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Sample records for nickel-iron alloy corrosion

  1. Cyclic Oxidation and Hot Corrosion Behavior of Nickel-Iron-Based Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellaganesh, D.; Adam Khan, M.; Winowlin Jappes, J. T.; Sathiyanarayanan, S.

    2018-01-01

    The high temperature oxidation and hot corrosion behavior of nickel-iron-based superalloy are studied at 900 ° and 1000 °C. The significant role of alloying elements with respect to the exposed medium is studied in detail. The mass change per unit area was catastrophic for the samples exposed at 1000 °C and gradual increase in mass change was observed at 900 °C for both the environments. The exposed samples were further investigated with SEM, EDS and XRD analysis to study the metallurgical characteristics. The surface morphology has expressed the in situ nature of the alloy and its affinity toward the environment. The EDS and XRD analysis has evidently proved the presence of protective oxides formation on prolonged exposure at elevated temperature. The predominant oxide formed during the exposure at high temperature has a major contribution toward the protection of the samples. The nickel-iron-based superalloy is less prone to oxidation and hot corrosion when compared to the existing alloy in gas turbine engine simulating marine environment.

  2. Corrosive inorganic contamination on wafer surfaces after nickel-iron electroplating formation mechanisms and prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritzer, P. [Freudenberg Nonwovens KG, Technical Nonwovens Div., Weinheim (Germany); Diel, W.; Barber, P.H. [IBM Speichersysteme Deutschland GmbH, Mainz (Germany); Romankiw, L.T. [IBM Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY (United States)

    2001-11-01

    Electroplating of Nickel-Iron alloys is widely used in the production of magnetic heads for storage systems. Usually, the plating process is performed in acidic, salt-containing solutions. After the plating step, a complete removal of the plating salts is necessary to receive a clean surface. In disadvantageous cases, a precipitation of sticky particles is observed that cannot be removed from the plated surface without damaging the surface. Some of these substances (esp. nickel sulfates) might lead to severe local corrosion and thus might act as ''time-bomb'' in the later product. Non-corrosive precipitations (i.e. nickel hydroxides) strongly hinder or even prevent the following production steps. In the present paper, the mechanisms of the origin of the different kinds of precipitation are described and the principle actions for their prevention are given. An outlook is given for other possible technical applications. (orig.)

  3. Process for fabricating articles of tungsten--nickel--iron alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Northcutt, W.G. Jr.; Snyder, W.B. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A high density W--Ni--Fe alloy of composition 85 to 96 percent by weight W and the remainder Ni and Fe in a wt. ratio of 5:5 to 8:2 having enhanced mechanical properties is prepared by compacting the mixed powders, sintering the compact in reducing atmosphere to near theoretical density followed by further sintering at a temperature where a liquid phase is present, vacuum annealing, and cold working to achieve high uniform hardness. 7 claims

  4. Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nikel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) seamless pipe and tube

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nikel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) seamless pipe and tube

  5. Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045 and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) plate, sheet and strip

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045 and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) plate, sheet and strip

  6. Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) rod, bar, and wire

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) rod, bar, and wire

  7. Synthesis, structure and properties of nickel-iron-tungsten alloy electrodeposits - Part II: Effect of microstructure on hardness, electrical and magnetic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćirović Nataša

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured nickel-iron-tungsten alloys were produced by electrodeposition from an ammoniacal citrate bath. The tungsten content of the alloy ranged from 0.8 wt.% to 11 wt.%, and the crystal grain size of the FCC phase of the solid solution of iron and tungsten in nickel was between 14 nm and 3.3 nm. The amorphous phase content of the alloy increases with decreasing crystal grain size. As the amorphous phase content increases, the magnetization, electrical conductivity and hardness of the alloy decrease. Annealing the alloy to crystallization temperature results in structural relaxation during which the alloy undergoes short-range ordering in conjunction with decreases in the density of chaotically distributed dislocations and internal microstrain level, which increases the exchange integral value, the electronic density of states at the Fermi level, the mean free path of electrons, the ordering and the mean size of cluster in the sliding plane and results in more uniform orientation of dipole moments of certain nanoparticles. These changes: a increase the mobility of magnetic domain walls, facilitate the orientation of domains in the external magnetic field and cause an increase in magnetization; b cause a decrease in electrical resistance, and c impede the sliding of grain boundaries and increase the hardness of the alloy. Annealing the alloys at temperatures above 400ºC results in amorphous phase crystallization and larger crystal grains of the FCC phase, along with a decrease in the density of chaotically distributed dislocations and a decrease in internal microstrain level. The formation of larger crystal grains reduces the hardness of the alloy, decreases its specific electrical resistance and impedes both the orientation of certain magnetic domains and the shift of walls of already oriented domains, thus inducing a decrease in magnetization. The heat released during the milling of Ni87.3Fe11.3W1.4 alloy with FCC-phase crystal grains 8

  8. Galvanic corrosion in odontological alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riesgo, O.; Bianchi, G.L.; Duffo, G.S.

    1993-01-01

    Galvanic corrosion can occur when different alloys are placed in direct contact within the oral cavity or within tissues. Concern has been expressed associated with the coupling of selected restorative materials as well as implant material with various alloys used for restorative procedures. This could be critical if the crown or bridge had subgingival finish line with a metallic zone in contact with the tissue, and the implant was made in titanium alloy. The present work shows the results of galvanic coupling studies done on implants of titanium alloy connected to nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys. (Author)

  9. Corrosion of carbon-alloyed iron aluminides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    alloyed intermetallics were susceptible to galvanic corrosion, due to the presence of carbides. Keywords. Corrosion; iron aluminides; Fe3Al; potentiodynamic polarization. 1. Introduction. Ordered intermetallic alloys based on iron aluminides of.

  10. Castable hot corrosion resistant alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Charles A. (Inventor); Holt, William H. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Some 10 wt percent nickel is added to an Fe-base alloy which has a ferrite microstructure to improve the high temperature castability and crack resistance while about 0.2 wt percent zirconium is added for improved high temperatur cyclic oxidation and corrosion resistance. The basic material is a high temperature FeCrAl heater alloy, and the addition provides a material suitable for burner rig nozzles.

  11. Liquid metal corrosion considerations in alloy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Liquid metal corrosion can be an important consideration in developing alloys for fusion and fast breeder reactors and other applications. Because of the many different forms of liquid metal corrosion (dissolution, alloying, carbon transfer, etc.), alloy optimization based on corrosion resistance depends on a number of factors such as the application temperatures, the particular liquid metal, and the level and nature of impurities in the liquid and solid metals. The present paper reviews the various forms of corrosion by lithium, lead, and sodium and indicates how such corrosion reactions can influence the alloy development process

  12. The oxidation and corrosion of ODS alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Carl E.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    The oxidation and hot corrosion of high temperature oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys are reviewed. The environmental resistance of such alloys are classified by oxide growth rate, oxide volatility, oxide spalling, and hot corrosion limitations. Also discussed are environmentally resistant coatings for ODS materials. It is concluded that ODS NiCrAl and FeCrAl alloys are highly oxidation and corrosion resistant and can probably be used uncoated.

  13. Passive Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R.B. Rebak; J.H. Payer

    2006-01-01

    Alloy 22 (NO6022) was designed to stand the most aggressive industrial applications, including both reducing and oxidizing acids. Even in the most aggressive environments, if the temperature is lower than 150 F (66 C) Alloy 22 would remain in the passive state having particularly low corrosion rates. In multi-ionic solutions that may simulate the behavior of concentrated ground water, even at near boiling temperatures, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is only a few nano-meters per year because the alloy is in the complete passive state. The corrosion rate of passive Alloy 22 decreases as the time increases. Immersion corrosion testing also show that the newer generation of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may offer a better corrosion resistance than Alloy 22 only in some highly aggressive conditions such as in hot acids

  14. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Certain Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasse, K. R.; Dorward, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    SC resistance of new high-strength alloys tested. Research report describes progress in continuing investigation of stress corrosion (SC) cracking of some aluminum alloys. Objective of program is comparing SC behavior of newer high-strength alloys with established SC-resistant alloy.

  15. Corrosion Behaviour of New Zr Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolksdorf, E.

    1974-01-01

    Corrosion studies have indicated that the most promising replacements for Zicaloy-2 are ZrCrFe, ZrVFe and probably ZrNbTa, provided they are in their optimized condition. These alloys are conventionally manufactured alloys. An internally oxidized ZrMgO alloy is even superior, from the corrosion...... and hydrogen uptake points of view, to the above-mentioned alloys. This alloy is of particular interest because the addition of MgO leads to no neutron penalty and the dispersion-strengthening entails the possibility of tailoring an alloy with the desired mechanical properties....

  16. In vivo corrosion, tumor outcome, and microarray gene expression for two types of muscle-implanted tungsten alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, B.E.; Roszell, L.E.; Murr, L.E.; Ramirez, D.A.; Demaree, J.D.; Klotz, B.R.; Rosencrance, A.B.; Dennis, W.E.; Bao, W.; Perkins, E.J.; Dillman, J.F.; Bannon, D.I.

    2012-01-01

    Tungsten alloys are composed of tungsten microparticles embedded in a solid matrix of transition metals such as nickel, cobalt, or iron. To understand the toxicology of these alloys, male F344 rats were intramuscularly implanted with pellets of tungsten/nickel/cobalt, tungsten/nickel/iron, or pure tungsten, with tantalum pellets as a negative control. Between 6 and 12 months, aggressive rhabdomyosarcomas formed around tungsten/nickel/cobalt pellets, while those of tungsten/nickel/iron or pure tungsten did not cause cancers. Electron microscopy showed a progressive corrosion of the matrix phase of tungsten/nickel/cobalt pellets over 6 months, accompanied by high urinary concentrations of nickel and cobalt. In contrast, non-carcinogenic tungsten/nickel/iron pellets were minimally corroded and urinary metals were low; these pellets having developed a surface oxide layer in vivo that may have restricted the mobilization of carcinogenic nickel. Microarray analysis of tumors revealed large changes in gene expression compared with normal muscle, with biological processes involving the cell cycle significantly up‐regulated and those involved with muscle development and differentiation significantly down‐regulated. Top KEGG pathways disrupted were adherens junction, p53 signaling, and the cell cycle. Chromosomal enrichment analysis of genes showed a highly significant impact at cytoband 7q22 (chromosome 7) which included mouse double minute (MDM2) and cyclin‐dependant kinase (CDK4) as well as other genes associated with human sarcomas. In conclusion, the tumorigenic potential of implanted tungsten alloys is related to mobilization of carcinogenic metals nickel and cobalt from corroding pellets, while gene expression changes in the consequent tumors are similar to radiation induced animal sarcomas as well as sporadic human sarcomas. -- Highlights: ► Tungsten/nickel/cobalt, tungsten/nickel/iron, and pure tungsten were studied. ► Male Fischer rats implanted with

  17. In vivo corrosion, tumor outcome, and microarray gene expression for two types of muscle-implanted tungsten alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, B.E. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, B434 Mulberry Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5609 (United States); Roszell, L.E. [U.S. Army Institute of Public Health, 5158 Blackhawk Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010‐5403 (United States); Murr, L.E.; Ramirez, D.A. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Texas, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Demaree, J.D. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, B434 Mulberry Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5609 (United States); Klotz, B.R. [Dynamic Science Inc., Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005‐5609 (United States); Rosencrance, A.B.; Dennis, W.E. [U.S. Army Center for Environmental Health Research, Department of Chemistry, Ft. Detrick, MD 21702‐5010 (United States); Bao, W. [SAS Institute, Inc. SAS Campus Drive, Cary, NC 27513 (United States); Perkins, E.J. [U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, 3909 Hall Ferry Road, Vicksburg MS 39180 (United States); Dillman, J.F. [U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, 3100 Ricketts Point Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010‐5400 (United States); Bannon, D.I., E-mail: desmond.bannon@us.army.mil [U.S. Army Institute of Public Health, 5158 Blackhawk Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010‐5403 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Tungsten alloys are composed of tungsten microparticles embedded in a solid matrix of transition metals such as nickel, cobalt, or iron. To understand the toxicology of these alloys, male F344 rats were intramuscularly implanted with pellets of tungsten/nickel/cobalt, tungsten/nickel/iron, or pure tungsten, with tantalum pellets as a negative control. Between 6 and 12 months, aggressive rhabdomyosarcomas formed around tungsten/nickel/cobalt pellets, while those of tungsten/nickel/iron or pure tungsten did not cause cancers. Electron microscopy showed a progressive corrosion of the matrix phase of tungsten/nickel/cobalt pellets over 6 months, accompanied by high urinary concentrations of nickel and cobalt. In contrast, non-carcinogenic tungsten/nickel/iron pellets were minimally corroded and urinary metals were low; these pellets having developed a surface oxide layer in vivo that may have restricted the mobilization of carcinogenic nickel. Microarray analysis of tumors revealed large changes in gene expression compared with normal muscle, with biological processes involving the cell cycle significantly up‐regulated and those involved with muscle development and differentiation significantly down‐regulated. Top KEGG pathways disrupted were adherens junction, p53 signaling, and the cell cycle. Chromosomal enrichment analysis of genes showed a highly significant impact at cytoband 7q22 (chromosome 7) which included mouse double minute (MDM2) and cyclin‐dependant kinase (CDK4) as well as other genes associated with human sarcomas. In conclusion, the tumorigenic potential of implanted tungsten alloys is related to mobilization of carcinogenic metals nickel and cobalt from corroding pellets, while gene expression changes in the consequent tumors are similar to radiation induced animal sarcomas as well as sporadic human sarcomas. -- Highlights: ► Tungsten/nickel/cobalt, tungsten/nickel/iron, and pure tungsten were studied. ► Male Fischer rats implanted with

  18. Corrosion resistance of titanium alloys for dentistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskawiec, J.; Michalik, R.

    2001-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys belong to biomaterials which the application scope in medicine increases. Some properties of the alloys, such as high mechanical strength, low density, low Young's modulus, high corrosion resistance and good biotolerance decide about it. The main areas of the application of titanium and its alloys are: orthopedics and traumatology, cardiosurgery, faciomaxillary surgery and dentistry. The results of investigations concerning the corrosion resistance of the technical titanium and Ti6Al14V alloy and comparatively a cobalt alloy of the Vitallium type in the artificial saliva is presented in the work. Significantly better corrosion resistance of titanium and the Ti6Al14V than the Co-Cr-Mo alloy was found. (author)

  19. Towards an understanding of zirconium alloy corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, B.

    1976-08-01

    A brief historical summary is given of the development of a programme for understanding the corrosion mechanisms operating for zirconium alloys. A general summary is given of the progress made, so far, in carrying through this programme. (author)

  20. Atmospheric corrosion of uranium-carbon alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousset, P.; Accary, A.

    1965-01-01

    The authors study the corrosion of uranium-carbon alloys having compositions close to that of the mono-carbide; they show that the extent of the observed corrosion effects increases with the water vapour content of the surrounding gas and they conclude that the atmospheric corrosion of these alloys is due essentially to the humidity of the air, the effect of the oxygen being very slight at room temperature. They show that the optimum conditions for preserving U-C alloys are either a vacuum or a perfectly dry argon atmosphere. The authors have also established that the type of corrosion involved is a corrosion which 'cracks under stress' and is transgranular (it can also be intergranular in the case of sub-stoichiometric alloys). They propose, finally, two hypotheses for explaining this mechanism, one of which is illustrated by the existence, at the fissure interface, of corrosion products which can play the role of 'corners' in the mono-carbide grains. (authors) [fr

  1. Corrosion resistance improvement of titanium base alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai V. Popa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion resistance of the new Ti-6Al-4V-1Zr alloy in comparison with ternary Ti-6Al-4V alloy in Ringer-Brown solution and artificial Carter-Brugirard saliva of different pH values was studied. In Ringer-Brown solution, the new alloy presented an improvement of all electrochemical parameters due to the alloying with Zr; also, impedance spectra revealed better protective properties of its passive layer. In Carter-Brugirard artificial saliva, an increase of the passive film thickness was proved. Fluoride ions had a slight negative influence on the corrosion and ion release rates, without to affect the very good stability of the new Ti-6Al-4V-1Zr alloy.

  2. Zirconium alloy barrier having improved corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, R.B.; Rosenbaum, H.S.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor has a composite cladding container having a substrate and a dilute zirconium alloy liner bonded to the inside surface of the substrate. The dilute zirconium alloy liner forms about 1 to about 20 percent of the thickness of the cladding and is comprised of zirconium and a metal selected from the group consisting of iron, chromium, iron plus chromium, and copper. The dilute zirconium alloy liner shields the substrate from impurities or fission products from the nuclear fuel material and protects the substrate from stress corrosion and stress cracking. The dilute zirconium alloy liner displays greater corrosion resistance, especially to oxidation by hot water or steam than unalloyed zirconium. The substrate material is selected from conventional cladding materials, and preferably is a zirconium alloy. (author)

  3. Corrosion resistance of tantalum base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gypen, L.A.; Brabers, M.; Deruyttre, A.

    1984-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of substitutional Ta-Mo, Ta-W, Ta-Nb, Ta-Hf, Ta-Zr, Ta-Re, Ta-Ni, Ta-V, Ta-W-Mo, Ta-W-Nb, Ta-W-Hf and Ta-W-Re alloys has been investigated in various corrosive media, i.e. (1) concentrated sulfuric acid at 250 0 C and 200 0 C, (2) boiling hydrochloric acid of azeotropic composition, (3) concentrated hydrochloric acid at 150 0 C under pressure, (4) HF-Containing solutions and (5) 0.5% H 2 SO 4 at room temperature (anodisation). In highly corrosive media such as concentrated H 2 SO 4 at 250 0 C and concentrated HCl at 150 0 C tantalum is hydrogen embrittled, probably by stress induced precipitation of β-hydride. Both corrosion rate and hydrogen embrittlement in concentrated H 2 SO 4 at 250 0 C are strongly influenced by alloying elements. Small alloying additions of either Mo or Re decrease the corrosion rate and the hydrogen embrittlement, while Hf has the opposite effect. Hydrogen embrittlement in concentrated H 2 SO 4 at 250 0 C is completely eliminated by alloying Ta with 1 to 3 at % Mo (0.5 to 1.5 wt % Mo). These results can be explained in terms of oxygen deficiency of the Ta 2 O 5 film and the electronic structure of these alloys. (orig.) [de

  4. The comparison of corrosion resistance between Baosteel's alloy 690 tube and foreign alloy 690 tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Mingjuan; Zhang Lefu; Li Yan

    2012-01-01

    Alloy 690 having excellent corrosion resistance is widely used for SG tubes. The intergranular corrosion and pitting corrosion resistance of Baosteel's alloy 690 tube, Country A alloy 690 tube and Country B alloy 690 tube have been analysed by comparison. It shows that: The intergranular corrosion of Baosteel's alloy 690 tube tested complied with ASTM G28 Standard could satisfy the technical requirement. However.some of Baosteel's alloy 690 tube in intergranular corrosion resistance had less performance than Country A. In addition, pitting corrosion tested with ASTM G48 Standard shown the Baosteel's alloy 690 tube better than Country B. (authors)

  5. Seacoast stress corrosion cracking of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of high strength, wrought aluminum alloys in a seacoast atmosphere was investigated and the results were compared with those obtained in laboratory tests. Round tensile specimens taken from the short transverse grain direction of aluminum plate and stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths were exposed to the seacoast and to alternate immersion in salt water and synthetic seawater. Maximum exposure periods of one year at the seacoast, 0.3 or 0.7 of a month for alternate immersion in salt water, and three months for synthetic seawater were indicated for aluminum alloys to avoid false indications of stress corrosion cracking failure resulting from pitting. Correlation of the results was very good among the three test media using the selected exposure periods. It is concluded that either of the laboratory test media is suitable for evaluating the stress corrosion cracking performance of aluminum alloys in seacoast atmosphere.

  6. Stress-corrosion cracking of titanium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, M. J.; Feeney, J. A.; Beck, T. R.

    1973-01-01

    In the light of research material published up to May 1970, the current understanding of the experimental variables involved in the stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of titanium and its alloys is reviewed. Following a brief summary of the metallurgy and electrochemistry of titanium alloys, the mechanical, electrochemical, and metallurgical parameters influencing SCC behavior are explored with emphasis on crack growth kinetics. Macro- and microfeatures of fractures are examined, and it is shown that many transgranular SCC failures exhibit morphological and crystallographic features similar to mechanical cleavage failures. Current SCC models are reviewed with respect to their ability to explain the observed SCC behavior of titanium and its alloys. Possible methods for eliminating or minimizing stress corrosion hazards in titanium or titanium alloy components are described.

  7. Pitting corrosion of 5052 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, F.; Lee, S.; Faunce, J.; Green, J. A. S.; Ptashnick, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    The relative degree of pitting of 5052 aluminum alloy in a prepaint cleaning process is correlated with the proportion of MgO in the surface oxide of the alloy. Magnesium oxide, formed on the surface during process heat treatments of the alloy, is soluble in the acidic environment of the particular cleaning solutions, thus allowing easier access of corrosive ion to the aluminum metal. The pitting mechanism involves the: (1) formation of microscopic, localized galvanic cells between aluminum (anode) and iron-containing constituents (cathodic sites) normally found in the matrix of 5052 (and other 5xxx aluminum alloys), (2) aggravation of pit formation by chloride, and (3) enhancement of cathodic reactions and hence the overall corrosion process due to penetration of the oxide layer by cupric and ferric ions, and dissolved O 2 present in the cleaning solutions. Pitting was eliminated by adding 0.1% NaNO 3 to the cleaning bath.

  8. Corrosion and corrosion fatigue of airframe aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G. S.; Gao, M.; Harlow, D. G.; Wei, R. P.

    1994-01-01

    Localized corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack nucleation and growth are recognized as degradation mechanisms that effect the durability and integrity of commercial transport aircraft. Mechanically based understanding is needed to aid the development of effective methodologies for assessing durability and integrity of airframe components. As a part of the methodology development, experiments on pitting corrosion, and on corrosion fatigue crack nucleation and early growth from these pits were conducted. Pitting was found to be associated with constituent particles in the alloys and pit growth often involved coalescence of individual particle-nucleated pits, both laterally and in depth. Fatigue cracks typically nucleated from one of the larger pits that formed by a cluster of particles. The size of pit at which fatigue crack nucleates is a function of stress level and fatigue loading frequency. The experimental results are summarized, and their implications on service performance and life prediction are discussed.

  9. Stress corrosion of low alloy steel forgings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, D.V.; Mould, P.B.; Patrick, E.C.

    1976-01-01

    The catastrophic failure of a steam turbine rotor disc at Hinkley Point 'A' Power station was shown to have been caused by the growth of a stress corrosion crack to critical dimensions. This failure has promoted great interest in the stress corrosion susceptibility of medium strength low alloy steel forgings in steam environments. Consequently, initiation and growth of stress corrosion cracks of typical disc steels have been investigated in steam and also in water at 95 0 C. Cracking has been shown to occur, predominantly in an intergranular manner, with growth rates of between 10 -9 and 10 -7 mm sec. -1 . It is observed that corrosion pitting and oxide penetration prior to the establishment of a stress corrosion crack in the plain samples. (author)

  10. Corrosion of high-density sintered tungsten alloys. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batten, J.J.; McDonald, I.G.; Moore, B.T.; Silva, V.M.

    1988-10-01

    The corrosion behaviour of four tungsten alloys has been evaluated through weight loss measurements after total immersion in both distilled water insight into the mechanism of corrosion was afforded by an examination of the and 5% sodium chloride solutions. Some insight the mechanism of corrosion was afforded by using the Scanning Electron Microscopy and through an analysis of the corrosion products. Pure tungsten and all the alloys studied underwent corrosion during the tests, and in each case the rare of corrosion in sodium chloride solution was markedly less than that in distilled water. A 95% W, 3.5% Ni, 1.5% Fe alloy was found to be the most corrosion resistant of the alloys under the experimental conditions. Examination of the data shows that for each of the tests, copper as an alloying element accelerates corrosion of tungsten alloys. 9 refs., 7 tabs., 12 figs

  11. Stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statler, G. R.; Spretnak, J. W.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the properties of metals, including titanium and its alloys, was investigated. The basic theories of stress corrosion of titanium alloys are reviewed along with the literature concerned with the effect of absorbed hydrogen on the mechanical properties of metals. Finally, the basic modes of metal fracture and their importance to this study is considered. The experimental work was designed to determine the effects of hydrogen concentration on the critical strain at which plastic instability along pure shear directions occurs. The materials used were titanium alloys Ti-8Al-lMo-lV and Ti-5Al-2.5Sn.

  12. Corrosion of Metal-Matrix Composites with Aluminium Alloy Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bobic

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour of MMCs with aluminium alloy matrix was presented. The corrosion characteristics of boron-, graphite-, silicon carbide-, alumina- and mica- reinforced aluminium MMCs were reviewed. The reinforcing phase influence on MMCs corrosion rate as well as on various corrosion forms (galvanic, pitting, stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatique, tribocorrosion was discussed. Some corrosion protection methods of aluminium based MMCs were described

  13. Corrosion of carbon-alloyed iron aluminides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    MS received 22 May 2000; revised 17 August 2000. Abstract. The corrosion behaviour of two carbon-alloyed intermetallics of composition Fe–28⋅1Al–2⋅1C and. Fe–27⋅5Al–3⋅7C has been studied and compared with that of binary intermetallics. Potentiodynamic polariza- tion studies indicated that the intermetallics ...

  14. Modelling of zirconium alloys corrosion in LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kritskij, V.G.; Berezina, I.G.; Kritskij, A.V.; Stjagkin, P.S.

    1999-01-01

    Chemical parameters, that exerted effect on Zr+1%Nb alloy corrosion and deserved consideration during reactor operation, were defined and a model was developed to describe the influence of physical and chemical parameters on zirconium alloys corrosion in nuclear power plants. The model is based on the correlation between the zirconium oxide solubility in high-temperature water under the influence of the chemical parameters and the measured values of fuel cladding corrosion under LWR conditions. The intensity of fuel cladding corrosion in the primary circuits depends on the coolant water quality, growth of iron oxide deposits and vaporization portion. Mathematically, the oxidation rate can be expressed as a sum of heat and radiation components. The temperature dependence on the oxidation rate can be described by the Arrenius equation. The radiation component of Zr uniform corrosion equation is a function of several factors such as neutron fluency, the temperature the metallurgical composition and et. We assume that the main factor is the changing of water chemistry and the H 2 O 2 concentration play the determinative role. Probably, the influence of H 2 O 2 is based on the formation of unstable compound ZrO 3 ·nH 2 O and Zr(OH) 4 with high solubility. The validity of the used formulae was confirmed by corrosion measurements on WWER and RBMK fuel cladding. The model can be applied for calculating the reliability of nuclear fuel operation. (author)

  15. Corrosion of copper alloys in sulphide containing district heting systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorarinsdottir, R.I.; Maahn, Ernst Emanuel

    1999-01-01

    Copper and some copper alloys are prone to corrosion in sulphide containing geothermal water analogous to corrosion observed in district heating systems containing sulphide due to sulphate reducing bacteria. In order to study the corrosion of copper alloys under practical conditions a test...... was carried out at four sites in the Reykjavik District Heating System. The geothermal water chemistry is different at each site. The corrosion rate and the amount and chemical composition of deposits on weight loss coupons of six different copper alloys are described after exposure of 12 and 18 months......, respectively. Some major differences in scaling composition and the degree of corrosion attack are observed between alloys and water types....

  16. Stress corrosion in high-strength aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorward, R. C.; Hasse, K. R.

    1980-01-01

    Report describes results of stress-corrosion tests on aluminum alloys 7075, 7475, 7050, and 7049. Tests compare performance of original stress-corrosion-resistant (SCR) aluminum, 7075, with newer, higher-strength SCR alloys. Alloys 7050 and 7049 are found superior in short-transverse cross-corrosion resistance to older 7075 alloy; all alloys are subject to self-loading effect caused by wedging of corrosion products in cracks. Effect causes cracks to continue to grow, even at very-low externally applied loads.

  17. The Development of Corrosion Resistant Zirconium Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul-Latief; Noor-Yudhi; Isfandi; Djoko-Kisworo; Pranjono

    2000-01-01

    Corrosion test of Zr alloy consisting of quenching and tempering Zry-2,Zry-4 cast, Zr-1% Nb cast, has been. conducted. In corrosion test, thechanges during β-quenching, tempering and corrosion test at varioustemperature and time in autoclave water medium, can be seen. The treatmentconsisted of heating at 1050 o C for 30 minutes, quenching in water andtempering at 200 o C, 300 o C, 400 o C, 500 o C, 600 o C as well as corrosiontests at 225 o C, 275 o C, 325 o C at 4, 8, 12 hours. Sample preparation forcorrosion test was based on ASTM G-2 procedure, which consisted of washing,rinsing, pickling (3.5 cc HF 50%; 2.9 cc HNO 3 65% and 57 cc AMB),neutralizing in 0.1 M Al(NO 3 ) 3 , 9 H 2 O and ultrasonic rinsing/washing.Measurement performed are weight gain during corrosion, hardness test andmicrostructure observation using microscope optic. The results show thatβ-quenching of Zr alloy which was followed by tempering can turn αmartensite into tempered α 1 martensit. The increase of temperingtemperature decreases the Zr alloy hardness and the lowest hardness ispossessed by Zr-1% Nb alloy. The corrosion test at 275 o C and 325 o C showsthat the weight gain depends on the tempering temperature, the temperingtemperature of 400 o C and 200 o C gives the maximum weight gain for Zry-2,Zry-4 cast, Zr-1% Nb. The largest number of hydride formed during corrosionis found in Zry-2, while the small one is in Zr-1% Nb. (author)

  18. Tough and corrosion resistant austenitic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, T.E.

    1977-01-01

    The invention concerns austenitic alloys of high corrosion resistance, which can be deformed hot and tempered, so that they can be forged, rolled, and drawn into tubes and other shapes. The alloys have a basis of nickel, chromium and iron. The silicon content is between 2 and 4% by weight, and the molybdenum content is between 0 and 2% by weight. The alloys can be hardened by ageing and contain up to 0.1% by weight of boron. The other alloying materials are 1 to 3.5% by weight of manganese, 4 to 7.5% by weight of cobalt, 2.5 to 8% by weight of copper and 0.05 to 0.25% by weight of carbon. (IHOE) [de

  19. Sulfuric Acid Corrosion of Low Sb - Pb Battery Alloys | Ntukogu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The corrosion properties of low Sb - Pb alloys developed for maintenance free motive power industrial batteries was studied by a bare grid constant current method and compared to those of the conventional Pb- 6% Sb alloy. Low Sb-Pb alloys with Se and As grain refiners were found to have higher corrosion rates than the ...

  20. Nickel-iron battery system safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltat, R. C.

    1984-06-01

    The generated flow rates of gaseous hydrogen and gaseous oxygen from an electrical vehicle nickel-iron battery system were determined and used to evaluate the flame quenching capabilities of several candidate devices to prevent flame propagation within batteries having central watering/venting systems. The battery generated hydrogen and oxygen gases were measured for a complete charge and discharge cycle. The data correlates well with accepted theory during strong overcharge conditions indicating that the measurements are valid for other portions of the cycle. Tests confirm that the gas mixture in the cells is always flammable regardless of the battery status. The literature indicated that a conventional flame arrestor would not be effective over the broad spectrum of gassing conditions presented by a nickel-iron battery. Four different types of protective devices were evaluated. A foam-metal arrestor design was successful in quenching gaseous hydrogen and gaseous oxygen flames, however; the application of this flame arrestor to individual cell or module protection in a battery is problematic. A possible rearrangement of the watering/venting system to accept the partial protection of simple one-way valves is presented which, in combination with the successful foam-metal arrestor as main vent protection, could result in a significant improvement in battery protection.

  1. Nickel-iron battery system safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltat, R. C.

    1984-06-01

    Eagle-Picher Industries conducted a literature search and experimental tests to characterize the generated flow rates of gaseous hydrogen (GH2) and gaseous oxygen (GO2) from an electrical vehicle (EV) nickel iron battery system. The resulting gassing rates were used to experimentally evaluate the flame quenching capabilities of several candidate devices to prevent the propagation of flame within batteries having central watering/venting systems. The battery generated hydrogen (GH2) and oxygen (GO2) gasses were measured for a complete charge and discharge cycle. The data correlates well with accepted theory during strong overcharge conditions indicating that the measurements are valid for other portions of the cycle. Tests have confirmed that the gas mixture in the cells is always flammable regardless of the battery status. Research of flame arrestor literature yielded little information regarding their operation with hydrogen-oxygen mixtures. It was indicated that a conventional flame arrestor would not be effective over the broad spectrum of gassing conditions presented by a nickel iron battery.

  2. Corrosion behavior of Ti–39Nb alloy for dentistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fojt, Jaroslav; Joska, Ludek; Malek, Jaroslav; Sefl, Vaclav

    2015-01-01

    To increase an orthopedic implant's lifetime, researchers are now concerned on the development of new titanium alloys with suitable mechanical properties (low elastic modulus–high fatigue strength), corrosion resistance and good workability. Corrosion resistance of the newly developed titanium alloys should be comparable with that of pure titanium. The effect of medical preparations containing fluoride ions represents a specific problem related to the use of titanium based materials in dentistry. The aim of this study was to determine the corrosion behavior of β titanium alloy Ti–39Nb in physiological saline solution and in physiological solution containing fluoride ions. Corrosion behavior was studied using standard electrochemical techniques and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that corrosion properties of the studied alloy were comparable with the properties of titanium grade 2. The passive layer was based on the oxides of titanium and niobium in several oxidation states. Alloying with niobium, which was the important part of the alloy passive layer, resulted in no significant changes of corrosion behavior. In the presence of fluoride ions, the corrosion resistance was higher than the resistance of titanium. - Highlights: • Alloy Ti–39Nb shows excellent corrosion resistance in physiological solution. • Corrosion resistance of Ti–39Nb alloy is significantly higher than that of titanium in the presence of fluoride ions. • The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy indicates a porous passive layer. • Passive layer of the alloy is enriched by niobium

  3. Waterside corrosion of zirconium alloys in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Yong Hwan; Baek, B. J.; Park, S. Y. and others

    1999-08-01

    The overview of corrosion and hydriding behaviors of Zr-based alloy under the conditions of the in-reactor service and in the absence of irradiation is introduced in this report. The metallurgical characteristics of Zr-based alloys and the thermo-mechanical treatments on the microstructures and the textures in the manufacturing process for fuel cladding are also introduced. The factors affecting the corrosion of Zr alloy in reactor are summarized. And the corrosion mechanism and hydrogen up-take are discussed based on the laboratory and in-reactor results. The phenomenological observations of zirconium alloy corrosion in reactors are summarized and the models of in-reactor corrosion are exclusively discussed. Finally, the effects of irradiation on the corrosion process in Zr alloy were investigated mainly based on the literature data. (author). 538 refs., 26 tabs., 105 figs

  4. Waterside corrosion of zirconium alloys in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Yong Hwan; Baek, B.J.; Park, S.Y. [and others

    1999-08-01

    The overview of corrosion and hydriding behaviors of Zr-based alloy under the conditions of the in-reactor service and in the absence of irradiation is introduced in this report. The metallurgical characteristics of Zr-based alloys and the thermo-mechanical treatments on the microstructures and the textures in the manufacturing process for fuel cladding are also introduced. The factors affecting the corrosion of Zr alloy in reactor are summarized. And the corrosion mechanism and hydrogen up-take are discussed based on the laboratory and in-reactor results. The phenomenological observations of zirconium alloy corrosion in reactors are summarized and the models of in-reactor corrosion are exclusively discussed. Finally, the effects of irradiation on the corrosion process in Zr alloy were investigated mainly based on the literature data. (author). 538 refs., 26 tabs., 105 figs.

  5. Corrosion-Resistant High-Entropy Alloys: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunzhu Shi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion destroys more than three percent of the world’s gross domestic product. Therefore, the design of highly corrosion-resistant materials is urgently needed. By breaking the classical alloy-design philosophy, high-entropy alloys (HEAs possess unique microstructures, which are solid solutions with random arrangements of multiple elements. The particular locally-disordered chemical environment is expected to lead to unique corrosion-resistant properties. In this review, the studies of the corrosion-resistant HEAs during the last decade are summarized. The corrosion-resistant properties of HEAs in various aqueous environments and the corrosion behavior of HEA coatings are presented. The effects of environments, alloying elements, and processing methods on the corrosion resistance are analyzed in detail. Furthermore, the possible directions of future work regarding the corrosion behavior of HEAs are suggested.

  6. Hot corrosion of low cobalt alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    The hot corrosion attack susceptibility of various alloys as a function of strategic materials content are investigated. Preliminary results were obtained for two commercial alloys, UDIMET 700 and Mar-M 247, that were modified by varying the cobalt content. For both alloys the cobalt content was reduced in steps to zero. Nickel content was increased accordingly to make up for the reduced cobalt but all other constituents were held constant. Wedge bar test samples were produced by casting. The hot corrosion test consisted of cyclically exposing samples to the high velocity flow of combustion products from an air-fuel burner fueled with jet A-1 and seeded with a sodium chloride aqueous solution. The flow velocity was Mach 0.5 and the sodium level was maintained at 0.5 ppm in terms of fuel plus air. The test cycle consisted of holding the test samples at 900 C for 1 hour followed by 3 minutes in which the sample could cool to room temperature in an ambient temperature air stream.

  7. CORROSION RESISTANCE OF DYNAMIC LOADED CAST ALLOY AS12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Andrushevich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of influence of powder particles in the mode of super deep penetration (SDP on change of corrosion resistance of aluminum cast alloy AK12 is executed. The aluminum alloy reinforced by fiber zones with the reconstructed structure has the increased corrosion resistance.

  8. Method for inhibiting corrosion of nickel-containing alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVan, J.H.; Selle, J.E.

    Nickel-containing alloys are protected against corrosion by contacting the alloy with a molten alkali metal having dissolved therein aluminum, silicon or manganese to cause the formation of a corrosion-resistant intermetallic layer. Components can be protected by applying the coating after an apparatus is assembled.

  9. Combined Corrosion and Wear of Aluminium Alloy 7075-T6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y.; Mol, J.M.C.; Janssen, G.C.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    The aluminium alloy 7075-T6 is widely used in engineering. In some applications, like slurry transport, corrosion and abrasion occur simultaneously, resulting in early material failure. In the present work, we investigated the combined effect of corrosion and wear on the aluminium alloy 7075-T6. We

  10. Corrosion Studies of Wrought and Cast NASA-23 Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion studies were carried out for wrought and cast NASA-23 alloy using electrochemical methods. The scanning reference electrode technique (SRET), the polarization resistance technique (PR), and the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were employed. These studies corroborate the findings of stress corrosion studies performed earlier, in that the material is highly resistant to corrosion.

  11. Effects of chemical composition on the corrosion of dental alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galo, Rodrigo; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira; Rocha, Luís Augusto; de Mattos, Maria da Glória Chiarello

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the oral environment on the corrosion of dental alloys with different compositions, using electrochemical methods. The corrosion rates were obtained from the current-potential curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The effect of artificial saliva on the corrosion of dental alloys was dependent on alloy composition. Dissolution of the ions occurred in all tested dental alloys and the results were strongly dependent on the general alloy composition. Regarding the alloys containing nickel, the Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr-Ti alloys released 0.62 mg/L of Ni on average, while the Co-Cr dental alloy released ions between 0.01 and 0.03 mg/L of Co and Cr, respectively.The open-circuit potential stabilized at a higher level with lower deviation (standard deviation: Ni-Cr-6Ti = 32 mV/SCE and Co-Cr = 54 mV/SCE). The potenciodynamic curves of the dental alloys showed that the Ni-based dental alloy with >70 wt% of Ni had a similar curve and the Co-Cr dental alloy showed a low current density and hence a high resistance to corrosion compared with the Ni-based dental alloys. Some changes in microstructure were observed and this fact influenced the corrosion behavior for the alloys. The lower corrosion resistance also led to greater release of nickel ions to the medium. The quantity of Co ions released from the Co-Cr-Mo alloy was relatively small in the solutions. In addition, the quantity of Cr ions released into the artificial saliva from the Co-Cr alloy was lower than Cr release from the Ni-based dental alloys.

  12. SULFURIC ACID CORROSION OF LOW Sb - Pb BATTERY ALLOYS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    1983-09-01

    Sep 1, 1983 ... (Manuscript received February,1983). ABSTRACT. The corrosion properties of low Sb - Pb alloys developed for maintenance free motive power industrial batteries was studied by a bare grid constant current method and compared to those of the conventional. Pb- 6% Sb alloy. Low Sb-Pb alloys with Se and ...

  13. Corrosion of high-density sintered tungsten alloys. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batten, J.J.; Moore, B.T.

    1988-12-01

    The behaviour of four high-density sintered tungsten alloys has been evluated and compared with that of pure tungsten. Rates of corrosion during the cyclic humidity and the salt mist tests were ascertained from weight loss measurements. Insight into the corrosion mechanism was gained from the nature of the corrosion products and an examination of the corroded surfaces. In the tests, the alloy 95% W, 2.5% Ni, 1.5% Fe was the most corrosion resistant. The data showed that copper as an alloying element accelerates corrosion of tungsten alloys. Both attack on the tungsten particles and the binder phase were observed together with tungsten grain loss. 6 refs., 3 tabs.,

  14. Corrosion of alloys of the niobium--titanium--aluminium system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva, V.V.; Alekseeva, E.L.; Dontsov, S.N.; Moiseeva, I.S.

    The mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of niobium--titanium--aluminum alloys in 20 percent HCl and 40--75 percent H 2 SO 4 at 40 and 100 0 C are considered. Current density vs potential and corrosion rate vs potential potentiostatic curves plotted in 75 percent H 2 SO 4 at 140 0 C for the alloys with different titanium contents at a constant content of aluminum and also for alloys with a constant titanium content at different contents of aluminum are given. It was shown that the corrosion resistance of the alloys in 75 percent H 2 SO 4 at 140 0 C is an exponential function of the atomic content of the alloying components (Ti, Al) in them; aluminum vitiates the corrosion resistance very strongly

  15. Corrosion Resistance of 7475-T7351 Aluminum Alloy Plate for Aviation

    OpenAIRE

    LIU Ming; LI Hui-qu; CHEN Jun-zhou; LI Guo-ai; CHEN Gao-hong

    2017-01-01

    The intergranular corrosion and exfoliation corrosion properties of 7475-T7351 aluminum alloy plate for aviation were investigated, and the corrosion behaviors of the alloy were analyzed by metallographic analysis(MA) and transmission electron microscope(TEM). The results show that no obvious intergranular corrosion is observed, but exfoliation corrosion grade of 7475-T7351 aluminum alloy increases from EA on surface to EC in the core. The exfoliation corrosion of 7475 alloy plate is mainly b...

  16. Corrosion behavior of friction stir welded AZ31B Mg alloy - Al6063 alloy joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ratna Sunil

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, AZ31B Mg alloy and Al6063 alloy-rolled sheets were successfully joined by friction stir welding. Microstructural studies revealed a sound joint with good mechanical mixing of both the alloys at the nugget zone. Corrosion performance of the joint was assessed by immersing in 3.5% NaCl solution for different intervals of time and the corrosion rate was calculated. The joint has undergone severe corrosion attack compared with both the base materials (AZ31B and Al6063 alloys. The predominant corrosion mechanism behind the high corrosion rate of the joint was found to be high galvanic corrosion. From the results, it can be suggested that the severe corrosion of dissimilar Mg–Al joints must be considered as a valid input while designing structures intended to work in corroding environment.

  17. Corrosion Mechanisms in Brazed Al-Base Alloy Sandwich Structures as a Function of Braze Alloy and Process Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    alloying additions are predicted to optimize corrosion performance and be compatible with AA 6061 and 5052 from the standpoint of mitigating...34Corrosion of metals and alloys . Determination of resistance to intergranular corrosion of solution heat- treatable aluminium alloys " 1996. 25. ASTM...binary aluminium alloys —I. Al-Cu alloys . Pitting and intergranular corrosion," Corros Sei 17, 3 (1977): p. 179. 42. I.L. Müller and J.R. Galvele

  18. Burner rig alkali salt corrosion of several high temperature alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    The hot corrosion of five alloys was studied in cyclic tests in a Mach 0.3 burner rig into whose combustion chamber various aqueous salt solutions were injected. Three nickel-based alloys, a cobalt-base alloy, and an iron-base alloy were studied at temperatures of 700, 800, 900, and 1000 C with various salt concentrations and compositions. The relative resistance of the alloys to hot corrosion attack was found to vary with temperature and both concentration and composition of the injected salt solution. Results indicate that the corrosion of these alloys is a function of both the presence of salt condensed as a liquid on the surface and of the composition of the gas phases present.

  19. Crevice Corrosion on Ni-Cr-Mo Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P. Jakupi; D. Zagidulin; J.J. Noel; D.W. Shoesmith

    2006-01-01

    Ni-Cr-Mo alloys were developed for their exceptional corrosion resistance in a variety of extreme corrosive environments. An alloy from this series, Alloy-22, has been selected as the reference material for the fabrication of nuclear waste containers in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository located in Nevada (US). A possible localized corrosion process under the anticipated conditions at this location is crevice corrosion. therefore, it is necessary to assess how this process may, or may not, propagate if the use of this alloy is to be justified. Consequently, the primary objective is the development of a crevice corrosion damage function that can be used to assess the evolution of material penetration rates. They have been using various electrochemical methods such as potentiostatic, galvanostatic and galvanic coupling techniques. Corrosion damage patterns have been investigated using surface analysis techniques such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy. All crevice corrosion experiments were performed at 120 C in 5M NaCl solution. Initiating crevice corrosion on these alloys has proven to be difficult; therefore, they have forced it to occur under either potentiostatic or galvanostatic conditions

  20. Corrosion behavior of Ti-39Nb alloy for dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fojt, Jaroslav; Joska, Ludek; Malek, Jaroslav; Sefl, Vaclav

    2015-11-01

    To increase an orthopedic implant's lifetime, researchers are now concerned on the development of new titanium alloys with suitable mechanical properties (low elastic modulus-high fatigue strength), corrosion resistance and good workability. Corrosion resistance of the newly developed titanium alloys should be comparable with that of pure titanium. The effect of medical preparations containing fluoride ions represents a specific problem related to the use of titanium based materials in dentistry. The aim of this study was to determine the corrosion behavior of β titanium alloy Ti-39Nb in physiological saline solution and in physiological solution containing fluoride ions. Corrosion behavior was studied using standard electrochemical techniques and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that corrosion properties of the studied alloy were comparable with the properties of titanium grade 2. The passive layer was based on the oxides of titanium and niobium in several oxidation states. Alloying with niobium, which was the important part of the alloy passive layer, resulted in no significant changes of corrosion behavior. In the presence of fluoride ions, the corrosion resistance was higher than the resistance of titanium. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Waterside corrosion of zirconium alloys in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Technically the study of corrosion of zirconium alloys in nuclear power reactors is a very active field and both experimental work and understanding of the mechanisms involved are going through rapid changes. As a result, the lifetime of any publication in this area is short. Because of this it has been decided to revise IAEA-TECDOC-684 - Corrosion of Zirconium Alloys in Nuclear Power Plants - published in 1993. This updated, revised and enlarged version includes major changes to incorporate some of the comments received about the first version. Since this review deals exclusively with the corrosion of zirconium and zirconium based alloys in water, and another separate publication is planned to deal with the fuel-side corrosion of zirconium based fuel cladding alloys, i.e. stress corrosion cracking, it was decided to change the original title to Waterside Corrosion of Zirconium Alloys in Nuclear Power Plants. The rapid changes in the field have again necessitated a cut-off date for incorporating new data. This edition incorporates data up to the end of 1995; including results presented at the 11 International Symposium on Zirconium in the Nuclear Industry held in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany, in September 1995. The revised format of the review now includes: Introductory chapters on basic zirconium metallurgy and oxidation theory; A revised chapter discussing the present extent of our knowledge of the corrosion mechanism based on laboratory experiments; a separate and revised chapter discussing hydrogen uptake; a completely reorganized chapter summarizing the phenomenological observations of zirconium alloy corrosion in reactors; a new chapter on modelling in-reactor corrosion; a revised chapter devoted exclusively to the manner in which irradiation might influence the corrosion process; finally, a summary of our present understanding of the corrosion mechanisms operating in reactor

  2. Corrosion properties of cladding materials from Zr1Nb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloc, K.; Kosler, S.

    1975-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour was observed of the Zr1Nb alloy in hot water and superheated steam and the effects of impurity content, of the purity of the corrosion environment and of the heat treatment of the alloy were studied on the alloy corrosion resistance. Also studied were the absorption of hydrogen by the alloy and its behaviour in reactor situations. It was ascertained that the alloy has a good corrosion resistance up to a temperature of 350 degC. The corrosion resistance is reduced by the presence of nitrogen above 50 to 70 ppm and of carbon above 50 to 90 ppm. A graphic representation is given of the dependence of corrosion resistance on the temperature of annealing, the nitrogen content of the alloy and the time of the action of hot water or steam, as well as the dependence of the hydrogen content in the alloy on the peripheral tension of the cladding in hot water both in non-active environment and at irradiation with a neutron flux of approximately 10 20 n/cm 2 . (J.B.)

  3. Laser Surface Alloying of Aluminum for Improving Acid Corrosion Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiru, Woldetinsay Gutu; Sankar, Mamilla Ravi; Dixit, Uday Shanker

    2018-04-01

    In the present study, laser surface alloying of aluminum with magnesium, manganese, titanium and zinc, respectively, was carried out to improve acid corrosion resistance. Laser surface alloying was conducted using 1600 and 1800 W power source using CO2 laser. Acid corrosion resistance was tested by dipping the samples in a solution of 2.5% H2SO4 for 200 h. The weight loss due to acid corrosion was reduced by 55% for AlTi, 41% for AlMg alloy, 36% for AlZn and 22% for AlMn alloy. Laser surface alloyed samples offered greater corrosion resistance than the aluminum substrate. It was observed that localized pitting corrosion was the major factor to damage the surface when exposed for a long time. The hardness after laser surface alloying was increased by a factor of 8.7, 3.4, 2.7 and 2 by alloying with Mn, Mg, Ti and Zn, respectively. After corrosion test, hardness was reduced by 51% for AlTi sample, 40% for AlMg sample, 41.4% for AlMn sample and 33% for AlZn sample.

  4. Influence of alloying elements and density on aqueous corrosion behaviour of some sintered low alloy steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandavel, T.K.; Chandramouli, R.; Karthikeyan, P.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Corrosion of low alloy P/M steels under HCl acid pickling environment has been studied. ► Influence of density, strain and alloying elements on the rate of corrosion of the steels has been investigated. ► Residual porosity has significant effect on acid corrosion. ► Addition of the alloying elements Cu, Mo and Ti reduces the corrosion rate significantly. ► Carbide forming elements Mo and Ti improve further the resistance of the steels to aqueous corrosion. -- Abstract: Low alloy steels produced through powder metallurgy route of sintering followed by forging are promising candidate materials for high strength small components. Porosity in such steels poses a real challenge during acid pickling treatment, which is one of the processing steps during manufacturing. The present research work attempts to investigate the mechanism underlying the acid corrosion behaviour of some sintered low alloy steels under induced acid pickling conditions. Sintered-forged low alloy steel samples containing molybdenum (Mo), copper (Cu) and titanium (Ti) were subjected to aqueous corrosion attack by immersing the samples in 18% HCl (Hydrochloric acid) solution for 25 h. Sample weight loss and Fe (Iron) loss were estimated for the corroded samples. The morphology of the corroded surfaces was studied through metallography and scanning electron microscopy. Higher porosity alloys underwent enhanced corrosion rates. Both corrosion rate and iron loss are found to decrease linearly with reduction in porosity in all cases of the alloys. The alloying elements Mo, Ti and Cu, when added in combination, have played a complementary role in the reduction of corrosion rate by almost one order of magnitude compared to unalloyed steel. Presence of carbides of the carbide forming elements Mo and Ti played a positive role on the corrosion behaviour of the low alloy steels.

  5. Effect of alloy elements on the anti-corrosion properties of low alloy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Effect of alloy elements on corrosion of low alloy steel was studied under simulated offshore condi- tions. The results showed that the elements Cu, P, Mo, W, V had evident effect on corrosion resistance in the atmosphere zone; Cu, P, V, Mo in the splash zone and Cr, Al, Mo in the submerged zone. Keywords.

  6. Corrosion of Co-Cr alloys in aqueous environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, A T

    1981-04-01

    The literature relating to the corrosion in aqueous media of the Co-Cr alloys is reviewed. Data are surveyed for their corrosion in sulphuric acid, alkalis and in hydrochloric acid and chloride media. In the latter category, the information is sub-divided into single corrosion, crevice and stress corrosion, fretting corrosion and data obtained from 'in vivo' experiments. It is clear that the very low current densities which result from 'in vitro' experiments present abnormal experimental problems and may not, in every case, actually represent the dissolution process.

  7. Corrosion behavior of nickel-containing alloys in artificial sweat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randin, J P

    1988-07-01

    The corrosion resistance of various nickel-containing alloys was measured in artificial sweat (perspiration) using the Tafel extrapolation method. It was found that Ni, CuNi 25 (coin alloy), NiAl (colored intermetallic compounds), WC + Ni (hard metal), white gold (jewelry alloy), FN42 and Nilo Alby K (controlled expansion alloys), and NiP (electroless nickel coating) are in an active state and dissolve readily in oxygenated artificial sweat. By contrast, austenitic stainless steels, TiC + Mo2C + Ni (hard metal), NiTi (shape-memory alloy), Hastelloy X (superalloy), Phydur (precipitation hardening alloy), PdNi and SnNi (nickel-containing coatings) are in a passive state but may pit under certain conditions. Cobalt, Cr, Ti, and some of their alloys were also investigated for the purpose of comparison. Cobalt and its alloys have poor corrosion resistance except for Stellite 20. Chromium and high-chromium ferritic stainless steels have a high pitting potential but the latter are susceptible to crevice corrosion. Ti has a pitting potential greater than 3 V. Comparison between the in vitro measurements of the corrosion rate of nickel-based alloys and the clinical observation of the occurrence of contact dermatitis is discussed.

  8. The corrosion behaviour of Zr3Al-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, E.V.; Wieler, R.

    1977-07-01

    The corrosion resistance of several zirconium-aluminum alloys with aluminum contents ranging from 7.6 to 9.6 wt% was examined in 300 deg C and 325 deg C water, 350 deg C and 400 deg C steam and in air and wet CO 2 at 325 deg C and 400 deg C. In the transformed alloys there are three phases present, αZr, Zr 2 Al and Zr 3 Al of which the αZr phase is the least corrosion resistant. The most important factor controlling the corrosion behaviour of these alloys was found to be the size, distribution and amount of the αZr phase in the transformed alloys, which in turn was dependent upon the microstructural scale of the untransformed alloys

  9. Corrosion of high-density sintered tungsten alloys. Part 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batten, J.J.; Bombaci, S.A.; Garrard, W.N.C.; Moore, B.T.; Smith, B.S.

    1988-12-01

    The corrosion behaviour of tungsten and high-density tungsten alloys (W ≥ 90 weight %) has been examined electrochemically through anodic polarization measurements, instantaneous corrosion rate measurements, galvanic coupling, and surface potential mapping. In the anodic polarization tests, pure tungsten and the four alloys studied underwent transitions from an active state to a state where any further increase in potential produced no further increase in current. The presence of chloride ions increased corrosion rates. Predictions of likely trends in corrosion rates from the above electrochemical tests were not in complete agreement with those obtained by the long-term immersion tests. Similarly, a consistent prediction of the likely nature of the corrosion products that would result from long-term immersion testing was not obtained from the above studies. Predictions about which alloys would be susceptible to a crevice effect were in agreement with the immersion testing results, namely those alloys not containing Cu would be the most susceptible. Some insight into the nature of the corrosion mechanism is afforded by the work on galvanic coupling and surface potential mapping. This supported the view that galvanic corrosion plays a part in the corrosion process. 15 refs., 5 tabs., 19 figs

  10. Interplay of microbiological corrosion and alloy microstructure in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    As a precursor to the topic the paper also reviews the performance of the traditional corrosion-resistant alloys and their weldments and the necessity of using duplex stainless steels (DSS), in order to alleviate corrosion problems in marine environments. Given that the performance of weldments of such steels is often ...

  11. The Corrosion Protection of Magnesium Alloy AZ31B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.; Mendrek, M. J.; Mitchell, M. L.; Torres, P. D.

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion rates for bare and coated Magnesium alloy AZ31B have been measured. Two coatings, Dow-23(Trademark) and Tagnite(Trademark), have been tested by electrochemical methods and their effectiveness determined. Electrochemical methods employed were the scanning reference electrode technique (SRET), the polarization resistance technique (PR) and the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique (EIS). In addition, general corrosion and stress corrosion methods were employed to examine the effectiveness of the above coatings in 90 percent humidity. Results from these studies are presented.

  12. Alloy Microstructure Dictates Corrosion Modes in THA Modular Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourzal, Robin; Hall, Deborah J; Ehrich, Jonas; McCarthy, Stephanie M; Mathew, Mathew T; Jacobs, Joshua J; Urban, Robert M

    2017-12-01

    Adverse local tissue reactions (ALTRs) triggered by corrosion products from modular taper junctions are a known cause of premature THA failure. CoCrMo devices are of particular concern because cobalt ions and chromium-orthophosphates were shown to be linked to ALTRs, even in metal-on-polyethylene THAs. The most common categories of CoCrMo alloy are cast and wrought alloy, which exhibit fundamental microstructural differences in terms of grain size and hard phases. The impact of implant alloy microstructure on the occurring modes of corrosion and subsequent metal ion release is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine whether (1) the microstructure of cast CoCrMo alloy varies broadly between manufacturers and can dictate specific corrosion modes; and whether (2) the microstructure of wrought CoCrMo alloy is more consistent between manufacturers and has low implications on the alloy's corrosion behavior. The alloy microstructure of four femoral-stem and three femoral-head designs from four manufacturers was metallographically and electrochemically characterized. Three stem designs were made from cast alloy; all three head designs and one stem design were made from wrought alloy. Alloy samples were sectioned from retrieved components and then polished and etched to visualize grain structure and hard phases such as carbides (eg, M 23 C 6 ) or intermetallic phases (eg, σ phase). Potentiodynamic polarization (PDP) tests were conducted to determine the corrosion potential (E corr ), corrosion current density (I corr ), and pitting potential (E pit ) for each alloy. Four devices were tested within each group, and each measurement was repeated three times to ensure repeatable results. Differences in PDP metrics between manufacturers and between alloys with different hard phase contents were compared using one-way analysis of variance and independent-sample t-tests. Microstructural features such as twin boundaries and slip bands as well as corrosion

  13. Reducing Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Bearing Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, N. E.; Dennies, D. P.; Lumsden, I., J.b.

    1986-01-01

    Resistance to stress-corrosion cracking in some stainless-steel alloys increased by addition of small amounts of noble metals. 0.75 to 1.00 percent by weight of palladium or platinum added to alloy melt sufficient to improve properties of certain stainless steels so they could be used in manufacture of high-speed bearings.

  14. Corrosion protection of aluminum alloys in contact with other metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuster, C. A.

    1969-01-01

    Study establishes the quality of chemical and galvanized protection afforded by anodized and aldozided coatings applied to test panels of various aluminum alloys. The test panels, placed in firm contact with panels of titanium alloys, were subjected to salt spray tests and visually examined for corrosion effect.

  15. Corrosion wear fracture of new {beta} biomedical titanium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niinomi, M.; Fukunaga, K.-I. [Toyohashi Univ. of Technol. (Japan). Dept. of Production Syst. Eng.; Kuroda, D.; Morinaga, M.; Kato, Y.; Yashiro, T.; Suzuki, A.

    1999-05-15

    Metallic materials such as stainless steel, Co-Cr alloy, pure titanium and titanium alloys have been used for surgical implant materials. The {alpha} + {beta} type titanium alloy such as Ti-6Al-4V ELI has been most widely used as an implant material for artificial hip joint and dental implant because of its high strength and excellent corrosion resistance. Toxicity of alloying elements in conventional biomedical titanium alloys like Al and V, and the high modulus of elasticity of these alloy as compared to that of bone have been, however, pointed out [1,2]. New {beta} type titanium alloys composed of non-toxic elements like Nb, Ta, Zr, Mo and Sn with lower moduli of elasticity, greater strength and greater corrosion resistance were, therefore, designed in this study. The friction wear properties of titanium alloys are, however, low as compared to those of other conventional metallic implant materials such as stainless steels and Co-Cr alloy. Tensile tests and friction wear tests in Ringer`s solution were conducted in order to investigate the mechanical properties of designed alloys. The friction wear characteristics of designed alloys and typical conventional biomedical titanium alloys were evaluated using a pin-on-disk type friction wear testing system and measuring the weight loss and width of groove of the specimen. (orig.) 8 refs.

  16. Corrosion behavior of zinc-nickel alloy electrodeposited coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabri Miranda, F.J. [USIMINAS, Ipatinga, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Margarit, I.C.P.; Mattos, O.R.; Barcia, O.E. [UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Wiart, R. [Univ. Pierre et M. Curie, Paris (France)

    1999-08-01

    Various types of zinc-electrocoated steel sheets are used to improve the durability of car bodies. Among these coatings, the Zn-Ni alloy has higher corrosion resistance than pure Zn, as well as better welding and painting properties. The corrosion mechanism of the Zn-Ni alloy has been investigated mainly on the basis of accelerated tests and electrochemical measurements. There are few data about long-term corrosion tests. In the present study, the behavior of unpainted Zn-Ni alloy coated steel was studied during 3 years of exposure in industrial and marine environments. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and surface analysis (scanning electron microscopy [SEM] and Auger electron spectroscopy [AES]) were the experimental techniques used. Long-term atmospheric corrosion mechanism of Zn-Ni coatings was discussed and compared with that proposed based on short-term tests.

  17. Bio-Corrosion of Magnesium Alloys for Orthopaedic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Emily K.; Ehrensberger, Mark T.

    2017-01-01

    Three Mg alloys, Mg–1.34% Ca–3% Zn (MCZ), Mg–1.34% Ca–3% Zn–0.2% Sr (MCZS), and Mg–2% Sr (MS), were examined to understand their bio-corrosion behavior. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and polarization scans were performed after 6 days of immersion in cell culture medium, and ion release and changes in media pH were tracked over a 28 day time period. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of alloy microstructure was performed to help interpret the results of the electrochemical testing. Results indicate that corrosion resistance of the alloys is as follows: MCZ > MCZS > MS. PMID:28862647

  18. Bio-Corrosion of Magnesium Alloys for Orthopaedic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily K. Brooks

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Three Mg alloys, Mg–1.34% Ca–3% Zn (MCZ, Mg–1.34% Ca–3% Zn–0.2% Sr (MCZS, and Mg–2% Sr (MS, were examined to understand their bio-corrosion behavior. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and polarization scans were performed after 6 days of immersion in cell culture medium, and ion release and changes in media pH were tracked over a 28 day time period. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM of alloy microstructure was performed to help interpret the results of the electrochemical testing. Results indicate that corrosion resistance of the alloys is as follows: MCZ > MCZS > MS.

  19. Corrosion Behavior of New Cr-Ni-Cu Low Alloy Seawater Corrosion Resistant Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Piaopiao; Yang, Zhongmin; Chen, Ying; Wang, Huimin

    Two kinds of Cr-Ni-Cu low alloyed steels were designed, 0.1%C-0.7%Cr-1.2%Ni-0.7Cu and 0.1%C-0.7%Cr-0.3%Ni-0.5Cu. With the method of SEM, XRD and electrochemical analysis and testing technology, periodic immersion accelerated corrosion test was carried out to investigate the corrosion resistance of the designed steels in simulated marine environment. The steel with best corrosion resistance was selected, and then focused on the variation of its corrosion rate with time. The results indicated that the designed Cu-Cr-Ni low alloyed steels showed better corrosion resistance than 20MnSi, the ratio of their corrosion rates was 0.44. The corrosion rate of designed steels decreased gradually to 3 4 g/(mm2·h) with the elongation of test period, while the corrosion rate of 20MnSi kept downward trend, not reach stability, and the corrosion rate gap between them became smaller. The Cr element banding enriched in the inner rust can withstand the diffusion of Cl-. Besides, the addition of Ni raised the self-corrosion potential of the bare steels and promoted the transformation of γ-FeOOH to α-FeOOH, and consequently, improved the stability of the rust and the corrosion resistance of steels.

  20. Hot corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, G. J.; Barret, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The hot corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys was examined by cyclically oxidizing sodium sulfate-coated specimens in still air at 900, 1000, and 1100 C. The compositions tested were within the ternary region: Ni, Ni-50 at.% Cr, and Ni-50 at.% Al. At each temperature the corrosion data were statistically fitted to a third order regression equation as a function of chromium and aluminum contents. From these equations corrosion isopleths were prepared. Compositional regions with the best hot corrosion resistance were identified.

  1. Effect of Bi on the corrosion resistance of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Meiyi; Zhou Bangxin; Li Qiang; Zhang Weipeng; Zhu Li; Zou Linghong; Zhang Jinlong; Peng Jianchao

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate systematically the effect of Bi addition on the corrosion resistance of zirconium alloys, different zirconium-based alloys, including Zr-4 (Zr-l.5Sn-0.2Fe-0.1Cr), S5 (Zr-0.8Sn-0.35Nb-0.4Fe-0.1Cr), T5 (Zr-0.7Sn-l.0Nb-0.3Fe-0.1Cr) and Zr-1Nb, were adopted to prepare the zirconium alloys containing Bi of 0∼0.5% in mass fraction. These alloys were denoted as Zr-4 + xBi, S5 + xBi, T5 + xBi and Zr-1Nb + xBi, respectively. The corrosion behavior of these specimens was investigated by autoclave testing in lithiated water with 0.01 M LiOH or deionized water at 360 ℃/18.6 MPa and in superheated steam at 400 ℃/10.3 MPa. The microstructure of the alloys was examined by TEM and the second phase particles (SPPs) were analyzed by EDS. Microstructure observation shows that the addition of Bi promotes the precipitation of Sn as second phase particles (SPPs) because Sn is in solid solution in α-Zr matrix in Zr-4, S5 and T5 alloys. The concentration of Bi dissolved in α-Zr matrix increase with the increase of Nb in the alloys, and the excess Bi precipitates as Bi-containing SPPs. The corrosion results show that the effect of Bi addition on the corrosion behavior of different zirconium-based alloys is very complicated, depending on their compositions and corrosion conditions. In the case of higher Bi concentration in α-Zr, the zirconium alloys exhibit better corrosion resistance. However, in the case of precipitation of Bi-containing SPPs, the corrosion resistance gets worse. This indicates that the solid solution of Bi in α-Zr matrix can improve the corrosion resistance, while the precipitation of the Bi-containing SPPs is harmful to the corrosion resistance. (authors)

  2. Corrosion Monitoring of PEO-Pretreated Magnesium Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnedenkov, A. S.; Sinebryukhov, S. L.; Mashtalyar, D. V.; Gnedenkov, S. V.; Sergienko, V. I. [Institute of Chemistry, Vladivostok (Russian Federation)

    2017-06-15

    The MA8 alloy (formula Mg-Mn-Ce) has been shown to have greater corrosion stability than the VMD10 magnesium alloy (formula Mg-Zn-Zr-Y) in chloride-containing solutions by Scanning Vibrating Electrode Technique (SVET) and by optical microscopy, gravimetry, and volumetry. It has been established that the crucial factor for the corrosion activity of these samples is the occurrence of microgalvanic coupling at the sample surface. The peculiarities of the kinetics and mechanism of the corrosion in the local heterogeneous regions of the magnesium alloy surface were investigated by localized electrochemical techniques. The stages of the corrosion process in artificial defects in the coating obtained by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) at the surface of the MA8 magnesium alloy were also studied. The analysis of the experimental data enabled us to determine that the corrosion process in the defect zone develops predominantly at the magnesium/coating interface. Based on the measurements of the corrosion rate of the samples with PEO and composite polymer-containing coatings, the best anticorrosion properties were displayed by the composite polymer-containing coatings.

  3. Corrosion characteristics of Hastelloy N alloy after He+ ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Jianbo; Yu Xiaohan; Li Aiguo; He Shangming; Cao Xingzhong; Wang Baoyi; Li Zhuoxin

    2014-01-01

    With the goal of understanding the invalidation problem of irradiated Hastelloy N alloy under the condition of intense irradiation and severe corrosion, the corrosion behavior of the alloy after He + ion irradiation was investigated in molten fluoride salt at 700 °C for 500 h. The virgin samples were irradiated by 4.5 MeV He + ions at room temperature. First, the virgin and irradiated samples were studied using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) to analyze the influence of irradiation dose on the vacancies. The PALS results showed that He + ion irradiation changed the size and concentration of the vacancies which seriously affected the corrosion resistance of the alloy. Second, the corroded samples were analyzed using synchrotron radiation micro-focused X-ray fluorescence, which indicated that the corrosion was mainly due to the dealloying of alloying element Cr in the matrix. Results from weight-loss measurement showed that the corrosion generally correlated with the irradiation dose of the alloy. (author)

  4. Corrosion of carbon-alloyed iron aluminides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Corrosion rates were also obtained by immersion testing. The variation of corrosion rate as a function of time was similar for both the intermetallics. The variation in corrosion rate as a function of time has been explained based on the observed potentiodynamic polarization behaviour. Scanning electron microscopy of ...

  5. Alloy SCR-3 resistant to stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowaka, Masamichi; Fujikawa, Hisao; Kobayashi, Taiki

    1977-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steel is used widely because the corrosion resistance, workability and weldability are excellent, but the main fault is the occurrence of stress corrosion cracking in the environment containing chlorides. Inconel 600, most resistant to stress corrosion cracking, is not necessarily safe under some severe condition. In the heat-affected zone of SUS 304 tubes for BWRs, the cases of stress corrosion cracking have occurred. The conventional testing method of stress corrosion cracking using boiling magnesium chloride solution has been problematical because it is widely different from actual environment. The effects of alloying elements on stress corrosion cracking are remarkably different according to the environment. These effects were investigated systematically in high temperature, high pressure water, and as the result, Alloy SCR-3 with excellent stress corrosion cracking resistance was found. The physical constants and the mechanical properties of the SCR-3 are shown. The states of stress corrosion cracking in high temperature, high pressure water containing chlorides and pure water, polythionic acid, sodium phosphate solution and caustic soda of the SCR-3, SUS 304, Inconel 600 and Incoloy 800 are compared and reported. (Kako, I.)

  6. Amorphous Metallic Alloys: Pathways for Enhanced Wear and Corrosion Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aditya, Ayyagari; Felix Wu, H.; Arora, Harpreet; Mukherjee, Sundeep

    2017-11-01

    Amorphous metallic alloys are widely used in bulk form and as coatings for their desirable corrosion and wear behavior. Nevertheless, the effects of heat treatment and thermal cycling on these surface properties are not well understood. In this study, the corrosion and wear behavior of two Zr-based bulk metallic glasses were evaluated in as-cast and thermally relaxed states. Significant improvement in wear rate, friction coefficient, and corrosion penetration rate was seen for both alloys after thermal relaxation. A fully amorphous structure was retained with thermal relaxation below the glass transition. There was an increase in surface hardness and elastic modulus for both alloys after relaxation. The improvement in surface properties was explained based on annihilation of free volume.

  7. Corrosion resistance of Fe-based amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botta, W.J.; Berger, J.E.; Kiminami, C.S.; Roche, V.; Nogueira, R.P.; Bolfarini, C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: ► We report corrosion properties of Fe-based amorphous alloys in different media. ► The Cr-containing alloys had corrosion resistance close to that of Pt in all media. ► The wide range of electrochemical stability is relevant in many industrial domains. -- Abstract: Fe-based amorphous alloys can be designed to present an attractive combination of properties with high corrosion resistance and high mechanical strength. Such properties are clearly adequate for their technological use as coatings, for example, in steel pipes. In this work, we studied the corrosion properties of amorphous ribbons of the following Fe-based compositions: Fe 66 B 30 Nb 4 , [(Fe 0.6 Co 0.4 ) 0.75 B 0.2 Si 0.05 ] 96 Nb 4 , [(Fe 0.7 Co 0.3 ) 0.75 B 0.2 Si 0.05 ] 96 Nb 4 , Fe 56 Cr 23 Ni 5.7 B 16 , Fe 53 Cr 22 Ni 5.6 B 19 and Fe 50 Cr 22 Ni 5.4 B 23 . The ribbons were obtained by rapid solidification using the melt-spinning process, and were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and optical (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The corrosion properties were evaluated by corrosion potential survey and potentiodynamic polarization. The Cr containing alloys, that is the FeCrNiB type of alloys, showed the best corrosion resistance properties with the formation of a stable passive film that ensured a very large passivation plateau

  8. Hot Corrosion Degradation of Metals and Alloys - A Unified Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-06-01

    of chromium, aluminum , molybdenum and tungsten constituted the principal materials studied. The hot corrosion attack of alloys has been found to...polished through 600 grit silicon carbide abrasive paper, ultrasonically agitated in ethylene trichloride , rinsed in ethyl alcohol and dried. SI I S- 4...Figure 3 show that the length of the initiation stage for hot corrosion induced by Na2SO4 in air is increased as the aluminum content of nickel

  9. Local corrosion of high alloy steels under biodeposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korovyakova, M.D.; Nikitin, V.M.; Speshneva, N.V.

    1999-01-01

    Impact of the bacteriozenosis different structural-functional state under biodeposits on corrosion resistance of the 12Kh18N10T and Kh18N10T high-alloy steels in the natural seawater is studied. It is shown that saturation of natural micro communities by separate aerobic and facultative-anaerobic bacterial monocultures increases corrosion resistance of these steels by their overgrow with biodeposits [ru

  10. Prediction of Corrosion of Alloys in Mixed-Solvent Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderko, Andrzej [OLI Systems Inc. Morris Plains (United States); Wang, Peiming [OLI Systems Inc. Morris Plains (United States); Young, Robert D. [OLI Systems Inc. Morris Plains (United States); Riemer, Douglas P. [OLI Systems Inc. Morris Plains (United States); McKenzie, Patrice [OLI Systems Inc. Morris Plains (United States); Lencka, Malgorzata M. [OLI Systems Inc. Morris Plains (United States); Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Angelini, Peter [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2003-06-05

    Corrosion is much less predictable in organic or mixed-solvent environments than in aqueous process environments. As a result, US chemical companies face greater uncertainty when selecting process equipment materials to manufacture chemical products using organic or mixed solvents than when the process environments are only aqueous. Chemical companies handle this uncertainty by overdesigning the equipment (wasting money and energy), rather than by accepting increased risks of corrosion failure (personnel hazards and environmental releases). Therefore, it is important to develop simulation tools that would help the chemical process industries to understand and predict corrosion and to develop mitigation measures. To create such tools, we have developed models that predict (1) the chemical composition, speciation, phase equilibria, component activities and transport properties of the bulk (aqueous, nonaqueous or mixed) phase that is in contact with the metal; (2) the phase equilibria and component activities of the alloy phase(s) that may be subject to corrosion and (3) the interfacial phenomena that are responsible for corrosion at the metal/solution or passive film/solution interface. During the course of this project, we have completed the following: (1) Development of thermodynamic modules for calculating the activities of alloy components; (2) Development of software that generates stability diagrams for alloys in aqueous systems; these diagrams make it possible to predict the tendency of metals to corrode; (3) Development and extensive verification of a model for calculating speciation, phase equilibria and thermodynamic properties of mixed-solvent electrolyte systems; (4) Integration of the software for generating stability diagrams with the mixed-solvent electrolyte model, which makes it possible to generate stability diagrams for nonaqueous or mixed-solvent systems; (5) Development of a model for predicting diffusion coefficients in mixed-solvent electrolyte

  11. Corrosion phase formation on container alloys in basalt repository environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, R.G.; Anantatmula, R.P.; Lutton, J.M.; Rivera, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    The Basalt Waste Isolation Project is evaluating the suitability of basalt in southeastern Washington State as a possible location for a nuclear waste repository. The performance of the waste package, which includes the waste form, container, and surrounding packing material, will be affected by the stability of container alloys in the repository environment. Primary corrosion phases and altered packing material containing metals leached from the container may also influence subsequent reactions between the waste form and repository environment. Copper- and iron-based alloys were tested at 50 0 to 300 0 C in an air/steam environment and in pressure vessels in ground-water-saturated basalt-bentonite packing material. Reaction phases formed on the alloys were identified and corrosion rates were measured. Changes in adhering packing material were also evaluated. The observed reactions and their possible effects on container alloy durability in the repository are discussed

  12. The Growth of Small Corrosion Fatigue Cracks in Alloy 7075

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piascik, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small (greater than 35 micrometers) surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 7075 is established. The early stage of crack growth is studied by performing in situ long focal length microscope (500×) crack length measurements in laboratory air and 1% sodium chloride (NaCl) environments. To quantify the "small crack effect" in the corrosive environment, the corrosion fatigue crack propagation behavior of small cracks is compared to long through-the-thickness cracks grown under identical experimental conditions. In salt water, long crack constant K(sub max) growth rates are similar to small crack da/dN.

  13. Corrosion fatigue of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmillan, V. C.

    1986-01-01

    Corrosion fatigue studies were conducted on bare, chemical conversion coated, and anodized 2219-T87 aluminum alloy. These tests were performed using a rotating beam machine running at a velocity of 2500 rpm. The corrosive environments tested were distilled water, 100 ppm NaCl, and 3.5 percent NaCl. Results were compared to the endurance limit in air. An evaluation of the effect of protective coatings on corrosion fatigue was made by comparing the fatigue properties of specimens with coatings to those without.

  14. Corrosion of low alloy steels in natural seawater. Influence of alloying elements and bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dajoux Malard, Emilie

    2006-01-01

    Metallic infrastructures immersed in natural seawater are exposed to important corrosion phenomena, sometimes characterised as microbiologically influenced corrosion. The presence of alloying elements in low alloy steels could present a corrosion resistance improvement of the structures. In this context, tests are performed with commercial steel grades, from 0,05 wt pc Cr to 11,5 wt pc Cr. They consist in 'on site' immersion in natural seawater on the one hand, and in laboratory tests with immersion in media enriched with marine sulphide-producing bacteria on the other hand. Gravimetric, microbiological, electrochemical measurements and corrosion product analyses are carried out and show that corrosion phenomenon is composed of several stages. A preliminary step is the reduction of the corrosion kinetics and is correlated with the presence of sessile sulphide-producing bacteria and an important formation of sulphur-containing species. This phase is shorter when the alloying element content of the steel increases. This phase is probably followed by an increase of corrosion, appearing clearly after an 8-month immersion in natural seawater for some of the grade steels. Chromium and molybdenum show at the same time a beneficial influence to generalised corrosion resistance and a toxic effect on sulphide-producing bacteria. This multidisciplinary study reflects the complexity of the interactions between bacteria and steels; sulphide-producing bacteria seem to be involved in corrosion processes in natural seawater and complementary studies would have to clarify occurring mechanisms. (author) [fr

  15. The corrosion and passivity of sputtered Mg–Ti alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Guang-Ling; Unocic, Kinga A.; Meyer, Harry; Cakmak, Ercan; Brady, Michael P.; Gannon, Paul E.; Himmer, Phil; Andrews, Quinn

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A supersaturated single phase Mg–Ti alloy can be obtained by magnetron sputtering. • The anodic dissolution of Mg–Ti alloy is inhibited by Ti addition. • The alloy becomes passive when Ti content is high and the alloy has become Ti based. • The formation of a continuous thin passive film is responsible for the passivation of the alloy. - Abstract: This study explored the possibility of forming a “stainless” Mg–Ti alloy. The electrochemical behavior of magnetron-sputtered Mg–Ti alloys was measured in a NaCl solution, and the surface films on the alloys were examined by XPS, SEM and TEM. Increased corrosion resistance was observed with increased Ti content in the sputtered Mg–Ti alloys, but passive-like behavior was not reached until the Ti level (atomic %) was higher than the Mg level. The surface film that formed on sputtered Mg–Ti based alloys in NaCl solution was thick, discontinuous and non-protective, whereas a thin, continuous and protective Mg and Ti oxide film was formed on a sputtered Ti–Mg based alloy.

  16. Corrosion and wear protective composition modulated alloy coatings based on ternary Ni-P-X alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leisner, P.; Benzon, M. E.; Christoffersen, Lasse

    1996-01-01

    Scattered reporting in the litterature describes a number of ternary Ni-P-X alloyes (where X can be Co, Cr, Cu, Mo, Pd, Re or W) with promising corrosin and wear protective performance. Based on a systematic study of Ni-P-X alloys it is the intention to produce coatings with improved corrosion...

  17. Study of localized corrosion in AA2024 aluminium alloy using electron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, X.; Luo, C.; Hashimoto, T.; Hughes, A.E.; Thompson, G.E.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► SEM tomography of localized corrosion has been achieved. ► Nanotomography provides evidence that links microstructure and corrosion propagation path. ► IGC stemmed from localized corrosion associated with buried clusters of intermetallics. ► IGC started beneath the alloy surface and may emerge on the alloy surface. - Abstract: SEM based tomography of localized corrosion has been achieved using selective detection of backscattered electrons. The high resolution tomography provides direct evidence that links the surface appearance of corroded alloy, the alloy microstructure and the corrosion propagation path. Stable localized corrosion of AA2024-T351 aluminium alloy was initiated at locations where large clusters of S phase particles were buried beneath the surface. Propagating away from the initiation sites, corrosion developed preferentially along the grain boundary network. The grain boundary attack started beneath the alloy surface, proceeded along preferred grain boundaries and may emerge at the alloy surface.

  18. Corrosion fatigue of biomedical metallic alloys: mechanisms and mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Renato Altobelli; de Oliveira, Mara Cristina Lopes

    2012-03-01

    Cyclic stresses are often related to the premature mechanical failure of metallic biomaterials. The complex interaction between fatigue and corrosion in the physiological environment has been subject of many investigations. In this context, microstructure, heat treatments, plastic deformation, surface finishing and coatings have decisive influence on the mechanisms of fatigue crack nucleation and growth. Furthermore, wear is frequently present and contributes to the process. However, despite all the effort at elucidating the mechanisms that govern corrosion fatigue of biomedical alloys, failures continue to occur. This work reviews the literature on corrosion-fatigue-related phenomena of Ti alloys, surgical stainless steels, Co-Cr-Mo and Mg alloys. The aim was to discuss the correlation between structural and surface aspects of these materials and the onset of fatigue in the highly saline environment of the human body. By understanding such correlation, mitigation of corrosion fatigue failure may be achieved in a reliable scientific-based manner. Different mitigation methods are also reviewed and discussed throughout the text. It is intended that the information condensed in this article should be a valuable tool in the development of increasingly successful designs against the corrosion fatigue of metallic implants. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Stress corrosion of alloy 600: mechanism proposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnin, T.

    1993-01-01

    A fissuring model by stress corrosion based on interactions corrosion-plasticity on the fissure top is proposed to describe the generally intergranular bursting of INCONEL 600 in the PWR. The calculation shows, and some observations check experimentally, that a pseudo intergranular cracking bound to the zigzag micro facets formation along the joints may be so that a completely intergranular bursting. This pseudo intergranular mode makes up a signature of the proposed mechanism. It may be suggested that it may exist one continuity mechanism between the trans and intergranular cracking by stress corrosion of ductile cubic centered faces materials. 2 figs

  20. Treatment increases stress-corrosion resistance of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, A. J.

    1966-01-01

    Overaging during heat treatment of the aluminum alloys immediately followed by moderate plastic deformation, preferably by shock loading achieves near optimum values of both yield strength and resistance to stress corrosion. Similar results may be obtained by substituting a conventional deformation process for the shock loading step.

  1. Corrosion resistant coatings for uranium and uranium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weirick, L.J.; Lynch, C.T.

    1977-01-01

    Coatings to prevent the corrosion of uranium and uranium alloys are considered in two military applications: kinetic energy penetrators and aircraft counterweights. This study, which evaluated organic films and metallic coatings, demonstrated that the two most promising coatings are based on an electrodeposited nickel system and a galvanized zinc system

  2. Corrosion of titanium alloys in high temperature near anaerobic seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, Jianjun; Blackwood, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • In absence of CO 2 Ti grades 2 and 5 suffer crevice corrosion at temperatures 80 °C and 200 °C. • For Ti grade 5 crevice corrosion can occur as low as 80 °C in the presence of CO 2 . • Ti grade 7 is immune to crevice corrosion in test conditions. • All grades resistant to SCC and pitting in presence of CO 2 . • Rare earth yttrium additions below 0.2 wt%. for improved mechanical properties are detrimental to corrosions performance. • Analysis of threat of hydrogen induced cracking suggest this is not a threat at a deepsea well head. - Abstract: Grades 2, 5 and Grade 7 were investigated in near anaerobic (<1 ppm oxygen) seawater up to 200 °C with and without CO 2 . All three grades were found to resist stress corrosion cracking and pitting corrosion. Grades 2 and 5 suffer crevice corrosion at temperatures 80 °C and 200 °C respectively. In the presence of CO 2 Grade 5 becomes more vulnerable to crevice corrosion, with attack starting at 80 °C with preferential dissolution of the beta phase. An analysis of the threat of hydrogen induced cracking leads to the conclusion that this was not a likely threat to any of the Ti alloys investigated.

  3. Corrosion of iron-base alloys by lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selle, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    A review of corrosion mechanisms operating in lithium-iron-base alloy systems is presented along with data obtained with thermal-convection loops of niobium-stabilized 2 1 / 4 percent Cr-1 percent Mo steel and types 304L and 321 stainless steels. A corrosion rate of 2.3 μm/year (0.09 mil/year) was obtained on the 2 1 / 4 percent Cr-1 percent Mo steel at 600 0 C. Considerably more mass transport of alloying constituents and a maximum corrosion rate of about 14 μm/year (0.55 mil/year) was obtained with the austenitic stainless steels. Results of metallography, x-ray fluorescence analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and weight-change data are presented and discussed

  4. Mechanical Characterization and Corrosion Testing of X608 Al Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Catalini, David; Lavender, Curt A.; Rohatgi, Aashish

    2016-02-07

    This paper describes the mechanical characterization and corrosion testing of X608 Al alloy that is being considered for A-pillar covers for heavy-duty truck applications. Recently, PNNL developed a thermo-mechanical process to stamp A-pillar covers at room temperature using this alloy, and the full-size prototype was successfully stamped by a tier-1 supplier. This study was conducted to obtain additional important information related to the newly developed forming process, and to further improve its mechanical properties. The solutionization temperature, pre-strain and paint-bake heat-treatment were found to influence the alloy’s fabricability and mechanical properties. Natural aging effect on the formability was investigated by limiting dome height (LDH) tests. Preliminary corrosion experiments showed that the employed thermo-mechanical treatments did not significantly affect the corrosion behavior of Al X608.

  5. Corrosion resistant alloys for reinforced concrete [2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Deterioration of concrete bridges because of reinforcing steel corrosion has been recognized for 4-plus decades as a major technical and economic challenge for the United States. As an option for addressing this problem, renewed interest has focused ...

  6. Corrosion resistant alloys for reinforced concrete [2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    Deterioration of concrete bridges because of reinforcing steel corrosion has been recognized for four-plus decades as a major technical and economic challenge for the United States. As an option for addressing this problem, renewed interest has focus...

  7. Corrosion of alloy C-22 in organic acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carranza, Ricardo M.; Rodriguez, Martin A.; Giordano, Celia M.

    2007-01-01

    Electrochemical studies such as cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were performed to determine the corrosion behavior of Alloy 22 (N06022) in 1M NaCl solutions at various pH values from acidic to neutral at 90 C degrees. All the tested material was wrought Mill Annealed (MA). Tests were also performed in NaCl solutions containing weak organic acids such as oxalic, acetic, citric and picric acids. Results show that the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 was significantly higher in solutions containing oxalic acid than in solutions of pure NaCl at the same pH. Citric and Picric acids showed a slightly higher corrosion rate, and Acetic acid maintained the corrosion rate of pure chloride solutions at the same pH. Organic acids revealed to be weak inhibitors for crevice corrosion. Higher concentration ratios, compared to nitrate ions, were needed to completely inhibit crevice corrosion in chloride solutions. Results are discussed considering acid dissociation constants, buffer capacity and complex formation constants of the different weak acids. (author) [es

  8. Effect of Cu content on exfoliation corrosion and electrochemical corrosion of A7N01 aluminum alloy in EXCO solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yaling; Wang, Xiaomin; Hu, Jie; Zhou, Qiang; Chen, Hui

    2017-07-01

    The exfoliation corrosion (EXCO) sensitivities and electrochemical corrosions of A7N01 aluminum (Al) alloys with 0.074% and 0.136% Cu contents were investigated in EXCO solution. The exfoliation corrosion developed more rapidly for the alloy with 0.136% Cu by expressing higher exfoliation rate and deeper corrosion pits as observed by SEM and laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM). In EXCO solution, the alloy with 0.136% Cu content showed lower open-circuit potential (OCP) than the alloy with 0.074% Cu content. The alloy with 0.136% Cu content had bigger “hysteresis loop” in cyclic polarization curve which meant lower self-passivation ability. In electrochemical impedance spectroscopy plot, its curvature radius and capacitance index were lower. The electrochemical test results revealed that the alloy with 0.136% Cu content showed more severe electrochemical corrosion than the alloy with 0.074% Cu content, consistent with the exfoliation corrosion results. The microstructures of two alloys were observed through optical microscopy (OM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The continuous distribution of the equilibrium precipitate η-MgZn2 on grain boundaries, the decreasing of the width of precipitate-free zone (PFZ) and the coarse Cu-Fe-Si-rich phase were responsible for the higher corrosion sensitivity of the Al alloy with 0.136% Cu than that of Al alloy with 0.074% Cu content in EXCO solution.

  9. Corrosion behaviour of laser-cleaned AA7024 aluminium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F. D.; Liu, H.; Suebka, C.; Liu, Y. X.; Liu, Z.; Guo, W.; Cheng, Y. M.; Zhang, S. L.; Li, L.

    2018-03-01

    Laser cleaning has been considered as a promising technique for the preparation of aluminium alloy surfaces prior to joining and welding and has been practically used in the automotive industry. The process is based on laser ablation to remove surface contaminations and aluminium oxides. However the change of surface chemistry and oxide status may affect corrosion behaviour of aluminium alloys. Until now, no work has been reported on the corrosion characteristics of laser cleaned metallic surfaces. In this study, we investigated the corrosion behaviour of laser-cleaned AA7024-T4 aluminium alloy using potentiodynamic polarisation, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET). The results showed that the laser-cleaned surface exhibited higher corrosion resistance in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution than as-received hot-rolled alloy, with significant increase in impedance and decrease in capacitance, while SVET revealed that the active anodic points appeared on the as-received surface were not presented on the laser-cleaned surfaces. Such corrosion behaviours were correlated to the change of surface oxide status measured by glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (GDOES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was suggested that the removal of the original less protective oxide layer consisting of MgO and MgAl2O4 on the as-received surfaces and the newly formed more protective oxide layer containing mainly Al2O3 and MgO by laser cleaning were responsible for the improvement of the corrosion performance.

  10. Corrosion of gold alloys and titanium in artificial saliva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brune, D.; Evje, D.

    1982-01-01

    Two types of gold alloys and one type of pure titanium have been submitted to corrosion in artificial saliva for periods of up to about 2 months. The release of copper, gold and silver from the gold alloys as well as titanium from the titanium matrix was measured with nuclear tracer technique. The physical/chemical state of the corrosion products of gold alloys referring to the ionic state or presence in particulate form has been examined retaining the particulate matter on a glass filter. Copper was observed to be mainly present in the ionic state. Considerable amounts of gold were observed to be retained on the glass filter explained by the presence of gold in particulate form or as a compentent of a dispersed collloidal phase. The estimation of the release of titanium was registered by the tracer nuclide 46 Sc assuming particulate matter to be deteriorated from the titanium surface. (author)

  11. Crevice corrosion of corrosion-resistant alloys in simulated sour gas environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuma, S.; Kudo, T.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses crevice corrosion behaviors of corrosion-resistant alloys (CRAs) with various Ni, Cr, and Mo contents investigated in conditions simulating the sour gas environment encountered in oil and gas production. Crevice corrosion occurred more easily in a 0.1 MPa H 2 S environment than in a 1.0 MPa H 2 S environment. Ni, Cr and Mo all improved crevice corrosion resistance in electrochemical and immersion tests. The improving effect of Ni and Cr on crevice corrosion resistance reached saturation at 20 percent of their contents. Alloys containing more than 6% Mo exhibited excellent crevice corrosion resistance, which could not be achieved by the increment in Ni and Cr contents. The onset of the crevice corrosion on CRAs in H 2 S-Cl - environment was investigated by electrochemically studying the pH drop in the crevice solution and the depassivation pH (pH d ). These are considered to determine the extent of crevice corrosion resistance in comparison to that in O 2 -Cl - environment. It has been shown that the crevice corrosion frequency from the immersion test in 0.1 MPa H 2 S was better correlated with the pH d in the deaerated solution rather than the pH d in the H 2 S containing solution. The crevice corrosion resistance under 0.1 and 1 MPa H 2 S is discussed in relation to the pH d dependent on the H 2 S concentration in the crevice

  12. Corrosion resistant Ti alloy for sulphuric acid medium: Suitability of Ti-Mo alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balusamy, T.; Jamesh, M.; Kumar, Satendra; Narayanan, T.S.N. Sankara [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Madras Centre, CSIR Complex, Taramani, Chennai 600 113 (India)

    2012-09-15

    The corrosion resistance of Ti-Mo (5, 10, 15 and 25 wt% molybdenum) alloys in 5-25% sulphuric acid was evaluated. The Ti-Mo alloys offered a better corrosion resistance than commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti). The higher impedance values, higher phase angle maximum, ability to reach the phase angle maximum at relatively lower frequencies, ability to exhibit a constant phase angle maximum over a wider range of frequencies, higher phase angle values at 0.01 Hz, have confirmed the formation of a stable passive oxide film on Ti-Mo alloys. The study recommends the use of Ti-Mo alloys, particularly Ti-25Mo alloy, as a suitable material of construction for sulphuric acid medium. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Influence of inorganic acid pickling on the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy AZ31 sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Blawert, C.; Scharnagl, N.

    2009-01-01

    Surface contaminants as a result of thermo-mechanical processing of magnesium alloys, e.g. sheet rolling, can have a negative effect on the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys. Especially contaminants such as Fe, Ni and Cu, left on the surface of magnesium alloys result in the formation...... of micro-galvanic couples and can therefore increase corrosion attack on these alloys. Due to this influence they should be removed to obtain good corrosion resistance. In this study, the effect of inorganic acid pickling on the corrosion behaviour of a commercial AZ31 magnesium alloy sheet...... the corrosion resistance of the alloy. The cleaning efficiency of the three acids used and the corrosion protection mechanisms were found to be remarkably different. Best corrosion results were obtained with nitric acid, followed closely by phosphoric acid. Only the sulphuric acid failed more or less when...

  14. Contradictory effect of chromate inhibitor on corrosive wear of aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokhmurskii, V.I.; Zin, I.M.; Vynar, V.A.; Bily, L.M.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Corrosive wear of aluminium alloy in inhibited artificial acid rain was studied. → Tribometer with linear reciprocating ball-on-flat geometry was used.→ Corrosion potential, polarization current and friction coefficient were measured. → Chromate decreases corrosion of aluminium alloy under wear conditions. → Chromate in general accelerates corrosive wear of the alloy in acid rain. - Abstract: The corrosive wear of D16T aluminium alloy in artificial acid rain was studied. A special tribometer with the linear reciprocating ball-on-flat geometry was used. The setup allows to measure simultaneously an open circuit potential, to carry out potentiostatic and potentiodynamic polarization studies of the alloy corrosion and to record the friction coefficient. It was established that the addition of strontium chromate inhibitor to the working environment decreases an electrochemical corrosion of the aluminium alloy under wear conditions, but in general accelerates its destruction due to insufficient wear resistance of a formed surface film.

  15. Corrosion deformation interaction during stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 in primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boursier, J.M.; Noel, D.; Rios, R.; Vaillant, F.; Magnin, T.

    1993-12-01

    In order to study the mechanisms involved in the SCC of Alloy 600 in primary water, the influence of chemical and microstructural parameters was assessed. Recent fractographic examinations performed on fracture surfaces of specimens are presented together with the influence of the environment on the creep rate to the nickel-base alloy. These results lead to the conclusion that intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Alloy 600 could result from a cleavage-cracking mechanism involving interactions between dissolution/hydrogen adsorption and plasticity. (authors). 20 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs

  16. Corrosion of dental alloys in artificial saliva with Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chunhui; Zheng, Yuanli; Zhong, Qun

    2017-01-01

    A comparative study of the corrosion resistance of CoCr and NiCr alloys in artificial saliva (AS) containing tryptic soy broth (Solution 1) and Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) species (Solution 2) was performed by electrochemical methods, including open circuit potential measurements, impedance spectroscopy, and potentiodynamic polarization. The adherence of S. mutans to the NiCr and CoCr alloy surfaces immersed in Solution 2 for 24 h was verified by scanning electron microscopy, while the results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy confirmed the importance of biofilm formation for the corrosion process. The R(QR) equivalent circuit was successfully used to fit the data obtained for the AS mixture without S. mutans, while the R(Q(R(QR))) circuit was found to be more suitable for describing the biofilm properties after treatment with the AS containing S. mutans species. In addition, a negative shift of the open circuit potential with immersion time was observed for all samples regardless of the solution type. Both alloys exhibited higher charge transfer resistance after treatment with Solution 2, and lower corrosion current densities were detected for all samples in the presence of S. mutans. The obtained results suggest that the biofilm formation observed after 24 h of exposure to S. mutans bacteria might enhance the corrosion resistance of the studied samples by creating physical barriers that prevented oxygen interactions with the metal surfaces.

  17. Corrosion behaviour and deposition of crud on Zr-alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroto, A.J.G.; Bordoni, R.; Olmedo, A.M.; Villegas, M.; Chocron, M.; Szpunar, J.

    1999-01-01

    The results from the long term corrosion surveillance of Zr-alloys samples located out of pile in the primary heat transfer system of a PHWR with standard water chemistry show that, up to 3400 days, the mean value of the oxide thickness obtained for Zr-2.5Nb and Zry-4 samples exposed at 305 deg. C is in good agreement with the values reported in the literature. The amount of crud deposited on the corrosion samples was calculated at every inspection of the long term surveillance programme. The corrosion behaviour of these alloys is also studied in static autoclaves with lithiated heavy water. The effect on Zr-alloys of a change in chemistry resulting from the degradation of mixed resins in the primary heat transfer system was investigated in additional tests in static autoclaves up to 120 days at 400 deg. C comparing the results with those from the corrosion samples inserted in the autoclave facilities of the plant. (author)

  18. Corrosion of dental alloys in artificial saliva with Streptococcus mutans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhui Lu

    Full Text Available A comparative study of the corrosion resistance of CoCr and NiCr alloys in artificial saliva (AS containing tryptic soy broth (Solution 1 and Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans species (Solution 2 was performed by electrochemical methods, including open circuit potential measurements, impedance spectroscopy, and potentiodynamic polarization. The adherence of S. mutans to the NiCr and CoCr alloy surfaces immersed in Solution 2 for 24 h was verified by scanning electron microscopy, while the results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy confirmed the importance of biofilm formation for the corrosion process. The R(QR equivalent circuit was successfully used to fit the data obtained for the AS mixture without S. mutans, while the R(Q(R(QR circuit was found to be more suitable for describing the biofilm properties after treatment with the AS containing S. mutans species. In addition, a negative shift of the open circuit potential with immersion time was observed for all samples regardless of the solution type. Both alloys exhibited higher charge transfer resistance after treatment with Solution 2, and lower corrosion current densities were detected for all samples in the presence of S. mutans. The obtained results suggest that the biofilm formation observed after 24 h of exposure to S. mutans bacteria might enhance the corrosion resistance of the studied samples by creating physical barriers that prevented oxygen interactions with the metal surfaces.

  19. Influence of impurities and ion surface alloying on the corrosion resistance of E110 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalin, B. A.; Volkov, N. V.; Valikov, R. A.; Novikov, V. V.; Markelov, V. A.; Pimenov, Yu. V.

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of zirconium alloys depends on their structural-phase state, the type of core coolant and operating factors. The formation of a protective oxide film on the zirconium alloys is sensitive to the content of impurity atoms present in the charge base of alloys and accumulating in them in the manufacture of products. The impurity composition of the initial zirconium is determined by the method of its manufacture and generally remains unchanged in the products, deter-mining their properties, including their corrosion resistance. An increased content of impurities (C, N, Al, Mo, Fe) both individually and in their combination negatively affects the corrosion resistance of zirconium and its alloys. One of the potentially effective methods to increase the protective properties of oxide films on zirconium alloys is a surface alloying using the regime of mixing the atoms of a film, preliminarily coated on the surface, and the atoms of a target. This method makes it possible to form a given structural-phase state in the thin surface layer with unique physicochemical properties and thus to in-crease the corrosion resistance and wear resistance of fuel claddings. In this context, the object of investigation was samples of cladding tubes from alloy E110 with various content of impurity elements (nitrogen, aluminum, and carbon) with the aim to reduce the negative influence of impurities on the corrosion resistance by changing the structural-phase state of the surface layer of fuel claddings and fuel assembly components with alloying in the regime of ion mixing of atoms

  20. Biodegradable magnesium alloys for orthopaedic applications: A review on corrosion, biocompatibility and surface modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Sankalp; Curtin, James; Duffy, Brendan; Jaiswal, Swarna

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys have been extensively explored as potential biodegradable implant materials for orthopaedic applications (e.g. Fracture fixation). However, the rapid corrosion of Mg based alloys in physiological conditions has delayed their introduction for therapeutic applications to date. The present review focuses on corrosion, biocompatibility and surface modifications of biodegradable Mg alloys for orthopaedic applications. Initially, the corrosion behaviour of Mg alloys and the effect of alloying elements on corrosion and biocompatibility is discussed. Furthermore, the influence of polymeric deposit coatings, namely sol-gel, synthetic aliphatic polyesters and natural polymers on corrosion and biological performance of Mg and its alloy for orthopaedic applications are presented. It was found that inclusion of alloying elements such as Al, Mn, Ca, Zn and rare earth elements provides improved corrosion resistance to Mg alloys. It has been also observed that sol-gel and synthetic aliphatic polyesters based coatings exhibit improved corrosion resistance as compared to natural polymers, which has higher biocompatibility due to their biomimetic nature. It is concluded that, surface modification is a promising approach to improve the performance of Mg-based biomaterials for orthopaedic applications. - Highlights: • The Mg based alloys are promising candidates for orthopaedic applications. • The rapid corrosion of Mg can affect human cells, and causes infection and implant failure. • The various physiological factors and Mg alloying elements affect the corrosion and mechanical properties of implants. • The polymeric deposit coatings enhance the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility.

  1. Study on Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking Behaviors of AZ31 Alloy in Sodium Sulfate Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiuli; Yan, Zhifeng; Liang, Hongyu; Wei, Yinghui

    2017-05-01

    The potentiodynamic polarization test and slow strain rate tensile test were carried out in 3.5 wt.% Na2SO4 solution with different pH values (2, 7, and 12). It was found that the SCC susceptibility of AZ31 magnesium alloy in 3.5 wt.% Na2SO4 solution was deteriorated significantly with the decreasing pH. This was consistent with the electrochemical properties. There were filiform corrosion forms on the specimen surface after slow strain rate tensile test in 3.5 wt.% Na2SO4 solution, which indicated the characteristics of general corrosion. Moreover, there were multiple stress corrosion crack initiation sources. The SCC fracture of AZ31 magnesium alloy in air was a mix type, while it was cleavage fracture in 3.5 wt.% Na2SO4 solution.

  2. Electrochemical study of stress corrosion cracking of copper alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malki, Brahim

    1999-01-01

    This work deals with the electrochemical study of stress corrosion of copper alloys in aqueous environment. Selective dissolution and electrochemical oxidation are two key-points of the stress corrosion of these alloys. The first part of this thesis treats of these aspects applied to Cu-Au alloys. Measurements have been performed using classical electrochemical techniques (in potentio-dynamic, potentio-static and galvano-static modes). The conditions of occurrence of an electrochemical noise is analysed using signal processing techniques. The impact on the behavior of Cu 3 Au are discussed. In the second part, the stress corrosion problem is addressed in the case of surface oxide film formation, in particular for Cu-Zn alloys. We have found useful to extend this study to mechanical stress oxidation mechanisms in the presence of an oscillating potential electrochemical system. The aim is to examine the influence of these new electrochemical conditions (galvano-static mode) on the behavior of stressed brass. Finally, the potential distribution at crack tip is calculated in order to compare the different observations [fr

  3. Coatings for Oxidation and Hot Corrosion Protection of Disk Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Jim; Gabb, Tim; Draper, Sue; Miller, Bob; Locci, Ivan; Sudbrack, Chantal

    2017-01-01

    Increasing temperatures in aero gas turbines is resulting in oxidation and hot corrosion attack of turbine disks. Since disks are sensitive to low cycle fatigue (LCF), any environmental attack, and especially hot corrosion pitting, can potentially seriously degrade the life of the disk. Application of metallic coatings are one means of protecting disk alloys from this environmental attack. However, simply the presence of a metallic coating, even without environmental exposure, can degrade the LCF life of a disk alloy. Therefore, coatings must be designed which are not only resistant to oxidation and corrosion attack, but must not significantly degrade the LCF life of the alloy. Three different Ni-Cr coating compositions (29, 35.5, 45wt. Cr) were applied at two thicknesses by Plasma Enhanced Magnetron Sputtering (PEMS) to two similar Ni-based disk alloys. One coating also received a thin ZrO2 overcoat. The coated samples were also given a short oxidation exposure in a low PO2 environment to encourage chromia scale formation. Without further environmental exposure, the LCF life of the coated samples, evaluated at 760C, was less than that of uncoated samples. Hence, application of the coating alone degraded the LCF life of the disk alloy. Since shot peening is commonly employed to improve LCF life, the effect of shot peening the coated and uncoated surface was also evaluated. For all cases, shot peening improved the LCF life of the coated samples. Coated and uncoated samples were shot peened and given environmental exposures consisting of 500 hrs of oxidation followed by 50 hrs of hot corrosion, both at 760C). The high-Cr coating showed the best LCF life after the environmental exposures. Results of the LCF testing and post-test characterization of the various coatings will be presented and future research directions discussed.

  4. Corrosion Characteristics and Kinetics of Zircaloys and Aluminium Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugondo; Chaidir, A

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion rate characterization of cladding materials has been done by dynamic method. The materials are zircaloy-2,zircaloy-4,AIMg2,and AIMgSi.The zircaloy alloys are characterized in the electrolytes of boric ion,iodide ion,lithium ion and cesium ion with a pH variation.The aluminum alloys are characterized in the cooling water of RSG-GAS reactor in different temperatures and Ph values .The results, show that corrosion product of iodine on zircaloy is not passivated, meanwhile the corrosion product of cesium undergoes passivation. However, the deposited substance in the surface of the specimens as indicated using WDX-SEM shows the same deposition rate.it is concluded therefore that iodine is diffused into the materials without getting resistance from the deposited substances on the surface. The effect of pH to corrosion rate of iodine on the zircaloy fluctuates meanwhile the cesium has the minimum corrosion rate at pH 7.5 At the concentration of 0.1 gram/1,cesium ion is more reactive than iodine but at higher concentration the reactivity becomes competitive . Furthermore , the interaction between zircaloy and boric ion at concentration of 300 ppm and lithium ion at 10 ppm shows an outstanding corrosion rate, i.e. 0.1 mpy. if both substances are mixed then the corrosion rate decreases drastically in the order of 10 -2 mpy.The reason of such a decrease may be due to the formation of complexes of boron lithium on the electrode surface. The arrhenius activation energies for such reaction have been found to be 37629.322 joule/mole 0 K for Al Mg 2 and 41609.822 joule /mole 0 K for AIMgSi ,respectively. This underlies the argument that AI Mg 2 is more reactive than AI Mg Si besides , AI Mg 2 is more reactive under acid condition meanwhile AI Mg Si more reactive under basic condition. Both alloys over come the minimum corrosion rate at the pH in between 4.7 to 7.5 and the level of the corrosion rate in the pH interval was outstanding

  5. In Situ X-ray Microtomography of Stress Corrosion Cracking and Corrosion Fatigue in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sudhanshu S.; Stannard, Tyler J.; Xiao, Xianghui; Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2017-08-01

    Structural materials are subjected to combinations of stress and corrosive environments that work synergistically to cause premature failure. Therefore, studies on the combined effect of stress and corrosive environments on material behavior are required. Existing studies have been performed in two dimensions that are inadequate for full comprehension of the three-dimensional (3D) processes related to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and corrosion-fatigue (CF) behavior. Recently, x-ray synchrotron tomography has evolved as an excellent technique to obtain the microstructure in 3D. Moreover, being nondestructive in nature, x-ray synchrotron tomography is well suited to study the evolution of microstructure with time (4D, or fourth dimension in time). This article presents our recent 4D studies on SCC and CF of Al 7075 alloys using x-ray synchrotron tomography.

  6. Corrosion resistance of titanium ion implanted AZ91 magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chenglong; Xin Yunchang; Tian Xiubo; Zhao, J.; Chu, Paul K.

    2007-01-01

    Degradable metal alloys constitute a new class of materials for load-bearing biomedical implants. Owing to their good mechanical properties and biocompatibility, magnesium alloys are promising in degradable prosthetic implants. The objective of this study is to improve the corrosion behavior of surgical AZ91 magnesium alloy by titanium ion implantation. The surface characteristics of the ion implanted layer in the magnesium alloys are examined. The authors' results disclose that an intermixed layer is produced and the surface oxidized films are mainly composed of titanium oxide with a lesser amount of magnesium oxide. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that the oxide has three layers. The outer layer which is 10 nm thick is mainly composed of MgO and TiO 2 with some Mg(OH) 2 . The middle layer that is 50 nm thick comprises predominantly TiO 2 and MgO with minor contributions from MgAl 2 O 4 and TiO. The third layer from the surface is rich in metallic Mg, Ti, Al, and Ti 3 Al. The effects of Ti ion implantation on the corrosion resistance and electrochemical behavior of the magnesium alloys are investigated in simulated body fluids at 37±1 deg. C using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and open circuit potential techniques. Compared to the unimplanted AZ91 alloy, titanium ion implantation significantly shifts the open circuit potential (OCP) to a more positive potential and improves the corrosion resistance at OCP. This phenomenon can be ascribed to the more compact surface oxide film, enhanced reoxidation on the implanted surface, as well as the increased β-Mg 12 Al 17 phase

  7. Pitting Corrosion Topography Characteristics and Evolution Laws of LC4 Aluminum Alloy in Service Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Zhiguo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft aluminum alloy is easy to initiate pitting corrosion in the service environment, the pitting corrosion topography characteristics could directly affect the fatigue mechanical property of structure material. In order to obtain the pitting corrosion topography characteristics of LC4 aluminum alloy in the service environment, the accelerated corrosion test was carried out along the accelerated corrosion test environment spectrum which imitated the service environment spectrum, and the corrosion topography characteristic parameters of corrosion pit depth H,corrosion pit surface length L and corrosion pit surface width W were defined respectively. During the corrosion test process,the three parameters of typical corrosion pit were successively measured in different equivalent corrosion years for obtaining the corrosion pit damage size data, then the data were analysed through the statistics method and fractal theory. Further more in order to gain the pit topography characteristics in the same equivalent corrosion year and the topography evolution laws during different equivalent corrosion years were gained. The analysis results indicate that LC4 aluminum alloy corrosion pit topography characteristics in the service environment include the following:firstly, the pit topography characteristic parameters conform to the lognormal distributions in the same equivalent corrosion years; secondly,the pit topography characteristic parameters gradually reflect the fractal feature in accordance with the equivalent corrosion year increment, and the pits tend to be shallow, long and moderate wide topography character.

  8. Corrosion resistance of metals and alloys in molten alkalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarubitskij, O.G.; Dmitruk, B.F.; Minets, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    Literature data on the corrosion of non-ferrous and noble metals, iron and steels in the molten alkalis and mixtures of their base are presented. It is shown that zirconium, niobium and tantalum are characterized by high corrosion stability in the molten NaOH. Additions of NaOH and KOH to the alkali chloride melts result in a 1000 time decrease of zirconium corrosion rate at 850 deg. The data testify to the characteristic passivating properties of OH - ions; Mo and W do not possess an ability to selfpassivation in hydroxide melts. Corrosion resistance of carbon and chromium-nickel steels in hydroxide melts depends considerably on the temperature, electrolyte composition and atmosphere over them. At the temperatures up to 600 deg C chromium-nickel steel is corrosion resistant in the molten alkali only in the inert atmosphere. Corrosion rate of chromium-nickel alloy is the lower the less chromium and the more nickel it contains. For the small installations the 4Kh18N25S2 and Kh23N28M3D3T steels can be recommended

  9. In vitro corrosion of dental Au-based casting alloys in polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasusuki, Norio; Ida, Yusuke; Hirose, Yukito; Ochi, Morio; Endo, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion and tarnish behaviors of two Au-based casting alloys (ISO type 1 and type 4 Au alloys) and their constituent pure metals, Au, Ag, Cu, Pt, and Pd in a polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine solution were examined. The two Au alloys actively corroded, and the main anodic reaction for both was dissolution of Au as AuI₂(-). The amount of Au released from the ISO type 1 Au alloy was significantly larger than that from the ISO type 4 Au alloy (Palloy exhibited higher susceptibility to tarnishing than the type 4 alloy. The corrosion forms of the two Au alloys were found to be completely different, i.e., the type 1 alloy exhibited the corrosion attack over the entire exposed surface with a little irregularity whereas the type 4 alloy exhibited typical intergranular corrosion, which was caused by local cells produced by segregation of Pd and Pt.

  10. Corrosion behavior of dental alloys in various types of electrolyzed water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hongwei; Nagamatsu, Yuki; Chen, Ker-Kong; Tajima, Kiyoshi; Kakigawa, Hiroshi; Shi, Sizhen; Kozono, Yoshio

    2003-12-01

    The corrosion behavior of dental alloys was examined in electrolyzed strong acid water, weak acid water and neutral water using a 7-day immersion test. The precious metal alloys, gold alloy. Au-Ag-Pd alloy and silver alloy showed the greatest surface color change and dissolution of constituents in the strong acid water and the smallest in the neutral water. The release of Au from gold alloy was especially marked in the strong acid water. Co-Cr alloy showed greater corrosion and tarnish resistance in the strong acid water rather than in the weak acid water and the neutral water. X-ray microanalysis revealed that the corrosion products on the precious metal alloys were silver chloride crystals and the thin brown products on Co-Cr alloy were cobalt and chromium oxides. Ti was sound in all three types of electrolyzed water. The neutral water appeared the least corrosive to metals among the three types showing equivalent bactericidal activity.

  11. Corrosion of ferrous alloys in eutectic lead-lithium environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Smith, D.L.

    1983-09-01

    Corrosion data have been obtained on austenitic prime candidate alloy (PCA) and Type 316 stainless steel and ferritic HT-9 and Fe-9Cr-1Mo steels in a flowing Pb-17 at. % Li environment at 727 and 700 K (454 and 427 0 C). The results indicate that the dissolution rates for both austenitic and ferritic steels in Pb-17Li are an order of magnitude greater than in flowing lithium. The influence of time, temperature, and alloy composition on the corrosion behavior in Pb-17Li is similar to that in lithium. The weight losses for the austenitic steels are an order of magnitude greater than for the ferritic steels. The rate of weight loss for the ferritic steels is constant, whereas the dissolution rates for the austenitic steels decrease with time. After exposure to Pb-17Li, the austenitic steels develop a very weak and porous ferrite layer which easily spalls from the specimen surface

  12. Quantitative evaluation of safety use limit for crevice corrosion in Ni-Cr-Mo alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukaya, Yuichi; Akashi, Masatsune; Sasaki, Hidetsugu; Tsujikawa, Shigeo

    2007-01-01

    The most important problem with corrosion-resistant alloys such as stainless steels is localized corrosion. Crevice corrosion, which is a typical localized corrosion, occurs under the mildest environmental conditions. Consequently, whether crevice corrosion occurs or not is an important issue in structural material selection. This study investigated highly corrosion-resistant Ni-Cr-Mo alloys whose resistance for crevice corrosion is difficult to evaluate with the JIS G 0592 standard for common strainless steels. The optimized procedures for determining the critical potential and temperature for crevice corrosion of the alloys were developed based on the JIS method. The limits of safety usage of various Ni-Cr-Mo alloys were evaluated quantitatively in chloride solution environments. (author)

  13. Chemical conversion coating for protecting magnesium alloys from corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Gaurang; Allen, Fred M.; Skandan, Ganesh; Hornish, Peter; Jain, Mohit

    2016-01-05

    A chromate-free, self-healing conversion coating solution for magnesium alloy substrates, composed of 10-20 wt. % Mg(NO.sub.3).sub.2.6H.sub.2O, 1-5 wt. % Al(NO.sub.3).sub.3.9H.sub.2O, and less than 1 wt. % of [V.sub.10O.sub.28].sup.6- or VO.sub.3.sup.- dissolved in water. The corrosion resistance offered by the resulting coating is in several hundreds of hours in salt-spray testing. This prolonged corrosion protection is attributed to the creation of a unique structure and morphology of the conversion coating that serves as a barrier coating with self-healing properties. Hydroxoaluminates form the backbone of the barrier protection offered while the magnesium hydroxide domains facilitate the "slow release" of vanadium compounds as self-healing moieties to defect sites, thus providing active corrosion protection.

  14. Corrosion of alloy 22 in phosphate and chloride containing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carranza, Ricardo M.

    2007-01-01

    Alloy C-22 is a Ni-based alloy (22% Cr, 13% Mo, 3% W y 3% Fe in weight per cent) that exhibits an excellent uniform and localized corrosion resistance due to its protective passive film. It was designed to resist the most aggressive environments for industrial applications. Alloy 22 is one of the candidates to be considered for the outer shell of the canister that would contain high level radioactive nuclear wastes. The effect of phosphate ion in chloride containing solutions at 90 C degrees was studied under aggressive conditions were this material might be susceptible to crevice corrosion. The electrolyte solution, which consisted of 1M NaCl and different phosphate concentrations (between 10 -3 M and 1M), was deoxygenated by bubbling with nitrogen. Electrochemical tests, electron microscope observations (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer analysis (EDS) were conducted. Crevice corrosion was not detected and the comparison of the potentiodynamic polarization tests showed an increase of the passivity range in phosphate containing solutions. The passive current value was 1 μA/cm 2 approximately in all the tests that were performed in this work. The differences in composition of the anodic film formed on the samples suggest that phosphate is responsible for the increase of the passivity range by incorporation to the passive film. (author)

  15. Theoretical aspects of stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Kwon; Macdonald, Digby D.

    2018-05-01

    Theoretical aspects of the stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 22 in contact with saturated NaCl solution are explored in terms of the Coupled Environment Fracture Model (CEFM), which was calibrated upon available experimental crack growth rate data. Crack growth rate (CGR) was then predicted as a function of stress intensity, electrochemical potential, solution conductivity, temperature, and electrochemical crack length (ECL). From the dependence of the CGR on the ECL and the evolution of a semi-elliptical surface crack in a planar surface under constant loading conditions it is predicted that penetration through the 2.5-cm thick Alloy 22 corrosion resistant layer of the waste package (WP) could occur 32,000 years after nucleation. Accordingly, the crack must nucleate within the first 968,000 years of storage. However, we predict that the Alloy 22 corrosion resistant layer will not be penetrated by SCC within the 10,000-year Intermediate Performance Period, even if a crack nucleates immediately upon placement of the WP in the repository.

  16. NF ISO 10270. Corrosion of metals and alloys. Aqueous corrosion tests of zirconium alloys used in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-06-01

    This international standard prescribes the determination of the mass gain and the superficial control of zirconium and zirconium alloy products after a corrosion test performed in water at 360 deg. C and in steam at 400 deg. C or more. A pressure of 10.3 MPa (1500 psi) is applied during the tests performed in vapor. This standard applies to welded and molded products, to powder metallurgy products and to filler metals for welding application. The method has been widely used in the development of new alloys and new techniques of thermal treatment and in the evaluation of welding techniques. (J.S.)

  17. Stress corrosion cracking and dealloying of copper-gold alloy in iodine vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvez, M.F.; Bianchi, G.L.; Galvele, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of copper-gold alloy in iodine vapor was studied and the results were analyzed under the scope of the surface mobility stress corrosion cracking mechanism. The copper-gold alloy undergoes stress corrosion cracking in iodine. Copper iodide was responsible of that behavior. The copper-gold alloy shows two processes in parallel: stress corrosion cracking and dealloying. As was predicted by the surface mobility stress corrosion cracking mechanism, the increase in strain rate induces an increase in the crack propagation rate. (Author)

  18. Corrosion of high purity Fe-Cr-Ni alloys in 13 N boiling nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Joji; Mayuzumi, Masami; Kusanagi, Hideo; Takaku, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion in boiling nitric acid was investigated for high purity Fe-18%Cr-12%Ni alloys and type 304L stainless steels (SS). Owing to very low impurity concentration, the solution treated high purity alloys show almost no intergranular corrosion while the type 304L SS show severe intergranular corrosion. Both in the high purity alloys and type 304L SS, aging treatments ranging from 873 K to 1073 K for 1 h enhance intergranular corrosion. During the aging treatments, impurities should be segregated to the grain boundaries. The corrosion behaviors were discussed from a standpoint of impurity segregation to grain boundaries. This study is of importance for purex reprocessing of spent fuels

  19. Influence of graphite-alloy interactions on corrosion of Ni-Mo-Cr alloy in molten fluorides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Hua; Hou, Juan; Ye, Xiang-Xi; Zeng, Chao Liu; Sun, Hua; Li, Xiaoyun; Yu, Guojun; Zhou, Xingtai; Wang, Jian-Qiang

    2018-05-01

    In this study, the effects of graphite-alloy interaction on corrosion of Ni-Mo-Cr alloy in molten FLiNaK salt were investigated. The corrosion tests of Ni-Mo-Cr alloys were conducted in graphite crucibles, to examine the differences of test specimens in conditions of electric contact and isolated with graphite, respectively. The corrosion attack is severer with more weight loss and deeper Cr depletion layer in samples electric contact with graphite than those isolated with graphite. The occurrence of galvanic corrosion between alloy specimens and graphite container was confirmed by electrochemical measurement. The corrosion is controlled by nonelectric transfer in isolated test while electrochemical reaction accelerated corrosion in electric contact test.

  20. Assessment of corrosion resistance of cast cobalt- and nickel-chromium dental alloys in acidic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercieca, Sven; Caligari Conti, Malcolm; Buhagiar, Joseph; Camilleri, Josette

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the degradation resistance of nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) and cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloys used as a base material for partial dentures in contact with saliva. Wiron® 99 and Wironit Extra-Hard® were selected as representative casting alloys for Ni-Cr and Co-Cr alloys, respectively. The alloys were tested in contact with deionized water, artificial saliva and acidified artificial saliva. Material characterization was performed by X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and microhardness and nanohardness testing. The corrosion properties of the materials were then analyzed using open circuit potential analysis and potentiodynamic analysis. Alloy leaching in solution was assessed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry techniques. Co-Cr alloy was more stable than the Ni-Cr alloy in all solutions tested. Leaching of nickel and corrosion attack was higher in Ni-Cr alloy in artificial saliva compared with the acidified saliva. The corrosion resistance of the Co-Cr alloy was seen to be superior to that of the Ni-Cr alloy, with the former exhibiting a lower corrosion current in all test solutions. Microstructural topographical changes were observed for Ni-Cr alloy in contact with artificial saliva. The Ni-Cr alloy exhibited microstructural changes and lower corrosion resistance in artificial saliva. The acidic changes did not enhance the alloy degradation. Ni-Cr alloys are unstable in solution and leach nickel. Co-Cr alloys should be preferred for clinical use.

  1. Laser deposition of (Cu + Mo) alloying reinforcements on AA1200 substrate for corrosion improvement

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Popoola, API

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Poor corrosion performance of aluminium alloys in marine environment has been a subject of intensive research recently. Aluminium substrate was alloyed with a combination of two metallic powders (Cu + Mo) using an Nd: YAG solid state laser...

  2. The growth of small corrosion fatigue cracks in alloy 2024

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Willard, Scott A.

    1993-04-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 2024 is established. The damaging effect of salt water on the early stages of small crack growth is characterized by crack initiation at constituent particle pits, intergranular microcracking for a less than 100 micrometers, and transgranular small crack growth for a micrometer. In aqueous 1 percent NaCl and at a constant anodic potential of -700 mV(sub SCE), small cracks exhibit a factor of three increase in fatigue crack growth rates compared to laboratory air. Small cracks exhibit accelerated corrosion fatigue crack growth rates at low levels of delta-K (less than 1 MPa square root of m) below long crack delta-K (sub th). When exposed to Paris regime levels of crack tip stress intensity, small corrosion fatigue cracks exhibit growth rates similar to that observed for long cracks. Results suggest that crack closure effects influence the corrosion fatigue crack growth rates of small cracks (a less than or equal to 100 micrometers). This is evidenced by similar small and long crack growth behavior at various levels of R. Contrary to the corrosion fatigue characteristics of small cracks in high strength steels, no pronounced chemical crack length effect is observed for Al by 2024 exposed to salt water.

  3. Atmospheric Corrosion Behavior of 2A12 Aluminum Alloy in a Tropical Marine Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongyu Cui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric corrosion behavior of 2A12 aluminum alloy exposed to a tropical marine environment for 4 years was investigated. Weight loss of 2A12 alloy in the log-log coordinates can be well fitted with two linear segments, attributing to the evolution of the corrosion products. EIS results indicate that the corrosion product layer formed on the specimens exposed for 12 months or longer presents a good barrier effect. Corrosion morphology changes from pitting corrosion to severe intergranular corrosion with the extension of exposure time, resulting in the reduction of the mechanical properties.

  4. A Review Corrosion of TI Grade 7 and Other TI Alloys in Nuclear Waste Repository Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Hua; K. Mon; P. Pasupathi; G. Gordon

    2004-05-11

    Titanium alloy degradation modes are reviewed in relation to their performance in repository environments. General corrosion, localized corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, hydrogen induced cracking, microbially influenced corrosion, and radiation-assisted corrosion of Ti alloys are considered. With respect to the Ti Grade 7 drip shields selected for emplacement in the repository at Yucca Mountain, general corrosion, hydrogen induced cracking, and radiation-assisted corrosion will not lead to failure within the 10,000 year regulatory period; stress corrosion cracking (in the absence of disruptive events) is of no consequence to barrier performance; and localized corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion are not expected to occur. To facilitate the discussion, Ti Grades 2, 5, 7, 9, 11, 12, 16, 17, 18, and 24 are included in this review.

  5. Iron-based alloys with corrosion resistance to oxygen-sulfur mixed gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natesan, Krishnamurti

    1992-01-01

    An iron-based alloy with improved performance with exposure to oxygen-sulfur mixed gases with the alloy containing about 9-30 wt. % Cr and a small amount of Nb and/or Zr implanted on the surface of the alloy to diffuse a depth into the surface portion, with the alloy exhibiting corrosion resistance to the corrosive gases without bulk addition of Nb and/or Zr and without heat treatment at temperatures of 1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.

  6. The corrosion behaviour of nanograined metals and alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrasti, P.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available There has been considerable interest in the properties of nanocrystalline materials over the last decade. Such materials include metals and alloys with a crystal size within the order of 1 to 100 nm. The interest arises due to the substantial differences in electrical, optical and magnetic properties and also due to their high adsorption capability and chemical reactivity compared to their larger grained counterparts. In this paper, the corrosion of nanocrystalline metals and alloys is investigated and compared to the corrosion of microcrystalline materials having a similar composition. The focus is on the corrosion of nickel, copper, cobalt and iron alloys. Key aspects of different corrosion behaviour such grain boundaries and size are identified.

    En la última década ha habido un gran interes en las propiedades de materiales nanocristalinos. Estos materiales incluyen metales y aleaciones con un tamaño de cristal del orden de 1 a 100 nm. El interes por estos materiales es debido a las grandes diferencias en cuanto a sus propiedades electricas, opticas y magneticas, asi como a su alta capacidad de adsorción y reactividad química en relación a los mismos materiales con tamaños de grano mayores. En este trabajo se ha investigado y comparado la corrosión de materiales nano y microcristalinos de similar composición química. Principalmente se ha centrado en la corrosión de metales tales como niquel, cobre, cobalto y aleaciones de hierro. Se ha comprobado que los diferentes comportamientos frente al proceso de corrosión están intimamente ligados con los bordes de grano y el tamaño de dichos granos.

  7. Enhancement of wear and corrosion resistance of beta titanium alloy by laser gas alloying with nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chi-Wai; Lee, Seunghwan; Smith, Graham; Sarri, Gianluca; Ng, Chi-Ho; Sharba, Ahmed; Man, Hau-Chung

    2016-03-01

    The relatively high elastic modulus coupled with the presence of toxic vanadium (V) in Ti6Al4V alloy has long been a concern in orthopaedic applications. To solve the problem, a variety of non-toxic and low modulus beta-titanium (beta-Ti) alloys have been developed. Among the beta-Ti alloy family, the quaternary Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta (TNZT) alloys have received the highest attention as a promising replacement for Ti6Al4V due to their lower elastic modulus and outstanding long term stability against corrosion in biological environments. However, the inferior wear resistance of TNZT is still a problem that must be resolved before commercialising in the orthopaedic market. In this work, a newly developed laser surface treatment technique was employed to improve the surface properties of Ti-35.3Nb-7.3Zr-5.7Ta alloy. The surface structure and composition of the laser-treated TNZT surface were examined by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The wear and corrosion resistance were evaluated by pin-on-plate sliding test and anodic polarisation test in Hanks' solution. The experimental results were compared with the untreated (or base) TNZT material. The research findings showed that the laser surface treatment technique reported in this work can effectively improve the wear and corrosion resistance of TNZT.

  8. Influence of bovine serum albumin in Hanks' solution on the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of a magnesium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harandi, Shervin Eslami; Banerjee, Parama Chakraborty; Easton, Christopher D; Singh Raman, R K

    2017-11-01

    It is essential for any temporary implant to possess adequate strength to maintain their mechanical integrity under the synergistic effects of mechanical loading characteristics of human body and the corrosive physiological environment. Such synergistic effects can cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of the addition of bovine serum albumin (BSA) to Hanks' solution in corrosion and SCC susceptibility of AZ91D magnesium alloy. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) results indicated that the addition of BSA increased corrosion resistance of the alloy during the first 48h of immersion and then decreased it rapidly. The energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses indicated adsorption of BSA on the alloy surface during initial hours of immersion. However, with the increasing immersion time, BSA chelated with the corrosion products causing disruption of the protective film; thus, it accelerated the corrosion of the alloy. Both the mechanical data and fractographic evidence have confirmed susceptibility of the alloy to SCC. However, in the presence of BSA, the alloy suffered greater SCC which was attributed to its increased susceptibility towards localized corrosion. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Corrosion Behavior of 7B04 Al-alloy in Simulated Marine Atmospheric Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Chenguang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion of aluminum alloy in marine atmospheric environment was an essential electrochemical corrosion under thin electrolyte film, which was different from the corrosion in bulk solution, the corrosion rate was related to the thickness and composition of thin electrolyte film. The relationship among film thickness, relative humidity and salt deposit on aluminum alloy surface was established and verified by experiment. The electrochemical properties of 7B04 Al-alloy under thin electrolyte film with different thickness and different NaCl concentration were studied. The results indicate that the free-corrosion potential of 7B04 Al-alloy under thin electrolyte film is easier to reach steady state than that in bulk solution, both free-corrosion potential and corrosion rate are higher under thin electrolyte film. With the decrease of film thickness, the cathodic polarization current density of 7B04 Al-alloy increases, and the anode reaction is suppressed. With the increase of NaCl concentration in thin electrolyte film, the free-corrosion potential of 7B04 Al-alloy decreases, and the corrosion rate increases, but the polarization of the anode and cathode have little effect on the change of NaCl concentration. The free-corrosion potential of 7B04 Al-alloy is no longer changed when the mass fraction of NaCl reaches 5%.

  10. Laboratory procedures used in the hot corrosion project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeys, T.R.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of the Hot Corrosion Project in the LLNL Metals and Ceramics Division is to study the physical and chemical mechanisms of corrosion of nickel, iron, and some of their alloys when these metals are subjected to oxidizing or sulfidizing environments at temperatures between 850 and 950 0 C. To obtain meaningful data in this study, we must rigidly control many parameters. Parameters are discussed and the methods chosen to control them in this laboratory. Some of the mechanics and manipulative procedures that are specifically related to data access and repeatability are covered. The method of recording and processing the data from each experiment using an LS-11 minicomputer are described. The analytical procedures used to evaluate the specimens after the corrosion tests are enumerated and discussed

  11. Effectiveness of Ti-micro alloying in relation to cooling rate on corrosion of AZ91 Mg alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candan, S.; Celik, M.; Candan, E.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, micro Ti-alloyed AZ91 Mg alloys (AZ91 + 0.5wt.%Ti) have been investigated in order to clarify effectiveness of micro alloying and/or cooling rate on their corrosion properties. Molten alloys were solidified under various cooling rates by using four stage step mold. The microstructural investigations were carried out by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Corrosion behaviors of the alloys were evaluated by means of immersion and electrochemical polarization tests in 3.5% NaCl solution. Results showed that the Mg 17 Al 12 (β) intermetallic phase in the microstructure of AZ91 Mg alloy formed as a net-like structure. The Ti addition has reduced the distribution and continuity of β intermetallic phase and its morphology has emerged as fully divorced eutectic. Compared to AZ91 alloy, the effect of the cooling rate in Ti-added alloy on the grain size was less pronounced. When AZ91 and its Ti-added alloys were compared under the same cooling conditions, the Ti addition showed notably high corrosion resistance. Electrochemical test results showed that while I corr values of AZ91 decrease with the increase in the cooling rate, the effect of the cooling rate on I corr values was much lower in the Ti-added alloy. The corrosion resistance of AZ91 Mg alloy was sensitive towards the cooling rates while Ti-added alloy was not affected much from the cooling conditions. - Highlights: • Effect the cooling rate on grain size was less pronounced in the Ti-added alloy. • The morphology of the β phase transformed into fully divorced eutectics. • Ti addition exhibited significantly higher corrosion resistance. • Ti micro alloying is more effective than faster cooling of the alloy on corrosion.

  12. Investigation of corrosion resistance of alloys with high mechanical characteristics in some environments of food industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tremoureux, Yves

    1978-01-01

    This research thesis aimed at improving knowledge in the field of stress-free corrosion of alloys with high mechanical characteristics in aqueous environments, at highlighting some necessary aspects of their behaviour during cleaning or disinfection, and at selecting alloys which possess a good stress-free corrosion resistance in view of a later investigation of their stress corrosion resistance. After a presentation of the metallurgical characteristics of high mechanical strength alloys and the report of a bibliographical study on corrosion resistance of these alloys, the author presents and discusses the results obtained in the study of a possible migration of metallic ions in a milk product which is submitted to a centrifugation, and of the corrosion resistance of selected alloys with respect to the different media they will be in contact with during ultra-centrifugation. The following alloys have been used in this research: Marval 18, Marphynox, Marval X12, 17-4PH steel, Inconel 718 [fr

  13. Intergranular corrosion mechanism of Alloy 400

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, W. [Univ. of Toronto, Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this study is to find the reason for the intergranular corrosion (or intergranular attack, IGA) of Monel 400 (70Ni-30Cu) tubes that occurs occasionally in practice. Generally, the hypothesized factors of IGA for Monel 400 tubing could be crevices, dissolved oxygen, low pH, reduced sulfur species, and precipitation of impurities at grain boundaries. Electrochemical techniques including cyclic polarization and long-term potentiostatic polarization were used to test two heats of Monel 400 tubing that had behaved differently in practice. To simulate the situation within a crevice or under a deposit, cupric ions were added to the base solution, which was either neutral or acidic in pH. Artificial crevices without the addition of cupric ions in the base solution and a limiting current model were created which helped to elucidate the mechanism of IGA. The effect of thiourea as a representative reduced sulfur compound was investigated. The results show that in neutral solution IGA occurs with little sensitivity to metallurgy and does not require thiourea, but in acid solution it only occurs with thiourea addition, and particular grain boundary microstructures are more susceptible. (author)

  14. Corrosion performance of Al-Si-Cu hypereutectic alloys in a synthetic condensed automotive solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilta de Oliveira Santos

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation the corrosion resistance of four Al-Si hypereutectic alloys in a solution typical of condensate from automotive fuel combustion products, and referred to here as synthetic condensed automotive solution, has been studied. Three commercial alloys that are used for cylinder liners, and a laboratory made alloy, were studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and measurements were taken after increasing times of immersion in this solution. Comparison of the electrochemical response of the four alloys in the corrosive solution was carried out. Although the mechanisms by which the four alloys corroded were similar, the results indicated differences in corrosion resistances of these alloys, and these differences could be related to their microstructures. The laboratory prepared alloy showed increased susceptibility to pitting corrosion compared to the commercial alloys. The surfaces of the alloys were examined, before and after the corrosion test, by scanning electron microscopy and analyzed by energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results indicated preferential attack of the aluminium matrix phase in all the alloys. The alloy with higher copper content and prepared by spray forming was more susceptible to pitting compared to the other alloys. The EIS response at low frequencies indicated a diffusion-controlled process, probably that of oxygen to the alloy interface.

  15. Influence of surface roughness on the corrosion behaviour of magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, R.; Kannan, M. Bobby

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Surface roughness of AZ91 magnesium alloy plays a critical role in the passivation behaviour of the alloy. → The passivation behaviour of the alloy influences the pitting tendency. → Increase in surface roughness of AZ91 magnesium alloy increases the pitting tendency of the alloy. -- Abstract: In this study, the influence of surface roughness on the passivation and pitting corrosion behaviour of AZ91 magnesium alloy in chloride-containing environment was examined using electrochemical techniques. Potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests suggested that the passivation behaviour of the alloy was affected by increasing the surface roughness. Consequently, the corrosion current and the pitting tendency of the alloy also increased with increase in the surface roughness. Scanning electron micrographs of 24 h immersion test samples clearly revealed pitting corrosion in the highest surface roughness (Sa 430) alloy, whereas in the lowest surface roughness (Sa 80) alloy no evidence of pitting corrosion was observed. Interestingly, when the passivity of the alloy was disturbed by galvanostatically holding the sample at anodic current for 1 h, the alloy underwent high pitting corrosion irrespective of their surface roughness. Thus the study suggests that the surface roughness plays a critical role in the passivation behaviour of the alloy and hence the pitting tendency.

  16. Influence of alloying elements on the marine corrosion of low alloy steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dajoux, E.; Malard, S.; Lefevre, Y.; Kervadec, D.; Gil, O.

    2005-01-01

    The study of steel marine corrosion leads to the survey of the parameters having an influence on this phenomenon. These parameters may be dependent on the seawater environment or on steel characteristics. Thus it appears that an experimental procedure could be set up in order to simulate immersion conditions in natural seawater. The system allows fifteen different steels with compositions ranging from carbon steels to stainless steels to be tested during some 14 months in natural seawater with or without microbiological activity. Electrochemical and gravimetric measurements are performed on immersed steel samples. Microbiological analyses are carried out either on the metallic surface and on the liquid medium. Possible influences of alloying elements and bacteria are studied. After a two-month immersion, first results show an influence of the chromium content on the steel corrosion resistance and on marine bacteria behaviour. They also reveal that the bio-film formed onto the carbon steel and low alloy steels surfaces tends to slow down the generalized corrosion or to increase localized corrosion depending on the steel alloying elements content. (authors)

  17. Improvement of corrosion resistance of vanadium alloys in high-temperature pressurized water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Mitsuhiro; Sakamoto, Toshiya; Satou, Manabu; Hasegawa, Akira; Abe, Katsunori; Kaiuchi, Kazuo; Furuya, Takemi

    2005-01-01

    Corrosion tests in pressurized and vaporized water were conducted for V-based high Cr and Ti alloys and V-4Cr-4Ti type alloys containing minor elements such as Si, Al and Y. Weight losses were observed for every alloy after corrosion tests in pressurized water. It was apparent that addition of Cr effectively reduced the weight change in pressurized water. The weight loss of V-4Cr-4Ti type alloys in corrosion tests in vaporized water was also reduced as Cr content increased. The V-20Cr-4Ti alloy had a slight weight gain, almost same as that of SUS316, which had the best corrosion properties in the tested alloys. The elongation of alloys with in excess of 10% Cr was reduced as Cr content increased. The elongations of the V-12Cr-4Ti and the V-15Cr-4Ti alloys were significantly reduced by corrosion and cleavage fracture was observed reflecting hydrogen embrittlement. The reduced elongations of the alloys of the alloys were recovered to the same level of as annealed conditions after hydrogen degassing. After corrosion, the V-15Cr-4Ti-0.5Y alloy still kept enough elongation, suggesting that the addition of Y is effective to reduce the hydrogen embrittlement. (author)

  18. Corrosion of metals and alloys - Corrosion and fouling in industrial cooling water systems - Part 1: Guidelines for conducting pilot-scale evaluation of corrosion and fouling control additives for open recirculating cooling water systems

    CERN Document Server

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    Corrosion of metals and alloys - Corrosion and fouling in industrial cooling water systems - Part 1: Guidelines for conducting pilot-scale evaluation of corrosion and fouling control additives for open recirculating cooling water systems

  19. Chromate-free corrosion resistant conversion coatings for aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchheit, R.G.; Drewien, C.A.; Martinez, M.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stoner, G.E. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science

    1995-03-01

    Inorganic polycrystalline hydrotalcite, Li{sub 2}[Al{sub 2}(OH){sub 6}]{sub 2}{center_dot}CO{sub 3}{center_dot}3H{sub 2}O, coatings can be formed on aluminum and aluminum alloys by exposure to alkaline lithium carbonate solutions. This process is conducted using methods similar to traditional chromate conversion coating procedures, but does not use or produce toxic chemicals. The coating provides anodic protection and delays the onset of pitting during anodic polarization. Cathodic reactions are also inhibited which may also contribute to corrosion protection. Recent studies have shown that corrosion resistance can be increased by sealing hydrotalcite coated surfaces to transition metal salt solutions including Ce(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, KMnO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}. Results from these studies are also reported.

  20. Effect of Ti3+ ion on the Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Bong; Lim, Han Gwi; Kim, Bok Hee; Kim, Ki Ju

    1999-01-01

    Alloy 600 has been widely used as a steam generator tubing material in pressurized water reactors(PWRs) nuclear power plants. Corrosion of steam generator tubing mainly occurs on the secondary water side. The purpose of this work is primarily concerned with examining the effect of Ti 3+ ion concentrations on the corrosion behavior of the Alloy 600 steam generator tubing material. Corrosion behavior of the Alloy 600 steam generator tubing material was studied in aqueous solutions with varying Ti 3+ ion concentration at room temperature. Potentiodynamic and potentiostatic polarization techniques were used to determine the corrosion and pitting potentials for the Alloy 600 test material. The addition of Ti 3+ ion to 1000ppm, showed inhibition effect on the corrosion of Alloy 600. But the corrosion of Alloy 600 was accelerated when the concentration of Ti 3+ ion exceeded 1000ppm, it is assumed that the effect of general corrosion of Alloy 600 is more sensitive than pitting corrosion. It is considered that the passive film which was formed on the Alloy 600 surface in the 100ppm Ti 3+ ion containing solution is mainly consisted of TiO 2

  1. Method for inhibiting alkali metal corrosion of nickel-containing alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVan, Jackson H.; Selle, James E.

    1983-01-01

    Structural components of nickel-containing alloys within molten alkali metal systems are protected against corrosion during the course of service by dissolving therein sufficient aluminum, silicon, or manganese to cause the formation and maintenance of a corrosion-resistant intermetallic reaction layer created by the interaction of the molten metal, selected metal, and alloy.

  2. Selected Test Results from the Encell Technology Nickel Iron Battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Summer Kamal Rhodes [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Power Sources R& D; Baca, Wes Edmund [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Power Sources R& D; Avedikian, Kristan [Encell Technology, Alachua, FL (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The performance of the Encell Nickel Iron (NiFe) battery was measured. Tests included capacity, capacity as a function of rate, capacity as a function of temperature, charge retention (28-day), efficiency, accelerated life projection, and water refill evaluation. The goal of this work was to evaluate the general performance of the Encell NiFe battery technology for stationary applications and demonstrate the chemistry's capabilities in extreme conditions. Test results have indicated that the Encell NiFe battery technology can provide power levels up to the 6C discharge rate, ampere-hour efficiency above 70%. In summary, the Encell batteries have met performance metrics established by the manufacturer. Long-term cycle tests are not included in this report. A cycle test at elevated temperature was run, funded by the manufacturer, which Encell uses to predict long-term cycling performance, and which passed their prescribed metrics.

  3. The influence of yttrium (Y) on the corrosion of Mg-Y binary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ming; Schmutz, Patrik; Uggowitzer, Peter J.; Song Guangling; Atrens, Andrej

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → The Y-intermetallic can accelerate corrosion and Y can increase the protectiveness of the surface layer. → In 0.1 M NaCl, the corrosion rate of Mg-Y alloys increased with increasing Y due to the Y intermetallic. → In 0.1 M NaCl, there was filiform corrosion. → In 0.1 M Na 2 SO 4 , the corrosion rate of Mg-Y alloys decreased with increasing Y in the range 3-7%Y. → Hydrogen evolution was observed from particular parts of the alloy surface. - Abstract: Corrosion of Mg-Y alloys was studied using electrochemical evaluations, immersion tests and direct observations. There were two important effects. In 0.1 M NaCl, the corrosion rate increased with increasing Y content due to increasing amounts of the Y-containing intermetallic. In 0.1 M Na 2 SO 4 , the corrosion rate decreased with increasing Y content above 3%, attributed to a more protective surface film, despite the intermetallic. The corrosion rate evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was somewhat smaller than that evaluated from H evolution as expected from the Mg corrosion mechanism. A mechanism is proposed for filiform corrosion. Direct in situ corrosion observations revealed that a predominant feature was hydrogen evolution from particular parts of the alloy surface.

  4. Corrosion of aluminum alloys in a reactor disassembly basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, J.P.; Zapp, P.E.; Nelson, D.Z.

    1992-12-01

    This document discusses storage of aluminum clad fuel and target tubes of the Mark 22 assembly takes place in the concrete-lined, light-water-filled, disassembly basins located within each reactor area at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A corrosion test program has been conducted in the K-Reactor disassembly basin to assess the storage performance of the assemblies and other aluminum clad components in the current basin environment. Aluminum clad alloys cut from the ends of actual fuel and target tubes were originally placed in the disassembly water basin in December 1991. After time intervals varying from 45--182 days, the components were removed from the basin, photographed, and evaluated metallographically for corrosion performance. Results indicated that pitting of the 8001 aluminum fuel clad alloy exceeded the 30-mil (0.076 cm) cladding thickness within the 45-day exposure period. Pitting of the 1100 aluminum target clad alloy exceeded the 30-mil (0.076 cm) clad thickness in 107--182 days exposure. The existing basin water chemistry is within limits established during early site operations. Impurities such as Cl{sup {minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} are controlled to the parts per million level and basin water conductivity is currently 170--190 {mu}mho/cm. The test program has demonstrated that the basin water is aggressive to the aluminum components at these levels. Other storage basins at SRS and around the US have successfully stored aluminum components for greater than ten years without pitting corrosion. These basins have impurity levels controlled to the parts per billion level (1000X lower) and conductivity less than 1.0 {mu}mho/cm.

  5. The effect of urea on the corrosion behavior of different dental alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geckili, Onur; Bilhan, Hakan; Bilgin, Tayfun; Anthony von Fraunhofer, J

    2012-01-01

    Intraoral corrosion of dental alloys has biological, functional, and esthetic consequences. Since it is well known that the salivary urea concentrations undergo changes with various diseases, the present study was undertaken to determine the effect of salivary urea concentrations on the corrosion behavior of commonly used dental casting alloys. Three casting alloys were subjected to polarization scans in synthetic saliva with three different urea concentrations. Cyclic polarization clearly showed that urea levels above 20 mg/100 ml decreased corrosion current densities, increased the corrosion potentials and, at much higher urea levels, the breakdown potentials. The data indicate that elevated urea levels reduced the corrosion susceptibility of all alloys, possibly through adsorption of organics onto the metal surface. This study indicates that corrosion testing performed in sterile saline or synthetic saliva without organic components could be misleading.

  6. Irradiation-assisted stress-corrosion cracking in austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, G.S.; Andresen, P.L.

    1992-01-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress-corrosion cracking (IASCC) in austentic alloys is a complicated phenomenon that poses a difficult problem for designers and operators of nuclear plants. Because IASCC accelerates the deterioration of various reactor components, it is imperative that it be understood and modeled to maintain reactor safety. Unfortunately, the costs and dangers of gathering data on radiation effects are high, and the phenomenon itself is so complex that it is difficult to enumerate all of the causes. This article reviews current knowledge of IASCC and describes the goals of ongoing work

  7. Evaluation of corrosion behavior of Al-Mg-Li alloys in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Z.; Abdul Aleem, B.J. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-04-01

    Weldalite 050, a high-strength Al-Mg-Li alloy, was evaluated for its corrosion resistance in deaerated and air saturated Arabian Gulf water to determine its suitability for marine applications. Weight loss and electrochemical studies showed that the alloy had minimum corrosion rates of 1.82 and 4.82 mpy (mils per year), respectively, in deaerated and air saturated Arabian Gulf water with very high total dissolved solids (TDS) content. Weldalite 050 exhibited good resistance to corrosion at velocities up to 3.9 m/s. The formation of Al{sub 2}MgLi, Al-Li, Al{sub 12}Mg{sub 17}, and Al-Li precipitates has a pronounced effect on its corrosion resistance. The corrosion resistance of Weldalite 050 compares favorably with that of alloys 5052 and 5054, wrought alloys 6061 and 6013, and silicon carbide (SiC) reinforced alloys 6061 and 6013.

  8. Study made of corrosion resistance of stainless steel and nickel alloys in nuclear reactor superheaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, S.; Hart, R. K.; Lee, R. H.; Ruther, W. E.; Schlueter, R. R.

    1967-01-01

    Experiments performed under conditions found in nuclear reactor superheaters determine the corrosion rate of stainless steel and nickel alloys used in them. Electropolishing was the primary surface treatment before the corrosion test. Corrosion is determined by weight loss of specimens after defilming.

  9. Effect of ageing time and temperature on corrosion behaviour of aluminum alloy 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadpale, Vikas; Banjare, Pragya N.; Manoj, Manoranjan Kumar

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the effect of corrosion behaviour of aluminium alloy 2014 were studied by potentiodynamic polarization in 1 mole of NaCl solution of aged sample. The experimental testing results concluded that, corrosion resistance of Aluminum alloy 2014 degraded with the increasing the temperature (150°C & 200°C) and time of ageing. Corroded surface of the aged specimens was tested under optical microscopes for microstructures for phase analysis. Optical micrographs of corroded surfaces showed general corrosion and pitting corrosion. The corrosion resistance of lower ageing temperature and lower ageing time is higher because of its fine distribution of precipitates in matrix phase.

  10. The stress corrosion cracking performance of pure zirconium and zirconium alloys in highly oxidizing nitric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagano, H.; Kajimura, H. [Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd., Amagasaki, Hyogo (Japan). Central Research Labs.

    1996-05-01

    Zr has been used for many plants dealing with nitric acid due to its high corrosion resistance. However, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) occurrence has recently been reported on Zr immersed in hot nitric acid. Here corrosion performance and countermeasures against SCC of Zr, Zr-Ti and Zr-Ti-Ta alloys in HNO{sub 3} were studied. Ti has good general corrosion and SCC resistance in highly oxidizing HNO{sub 3}, although it is severely attacked in pure HNO{sub 3} at elevated temperatures. Ta is an excellent corrosion resistant material over all concentrations of nitric acid. Alloying Ti and/or Ta into Zr has synergistic effects on improving both the general corrosion and SCC resistance. The optimization of corrosion resistance has been studied in Zr alloys. (Author).

  11. In vivo corrosion and corrosion protection of magnesium alloy LAE442.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, F; Fischer, J; Nellesen, J; Vogt, C; Vogt, J; Donath, T; Beckmann, F

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the extruded magnesium alloy LAE442 reacts in vivo with an appropriate host response and to investigate how an additional magnesium fluoride (MgF(2)) coating influences the in vivo corrosion rate. Forty cylinders were machined from extruded LAE442 and 20 of these were coated additionally with MgF(2) and implanted into the medial femur condyle of adult rabbits. Synchrotron-radiation-based X-ray computed micro-tomography (SRmicroCT) was used to quantitatively analyse corrosion non-destructively in vivo and comparisons were made to magnesium degradation rates based on area measurements of the remaining metal on uncalcified sections. Blood concentrations of the alloying elements were measured below toxicological limits. The MgF(2) layer was no longer detected after 4 weeks of implantation by particle-induced gamma emission, and the MgF(2) coating reduced the blood content of alloying elements during the first 6 weeks of implantation with no elevated fluoride concentration in the adjacent bone. Histopathological examinations of liver showed in 9 out of 40 cases minimal infiltrations of heterophil granulocytes of unknown origin (5 LAE442, 4 LAE442+MgF(2)). The kidneys were mainly regular in structure. The synovial tissue showed a granular cell infiltration as a temporary observation in the LAE442+MgF(2) group after 2 weeks. No subcutaneous gas cavities were observed clinically and on postoperative X-rays in all animals. All specimens were scanned by SRmicroCT at 2, 4, 6 and 12 weeks postoperatively before uncalcified sections were performed. All magnesium implants have been observed in direct bone contact and without a fibrous capsule. Localized pitting corrosion occurred in coated and uncoated magnesium implants. This study shows that the extruded magnesium alloy LAE442 provides low corrosion rates and reacts in vivo with an acceptable host response. The in vivo corrosion rate can be further reduced by additional MgF(2

  12. Improvement of sulfide corrosion resistance of nickel heat resisting alloys by means alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oryshkin, I.V.

    1999-01-01

    Paper describes the effect of the alloying elements (chromium, aluminium, titanium, molybdenum, tungsten, niobium, cobalt) on sulfide corrosion (SC) resistance of nickel base heat-resisting alloys during 30 h in 75% Na 2 SO 4 +25% NaCl molten sat under 900 deg C temperature. The obtained patterns are compared with the effect of the mentioned metals on the long-term strength. SC high resistance and the adequate level of heat resistance are ensured by a certain doping of a nickel base [ru

  13. Corrosion mechanism of a Ni-based alloy in supercritical water: Impact of surface plastic deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payet, Mickaël; Marchetti, Loïc; Tabarant, Michel; Chevalier, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The dissolution of Ni and Fe cations occurs during corrosion of Ni-based alloys in SCW. • The nature of the oxide layer depends locally on the alloy microstructure. • The corrosion mechanism changes when cold-work increases leading to internal oxidation. - Abstract: Ni–Fe–Cr alloys are expected to be a candidate material for the generation IV nuclear reactors that use supercritical water at temperatures up to 600 °C and pressures of 25 MPa. The corrosion resistance of Alloy 690 in these extreme conditions was studied considering the surface finish of the alloy. The oxide scale could suffer from dissolution or from internal oxidation. The presence of a work-hardened zone reveals the competition between the selective oxidation of chromium with respect to the oxidation of nickel and iron. Finally, corrosion mechanisms for Ni based alloys are proposed considering the effects of plastically deformed surfaces and the dissolution.

  14. The effect lead impurities on the corrosion resistance of alloy 600 and alloy 690 in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, T.; Nakagomi, N.; Kikuchi, T.; Aoki, K.; Nakayasu, F.; Yamakawa, K.

    1998-01-01

    Degradation of nickel-based alloy steam generator (SG) tubing caused by lead-induced corrosion has been reported recently in some PWR plants. Several laboratory studies also have shown that lead causes intergranular or transgranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC or TGSCC) of the tubing materials. Information from previous studies suggests two possible explanations for the mechanism of lead-induced corrosion. One is selective dissolution of tube metal elements, resulting in formation of a lead-containing nickel-depleted oxide film as observed in mildly acidic environments. The other explanation is an increase in potential, as has been observed in lead-contaminated caustic environments, although not in all volatile treatment (AVT) water such as the ammonium-hydrazine water chemistry. These observation suggest that an electrochemical reaction between metal elements and dissolved lead might be the cause of lead-induced corrosion. The present work was undertaken to clarify the lead-induced corrosion mechanism of nickel-based alloys from an electrochemical viewpoint, focusing on mildly acidic and basic environments. These are the probable pH conditions in the crevice region between the tube and tube support plate of the SG where corrosion damage could occur. Measurements of corrosion potential and electrochemical polarization of nickel-based alloys were performed to investigate the effect of lead on electrochemical behavior of the alloys. Then, constant extension rate tests (CERT) were carried out to determine the corrosion susceptibility of the alloys in a lead-contaminated environment. (J.P.N.)

  15. Influence of MAO Treatment on the Galvanic Corrosion Between Aluminum Alloy and 316L Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuanhang; Gu, Yanhong; Zhang, Lei; Jiao, Xiangdong; Che, Juntie

    2017-12-01

    To slow down the galvanic corrosion of aluminum alloy and 316L stainless steel in subsea water, a micro-arc oxidation (MAO) coating was prepared on the surface of the Al alloy, and no treatment was performed on the surface of the 316L. The surface morphology of MAO-coated Al alloy was evaluated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) before and after corrosion. A micro-hardness tester was used to measure the micro-hardness. Corrosion behaviors were evaluated by open-circuit potential (OCP), potentiodynamic polarization (PDP) and electrode impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests in a 3.5 g/L NaCl solution. The results of PDP testing show that the corrosion potential of the MAO-coated galvanic pair was more positive than that of the uncoated galvanic pair and that the corrosion current density was smaller than that of the uncoated galvanic pair. EIS results show that the impedance of the galvanic pair increased after MAO coating. SEM images show that the corrosion damage of the uncoated Al alloy was more severe than that of the MAO-coated one, and the post-corrosion images of the surface of the 316L connected with MAO-coated Al alloy were more compact than those of the 316L connected with uncoated Al alloy. A physical model was developed to discuss the influence of MAO treatment on the galvanic corrosion process and corrosion mechanism.

  16. Influence of alkali metal hydroxides on corrosion of Zr-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Y.H.; Ruhmann, H.; Garzarolli, F.

    1997-01-01

    In this study the influence of group-1 alkali hydroxides on different zirconium based alloys has been evaluated. The experiments have been carried out in small stainless steel autoclaves at 350 deg. C in pressurized 17 MPa water, with in low (0.32 mmol), medium (4.3 mmol) and high (31.5 mmol) equimolar concentrations of Li-, Na-, K-, Rb- and Cs-Hydroxides. Two types of alloys have been investigated: Zr-Sn-(Transition metal) and Zr-Sn-Nb-(Transition metal). The corrosion behaviour was evaluated from weight gain measurements. From the experiments the cation could be identified as the responsible species for zirconium alloy corrosion in alkalized water. The radius of the cation governs the corrosion behaviour in the pre accelerated region of zircaloy corrosion. Incorporating of alkali cations into the zirconium oxide lattice is probably the mechanism which allows the corrosion enhancement for Li and Na and the significantly lower effect for the other bases. Nb containing alloys show lower corrosion resistance than alloys from the Zr-Sn-TRM system in all alkali solutions. Both types of alloys corrode significantly more in LiOH and NaOH than in the other alkali environments. Lowest corrosive aggressiveness has been found for CsOH followed by KOH. Concluding from the corrosion behaviour in the different alkali environments and taking into account the tendency to promote accelerate corrosion, CsOH and KOH are possible alternate alkalis for PWR application. (author). 17 refs, 15 figs, 5 tabs

  17. Environmental and Geometrical Conditions to Sustain Crevice Corrosion in Alloy 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carranza, R M; Rodr?guez, M A; Rebak, R B

    2006-11-10

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is highly resistant to localized corrosion. Under aggressive environmental conditions Alloy 22 may be susceptible to crevice corrosion in hot chloride (Cl{sup -}) solutions. The objective of the present work was to explore the environmental and geometrical conditions for crevice corrosion to occur. Electrochemical tests were performed using PCA and prismatic mill annealed Alloy 22 specimens in chloride solutions. Crevice corrosion current density was found to be a function of applied potential. i{sub CREV} values ranged from 40 {micro}A/cm{sup 2} to 20 mA/cm{sup 2}. Such low values of current density explained the absence of pitting corrosion in Alloy 22 at any potential. Decreasing of the effective diffusion distance in a propagating crevice is thought to cause crevice corrosion stifling or repassivation after long anodic polarization. Crevice corrosion breakdown potential is expected to decrease with potential scan rate, approaching repassivation potential for low scan rates. The lowest corrosion potential of Alloy 22 in hydrochloric acid solutions at which active corrosion exists was proposed as the lowest possible repassivation potential for crevice corrosion.

  18. Overview of corrosion, corrosion protection, and stress-corrosion cracking of uranium and uranium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koger, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    This paper covers some basic definitions and provides some data. The 51 slides illustrates these definitions, crack initiation and propagation, sources of stress, types of specimens used for SCC, potentiostatic polarization, data for Mulberry and U-Nb alloys, effects of environment, and data for U-0.75 Ti and U-Mo alloys

  19. Corrosion Characteristics of Ti-xTa Alloys with Ta contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. J.; Choe, H. C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate corrosion characteristics of Ti-xTa alloys with Ta contents. Ti-xTa alloys used as samples (x=30, 40%) were arc-melted under argon atmosphere of 99.9% purity. Ti-xTa alloys were homogenized for 12hr at 1000 .deg. C and then water quenched. The surface characteristics of Ti-xTa alloys were investigated using optical microscopy (OM) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The anodic corrosion behaviors of the specimens were examined through potentiodynamic, potentiostatic and galvanostatic test in 0.9 % NaCl solution at 36.5 ± 1 .deg. C. After corrosion test, the surface characteristics of Ti-xTa alloys were investigated using OM. The microstructure of Ti-Ta alloy showed the beta structure with Ta content. The corrosion resistance of Ti alloy was improved by increasing Ta content and the corrosion morphology of Ti-Ta alloy showed that the site attacked by chloride ion decreased from the active to passive region with Ta content. Potential of Ti-40Ta alloy increased as time increased, whereas, current density of Ti-40Ta alloy decreased as time increased compared to Ti-30 alloy

  20. Study crevice corrosion alloys C-22 and 625 by electrochemical noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungaro, María L.; Carranza, Ricardo M.; Rodríguez, Martín A.

    2013-01-01

    C-22 and 625 alloys are two of the Ni –Cr-Mo alloys considered as candidate materials to form the corrosion resistance engineered barriers for nuclear waste repositories. The corrosion resistance of these alloys is remarkable in a wide variety of environments. Despite of their resistance these alloys are susceptible to crevice corrosion in a certain aggressive environments. This work presents the use of electrochemical noise technique to study crevice corrosion susceptibility of alloys C-22 and 625 in 1M NaCl acidic solutions at 60ºC and 90ºC. Asymmetrical electrodes and a complementary platinum electrode were used to assess the influence of cathodic reaction in crevice process. The obtained records were analyzed directly and through statistical parameters. The potential drop and the simultaneous increment of the current records indicated the occurrence of crevice corrosion. The alternative use of a platinum electrode resulted in higher currents and higher potentials and reduced the induction time to crevice formation. The reason for this behavior is that platinum surface allows faster cathodic reactions than C-22 and 625 alloys. The standard deviation of the current records was responsive to the crevice corrosion intensity. C-22 alloy had better crevice corrosion performance than 625 alloy. (author)

  1. Biodegradable magnesium alloys for orthopaedic applications: A review on corrosion, biocompatibility and surface modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Sankalp; Curtin, James; Duffy, Brendan; Jaiswal, Swarna

    2016-11-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys have been extensively explored as potential biodegradable implant materials for orthopaedic applications (e.g. Fracture fixation). However, the rapid corrosion of Mg based alloys in physiological conditions has delayed their introduction for therapeutic applications to date. The present review focuses on corrosion, biocompatibility and surface modifications of biodegradable Mg alloys for orthopaedic applications. Initially, the corrosion behaviour of Mg alloys and the effect of alloying elements on corrosion and biocompatibility is discussed. Furthermore, the influence of polymeric deposit coatings, namely sol-gel, synthetic aliphatic polyesters and natural polymers on corrosion and biological performance of Mg and its alloy for orthopaedic applications are presented. It was found that inclusion of alloying elements such as Al, Mn, Ca, Zn and rare earth elements provides improved corrosion resistance to Mg alloys. It has been also observed that sol-gel and synthetic aliphatic polyesters based coatings exhibit improved corrosion resistance as compared to natural polymers, which has higher biocompatibility due to their biomimetic nature. It is concluded that, surface modification is a promising approach to improve the performance of Mg-based biomaterials for orthopaedic applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Plasma surface tantalum alloying on titanium and its corrosion behavior in sulfuric acid and hydrochloric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, D. B.; Chen, X. H.; Zhang, P. Z.; Ding, F.; Li, F. K.; Yao, Z. J.

    2018-05-01

    An anti-corrosion Ti-Ta alloy coating was prepared on pure titanium surface by double glow plasma surface alloying technology. Electrochemical corrosion test was applied to test the anti-corrosion property of Ti-Ta alloy layer. The microstructure and the phase composition of Ti-Ta alloy coating were detected before and after corrosion process by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The results showed that the Ta-Ti alloy layer has a thickness of about 13-15 μm, which is very dense without obvious defects such as pores or cracks. The alloy layer is composed mainly of β-Ta and α-Ti. The Ta alloy layer improves the anti-corrosion property of pure titanium. A denser and more durable TiO2 formed on the surface Ta-Ti alloy layer after immersing in strong corrosive media may account for the excellent corrosion resistant.

  3. Influence of alkali metal hydroxides on corrosion of Zr-base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Yong Hwan

    1996-01-01

    The influence of group-1 alkali hydroxides on different Zr-based alloys have been carried out in static autoclaves at 350 deg C in pressurized water, conditioned in low(0.32 mmol), medium(4.3 mmol) and high(31.5 mmol) equimolar concentration of Li-, Na-, K-, Rb- and Cs-hydroxide. Two types of alloys have been investigated: Zr-Sn-(TRM, Transition metal) and Zr-Sn-Nb-(TRM, Transition metal). From the experiments the cation could be identified as the responsible species for corrosion of Zr alloy in alkalized water. The radius of the cation governs the accelerated corrosion in the pre-transition region of Zr alloy. Incorporation of alkali cation into the zirconium oxide lattice is probably the mechanism which allows the corrosion enhancement for Li and Na and the significant lower effect for the other bases. Nb containing alloys showed lower corrosion resistance than Zr-Sn-TRM alloys in all alkali solutions. Both types of alloys were corroded significantly more in LiOH and NaOH than in the other alkali environments. Lowest corrosive aggressiveness has been found for CsOH followed by KOH. Concluding from the corrosion behavior in the different alkali environments and taking into account the tendency to accelerate the corrosion of Zr alloys, CsOH and KOH are possible alternate alkali for PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) application. (author)

  4. Potentiodynamic polarization study of the corrosion behavior of palladium-silver dental alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Desheng; Brantley, William A; Frankel, Gerald S; Heshmati, Reza H; Johnston, William M

    2018-04-01

    Although palladium-silver alloys have been marketed for over 3 decades for metal-ceramic restorations, understanding of the corrosion behavior of current alloys is incomplete; this understanding is critical for evaluating biocompatibility and clinical performance. The purpose of this in vitro study was to characterize the corrosion behavior of 3 representative Pd-Ag alloys in simulated body fluid and oral environments and to compare them with a high-noble Au-Pd alloy. The study obtained values of important electrochemical corrosion parameters, with clinical relevance, for the rational selection of casting alloys. The room temperature in vitro corrosion characteristics of the 3 Pd-Ag alloys and the high-noble Au-Pd alloy were evaluated in 0.9% NaCl, 0.09% NaCl, and Fusayama solutions. After simulated porcelain firing heat treatment, 5 specimens of each alloy were immersed in the electrolytes for 24 hours. For each specimen, the open-circuit potential (OCP) was first recorded, and linear polarization was then performed from -20 mV to +20 mV (versus OCP) at a rate of 0.125 mV/s. Cyclic polarization was subsequently performed on 3 specimens of each alloy from -300 mV to +1000 mV and back to -300 mV (versus OCP) at a scanning rate of 1 mV/s. The differences in OCP and corrosion resistance parameters (zero-current potential and polarization resistance) among alloys and electrolyte combinations were compared with the 2-factor ANOVA (maximum-likelihood method) with post hoc Tukey adjustments (α=.05). The 24-hour OCPs and polarization resistance values of the 3 Pd-Ag alloys and the Au-Pd alloy were not significantly different (P=.233 and P=.211, respectively) for the same electrolyte, but significant differences were found for corrosion test results in different electrolytes (Palloy and electrolyte (P=.249 and P=.713, respectively). The 3 Pd-Ag silver alloys appeared to be resistant to chloride ion corrosion, and passivation and de-alloying were identified for these

  5. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, G.S.; Atzmon, M.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental program has been conducted to determine the mechanism of irradiation-assisted stress-corrosion cracking (IASCC) in austenitic stainless steel. High-energy protons have been used to produce grain boundary segregation and microstructural damage in samples of controlled impurity content. The densities of network dislocations and dislocation loops were determined by transmission electron microscopy and found to resemble those for neutron irradiation under LWR conditions. Grain boundary compositions were determined by in situ fracture and Auger spectroscopy, as well as by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Cr depletion and Ni segregation were observed in all irradiated samples, with the degree of segregation depending on the type and amount of impurities present. P, and to a lesser extent P, impurities were observed to segregate to the grain boundaries. Irradiation was found to increase the susceptibility of ultra-high-purity (UHP), and to a much lesser extent of UHP+P and UHP+S, alloys to intergranular SCC in 288 degree C water at 2 ppm O 2 and 0.5 μS/cm. No intergranular fracture was observed in arcon atmosphere, indicating the important role of corrosion in the embrittlement of irradiated samples. The absence of intergranular fracture in 288 degree C argon and room temperature tests also suggest that the embrittlement is not caused by hydrogen introduced by irradiation. Contrary to common belief, the presence of P impurities led to a significant improvement in IASCC over the ultrahigh purity alloy

  6. In Vitro Corrosion Study of Friction Stir Processed WE43 Magnesium Alloy in a Simulated Body Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Genghua; Zhang, Datong; Zhang, Weiwen; Zhang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion behavior of friction stir processing (FSP) WE43 alloy in a simulated body fluid (SBF) was investigated. Micro-galvanic corrosion was the dominated corrosion behavior, and the corrosion resistance of FSP WE43 alloy was improved compared to the cast counterpart. Furthermore, due to the fine-grained and homogeneous microstructure, uniform corrosion morphology was observed on FSP WE43 alloy. According to the tensile properties of specimens with different immersion time intervals, FSP WE43 alloy shows better performance to maintain the mechanical integrity in SBF as compared to the as-cast alloy. PMID:28773664

  7. [Study on corrosion resistance of three non-noble porcelain alloys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhikai; Xu, Sheng; Li, Wei; Teng, Jin; Li, Ning

    2011-10-01

    To study the electrochemical corrosion behavior of Co-Cr, Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr-Be based porcelain alloys in NaCl solution. Five samples of each alloy were made respectively, electric polarization curve of each alloy was obtained using potentiodynamic polarization technique. Self-corrosion potential (E(corr)), self-corrosion current density (I(corr), passive region and transpassivation potential were tested. Microstructure and constituent was examined using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Co-Cr alloy possessed the most desirable corrosion resistance because of its integrated, homogeneous and compact passive film. The poor compactness of Ni-Cr alloy's passive film decreased its corrosion resistance. Ni-Cr-Be alloy exhibited the worst corrosion resistance due to the Cr and Mo depleted Ni-Be eutectic phases in the alloy. Taking biological security into consideration, it is necessary to avoid the application of porcelain alloys with Be element. Co-Cr alloy with better biocompatibility possesses much broader prospect in the field of dental restoration.

  8. Lithium uptake and the accelerated corrosion of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramasubramanian, N.; Precoanin, N.; Ling, V.C.

    1989-01-01

    The corrosion of zirconium alloys in aqueous lithiated solutions is sensitive to the concentration of the alkali and the temperature. In concentrated solutions, >10 -1 M in lithium hydroxide (LiOH) (700-ppm lithium) and at temperatures >573 K, accelerated corrosion occurs at quite an early stage. Our investigations indicate that the accelerated corrosion is caused by the generation of porosity, rather than the dissolution of lithium, in the growing oxide. Specimens of standard Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding and Zr-2.5 wt% Nb pressure tube materials were corroded in lithium hydroxide solutions, 10 -3 to 1 M in concentration, at 589 K. Impedance measurements, polarizations in molten lithium nitrate-lithium hydroxide (LiNO 3 -LiOH) and scanning electron microscopy of the alloy-oxide interface indicated a high level of porosity, right from the initial stages, for oxide films grown in the concentrated solutions. The oxides, when analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy, revealed the presence of a few 100 ppm of lithium, too small to account for the accelerated corrosion by a mechanism of solid solution of lithium in zirconia. X-ray powder patterns of the oxides showed peaks for only monoclinic zirconia, but occasionally peaks for LiOH · H 2 O and LiOH were also observed. The counts for lithium, detected by secondary ion mass spectrometry, decreased when specimens cut from the same corroded samples were leached in nitric acid. It is concluded from these observations that a major part of lithium is physically held in the porous oxide. Lithium hydroxide is not completely dissociated in aqueous solutions; with increasing concentration and temperature, an increasingly larger proportion of the alkali remains undissociated. It is suggested that the accelerated corrosion in concentrated solutions is caused by the participation of the undissociated alkali in the reactions occurring on the surfaces of the zirconia crystallites. The undissociated LiOH and hydroxyl ions react at an

  9. Characterization and corrosion behaviour of CoNi alloys obtained by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olvera, S. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, Departamento de Ingeniería en Metalurgia y Materiales, México, D. F. (Mexico); Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Química-Física Aplicada, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Sánchez-Marcos, J. [Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Química-Física Aplicada, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Palomares, F.J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM-CSIC, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Salas, E. [Spline Spanish CRG Beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facilities, ESRF, BP 220-38043, Grenoble Cedex (France); Arce, E.M. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, Departamento de Ingeniería en Metalurgia y Materiales, México, D. F. (Mexico); Herrasti, P., E-mail: pilar.herrasti@uam.es [Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Química-Física Aplicada, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    CoNi alloys including Co{sub 30}Ni{sub 70}, Co{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} and Co{sub 70}Ni{sub 30} were prepared via mechanical alloying using Co and Ni powders. The crystallinity and short-range order were studied using X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results show that the milling process increases the number of vacancies, especially around the Co atoms, while the milling time decreases the crystalline size and enhances the crystallinity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterise the chemical composition of the samples surface. The magnetic properties were analysed using zero-field cooling, field cooling and a magnetic hysteresis loops. The magnetic saturation moment is approximately 1.05 μ{sub B}/atom; this value decreases with the mechanical alloying time, and it is proportional to the cobalt concentration. The polarization and impedance curves in different media (NaCl, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaOH) showed similar corrosion resistance values. The corrosion resistance increased in the order NaCl, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaOH. A good passivation layer was formed in NaOH due to the cobalt and nickel oxides on the particle surfaces. - Highlights: • Ni{sub x}Co{sub 100-x} alloys were synthesized by mechanical alloying • Milling time decrease size and enhances crystallinity. • Oxygen is not present in a significant percentage in bulk but is detected on the surface. • Magnetic saturation moment is 1.05 mB/atom and decrease with mechanical allowing time • Corrosion resistance is higher in NaOH than in NaCl or HCl solutions.

  10. Corrosion Characteristics of Ti-29Nb-xHf Ternary Alloy for Biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pak, Sun Young; Choi, Han Chul [Chosun Univ., Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The Cp-Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloys were widely used for dental materials due to their mechanical properties and good corrosion resistance. However, Cp-Ti was known as bio-inert materials, Ti-6Al-4V alloy has a problem such as high Young modulus, potential loss of the surrounding bone, and to the release of potentially toxic ions from the alloy. To overcome this problem, Ti alloys containing Nb and Hf elements have been used for biomaterials due to low toxicity and high corrosion resistance. Especially, alloying element of Nb was known as β phase stabilizer. The β phase alloy was widely used to replace currently used implant materials. The corrosion resistances of Ti-29Nb-xHf ternary alloys were dependent on Hf content in oral environment solution.

  11. Corrosion mechanisms of aluminum alloys in waters of low conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, Roberto E; Lanazani, Liliana; Rodriguez, Sebastian

    2006-01-01

    After completing their burn cycle, nuclear fuels in experimental reactors made with aluminum alloys have to remain for long periods in distilled water, in interim storage. While aluminum alloys are resistant to corrosion in pure water, severe deterioration occurs in elements that have been immersed for periods of up to 30 years. Pitting-like surface alterations can even occur in nuclear quality waters (conductivity below 5 μS/cm and dissolved ions content below detection thresholds) in time periods of less than one year. An important factor that could become a potential promoter of this phenomena is the presence of dust particles and others, that could settle on the metallic surface, generating a locally aggressive medium. A simple immersion experiment demonstrates that these points can become initiation sites for pitting with very low concentrations of chlorides (under 10 ppm), especially if the electrochemical potential is increased by contact with another metallic material, even staying below the pitting potential in this medium. There are several corrosion mechanisms acting simultaneously, depending on the nature of the deposits. Pitting under glass particles has been detected, which may be related to a simple crevice corrosion process. In the case of iron oxides, however, the results depend on the type of oxide. Pits more than 100 microns deep have been obtained in 7 day immersion tests, so in spent fuel storage sites these mechanisms could easily cause penetration of the 500 micron aluminum plates during the time covering the interim storage under water, which could be decades, with similar chemical conditions (CW)

  12. Overlapping double etch technique for evaluation of metallic alloys to stress corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Stewart, James C.

    1981-01-01

    A double overlapping etch zone technique for evaluation of the resistance of metallic alloys to stress corrosion cracking. The technique involves evaluating the metallic alloy along the line of demarcation between an overlapping double etch zone and single etch zone formed on the metallic alloy surface.

  13. Effectivity of fluoride treatment on hydrogen and corrosion product generation in temporal implants for different magnesium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinidad, Javier; Arruebarrena, Gurutze; Marco, Iñigo; Hurtado, Iñaki; Sáenz de Argandoña, Eneko

    2013-12-01

    The increasing interest on magnesium alloys relies on their biocompatibility, bioabsorbility and especially on their mechanical properties. Due to these characteristics, magnesium alloys are becoming a promising solution to be used, as temporary implants. However, magnesium alloys must overcome their poor corrosion resistance. This article analyses the corrosion behaviour in phosphate-buffered saline solution of three commercial magnesium alloys (AZ31B, WE43 and ZM21) as well as the influence of fluoride treatment on their corrosion behaviour. It is shown that the corrosion rate of all the alloys is decreased by fluoride treatment. However, fluoride treatment affects each alloy differently.

  14. Effect of cold working on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of nickel-chromium-iron alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, T.; Onimura, K.

    1987-01-01

    In order to grasp the stress corrosion cracking resistance of cold worked nickel base alloys in PWR primary water, the effect of cold working on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of alloys 600, X-750 and 690, in high temperature water, have been studied. Stress corrosion cracking tests were conducted at 360 0 C (633K) in a simulated PWR primary water for about 12,000 hours (43.2Ms). From the test results, it is concluded that the stress corrosion cracking resistance in the cold worked Alloy 600 at the same applied stress level increases with an increase in cold working ratio, and the cold worked alloys of thermally treated 690 and X-750 have excellent stress corrosion cracking resistance. (Author)

  15. Corrosion of experimental magnesium alloys in blood and PBS: A gravimetric and microscopic evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schille, Ch., E-mail: Christine.Schille@med.uni-tuebingen.de [University Hospital Tuebingen, Center for Dentistry, Oral Medicine and Maxillofacial Surgery, Section Medical Materials and Technology, Osianderstr. 2-8, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Braun, M.; Wendel, H.P. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Div. Congenital and Paediatric Cardiac Surgery, University Children' s Hospital, Tuebingen, Germany, Calwerstr. 7/1, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Scheideler, L. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Center for Dentistry, Oral Medicine and Maxillofacial Surgery, Section Medical Materials and Technology, Osianderstr. 2-8, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Hort, N. [GKSS Research Centre, Institute of Materials Research, Max-Planck-Str. 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Reichel, H.-P. [Weissensee Company, Buergermeister-Ebert-Str. 30-32, D-36124 Eichenzell (Germany); Schweizer, E.; Geis-Gerstorfer, J. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Center for Dentistry, Oral Medicine and Maxillofacial Surgery, Section Medical Materials and Technology, Osianderstr. 2-8, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Corrosion of eight Mg-based Biomaterials was tested in saline and human blood. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Corrosion behaviour in physiological saline and in blood was entirely different. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al and Zn had the highest influence on corrosion behaviour in both electrolytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MgAl9 and MgAl9Zn1 showed least corrosion in human whole blood. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tests in buffered corrosion media are not sufficient to predict corrosion in vivo. - Abstract: Corrosion tests for medical materials are often performed in simulated body fluids (SBF). When SBF are used for corrosion measurement, the open question is, how well they match the conditions in the human body. The aim of the study was to compare the corrosion behaviour of different experimental magnesium alloys in human whole blood and PBS{sup minus} (phosphate buffered saline w/o Ca and Mg) as a simulated body fluid by gravimetric weight measurements and microscopic evaluation. Eight different experimental magnesium alloys, containing neither Mn nor other additives, were manufactured. With these alloys, a static immersion test in PBS{sup minus} and a dynamic test using the Chandler-loop model with human whole blood over 6 h were performed. During the static immersion test, the samples were weighed every hour. During the dynamic test, the specimens were weighed before and after the 6 h incubation period in the Chandler-loop. From both tests, the total mass change was calculated for each alloy and the values were compared. Additionally, microscopic pictures from the samples were taken at the end of the test period. All alloys showed different corrosion behaviour in both tests, especially the alloys with high aluminium content, MgAl9 and MgAl9Zn1. Generally, alloys in PBS showed a weight gain due to generation of a microscopically visible corrosion layer, while in the blood test system a more or less distinct weight

  16. Corrosion of experimental magnesium alloys in blood and PBS: A gravimetric and microscopic evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schille, Ch.; Braun, M.; Wendel, H.P.; Scheideler, L.; Hort, N.; Reichel, H.-P.; Schweizer, E.; Geis-Gerstorfer, J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Corrosion of eight Mg–based Biomaterials was tested in saline and human blood. ► Corrosion behaviour in physiological saline and in blood was entirely different. ► Al and Zn had the highest influence on corrosion behaviour in both electrolytes. ► MgAl9 and MgAl9Zn1 showed least corrosion in human whole blood. ► Tests in buffered corrosion media are not sufficient to predict corrosion in vivo. - Abstract: Corrosion tests for medical materials are often performed in simulated body fluids (SBF). When SBF are used for corrosion measurement, the open question is, how well they match the conditions in the human body. The aim of the study was to compare the corrosion behaviour of different experimental magnesium alloys in human whole blood and PBS minus (phosphate buffered saline w/o Ca and Mg) as a simulated body fluid by gravimetric weight measurements and microscopic evaluation. Eight different experimental magnesium alloys, containing neither Mn nor other additives, were manufactured. With these alloys, a static immersion test in PBS minus and a dynamic test using the Chandler-loop model with human whole blood over 6 h were performed. During the static immersion test, the samples were weighed every hour. During the dynamic test, the specimens were weighed before and after the 6 h incubation period in the Chandler-loop. From both tests, the total mass change was calculated for each alloy and the values were compared. Additionally, microscopic pictures from the samples were taken at the end of the test period. All alloys showed different corrosion behaviour in both tests, especially the alloys with high aluminium content, MgAl9 and MgAl9Zn1. Generally, alloys in PBS showed a weight gain due to generation of a microscopically visible corrosion layer, while in the blood test system a more or less distinct weight loss was observed. When alloys are ranked according to corrosion susceptibility, the results differ also between the test systems. The

  17. The Corrosion Behaviour of WC-Co-Ru Alloys in Aggressive Chloride Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Potgieter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hardmetals possess excellent wear resistance, making them suitable alloys in several industrial applications. Mine waters with both dissolved chloride and sulphate salts can be severely corrosive and can limit the application of hardmetal tools in the mining industry. Ru additions to these alloys can refine and improve selected mechanical properties, but its influence on the corrosion resistance is unknown. A series of WC-Co-Ru alloys was evaluated in different chloride containing media to investigate their corrosion resistance. Standard electrochemical corrosion tests, chronoamperometric measurements, and surface analyses with Raman spectroscopy were conducted. An increasing amount of Ru improves the corrosion resistance of all the alloys. The effect is not as dramatic as that observed with stainless steels containing Ru in corrosive media. In both corrosive media Ru decreased the cathodic Tafel constant and has a retarding influence on the cathodic part of the corrosion reaction. Raman analyses indicated the presence of tungsten oxide, hydrated tungsten oxide compounds, and CoO and Co3O4 formed on the alloy surfaces during the corrosion process.

  18. Effects of acidity and alkalinity on corrosion behaviour of Al-Zn-Mg based anode alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jingling; Wen, Jiuba; Li, Quanan; Zhang, Qin

    2013-03-01

    Effects of 1 M HCl, 0.6 M NaCl with different pH values and 4 M NaOH solutions on the corrosion behaviour of Al-5Zn-1Mg-0.02In-0.05Ti-0.5Mn (wt%) alloy have been investigated using measurements of self-corrosion, potentiodynamic polarization, cyclic polarization experiment combined with open circuit potential technique and scanning electron microscopy. The corrosion behaviour of the alloy was found to be dependant on the Cl-, OH- ions and pH value. In acidic or slightly neutral solutions, general and pitting corrosion occurred simultaneously. In contrast, exposure to alkaline solutions results in general corrosion which was traced back to the dissolution of the resistive oxidation film on the surface of the alloy. Experience revealed that the alloy was susceptible to pitting corrosion in all chloride solution. The alloy undergoes two types of localized corrosion process, leading to the formation of hemispherical and crystallographic pits. Polarization resistance measurements which are in good agreement with those of self-corrosion, show that the corrosion kinetic is minimized in slightly neutral solutions (pH = 7).

  19. Factors affecting the corrosion performance of Elektron WE43 and WE54 magnesium casting alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimzadeh, H.; Lyon, P.; King, J.F. (Magnesium Elektron Ltd., Manchester (United Kingdom))

    1998-01-01

    Magnesium sand casting alloys, Elektron WE43 and WE54, are available to users who require excellent mechanical properties and high corrosion resistance combined with light weight. The corrosion behaviour of these alloys depends upon several factors. Whilst Elektron WE43 and WE54 will achieve corrosion rates similar to aluminium based alloys, processing factors can influence the corrosion resistance of the finished part. Molten metal handling prior to casting plays a major role in the level of insoluble zirconium and iron containing zirconium particles. These particles/clusters can have a significant effect upon the corrosion performance of the alloy. The effect of metal handling on the level of the aforementioned particles has been investigated. Heavy metal impurities such as Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn and Ag may be introduced during foundry operations. Critical levels of these elements, both singly and in combination, have been studied. Similarly, the benefits of corrosion resistance achieved in 'high purity' alloys can be negated by contamination of the surface by galvanically active elements. The effect of such contamination has been investigated and practical methods to minimise it are described. Finally, magnesium components can be affected by galvanic corrosion when assembled in contact with other materials in a corrosive environment. Use of appropriate materials and techniques to minimise potential galvanic corrosion problems is illustrated. (orig.)

  20. Corrosion behavior of Zr-x(Nb, Sn and Cu) binary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M. H.; Lee, M. H.; Park, S. Y.; Jung, Y. H.; We, M. Y.

    1999-01-01

    For the development of advanced zirconium alloys for nuclear fuel cladding, the corrosion behaviors of zirconium binary alloys were studied on the Zr-xNb, Zr-xSn, and Zr-xCu alloys. The corrosion test were performed in water at 360 deg C, steam at 400 deg C and LiOH at 360 deg C for 45 days. The corrosion behaviors of Zr-xNb was similar to that of Zr-xCu alloys. However, the corrosion behavior of Zr-xSn was different from Zr-xNb and Zr-xCu. The weight gain of Zr-xNb and Zr-xCu was increased with addition of alloying elements. When Sn is added to Zr matrix in range below the solubility limit, the corrosion resistance decrease with increasing Sn-content, while in the range over solubility limit, Sn has an adverse effect on the corrosion resistance. Especially, Zr-xSn alloys showed higher corrosion resistance than Zr-xNb and Zr-xCu alloys in LiOH solution

  1. Nickel-Titanium Alloys: Corrosion "Proof" Alloys for Space Bearing, Components and Mechanism Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaCorte, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    An intermetallic nickel-titanium alloy, 60NiTi (60 wt% Ni, 40 wt% Ti), is shown to be a promising candidate tribological material for space mechanisms. 60NiTi offers a broad combination of physical properties that make it unique among bearing materials. 60NiTi is hard, electrically conductive, highly corrosion resistant, readily machined prior to final heat treatment, and is non-magnetic. Despite its high Ti content, 60NiTi is non-galling even under dry sliding. No other bearing alloy, metallic or ceramic, encompasses all of these attributes. Since 60NiTi contains such a high proportion of Ti and possesses many metallic properties, it was expected to exhibit poor tribological performance typical of Ti alloys, namely galling type behavior and rapid lubricant degradation. In this poster-paper, the oil-lubricated behavior of 60NiTi is presented.

  2. Peculiar high temperature corrosion of martensite alloy under impact of Estonian oil shale fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallermo, H.; Klevtsov, I. [Thermal Engineering Department of Tallinn Technical University, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1998-12-31

    The superheaters` surfaces of oil shale steam boiler made of pearlitic and austenitic alloys, are subject to intensive corrosion, mainly due to presence of chlorine in external deposits. The applicability of martensitic alloys X1OCrMoVNb91 and X20CrMoV121 for superheaters is examined here and empirical equations allowing to predict alloys` corrosion resistance in the range of operational temperatures are established. Alloy X1OCrMoVNb91 is found been most perspective for superheaters of boilers firing fossil fuel that contain alkaline metals and chlorine. The abnormal dependence of corrosion resistance of martensitic alloys on temperature is revealed, namely, corrosion at 580 deg C in presence of oil shale fly ash is more intensive than at 620 deg C. (orig.) 2 refs.

  3. Corrosion behaviors and effects of corrosion products of plasma electrolytic oxidation coated AZ31 magnesium alloy under the salt spray corrosion test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Huang, Zhiquan; Yan, Qin; Liu, Chen; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yi; Guo, Changhong; Jiang, Guirong; Shen, Dejiu

    2016-08-01

    The effects of corrosion products on corrosion behaviors of AZ31 magnesium alloy with a plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating were investigated under the salt spray corrosion test (SSCT). The surface morphology, cross-sectional microstructure, chemical and phase compositions of the PEO coating were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), respectively. Further, the corrosion process of the samples under the SSCT was examined in a non-aqueous electrolyte (methanol) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) coupled with equivalent circuit. The results show that the inner layer of the coating was destroyed firstly and the corrosion products have significant effects on the corrosion behaviors of the coating. The results above are discussed and an electrochemical corrosion model is proposed in the paper.

  4. Corrosion behaviour of cobalt-chromium dental alloys doped with precious metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reclaru, Lucien; Lüthy, Heinz; Eschler, Pierre-Yves; Blatter, Andreas; Susz, Christian

    2005-07-01

    Precious metal based dental alloys generally exhibit a superior corrosion resistance, in particular enhanced resistance to pitting and crevice corrosion, compared to non-precious metal based alloys such as CoCr alloys. A new generation of Co-Cr alloys enriched with precious metals (Au, Pt, Ru) have now appeared on the market. The goal of this study was to clarify the effect of the precious metals additions on the corrosion behaviour of such alloys. Various commercial alloys with different doping levels were tested by electrochemical techniques in two different milieus based on the Fusayama artificial saliva and an electrolyte containing NaCl. Open circuit potentials, corrosion currents, polarization resistances, and crevices potentials were determined for the various alloys and completed by a coulometric analysis of the potentiodynamic curves. In addition, the microstructures were characterised by metallography and phase compositions analysed by EDX. The results show that the presence of precious metals can deteriorate the corrosion behaviour of Co-Cr alloys in a significant way. Gold doping, in particular, produces heterogeneous microstructures that are vulnerable to corrosive attack.

  5. Electrochemical polarization measurements on pitting corrosion susceptibility of nickel-rich Alloy 825

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCright, R.D.; Fleming, D.L.

    1991-10-01

    Alloy 825 contains approximately 40% Ni, 30% Fe, 20% Cr, 3.5% Mo, 2% Cu, and 1% Ti. Alloy 825 has a number of performance features that make it attractive as a candidate material for nuclear waste containers. However, under certain environmental conditions Alloy 825 is susceptible to localized forms of corrosion, and the focus of this paper is determination of those conditions. Electrochemical polarization was used to determine the critical potential for passive film breakdown, a process which leads to localized corrosion attack. Results indicated that quite high levels of chloride ion concentrations coupled with low pH are required to lower the critical potential to approach the corrosion potential

  6. Influence of Carbon and Nitrogen on Corrosion Resistance of High Purity Fe-50mass % Cr Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Kato, Y.; Ujiro, T.; Satoh, S.; Yamato, K.; Abiko, K.

    1995-01-01

    High purity Fe-50mass%Cr alloys containing (C+N) in the range of 30 to 500 mass ppm were prepared and their corrosion resistance was investigated. Pitting potential in a 3.5mass%NaCl solution at 343K rose with reducing (C+N) content. Alloys containing (C+N) at less than 100 mass ppm did not sustain pitting corrosion. However, alloys containing 500 mass ppm (C+N) corroded severely in 6%FeCl3+1/20N HCl solutions. Heat treatment at 923K was recognized as influencing corrosion resistance due to p...

  7. [Corrosion of Ag-Pd-Cu alloys in saline solution. Amount of released elements and electrochemical corrosion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaoka, M

    1989-03-01

    The effect of the Pd content on corrosion and tarnish resistance in twelve experimental alloys was investigated. The alloys were prepared with a composition of Pd content from 20.1 to 30.1 at %. The composition of the alloys Ag-20% Pd, Ag-25% Pd and Ag-30% Pd was varied by adding Cu 5 wt%, 10 wt% and 15 wt% to each of them. The corrosion resistance was estimated by the amount of the released Ag, Cu and by electrochemical corrosion behavior in 0.86% NaCl solution at 37 degrees C. The tarnish resistance was assessed using a spectrophotometer. The test solutions included 0.86% NaCl solution, 0.1% Na2S solution and a mixture of 1.0% lactic acid and 0.1% Na2S, all at 37 degrees C, in sealed containers. The results are summarized as follows. The larger the amount of Pd in Ag-Pd binary alloys and Ag-Pd-Cu ternary alloys, the more stable was the release and the release rate of Ag, Cu and corrosion resistance increased in 0.86% NaCl solution. The addition of Cu to Ag-Pd binary alloys increased the release and release rate of Ag, but there was a shift of the rest potential in the noble direction. A relationship was found between the amount of Ag and Cu released from Ag-Pd-Cu ternary alloys. In this study, an increase in corrosion resistance was observed when the content of Pd in Ag-Pd binary alloys was 25 wt%. Furthermore, it was also observed that Ag-Pd-Cu ternary alloys need an additional 30 wt% Pd for corrosion resistance. Moreover, the addition of Cu must be kept lower than 10 wt%. The tarnish resistance of the twelve experimental alloys was good in 0.86% NaCl solution but was barely improved with increased in the Pd content in sulfide solution. The correlation between electrochemical corrosion behavior and tarnish resistance was not significant, but the correlation between the amount of Ag, Cu release from Ag-Pd-Cu ternary alloys and tarnish resistance was remarkable.

  8. An overview of the corrosion aspect of dental implants (titanium and its alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaturvedi T

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium and its alloys are used in dentistry for implants because of its unique combination of chemical, physical, and biological properties. They are used in dentistry in cast and wrought form. The long term presence of corrosion reaction products and ongoing corrosion lead to fractures of the alloy-abutment interface, abutment, or implant body. The combination of stress, corrosion, and bacteria contribute to implant failure. This article highlights a review of the various aspects of corrosion and biocompatibility of dental titanium implants as well as suprastructures. This knowledge will also be helpful in exploring possible research strategies for probing the biological properties of materials.

  9. Effects of Pulse Electromagnetic Field on Corrosion Resistance of Al-5 % Cu Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Tang, L. D.; Qi, J. G.; Wang, J. Z.

    2013-03-01

    It was investigated that corrosion resistance of Al-5 % Cu alloy was influenced by pulse electromagnetic field (PEMF). The morphologies were observed by scanning election microscopy (SEM). The corrosion behaviors were investigated by potentiodynamic polarization tests and immersion tests. The results indicated that corrosion resistance of samples could be increased by using pulse electromagnetic field, moreover, the optimum parameter of pulse electromagnetic field in this experiment was showed as follows: 500 V, 3 Hz, 30 s. Decreasing the quantity of eutectic in grain boundaries and refining the grains were main causations for increasing corrosion resistance of Al-5 % Cu alloy with pulse electromagnetic field.

  10. Materials corrosion of high temperature alloys immersed in 600C binary nitrate salt.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Gill, David Dennis; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Thirteen high temperature alloys were immersion tested in a 60/40 binary nitrate salt. Samples were interval tested up to 3000 hours at 600ÀC with air as the ullage gas. Chemical analysis of the molten salt indicated lower nitrite concentrations present in the salt, as predicted by the equilibrium equation. Corrosion rates were generally low for all alloys. Corrosion products were identified using x-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analysis. Fe-Cr based alloys tended to form mixtures of sodium and iron oxides, while Fe-Ni/Cr alloys had similar corrosion products plus oxides of nickel and chromium. Nickel based alloys primarily formed NiO, with chromium oxides near the oxide/base alloy interface. In625 exhibited similar corrosion performance in relation to previous tests, lending confidence in comparisons between past and present experiments. HA230 exhibited internal oxidation that consisted of a nickel/chromium oxide. Alloys with significant aluminum alloying tended to exhibit superior performance, due formation of a thin alumina layer. Soluble corrosion products of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten were also formed and are thought to be a significant factor in alloy performance.

  11. Corrosion behaviour of alloy 31 - UNS N08031 - under conditions of oil and gas production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloewer, J. [ThyssenKrupp VDM France SARL, Rueil-Malmaison (France); Schlerkmann, H.; Poepperling, R. [Mannesmann Forschungsinstitut, Duisburg (Germany)

    2002-10-01

    The corrosion behaviour of alloy 31 (UNS N08031-31Ni-27Cr-6.5Mo-1.2Cu-0.2N-bal.Fe) was tested in laboratory and field tests in seawater with and without additions of CO{sub 2} and/or H{sub 2}S in slow strain rate tests, and in SSC (Sulphide Stress Corrosion) tests according to NACE MR0175. The results demonstrate a high resistance of alloy 31 to localised corrosion. Due to the high chromium and molybdenum concentration, its resistance to pitting and crevice corrosion in chloride-contaminated seawater is significantly higher than that of alloy 28 and alloy 825 and it equals that of typical nickel base alloys like alloy 625. Alloy 31 is not sensitive to chloride-induced stress corrosion cracking, either with or without H{sub 2}S, or sulphide stress cracking. Alloy 31 is approved for sour gas applications up to LEVEL VI in NACE MR0175. The combination of properties makes alloy 31 an attractive choice for components in oil and gas production including wirelines, umbilicals, tubing, piping and topside application. (orig.)

  12. High temperature corrosion resistance of candidate nickel-based weld overlay alloys in a low NOx environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deacon, R.M.; Du Pont, J.N.; Marder, A.R. [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Changes in environmental regulations have led many fossil fuel-fired boiler operators to alter their combustion practices (low NOx, burning), thereby lowering plant emissions. This change has led to unacceptable wastage of carbon and low alloy steel waterwall tubes and expensive shutdowns due to severe corrosion. One favored solution is to weld overlay a more corrosion resistant alloy on top of existing tubes. Two nickel-based alloys developed for such applications were tested alongside the commercially available alloy 622 in a simulated low NOx, environment. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) examination of the weld overlays and corrosion scales demonstrated that microsegregation of molybdenum occurred in one of the candidate alloys and alloy 622. This microsegregation had a detrimental effect on the corrosion resistance of these alloys. The candidate alloy with higher chromium concentration, low nominal molybdenum concentration, and corresponding minimum molybdenum segregation, exhibited the best corrosion resistance of the examined alloys.

  13. High temperature corrosion resistance of candidate nickel-based weld overlay alloys in a low NO {sub x} environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deacon, R.M. [Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States)], E-mail: rmd3@lehigh.edu; DuPont, J.N. [Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Marder, A.R. [Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Changes in environmental regulations have led many fossil fuel-fired boiler operators to alter their combustion practices (low NO {sub x} burning), thereby lowering plant emissions. This change has led to unacceptable wastage of carbon and low alloy steel waterwall tubes and expensive shutdowns due to severe corrosion. One favored solution is to weld overlay a more corrosion resistant alloy on top of existing tubes. Two nickel-based alloys developed for such applications were tested alongside the commercially available alloy 622 in a simulated low NO {sub x} environment. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) examination of the weld overlays and corrosion scales demonstrated that microsegregation of molybdenum occurred in one of the candidate alloys and alloy 622. This microsegregation had a detrimental effect on the corrosion resistance of these alloys. The candidate alloy with higher chromium concentration, low nominal molybdenum concentration, and corresponding minimum molybdenum segregation, exhibited the best corrosion resistance of the examined alloys.

  14. Corrosion behaviour of Al-Fe-Ti-V medium entropy alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodunrin, M. O.; Obadele, B. A.; Chown, L. H.; Olubambi, P. A.

    2017-12-01

    Alloys containing up to four multi-principal elements in equiatomic ratios are referred to as medium entropy alloys (MEA). These alloys have attracted the interest of many researchers due to the superior mechanical properties it offers over the traditional alloys. The design approach of MEA often results to simple solid solution with either body centered cubic; face centered cubic structures or both. As the consideration for introducing the alloys into several engineering application increases, there have been efforts to study the corrosion behaviour of these alloys. Previous reports have shown that some of these alloys are more susceptible to corrosion when compared with traditional alloys due to lack of protective passive film. In this research, we have developed AlFeTiV medium entropy alloys containing two elements (Ti and Al) that readily passivate when exposed to corrosive solutions. The alloys were produced in vacuum arc furnace purged with high purity argon. Open circuit potential and potentiodynamic polarisation tests were used to evaluate the corrosion behaviour of the as-cast AlFeTiV alloy in 3.5 wt% NaCl and 1 M H2SO4. The corrosion performance of the alloy was compared with Ti-6Al-4V alloy tested under similar conditions. The results show that unlike in Ti-6Al-4V alloy, the open circuit potential of the AlFeTiV alloy move towards the negative values in both 3.5 wt% NaCl and 1 M H2SO4 solutions indicating that self-activation occurred rapidly on immersion. Anodic polarisation of the alloys showed that AlFeTiV alloy exhibited a narrow range of passivity in both solutions. In addition, the alloys exhibited lower Ecorr and higher Icorr when compared with traditional Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The traditional Ti-6Al-4V alloy showed superior corrosion resistant to the AlFeTiV alloy in both 3.5 wt.% NaCl and 1 M H2SO4 solutions.

  15. Increased corrosion resistance of the AZ80 magnesium alloy by rapid solidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghion, E; Jan, L; Meshi, L; Goldman, J

    2015-11-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and Mg-alloys are being considered as implantable biometals. Despite their excellent biocompatibility and good mechanical properties, their rapid corrosion is a major impediment precluding their widespread acceptance as implantable biomaterials. Here, we investigate the potential for rapid solidification to increase the corrosion resistance of Mg alloys. To this end, the effect of rapid solidification on the environmental and stress corrosion behavior of the AZ80 Mg alloy vs. its conventionally cast counterpart was evaluated in simulated physiological electrolytes. The microstructural characteristics were examined by optical microscopy, SEM, TEM, and X-ray diffraction analysis. The corrosion behavior was evaluated by immersion, salt spraying, and potentiodynamic polarization. Stress corrosion resistance was assessed by Slow Strain Rate Testing. The results indicate that the corrosion resistance of rapidly solidified ribbons is significantly improved relative to the conventional cast alloy due to the increased Al content dissolved in the α-Mg matrix and the correspondingly reduced presence of the β-phase (Mg17 Al12 ). Unfortunately, extrusion consolidated solidified ribbons exhibited a substantial reduction in the environmental performance and stress corrosion resistance. This was mainly attributed to the detrimental effect of the extrusion process, which enriched the iron impurities and increased the internal stresses by imposing a higher dislocation density. In terms of immersion tests, the average corrosion rate of the rapidly solidified ribbons was alloy and 26 mm/year for the rapidly solidified extruded ribbons. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Heat treatment of NiCrFe alloy to optimize resistance to intergrannular stress corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Bibb, Albert E.

    1984-01-01

    A process of producing a NiCrFe alloy having a high resistance to stress corrosion cracking comprising heating a NiCrFe alloy to a temperature sufficient to enable the carbon present in the alloy body in the form of carbide deposits to enter into solution, rapidly cool the alloy body, and heat the cooled body to a temperature between 1100.degree. to 1500.degree. F. for about 1 to 30 hours.

  17. Study on corrosion resistance of high - entropy alloy in medium acid liquid and chemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florea, I; Buluc, G; Florea, R M; Carcea, I; Soare, V

    2015-01-01

    High-entropy alloy is a new alloy which is different from traditional alloys. The high entropy alloys were started in Tsing Hua University of Taiwan since 1995 by Yeh et al. Consisting of a variety of elements, each element occupying a similar compared with other alloy elements to form a high entropy. We could define high entropy alloys as having approximately equal concentrations, made up of a group of 5 to 11 major elements. In general, the content of each element is not more than 35% by weight of the alloy. During the investigation it turned out that this alloy has a high hardness and is also corrosion proof and also strength and good thermal stability. In the experimental area, scientists used different tools, including traditional casting, mechanical alloying, sputtering, splat-quenching to obtain the high entropy alloys with different alloying elements and then to investigate the corresponding microstructures and mechanical, chemical, thermal, and electronic performances. The present study is aimed to investigate the corrosion resistance in a different medium acid and try to put in evidence the mechanical properties. Forasmuch of the wide composition range and the enormous number of alloy systems in high entropy alloys, the mechanical properties of high entropy alloys can vary significantly. In terms of hardness, the most critical factors are: hardness/strength of each composing phase in the alloy, distribution of the composing phases. The corrosion resistance of an high entropy alloy was made in acid liquid such as 10%HNO 3 -3%HF, 10%H 2 SO 4 , 5%HCl and then was investigated, respectively with weight loss experiment. Weight loss test was carried out by put the samples into the acid solution for corrosion. The solution was maintained at a constant room temperature. The liquid formulations used for tests were 3% hydrofluoric acid with 10% nitric acid, 10% sulphuric acid, 5% hydrochloric acid. Weight loss of the samples was measured by electronic scale. (paper)

  18. Heat treatment of NiCrFe alloy 600 to optimize resistance to intergranular stress corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeves, A.F.; Bibb, A.E.

    A process of producing a NiCrFe alloy having a high resistance to stress corrosion cracking comprises heating a NiCrFe alloy to a temperature sufficient to enable the carbon present in the alloy body in the form of carbide deposits to enter into solution, rapidly cooling the alloy body, and heating the cooled body to a temperature between 1100 to 1500/sup 0/F for about 1 to 30 hours.

  19. Thermogalvanic corrosion of Alloy 31 in different heavy brine LiBr solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Domene, Ramón Manuel; Blasco Tamarit, María Encarnación; García García, Dionisio Miguel; García Antón, José

    2012-01-01

    Thermogalvanic corrosion generated between two electrodes of Alloy 31, a highly-alloyed austenitic stainless steel (UNS N08031), has been investigated imposing different temperature gradients in three deaerated LiBr solutions, under open circuit conditions by using a zero-resistance ammeter (ZRA). Besides EIS spectra were acquired in order to explain the obtained results. On the whole, cold Alloy 31 electrodes were anodic to hot Alloy 31 electrodes, since an increase in temperature favoured t...

  20. Corrosion of zirconium alloys in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    To improve our understanding of corrosion mechanisms under irradiation of zirconium alloys, to collect information systematically and to identify areas where further experimentation is needed, in 1989 the IAEA initiated a special project with the participation of expert from Canada, France, Japan, USA and the former USSR. This technical document is the result of two years of joint investigations. In view of the rapidly evolving mechanistic understanding of the phenomena in this field, the document presents a series of snapshots of current ideas in specific areas of study that are relevant to the whole problem. Any attempt to present an agreed upon micromechanistic hypothesis that explains the overall phenomena must await further detailed investigations. Throughout the text, the authors have endeavored to indicate critical gaps in our basic knowledge. It is hoped that this will stimulate experimental studies in just those areas where further data are most urgently required. Refs, figs and tabs

  1. Enhancement of wear and corrosion resistance of beta titanium alloy by laser gas alloying with nitrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Chi-Wai; Lee, Seunghwan; Smith, Graham

    2016-01-01

    , the quaternary Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta (TNZT) alloys have received the highest attention as a promising replacement for Ti6Al4V due to their lower elastic modulus and outstanding long term stability against corrosion in biological environments. However, the inferior wear resistance of TNZT is still a problem that must......The relatively high elastic modulus coupled with the presence of toxic vanadium (V) in Ti6Al4V alloy has long been a concern in orthopaedic applications. To solve the problem, a variety of non-toxic and low modulus beta-titanium (beta-Ti) alloys have been developed. Among the beta-Ti alloy family...... be resolved before commercialising in the orthopaedic market. In this work, a newly developed laser surface treatment technique was employed to improve the surface properties of Ti-35.3Nb-7.3Zr-5.7Ta alloy. The surface structure and composition of the laser-treated TNZT surface were examined by grazing...

  2. Corrosion resistance of aluminum-magnesium alloys in glacial acetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaitseva, L.V.; Romaniv, V.I.

    1984-01-01

    Vessels for the storage and conveyance of glacial acetic acid are produced from ADO and AD1 aluminum, which are distinguished by corrosion resistance, weldability and workability in the hot and cold conditions but have low tensile strength. Aluminum-magnesium alloys are stronger materials close in corrosion resistance to technical purity aluminum. An investigation was made of the basic alloying components on the corrosion resistance of these alloys in glacial acetic acid. Both the base metal and the weld joints were tested. With an increase in temperature the corrosion rate of all of the tested materials increases by tens of times. The metals with higher magnesium content show more pitting damage. The relationship of the corrosion resistance of the alloys to magnesium content is confirmed by the similar intensity of failure of the joint metal of all of the investigated alloys and by electrochemical investigations. The data shows that AMg3 alloy is close to technically pure ADO aluminum. However, the susceptibility of even this material to local corrosion eliminates the possibility of the use of aluminum-magnesium alloys as reliable constructional materials in glacial acetic acid

  3. Corrosion behavior of Al6061 alloy weldment produced by friction stir welding process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Gharavi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the corrosion behavior of welded lap joints of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy produced by friction stir welding process has been investigated. Corrosion properties of welded lap joints were studied by cyclic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests. All tests were performed in an aerated 0.6 mol L−1 NaCl aqueous solution with pH = 6.5 at a temperature of 30 °C to characterize corrosion morphology and realize corrosion features of weld regions as opposed to the parent alloy. The microstructure of weld nugget (WN, heated affected zone (HAZ, and parent alloy were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The experimental results indicated that the welding process has a major effect on the corrosion resistance, which possibly associated to the break-down and dissolution of intermetallic particles. It is supposed that an increasing in intermetallic distributed throughout the matrix of weld regions increases the galvanic corrosion couples. Furthermore, by decreasing the grain size in the weld regions, the susceptibility to corrosion is enhanced. The pitting corrosion and intergranular attack are the dominant corrosion types in the weld regions and the parent alloy.

  4. Fundamental aspects of corrosion on zirconium base alloys in water reactor environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    The purpose of this meeting was to discuss the state of knowledge of zirconium alloy corrosion mechanisms. Forty-five participants from 16 countries attended the meeting, and 25 papers were presented and discussed. One additional paper was provided only in written form. The papers were presented in seven sub-sessions under the following headings: Electrochemistry, Coolant Chemistry Effects, Irradiation Effects, Characteristics of Zirconium Oxide, Effects of Alloying on Corrosion, Corrosion Modeling and Effect of Zirconium Base Metal Properties on Corrosion. There is still a need for a laboratory corrosion test that reliably predicts in-pile corrosion in BWR's and PWR's. This holds particularly if out-of-pile tests are used for developing new Zr base alloy compositions. The role of the precipitates and of the solute elements in the matrix has still to be clarified. As it appears, a combination of both influences is necessary to explain the mechanistic aspect of the corrosion of Zircaloy. It is clear that mechanistic understanding of zirconium alloy corrosion is still some way off, although a significant amount of progress has been made toward experimental determination of the micro-scale phenomena. The papers presented a status report of our knowledge of these corrosion mechanisms, but they also served to illustrate the fact that much of the work done to date has been phenomenological rather than mechanistic. The summaries of individual sessions detail the specific conclusions and recommendations made at the meeting. Refs, figs and tabs

  5. Stress corrosion cracking of an aluminum alloy used in external fixation devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartner, Jacob L; Haggard, Warren O; Ong, Joo L; Bumgardner, Joel D

    2008-08-01

    Treatment for compound and/or comminuted fractures is frequently accomplished via external fixation. To achieve stability, the compositions of external fixators generally include aluminum alloy components due to their high strength-to-weight ratios. These alloys are particularly susceptible to corrosion in chloride environments. There have been several clinical cases of fixator failure in which corrosion was cited as a potential mechanism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of physiological environments on the corrosion susceptibility of aluminum 7075-T6, since it is used in orthopedic external fixation devices. Electrochemical corrosion curves and alternate immersion stress corrosion cracking tests indicated aluminum 7075-T6 is susceptible to corrosive attack when placed in physiological environments. Pit initiated stress corrosion cracking was the primary form of alloy corrosion, and subsequent fracture, in this study. Anodization of the alloy provided a protective layer, but also caused a decrease in passivity ranges. These data suggest that once the anodization layer is disrupted, accelerated corrosion processes occur. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Stress corrosion cracking of Ni base alloys in Pb-contaminated caustic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Ae; Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Joung Soo; Kim, Hong Pyo

    2009-01-01

    Steam generator tubes in pressurized water reactors(PWRs) form a pressure boundary between the primary and secondary sides. Austenitic stainless steel was used initially for the tubing, but it was changed to Alloy 600 as the results of corrosion problems. Experiences with Alloy 600 in the late 1960s and early 1970s, in the early high temperature large PWRs, identified numerous corrosion problems. Efforts for the development of a new made and the result was Alloy 690. Since the mid-1980s new and replacement steam generators have used Alloy 690. However, PWRs with Alloy 600 steam generators are still being operated. A lot of problems related to corrosion have been reported in Alloy 600 steam generator tubes of operating nuclear power plants(NPPs), and the outer diameter stress corrosion cracking (ODSCC) and intergranular attack(IGA) which have been occurring in Alloy 600 tubes are known to be the leading causes of PWR steam generator tube plugging in the USA and worldwide. According to Smith and Stratton, Alloy 690 is also reported to be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking and intergranular attack in deaerated (with argon) caustic solutions. It has been reported that contaminated lead in the secondary side cooling water is accumulated in the sludge piled on top of the tube sheet thus accelerating stress corrosion cracking in the SG tubes of NPPs. The detailed mechanism of accelerated stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 and 690 by Pb, however, has yet to be completely understood. It was observed that Pb dissolved in water can produce PbSCC at a Pb concentration as low as 0.1 ppm in these alloys. Lead is known to be one of the most aggressive environmental species that can accumulate in the crevice between the tubes and sludge piled on TTS in steam generators. Many laboratory experiments indicate that the stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tubing materials is accelerated in the presence of lead species in a caustic environment. In order to observe the

  7. Quantitative Correlation of 7B04 Aluminum Alloys Pitting Corrosion Morphology Characteristics with Stress Concentration Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiguo; Yan, Guangyao; Mu, Zhitao; Li, Xudong

    2018-01-01

    The accelerated pitting corrosion test of 7B04 aluminum alloy specimen was carried out according to the spectrum which simulated airport environment, and the corresponding pitting corrosion damage was obtained and was defined through three parameters A and B and C which respectively denoted the corrosion pit surface length and width and corrosion pit depth. The ratio between three parameters could determine the morphology characteristics of corrosion pits. On this basis the stress concentration factor of typical corrosion pit morphology under certain load conditions was quantitatively analyzed. The research shows that the corrosion pits gradually incline to be ellipse in surface and moderate in depth, and most value of B/A and C/A lies in 1 between 4 and few maximum exceeds 4; The stress concentration factor Kf of corrosion pits is obviously affected by the its morphology, the value of Kf increases with corrosion pits depth increasement under certain corrosion pits surface geometry. Also, the value of Kf decreases with surface width increasement under certain corrosion pits depth. The research conclusion can set theory basis for corrosion fatigue life analysis of aircraft aluminum alloy structure.

  8. Corrosion of alloy 800 in PHWR primary and secondary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroto, A.J.G.; Blesa, M.A.; Villegas, M.; Olmedo, A.M.; Bordoni, R.; Alvarez, M.G.; Sainz, R.

    1998-01-01

    A hot leg section of a steam generator tubing was removed for destructive examination from one of the steam generators (SG) of the Embalse Nuclear Power Plant. The tube material is Alloy 800 and carbon steel is the tube support plate material. Samples of the deposits were taken at the first tube support plate and at the top, mid-height and bottom of the sludge pile. Transverse sections were taken at several locations along the tube length measuring the oxide thicknesses and studying the morphology of the oxide layer by scanning electron microscopy on the primary and secondary side at each location. Deposit layers on the outer tube surface revealed iron as major component and the presence of calcium, phosphorous, zinc and manganese. The oxide scale thickness at the secondary side in the open area was around 22 to 30 μm. The oxide thickness grown under isothermal conditions on the corrosion test samples installed in the autoclaves facilities of the primary circuit of the plant was measured and compared with that found on the inner surface of the examined tube section. The oxide thickness of the test samples was around 1-2 μm showing the influence of the deposition of corrosion products from the coolant. Deposition and precipitation of oxide was also found in the actual tube, where the common feature was the irregularity of the oxide layer on the primary side and thicknesses values in the range 4 to 10 μm were measured. The autoclave tests and SG tubing examination permit to compare the influence of materials and of operating (flow rate, isothermal vs non-isothermal) conditions on corrosion and deposition. (author)

  9. Corrosion and Creep Characteristics of the HANA-4 Alloy with the various Manufacturing Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun-Gil; Choi, Byung-Kwan; Park, Jeong-Yong; Jeong, Yong-Hwan

    2008-01-01

    Zirconium alloys have been used as a fuel cladding material for several decades, since these alloys have revealed a good corrosion resistance and mechanical properties in reactor operating conditions. The development of an advanced Zr-based alloy with an improved corrosion and creep resistance is necessary for the high burn-up operating conditions in PWRs. The alloying element effects of the Nb, Sn, Fe, Cr, Cu etc as well as an optimization of the manufacturing processes such as the reduction ratio and annealing temperatures have been studied to improve the corrosion and creep properties. A high Nb-containing Zr-based alloy named HANA-4 was designed at KAERI and its nominal composition is Zr-1.5Nb-0.4Sn-0.2Fe-0.1Cr in wt.%. For high Nb-containing Zr alloys, their corrosion resistance is very sensitive to their microstructural characteristics which are determined by a manufacturing process. In order to obtain the best manufacturing process for the HANA-4 alloy, various evaluations such as corrosion and creep tests, a microstructural analysis, and a texture analysis were performed on the HANA-4 alloy with various manufacturing processes

  10. Influence of the casting processing route on the corrosion behavior of dental alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galo, Rodrigo; Rocha, Luis Augusto; Faria, Adriana Claudia; Silveira, Renata Rodrigues; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; de Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello

    2014-12-01

    Casting in the presence of oxygen may result in an improvement of the corrosion performance of most alloys. However, the effect of corrosion on the casting without oxygen for dental materials remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the casting technique and atmosphere (argon or oxygen) on the corrosion behavior response of six different dental casting alloys. The corrosion behavior was evaluated by electrochemical measurements performed in artificial saliva for the different alloys cast in two different conditions: arc melting in argon and oxygen-gas flame centrifugal casting. A slight decrease in open-circuit potential for most alloys was observed during immersion, meaning that the corrosion tendency of the materials increases due to the contact with the solution. Exceptions were the Co-based alloys prepared by plasma, and the Co-Cr-Mo and Ni-Cr-4Ti alloys processed by oxidized flame, in which an increase in potential was observed. The amount of metallic ions released into the artificial saliva solution during immersion was similar for all specimens. Considering the pitting potential, a parameter of high importance when considering the fluctuating conditions of the oral environment, Co-based alloys show the best performance in comparison with the Ni-based alloys, independent of the processing route. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Corrosion of high temperature alloys in solar salt at 400, 500, and 680ÀC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Gill, David Dennis; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth

    2013-09-01

    Corrosion tests at 400, 500, and 680ÀC were performed using four high temperature alloys; 347SS, 321SS In625, and HA230. Molten salt chemistry was monitored over time through analysis of nitrite, carbonate, and dissolved metals. Metallography was performed on alloys at 500 and 680ÀC, due to the relatively thin oxide scale observed at 400ÀC. At 500ÀC, corrosion of iron based alloys took the form of chromium depletion and iron oxides, while nickel based alloys also had chromium depletion and formation of NiO. Chromium was detected in relatively low concentrations at this temperature. At 680ÀC, significant surface corrosion occurred with metal losses greater than 450microns/year after 1025hours of exposure. Iron based alloys formed complex iron, sodium, and chromium oxides. Some data suggests grain boundary chromium depletion of 321SS. Nickel alloys formed NiO and metallic nickel corrosion morphologies, with HA230 displaying significant internal oxidation in the form of chromia. Nickel alloys both exhibited worse corrosion than iron based alloys likely due to preferential dissolution of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten.

  12. Metal alloys for the new generation of compressors at hydrogen stations: Parametric study of corrosion behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arjomand Kermani, Nasrin; Petrushina, Irina; Nikiforov, Aleksey Valerievich

    2017-01-01

    the corrosion rate. However, even at 80 °C, the very low corrosion current densities proved that all of the tested alloys are safe to use as construction materials. AISI 347 showed very high corrosion resistance in all of the ionic liquids. The highest corrosion resistance among all of the tested alloys......, consequently, significantly reduce the final cost of hydrogen production. The correct choice of ionic liquid and construction materials is critical for avoiding significant corrosion problems. Hence, the objective of this study is to evaluate the compatibility of various austenitic stainless steels and nickel......-based alloys as construction materials in contact with 80 °C ionic liquids in an ionic liquid hydrogen compressor, considering the role of parameters such as the temperature, viscosity, ionic liquid cation and anion, and water absorption. The results show that temperature contributes to increasing...

  13. A comparison of fingerprint sweat corrosion of different alloys of brass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Stephanie; Bond, John W

    2013-01-01

    Fingerprint sweat from 40 donors was deposited onto samples of five α and α + β phase brasses, comprising five alloys with different copper and zinc concentrations, two of which also had the addition of small concentrations of lead. Visual grading of the visibility of the corrosion revealed that brasses with the least amount of zinc produced the most visible and fully formed fingerprints from the most donors. Consideration of previously reported mechanisms for the corrosion of brass suggests red copper (I) oxide as a likely corrosion product for low zinc brasses, and a consideration of the color, composition, and solubility of fingerprint sweat corrosion products suggests that copper (I) oxide produces good contrast and visibility with the brass substrate. Scanning electron microscope images of the corrosion of all five alloys confirmed the enhanced contrast between corroded and uncorroded areas for low zinc alloys. © 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  14. 3D study of intermetallics and their effect on the corrosion morphology of rheocast aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mingo, B.; Arrabal, R.; Pardo, A.; Matykina, E.; Skeldon, P.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the effect of heat treatment T6.1 on the microstructure and corrosion behaviour of rheocast aluminium alloy A356 is investigated on the basis of 2D/3D characterization techniques and electrochemical and SKPFM measurements. Heat treatment strengthens the α-Al matrix, modifies the intermetallic particles and spheroidizes eutectic Si. These changes do not modify significantly the corrosion behaviour of the alloy. 3D SEM-Tomography clearly shows that the corrosion advances in the shape of narrow paths between closely spaced intermetallics without a major influence of eutectic Si. - Highlights: • T6.1 spheroidizes Si, strengthens the matrix and modifies the intermetallics. • Electrochemical behaviour of untreated and heat-treated alloys is similar. • 3D SEM-Tomography provides additional information on the corrosion morphology. • Corrosion advances as paths between intermetallics with little influence of Si.

  15. Pitting corrosion resistance of high alloy OCTG in ferric chloride solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masamura, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Matsushima, I.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of alloying elements and precipitated phases on the corrosion rate of high alloy OCTG in the ferric chloride solution have been evaluated. The corrosion rate of Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys without precipitated phases, e.g. carbides and sigma phase, can be estimated from the composition using the following equation: log(C.R.)=-0.144xPRE-7690/(273+T)+28.6 where C.R. is the corrosion rate in g/m/sup 2//hr; PRE is Cr+3Mo+16N in percent and T is the test temperature in 0 C. The activation energies of the ferric chloride test are almost the same regardless of PRE or Ni content when no detrimental phase precipitates. When carbides or the sigma phase precipitate, the corrosion rate is higher and the activation energy is lowered. This suggests that secondary phases give preferential sites for initiation of pitting corrosion

  16. Corrosion rate transients observed by linear polarization techniques at Zr-1%Nb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beran, J.; Cerny, K.

    1997-01-01

    Momentary corrosion rate of Zr-1%Nb alloy during nonisothermal autoclave experiments at temperature up to 328 deg. C in various solutions was determined by T/R p values (T - absolute temperature, R p - polarization resistance), multiplied by temperature independent conversion factor. This factor was found by comparison of conventional corrosion loss evaluation with electrochemical measurements. Corrosion rate transients in boric acid solutions and in lithium hydroxide differed significantly. Great differences were also found in stabilized corrosion rates at the end of experiments. Temperature irregularities caused considerable changes in corrosion rate. (author). 5 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab

  17. Two peculiarities of evaluating stress-corrosion cracking in structural alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romaniv, O.N.; Nikiforchin, G.N.; Student, A.Z.; Tsirul'nik, A.T.

    1982-01-01

    Two aspects of evaluating subcritical crack growth are considered for alloys under long-term loading in corrosive environments: corrosion cracks morphology and electrochemical conditions at corrosion crack tips. Specimens of the 20Kh13, 45KhN2MFA and 50Kh steels were tested in NaCl aqueous solution, distilled water and isobutanol. The necessity is shown to take into account the branching of corrosion cracks for constructing fracture kinetic diagrams as well as real corrosion processes at a crack tip. A new technique is suggested for measurements of solution pH and potential of the metal-environment system at a crack tip [ru

  18. Estimation of atmospheric corrosion of high-strength, low-alloy steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-05-01

    This data analysis was undertaken to investigate the weatherability of steels : whose compositions do not fall in the range of ASTM Standard G101, Estimating : the Atmospheric Corrosion Resistance of Low-Alloy Steels.

  19. Microstructure and corrosion resistance of Sm-containing Al-Mn-Si-Fe-Cu alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Yuyin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Optimizing alloy composition is an effective way to improve physical and chemical properties of automobile heat exchanger materials.A Sm-containing Al-Mn-Si-Fe-Cu alloy was investigated through transmission electron microscopy,scanning electron microscopy,and electrochemical measurement.Experimental results indicated that main phases distributed in the alloy wereα-Al(Mn,FeSi,Al2Sm and Al10Cu7Sm2.Alloying with Sm element could refine the precipitated α-Al(Mn,FeSi phase.Polarization testing results indicated that the corrosion surfacewas mainly composed of pitting pits and corrosion products.Sea water acetic acid test(SWAAT showed that corrosion loss increased first and then slowed downwith increase of the corrosion time.

  20. Corrosion of Aluminum Alloys in the Presence of Fire-Retardant Aircraft Interior Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This research project was to evaluate the potential for fire-retardant materials used in aircraft interiors to cause corrosion of aluminum structural alloys. Service Difficulty Reports (SDR's) were reviewed for several aircraft types, and the most fr...

  1. Fatigue and Fracture Characterization of Aircraft Aluminum Alloys Damaged by Prior Corrosion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baldwin, J

    2002-01-01

    At the time of the initiation of this project, there was no comprehensive data describing corrosion's effect on the fatigue and fracture behavior of aluminum alloys typically found in aging aircraft...

  2. Determination of Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Aluminum-Lithium Alloy ML377

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valek, Bryan C.

    1995-01-01

    The use of aluminum-lithium alloys for aerospace applications is currently being studied at NASA Langley Research Center's Metallic Materials Branch. The alloys in question will operate under stress in a corrosive environment. These conditions are ideal for the phenomena of Stress-Corrosion Cracking (SCC) to occur. The test procedure for SCC calls for alternate immersion and breaking load tests. These tests were optimized for the lab equipment and materials available in the Light Alloy lab. Al-Li alloy ML377 specimens were then subjected to alternate immersion and breaking load tests to determine residual strength and resistance to SCC. Corrosion morphology and microstructure were examined under magnification. Data shows that ML377 is highly resistant to stress-corrosion cracking.

  3. Corrosion resistance of sodium sulfate coated cobalt-chromium-aluminum alloys at 900 C, 1000 C, and 1100 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, G. J.

    1979-01-01

    The corrosion of sodium sulfate coated cobalt alloys was measured and the results compared to the cyclic oxidation of alloys with the same composition, and to the hot corrosion of compositionally equivalent nickel-base alloys. Cobalt alloys with sufficient aluminum content to form aluminum containing scales corrode less than their nickel-base counterparts. The cobalt alloys with lower aluminum levels form CoO scales and corrode more than their nickel-base counterparts which form NiO scales.

  4. Stress Corrosion Crack Growth of Alloy 52M in Simulated PWR Primary Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toloczko, M. B.; Olszta, M. J.; Bruemmer, S. M.

    Crack-growth experiments have been performed on five different alloy 52M welds in simulated PWR primary water at 350°C or 360°C. The alloy 52M test matrix included V-groove and narrow-gap welds, an overlay on alloy 182, and an inlay on alloy 82. For the overlay and inlay materials, crack growth rates are reported only on the alloy 52M weld well beyond the dilution zone. In one of the narrow gap welds, the crack path was oriented to pass through a distribution of pre-existing weld cracks and their influence on stress-corrosion behavior is evaluated. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) is observed in several alloy 52M welds, however propagation rates remain below 5x10-9 mm/s in all cases. Comparisons will be made to our previous SCC measurements on alloy 152 and 52 welds.

  5. Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Zr Alloys for High Burnup and Generation IV Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur Motta; Yong Hwan Jeong; R.J. Comstock; G.S. Was; Y.S. Kim

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this collaboration between four institutions in the US and Korea is to demonstrate a technical basis for the improvement of the corrosion resistance of zirconium-based alloys in more extreme operating environments (such as those present in severe fuel duty, cycles high burnup, boiling, aggressive chemistry) and to investigate the feasibility (from the point of view of corrosion rate) of using advanced zirconium-based alloys in a supercritical water environment

  6. Corrosion of alloy 22 in phosphate ions effect and chloride containing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carranza, Ricardo M.

    2009-01-01

    Alloy 22 belongs to Ni-Cr-Mo family. This alloy resists the most aggressive environments for industrial applications, in oxidizing as well as reducing conditions, because exhibits an excellent uniform and localized corrosion resistance in aqueous solution. Because of its outstanding corrosion resistant, this alloy is one of the candidate to be considered for the outer shell of the canister that would contain high level radioactive nuclear wastes in a geological repository. The aim of this work is to study ion phosphate influence over Alloy 22 corrosion behavior under aggressive conditions, such as high temperature and high ion chloride concentration, where this material might be susceptible to crevice corrosion. Two different types of samples were used: cylinder specimens for uniform corrosion behavior studies and Prismatic Crevice Assembly (PCA) specimens for localized corrosion studies. Electrochemical tests were performed in deaerated aqueous solution of 1 M NaCl and 1 M NaCl with different phosphate additions at 90 C degrees and pH near neutral. The anodic film and corrosion products obtained were studied by SEM/EDS. Cyclic Potentiodynamic Polarization (CPP) curves obtained for uniform corrosion studies, showed an increase of the passivity range in phosphate containing solutions. The passive current value was 1 μA/cm 2 approximately in all the tests. PCA electrochemical tests, that combined a CPP with a potentiostatic polarization step for 2 hours in between the forward and reverse scan, showed crevice corrosion development in some cases. The repassivation potential value, determined by the intersection of the forward and the reverse scan, increased with phosphate addition. A complete crevice corrosion inhibition effect was found for phosphate concentration higher than 0.3 M. These results indicate that the passivity potential range depend on phosphate presence and might be related with the incorporation of the anion in the passive film. Results of the tests

  7. Investigation of models to predict the corrosion of steels in flowing liquid lead alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balbaud-Celerier, F.; Barbier, F.

    2001-01-01

    Corrosion of steels exposed to flowing liquid lead alloys can be affected by hydrodynamic parameters. The rotating cylinder system is of interest for the practical evaluation of the fluid velocity effect on corrosion and for the prediction of the corrosion behavior in other geometries. Models developed in aqueous medium are tested in the case of liquid metal environments. It is shown that equations established for the rotating cylinder and the pipe flow geometry can be used effectively in liquid lead alloys (Pb-17Li) assuming the corrosion process is mass transfer controlled and the diffusion coefficient of dissolved species is known. The corrosion rate of martensitic steels in Pb-17Li is shown to be independent of the geometry when plotted as a function of the mass transfer coefficient. Predictions about the corrosion of steel in liquid Pb-Bi are performed but experiments are needed to validate the results obtained by modeling

  8. Study of corrosion-erosion behaviour of stainless alloys in industrial phosphoric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenbour, Abdellah; Hajji, Mohamed-Adil; Jallouli, El Miloudi; Bachir, Ali Ben

    2006-01-01

    The corrosion and corrosion-abrasion resistance of some stainless steels in industrial phosphoric acid 30% P 2 O 5 has been studied using electrochemical techniques. The corrosion rate of materials increases with the increase of temperature. Alloys which contain chromium, molybdenum and nitrogen in sufficient quantities present the best behaviour. In the abrasion-corrosion conditions, the experimental device set up allowed to follow continually samples electrochemical behaviour. Under dynamic conditions and without solid particles, the increase of acid projection speed has no effect on the alloys corrosion behaviour. The adding of abrasive leads to a general increase of corrosion rate and to a decrease of material resistance. Under these conditions, materials attack is controlled by synergistic effect between the abrasion and the impurities. The cast 30% Cr shows good resistance according to his high chromium content

  9. Prevention of Crevice Corrosion of STS 304 Stainless Steel by a Mg-alloy Galvanic Anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, U. J.; Yun, B. D.; Kim, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Prevention of crevice corrosion was studied for STS 304 stainless steel using a Mg-alloy galvanic anode in solutions with various specific resistivity. The crevice corrosion and corrosion protection characteristics of the steel was investigated by the electrochemical polarization and galvanic corrosion tests. Experimental results show that the crevice corrosion of STS 304 stainless steel does not occur in solutions of high specific resistivity, but it occurs in solutions of low specific resistivity like in solutions with resistivities of 30, 60 and 115 Ω · m. With decreasing specific resistivity of the solution, the electrode potential of STS 304 stainless steel in the crevice is lowered. The potential of STS 304 stainless steel in the crevice after coupling is cathodically polarized more by decreasing specific resistivity indicating that the crevice corrosion of STS 304 stainless steel is prevented by the Mg-alloy galvanic anode

  10. Corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys. Chemical composition and metallurgical condition's effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zadorozne, N.S.; Rebak, Raul B.

    2009-01-01

    Ni-Cr-Mo alloys offer an outstanding corrosion resistance in a wide variety of highly-corrosive environments. This versatility is due to the excellent performance of nickel in hot alkaline solutions and the beneficial effect of chromium and molybdenum in oxidizing and reducing conditions, respectively. Alloy C-22 (22 % Cr-13 % Mo-3% W) is a well known versatile member of this family. Due to its excellent corrosion resistance in a wide variety of environments, Alloy C-22 has been selected for the fabrication of the corrosion-resistant outer shell of the high-level nuclear waste container. The increasing demand of the industry for corrosion resistant alloys with particular properties of corrosion and mechanical resistance has led to the development of new alloys. Alloy C-22HS (Ni-21 % Cr-17 % Mo) is a new high-strength corrosion resistant material recently developed and introduced into the market. This alloy provides a corrosion resistance comparable with that of other C-type alloys, and it can also be age hardened to effectively double its yield strength. HASTELLOY HYBRID-BC1 (Ni-22 % Mo-15 % Cr) is a new development intended for filling the gap between Ni-Mo and Ni-Cr-Mo alloys. This novel alloy is able to withstand HCl and H 2 SO 4 , even in the presence of dissolved oxygen and other oxidizing species. Its resistance to chloride-induced pitting corrosion, crevice corrosion and stress corrosion cracking is also remarkable. Thermal aging of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys leads to microstructure changes depending on the temperature range and exposure time at temperature. A Long Range Ordering (LRO) reaction can occur in the range of 350 C degrees to 600 C degrees, producing an ordered Ni 2 (Cr,Mo) phase. This ordering reaction does not seem to affect the corrosion resistance and produces only a slight loss in ductility. LRO transformation is homogeneous and has proven to be useful to fabricate the age-hard enable Alloy C22-HS. Tetrahedral Close Packed (TCP) phases, like μ, σ and

  11. Corrosion properties of pulse-plated zinc-nickel alloy coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfantazi, A.M. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada). Dept. of Metals and Materials Engineering; Erb, U. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-11-01

    Corrosion properties of pulse-plated Zn-Ni alloy coating on a steel substrate were investigated using the neutral salt-spray test (ASTM B 117-81) and the potentiodynamic polarization technique (ASTM G 5-82). Performance of these alloy coatings with various Ni contents (up to 62 wt%) was compared to that of laboratory-prepared electrodeposited Zn coatings and commercial galvannealed (GA) steel. Results of the neutral salt-spray test indicated corrosion resistance of pulse-plated Zn-Ni alloy coatings was superior to that of the pure Zn and commercial GA coating. The Zn-20 wt% Ni and Zn-14 wt% Ni alloys gave the best protection of the Zn-Ni coatings tested. Potentiodynamic polarization tests confirmed excellent corrosion performance of the 20 wt% Ni alloy

  12. Corrosion resistant Zn–Co alloy coatings deposited using saw-tooth ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Optimal configuration, represented as (Zn–Co)2.0/4.0/300 was found to exhibit ∼ 89 times better corrosion resistance compared to monolithic (Zn–Co)3.0 alloy deposited for same time, from same bath. The better corrosion resistance of CMMA coatings was attributed to changed interfacial dielectric properties, evidenced by ...

  13. High Velocity Oxidation and Hot Corrosion Resistance of Some ODS Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, C. E.; Deadmore, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    Several oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys were tested for cyclic, high velocity, oxidation, and hot corrosion resistance. These results were compared to the resistance of an advanced, NiCrAl coated superalloy. An ODS FeCrAl were identified as having sufficient oxidation and hot corrosion resistance to allow potential use in an aircraft gas turbine without coating.

  14. Corrosion behaviour of Ni–Co alloy coatings at Kish Island (marine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. In this study, the corrosion behaviour of Ni-Co alloys with low Co content, electroplated on steel substrate in sulphate bath, was investigated. The morphology of coatings was studied by optical and SEM microscopy. The corrosion products were analyzed using EDX. The results showed that Ni–1%Co coatings had ...

  15. Corrosion behaviour of Ni–Co alloy coatings at Kish Island

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, the corrosion behaviour of Ni-Co alloys with low Co content, electroplated on steel substrate in sulphate bath, was investigated. The morphology of coatings was studied by optical and SEM microscopy. The corrosion products were analyzed using EDX. The results showed that Ni–1% Co coatings had a better ...

  16. Microscopic analysis of effect of shot peening on corrosion fatigue behavior of aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Cheon; Cheong, Seong Kyun

    2012-01-01

    The object of this study considers corrosion fatigue improvement of 7075-T6 aluminum by using shot peening treatment on 3.5% NaCl solution at room temperature. Aluminum alloy is generally used in aerospace structural components because of the light weight and high strength characteristics. Many studies have shown that an aluminum alloy can be approximately 50% lighter than other materials. Mostly, corrosion leads to earlier fatigue crack propagation under tensile conditions and severely reduces the life of structures. Therefore, the technique to improve material resistance to corrosion fatigue is required. Shot peening technology is widely used to improve fatigue life and other mechanical properties by induced compressive residual stress. Even the roughness of treated surface causes pitting corrosion, the compressive residual stress, which is induced under the surface layer of material by shot peening, suppersses the corrosion and increases the corrosion resistance. The experimental results for shot peened specimens were compared with previous work for non treated aluminum alloy. The results show that the shot peening treatment affects the corrosion fatigue improvement of aluminum alloys and the induced compressive residual stress by shot peening treatment improves the resistance to corrosion fatigue

  17. The corrosion protection of several aluminum alloys by chromic acid and sulfuric acid anodizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    The corrosion protection afforded 7075-T6, 7075-T3, 6061-T6, and 2024-T3 aluminum alloys by chromic acid and sulfuric acid anodizing was examined using electrochemical techniques. From these studies, it is concluded that sulfuric acid anodizing provides superior corrosion protection compared to chromic acid anodizing.

  18. Structure and Corrosion Resistance of Welded Joints of Alloy 1151 in Marine Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakulo, A. V.; Yakushin, B. F.; Puchkov, Yu. A.

    2017-07-01

    The corrosion behavior of joints formed by TIG and IMIG welding from clad sheets of heat-hardenable aluminum alloy 1151 of the Al - Cu - Mg system is studied. The corrosion tests are performed in an aqueous solution of NaCl in a salt-spray chamber. The welded joints are subjected to a metallographic analysis.

  19. High-temperature corrosion of alloyed steels in molten sodium tetraborate under atmosphere of air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochergin, V.P.; Zvegintseva, G.E.; Vinyarskaya, I.N.; Demidenko, O.V.; Sazonova, N.A.

    1993-01-01

    Results of corrosion process investigation at 1123-1223 K in molten sodium tetraborate on the surface of samples produced of steels alloyed by 1-6 mas.% of Mn, chromium-nickel steels containing 0.35 mas.% of C, 1-3 mas.% of Cr and Ni, as well as of a group of corrosion resistant steels are generalized

  20. Testing Corrosion Inhibitors for the Conservation of Archaeological Copper and Copper Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert B. Faltermeier

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available This is a synopsis of the Ph.D. research undertaken at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London. The aim was to evaluate corrosion inhibitors for use in the conservation of copper and copper alloy archaeological artefacts. The objective of this work was to acquire an insight into the performance of copper corrosion inhibitors, when applied to archaeological copper.

  1. The effect of urea on the corrosion behavior of different dental alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Geckili

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: The data indicate that elevated urea levels reduced the corrosion susceptibility of all alloys, possibly through adsorption of organics onto the metal surface. This study indicates that corrosion testing performed in sterile saline or synthetic saliva without organic components could be misleading.

  2. Corrosion behaviour of Ni–Co alloy coatings at Kish Island (marine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, the corrosion behaviour of Ni-Co alloys with low Co content, electroplated on steel substrate in sulphate bath, was investigated. The morphology of coatings was studied by optical and SEM microscopy. The corrosion products were analyzed using EDX. The results showed that Ni–1% Co coatings had a better ...

  3. Role of alloying elements and carbides in the chlorine-induced corrosion of steels and alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Jürgen Grabke

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The high temperature corrosion of steels and Ni-base alloys in oxidizing and chloridizing environments is of practical interest in relation to problems in waste incineration plants and power plants using Cl containing fuels. The behaviour of the most important alloying elements Fe, Cr, Ni, Mo, Mn, Si, Al upon corrosion in an oxidizing and chloridizing atmosphere was elucidated: the reactions and kinetics can be largely understood on the base of thermodynamic data, i.e. free energy of chloride formation, vapor pressure of the chlorides and oxygen pressure pO2 needed for the conversion chlorides -> oxides. The mechanism is described by 'active oxidation', comprising inward penetration of chlorine into the scale, formation of chlorides at the oxide/metal interface, evaporation of the chlorides and conversion of the evaporating chlorides into oxides, which occurs in more or less distance from the surface (depending on pO2. This process leads to loose, fragile, multilayered oxides which are unprotective (therefore: active oxidation. Fe and Cr are rapidly transferred into such scale, Ni and Mo are relatively resistant. In many cases, the grain boundaries of the materials are strongly attacked, this is due to a susceptibility of chromium carbides to chloridation. In contrast the carbides Mo2C, TiC and NbC are less attacked than the matrix. Alloys on the basis Fe-Cr-Si proved to be rather resistant, and the alloying elements Ni and Mo clearly retard the attack in an oxidizing and chloridizing environment.

  4. Stress corrosion cracking of several high strength ferrous and nickel alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E. E.

    1971-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of several high strength ferrous and nickel base alloys has been determined in a sodium chloride solution. Results indicate that under these test conditions Multiphase MP35N, Unitemp L605, Inconel 718, Carpenter 20Cb and 20Cb-3 are highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking. AISI 410 and 431 stainless steels, 18 Ni maraging steel (250 grade) and AISI 4130 steel are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking under some conditions.

  5. Effects of Alloying Elements (Cr, Mn) on Corrosion Properties of Carbon Steel in Synthetic Seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, Youngmin; Kim, Heesan

    2016-01-01

    Effects of alloying elements, manganese and chromium, on corrosion resistance of carbon steel were examined using weight loss test and electrochemical tests (polarization test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)) in synthetic seawater at 60 ℃. The results from the weight loss test showed that chromium effectively improved corrosion resistance of carbon steel during the entire immersion time, but manganese improved corrosion resistance after the lowered corrosion resistance at the beginnings of immersion. Unlike the weight loss test, the electrochemical tests showed that the corrosion resistance did not increase with immersion time, in all the specimens. This disagreement is explained by the presence of rust involved in electrochemical reaction during electrochemical tests. The analysis of rust with transmission electron microscopy (TEM)−energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) showed that the amorphous-like rust layer located at the metal/rust interface with enriched alloying element (Cr, Mn) prevents diffusion of corrosive species into a metal/rust interface effectively, which leads to increased corrosion resistance. The initial corrosion behaviour is also affected by the rust types. In other words, manganese accelerated the formation of spinel oxides, negatively affecting corrosion resistance. Meanwhile, chromium accelerated the formation of goethite but impeded the formation of spinel oxides, positively affecting the corrosion resistance. From the above results, the corrosion resistance of steel is closely related with a rust type.

  6. In vitro corrosion behavior and cellular response of thermally oxidized Zr-3Sn alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, F.Y.; Wang, B.L.; Qiu, K.J. [Center for Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Li, H.F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, L. [Center for Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Zheng, Y.F., E-mail: yfzheng@pku.edu.cn [Center for Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Han, Y. [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xian Jiaotong University, Xian 710049 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A main monoclinic ZrO{sub 2} layer formed on ZrSn alloy after thermal oxidation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Corrosion resistance of ZrSn alloy was improved with thermal oxidation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The oxide layer inhibited the release of the ions into the mediums. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidized ZrSn alloy exhibited an excellent in vitro biocompatibility. - Abstract: In this study, ZrSn alloy was thermally oxidized at 600 Degree-Sign C for 3 h and its morphological and structural characteristics, corrosion behavior, ion release and in vitro cytocompatibility were studied to evaluate the feasibility of applying it as dental implant. After oxidation, a dense black oxide layer formed on ZrSn alloy surface, which consisted of predominant monoclinic zirconia and a few non-stoichiometric oxides. The scratching and water contact angle test results demonstrated that the oxide layer exhibited good adhesion strength and similar hydrophilicity to zirconia. The oxidized ZrSn alloy showed higher corrosion resistance, as indicated by far lower corrosion current density and passive current density compared to pure Ti and untreated ZrSn alloy in artificial saliva with and without H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The amount of ions released from the oxidized ZrSn alloy was much lower than that dissolved from pure Ti in simulated corrosive oral mediums. Moreover, the oxidized ZrSn alloy did not present any significant toxic effect to both osteoblast-like cells and fibroblast cells, and osteoblast-like cells could adhere well onto the surface and exhibited a good proliferative pattern. The combination of improved surface properties, superior corrosion resistance and good biocompatibility made the oxidized ZrSn alloy promising for oral implantology application.

  7. Mechanical and corrosion properties of newly developed biodegradable Zn-based alloys for bone fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojtěch, D; Kubásek, J; Serák, J; Novák, P

    2011-09-01

    In the present work Zn-Mg alloys containing up to 3wt.% Mg were studied as potential biodegradable materials for medical use. The structure, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of these alloys were investigated and compared with those of pure Mg, AZ91HP and casting Zn-Al-Cu alloys. The structures were examined by light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and tensile and hardness testing were used to characterize the mechanical properties of the alloys. The corrosion behavior of the materials in simulated body fluid with pH values of 5, 7 and 10 was determined by immersion tests, potentiodynamic measurements and by monitoring the pH value evolution during corrosion. The surfaces of the corroded alloys were investigated by SEM, energy-dispersive spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that a maximum strength and elongation of 150MPa and 2%, respectively, were achieved at Mg contents of approximately 1wt.%. These mechanical properties are discussed in relation to the structural features of the alloys. The corrosion rates of the Zn-Mg alloys were determined to be significantly lower than those of Mg and AZ91HP alloys. The former alloys corroded at rates of the order of tens of microns per year, whereas the corrosion rates of the latter were of the order of hundreds of microns per year. Possible zinc doses and toxicity were estimated from the corrosion behavior of the zinc alloys. It was found that these doses are negligible compared with the tolerable biological daily limit of zinc. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Electrochemical corrosion behavior of AZ91D alloy in ethylene glycol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fekry, A.M. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza 12613 (Egypt)], E-mail: hham4@hotmail.com; Fatayerji, M.Z. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza 12613 (Egypt)

    2009-11-01

    The effect of concentration on the corrosion behavior of Mg-based alloy AZ91D was investigated in ethylene glycol-water solutions using electrochemical techniques i.e. potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance measurements (EIS) and surface examination via scanning electron microscope (SEM) technique. This can provide a basis for developing new coolants for magnesium alloy engine blocks. Corrosion behavior of AZ91D alloy by coolant is important in the automotive industry. It was found that the corrosion rate of AZ91D alloy decreased with increasing concentration of ethylene glycol. For AZ91D alloy in chloride >0.05 M or fluoride <0.05 M containing 30% ethylene glycol solution, they are more corrosive than the blank (30% ethylene glycol-70% water). However, at concentrations <0.05 for chloride or >0.05 M for fluoride containing ethylene glycol solution, some inhibition effect has been observed. The corrosion of AZ91D alloy in the blank can be effectively inhibited by addition of 0.05 mM paracetamol that reacts with AZ91D alloy and forms a protective film on the surface at this concentration as confirmed by surface examination.

  9. Applications of electricity and corrosion. Precautions for use of metals and stainless and refractory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gras, J.M.

    1993-09-01

    The development of applications of electricity poses highly diversified problems with materials where the resistance to corrosion prevails. Corrosion occurs under various conditions, which sometimes look harmless, and it covers diverse phenomenons linked to the nature of materials and to the physical and chemical context. However, in spite of the diversity of the processes used (electrical boilers, mechanical steam compression, heat pumps, Joule effect,) the knowledge required to approach the corrosion problems corresponds to a limited number of generic situations with regard not only to the phenomenons proper (general corrosion of copper, pitting and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steels, refractory alloys oxidation,) but also to chemical conditions which favour the corrosion (natural waters, acidic condensates, hot gases). This report is a short guide to anti-corrosion. With the aid of questions asked during the past few years, it aims to provide engineers in charge of the development of applications of electricity with a few recommendations upon the precautions for use of metallic materials. We analyze in turn the problems met with wet air and drying mists, chloride-containing neutral waters, alkaline waters and caustic media, acidic waters and concentrated acids, and, last, hot gases. We lay stress upon the behaviour of materials deemed to withstand corrosion under aqueous conditions (stainless steels and alloys, copper,titanium) and corrosion at high temperatures (refractory alloys). (author). 11 figs., 43 refs., 11 tabs

  10. Repassivation potentials determination of crevice corrosion of alloy in Chloride solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rincon Ortiz, Mauricio

    2009-01-01

    Alloy 22 (UNS N06022) belongs to the Ni-Cr-Mo family and it is highly resistant to general and localized corrosion, but it may suffer crevice corrosion in aggressive environmental conditions, such as high chloride concentration, high applied potential and high temperature. Alloy 22 is one of the candidates to be considered for the outer corrosion-resistant shell of high-level nuclear waste containers. It is assumed that localized corrosion will only occur when the corrosion potential (E CORR ) is equal or higher than the crevice corrosion repassivation potential (E R,CREV ). This parameter is obtained by different electrochemical techniques using artificially creviced specimens. These techniques include cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) curves, Tsujikawa-Hisamatsu electrochemical (THE) method or other non-standardized methods. Recently, as a variation of THE method, the PD-GS-PD technique was introduced. The aim of the present work was to determine reliable critical potentials for crevice corrosion of Alloy 22 in pure chloride solutions at 90 C degrees. Conservative methodologies (which include extended potentiostatic steps) were applied for determining protection potentials below which crevice corrosion cannot initiate and propagate. Results from PD-GS-PD technique were compared with those from these methodologies in order to assess their reliability. Results from the CPP and the THE methods were also considered for comparison. The repassivation potentials from the PD-GS-PD technique were conservative and reproducible, and they did not depend on the amount of previous crevice corrosion propagation in the studied conditions. (author)

  11. Investigations into the corrosion resistance of copper aluminium alloys. Effect of phosphorus as corrosion resistant third alloying element in the ternary system CuAl20P1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allwardt, A.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of phosphorus on the corrosion resistance of Al-bronzes is studied in detail in this work. A literature review showed that there are a lot of things known about the microstructure and the mechanical properties of Al-bronzes. In spite of their corrosion resistance the corrosion properties and the structure of the protective oxide films of Al-bronzes were seldom a matter of interest. Systematic studies of the influence of different alloying elements on the oxide film and the corrosion properties are rare. Therefore, it is not possible to predict the corrosion resistance of Al-bronzes, made by alloying particular elements. The high corrosion resistance of the new alloy CuAl 20 P 1 was the reason to investigate the influence of phosphorus on the corrosion properties of Al-bronzes in more detail. A systematic study of the microstructure and the corrosion properties of Cu, CuP x , CuAl 20 and CuAl 20 P x offers an insight into the effect of aluminium and phosphorus on the formation of the oxide film on Al-bronzes. It was found that there exists a critical amount of 1 at.-% of phosphorus. Above and below this amount the corrosion resistance becomes worse. This behaviour could be explained by XPS-and electrochemical measurements. Although there are still some questions about the influence of phosphorus on the corrosion resistance of Al-bronzes, this work has produced some important results, which in the future may be helpful to develop new high corrosion resistant Al-bronzes more efficiently: - on clean surface Al-bronze, the oxidation of Al and Cu takes place simultaneously, - Al promotes the formation of Cu 2 O but impedes the formation of Cu(II)-oxide/-hydride in neutral solutions, - P impedes the formation of Cu 2 O and as a consequence promotes the formation of aluminium oxide. This results in a higher amount of Al in the oxide film on the surface of the alloy, which leads to a better corrosion resistance. (author) figs., tabs., 106 refs

  12. Cluster formula of Fe-containing Monel alloys with high corrosion-resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Baozeng; Gu Junjie [Key Lab of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Dalian University of Technology), Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang Qing, E-mail: wangq@dlut.edu.cn [Key Lab of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Dalian University of Technology), Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Ji Chunjun [College of Energy Source and Power, Dalian University of Science and Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China); Wang Yingmin; Qiang Jianbing [Key Lab of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Dalian University of Technology), Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Dong Chuang, E-mail: dong@dlut.edu.cn [Key Lab of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Dalian University of Technology), Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2012-06-15

    The cluster-plus-glue-atom model is applied in the composition interpretation of Monel alloys. This model considers ideal atomic nearest neighbor configurations among the constituent elements and has been used in understanding compositions of complex alloys like quasicrystals, amorphous alloys, and cupronickels. According to this model, any structure can be expressed by cluster formula [cluster](glue atom){sub x}, x denoting the number of glue atoms matching one cluster. According to this model, two groups of experimental composition series [Fe{sub 1}Ni{sub 12}]Cu{sub x} and [Fe{sub y}Ni{sub 12}]Cu{sub 5} were designed which fell close to conventional Fe-containing Monel alloys. The designed alloys after solution treatment plus water quenching, are monolithic FCC Ni-based solid solutions. Among them, the [Fe{sub 1}Ni{sub 12}]Cu{sub 5} alloy has the highest corrosion resistance in simulated sea water, and its performance is superior to that of industrial Monel 400 alloy. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A stable solid solution model is proposed using our 'cluster-plus-glue-atom model'. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This model is used to develop Monel corrosion resistant alloys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single FCC structure is easily retained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The alloys show good corrosion properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This work contributes to the general understanding of engineering alloys.

  13. Microstructure, mechanical property, corrosion behavior, and in vitro biocompatibility of Zr-Mo alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, F Y; Wang, B L; Qiu, K J; Li, L; Lin, J P; Li, H F; Zheng, Y F

    2013-02-01

    In this study, the microstructure, mechanical properties, corrosion behaviors, and in vitro biocompatibility of Zr-Mo alloys as a function of Mo content after solution treatment were systemically investigated to assess their potential use in biomedical application. The experimental results indicated that Zr-1Mo alloy mainly consisted of an acicular structure of α' phase, while ω phase formed in Zr-3Mo alloy. In Zr-5Mo alloy, retained β phase and a small amount of precipitated α phase were observed. Only the retained β phase was obtained in Zr-10Mo alloy. Zr-1Mo alloy exhibited the greatest hardness, bending strength, and modulus among all experimental Zr-Mo alloys, while β phase Zr-10Mo alloy had a low modulus. The results of electrochemical corrosion indicated that adding Mo into Zr improved its corrosion resistance which resulted in increasing the thermodynamic stability and passivity of zirconium. The cytotoxicity test suggested that the extracts of the studied Zr-Mo alloys produced no significant deleterious effect to fibroblast cells (L-929) and osteoblast cells (MG 63), indicating an excellent in vitro biocompatibility. Based on these facts, certain Zr-Mo alloys potentially suitable for different biomedical applications were proposed. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of LD10 Aluminum Alloy in UDMH and N2O4 propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Youhong; Chang, Xinlong; Liu, Wanlei

    2018-03-01

    The LD10 aluminum alloy double cantilever beam specimens were corroded under the conditions of Unsymmetric Uimethyl Hydrazine (UDMH), Dinitrogen Tetroxide (N2O4), and 3.5% NaCl environment. The crack propagation behavior of the aluminum alloy in different corrosion environment was analyzed. The stress corrosion cracking behavior of aluminum alloy in N2O4 is relatively slight and there are not evident stress corrosion phenomenons founded in UDMH.

  15. Comparative corrosion study of Ag–Pd and Co–Cr alloys used in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. The electrochemical behaviour of two Ag–Pd alloys (Unique White and Paliag) used in dental prosthetics construction for crowns and bridges and one Co–Cr alloy (Vitallium 2000) was studied in artificial saliva using the polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The corrosion resi-.

  16. In vitro corrosion properties and cytocompatibility of Fe-Ga alloys as potential biodegradable metallic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Henan; Zheng, Yang; Liu, Jinghua; Jiang, Chengbao; Li, Yan

    2017-02-01

    The in vitro biodegradable properties and cytocompatibility of Fe-Ga alloys including Fe 81 Ga 19 , (Fe 81 Ga 19 ) 98 B 2 and (Fe 81 Ga 19 ) 99.5 (TaC) 0.5 , and pure Fe were investigated for biomedical applications. The microstructure of the alloys was characterized using X-ray diffraction spectroscopy and optical microscopy. The results showed that A2 and D0 3 phases were detected for the three types of Fe-Ga alloys, and additional Fe 2 B and TaC phases were found in the (Fe 81 Ga 19 ) 98 B 2 and (Fe 81 Ga 19 ) 99.5 (TaC) 0.5 alloys, respectively. The corrosion rates of the Fe-Ga alloys were higher than that of pure Fe, as demonstrated by both potentiodynamic polarization measurements and immersion tests in simulated body fluid. The alloying element Ga lowered the corrosion potential of the Fe matrix and made it more susceptible to corrosion. Severe pitting corrosion developed on the surface of the Fe 81 Ga 19 alloy after the addition of ternary B or TaC due to the multi-phase microstructures. The MC3T3-E1 cells exhibited good adhesion and proliferation behavior on the surfaces of the Fe-Ga alloys after culture for 4h and 24h. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparative corrosion study of Ag–Pd and Co–Cr alloys used in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electrochemical behaviour of two Ag–Pd alloys (Unique White and Paliag) used in dental prosthetics construction for crowns and bridges and one Co–Cr alloy (Vitallium 2000) was studied in artificial saliva using the polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The corrosion resistance was ...

  18. Effect of carbide precipitation on the corrosion behavior of Inconel alloy 690

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarver, J.M.; Crum, J.R.; Mankins, W.L.

    1987-01-01

    Intergranular carbide precipitation reactions have been shown to affect the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of nickel-chromium-iron alloys in environments relative to nuclear steam generators. Carbon solubility curves, time-temperature-sensitization plots and other carbide precipitation data are presented for alloy 690 as an aid in developing heat treatments for improved SCC resistance

  19. Increased resistance to stress corrosion of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummer, S. B.; Cocks, F. H.

    1970-01-01

    Stress corrosion resistance is increased by distorting surface grain-boundary structure and by interrupting the corrosion and stress corrosion. The first is accomplished by machining or shot peening and the second by removal from and later reexposure to the corrosive environment.

  20. Effects of organic acid pickling on the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy AZ31 sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Blawert, C.; Scharnagl, N.

    2010-01-01

    Organic acids were used to clean AZ31 magnesium alloy sheet and the effect of the cleaning processes on the surface condition and corrosion performance of the alloy was investigated. Organic acid cleanings reduced the surface impurities and enhanced the corrosion resistance. Removal of at least 4...... mu m of the contaminated surface was required to reach corrosion rates less than 1 mm/year in salt spray condition. Among the three organic acids examined, acetic acid is the best choice. Oxalic acid can be an alternative while citric acid is not suitable for cleaning AZ31 sheet, because...

  1. Influence of yttria surface modification on high temperature corrosion of porous Ni22Cr alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karczewski, Jakub; Dunst, Katarzyna; Jasinski, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Protective coatings for porous alloys for high temperature use are relatively new materials. Their main drawback is high temperature corrosion. In this work protective coatings based the on Y-precursor infiltrated into the sintered Ni22Cr alloys are studied at 700°C. Effects of the amount...... of the protective phase on the resulting corrosion properties are evaluated in air and humidified hydrogen. Weight gain of the samples, their open porosities and microstructures are analyzed and compared. Results show, that by the addition of even a minor amount of the Y-precursor corrosion rates can be decreased...

  2. Corrosion-resistant amorphous metallic films of Mo49Cr33B18 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesham, R.; Distefano, S.; Fitzgerald, D.; Thakoor, A. P.; Khanna, S. K.

    1987-01-01

    Corrosion-resistant amorphous metallic alloy films of Mo49Cr33B18 with a crystallization temperature of 590 C were deposited onto glass and quartz substrates by magnetron sputter-quench technique. The amorphous nature of the films was confirmed by their diffuse X-ray diffraction patterns. The deposited films are densely packed (zone T) and exhibit low stress and good adhesion to the substrate. Corrosion current of as-deposited coating of MoCrB amorphous metallic alloy is approximately three orders of magnitude less than the corrosion current of 304 stainless steel in 1N H2SO4 solution.

  3. Performance characterization of sintered iron electrodes in nickel/iron alkaline batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periasamy, P.; Ramesh Babu, B.; Venkatakrishna Iyer, S.

    A nickel/iron storage battery with a porous, sintered, iron negative electrode and a nickel positive electrode is a high power system by virtue of its low internal resistance. A dry-powder sintering procedure is used to fabricate negative and positive electrodes. Negative iron electrodes are activated with various salt solutions such as CdSO 4, BaCl 2, HgCl 2 and sulfur. Positive electrodes are impregnated with nickel hydroxide by a chemical method. Tests are performed in 10 Ah capacity nickel/iron cells and two types of activated iron electrodes are used. The present work deals with electrode fabrication, charge/discharge studies, self-discharge, temperature performance and cycle life. Finally, the best iron electrodes are coupled with nickel electrodes to obtain a 1.37 V, 75 Ah nickel/iron cell. The performance of this cell is discussed.

  4. Research, development, and demonstration of nickel-iron batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-03-01

    The objective of the Eagle-Picher nickel-iron battery program is to develop a nickel-iron battery for use in the propulsion of electric and electric-hybrid vehicles. To date, the program has concentrated on the characterization, fabrication and testing of the required electrodes, the fabrication and testing of full-scale cells, and finally, the fabrication and testing of full-scale (270 AH) six (6) volt modules. Electrodes of the final configuration have now exceeded 1880 cycles and are showing minimal capacity decline. Full-scale cells have presently exceeded 600 cycles and are tracking the individual electrode tests almost identically. Six volt module tests have exceeded 500 cycles, with a specific energy of 48 Wh/kg. Results to date indicate the nickel-iron battery is beginning to demonstrate the performance required for electric vehicle propulsion.

  5. Indoor accelerated corrosion test and marine field test of corrosion-resistant low-alloy steel rebars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Macrocell corrosion test and accelerated alternating wet–dry experiment combined with marine field test were employed to study the corrosion behavior of HRB400 carbon steel, 1.5Cr steel, and 5Cr steel in a simulated concrete pore solution and mortar. The macrocell current significantly decreases in samples added with Cr compared with that in HRB400 steel. The corrosion rate is decreased by Cr but increased by Cl−; as a consequence, the corrosion rates of 1.5Cr and 5Cr steel are lower than that of HRB400 steel. However, the corrosion products differ slightly in terms of the contents of α-FeOOH (goethite, γ-FeOOH (lepidocrocite, γ-Fe2O3, and Fe3O4 (maghemite or magnetite. The addition of Cr increases the content of the protective α-FeOOH and reduces the content of γ-FeOOH. Both ordinary and high-performance epoxy coatings remain intact after 1 year of marine field test. Among the bare steel rebars, HRB400 steel shows extensive localized corrosion on the surface, whereas 1.5Cr steel exhibits less severe corrosion. The scarcely visible corroded areas in 5Cr steel indicate that this rebar is in the passive state, consistent with results of the indoor accelerated test. Hence, the durability of concrete structures can be prolonged with the utilization of corrosion-resistant low-alloy rebars.

  6. Mechanical properties, corrosion, and biocompatibility of Mg-Zr-Sr-Dy alloys for biodegradable implant applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yunfei; Lin, Jixing; Wen, Cuie; Zhang, Dongmei; Li, Yuncang

    2017-11-28

    This study investigates the microstructure, mechanical properties, corrosion behavior, and biocompatibility of magnesium (Mg)-based Mg1Zr2SrxDy (x = 0, 1, 1.63, 2.08 wt %) alloys for biodegradable implant applications. The corrosion behavior of the Mg-based alloys has been evaluated in simulated body fluid using an electrochemical technique and hydrogen evolution. The biocompatibility of the Mg-based alloys has been assessed using SaSO2 cells. Results indicate that the addition of Dy to Mg-Zr-Sr alloy showed a positive impact on the corrosion behavior and significantly decreased the degradation rates of the alloys. The degradation rate of Mg1Zr2Sr1.0Dy decreased from 17.61 to 12.50 mm year -1 of Mg1Zr2Sr2.08Dy based on the hydrogen evolution. The ultimate compressive strength decreased from 270.90 MPa for Mg1Zr2Sr1Dy to 236.71 MPa for Mg1Zr2Sr2.08Dy. An increase in the addition of Dy to the Mg-based alloys resulted in an increase in the volume fraction of the Mg 2 Dy phase, which mitigated the galvanic effect between the Mg 17 Sr 2 phase and the Mg matrix, and led to an increase in the corrosion resistance of the base alloy. The biocompatibility of the Mg-based alloys was enhanced with decreasing corrosion rates. Mg1Zr2Sr2.08Dy exhibited the lowest corrosion rate and the highest biocompatibility compared with the other Mg-based alloys. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Influence of Scandium Addition on Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Al-Zn-Mg Alloy in Different Corrosive Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoming Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Stress corrosion cracking (SCC susceptibilities of Al-Zn-Mg alloys without and with Scandium addition were evaluated in 3.5% NaCl solution at different pH and different strain rate, using slow strain rate test technique. The results indicate that Sc addition reduces grain size and width of precipitation free zones, and transforms grain boundary precipitates from continuous distribution into interrupted distribution by inhibiting recrystallization. In solution at pH 1, pH 3 and pH 7, Sc addition reduces the degree of localized corrosion of alloy surface and SCC susceptibility of Al-Zn-Mg alloy. However, in solution at pH 10 and pH 12, grain refinement significantly promotes the diffusion of hydrogen atoms into matrix, thus Sc addition increases SCC susceptibility of Al-Zn-Mg alloy. Under different strain rate conditions, Sc addition can all reduce SCC susceptibility of Al-Zn-Mg alloy in solution at pH 1, pH 3 and pH 7, and can all increase SCC susceptibility of Al-Zn-Mg alloy in solution at pH 10 and pH 12. As a result, Sc modified Al-Zn-Mg alloy in practical applications should be avoided in alkaline environments.

  8. Corrosion Behavior and Durability of Low-Alloy Steel Rebars in Marine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Cheng, Xuequn; Li, Xiaogang; Yue, Pan; Li, Jun

    2016-11-01

    The corrosion resistance of Cr-modified low-alloy steels and HRB400 carbon steel was estimated using the open-circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopic, and weight loss methods in simulated concrete pore solution. Results show that Cr-modified steels exhibit a higher corrosion resistance with a higher critical chloride level (CTL), lower corrosion current density, and higher impedance than carbon steel. The CTL of the steels significantly reduces with increasing temperature. Weight loss measurement shows that the Cr-modified steels exhibit low corrosion rates and small corrosion pitting. The primary constituents of the corrosion scales are Fe2O3, Fe3O4, β-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH, and α-FeOOH. A large amount of α-FeOOH could be detected in the Cr-modified steel corrosion products. Moreover, the Cr-modified steels demonstrate a higher durability than HRB400 carbon steel.

  9. Corrosion behavior of low-alloy steel in the presence of Desulfotomaculum sp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cetin, Demet; Aksu, Mehmet Levent

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of sulfate-reducing Desulfotomaculum sp. bacteria isolated from a crude oil field on the corrosion of low-alloy steel. The corrosion rate and mechanism were determined with the use of Tafel slopes, mass loss method and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The formation of the biofilm and the corrosion products on the steel surface was determined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs and energy dispersive X-ray spectra (EDS) analysis. It was observed from the Tafel plots that the corrosion potential exhibited a cathodic shift that verifies an increase in the corrosion rates. The semicircles tended to open at lower frequencies in the Nyquist plots which indicates the rupture of the protective film. The corrosion current density reached its maximum value at the 14th hour after the inoculation and decreased afterwards. This was attributed to the accumulation of corrosion products on the surface.

  10. Stress corrosion cracking behavior of Nd:YAG laser-treated aluminum alloy 7075

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, T.M.; Yan, L.J.; Chan, C.P.

    2006-01-01

    Nd-YAG laser surface treatment was conducted on 7075-T651 aluminum alloy with the aim of improving the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the alloy. Laser surface treatment was performed under two different gas environments, air and nitrogen. After the laser treatment, coarse constituent particles were removed and fine cellular/dendritic structures had formed. In addition, for the N 2 -treated specimen, an AlN phase was detected. The results of the stress corrosion test showed that after 30 days of immersion, the untreated specimen had been severely attacked by corrosion, with intergranular cracks having formed along the planar grain boundaries of the specimen. For the air-treated specimen, some relatively long stress corrosion cracks and a small number of relatively large corrosion pits were found. The cracks mainly followed the interdendritic boundaries; the fusion boundary was found to be acting as an arrestor to corrosion attacks. In contrast, only few short stress corrosion cracks appeared in the N 2 -treated specimen, indicating an improvement in corrosion initiation resistance. The superior corrosion resistance was attributed to the formation of the AlN phase in the surface of the laser-melted layer, which is an electrical insulator. The electrochemical impedance measurements taken during the stress corrosion test showed that the film resistance of the laser-treated specimens was always higher than that of the untreated specimen, with the N 2 -treated specimen showing the highest resistance

  11. Corrosion behaviour of laser surface melted magnesium alloy AZ91D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taltavull, C.; Torres, B.; Lopez, A.J.; Rodrigo, P.; Otero, E.; Atrens, A.; Rams, J.

    2014-01-01

    A high power diode laser (HPDL) was used to produce laser surface melting (LSM) treatments on the surface of the Mg alloy AZ91D. Different treatments with different microstructures were produced by varying the laser-beam power and laser-scanning speed. Corrosion evaluation, using hydrogen evolution and electrochemical measurements, led to a relationship between microstructure and corrosion. Most corrosion rates for LSM treated specimens were within the scatter of the as-received AZ91D, whereas some treatments gave higher corrosion rates and some of the samples had corrosion rates lower than the average of the corrosion rate for AZ91D. There were differences in corroded surface morphology. Nevertheless laser treatments introduced surface discontinuities, which masked the effect of the microstructure. Removing these surface defects decreased the corrosion rate for the laser-treated samples. - Highlights: • Corrosion behavior of AZ91D Mg alloys is intimately related with its microstructure. • Laser surface melting treatments allows surface modification of the microstructure. • Different laser parameters can achieve different microstructures. • Controlling laser parameters can produce different corrosion rates and morphologies. • Increase of surface roughness due to laser treatment is relevant to the corrosion rate

  12. New corrosion resistant alloys on the base of titanium and high-chromium steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomashov, N.D.; Chernova, G.P.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown that stability of titanium alloys, with α-structure (OT-4, AT3,AT6) and high-strength α+β or pure β-structure (BT-14; BT-15), in hydrochloric acid solutions may be significantly improved due to additional alloying by minor additions of Pd(0,2%) similar to pure titanium. Additions of 0,2% Pd also significantly improve acid resistance of alloys of the Fe-Cr system. The highest corrosion resistance has Fe,40%Cr,0,2%Pd alloy. This alloy is stable in 20-40%H 2 SO 4 and 1% HCl at 100 deg C

  13. Magnesium alloys: predicting in vivo corrosion with in vitro immersion testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jemimah; Shadanbaz, Shaylin; Kirkland, Nicholas T; Stace, Edward; Woodfield, Tim; Staiger, Mark P; Dias, George J

    2012-05-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys have been proposed as degradable replacements to commonly used orthopedic biomaterials such as titanium alloys and stainless steel. However, the corrosion of Mg in a physiological environment remains a difficult characteristic to accurately assess with in vitro methods. The aim of this study was to identify a simple in vitro immersion test that could provide corrosion rates similar to those observed in vivo. Pure Mg and five alloys (AZ31, Mg-0.8Ca, Mg-1Zn, Mg-1Mn, Mg-1.34Ca-3Zn) were immersed in either Earle's balanced salt solution (EBSS), minimum essential medium (MEM), or MEM-containing 40 g/L bovine serum albumin (MEMp) for 7, 14, or 21 days before removal and assessment of corrosion by weight loss. This in vitro data was compared to in vivo corrosion rates of the same materials implanted in a subcutaneous environment in Lewis rats for equivalent time points. The results suggested that, for the alloys investigated, the EBSS buffered with sodium bicarbonate provides a rate of degradation comparable to those observed in vivo. In contrast, the addition of components such as (4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid) (HEPES), vitamins, amino acids, and albumin significantly increased corrosion rates. Based on these findings, it is proposed that with this in vitro protocol, immersion of Mg alloys in EBSS can be used as a predictor of in vivo corrosion. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Corrosion resistance and microstructure characterization of rare-earth-transition metal-aluminum-magnesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banczek, E.P.; Zarpelon, L.M.C.; Faria, R.N.; Costa, I.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the results of investigation carried out to evaluate the corrosion resistance and microstructure of some cast alloys represented by the general formula: La 0.7-x Pr x Mg 0.3 Al 0.3 Mn 0.4 Co 0.5 Ni 3.8 (x = 0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, and 0.7). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical methods, specifically, polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), have been employed in this study. The effects of Pr substitution on the composition of the various phases in the alloys and their corrosion resistance have been studied. The electrochemical results showed that the alloy without Pr and the one with total La substitution showed the highest corrosion resistance among the studied alloys. The corrosion resistance of the alloys decreased when Pr was present in the lowest concentrations (0.1 and 0.3), but for higher Pr concentrations (0.5 and 0.7), the corrosion resistance increased. Corrosion occurred preferentially in a Mg-rich phase.

  15. In vitro and in vivo corrosion evaluation of nickel-chromium- and copper-aluminum-based alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benatti, O F; Miranda, W G; Muench, A

    2000-09-01

    The low resistance to corrosion is the major problem related to the use of copper-aluminum alloys. This in vitro and in vivo study evaluated the corrosion of 2 copper-aluminum alloys (Cu-Al and Cu-Al-Zn) compared with a nickel-chromium alloy. For the in vitro test, specimens were immersed in the following 3 corrosion solutions: artificial saliva, 0.9% sodium chloride, and 1.0% sodium sulfide. For the in vivo test, specimens were embedded in complete dentures, so that one surface was left exposed. The 3 testing sites were (1) close to the oral mucosa (partial self-cleaning site), (2) surface exposed to the oral cavity (self-cleaning site), and (3) specimen bottom surface exposed to the saliva by means of a tunnel-shaped perforation (non-self-cleaning site). Almost no corrosion occurred with the nickel-chromium alloy, for either the in vitro or in vivo test. On the other hand, the 2 copper-aluminum-based alloys exhibited high corrosion in the sulfide solution. These same alloys also underwent high corrosion in non-self-cleaning sites for the in vivo test, although minimal attack was observed in self-cleaning sites. The nickel-chromium alloy presented high resistance to corrosion. Both copper-aluminum alloys showed considerable corrosion in the sulfide solution and clinically in the non-self-cleaning site. However, in self-cleaning sites these 2 alloys did not show substantial corrosion.

  16. The effect of Electro Discharge Machining (EDM) on the corrosion resistance of dental alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntasi, Argyro; Mueller, Wolf Dieter; Eliades, George; Zinelis, Spiros

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Electro Discharge Machining (EDM) on the corrosion resistance of two types of dental alloys used for fabrication of implant retained superstructures. Two groups of specimens were prepared from a Co-Cr (Okta-C) and a grade II cpTi (Biotan) alloys respectively. Half of the specimens were subjected to EDM with Cu electrodes and the rest were conventionally finished (CF). The corrosion resistance of the alloys was evaluated by anodic polarization in Ringer's solution. Morphological and elemental alterations before and after corrosion testing were studied by SEM/EDX. Six regions were analyzed on each surface before and after corrosion testing and the results were statistically analyzed by paired t-test (a=0.05). EDM demonstrated inferior corrosion resistance compared to CF surfaces, the latter being passive in a wider range of potential demonstrating higher polarization resistance and lower I(corr) values. Morphological alterations were found before and after corrosion testing for both materials tested after SEM analysis. EDX showed a significant decrease in Mo, Cr, Co, Cu (Co-Cr) and Ti, Cu (cpTi) after electrochemical testing plus an increase in C. According to the results of this study the EDM procedure decreases the corrosion resistance of both the alloys tested, increasing thus the risk of possible adverse biological reactions. Copyright © 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nanocontainer-Enhanced Self-Healing for Corrosion-Resistant Ni Coating on Mg Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhi-Hui; Li, Dan; Skeete, Zakiya; Sharma, Anju; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2017-10-18

    The ability to manipulate the functionalization of Ni coating is of great importance in improving the corrosion resistance of magnesium (Mg) alloy for many industrial applications. In the present work, MCM-41 type mesoporous silica nanocontainers (MSNs) loaded with corrosion inhibitor (NaF) were synthesized and employed as smart reinforcements to enhance the integrity and corrosion inhibition of the Ni coating. The incorporation of the F-loaded MSNs (F@MSNs) to enhance the corrosion resistant capacity of a metallic coating is reported for the first time. The mesoporous structures of the as-prepared MSNs and F@MSNs were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small angle X-rays scattering (SAXS), and N 2 adsorption-desorption isotherms. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data demonstrated the successful immobilization of fluoride ion on the MSNs and formation of a magnesium fluoride (MgF 2 ) protective film at the corrosion sites of the Mg alloy upon soaking in a F@MSNs-containing NaCl solution. The results from potentiodynamic polarization (PDP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) for both bare Mg alloy and Ni coatings with and without F@MSNs have revealed a clear decrease in corrosion rate in a corrosive solution for a long-time immersion due to the introduction of F@MSNs. These findings open new opportunities in the exploration of self-healing metallic coatings for highly enhanced anticorrosion protection of Mg alloy.

  18. Hot corrosion resistance of a Pb-Sb alloy for lead acid battery grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osorio, Wislei R.; Garcia, Amauri [Department of Materials Engineering, University of Campinas - UNICAMP, PO Box 6122, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Aoki, Claudia S.C. [Research and Development Centre - CPqD Foundation, Rod. Campinas/Mogi, km 118.5, 13086-912 Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the microstructural morphologies of a Pb-6.6 wt%Sb alloy on the resulting corrosion resistance in a 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution at different temperatures: environment temperature, 50 C and 70 C. A water-cooled unidirectional solidification system was employed permitting a wide range of microstructures to be analyzed. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) diagrams, potentiodynamic polarization curves and an equivalent circuit analysis were used to evaluate the corrosion behavior of the Pb-Sb alloy samples. It was found that with increasing temperatures the general corrosion resistance of Pb-Sb dendritic alloys decreases, and that independently of the working temperature finer dendritic spacings exhibit better corrosion resistance than coarser ones. (author)

  19. Effect of hydrogen on the corrosion behavior of the Mg–xZn alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingwei Song

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen evolution reaction is inevitable during the corrosion of Mg alloys. The effect of hydrogen on the corrosion behavior of the Mg–2Zn and Mg–5Zn alloys is investigated by charging hydrogen treatment. The surface morphologies of the samples after charging hydrogen were observed using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM and the corrosion resistance was evaluated by polarization curves. It is found that there are oxide films formed on the surface of the charged hydrogen samples. The low hydrogen evolution rate is helpful to improve the corrosion resistance of Mg alloys, while the high hydrogen evolution rate can increases the defects in the films and further deteriorates their protection ability. Also, the charging hydrogen effect is greatly associated with the microstructure of Mg substrate.

  20. Steam assisted oxide growth on aluminium alloys using oxidative chemistries: Part II corrosion performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    Surface treatment of aluminium alloys using steam with oxidative chemistries, namely KMnO4 and HNO3 resulted in accelerated growth of oxide on aluminium alloys. Detailed investigation of the corrosion performance of the treated surfaces was carried out using potentiodynamic polarisation...... and standard industrial test methods such as acetic acid salt spray (AASS) and filiform corrosion on commercial AA6060 alloy. Barrier properties of the film including adhesion were evaluated using tape test under wet and dry conditions. Electrochemical results showed reduced cathodic and anodic activity, while...... the protection provided by steam treatment with HNO3was a function of the concentration of NO3−ions. The coating generated by inclusion of KMnO4showed highest resistance to filiform corrosion. Overall, the performance of the steam treated surfaces under filiform corrosion and AASS test was a result of the local...

  1. Characterization of steam generated anti-corrosive oxide films on Aluminium alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2014-01-01

    Aluminium and its alloys are widely used in structural and transportation industry owing to their high strength to weight ratio. The surface of aluminium under normal conditions has a thin oxide film (2.5-10 nm) responsible for its inherent corrosion resistance. This oxide film can further...... be converted or transformed into functional conversion coatings in order to enhance corrosion resistance and adhesion to paint systems. Chromium based conversion coatings have been extensively used on aluminium alloys to improve adhesion of subsequent paint layers and corrosion resistance. However, the use...... chemical additives on surface morphology and growth of oxide film on different intermetallic particles and corrosion behaviour of such alloys.Surface morphology was observed by using FEG-SEM, EDX and FIB-SEM. Metal oxide surface characterization and compositional depth profiling were investigated by using...

  2. Effect of Al on the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of Pb-Al alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    LU, Zhicheng; LIU, Zhenlin; LI, Yongliang; WU, Dan; WANG, Fuming

    2017-05-01

    A set of binary Pb-Al alloys with different Al contents were designed in this work. The mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of Pb-Al alloys were investigated with help of tensile test, Charpy V-notch impact test and salt spray corrosion test (SSCT). And the microstructure was observed by optical microscopy. The results showed that microstructure of all alloys were twin structure, and the twin structure was gradually refined with the increase of Al content. Al dissolved in matrix could significantly improve the tensile strength, impact energy and corrosion resistance. However, a higher content of Al would harm the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. It may be due to the heterogeneous precipitation of Al rich phase.

  3. A closer look at constituent induced localised corrosion in Al-Cu-Mg alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birbilis, N.; Zhu, Y.M.; Kairy, S.K.; Glenn, M.A.; Nie, J.-F.; Morton, A.J.; Gonzalez-Garcia, Y.; Terryn, H.; Mol, J.M.C.; Hughes, A.E.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Constituent particle in AA2024-T3 uniquely characterised as multiphase. • High resolution electron microscopy reveals structural and chemical complexity of constituent particle. • Unambiguous characterisation reveals unreported constituent particle crystal structure. • Localised corrosion related to constituent particle composition. - Abstract: The role of constituent intermetallic particles in the pitting corrosion of aluminium (Al) alloys is well recognised. A definitive quantification of the role of unique constituent particles has contributed towards an enhanced understanding of Al-alloy corrosion, however the complexity of Al-alloy microstructures warrants further attention. In the present work we identify a unique intermetallic type in contemporary versions of AA2024-T3, which has a two-phase structure, defined by two distinct crystal types, and distinct compositions. Detailed characterisation is used to unambiguously define this constituent, along with its role in localised corrosion.

  4. Effect of manganese on the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of titanium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji-Woo; Hwang, Moon-Jin; Han, Mi-Kyung [Department of Dental Materials and MRC for Biomineralization Disorders, School of Dentistry, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong-Geun [Department of Ophthalmic Optics, Dongkang College, Gwangju 500-714 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Ho-Jun [Department of Dental Materials and MRC for Biomineralization Disorders, School of Dentistry, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yeong-Joon, E-mail: yjpark@jnu.ac.kr [Department of Dental Materials and MRC for Biomineralization Disorders, School of Dentistry, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-01

    The phase/microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of a series of binary Ti−Mn alloys with 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt% Mn were investigated in order to understand the effects of Mn content on mechanical properties, oxidation behavior, and electrochemical corrosion properties of Ti−Mn alloys. The phase/microstructure of Ti-xMn alloys was analyzed using X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. All examined properties of the Ti−Mn alloys were sensitive to the Mn content. The tested Ti-xMn alloys had α-Ti, β-Ti, and α-TiMn phases. Ti−Mn alloy containing 5 wt% Mn composed of α-Ti, β-Ti, α-TiMn, and isothermal ω phases. The proportion of α-Ti phase decreased and precipitation of β-Ti phase increased with increasing wt% of Mn. Cast Ti−Mn exhibited higher hardness and better oxidation protection than commercially pure Ti (cp-Ti). The tested Ti-xMn alloys showed better corrosion resistance than the cp-Ti. Ti−Mn alloy containing 5 wt% Mn had the highest hardness and lowest modulus, and is a good candidate for dental implant alloy. - Highlights: • Mechanical properties of Ti−Mn alloys were sensitive to the content of Mn. • As Mn content increased, α-Ti phase decreased and β-Ti phase increased. • Ti−Mn exhibited higher hardness and better oxidation protection ability. • Ti−Mn displayed superior corrosion resistance than commercially pure Ti. • Ti−Mn alloy with 5 wt% Mn is a good candidate for dental casting alloy.

  5. Microstructure, tensile deformation mode and crevice corrosion resistance in Ti-10Mo-xFe alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, X.H.; Emura, S.; Nishimura, T.; Tsuchiya, K.; Tsuzaki, K.

    2010-01-01

    The microstructure, the tensile deformation mode at ambient temperature and the crevice corrosion resistance at a high temperature of 373 K were investigated in the Ti-10Mo-xFe (x = 0, 1, 3, 5) alloys. The stability of the β phase increased, and the formation of the α'' martensite and the athermal ω phase was suppressed by the increase in the Fe content. EPMA examinations indicated that the existence of the α'' martensite in the Ti-10Mo alloy was caused by the solidification segregation of Mo atoms. EBSD observations showed that the deformation mode changed from a {3 3 2} twinning to a slip by an increase in the Fe content, which coincided with the prediction by the electron/atom (e/a) ratio. The Ti-10Mo-3Fe alloy showed the highest yield strength of 935 MPa among all the alloys, while the Ti-10Mo-1Fe alloy showed the lowest value of 563 MPa due to the change in the deformation mode. On the other hand, all the alloys exhibited a high crevice corrosion resistance in a high chloride and high acidic solution at the high temperature, although the corrosion resistance decreased with an increase in the Fe content. The decrease in the corrosion resistance can be explained by the bond order (Bo). A good combination of tensile properties and crevice corrosion resistance may be obtainable through a further optimization of the Fe content by the e/a ratio and the Bo.

  6. Structural characteristics and corrosion behavior of biodegradable Mg-Zn, Mg-Zn-Gd alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubásek, J; Vojtěch, D

    2013-07-01

    In this research, binary Mg-Zn (up to 3 wt% Zn) and ternary Mg-Zn-Gd (up to 3 wt% Gd, 3 wt% Zn) alloys were prepared by induction melting in an argon atmosphere. The structures of these alloys were characterized using light and scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry, X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence. In addition, Brinell hardness measurements were taken to supplement these studies. Corrosion behavior was evaluated by immersion tests and potentiodynamic measurements in a physiological solution (9 g/l NaCl). Depending on the composition, structures of the as-cast alloys contained α-Mg dendrites, MgZn, Mg5Gd and Mg3Gd2Zn3 phases. Compared to pure Mg, zinc improved the corrosion resistance of binary Mg-Zn. Gadolinium also improved the corrosion resistance in the case of Mg-1Zn-3Gd alloy. The highest corrosion rate was observed for Mg-3Zn-3Gd alloy. Our results improve the understanding of the relationships between the structure and corrosion behavior of our studied alloy systems.

  7. Electrochemical and corrosion behavior of two chromium dental alloys in artificial bioenvironments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to compare the corrosion and tarnish behavior of NiCrMo and CoCrMo cast dental alloys in artificial bio environments. The cobalt chromium alloys are known and used in dentistry for many years, but its difficult machinability because of the strength and hardness, is an argument for scientists to study alternative materials with comparable biocompatibility. On the other hand, for dentistry devices beside corrosion behavior is important the aesthetic so, the used alloys have to preserve their shining and do not stain. The corrosion resistance has been evaluated using the Atomic mass spectroscopy method for ion release determination, the anodic polarization curves and the open circuit potential – time monitoring for corrosion behavior evaluation and optical microscopy for the structure analysis. The tarnish tendency of alloys was estimated using the method of cyclic immersion with frequency of 10 seconds for each minute during 72 hours in Na2S containing solution. The most important conclusion is that the alloys are comparable from corrosion and tarnish point of view, but we recommend to use the nickel base alloy only for orthodontic devices implanted for short periods of time, because of higher quantity of released ions.

  8. The relative stress-corrosion-cracking susceptibility of candidate aluminum-lithium alloys for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, P. P.

    1982-01-01

    Stress corrosion tests of Al-Li-Cu powder metallurgy alloys are described. Alloys investigated were Al-2.6% Li-1.4% and Al-2.6% Li-1.4% Cu-1.6% Mg. The base properties of the alloys were characterized. Process, heat treatment, and size/orientational effects on the tensile and fracture behavior were investigated. Metallurgical and electrochemical conditions are identified which provide reproducible and controlled parameters for stress corrosion evaluation. Preliminary stress corrosion test results are reported. Both Al-Li-Cu alloys appear more susceptible to stress corrosion crack initiation than 7075-T6 aluminum, with the magnesium bearing alloy being the most susceptible. Tests to determine the threshold stress intensity for the base and magnesium bearing alloys are underway. Twelve each, bolt loaded DCB type specimens are under test (120 days) and limited crack growth in these precracked specimens has been observed. General corrosion in the aqueous sodium chloride environment is thought to be obscuring results through crack tip blunting.

  9. Structural Characteristics and Corrosion Behavior of Bio-Degradable Zn-Li Alloys in Stent Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shan

    Zinc has begun to be studied as a bio-degradable material in recent years due to its excellent corrosion rate and optimal biocompatibility. Unfortunately, pure Zn's intrinsic ultimate tensile strength (UTS; below 120 MPa) is lower than the benchmark (about 300 MPa) for cardiovascular stent materials, raising concerns about sufficient strength to support the blood vessel. Thus, modifying pure Zn to improve its mechanical properties is an important research topic. In this dissertation project, a new Zn-Li alloy has been developed to retain the outstanding corrosion behavior from Zn while improving the mechanical characteristics and uniform biodegradation once it is implanted into the artery of Sprague-Dawley rats. The completed work includes: Manufactured Zn-Li alloy ingots and sheets via induction vacuum casting, melt spinning, hot rolling deformation, and wire electro discharge machining (wire EDM) technique; processed alloy samples using cross sectioning, mounting, etching and polishing technique; • Characterized alloy ingots, sheets and wires using hardness and tensile test, XRD, BEI imaging, SEM, ESEM, FTIR, ICP-OES and electrochemical test; then selected the optimum composition for in vitro and in vivo experiments; • Mimicked the degradation behavior of the Zn-Li alloy in vitro using simulated body fluid (SBF) and explored the relations between corrosion rate, corrosion products and surface morphology with changing compositions; • Explanted the Zn-Li alloy wire in abdominal aorta of rat over 12 months and studied its degradation mechanism, rate of bioabsorption, cytotoxicity and corrosion product migration from histological analysis.

  10. Evaluation of austenitic stainless steels for transpassive corrosion by metal purification technology. Synergistic effect of Si and P on intergranular corrosion of Fe-18Cr-14Ni alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayuzumi, Masami; Ohta, Joji; Kako, Kenji; Kawakami, Eishi

    2001-01-01

    The synergistic effect of Si, Mn, C, P, and S on the transpassive corrosion of HP18Cr-14Ni alloys was studied in 13N nitric acid. The specimens were fabricated using a cold crucible method in a high-vacuum chamber to reduce contamination. The additions of Si<1% and Mn<2% had no effect on the corrosion behavior of HP18Cr-14Ni alloys, and the addition of Si<1% also had no effect on the corrosion behavior of HP18Cr-14Ni-1Mn alloys, although 1% Si induced intergranular corrosion in both the alloys. Thus, HP18Cr-14Ni-1Mn-0.5Si alloys were selected to evaluate the effects of C, P and S (100 ppm each). The addition of P, and the co-addition of C, P, and S to HP18Cr-14Ni-1Mn-0.5Si induced intergranular corrosion of the same degree in the solution annealed condition. This result suggests the synergistic effect of Si and P to induce intergranular corrosion, since the single addition of Si or P to this level did not lead to intergranular corrosion of HP18Cr-14Ni alloys. HP18Cr-14Ni-1Mn-0.5Si alloys containing C, P, and S at the 100 ppm level each showed superior corrosion resistance compared to a commercial Type 304L in 13N nitric acid. (author)

  11. Chemical passivation as a method of improving the electrochemical corrosion resistance of Co-Cr-based dental alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylska, Dorota; Sokołowski, Grzegorz; Sokołowski, Jerzy; Łukomska-Szymańska, Monika

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate corrosion resistance of Wirobond C® alloy after chemical passivation treatment. The alloy surface undergone chemical passivation treatment in four different media. Corrosion studies were carried out by means of electrochemical methods in saline solution. Corrosion effects were determined using SEM. The greatest increase in the alloy polarization resistance was observed for passive layer produced in Na2SO4 solution with graphite. The same layer caused the highest increase in corrosion current. Generally speaking, the alloy passivation in Na2SO4 solution with graphite caused a substantial improvement of the corrosion resistance. The sample after passivation in Na2SO4 solution without graphite, contrary to others, lost its protective properties along with successive anodic polarization cycles. The alloy passivation in Na3PO4 solution with graphite was the only one that caused a decrease in the alloy corrosion properties. The SEM studies of all samples after chemical passivation revealed no pit corrosion - in contrast to the sample without any modification. Every successive polarization cycle in anodic direction of pure Wirobond C® alloy enhances corrosion resistance shifting corrosion potential in the positive direction and decreasing corrosion current value. The chemical passivation in solutions with low pH values decreases susceptibility to electrochemical corrosion of Co-Cr dental alloy. The best protection against corrosion was obtained after chemical passivation of Wirobond C® in Na2SO4 solution with graphite. Passivation with Na2SO4 in solution of high pH does not cause an increase in corrosion resistance of WIROBOND C. Passivation process increases alloy resistance to pit corrosion.

  12. Corrosion behavior of high purity Fe-Cr-Ni alloys in trans-passive condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayuzumi, Masami; Ohta, Jyoji; Kako, Kenji

    1998-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of high-purity (99.99%) Fe-Cr-Ni alloys was investigated in 13 N nitric acid with/without Ce 4+ ions to clarify the effect of impurities on the trans-passive corrosion of stainless steel. The following results were obtained. (1) Almost no intergranular corrosion was observed in the high-purity alloys, although the corrosion rate of the matrix region was nearly the same as that of a commercial stainless steel with the same Cr and Ni content. (2) Due to the improved intergranular corrosion resistance, the effect of the purification became significant in the corrosion condition with the grain-separation being predominant. (3) The high-purity alloys showed higher susceptivility to intergranular corrosion with aging treatment between 873 K and 1073 K. Although the sulfuric acid/copper sulfate test suggested the formation of Cr-depleted zones, a grain boundary micro-analysis using a FETEM with an EDX did not reveal any change in Cr content or impurity segregain along the grain boundaries. The mechanism of corrosion enhancement resulting from the aging treatment remains nuclear. (author)

  13. TEM characterization of corrosion products formed on a SS-15ZR alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, J. S.; Abraham, D. P.

    2000-01-01

    The corrosion products formed on a stainless steel-15Zr (SS-15Zr) alloy have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Examination of alloy particles that were immersed in 90 C deionized water for two years revealed that different corrosion products were formed on the stainless steel and intermetallic phases. Two corrosion products were identified on an austenite particle: trevorite (NiFe 2 O 4 ) in the layer close to the metal and maghemite (Fe 2 O 3 ) in the outer layer. The corrosion layer formed on the intermetallic was uniform, adherent, and amorphous. The EDS analysis indicated that the layer was enriched in zirconium when compared with the intermetallic composition. High-resolution TEM images of the intermetallic-corrosion layer interface show an interlocking metal-oxide interface which may explain the relatively strong adherence of the corrosion layer to the intermetallic surface. These results will be used to evaluate corrosion mechanisms and predict long-term corrosion behavior of the alloy waste form

  14. Bioactive glass–ceramic coating for enhancing the in vitro corrosion resistance of biodegradable Mg alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Xinyu; Cai Shu; Dou Ying; Xu Guohua; Huang Kai; Ren Mengguo; Wang Xuexin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Sol–gel derived 45S5 glass–ceramic coating was prepared on Mg alloy substrate. ► The corrosion resistance of glass–ceramic coated Mg alloy was markedly improved. ► The corrosion behavior of the coated sample varied due to the cracking of coating. - Abstract: In this work, a bioactive 45S5 glass–ceramic coating was synthesized on magnesium (Mg) alloy substrate by using a sol–gel dip-coating method, to improve the initial corrosion resistance of AZ31 Mg alloy. The surface morphology and phase composition of the glass–ceramic coating were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The coating composed of amorphous phase and crystalline phase Na 2 Ca 2 Si 3 O 9 , with the thickness of ∼1.0 μm, exhibited a uniform and crack-free surface morphology. The corrosion behavior of the uncoated and coated Mg alloy substrates was investigated by the electrochemical measurements and immersion tests in simulated body fluid (SBF). Potentiodynamic polarization tests recorded an increase of potential (E corr ) form −1.60 V to −1.48 V, and a reduction of corrosion current density (i corr ) from 4.48 μA cm −2 to 0.16 μA cm −2 , due to the protection provided by the glass–ceramic coating. Immersion tests also showed the markedly improved corrosion resistance of the coated sample over the immersion period of 7 days. Moreover, after 14 days of immersion in SBF, the corrosion resistance of the coated sample declined due to the cracking of the glass–ceramic coating, which was confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis. The results suggested that the 45S5 glass–ceramic coated Mg alloy could provide a suitable corrosion behavior for use as degradable implants.

  15. Evaluation of microstructural effects on the corrosion behaviour of AZ91D magnesium alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambat, Rajan; Aung, Naing Naing; Zhou, W.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of microconstituents on the corrosion and electrochemical behaviour of AZ91D alloy prepared by die-casting and ingot casting route has been investigated in 3.5% NaCl solution at pH 7.25. The experimental techniques used include constant immersion technique, in-situ corrosion monitoring...... phase offered marginally lower corrosion rate and better passivation compared with the ingot. In die-cast and ingot, hydrogen evolution took place preferentially on beta phase. XRD pattern of non-corroded and corroded surface revealed the removal of beta phase from alloy surface during corrosion......, and potentiodynamic polarisation experiments. Surface examination and analytical studies were carried out using optical and scanning electron microscopy, EDX and XRD. The corrosion behaviour of microconstituents namely primary alpha, eutectic alpha and beta phases was significantly different. Goring of aluminum...

  16. Emeraldine base as corrosion protective layer on aluminium alloy AA5182, effect of the surface microstructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cecchetto, L; Ambat, Rajan; Davenport, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    AA5182 aluminium alloy cold rolled samples were coated by thin Wlms of emeraldine base (EB) obtained from a 5% solution in N-methylpyrrolidinone. Accelerated corrosion tests prove this coating very eVective for corrosion protection of aluminium alloys in neutral environment. This study underlines...... the prominent role of surface cathodic intermetallic particles in pit initiation and coating break down in enhanced corrosion conditions and suggest that, beside the EB barrier properties, the enhanced corrosion resistance observed on the EB coated samples could partly arise from two other mains factors......: • a weak redox activity of the polymer which passivate the metal, • a proton involving self-healing process taking place at the polymer–metal interface, which contributes to delay local acidiWcation in Wrst steps of corrosion on EB coated aluminium surfaces....

  17. Corrosion behaviour of ion implanted aluminium alloy in 0.1 M NaCl electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, J.W.; Evans, P.J. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Sood, D.K. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Aluminum and its alloys are widely used in industry because of their light weight, high strength and good corrosion resistance which is due to the formation of a protective oxide layer. However, under saline conditions such as those encountered in marine environments, this group of metals are vulnerable to localised degradation in the form of pitting corrosion. This type of corrosion involves the adsorption of an anion, such as chlorine, at the oxide solution interface. Ion implantation of metal ions has been shown to improve the corrosion resistance of a variety of materials. This effect occurs : when the implanted species reduces anion adsorption thereby decreasing the corrosion rate. In this paper we report on the pitting behavior of Ti implanted 2011 Al alloy in dilute sodium chloride solution. The Ti implanted surfaces exhibited an increased pitting potential and a reduced oxygen uptake. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Emeraldine base as corrosion protective layer on aluminium alloy AA5182, effect of the surface microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecchetto, L. [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Physicochimie des Materiaux et des Interfaces, CNRS-UJF-INP-Grenoble (UMR 5631), ENSEEG, BP 75, 38402 St. Martin d' Heres (France); Ambat, R. [School of Engineering Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Davenport, A.J. [School of Engineering Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Delabouglise, D. [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Physicochimie des Materiaux et des Interfaces, CNRS-UJF-INP-Grenoble (UMR 5631), ENSEEG, BP 75, 38402 St. Martin d' Heres (France)]. E-mail: Didier.Delabouglise@lepmi.inpg.fr; Petit, J.-P. [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Physicochimie des Materiaux et des Interfaces, CNRS-UJF-INP-Grenoble (UMR 5631), ENSEEG, BP 75, 38402 St. Martin d' Heres (France); Neel, O. [Centre de Recherche de Voreppe, Pechiney, Parc economique Centr' Alp, 38340 Voreppe (France)

    2007-02-15

    AA5182 aluminium alloy cold rolled samples were coated by thin films of emeraldine base (EB) obtained from a 5% solution in N-methylpyrrolidinone. Accelerated corrosion tests prove this coating very effective for corrosion protection of aluminium alloys in neutral environment. This study underlines the prominent role of surface cathodic intermetallic particles in pit initiation and coating break down in enhanced corrosion conditions and suggest that, beside the EB barrier properties, the enhanced corrosion resistance observed on the EB coated samples could partly arise from two other mains factors:- a weak redox activity of the polymer which passivate the metal, - a proton involving self-healing process taking place at the polymer-metal interface, which contributes to delay local acidification in first steps of corrosion on EB coated aluminium surfaces.

  19. Resistance of Magnesium Alloys to Corrosion Fatigue for Biodegradable Implant Applications: Current Status and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, R. K. Singh; Harandi, Shervin Eslami

    2017-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg) alloys are attracting increasing interest as the most suitable metallic materials for construction of biodegradable and bio-absorbable temporary implants. However, Mg-alloys can suffer premature and catastrophic fracture under the synergy of cyclic loading and corrosion (i.e., corrosion fatigue (CF)). Though Mg alloys are reported to be susceptible to CF also in the corrosive human body fluid, there are very limited studies on this topic. Furthermore, the in vitro test parameters employed in these investigations have not properly simulated the actual conditions in the human body. This article presents an overview of the findings of available studies on the CF of Mg alloys in pseudo-physiological solutions and the employed testing procedures, as well as identifying the knowledge gap. PMID:29144428

  20. In situ corrosion testing of various nickel alloys at Måbjerg waste incineration plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Hansson, A. N.; Jensen, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of waste in Denmark is disposed via waste to energy (WTE) incineration plants which are fabricated from carbon steel. However, due to the increasing corrosiveness of waste over the years, more corrosion resistant alloys are required. In Denmark, Inconel 625 (UNSN06625) is the weld...... overlay material currently being used to give improved corrosion resistance. In order to assess the use of alternative nickel alloys, test panels have been manufactured and inserted into Måbjerg waste incineration plant. Inconel 625 as a 50% weld overlay, two layered weld overlay and as a spiral weld...... overlay was exposed. Other nickel materials exposed were weld overlay Alloy 686, Alloy 50 and Sumitomo Super 625 coextruded tube. Exposure has been undertaken from 2003 to 2009 in the first pass and 2005–2009 in the second pass, and sections have been removed and investigated during this period...

  1. Stress Corrosion Cracking of ZEK100 Magnesium Alloy for Automotive Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xin; Shi, Chao; Zavadil, Renata

    ZEK100 magnesium alloy has attracted considerable interest for automotive body structure applications in light-weight vehicles due to its excellent formability at room temperature. However, the intrinsic tendency of magnesium alloys to corrode under wet conditions has been a concern. Reports on the corrosion resistance and, in particular, the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of ZEK100 under automotive service conditions have been scarce. In this work, the SCC of ZEK100 magnesium alloy was characterized by slow strain rate testing method. The effects of microstructure and corrosion environment on the SCC resistance of the alloy have been investigated. The results represent outcomes from a US-Canada-China collaborative research and development project — Magnesium Front End Research and Development (MFERD) currently underway.

  2. Influence of carbon and nitrogen on corrosion resistance of high purity Fe-50mass% Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Y.; Ujiro, T.; Satoh, S.; Yamato, K.; Abiko, K.

    1995-01-01

    High purity Fe-50mass%Cr alloys containing (C+N) in the range of 30 to 500 mass ppm were prepared and their corrosion resistance was investigated. Pitting potential in a 3.5mass%NaCl solution at 343K rose with reducing (C+N) content. Alloys containing (C+N) at less than 100 mass ppm did not sustain pitting corrosion. However, alloys containing 500 mass ppm (C+N) corroded severely in 6%FeCl 3 +1/20N HCl solutions. Heat treatment at 923K was recognized as influencing corrosion resistance due to precipitation of carbonitrides only in the case of the alloy containing 500 mass ppm (C+N). (orig.)

  3. DEALLOYING, MICROSTRUCTURE AND THE CORROSION/PROTECTION OF CAST MAGNESIUM ALLOYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sieradzki, Karl; Aiello, Ashlee; McCue, Ian

    2017-12-15

    The purpose of this project was to develop a greater understanding of micro-galvanic corrosion effects in cast magnesium alloys using both experimental and computational methods. Experimental accomplishments have been made in the following areas of interest: characterization, aqueous free-corrosion, atmospheric corrosion, ionic liquid dissolution, rate kinetics of oxide dissolution, and coating investigation. Commercial alloys (AZ91D, AM60, and AZ31B), binary-phase alloys (αMg-2at.%Al, αMg-5at.%Al, and Mg-8at.%Al), and component phases (Mg, Al, β-Mg, β-1%Zn, MnAl3) were obtained and characterized using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Full immersion in aqueous chloride was used to characterize the corrosion behavior of alloys. Rotating disc electrodes (RDEs) were used to observe accelerated long-term corrosion behavior. Al surface redistribution for freely corroded samples was analyzed using SEM, EDS, and lithium underpotential deposition (Li UPD). Atmospheric corrosion was observed using contact angle evolution, overnight pH monitoring, and surface pH evolution studies. Ionic liquid corrosion characterization was performed using linear sweep voltammetry and potentiostatic dissolution in 150° choline chloride-urea (cc-urea). Two surface coatings were investigated: (1) Li-carbonate and (2) cc-urea. Li-carbonate coatings were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), SEM, and aqueous free corrosion potential monitoring. Hydrophobic cc-urea coatings were characterized using contact angle measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Oxide dissolution rate kinetics were studied using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Computational accomplishments have been made through the development of Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations which model time- and composition-dependent effects on the microstructure due to spatial redistribution of alloying

  4. A simulation of corrosion fatigue life distribution in low alloy steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Masaki; Kunieda, Hisashi; Tokaji, Keiro

    1992-07-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of corrosion fatigue life distributions was conducted in a low alloy steel, SNCM439, by assuming that the scatter of fatigue life resulted from the variation in the growth characteristics of corrosion pits and fatigue cracks. The parameters used in the simulation were obtained experimentally. The results showed that the experimental distributions were expressed satisfactorily by the simulation in which the parameters obtained from fatigue tests at the same stress were used. Therefore, it is concluded that corrosion fatigue life distribution can be predicted by a Monte Carlo simulation taking account of the statistical properties in the growth processes of corrosion pits and fatigue cracks.

  5. Corrosion resistance of amorphous and crystalline Pd40Ni40P20 alloys in aqueous solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Y.F.; Chiang, Wen-Chi; Chu, J.

    2006-01-01

    The corrosion behaviors of amorphous and crystalline Pd40Ni40P20 alloys in various aqueous solutions are reported in this paper. The corrosion resistance of crystalline (annealed) Pd40Ni40P20 is better than that of amorphous Pd40Ni40P20 in various corrosive solutions, due to crystalline Pd40Ni40P20...... and mainly consists of inert Pd5P2, NI3P, Ni2Pd2P and noble Pd phases. These inert and noble properties result in a higher corrosion resistance in crystalline Pd40Ni40P20....

  6. Crevice corrosion resistance of high alloyed materials in 3.5 % NaCl solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alar, Vesna; Stojanovic, Ivan; Simunovic, Vinko

    2014-01-01

    The effects of applied torque on the corrosion behaviour of W.-Nr. 1.4404 and 1.4462 stainless steels and W.-Nr. 2.4605 and 2.4858 nickel alloys with crevices were investigated using the cyclic potentiodynamic polarization method. Crevice corrosion (material-to-polytetrafluoroethylene) was tested in 3.5 % NaCl solution at 22 C. The corroded surface was examined using scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate similar trends in susceptibility to crevice corrosion with increasing torque. Among the four specimens, the W.-Nr. 1.4404 is the most susceptible to crevice corrosion. (orig.)

  7. Oxidation and corrosion resistance of candidate Stirling engine heater-head-tube alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.; Barrett, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Sixteen candidate iron base Stirling engine heater head tube alloys are evaluated in a diesel fuel fired simulator materials test rig to determine their oxidation and corrosion resistance. Sheet specimens are tested at 820 C for 3500 hr in 5 hr heating cycles. Specific weight change data and an attack parameter are used to categorize the alloys into four groups; 10 alloys show excellent for good oxidation and corrosion resistance and six alloys exhibit poor or catastrophic resistance. Metallographic, X-ray, and electron microprobe analyses aid in further characterizing the oxidation and corrosion behavior of the alloys. Alloy compositions, expecially the reactive elements aluminum, titanium, and chromium, play a major role in the excellent oxidation and corrosion behavior of the alloys. The best oxidation resistance is associated with the formation of an iron nickel aluminum outer oxide scale, an intermediate oxide scale rich in chromium and titanium, and an aluminum outer oxide scale adjacent to the metallic substrate, which exhibits a zone of internal oxidation of aluminum and to some extent titanium.

  8. Finite Element Based Physical Chemical Modeling of Corrosion in Magnesium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh Vijayaraghavan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium alloys have found widespread applications in diverse fields such as aerospace, automotive, bio-medical and electronics industries due to its relatively high strength-to-weight ratio. However, stress corrosion cracking of these alloys severely restricts their applications in several novel technologies. Hence, it will be useful to identify the corrosion mechanics of magnesium alloys under external stresses as it can provide further insights on design of these alloys for critical applications. In the present study, the corrosion mechanics of a commonly used magnesium alloy, AZ31, is studied using finite element simulation with a modified constitutive material damage model. The data obtained from the finite element modeling were further used to formulate a mathematical model using computational intelligence algorithm. Sensitivity and parametric analysis of the derived model further corroborated the mechanical response of the alloy in line with the corrosion physics. The proposed approach is anticipated to be useful for materials engineers for optimizing the design criteria for magnesium alloys catered for high temperature applications.

  9. Enhanced antimicrobial properties, cytocompatibility, and corrosion resistance of plasma-modified biodegradable magnesium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying; Jamesh, Mohammed Ibrahim; Li, Wing Kan; Wu, Guosong; Wang, Chenxi; Zheng, Yufeng; Yeung, Kelvin W K; Chu, Paul K

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium alloys are potential biodegradable materials and have received increasing attention due to their outstanding biological performance and mechanical properties. However, rapid degradation in the physiological environment and potential toxicity limit clinical applications. Recently, special magnesium-calcium (Mg-Ca) and magnesium-strontium (Mg-Sr) alloys with biocompatible chemical compositions have been reported, but the rapid degradation still does not meet clinical requirements. In order to improve the corrosion resistance, a rough, hydrophobic and ZrO(2)-containing surface film is fabricated on Mg-Ca and Mg-Sr alloys by dual zirconium and oxygen ion implantation. Weight loss measurements and electrochemical corrosion tests show that the corrosion rate of the Mg-Ca and Mg-Sr alloys is reduced appreciably after surface treatment. A systematic investigation of the in vitro cellular response and antibacterial capability of the modified binary magnesium alloys is performed. The amounts of adherent bacteria on the Zr-O-implanted and Zr-implanted samples diminish remarkably compared to the unimplanted control. In addition, significantly enhanced cell adhesion and proliferation are observed from the Zr-O-implanted sample. The results suggest that dual zirconium and oxygen ion implantation, which effectively enhances the corrosion resistance, in vitro biocompatibility and antimicrobial properties of Mg-Ca and Mg-Sr alloys, provides a simple and practical means to expedite clinical acceptance of biodegradable magnesium alloys. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Stress-corrosion behavior of aluminum-lithium alloys in aqueous salt environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, P. P.; Galvin, R. P.; Nelson, H. G.

    1984-01-01

    The stress corrosion susceptibility of two powder metallurgy (P/M) alloys, Al-Li-Cu and Al-Li-Cu-Mg; two mechanically attrited (M/A) alloys, Al-Li-Cu and Al-Li-Mg; and two wrought, ingot alloys, X-2020 and AA7475, are compared. Time-dependent fracture in an aqueous sodium chloride environment under alternate immersion condition was found to vary significantly between alloys. The stress corrosion behavior of the two powder metallurgy processed alloys was studied in detail under conditions of crack initiation, static crack growth, and fatigue crack growth. A variety of stress corrosion tests were performed including smooth surface, time-to-failure tests; potentiostatic tests on smooth surfaces exposed to constant applied strain rates; and fracture mechanics-type tests under static and cyclic loads. Both alloys show surface pitting and subsequent intergranular corrosion. Pitting is more severe in the magnesium-bearing alloy and is associated with stringer particles strung along the extrusion direction as a result of P/M processing.

  11. Stress-corrosion behavior of aluminum-lithium alloys in aqueous environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, P. P.; Galvin, R. P.; Nelson, H. G.

    1983-01-01

    The stress corrosion susceptibility of two powder metallurgy (P/M) alloys, Al-Li-Cu and Al-Li-Cu-Mg two mechanically attrited (M/A) alloys, Al-Li-Cu and Al-Li-Mg; and two wrought, ingot alloys, X-2020 and AA7475, are compared. Time-dependent fracture in an aqueous sodium chloride environment under alternate immersion condition was found to vary significantly between alloys. The stress corrosion behavior of the two powder metallurgy processed alloys was studied in detail under conditions of crack initiation, static crack growth, and fatigue crack growth. A variety of stress corrosion tests were performed including smooth surface, time-to-failure tests; potentiostatic tests on smooth surfaces exposed to constant applied strain rates; and fracture mechanics-type tests under static and cyclic loads. Both alloys show surface pitting and subsequent intergranular corrosion. Pitting is more severe in the magnesium-bearing alloy and is associated with stringer particles strung along the extrusion direction as a result of P/M processing.

  12. Effect of cold working and applied stress on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of nickel-chromium-iron alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, T.; Onimura, K.; Itoh, H.; Saito, I.; Takamatsu, H.; Fujitani, T.

    1992-01-01

    In order to grasp the stress corrosion cracking quantitative resistance of Alloys 600 and 690 in PWR primary water, the authors have studied the effect of cold working and applied stress on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of Alloys 600 and 690, in high temperature water. Stress corrosion cracking tests were conducted at 360 degrees C (633K) in a simulated PWR primary water for about 12,000 hours or 24,000 hours. From the test results, it is concluded that the stress corrosion cracking resistance in the cold worked Alloy 600 at the same applied stress level increases with an increase in cold working ratio, and the cold worked Alloys of thermally treated 690 have the excellent stress corrosion cracking resistance. Further, in this paper, the planning of stress corrosion cracking test for weld joints and weld metal of Alloy 600 is described

  13. Mechanical and bio-corrosion properties of quaternary Mg–Ca–Mn–Zn alloys compared with binary Mg–Ca alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhsheshi-Rad, H.R.; Idris, M.H.; Abdul-Kadir, M.R.; Ourdjini, A.; Medraj, M.; Daroonparvar, M.; Hamzah, E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Quaternary alloy show better mechanical and corrosion properties than binary alloy. • Mg–2Ca–0.5Mn–2Zn alloy showed suitable mechanical properties for bone application. • The improved corrosion resistance with addition of Mn and Zn into the Mg–Ca alloy. • Formation of protective surface film Mn-containing magnesium on quaternary alloy. • Secondary phases have strong effect on micro-galvanic corrosion of Mg alloys. - Abstract: Binary Mg–xCa alloys and the quaternary Mg–Ca–Mn–xZn were studied to investigate their bio-corrosion and mechanical properties. The surface morphology of specimens was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The results of mechanical properties show that the yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation of quaternary alloy increased significantly with the addition of zinc (Zn) up to 4 wt.%. However, further addition of Zn content beyond 4 wt.% did not improve yield strength and ultimate tensile strength. In contrast, increasing calcium (Ca) content has a deleterious effect on binary Mg–Ca alloys. Compression tests of the magnesium (Mg) alloys revealed that the compression strength of quaternary alloy was higher than that of binary alloy. However, binary Mg–Ca alloy showed higher reduction in compression strength after immersion in simulated body fluid. The bio-corrosion behaviour of the binary and quaternary Mg alloys were investigated using immersion tests and electrochemical tests. Electrochemical tests shows that the corrosion potential (E corr ) of binary Mg–2Ca significantly shifted toward nobeler direction from −1996.8 to −1616.6 mV SCE with the addition of 0.5 wt.% manganese (Mn) and 2 wt.% Zn content. However, further addition of Zn to 7 wt.% into quaternary alloy has the reverse effect. Immersion tests show that the quaternary

  14. Progress with alloy 33 (UNS R20033), a new corrosion resistant chromium-based austenitic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, M.; Heubner, U.; Eichenhofer, K.W.; Renner, M.

    1996-01-01

    Alloy 33 (UNS R20033), a new chromium-based corrosion resistant austenitic material with nominally (wt. %) 33 Cr, 32 Fe, 31 Ni, 1.6 Mo, 0.6 Cu, 0.4 N has been introduced to the market in 1995. This paper provides new data on this alloy with respect to mechanical properties, formability, weldability, sensitization characteristics and corrosion behavior. Mechanical properties of weldments including ductility have been established, and match well with those of wrought plate material, without any degradation of ISO V-notch impact toughness in the heat affected zone. When aged up to 8 hours between 600 C and 1,000 C the alloy is not sensitized when tested in boiling azeotropic nitric acid (Huey test). Under field test conditions alloy 33 shows excellent resistance to corrosion in flowing 96--98.5% H 2 SO 4 at 135 C--140 C and flowing 99.1% H 2 SO 4 at 150 C. Alloy 33 has also been tested with some success in 96% H 2 SO 4 with nitrosyl additions at 240 C. In nitric acid alloy 33 is corrosion resistant up to 85% HNO 3 and 75 C or even more. Alloy 33 is also corrosion resistant in 1 mol. HCl at 40 C and in NaOH/NaOCl-solutions. In artificial seawater the pitting potential remains unchanged up to 75 C and is still well above the seawater's redox potential at 95 C. Alloy 33 can be easily manufactured into all product forms required. The new data provided support the multipurpose character of alloy 33 to cope successfully with many requirements of the Chemical Process Industry, the Oil and Gas Industry and the Refinery Industry

  15. Influence of casting procedures on the corrosion resistance of clinical dental alloys containing palladium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viennot, Stéphane; Lissac, Michèle; Malquarti, Guillaume; Dalard, Francis; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2006-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the in vitro corrosion resistance in artificial saliva of two palladium-silver alloys (a Pd-Ag (Pors on 4) and an Ag-Pd (Palliag LTG)), with and without casting defects; 1 nickel-chrome alloy and 1 high-gold alloy, cast under recommended conditions, served as controls. For each of the palladium-based alloys, three specimens corresponding to three different casting conditions were used: under recommended conditions, with the use of a graphite-containing investment and crucible, and by reusing the sprues and sprue button. The electrochemical tests were run in Fusayama-Meyer artificial saliva. The open-circuit potential was recorded in mV/SCE at t=24h. Then, potentiodynamic polarization was performed to measure the polarization resistance (R(p)) in kOmega cm(2) and the corrosion current (i(corr)) in microA cm(-2). Data were evaluated with one-way analysis of variance and multiple comparisons test (alpha=0.05). In addition, each specimen was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Compared to the control alloys, the electrochemical experiments in artificial saliva indicated satisfactory corrosion resistance for the Pd-Ag and Ag-Pd alloys; these results are related to their high noble metal content and stable substructure. The Pd-Ag alloy displayed superior electrochemical properties to those of the Ag-Pd alloy regardless of the casting condition. The use of the graphite-containing crucible and investment during the cast process did not dramatically reduce the corrosion resistance values, but the reuse of sprues and the sprue button did. The optimal corrosion resistance values were obtained for the alloys cast according to the recommended conditions.

  16. Testing and prediction of erosion-corrosion for corrosion resistant alloys used in the oil and gas production industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, Hernan E.

    The corrosion behavior of CRAs has been thoroughly investigated and documented in the public literature by many researchers; however, little work has been done to investigate erosion-corrosion of such alloys. When sand particles are entrained in the flow, the degradation mechanism is different from that observed for sand-free corrosive environment. There is a need in the oil and gas industry to define safe service limits for utilization of such materials. The effects of flow conditions, sand rate, pH and temperature on the erosion-corrosion of CRAs were widely studied. An extensive experimental work was conducted using scratch tests and flow loop tests using several experimental techniques. At high erosivity conditions, a synergistic effect between erosion and corrosion was observed. Under the high sand rate conditions tested, erosivity is severe enough to damage the passive layer protecting the CRA thereby enhancing the corrosion rate. In most cases there is likely a competition between the rates of protective film removal due to mechanical erosion and protective film healing. Synergism occurs for each of the three alloys examined (13Cr and Super13Cr and 22Cr); however, the degree of synergism is quite different for the three alloys and may not be significant for 22Cr for field conditions where erosivities are typically much lower that those occurring in the small bore loop used in this research. Predictions of the corrosion component of erosion-corrosion based on scratch test data compared reasonably well to test results from flow loops for the three CRAs at high erosivity conditions. Second order behavior appears to be an appropriate and useful model for representing the repassivation process of CRAs. A framework for a procedure to predict penetration rates for erosion-corrosion conditions was developed based on the second order model behavior observed for the re-healing process of the passive film of CRAs and on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations

  17. The role of intermetallic phases in the corrosion of magnesium-rare earth alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Campos, Maria del Rosario

    2016-01-01

    A new concept to develop a RE based Mg alloy with improved corrosion resistance was followed in the current work. Based on subsequent characterisation steps to eliminate less suitable RE elements the best microstructure for improved corrosion resistance was identified. At first, the corrosion properties of selected RE elements were determined. Based on these results RE elements that have a potential to enhance the corrosion resistance of Mg-RE alloys were selected. Two aspects of RE elements were important for the selection: the electrochemical properties and the solid solubility in Mg. If the solubility limit of RE elements in the Mg matrix is exceeded, they form intermetallic phases with Mg. By performing galvanic coupling measurements the compatibility between Mg matrix and intermetallic phases were estimated. At that point three binary Mg-RE alloys systems remained (Mg-Ce, Mg-La, and Mg-Gd). To evaluate the influence of composition (amount of intermetallic phases) on the corrosion behaviour, four concentrations were cast with 1, 5, 10 and 15 wt. % of RE. Ce and La have a lower solid solubility in Mg matrix generating higher volume fraction of the secondary phases, thus higher dissolution rates in the binary Mg-RE alloys. While Gd with higher solid solubility shows a different behaviour. Additions of up to 10 wt. % Gd resulted in similar behaviour compared to 1 wt. % Gd addition. The most promising results were obtained for the Mg-Gd system with 10 wt. % Gd. Thus, the microstructure of this alloy was further modified by heat treatments to understand the influence of microstructural changes on corrosion behaviour. A ternary element was used to attempt further optimisation of the corrosion performance. Additions of Al, Zn, Ga and Y did not show any improvement in the corrosion resistance of Mg10Gd. This is due to increasing volume fractions of critical more noble phases and the microstructure dominated by eutectic phase formation. Thus galvanic effects became much

  18. The role of intermetallic phases in the corrosion of magnesium-rare earth alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Campos, Maria del Rosario

    2016-07-25

    A new concept to develop a RE based Mg alloy with improved corrosion resistance was followed in the current work. Based on subsequent characterisation steps to eliminate less suitable RE elements the best microstructure for improved corrosion resistance was identified. At first, the corrosion properties of selected RE elements were determined. Based on these results RE elements that have a potential to enhance the corrosion resistance of Mg-RE alloys were selected. Two aspects of RE elements were important for the selection: the electrochemical properties and the solid solubility in Mg. If the solubility limit of RE elements in the Mg matrix is exceeded, they form intermetallic phases with Mg. By performing galvanic coupling measurements the compatibility between Mg matrix and intermetallic phases were estimated. At that point three binary Mg-RE alloys systems remained (Mg-Ce, Mg-La, and Mg-Gd). To evaluate the influence of composition (amount of intermetallic phases) on the corrosion behaviour, four concentrations were cast with 1, 5, 10 and 15 wt. % of RE. Ce and La have a lower solid solubility in Mg matrix generating higher volume fraction of the secondary phases, thus higher dissolution rates in the binary Mg-RE alloys. While Gd with higher solid solubility shows a different behaviour. Additions of up to 10 wt. % Gd resulted in similar behaviour compared to 1 wt. % Gd addition. The most promising results were obtained for the Mg-Gd system with 10 wt. % Gd. Thus, the microstructure of this alloy was further modified by heat treatments to understand the influence of microstructural changes on corrosion behaviour. A ternary element was used to attempt further optimisation of the corrosion performance. Additions of Al, Zn, Ga and Y did not show any improvement in the corrosion resistance of Mg10Gd. This is due to increasing volume fractions of critical more noble phases and the microstructure dominated by eutectic phase formation. Thus galvanic effects became much

  19. Crevice corrosion of alloy 22 in fluoride and chloride containing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carranza, Ricardo M.; Rodriguez, Martin A.

    2005-01-01

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is highly resistant to localized corrosion. Alloy 22 may be susceptible to crevice corrosion in pure chloride (Cl - ) solutions under aggressive environmental conditions. The effect of the fluoride (F - ) on the susceptibility to crevice corrosion induced by chloride ions is still not well established. The objective of the present work was to explore the crevice corrosion resistance of this alloy to different mixtures of fluorides and chlorides. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) tests were conducted in deaerated aqueous solutions of pure halide ions and also in different mixtures of chloride and fluoride at 90 C degrees and pH 6. The range of chloride concentration [Cl - ] was 0.001 M ≤ [Cl - ] ≤ 1 M and the range of molar fluoride to chloride ratio [F - ]/[Cl - ] was 0.1≤ [F - ]/[Cl - ] ≤ 10. Results showed that Alloy 22 was susceptible to crevice corrosion in all the pure chloride solutions but not in the pure fluoride solutions. A molar ratio [F - ]/[Cl - ] ranging from 5 to 10 was required for the inhibition of crevice corrosion to be complete in the halide mixtures. A moderate or nil inhibitive effect was observed for molar ratios [F - ]/[Cl - ] [es

  20. Effect of mixed alloy combinations on fretting corrosion performance of spinal screw and rod implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, Sachin A; Singh, Vaneet; Gilbert, Jeremy L

    2017-07-01

    Spinal implants are made from a variety of materials to meet the unique mechanical demands of each application. However, the medical device community has raised concern about mixing dissimilar metals in an implant because of fear of inducing corrosion. There is a lack of systematic studies on the effects of mixing metals on performance of spinal implants, especially in fretting corrosion conditions. Hence, the goal was to determine whether mixing stainless steel (SS316L), titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) and cobalt chromium (CoCrMo) alloy components in a spinal implant leads to any increased risk of corrosion degradation. Spinal constructs consisting of single assembly screw-connector-rod components were tested using a novel short-term cyclic fretting corrosion test method. A total of 17 alloy component combinations (comprised of SS316L, Ti6Al4V-anodized and CoCrMo alloy for rod, screws and connectors) were tested under three anatomic orientations. Spinal constructs having all SS316L were most susceptible to fretting-initiated crevice corrosion attack and showed higher average fretting currents (∼25 - 30 µA), whereas constructs containing all Ti6Al4V components were less susceptible to fretting corrosion with average fretting currents in the range of 1 - 6 µA. Mixed groups showed evidence of fretting corrosion but they were not as severe as all SS316L group. SEM results showed evidence of severe corrosion attack in constructs having SS316L components. There also did not appear to be any galvanic effects of combining alloys together. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 1169-1177, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Biochemical analysis of the Hormoconis resinae fungal mycelium in the corrosion of aeronautical aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araya, R.; Bobadilla, C.; Vera, R.; Rosales, B. M.

    2007-01-01

    Biochemical analyses of the Hormoconis resinae fungal mycelium would explain behaviour differences of corrosive and non-corrosive strains of Al and its aeronautical alloys. In previous works its aggressiveness had been studied through SEM-EDX surface analysis, electrochemical techniques and immersion testing. In this paper separation of the proteins of the mycelium produced by a non-corrosive strain and its culture along three generations was performed. cultures were prepared in batch in the presence and absence of pure Al and AA 2024, AA 7005 and AA 7075 alloys. The mycelia grown throughout the three generations increasingly recovered usual characteristics at the third replication, included their corrosiveness on Al and its alloys previously shown by all out strains. Among the bio-molecule fractions isolated and analysed during this preliminary study only the proteins revealed changes with the generation grown. When this fungal strain was cultured in the presence of alloy metal sheets electrophoresis of the protean fraction was correlative with the distinct mycelia behaviour observed, including corrosiveness on Al and its alloys. (Author) 30 refs

  2. Phosphating treatment and corrosion properties of Mg-Mn-Zn alloy for biomedical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liping; Zhang, Erlin; Yang, Ke

    2009-04-01

    A phosphating treatment was applied to Mg-Mn-Zn alloy in order to improve the corrosion resistance. Surface morphology and phase constitute were observed and identified by SEM, EDS, SAXS, XRD and XPS. SEM observation showed that a rough and crystalline reaction layer was formed on the surface of Mg alloy. With the increasing of phosphating time, the layer became thicker and denser. It has been showed that the reaction layer was mainly composed of brushite (CaHPO4 x 2H2O). Small amount of Zn2+ was also detected by XPS and EDS. The corrosion resistance of the phosphated samples was measured by the electrochemical polarization and the immersion test in comparison with the bare alloy. The results manifested that the corrosion resistance of Mg alloy was improved by the phosphating treatment, and the corrosion resistance increased with the increase of the phosphating time within 50 min. Immersion tests showed that the phosphate layer could protect magnesium alloy from fast corrosion. The brushite layer has been transformed into hydroxyapatite (HA) during the immersion in the simulated body fluid (SBF) solution, which suggested the brushite layer could provide good biocompatibility.

  3. Microbiologically induced corrosion of aluminum alloys in fuel-oil/aqueous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S S; Lin, J Y; Lin, Y T

    1998-09-01

    To investigate the microbiologically induced corrosion of aluminum alloys in fuel-oil/aqueous system, aluminum alloys A356, AA 5052, AA 5083 and AA 6061 were chosen as the test alloys and Cladosporium and several fuel-oil contaminated microbes isolated in Taiwan were used as test organisms. Aluminum alloy AA 5083 in fuel-oil/aqueous system was the most susceptible material for microbial corrosion, then followed by aluminum alloys AA 5052 and A356, and AA 6061 was more resistant to microbial aggression. Mixed culture had high capability of corrosion, then followed by Penicillium sp. AM-F5, Fusarium sp. AM-F1, Pseudomonas aeruginosa AM-B5, Ps. fluorescens AM-B9, C. resinae ATCC 22712, Penicillium sp. AM-F2, Candida sp. AM-Y1 and Ps. aeruginosa AM-B11. From energy dispersive spectrometer analysis, aluminum and magnesium contents decreased in the corrosion area, while chlorine and sulfur contents increased. The major organic acid produced in fuel-oil/aqueous system was acetic acid, and the total organic acids content had a positive correlation with the degree of microbial corrosion.

  4. Dependence of Crystallographic Orientation on Pitting Corrosion Behavior of Ni-Fe-Cr Alloy 028

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, LiNa; Szpunar, Jerzy A.; Dong, JianXin; Ojo, Olanrewaju A.; Wang, Xu

    2018-03-01

    The influence of crystallographic orientation on the pitting corrosion behavior of Ni-Fe-Cr alloy 028 was studied using a combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), potentiodynamic polarization technique, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that there is anisotropy of pitting corrosion that strongly depends on crystallographic orientation of the surface plane. The distribution of pit density in a standard stereographic triangle indicates that the crystallographic planes close to {100} are more prone to pitting corrosion compared to planes {110} and {111}. The surface energy calculation of (001) and (111) shows that the plane with a high atomic packing density has a low surface energy with concomitant strong resistance to pitting corrosion. A correlation function between crystallographic orientation and pitting corrosion susceptibility suggests a method that not only predicts the pitting resistance of known textured materials, but also could help to improve corrosion resistance by controlling material texture.

  5. Effect of fluorides and chlorides upon corrosion behavior of alloy C-22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carranza, Ricardo M.

    2003-01-01

    Alloy C-22 is one of the candidates to fabricate the external wall of the high level nuclear waste containers. These packages are designed to maintain isolation of the waste for a minimum of 10,000 years. During this period they must resist atmospheric corrosion. Electrochemical techniques such as cyclic potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and variation of corrosion potential in time and non-electrochemical techniques such as X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and microscopy were applied to determine the effect of fluorides and chlorides upon general and localized corrosion of different microstructures of alloy C-22. The corrosion rates obtained were about 0.1 μm/year. Crevice corrosion was detected only in those solutions where chlorides ions were present. Fluoride ions affected the passivity and trans passivity behavior of the alloy. They produced higher current densities than chlorides in both ranges. There were no differences in corrosion behavior of the different microstructures. Mixtures of chlorides and fluorides seem to be more detrimental than the separated ions regarding to localized corrosion and trans passivity. (author)

  6. Localized corrosion of high performance metal alloys in an acid/salt environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdowell, L. G.; Ontiveros, C.

    1991-01-01

    Various vacuum jacketed cryogenic supply lines at the Space Shuttle launch site at Kennedy Space Center use convoluted flexible expansion joints. The atmosphere at the launch site has a very high salt content, and during a launch, fuel combustion products include hydrochloric acid. This extremely corrosive environment has caused pitting corrosion failure in the thin walled 304L stainless steel flex hoses. A search was done to find a more corrosion resistant replacement material. The study focussed on 19 metal alloys. Tests which were performed include electrochemical corrosion testing, accelerated corrosion testing in a salt fog chamber, and long term exposure at a beach corrosion testing site. Based on the results of these tests, several nickel based alloys were found to have very high resistance to this corrosive environment. Also, there was excellent agreement between the electrochemical tests and the actual beach exposure tests. This suggests that electrochemical testing may be useful for narrowing the field of potential candidate alloys before subjecting samples to long term beach exposure.

  7. Impact of β- radiolysis and transient products on irradiation-enhanced corrosion of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaignan, C.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis has been undertaken of the various cases of local enhancement of the corrosion rate of zirconium alloys under irradiation. It is observed that in most cases a strong emission of energetic β - is present leading to a local energy desorption rate higher than the core average. This suggests that the local transient radiolytic oxidising species produced in the coolant by the β - particles could contribute to corrosion enhancement, by increasing the local corrosion potential. This process is applicable to the local enhanced corrosion found in front of stainless steels structural parts, due to the contribution of Mn, in front of Pt inserts and Cu-rich cruds. It explains also the irradiation corrosion enhancement of Cu-rich Zr alloys. Enhanced corrosion around neutron absorbing material is explained similarly by pair production from conversion of high energy capture photons in the cladding, leading to energetic electrons. The same process was found to be active with other highly ionising species like α in Ni-rich alloys and fission products in homogeneous reactors. This mechanism, applicable for an explanation of localised irradiation-enhanced corrosion, is proposed to be extended to the reactor core, where the general enhancement of Zr-alloy corrosion under irradiation would be due to the general radiolysis. It suggests that care should be taken to avoid any source of β - emission or other ionising species in the reactor core that could give an increase of energy deposition rate for radiolysis. Also the corrosion testing conditions for the materials to be used in reactors have to be relevant to the radiolytic environments found in the reactor cores. (orig.)

  8. Corrosion resistance of materials of construction for high temperature sulfuric acid service in thermochemical IS process. Alloy 800, Alloy 600, SUSXM15J1 and SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Onuki, Kaoru; Shimizu, Saburo; Yamaguchi, Akihisa

    2006-01-01

    Exposure tests of candidate materials were carried out up to 1000 hr in the sulfuric acid environments of thermochemical hydrogen production IS process, focusing on the corrosion of welded portion and of crevice area. In the gas phase sulfuric acid decomposition condition at 850degC, welded samples of Alloy 800 and of Alloy 600 showed the same good corrosion resistance as the base materials. In the boiling condition of 95 wt% sulfuric acid solution, test sample of SiC showed the same good corrosion resistance. Also negligible corrosion was observed in crevice corrosion. (author)

  9. Corrosion behavior of silver-palladium dental casting alloys in artificial saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewski, Katherine Mary

    Ag-Pd dental casting alloys have been used as alternatives to high gold alloys in restorative dentistry since the 1980s. These alloys exhibited mechanical properties superior to gold alloys and excellent adherence to porcelain in porcelain fused to metal (PFM) restorations, such as dental crowns. However, later increases in the price of palladium along with concerns regarding possible allergic reactions and palladium's cytotoxicity have limited the use of these alloys. Evaluation of the biocompatibility concern requires a better understanding of the interaction of Ag-Pd alloys with the oral environment, and the cost problem would be lessened if the palladium content could be reduced without lowering the corrosion resistance. Previous studies have shown differences in the corrosion behavior between Pd-rich and Ag-rich alloys, but the mechanisms of the two behaviors are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to characterize the electrochemical behavior of binary Ag-Pd alloys under conditions simulating the exposure in the oral cavity. Electrochemical measurements, surface and solution analysis were performed with alloy composition, electrolyte composition, and exposure time as variables. Results showed the corrosion behavior for all alloys was governed by the formation of an insoluble thiocyanate salt combined with selective dissolution of Ag for the Pd-rich alloys. The tendency to form thiocyanate was found to dominate over the tendency to form chloride, the formation of which was suggested in other studies. The electrode behavior has been explained on the basis of the theory of behavior of electrodes of the second kind. The difference in behavior of Ag-rich and Pd-rich alloys has been related to the difference in the solubility of the salts and difference in bonding of thiocyanate with Pd and Ag.

  10. Microstructural, mechanical, corrosion and cytotoxicity characterization of the hot forged FeMn30(wt.%) alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čapek, Jaroslav; Kubásek, Jiří; Vojtěch, Dalibor; Jablonská, Eva; Lipov, Jan; Ruml, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    An interest in biodegradable metallic materials has been increasing in the last two decades. Besides magnesium based materials, iron-manganese alloys have been considered as possible candidates for fabrication of biodegradable stents and orthopedic implants. In this study, we prepared a hot forged FeMn30 (wt.%) alloy and investigated its microstructural, mechanical and corrosion characteristics as well as cytotoxicity towards mouse L 929 fibroblasts. The obtained results were compared with those of iron. The FeMn30 alloy was composed of antiferromagnetic γ-austenite and ε-martensite phases and possessed better mechanical properties than iron and even that of 316 L steel. The potentiodynamic measurements in simulated body fluids showed that alloying with manganese lowered the free corrosion potential and enhanced the corrosion rate, compared to iron. On the other hand, the corrosion rate of FeMn30 obtained by a semi-static immersion test was significantly lower than that of iron, most likely due to a higher degree of alkalization in sample surrounding. The presence of manganese in the alloy slightly enhanced toxicity towards the L 929 cells; however, the toxicity did not exceed the allowed limit and FeMn30 alloy fulfilled the requirements of the ISO 10993-5 standard. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Stress corrosion cracking of alloy 182 weld in a PWR water environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Luciana Iglesias Lourenco; Schvartzman, Monica Maria de Abreu Mendonca; Quinan, Marco Antonio Dutra; Soares, Antonio Edicleto Gomes; Piva, Stephano P.T.

    2011-01-01

    The weld used to connect two different metals is known as dissimilar metal welds (DMW). In the nuclear power plant, this weld is used to join stainless steel nipples to low alloy carbon steel components on the nuclear pressurized water reactor (PWR). In most cases, nickel alloys are used to joint these materials. These alloys are known to accommodate the differences in composition and thermal expansion of the two materials. The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a phenomenon that occurs in nuclear power plants metallic components where susceptibility materials are subjected to the simultaneously effect of mechanical stress and an aggressive media with different compositions. SCC is one of degradation process that gradually introduces damage of components, change their characteristics with the operation time. The nickel alloy 600, and their weld metals (nickel alloys 82 and 182), originally selected due to its high corrosion resistance, it exhibit after long operation period (20 years), susceptibility to the SCC. This study presents a comparative work between the SCC in the Alloy 182 filler metal weld in two different temperatures (303 deg C and 325 deg C) in primary water. The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking was assessed using the slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) test. The results of the SSRT tests indicated that SCC is a thermally-activated mechanism and that brittle fracture caused by the corrosion process was observed at 325 deg C. (author)

  12. Microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of Mg-Dy-Gd-Zr alloys for medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L; Huang, Y; Feyerabend, F; Willumeit, R; Mendis, C; Kainer, K U; Hort, N

    2013-11-01

    In previous investigations, a Mg-10Dy (wt.%) alloy with a good combination of corrosion resistance and cytocompatibility showed great potential for use as a biodegradable implant material. However, the mechanical properties of Mg-10Dy alloy are not satisfactory. In order to allow the tailoring of mechanical properties required for various medical applications, four Mg-10(Dy+Gd)-0.2Zr (wt.%) alloys were investigated with respect to microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties. With the increase in Gd content, the number of second-phase particles increased in the as-cast alloys, and the age-hardening response increased at 200°C. The yield strength increased, while the ductility reduced, especially for peak-aged alloys with the addition of Gd. Additionally, with increasing Gd content, the corrosion rate increased in the as-cast condition owing to the galvanic effect, but all the alloys had a similar corrosion rate (~0.5 mm year(-1)) in solution-treated and aged condition. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Alloy 31, a new 6 moly stainless steel with improved corrosion resistance in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasner, M.; Heubner, U. [Krupp VDM GmbH, Werdohl (Germany)

    1995-10-01

    Alloy 31--UNS N08031--31Ni-27Cr-6.5Mo-1.2Cu-0.2N-balance iron--is an advanced 6 Mo stainless steel with increased chromium and nickel, contents for seawater service. In hot seawater the pitting potential of alloy 31 remains high up to 90 C (194 F). Investigations of resistance to crevice corrosion in real piping systems in natural seawater, both North Sea and Baltic Sea, show that the threshold conditions for alloy 31 in chlorinated seawater (North Sea) are at 40 C and 1 ppm chlorine well superior to the 6 Mo stainless grades being currently in use. In addition, alloy 31 shows an excellent resistance to corrosion versus both hot reducing media (e.g. H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) and hot oxidizing media (e.g. HNO{sub 3}). The combination of high resistance to localized corrosion vs. hot chloride-bearing cooling waters including seawater and aggressive oxidizing and reducing hot corrosive media is a unique feature of alloy 31. Alloy 31 is recommended for the construction of heat exchangers, process coolers and piping systems. The material is supplied in a number of semifinished products such as seamless and welded pipes, fittings, flanges, forged bars, plate, sheet, strip, wire and prefabricated piping systems.

  14. Thermal Aging Effect on Corrosion Resistance in Fusion Boundary of A533 Gr. B and Alloy 152

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Taeho; Ham, Junhyuk; Kim, Ji Hyun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Dissimilar metal weldment (DMW) is frequently used for joining low-alloy steel pressure vessel nozzles and steam generator nozzles to nickel-based wrought alloy or austenitic stainless steel components in high energy systems. This feature also significantly hinders C diffusion from the ferrite base metal to the weld metal. Until now, stress corrosion cracking has not occurred in DMWs where a High-Cr weld metal (such as Alloy 152 or Alloy 690), which is Ni-base weld metal including relative high Cr, is used as the weld metal in the weld between the nickel-based alloy and low-alloy steel. To understand the microstructure and corrosion evolution on fusion boundary between low-alloy steel and Ni-base weld metal, microstructural analysis and polarization test were performed with A533 Gr. B/Alloy 152/Alloy 690. Remarkable changes were observed in corrosion resistance and hardness at fusion boundary between low-alloy steel and Ni-base weld metal. The precipitate, which has different potential with peripheral region, can cause galvanic corrosion or pitting corrosion and is the one of hardening methods by disturbing movement of the dislocation. At initial step of heat treatment, the number of precipitates was increased. In fusion boundary between A533 Gr. B and Alloy 152, the corrosion resistance was decreased, and the hardness was increased. Next, at further step, the number of precipitates.

  15. Corrosion behavior of novel imitation-gold copper alloy with rare earth in 3.5% NaCl solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.L.; Li, Z.; Zhu, A.Y.; Luo, L.Y.; Liang, J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → The design alloy has better anti-tarnish property than that of H7211 alloy during salt-spray test. → The corrosion rate of design alloy is much lower than that of H7211 alloy as immersed in NaCl solution. → In the low frequency region, the capacitive behavior normally faded and diffusion process had a key role. → In the medium frequency region, the Bode pattern showed a capacitive behavior. -- Abstract: A novel imitation-gold copper alloy with rare earth was designed and prepared. The corrosion behavior of the alloy immersed in 3.5% NaCl solution and its anti-tarnish property in the salt spray for different days has been studied. The designed alloy (CuZnAlNiMeRe) has more excellent anti-tarnish property and lower corrosion rate than those of currency coinage materials of H7211 alloy (used in China). A uniform and compact of corrosion film has been formed after the designed alloy immersed in 3.5% NaCl solution. The corrosion current densities I corr of the alloy decreased while the polarization resistance R p increased with time. The capacitance of the corrosion product film C film of the alloy decreased while the charge transfer resistance R ct . The Warburg diffusion impedance W R and the resistance of the equivalent circuit R increased with time.

  16. Effects of Cr and Nb contents on the susceptibility of Alloy 600 type Ni-base alloys to stress-corrosion cracking in a simulated BWR environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akashi, Masatsune

    1995-01-01

    In order to discuss the effects of chromium and niobium contents on the susceptibility of Alloy 600 type nickel-base alloys to stress-corrosion cracking in the BWR primary coolant environment, a series of creviced bent-beam (CBB) tests were conducted in a high-temperature, high-purity water environment. Chromium, niobium, and titanium as alloying elements improved the resistivity to stress-corrosion cracking, whereas carbon enhanced the susceptibility to it. Alloy-chemistry-based correlations have been defined to predict the relative resistances of alloys to stress-corrosion cracking. A strong correlation was found, for several heats of alloys, between grain-boundary chromium depletion and the susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking

  17. Corrosion Behavior of Ti-13Nb-13Zr and Ti-6Al-4V Alloys for Biomaterial Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saji, Viswanathan S.; Jeong, Yong Hoon; Choe, Han Cheol [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Jin Woo [Shingyeong University, Hwaseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    Ti-13Nb-13Zr (TNZ) alloy has attracted considerable research attention in the last decade as a suitable substitute for the commercially used Ti-6Al-4V (TAV) alloy for orthopedic and dental implant applications. Hence, in the present work, a comparative evaluation has been performed on the electrochemical corrosion behavior of TNZ and TAV alloys in 0.9 wt.% NaCl solution. The result of the study showed that both the alloys had similar electrochemical behavior. The corrosion resistance of TAV alloy is found to be marginally superior to that of TNZ alloy.

  18. Experimental Investigation of the Corrosion Behavior of Friction Stir Welded AZ61A Magnesium Alloy Welds under Salt Spray Corrosion Test and Galvanic Corrosion Test Using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dhanapal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extruded Mg alloy plates of 6 mm thick of AZ61A grade were butt welded using advanced welding process and friction stir welding (FSW processes. The specimens were exposed to salt spray conditions and immersion conditions to characterize their corrosion rates on the effect of pH value, chloride ion concentration, and corrosion time. In addition, an attempt was made to develop an empirical relationship to predict the corrosion rate of FSW welds in salt spray corrosion test and galvanic corrosion test using design of experiments. The corrosion morphology and the pit morphology were analyzed by optical microscopy, and the corrosion products were examined using scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction analysis. From this research work, it is found that, in both corrosion tests, the corrosion rate decreases with the increase in pH value, the decrease in chloride ion concentration, and a higher corrosion time. The results show the usage of the magnesium alloy for best environments and suitable applications from the aforementioned conditions. Also, it is found that AZ61A magnesium alloy welds possess low-corrosion rate and higher-corrosion resistance in the galvanic corrosion test than in the salt spray corrosion test.

  19. The corrosion resistance of Zr-Nb and Zr-Nb-Sn alloys in high-temperature water and steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalgaard, S.B.

    1960-03-01

    An alloy of reactor-grade sponge zirconium-2.5 wt. % niobium was exposed to water and steam at high temperature. The corrosion was twice that of Zircaloy-2 while hydrogen pickup was found to be equal to that of Zircaloy-2. Ternary additions of tin to this alloy in the range 0.5-1.5 had no effect on the corrosion resistance in water at 315 o C up to 100 days. At higher temperatures, tin increased the corrosion, the effect varying with temperature. Heat treatment of the alloys was shown to affect corrosion resistance. (author)

  20. Corrosion resistance of a composite polymeric coating applied on biodegradable AZ31 magnesium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zomorodian, A; Garcia, M P; Moura e Silva, T; Fernandes, J C S; Fernandes, M H; Montemor, M F

    2013-11-01

    The high corrosion rate of magnesium alloys is the main drawback to their widespread use, especially in biomedical applications. There is a need for developing new coatings that provide simultaneously corrosion resistance and enhanced biocompatibility. In this work, a composite coating containing polyether imide, with several diethylene triamine and hydroxyapatite contents, was applied on AZ31 magnesium alloys pre-treated with hydrofluoric acid by dip coating. The coated samples were immersed in Hank's solution and the coating performance was studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the behavior of MG63 osteoblastic cells on coated samples was investigated. The results confirmed that the new coatings not only slow down the corrosion rate of AZ31 magnesium alloys in Hank's solution, but also enhance the adhesion and proliferation of MG63 osteoblastic cells, especially when hydroxyapatite nanoparticles were introduced in the coating formulation. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Causes and mechanisms of thermal embrittlement and corrosion cracking of complex α-titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushkov, S.S.; Rybin, V.V.; Razuvaeva, I.N.; Nesterova, E.V.; Gunbina, O.A.

    1995-01-01

    Effect of aging under 500 deg C on mechanical and corrosion-mechanical properties of Ti-6Al base titanium α-alloys with zirconium and carbon additions is studied. Using electron microscopy one determines the reasons of reduction of plasticity and of corrosion-mechanical strength of alloys after aging. It is determined that in the given alloys there are two different processes with occurrence different kinetics: the first one-formation of grain-boundary precipitations of Ti 2 (Fe, Ni) intermetallic compound responsible for plasticity reduction; and the second one-homogeneous decomposition of Ti-Al solid solution responsible for reduction of corrosion-mechanical properties. 14 refs., 6 figs

  2. Corrosion resistance of stainless steels and high Ni-Cr alloys to acid fluoride wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, H.D.; Mackey, D.B.; Pool, K.H. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Schwenk, E.B. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

    1992-04-01

    TRUEX processing of Hanford Site waste will utilize potentially corrosive acid fluoride processing solutions. Appropriate construction materials for such a processing facility need to be identified. Toward this objective, candidate stainless steels and high Ni-Cr alloys have been corrosion tested in simulated acid fluoride process solutions at 333K. The high Ni-Cr alloys exhibited corrosion rates as low as 0.14 mm/y in a solution with an HF activity of about 1.2 M, much lower than the 19 to 94 mm/y observed for austenitic stainless steels. At a lower HF activity (about 0.008 M), stainless steels display delayed passivation while high Ni-Cr alloys display essentially no reaction.

  3. Annealing Effect on Corrosion Behavior of the Beta-Quenched HANA Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Gil; Kim, Il Hyun; Choi, Byung Kwan; Park, Sang Yoon; Park, Jeong Yong; Jeong, Yong Hwan

    2009-01-01

    The advanced fuel cladding materials named as HANA cladding have been developed at KAERI for application of high burn-up and that cladding showed an improved performance in both in-pile and out-of-pile conditions. However, the cladding performance could be changed by the annealing conditions during the tube manufacturing process. Especially, the corrosion resistance is considerably sensitive to their microstructure which is determined by a manufacturing process in the high Nb-containing zirconium alloys. They reported that the corrosion properties of the Nb-containing Zr alloys were considerably affected by the microstructure conditions such as the Nb concentration in the matrix and the second phase types. Therefore, the corrosion behavior of HANA cladding having the high Nb could be considerably affected by the annealing time and temperatures. The purpose of this study is focused on the annealing effect of the beta quenched HANA alloy to obtain the optimum annealing conditions

  4. Experimental Study of Laser - enhanced 5A03 Aluminum Alloy and Its Stress Corrosion Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guicheng; Chen, Jing; Pang, Tao

    2018-02-01

    Based on the study of improving the stress corrosion resistance of 5A03 aluminum alloy for ship, this paper mainly studied the tensile test, surface morphology and residual stress under laser shock, high temperature and stress corrosion. It is found that the residual compressive stress and the grain refinement on the surface of the material during the heat strengthening process increase the breaking strength of the sample in the stress corrosion environment. Appropriate high temperature maintenance helps to enhance the effect of deformation strengthening. In the 300°C environment insulation, due to recrystallization of the material, the performance decreased significantly. This study provides an experimental basis for effectively improving the stress corrosion resistance of 5A03 aluminum alloy.

  5. Characterization of the corrosion resistance of several alloys to dilute biologically active solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Daniel W.

    1990-01-01

    Sulfate reducing bacteria and acid producing bacteria/fungi detected in hygiene waters increased the corrosion rate in aluminum alloy. Biologically active media enhanced the formation of pits on metal coupons. Direct observation of gas evolved at the corrosion sample, coupled with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray analysis of the corrosion products indicates that the corrosion rate is increased because the presence of bacteria favor the reduction of hydrogen as the cathodic reaction through the reaction of oxygen and water. SEM verifies the presence of microbes in a biofilm on the surface of corroding samples. The bacterial consortia are associated with anodic sites on the metal surface, aggressive pitting occurs adjacent to biofilms. Many pits are associated with triple points and inclusions in the aluminum alloy microstructure. Similar bacterial colonization was found on the stainless steel samples. Fourier transform Infrared Spectroscopy confirmed the presence of carbonyl groups in pitted areas of samples exposed to biologically active waters.

  6. Electrochemical Estimation of the Corrosion Rate of Magnesium/Aluminium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pardo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion rate of AZ31, AZ80, and AZ91D magnesium/aluminium alloys immersed in 3.5 wt.% NaCl was determined comparing gravimetric and electrochemical measurements. The findings revealed that, for all investigated materials, a fraction of the metallic surface exposed to the corrosive medium did not reveal a normal electrochemical response to the applied signal. This may be associated with phenomena such as partial disintegration of specimens into fine metallic particles, electrochemical formation of Mg+ ions, and/or anomalous chemical attack occurring simultaneously with the normal electrochemical corrosion attack. The abnormal electrochemical behaviour was more evident for lower amounts of aluminium in the bulk composition of the investigated materials. Thus, the electrochemical estimates of pure Mg and the AZ31 alloy were not reliable and tended to underestimate corrosion losses.

  7. Stress corrosion cracking of nickel base alloys in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speidel, M.O.; Magdoswki, R.

    1993-01-01

    The resistance of nickel base alloys against stress corrosion cracking in high temperature water has been evaluated by measuring the crack growth rates for specific material-environment combinations. For this purpose, fracture mechanics testing techniques have been applied. The materials tested include both, precipitation hardened and solid solution hardened nickel base alloys. The effect of stress intensity on the stress corrosion crack growth rates has been established by measuring complete crack growth curves. In many cases, the effect of stress intensity on the crack growth rate is very small and thus a plateau is observed in the crack growth rate versus stress intensity curves. However, there are clear exceptions to this rule in certain materials and these are pointed out in comparison with data from the literature. The effect of yield strength on stress corrosion crack growth rates has been studied in detail. It is shown how precipitation hardening and particularly how work hardening influence stress corrosion cracking

  8. In vitro corrosion behaviour of Ti-Nb-Sn shape memory alloys in Ringer's physiological solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosalbino, F; Macciò, D; Scavino, G; Saccone, A

    2012-04-01

    The nearly equiatomic Ni-Ti alloy (Nitinol) has been widely employed in the medical and dental fields owing to its shape memory or superelastic properties. The main concern about the use of this alloy derives form the fact that it contains a large amount of nickel (55% by mass), which is suspected responsible for allergic, toxic and carcinogenic reactions. In this work, the in vitro corrosion behavior of two Ti-Nb-Sn shape memory alloys, Ti-16Nb-5Sn and Ti-18Nb-4Sn (mass%) has been investigated and compared with that of Nitinol. The in vitro corrosion resistance was assessed in naturally aerated Ringer's physiological solution at 37°C by corrosion potential and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements as a function of exposure time, and potentiodynamic polarization curves. Corrosion potential values indicated that both Ni-Ti and Ti-Nb-Sn alloys undergo spontaneous passivation due to spontaneously formed oxide film passivating the metallic surface, in the aggressive environment. It also indicated that the tendency for the formation of a spontaneous oxide is greater for the Ti-18Nb-5Sn alloy. Significantly low anodic current density values were obtained from the polarization curves, indicating a typical passive behaviour for all investigated alloys, but Nitinol exhibited breakdown of passivity at potentials above approximately 450 mV(SCE), suggesting lower corrosion protection characteristics of its oxide film compared to the Ti-Nb-Sn alloys. EIS studies showed high impedance values for all samples, increasing with exposure time, indicating an improvement in corrosion resistance of the spontaneous oxide film. The obtained EIS spectra were analyzed using an equivalent electrical circuit representing a duplex structure oxide film, composed by an outer and porous layer (low resistance), and an inner barrier layer (high resistance) mainly responsible for the alloys corrosion resistance. The resistance of passive film present on the metals' surface

  9. Effects of metallurgical factors on stress corrosion cracking of Ni-base alloys in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, T.; Sasaguri, N.; Onimura, K.

    1988-01-01

    Nickel-base Alloy 600 is the principal material used for the steam generator tubes of PWRs. Generally, this alloy has been proven to be satisfactory for this application, however when it is subjected to extremely high stress level in PWR primary water, it may suffer from stress corrosion cracking. The authors have systematically studied the effects of test temperature and such metallurgical factors as cold working, chemical composition and heat treatment on the stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in high temperature water, and also on that of Alloy 690 which is a promising material for the tubes and may provide improved crrosion resistance for steam generators. The test materials, the stress corrosion cracking test and the test results are reported. When the test temperature was raise, the stress corrosion cracking of the nickel-base alloys was accelerated. The time of stress corrosion cracking occurrence decreased with increasing applied stress, and it occurred at the stress level higher than the 0.2 % offset proof stress of Alloy 600. In Alloy 690, stress corrosion cracking was not observed at such stress level. Cold worked Alloy 600 showed higher resistance to stress corrosion cracking than the annealed alloy. (Kako, I.)

  10. Effects of alloy chemistry, cold work, and water chemistry on corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking of nickel alloys and welds.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O. K.; Soppet, W. K.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2001-04-01

    Reactor vessel internal components made of nickel-base alloys are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). A better understanding of the causes and mechanisms of this cracking may permit less conservative estimates of damage accumulation and requirements on inspection intervals. The objective of this work is to evaluate and compare the resistance of Alloys 600 and 690 and their welds, such as Alloys 82, 182, 52, and 152, to EAC in simulated light water reactor environments. The existing crack growth rate (CGR) data for these alloys under cyclic and constant loads have been evaluated to establish the effects of alloy chemistry, cold work, and water chemistry. The experimental fatigue CGRs are compared with CGRs that would be expected in air under the same mechanical loading conditions to obtain a qualitative understanding of the degree and range of conditions for significant environmental enhancement in growth rates. The existing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) data on Alloys 600 and 690 and Alloy 82, 182, and 52 welds have been compiled and analyzed to determine the influence of key parameters on growth rates in simulated PWR and BWR environments. The SCC data for these alloys have been evaluated with correlations developed by Scott and by Ford and Andresen.

  11. In vitro and in vivo corrosion measurements of Mg-6Zn alloys in the bile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yigang; Yan, Jun; Wang, Zhigang; Yu, Song; Wang, Xiaohu; Yuan, Ziming; Zhang, Xiaonong; Zhao, Changli; Zheng, Qi

    2014-09-01

    Mg-6Zn alloy was studied as candidate biodegradable metallic implants for the common bile duct (CBD) in terms of its in vitro corrosion and in vivo corrosion. Electrochemical measurements, immersion tests and hydrogen evolution were performed in the bile and Hanks' solution to evaluate the in vitro degradation behavior of Mg-6Zn alloy. The results showed that the degradation rate and hydrogen evolution were higher when Mg-6Zn alloy immersed in the bile than in the Hanks' solution. The polarization resistance of the samples in the Hanks' solution was about 1.5 times to that in the bile. In the in vivo experiment, Mg-6Zn alloy stents were inserted in CBD of 42 rabbits, and CT scans, the value of total bilirubin (TB) and in vivo corrosion rate were determined. From the results of CT images and the fluctuations of TB values, it can be seen that the stent was degraded gradually in CBD. After 1 week post-implantation, the majority of the Mg-6Zn alloy sample remained in the CBD. Usually the required support time for CBD stent was approximately 7-10 days, thus the Mg-6Zn alloy stent was very close to the clinical requirement for CBD support materials. After three weeks, the residual weight of the Mg-6Zn alloy was only 9% of the original weight. The in vivo corrosion rate of Mg-6Zn alloy was ~0.107 mm·year(-1), which was much lower than that calculated in vitro (~0.72 mm·year(-1) by electrochemical test). Based on our research, there is promising for the Mg-6Zn alloy in CBD applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Accelerated Stress Corrosion Crack Initiation of Alloys 600 and 690 in Hydrogenated Supercritical Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Tyler; Was, Gary S.

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether stress corrosion crack initiation of Alloys 600 and 690 occurs by the same mechanism in subcritical and supercritical water. Tensile bars of Alloys 690 and 600 were strained in constant extension rate tensile experiments in hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water from 593 K to 723 K (320 °C to 450 °C), and the crack initiation behavior was characterized by high-resolution electron microscopy. Intergranular cracking was observed across the entire temperature range, and the morphology, structure, composition, and temperature dependence of initiated cracks in Alloy 690 were consistent between hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water. Crack initiation of Alloy 600 followed an Arrhenius relationship and did not exhibit a discontinuity or change in slope after crossing the critical temperature. The measured activation energy was 121 ± 13 kJ/mol. Stress corrosion crack initiation in Alloy 690 was fit with a single activation energy of 92 ± 12 kJ/mol across the entire temperature range. Cracks were observed to propagate along grain boundaries adjacent to chromium-depleted metal, with Cr2O3 observed ahead of crack tips. All measures of the SCC behavior indicate that the mechanism for stress corrosion crack initiation of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 is consistent between hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water.

  13. Corrosion Behavior and Surface Modification of Mg-Zn Implant Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghayad, I. M.; Maamoun, M. A.; Metwally, W. A.; El-Baradie, Z. M.; Abdel-Azim, A. N.

    2016-10-01

    In this study, Mg-Zn alloys (1-4 wt.% Zn) were fabricated with high-purity raw materials using a clean melting process (fluxless method) and a protective atmosphere of CO2 + 0.4 SF6. The as-cast microstructures of the investigated alloys were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopes, EDS and XRD. Corrosion properties of the prepared alloys were examined in simulated body fluid by electrochemical techniques and immersion test (hydrogen evolution method). Surface modification of the prepared alloys was performed using micro-arc oxidation (MAO) treatment and hydroxyapatite (HA) coating. Microstructure observation revealed that Zn was completely dissolved in the α-Mg matrix up to 2 wt.%. Higher Zn content led to a reduction in the grain size and the development of a second phase (MgZn2). Corrosion testing results revealed that Mg-1,2,3 wt.% Zn have almost the same degradation rate, whereas Mg-4Zn has the highest degradation rate. HA coating on MAO-treated magnesium alloys formed a dense and compact layer on the alloy surface, which had largely improved surface properties and enhanced corrosion resistance of the prepared alloys.

  14. Corrosion Behavior of Arc Weld and Friction Stir Weld in Al 6061-T6 Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Byoung Hyun; Kim, Heung Ju; Chang, Woong Seong; Kweon, Young Gak

    2006-01-01

    For the evaluation of corrosion resistance of Al 6061-T6 Alloy, Tafel method and immersion test was performed with Friction Stir Weld(FSW) and Gas Metal Arc Weld(GMAW). The Tafel and immersion test results indicated that GMA weld was severely attacked compared with those of friction stir weld. It may be mainly due to the galvanic corrosion mechanism act on the GMA weld

  15. The evaluation of corrosion inhibitors for application to copper and copper alloy archaeological artefacts

    OpenAIRE

    Faltermeier, R.

    1995-01-01

    This thesis concerns corrosion inhibiting compounds which slow the deterioration of archaeological copper artefacts. Benzotriazole (BTA) and 2-Amino- 5-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole (AMT) have been applied as corrosion inhibitors in archaeological conservation. A search was conducted for similar compounds that could be applied in the conservation of copper and copper alloys. According to a list of requirements specific to archaeological conservation, six new inhibitors were tes...

  16. Corrosion behaviour of AISI 316L stainless-steel alloys in diabetic serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura e Silva, T; Monteiro, J M; Ferreira, M G; Vieira, J M

    1993-01-01

    The present study investigates the pitting-corrosion behaviour of AISI 316L stainless steel in human physiological fluids. The emphasis is on the effect of diabetic serum with glucose and proteins, but reference solutions of isotonic saline solution with and without antibiotics were also used. Polarization experiments were carried out, and the results point to the innocuity of those fluids on the performance of the alloy as far as pitting corrosion is concerned.

  17. The Role of Stress in the Corrosion Cracking of Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    aluminium alloy in sodium chloride solution," Journal of Corrosion Science, vol. 65, pp. 387-396, 2012. [26] X. F. Liu et al. "The influence of tensile...circular pits around cathodic intermetallic particles, as listed in Table 1, a process generally referred to as “pitting.” When the chloride ions...grain boundaries acts as a catalyst prompting crack growth and subsequent intergranular corrosion cracking through anodic dissolution [4]. As chloride

  18. EFFECT OF THE HEAT AND SURFACE LASER TREATMENT ON THE CORROSION DEGRADATION OF THE Mg-Al ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leszek A. Dobrzański

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper there is presented the corrosion behavior of the cast magnesium alloys as cast state, after heat and laser treatment. Pitting corrosion resistance of the analyzed alloys was carried out using the potentiodynamic electrochemical method (direct current, based on a anodic polarization curve. On the basis of the achieved anodic polarization curves, using the Tefel extrapolation method near to the corrosion potential, the quantitative data were determined, which describe the electrochemical corrosion process of the investigated alloys: value of the corrosion potential Ecorr (mV, polarization resistance RP (kohm.cm2, corrosion current density icorr (10-6A/cm2, corrosion rate Vcorr (mm/year as well the mass loss Vc (g/m2<.

  19. High temperature corrosion performance of FeAl intermetallic alloys in molten salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaya, M.; Espinosa-Medina, M.A.; Porcayo-Calderon, J.; Martinez, L.; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, J.G

    2003-05-25

    The corrosion performance of FeAl base intermetallic alloys fabricated by spray-atomization and deposition during their immersion in molten sodium metavanadate (NaVO{sub 3}), 80% (wt.%) sodium pentoxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) +20% sodium sulfate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) and pure Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in the temperature range of 600-1000 deg. C during 200 h was investigated. The experiments were realized by the weight loss method in the intermetallic alloys of composition FeAl40(at.%), FeAl40+0.1B and FeAl40+0.1B+10Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. In all cases, the FeAl40+0.1B+10Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} alloy showed the best corrosion resistance in the temperatures interval studied here. This behavior was discussed in terms of the formation of a protective Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer and its dissolution by vanadate phases and internal sulfidation in the case of experiments carried out in pure Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The morphology of the external layers and the corrosion products formed during the tests revealed that the corrosion rate of this type alloy depends on the corrosion compounds that are formed and the development of protective alumina scales.

  20. Corrosion behaviour of 6063 aluminium alloy in acidic and in alkaline media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhu Deepa

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour of 6063 aluminium alloy was investigated in different concentrations of phosphoric acid medium and sodium hydroxide medium at different temperatures. The study was done by electrochemical method, using Tafel polarization technique and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS technique. The surface morphology was investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM with Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX. The results showed that the 6063 aluminium alloy undergoes severe corrosion in sodium hydroxide medium than in phosphoric acid medium. The corrosion rate of 6063 aluminium alloy increased with an increase in the concentration of acid as well as with alkali. The corrosion rate was increased with an increase in temperature. The kinetic parameters and thermodynamic parameters were calculated using Arrhenius theory and transition state theory. Suitable mechanism was proposed for the corrosion of 6063 aluminium alloy in phosphoric acid medium and sodium hydroxide medium. The results obtained by Tafel polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS techniques were in good agreement with each other.

  1. The Enhancement of Mg Corrosion Resistance by Alloying Mn and Laser-Melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youwen Yang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mg has been considered a promising biomaterial for bone implants. However, the poor corrosion resistance has become its main undesirable property. In this study, both alloying Mn and laser-melting were applied to enhance the Mg corrosion resistance. The corrosion resistance, mechanical properties, and microstructure of rapid laser-melted Mg-xMn (x = 0–3 wt % alloys were investigated. The alloys were composed of dendrite grains, and the grains size decreased with increasing Mn. Moreover, Mn could dissolve and induce the crystal lattice distortion of the Mg matrix during the solidification process. Mn ranging from 0–2 wt % dissolved completely due to rapid laser solidification. As Mn contents further increased up to 3 wt %, a small amount of Mn was left undissolved. The compressive strength of Mg-Mn alloys increased first (up to 2 wt % and then decreased with increasing Mn, while the hardness increased continuously. The refinement of grains and the increase in corrosion potential both made contributions to the enhancement of Mg corrosion resistance.

  2. Corrosion behavior of metals and alloys in marine-industrial environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariappan Natesan, Subbiah Selvaraj, Tharmakkannu Manickam and Gopalachari Venkatachari

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with atmospheric corrosion to assess the degrading effects of air pollutants on ferrous and non-ferrous metals and alloys, which are mostly used as engineering materials. An exposure study was conducted in the Tuticorin port area located on the east coast of South India, in the Gulf of Mannar with Sri Lanka to the southeast. Common engineering materials, namely mild steel, galvanized iron, Zn, Al, Cu and Cu–Zn alloys (Cu–27Zn, Cu–30Zn and Cu–37Zn, were used in the investigation. The site was chosen where the metals are exposed to marine and industrial atmospheres. Seasonal 1 to 12 month corrosion losses of these metals and alloys were determined by a weight loss method. The weight losses showed strong corrosion of mild steel, galvanized iron, Cu and Zn and minor effect on Al and Cu–Zn alloys. Linear regression analysis was conducted to study the mechanism of corrosion. The composition of corrosion products formed on the metal surfaces was identified by x-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  3. Corrosion behavior of metals and alloys in marine-industrial environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natesan, Mariappan; Selvaraj, Subbiah; Manickam, Tharmakkannu; Venkatachari, Gopalachari

    2008-12-01

    This work deals with atmospheric corrosion to assess the degrading effects of air pollutants on ferrous and non-ferrous metals and alloys, which are mostly used as engineering materials. An exposure study was conducted in the Tuticorin port area located on the east coast of South India, in the Gulf of Mannar with Sri Lanka to the southeast. Common engineering materials, namely mild steel, galvanized iron, Zn, Al, Cu and Cu-Zn alloys (Cu-27Zn, Cu-30Zn and Cu-37Zn), were used in the investigation. The site was chosen where the metals are exposed to marine and industrial atmospheres. Seasonal 1 to 12 month corrosion losses of these metals and alloys were determined by a weight loss method. The weight losses showed strong corrosion of mild steel, galvanized iron, Cu and Zn and minor effect on Al and Cu-Zn alloys. Linear regression analysis was conducted to study the mechanism of corrosion. The composition of corrosion products formed on the metal surfaces was identified by x-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  4. New metallurgical feasibilities in improvement of steel and alloy corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khasin, G.A.; Pokrovskij, A.B.; Krylov, S.M.; Leonovich, B.I.; Tomilov, V.I.

    1981-01-01

    New methods of the improvement of steel and alloy corrosion resistance are described. Some versions of technology of especially corrosion resistant steels melting in arc furnace with low carbon content are developed. One of such methods provides the complete decarburization of iron-nickel melt by oxygen-air mixture, the transition to the reduction period without the skimming of oxidation slag, ferrochromium melting at the expense of excess heat and the final reduction and refining of metal by inert gas blowing in the ladle. The 03Kh18N11, 03Kh18N12, 03Kh21N21M4GB, 03Kh17N14M3 and other steels are melted using this technology. Lately the melting technology of corrosion resistant and other alloyed steels and alloys with program thermo-time treatment of melts in arc and open induction furnaces is introduced. The method of phase equilibria calculation, which permits to estimate qualitatively and quantitatively the phases, formed in liquid metal during its solidification, and in solid metal, depending on temperature and composition of metal, is developed. Using the casting method, the production of corrosion resistant compositions with titanium carbides, is realized. Heat treatment and deformation methods of corrosion resistant steels and alloys are also discussed [ru

  5. The effect of PVD coatings on the corrosion behaviour of AZ91 magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altun, Hikmet; Sen, Sadri

    2006-01-01

    In this study, multilayered AlN (AlN + AlN + AlN) and AlN + TiN were coated on AZ91 magnesium alloy using physical vapour deposition (PVD) technique of DC magnetron sputtering, and the influence of the coatings on the corrosion behaviour of the AZ91 alloy was examined. A PVD system for coating processes, a potentiostat for electrochemical corrosion tests, X-ray difractometer for compositional analysis of the coatings, and scanning electron microscopy for surface examinations were used. It was determined that PVD coatings deposited on AZ91 magnesium alloy increased the corrosion resistance of the alloy, and AlN + AlN + AlN coating increased the corrosion resistance much more than AlN + TiN coating. However, it was observed that, in the coating layers, small structural defects e.g., pores, pinholes, cracks that could arise from the coating process or substrate and get the ability of protection from corrosion worsened were present

  6. Preparation of bimodal grain size 7075 aviation aluminum alloys and their corrosion properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenming TIAN

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The bimodal grain size metals show improved strength and ductility compared to traditional metals; however, their corrosion properties are unknown. In order to evaluate the corrosion properties of these metals, the bimodal grain size 7075 aviation aluminum alloys containing different ratios of coarse (100 μm in diameter and fine (10 μm in diameter grains were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS. The effects of grain size as well as the mixture degree of coarse and fine grains on general corrosion were estimated by immersion tests, electrochemical measurements and complementary techniques such as scanning electron microscope (SEM and transmission electron microscope-energy disperse spectroscopy (TEM-EDS. The results show that, compared to fine grains, the coarse grains have a faster dissolution rate in acidic NaCl solution due to the bigger size, higher alloying elements content and larger area fraction of second phases in them. In coarse grains, the hydrogen ions have a faster reduction rate on cathodic second phases, therefore promoting the corrosion propagation. The mixture of coarse and fine grains also increases the electrochemical heterogeneity of alloys in micro-scale, and thus the increased mixture degree of these grains in metal matrix accelerates the corrosion rate of alloys in acidic NaCl solution.

  7. Microstructure and corrosion behavior of laser processed NiTi alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marattukalam, Jithin J; Singh, Amit Kumar; Datta, Susmit; Das, Mitun; Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Bontha, Srikanth; Kalpathy, Sreeram K

    2015-12-01

    Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™), a commercially available additive manufacturing technology, has been used to fabricate dense equiatomic NiTi alloy components. The primary aim of this work is to study the effect of laser power and scan speed on microstructure, phase constituents, hardness and corrosion behavior of laser processed NiTi alloy. The results showed retention of large amount of high-temperature austenite phase at room temperature due to high cooling rates associated with laser processing. The high amount of austenite in these samples increased the hardness. The grain size and corrosion resistance were found to increase with laser power. The surface energy of NiTi alloy, calculated using contact angles, decreased from 61 mN/m to 56 mN/m with increase in laser energy density from 20 J/mm(2) to 80 J/mm(2). The decrease in surface energy shifted the corrosion potentials to nobler direction and decreased the corrosion current. Under present experimental conditions the laser power found to have strong influence on microstructure, phase constituents and corrosion resistance of NiTi alloy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The thermodynamics of latent fingerprint corrosion of metal elements and alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, John W

    2008-11-01

    Redox reactions taking place between the surface of a metal and fingerprint residue have been expressed thermodynamically in terms of both the Nernst equation for reduction potential and the complexation constant for the formation of complex metal halide ions in aqueous solution. These expressions are used to explain experimental results for the corrosion of 10 different metal elements by fingerprint residue in air at room temperature. Corrosion of noble metals, such as silver and gold, supports the proposition that the degree of metal corrosion is enhanced by the presence of chloride ions in eccrine sweat. Extending the experiments to include 10 metal alloys enabled the construction of a fingerprint corrosion series for 20 different metals. Fingerprint corrosion on metals alloyed with > approximately 40% copper was found to display third level fingerprint detail. A comparison of both conventional ink on paper and digital (Livescan) fingerprinting techniques with fingerprints deposited on 9 Karat gold alloy has shown that gold alloy depositions are least susceptible to third level detail obliteration by poor fingerprint capturing techniques.

  9. Evaluation of the corrosion behavior of the al-356 alloy in NaCl solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Vásquez Rendón

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular metals are a new class of materials with promising applications and a unique combination of physical, chemical and mechanical properties. The Al-356 alloy is used to manufacture metal foams from NaCl preforms. Despite the usefulness of these materials, their performance may be affected by corrosion due to residual salt. This paper reports the study of the behavior of the Al-356 alloy in chloride solutions by electrochemical techniques in rotating disk electrode. The cathodic reaction of oxygen reduction is the crucial stage of process dissolution of the material, which shows that is the oxygen transport which limits the corrosion process.

  10. A survey on the corrosion susceptibility of Alloy 800 CANDU steam generator tubing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Y.C.; Dupuis, M.; Burns, D.

    2008-01-01

    To provide support for a proactive steam generator (SG) aging management strategy, a survey on the corrosion susceptibility of the archived Alloy 800 tubing from CANDU SGs under plausible crevice chemistry conditions was conducted to assess the potential material degradation issues in CANDU SGs. Archived Alloy 800 samples were collected from four CANDU utilities. High-temperature electrochemical analysis was carried out to assess the corrosion susceptibility of the archived SG tubing under simulated CANDU crevice chemistry conditions at both 150 o C and 300 o C. The potentiodynamic polarization results obtained from the archived CANDU SG tubes were compared to the data from ex-service tubes removed from Darlington Nuclear Generating Station (DNGS) SGs and a reference nuclear grade Alloy 800 tubing. It was found that the removed Darlington SG tubes, with signs of in-service degradation, were more susceptible to pitting corrosion than the reference nuclear grade Alloy 800 tubing. At 150 o C, under the same neutral crevice chemistry conditions, the potentiodynamic polarization curve of the ex-service Darlington SG tubing has an active peak, which is a sign of propensity to crevice/underdeposit corrosion. This active peak was not observed in any of the potentiodynamic polarization curves of all archived Alloy 800 CANDU SG tubing indicating that archived CANDU SG tubes are less susceptible to the underdeposit corrosion under SG startup conditions. The corrosion behaviour of the archived Alloy 800 tubes from CANDU SG was similar to that of the reference nuclear grade Alloy 800 tubing. The results of this survey suggest that the Alloy 800 tubing materials used in the existing CANDU utilities (other than ex-service DNGS tubing) will continue to have reliable performance under specified CANDU operating conditions. Ex-service SG tubing from DNGS, although showing lower than average corrosion resistance, still has a wide acceptable operating margin and the in

  11. Effect of Heat Treatment on Corrosion Behaviors of Mg-5Y-1.5Nd Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiumin Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion behavior of Mg-5Y-1.5Nd alloy was investigated after heat treatment. The microstructure and precipitation were studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS. The weight loss rates of different samples were arranged as T6-24 h>T6-6 h>T6-14 h>as-cast>T4. The open circuit potential (OCP showed that T4 sample had a more positive potential than that of other samples. The potentiodynamic polarization curves showed that the T6-24 h sample had the highest corrosion current density of 245.362 μA·cm−2, whereas the T4 sample had the lowest at 52.164 μA·cm−2. The EIS results confirmed that the heat treatment reduced the corrosion resistance for Mg-5Y-1.5Nd alloy, because the precipitations acted as the cathode of electrochemical reactions to accelerate the corrosion process. The corrosion rates of different samples were mainly determined by the amount and distribution of the precipitations. The precipitations played dual roles that depended on the amount and distribution. The presence of the phase in the alloys could deteriorate the corrosion performance as it could act as an effective galvanic cathode. Otherwise, a fine and homogeneous phase appeared to be a better anticorrosion barrier.

  12. The Effect of Adding Corrosion Inhibitors into an Electroless Nickel Plating Bath for Magnesium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rong; Su, Yongyao; Liu, Hongdong; Cheng, Jiang; Yang, Xin; Shao, Zhongcai

    2016-10-01

    In this work, corrosion inhibitors were added into an electroless nickel plating bath to realize nickel-phosphorus (Ni-P) coating deposition on magnesium alloy directly. The performance of five corrosion inhibitors was evaluated by inhibition efficiency. The results showed that only ammonium hydrogen fluoride (NH4HF2) and ammonium molybdate ((NH4)2MoO4) could be used as corrosion inhibitors for magnesium alloy in the bath. Moreover, compounding NH4HF2 and (NH4)2MoO4, the optimal concentrations were both at 1.5 ~ 2%. The deposition process of Ni-P coating was observed by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). It showed corrosion inhibitors inhibited undesired dissolution of magnesium substrate during the electroless plating process. In addition, SEM observation indicated that the corrosion inhibition reaction and the Ni2+ replacement reaction were competitive at the initial deposition time. Both electrochemical analysis and thermal shock test revealed that the Ni-P coating exhibited excellent corrosion resistance and adhesion properties in protecting the magnesium alloy.

  13. Corrosion of magnesium and magnesium–calcium alloy in biologically-simulated environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Harrison

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A study of biocompatibility and corrosion of both metallic magnesium (Mg and a magnesium alloy containing 1% calcium (Mg–Ca were investigated in in vitro culture conditions with and without the presence of bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs. Chemical analysis of the degraded samples was performed using XRD and FEGSEM. The results from the XRD analysis strongly suggested that crystalline phase of magnesium carbonate was present on the surface of both the Mg and Mg–Ca samples. Flame absorption spectrometry was used to analyse the release of magnesium and calcium ions into the cell culture medium. Magnesium concentration was kept consistently at a level ranging from 40 to 80 mM for both Mg and Mg–Ca samples. No cell growth was observed when in direct contact with the metals apart from a few cells observed at the bottom of culture plate containing Mg–Ca alloy. In general, in vitro study of corrosion of Mg–Ca in a biologically-simulated environment using cell culture medium with the presence of hMSCs demonstrated close resemblances to in vivo corrosion. Although in vitro corrosion of Mg–Ca revealed slow corrosion rate and no immediate cytotoxicity effects to hMSCs, its corrosion rate was still too high to achieve normal stem cell growth when cells and alloys were cultured in vitro in direct contact.

  14. Effects of Ca on microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties and biocompatibility of Mg-Zn-Ca alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ping; Li, Nian Feng; Lei, Ting; Liu, Lin; Ouyang, Chun

    2013-06-01

    Zn and Ca were selected as alloying elements to develop an Mg-Zn-Ca alloy system for biomedical application due to their good biocompatibility. The effects of Ca on the microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties as well as the biocompatibility of the as-cast Mg-Zn-Ca alloys were studied. Results indicate that the microstructure of Mg-Zn-Ca alloys typically consists of primary α-Mg matrix and Ca₂Mg₆Zn₃/Mg₂Ca intermetallic phase mainly distributed along grain boundary. The yield strength of Mg-Zn-Ca alloy increased slightly with the increase of Ca content, whilst its tensile strength increased at first and then decreased. Corrosion tests in the simulated body fluid revealed that the addition of Ca is detrimental to corrosion resistance due to the micro-galvanic corrosion acceleration. In vitro hemolysis and cytotoxicity assessment disclose that Mg-5Zn-1.0Ca alloy has suitable biocompatibility.

  15. Structure and corrosion resistance of Co-Cr-Mo alloy used in Birmingham Hip Resurfacing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobruchowska, Ewa; Paziewska, Monika; Przybyl, Krzysztof; Reszka, Kazimierz

    2017-01-01

    The endoprostheses made of cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (Co-Cr-Mo) alloys belong to the group of the most popular metallic implants used for reconstruction of hip joints. For such biomaterials, the primary goal is a correct and long-term functioning in the aggressive environment of body fluids. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine both the morphology and the corrosion resistance of implants made of the cobalt alloy used in Birmingham Hip Resurfacing (BHR) system (Smith & Nephew). For comparative purposes, the electrochemical studies were done for the nitrided stainless steel - Orthinox. Observations of the microstructure of the material under investigation were performed by means of the optical metallographic microscope and the scanning electron microscope. Furthermore, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy was used to analyse the chemical composition of the endoprosthesis. Characterisation and evaluation of electrochemical corrosion resistance of the selected alloys were performed by potentiodynamic polarisation tests. The structural studies confirmed that Co-Cr-Mo (BHR system) is characterised by a typical dendritic microstructure with carbide precipitates, mainly M23C6, within the interdendritic areas. The results of the polarisation measurements showed that the cobalt alloy investigated exhibits lower corrosion potential than Orthinox in the utilised environments (3% NaCl, simulated body fluid - Hank's Body Fluid). However, the high passivation ability of the Co-Cr-Mo alloy, as well as its resistance to the initiation and propagation of localised corrosion processes, indicate that this material is significantly more appropriate for long-term implants.

  16. Corrosion mechanism of model zinc-magnesium alloys in atmospheric conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosek, T.; Nazarov, A.; Bexell, U.; Thierry, D.; Serak, J.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, superior corrosion properties of zinc coatings alloyed with magnesium have been reported. Corrosion behaviour of model zinc-magnesium alloys was studied to understand better the protective mechanism of magnesium in zinc. Alloys containing from 1 to 32 wt.% magnesium, pure zinc, and pure magnesium were contaminated with sodium chloride and exposed to humid air for 28 days. Composition of corrosion products was analyzed using infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), ion chromatography (IC), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The exposure tests were completed with scanning Kelvin probe (SKP) and electrochemical measurements. Weight loss of ZnMg alloys with 1-16 wt.% magnesium was lower than that of pure zinc. Up to 10-fold drop in weight loss was found for materials with 4-8 wt.% Mg in the structure. The improved corrosion stability of ZnMg alloys was connected to the presence of an Mg-based film adjacent to the metal surface. It ensured stable passivity in chloride environment and limited the efficiency of oxygen reduction

  17. KCl-induced high temperature corrosion of selected commercial alloys. Part I: chromia-formers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiamehr, Saeed; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Montgomery, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory testing of selected chromia-forming alloys was performed to rank the materials and gain further knowledge on the mechanism of KCl-induced high temperature corrosion. The investigated alloys were stainless steels EN1.4021, EN1.4057, EN1.4521, TP347H (coarse-grained), TP347HFG (fine......-grained), Sanicro 28 and the nickel-based alloys 625, 263 and C276. Exposure was performed at 600 °C for 168 h in flowing N2(g)+5%O2(g)+15% H2O(g) (vol.%). Samples were covered with KCl powder prior to exposure. A salt-free exposure was also performed for comparison. Corrosion morphology and products were studied....... In the presence of solid KCl, all the alloys showed significant corrosion. Measurement of corrosion extent indicated that alloys EN1.4057, Sanicro 28 and 625 show a better performance compared to the industrial state of the art material TP347HFG under laboratory conditions. An additional test was performed...

  18. Investigation of processing effects on the corrosion resistance of Ti20Mo alloy in saline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolat, G.; Izquierdo, J.; Gloriant, T.; Chelariu, R.; Mareci, D.; Souto, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Alloy fabrication method affects both surface finish and corrosion resistance. • More porous surface finish and higher wettability produced by powder sintering. • Passive layer formed on sintered alloy breaks down in saline solution. • Increase in surface porosity facilitated electron transfer through the oxide film. • More corrosion resistant alloy produced by cold crucible levitation melting. - Abstract: The electrochemical properties of Ti20Mo alloys prepared using different fabrication procedures, namely cold crucible levitation melting (CCLM) and powder sintering, were investigated using linear potentiodynamic polarization and EIS measurements. The surface condition was established using AFM, with the observation of a more porous surface finish in the case of powder sintering. A major effect of surface conditioning on the corrosion resistance of Ti20Mo alloys was observed, where the compact finish exhibits a superior corrosion resistance in chloride-containing saline solutions. Less insulating surfaces towards electron exchange resulted for the more porous finish as revealed by scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM)

  19. Corrosion and nanomechanical behaviors of plasma electrolytic oxidation coated AA7020-T6 aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venugopal, A., E-mail: arjun_venu@hotmail.com [Materials and Metallurgy Group, Materials and Mechanical Entity, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Thiruvananthapuram (India); Srinath, J. [Materials and Metallurgy Group, Materials and Mechanical Entity, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Thiruvananthapuram (India); Rama Krishna, L. [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur P.O., Hyderabad 500005 (India); Ramesh Narayanan, P.; Sharma, S.C.; Venkitakrishnan, P.V. [Materials and Metallurgy Group, Materials and Mechanical Entity, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Thiruvananthapuram (India)

    2016-04-13

    Alumina coating was deposited on AA7020 aluminum alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) method. The corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and nano-mechanical behaviors were examined by means of potentiodynamic polarization, slow strain rate test (SSRT) and nano-indentation tests. Potentiodynamic polarization (PP) was used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of the coating and slow strain rate test (SSRT) was used for evaluating the environmental cracking resistance in 3.5% NaCl solution. The mechanical properties (hardness and elastic modulus) were obtained from each indentation as a function of the penetration depth across the coating cross section. The above results were compared with similar PEO coated aluminum and magnesium alloys. Results indicated that PEO coating on AA7020 alloy significantly improved the corrosion resistance. However the environmental cracking resistance was found to be only marginal. The hardness and elastic modulus values were found to be much higher when compared to the base metal and similar PEO coated 7075 aluminum alloys. The fabricated coating also exhibited good adhesive strength with the substrate similar to other PEO coated aluminum alloys reported in the literature.

  20. Relaxation and corrosion resistance of alloy 800 used for steam generator tubes of ship borne boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrieu, J.M.; Cortial, F.; Maillard, J.L.; Vernot-Loier, C.; Lebeau, M.

    1994-01-01

    The INCO ''INCOLOY 800'' trademark groups the Fe-Cr-Ni alloys containing 30 to 35% nickel, 19 to 23% chromium, 0,15 to 0,60% aluminium, 0,15 to 0,60% titanium and less than 0,10% carbon contents, used as construction materials for condenser and heat exchanger tubes. In parallel with water chemistry control and studies aimed at reducing the residual stresses resulting from tube expansion, studies have been conducted to a better understanding of this alloy, its metallurgy and its corrosion behaviour under accurately defined fabrication and heat treatment conditions. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a behaviour study of INDRET alloy 800 concerning isothermal relaxation and effects of the said relaxation heat treatments on alloy microstructure studied with a transmission electron-chemical method to determine the sensitiveness to intergranular corrosion, and by electrochemistry in pressurized hot water. (authors). 4 figs., 5 tabs., 7 refs

  1. Influence of mictrostructure features on the corrosion behaviourof AZ91 alloy in chloride media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Bukovinová

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the microstructure of as-cast AZ91 magnesium alloy, which applied to solution annealing treatment and ageing treatment respectively, was evaluated in terms of its corrosion behaviour in 0.1 M NaCl solution at room temperature. The corrosion process was monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS and the surface was characterized by scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM. The extent of corrosion damage was dependent on the microstructure. Surface potential maps indicated that, the surface potential of α-matrix is more positive than surface potential of β phase.

  2. Pitting corrosion of friction stir welded aluminum alloy thick plate in alkaline chloride solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Weifeng; Liu Jinhe; Zhu Hongqiang

    2010-01-01

    The pitting corrosion of different positions (Top, Middle and Bottom) of weld nugget zone (WNZ) along thickness plate in friction stir welded 2219-O aluminum alloy in alkaline chloride solution was investigated by using open circuit potential, cyclic polarization, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscope. The results indicate that the material presents significant passivation, the top has highest corrosion potential, pitting potential and re-passivation potential compared with the bottom and base material. With the increase of traverse speed from 60 to 100 mm/min or rotary speed from 500 to 600 rpm, the corrosion resistance decreases.

  3. Corrosion-fatigue lifetime of Aluminium–Copper–Lithium alloy 2050 in chloride solution

    OpenAIRE

    Guérin , Mathilde; Alexis , Joël; Andrieu , Eric; Blanc , Christine; Odemer , Grégory

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The fatigue behaviour of Aluminium–Copper–Lithium 2050 alloy under two metallurgical states (T34 and T84) was studied in air for healthy and pre-corroded samples in a 0.7 NaCl solution. The results were compared to those obtained during fatigue–corrosion tests performed in a similar chloride medium. Preliminary corrosion tests demonstrated that the T34 metallurgical state was susceptible to intergranular corrosion, while the T84 metallurgical state was susceptible to i...

  4. Steam based conversion coating on AA6060 alloy: Effect of sodium silicate chemistry and corrosion performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Bordo, Kirill; Tabrizian, Naja; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2017-11-01

    Surface treatment of aluminium alloy AA6060 using an industrially applicable pilot steam jet system with and without silicate chemistry has been investigated. Treatment using steam alone and steam with silicate, resulted in an oxide layer formation with thickness ∼425 nm and ∼160 nm, respectively. Moreover, the use of sodium silicate resulted in the formation of distinct microstructure and incorporation of silicate into the oxide film. These oxide films reduced the anodic activity 4 times, while the corrosion protection by silicate containing oxide was the function of its concentration. Further, in acid salt spray and filiform corrosion tests, oxide layer containing silicate exhibited two times higher corrosion resistance.

  5. A systematic multiscale modeling and experimental approach to protect grain boundaries in magnesium alloys from corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horstemeyer, Mark R. [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States); Chaudhuri, Santanu [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2015-09-30

    A multiscale modeling Internal State Variable (ISV) constitutive model was developed that captures the fundamental structure-property relationships. The macroscale ISV model used lower length scale simulations (Butler-Volmer and Electronics Structures results) in order to inform the ISVs at the macroscale. The chemomechanical ISV model was calibrated and validated from experiments with magnesium (Mg) alloys that were investigated under corrosive environments coupled with experimental electrochemical studies. Because the ISV chemomechanical model is physically based, it can be used for other material systems to predict corrosion behavior. As such, others can use the chemomechanical model for analyzing corrosion effects on their designs.

  6. Adhesion and corrosion studies of a lithium based conversion coating film on the 2024 aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, M.R.S.; Nogueira, J.C.; Thim, G.P.; Oliveira, M.A.S.

    2004-01-01

    AA2024-T3-aluminum alloy surfaces were coated using non-chromate and chromate conversion coatings. All coatings were painted with the 10P4-2-primer epoxy resin. Independent on the film formation process, films passed on the substrate/conversion coating wet tape adhesion test. However, only the chromate conversion coating passed on the conversion coating/primer epoxy resin adhesion test. Electrochemical corrosion measurements showed that non-chromate conversion coated surfaces present lower corrosion current density, bigger polarization resistance and less negative corrosion potential than chromate conversion coated surfaces

  7. Microstructure and Salt Fog Corrosion Behavior of AA2219 Friction-Stir-Welded Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasa Rao, G.; Subba Rao, V. V.; Rao, S. R. K.

    2017-07-01

    Plates (8.1-mm-thick) from aluminum alloy AA2219-T87 are studied after friction stir welding. The plates are subjected to salt fog corrosion tests according to ASTM B117 at different pH values and different spraying times. The regions affected by corrosion are studied in different zones of welded joints by the methods of optical and transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion resistance is determined in acid, basic and neutral solutions. The resistances of the base metal and of the zones of welded joints are compared.

  8. The deterministic prediction of localised corrosion damage to alloy C-22 HLNW canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, Digby D.; Engelhardt, G.; Jayaweera, P.; Priyantha, N.; Davydov, A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarises DOE-funded research programmes currently underway by researchers at SRI International, Penn State University, OLI Systems, and the Frumkin Institute of Electrochemistry (Moscow, Russia) that are aimed at exploring the corrosion behaviour of Alloy C-22 as the canister material for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLNW) in Yucca Mountain-type repositories. The ultimate objective of these programmes is to develop deterministic models for predicting the accumulation of damage due to general corrosion and localised corrosion over the specified evolutionary path of the repository. Additionally, the programme seeks to measure important electrochemical parameters and diagnostic functions under conditions (steady-state) that are in good confluence with the theories and models used in the predictions. The present paper deals with the prediction of accumulated localised corrosion damage in the form of pitting; the prediction of general corrosion damage is dealt elsewhere in the Volume. (authors)

  9. Corrosion Inhibition Study of Al-Cu-Ni Alloy in Simulated Sea-Water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study on the inhibition of Al-Cu-Ni alloy in simulated sea-water environment was investigated using Sodium Chromate as inhibitor. The inhibitor concentration was varied as control, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 Molar. Al-Cu-Ni alloy was sand cast into cylindrical bars of 20 mm x 300 mm dimension. The corrosion of the ...

  10. Stress Corrosion Cracking Sensitivity of High Purity Fe-Cr Alloys in High Temperature Water

    OpenAIRE

    Takaku, H.; Kato, S.; Tani, J.; Abiko, K.

    1995-01-01

    Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) sensitivities of high purity Fe-Cr alloys were investigated in simulated Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and primary Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) cooling waters, by constant extension rate tests (CERT) at a strain rate of 4x10-7s-1. No high purity Fe-Cr alloy showed any SCC sensitivity in either simulated BWR and PWR primary water environment.

  11. Bio-corrosion characterization of Mg-Zn-X (X = Ca, Mn, Si) alloys for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosalbino, F; De Negri, S; Saccone, A; Angelini, E; Delfino, S

    2010-04-01

    The successful applications of magnesium-based alloys as biodegradable orthopedic implants are mainly inhibited due to their high degradation rates in physiological environment. This study examines the bio-corrosion behaviour of Mg-2Zn-0.2X (X = Ca, Mn, Si) alloys in Ringer's physiological solution that simulates bodily fluids, and compares it with that of AZ91 magnesium alloy. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results showed a better corrosion behaviour of AZ91 alloy with respect to Mg-2Zn-0.2Ca and Mg-2Zn-0.2Si alloys. On the contrary, enhanced corrosion resistance was observed for Mg-2Zn-0.2Mn alloy compared to the AZ91 one: Mg-2Zn-0.2Mn alloy exhibited a four-fold increase in the polarization resistance than AZ91 alloy after 168 h exposure to the Ringer's physiological solution. The improved corrosion behaviour of the Mg-2Zn-0.2Mn alloy with respect to the AZ91 one can be ascribed to enhanced protective properties of the Mg(OH)(2) surface layer. The present study suggests the Mg-2Zn-0.2Mn alloy as a promising candidate for its applications in degradable orthopedic implants, and is worthwhile to further investigate the in vivo corrosion behaviour as well as assessed the mechanical properties of this alloy.

  12. Effect of calcium on the microstructure and corrosion behavior of microarc oxidized Mg-xCa alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yaokun; Chen, Chuanzhong; Feng, Rui; Cui, Hongwei; Gong, Benkui; Zheng, Tingting; Ji, Yarou

    2018-01-16

    Magnesium alloys are potential biodegradable implants for biomedical applications, and calcium (Ca) is one kind of ideal element being examined for magnesium alloys and biodegradable ceramic coatings owing to its biocompatibility and mechanical suitability. In this study, microarc oxidation (MAO) coatings were prepared on Mg-xCa alloys to study the effect of Ca on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of Mg-xCa alloys and their surface MAO coatings. The electrochemical corrosion behavior was investigated using an electrochemical workstation, and the degradability and bioactivity were evaluated by soaking tests in simulated body fluid (SBF) solutions. The corrosion products were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffractometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. The effects of Ca on the alloy phase composition, microstructure, MAO coating formation mechanism, and corrosion behavior were investigated. Results showed that the Mg-0.82Ca alloy and MAO-coated Mg-0.82Ca exhibited the highest corrosion resistance. The number and distribution of Mg 2 Ca phases can be controlled by adjusting the Ca content in the Mg-xCa alloys. The proper amount of Ca in magnesium alloy was about 0.5-0.8 wt. %. The pore size, surface roughness, and corrosion behavior of microarc oxidized Mg-xCa samples can be controlled by the number and distribution of the Mg 2 Ca phase. The corrosion behaviors of microarc oxidized Mg-Ca in SBF solutions were discussed.

  13. Multilayered Zn-Ni alloy coatings for better corrosion protection of mild steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadananda Rashmi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A simple aqueous electrolyte for the deposition of anti-corrosive Zn-Ni alloy coatings was optimized using conventional Hull cell method. The corrosion protection value of the electrodeposited coatings at a current density (c.d. range of 2.0–5.0 A dm−2 has been testified in 5 wt% NaCl solution, as representative corrosion medium. The electrochemical behavior of the coatings towards corrosion was related to its surface topography, elemental composition and phase structure using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS and X-ray diffraction (XRD analyses, respectively. Among the monolithic coatings developed at different c.d.’s, the coating obtained at 3.0 A dm−2 was found to be the best with least corrosion current (icorr value. Further, the corrosion protection efficacy of the monolayer coatings were improved to many folds through multilayer coating approach, by modulating the cyclic cathode current densities (CCCD’s. The composition modulated multilayer (CMM Zn-Ni alloy coating with 60 layers, developed from the combination of CCCD’s 3.0 and 5.0 A dm−2 was found to be the best with 3 fold enhancement in corrosion protection efficiency. The formation of multilayer coatings was confirmed using cross-sectional SEM, and the experimental results are discussed with tables and figures.

  14. [Corrosion property and oxide film of dental casting alloys before and after porcelain firing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qian; Wu, Feng-ming

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate the types and compositions of oxide films formed during porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) firing on three kinds of dental casting alloys, and to investigate the corrosion property of these alloys in Dulbecco's modification of Eagle's medium (DMEM) cell culture fluid, before and after PFM firing. Specimens of three dental casting alloys (Ni-Cr, Co-Cr and Ni-Ti) before and after PFM firing were prepared, and were immersed in DMEM cell culture fluid. After 30 days, the type and concentration of released metal ions were measured using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used for analysis of oxide film on the alloys. One way-ANOVA was adopted in data analysis. The total amount of metal ions released from the three dental alloys was found to be highest in Ni-Cr alloy [(2.829 ± 0.694) mg/L], followed by Co-Cr [(2.120 ± 0.418) mg/L] and Ni-Ti alloy [(1.211 ± 0.101) mg/L]. The amount of Ni ions released from Ni-Cr alloys [(1.531 ± 0.392) mg/L] was higher than that from Ni-Ti alloys [(0.830 ± 0.052) mg/L]. The amount of Cr, Mo ions released from Co-Cr alloy [Cr: (0.048 ± 0.011) mg/L, Mo: (1.562 ± 0.333) mg/L] was higher than that from Ni-Cr alloy [Cr: (0.034 ± 0.002) mg/L, Mo: (1.264 ± 0.302) mg/L] and Ni-Ti alloy [Cr: (0.013 ± 0.006) mg/L, Mo: (0.151 ± 0.026) mg/L] (P metal irons released from the three dental alloys decreased [Ni-Cr: (0.861 ± 0.054) mg/L, Co-Cr: (0.695 ± 0.327) mg/L, Ni-Ti: (0.892 ± 0.115) mg/L] (P alloys after PFM firing. The amount of ions released from Ni-Cr alloy was the highest among the three dental casting alloys, this means Ni-Cr alloy is prone to corrode. The PFM firing process changed the alloys' surface composition. Increased Ni, Cr and Mo were found in oxide film, and the increase in Cr(2)O(3) can improve the corrosion-resistance of alloys.

  15. Mechanical and corrosion resistance of a new nanostructured Ti-Zr-Ta-Nb alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raducanu, D; Vasilescu, E; Cojocaru, V D; Cinca, I; Drob, P; Vasilescu, C; Drob, S I

    2011-10-01

    In this work, a multi-elementary Ti-10Zr-5Nb-5Ta alloy, with non-toxic alloying elements, was used to develop an accumulative roll bonding, ARB-type procedure in order to improve its structural and mechanical properties. The alloy was obtained by cold crucible semi-levitation melting technique and then was ARB deformed following a special route. After three ARB cycles, the total deformation degree per layer is about 86%; the calculated medium layer thickness is about 13 μm. The ARB processed alloy has a low Young's modulus of 46 GPa, a value very close to the value of the natural cortical bone (about 20 GPa). Data concerning ultimate tensile strength obtained for ARB processed alloy is rather high, suitable to be used as a material for bone substitute. Hardness of the ARB processed alloy is higher than that of the as-cast alloy, ensuring a better behaviour as a implant material. The tensile curve for the as-cast alloy shows an elastoplastic behaviour with a quite linear elastic behaviour and the tensile curve for the ARB processed alloy is quite similar with a strain-hardening elastoplastic body. Corrosion behaviour of the studied alloy revealed the improvement of the main electrochemical parameters, as a result of the positive influence of ARB processing. Lower corrosion and ion release rates for the ARB processed alloy than for the as-cast alloy, due to the favourable effect of ARB thermo-mechanical processing were obtained. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Interplay of microbiological corrosion and alloy microstructure in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    tion of fracture toughness, formability, fabricability and corrosion resistance. However, the austenitic SS are less commonly used in marine environments because of their susceptibil- ity, in chloride-containing environments to stress corrosion cracking (SCC, defined as the premature cracking in materials under the conjoint ...

  17. Supercritical water corrosion of high Cr steels and Ni-base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Jin Sung; Han, Chang Hee; Hwang, Seong Sik

    2004-01-01

    High Cr steels (9 to 12% Cr) have been widely used for high temperature high pressure components in fossil power plants. Recently the concept of SCWR (supercritical water-cooled reactor) has aroused a keen interest as one of the next generation (Generation IV) reactors. Consequently Ni-base (or high Ni) alloys as well as high Cr steels that have already many experiences in the field are among the potential candidate alloys for the cladding or reactor internals. Tentative inlet and outlet temperatures of the anticipated SCWR are 280 and 510 .deg. C respectively. Among many candidate alloys there are austenitic stainless steels, Ni base alloys, ODS alloys as well as high Cr steels. In this study the corrosion behavior of the high Cr steels and Ni base (or high Ni) alloys in the supercritical water were investigated. The corrosion behavior of the unirradiated base metals could be used in the near future as a guideline for the out-of-pile or in-pile corrosion evaluation tests

  18. Improved mechanical performance and delayed corrosion phenomena in biodegradable Mg-Zn-Ca alloys through Pd-alloying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, S; Pellicer, E; Fornell, J; Blanquer, A; Barrios, L; Ibáñez, E; Solsona, P; Suriñach, S; Baró, M D; Nogués, C; Sort, J

    2012-02-01

    The influence of partial substitution of Mg by Pd on the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behaviour of Mg(72-x)Zn(23)Ca(5)Pd(x) (x=0, 2 and 6 at.%) alloys, synthesized by copper mould casting, is investigated. While the Mg(72)Zn(23)Ca(5) alloy is mainly amorphous, the addition of Pd decreases the glass-forming ability, thus favouring the formation of crystalline phases. From a mechanical viewpoint, the hardness increases with the addition of Pd, from 2.71 GPa for x=0 to 3.9 GPa for x=6, mainly due to the formation of high-strength phases. In turn, the wear resistance is maximized for an intermediate Pd content (i.e., Mg(70)Zn(23)Ca(5)Pd(2)). Corrosion tests in a simulated body fluid (Hank's solution) indicate that Pd causes a shift in the corrosion potential towards more positive values, thus delaying the biodegradability of this alloy. Moreover, since the cytotoxic studies with mouse preosteoblasts do not show dead cells after culturing for 27 h, these alloys are potential candidates to be used as biomaterials. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparative study on the corrosion behavior of Ti-Nb and TMA alloys for dental application in various artificial solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Y.J.; Wang, Y.B.; Cheng, Y.; Deng, F.; Zheng, Y.F.; Wei, S.C.

    2011-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of Ti-Nb dental alloy in artificial saliva with and without the addition of lactic acid and sodium fluoride was investigated by electrochemical techniques, with the commercial Titanium-molybdenum alloy (TMA) as a comparison. The chemical composition, microstructure and constitutional phase were characterized via energy dispersive spectrometry, optical microscope and X-ray diffraction, meanwhile the open circuit potential, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization measurements were carried out to study the corrosion resistance of experimental alloys, with the corroded surface being further characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that the corrosion behavior of Ti-Nb alloy was similar to those TMA alloy samples in both artificial and acidified saliva solutions, whereas statistical analysis of the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and polarization parameters showed Ti-Nb alloy exhibited better corrosion resistance in fluoridated saliva and fluoridated acidified saliva. SEM observation indicated that TMA alloy corroded heavily than Ti-Nb alloy in fluoride containing saliva. XPS surface analysis suggested that Nb 2 O 5 played an important role in anti-corrosion from the attack of fluoride ion. Based on the above finding, Ti-Nb alloy is believed to be suitable for the usage in certain fluoride treated dental works with excellent corrosion resistance in fluoride-containing oral media.

  20. Relationship between stress corrosion cracking and low frequency fatigue-corrosion of alloy 600 in PWR primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosch, C.

    1998-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking of PWR vessel head adapters is a main problem for nuclear industry. With the aim to better understand the influence of the mechanical parameters on the cracking phenomena (by stress corrosion (SCC) or fatigue corrosion (FC)) of alloy 600 exposed to primary PWR coolant, a parametrical study has been carried out. Crack propagation tests on CT test specimens have been implemented under static loads (stress corrosion tests) or low frequency cyclic loads (fatigue corrosion tests). Results (frequency influence, type of cycles, ratio charge on velocities and propagation modes of cracks) have allowed to characterize the transition domain between the crack phenomena of SCC and FC. With the obtained results, it has been possible too to differentiate the effects due to environmental factors and the effects due to mechanical factors. At last, a quantitative fractographic study and the observations of the microstructure at the tip of crack have led to a better understanding of the transitions of the crack propagation mode between the SCC and the FC. (O.M.)

  1. Corrosion performance of atmospheric plasma sprayed alumina coatings on AZ31B magnesium alloy under immersion environment

    OpenAIRE

    D. Thirumalaikumarasamy; K. Shanmugam; V. Balasubramanian

    2014-01-01

    Plasma sprayed ceramic coatings are successfully used in many industrial applications, where high wear and corrosion resistance with thermal insulation are required. The alumina powders were plasma sprayed on AZ31B magnesium alloy with three different plasma spraying parameters. In the present work, the influence of plasma spray parameters on the corrosion behavior of the coatings was investigated. The corrosion behavior of the coated samples was evaluated by immersion corrosion test in 3.5 w...

  2. Corrosion resistance of titanium alloy on the overpack for high-level radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Toshiyasu

    2008-01-01

    Crevice corrosion of titanium and its alloys were investigated in 10% sodium chloride at 100 degC simulating the environment of the overpack near the seaside. The pH and Chloride ion concentration inside the crevice were monitored by using W/WO 3 and Ag/AgCl microelectrode, respectively. The pH and Cl - concentration within the crevice were calculated from the standard potential-pH and potential-log [Cl - ] calibration curves. The effect of Mo on the crevice corrosion of titanium was mainly studied. The passivation behavior of the titanium and Ti-15% Mo alloy were also studied using electrochemical impedance studies. A marginal decrease in pH and increase in Cl - ion concentration were observed for pure titanium at 100 degC, where there was large increase of the crevice current. On other hand, there was no apparent change in pH and Cl - ion activity inside the crevice for Ti-15% Mo alloy, where there was no increase of the crevice current. Based on the results, it has been documented that the Ti-15% Mo alloy was not susceptible to crevice corrosion in 10% NaCl solutions at 100 degC. The corrosion reaction resistance (R t ) was found to increase with addition of Mo as an alloying element and also increase with applied anodic potential. Hence, Mo is able to be an effective alloying element, which enhanced the crevice corrosion resistance of titanium under the environment simulating the overpack near the seaside. (author)

  3. The Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanism of Alloy 600 Steam Generator Tubes: Materials Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Youngsuk; Kim, Sungsoo; Kim, Daewhan

    2013-01-01

    The problem is that intergranular (IG) cracking of austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys occurs even in Ar with no corrosion or oxidation of grain boundaries being accompanied. This fact suggests that IG cracking has nothing to do with grain boundary (GB) corrosion or oxidation. This fact cast a doubt about the current notion that applied stresses are required to initiate IG cracking or PWSCC. These facts indicate that PWSCC is closely related to internal factors of materials, not to external factors such as grain boundary oxidation or corrosion or applied stresses. Given that austenitic alloys including Alloy 600 are a kind of solid solution alloys with alloying elements dissolved in the matrix as solutes, ordering of alloying elements of Fe, Cr and Ni occur in Alloy 600 during exposure to reactor operating condition. We suggest that atomic ordering is the main internal factor to govern PWSCC or IG cracking of austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys because lattice contraction due to atomic ordering induces internal stresses which are large enough to cause GB cracking. The aim of this work is to provide experimental evidence for our suggestion. To this end, water quenching (WQ) or air cooling (AC) or furnace cooling (FC) was applied respectively to Alloy 600 after solution treatment at 1095 .deg. C for 0.5h to make Alloy 600 with either disorder (DO) or different degrees of short range order, respectively. Alloy 600 showed lattice contraction upon aging at 400 .deg. C whose extent increased with increasing cooling rate: the water-quenched (WQ) Alloy 600 exhibited the largest amount of lattice contraction than the furnace-cooled (FC) or air-cooled (AC) one. Yonezawa's experiments have indeed shown that the WQ-Alloy 600 with the largest amount of lattice contraction upon aging at 400 .deg. C is the most susceptible to PWSCC when compared to the AC- or FC-Alloy 600 with the lesser amount of lattice contraction. These observations demonstrate, for the first time, that PWSCC of Alloy 600 is

  4. Corrosion studies of modified organosilane coated magnesium–yttrium alloy in different environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Dingchuan; Tan Zongqing; Schulz, Mark J.; Vanooij, William J.; Sankar, Jagannathan; Yun Yeoheung; Dong Zhongyun

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys have numerous potential applications as biodegradable implants, but the fast degradation rate of Mg alloys at the initial implanted stage could be a problem. This paper describes the modification of the water-based bis-[triethoxysilyl] ethane (BTSE) silane applied to the surface of magnesium–yttrium (Mg–4Y) to increase its corrosion resistance. Surface characterization by SEM, FTIR, and EDX showed that the hydrolysis and condensation of the silane resulted in a covalent bonding to the Mg–4Y surface. Corrosion behavior of the uncoated and coated Mg–4Y alloy was evaluated in different environments by using a novel self-developed corrosion probe. Based on the electrochemical results of DC polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), we conclude that the epoxy-modified BTSE silane coating successfully increases the corrosion resistance at the initial stage of implantation. The corrosion rates in the flesh of dead mice environments such as body cavity and subcutaneous tissue of the mice were lower than the corrosion rates in in vitro environments. - Highlights: ► Modified silane was used on Mg–4Y for biological applications. ► Modified silane-treated Mg–4Y increased its corrosion resistance in both In Vitro and In Vivo environments. ► In Vitro testing environment is not consistent with In Vivo animal environment. ► The modified silane mixture protecting mechanisms and its biocompatibility were discussed. ► A novel three-electrode corrosion-monitoring probe was developed for realizing this work's In Vivo testing goals.

  5. Study of surface interactions of ionic liquids with aluminium alloys in corrosion and erosion-corrosion processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bermudez, Maria-Dolores [Grupo de Ciencia de Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Departamento de Ingenieria de Materiales y Fabricacion, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, C/ Doctor Fleming s/n, Campus Muralla del Mar, 30202 Cartagena (Spain)]. E-mail: mdolores.bermudez@upct.es; Jimenez, Ana-Eva [Grupo de Ciencia de Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Departamento de Ingenieria de Materiales y Fabricacion, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, C/ Doctor Fleming s/n, Campus Muralla del Mar, 30202 Cartagena (Spain); Martinez-Nicolas, Gines [Grupo de Ciencia de Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Departamento de Ingenieria de Materiales y Fabricacion, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, C/ Doctor Fleming s/n, Campus Muralla del Mar, 30202 Cartagena (Spain)

    2007-06-30

    Surface interactions of alkylimidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) with aluminium alloy Al 2011 have been studied by immersion tests in seven neat ILs [1-n-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium X{sup -} (X = BF{sub 4}; n = 2 (IL1), 6 (IL2), 8 (IL3). X = CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}; n = 2 (IL4). X = (4-CH{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}SO{sub 3}); n = 2 (IL5). X PF{sub 6}; n = 6 (IL6)] and 1-butyl-3-methylpyridinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (IL7)]. Immersion tests for Al 2011 have also been carried out in 1 wt.% and 5 wt.% solutions of 1-ethyl,3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (IL1) in water. No corrosion of Al 2011 by neat ILs is observed. The highest corrosion rate for Al 2011 in water is observed in the presence of a 5 wt.% IL1 due to hydrolysis of the anion with hydrogen evolution and formation of aluminium fluoride. Erosion-corrosion processes have been studied for three aluminium alloys (Al 2011, Al 6061 and Al 7075) in a 90 wt.% IL1 solution in water in the presence of {alpha}-alumina particles. The erosion-corrosion rates are around 0.2 mm/year or lower, and increase with increasing copper content to give a corrosion resistance order of Al 6061 > Al 7075 > Al 2011. Results are discussed on the basis of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) determinations.

  6. Study on the corrosion resistance and anti-infection of modified magnesium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ningning; Tan, Cui; Li, Qing; Xi, Zhongxian

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a low-cost and multifunctional hydroxyapatite (HA)/pefloxacin (PFLX) drug eluting layer is coated on magnesium (Mg) alloy through a simple hydrothermal and dip process. The drug PFLX could provide effective prevention for bone infection and inflammation due to its broad-spectrum antibacterial property. And HA would promote the growth of new bone and further improve the biocompatibility of implants. Besides, both PFLX and HA exhibits excellent corrosion protection for Mg alloy substrate. This coating is of great value for improving the application of Mg alloy as biomaterials.

  7. Effect of heat treatment conditions on stress corrosion cracking resistance of alloy X-750 in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, Toshio; Onimura, Kichiro; Sakamoto, Naruo; Sasaguri, Nobuya; Susukida, Hiroshi; Nakata, Hidenori.

    1984-01-01

    In order to improve the resistance of the Alloy X-750 in high temperature and high purity water, the authors investigated the influence of heat treatment condition on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the alloy. This paper describes results of the stress corrosion cracking test and some discussion on the mechanism of the stress corrosion cracking of Alloy X-750 in deaerated high temperature water. The following results were obtained. (1) The stress corrosion cracking resistance of Alloy X-750 in deaerated high temperature water remarkably depended upon the heat treatment condition. The materials solution heat treated and aged within temperature ranges from 1065 to 1100 0 C and from 704 to 732 0 C, respectively, have a good resistance to the stress corrosion cracking in deaerated high temperature water. Especially, water cooling after the solution heat treatment gives an excellent resistance to the stress corrosion cracking in deaerated high temperature water. (2) Any correlations were not observed between the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of Alloy X-750 in deaerated high temperature water and grain boundary chromium depleted zones, precipitate free zones and the grain boundary segregation of impurity elements and so on. It appears that there are good correlations between the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the alloy in the environment and the kinds, morphology and coherency of precipitates along the grain boundaries. (author)

  8. Enhanced antibacterial properties, biocompatibility, and corrosion resistance of degradable Mg-Nd-Zn-Zr alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hui; Zhao, Yaochao; An, Zhiquan; Cheng, Mengqi; Wang, Qi; Cheng, Tao; Wang, Qiaojie; Wang, Jiaxing; Jiang, Yao; Zhang, Xianlong; Yuan, Guangyin

    2015-06-01

    Magnesium (Mg), a potential biodegradable material, has recently received increasing attention due to its unique antibacterial property. However, rapid corrosion in the physiological environment and potential toxicity limit clinical applications. In order to improve the corrosion resistance meanwhile not compromise the antibacterial activity, a novel Mg alloy, Mg-Nd-Zn-Zr (Hereafter, denoted as JDBM), is fabricated by alloying with neodymium (Nd), zinc (Zn), zirconium (Zr). pH value, Mg ion concentration, corrosion rate and electrochemical test show that the corrosion resistance of JDBM is enhanced. A systematic investigation of the in vitro and in vivo antibacterial capability of JDBM is performed. The results of microbiological counting, CLSM, SEM in vitro, and microbiological cultures, histopathology in vivo consistently show JDBM enhanced the antibacterial activity. In addition, the significantly improved cytocompatibility is observed from JDBM. The results suggest that JDBM effectively enhances the corrosion resistance, biocompatibility and antimicrobial properties of Mg by alloying with the proper amount of Zn, Zr and Nd. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Electrochemical corrosion behavior of a Ti-35Nb alloy for medical prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremasco, Alessandra; Osorio, Wislei R.; Freire, Celia M.A.; Garcia, Amauri; Caram, Rubens

    2008-01-01

    Since the 1980s, the titanium alloys show attractive properties for biomedical applications where the most important factors are, firstly, biocompatibility, corrosion and mechanical resistances, low modulus of elasticity, very good strength to weight ratio, reasonable formability and osseointegration. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two different heat treatments; furnace cooling and water quenching, on the general electrochemical corrosion resistance of Ti-35 wt%Nb alloy samples immersed in a 0.9% NaCl (0.15 mol L -1 ) solution at 25 deg. C and neutral pH range. The samples were obtained using a non-consumable tungsten electrode furnace with a water-cooled copper hearth under argon atmosphere. The microstructural pattern was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). In order to evaluate the electrochemical corrosion behavior of such Ti-Nb alloy samples, corrosion tests were performed by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization curves. Analyses of an equivalent circuit have also been used to provide quantitative support for the discussions and understanding of the corrosion behavior. It was found that water quenching provides a microstructural pattern consisting of an alpha-martensite acicular phase which decreases the material electrochemical performance due to the stress-induced martensitic transformation

  10. Electrochemical corrosion behavior of a Ti-35Nb alloy for medical prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremasco, Alessandra [Department of Materials Engineering, State University of Campinas, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6122, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Osorio, Wislei R. [Department of Materials Engineering, State University of Campinas, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6122, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: wislei@fem.unicamp.br; Freire, Celia M.A.; Garcia, Amauri; Caram, Rubens [Department of Materials Engineering, State University of Campinas, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6122, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2008-05-30

    Since the 1980s, the titanium alloys show attractive properties for biomedical applications where the most important factors are, firstly, biocompatibility, corrosion and mechanical resistances, low modulus of elasticity, very good strength to weight ratio, reasonable formability and osseointegration. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two different heat treatments; furnace cooling and water quenching, on the general electrochemical corrosion resistance of Ti-35 wt%Nb alloy samples immersed in a 0.9% NaCl (0.15 mol L{sup -1}) solution at 25 deg. C and neutral pH range. The samples were obtained using a non-consumable tungsten electrode furnace with a water-cooled copper hearth under argon atmosphere. The microstructural pattern was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). In order to evaluate the electrochemical corrosion behavior of such Ti-Nb alloy samples, corrosion tests were performed by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization curves. Analyses of an equivalent circuit have also been used to provide quantitative support for the discussions and understanding of the corrosion behavior. It was found that water quenching provides a microstructural pattern consisting of an alpha-martensite acicular phase which decreases the material electrochemical performance due to the stress-induced martensitic transformation.

  11. Corrosion characterization of micro-arc oxidization composite electrophoretic coating on AZ31B magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Congjie; Jiang, Bailing; Liu, Ming; Ge, Yanfeng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A new protective composite coatings were prepared on AZ31B Mg alloy. • The E-coat locked into MAO coat by discharge channels forming a smoother and compact surface without defects. • Comparing with MAO coat, the MAOE composite coat could provide an excellent barrier for bare Mg against corrosion attack. - Abstract: A two layer composite coating system was applied on the surface of AZ31B magnesium alloy by Micro-arc Oxidation (MAO) plus electrophoretic coat (E-coat) technique. The Mg sample coated with MAO plus E-coat (MAOE) was compared with bare Mg and Mg sample coated by MAO only. The surface microstructure and cross section of bare and coated Mg before and after corrosion were examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The corrosion performance of bare and coated Mg was evaluated using electrochemical measurement and hydrogen evolution test. The results indicated that the corrosion resistance of AZ31B Mg alloy was significantly improved by MAOE composite coating. The corrosion mechanism of bare and coated Mg is discussed

  12. Hot Corrosion of Single-Crystal NiAl-X Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, James A.

    1998-01-01

    Several single-crystal NiAl-X alloys (X=Hf, Ti, Cr, Ga) underwent hot corrosion testing in a Mach 0.3 burner rig at 900 deg. C for 300 1-hr cycles. The surface morphology after testing consisted of either mounds or an inward, uniform-type of attack which preserved surface features. It was observed that the surface morphology was affected by the surface preparation treatments. Microstructurally, the hot corrosion attack initiated as pits but evolved to a rampant attack consisting of the rapid inward growth of Al2O3. Electropolishing and chemical milling produced many pits and grooves on the surface. However, the presence of pits and grooves did not appear to strongly influence the hot corrosion response. Attack on many samples was strongly localized which was attributed to compositional inhomogeneity within the samples. It was found that increasing the Ti content from 1% to 5 % degraded the hot corrosion response of these alloys. In contrast, the addition of 1-2% Cr reduced the susceptibility of these alloys to hot corrosion attack and negated the deleterious effect of the 4-5% Ti addition.

  13. Effect of thermal aging on corrosion resistance of C-22 alloy in chloride solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carranza, Ricardo M.; Rodriguez, Martin A.

    2007-01-01

    Alloy 22 (N06022) belongs to the Ni-Cr-Mo family and it is highly resistant to localized corrosion. The anodic behavior of mill annealed (MA) and thermally aged (10 hours at 760 C degrees) Alloy 22 was studied in chloride solutions with different pH values at 90 C degrees. Thermal aging leads to a microstructure of full grain boundary precipitation of topologically closed packed (TCP) phases. Electrochemical tests included monitoring of open circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Assessment of general and localized (crevice) corrosion was performed. Re passivation potentials were obtained from cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests. Results indicate that MA and TCP material show similar general corrosion rates and crevice corrosion resistance in the tested environments. MA and TCP specimens suffered general corrosion in an active state when tested in low pH chloride solutions. The grain structure of the alloy was revealed for MA material, while TCP material suffered a preferential attack at grain boundaries. (author)

  14. Inhibitive Behaviour of Corrosion of Aluminium Alloy in NaCl by Mangrove Tannin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solhan Yahya; Afidah Abdul Rahim; Affaizza Mohd Shah; Rohana Adnan

    2011-01-01

    Anticorrosion potential of mangrove tannins on aluminium alloys AA6061 in NaCl solution has been studied using potentiodynamic polarisation method and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The study was carried out in different pH of corrosive medium in the absence and presence of various concentrations of tannin. The corrosion inhibition behaviour of the mangrove tannin on AA6061 aluminium alloy corrosion was found to be dependant on the pH of NaCl solution. Our results showed that the inhibition efficiency increased with increasing tannins concentration in chloride solution at pH 6. Treatment of aluminium alloy 6061 with all concentrations of mangrove tannins reduced the current density, thus decreased the corrosion rate. Tannins behaved as mixed inhibitors at pH 6 and reduction in current density predominantly affected in cathodic reaction. Meanwhile, at pH 12, addition of tannins shifted the corrosion potential to more cathodic potentials and a passivating effect was observed in anodic potentials. SEM studies have shown that the addition of tannins in chloride solution at pH 12 reduced the surface degradation and the formation of pits. (author)

  15. KTA 625 alloy tube with excellent corrosion resistance and heat resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Kazuo; Kadonaga, Toshiki; Kikuma, Seiji.

    1982-01-01

    The problems when seamless tubes are produced by using nickel base 625 alloy (61Ni-22Cr-9Mo-Cb) which is known as a corrosion resistant and heat resistant alloyF were examined, and the confirmation experiment was carried out on its corrosion resistance and heat resistance. Various difficulties have been experienced in the tube making owing to the characteristics due to the chemical composition, but they were able to be solved by the repeated experiments. As for the characteristics of the product, the corrosion resistance was excellent particularly in the environment containing high temperature, high concentration chloride, and also the heat resistance was excellent in the wide temperature range from normal temperature to 1000 deg C. From these facts, the wide fields of application are expected for these alloy tubes, including the evaporation and concentration equipment for radioactive wastes in atomic energy field. Expecting the increase of demand hereafter, Kobe Steel Ltd. examined the problems when seamless tubes are produced from the 625 alloy by Ugine Sejournet process. The aptitude for tube production such as the chemical composition, production process and the product characteristics, the corrosion resistance against chloride, hydrogen sulfide, polythionic and other acids,F the high temperature strength and oxidation resistance are reported. (Kako, I.)

  16. Corrosion behaviour of Ni–Co alloy coatings at Kish Island (marine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    directly on the steel or over an intermediate coating of copper. In comparison with pure nickel, nickel alloy possesses good adhesion, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, thermal stability and excellent magnetic proper- ties. It has a wide variety of applications in the aerospace, electronic, petrochemical and medical ...

  17. Effect of cerium addition on the corrosion behaviour of carbon-alloyed iron aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriram, S.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Mungole, M.N.; Bharagava, S.; Baligidad, R.G.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of Ce addition on the microstructure and corrosion behavior of carbon-alloyed iron aluminides Fe-20.0Al-2.0C, Fe-18.5Al-3.6C and Fe-19.2Al-3.3C-0.07Ce (in at.%) has been studied. The potentiodynamic polarization behaviour of the alloys was evaluated in freely aerated 0.25 mol/l H 2 SO 4 . A 0.05% C steel was used for comparison purposes. All the alloys exhibited active-passive behaviour in the acidic solution. The addition of Ce destroyed passivity as indicated by lower breakdown potentials in polarization studies. This has been related to the finer distribution of the carbides in the microstructure. Corrosion rates were evaluated by immersion testing. The iron aluminide with Ce addition exhibited a lower corrosion rate compared to the aluminides without Ce addition. This has been attributed to modifications in surface film with Ce addition. Scanning electron microscopy of corroded surfaces indicated that the carbon-alloyed intermetallics were susceptible to localized galvanic corrosion due to the presence of carbides in the microstructure

  18. Localized Corrosion of Alloy 22 -Fabrication Effects-FY05 Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebak, R B

    2005-01-01

    This report deals with the impact of fabrication processes on the localized corrosion behavior of Alloy 22 (N06022). The four fabrication processes that were analyzed are: (1) Surface stress mitigation of final closure weld, (2) Manufacturing of the mockup container, (3) Black annealing of the container and (4) Use of different heats of Alloy 22 for container fabrication. Immersion and Electrochemical tests performed in the laboratory are generally aggressive and do not represent actual repository environments in Yucca Mountain. For example, to determine the intergranular attack in the heat affected zone of a weldment, tests are conducted in boiling acidic and oxidizing solutions according to ASTM standards. These solutions are used to compare the behavior of differently treated metallic coupons. Similarly for electrochemical tests many times pure sodium chloride or calcium chloride solutions are used. Pure chloride solutions are not representative of the repository environment. (1) Surface Stress Mitigation--When metallic plates are welded, for example using the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) method, residual tensile stresses may develop in the vicinity of the weld seam. Processes such as Low Plasticity Burnishing (LPB) and Laser Shock Peening (LSP) could be applied locally to eliminate the residual stresses produced by welding. In this study, Alloy 22 plates were welded and then the above-mentioned surface treatments were applied to eliminate the residual tensile stresses. The aim of the current study was to comparatively test the corrosion behavior of as-welded (ASW) plates with the corrosion behavior of plates with stress mitigated surfaces. Immersion and electrochemical tests were performed. Results from both immersion and electrochemical corrosion tests show that the corrosion resistance of the mitigated plates was not affected by the surface treatments applied. (2) Behavior of Specimens from a Mockup container--Alloy 22 has been extensively tested for

  19. Stress corrosion of the alloy U-7.5 Nb-2.5 Zr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepoutre, D.; Nomine, A.M.; Miannay, D.

    1983-09-01

    Oxide formed on U-7.5 Nb-2.5 Zr at room temperature during stress corrosion cracking in oxygen is identical to the natural oxide of the alloy. It is formed by UO 2 with Nb and Zr and is associated with an increased Nb content at the interface. This oxide would be responsible for cracking [fr

  20. Corrosion protection of AM60B magnesium alloy by application of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sample plated with the Ce–V conversion coating showed lower corrosion current density than the sample plated with traditional chromium oxide pretreatment. The micro-hardness of the bare alloy was significantly increased after electroless coating. The electroless coating is pore-free and there is suitable adhesion ...

  1. Thermal characteristics and corrosion behaviour of Mg–xZn alloys ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The thermal parameters of Mg–Zn cast alloys with 0.5–9 wt% Zn were evaluated by using computer aided cooling curve thermal analysis (CA–CCTA), whereas the corrosion behaviour was investigated by potentiodynamic polarization and immersion tests. Thermal analysis results revealed that the dendrite coherency ...

  2. Thermal characteristics and corrosion behaviour of Mg–xZn alloys ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The thermal parameters of Mg–xZn cast alloys with 0·5–9 wt% Zn were evaluated by using computer aided cooling curve thermal analysis (CA–CCTA), whereas the corrosion behaviour was investigated by potentiody- namic polarization and immersion tests. Thermal analysis results revealed that the dendrite coherency ...

  3. Corrosion resistance of Zn-Co-Fe alloy coatings on high strength steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodhi, Z.F.; Mol, J.M.C.; Hovestad, A.; Hoen-Velterop, L. 't; Terryn, H.; Wit, J.H.W.de

    2009-01-01

    The corrosion properties of electrodeposited zinc-cobalt-iron (Zn-Co-Fe) alloys (up to 40 wt.% Co and 1 wt.% Fe) on steel were studied by using various electrochemical techniques and compared with zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) coatings in 3.5% NaCl solution. It was found that with an increase in Co

  4. The electrochemical deposition of tin-nickel alloys and the corrosion properties of the coating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Møller, Per

    2005-01-01

    electrodeposition. The alloy has unique corrosion properties and exhibits surface passivation like stainless steel. The coating is decorative and non-allergic to the skin, can replace decorative nickel and nickel-chromium coatings in many cases and decreases the risk for allergic contact dermatitis. A number...

  5. Tempering effect on corrosion performance of magnesium alloys for biomedical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.; Ferrari, G.M.; Erinc, M.; Sillekens, W.H.

    2010-01-01

    The corrosion resistances for magnesium alloys AZ80, AE82 and ZM21 treated at 200 and 330°C for 2 hours, and for AZ80 and AE82 at 415°C for 8 hours were investigated using potentiodynamic polarization measurements in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution at 37°C. The morphology and the Volta potential

  6. Corrosion properties of plasma deposited nickel and nickel-based alloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Voleník, Karel; Pražák, M.; Kalabisová, E.; Kreislová, K.; Had, J.; Neufuss, Karel

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 3 (2003), s. 215-226 ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/99/0298 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : plasma deposits, nickel, nickel-based alloys Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials

  7. Influence of shape and finishing on the corrosion of palladium-based dental alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milheiro, A.; Muris, J.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the surface treatment and shape of the dental alloy on the composition of the prosthetic work and its metallic ion release in a corrosive medium after casting. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Orion Argos (Pd-Ag) and Orion Vesta (Pd-Cu) were

  8. Crack Initiation and Growth Behavior at Corrosion Pit in 7075-T6 High Strength Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    corrosion damage in 7075-T6511 aluminium alloy under aircraft loading”. Dept of Mechanical Engineering, Royal Military College of Canada, 1996. [14...AZ31 in sodium chloride solution”. International Journal of Fatigue, 38:1181–1188, 2008. ISSN 0142-1123. [31] Pao, P.S., P.S. Gill, and C.R. Feng. “On

  9. A morphological study of filiform corrosive attack on cerated AA2024-T351 aluminium alloy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hughes, A.E.; Mol, J.M.C.; Hinton, B.R.W.; Zwaag, S. van der

    2005-01-01

    SEM and EDS studies were carried out to characterise filiform attack on a cerated AA2024- T351 aluminium alloy with a polyurethane topcoat. The filiforms developed on AA2024-T351 were sectioned, stripped of corrosion product and etched to reveal the grain structure. Examination of sections through

  10. Corrosion resistant Zn–Co alloy coatings deposited using saw-tooth ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Keywords. Composition modulated multilayer alloy; Zn–Co; saw-tooth current pulse; corrosion resistance; dielectric spectroscopy. 1. ... capital cost and high energy cost an alternative method is required. Electrolytic deposition has ... cathode c.d., agitation, temperature, etc, the composition can be better controlled with great ...

  11. Utilizing various test methods to study the stress corrosion behavior of Al-Li-Cu alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, P. P.; Galvin, R. P.; Nelson, H. G.

    1984-01-01

    Recently, much attention has been given to aluminum-lithium alloys because of rather substantial specific-strength and specific-stiffness advantages offered over commercial 2000and 7000-series aluminum alloys. An obstacle to Al-Li alloy development has been inherent limited ductility. In order to obtain a more refined microstructure, powder metallurgy (P/M) has been employed in alloy development programs. As stress corrosion (SC) of high-strength aluminum alloys has been a major problem in the aircraft industry, the possibility of an employment of Al-Li alloys has been considered, taking into account a use of Al-Li-Cu alloys. Attention is given to a research program concerned with the evaluation of the relative SC resistance of two P/M processed Al-Li-Cu alloys. The behavior of the alloys, with and without an addition of magnesium, was studied with the aid of three test methods. The susceptibility to SC was found to depend on the microstructure of the alloys.

  12. Review and study of physics driven pitting corrosion modeling in 2024-T3 aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lingyu; Jata, Kumar V.

    2015-04-01

    Material degradation due to corrosion and corrosion fatigue has been recognized to significantly affect the airworthiness of civilian and military aircraft, especially for the current fleet of airplanes that have served beyond their initial design life. The ability to predict the corrosion damage development in aircraft components and structures, therefore, is of great importance in managing timely maintenance for the aging aircraft vehicles and in assisting the design of new ones. The assessment of aircraft corrosion and its influence on fatigue life relies on appropriate quantitative models that can evaluate the initiation of the corrosion as well as the accumulation during the period of operation. Beyond the aircraft regime, corrosion has also affected the maintenance, safety and reliability of other systems such as nuclear power systems, steam and gas turbines, marine structures and so on. In the work presented in this paper, we reviewed and studied several physics based pitting corrosion models that have been reported in the literature. The classic work of particle induced pitting corrosion by Wei and Harlow is reviewed in detail. Two types of modeling, a power law based simplified model and a microstructure based model, are compared for 2024-T3 alloy. Data from literatures are used as model inputs. The paper ends with conclusions and recommendations for future work.

  13. Effect of the electrode position conditions on the morphology and corrosion behavior of Ni-Co alloys part 2: Phase composition and corrosion behavior of Ni-Co alloys, electrodeposited from citrate electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatova, Katya; Avdeev, Georgi

    2016-01-01

    The changes in the phase composition (through X-Ray analysis) and the corrosion behaviors (through potentiodynamic polarization studies in 4 % NaCl) of Ni-Co alloys, electrodeposited from a citrate electrolyte by changing the Ni/Co ratio, content of organic additive (saccharine) and the content of sodium citrate in the solution, are studied. It is found that the increase of Ni/Co ratio from 1 to 5 increases the content of Ni in the Ni-Co alloy to 48 mass %. The proportion between the phases of Co and Ni with cubic face-centered crystal lattice is in approximate compliance with the proportion of the two metals in the alloy. The peaks in the difractograms are weak and stretched, which corresponds to the nano-sized structure of the alloy. The Ni-Co alloys with highest content of Ni have a higher corrosion resistance compared to those containing a higher percentage of Co. It is also shown that the Ni-Co coatings obtained in the presence of addition of saccharine show a much higher corrosion resistance than the coatings obtained in absence of additive. Ni-Co alloys, deposited from electrolyte with more sodium citrate show only a slight growth of Ni content and the effect of sodium citrate on corrosion behaviors of the alloy is insignificant. Keywords: phase composition, corrosion behavior, Ni-Co alloys, nanostructured alloys.

  14. Localized corrosion of alloys C-276 and 625 in aerated sodium chloride solutions at 25 to 200 degrees C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postlethwaite, J.

    1991-12-01

    Two molybdenum-bearing nickel alloys, Alloy C-276 and Alloy 625, were previously identified for consideration as candidate container materials for the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. Because of the paucity of data for the localized corrosion behaviour of these passive alloys under conditions that may be experienced in a disposal vault, this project was undertaken to study the crevice and pitting corrosion of Alloys C-276 and 625 in chloride solutions at elevated temperatures. Electrochemical and immersion tests have been conducted in neutral sodium chloride solutions (0.1 wt% to saturated) at 25 to 200 degrees C, in an attempt to identify the conditions under which localized corrosion occurs and to relate the actual corrosion behaviour to that expected on the basis of electrochemical studies. Cyclic polarization studies showed that the passivation breakdown potentials move rapidly to more active values with increasing temperatures. Above 100 degrees C the resistance to localized corrosion is greatly reduced. The results of the immersion tests are presented in the form of T versus (C1-) diagrams. These susceptibility diagrams suggest that there is a limiting crevice-corrosion temperature for each alloy in aerated, neutral sodium chloride solutions. Below this temperature corrosion does not occur, regardless of the chloride concentration. The values of the limiting crevice-corrosion temperatures were in the range 100 to 125 degrees C for Alloy C-276 and 100 to 115 degrees C for Alloy 625. Such values suggest that saturation of the chloride solutions by surface boiling could occur without the initiation of localized corrosion. These electrochemical results indicate that a large safety margin for susceptibility to localized corrosion might be found below 100 degrees C

  15. Study of corrosion of aluminium alloys of nuclear purity in ordinary water, пart one

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić Milan P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of corrosion of aluminum alloys of nuclear purity in ordinary water of the spent fuel storage pool of the RA research reactor at VINČA Institute of Nuclear Sciences has been examined in the frame work of the International Atomic Energy Agency Coordinated Research Project "Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminum-Clad Spent Fuel in Water" since 2002. The study presented in this paper comprises activities on determination and monitoring of chemical parameters and radio activity of water and sludge in the RA spent fuel storage pool and results of the initial study of corrosion effects obtained by visual examinations of surfaces of various coupons made of aluminum alloys of nuclear purity of the test racks exposed to the pool water for a period from six months to six years.

  16. Improvement of corrosion resistance of low-alloy steels by resurfacing using multifunction cavitation in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijiri, Masataka; Yoshimura, Toshihiko

    2018-02-01

    Low-alloy steels are based on carbon steel in combination with several percent or less (in many cases, 1 mass%) alloying elements, and they offer improved resistance to corrosion at a cost slightly higher than that of carbon steel. However, these materials do not exhibit the same corrosion resistance as stainless steel. The authors have previously developed a novel multifunction cavitation (MFC) technique, which combines ultrasonic cavitation with water jet cavitation. In this study, MFC was used to modify the surface of Cr-Mo steel (SCM435) and Ni-Cr-Mo steel (SNCM630). MFC was found to improve the residual stress value of the material as the result of surface modification while also imparting high strength and superior corrosion resistance.

  17. INFLUENCE OF PHOSPHATIZED SURFACE LAYER ON CORROSION RESISTANCE OF Mg-Al-RE ALLOY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarína Miková

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This contribution deals with evaluation of the corrosion resistance of extruded Mg-2Al-1RE (AE21 magnesium alloy in the state before and after treatment of ground surface by selected phosphatizing procedure. Specimens were exposed to 0.1M NaCl solution for several time periods starting from 5 minutes up-to 168 hours at room temperature of 22 ± 1 °C. Afterwards electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was carried out on the exposed specimens. Based on the results obtained from the electrochemical tests and visual observation of corrosion attack progress, positive or negative impact of selected phosphating process on the corrosion resistance of Mg-2Al-1RE magnesium alloy under given conditions was assessed.

  18. Mg and Mg alloys: how comparable are in vitro and in vivo corrosion rates? A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Sanchez, Adela Helvia; Luthringer, Bérengère J C; Feyerabend, Frank; Willumeit, Regine

    2015-02-01

    Due to their biodegradability, magnesium and magnesium-based alloys could represent the third generation of biomaterials. However, their mechanical properties and time of degradation have to match the needs of applications. Several approaches, such as choice of alloying elements or tailored microstructure, are employed to tailor corrosion behaviour. Due to the high electrochemical activity of Mg, numerous environmental factors (e.g. temperature and surrounding ion composition) influence its corrosion behaviour, making it unpredictable. Nevertheless, the need of reliable in vitro model(s) to predict in vivo implant degradation is increasing. In an attempt to find a correlation between in vitro and vivo corrosion rates, this review presents a systematic literature survey, as well as an attempt to correlate the different results. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Chitosan coatings crosslinked with genipin for corrosion protection of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Y Pozzo, Ludmila; da Conceição, Thiago F; Spinelli, Almir; Scharnagl, Nico; Pires, Alfredo T N

    2018-02-01

    In this study, coatings of chitosan crosslinked with genipin were prepared on sheets of AZ31 magnesium alloy and their corrosion protection properties were characterized by means of potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The coatings were also characterized by means of FTIR and XPS. It was observed that the crosslinking process decreases the corrosion current and shifts the corrosion potential of the alloy to less negative values. The EIS analysis demonstrated that the crosslinking process increases the maximum impedance after short and long exposure times. The superior performance of the crosslinked coatings is related to a lower degree of swelling, as observed in the swelling tests carried out on free-standing films. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Microstructure and corrosion resistance of phytic acid conversion coatings for magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui Xiufang [School of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Li Qingfen [School of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Li Ying; Wang Fuhui [State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Jin Guo [School of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China)], E-mail: jg97721@yahoo.com.cn; Ding Minghui [School of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2008-12-30

    In this paper, a new innoxious and pollution-free chemical protective coating for magnesium alloys, phytic acid conversion coating, was prepared. The conversion coatings are found to have high cover ratio and no cracks are found by atomic force microscopes (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The main elements of the conversion coatings are Mg, Al, O, P and C by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The chemical state of the elements in the coatings was also investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). AES depth profile analysis suggests that the thickness of the conversion coating is about 340 nm. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was evaluated by polarization curves. The results indicate that the corrosion resistance for the conversion coated AZ91D magnesium alloys in 3.5% NaCl solution increases markedly. The mechanisms of corrosion resistance and coatings formation are also discussed.

  1. Adsorption and inhibitive properties of Tryptophan on low alloy steel corrosion in acidic media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham T.M. Abdel-Fatah

    2017-02-01

    Corrosion inhibition was studied using electrochemical methods (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy; EIS and the new technique electrochemical frequency modulation; EFM and weight loss measurements. The influence of inhibitor concentration, solution temperature, and immersion time on the corrosion resistance of low alloy steel (LAS has been investigated. Trp proved to be a very good inhibitor for low alloy steel acid corrosion. EFM measurements showed that Trp is a mixed type inhibitor. Trp behaved better in 0.6 M HCl than in 0.6 M HSO3NH2. Moreover, it was found that the inhibition efficiency increased with increasing inhibitor concentration, while a decrease was detected with the rise of temperature and immersion time. The associated activation energy (Ea has been determined. The values of Ea indicate that the type of adsorption of Trp on the steel surface in both acids belongs to physical adsorption. The adsorption process was tested using Temkin adsorption isotherm.

  2. Multiscale Electrochemical Investigation of the Corrosion Resistance of Various Alloys Used in Dental Prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacoban, Sorin; Mareci, Daniel; Bolat, Georgiana; Munteanu, Corneliu; Souto, Ricardo Manuel

    2015-04-01

    The electrochemical behavior of Ag-Pd (Paliag), Ni-Cr (Heraenium NA), and Co-Cr (Heraenium CE) alloys used in dental prosthetics construction of crowns and bridges was studied in 0.9 pct NaCl solution at 298 K (25 °C). The localized electrochemical characteristics related to corrosion resistance and eventual breakdown of the protecting oxide layers were investigated by scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), whereas potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques were employed to establish oxide stability. When the corrosion resistance of the alloys was evaluated by means of the corrosion current value determined around their corresponding open circuit potential in 0.9 pct NaCl solution, good protection can be expected resulting from their spontaneous passivation (low current densities in the order of tenths of μA cm-2). The polarization resistance of all the samples increased with immersion time, in the sequence Ag-Pd Ag-Pd instead.

  3. Effects of ion implantation on corrosion of zirconium and zirconium base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenskij, V.F.; Petel'guzov, I.A.; Rekova, L.P.; Rodak, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of He and Ar ion bombardment on the corrosion of Zr and Zr-1%Nb and Zr-2.5%Nb alloys is investigated with the aims of finding the irradiation influence laws, obtaining the dependences of the effect of increasing the corrosiuon resistance on the type and dose of bombarding ions and of finding the conditions for the maximum effect. The prolonged corrosion test of specimens (3500 hours) have shown that the strongest effect is obtained for the irradiation with Ar ions up to the dose 1x10 16 ion/cm 2 . The kinetics of ion thermosorption after corrosion of irradiated materials is studied, the temperature threshold of implanted ion stability in zirconium and its alloys is found to be 400 deg C

  4. Corrosion studies on Cu-Ni alloys and ferritic steel in salt water for desalination service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibad, P.R.; Balachandra, J.

    1975-01-01

    Corrosion studies on In 838 and In 848 alloys in 3% NaCl solution, synthetic sea water and in 3% NaCl at pH3 and pH10 indicate that the latter alloy is more corrosion resistant than the former at room (28 0 C), and boiling temperature (101 0 C) and at 125 0 C. Ferritic steel is unaffected in boiling synthetic sea water. In boiling 3% NaCl solution at pH3 and pH10, (the pH values adjusted at room temperature) increase in the rate of corrosion of ferritic steel compared to that at room temperature has been observed. A fair correlation between polarization characteristics and dissolution rates in these solutions is seen for all these materials. (author)

  5. Evaluation of High Temperature Corrosion Resistance of Finned Tubes Made of Austenitic Steel And Nickel Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turowska A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper was to evaluate the resistance to high temperature corrosion of laser welded joints of finned tubes made of austenitic steel (304,304H and nickel alloys (Inconel 600, Inconel 625. The scope of the paper covered the performance of corrosion resistance tests in the atmosphere of simulated exhaust gases of the following chemical composition: 0.2% HCl, 0.08% SO2, 9.0% O2 and N2 in the temperature of 800°C for 1000 hours. One found out that both tubes made of austenitic steel and those made of nickel alloy displayed good resistance to corrosion and could be applied in the energy industry.

  6. Characterization and corrosion study of NiTi laser surface alloyed with Nb or Co

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, K. W.; Man, H. C.; Yue, T. M.

    2011-02-01

    The interest in NiTi alloys for medical applications has been steadily growing in recent years because of its biocompatibility, superelasticity and shape memory characteristics. However, the high Ni content in NiTi alloys is still a concern for its long-term applications in the human body. The release of Ni ion into the human body might cause serious problems, as Ni is capable of eliciting toxic and allergic responses. In view of this, surface modification to reduce the surface content of Ni and to improve the corrosion resistance, both of which would reduce Ni release, is an important step in the development of NiTi implants. In the present study, NiTi was surface alloyed with Nb or Co by laser processing. The fine dendritic structure characteristic of laser processing has been described in terms of rapid solidification. The amount of surface elemental Ni was reduced to 10% and 35% for the Nb-alloyed and Co-alloyed layer, respectively. The corrosion resistance in Hanks' solution (a simulated body fluid) was increased as evidenced by a reduced passive current density and a higher pitting potential for both the Nb- and Co-alloyed specimens. The composition and hardness profiles along the depth of the modified layer were correlated with the distribution of the dendrites. The microhardness of the alloyed layers was around 700-800 Hv, which was about four times that of the untreated NiTi specimens.

  7. In vitro corrosion and biocompatibility study of phytic acid modified WE43 magnesium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, C. H.; Zheng, Y. F.; Wang, S. Q.; Xi, T. F.; Li, Y. D.

    2012-02-01

    Phytic acid (PA) conversion coating on WE43 magnesium alloy was prepared by the method of immersion. The influences of phytic acid solution with different pH on the microstructure, properties of the conversion coating and the corrosion resistance were investigated by SEM, FTIR and potentiodynamic polarization method. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of different pH phytic acid solution modified WE43 magnesium alloys was evaluated by MTT and hemolysis test. The results show that PA can enhance the corrosion resistance of WE43 magnesium especially when the pH value of modified solution is 5 and the cytotoxicity of the PA coated WE43 magnesium alloy is much better than that of the bare WE43 magnesium alloy. Moreover, all the hemolysis rates of the PA coated WE43 Mg alloy were lower than 5%, indicating that the modified Mg alloy met the hemolysis standard of biomaterials. Therefore, PA coating is a good candidate to improve the biocompatibility of WE43 magnesium alloy.

  8. Corrosion mechanism of micro-arc oxidation treated biocompatible AZ31 magnesium alloy in simulated body fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Li

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The rapid degradation of magnesium (Mg based alloys has prevented their further use in orthopedic trauma fixation and vascular intervention, and therefore it is essential to investigate the corrosion mechanism for improving the corrosion resistance of these alloys. In this work, the effect of applied voltage on the surface morphology and the corrosion behavior of micro-arc oxidation (MAO with different voltages were carried out to obtain biocompatible ceramic coatings on AZ31 Mg alloy. The effects of applied voltage on the surface morphology and the corrosion behavior of MAO samples in the simulated body fluid (SBF were studied systematically. Scanning electron microscope (SEM and X-ray diffractometer (XRD were employed to characterize the morphologies and phase compositions of coating before and after corrosion. The results showed that corrosion resistance of the MAO coating obtained at 250 V was better than the others in SBF. The dense layer of MAO coating and the corrosion precipitation were the key factors for corrosion behavior. The corrosion of precipitation Mg(OH2 and the calcium phosphate (Ca–P minerals on the surface of MAO coatings could enhance their corrosion resistance effectively. In addition, the mechanism of MAO coated Mg alloys was proposed.

  9. Influence of structural relaxation and partial devitrification on the corrosion resistance of Fe78B13Si9 amorphous alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, C.A.C.; Politi, F.S.; Kiminami, C.S.

    1998-01-01

    Amorphous alloys obtained by rapid solidification from the melt exhibit a similar structure to those observed in the liquid state, i.e., without long range ordering, in such a way that the constituents of the alloy usually are randomly and homogeneously distributed. Amorphous alloys, depending on their composition, may exhibit interesting characteristics such as very soft magnetic properties and improved resistance to corrosion. The high corrosion resistance of these alloys is attributed mainly to a higher rate of dissolution of passivating elements in the amorphous state. In addition, amorphous alloys are chemically homogeneous and free of defects such as grain boundaries, precipitates and segregation, which are favorable sites for corrosion. The corrosion resistance of amorphous alloys also depends on their thermal history. Several authors have reported that structural changes, such as structural relaxation and devitrification caused by annealing, change significantly the corrosion properties of these alloys. The purpose of this paper is to study corrosion resistance of the amorphous FeBSi alloy and the effects of structural changes such as structural relaxation and partial crystallization caused by annealing

  10. Mechanism study of c.f.c Fe-Ni-Cr alloy corrosion in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payet, M.

    2011-01-01

    Supercritical water can be use as a high pressure coolant in order to improve the thermodynamic efficiency of power plants. For nuclear concept, lifetime is an important safety parameter for materials. Thus materials selection criteria concern high temperature yield stress, creep resistance, resistance to irradiation embrittlement and also to both uniform corrosion and stress corrosion cracking.This study aims for supplying a new insight on uniform corrosion mechanism of Fe-Ni-Cr f.c.c. alloys in deaerated supercritical water at 600 C and 25 MPa. Corrosion tests were performed on 316L and 690 alloys as sample autoclaves taking into account the effect of surface finishes. Morphologies, compositions and crystallographic structure of the oxides were determined using FEG scanning electron microscopy, glow discharge spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. If supercritical water is expected to have a gas-like behaviour in the test conditions, the results show a significant dissolution of the alloy species. Thus the corrosion in supercritical water can be considered similar to corrosion in under-critical water assuming the higher temperature and its effect on the solid state diffusion. For alloy 690, the protective oxide layer formed on polished surface consists of a chromia film topped with an iron and nickel mixed chromite or spinel. The double oxide layer formed on 316L steel seems less protective with an outer porous layer of magnetite and an inhomogeneous Cr-rich inner layer. For each alloy, the study of the inner protective scale growth mechanisms by marker or tracer experiments reveals that diffusion in the oxide scale is governed by an anionic process. However, surface finishes impact deeply the growth mechanisms. Comparisons between the results for the steel suggest that there is a competition between the oxidation of iron and chromium in supercritical water. Sufficient available chromium is required in order to form a thin oxide layer. Highly deformed or ultra fine

  11. Electrodeposition and Characterization of Mn-Cu-Zn Alloys for Corrosion Protection Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurtsumia, Gigla; Gogoli, David; Koiava, Nana; Kakhniashvili, Izolda; Jokhadze, Nunu; Lezhava, Tinatin; Nioradze, Nikoloz; Tatishvili, Dimitri

    2017-12-01

    Mn-Cu-Zn alloys were electrodeposited from sulphate bath, containing citrate or EDTA and their mixtures as complexing ligands. The influence of bath composition and deposition parameters on alloys composition, cathodic current efficiency and structural and electrochemical properties were studied. At a higher current density (≥ 37.5 A dm-2) a uniform surface deposit of Mn-Cu-Zn was obtained. Optimal pH of electrolyte (0.3 mol/dm3Mn2+ + 0.6 mol/dm3 (NH4)2SO4 +0.1 mol/dm3Zn2++0.005 mol/dm3 Cu2++ 0.05mol/dm3Na3Cit + 0.15mol/dm3 EDTA; t=300C; τ=20 min) for silvery, nonporous coating of Mn-Cu-Zn alloy was within 6.5-7.5; coating composition: 71-83% Mn, 6-7.8% Cu, 11.5-20% Zn, current efficiency up to 40%. XRD patterns revealed BCT (body centred tetragonal) γ-Mn solid phase solution (lattice constants a=2.68 Å c=3.59 Å). Corrosion measurements of deposited alloys were performed in aerated 3.5% NaCl solution. The corrosion current density (icorr) of the electrodeposited alloys on carbon steel was 10 times lower than corrosion rate of pure zinc and manganese coatings. Triple alloy coatings corrosion potential (Ecorr = -1140 mV vs. Ag/AgCl) preserved negative potential value longer (more than three months) compared to carbon steel substrate (Ecorr = -670 mV vs. Ag/AgCl). Tafel polarization curves taken on Mn-Cu-Zn alloy coating in aerated 3.5% NaCl solution did not show a typical passivation behaviour which can be explained by formation oflow solubility of adherent corrosion products on the alloy surface. Corrosion test of Mn-Cu-Zn electrocoating in chlorine environment shows that it is the best cathodic protective coating for a steel product.

  12. Biomimetic coating of magnesium alloy for enhanced corrosion resistance and calcium phosphate deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, W; Beniash, E; Gawalt, E; Xu, Z; Sfeir, C

    2013-11-01

    Degradable metals have been suggested as biomaterials with revolutionary potential for bone-related therapies. Of these candidate metals, magnesium alloys appear to be particularly attractive candidates because of their non-toxicity and outstanding mechanical properties. Despite their having been widely studied as orthopedic implants for bone replacement/regeneration, their undesirably rapid corrosion rate under physiological conditions has limited their actual clinical application. This study reports the use of a novel biomimetic peptide coating for Mg alloys to improve the alloy corrosion resistance. A 3DSS biomimetic peptide is designed based on the highly acidic, bioactive bone and dentin extracellular matrix protein, phosphophoryn. Surface characterization techniques (scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and diffuse-reflectance infrared spectroscopy) confirmed the feasibility of coating the biomimetic 3DSS peptide onto Mg alloy AZ31B. The 3DSS peptide was also used as a template for calcium phosphate deposition on the surface of the alloy. The 3DSS biomimetic peptide coating presented a protective role of AZ31B in both hydrogen evolution and electrochemical corrosion tests. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Galvanic Corrosion of Mg-Zr Alloy and Steel or Graphite in Mineral Binders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertin, David; Rooses, Adrien; Frizon, Fabien

    The dismantling of UNGG nuclear reactor generates numerous nuclear wastes such as fuel decanning commonly composed of Mg-Zr alloy. A conditioning strategy consists in encapsulating these wastes into a hydraulic binder in a suitable state for storage. The eventual presence of steel and graphite accompanying the magnesium wastes could imply corrosion by galvanic coupling. This work is an experimental investigation of the galvanic coupling between Mg-Zr alloy and steel or graphite using ZRA electrochemical method in Portland cement or geopolymer pastes. The lowest corrosion activity of magnesium alloy while coupled to graphite or steel cathode has been observed in geopolymer pastes. Indeed, in this binder, an efficient corrosion protection of the magnesium alloy maintains the galvanic current very low during all the hardening process. In geopolymer paste, current densities of anodised Mg-Zr alloy is not dependent of the cathode/anode surface ratio in the range of 0.1 to 5 due to the dominance of the anode resistance.

  14. Metallurgical study of stress corrosion in aqueous media of alloy 600 (NC15Fe)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garriga-Majo, Denis

    1993-01-01

    The development of intergranular cracks have been noticed in steam generator tubes made of alloy 600. These cracks result in tube embrittlement, and several actions have been implemented to try to improve tube strength, mainly by reducing the applied mechanical solicitations. For given temperature, chemistry and mechanical solicitations, the alloy sensitivity seems to depend on its micro-structural condition. Thus, after a general description of stress corrosion cracking phenomena, the main existing theories are reviewed as well as means to reproduce these cracking phenomena in laboratory. The author addresses general and microstructure properties of Alloy 600, metallurgical, electrochemical or mechanical parameters which govern its stress corrosion cracking behaviour, and different theories proposed to model and predict this behaviour. In the second part, the author studies the structure of Alloy 600 tubes before their installation in the steam generator: metallurgical study, search for parameters enabling the prediction of tube microstructure and tensile characteristics, study of the origin of microstructure differences with respect to tube fabrication batch. The third part addresses the study of Alloy 600 plasticity and creep with respect to its micro-structural condition, with a particular attention to material deformation mechanisms at grain boundaries. The fourth part reports the analysis of the stress corrosion behaviour of steam generator tubes in pure water and in primary environment [fr

  15. Corrosion behavior of dental alloys used for retention elements in prosthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nierlich, Judith; Papageorgiou, Spyridon N; Bourauel, Christoph; Hültenschmidt, Robert; Bayer, Stefan; Stark, Helmut; Keilig, Ludger

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the corrosion behavior of 10 different high noble gold-based dental alloys, used for prosthodontic retention elements, according to ISO 10271. Samples of 10 high-noble and noble gold-based dental alloys were subjected to: (i) static immersion tests with subsequent analysis of ion release for eight different elements using mass spectrometry; (ii) electrochemical tests, including open-circuit potential and potentiodynamic scans; and (iii) scanning electron microscopy, followed by energy-dispersive X-ray microscopy. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Sidak multiple-comparisons post-hoc test at a level of significance of α = 0.05. Significant differences were found among the 10 alloys studied for all ions (P alloys. Scanning electron microscopy analysis confirmed the existence of typically small-diameter corrosion defects, whilst the energy-dispersive X-ray analysis found no significant alteration in the elemental composition of the alloys. The results of this study reveal the variability in the corrosive resistance among the materials used for retention elements in prosthodontics. © 2016 Eur J Oral Sci.

  16. Fabrication of biodegradable Zn-Al-Mg alloy: Mechanical properties, corrosion behavior, cytotoxicity and antibacterial activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhsheshi-Rad, H R; Hamzah, E; Low, H T; Kasiri-Asgarani, M; Farahany, S; Akbari, E; Cho, M H

    2017-04-01

    In this work, binary Zn-0.5Al and ternary Zn-0.5Al-xMg alloys with various Mg contents were investigated as biodegradable materials for implant applications. Compared with Zn-0.5Al (single phase), Zn-0.5Al-xMg alloys consisted of the α-Zn and Mg 2 (Zn, Al) 11 with a fine lamellar structure. The results also revealed that ternary Zn-Al-Mg alloys presented higher micro-hardness value, tensile strength and corrosion resistance compared to the binary Zn-Al alloy. In addition, the tensile strength and corrosion resistance increased with increasing the Mg content in ternary alloys. The immersion tests also indicated that the corrosion rates in the following order Zn-0.5Al-0.5Mgcorrosion rate, good biocompatibility and antibacterial activities was believed to be a good candidate as a biodegradable implant material. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Corrosion resistance and surface characterization of electrolyzed Ti-Ni alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Osamu; Yoneyama, Takayuki; Doi, Hisashi; Hanawa, Takao

    2006-03-01

    Ti-Ni alloy has been increasingly applied to medical and dental devices, such as coronary stents and orthodontic wires. This alloy contains nickel, which is known to give rise to cytotoxicity, metal allergy, and carcinogenicity. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to improve the corrosion resistance of Ti-Ni alloy by electrolytic treatment, whereby investigation was carried out using different acidic electrolyte compositions. As a result, specimens electrolyzed with lactic acid, water, and glycerol were found to show higher corrosion potential and release lower amount of titanium and nickel ions than mechanical-polished specimens (pnickel concentration in the surface oxide layer of Ti-Ni alloy decreased, and the thickness of the surface oxide layer increased. Based on the results of this study, it was shown that electrolytic treatment with suitable electrolyte could improve the corrosion resistance of Ti-Ni alloy, which is effective to produce medical and dental devices that utilize shape memory effect or superelasticity with better biocompatibility.

  18. Corrosion of AZ91D magnesium alloy with a chemical conversion coating and electroless nickel layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo Hongwei; Li Ying; Wang Fuhui

    2004-01-01

    A chemical conversion treatment and an electroless nickel plating were applied to AZ91D alloy to improve its corrosion resistance. By conversion treatment in alkaline stannate solution, the corrosion resistance of the alloy was improved to some extent as verified by immersion test and potentiodynamic polarization test in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution at pH 7.0. X-ray diffraction patterns of the stannate treated AZ91D alloy showed the presence of MgSnO 3 · H 2 O, and SEM images indicated a porous structure, which provided advantage for the adsorption during sensitisation treatment prior to electroless nickel plating. A nickel coating with high phosphorus content was successfully deposited on the chemical conversion coating pre-applied to AZ91D alloy. The presence of the conversion coating between the nickel coating and the substrate reduced the potential difference between them and enhanced the corrosion resistance of the alloy. An obvious passivation occurred for the nickel coating during anodic polarization in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution

  19. Microstructure and Corrosion Characteristics with the Manufacturing Process of HANA Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun-Gil; Choi, Byoung-Kwon; Jeong, Yong-Hwan; Kim, Sun-Doo

    2007-01-01

    The HANA alloy designed in KAERI was one of the newly developed materials having an improved corrosion resistance. It was reported that the corrosion properties of Zr-based alloys were very sensitive to their microstructural properties such as the texture, dislocations and precipitate characteristics. The microstructural characteristics of Zr-based alloy were determined by the performed manufacturing process conditions. Therefore, to obtain a good corrosion resistance, the Zr-based alloy as a fuel cladding was applied to the optimized manufacturing process which could be found by different parameter studies. Generally, the manufacturing process of a fuel cladding was divided into two stages. In the first stage, the TREX (Tube Reduced Extrusion), which is a semi-product to make a fuel cladding, is manufactured by a sequence of a malting, beta-forging, beta-quenching, extrusion, pilgering, and annealing. In the second stage, the fuel cladding, which is final product, is manufactured by several pilgering steps containing an intermediate and final annealing from the TREX. So, the quality of the fuel cladding as a final product could be affected by the TREX property as a semi-product. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation is to evaluate the property of HANA alloy during a sequence of the TREX manufacturing process

  20. Research, development, and demonstration of nickel-iron batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-01

    The objective of this program is to develop a nickel-iron battery suitable for use in electric vehicles. Ultimately, it is expected that a number of these batteries will be demonstrated under the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Act of 1976. The report presents the technical approach and a summary of the progress that was achieved under the contract. Work began 1 May 1978. The report covers the period through September 1978. (TFD)

  1. High-temperature corrosion-resistant iron-aluminide (FeAl) alloys exhibiting improved weldability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziasz, Philip J.; Goodwin, Gene M.; Liu, Chain T.

    1996-01-01

    This invention relates to improved corrosion-resistant iron-aluminide intermetallic alloys. The alloys of this invention comprise, in atomic percent, from about 30% to about 40% aluminum alloyed with from about 0.1% to about 0.5% carbon, no more than about 0.04% boron such that the atomic weight ratio of boron to carbon in the alloy is in the range of from about 0.01:1 to about 0.08:1, from about 0.01 to about 3.5% of one or more transition metals selected from Group IVB, VB, and VIB elements and the balance iron wherein the alloy exhibits improved resistance to hot cracking during welding.

  2. Corrosion characteristics of an aluminium alloy in the H3PO4 - CO2 mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aljinovic, Lj.; Smith, M.; Gotovac, V.

    1998-01-01

    The Al 6063 alloy examined in this work contains silicon and magnesium capable of forming Mg 2 Si and iron, which can form an intermetallic second phase (FeAl 3 ). In order to examine the influence of temperature on the corrosion behaviour of the Al 6063 alloy, examinations were carried out in aerated H 3 PO 4 and in H 3 PO 4 saturated with CO 2 at temperatures of 20, 30, 40, and 50 C. The following electrochemical methods were applied: determination of dependence of E OCP on time, recording of anodic and cathodic polarization curves, and cyclic voltammetry. It has been observed that corrosion parameters obtained are strongly temperature dependent. They also depend on CO 2 dissolved in H 3 PO 4 . CO 2 retards cathodic and anodic reactions at all temperatures, which can be attributed to formation of a kind of mechanical passivity as alloy components react with CO 2 . (orig.)

  3. Mechanical properties and oxidation and corrosion resistance of reduced-chromium 304 stainless steel alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.; Barrett, C. A.; Gyorgak, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental program was undertaken to identify effective substitutes for part of the Cr in 304 stainless steel as a method of conserving the strategic element Cr. Although special emphasis was placed on tensile properties, oxidation and corrosion resistance were also examined. Results indicate that over the temperature range of -196 C to 540 C the yield stress of experimental austenitic alloys with only 12 percent Cr compare favorably with the 18 percent Cr in 304 stainless steel. Oxidation resistance and in most cases corrosion resistance for the experimental alloys were comparable to the commercial alloy. Effective substitutes for Cr included Al, Mo, Si, Ti, and V, while Ni and Mn contents were increased to maintain an austenitic structure.

  4. Corrosion behaviour of 8090 alloy in saline solution with moderate aggressiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conde, A.; Damborenea, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion studies of Al-Li alloys are not so extensive and concentrate almost exclusively on atmospheric exposure tests and accelerated laboratory tests due to the fact they provide a reasonable approximation to the real behaviour of the alloy in service conditions. This paper attempts to establish a correlation between the evolution of the impedance diagrams and the process of the attack undergone by a commercial 8090 T8171 alloy, with the aim of establishing the kinetics of the corrosion process. After 100 h of immersion, samples showed only a slight intergranular attack. As a results of the low aggressiveness of the solution no major deviations from the ideal behaviour described by the Randles circuit are expected in the impedance plots. After 50 hours of testing, the impedance diagram evolves towards two semicircles which seem to be related with the charge transfer and ionic migration through the oxide layer and the adsorption of electrolyte anions. (Author) 7 refs

  5. Stress corrosion cracking resistance of aluminum alloy 7000 series after two-step aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jegdić Bore V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of one step-and a new (short two-step aging on the resistance to stress corrosion cracking of an aluminum alloy 7000 series was investigated, using slow strain rate test and fracture mechanics method. Aging level in the tested alloy was evaluated by means of scanning electron microscopy and measurements of electrical resistivity. It was shown that the alloy after the new two-step aging is significantly more resistant to stress corrosion cracking. Values of tensile properties and fracture toughness are similar for both thermal states. Processes that take place at the crack tip have been considered. The effect of the testing solution temperature on the crack growth rate on the plateau was determined. Two values of the apparent activation energy were obtained. These values correspond to different processes that control crack growth rate on the plateau at higher and lower temperatures. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 34028 i br. TR 34016

  6. Study of Influence of an Annealing on Corrosion Stability of Pipes-shells for Fuel of Zr1Nb Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petel'guzov, I.A.; Rodak, A.G.; Pasenov, F.A.; Ishchenko, N.I.

    2006-01-01

    Explored influence an annealing to the kinetics of corrosion and mechanical characteristics of pipe material for shells fuel elements made from the experimental zirconium alloy Zr1Nb calcium-thermal way of production, in the comparison with the staff alloy E110 electrolytic way of production. Determined parameters of kinetics of corrosion depending on temperature and duration annealing before testing. Conducted also mechanical testing the alloys on the ring samples. Determined ranges of temperatures, within which corrosion characteristics save values, close to source, and connecting temperatures, under which is observed reduction research; investigating features

  7. Flow-induced corrosion of absorbable magnesium alloy: In-situ and real-time electrochemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Juan; Jang, Yongseok; Wan, Guojiang; Giridharan, Venkataraman; Song, Guang-Ling; Xu, Zhigang; Koo, Youngmi; Qi, Pengkai; Sankar, Jagannathan; Huang, Nan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An in-situ and real-time electrochemical monitoring of flow-induced corrosion of Mg alloy is designed in a vascular bioreactor. • Effect of hydrodynamics on corrosion kinetics, types, rates and products is analyzed. • Flow accelerates mass and electron transfer, leading to an increase in uniform and localized corrosions. • Flow increases not only the thickness of uniform corrosion product layer, but the removal rate of localized corrosion products. • Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and linear polarization-measured polarization resistances provide a consistent correlation to corrosion rate calculated by computed tomography. - Abstract: An in-situ and real-time electrochemical study in a vascular bioreactor was designed to analyze corrosion mechanism of magnesium alloy (MgZnCa) under mimetic hydrodynamic conditions. Effect of hydrodynamics on corrosion kinetics, types, rates and products was analyzed. Flow-induced shear stress (FISS) accelerated mass and electron transfer, leading to an increase in uniform and localized corrosions. FISS increased the thickness of uniform corrosion layer, but filiform corrosion decreased this layer resistance at high FISS conditions. FISS also increased the removal rate of localized corrosion products. Impedance-estimated and linear polarization-measured polarization resistances provided a consistent correlation to corrosion rate calculated by computed tomography.

  8. Effects of environmental variables on the crack initiation stages of corrosion fatigue of high strength aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteat, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    Fatigue initiation in six aluminum alloys used in the aircraft industry was investigated. Cyclic loading superimposed on a constant stress was alternated with atmospheric corrosion. Tests made at different stress levels revealed that a residual stress as low as 39% of the yield strength caused stress corrosion cracking in some of the alloys. An atmospheric corrosion rate meter developed to measure the corrosivity of the atmosphere is described. An easily duplicated hole in the square test specimen with a self-induced residual stress was developed.

  9. The influence of nitrogen, phosphorus, sulphur and nickel on the stress corrosion cracking of austenitic Fe-Ni-Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cihal, V.

    1985-01-01

    From the results of the stress corrosion cracking tests it is evident that austenitic alloys with a phosphorus content 0.01% causes a strong increase in stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of alloys with a nickel content in the range 33 to 38%. With a nickel content of approx. 35%, an increase of nitrogen concentration to approx. 0.15% also produces a significant effect on stress corrosion cracking susceptibility. A sulphur content up to 0.033% does not produce a significant effect on stress corrosion cracking. (author)

  10. Stress corrosion cracking of nickel alloys in bicarbonate and chloride solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ares, A. E.; Carranza, R. M.; Giordano, C. M.; Zadorozne, N. S.; Rebak, R.B.

    2013-01-01

    Alloy 22 is one of the candidates for the manufacture of high level radioactive waste containers. These containers provide services in natural environments characterized by multi-ionics solutions, it is estimated they could suffer three types of deterioration: general corrosion, localized corrosion (crevice corrosion) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC). It has been confirmed that the presence of bicarbonate at temperatures above 60°C and applied potentials around +400 mVSCE are necessary in order to produce cracking, . This susceptibility may be associated to the instability of the passive film formed and to the formation of an anodic current peak in the polarization curves in these media. Until now, it is unclear the role played by each alloying element (Ni, Cr or Mo) in the SCC susceptibility of Alloy 22 in these media The aim of this work is to evaluate the SCC susceptibility of nickel-based alloys in media containing bicarbonate and chloride ions, at high temperature. Slow Strain Rate Testing (SSRT) was conducted to samples of different alloys: 22 (Ni-Cr-Mo), 600 (Ni-Cr-Fe), 800H (Ni-Fe-Cr) y 201 (99.5% Ni).This tests were conducted in 1.1 mol/L NaHCO 3 +1.5 mol/L NaCl a 90°C and different applied potentials (+200mVSCE,+300 mVSCE, +400 mVSCE). These results were complemented with those obtained in a previous work, where we studied the anodic electrochemical behavior of nickel base alloys under the same conditions. It was found that alloy 22 showed a current peak in a potential range between +200 mVSCE and +300 mVSCE when immersed in bicarbonate ions containing solutions. This peak was attributed to the presence of chromium in the alloys. The SSRT showed that only alloy 22 has a clear indication of stress corrosion cracking. The current results suggested that the presence of an anodic peak in the polarization curves was not a sufficient condition for cracking. (author)

  11. Investigation of fretting corrosion of vacuum-chrome-plated vt3-1 titanium alloy in pair with unprotected vt3-1 alloy and 40khnma steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojkh, I.L.; Koltunova, L.N.; Vejtsman, M.G.; Birman, Ya.N.; Skosarev, A.V.; Kogan, I.S.

    1978-01-01

    The character of destruction of contacting surfaces in the process of fretting corrosion of titanium alloy VT3-1 chromized in vacuum in pair with unprotected alloy VT3-1 and steel 40KhNMA has been studied by scanning electron microscopy, electronography, and recording the surface profile. The specific load was 200 kg/cm 2 , vibration amplitude 50 mkm and frequency 500 Hz. It has been established that pairs unprotected with coating are subjected to intensive fretting corrosion especially when they are made of titanium alloy. For the pair chromized alloy VT3-1 - unprotected alloy VT3-1 no destruction of a chromized surface is observed. Vacuum chromium coating in the pair with steel 40KhNMA reveals similar properties as in pair with a titanium alloy. The surface of a steel sample is destroyed because of fretting corrosion, though the intensity of corrosion is lower than in the case of unprotected pairs. Vacuum chromium coating is recommended for protection of titanium alloy VT3-1 from fretting corrosion in pair with steel 40KhNMA or an alloy VT3-1 especially in those cases when various organic coatings are unsuitable

  12. Investigation on wear resistance and corrosion resistance of electron beam cladding co-alloy coating on Inconel617

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hailang; Zhang, Guopei; Huang, Yiping; Qi, Zhengwei; Wang, Bo; Yu, Zhibiao; Wang, Dezhi

    2018-04-01

    To improve surface properties of Inconel 617 alloy (referred to as 617 alloy), co-alloy coating metallurgically bonded to substrate was prepared on the surface of 617 alloy by electron beam cladding. The microstructure, phase composition, microhardness, tribological properties and corrosion resistance of the coatings were investigated. The XRD results of the coatings reinforced by co-alloy (Co800) revealed the presence of γ-Co, CoCx and Cr23C6 phase as matrix and new metastable phases of Cr2Ni3 and Co3Mo2Si. These hypoeutectic structures contain primary dendrites and interdendritic eutectics. The metallurgical bonding forms well between the cladding layer and the matrix of 617 alloy. In most studied conditions, the co-alloy coating displays a better hardness, tribological performance, i.e., lower coefficient of frictions and wear rates, corrosion resistance in 1 mol L‑1 HCl solution, than the 617 alloy.

  13. Improving Corrosion Resistance and Biocompatibility of Magnesium Alloy by Sodium Hydroxide and Hydrofluoric Acid Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Jiang Pan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Owing to excellent mechanical property and biodegradation, magnesium-based alloys have been widely investigated for temporary implants such as cardiovascular stent and bone graft; however, the fast biodegradation in physiological environment and the limited surface biocompatibility hinder their clinical applications. In the present study, magnesium alloy was treated by sodium hydroxide (NaOH and hydrogen fluoride (HF solutions, respectively, to produce the chemical conversion layers with the aim of improving the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. The results of attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS indicated that the chemical conversion layers of magnesium hydroxide or magnesium fluoride were obtained successfully. Sodium hydroxide treatment can significantly enhance the surface hydrophilicity while hydrogen fluoride treatment improved the surface hydrophobicity. Both the chemical conversion layers can obviously improve the corrosion resistance of the pristine magnesium alloy. Due to the hydrophobicity of magnesium fluoride, HF-treated magnesium alloy showed the relative better corrosion resistance than that of NaOH-treated substrate. According to the results of hemolysis assay and platelet adhesion, the chemical surface modified samples exhibited improved blood compatibility as compared to the pristine magnesium alloy. Furthermore, the chemical surface modified samples improved cytocompatibility to endothelial cells, the cells had better cell adhesion and proliferative profiles on the modified surfaces. Due to the excellent hydrophilicity, the NaOH-treated substrate displayed better blood compatibility and cytocompatibility to endothelial cells than that of HF-treated sample. It was considered that the method of the present study can be used for the surface modification of the magnesium alloy to enhance the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility.

  14. Relationship between microstructure, cytotoxicity and corrosion properties of a Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colić, Miodrag; Rudolf, Rebeka; Stamenković, Dragoslav; Anzel, Ivan; Vucević, Dragana; Jenko, Monika; Lazić, Vojkan; Lojen, Gorazd

    2010-01-01

    Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys (SMAs) have been investigated as materials for medical devices, but their biomedical application is still limited. The aim of this work was to compare the microstructure, corrosion and cytotoxicity in vitro of a Cu-Al-Ni SMA. Rapidly solidified (RS) thin ribbons, manufactured via melt spinning, were used for the tests. The control alloy was a permanent mould casting of the same composition, but without shape memory effect. The results show that RS ribbons are significantly more resistant to corrosion compared with the control alloy, as judged by the lesser release of Cu and Ni into the conditioning medium. These results correlate with the finding that RS ribbons were not cytotoxic to L929 mouse fibroblasts and rat thymocytes. In addition, the RS ribbon conditioning medium inhibited cellular proliferation and IL-2 production by activated rat splenocytes to a much lesser extent. The inhibitory effects were almost completely abolished by conditioning the RS ribbons in culture medium for 4 weeks. Microstructural analysis showed that RS ribbons are martensitic, with boron particles as a minor phase. In contrast, the control Cu-Al-Ni alloy had a complex multiphase microstructure. Examination of the alloy surfaces after conditioning by energy dispersive X-ray and Auger electron spectroscopy showed the formation of Cu and Al oxide layers and confirmed that the metals in RS ribbons are less susceptible to oxidation and corrosion compared with the control alloy. In conclusion, these results suggest that rapid solidification significantly improves the corrosion stability and biocompatibility in vitro of Cu-Al-Ni SMA ribbons.

  15. Temperature Effect on the Corrosion Behaviour of Alloy 31 in polluted H3PO4 and Analysis of the Corrosion Products by Laser Raman Microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Escrivá Cerdán, Clara; Blasco-Tamarit, E.; García-García, D.M.; Garcia-Anton, Jose; Ben-Bachir, A.

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical behaviour of Alloy 31, a highly alloyed austenitic stainless steel (UNS N08031), in a 40 wt.% H3PO4 solution polluted with 2 wt.% H2SO4, 0.06 wt.% KCl and 0.6 wt.% HF was evaluated by cyclic potentiodinamic curves at different temperatures (20, 40, 60 and 80 degrees C). Temperature was found to favour both cathodic and anodic reactions. The corrosion products forming on the surface of Alloy 31 were indentified in situ by Laser Raman microscope. Corrosion products were mainly i...

  16. Controlled Release from Core-Shell Nanoporous Silica Particles for Corrosion Inhibition of Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingmao Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerium (Ce corrosion inhibitors were encapsulated into hexagonally ordered nanoporous silica particles via single-step aerosol-assisted self-assembly. The core/shell structured particles are effective for corrosion inhibition of aluminum alloy AA2024-T3. Numerical simulation proved that the core-shell nanostructure delays the release process. The effective diffusion coefficient elucidated from release data for monodisperse particles in water was 1.0×10−14 m2s for Ce3+ compared to 2.5×10−13 m2s for NaCl. The pore size, pore surface chemistry, and the inhibitor solubility are crucial factors for the application. Microporous hydrophobic particles encapsulating a less soluble corrosion inhibitor are desirable for long-term corrosion inhibition.

  17. Anti-corrosive Conversion Coating on Aluminium Alloys Using High Temperature Steam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    Aluminium is extensively used as a structural material due to its excellent strength to weight ratio and corrosion resistance properties. The surface of aluminium under normal conditions has a thin oxide film (1-10nm) which provides corrosion resistance. However due to lower thickness, flaws...... and heterogeneity of native oxide layer does not provide long time corrosion resistance and adhesion of organic coating for a particular function in different environments. In order to enhance the corrosion resistance and adhesion of organic coating, the aluminium native oxide layer is treated to transform...... or convert to a functional conversion coating. In the last several decades chromate conversion coating (CrCCs) have been the most common conversion coatings used for aluminium alloys. Due to the toxicity of the hexavalent chrome, however, environmental friendly alternatives to CrCCs have been investigated...

  18. Influence of Temperature on Corrosion Behavior of 2A02 Al Alloy in Marine Atmospheric Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Min; Liu, Li; Fan, Lei; Yu, Zhongfen; Li, Ying; Oguzie, Emeka E.; Wang, Fuhui

    2018-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of 2A02 Al alloy under 4 mg/cm2 NaCl deposition at different temperatures (from 30 to 80 °C) has been studied. This corrosion behavior was researched using mass-gain, scanning electron microscopy-SEM, laser scanning confocal microscopy-LSCM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy-XPS and other techniques. The results showed and revealed that the corrosion was maximal at 60 °C after 200 h of exposure. The increase of temperature not only affected the solubility of oxygen gas in the thin film, but also promoted the transport of ions (such as Cl−), and the formation of protective AlO(OH), which further affects the corrosion speed. PMID:29401690

  19. Influence of Temperature on Corrosion Behavior of 2A02 Al Alloy in Marine Atmospheric Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Cao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of 2A02 Al alloy under 4 mg/cm2 NaCl deposition at different temperatures (from 30 to 80 °C has been studied. This corrosion behavior was researched using mass-gain, scanning electron microscopy-SEM, laser scanning confocal microscopy-LSCM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy-XPS and other techniques. The results showed and revealed that the corrosion was maximal at 60 °C after 200 h of exposure. The increase of temperature not only affected the solubility of oxygen gas in the thin film, but also promoted the transport of ions (such as Cl−, and the formation of protective AlO(OH, which further affects the corrosion speed.

  20. Controlled Release from Core-Shell Nano porous Silica Particles for Corrosion Inhibition of Aluminum Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, X.; Rathod, Sh.; Shah, P.; Brinker, C.J.; Jiang, X.; Jiang, Y.; Liu, N.; Xu, H.; Brinker, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    Cerium (Ce) corrosion inhibitors were encapsulated into hexagonally ordered nanoporous silica particles via single-step aerosol-assisted self-assembly. The core/shell structured particles are effective for corrosion inhibition of aluminum alloy AA2024-T3. Numerical simulation proved that the core-shell nanostructure delays the release process. The effective diffusion coefficient elucidated from release data for monodisperse particles in water was 1.0x10-14 m 2 s for Ce 3+ compared to 2.5x10-13 m 2 s for NaCl. The pore size, pore surface chemistry, and the inhibitor solubility are crucial factors for the application. Microporous hydrophobic particles encapsulating a less soluble corrosion inhibitor are desirable for long-term corrosion inhibition.