doses to get transdermal patches. The developed systems were evaluated for residual monomer content, equilibrium weight swelling ratio, weight uniformity, thickness uniformity, drug content, peel strength, in vitro release and skin permeation kinetics. They possessed excellent tack and adhesive properties. In the case of isosorbide dinitrate-EHA systems, an increase in the peel strength values with respect to the skin was observed with increasing radiation doses. The systems exhibited promising skin permeation kinetics favorable for transdermal drug delivery. The radiation stability of the drug in the pure solid state form was also assessed

  20. A pilot study on nicotine residues in houses of electronic cigarette users, tobacco smokers, and non-users of nicotine-containing products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Derek; Goniewicz, Maciej L

    2015-06-01

    Nicotine deposited on the surfaces has been shown to react with airborne chemicals leading to formation of carcinogens and contributing to thirdhand exposure. While prior studies revealed nicotine residues in tobacco smokers' homes, none have examined the nicotine residue in electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) users' homes. We measured nicotine on the surfaces in households of 8 e-cigarette users, 6 cigarette smokers, and 8 non-users of nicotine-containing products in Western New York, USA. Three surface wipe samples were taken from the floor, wall and window. Nicotine was extracted from the wipes and analyzed using gas chromatography. Half of the e-cigarette users' homes had detectable levels of nicotine on surfaces whereas nicotine was found in all of the tobacco cigarette smokers' homes. Trace amounts of nicotine were also detected in half of the homes of non-users of nicotine-containing products. Nicotine levels in e-cigarette users homes was significantly lower than that found in cigarette smokers homes (average concentration 7.7±17.2 vs. 1303±2676 μg/m2; pe-cigarette users and non-users (p>0.05). Nicotine is a common contaminant found on indoor surfaces. Using e-cigarettes indoors leads to significantly less thirdhand exposure to nicotine compared to smoking tobacco cigarettes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Nicotine, adolescence, and stress: A review of how stress can modulate the negative consequences of adolescent nicotine abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Erica; Gould, Thomas J

    2016-06-01

    In order to continue the decline of smoking prevalence, it is imperative to identify factors that contribute to the development of nicotine and tobacco addiction, such as adolescent initiation of nicotine use, adolescent stress, and their interaction. This review highlights the biological differences between adolescent and adults in nicotine use and resulting effects, and examines the enduring consequences of adolescent nicotine administration. A review of both clinical and preclinical literature indicates that adolescent, but not adult, nicotine administration leads to increased susceptibility for development of long-lasting impairments in learning and affect. Finally, the role stress plays in normal adolescent development, the deleterious effects stress has on learning and memory, and the negative consequences resulting from the interaction of stress and nicotine during adolescence is reviewed. The review concludes with ways in which future policies could benefit by addressing adolescent stress as a means of reducing adolescent nicotine abuse. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cardiovascular risks in smokers treated with nicotine replacement therapy: a historical cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dollerup J

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Jens Dollerup,1 Jørgen Vestbo,2 Tarita Murray-Thomas,3 Alan Kaplan,4 Richard J Martin,5 Emilio Pizzichini,6 Marcia M M Pizzichini,6 Anne Burden,7 Jessica Martin,7 David B Price7,8 1Dollerup Medical Consultancy, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark; 2Division of Infection, Immunity and Respiratory Medicine, School of Biological Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; 3Clinical Practice Research Datalink, Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, London, UK; 4Family Physician Airways Group of Canada, Richmond Hill, ON, Canada; 5National Jewish Health, Denver, CO, USA; 6Federal University of Santa Catarina, Santa Catarina, Brazil; 7Observational and Pragmatic Research Institute Pte Ltd, Singapore; 8Centre for Academic Primary Care, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK Background: Previous research suggests exposure to nicotine replacement therapy (NRT may be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD.Methods: Using data from the United Kingdom’s Clinical Practice Research Datalink, this study aimed to evaluate CVD events and survival among individuals who attempted smoking cessation with the support of NRT compared with those aided by smoking cessation advice only. We studied CVD outcomes over 4 and 52 weeks in 50,214 smokers attempting to quit – 33,476 supported by smoking cessation advice and 16,738 with the support of NRT prescribed by their primary care physician. Patients were matched (2 smoking cessation advice patients:1 NRT patient on demographic and clinical characteristics during a baseline year preceding their quit attempt. Cox proportional hazard regression, conditional negative binomial regression model, and conditional logistic regression were used to analyze data.Results: Mean (standard deviation population age was 47 (11.2 years; 51% were females. Time to first diagnosis of ischemic heart disease (IHD among NRT and smoking cessation advice patients was similar within the first 4 weeks, but

  3. Adolescents' understanding and use of nicotine in e-cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, Jessica K; Farrelly, Matthew C; Watson, Kimberly A

    2018-07-01

    Nicotine harms adolescent brain development and contributes to addiction. Some adolescents report using nicotine-free e-cigarettes, but the accuracy of their reporting is unclear. We explored adolescents' use of nicotine-free e-cigarettes and understanding of chemicals in e-cigarettes, including nicotine. Using social media, we recruited 1589 US adolescents (aged 15-17) who reported past 30-day use of e-cigarettes in 2016. We assessed perceptions of the nicotine source in e-liquid and whether e-cigarette aerosol is just "water vapor." We explored differences among adolescents who usually used e-cigarettes with nicotine (n = 473) and without nicotine (n = 452). We used weights to calibrate our sample to the Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Twenty-nine percent usually used e-cigarettes without nicotine, 28% with nicotine, 39% with "both," and 5% were "not sure." Few participants (17% of non-nicotine users vs. 34% of nicotine users, p e-cigarette aerosol was just water vapor were more likely to usually use without nicotine. Older adolescents and current tobacco users were less likely to usually use without nicotine. The adolescents who reported usually using e-cigarettes without nicotine had poorer knowledge of e-cigarettes. This lack of understanding could contribute to inaccurate reporting of nicotine use. Most youth thought the nicotine in e-cigarettes was artificial, potentially indicating a belief that this nicotine is "safer." The US Food & Drug Administration will require nicotine warnings on e-cigarettes in 2018; a complementary educational campaign could address youths' misperceptions about nicotine and other chemicals in e-cigarette aerosol. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Vitamin E Nicotinate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimbell R. Duncan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin E refers to a family of compounds that function as lipid-soluble antioxidants capable of preventing lipid peroxidation. Naturally occurring forms of vitamin E include tocopherols and tocotrienols. Vitamin E in dietary supplements and fortified foods is often an esterified form of α-tocopherol, the most common esters being acetate and succinate. The vitamin E esters are hydrolyzed and converted into free α-tocopherol prior to absorption in the intestinal tract. Because its functions are relevant to many chronic diseases, vitamin E has been extensively studied in respect to a variety of diseases as well as cosmetic applications. The forms of vitamin E most studied are natural α-tocopherol and the esters α-tocopheryl acetate and α-tocopheryl succinate. A small number of studies include or focus on another ester form, α-tocopheryl nicotinate, an ester of vitamin E and niacin. Some of these studies raise the possibility of differences in metabolism and in efficacy between vitamin E nicotinate and other forms of vitamin E. Recently, through metabolomics studies, we identified that α-tocopheryl nicotinate occurs endogenously in the heart and that its level is dramatically decreased in heart failure, indicating the possible biological importance of this vitamin E ester. Since knowledge about vitamin E nicotinate is not readily available in the literature, the purpose of this review is to summarize and evaluate published reports, specifically with respect to α-tocopheryl nicotinate with an emphasis on the differences from natural α-tocopherol or α-tocopheryl acetate.

  5. Hyaluronan-Based Nanohydrogels as Effective Carriers for Transdermal Delivery of Lipophilic Agents: Towards Transdermal Drug Administration in Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Uk Son

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We suggest a convenient nanoemulsion fabrication method to create hyaluronan (HA-based nanohydrogels for effective transdermal delivery. First, hyaluronan-conjugated dodecylamine (HA–Do HA-based polymers to load the lipophilic agents were synthesized with hyaluronan (HA and dodecylamine (Do by varying the substitution ratio of Do to HA. The synthetic yield of HA–Do was more than 80% (HA–Do (A: 82.7 ± 4.7%, HA–Do (B: 87.1 ± 3.9% and HA–Do (C: 81.4 ± 4.5%. Subsequently, nanohydrogels were fabricated using the nanoemulsion method. Indocyanine green (ICG simultaneously self-assembled with HA–Do, and the size depended on the substitution ratio of Do in HA–Do (nanohydrogel (A: 118.0 ± 2.2 nm, nanohydrogel (B: 121.9 ± 11.4 nm, and nanohydrogel (C: 142.2 ± 3.8 nm. The nanohydrogels were delivered into cells, and had excellent biocompatibility. Especially, nanohydrogel (A could deliver and permeate ICG into the deep skin layer, the dermis. This suggests that nanohydrogels can be potent transdermal delivery systems.

  6. Effects of the nicotinic agonist varenicline, nicotinic antagonist r-bPiDI, and DAT inhibitor (R)-modafinil on co-use of ethanol and nicotine in female P rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Sarah E; Saunders, Meredith A; Baxter, Thomas A; Nixon, Kimberly; Prendergast, Mark A; Zheng, Guangrong; Crooks, Peter; Dwoskin, Linda P; Slack, Rachel D; Newman, Amy H; Bell, Richard L; Bardo, Michael T

    2018-05-01

    Co-users of alcohol and nicotine are the largest group of polysubstance users worldwide. Commonalities in mechanisms of action for ethanol (EtOH) and nicotine proposes the possibility of developing a single pharmacotherapeutic to treat co-use. Toward developing a preclinical model of co-use, female alcohol-preferring (P) rats were trained for voluntary EtOH drinking and i.v. nicotine self-administration in three phases: (1) EtOH alone (0 vs. 15%, two-bottle choice), (2) nicotine alone (0.03 mg/kg/infusion, active vs. inactive lever), and (3) concurrent access to both EtOH and nicotine. Using this model, we examined the effects of (1) varenicline, a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) partial agonist with high affinity for the α4β2* subtype; (2) r-bPiDI, a subtype-selective antagonist at α6β2* nAChRs; and (3) (R)-modafinil, an atypical inhibitor of the dopamine transporter (DAT). In phases 1 and 2, pharmacologically relevant intake of EtOH and nicotine was achieved. In the concurrent access phase (phase 3), EtOH consumption decreased while nicotine intake increased relative to phases 1 and 2. For drug pretreatments, in the EtOH access phase (phase 1), (R)-modafinil (100 mg/kg) decreased EtOH consumption, with no effect on water consumption. In the concurrent access phase, varenicline (3 mg/kg), r-bPiDI (20 mg/kg), and (R)-modafinil (100 mg/kg) decreased nicotine self-administration but did not alter EtOH consumption, water consumption, or inactive lever pressing. These results indicate that therapeutics which may be useful for smoking cessation via selective inhibition of α4β2* or α6β2* nAChRs, or DAT inhibition, may not be sufficient to treat EtOH and nicotine co-use.

  7. Tying up Nicotine: New Selective Competitive Antagonist of the Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ida Nymann; Crestey, François; Jensen, Anders A

    2015-01-01

    Conformational restriction of the pyrrolidine nitrogen in nicotine by the introduction of an ethylene bridge provided a potent and selective antagonist of the α4β2-subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Resolution by chiral SFC, pharmacological characterization of the two enantiomers...

  8. Inkjet printing of insulin microneedles for transdermal delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Steven; Scoutaris, Nicolaos; Lamprou, Dimitrios; Mallinson, David; Douroumis, Dennis

    2015-08-01

    Inkjet printing technology was used to apply insulin polymeric layers on metal microneedles for transdermal delivery. A range of various polymers such as gelatin (GLN), polyvinyl caprolactame-polyvinyl acetate-polyethylene glycol (SOL), poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) (POX) and trehalose (THL) were assessed for their capacity to form thin uniform and homogeneous layers that preserve insulin intact. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed homogeneous insulin-polymer layers without any phase separation while SOL demonstrated the best performance. Circular discroism (CD) analysis of rehydrated films showed that insulin's alpha helices and β-sheet were well preserved for THL and SOL. In contrast, GLN and POX insulin layers revealed small band shifts indicating possible conformational changes. Insulin release in Franz diffusion cells from MNs inserted into porcine skin showed rapid release rates for POX and GLN within the first 20 min. Inkjet printing was proved an effective approach for transdermal delivery of insulin in solid state.

  9. Fabrication, appraisal, and transdermal permeation of sildenafil citrate-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers versus solid lipid nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnaggar, Yosra SR; El-Massik, Magda A; Abdallah, Ossama Y

    2011-01-01

    Although sildenafil citrate (SC) is used extensively for erectile dysfunction, oral delivery of SC encounters many obstacles. Furthermore, the physicochemical characteristics of this amphoteric drug are challenging for delivery system formulation and transdermal permeation. This article concerns the assessment of the potential of nanomedicine for improving SC delivery and transdermal permeation. SC-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) were fabricated using a modified high-shear homogenization technique. Nanoparticle optimization steps included particle size analysis, entrapment efficiency (EE) determination, freeze-drying and reconstitution, differential scanning calorimetry, in vitro release, stability study and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. Transdermal permeation of the nanocarriers compared with SC suspension across human skin was assessed using a modified Franz diffusion cell assembly. Results revealed that SLNs and NLCs could be optimized in the nanometric range (180 and 100 nm, respectively) with excellent EE (96.7% and 97.5%, respectively). Nanoparticles have significantly enhanced in vitro release and transdermal permeation of SC compared with its suspensions. Furthermore, transdermal permeation of SC exhibited higher initial release from both SLN and NLC formulations followed by controlled release, with promising implications for faster onset and longer drug duration. Nanomedicines prepared exhibited excellent physical stability for the study period. Solid nanoparticles optimized in this study successfully improved SC characteristics, paving the way for an efficient topical Viagra® product. PMID:22238508

  10. Nicotine Contamination in Particulate Matter Sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Garshick

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We have addressed potential contamination of PM2.5 filter samples by nicotine from cigarette smoke. We collected two nicotine samples – one nicotine sampling filter was placed in-line after the collection of PM2.5 and the other stood alone. The overall correlation between the two nicotine filter levels was 0.99. The nicotine collected on the “stand-alone” filter was slightly greater than that on the “in-line” filter (mean difference = 1.10 μg/m3, but the difference was statistically significant only when PM2.5 was low (≤ 50 μg/m3. It is therefore important to account for personal and secondhand smoke exposure while assessing occupational and environmental PM.

  11. Dissolving and biodegradable microneedle technologies for transdermal sustained delivery of drug and vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xiaoyun; Wei, Liangming; Wu, Fei; Wu, Zaozhan; Chen, Lizhu; Liu, Zhenguo; Yuan, Weien

    2013-01-01

    Microneedles were first conceptualized for drug delivery many decades ago, overcoming the shortages and preserving the advantages of hypodermic needle and conventional transdermal drug-delivery systems to some extent. Dissolving and biodegradable microneedle technologies have been used for transdermal sustained deliveries of different drugs and vaccines. This review describes microneedle geometry and the representative dissolving and biodegradable microneedle delivery methods via the skin, followed by the fabricating methods. Finally, this review puts forward some perspectives that require further investigation. PMID:24039404

  12. Enhancement of transdermal delivery of ibuprofen using microemulsion vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liandong; Hu, Qiaofeng; Yang, Jianxue

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to find a stable microemulsion vehicle for transdermal delivery of ibuprofen to improve the skin permeability. Microemulsion was prepared using different sorts of oils, surfactants and co-surfactants. Pseudo-ternary phase diagrams were used to evaluate the microemulsion domain. The effects of oleic acid and surfactant mixture on skin permeation of ibuprofen were evaluated with excised skins. The optimum formulation F3 consisting of 6% oleic acid, 30% Cremophor RH40/Transcutol P (2:1, w/w) and 59% water phase, showed a high permeation rate of 42.98 µg/cm(2)/hr. The mean droplet size of microemulsion was about 43 nm and no skin irritation signs were observed on the skin of rabbits. These results indicated that this novel microemulsion is a useful formulation for the transdermal delivery of ibuprofen.

  13. Nonaqueous gel for the transdermal delivery of a DTPA penta-ethyl ester prodrug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Sadgrove, Matthew P; Sueda, Katsuhiko; Yang, Yu-Tsai; Pacyniak, Erik K; Kagel, John R; Braun, Brenda A; Zamboni, William C; Mumper, Russell J; Jay, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid penta-ethyl ester, designated as C2E5, was successfully incorporated into a nonaqueous gel for transdermal delivery. The thermal and rheological properties of a formulation containing 40% C2E5, 20% ethyl cellulose, and 40% Miglyol 840® prepared using the solvent evaporation method demonstrated that the gel had acceptable content uniformity and flow properties. In vitro studies showed that C2E5 was steadily released from the gel at a rate suitable for transdermal delivery. Topical application of the gel at a 200 mg C2E5/kg dose level in rats achieved significantly higher plasma exposures of several active metabolites compared with neat C2E5 oil at the same dose level. The results suggest that transdermal delivery of a chelator prodrug is an effective radionuclide decorporation strategy by delivering chelators to the circulation with a pharmacokinetic profile that is more consistent with the biokinetic profile of transuranic elements in contaminated individuals.

  14. Fetal Nicotine Exposure Increases Preference for Nicotine Odor in Early Postnatal and Adolescent, but Not Adult, Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantella, Nicole M.; Kent, Paul F.; Youngentob, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    Human studies demonstrate a four-fold increased possibility of smoking in the children of mothers who smoked during pregnancy. Nicotine is the active addictive component in tobacco-related products, crossing the placenta and contaminating the amniotic fluid. It is known that chemosensory experience in the womb can influence postnatal odor-guided preference behaviors for an exposure stimulus. By means of behavioral and neurophysiologic approaches, we examined whether fetal nicotine exposure, using mini-osmotic pumps, altered the response to nicotine odor in early postnatal (P17), adolescent (P35) and adult (P90) progeny. Compared with controls, fetal exposed rats displayed an altered innate response to nicotine odor that was evident at P17, declined in magnitude by P35 and was absent at P90 - these effects were specific to nicotine odor. The behavioral effect in P17 rats occurred in conjunction with a tuned olfactory mucosal response to nicotine odor along with an untoward consequence on the epithelial response to other stimuli – these P17 neural effects were absent in P35 and P90 animals. The absence of an altered neural effect at P35 suggests that central mechanisms, such as nicotine-induced modifications of the olfactory bulb, bring about the altered behavioral response to nicotine odor. Together, these findings provide insights into how fetal nicotine exposure influences the behavioral preference and responsiveness to the drug later in life. Moreover, they add to a growing literature demonstrating chemosensory mechanisms by which patterns of maternal drug use can be conveyed to offspring, thereby enhancing postnatal vulnerability for subsequent use and abuse. PMID:24358374

  15. The Role of Nicotine Dependence in E-Cigarettes' Potential for Smoking Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selya, Arielle S; Dierker, Lisa; Rose, Jennifer S; Hedeker, Donald; Mermelstein, Robin J

    2017-07-07

    remains unclear. The use of e-cigarettes as a quit aid was not associated with reductions in conventional smoking, consistent with most other quit aids in this sample except for nicotine replacement therapy, which was only effective for the most dependent smokers. Notably, these findings highlight the necessity of accounting for smokers' nicotine dependence levels when examining tobacco use patterns. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Effect of a nicotine vaccine on nicotine binding to the beta2-nAChRs in vivo in human tobacco smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esterlis, Irina; Hannestad, Jonas O.; Perkins, Evgenia; Bois, Frederic; D’Souza, D. Cyril; Tyndale, Rachel F.; Seibyl, John P.; Hatsukami, Dorothy M.; Cosgrove, Kelly P.; O’Malley, Stephanie S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Nicotine acts in the brain to promote smoking in part by binding to the beta2-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (β2*-nAChRs) and acting in the mesolimbic reward pathway. The effects of nicotine from smoking one tobacco cigarette are significant (80% of β2*-nAChRs occupied for >6h). This likely contributes to the maintenance of smoking dependence and low cessation outcomes. Development of nicotine vaccines provides potential for alternative treatments. We used [123I]5IA-85380 SPECT to evaluate the effect of 3′-AmNic-rEPA on the amount of nicotine that binds to the β2*-nAChRs in the cortical and subcortical regions in smokers. Method Eleven smokers (36years (SD=13); 19cig/day (SD=11) for 10years (SD=7) who were dependent on nicotine (Fagerström Test of Nicotine Dependence score =5.5 (SD=3); plasma nicotine 9.1 ng/mL (SD=5)) participated in 2 SPECT scan days: before and after immunization with 4–400μg doses of 3′-AmNic-rEPA. On SPECT scan days, 3 30-min baseline emission scans were obtained, followed by administration of IV nicotine (1.5mg/70kg) and up to 9 30-min emission scans. Results β2*-nAChR availability was quantified as VT/fP and nicotine binding was derived using the Lassen plot approach. Immunization led to a 12.5% reduction in nicotine binding (F=5.19, df=1,10, p=0.05). Significant positive correlations were observed between nicotine bound to β2*-nAChRs and nicotine injected before but not after vaccination (p=0.05 vs. p=0.98). There was a significant reduction in the daily number of cigarettes and desire for a cigarette (p=.01 and p=.04, respectively). Conclusions This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that immunization with nicotine vaccine can reduce the amount of nicotine binding to β2*-nAChRs and disrupt the relationship between nicotine administered vs. nicotine available to occupy β2*-nAChRs. PMID:23429725

  17. Transdermal and intradermal delivery of therapeutic agents: application of physical technologies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Banga, Ajay K

    2011-01-01

    .... Commercialization of transdermal drug delivery requires technology from many disciplines beyond pharmaceutical sciences, such as polymer chemistry, adhesion sciences, mass transport, web film coating...

  18. Effects of a selective cannabinoid CB2 agonist and antagonist on intravenous nicotine self administration and reinstatement of nicotine seeking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam Gamaleddin

    Full Text Available Over the last decade there have been significant advances in the discovery and understanding of the cannabinoid system along with the development of pharmacologic tools that modulate its function. Characterization of the crosstalk between nicotine addiction and the cannabinoid system may have significant implications on our understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying nicotine dependence. Two types of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2 have been identified. CB1 receptors are expressed in the brain and modulate drug taking and drug seeking for various drugs of abuse, including nicotine. CB2 receptors have been recently identified in the brain and have been proposed to play a functional role in mental disorders and drug addiction. Our objective was to explore the role of CB2 receptors on intravenous nicotine self administration under two schedules of reinforcement (fixed and progressive ratio and on nicotine seeking induced by nicotine priming or by nicotine associated cues. For this, we evaluated the effects of various doses of the selective CB2 antagonist AM630 (1.25 to 5 mg/kg and CB2 agonist AM1241 (1 to 10 mg/kg on these behavioral responses in rats. Different groups of male Long Evans rats were trained to lever press for nicotine at a unit dose of 30 µg/kg/infusion. Subsequently, animals were randomized using a Latin-square design and injected with either AM1241 or AM630 using a counterbalanced within subject design. Administration of the CB2 ligands did not affect either nicotine-taking nicotine-seeking behavior. Our results do not support the involvement of CB2 receptors in nicotine-taking or nicotine-seeking behavior.

  19. Efficacy and transdermal absorption of permethrin in scabies patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Rhee, H.J.; Farquhar, J A; Vermeulen, N P

    1989-01-01

    The clinical efficacy and transdermal absorption of permethrin, a new synthetic insecticide was investigated in ten scabies patients. All patients were successfully treated with one application of a cream, containing 5% permethrin. Apart from mild postscabies dermatitis no side-effects were

  20. Molecular genetics of nicotine dependence and abstinence: whole genome association using 520,000 SNPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walther Donna

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classical genetic studies indicate that nicotine dependence is a substantially heritable complex disorder. Genetic vulnerabilities to nicotine dependence largely overlap with genetic vulnerabilities to dependence on other addictive substances. Successful abstinence from nicotine displays substantial heritable components as well. Some of the heritability for the ability to quit smoking appears to overlap with the genetics of nicotine dependence and some does not. We now report genome wide association studies of nicotine dependent individuals who were successful in abstaining from cigarette smoking, nicotine dependent individuals who were not successful in abstaining and ethnically-matched control subjects free from substantial lifetime use of any addictive substance. Results These data, and their comparison with data that we have previously obtained from comparisons of four other substance dependent vs control samples support two main ideas: 1 Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs whose allele frequencies distinguish nicotine-dependent from control individuals identify a set of genes that overlaps significantly with the set of genes that contain markers whose allelic frequencies distinguish the four other substance dependent vs control groups (p vs unsuccessful abstainers cluster in small genomic regions in ways that are highly unlikely to be due to chance (Monte Carlo p Conclusion These clustered SNPs nominate candidate genes for successful abstinence from smoking that are implicated in interesting functions: cell adhesion, enzymes, transcriptional regulators, neurotransmitters and receptors and regulation of DNA, RNA and proteins. As these observations are replicated, they will provide an increasingly-strong basis for understanding mechanisms of successful abstinence, for identifying individuals more or less likely to succeed in smoking cessation efforts and for tailoring therapies so that genotypes can help match smokers

  1. Design and Development of a Proniosomal Transdermal Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to develop a proniosomal carrier system for captopril for the treatment of hypertension that is capable of efficiently delivering entrapped drug over an extended period of time. Method: The potential of proniosomes as a transdermal drug delivery system for captopril was investigated by ...

  2. In vivo real-time monitoring system of electroporation mediated control of transdermal and topical drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagus, Tanja; Markelc, Bostjan; Cemazar, Maja; Kosjek, Tina; Preat, Veronique; Miklavcic, Damijan; Sersa, Gregor

    2013-12-28

    Electroporation (EP) is a physical method for the delivery of molecules into cells and tissues, including the skin. In this study, in order to control the degree of transdermal and topical drug delivery, EP at different amplitudes of electric pulses was evaluated. A new in vivo real-time monitoring system based on fluorescently labeled molecules was developed, for the quantification of transdermal and topical drug delivery. EP of the mouse skin was performed with new non-invasive multi-array electrodes, delivering different amplitudes of electric pulses ranging from 70 to 570 V, between the electrode pin pairs. Patches, soaked with 4 kDa fluorescein-isothiocyanate labeled dextran (FD), doxorubicin (DOX) or fentanyl (FEN), were applied to the skin before and after EP. The new monitoring system was developed based on the delivery of FD to and through the skin. FD relative quantity was determined with fluorescence microscopy imaging, in the treated region of the skin for topical delivery and in a segment of the mouse tail for transdermal delivery. The application of electric pulses for FD delivery resulted in enhanced transdermal delivery. Depending on the amplitude of electric pulses, it increased up to the amplitude of 360 V, and decreased at higher amplitudes (460 and 570 V). Topical delivery steadily enhanced with increasing the amplitude of the delivered electric pulses, being even higher than after tape stripping used as a positive control. The non-invasive monitoring of the delivery of DOX, a fluorescent chemotherapeutic drug, qualitatively and quantitatively confirmed the effects of EP at 360 and 570 V pulse amplitudes on topical and transdermal drug delivery. Delivery of FEN at 360 and 570 V pulse amplitudes verified the observed effects as obtained with FD and DOX, by the measured physiological responses of the mice as well as FEN plasma concentration. This study demonstrates that with the newly developed non-invasive multi-array electrodes and with the

  3. Nicotine transport in lung and non-lung epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Mikihisa; Kamei, Hidetaka; Nagahiro, Machi; Kawami, Masashi; Yumoto, Ryoko

    2017-11-01

    Nicotine is rapidly absorbed from the lung alveoli into systemic circulation during cigarette smoking. However, mechanism underlying nicotine transport in alveolar epithelial cells is not well understood to date. In the present study, we characterized nicotine uptake in lung epithelial cell lines A549 and NCI-H441 and in non-lung epithelial cell lines HepG2 and MCF-7. Characteristics of [ 3 H]nicotine uptake was studied using these cell lines. Nicotine uptake in A549 cells occurred in a time- and temperature-dependent manner and showed saturation kinetics, with a Km value of 0.31mM. Treatment with some organic cations such as diphenhydramine and pyrilamine inhibited nicotine uptake, whereas treatment with organic cations such as carnitine and tetraethylammonium did not affect nicotine uptake. Extracellular pH markedly affected nicotine uptake, with high nicotine uptake being observed at high pH up to 11.0. Modulation of intracellular pH with ammonium chloride also affected nicotine uptake. Treatment with valinomycin, a potassium ionophore, did not significantly affect nicotine uptake, indicating that nicotine uptake is an electroneutral process. For comparison, we assessed the characteristics of nicotine uptake in another lung epithelial cell line NCI-H441 and in non-lung epithelial cell lines HepG2 and MCF-7. Interestingly, these cell lines showed similar characteristics of nicotine uptake with respect to pH dependency and inhibition by various organic cations. The present findings suggest that a similar or the same pH-dependent transport system is involved in nicotine uptake in these cell lines. A novel molecular mechanism of nicotine transport is proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The effects of nicotine in the neonatal quinpirole rodent model of psychosis: Neural plasticity mechanisms and nicotinic receptor changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Daniel J; Gill, W Drew; Dose, John M; Hoover, Donald B; Pauly, James R; Cummins, Elizabeth D; Burgess, Katherine C; Brown, Russell W

    2017-05-15

    Neonatal quinpirole (NQ) treatment to rats increases dopamine D2 receptor sensitivity persistent throughout the animal's lifetime. In Experiment 1, we analyzed the role of α7 and α4β2 nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) in nicotine behavioral sensitization and on the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) response to nicotine in NQ- and neonatally saline (NS)-treated rats. In Experiment 2, we analyzed changes in α7 and α4β2 nAChR density in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and dorsal striatum in NQ and NS animals sensitized to nicotine. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were neonatally treated with quinpirole (1mg/kg) or saline from postnatal days (P)1-21. Animals were given ip injections of either saline or nicotine (0.5mg/kg free base) every second day from P33 to P49 and tested on behavioral sensitization. Before each injection, animals were ip administered the α7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA; 2 or 4mg/kg) or the α4β2 nAChR antagonist dihydro beta erythroidine (DhβE; 1 or 3mg/kg). Results revealed NQ enhanced nicotine sensitization that was blocked by DhβE. MLA blocked the enhanced nicotine sensitization in NQ animals, but did not block nicotine sensitization. NQ enhanced the NAcc BDNF response to nicotine which was blocked by both antagonists. In Experiment 2, NQ enhanced nicotine sensitization and enhanced α4β2, but not α7, nAChR upregulation in the NAcc. These results suggest a relationship between accumbal BDNF and α4β2 nAChRs and their role in the behavioral response to nicotine in the NQ model which has relevance to schizophrenia, a behavioral disorder with high rates of tobacco smoking. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Ceasing intrathecal therapy in chronic non-cancer pain: an invitation to shift from biomedical focus to active management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Hayes

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To report long term experience (1997-2009 of intrathecal (IT therapy for chronic non-cancer pain in the context of our team's increasing emphasis on active management. DESIGN: Descriptive case series. SETTING: Australian tertiary multidisciplinary pain center, Hunter Integrated Pain Service (HIPS. INTERVENTION: This case series reports the changing use of IT implanted drug delivery systems (IDDSs for chronic non-cancer pain over 13 years. Initially IT therapy was used selectively following multidisciplinary assessment and double blind IT trial. Typical therapy combined opioid with clonidine. Multidimensional management was offered. Treatment strategy changed in 2003 due to HIPS experience of limited therapeutic gains and equivocal support for IT therapy in the literature. Subsequently IT therapy was no longer initiated for non-cancer pain and those on established regimes were encouraged to shift to oral/transdermal opioids with greater emphasis on active management. Patient education and consultation were key elements. Where IT cessation was elective gradual dose reduction commenced as an outpatient. In elective and urgent cases ketamine infusion and oral clonidine were used during hospital admissions to cover the switch to oral/transdermal opioids. Over the study period transition occurred to a broader management framework in which IT therapy for chronic non-cancer pain was no longer supported by HIPS. RESULTS: 25 patients were managed using IDDSs; 8 implanted by HIPS and 17 by other teams. Dose escalation and adverse effects were common. 24 of 25 patients ceased IT therapy; 7 (29% with urgent IDDS related complications, 16 (67% electively and 1 due to an unrelated death. The remaining patient returned to her original team to continue IT therapy. One post-explantation patient transferred to another team to recommence IT therapy. The remainder were successfully maintained on oral/transdermal opioids combined with active management.

  6. A hierarchical instrumental decision theory of nicotine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogarth, Lee; Troisi, Joseph R

    2015-01-01

    It is important to characterize the learning processes governing tobacco-seeking in order to understand how best to treat this behavior. Most drug learning theories have adopted a Pavlovian framework wherein the conditioned response is the main motivational process. We favor instead a hierarchical instrumental decision account, wherein expectations about the instrumental contingency between voluntary tobacco-seeking and the receipt of nicotine reward determines the probability of executing this behavior. To support this view, we review titration and nicotine discrimination research showing that internal signals for deprivation/satiation modulate expectations about the current incentive value of smoking, thereby modulating the propensity of this behavior. We also review research on cue-reactivity which has shown that external smoking cues modulate expectations about the probability of the tobacco-seeking response being effective, thereby modulating the propensity of this behavior. Economic decision theory is then considered to elucidate how expectations about the value and probability of response-nicotine contingency are integrated to form an overall utility estimate for that option for comparison with qualitatively different, nonsubstitute reinforcers, to determine response selection. As an applied test for this hierarchical instrumental decision framework, we consider how well it accounts for individual liability to smoking uptake and perseveration, pharmacotherapy, cue-extinction therapies, and plain packaging. We conclude that the hierarchical instrumental account is successful in reconciling this broad range of phenomenon precisely because it accepts that multiple diverse sources of internal and external information must be integrated to shape the decision to smoke.

  7. Compound list: nicotinic acid [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nicotinic acid NIC 00081 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Hum...an/in_vitro/nicotinic_acid.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/R...at/in_vitro/nicotinic_acid.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat.../in_vivo/Liver/Single/nicotinic_acid.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosc

  8. Discriminating nicotine and non-nicotine containing e-liquids using infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deconinck, E; Bothy, J L; Barhdadi, S; Courselle, P

    2016-02-20

    In a few countries, including Belgium, nicotine-containing e-cigarettes and e-liquids are considered medicines, and therefore cannot freely be sold, but should be distributed in a pharmacy. The fact that in the neighbouring countries these products are freely available, poses a problem for custom personnel, the more the nicotine content of the products is not always labelled, especially when they are bought through internet. Therefore there is a need for easy-to-use equipment and methods to perform a first on site screening of intercepted samples, both for border control as to check label compliance of the sample. The use of attenuated total reflectance-infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIR), combined with chemometrics was evaluated for the discrimination between nicotine containing and non-nicotine containing samples. It could be concluded that both ATR-IR and NIR could be used for the discrimination when combined with the appropriate chemometric techniques. The presented techniques do not need sample preparation and result in models with a minimum of false negative samples. If a large enough training set can be established the interpretation can be fully automated, making the presented approach suitable for on-site screening of e-liquid samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Synthesis of conjugated chitosan and its effect on drug permeation from transdermal patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satheeshababu, B K; Shivakumar, K L

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to synthesis the conjugated chitosan by covalent attachment of thiol moieties to the cationic polymer, mediated by a carbodiimide to improve permeation properties of chitosan. Thioglycolic acid was covalently attached to chitosan by the formation of amide bonds between the primary amino groups of the polymer and the carboxylic acid groups of thioglycolic acid. Hence, these polymers are called as thiomers or thiolated polymers. Conjugation of chitosan was confirmed by Fourier transform-infrared and differential scanning calorimetric analysis. Matrix type transdermal patches of carvedilol were prepared using the different proportions of chitosan and chitosan-thioglycolic acid conjugates (2:0, 1.7:0.3, 1.4:0.6, 1:1, 0.6:1.4 and 0.3:1.7) by solvent casting technique. Prepared matrix type patches were evaluated for their physicochemical characterization followed by in vitro evaluation. Selected formulations were subjected for their ex vivo studies on Wistar albino rat skin and human cadaver skin using the modified Franz diffusion cell. As the proportion of conjugated chitosan increased, the transdermal patches showed increased drug permeation. The mechanism of drug release was found to be nonFickian profiles. The present study concludes that the transdermal patches of carvedilol using conjugated chitosan with different proportions of chitosan were successfully developed to provide improved drug permeation. The transdermal patches can be a good approach to improve drug bioavailability by bypassing the extensive hepatic first-pass metabolism of the drug.

  10. In vivo imaging of nicotinic receptor upregulation following chronic (-)-nicotine treatment in baboon using SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassiou, Michael; Eberl, Stefan; Meikle, Steven R.; Birrell, Alex; Constable, Chris; Fulham, Michael J.; Wong, Dean F.; Musachio, John L.

    2001-01-01

    To quantify changes in neuronal nAChR binding in vivo, quantitative dynamic SPECT studies were performed with 5-[ 123 I]-iodo-A-85380 in baboons pre and post chronic treatment with (-)-nicotine or saline control. Infusion of (-)-nicotine at a dose of 2.0 mg/kg/24h for 14 days resulted in plasma (-)-nicotine levels of 27.3 ng/mL. This is equivalent to that found in an average human smoker (20 cigarettes a day). In the baboon brain the regional distribution of 5-[ 123 I]-iodo-A-85380 was consistent with the known densities of nAChRs (thalamus > frontal cortex > cerebellum). Changes in nAChR binding were estimated from the volume of distribution (V d ) and binding potential (BP) derived from 3-compartment model fits. In the (-)-nicotine treated animal V d was significantly increased in the thalamus (52%) and cerebellum (50%) seven days post cessation of (-)-nicotine treatment, suggesting upregulation of nAChRs. The observed 33% increase in the frontal cortex failed to reach significance. A significant increase in BP was seen in the thalamus. In the saline control animal no changes were observed in V d or BP under any experimental conditions. In this preliminary study, we have demonstrated for the first time in vivo upregulation of neuronal nAChR binding following chronic (-)-nicotine treatment

  11. Prevalence of Use of Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems (ENDS) to Vape Recreational Drugs by Club Patrons in South London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurtle, Natalie; Abouchedid, Rachelle; Archer, John R H; Ho, James; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Dargan, Paul I; Wood, David M

    2017-03-01

    Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS, often called e-cigarettes) are nicotine delivery devices that heat nicotine into vapour that is inhaled, a process called 'vaping'. Use eclipsed nicotine-replacement therapy (NRT) in 2014 but ENDS role in smoking cessation remains controversial. Safety has not been proven and there have been reports to US poison centres regarding potential ENDS-related nicotine toxicity. A further concern is use of ENDS to vape recreational drugs, but there is limited data to substantiate this. The aim of this study was to report on ENDS use to vape recreational drugs in patrons of a South London nightclub where high prevalence of recreational drug use has previously been shown. A convenience sample of 101 participants was surveyed in March 2015 as part of a larger survey on drug use. Individuals were asked if they used ENDS to vape nicotine and/or other substances (and if so which substances). Ninety (89.1 %) of respondents were male with median age of 28 years (IQR 23-34). Eighty (79.2 %) currently smoked cigarettes; 20 (19.8 %) currently used ENDS for nicotine. Six (5.9 %) reported using ENDS to take other substances: 2 for 'liquid cannabis' and 4 did not elaborate on the substance(s) used. Of these 6, 3 were using ENDS to vape nicotine and 3 had never used them for nicotine. 5.9 % of individuals in this sample reported using ENDS to vape substances other than nicotine. Further work is required in larger populations to determine how common this is, evaluate which agents are being vaped and to inform appropriate public education.

  12. Chronic Underactivity of Medial Frontal Cortical β2-Containing Nicotinic Receptors Increases Clozapine-Induced Working Memory Impairment in Female Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Edward D.; Perkins, Abigail; Brotherton, Terrell; Qazi, Melissa; Berez, Chantal; Montalvo-Ortiz, Janitza; Davis, Kasey; Williams, Paul; Christopher, N. Channelle

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinic receptor decreases in the frontal cortex and hippocampus are important mediators of cognitive impairment in both schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Drug treatments for these diseases should take into account the impacts of compromised brain function on drug response. This study investigated the impact of compromised nicotinic receptor activity in the frontal cortex in rats on memory function. Since both Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia can involve psychosis, antipsychotic drugs are often given. The impacts of antipsychotic drugs on cognitive function have been found to be quite variable. It is the hypothesis of this and previous studies that the cognitive effects of antispychotic drugs on cognitive function depend on the integrity of brain systems involved in cognition. Previously in studies of the hippocampus, we found that chronic inhibition of β2-containing nicotinic receptors with dihydro-β-erythrodine (DHβE) impaired working memory and that this effect was attenuated by the antipsychotic drug clozapine. In contrast, chronic hippocampal α7 nicotinic receptor blockade with methyllycaconitine (MLA) potentiated the clozapine-induced memory impairment which is seen in rats without compromised nicotinic receptor activity. The current study determined medial frontal cortical α7 and β2-containing nicotinic receptor involvement in memory and the interactions with antipsychotic drug therapy with clozapine. Chronic DHβE and MLA infusion effects and interactions with systemic clozapine were assessed in female rats tested for memory on the radial-arm maze. Antipsychotic drug interactions with chronic systemic nicotine were investigated because nicotinic procognitive treatment has been proposed. The same local infusion DHβE dose that impaired memory with hippocampal infusion did not impair memory when infused in the medial frontal cortex. Frontal DHβE infusion potentiated clozapine-induced memory impairment, whereas previously the memory

  13. Chronic underactivity of medial frontal cortical beta2-containing nicotinic receptors increases clozapine-induced working memory impairment in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Edward D; Perkins, Abigail; Brotherton, Terrell; Qazi, Melissa; Berez, Chantal; Montalvo-Ortiz, Janitza; Davis, Kasey; Williams, Paul; Christopher, N Channelle

    2009-03-17

    Nicotinic receptor decreases in the frontal cortex and hippocampus are important mediators of cognitive impairment in both schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Drug treatments for these diseases should take into account the impacts of compromised brain function on drug response. This study investigated the impact of compromised nicotinic receptor activity in the frontal cortex in rats on memory function. Since both Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia can involve psychosis, antipsychotic drugs are often given. The impacts of antipsychotic drugs on cognitive function have been found to be quite variable. It is the hypothesis of this and previous studies that the cognitive effects of antispychotic drugs on cognitive function depend on the integrity of brain systems involved in cognition. Previously in studies of the hippocampus, we found that chronic inhibition of beta2-containing nicotinic receptors with dihydro-beta-erythrodine (DHbetaE) impaired working memory and that this effect was attenuated by the antipsychotic drug clozapine. In contrast, chronic hippocampal alpha7 nicotinic receptor blockade with methyllycaconitine (MLA) potentiated the clozapine-induced memory impairment which is seen in rats without compromised nicotinic receptor activity. The current study determined medial frontal cortical alpha7 and beta2-containing nicotinic receptor involvement in memory and the interactions with antipsychotic drug therapy with clozapine. Chronic DHbetaE and MLA infusion effects and interactions with systemic clozapine were assessed in female rats tested for memory on the radial-arm maze. Antipsychotic drug interactions with chronic systemic nicotine were investigated because nicotinic procognitive treatment has been proposed. The same local infusion DHbetaE dose that impaired memory with hippocampal infusion did not impair memory when infused in the medial frontal cortex. Frontal DHbetaE infusion potentiated clozapine-induced memory impairment, whereas previously

  14. Therapeutic serum phenobarbital concentrations obtained using chronic transdermal administration of phenobarbital in healthy cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delamaide Gasper, Joy A; Barnes Heller, Heidi L; Robertson, Michelle; Trepanier, Lauren A

    2015-04-01

    Seizures are a common cause of neurologic disease, and phenobarbital (PB) is the most commonly used antiepileptic drug. Chronic oral dosing can be challenging for cat owners, leading to poor compliance. The purpose of this study was to determine if the transdermal administration of PB could achieve serum PB concentrations of between 15 and 45 μg/ml in healthy cats. Nineteen healthy cats were enrolled in three groups. Transdermal PB in pluronic lecithin organogel (PLO) was applied to the pinnae for 14 days at a dosage of 3 mg/kg q12h in group 1 (n = 6 cats) and 9 mg/kg q12h in group 2 (n = 7 cats). Transdermal PB in Lipoderm Activemax was similarly applied at 9 mg/kg q12h for 14 days in group 3 (n = 6 cats). Steady-state serum PB concentrations were measured at trough, and at 2, 4 and 6 h after the morning dose on day 15. In group 1, median concentrations ranged from 6.0-7.5 μg/ml throughout the day (observed range 0-11 μg/ml). Group 2 median concentrations were 26.0 μg/ml (observed range 18.0-37.0 μg/ml). For group 3, median concentrations ranged from 15.0-17.0 μg/ml throughout the day (range 5-29 μg/ml). Side effects were mild. One cat was withdrawn from group 2 owing to ataxia and sedation. These results show therapeutic serum PB concentrations can be achieved in cats following chronic transdermal administration of PB in PLO at a dosage of 9 mg/kg q12h. More individual variation was noted using Lipoderm Activemax. Transdermal administration may be an alternative for cats that are difficult to medicate orally. © ISFM and AAFP 2014.

  15. In vivo human buccal permeability of nicotine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adrian, Charlotte L; Olin, Helle B D; Dalhoff, Kim

    2006-01-01

    The aim was to examine the in vivo buccal pH-dependent permeability of nicotine in humans and furthermore compare the in vivo permeability of nicotine to previous in vitro permeability data. The buccal permeability of nicotine was examined in a three-way cross-over study in eight healthy non......-smokers using a buccal perfusion cell. The disappearance of nicotine from perfusion solutions with pH 6.0, 7.4, and 8.1 was studied for 3h. The apparent permeability of nicotine (P(app)) was determined at each pH value. Parotid saliva was collected in an attempt to assess systemic levels of nicotine....... The disappearance rate of nicotine increased significantly as the pH increased, which resulted in P(app) values of 0.57+/-0.55 x 10(-4), 2.10+/-0.23 x 10(-4), and 3.96+/-0.54 x 10(-4)cms(-1) (mean+/-S.D.) at pH 6.0, 7.4, and 8.1, respectively. A linear relationship (R(2)=0.993) was obtained between the P...

  16. Bioelectronic sniffer for nicotine using enzyme inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsubayashi, Kohji; Nakayama, Kazumi; Taniguchi, Midori; Saito, Hirokazu; Otsuka, Kimio; Kudo, Hiroyuki

    2006-07-28

    A novel bioelectronic sniffer for nicotine in the gas phase was developed with enzyme inhibition principle to butyrylcholinesterase activity. The bioelectronic devices for nicotine in the gas and liquid phases were constructed using a Clark-type dissolved oxygen electrode and a membrane immobilized butyrylcholinesterase and choline oxidase. After the assessment of the sensor performances to choline and butyrylcholine as pre-examinations, the characteristics of the biosensor and bio-sniffer for nicotine were evaluated in the liquid and gas phases, respectively. The sensor signal of the bio-devices with 300 micromol l(-1) of butyrylcholine decreased quickly following application of nicotine and reached to the steady-state current, thus relating the concentration of nicotine in the liquid and gas phases. The biosensor was used to measure nicotine solution from 10 to 300 micromol l(-1). In the gas-phase experiment, the current signal of the bio-sniffer was also found to be linearly to the nicotine concentration over the range of 10.0-1000 ppb including 75.0 ppb as threshold limit value (TLV) by American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH).

  17. Nicotine adsorption on single wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girao, Eduardo C. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Caixa Postal 6030, Campus do Pici, 60455-900 Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil); Fagan, Solange B.; Zanella, Ivana [Area de Ciencias Tecnologicas, Centro Universitario Franciscano - UNIFRA, 97010-032 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Filho, Antonio G. Souza, E-mail: agsf@fisica.ufc.br [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Caixa Postal 6030, Campus do Pici, 60455-900 Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil)

    2010-12-15

    This work reports a theoretical study of nicotine molecules interacting with single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) through ab initio calculations within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). Different adsorption sites for nicotine on the surface of pristine and defective (8,0) SWCNTs were analyzed and the total energy curves, as a function of molecular position relative to the SWCNT surface, were evaluated. The nicotine adsorption process is found to be energetically favorable and the molecule-nanotube interaction is intermediated by the tri-coordinated nitrogen atom from the nicotine. It is also predicted the possibility of a chemical bonding between nicotine and SWCNT through the di-coordinated nitrogen.

  18. Brain indices of nicotine's effects on attentional bias to smoking and emotional pictures and to task-relevant targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, David G; Sugai, Chihiro; Zuo, Yantao; Rabinovich, Norka E; McClernon, F Joseph; Froeliger, Brett

    2007-03-01

    Aversive and smoking-related stimuli are related to smoking urges and relapse and can be potent distractors of selective attention. It has been suggested that the beneficial effect of nicotine replacement therapy may be mediated partly by the ability of nicotine to reduce distraction by such stimuli and thereby to facilitate attention to task-relevant stimuli. The present study tested the hypothesis that nicotine reduces distraction by aversive and smoking-related stimuli as indexed by the parietal P3b brain response to a task-relevant target digit. We assessed the effect of nicotine on distraction by emotionally negative, positive, neutral, and smoking-related pictures immediately preceding target digits during a rapid visual information processing task in 16 smokers in a double-blind, counterbalanced, within-subjects design. The study included two experimental sessions. After overnight smoking deprivation (12+ hr), active nicotine patches were applied to participants during one of the sessions and placebo patches were applied during the other session. Nicotine enhanced P3b responses associated with target digits immediately subsequent to negative emotional pictures bilaterally and subsequent to smoking-related pictures only in the right hemisphere. No effects of nicotine were observed for P3bs subsequent to positive and neutral distractor pictures. Another measure of attention, contingent negative variation amplitude in anticipation of the target digits also was increased by nicotine, especially in the left hemisphere and at posterior sites. Together, these findings suggest that nicotine reduces the distraction by emotionally negative and smoking-related stimuli and promotes attention to task-related stimuli by modulating somewhat lateralized and task-specific neural networks.

  19. Novel engineered systems for oral, mucosal and transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hairui; Yu, Yuan; Faraji Dana, Sara; Li, Bo; Lee, Chi-Ying; Kang, Lifeng

    2013-08-01

    Technological advances in drug discovery have resulted in increasing number of molecules including proteins and peptides as drug candidates. However, how to deliver drugs with satisfactory therapeutic effect, minimal side effects and increased patient compliance is a question posted before researchers, especially for those drugs with poor solubility, large molecular weight or instability. Microfabrication technology, polymer science and bioconjugate chemistry combine to address these problems and generate a number of novel engineered drug delivery systems. Injection routes usually have poor patient compliance due to their invasive nature and potential safety concerns over needle reuse. The alternative non-invasive routes, such as oral, mucosal (pulmonary, nasal, ocular, buccal, rectal, vaginal), and transdermal drug delivery have thus attracted many attentions. Here, we review the applications of the novel engineered systems for oral, mucosal and transdermal drug delivery.

  20. Effects of Electronic Cigarette Liquid Nicotine Concentration on Plasma Nicotine and Puff Topography in Tobacco Cigarette Smokers: A Preliminary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Alexa A; Hiler, Marzena M; Soule, Eric K; Ramôa, Carolina P; Karaoghlanian, Nareg V; Lipato, Thokozeni; Breland, Alison B; Shihadeh, Alan L; Eissenberg, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Electronic cigarettes (ECIGs) aerosolize a liquid that usually contains propylene glycol and/or vegetable glycerin, flavorants, and the dependence-producing drug nicotine in various concentrations. This study examined the extent to which ECIG liquid nicotine concentration is related to user plasma nicotine concentration in ECIG-naïve tobacco cigarette smokers. Sixteen ECIG-naïve cigarette smokers completed four laboratory sessions that differed by the nicotine concentration of the liquid (0, 8, 18, or 36 mg/ml) that was placed into a 1.5 Ohm, dual coil "cartomizer" powered by a 3.3V battery. In each session, participants completed two, 10-puff ECIG use bouts with a 30-second inter-puff interval; bouts were separated by 60 minutes. Venous blood was sampled before and after bouts for later analysis of plasma nicotine concentration; puff duration, volume, and average flow rate were measured during each bout. In bout 1, relative to the 0mg/ml nicotine condition (mean = 3.8 ng/ml, SD = 3.3), plasma nicotine concentration increased significantly immediately after the bout for the 8 (mean = 8.8 ng/ml, SD = 6.3), 18 (mean = 13.2 ng/ml, SD = 13.2), and 36 mg/ml (mean = 17.0 ng/ml, SD = 17.9) liquid concentration. A similar pattern was observed after bout 2. Average puff duration in the 36 mg/ml condition was significantly shorter compared to the 0mg/ml nicotine condition. Puff volume increased during the second bout for 8 and 18 mg/ml conditions. For a given ECIG device, nicotine delivery may be directly related to liquid concentration. ECIG-naïve cigarette smokers can, from their first use bout, attain cigarette-like nicotine delivery profiles with some currently available ECIG products. Liquid nicotine concentration can influence plasma nicotine concentration in ECIG-naïve cigarette smokers, and, at some concentrations, the nicotine delivery profile of a 3.3V ECIG with a dual coil, 1.5-Ohm cartomizer approaches that of a combustible tobacco cigarette in this

  1. Exposure to Fentanyl After Transdermal Patch Administration for Cancer Pain Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bista, Sudeep R; Haywood, Alison; Hardy, Janet; Norris, Ross; Hennig, Stefanie

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to describe exposure after fentanyl transdermal patch administration in patients with advanced cancer to quantify variability around the exposure. Patients (n  =  56) with advanced cancer who received transdermal fentanyl (Durogesic®; median dose, 50 μg/h; range, 12-200 μg/h) provided venous blood samples (n  =  163) at various times (0.5-72 hours) during several patch application intervals. Plasma fentanyl concentration was determined (median, 0.9 μg/L; range, 0.04-9.7 μg/L) by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling with NONMEM. A 1-compartment distribution model with first-order absorption and elimination described fentanyl exposure after transdermal patch administration. Fentanyl apparent clearance (between-subject variability [BSV], %) was estimated at 122 L/h/70 kg and 38.5%, respectively. The absorption rate constant was 0.013 h(-1) . Between-occasion variability on apparent clearance was 22.0%, which was lower than BSV, suggesting predictable exposure within the same patient and justifying therapeutic drug monitoring. Except for weight-based dosing, no other patient characteristic could be identified to guide initial fentanyl dose selection in patients with advanced cancer. © 2015, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  2. Stable isotope studies of nicotine kinetics and bioavailability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benowitz, N.L.; Jacob, P. III; Denaro, C.; Jenkins, R.

    1991-01-01

    The stable isotope-labeled compound 3',3'-dideuteronicotine was used to investigate the disposition kinetics of nicotine in smokers, the systemic absorption of nicotine from cigarette smoke, and the bioavailability of nicotine ingested as oral capsules. Blood levels of labeled nicotine could be measured for 9 hours after a 30-minute intravenous infusion. Analysis of disposition kinetics in 10 healthy men revealed a multiexponential decline after the end of an infusion, with an elimination half-life averaging 203 minutes. This half-life was longer than that previously reported, indicating the presence of a shallow elimination phase. Plasma clearance averaged 14.6 ml/min/kg. The average intake of nicotine per cigarette was 2.29 mg. A cigarette smoke-monitoring system that directly measured particulate matter in smoke was evaluated in these subjects. Total particulate matter, number of puffs on the cigarette, total puff volume, and time of puffing correlated with the intake of nicotine from smoking. The oral bioavailability of nicotine averaged 44%. This bioavailability is higher than expected based on the systemic clearance of nicotine and suggests that there may be significant extrahepatic metabolism of nicotine

  3. Characterization and Genome Analysis of a Nicotine and Nicotinic Acid-Degrading Strain Pseudomonas putida JQ581 Isolated from Marine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Aiwen; Qiu, Jiguo; Chen, Dongzhi; Ye, Jiexu; Wang, Yuhong; Tong, Lu; Jiang, Jiandong; Chen, Jianmeng

    2017-05-31

    The presence of nicotine and nicotinic acid (NA) in the marine environment has caused great harm to human health and the natural environment. Therefore, there is an urgent need to use efficient and economical methods to remove such pollutants from the environment. In this study, a nicotine and NA-degrading bacterium-strain JQ581-was isolated from sediment from the East China Sea and identified as a member of Pseudomonas putida based on morphology, physio-biochemical characteristics, and 16S rDNA gene analysis. The relationship between growth and nicotine/NA degradation suggested that strain JQ581 was a good candidate for applications in the bioaugmentation treatment of nicotine/NA contamination. The degradation intermediates of nicotine are pseudooxynicotine (PN) and 3-succinoyl-pyridine (SP) based on UV, high performance liquid chromatography, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. However, 6-hydroxy-3-succinoyl-pyridine (HSP) was not detected. NA degradation intermediates were identified as 6-hydroxynicotinic acid (6HNA). The whole genome of strain JQ581 was sequenced and analyzed. Genome sequence analysis revealed that strain JQ581 contained the gene clusters for nicotine and NA degradation. This is the first report where a marine-derived Pseudomonas strain had the ability to degrade nicotine and NA simultaneously.

  4. Higher dosage nicotine patches increase one-year smoking cessation rates : results from the European CEASE trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tonnesen, P; Paoletti, P; Gustavsson, G; Russell, MA; Saracci, R; Gulsvik, A; Rijcken, B

    The Collaborative European Anti-Smoking Evaluation (CEASE) was a European multicentre, randomized, double-blind placebo controlled smoking cessation study, The objectives were to determine whether higher dosage and longer duration of nicotine patch therapy would increase the success rate. Thirty-six

  5. Transdermal thiol-acrylate polyethylene glycol hydrogel synthesis using near infrared light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Solchan; Lee, Hwangjae; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Kim, Min-Gon; Lee, Luke P.; Lee, Jae Young

    2016-07-01

    Light-induced polymerization has been widely applied for hydrogel synthesis, which conventionally involves the use of ultraviolet or visible light to activate a photoinitiator for polymerization. However, with these light sources, transdermal gelation is not efficient and feasible due to their substantial interactions with biological systems, and thus a high power is required. In this study, we used biocompatible and tissue-penetrating near infrared (NIR) light to remotely trigger a thiol-acrylate reaction for efficient in vivo gelation with good controllability. Our gelation system includes gold nanorods as a photothermal agent, a thermal initiator, diacrylate polyethylene glycol (PEG), and thiolated PEG. Irradiation with a low-power NIR laser (0.3 W cm-2) could induce gelation via a mixed-mode reaction with a small increase in temperature (~5 °C) under the optimized conditions. We also achieved successful transdermal gelation via the NIR-assisted photothermal thiol-acryl reactions. This new type of NIR-assisted thiol-acrylate polymerization provides new opportunities for in situ hydrogel formation for injectable hydrogels and delivery of drugs/cells for various biomedical applications.Light-induced polymerization has been widely applied for hydrogel synthesis, which conventionally involves the use of ultraviolet or visible light to activate a photoinitiator for polymerization. However, with these light sources, transdermal gelation is not efficient and feasible due to their substantial interactions with biological systems, and thus a high power is required. In this study, we used biocompatible and tissue-penetrating near infrared (NIR) light to remotely trigger a thiol-acrylate reaction for efficient in vivo gelation with good controllability. Our gelation system includes gold nanorods as a photothermal agent, a thermal initiator, diacrylate polyethylene glycol (PEG), and thiolated PEG. Irradiation with a low-power NIR laser (0.3 W cm-2) could induce gelation

  6. Advanced progress of microencapsulation technologies: in vivo and in vitro models for studying oral and transdermal drug deliveries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, P L; Gambari, R

    2014-03-28

    This review provides an overall discussion of microencapsulation systems for both oral and transdermal drug deliveries. Clinically, many drugs, especially proteins and peptides, are susceptible to the gastrointestinal tract and the first-pass metabolism after oral administration while some drugs exhibit low skin permeability through transdermal delivery route. Medicated microcapsules as oral and transdermal drug delivery vehicles are believed to offer an extended drug effect at a relatively low dose and provide a better patient compliance. The polymeric microcapsules can be produced by different microencapsulation methods and the drug microencapsulation technology provides the quality preservation for drug stabilization. The release of the entrapped drug is controlled and prolonged for specific usages. Some recent studies have focused on the evaluation of drug containing microcapsules on potential biological and therapeutic applications. For the oral delivery, in vivo animal models were used for evaluating possible treatment effects of drug containing microcapsules. For the transdermal drug delivery, skin delivery models were introduced to investigate the potential skin delivery of medicated microcapsules. Finally, the challenges and limitations of drug microencapsulation in real life are discussed and the commercially available drug formulations using microencapsulation technology for oral and transdermal applications are shown. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Inside-out neuropharmacology of nicotinic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Brandon J; Lester, Henry A

    2015-09-01

    Upregulation of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) is a venerable result of chronic exposure to nicotine; but it is one of several consequences of pharmacological chaperoning by nicotine and by some other nicotinic ligands, especially agonists. Nicotinic ligands permeate through cell membranes, bind to immature AChR oligomers, elicit incompletely understood conformational reorganizations, increase the interaction between adjacent AChR subunits, and enhance the maturation process toward stable AChR pentamers. These changes and stabilizations in turn lead to increases in both anterograde and retrograde traffic within the early secretory pathway. In addition to the eventual upregulation of AChRs at the plasma membrane, other effects of pharmacological chaperoning include modifications to endoplasmic reticulum stress and to the unfolded protein response. Because these processes depend on pharmacological chaperoning within intracellular organelles, we group them as "inside-out pharmacology". This term contrasts with the better-known, acute, "outside-in" effects of activating and desensitizing plasma membrane AChRs. We review current knowledge concerning the mechanisms and consequences of inside-out pharmacology. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor: From Molecular Biology to Cognition'. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Tolerance to and cross tolerance between ethanol and nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, A C; Burch, J B; de Fiebre, C M; Marks, M J

    1988-02-01

    Female DBA mice were subjected to one of four treatments: ethanol-containing or control diets, nicotine (0.2, 1.0, 5.0 mg/kg/hr) infusion or saline infusion. After removal from the liquid diets or cessation of infusion, the animals were challenged with an acute dose of ethanol or nicotine. Chronic ethanol-fed mice were tolerant to the effects of ethanol on body temperature and open field activity and were cross tolerant to the effects of nicotine on body temperature and heart rate. Nicotine infused animals were tolerant to the effects of nicotine on body temperature and rotarod performance and were cross tolerant to the effects of ethanol on body temperature. Ethanol-induced sleep time was decreased in chronic ethanol- but not chronic nicotine-treated mice. Chronic drug treatment did not alter the elimination rate of either drug. Chronic ethanol treatment did not alter the number or affinity of brain nicotinic receptors whereas chronic nicotine treatment elicited an increase in the number of [3H]-nicotine binding sites. Tolerance and cross tolerance between ethanol and nicotine is discussed in terms of potential effects on desensitization of brain nicotinic receptors.

  9. Experimental design and optimization of raloxifene hydrochloride loaded nanotransfersomes for transdermal application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood S

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Syed Mahmood, Muhammad Taher, Uttam Kumar Mandal Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Kulliyyah of Pharmacy, International Islamic University Malaysia (IIUM, Pahang Darul Makmur, Malaysia Abstract: Raloxifene hydrochloride, a highly effective drug for the treatment of invasive breast cancer and osteoporosis in post-menopausal women, shows poor oral bioavailability of 2%. The aim of this study was to develop, statistically optimize, and characterize raloxifene hydrochloride-loaded transfersomes for transdermal delivery, in order to overcome the poor bioavailability issue with the drug. A response surface methodology experimental design was applied for the optimization of transfersomes, using Box-Behnken experimental design. Phospholipon® 90G, sodium deoxycholate, and sonication time, each at three levels, were selected as independent variables, while entrapment efficiency, vesicle size, and transdermal flux were identified as dependent variables. The formulation was characterized by surface morphology and shape, particle size, and zeta potential. Ex vivo transdermal flux was determined using a Hanson diffusion cell assembly, with rat skin as a barrier medium. Transfersomes from the optimized formulation were found to have spherical, unilamellar structures, with a ­homogeneous distribution and low polydispersity index (0.08. They had a particle size of 134±9 nM, with an entrapment efficiency of 91.00%±4.90%, and transdermal flux of 6.5±1.1 µg/cm2/hour. Raloxifene hydrochloride-loaded transfersomes proved significantly superior in terms of amount of drug permeated and deposited in the skin, with enhancement ratios of 6.25±1.50 and 9.25±2.40, respectively, when compared with drug-loaded conventional liposomes, and an ethanolic phosphate buffer saline. Differential scanning calorimetry study revealed a greater change in skin structure, compared with a control sample, during the ex vivo drug diffusion study. Further, confocal laser

  10. Galactosyl Pentadecene Reversibly Enhances Transdermal and Topical Drug Delivery

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopečná, M.; Macháček, M.; Prchalová, Eva; Štěpánek, P.; Drašar, P.; Kotora, Martin; Vávrová, K.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 10 (2017), s. 2097-2108 ISSN 0724-8741 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : galactoside * penetration enhancers * sugar * topical drug delivery * transdermal drug delivery Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry OBOR OECD: Pharmacology and pharmacy Impact factor: 3.002, year: 2016

  11. Optimization of Microemulsion Based Transdermal Gel of Triamcinolone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagdale, Swati; Chaudhari, Bhagyashree

    2017-01-01

    Triamcinolone is a long acting corticosteroid used in the treatment of arthritis, eczema, psoriasis and similar conditions which cause inflammation. Triamcinolone has half-life of 88min. Prolonged oral use is associated with gastrointestinal adverse effects as peptic ulcer, abdominal distention and ulcerative esophagitis as described in various patents. Microemulgel offers advantage of better stability, better loading capacity and controlled release especially for drug with short half life. Objective of the present study was to optimize microemulgel based transdermal delivery of triamcinolone. Saturated solubility of triamcinolone in various oils, surfactants and co-surfactants is estimated. Pseudo-ternary phase diagrams were constructed to determine the region of transparent microemulsion. Microemulsion was evaluated for globule size (FE-SEM, zetasizer), % transmittance, pH, viscosity, conductivity etc. Design of experiment was used to optimize microemulsion based gel. Carbopol 971P and HPMC K100M were used as independent variables. Microemulsion based gel was evaluated for in-vitro as well as ex-vivo parameters. Microemulsion was formulated with oleic acid, lauroglycol FCC and propylene glycol. PDI 0.197 indicated microemulsion is mono-disperse. 32 factorial design gave batch F8 as optimized. Design expert suggested drug release; gel viscosity and bio-adhesive strength were three significant dependant factors affecting the transdermal delivery. F8 showed drug release 92.62.16±1.22% through egg membrane, 95.23±1.44% through goat skin after 8hr and Korsmeyer-Peppas release model was followed. It can be concluded that a stable, effective controlled release transdermal microemulgel was optimised for triamcinolone. This would be a promising tool to deliver triamcinolone with enhanced bioavailability and reduced dosing frequency. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. A simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic model evaluating the effect of anti-nicotine antibodies on nicotine disposition in the brains of rats and humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saylor, Kyle, E-mail: saylor@vt.edu; Zhang, Chenming, E-mail: chzhang2@vt.edu

    2016-09-15

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was applied to investigate the effects of anti-nicotine antibodies on nicotine disposition in the brains of rats and humans. Successful construction of both rat and human models was achieved by fitting model outputs to published nicotine concentration time course data in the blood and in the brain. Key parameters presumed to have the most effect on the ability of these antibodies to prevent nicotine from entering the brain were selected for investigation using the human model. These parameters, which included antibody affinity for nicotine, antibody cross-reactivity with cotinine, and antibody concentration, were broken down into different, clinically-derived in silico treatment levels and fed into the human PBPK model. Model predictions suggested that all three parameters, in addition to smoking status, have a sizable impact on anti-nicotine antibodies' ability to prevent nicotine from entering the brain and that the antibodies elicited by current human vaccines do not have sufficient binding characteristics to reduce brain nicotine concentrations. If the antibody binding characteristics achieved in animal studies can similarly be achieved in human studies, however, nicotine vaccine efficacy in terms of brain nicotine concentration reduction is predicted to meet threshold values for alleviating nicotine dependence. - Highlights: • Modelling of nicotine disposition in the presence of anti-nicotine antibodies • Key vaccine efficacy factors are evaluated in silico in rats and in humans. • Model predicts insufficient antibody binding in past human nicotine vaccines. • Improving immunogenicity and antibody specificity may lead to vaccine success.

  13. A simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic model evaluating the effect of anti-nicotine antibodies on nicotine disposition in the brains of rats and humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saylor, Kyle; Zhang, Chenming

    2016-01-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was applied to investigate the effects of anti-nicotine antibodies on nicotine disposition in the brains of rats and humans. Successful construction of both rat and human models was achieved by fitting model outputs to published nicotine concentration time course data in the blood and in the brain. Key parameters presumed to have the most effect on the ability of these antibodies to prevent nicotine from entering the brain were selected for investigation using the human model. These parameters, which included antibody affinity for nicotine, antibody cross-reactivity with cotinine, and antibody concentration, were broken down into different, clinically-derived in silico treatment levels and fed into the human PBPK model. Model predictions suggested that all three parameters, in addition to smoking status, have a sizable impact on anti-nicotine antibodies' ability to prevent nicotine from entering the brain and that the antibodies elicited by current human vaccines do not have sufficient binding characteristics to reduce brain nicotine concentrations. If the antibody binding characteristics achieved in animal studies can similarly be achieved in human studies, however, nicotine vaccine efficacy in terms of brain nicotine concentration reduction is predicted to meet threshold values for alleviating nicotine dependence. - Highlights: • Modelling of nicotine disposition in the presence of anti-nicotine antibodies • Key vaccine efficacy factors are evaluated in silico in rats and in humans. • Model predicts insufficient antibody binding in past human nicotine vaccines. • Improving immunogenicity and antibody specificity may lead to vaccine success.

  14. Microneedle-mediated transdermal delivery of nanostructured lipid carriers for alkaloids from Aconitum sinomontanum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Teng; Zhang, Yongtai; Li, Zhe; Zhao, Jihui; Feng, Nianping

    2017-09-12

    A combination method using microneedle (MN) pretreatment and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) was developed to improve the transdermal delivery of therapeutics. The MN treatment of the skin and co-administration of NLCs loaded with total alkaloids isolated from Aconitum sinomontanum (AAS-NLCs) significantly increased the skin permeation of the drugs. Fluorescence imaging confirmed that MNs could provide microchannels penetrating the stratum corneum, and delivery of NLCs through the channels led to their deeper permeation. In vivo studies showed that combination of AAS-NLCs with MNs (AAS-NLCs-MN) in transdermal delivery could improve the bioavailability and maintain stable drug concentrations in the blood. Moreover, AAS-NLCs-MN showed benefits in eliminating paw swelling, decreasing inflammation and pain, and regulating immune function in adjuvant arthritis rats. After administration of AAS-NLCs-MN, no skin irritation was observed in rabbits, and electrocardiograms of rats showed improved arrhythmia. These results indicated that the dual approach combining MN insertion and NLCs has the potential to provide safe transdermal delivery and to improve the therapeutic efficacy through sustained release of AAS.

  15. Efficacy and safety of transdermal testosterone in postmenopausal women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilli, Chiara; Pundir, Jyotsna; Ramanathan, Parimalam; Sabatini, Luca; Hamoda, Haitham; Panay, Nick

    2017-02-01

    To systematically review and summarize the existing evidence related to the efficacy and safety of transdermal T in postmenopausal women for the treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD). Systematic reviews and meta-analysis. Not applicable. Seven randomized controlled trials enrolled 3,035 participants; 1,350 women were randomized to treatment with T patch, and 1,379 women were randomized to placebo. None. Primary outcome: satisfying sexual episodes. sexual activity, orgasm, Profile of Female Sexual Function domains (desire), personal distress score, adverse events, acne, increased hair growth, facial hair, alopecia, voice deepening, urinary symptoms, breast pain, headache, site reaction, total adverse events, serious adverse events, withdrawal from study, and follow-up rate. The T group had significantly more satisfying sexual episodes, sexual activity, orgasms, desire, significant change in Personal Distress Scale score, androgenic adverse events, acne, and hair growth compared with the placebo group. There was no significant difference between the two groups in increase in facial hair, alopecia, voice deepening, urinary symptoms, breast pain, headache, site reaction to the patch, total adverse events, serious adverse events, reasons for withdrawal from the study, and the number of women who completed the study. The short-term efficacy in terms of improvement of sexual function and safety of transdermal T in naturally and surgically menopausal women affected by HSDD either on or not on estrogen progestin hormone therapy is evident from this systematic review. The use of transdermal T is associated with increase in androgenic adverse events such as acne but is not associated with any serious adverse events. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. REINFORCEMENT ENHANCING EFFECTS OF ACUTE NICOTINE VIA ELECTRONIC CIGARETTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Kenneth A.; Karelitz, Joshua L.; Michael, Valerie C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent human studies confirm animal research showing that nicotine enhances reinforcement from rewards unrelated to nicotine. These effects of acute nicotine via tobacco smoking may also occur when consumed from non-tobacco products. Methods We assessed acute effects of nicotine via electronic cigarettes (“e-cigarettes”) on responding reinforced by music, video, or monetary rewards, or for no reward (control). In a fully within-subjects design, adult dependent smokers (N=28) participated in three similar experimental sessions, each following overnight abstinence (verified by CO≤10 ppm). Varying only in e-cigarette condition, sessions involved controlled exposure to a nicotine (labeled “36 mg/ml”) or placebo (“0”) e-cigarette, or no e-cigarette use. A fourth session involved smoking one’s own tobacco cigarette brand after no abstinence, specifically to compare responses under typical nicotine satiation with these acute e-cigarette conditions after abstinence. Results Reinforced responding for video reward, but not the other rewards, was greater due to use of the nicotine versus placebo e-cigarette (i.e., nicotine per se), while no differences were found between the placebo e-cigarette and no e-cigarette conditions (i.e., e-cigarette use per se). For nicotine via tobacco smoking, responding compared to the nicotine e-cigarette was similar for video but greater for music, while both video and music reward were enhanced relative to the non-nicotine conditions (placebo and no e-cigarette). Conclusions Acute nicotine from a non-tobacco product has some reinforcement enhancing effects in humans, in a manner partly consistent with nicotine via tobacco smoking and perhaps contributing to the rising popularity of nicotine e-cigarette use. PMID:26070455

  17. Reinforcement enhancing effects of acute nicotine via electronic cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Kenneth A; Karelitz, Joshua L; Michael, Valerie C

    2015-08-01

    Recent human studies confirm animal research showing that nicotine enhances reinforcement from rewards unrelated to nicotine. These effects of acute nicotine via tobacco smoking may also occur when consumed from non-tobacco products. We assessed acute effects of nicotine via electronic cigarettes ("e-cigarettes") on responding reinforced by music, video, or monetary rewards, or for no reward (control). In a fully within-subjects design, adult dependent smokers (N=28) participated in three similar experimental sessions, each following overnight abstinence (verified by CO≤10ppm). Varying only in e-cigarette condition, sessions involved controlled exposure to a nicotine (labeled "36mg/ml") or placebo ("0″) e-cigarette, or no e-cigarette use. A fourth session involved smoking one's own tobacco cigarette brand after no abstinence, specifically to compare responses under typical nicotine satiation with these acute e-cigarette conditions after abstinence. Reinforced responding for video reward, but not the other rewards, was greater due to use of the nicotine versus placebo e-cigarette (i.e., nicotine per se), while no differences were found between the placebo e-cigarette and no e-cigarette conditions (i.e., e-cigarette use per se). For nicotine via tobacco smoking, responding compared to the nicotine e-cigarette was similar for video but greater for music, while both video and music reward were enhanced relative to the non-nicotine conditions (placebo and no e-cigarette). Acute nicotine from a non-tobacco product has some reinforcement enhancing effects in humans, in a manner partly consistent with nicotine via tobacco smoking and perhaps contributing to the rising popularity of nicotine e-cigarette use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Detoxification and elimination of nicotine by nectar-feeding birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch-Henning, S; Du Rand, E E; Nicolson, S W

    2017-05-01

    Many dilute nectars consumed by bird pollinators contain secondary metabolites, potentially toxic chemicals produced by plants as defences against herbivores. Consequently, nectar-feeding birds are challenged not only by frequent water excess, but also by the toxin content of their diet. High water turnover, however, could be advantageous to nectar consumers by enabling them to excrete secondary metabolites or their transformation products more easily. We investigated how the alkaloid nicotine, naturally present in nectar of Nicotiana species, influences osmoregulation in white-bellied sunbirds Cinnyris talatala and Cape white-eyes Zosterops virens. We also examined the metabolic fate of nicotine in these two species to shed more light on the post-ingestive mechanisms that allow nectar-feeding birds to tolerate nectar nicotine. A high concentration of nicotine (50 µM) decreased cloacal fluid output and increased its osmolality in both species, due to reduced food intake that led to dehydration. White-eyes excreted a higher proportion of the ingested nicotine-containing diet than sunbirds. However, sugar concentration did not affect nicotine detoxification and elimination. Both species metabolised nicotine, excreting very little unchanged nicotine. Cape white-eyes mainly metabolised nicotine through the cotinine metabolic pathway, with norcotinine being the most abundant metabolite in the excreta, while white-bellied sunbirds excreted mainly nornicotine. Both species also utilized phase II conjugation reactions to detoxify nicotine, with Cape white-eyes depending more on the mercapturic acid pathway to detoxify nicotine than white-bellied sunbirds. We found that sunbirds and white-eyes, despite having a similar nicotine tolerance, responded differently and used different nicotine-derived metabolites to excrete nicotine.

  19. Effects of the BDNF Val66Met Polymorphism on Anxiety-Like Behavior Following Nicotine Withdrawal in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bridgin G; Anastasia, Agustin; Hempstead, Barbara L; Lee, Francis S; Blendy, Julie A

    2015-12-01

    Nicotine withdrawal is characterized by both affective and cognitive symptoms. Identifying genetic polymorphisms that could affect the symptoms associated with nicotine withdrawal are important in predicting withdrawal sensitivity and identifying personalized cessation therapies. In the current study we used a mouse model of a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism in the translated region of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene that substitutes a valine (Val) for a methionine (Met) amino acid (Val66Met) to examine the relationship between the Val66Met single nucleotide polymorphism and nicotine dependence. This study measured proBDNF and the BDNF prodomain levels following nicotine and nicotine withdrawal and examined a mouse model of a common polymorphism in this protein (BDNF(Met/Met)) in three behavioral paradigms: novelty-induced hypophagia, marble burying, and the open-field test. Using the BDNF knock-in mouse containing the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism we found: (1) blunted anxiety-like behavior in BDNF(Met/Met) mice following withdrawal in three behavioral paradigms: novelty-induced hypophagia, marble burying, and the open-field test; (2) the anxiolytic effects of chronic nicotine are absent in BDNF(Met/Met) mice; and (3) an increase in BDNF prodomain in BDNF(Met/Met) mice following nicotine withdrawal. Our study is the first to examine the effect of the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism on the affective symptoms of withdrawal from nicotine in mice. In these mice, a single-nucleotide polymorphism in the translated region of the BDNF gene can result in a blunted withdrawal, as measured by decreased anxiety-like behavior. The significant increase in the BDNF prodomain in BDNF(Met/Met) mice following nicotine cessation suggests a possible role of this ligand in the circuitry remodeling after withdrawal. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For

  20. Menthol Enhances Nicotine Reward-Related Behavior by Potentiating Nicotine-Induced Changes in nAChR Function, nAChR Upregulation, and DA Neuron Excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Brandon J; Wall, Teagan R; Henley, Beverley M; Kim, Charlene H; McKinney, Sheri; Lester, Henry A

    2017-11-01

    Understanding why the quit rate among smokers of menthol cigarettes is lower than non-menthol smokers requires identifying the neurons that are altered by nicotine, menthol, and acetylcholine. Dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) mediate the positive reinforcing effects of nicotine. Using mouse models, we show that menthol enhances nicotine-induced changes in nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) expressed on midbrain DA neurons. Menthol plus nicotine upregulates nAChR number and function on midbrain DA neurons more than nicotine alone. Menthol also enhances nicotine-induced changes in DA neuron excitability. In a conditioned place preference (CPP) assay, we observed that menthol plus nicotine produces greater reward-related behavior than nicotine alone. Our results connect changes in midbrain DA neurons to menthol-induced enhancements of nicotine reward-related behavior and may help explain how smokers of menthol cigarettes exhibit reduced cessation rates.

  1. The Influence of Solid Microneedles on the Transdermal Delivery of Selected Antiepileptic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Nguyen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this project was to examine the effect of microneedle rollers on the percutaneous penetration of tiagabine hydrochloride and carbamazepine across porcine skin in vitro. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis was carried out using an Agilent 1200 Series HPLC system coupled to an Agilent G1969A TOF-MS system. Transdermal flux values of the drugs were determined from the steady-state portion of the cumulative amount versus time curves. Following twelve hours of microneedle roller application, there was a 6.74-fold increase in the percutaneous penetration of tiagabine hydrochloride (86.42 ± 25.66 µg/cm2/h compared to passive delivery (12.83 ± 6.30 µg/cm2/h. For carbamazepine in 20% ethanol, passive transdermal flux of 7.85 ± 0.60 µg/cm2/h was observed compared to 10.85 ± 0.11 µg/cm2/h after microneedle treatment. Carbamazepine reconstituted in 30% ethanol resulted in only a 1.19-fold increase in drug permeation across porcine skin (36.73 ± 1.83 µg/cm2/h versus 30.74 ± 1.32 µg/cm2/h. Differences in flux values of untreated and microneedle-treated porcine skin using solid microneedles for the transdermal delivery of tiagabine were statistically significant. Although there were 1.38- and 1.19-fold increases in transdermal flux values of carbamazepine when applied as 20% and 30% ethanol solutions across microneedle-treated porcine skin, respectively, the increases were not statistically significant.

  2. Gold nanorods in an oil-base formulation for transdermal treatment of type 1 diabetes in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nose, Keisuke; Pissuwan, Dakrong; Goto, Masahiro; Katayama, Yoshiki; Niidome, Takuro

    2012-05-01

    Efficient transdermal insulin delivery to the systemic circulation would bring major benefit to diabetic patients. We investigated the possibility of using gold nanorods (GNRs) that formed a complex with an edible surfactant and insulin (INS) in an oil phase to form a solid-in-oil (SO) formulation (SO-INS-GNR) for transdermal treatment of diabetes. Diabetic mice comprised the model for our study. In vitro, there was high penetration of insulin through the stratum corneum (SC) and the dermis in mouse skin treated with an SO-INS-GNR complex plus near-infrared (NIR) light irradiation. Blood glucose levels in the diabetic mice were significantly decreased after treatment with SO-INS-GNR plus irradiation. To our knowledge, this is the first study to use gold nanorods for systemic insulin delivery through the skin. The use of an SO-INS-GNR complex combined with NIR irradiation may provide the possibility of transdermal insulin delivery to diabetic patients.Efficient transdermal insulin delivery to the systemic circulation would bring major benefit to diabetic patients. We investigated the possibility of using gold nanorods (GNRs) that formed a complex with an edible surfactant and insulin (INS) in an oil phase to form a solid-in-oil (SO) formulation (SO-INS-GNR) for transdermal treatment of diabetes. Diabetic mice comprised the model for our study. In vitro, there was high penetration of insulin through the stratum corneum (SC) and the dermis in mouse skin treated with an SO-INS-GNR complex plus near-infrared (NIR) light irradiation. Blood glucose levels in the diabetic mice were significantly decreased after treatment with SO-INS-GNR plus irradiation. To our knowledge, this is the first study to use gold nanorods for systemic insulin delivery through the skin. The use of an SO-INS-GNR complex combined with NIR irradiation may provide the possibility of transdermal insulin delivery to diabetic patients. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10

  3. Airborne Nicotine, Secondhand Smoke, and Precursors to Adolescent Smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Jennifer J; Racicot, Simon; Okoli, Chizimuzo T C; Hammond, S Katharine; O'Loughlin, Jennifer

    2018-01-01

    Secondhand smoke (SHS) directly increases exposure to airborne nicotine, tobacco's main psychoactive substance. When exposed to SHS, nonsmokers inhale 60% to 80% of airborne nicotine, absorb concentrations similar to those absorbed by smokers, and display high levels of nicotine biomarkers. Social modeling, or observing other smokers, is a well-established predictor of smoking during adolescence. Observing smokers also leads to increased pharmacological exposure to airborne nicotine via SHS. The objective of this study is to investigate whether greater exposure to airborne nicotine via SHS increases the risk for smoking initiation precursors among never-smoking adolescents. Secondary students ( N = 406; never-smokers: n = 338, 53% girls, mean age = 12.9, SD = 0.4) participated in the AdoQuest II longitudinal cohort. They answered questionnaires about social exposure to smoking (parents, siblings, peers) and known smoking precursors (eg, expected benefits and/or costs, SHS aversion, smoking susceptibility, and nicotine dependence symptoms). Saliva and hair samples were collected to derive biomarkers of cotinine and nicotine. Adolescents wore a passive monitor for 1 week to measure airborne nicotine. Higher airborne nicotine was significantly associated with greater expected benefits ( R 2 = 0.024) and lower expected costs ( R 2 = 0.014). Higher social exposure was significantly associated with more temptation to try smoking ( R 2 = 0.025), lower aversion to SHS ( R 2 = 0.038), and greater smoking susceptibility ( R 2 = 0.071). Greater social exposure was significantly associated with more nicotine dependence symptoms; this relation worsened with higher nicotine exposure (cotinine R 2 = 0.096; airborne nicotine R 2 = 0.088). Airborne nicotine exposure via SHS is a plausible risk factor for smoking initiation during adolescence. Public health implications include limiting airborne nicotine through smoking bans in homes and cars, in addition to stringent restrictions

  4. Nicotine pharmacokinetics and its application to intake from smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyerabend, C; Ings, R M; Russel, M A

    1985-01-01

    Five subjects were given 25 micrograms/kg nicotine intravenously over 1 min, before and after a loading period involving the smoking of six cigarettes. Plasma nicotine concentrations declined in a biphasic manner, the half-lives of the initial and terminal phases averaging 9 min and 133 min respectively. Terminal half-lives before and after the loading period were essentially the same suggesting the absence of saturation kinetics at nicotine concentrations that build up during smoking. The plasma clearance of nicotine and the volume of distribution were very high averaging 915 ml/min and 1731, respectively. Two approaches were used to calculate the nicotine intake from smoking. The average dose of nicotine absorbed from one cigarette was 1.06 mg which was 82% of the standard machine-smoked yield of 1.3 mg. To illustrate their potential use in 'nicotine titration' studies, these approaches were used to compare nicotine intake from smoking a high (2.4 mg) and low (0.6 mg) nicotine cigarette. The dose of nicotine absorbed averaged 1.14 mg and 0.86 mg per cigarette respectively, being 48% and 143% of the machine-smoked yields. PMID:3986082

  5. NMR characterisation and transdermal drug delivery potential of microemulsion systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreilgaard, Mads; Pedersen, E J; Jaroszewski, J W

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of structure and composition of microemulsions (Labrasol/Plurol Isostearique/isostearylic isostearate/water) on their transdermal delivery potential of a lipophilic (lidocaine) and a hydrophilic model drug (prilocaine hydrochloride), and ...

  6. NICOTINE EFFECTS ON THE ACTIVITY OF MICE EXPOSED PRENATALLY TO THE NICOTINIC AGONIST ANATOXIN-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Considerable research has shown long-lasting effects of early exposure in experimental animals to nicotine. Anatoxin-a is produced by cyanobacteria and has been shown to be a potent nicotinic agonist. This experiment evaluated the motor activity of adult mice, and their respons...

  7. Effect of nicotine on negative affect among more impulsive smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Neal; McChargue, Dennis; Spring, Bonnie; VanderVeen, Joe; Cook, Jessica Werth; Richmond, Malia

    2006-08-01

    In the present study, the authors tested the hypothesis that nicotine would provide greater relief from negative affect for more impulsive smokers than for less impulsive smokers. Euthymic adult smokers (N=70) participated in 2 laboratory sessions, during which they underwent a negative mood induction (music + autobiographical memory), then smoked either a nicotinized or de-nicotinized cigarette. Mixed-effects regression yielded a significant Impulsivity x Condition (nicotinized vs. de-nicotinized) x Time interaction. Simple effects analyses showed that heightened impulsivity predicted greater negative affect relief after smoking a nicotinized cigarette but not after smoking a de-nicotinized cigarette. These data suggest that nicotine may be a disproportionately powerful negative reinforcer for highly impulsive smokers, promoting higher levels of nicotine dependence and inhibiting smoking cessation.

  8. Beta3 subunits promote expression and nicotine-induced up-regulation of human nicotinic alpha6* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in transfected cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumkosit, Prem; Kuryatov, Alexander; Luo, Jie; Lindstrom, Jon

    2006-10-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) containing alpha6 subunits are typically found at aminergic nerve endings where they play important roles in nicotine addiction and Parkinson's disease. alpha6* AChRs usually contain beta3 subunits. beta3 subunits are presumed to assemble only in the accessory subunit position within AChRs where they do not participate in forming acetylcholine binding sites. Assembly of subunits in the accessory position may be a critical final step in assembly of mature AChRs. Human alpha6 AChRs subtypes were permanently transfected into human tsA201 human embryonic kidney (HEK) cell lines. alpha6beta2beta3 and alpha6beta4beta3 cell lines were found to express much larger amounts of AChRs and were more sensitive to nicotine-induced increase in the amount of AChRs than were alpha6beta2 or alpha6beta4 cell lines. The increased sensitivity to nicotine-induced up-regulation was due not to a beta3-induced increase in affinity for nicotine but probably to a direct effect on assembly of AChR subunits. HEK cells express only a small amount of mature alpha6beta2 AChRs, but many of these subunits are on the cell surface. This contrasts with Xenopus laevis oocytes, which express a large amount of incorrectly assembled alpha6beta2 subunits that bind cholinergic ligands but form large amorphous intracellular aggregates. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were made to the alpha6 and beta3 subunits to aid in the characterization of these AChRs. The alpha6 mAbs bind to epitopes C-terminal of the extracellular domain. These data demonstrate that both cell type and the accessory subunit beta3 can play important roles in alpha6* AChR expression, stability, and up-regulation by nicotine.

  9. Nicotinic binding in rat brain: autoradiographic comparison of [3H]acetylcholine, [3H]nicotine, and [125I]-alpha-bungarotoxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, P.B.; Schwartz, R.D.; Paul, S.M.; Pert, C.B.; Pert, A.

    1985-01-01

    Three radioligands have been commonly used to label putative nicotinic cholinoceptors in the mammalian central nervous system: the agonists [ 3 H]nicotine and [ 3 H]acetylcholine ([ 3 H]ACh--in the presence of atropine to block muscarinic receptors), and the snake venom extract, [ 125 I]-alpha-bungarotoxin([ 125 I]BTX), which acts as a nicotinic antagonist at the neuromuscular junction. Binding studies employing brain homogenates indicate that the regional distributions of both [ 3 H]nicotine and [ 3 H]ACh differ from that of [ 125 I]BTX. The possible relationship between brain sites bound by [ 3 H]nicotine and [ 3 H]ACh has not been examined directly. The authors have used the technique of autoradiography to produce detailed maps of [ 3 H]nicotine, [ 3 H]ACh, and [ 125 I]BTX labeling; near-adjacent tissue sections were compared at many levels of the rat brain. The maps of high affinity agonist labeling are strikingly concordant, with highest densities in the interpeduncular nucleus, most thalamic nuclei, superior colliculus, medial habenula, presubiculum, cerebral cortex (layers I and III/IV), and the substantia nigra pars compacta/ventral tegmental area. The pattern of [ 125 I]BTX binding is strikingly different, the only notable overlap with agonist binding being the cerebral cortex (layer I) and superior colliculus. [ 125 I]BTX binding is also dense in the inferior colliculus, cerebral cortex (layer VI), hypothalamus, and hippocampus, but is virtually absent in thalamus. Various lines of evidence suggest that the high affinity agonist-binding sites in brain correspond to nicotinic cholinergic receptors similar to those found at autonomic ganglia; BTX-binding sites may also serve as receptors for nicotine and are possibly related to neuromuscular nicotinic cholinoceptors

  10. Enhancing effect of negative polypropylene electret on in vitro transdermal delivery of cyclosporine A solution and its synergistic effect with ethyl oleate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, L L; Liu, H Y; Ma, L; Liang, Y Y; Guo, X; Jiang, J

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the corona charged electrets at voltages of −500 V, −1000 V and −2000 V were made from polypropylene (PP) film. The cyclosporine A (CsA) and 10% ethyl oleate were chosen as the model drug and chemical enhancer, respectively. The charge storage stability of the electrets and the in vitro transdermal behaviour of the model drug in solution under different conditions were studied. The results indicate that the external electrostatic field of the negative PP electrets could penetrate through the rat skin and enhance the transdermal delivery of cyclosporine A. A synergistic effect on enhancing the transdermal delivery of cyclosporine A was observed by combining different surface potential negative PP electrets with 10% ethyl oleate, and the amount of transdermal delivery of CsA was greatly increased comparing with only application of electrets. Therefore, the combination application of electret and chemical enhancer could be a feasible strategy in enhancing transdermal delivery of small peptide drugs or some large molecular drugs.

  11. Nicotine Reduction Revisited: Science and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatsukami, Dorothy K.; Perkins, Kenneth A.; LeSage, Mark G.; Ashley, David L.; Henningfield, Jack E.; Benowitz, Neal L.; Backinger, Cathy; Zeller, Mitch

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of nicotine levels in cigarettes and other tobacco products is now possible with the passage of the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (FSPTCA) in 2009 giving the U.S. Food and Drug Administration authority to regulate tobacco products, and with Articles 9-11 of the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.[1-2] Both regulatory approaches allow establishing product standards for tobacco constituents, including nicotine. The FSPTCA does not allow nicotine levels to be decreased to zero, although FDA has the authority to reduce nicotine yields to very low, presumably non-addicting levels. The proposal to reduce levels of nicotine to a level that is non-addicting was originally suggested in 1994.[3] Reduction of nicotine in tobacco products could potentially have a profound impact on reducing tobacco-related morbidity and mortality. To examine this issue, two meetings were convened in the United States with non-tobacco-industry scientists of varied disciplines, tobacco control policy-makers and representatives of government agencies. This article provides an overview of the current science in the area of reduced nicotine content cigarettes and key conclusions and recommendations for research and policy that emerged from the deliberations of the meeting members. PMID:20876072

  12. Nicotine and endogenous opioids: neurochemical and pharmacological evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjiconstantinou, Maria; Neff, Norton H

    2011-06-01

    Although the mesolimbic dopamine hypothesis is the most influential theory of nicotine reward and reinforcement, there has been a consensus that other neurotransmitter systems contribute to the addictive properties of nicotine as well. In this regard, the brain opioidergic system is of interest. Striatum is rich in opioid peptides and opioid receptors, and striatal opioidergic neurons are engaged in a bidirectional communication with midbrain dopaminergic neurons, closely regulating each other's activity. Enkephalins and dynorphins exert opposing actions on dopaminergic neurons, increasing and decreasing dopamine release respectively, and are components of circuits promoting positive or negative motivational and affective states. Moreover, dopamine controls the synthesis of striatal enkephalins and dynorphins. Evidence suggests that opioidergic function is altered after nicotine and endogenous opioids are involved in nicotine's behavioral effects. 1) The synthesis and release of β-endorphin, met-enkephalin and dynorphin in brain, especially nucleus accumbens (NAc), are altered after acute or chronic nicotine treatment and during nicotine withdrawal. 2) Although opioid receptor binding and mRNA do not appear to change in the striatum during nicotine withdrawal, the activity of κ-opioid (KOPr) and δ-opioid (DOPr) receptors is attenuated in NAc. 3) The nicotine withdrawal syndrome reminisces that of opiates, and naloxone precipitates some of its somatic, motivational, and affective signs. 4) Genetic and pharmacological studies indicate that μ-opioid (MOPr) receptors are mainly involved in nicotine reward, while DOPrs contribute to the emotional and KOPrs to the aversive responses of nicotine. 5) Finally, MOPrs and enkephalin, but not β-endorphin or dynorphin, are necessary for the physical manifestations of nicotine withdrawal. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Trends in neuropharmacology: in memory of Erminio Costa'. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier

  13. Nicotine Analysis in Several Non-Tobacco Plant Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moldoveanu Serban C.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Present study describes the determination of nicotine in various plant samples with a low content of this compound. Nicotine is found naturally in plants from the Solanaceae family. The plants from Nicotiana genus contain large levels of nicotine. However, only low levels are present in plants from Solanum genus including potato, tomato, eggplant, and from Capsicum genus, which are used as food. Because the levels of nicotine in these materials are in the range of parts per billion, the measurements are difficult and the results are very different from study to study. The present study evaluated the level of nicotine in a number of plants (fruits, roots, leaves, tubers from Solanaceae family (not including Nicotiana genus and from several other vegetables commonly used as food. The analysis consisted of the treatment of plant material with an aqueous solution 5% NaOH at 70°C for 30 min, followed by extraction with TBME containing d3-nicotine as an internal standard. The TBME organic layer was analyzed on a 7890B/7000C GC-MS/MS system with a 30 m × 0.25 mm, 0.25 μm film CAM column. The MS/MS system worked in MRM positive ionization mode monitoring the transition 162 - 84 for nicotine and 165 - 87 for d3-nicotine. Particular attention was given to the preservation of the intact levels of nicotine in the plant material. The plant material was analyzed as is, without drying and with minimal exposure to contaminations. Separately, the moisture of the plant material was measured in order to report the nicotine level on a dry-basis. Levels of nicotine around 180 ng/g dry material were obtained for tomatoes and eggplant (fruit and lower levels were obtained for green pepper and potato. Similar levels to that in the tomato fruit were detected in tomato leaves. Materials from other plant families also showed traces of nicotine. [Beitr. Tabakforsch. Int. 27 (2016 54-59

  14. Nicotine-selective radiation-induced poly(acrylamide/maleic acid) hydrogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saraydin, D.; Karadag, E.; Caldiran, Y.; Gueven, O.

    2001-01-01

    Nicotine-selective poly(acrylamide/maleic acid) (AAm/MA) hydrogels prepared by γ-irradiation were used in experiments on swelling, diffusion, and interactions of the pharmaceuticals nicotine, nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, and nikethamide. For AAm/MA hydrogel containing 60 mg maleic acid and irradiated at 5.2 kGy, the studies indicated that swelling increased in the following order; nicotine>nicotinamide>nikethamide>nicotinic acid>water. Diffusions of water and the pharmaceuticals within the hydrogels were found to be non-Fickian in character. AAm/MA hydrogel sorbed only nicotine and did not sorb nicotinamide, nikethamide and nicotinic acid in the binding experiments. S-type adsorption in Giles's classification system was observed. Some binding and thermodynamic parameters for AAm/MA hydrogel-nicotine system were calculated using the Scatchard method. The values of adsorption heat and free energy of this system were found to be negative whereas adsorption entropy was found to be positive. (author)

  15. Brain activation by short-term nicotine exposure in anesthetized wild-type and beta2-nicotinic receptors knockout mice: a BOLD fMRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez, S.V.; Changeux, J.P.; Granon, S. [Unite de Neurobiologie Integrative du Systeme Cholinergique, URA CNRS 2182, Institut Pasteur, Departement de Neuroscience, 25 rue du Dr Roux, 75015 Paris (France); Amadon, A.; Giacomini, E.; Le Bihan, D. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, 4 place du general Leclerc, 91400 Orsay (France); Wiklund, A. [Section of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-07-01

    Rationale: The behavioral effects of nicotine and the role of the beta2-containing nicotinic receptors in these behaviors are well documented. However, the behaviors altered by nicotine rely on the functioning on multiple brain circuits where the high-affinity {beta}2-containing nicotinic receptors ({beta}2*nAChRs) are located. Objectives We intend to see which brain circuits are activated when nicotine is given in animals naive for nicotine and whether the {beta}2*nAChRs are needed for its activation of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal in all brain areas. Materials and methods: We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure the brain activation evoked by nicotine (1 mg/kg delivered at a slow rate for 45 min) in anesthetized C57BL/6J mice and {beta}2 knockout (KO) mice. Results: Acute nicotine injection results in a significant increased activation in anterior frontal, motor, and somatosensory cortices and in the ventral tegmental area and the substantia nigra. Anesthetized mice receiving no nicotine injection exhibited a major decreased activation in all cortical and subcortical structures, likely due to prolonged anesthesia. At a global level, {beta}2 KO mice were not rescued from the globally declining BOLD signal. However, nicotine still activated regions of a meso-cortico-limbic circuit likely via {alpha}7 nicotinic receptors. Conclusions: Acute nicotine exposure compensates for the drop in brain activation due to anesthesia through the meso-cortico-limbic network via the action of nicotine on {beta}2*nAChRs. The developed fMRI method is suitable for comparing responses in wild-type and mutant mice. (authors)

  16. Brain activation by short-term nicotine exposure in anesthetized wild-type and beta2-nicotinic receptors knockout mice: a BOLD fMRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, S.V.; Changeux, J.P.; Granon, S.; Amadon, A.; Giacomini, E.; Le Bihan, D.; Wiklund, A.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: The behavioral effects of nicotine and the role of the beta2-containing nicotinic receptors in these behaviors are well documented. However, the behaviors altered by nicotine rely on the functioning on multiple brain circuits where the high-affinity β2-containing nicotinic receptors (β2*nAChRs) are located. Objectives We intend to see which brain circuits are activated when nicotine is given in animals naive for nicotine and whether the β2*nAChRs are needed for its activation of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal in all brain areas. Materials and methods: We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure the brain activation evoked by nicotine (1 mg/kg delivered at a slow rate for 45 min) in anesthetized C57BL/6J mice and β2 knockout (KO) mice. Results: Acute nicotine injection results in a significant increased activation in anterior frontal, motor, and somatosensory cortices and in the ventral tegmental area and the substantia nigra. Anesthetized mice receiving no nicotine injection exhibited a major decreased activation in all cortical and subcortical structures, likely due to prolonged anesthesia. At a global level, β2 KO mice were not rescued from the globally declining BOLD signal. However, nicotine still activated regions of a meso-cortico-limbic circuit likely via α7 nicotinic receptors. Conclusions: Acute nicotine exposure compensates for the drop in brain activation due to anesthesia through the meso-cortico-limbic network via the action of nicotine on β2*nAChRs. The developed fMRI method is suitable for comparing responses in wild-type and mutant mice. (authors)

  17. Cholinergic modulation of dopamine pathways through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kloet, S.F.; Mansvelder, H.D.; de Vries, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    Nicotine addiction is highly prevalent in current society and is often comorbid with other diseases. In the central nervous system, nicotine acts as an agonist for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and its effects depend on location and receptor composition. Although nicotinic receptors are

  18. The metabolic fate of nectar nicotine in worker honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Rand, Esther E; Pirk, Christian W W; Nicolson, Susan W; Apostolides, Zeno

    2017-04-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera) are generalist pollinators that forage for nectar and pollen of a very large variety of plant species, exposing them to a diverse range of secondary metabolites produced as chemical defences against herbivory. Honey bees can tolerate high levels of many of these toxic compounds, including the alkaloid nicotine, in their diet without incurring apparent fitness costs. Very little is known about the underlying detoxification processes mediating this tolerance. We examined the metabolic fate of nicotine in newly emerged worker bees using radiolabeled nicotine and LC-MS/MS analysis to determine the kinetic distribution profile of nicotine as well as the absence or presence and identity of any nicotine-derived metabolites. Nicotine metabolism was extensive; virtually no unmetabolised nicotine were recovered from the rectum. The major metabolite found was 4-hydroxy-4-(3-pyridyl) butanoic acid, the end product of 2'C-oxidation of nicotine. It is the first time that 4-hydroxy-4-(3-pyridyl) butanoic acid has been identified in an insect as a catabolite of nicotine. Lower levels of cotinine, cotinine N-oxide, 3'hydroxy-cotinine, nicotine N-oxide and norcotinine were also detected. Our results demonstrated that formation of 4-hydroxy-4-(3-pyridyl) butanoic acid is quantitatively the most significant pathway of nicotine metabolism in honey bees and that the rapid excretion of unmetabolised nicotine does not contribute significantly to nicotine tolerance in honey bees. In nicotine-tolerant insects that do not rely on the rapid excretion of nicotine like the Lepidoptera, it is possible that the 2'C-oxidation of nicotine is the conserved metabolic pathway instead of the generally assumed 5'C-oxidation pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The effects of transdermal testosterone and oestrogen therapy on dry eye in postmenopausal women: a randomised, placebo-controlled, pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golebiowski, Blanka; Badarudin, Noor; Eden, John; Gerrand, Leanne; Robinson, Jennifer; Liu, Jinzhu; Hampel, Ulrike; You, Jingjing; Stapleton, Fiona

    2017-07-01

    Sex hormones could provide a future treatment avenue for dry eye post menopause. However, there are few well-controlled studies. This study investigates the impact of testosterone and oestrogen on dry eye symptoms and signs in postmenopausal women. A randomised double-blind placebo-controlled pilot study was conducted involving 40 women with dry eye (age 63.9±5.1 years, 13.2±6.3 years post menopause). Ten women were assigned to each of four treatment groups: transdermal testosterone, oestradiol, testosterone/oestradiol combination and placebo. Assessment at baseline and after 8 weeks: ocular symptoms, tear osmolarity, tear stability, tear secretion, meibomian gland assessment, corneal and conjunctival sensitivity, serum concentrations of 17β-oestradiol, 3-α-androstanediol-glucuronide and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate. Differences from placebo were examined using one-way analysis of variance and Dunnett's t-test. Within-group analyses included paired t-tests and Spearman correlation. Dryness intensity after 8 weeks was significantly worse in the oestrogen group compared with placebo (p=0.04). No significant changes in other symptoms, tear function, meibomian gland function, lid morphology, corneal or conjunctival sensitivity were observed in any of the groups when compared with the change in placebo after 8 weeks. Within-group analyses showed increased tear secretion in the testosterone/oestradiol combination group (p=0.03) and a strong association between increased serum androgen and improved tear stability in the testosterone group (ρ=0.83,p=0.01). Oestrogen supplementation may worsen ocular symptoms in postmenopausal women with dry eye, whereas no impact of testosterone therapy on symptoms was apparent. The positive effects of oestrogen and testosterone on tear function require confirmation in a larger study, with sample size calculated from the data generated herein. Placebo control is essential in studies of dry eye therapies. ACTRN

  20. Transdermal and intradermal delivery of therapeutic agents: application of physical technologies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Banga, Ajay K

    2011-01-01

    .... Advancements in science combined with the need for diverse drug delivery modalities have introduced a variety of transdermal and intradermal products for existing drugs at a fraction of the cost of new drug development...

  1. Binding, uptake, and release of nicotine by human gingival fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanes, P.J.; Schuster, G.S.; Lubas, S.

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies of the effects of nicotine on fibroblasts have reported an altered morphology and attachment of fibroblasts to substrates and disturbances in protein synthesis and secretion. This altered functional and attachment response may be associated with changes in the cell membrane resulting from binding of the nicotine, or to disturbances in cell metabolism as a result of high intracellular levels of nicotine. The purpose of the present study, therefore, was to (1) determine whether gingival fibroblasts bound nicotine and if any binding observed was specific or non-specific in nature; (2) determine whether gingival fibroblasts internalized nicotine, and if so, at what rate; (3) determine whether gingival fibroblasts also released nicotine back into the extracellular environment; and (4) if gingival fibroblasts release nicotine intact or as a metabolite. Cultures of gingival fibroblasts were prepared from gingival connective tissue biopsies. Binding was evaluated at 4 degree C using a mixture of 3 H-nicotine and unlabeled nicotine. Specific binding was calculated as the difference between 3 H-nicotine bound in the presence and absence of unlabeled nicotine. The cells bound 1.44 (+/- 0.42) pmols/10(6) cells in the presence of unlabeled nicotine and 1.66 (+/- 0.55) pmols/10(6) cells in the absence of unlabeled nicotine. The difference was not significant. Uptake of nicotine was measured at 37 degree C after treating cells with 3 H-nicotine for time periods up to 4 hours. Uptake in pmols/10(6) cells was 4.90 (+/- 0.34) at 15 minutes, 8.30 (+/- 0.75) at 30 minutes, 12.28 (+/- 2.62) at 1 hour and 26.31 (+/- 1.15) at 4 hours

  2. Alfuzosin hydrochloride transdermal films: evaluation of physicochemical, in vitro human cadaver skin permeation and thermodynamic parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyanarayan Pattnaik

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main objective of the investigation was to develop a transdermal therapeutic system for alfuzosin hydrochloride and to study the effects of polymeric system and loading dose on the in vitro skin permeation pattern. Materials and methods: Principles of experimental design have been exploited to develop the dosage form. Ratio of ethyl cellulose (EC and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP and loading dose were selected as independent variables and their influence on the cumulative amount of alfuzosin hydrochloride permeated per cm2 of human cadaver skin at 24 h (Q24, permeation flux (J and steady state permeability coefficient (P SS were studied using experimental design. Various physicochemical parameters of the transdermal films were also evaluated. Activation energy for in vitro transdermal permeation has been estimated. Results: Ratio of EC and PVP was found to be the main influential factor for all the dependent variables studied. Drug loading dose was also found to influence the dependent variables but to a lesser extent. Physicochemical parameters of the prepared films were evaluated and found satisfactory. Activation energy for alfuzosin permeation has also been estimated and reported. Conclusion: The therapeutic system was found to be dermatologically non-irritant and hence, a therapeutically effective amount of alfuzosin hydrochloride can be delivered via a transdermal route.

  3. Superiority of liquid crystalline cubic nanocarriers as hormonal transdermal vehicle: comparative human skin permeation-supported evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohyeldin, Salma M; Mehanna, Mohammed M; Elgindy, Nazik A

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this investigation was to explore the feasibility of various nanocarriers to enhance progesterone penetration via the human abdominal skin. Four progesterone-loaded nanocarriers; cubosomes, nanoliposomes, nanoemulsions and nanomicelles were formulated and characterized regarding particle size, zeta potential, % drug encapsulation and in vitro release. Structural elucidation of each nanoplatform was performed using transmission electron microscopy. Ex vivo skin permeation, deposition ability and histopathological examination were evaluated using Franz diffusion cells. Each nanocarrier was fabricated with a negative surface, nanometric size (≤ 270 nm), narrow size distribution and reasonable encapsulation efficiency. In vitro progesterone release showed a sustained release pattern for 24 h following a non-Fickian transport diffusion mechanism. All nanocarriers exhibited higher transdermal flux relative to free progesterone. Cubosomes revealed a higher skin penetration with transdermal steady flux of 48.57.10(-2) ± 0.7 µg/cm(2) h. Nanoliposomes offered a higher percentage of skin progesterone deposition compared to other nanocarriers. Based on the histopathological examination, cubosomes and nanoliposomes were found to be biocompatible for transdermal application. Confocal laser scanning microscopy confirmed the ability of fluoro-labeled cubosomes to penetrate through the whole skin layers. The elaborated cubosomes proved to be a promising non-invasive nanocarrier for transdermal hormonal delivery.

  4. Ultradeformable Liposomes: a Novel Vesicular Carrier For Enhanced Transdermal Delivery of Procyanidins: Effect of Surfactants on the Formation, Stability, and Transdermal Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rencai; Li, Rongli; Liu, Qian; Bai, Chao; Qin, Benlin; Ma, Yue; Han, Jing

    2017-07-01

    The aims of this work were to develop a novel vesicular carrier, procyanidins, ultradeformable liposomes (PUDLs), to expand the applications for procyanidins, and increase their stability and transdermal delivery. In this study, we prepared procyanidins ultradeformable liposomes using thin film hydration method and evaluated their encapsulation efficiency, vesicle deformability, storage stability, and skin permeation in vitro. The influence of different surfactants on the properties of PUDLs was also investigated. The results obtained showed that the PUDLs containing Tween 80 had a high entrapment efficiency (80.27 ± 0.99%), a small particle size (140.6 ± 19 nm), high elasticity, and prolonged drug release. Compared with procyanidins solution, the stability of procyanidins in PUDLs improved significantly when stored at 4, 25, and 30°C. The penetration rate of PUDLs was 6.25-fold greater than that of procyanidins solution. Finally, the results of our study suggested that PUDLs could increase the transdermal flux, prolong the release and improve the stability of procyanidins, and could serve as an effective dermal delivery system for procyanidins.

  5. What Are Tobacco, Nicotine, and E-Cigarette Products?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drug Facts / Tobacco, Nicotine, & E-Cigarettes Tobacco, Nicotine, & E-Cigarettes Street names: Chew, Dip, Snuff Print Expand All Revised July 2017 What are tobacco, nicotine, and e-cigarette products? ©Shutterstock/ CatherineL-Prod Also known as: Cigarettes: ...

  6. Counterfeit Electronic Cigarette Products with Mislabeled Nicotine Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omaiye, Esther E; Cordova, Iliana; Davis, Barbara; Talbot, Prue

    2017-07-01

    We compared nicotine concentrations in one brand of refill fluids that were purchased in 4 countries and labeled 0 mg of nicotine/mL. We then identified counterfeit e-cigarette products from these countries. Overall, 125 e-cigarette refill fluids were purchased in Nigeria, the United States (US), England, and China. Nicotine concentrations were measured using high performance liquid chromatography and compared to labeled concentrations. Refill fluids were examined to identify physical differences and grouped into authentic and counterfeit products. Whereas nicotine was in 51.7% (15/29) of the Nigerian, 3.7% (1/27) of the Chinese and 1.6% (1/61) of the American refill fluids (range = 0.4 - 20.4 mg/mL), 8 British products did not contain nicotine. Products from China, the US, and Nigeria with trace amounts of nicotine (0.4 to 0.6 mg/mL) were authentic; however, all products from Nigeria with more than 3.7 mg/mL were counterfeit. We introduce 2 novel issues in the e-cigarette industry, the production of counterfeit refill fluids under a brandjacked label and inclusion of nicotine in 81.3% of the counterfeit products labeled 0 mg/mL. This study emphasizes the need for better control and monitoring of nicotine containing products and sales outlets.

  7. Simultaneous multiplexed quantification of nicotine and its metabolites using surface enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Omar; Xu, Yun; Goodacre, Royston

    2014-10-07

    The detection and quantification of xenobiotics and their metabolites in man is important for drug dosing, therapy and for substance abuse monitoring where longer-lived metabolic products from illicit materials can be assayed after the drug of abuse has been cleared from the system. Raman spectroscopy offers unique specificity for molecular characterization and this usually weak signal can be significantly enhanced using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). We report here the novel development of SERS with chemometrics for the simultaneous analysis of the drug nicotine and its major xenometabolites cotinine and trans-3'-hydroxycotinine. Initial experiments optimized the SERS conditions and we found that when these three determinands were analysed individually that the maximum SERS signals were found at three different pH. These were pH 3 for nicotine and pH 10 and 11 for cotinine and trans-3'-hydroxycotinine, respectively. Tertiary mixtures containing nicotine, cotinine and trans-3'-hydroxycotinine were generated in the concentration range 10(-7)-10(-5) M and SERS spectra were collected at all three pH values. Chemometric analysis using kernel-partial least squares (K-PLS) and artificial neural networks (ANNs) were conducted and these models were validated using bootstrap resampling. All three analytes were accurately quantified with typical root mean squared error of prediction on the test set data being 5-9%; nicotine was most accurately predicted followed by cotinine and then trans-3'-hydroxycotinine. We believe that SERS is a powerful approach for the simultaneous analysis of multiple determinands without recourse to lengthy chromatography, as demonstrated here for the xenobiotic nicotine and its two major xenometabolites.

  8. α-4 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor polymorphisms exhibit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Smoking behavior is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Nicotine is the major addictive substance in cigarettes. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are thought to play an important role in nicotine addiction of smokers. One of the genes, α-4 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ...

  9. Antifungal activity of nicotine and its cadmium complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaidi, I.M.; Gul, A.

    2005-01-01

    Nicotine and its metal complex; Cd(II)-nicotine were isolated from leaves of Nicotiana tabacum using various metal ions by the reported techniques and studied for their antifungal activities against fourteen different species of fungi. For comparative study, pure sample of nicotine and metal salt used for complexation; cadmium(II) iodide was also subjected to antifungal tests with the same species of fungus under similar conditions. Results indicated that nicotine is quite effective against the rare pathogenic and Non pathogenic fungi but comparatively less effective against Pathogenic fungi. Nicotine was found to be completely ineffective against the selected species of Occasional pathogenic fungi. Cadmium(II) iodide effectively inhibited Pathogenic and Non pathogenic fungi whereas relatively ineffective against the Occasional pathogenic and Rare pathogenic fungi. On the other hand, Cadmium(II) nicotine complex inhibited all the selected species of fungi except Fusarium solani. (author)

  10. Nicotine aversion: Neurobiological mechanisms and relevance to tobacco dependence vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Christie D.; Kenny, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Nicotine stimulates brain reward circuitries, most prominently the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system, and this action is considered critical in establishing and maintaining the tobacco smoking habit. Compounds that attenuate nicotine reward are considered promising therapeutic candidates for tobacco dependence, but many of these agents have other actions that limit their potential utility. Nicotine is also highly noxious, particularly at higher doses, and aversive reactions to nicotine after initial exposure can decrease the likelihood of developing a tobacco habit in many first time smokers. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about the mechanisms of nicotine aversion. The purpose of this review is to present recent new insights into the neurobiological mechanisms that regulate avoidance of nicotine. First, the role of the mesocorticolimbic system, so often associated with nicotine reward, in regulating nicotine aversion is highlighted. Second, genetic variation that modifies noxious responses to nicotine and thereby influences vulnerability to tobacco dependence, in particular variation in the CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunit gene cluster, will be discussed. Third, the role of the habenular complex in nicotine aversion, primarily medial habenular projections to the interpeduncular nucleus (IPN) but also lateral habenular projections to rostromedial tegmental nucleus (RMTg) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) are reviewed. Forth, brain circuits that are enriched in nAChRs, but whose role in nicotine avoidance has not yet been assessed, will be proposed. Finally, the feasibility of developing novel therapeutic agents for tobacco dependence that act not by blocking nicotine reward but by enhancing nicotine avoidance will be considered. PMID:24055497

  11. Opname van nicotine door kippen en overdracht naar eieren bij toepassing van nicotine tegen bloedluis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Traag, W.A.; Rijk, de T.C.; Zomer, P.; Vos Van Avezathe, A.; Kan, C.A.; Zeilmaker, M.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.

    2005-01-01

    Uit onderzoek van de AID blijkt nicotine gebruikt te worden voor de bestrijding van bloedluis bij kippen. Dit levert mogelijk gezondheidsrisico's op voor de consument van het kippenvlees of de eieren. Omdat niet duidelijk is of het nicotine na de bestrijding van bloedluis in het vlees of eieren

  12. Transdermal delivery of scopolamine by natural submicron injectors: in-vivo study in pig.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Shaoul

    Full Text Available Transdermal drug delivery has made a notable contribution to medical practice, but has yet to fully achieve its potential as an alternative to oral delivery and hypodermic injections. While transdermal delivery systems would appear to provide an attractive solution for local and systemic drug delivery, only a limited number of drugs can be delivered through the outer layer of the skin. The most difficult to deliver in this way are hydrophilic drugs. The aquatic phylum Cnidaria, which includes sea anemones, corals, jellyfish and hydra, is one of the most ancient multicellular phyla that possess stinging cells containing organelles (cnidocysts, comprising a sophisticated injection system. The apparatus is folded within collagenous microcapsules and upon activation injects a thin tubule that immediately penetrates the prey and delivers its contents. Here we show that this natural microscopic injection system can be adapted for systemic transdermal drug delivery once it is isolated from the cells and uploaded with the drug. Using a topically applied gel containing isolated natural sea anemone injectors and the muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine, we found that the formulated injectors could penetrate porcine skin and immediately deliver this hydrophilic drug. An in-vivo study in pigs demonstrated, for the first time, rapid systemic delivery of scopolamine, with T(max of 30 minutes and C(max 5 times higher than in controls treated topically with a scopolamine-containing gel without cnidocysts. The ability of the formulated natural injection system to penetrate a barrier as thick as the skin and systemically deliver an exogenous compound presents an intriguing and attractive alternative for hydrophilic transdermal drug delivery.

  13. A behavioral economic analysis of the value-enhancing effects of nicotine and varenicline and the role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in male and female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Scott T; Geary, Trevor N; Steiner, Amy N; Bevins, Rick A

    2018-04-09

    Reinforcement value enhancement by nicotine of non-nicotine rewards is believed to partially motivate smoking behavior. Recently, we showed that the value-enhancing effects of nicotine are well characterized by reinforcer demand models and that the value-enhancing effects of the smoking-cessation aid bupropion (Zyban) are distinct from those of nicotine and differ between the sexes. The present study evaluated potential sex differences in the enhancement effects of nicotine and varenicline (Chantix) using a reinforcer demand methodology. The role of α4β2* and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the enhancing effects of nicotine and varenicline is also evaluated. Male and female rats (n=12/sex) were trained to lever press maintained by sensory reinforcement by visual stimulus (VS) presentations. Changes in the VS value following nicotine and varenicline administration were assessed using an established reinforcer demand approach. Subsequently, the effects of antagonism of α4β2* and α7 nAChRs on varenicline and nicotine-induced enhancement active lever-pressing were assessed using a progressive ratio schedule. Nicotine and varenicline enhanced VS demand equivalently between the sexes as evaluated by reinforcer demand. However, α4β2* receptor antagonism attenuated value enhancement by nicotine and varenicline in females, but only of nicotine in males.

  14. Nicotinic activation of laterodorsal tegmental neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishibashi, Masaru; Leonard, Christopher S; Kohlmeier, Kristi A

    2009-01-01

    Identifying the neurological mechanisms underlying nicotine reinforcement is a healthcare imperative, if society is to effectively combat tobacco addiction. The majority of studies of the neurobiology of addiction have focused on dopamine (DA)-containing neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA......). However, recent data suggest that neurons of the laterodorsal tegmental (LDT) nucleus, which sends cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic-containing projections to DA-containing neurons of the VTA, are critical to gating normal functioning of this nucleus. The actions of nicotine on LDT neurons...... are unknown. We addressed this issue by examining the effects of nicotine on identified cholinergic and non-cholinergic LDT neurons using whole-cell patch clamp and Ca(2+)-imaging methods in brain slices from mice (P12-P45). Nicotine applied by puffer pipette or bath superfusion elicited membrane...

  15. Transdermal glimepiride delivery system based on optimized ethosomal nano-vesicles: Preparation, characterization, in vitro, ex vivo and clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Tarek A; El-Say, Khalid M; Aljaeid, Bader M; Fahmy, Usama A; Abd-Allah, Fathy I

    2016-03-16

    This work aimed to develop an optimized ethosomal formulation of glimepiride then loading into transdermal films to offer lower drug side effect, extended release behavior and avoid first pass effect. Four formulation factors were optimized for their effects on vesicle size (Y1), entrapment efficiency (Y2) and vesicle flexibility (Y3). Optimum desirability was identified and, an optimized formulation was prepared, characterized and loaded into transdermal films. Ex-vivo permeation study for the prepared films was conducted and, the permeation parameters and drug permeation mechanism were identified. Penetration through rat skin was studied using confocal laser microscope. In-vivo study was performed following transdermal application on human volunteers. The percent of alcohol was significantly affecting all the studied responses while the other factors and their interaction effects were varied on their effects on each response. The optimized ethosomal formulation showed observed values for Y1, Y2 and Y3 of 61 nm, 97.12% and 54.03, respectively. Ex-vivo permeation of films loaded with optimized ethosomal formulation was superior to that of the corresponding pure drug transdermal films and this finding was also confirmed after confocal laser microscope study. Permeation of glimepiride from the prepared films was in favor of Higushi-diffusion model and exhibited non-Fickian or anomalous release mechanism. In-vivo study revealed extended drug release behavior and lower maximum drug plasma level from transdermal films loaded with drug ethosomal formulation. So, the ethosomal formulation could be considered a suitable drug delivery system especially when loaded into transdermal vehicle with possible reduction in side effects and controlling the drug release. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of diclofenac prodrugs for enhancing transdermal delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Shabbir; Li, Henan; Farhan, Nashid; Yan, Guang

    2014-03-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the approach of using diclofenac acid (DA) prodrugs for enhancing transdermal delivery. Methanol diclofenac ester (MD), ethylene glycol diclofenac ester (ED), glycerol diclofenac ester (GD) and 1,3-propylene glycol diclofenac ester (PD) were synthesized and evaluated for their physicochemical properties such as solubilities, octanol/water partition coefficients, stratum corneum/water partition coefficients, hydrolysis rates and bioconversion rates. In vitro fluxes across human epidermal membrane (HEM) in the Franz diffusion cell were determined on DA-, MD-, ED-, GD- and PD-saturated aqueous solutions. The formation of GD and ED led to the prodrugs with higher aqueous solubilities and lower partition coefficients than those of the parent drug. Prodrugs with improved aqueous solubility showed better fluxes across HEM in aqueous solution than that of the parent drug, with GD showing the highest aqueous solubility and also the highest flux. There is a linear relationship between the aqueous solubility and flux for DA, ED and PD, but GD and MD deviated from the linear line. Diclofenac prodrugs with improved hydrophilicity than the parent drug could be utilized for enhancing transdermal diclofenac delivery.

  17. Evaluation of Diclofenac Prodrugs for Enhancing Transdermal Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Shabbir; Li, Henan; Farhan, Nashid; Yan, Guang

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the approach of using diclofenac acid (DA) prodrugs for enhancing transdermal delivery. Methanol diclofenac ester (MD), ethylene glycol diclofenac ester (ED), glycerol diclofenac ester (GD), and 1,3-propylene glycol diclofenac ester (PD) were synthesized and evaluated for their physicochemical properties such as solubilities, octanol/water partition coefficients, stratum corneum/water partition coefficients, hydrolysis rates, and bioconversion rates. In vitro fluxes across human epidermal membrane (HEM) in Franz diffusion cell were determined on DA, MD, ED, GD, and PD saturated aqueous solutions. The formation of GD and ED led to the prodrugs with higher aqueous solubilities and lower partition coefficients than those of the parent drug. Prodrugs with improved aqueous solubility showed better fluxes across HEM in aqueous solution than that of the parent drug, with GD showing the highest aqueous solubility and also the highest flux. There is a linear relationship between the aqueous solubility and flux for DA, ED and PD, but GD and MD deviated from the linear line. Overall, diclofenac prodrugs with improved hydrophilicity than the parent drug could be utilized for enhancing transdermal diclofenac delivery. PMID:24517636

  18. Design, development, physicochemical, and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of transdermal patches containing diclofenac diethylammonium salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Priyanka; Mukherjee, Biswajit

    2002-09-01

    In this study, matrix-type transdermal patches containing diclofenac diethylamine were prepared using different ratios of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and ethylcellulose (EC) by solvent evaporation technique. The drug matrix film of PVP and EC was casted on a polyvinylalcohol backing membrane. All the prepared formulations were subjected to physical studies (moisture content, moisture uptake, and flatness), in vitro release studies and in vitro skin permeation studies. In vitro permeation studies were performed across cadaver skin using a modified diffusion cell. Variations in drug release profiles among the formulations studied were observed. Based on a physicochemical and in vitro skin permeation study, formulation PA4 (PVP/EC, 1:2) and PA5 (PVP/EC, 1:5) were chosen for further in vivo experiments. The antiinflammatory effect and a sustaining action of diclofenac diethylamine from the two transdermal patches selected were studied by inducing paw edema in rats with 1% w/v carrageenan solution. When the patches were applied half an hour before the subplantar injection of carrageenan in the hind paw of male Wistar rats, it was observed that formulation PA4 produced 100% inhibition of paw edema in rats 12 h after carrageenan insult, whereas in the case of formulation PA5, 4% mean paw edema was obtained half an hour after the carrageenan injection and the value became 19.23% 12 h after the carrageenan insult. The efficacy of transdermal patches was also compared with the marketed Voveran gel and it was found that PA4 transdermal patches produced a better result as compared with the Voveran gel. Hence, it can be reasonably concluded that diclofenac diethylamine can be formulated into the transdermal matrix type patches to sustain its release characteristics and the polymeric composition (PVP/EC, 1:2) was found to be the best choice for manufacturing transdermal patches of diclofenac diethylamine among the formulations studied. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Evaluation of Microemulsion and Lamellar Liquid Crystalline Systems for Transdermal Zidovudine Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, André Luis Menezes; Silva, José Alexsandro da; Lira, Ana Amélia Moreira; Conceição, Tamara Matos Freire; Nunes, Rogéria de Souza; de Albuquerque Junior, Ricardo Luiz Cavalcanti; Sarmento, Victor Hugo Vitorino; Leal, Leila Bastos; de Santana, Davi Pereira

    2016-07-01

    This study proposed to investigate and to compare colloidal carrier systems containing Zidovudine (3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine) (AZT) for transdermal administration and optimization of antiretroviral therapy. Microemulsion (ME) and lamellar phase (LP) liquid crystal were obtained and selected from pseudoternary diagrams previously developed. Small-angle X-ray scattering and rheology analysis confirmed the presence of typical ME and liquid crystalline structures with lamellar arrangement, respectively. Both colloidal carrier systems, ME, and LP remained stable, homogeneous, and isotropic after AZT addition. In vitro permeation study (using pig ear skin) showed that the amount of permeated drug was higher for ME compared to the control and LP, obtaining a permeation enhancing effect on the order of approximately 2-fold (p drug permeation without causing apparent skin irritation. On the order hand, LP functioned as a drug reservoir reducing AZT partitioning into the skin. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of nicotine replacement therapy on cardiovascular outcomes after acute coronary syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Kevin J; Zabad, Mohammed Nour; Post, Jennifer M; McNitt, Scott; Williams, Geoffrey C; Bisognano, John D

    2012-10-01

    The optimal approach to encourage smoking cessation after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) remains unclear. The safety of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) after ACS is not well established. The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between NRT use and adverse cardiovascular outcomes after ACS. Using a pre-existing database, 663 smokers with ACS were identified. The patients were separated into the NRT (n = 184) or control (n = 479) groups according to whether NRT was prescribed on hospital discharge. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to account for the baseline differences between the 2 groups. Of the 663 patients, 202 had adverse events in the first year after ACS. No significant differences were seen with NRT use for the 1-year combined end point of death, myocardial infarction), repeat revascularization, or rehospitalization for angina, congestive heart failure or arrhythmia (odds ratio [OR] 0.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61 to 1.30, p = 0.54). There were no differences in the individual 1-year end points of death (odds ratio 0.80, 95% confidence interval 0.33 to 1.91, p = 0.61), myocardial infarction (odds ratio 0.90, 95% confidence interval 0.40 to 2.06, p = 0.80), repeat revascularization (odds ratio 0.77, 95% confidence interval 0.44 to 1.36, p = 0.37), or rehospitalization for angina, congestive heart failure, or arrhythmia (odds ratio 1.01, 95% confidence interval 0.66 to 1.53, p = 0.97). In conclusion, NRT use was not associated with an increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events in the first year after ACS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Plasma Concentrations of Fentanyl Achieved With Transdermal Application in Chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delaski, Kristina M; Gehring, Ronette; Heffron, Brendan T; Negrusz, Adam; Gamble, Kathryn C

    2017-01-01

    Providing appropriate analgesia is an important concern in any species. Fentanyl, a μ-receptor specific opioid, use is common in mammalian species but has been incompletely evaluated for this purpose in avian species. Transdermal fentanyl patches were applied to domestic chickens (n = 10) of varying

  2. Nicotine Withdrawal Induces Neural Deficits in Reward Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Jason A; Evans, David E; Addicott, Merideth A; Potts, Geoffrey F; Brandon, Thomas H; Drobes, David J

    2017-06-01

    Nicotine withdrawal reduces neurobiological responses to nonsmoking rewards. Insight into these reward deficits could inform the development of targeted interventions. This study examined the effect of withdrawal on neural and behavioral responses during a reward prediction task. Smokers (N = 48) attended two laboratory sessions following overnight abstinence. Withdrawal was manipulated by having participants smoke three regular nicotine (0.6 mg yield; satiation) or very low nicotine (0.05 mg yield; withdrawal) cigarettes. Electrophysiological recordings of neural activity were obtained while participants completed a reward prediction task that involved viewing four combinations of predictive and reward-determining stimuli: (1) Unexpected Reward; (2) Predicted Reward; (3) Predicted Punishment; (4) Unexpected Punishment. The task evokes a medial frontal negativity that mimics the phasic pattern of dopaminergic firing in ventral tegmental regions associated with reward prediction errors. Nicotine withdrawal decreased the amplitude of the medial frontal negativity equally across all trial types (p nicotine dependence (p Nicotine withdrawal had equivocal impact across trial types, suggesting reward processing deficits are unlikely to stem from changes in phasic dopaminergic activity during prediction errors. Effects on tonic activity may be more pronounced. Pharmacological interventions directly targeting the dopamine system and behavioral interventions designed to increase reward motivation and responsiveness (eg, behavioral activation) may aid in mitigating withdrawal symptoms and potentially improving smoking cessation outcomes. Findings from this study indicate nicotine withdrawal impacts reward processing signals that are observable in smokers' neural activity. This may play a role in the subjective aversive experience of nicotine withdrawal and potentially contribute to smoking relapse. Interventions that address abnormal responding to both pleasant and

  3. New trends in the treatment of nicotine addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwińska-Mossoń, Mariola; Zieleń, Iwona; Milnerowicz, Halina

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to discuss the therapeutic substances used to treat nicotine addiction, not registered in Poland. This paper presents the results of the latest clinical trials and the possibility of their use in the treatment of nicotine addiction. The first two discussed drugs clonidine and nortriptyline are recommended by clinical practice guidelines AHRQ (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality) as the substance of the second line in the fight against addiction. Nortriptyline belongs to tricyclic antidepressants. Its mechanism of action is the inhibition of the reuptake of norepinephrine. It is suggested as the antagonist of activity of nicotinic receptors. The results confirm its efficacy in the treatment of nicotine addiction, but many side effects limit its use. Clonidine acts presumably by inhibition of sympathetic hyperactivity characteristic of symptoms associated with nicotine rehab. The remaining compounds under discussion, such as: venlafaxine, fluoxetine, moclobemide and rimonabant, are not registered in any country with an indication to use in the treatment of nicotine addiction, however, due to the mechanism in which they act, the possibility of their use in the treatment of this disease is considered. The possibility of using anxiolytics such as: buspirone, diazepam, meprobamate and beta-blockers: metoprolol and oxprenolol is also considered in order to treat the anxiety appearing as one of the symptoms of abstinence. An interesting proposal to combat nicotine addiction are vaccines--NicVAX, CYT002-NicQb and TA-NIC. Currently, they are in clinical phase I and II of their development. Their operation would be based on the induction of specific antibodies that bind nicotine in the plasma, thus prevent it reaching the nicotinic receptors. Preliminary results confirm the possible positive effects in the prevention and treatment of nicotine addiction.

  4. NMDA receptors regulate nicotine-enhanced brain reward function and intravenous nicotine self-administration: role of the ventral tegmental area and central nucleus of the amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Paul J; Chartoff, Elena; Roberto, Marisa; Carlezon, William A; Markou, Athina

    2009-01-01

    Nicotine is considered an important component of tobacco responsible for the smoking habit in humans. Nicotine increases glutamate-mediated transmission throughout brain reward circuitries. This action of nicotine could potentially contribute to its intrinsic rewarding and reward-enhancing properties, which motivate consumption of the drug. Here we show that the competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist LY235959 (0.5-2.5 mg per kg) abolished nicotine-enhanced brain reward function, reflected in blockade of the lowering of intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) thresholds usually observed after experimenter-administered (0.25 mg per kg) or intravenously self-administered (0.03 mg per kg per infusion) nicotine injections. The highest LY235959 dose (5 mg per kg) tested reversed the hedonic valence of nicotine from positive to negative, reflected in nicotine-induced elevations of ICSS thresholds. LY235959 doses that reversed nicotine-induced lowering of ICSS thresholds also markedly decreased nicotine self-administration without altering responding for food reinforcement, whereas the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptor antagonist NBQX had no effects on nicotine intake. In addition, nicotine self-administration upregulated NMDA receptor subunit expression in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) and ventral tegmental area (VTA), suggesting important interactions between nicotine and the NMDA receptor. Furthermore, nicotine (1 microM) increased NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents in rat CeA slices, similar to its previously described effects in the VTA. Finally, infusion of LY235959 (0.1-10 ng per side) into the CeA or VTA decreased nicotine self-administration. Taken together, these data suggest that NMDA receptors, including those in the CeA and VTA, gate the magnitude and valence of the effects of nicotine on brain reward systems, thereby regulating motivation to consume the drug.

  5. The effect of simultaneous exposure of HEMn-DP and HEMn-LP melanocytes to nicotine and UV-radiation on the cell viability and melanogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delijewski, Marcin; Wrześniok, Dorota; Beberok, Artur; Rok, Jakub; Otręba, Michał; Buszman, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Nicotine is a main compound of tobacco plants and may affect more than a billion people all over the world that are permanently exposed to nicotine from cigarettes, various forms of smoking cessation therapies, electronic cigarettes or second-hand smoke. It is known that nicotine forms complexes with melanin what may lead to accumulation of this alkaloid in tissues of living organisms containing the pigment. This may affect the viability of cells and process of melanin biosynthesis that takes place in melanocytes. Although UV radiation is known to be a particular inductor of melanin biosynthesis, its simultaneous effect with nicotine on this process as well as the viability of human cells containing melanin have not been assessed so far. The aim of this study was to examine the simultaneous impact of nicotine and UV radiation on viability and melanogenesis in cultured normal human melanocytes dark (HEMn-DP) and light (HEMn-LP) pigmented. Nicotine together with UV radiation induced concentration-dependent loss in melanocytes viability. The higher cell loss was observed in dark pigmented melanocytes in comparison to light pigmented cells. Simultaneous exposure of cells to nicotine and UV radiation also caused changes in melanization process in both tested cell lines. The data suggest that simultaneous exposure of melanocytes to nicotine and UV radiation up-regulates melanogenesis and affects cell viability. Observed processes are more pronounced in dark pigmented cells. - Highlights: • Nicotine and UVA induced concentration-dependent loss in melanocytes viability. • Nicotine and UVA modulated melanization process in melanocytes. • Changes in viability and melanization were more pronounced in dark pigmented cells.

  6. The effect of simultaneous exposure of HEMn-DP and HEMn-LP melanocytes to nicotine and UV-radiation on the cell viability and melanogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delijewski, Marcin; Wrześniok, Dorota; Beberok, Artur; Rok, Jakub; Otręba, Michał; Buszman, Ewa, E-mail: ebuszman@sum.edu.pl

    2016-11-15

    Nicotine is a main compound of tobacco plants and may affect more than a billion people all over the world that are permanently exposed to nicotine from cigarettes, various forms of smoking cessation therapies, electronic cigarettes or second-hand smoke. It is known that nicotine forms complexes with melanin what may lead to accumulation of this alkaloid in tissues of living organisms containing the pigment. This may affect the viability of cells and process of melanin biosynthesis that takes place in melanocytes. Although UV radiation is known to be a particular inductor of melanin biosynthesis, its simultaneous effect with nicotine on this process as well as the viability of human cells containing melanin have not been assessed so far. The aim of this study was to examine the simultaneous impact of nicotine and UV radiation on viability and melanogenesis in cultured normal human melanocytes dark (HEMn-DP) and light (HEMn-LP) pigmented. Nicotine together with UV radiation induced concentration-dependent loss in melanocytes viability. The higher cell loss was observed in dark pigmented melanocytes in comparison to light pigmented cells. Simultaneous exposure of cells to nicotine and UV radiation also caused changes in melanization process in both tested cell lines. The data suggest that simultaneous exposure of melanocytes to nicotine and UV radiation up-regulates melanogenesis and affects cell viability. Observed processes are more pronounced in dark pigmented cells. - Highlights: • Nicotine and UVA induced concentration-dependent loss in melanocytes viability. • Nicotine and UVA modulated melanization process in melanocytes. • Changes in viability and melanization were more pronounced in dark pigmented cells.

  7. Alcohol's actions on neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tiffany J; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2006-01-01

    Although it has been known for many years that alcoholism and tobacco addiction often co-occur, relatively little information is available on the biological factors that regulate the co-use and abuse of nicotine and alcohol. In the brain, nicotine acts at several different types of receptors collectively known as nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Alcohol also acts on at least some of these receptors, enhancing the function of some nAChR subtypes and inhibiting the activity of others. Chronic alcohol and nicotine administration also lead to changes in the numbers of nAChRs. Natural variations (i.e., polymorphisms) in the genes encoding different nAChR subunits may be associated with individual differences in the sensitivity to some of alcohol's and nicotine's effects. Finally, at least one subtype of nAChR may help protect cells against alcohol-induced neurotoxicity.

  8. Evaluation of Diclofenac Prodrugs for Enhancing Transdermal Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Lobo, Shabbir; Li, Henan; Farhan, Nashid; Yan, Guang

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the approach of using diclofenac acid (DA) prodrugs for enhancing transdermal delivery. Methanol diclofenac ester (MD), ethylene glycol diclofenac ester (ED), glycerol diclofenac ester (GD), and 1,3-propylene glycol diclofenac ester (PD) were synthesized and evaluated for their physicochemical properties such as solubilities, octanol/water partition coefficients, stratum corneum/water partition coefficients, hydrolysis rates, and bioconversion rates. ...

  9. Neurotensin Agonist Attenuates Nicotine Potentiation to Cocaine Sensitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Fredrickson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco usage typically precedes illicit drug use in adolescent and young adult populations. Several animal studies suggest nicotine increases the risk for subsequent cocaine abuse, and may be a negative prognostic factor for treatment of cocaine addiction; i.e., a “gateway drug”. Neurotensin (NT is a 13-amino acid neuropeptide that modulates dopamine, acetylcholine, glutamate, and GABA neurotransmission in brain reward pathways. NT69L, a NT(8-13 analog, blocks behavioral sensitization (an animal model for psychostimulant addiction to nicotine, and nicotine self-administration in rats. The present study tested the effect of NT69L on the potentiating effects of nicotine on cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization. Male Wistar rats were injected daily for seven days with nicotine or saline (control followed by four daily injections of cocaine. NT69L was administered 30 min prior to the last cocaine injection. Behavior was recorded with the use of activity chambers. Subchronic administration of nicotine enhanced cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization in Wistar rats, consistent with an hypothesized gateway effect. These behavioral effects of cocaine were attenuated by pretreatment with NT69L. The effect of the neurotensin agonist on cocaine sensitization in the nicotine treated group indicated a possible therapeutic effect for cocaine addiction, even in the presence of enhanced behavioral sensitization induced by nicotine.

  10. Evaluation of paeonol-loaded transethosomes as transdermal delivery carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z X; Li, B; Liu, T; Wang, X; Zhu, Y; Wang, L; Wang, X H; Niu, X; Xiao, Y; Sun, Q

    2017-03-01

    Paeonol shows effective anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities. However, because of its poor solubility in water and high volatility at room temperature, the application of this drug is restricted in the clinic. The objective of this research was to develop a biocompatible paeonol formulation with improved stability, skin delivery and pharmacokinetic efficiency. In this paper, paeonol-loaded vesicles were prepared using an ethanol injection method. Nano-vesicles were characterized for their physical properties and encapsulation efficiency (EE). Drug permeation behavior in vitro and deposition quantity in porcine ear skin were measured with a Valia-Chien (V-C) diffusion device. Additionally, a validated and sensitive high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed to analyze paeonol concentrations in rat plasma after transdermal administration. The results showed that the particle-size order of the nano-vesicles was the following: transethosomes (122.5±7.5nm)transethosomes had a higher EE (85.5±5.2%), and they showed a spherical morphology with a smooth surface when viewed under a transmission electron microscope (TEM). In an in vitro permeation study, the paeonol transethosomes showed an enhanced transdermal flux of 95.7±8.8μg/cm 2 /h and a higher deposition quantity in porcine ear skin compared to the transfersomes. A one-compartment first-order absorption model could be used to describe the pharmacokinetics of paeonol in rats after transdermal administration. The AUC of the paeonol transethosomes was approximately 1.57- and 3.52-fold higher than those of the transfersomes and a saturated solution of paeonol in 35% ethanol, respectively. The results demonstrated that the paeonol transethosomes had a narrow size distribution, high encapsulation efficiency, and long residence in the plasma. This formulation remarkably enhanced the bioavailability of paeonol. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Nicotinic and iso nicotinic acids: interactions with gamma radiation and acid-base equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Z.A.

    1984-01-01

    The values of pKa 1 and pKa 2 for nicotinic and iso nicotinic acids in aqueous medium were determined. The effects of gamma radiation about these acids by infrared and ultraviolet spectrophotometry and thermal gravimetric analysis were also studied. It was verified that the radiolysis of acids occurred by the two process of first order, determining the degradation constant and the degradation factors for each one of the solutions. (C.G.C.)

  12. Hybrid electrospun chitosan-phospholipids nanofibers for transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Ana C; Gorzelanny, Christian; Halter, Natalia; Schneider, Stefan W; Chronakis, Ioannis S

    2016-08-20

    Chitosan (Ch) polysaccharide was mixed with phospholipids (P) to generate electrospun hybrid nanofibers intended to be used as platforms for transdermal drug delivery. Ch/P nanofibers exibithed average diameters ranging from 248±94nm to 600±201nm, depending on the amount of phospholipids used. Fourier Transformed Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) data suggested the occurrence of electrostatic interactions between amine groups of chitosan with the phospholipid counterparts. The nanofibers were shown to be stable for at least 7days in Phosphate Buffer Saline (PBS) solution. Cytotoxicity studies (WST-1 and LDH assays) demonstrated that the hybrid nanofibers have suitable biocompatibility. Fluorescence microscopy, also suggested that L929 cells seeded on top of the CH/P hybrid have similar metabolic activity comparatively to the cells seeded on tissue culture plate (control). The release of curcumin, diclofenac and vitamin B12, as model drugs, from Ch/P hybrid nanofibers was investigated, demonstrating their potential utilization as a transdermal drug delivery system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Reduced Nicotine Content Expectancies Affect Initial Responses to Smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercincavage, Melissa; Smyth, Joshua M; Strasser, Andrew A; Branstetter, Steven A

    2016-10-01

    We sought to determine if negative responses to reduced nicotine content (RNC) cigarettes during open-label trials result from smokers' (negative) expectancies. We examined the effects of nicotine content description - independent of actual nicotine content - on subjective responses (craving reduction, withdrawal suppression, mood changes, and sensory ratings) and smoking behaviors (topography measures and carbon monoxide [CO] boost). Thirty-six 12-hour-abstinent daily smokers completed a 3-session crossover trial. During each session, participants smoked their preferred brand cigarette - blinded and described as containing "usual," "low," and "very low" nicotine content - through a topography device and completed CO and subjective response assessments. Although nicotine content was identical, compared to the "usual" content cigarette, participants experienced less craving reduction after smoking the "very low" nicotine cigarette, and rated its smoke as weaker (p marketing and labeling are likely important considerations if a federal nicotine reduction policy is initiated.

  14. In vivo studies of transdermal nanoparticle delivery with microneedles using photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moothanchery, Mohesh; Seeni, Razina Z.; Xu, Chenjie; Pramanik, Manojit

    2017-01-01

    Microneedle technology allows micron-sized conduits to be formed within the outermost skin layers for both localized and systemic delivery of therapeutics including nanoparticles. Histological methods are often employed for characterization, and unfortunately do not allow for the in vivo visualization of the delivery process. This study presents the utilization of optical resolution-photoacoustic microscopy to characterize the transdermal delivery of nanoparticles using microneedles. Specifically, we observe the in vivo transdermal delivery of gold nanoparticles using microneedles in mice ear and study the penetration, diffusion, and spatial distribution of the nanoparticles in the tissue. The promising results reveal that photoacoustic microscopy can be used as a potential imaging modality for the in vivo characterization of microneedles based drug delivery. PMID:29296482

  15. Serotonergic modulation of nicotine-induced kinetic tremor in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naofumi Kunisawa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that nicotine elicited kinetic tremor by elevating the neural activity of the inferior olive via α7 nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh receptors. Since α7 nACh receptors reportedly facilitate synaptic monoamine release, we explored the role of 5-HT receptors in induction and/or modulation of nicotine tremor. Treatment of mice with nicotine induced kinetic tremor that normally appeared during movement. The 5-HT1A agonist, 8-hydroxydipropylaminotetraline (8-OH-DPAT, significantly enhanced nicotine-induced tremor and the action of 8-OH-DPAT was antagonized by WAY-100135 (5-HT1A antagonist. In addition, the cerebral 5-HT depletion by repeated treatment with p-chlorophenylalanine did not reduce, but rather potentiated the facilitatory effects of 8-OH-DPAT. In contrast, the 5-HT2 agonist, 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI, significantly attenuated nicotine tremor, which was antagonized by ritanserin (5-HT2 antagonist. The 5-HT3 agonist SR-57227 did not affect nicotine-induced tremor. Furthermore, when testing the direct actions of 5-HT antagonists, nicotine tremor was inhibited by WAY-100135, but was unaffected by ritanserin, ondansetron (5-HT3 antagonist or SB-258585 (5-HT6 antagonist. These results suggest that postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors are involved in induction of nicotine tremor mediated by α7 nACh receptors. In addition, 5-HT2 receptors have an inhibitory modulatory role in induction of nicotine tremor.

  16. Nicotine addiction management following surgery: a quality improvement approach in the post anesthesia care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finegan, Barry A; Roblin, Daniel; Hammal, Fadi

    2018-03-14

    For smokers, hospital admission is accompanied by forced involuntary nicotine abstinence due to smoke-free site/grounds policies. An audit of patients admitted to our surgical wards revealed that identification of smoking status was inadequate and that nicotine addiction management (NAM) was infrequently offered. The project aimed to enhance both these metrics by initiating NAM in the post anesthesia care unit (PACU). Out of 744 patients admitted to our PACU in August 2015, 54% had their smoking status documented. The 200 patients (27%) out of the 744 were smokers and only 50% were offered NAM before discharge. PACU unit staff to determine the smoking status of every patient before discharge from the PACU (later changed to OR nursing staff) and, if a patient was identified as a smoker, to offer NRT (patch and mouth spray only) and initiate therapy prior to transfer of the patient to the ward. Data about number of patients admitted, presence of documented smoking status, number of identified smokers, and number offered/accepted nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) were collected at baseline and thereafter quarterly. Engaging video education sessions addressed the education gaps highlighted in a needs assessment. Identification of smoking status was made part of preoperative checklist and NRT was made available in post-operative recovery room. These interventions resulted in an increase in screening for tobacco use from 54% at baseline to 95% and the offer of NRT to smokers from 50 to 89%.

  17. Replicated Risk Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptor Genes for Nicotine Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingjun Zuo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been hypothesized that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs play important roles in nicotine dependence (ND and influence the number of cigarettes smoked per day (CPD in smokers. We compiled the associations between nicotinic cholinergic receptor genes (CHRNs and ND/CPD that were replicated across different studies, reviewed the expression of these risk genes in human/mouse brains, and verified their expression using independent samples of both human and mouse brains. The potential functions of the replicated risk variants were examined using cis-eQTL analysis or predicted using a series of bioinformatics analyses. We found replicated and significant associations for ND/CPD at 19 SNPs in six genes in three genomic regions (CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4 and CHRNA4. These six risk genes are expressed in at least 18 distinct areas of the human/mouse brain, with verification in our independent human and mouse brain samples. The risk variants might influence the transcription, expression and splicing of the risk genes, alter RNA secondary or protein structure. We conclude that the replicated associations between CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4, CHRNA4 and ND/CPD are very robust. More research is needed to examine how these genetic variants contribute to the risk for ND/CPD.

  18. Prior nicotine self-administration attenuates subsequent dopaminergic deficits of methamphetamine in rats: role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baladi, Michelle G; Nielsen, Shannon M; McIntosh, J Michael; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2016-08-01

    Preclinical studies have demonstrated that oral nicotine exposure attenuates long-term dopaminergic damage induced by toxins, including repeated, high doses of methamphetamine. It is suggested that alterations in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) expression, including α4β2* and α6β2* subtypes, likely contribute to this protection. The current study extended these findings by investigating whether nicotine self-administration in male, Sprague-Dawley rats (a) attenuates short-term dopaminergic damage induced by methamphetamine and (b) causes alterations in levels of α4β2* and α6β2* nAChR subtypes. The findings indicate that nicotine self-administration (0.032 mg/kg/infusion for 14 days) per se did not alter α4β2* and α6β2* nAChR expression or dopamine transporter (DAT) expression and function. Interestingly, prior nicotine self-administration attenuated methamphetamine-induced decreases in DAT function when assessed 24 h, but not 1 h, after methamphetamine treatment (4×7.5 mg/kg/injection). The ability of nicotine to attenuate the effects of methamphetamine on DAT function corresponded with increases in α4β2*, but not α6β2*, nAChR binding density. Understanding the role of nAChRs in methamphetamine-induced damage has the potential to elucidate mechanisms underlying the etiology of disorders involving dopaminergic dysfunction, as well as to highlight potential new therapeutic strategies for prevention or reduction of dopaminergic neurodegeneration.

  19. Nicotine Gum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with a smoking cessation program, which may include support groups, counseling, or specific behavioral change techniques. Nicotine gum ... and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or ...

  20. Neural Signatures of Cognitive Flexibility and Reward Sensitivity Following Nicotinic Receptor Stimulation in Dependent Smokers: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesage, Elise; Aronson, Sarah E; Sutherland, Matthew T; Ross, Thomas J; Salmeron, Betty Jo; Stein, Elliot A

    2017-06-01

    Withdrawal from nicotine is an important contributor to smoking relapse. Understanding how reward-based decision making is affected by abstinence and by pharmacotherapies such as nicotine replacement therapy and varenicline tartrate may aid cessation treatment. To independently assess the effects of nicotine dependence and stimulation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor on the ability to interpret valence information (reward sensitivity) and subsequently alter behavior as reward contingencies change (cognitive flexibility) in a probabilistic reversal learning task. Nicotine-dependent smokers and nonsmokers completed a probabilistic reversal learning task during acquisition of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in a 2-drug, double-blind placebo-controlled crossover design conducted from January 21, 2009, to September 29, 2011. Smokers were abstinent from cigarette smoking for 12 hours for all sessions. In a fully Latin square fashion, participants in both groups underwent MRI twice while receiving varenicline and twice while receiving a placebo pill, wearing either a nicotine or a placebo patch. Imaging analysis was performed from June 15, 2015, to August 10, 2016. A well-established computational model captured effects of smoking status and administration of nicotine and varenicline on probabilistic reversal learning choice behavior. Neural effects of smoking status, nicotine, and varenicline were tested for on MRI contrasts that captured reward sensitivity and cognitive flexibility. The study included 24 nicotine-dependent smokers (12 women and 12 men; mean [SD] age, 35.8 [9.9] years) and 20 nonsmokers (10 women and 10 men; mean [SD] age, 30.4 [7.2] years). Computational modeling indicated that abstinent smokers were biased toward response shifting and that their decisions were less sensitive to the available evidence, suggesting increased impulsivity during withdrawal. These behavioral impairments were mitigated with nicotine and varenicline

  1. Animal Research on Nicotine Reduction: Current Evidence and Research Gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tracy T; Rupprecht, Laura E; Denlinger-Apte, Rachel L; Weeks, Jillian J; Panas, Rachel S; Donny, Eric C; Sved, Alan F

    2017-09-01

    A mandated reduction in the nicotine content of cigarettes may improve public health by reducing the prevalence of smoking. Animal self-administration research is an important complement to clinical research on nicotine reduction. It can fill research gaps that may be difficult to address with clinical research, guide clinical researchers about variables that are likely to be important in their own research, and provide policy makers with converging evidence between clinical and preclinical studies about the potential impact of a nicotine reduction policy. Convergence between clinical and preclinical research is important, given the ease with which clinical trial participants can access nonstudy tobacco products in the current marketplace. Herein, we review contributions of preclinical animal research, with a focus on rodent self-administration, to the science of nicotine reduction. Throughout this review, we highlight areas where clinical and preclinical research converge and areas where the two differ. Preclinical research has provided data on many important topics such as the threshold for nicotine reinforcement, the likelihood of compensation, moderators of the impact of nicotine reduction, the impact of environmental stimuli on nicotine reduction, the impact of nonnicotine cigarette smoke constituents on nicotine reduction, and the impact of nicotine reduction on vulnerable populations. Special attention is paid to current research gaps including the dramatic rise in alternative tobacco products, including electronic nicotine delivery systems (ie, e-cigarettes). The evidence reviewed here will be critical for policy makers as well as clinical researchers interested in nicotine reduction. This review will provide policy makers and clinical researchers interested in nicotine reduction with an overview of the preclinical animal research conducted on nicotine reduction and the regulatory implications of that research. The review also highlights the utility of

  2. Antifungal activity of nicotine and its cobalt complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaidi, M.I.; Gul, A.

    2005-01-01

    Nicotine and its metal complex; Co(II)-nicotine were isolated from leaves of Nicotiana tabacum using various metal ions by the reported techniques and studied for their antifungal activity against fourteen different species of fungi. For comparative study, pure sample of nicotine and metal salt used for complexation; cobalt(II) chloride was also subjected to antifungal tests with the same species of fungus under similar conditions. Results indicated that nicotine had antifungal activity against all species of fungi studied except Candida albicans, Microsporum canis, Epidermophyton floccosum, Candida tropicalis, and Alternaria infectoria. Cobalt(II) nicotine was found to be effective against all selected species of fungi but ineffective against Candida solani, Penicillium notalum, Microsporum canis, Fusarium solani and Fusarium moniliforme. (author)

  3. Transdermal Physostigmine—Absence of Effect on Topographic Brain Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Neufeld

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Nine patients with primary degenerative dementia (PDD participated in an open trial of transdermal physostigmine (TPh. In order to evaluate the neurophysiologic effects of TPh, EEG data were recorded and compared at baseline and following 2 months of continuous treatment. There was no significant effect of TPh on EEG spectra in patients with PDD.

  4. Age-related changes in nicotine response of cholinergic and non-cholinergic laterodorsal tegmental neurons: implications for the heightened adolescent susceptibility to nicotine addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Mark H.; Ishibashi, Masaru; Nielsen, Michael L.; Leonard, Christopher S.; Kohlmeier, Kristi A.

    2015-01-01

    The younger an individual starts smoking, the greater the likelihood that addiction to nicotine will develop, suggesting that neurobiological responses vary across age to the addictive component of cigarettes. Cholinergic neurons of the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) are importantly involved in the development of addiction, however, the effects of nicotine on LDT neuronal excitability across ontogeny are unknown. Nicotinic effects on several parameters affecting LDT cells across different age groups were examined using calcium imaging and whole-cell patch clamping. Within the youngest age group (P7-P15), nicotine was found to induce larger intracellular calcium transients and inward currents. Nicotine induced a greater number of excitatory synaptic currents in the youngest animals, whereas larger amplitude inhibitory synaptic events were induced in cells from the oldest animals (P15-P34). Nicotine increased neuronal firing of cholinergic cells to a greater degree in younger animals, possibly linked to development associated differences found in nicotinic effects on action potential shape and afterhyperpolarization. We conclude that in addition to age-associated alterations of several properties expected to affect resting cell excitability, parameters affecting cell excitability are altered by nicotine differentially across ontogeny. Taken together, our data suggest that nicotine induces a larger excitatory response in cholinergic LDT neurons from the youngest animals, which could result in a greater excitatory output from these cells to target regions involved in development of addiction. Such output would be expected to be promotive of addiction; therefore, ontogenetic differences in nicotine-mediated increases in the excitability of the LDT could contribute to the differential susceptibility to nicotine addiction seen across age. PMID:24863041

  5. Improvement in transdermal drug delivery performance by graphite oxide/temperature-responsive hydrogel composites with micro heater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Jumi; Lee, Dae Hoon; Im, Ji Sun; Kim, Hyung-Il

    2012-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS) was prepared with temperature-responsive hydrogel. The graphite was oxidized and incorporated into hydrogel matrix to improve the thermal response of hydrogel. The micro heater was fabricated to control the temperature precisely by adopting a joule heating method. The drug in hydrogel was delivered through a hairless mouse skin by controlling temperature. The efficiency of drug delivery was improved obviously by incorporation of graphite oxide due to the excellent thermal conductivity and the increased interfacial affinity between graphite oxide and hydrogel matrix. The fabricated micro heater was effective in controlling the temperature over lower critical solution temperature of hydrogel precisely with a small voltage less than 1 V. The cell viability test on graphite oxide composite hydrogel showed enough safety for using as a transdermal drug delivery patch. The performance of TDDS could be improved noticeably based on temperature-responsive hydrogel, thermally conductive graphite oxide, and efficient micro heater. - Graphical abstract: The high-performance transdermal drug delivery system could be prepared by combining temperature-responsive hydrogel, thermally conductive graphite oxide with improved interfacial affinity, and efficient micro heater fabricated by a joule heating method. Highlights: ► High performance of transdermal drug delivery system with an easy control of voltage. ► Improved thermal response of hydrogel by graphite oxide incorporation. ► Efficient micro heater fabricated by a joule heating method.

  6. Alpha5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor mediates nicotine-induced HIF-1α and VEGF expression in non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Xiaoli; Jia, Yanfei; Zu, Shanshan [Central Laboratory, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250013 (China); Li, Ruisheng [Institute of Infectious Diseases, 302 Military Hospital, Beijing 100039 (China); Jia, Ying; Zhao, Yun; Xiao, Dongjie [Central Laboratory, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250013 (China); Dang, Ningning [Department of Dermatology, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250013 (China); Wang, Yunshan [Central Laboratory, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250013 (China)

    2014-07-15

    By binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), nicotine induces the proliferation and apoptosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Previous studies have indicated that α5-nAChR is highly associated with lung cancer risk and nicotine dependence. However, the mechanisms through which α5-nAChRs may influence lung carcinogenesis are far from clear. In the present study, we investigated the roles of α5-nAChR in the nicotine-induced expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of α5-nAChR and HIF-1α in 60 specimens of lung cancer and para-carcinoma tissue. The correlations between the expression levels of α5-nAChR and HIF-1α and other clinicopathological data were analyzed. In a cell line that highly expressed α5-nAChR, the loss of α5-nAChR function by siRNA was used to study whether α5-nAChR is involved in the nicotine-induced expression of HIF-1α and VEGF through the activation of the ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. Cell growth was detected using the cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8). α5-nAChR (78.3%) and HIF-1α (88.3%) were both overexpressed in NSCLC, and their expression levels were found to be correlated with each other (P < 0.05). In the A549 cell line, α5-nAChR and HIF-1α were found to be expressed under normal conditions, and their expression levels were significantly increased in response to nicotine treatment. The silencing of α5-nAChR significantly inhibited the nicotine-induced cell proliferation compared with the control group and attenuated the nicotine-induced upregulation of HIF-1α and VEGF, and these effects required the cooperation of the ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. These results show that the α5-nAChR/HIF-1α/VEGF axis is involved in nicotine-induced tumor cell proliferation, which suggests that α5-nAChR may serve as a potential anticancer target in nicotine-associated lung cancer. - Highlights

  7. Alpha5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor mediates nicotine-induced HIF-1α and VEGF expression in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Xiaoli; Jia, Yanfei; Zu, Shanshan; Li, Ruisheng; Jia, Ying; Zhao, Yun; Xiao, Dongjie; Dang, Ningning; Wang, Yunshan

    2014-01-01

    By binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), nicotine induces the proliferation and apoptosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Previous studies have indicated that α5-nAChR is highly associated with lung cancer risk and nicotine dependence. However, the mechanisms through which α5-nAChRs may influence lung carcinogenesis are far from clear. In the present study, we investigated the roles of α5-nAChR in the nicotine-induced expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of α5-nAChR and HIF-1α in 60 specimens of lung cancer and para-carcinoma tissue. The correlations between the expression levels of α5-nAChR and HIF-1α and other clinicopathological data were analyzed. In a cell line that highly expressed α5-nAChR, the loss of α5-nAChR function by siRNA was used to study whether α5-nAChR is involved in the nicotine-induced expression of HIF-1α and VEGF through the activation of the ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. Cell growth was detected using the cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8). α5-nAChR (78.3%) and HIF-1α (88.3%) were both overexpressed in NSCLC, and their expression levels were found to be correlated with each other (P < 0.05). In the A549 cell line, α5-nAChR and HIF-1α were found to be expressed under normal conditions, and their expression levels were significantly increased in response to nicotine treatment. The silencing of α5-nAChR significantly inhibited the nicotine-induced cell proliferation compared with the control group and attenuated the nicotine-induced upregulation of HIF-1α and VEGF, and these effects required the cooperation of the ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. These results show that the α5-nAChR/HIF-1α/VEGF axis is involved in nicotine-induced tumor cell proliferation, which suggests that α5-nAChR may serve as a potential anticancer target in nicotine-associated lung cancer. - Highlights

  8. Lipid-drug-conjugate (LDC) solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) for the delivery of nicotine to the oral cavity - optimization of nicotine loading efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yuan; Nielsen, Kent A; Nielsen, Bruno P; Bøje, Niels W; Müller, Rainer H; Pyo, Sung Min

    2018-03-12

    Nicotine, obtained from tobacco leaves, has been used to promote the cessation of smoking and reduce the risk of COPD and lung cancer. Incorporating the active in lipid nanoparticles is an effective tool to minimize its irritation potential and to use the particles as intermediate to produce final products. However, as a hydrophilic active, it is a challenge to prepare nicotine loaded lipid nanoparticles with high drug loading. In this study, lipid-drug-conjugates (LDC) were formed by nicotine and different fatty acids to enable the production of sufficiently loaded nicotine lipid nanoparticles. The encapsulation efficiency of nicotine in LDC-containing SLN was about 50%, which increased at least fourfold compared to the non-LDC formulations (around 10%) due to the increased lipophilicity of nicotine by strong interactions between positively charged nicotine and negatively charged fatty acids (formation of LDCs). The z-average of all formulations (150 to 350 nm) proved to be in the required submicron size range with a narrow size distribution. In summary, nicotine loaded LDC lipid nanoparticles with high drug loading were successfully developed with Kolliwax® S and stearic acid as counter-ion forming the LDC and hydrogenated sunflower oil (HSO) as lipid particle matrix. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Epidemiology, radiology, and genetics of nicotine dependence in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hokanson John E

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cigarette smoking is the principal environmental risk factor for developing COPD, and nicotine dependence strongly influences smoking behavior. This study was performed to elucidate the relationship between nicotine dependence, genetic susceptibility to nicotine dependence, and volumetric CT findings in smokers. Methods Current smokers with COPD (GOLD stage ≥ 2 or normal spirometry were analyzed from the COPDGene Study, a prospective observational study. Nicotine dependence was determined by the Fagerstrom test for nicotine dependence (FTND. Volumetric CT acquisitions measuring the percent of emphysema on inspiratory CT (% of lung Results Among 842 currently smoking subjects (335 COPD cases and 507 controls, 329 subjects (39.1% showed high nicotine dependence. Subjects with high nicotine dependence had greater cumulative and current amounts of smoking. However, emphysema severity was negatively correlated with the FTND score in controls (ρ = -0.19, p Conclusions Nicotine dependence was a negative predictor for emphysema on CT in COPD and control smokers. Increased inflammation in more highly addicted current smokers could influence the CT lung density distribution, which may influence genetic association studies of emphysema phenotypes. Trial registration ClinicalTrials (NCT: NCT00608764

  10. Nasal nicotine solution: a potential aid to giving up smoking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, M A; Jarvis, M J; Feyerabend, C; Fernö, O

    1983-01-01

    A nasal solution was developed containing 2 mg nicotine for use as a kind of liquid snuff. Its absorption was studied in three subjects. An average peak of plasma nicotine concentrations of 86.9 nmol/l (14.1 ng/ml) was reached seven and a half minutes after taking the solution. This compared with an average peak of 158.4 nmol/l (25.7 ng/ml) one and a half minutes after completing (but seven and a half minutes after starting) a middle tar cigarette (1.4 mg nicotine) and an average peak of 52.4 nmol/l (8.5 ng/ml) after chewing nicotine gum (2 mg nicotine) for 30 minutes. The more rapid and efficient absorption of nicotine from the nasal nicotine solution than from nicotine chewing gum suggests that it might prove a useful aid to giving up smoking. Nasal nicotine solution might be particularly useful in smokers for whom the gum is less suitable on account of dentures or peptic ulcers or who experience nausea and dyspeptic symptoms from the gum. PMID:6402202

  11. Nanoethosomes for transdermal delivery of tropisetron HCl: multi-factorial predictive modeling, characterization, and ex vivo skin permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Messih, Hanaa A; Ishak, Rania A H; Geneidi, Ahmed S; Mansour, Samar

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the present work is to exclusively optimize and model the effect of phospholipid type either egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) or soybean phosphatidylcholine (SPC), together with other formulation variables, on the development of nano-ethosomal systems for transdermal delivery of a water-soluble antiemetic drug. Tropisetron HCl (TRO) is available as hard gelatin capsules and IV injections. The transdermal delivery of TRO is considered as a novel alternative route supposing to improve BAV as well as patient convenience. TRO-loaded ethanolic vesicular systems were prepared by hot technique. The effect of formulation variables were optimized through a response surface methodology using 3 × 2 2 -level full factorial design. The concentrations of both PC (A) and ethanol (B) and PC type (C) were the factors, while entrapment efficiency (Y 1 ), vesicle size (Y 2 ), polydispersity index (Y 3 ), and zeta potential (Y 4 ) were the responses. The drug permeation across rat skin from selected formulae was studied. Particle morphology, drug-excipient interactions, and vesicle stability were also investigated. The results proved the critical role of all formulation variables on ethosomal characteristics. The suggested models for all responses showed good predictability. Only the concentration of phospholipid, irrespective to PC type, had a significant effect on the transdermal flux (p transdermal TRO delivery.

  12. Nicotine promotes cell proliferation and induces resistance to cisplatin by α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor‑mediated activation in Raw264.7 and El4 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan Yan; Liu, Yao; Ni, Xiao Yan; Bai, Zhen Huan; Chen, Qiong Yun; Zhang, Ye; Gao, Feng Guang

    2014-03-01

    Although nicotine is a risk factor for carcinogenesis and atherosclerosis, epidemiological data indicate that nicotine has therapeutic benefits in treating Alzheimer's disease. Our previous studies also showed that nicotine-treated dendritic cells have potential antitumor effects. Hence, the precise effects of nicotine on the biological characterizations of cells are controversial. The aim of the present study was to assess the roles of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), Erk1/2-p38-JNK and PI3K-Akt pathway in nicotine-mediated proliferation and anti-apoptosis effects. The results firstly showed that nicotine treatment clearly augmented cell viability and upregulated PCNA expression in both Raw264.7 and El4 cells. Meanwhile, nicotine afforded protection against cisplatin-induced toxicity through inhibiting caspase-3 activation and upregulating anti-apoptotic protein expression. Further exploration demonstrated that nicotine efficiently abolished cisplatin-promoted mitochondria translocation of Bax and the release of cytochrome c. The pretreatment of α-bungarotoxin and tubocurarine chloride significantly attenuated nicotine-augmented cell viability, abolished caspase-3 activation and α7 nAChR upregulation. Both Erk-JNK-p38 and PI3K-Akt signaling pathways could be activated by nicotine treatment in Raw264.7 and El4 cells. Notably, when Erk-JNK and PI3K-Akt activities were inhibited, nicotine-augmented cell proliferation and anti-apoptotic effects were abolished accordingly. The results presented here indicate that nicotine could achieve α7 nAChR-mediated proliferation and anti-apoptotic effects by activating Erk-JNK and PI3K-Akt pathways respectively, providing potential therapeutic molecules to deal with smoking-associated human diseases.

  13. Serotonergic modulation of nicotine-induced kinetic tremor in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunisawa, Naofumi; Iha, Higor A; Nomura, Yuji; Onishi, Misaki; Matsubara, Nami; Shimizu, Saki; Ohno, Yukihiro

    2017-06-01

    We previously demonstrated that nicotine elicited kinetic tremor by elevating the neural activity of the inferior olive via α7 nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptors. Since α7 nACh receptors reportedly facilitate synaptic monoamine release, we explored the role of 5-HT receptors in induction and/or modulation of nicotine tremor. Treatment of mice with nicotine induced kinetic tremor that normally appeared during movement. The 5-HT 1A agonist, 8-hydroxydipropylaminotetraline (8-OH-DPAT), significantly enhanced nicotine-induced tremor and the action of 8-OH-DPAT was antagonized by WAY-100135 (5-HT 1A antagonist). In addition, the cerebral 5-HT depletion by repeated treatment with p-chlorophenylalanine did not reduce, but rather potentiated the facilitatory effects of 8-OH-DPAT. In contrast, the 5-HT 2 agonist, 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI), significantly attenuated nicotine tremor, which was antagonized by ritanserin (5-HT 2 antagonist). The 5-HT 3 agonist SR-57227 did not affect nicotine-induced tremor. Furthermore, when testing the direct actions of 5-HT antagonists, nicotine tremor was inhibited by WAY-100135, but was unaffected by ritanserin, ondansetron (5-HT 3 antagonist) or SB-258585 (5-HT 6 antagonist). These results suggest that postsynaptic 5-HT 1A receptors are involved in induction of nicotine tremor mediated by α7 nACh receptors. In addition, 5-HT 2 receptors have an inhibitory modulatory role in induction of nicotine tremor. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Investigating the role of ion-pair strategy in regulating nicotine release from patch: Mechanistic insights based on intermolecular interaction and mobility of pressure sensitive adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiaoyun; Wan, Xiaocao; Liu, Chao; Fang, Liang

    2018-07-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare a drug-in-adhesive patch of nicotine (NIC) and use ion-pair strategy to regulate drug delivery rate. Moreover, the mechanism of how ion-pair strategy regulated drug release was elucidated at molecular level. Formulation factors including pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs), drug loading and counter ions (C 4 , C 6 , C 8 , C 10 , and C 12 ) were screened. In vitro release experiment and in vitro transdermal experiment were conducted to determine the rate-limiting step in drug delivery process. FT-IR and molecular modeling were used to characterize the interaction between drug and PSA. Thermal analysis and rheology study were conducted to investigate the mobility variation of PSA. The optimized patch prepared with NIC-C 8 had the transdermal profile fairly close to that of the commercial product (p > 0.05). The release rate constants (k) of NIC, NIC-C 4 and NIC-C 10 were 21.1, 14.4 and 32.4, respectively. Different release rates of NIC ion-pair complexes were attributed to the dual effect of ion-pair strategy on drug release. On one hand, ion-pair strategy enhanced the interaction between drug and PSA, which inhibited drug release. On the other hand, using ion-pair strategy improved the mobility of PSA, which facilitated drug release. Drug release behavior was determined by combined effect of two aspects above. These conclusions provided a new idea for us to regulate drug release behavior from patch. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The tendency to sign-track predicts cue-induced reinstatement during nicotine self-administration, and is enhanced by nicotine but not ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versaggi, Cassandra L.; King, Christopher P.; Meyer, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Some individuals are particularly responsive to reward-associated stimuli (“cues”), including the effects of these cues on craving and relapse to drug-seeking behavior. In the cases of nicotine and alcohol, cues may acquire these abilities via the incentive-enhancing properties of the drug. Objectives To determine the interaction between cue-responsivity and nicotine reinforcement, we studied the patterns of nicotine self-administration in rats categorized based on their tendency to approach a food predictive cue (“sign-trackers”) or a reward-delivery location (“goal-trackers”). In a second experiment, we determined whether nicotine and ethanol altered the incentive value of a food cue. Methods Rats were classified as sign- or goal-trackers during a Pavlovian conditioned approach paradigm. Rats then self-administered intravenous nicotine (0.03 mg/kg infusions) followed by extinction and cue induced reinstatement tests. We also tested the effects of nicotine (0.4 mg/kg base s.c.) or ethanol (0.7 g/kg i.p.) on the approach to, and reinforcing efficacy of, a food cue. Results Sign-trackers showed greater reinstatement in response to a nicotine cue. Further, nicotine enhanced sign-tracking but not goal-tracking to a food cue, and also enhanced responding for the food cue during the conditioned reinforcement test. Conversely, ethanol reduced sign-tracking and increased goal-tracking, but had no effect on conditioned reinforcement. Conclusions Our studies demonstrate that the tendency to attribute incentive value to a food cue predicts enhanced cue-induced reinstatement. Additionally, the incentive value of food cues is differentially modulated by nicotine and ethanol, which may be related to the reinforcing effects of these drugs. PMID:27282365

  16. The tendency to sign-track predicts cue-induced reinstatement during nicotine self-administration, and is enhanced by nicotine but not ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versaggi, Cassandra L; King, Christopher P; Meyer, Paul J

    2016-08-01

    Some individuals are particularly responsive to reward-associated stimuli ("cues"), including the effects of these cues on craving and relapse to drug-seeking behavior. In the cases of nicotine and alcohol, cues may acquire these abilities via the incentive-enhancing properties of the drug. To determine the interaction between cue-responsivity and nicotine reinforcement, we studied the patterns of nicotine self-administration in rats categorized based on their tendency to approach a food-predictive cue ("sign-trackers") or a reward-delivery location ("goal-trackers"). In a second experiment, we determined whether nicotine and ethanol altered the incentive value of a food cue. Rats were classified as sign- or goal-trackers during a Pavlovian conditioned approach paradigm. Rats then self-administered intravenous nicotine (0.03 mg/kg infusions) followed by extinction and cue-induced reinstatement tests. We also tested the effects of nicotine (0.4 mg/kg base s.c.) or ethanol (0.7 g/kg i.p.) on the approach to, and reinforcing efficacy of, a food cue. Sign-trackers showed greater reinstatement in response to a nicotine cue. Further, nicotine enhanced sign-tracking but not goal-tracking to a food cue and also enhanced responding for the food cue during the conditioned reinforcement test. Conversely, ethanol reduced sign-tracking and increased goal-tracking, but had no effect on conditioned reinforcement. Our studies demonstrate that the tendency to attribute incentive value to a food cue predicts enhanced cue-induced reinstatement. Additionally, the incentive value of food cues is differentially modulated by nicotine and ethanol, which may be related to the reinforcing effects of these drugs.

  17. GLP-1 acts on habenular avoidance circuits to control nicotine intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuesta, Luis M; Chen, Zuxin; Duncan, Alexander; Fowler, Christie D; Ishikawa, Masago; Lee, Brian R; Liu, Xin-An; Lu, Qun; Cameron, Michael; Hayes, Matthew R; Kamenecka, Theodore M; Pletcher, Matthew; Kenny, Paul J

    2017-05-01

    Tobacco smokers titrate their nicotine intake to avoid its noxious effects, sensitivity to which may influence vulnerability to tobacco dependence, yet mechanisms of nicotine avoidance are poorly understood. Here we show that nicotine activates glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS). The antidiabetic drugs sitagliptin and exenatide, which inhibit GLP-1 breakdown and stimulate GLP-1 receptors, respectively, decreased nicotine intake in mice. Chemogenetic activation of GLP-1 neurons in NTS similarly decreased nicotine intake. Conversely, Glp1r knockout mice consumed greater quantities of nicotine than wild-type mice. Using optogenetic stimulation, we show that GLP-1 excites medial habenular (MHb) projections to the interpeduncular nucleus (IPN). Activation of GLP-1 receptors in the MHb-IPN circuit abolished nicotine reward and decreased nicotine intake, whereas their knockdown or pharmacological blockade increased intake. GLP-1 neurons may therefore serve as 'satiety sensors' for nicotine that stimulate habenular systems to promote nicotine avoidance before its aversive effects are encountered.

  18. The effect of coniine on presynaptic nicotinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkent, Ulkem; Iskit, Alper B; Onur, Rustu; Ilhan, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Toxicity of coniine, an alkaloid of Conium maculatum (poison hemlock), is manifested by characteristic nicotinic clinical signs including excitement, depression, hypermetria, seizures, opisthotonos via postsynaptic nicotinic receptors. There is limited knowledge about the role of presynaptic nicotinic receptors on the pharmacological and toxicological effects of coniine in the literature. The present study was un