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Sample records for nickel regulation results

  1. Nickel allergy in a Danish population 25 years after the first nickel regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlström, Malin G; Menné, Torkil; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nickel in metallic items has been regulated in Denmark since 1990; however, 10% of young Danish women are still sensitized to nickel. There is a need for continuous surveillance of the effect of regulation. OBJECTIVES: To identify current self-reported metallic exposures leading...... reactions within 30 min of contact were reported by 30.7% of patients. CONCLUSIONS: Nickel exposures that led to the implementation of a nickel regulation seem to persist. The durations of contact with metallic items to fall under the current REACH regulation of nickel correspond well with the results...... to dermatitis in nickel-allergic patients, and the minimum contact time needed for dermatitis to occur. METHODS: A questionnaire was sent to all patients who reacted positively to nickel sulfate 5% pet. within the last 5 years at the Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Gentofte Hospital. RESULTS...

  2. The association between hand eczema and nickel allergy has weakened among young women in the general population following the Danish nickel regulation: results from two cross-sectional studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Linneberg, Allan René; Menné, Torkil

    2009-01-01

    tested with nickel. Data were analysed by logistic regression analyses and associations were expressed as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: The prevalence of concomitant nickel contact allergy and a history of hand eczema decreased among 18-35-year-old women from 9.......0% in 1990 to 2.1% in 2006 (P women, no significant changes were observed in the association between...

  3. Prevalence of nickel and cobalt allergy among female patients with dermatitis before and after Danish government regulation: a 23-year retrospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Carlsen, Berit Christina

    2009-01-01

    with isolated cobalt allergy than among patients with nickel allergy (P exposures was available. CONCLUSIONS: Nickel allergy decreased among young female patients with dermatitis between 1985 and 2007 whereas it increased among older patients, probably......BACKGROUND: An increased prevalence of nickel allergy prompted the Danish government to prohibit excessive nickel release (ie, >0.5 microg nickel/cm(2)/wk) from consumer products in 1990. Concomitant allergy to nickel and cobalt is often observed among patients with dermatitis, probably as a result...... of cosensitization. OBJECTIVES: The study investigated the development of nickel and cobalt allergy among Danish female patients with dermatitis tested between 1985 and 2007. This was done to examine whether Danish nickel regulation has reduced the prevalence of nickel allergy and to examine whether the prevalence...

  4. Characterization and Growth Mechanism of Nickel Nanowires Resulting from Reduction of Nickel Formate in Polyol Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga A. Logutenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nickel linear nanostructures were synthesized by reduction of nickel formate with hydrazine hydrate in ethylene glycol medium in the absence of any surfactants or capping agents for direction of the particles growth. The effect of the synthesis conditions such as temperature, reduction time, type of polyol, and nickel formate concentration on the reduction products was studied. The size and morphology of the nickel nanowires were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that the nickel nanocrystallites were wire-shaped with a face-center-cubic phase. Ethylene glycol was found to play a crucial role in the formation of the nickel nanowires. The possible growth processes of the wire-shaped particles taking place at 110 and 130°C are discussed. It was shown that, under certain synthesis conditions, nickel nanowires grow on the surface of the crystals of the solid intermediate of nickel with hydrazine hydrate.

  5. Characterization and Growth Mechanism of Nickel Nanowires Resulting from Reduction of Nickel Formate in Polyol Medium

    OpenAIRE

    Logutenko, Olga A.; Titkov, Alexander I.; Vorob’yov, Alexander M.; Yukhin, Yriy M.; Lyakhov, Nikolay Z.

    2016-01-01

    Nickel linear nanostructures were synthesized by reduction of nickel formate with hydrazine hydrate in ethylene glycol medium in the absence of any surfactants or capping agents for direction of the particles growth. The effect of the synthesis conditions such as temperature, reduction time, type of polyol, and nickel formate concentration on the reduction products was studied. The size and morphology of the nickel nanowires were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning, and transmission ...

  6. Selected Test Results from the Encell Technology Nickel Iron Battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Summer Kamal Rhodes [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Power Sources R& D; Baca, Wes Edmund [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Power Sources R& D; Avedikian, Kristan [Encell Technology, Alachua, FL (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The performance of the Encell Nickel Iron (NiFe) battery was measured. Tests included capacity, capacity as a function of rate, capacity as a function of temperature, charge retention (28-day), efficiency, accelerated life projection, and water refill evaluation. The goal of this work was to evaluate the general performance of the Encell NiFe battery technology for stationary applications and demonstrate the chemistry's capabilities in extreme conditions. Test results have indicated that the Encell NiFe battery technology can provide power levels up to the 6C discharge rate, ampere-hour efficiency above 70%. In summary, the Encell batteries have met performance metrics established by the manufacturer. Long-term cycle tests are not included in this report. A cycle test at elevated temperature was run, funded by the manufacturer, which Encell uses to predict long-term cycling performance, and which passed their prescribed metrics.

  7. Nickel extraction from nickel matte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subagja, R.

    2018-01-01

    In present work, the results of research activities to make nickel metal from nickel matte are presented. The research activities were covering a) nickel matte characterization using Inductively Couple plasma (ICP), Electron Probe Micro Analyzer (EPMA) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), b) nickel matte dissolution process to dissolve nickel from nickel matte into the spent electrolyte solutions that contains hydrochloric acid, c) purification of nickel chloride leach solution by copper cementation process to remove copper using nickel matte, selective precipitation process to remove iron, solvent extraction using Tri normal octyl amine to separate cobalt from nickel chloride solutions and d) Nickel electro winning process to precipitate nickel into the cathode surface from purified nickel chloride solution by using direct current. The research activities created 99, 72 % pure nickel metal as the final product of the process.

  8. 75 Ah and 10 boilerplate nickel-hydrogen battery designs and test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daman, M. E.; Manzo, Michelle A.; Chang, R.; Cruz, E.

    1992-01-01

    The results of initial characterization testing of 75 Ah actively cooled bipolar battery designs and 10 boilerplate nickel-hydrogen battery designs are presented. The results demonstrate the extended cycle life capability of the Ah batteries and the high capacity utilizations at various discharge rates of the nickel-hydrogen batteries.

  9. Nickel Dermatitis - Nickel Excretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menné, T.; Thorboe, A.

    1976-01-01

    Nickel excretion in urine in four females -sensitive to nickel with an intermittent dyshidrotic eruption was measured with flameless atomic absorption. Excretion of nickel was found to be increased in association with outbreaks of vesicles. The results support the idea that the chronic condition ...

  10. Excessive nickel release from mobile phones--a persistent cause of nickel allergy and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter; Johansen, Jeanne D; Zachariae, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Despite the political intention to limit nickel allergy and dermatitis in Europeans, nickel allergy remains frequent. There are several explanations for the persistence of nickel allergy and dermatitis, including the increasing use of mobile phones. Before regulation of nickel release from mobile...... phones, we showed that eight (19.5%) of 41 mobile phones marketed in Denmark between 2003 and 2007 released nickel in concentrations that may result in nickel allergy and dermatitis. In 2009, the EU Nickel Directive was revised to include nickel-releasing mobile phones....

  11. Excessive nickel release from mobile phones--a persistent cause of nickel allergy and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter; Johansen, Jeanne D; Zachariae, Claus

    2011-01-01

    phones, we showed that eight (19.5%) of 41 mobile phones marketed in Denmark between 2003 and 2007 released nickel in concentrations that may result in nickel allergy and dermatitis. In 2009, the EU Nickel Directive was revised to include nickel-releasing mobile phones.......Despite the political intention to limit nickel allergy and dermatitis in Europeans, nickel allergy remains frequent. There are several explanations for the persistence of nickel allergy and dermatitis, including the increasing use of mobile phones. Before regulation of nickel release from mobile...

  12. Long-life fatigue test results for two nickel-base structural alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mowbray, D.F.; Giaquinto, E.V.; Mehringer, F.J.

    1978-11-01

    The results are reported of fatigue tests on two nickel--base alloys, hot-cold-worked and stress-relieved nickel--chrome--iron Alloy 600 and mill-annealed nickel--chrome--moly--iron Alloy 625 in which S-N data were obtained in the life range of 10 6 to 10 10 cycles. The tests were conducted in air at 600 0 F, in the reversed membrane loading mode, at a frequency of approx. 1850 Hz. An electromagnetic, closed loop servo-controlled machine was built to perform the tests. A description of the machine is given

  13. Nickel-regulated heart rate variability: The roles of oxidative stress and inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Hsueh, Tzu-Wei; Chang, Chuen-Chau; Hwang, Jing-Shiang; Chuang, Kai-Jen; Yan, Yuan-Horng; Cheng, Tsun-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) has been reported to be a putative marker of cardiac autonomic imbalance caused by exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM). Our objective in this study was to determine the effects on HRV from exposure to nickel, an important chemical component of ambient PM that results in oxidative stress and inflammation. HRV data were collected for 72 h before lung exposure (baseline) and 72 h after intratracheal exposure (response) to nickel sulphate (NiSO 4 ; 526 μg) in Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats. The antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and the anti-inflammatory celecoxib were intraperitoneally injected to examine post-exposure oxidative and inflammatory responses. Self-controlled experiments examined the effects of NiSO 4 exposure on average normal-to-normal intervals (ANN), natural logarithm-transformed standard deviation of the normal-to-normal intervals (LnSDNN) and root mean square of successive differences of adjacent normal-to-normal intervals (LnRMSSD); the resulting data were sequentially analysed using the generalised estimating equation model. HRV effects on NiSO 4 -exposed SH rats were greater than those on NiSO 4 -exposed WKY rats. After adjusted the HRV responses in the WKY rats as control, ANN and LnRMSSD were found to be quadratically increased over 72 h after exposure to NiSO 4 . Both NAC and celecoxib mitigated the NiSO 4 -induced alterations in HRV during the exposure period. The results suggest that concurrent Ni-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory responses play important roles in regulating HRV. These findings help bridge the gap between epidemiological and clinical studies on the plausible mechanisms of the cardiovascular consequences induced by chemical components in ambient PM. -- Highlights: ► To determine the effects on HRV from exposure to nickel. ► ANN and LnRMSSD were found to be quadratically increased after exposure to Ni. ► NAC and celecoxib mitigated the Ni

  14. Nickel-regulated heart rate variability: The roles of oxidative stress and inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Hsiao-Chi, E-mail: r92841005@ntu.edu.tw [School of Respiratory Therapy, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsueh, Tzu-Wei, E-mail: r95841015@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, Department of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chuen-Chau, E-mail: nekota@tmu.edu.tw [Department of Anaesthesiology, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hwang, Jing-Shiang, E-mail: jshwang@stat.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Statistical Science, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chuang, Kai-Jen, E-mail: kjc@tmu.edu.tw [Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yan, Yuan-Horng, E-mail: d97841006@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, Department of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research, Ditmanson Medical Foundation Chia-Yi Christian Hospital, Chiayi City, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Tsun-Jen, E-mail: tcheng@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, Department of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Public Health, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2013-01-15

    Heart rate variability (HRV) has been reported to be a putative marker of cardiac autonomic imbalance caused by exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM). Our objective in this study was to determine the effects on HRV from exposure to nickel, an important chemical component of ambient PM that results in oxidative stress and inflammation. HRV data were collected for 72 h before lung exposure (baseline) and 72 h after intratracheal exposure (response) to nickel sulphate (NiSO{sub 4}; 526 μg) in Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats. The antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and the anti-inflammatory celecoxib were intraperitoneally injected to examine post-exposure oxidative and inflammatory responses. Self-controlled experiments examined the effects of NiSO{sub 4} exposure on average normal-to-normal intervals (ANN), natural logarithm-transformed standard deviation of the normal-to-normal intervals (LnSDNN) and root mean square of successive differences of adjacent normal-to-normal intervals (LnRMSSD); the resulting data were sequentially analysed using the generalised estimating equation model. HRV effects on NiSO{sub 4}-exposed SH rats were greater than those on NiSO{sub 4}-exposed WKY rats. After adjusted the HRV responses in the WKY rats as control, ANN and LnRMSSD were found to be quadratically increased over 72 h after exposure to NiSO{sub 4}. Both NAC and celecoxib mitigated the NiSO{sub 4}-induced alterations in HRV during the exposure period. The results suggest that concurrent Ni-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory responses play important roles in regulating HRV. These findings help bridge the gap between epidemiological and clinical studies on the plausible mechanisms of the cardiovascular consequences induced by chemical components in ambient PM. -- Highlights: ► To determine the effects on HRV from exposure to nickel. ► ANN and LnRMSSD were found to be quadratically increased after exposure to Ni. ► NAC and

  15. Characterization and Growth Mechanism of Nickel Nano wires Resulting from Reduction of Nickel Formate in Polyol Medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logutenko, O.A.; Titkov, A.I.; Vorobyov, A.M.; Yukhin, Y.M.; Lyakhov, N.Z.

    2016-01-01

    Nickel linear nano structures were synthesized by reduction of nickel formate with hydrazine hydrate in ethylene glycol medium in the absence of any surfactants or capping agents for direction of the particles growth. The effect of the synthesis conditions such as temperature, reduction time, type of polyol, and nickel formate concentration on the reduction products was studied. The size and morphology of the nickel nano wires were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that the nickel nano crystallites were wire-shaped with a face-center-cubic phase. Ethylene glycol was found to play a crucial role in the formation of the nickel nano wires. The possible growth processes of the wire-shaped particles taking place at 110 and 130 degree are discussed. It was shown that, under certain synthesis conditions, nickel nano wires grow on the surface of the crystals of the solid intermediate of nickel with hydrazine hydrate.

  16. Nickel allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, L A; Johansen, J D; Menné, T

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The frequency of nickel allergy varies between different population groups. Exposure regulation has proven effective in decreasing the frequency. Experimental studies with other allergens have shown a significant relation between patch test reactivity and repeated open application test...... in a patch test and a dilution series of three concentrations in a ROAT, with duration of up to 21 days. Eighteen persons with no nickel allergy were included as control group for the ROAT. RESULTS: The predicted dose which will elicit a reaction in 10% of allergic individuals was calculated to be 0......-response; indeed, there was no statistically significant difference. CONCLUSIONS: For elicitation of nickel allergy the elicitation threshold for the patch test is higher than the elicitation threshold (per application) for the ROAT, but is approximately the same as the accumulated elicitation threshold...

  17. Life cycle test results of a bipolar nickel hydrogen battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    A history is given of low Earth orbit (LEO) laboratory test data on a 6.5 ampere-hour bipolar nickel hydrogen battery designed and built at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The bipolar concept is a means of achieving the goal of producing an acceptable battery, of higher energy density, able to withstand the demands of low-Earth-orbit regimes. Over 4100 LEO cycles were established on a ten cell battery. It seems that any perturbation on normal cycling effects the cells performance. Explanations and theories of the battery's behavior are varied and widespread among those closely associated with it. Deep discharging does provide a reconditioning effect and further experimentation is planned in this area. The battery watt-hour efficiency is about 75 percent and the time averaged, discharge voltage is about 1.26 volts for all cells at both the C/4 and LEO rate. Since a significant portion of the electrode capacity has degraded, the LEO cycle discharges are approaching depths of 90 to 100 percent of the high rate capacity. Therefore, the low end-of-discharge voltages occur precipitously after the knee of the discharge curve and is more an indication of electrode capacity and is a lesser indicator of overall cell performance.

  18. Results of a technical analysis of the Hubble Space Telescope nickel-cadmium and nickel-hydrogen batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Michelle A.

    1991-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Program Office requested the expertise of the NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Steering Committee (NAFBSSC) in the conduct of an independent assessment of the HST's battery system to assist in their decision of whether to fly nickel-cadmium or nickel-hydrogen batteries on the telescope. In response, a subcommittee to the NAFBSSC was organized with membership comprised of experts with background in the nickel-cadmium/nickel-hydrogen secondary battery/power systems areas. The work and recommendations of that subcommittee are presented.

  19. Excessive nickel release from mobile phones--a persistent cause of nickel allergy and dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Peter; Johansen, Jeanne D; Zachariae, Claus; Menné, Torkil; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2011-12-01

    Despite the political intention to limit nickel allergy and dermatitis in Europeans, nickel allergy remains frequent. There are several explanations for the persistence of nickel allergy and dermatitis, including the increasing use of mobile phones. Before regulation of nickel release from mobile phones, we showed that eight (19.5%) of 41 mobile phones marketed in Denmark between 2003 and 2007 released nickel in concentrations that may result in nickel allergy and dermatitis. In 2009, the EU Nickel Directive was revised to include nickel-releasing mobile phones. To investigate the proportion of mobile phones sold in Denmark that release nickel after regulation. Metallic parts from 50 randomly selected mobile phones currently for sale in Denmark were tested for nickel release by use of the dimethylglyoxime (DMG)-nickel spot test. Nine (18%) phones showed at least one positive DMG test reaction and two phones had more than one DMG test-positive spot. Apparently, the proportion of mobile phones with significant nickel release remains unchanged, despite the 2009 revision of the EU Nickel Directive. We encourage manufacturers to measure nickel release from metallic components used in the assembly of mobile phones to ensure safe products. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Nickel induces transcriptional down-regulation of DNA repair pathways in tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Susan E; Scanlon, Christine D; Hegan, Denise C; Sulkowski, Parker L; Glazer, Peter M

    2017-06-01

    The heavy metal nickel is a known carcinogen, and occupational exposure to nickel compounds has been implicated in human lung and nasal cancers. Unlike many other environmental carcinogens, however, nickel does not directly induce DNA mutagenesis, and the mechanism of nickel-related carcinogenesis remains incompletely understood. Cellular nickel exposure leads to signaling pathway activation, transcriptional changes and epigenetic remodeling, processes also impacted by hypoxia, which itself promotes tumor growth without causing direct DNA damage. One of the mechanisms by which hypoxia contributes to tumor growth is the generation of genomic instability via down-regulation of high-fidelity DNA repair pathways. Here, we find that nickel exposure similarly leads to down-regulation of DNA repair proteins involved in homology-dependent DNA double-strand break repair (HDR) and mismatch repair (MMR) in tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic human lung cells. Functionally, nickel induces a defect in HDR capacity, as determined by plasmid-based host cell reactivation assays, persistence of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks and cellular hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation. Mechanistically, we find that nickel, in contrast to the metalloid arsenic, acutely induces transcriptional repression of HDR and MMR genes as part of a global transcriptional pattern similar to that seen with hypoxia. Finally, we find that exposure to low-dose nickel reduces the activity of the MLH1 promoter, but only arsenic leads to long-term MLH1 promoter silencing. Together, our data elucidate novel mechanisms of heavy metal carcinogenesis and contribute to our understanding of the influence of the microenvironment on the regulation of DNA repair pathways. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. First experimental results on CMOS Integrated Nickel Electroplated Resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yalcinkaya, Arda Deniz; Hansen, Ole

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results on MEMS metallic add-on post-fabrication effects on complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) transistors. Two versions of add-on processing, that use either e-beam evaporation or magnetron sputtering, are compared through investigation of the electri...

  2. Nickel exposure from keys: a Brazilian issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Nathalie Mie; Duarte, Ida Alzira Gomes; Hafner, Mariana de Figueiredo Silva; Lazzarini, Rosana

    2017-01-01

    Keys are a significant source of exposure to metal allergens and can be a relevant problem for nickel-allergic individuals. This study aimed to perform nickel and cobalt spot testing among the 5 most common Brazilian brands of keys. Among the tested keys, 100% showed positive result to nickel spot test, 83,3% presented strong positive reaction. 50% exhibited cobalt release as well. Nickel release from keys is very common in our country and may cause a negative impact on sensitized individual's quality of life. Study's results highlight the importance of establishing directives to regulate nickel release in Brazil.

  3. Test Results of a Ten Cell Bipolar Nickel-hydrogen Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A study was initiated to design and evaluate a new design concept for nickel-hydrogen cells. This concept involved constructing a battery in a bipolar stack with cells consisting of a one plate for each nickel and hydrogen electrode. Preliminary designs at the system level of this concept promised improvements in both volumetric and gravimetric energy densities, thermal management, life extension, costs, and peak power capability over more conventional designs. Test results were most encouraging. This preprototype battery, built with less than ideal components and hardware, exceeded expectations. A total of 2000 LEO cycles at 80 percent depth of discharge were accrued. A cycle life goal of 30,000 cycles appears achievable with minor design changes. These improvements include advanced technology nickel electrodes, insulated bipolar plates and specifically designed frames to minimize shunt currents. The discharge rate capability of this design exceeds 25C. At the 10C discharge rate, 80% of the battery capacity can be withdrawn in six minutes. This data shows that the bipolar design is well suited for those applications requiring high peak power pulses.

  4. Nickel and low CO2-controlled motility in Chlamydomonas through complementation of a paralyzed flagella mutant with chemically regulated promoters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenbaum Joel L

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a model system for the biology of unicellular green algae. Chemically regulated promoters, such as the nickel-inducible CYC6 or the low CO2-inducible CAH1 promoter, may prove useful for expressing, at precise times during its cell cycle, proteins with relevant biological functions, or complementing mutants in genes encoding such proteins. To this date, this has not been reported for the above promoters. Results We fused the CYC6 and CAH1 promoters to an HA-tagged RSP3 gene, encoding a protein of the flagellar radial spoke complex. The constructs were used for chemically regulated complementation of the pf14 mutant, carrying an ochre mutation in the RSP3 gene. 7 to 8% of the transformants showed cells with restored motility after induction with nickel or transfer to low CO2 conditions, but not in non-inducing conditions. Maximum complementation (5% motile cells was reached with very different kinetics (5-6 hours for CAH1, 48 hours for CYC6. The two inducible promoters drive much lower levels of RSP3 protein expression than the constitutive PSAD promoter, which shows almost complete rescue of motility. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first example of the use of the CYC6 or CAH1 promoters to perform a chemically regulated complementation of a Chlamydomonas mutant. Based on our data, the CYC6 and CAH1 promoters should be capable of fully complementing mutants in genes whose products exert their biological activity at low concentrations.

  5. Crystal habit modification of nickel-ferrite: development and results of initial laboratory testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, C.E.; Varrin, R.D.; Marks, C.; Barkatt, A.; Kim, K.; Fruzzetti, K.P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper documents the results of a laboratory test program conducted to assess the feasibility of using a new type of additive in the primary coolant of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) or to boiling water reactor (BWR) coolant. These additives, known as crystal habit modifiers (CHMs), could potentially be used to control the crystal habits, or shapes, that comprise primary deposits and crud. Similar additives are used throughout the chemical process industry to produce products with desirable crystalline structure, morphology, density, particle size, or surface area. Based on the successes of CHM technologies in other industries, CHMs may have the potential to alleviate problems associated with deposits in nuclear plants including axial offset anomaly (AOA). By controlling the habit of deposit materials, it may be possible to retard deposit formation, produce deposits with desirable properties (e.g., high friability, low or high porosity), or promote a preferred chemical composition or deposit structure that is more amenable to removal. Desirable properties that could be selected for include enhanced boiling efficiency, reduced surface affinity for boron, and resistance to consolidation. The results of this project demonstrate that crystal habit modification of nickel ferrite, a typical primary side deposit species, can be achieved by the addition of both inorganic and organic chemical species (CHMs). The most significant habit modification of nickel ferrite was observed with the addition of metal species (e.g., Zn, Cr) due to their incorporation into the crystal lattice of the oxide. Lesser degrees of modification were achieved with organic additives such as acetate. Specific CHM candidates that may have a beneficial effect on PWR operation are identified in this paper. In addition, this paper summarizes the refinement of several methods for synthesizing nickel ferrites under hydrothermal conditions that may benefit those interested in studying crud and

  6. Crystal habit modification of nickel-ferrite: development and results of initial laboratory testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, C.E.; Varrin, R.D.; Marks, C. [Dominion Engineering, Inc., Reston, Virginia (United States); Barkatt, A. [The Catholic Univ. of America, Dept. of Chemistry, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Kim, K.; Fruzzetti, K.P. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, California (United States)

    2010-07-01

    This paper documents the results of a laboratory test program conducted to assess the feasibility of using a new type of additive in the primary coolant of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) or to boiling water reactor (BWR) coolant. These additives, known as crystal habit modifiers (CHMs), could potentially be used to control the crystal habits, or shapes, that comprise primary deposits and crud. Similar additives are used throughout the chemical process industry to produce products with desirable crystalline structure, morphology, density, particle size, or surface area. Based on the successes of CHM technologies in other industries, CHMs may have the potential to alleviate problems associated with deposits in nuclear plants including axial offset anomaly (AOA). By controlling the habit of deposit materials, it may be possible to retard deposit formation, produce deposits with desirable properties (e.g., high friability, low or high porosity), or promote a preferred chemical composition or deposit structure that is more amenable to removal. Desirable properties that could be selected for include enhanced boiling efficiency, reduced surface affinity for boron, and resistance to consolidation. The results of this project demonstrate that crystal habit modification of nickel ferrite, a typical primary side deposit species, can be achieved by the addition of both inorganic and organic chemical species (CHMs). The most significant habit modification of nickel ferrite was observed with the addition of metal species (e.g., Zn, Cr) due to their incorporation into the crystal lattice of the oxide. Lesser degrees of modification were achieved with organic additives such as acetate. Specific CHM candidates that may have a beneficial effect on PWR operation are identified in this paper. In addition, this paper summarizes the refinement of several methods for synthesizing nickel ferrites under hydrothermal conditions that may benefit those interested in studying crud and

  7. The role of nickel in urea assimilation by algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, T A; Bekheet, I A

    1982-12-01

    Nickel is required for urease synthesis by Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Tetraselmis subcordiformis and for growth on urea by Phaeodactylum. There is no requirement for nickel for urea amidolyase synthesis by Chlorella fusca var. vacuolata. Neither copper nor palladium can substitute for nickel but cobalt partially restored urease activity in Phaeodactylum. The addition of nickel to nickel-deficient cultures of Phaeodactylum or Tetraselmis resulted in a rapid increase of urease activity to 7-30 times the normal level; this increase was not inhibited by cycloheximide. It is concluded that nickel-deficient cells over-produce a non-functional urease protein and that either nickel or the functional urease enzyme participates in the regulation of the production of urease protein.

  8. KOH concentration effect on the cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells. 4: Results of failure analyse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1989-01-01

    Effects of KOH concentrations on failure modes and mechanisms of nickel-hydrogen cells were studied using long cycled boiler plate cells containing electrolytes of various KOH concentrations ranging 21 to 36 percent. Life of these cells were up to 40,000 cycles in an accelerated low earth orbit (LEO) cycle regime at 80 percent depth of discharge. An interim life test results were reported earlier in J. Power Sources, 22, 213-220, 1988. The results of final life test, end-of-life cell performance, and teardown analyses are discussed. These teardown analyses included visual observations, measurements of nickel electrode capacity in an electrolyte-flooded cell, dimensional changes of cell components, SEM studies on cell cross section, BET surface area and pore volume distribution in cycled nickel electrodes, and chemical analyses. Cycle life of a nickel-hydrogen cell was improved tremendously as KOH concentration was decreased from 36 to 31 percent and from 31 to 26 percent while effect of further concentration decrease was complicated as described in our earlier report. Failure mode of high concentration (31 to 36 percent) cells was gradual capacity decrease, while that of low concentration (21 to 26 percent) cells was mainly formation of a soft short. Long cycled (25,000 to 40,000 cycles) nickel electrodes were expanded more than 50 percent of the initial value, but no correlation was found between this expansion and measured capacity. All electrodes cycled in low concentration (21 to 26 percent) cells had higher capacity than those cycled in high concentration (31 to 36 percent) cells.

  9. Biotin status affects nickel allergy via regulation of interleukin-1beta production in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroishi, Toshinobu; Kinbara, Masayuki; Sato, Naoki; Tanaka, Yukinori; Nagai, Yasuhiro; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Endo, Yasuo; Sugawara, Shunji

    2009-05-01

    Biotin, a water-soluble B complex vitamin, is possibly involved in chronic inflammatory diseases, although the detailed mechanisms are unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of biotin status on nickel (Ni) allergy in mice. Mice were fed a basal or biotin-deficient (BD) diet for 8 wk and sensitized with an intraperitoneal injection of NiCl(2) and lipopolysaccharide. Ten days after sensitization, NiCl(2) was intradermally injected into pinnas and ear swelling was measured. For in vitro analysis, we cultured a murine macrophage cell line, J774.1, under a biotin-sufficient (C, meaning control) or BD condition for 4 wk and analyzed interleukin (IL)-1 production. Significantly higher ear swelling was induced in BD mice than C mice. Adaptive transfer of splenocytes from both C and BD mice induced Ni allergy in unsensitized mice. Regardless of donor mice, ear swelling was significantly higher in BD recipient mice than C recipient mice. Ni allergy was not induced in either C or BD IL-1(-/-) mice. Splenocytes from BD mice produced a significantly higher amount of IL-1beta than those from C mice. Production and mRNA expression of IL-1beta were significantly higher in BD J774.1 cells than in C cells. Biotin supplementation inhibited the augmentation of IL-1beta production in vitro. In vivo supplementation of biotin in drinking water dose-dependently decreased ear swelling in C and BD mice. These results indicate that biotin status affects Ni allergy in the elicitation phase via the upregulation of IL-1beta production in mice, suggesting that biotin supplementation may have therapeutic effects on human metal allergy.

  10. KOH concentration effect on the cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells. IV - Results of failure analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1990-01-01

    Potassium hydroxide concentration effects on the cycle life of a Ni/H2 cell have been studied by carrying out a cycle life test on ten Ni/H2 boiler plate cells which contain electrolytes of various KOH concentrations. Failure analyses of these cells were carried out after completion of the life test, which accumulated up to 40,000 cycles at an 80-percent depth of discharge over a period of 3.7 years. These failure analyses included studies on changes of electrical characteristics of test cells, and component analyses after disassembly of the cell. The component analyses included visual inspections, dimensional changes, capacity measurements of nickel electrodes, scanning electron microscopy, surface area measurements, and chemical analyses. Results have indicated that failure mode and change in the nickel electrode varied as the concentration was varied, especially when the concentration was changed from 31 percent or higher to 26 percent or lower.

  11. KOH concentration effect on the cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells. Part 4: Results of failure analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1989-01-01

    KOH concentration effects on cycle life of a Ni/H2 cell have been studied by carrying out a cycle life test of ten Ni/H2 boiler plate cells which contain electrolytes of various KOH concentrations. Failure analyses of these cells were carried out after completion of the life test which accumulated up to 40,000 cycles at an 80 percent depth of discharge over a period of 3.7 years. These failure analyses included studies on changes of electrical characteristics of test cells and component analyses after disassembly of the cell. The component analyses included visual inspections, dimensional changes, capacity measurements of nickel electrodes, scanning electron microscopy, BET surface area measurements, and chemical analyses. Results have indicated that failure mode and change in the nickel electrode varied as the concentration was varied, especially, when the concentration was changed from 31 percent or higher to 26 percent or lower.

  12. Test results of a 60 volt bipolar nickel-hydrogen battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Robert L.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, Olga; Gahn, Randall F.; Manzo, Michelle A.; Gemeiner, Russel P.

    1987-01-01

    In July 1986, a high-voltage nickel-hydrogen battery was assembled at the NASA Lewis Research Center. This battery incorporated bipolar construction techniques to build a 50-cell stack with approximately 1.0 A-hr capacity (C) and an open-circuit voltage of 65 V. The battery was characterized at both low and high current rates prior to pulsed and nonpulsed discharges. Pulse discharges at 5 and 10 C were performed before placing the battery on over 1400, 40-percent depth-of-discharge, low-earth-orbit cycles. The successful demonstration of a high-voltage bipolar battery in one containment vessel has advanced the technology to where nickel-hydrogen high-voltage systems can be constructed of several modules instead of hundreds of individual cells.

  13. Thermal testing results of an electroformed nickel secondary (M2) mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David R.; Gale, David M.; Cabrera Cuevas, Lizeth; Lucero Álvarez, Maribel; Castro Santos, David; Olmos Tapia, Arak

    2016-07-01

    To support higher-frequency operation, the Large Millimeter Telescope/Gran Telescopio Milimetrico (or LMT/GTM) is replacing its existing monolithic aluminum secondary mirror (M2). The new mirror is a segmented design based on the same electroformed nickel reflector panel technology that is already in use for the primary reflector segments. While the new M2 is lighter and has better surface accuracy than the original mirror, the electroformed panels are more sensitive to high temperatures. During the design phase, concerns were raised over the level of temperature increase that could occur at M2 during daytime observations. Although the panel surface is designed to scatter visible light, the LMT primary mirror is large enough to cause substantial solar heating, even at significant angular separation from the Sun. To address these concerns, the project conducted a series of field tests, within the constraint of having minimum impact on night time observations. The supplier sent two coupon samples of a reflector panel prepared identically to their proposed M2 surface. Temperature sensors were mounted on the samples and they were temporarily secured to the existing M2 mirror at different distances from the center. The goal was to obtain direct monitoring of the surface temperature under site thermal conditions and the concentration effects from the primary reflector. With the sensors installed, the telescope was then commanded to track the Sun with an elevation offset. Initially, elevation offsets from as far as 40 degrees to as close as 6 degrees were tested. The 6 degree separation test quickly passed the target maximum temperature and the telescope was returned to a safer separation. Based on these initial results, a second set of tests was performed using elevation separations from 30 degrees to 8 degrees. To account for the variability of site conditions, the temperature data were analyzed using multiple metrics. These metrics included maximum temperature, final

  14. Electroless nickel plating on abs plastics from nickel chloride and nickel sulfate baths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inam-ul-haque; Ahmad, S.; Khan, A.

    2005-01-01

    Aqueous acid nickel chloride and alkaline nickel sulphate bath were studied for electroless nickel planting on acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) plastic. Before electroless nickel plating, specimens were etched, sensitized and activated. Effects of sodium hypophosphite and sodium citrate concentration on the electroless nickel plating thickness were discussed. Aqueous acid nickel chloride bath comprising, nickel chloride 10 g/L, sodium hypophosphite 40 g/L, sodium citrate 40g/L at pH 5.5, temperature 85 deg. C and density of 1 Be/ for thirty minutes gave best coating thickness in micrometer. It was found that acid nickel chloride bath had a greater stability, wide operating range and better coating thickness results than alkaline nickel sulphate bath. Acid nickel chloride bath gave better coating thickness than alkaline nickel sulfate bath

  15. Dependence of ΔE effect on internal stresses in nickel: Experimental results by laser interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chicharro, J.M.; Bayon, A.; Salazar, F.

    2006-01-01

    The speckle heterodyne interferometry is applied to the study of the dependence of Young's modulus on both the magnetic field and the internal stresses in a soft ferromagnetic material. Young's modulus is determined from the first natural longitudinal frequency of a slender magnetic rod positioned within a solenoid. Vibration of the sample is detected by an optical heterodyne system with a wide bandwidth. The samples are heated to above the Curie point and then cooled at several rates in order to induce different internal stresses. The study refers to nickel rods 10mm in diameter and 110mm in length. The grain sizes of the samples are also determined and related to changes in ΔE

  16. Dependence of {delta}E effect on internal stresses in nickel: Experimental results by laser interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chicharro, J.M. [Dept. de Mecanica Aplicada e Ingenieria de Proyectos, E.T.S.I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Avd. Camilo Jose Cela s/n, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)]. E-mail: josemanuel.chicharro@uclm.es; Bayon, A. [Dept. de Fisica Aplicada a los Recursos Naturales, E.T.S.I. Minas, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, c/Rios Rosas, 21, 28003 Madrid (Spain); Salazar, F. [Dept. de Fisica Aplicada a los Recursos Naturales, E.T.S.I. Minas, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, c/Rios Rosas, 21, 28003 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-02-15

    The speckle heterodyne interferometry is applied to the study of the dependence of Young's modulus on both the magnetic field and the internal stresses in a soft ferromagnetic material. Young's modulus is determined from the first natural longitudinal frequency of a slender magnetic rod positioned within a solenoid. Vibration of the sample is detected by an optical heterodyne system with a wide bandwidth. The samples are heated to above the Curie point and then cooled at several rates in order to induce different internal stresses. The study refers to nickel rods 10mm in diameter and 110mm in length. The grain sizes of the samples are also determined and related to changes in {delta}E.

  17. The EU Nickel Directive revisited--future steps towards better protection against nickel allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Uter, Wolfgang; McFadden, John

    2011-01-01

    In July 2001, the EU Nickel Directive came into full force to protect European citizens against nickel allergy and dermatitis. Prior to this intervention, Northern European governments had already begun to regulate consumer nickel exposure. According to part 2 of the EU Nickel Directive and the D......In July 2001, the EU Nickel Directive came into full force to protect European citizens against nickel allergy and dermatitis. Prior to this intervention, Northern European governments had already begun to regulate consumer nickel exposure. According to part 2 of the EU Nickel Directive...... and the Danish nickel regulation, consumer items intended to be in direct and prolonged contact with the skin were not allowed to release more than 0.5 µg nickel/cm2/week. It was considered unlikely that nickel allergy would disappear altogether as a proportion of individuals reacted below the level defined...

  18. Salinity-dependent nickel accumulation and effects on respiration, ion regulation and oxidative stress in the galaxiid fish, Galaxias maculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewett, Tamzin A; Wood, Chris M; Glover, Chris N

    2016-07-01

    Inanga (Galaxias maculatus) are a euryhaline and amphidromous Southern hemisphere fish species inhabiting waters highly contaminated in trace elements such as nickel (Ni). Ni is known to exert its toxic effects on aquatic biota via three key mechanisms: inhibition of respiration, impaired ion regulation, and stimulation of oxidative stress. Inanga acclimated to freshwater (FW), 50% seawater (SW) or 100% SW were exposed to 0, 150 or 2000 μg Ni L(-1), and tissue Ni accumulation, metabolic rate, ion regulation (tissue ions, calcium (Ca) ion influx), and oxidative stress (catalase activity, protein carbonylation) were measured after 96 h. Ni accumulation increased with Ni exposure concentration in gill, gut and remaining body, but not in liver. Only in the gill was Ni accumulation affected by exposure salinity, with lower branchial Ni burdens in 100% and 50% SW inanga, relative to FW fish. There were no Ni-dependent effects on respiration, or Ca influx, and the only Ni-dependent effect on tissue ion content was on gill potassium. Catalase activity and protein carbonylation were affected by Ni, primarily in FW, but only at 150 μg Ni L(-1). Salinity therefore offsets the effects of Ni, despite minimal changes in Ni bioavailability. These data suggest only minor effects of Ni in inanga, even at highly elevated environmental Ni concentrations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Allergic contact dermatitis pattern in Kuwait: nickel leads the pack. In-depth analysis of nickel allergy based on the results from a large prospective patch test series report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almutawa, Fahad

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Contact dermatitis is a relatively common dermatosis reported among several population groups from all around the globe. However, the data from Kuwait is unavailable. Patch tests are essential for the diagnosis of contact sensitization. Aim To determine a relative frequency and pattern of sensitizers to different allergens in patients of suspected contact dermatitis in Kuwait and, also to study the role of the commonest sensitizer in detail. Material and methods Patch tests were performed in 2461 consecutive patients with a clinical diagnosis of contact dermatitis seen at our hospital between September 1, 2014 and August 31, 2015. Out of the total of 1381 (56.1%) patients with positive patch test results to at least one allergen, 546 (22.2%) patients with a single positive reaction to nickel only (single largest sensitizer) were selected as the study population for further detailed analysis. Results At least one positive patch test reaction was found in 1381 (56.12%) patients. Nickel was found to be the most common sensitizer seen in 546 (40%) patients. The mean age was 37.3 ±13.8 years and the mean duration of disease was 27.3 ±13.8 months. Most (387/546) patients sensitized were females. The forearms/hands and wrists were the most prevalent sites (52.56% of the participants). In 58.91% of women, dermatitis was more often confined to other sites, mostly ears and the neck due to earrings and necklaces. Just more than half of the number (51.09%) of nickel allergic patients were found in the age group of 15–25 years. Hairdressers/beauticians were the most affected group followed by house workers (housewives, cleaners, housekeepers). Conclusions Nickel is the single most common sensitizer found in our patients, and female sex, young age, occupation with long hours of contact to nickel are high risk factors. We recommend that a directive, which limits the release of nickel from products with extended skin contact, be approved in Kuwait. PMID:28670248

  20. The EU Nickel Directive revisited--future steps towards better protection against nickel allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Uter, Wolfgang; McFadden, John

    2011-01-01

    In July 2001, the EU Nickel Directive came into full force to protect European citizens against nickel allergy and dermatitis. Prior to this intervention, Northern European governments had already begun to regulate consumer nickel exposure. According to part 2 of the EU Nickel Directive...... by the EU Nickel Directive. Despite this, the EU Nickel Directive part 2 was expected to work as an operational limit that would sufficiently protect European consumers against nickel allergy and dermatitis. This review presents the accumulation of epidemiological studies that evaluated the possible effect...... and the Danish nickel regulation, consumer items intended to be in direct and prolonged contact with the skin were not allowed to release more than 0.5 µg nickel/cm2/week. It was considered unlikely that nickel allergy would disappear altogether as a proportion of individuals reacted below the level defined...

  1. Sources of variation in concentrations of nickel and copper in mountain birch foliage near a nickel-copper smelter at Monchegorsk, north-western Russia: results of long-term monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, Mikhail V.

    2005-01-01

    Concentrations of nickel and copper, two principal metal pollutants of the 'Severonikel' smelter at Monchegorsk, NW Russia, were measured in unwashed leaves of mountain birch, Betula pubescens subsp. czerepanovii, collected in eight study sites along the pollution gradient during 1991-2003. In spite of significant decline in metal emissions, concentrations of foliar metals in most of the study sites did not decrease, indicating that soil contamination remains extremely high. Multiyear mean values peaked at 6.6 km S of the smelter, where they were 20-25 times higher than in the most distant study site. Concentrations of both metals demonstrated pronounced annual variation, which was explained by the meteorological conditions of early summer: higher precipitation in May increased foliar concentrations of both metals, whereas higher precipitation in June resulted in lower foliar concentrations of nickel. These data suggest that ecotoxicological situation in metal-contaminated areas can be modified by the expected climate change. In heavily polluted sites individual birch trees generally retained their ranks in terms of metal contamination during 1995-2003, demonstrating that the use of the same set of trees can significantly increase the accuracy of the monitoring data. - Foliar concentrations of nickel and copper did not reflect emission decline during 1991-2003; annual variation was explained by weather conditions

  2. Nickel (II)-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in human proximal tubule cells through a ROS- and mitochondria-mediated pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yi-Fen; Shyu, Huey-Wen [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chang, Yi-Chuang [Department of Nursing, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Tseng, Wei-Chang [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Huang, Yeou-Lih [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Kuan-Hua; Chou, Miao-Chen; Liu, Heng-Ling [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chang-Yu, E-mail: mt037@mail.fy.edu.tw [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2012-03-01

    Nickel compounds are known to be toxic and carcinogenic in kidney and lung. In this present study, we investigated the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondria in nickel (II) acetate-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in the HK-2 human renal cell line. The results showed that the cytotoxic effects of nickel (II) involved significant cell death and DNA damage. Nickel (II) increased the generation of ROS and induced a noticeable reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Analysis of the sub-G1 phase showed a significant increase in apoptosis in HK-2 cells after nickel (II) treatment. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) not only inhibited nickel (II)-induced cell death and DNA damage, but also significantly prevented nickel (II)-induced loss of MMP and apoptosis. Cell apoptosis triggered by nickel (II) was characterized by the reduced protein expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and the induced the protein expression of Bad, Bcl-Xs, Bax, cytochrome c and caspases 9, 3 and 6. The regulation of the expression of Bcl-2-family proteins, the release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspases 9, 3 and 6 were inhibited in the presence of NAC. These results suggest that nickel (II) induces cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HK-2 cells via ROS generation and that the mitochondria-mediated apoptotic signaling pathway may be involved in the positive regulation of nickel (II)-induced renal cytotoxicity.

  3. Nickel (II)-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in human proximal tubule cells through a ROS- and mitochondria-mediated pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yi-Fen; Shyu, Huey-Wen; Chang, Yi-Chuang; Tseng, Wei-Chang; Huang, Yeou-Lih; Lin, Kuan-Hua; Chou, Miao-Chen; Liu, Heng-Ling; Chen, Chang-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Nickel compounds are known to be toxic and carcinogenic in kidney and lung. In this present study, we investigated the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondria in nickel (II) acetate-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in the HK-2 human renal cell line. The results showed that the cytotoxic effects of nickel (II) involved significant cell death and DNA damage. Nickel (II) increased the generation of ROS and induced a noticeable reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Analysis of the sub-G1 phase showed a significant increase in apoptosis in HK-2 cells after nickel (II) treatment. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) not only inhibited nickel (II)-induced cell death and DNA damage, but also significantly prevented nickel (II)-induced loss of MMP and apoptosis. Cell apoptosis triggered by nickel (II) was characterized by the reduced protein expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and the induced the protein expression of Bad, Bcl-Xs, Bax, cytochrome c and caspases 9, 3 and 6. The regulation of the expression of Bcl-2-family proteins, the release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspases 9, 3 and 6 were inhibited in the presence of NAC. These results suggest that nickel (II) induces cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HK-2 cells via ROS generation and that the mitochondria-mediated apoptotic signaling pathway may be involved in the positive regulation of nickel (II)-induced renal cytotoxicity.

  4. Preliminary results on the chemical characterisation of the cathode nickel--emissive layer interface in oxide cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, S.N.; Barber, D.K.; Whiting, M.J.; Baker, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    In cathode ray tube (CRT) thermionic oxide cathodes, the nickel-oxide interface properties are key to understanding the mechanisms of operation. At the elevated operational temperatures, free barium is formed at the interface by the reaction of reducing activators, from the nickel alloy, with barium oxide. The free barium diffuses to the outer surface of the oxide providing a low work function electron-emitting surface. However, during cathode life an interface layer grows between the nickel alloy and oxide, comprised of reaction products. The interfacial layer sets limits on the cathode performance and useful operational lifetime by inhibiting the barium reducing reaction. This paper discusses sample preparation procedures for exposure of the interface and the use of several surface and bulk analytical techniques to study interface layer formation. SEM, AES and SIMS data are presented, which provide preliminary insight into the mechanisms operating during the cathode's lifetime. There is evidence that the activator elements in the nickel alloy base, Al and Mg, are able to diffuse to the surface of the oxide during activation and ageing and that these elements are enriched at the interface after accelerated life

  5. Levels and predictors of airborne and internal exposure to chromium and nickel among welders--results of the WELDOX study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Tobias; Pesch, Beate; Lotz, Anne; Gutwinski, Eleonore; Van Gelder, Rainer; Punkenburg, Ewald; Kendzia, Benjamin; Gawrych, Katarzyna; Lehnert, Martin; Heinze, Evelyn; Hartwig, Andrea; Käfferlein, Heiko U; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Brüning, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this analysis was to investigate levels and determinants of exposure to airborne and urinary chromium (Cr, CrU) and nickel (Ni, NiU) among 241 welders. Respirable and inhalable welding fume was collected during a shift, and the metal content was determined using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. In post-shift urine, CrU and NiU were measured by means of graphite furnace atom absorption spectrometry, with resulting concentrations varying across a wide range. Due to a large fraction below the limits of quantitation we applied multiple imputations to the log-transformed exposure variables for the analysis of the data. Respirable Cr and Ni were about half of the concentrations of inhalable Cr and Ni, respectively. CrU and NiU were determined with medians of 1.2 μg/L (interquartile range exposure-modulating variables in form of multiplicative factors and revealed slightly better model fits for Cr (R(2) respirable Cr 48%, CrU 55%) than for Ni (R(2) respirable Ni 42%, NiU 38%). The air concentrations were mainly predicted by the metal content in electrodes or base material in addition to the welding technique. Respirable Cr and Ni were good predictors for CrU and NiU, respectively. Exposure was higher when welding was performed in confined spaces or with inefficient ventilation, and lower in urine when respirators were used. In conclusion, statistical modelling allowed the evaluation of determinants of internal and external exposure to Cr and Ni in welders. Welding parameters were stronger predictors than workplace conditions. Airborne exposure was lowest inside respirators with supply of purified air. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Nickel hydrogen/nickel cadmium battery trade studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadnick, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    Nickel Hydrogen cell and battery technology has matured to the point where a real choice exists between Nickel Hydrogen and Nickel Cadmium batteries for each new spacecraft application. During the past few years, a number of spacecraft programs have been evaluated at Hughes with respect to this choice, with the results being split about fifty-fifty. The following paragraphs contain criteria which were used in making the battery selection.

  7. Oral nickel exposure may induce Type I hypersensitivity reaction in nickel-sensitized subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyüköztürk, Suna; Gelincik, Aslı; Ünal, Derya; Demirtürk, Mustafa; Çelik, Dolay Damla; Erden, Sacide; Çolakoğlu, Bahattin; Erdem Kuruca, Serap

    2015-05-01

    Little is known about the clinical and immunological changes in the nickel allergic patients with systemic symptoms. We aimed to evaluate T helper cell responses of patients with different clinical presentations due to nickel. Patients having various allergic symptoms and positive patch test results to nickel and 20 controls underwent skin prick tests with nickel. IL-10, IL-4, IL-5 and IFN-gamma were measured in the culture supernatants of PBMC stimulated by nickel during lymphocyte proliferation test (LTT). 69 patients (56 female, mean age: 49.2 ± 13.1), 97% having nickel containing dental devices and 20 controls (8 female, mean age 34.9 ± 12.06) were evaluated. Skin prick tests with nickel were positive in 70% of the patients (pnickel. Nickel containing dental alloys and oral nickel intake seem to trigger systemic symptoms in previously nickel sensitized patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Radiative properties of stellar envelopes: Comparison of asteroseismic results to opacity calculations and measurements for iron and nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turck-Chieze, S.; Gilles, D.; Le Pennec, M.; Blenski, T.; Thais, F.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Blancard, C.; Caillaud, T.; Cosse, P.; Faussurier, G.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J.C.; Reverdin, C.; Silvert, V.; Villette, B.; Busquet, M.; Colgan, J.; Guzik, J.; Kilcrease, D.P.; Magee, N.H.; Delahaye, F.; Zeippen, C.J.; Ducreta, J.E.; Fontes, C.J.; Harris, J.W.; Loisel, G.

    2013-01-01

    The international OPAC consortium consists of astrophysicists, plasma physicists and experimentalists who examine opacity calculations used in stellar physics that appear questionable and perform new calculations and laser experiments to understand the differences and improve the calculations. We report on iron and nickel opacities for envelopes of stars from 2 to 14 M and deliver our first conclusions concerning the reliability of the used calculations by illustrating the importance of the configuration interaction and of the completeness of the calculations for temperatures around 15-27 eV. (authors)

  9. Nickel hydrogen battery cell storage matrix test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, James R.; Dodson, Gary W.

    1993-01-01

    Test were conducted to evaluate post storage performance of nickel hydrogen cells with various design variables, the most significant being nickel precharge versus hydrogen precharge. Test procedures and results are presented in outline and graphic form.

  10. Void formation in irradiated binary nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, M.A.; Ahmed, M.; Akhter, J.I.

    1994-01-01

    In this work a computer program has been used to compute void radius, void density and swelling parameter for nickel and binary nickel-carbon alloys irradiated with nickel ions of 100 keV. The aim is to compare the computed results with experimental results already reported

  11. Proteomic Assessment of Biochemical Pathways That Are Critical to Nickel-Induced Toxicity Responses in Human Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yue; Bruno, Maribel; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Wallace, Kathleen; Andrews, Debora; Swank, Adam; Winnik, Witold; Ross, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying toxicity initiated by nickel, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant and known human carcinogen is necessary for proper assessment of its risks to human and environment. Among a variety of toxic mechanisms, disruption of protein responses and protein response-based biochemical pathways represents a key mechanism through which nickel induces cytotoxicity and carcinogenesis. To identify protein responses and biochemical pathways that are critical to nickel-induced toxicity responses, we measured cytotoxicity and changes in expression and phosphorylation status of 14 critical biochemical pathway regulators in human BEAS-2B cells exposed to four concentrations of nickel using an integrated proteomic approach. A subset of the pathway regulators, including interleukin-6, and JNK, were found to be linearly correlated with cell viability, and may function as molecular determinants of cytotoxic responses of BEAS-2B cells to nickel exposures. In addition, 128 differentially expressed proteins were identified by two dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry. Principal component analysis, hierarchical cluster analyses, and ingenuity signaling pathway analysis (IPA) identified putative nickel toxicity pathways. Some of the proteins and pathways identified have not previously been linked to nickel toxicity. Based on the consistent results obtained from both ELISA and 2-DE proteomic analysis, we propose a core signaling pathway regulating cytotoxic responses of human BEAS-2B cells to nickel exposures, which integrates a small set of proteins involved in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis pathways, apoptosis, protein degradation, and stress responses including inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:27626938

  12. Determination of nickel-63

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poletiko, C.

    1988-01-01

    The research of activation products in the environment is often centered on cobalt-60 or other gamma emitters, since pure beta emitters require time consuming separations to be counted. However, some beta emitters must be checked because they have a build up in the environment, leading to potential hazards. Among these nuclides, there is nickel-63 which is a pure, soft beta emitter (67 keV) with a long half-life (100 years). A chemical separation, providing good results, was developed. Such a separation is based upon nickel carrier addition in the sample than DMG complex formation and isolation; after elimination of solvent. DMG complex is destroyed. Chemical yield is determined by flame atomic absorption measurement and nickel-63 counted by liquid scintillation. The described procedure allows the determination of low-level activities in different samples (soils, effluents, etc.). Detection limits are close to 0.1 Bq per sample

  13. Does airborne nickel exposure induce nickel sensitization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Eugen; Ranft, Ulrich; Eberwein, Georg; Gladtke, Dieter; Sugiri, Dorothee; Behrendt, Heidrun; Ring, Johannes; Schäfer, Torsten; Begerow, Jutta; Wittsiepe, Jürgen; Krämer, Ursula; Wilhelm, Michael

    2010-06-01

    Nickel is one of the most prevalent causes of contact allergy in the general population. This study focuses on human exposure to airborne nickel and its potential to induce allergic sensitization. The study group consisted of 309 children at school-starter age living in the West of Germany in the vicinity of two industrial sources and in a rural town without nearby point sources of nickel. An exposure assessment of nickel in ambient air was available for children in the Ruhr district using routinely monitored ambient air quality data and dispersion modelling. Internal nickel exposure was assessed by nickel concentrations in morning urine samples of the children. The observed nickel sensitization prevalence rates varied between 12.6% and 30.7%. Statistically significant associations were showed between exposure to nickel in ambient air and urinary nickel concentration as well as between urinary nickel concentration and nickel sensitization. Furthermore, an elevated prevalence of nickel sensitization was associated with exposure to increased nickel concentrations in ambient air. The observed associations support the assumption that inhaled nickel in ambient air might be a risk factor for nickel sensitization; further studies in larger collectives are necessary.

  14. Nickel Inhibits Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppala, Radha; McKinney, Richard W.; Brant, Kelly A.; Fabisiak, James P.; Goetzman, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Nickel exposure is associated with changes in cellular energy metabolism which may contribute to its carcinogenic properties. Here, we demonstrate that nickel strongly represses mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation—the pathway by which fatty acids are catabolized for energy—in both primary human lung fibroblasts and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. At the concentrations used, nickel suppresses fatty acid oxidation without globally suppressing mitochondrial function as evidenced by increased glucose oxidation to CO2. Pre-treatment with L-carnitine, previously shown to prevent nickel-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in neuroblastoma cells, did not prevent the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation. The effect of nickel on fatty acid oxidation occurred only with prolonged exposure (>5 hr), suggesting that direct inhibition of the active sites of metabolic enzymes is not the mechanism of action. Nickel is a known hypoxia-mimetic that activates hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1α). Nickel-induced inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was blunted in HIF1α knockout fibroblasts, implicating HIF1α as one contributor to the mechanism. Additionally, nickel down-regulated the protein levels of the key fatty acid oxidation enzyme very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid oxidation by nickel, concurrent with increased glucose metabolism, represents a form of metabolic reprogramming that may contribute to nickel-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:26051273

  15. Nickel release from inexpensive jewelry and hair clasps purchased in an EU country - Are consumers sufficiently protected from nickel exposure?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nickel allergic subjects are at risk factor of acquiring hand eczema. In 1990 and 1994, respectively, Denmark and member states in the EU regulated nickel release from selected consumer products. The intention was that the nickel epidemic could be controlled and prevented if the general...... population was protected from high cutaneous nickel concentrations. Despite a decrease, the prevalence of nickel allergy remains high as nearly 10% of young women are nickel allergic. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to perform dimethylglyoxime (DMG) testing of inexpensive jewelry and hair clasps purchased from...

  16. Synthesis of Nickel and Nickel Hydroxide Nano powders by Simplified Chemical Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tientong, J.; Garcia, S.; Thurber, C.R.; Golden, T.D.

    2014-01-01

    Nickel nano powders were synthesized by a chemical reduction of nickel ions with hydrazine hydrate at ph ∼ 12.5. Sonication of the solutions created a temperature of 54-65 °C to activate the reduction reaction of nickel nanoparticles. The solution ph affected the composition of the resulting nanoparticles. Nickel hydroxide nanoparticles were formed from an alkaline solution (ph ∼10) of nickel-hydrazine complexed by dropwise titration. X-ray diffraction of the powder and the analysis of the resulting Williamson-Hall plots revealed that the particle size of the powders ranged from 12 to 14 nm. Addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone into the synthesis decreased the nickel nanoparticle size to approximately 7 nm. Dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the particles were in the nanometer range. The structure of the synthesized nickel and nickel hydroxide nanoparticles was identified by X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  17. Assaying environmental nickel toxicity using model nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Rudel

    Full Text Available Although nickel exposure results in allergic reactions, respiratory conditions, and cancer in humans and rodents, the ramifications of excess nickel in the environment for animal and human health remain largely undescribed. Nickel and other cationic metals travel through waterways and bind to soils and sediments. To evaluate the potential toxic effects of nickel at environmental contaminant levels (8.9-7,600 µg Ni/g dry weight of sediment and 50-800 µg NiCl2/L of water, we conducted assays using two cosmopolitan nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus. We assayed the effects of both sediment-bound and aqueous nickel upon animal growth, developmental survival, lifespan, and fecundity. Uncontaminated sediments were collected from sites in the Midwestern United States and spiked with a range of nickel concentrations. We found that nickel-spiked sediment substantially impairs both survival from larval to adult stages and adult longevity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, while aqueous nickel showed no adverse effects on either survivorship or longevity, we observed a significant decrease in fecundity, indicating that aqueous nickel could have a negative impact on nematode physiology. Intriguingly, C. elegans and P. pacificus exhibit similar, but not identical, responses to nickel exposure. Moreover, P. pacificus could be tested successfully in sediments inhospitable to C. elegans. Our results add to a growing body of literature documenting the impact of nickel on animal physiology, and suggest that environmental toxicological studies could gain an advantage by widening their repertoire of nematode species.

  18. Assaying environmental nickel toxicity using model nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudel, David; Douglas, Chandler; Huffnagle, Ian; Besser, John M.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    Although nickel exposure results in allergic reactions, respiratory conditions, and cancer in humans and rodents, the ramifications of excess nickel in the environment for animal and human health remain largely undescribed. Nickel and other cationic metals travel through waterways and bind to soils and sediments. To evaluate the potential toxic effects of nickel at environmental contaminant levels (8.9-7,600 µg Ni/g dry weight of sediment and 50-800 µg NiCl2/L of water), we conducted assays using two cosmopolitan nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus. We assayed the effects of both sediment-bound and aqueous nickel upon animal growth, developmental survival, lifespan, and fecundity. Uncontaminated sediments were collected from sites in the Midwestern United States and spiked with a range of nickel concentrations. We found that nickel-spiked sediment substantially impairs both survival from larval to adult stages and adult longevity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, while aqueous nickel showed no adverse effects on either survivorship or longevity, we observed a significant decrease in fecundity, indicating that aqueous nickel could have a negative impact on nematode physiology. Intriguingly, C. elegansand P. pacificus exhibit similar, but not identical, responses to nickel exposure. Moreover, P. pacificus could be tested successfully in sediments inhospitable to C. elegans. Our results add to a growing body of literature documenting the impact of nickel on animal physiology, and suggest that environmental toxicological studies could gain an advantage by widening their repertoire of nematode species.

  19. Influence of Plant Growth Regulators and Humic Substance on the Phytoremediation of Nickel in a Ni-Polluted Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahshid Shafigh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Plants can uptake, bioaccumulate and immobilize different metals in their tissues. Phytoremediation technique has been used to remove hazardous substances including heavy metals from the environment. Assisted phytoremediation is usually the process of applying a chemical additive to heavy metal contaminated soils to enhance the metal uptake by plants. The main objective of present study was to investigate the effectiveness of plant growth regulators (PGRs and a humic substance (HS on Ni phytoremediation by maize in a Ni-pollutrd calcareous soil. Materials and Methods: The experiment designed as a 5×3 factorial trial arranged in a completely randomized design with three replicates. Three kilograms of soil was placed in plastic pots and pots were watered with distilled water to field capacity and maintained at this moisture level throughout the experiment by watering the pots to a constant weight. The soils were polluted with 250 mg Ni Kg-1 as Ni-nitrate Ni (NO32. Six maize (Zea mays L. seeds were planted 2 cm deep in soil and thinned to three uniform stands 1 week after emergence. Treatments consisted of three levels of soil application of commercially humic substance, HS, (0, 3, and 6 mg kg as Humax 95-WSG containing about 80% humic acid, and about 15% fulvic acid and five levels of PGRs (0 or 10 µM GA3, IAA, BAP and SA. The HS was applied as split doses in three times at 15 day intervals along with irrigation water. The seedlings were exposed to aqueous solutions of HS 16 days after sowing for the first time. Prepared solutions of PGRs were sprayed three times at 15 day intervals from emergence. Seven weeks after planting, shoots were harvested and roots were separated from soil carefully, both parts were rinsed with distilled water and dried at 65°C for 72 h, weighed, ground, and dry meshed at 550°C. Root and shoot dry matter and Ni concentration and uptake and phytoremediation criteria were considered as plant responses

  20. Biological role of nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thauer, R K; Diekert, G; Schoenheit, P

    1980-01-01

    Several enzymes and one cofactor have recently been shown to contain nickel. For example, urease of jack beans has been found to be a nickel protein and factor F/sub 430/ from methanogenic bacteria to be a nickel tetrapyrrole. The biological role of nickel in several organisms is discussed.

  1. Mercury and nickel contents in fish meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Toth

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of our work was to identify the content of mercury and nickel in selected fish species. Consumers today are increasingly aware of the association between diet and health, and thus in Europe consume more and more fish. Fish is a valuable source of high quality protein, minerals and vitamins, and fatty fish are also rich in omega-3-polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are normally considered to be beneficial to health. In our work we determined content of mercury and nickel harvested fish in particular were the following species: Common goldfish (Carassius auratus, L., Common roach (Rutilus rutilus, L. and Common bream (Abramis brama, L. Concentrations of mercury and nickel was analyzed and results evaluated according to current standards and compared to the values ​​established by the Codex Alimentarius of the Slovak Republic and the EU Commission Regulation no. 1881/2006, as well as in the EU Commission Regulation no. 420/2011 and no. 269/2008. In our research area we analysed 19 samples of fish muscle. Samples were taken from two water reservoirs – Golianovo and Vráble.  The highest mercury content was in sample Rutilus 1 - 0.052632 mg/kg. Lowest mercury content was in sample Abramis 2  - 0.010431 mg/kg. Largest nickel content was in meat of Abramis  - sample 2  - 0.78 mg/kg. Minimum content of nickel was in sample Carassius 1  - 0.11 mg/kg. We got out of the limit values ​​specified: Codex Alimentarius SR - Mercury 0.5 mg/kg and  Regulation of the EU Commission no. 1881/2006, no. 420/2011 and no. 629/2008. To optimize the protection of the population, it is necessary to continue to monitor the concentration of mercury in fish and fish products. Risk management strategy must focus on reducing potential exposure derived from consumption of fish. In particular, the definition of maximum levels for methylmercury, advising consumers and environmental activities oriented to reduce contamination.

  2. Gold, nickel and copper mining and processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightfoot, Nancy E; Pacey, Michael A; Darling, Shelley

    2010-01-01

    Ore mining occurs in all Canadian provinces and territories except Prince Edward Island. Ores include bauxite, copper, gold, iron, lead and zinc. Workers in metal mining and processing are exposed, not only to the metal of interest, but also to various other substances prevalent in the industry, such as diesel emissions, oil mists, blasting agents, silica, radon, and arsenic. This chapter examines cancer risk related to the mining of gold, nickel and copper. The human carcinogenicity of nickel depends upon the species of nickel, its concentration and the route of exposure. Exposure to nickel or nickel compounds via routes other than inhalation has not been shown to increase cancer risk in humans. As such, cancer sites of concern include the lung, and the nasal sinus. Evidence comes from studies of nickel refinery and leaching, calcining, and sintering workers in the early half of the 20th century. There appears to be little or no detectable risk in most sectors of the nickel industry at current exposure levels. The general population risk from the extremely small concentrations detectable in ambient air are negligible. Nevertheless, animal carcinogenesis studies, studies of nickel carcinogenesis mechanisms, and epidemiological studies with quantitative exposure assessment of various nickel species would enhance our understanding of human health risks associated with nickel. Definitive conclusions linking cancer to exposures in gold and copper mining and processing are not possible at this time. The available results appear to demand additional study of a variety of potential occupational and non-occupational risk factors.

  3. Behavioral interventions to reduce nickel exposure in a nickel processing plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumchev, Krassi; Brown, Helen; Wheeler, Amanda; Pereira, Gavin; Spickett, Jeff

    2017-10-01

    Nickel is a widely-used material in many industries. Although there is enough evidence that occupational exposure to nickel may cause respiratory illnesses, allergies, and even cancer, it is not possible to stop the use of nickel in occupational settings. Nickel exposure, however, can be controlled and reduced significantly in workplaces. The main objective of this study was to assess if educational intervention of hygiene behavior could reduce nickel exposure among Indonesian nickel smelter workers. Participants were randomly assigned to three intervention groups (n = 99). Group one (n = 35) received only an educational booklet about nickel, related potential health effects and preventive measures, group two (n = 35) attended a presentation in addition to the booklet, and group three (n = 29) received personal feedback on their biomarker results in addition to the booklet and presentations. Pre- and post-intervention air sampling was conducted to measure concentrations of dust and nickel in air along with worker's blood and urine nickel concentrations. The study did not measure significant differences in particles and nickel concentrations in the air between pre- and post-interventions. However, we achieved significant reductions in the post intervention urine and blood nickel concentrations which can be attributed to changes in personal hygiene behavior. The median urinary nickel concentration in the pre-intervention period for group one was 52.3 µg/L, for group two 57.4 µg/L, and group three 43.2 µg/L which were significantly higher (pnickel with significantly (p nickel levels of 0.1 µg/L for all groups. The study showed that educational interventions can significantly reduce personal exposure levels to nickel among Indonesian nickel smelter workers.

  4. Human exposure to nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandjean, P

    1984-01-01

    In order of abundance in the earth's crust, nickel ranks as the 24th element and has been detected in different media in all parts of the biosphere. Thus, humans are constantly exposed to this ubiquitous element, though in variable amounts. Occupational exposures may lead to the retention of 100 micrograms of nickel per day. Environmental nickel levels depend particularly on natural sources, pollution from nickel-manufacturing industries and airborne particles from combustion of fossil fuels. Absorption from atmospheric nickel pollution is of minor concern. Vegetables usually contain more nickel than do other food items. Certain products, such as baking powder and cocoa powder, have been found to contain excessive amounts of nickel, perhaps related to nickel leaching during the manufacturing process. Soft drinking-water and acid beverages may dissolve nickel from pipes and containers. Scattered studies indicate a highly variable dietary intake of nickel, but most averages are about 200-300 micrograms/day. In addition, skin contact to a multitude of metal objects may be of significance to the large number of individuals suffering from contact dermatitis and nickel allergy. Finally, nickel alloys are often used in nails and prostheses for orthopaedic surgery, and various sources may contaminate intravenous fluids. Thus, human nickel exposure originates from a variety of sources and is highly variable. Occupational nickel exposure is of major significance, and leaching of nickel may add to dietary intakes and to cutaneous exposures. 79 references.

  5. Aluminium and nickel in human albumin solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Sandberg, E

    1989-01-01

    Five different brands of commercially available human albumin solutions for infusion were analysed for their aluminium and nickel contents by atomic absorption spectrometry. The aluminium concentrations ranged from 12 micrograms/l to 1109 micrograms/l and the nickel concentrations ranged from 17...... micrograms/l to 77 micrograms/l. Examination of the aluminium and nickel contents of the constituents for the production of one brand showed too low levels to explain the final contamination of the product. By following the aluminium and nickel concentrations of the same brand during the production...... of a batch of albumin solution, filtration was shown to contribute to contamination, although the largest increase in aluminium as well as nickel concentrations appeared during the bulk concentrating process. To avoid health risks to certain patients, regulations should be established requiring aluminium...

  6. Respiratory carcinogenicity assessment of soluble nickel compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oller, Adriana R

    2002-10-01

    The many chemical forms of nickel differ in physicochemical properties and biological effects. Health assessments for each main category of nickel species are needed. The carcinogenicity assessment of water-soluble nickel compounds has proven particularly difficult. Epidemiologic evidence indicates an association between inhalation exposures to nickel refinery dust containing soluble nickel compounds and increased risk of respiratory cancers. However, the nature of this association is unclear because of limitations of the exposure data, inconsistent results across cohorts, and the presence of mixed exposures to water-insoluble nickel compounds and other confounders that are known or suspected carcinogens. Moreover, well-conducted animal inhalation studies, where exposures were solely to soluble nickel, failed to demonstrate a carcinogenic potential. Similar negative results were seen in animal oral studies. A model exists that relates respiratory carcinogenic potential to the bioavailability of nickel ion at nuclear sites within respiratory target cells. This model helps reconcile human, animal, and mechanistic data for soluble nickel compounds. For inhalation exposures, the predicted lack of bioavailability of nickel ion at target sites suggests that water-soluble nickel compounds, by themselves, will not be complete human carcinogens. However, if inhaled at concentrations high enough to induce chronic lung inflammation, these compounds may enhance carcinogenic risks associated with inhalation exposure to other substances. Overall, the weight of evidence indicates that inhalation exposure to soluble nickel alone will not cause cancer; moreover, if exposures are kept below levels that cause chronic respiratory toxicity, any possible tumor-enhancing effects (particularly in smokers) would be avoided.

  7. Nickel-hydrogen bipolar battery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaller, L. H.

    1982-01-01

    Rechargeable nickel-hydrogen systems are described that more closely resemble a fuel cell system than a traditional nickel-cadmium battery pack. This was stimulated by the currently emerging requirements related to large manned and unmanned low Earth orbit applications. The resultant nickel-hydrogen battery system should have a number of features that would lead to improved reliability, reduced costs as well as superior energy density and cycle lives as compared to battery systems constructed from the current state-of-the-art nickel-hydrogen individual pressure vessel cells.

  8. NICKEL PLATING PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, T.B.; Zava, T.E.

    1959-05-12

    A simplified process is presented for plating nickel by the vapor decomposition of nickel carbonyl. In a preferred form of the invention a solid surface is nickel plated by subjecting the surface to contact with a mixture containing by volume approximately 20% nickel carbonyl vapor, 2% hydrogen sulfide and .l% water vapor or 1% oxygen and the remainder carbon dioxide at room temperature until the desired thickness of nickel is obtained. The advantage of this composition over others is that the normally explosive nickel carbonyl is greatly stabilized.

  9. Nickel silicide formation in silicon implanted nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Z.; Williams, J. S.; Pogany, A. P.; Sood, D. K.; Collins, G. A.

    1995-04-01

    Nickel silicide formation during the annealing of very high dose (≥4.5×1017 ions/cm2) Si implanted Ni has been investigated, using ion beam analytical techniques, electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction analysis. An initial amorphous Si-Ni alloy, formed as a result of high dose ion implantation, first crystallized to Ni2Si upon annealing in the temperature region of 200-300 °C. This was followed by the formation of Ni5Si2 in the temperature region of 300-400 °C and then by Ni3Si at 400-600 °C. The Ni3Si layer was found to have an epitaxial relationship with the substrate Ni, which was determined as Ni3Si∥Ni and Ni3Si∥Ni for Ni(100) samples. The minimum channeling yield in the 2 MeV He Rutherford backscattering and channeling spectra of this epitaxial layer improved with higher annealing temperatures up to 600 °C, and reached a best value measured at about 8%. However, the epitaxial Ni3Si dissolved after long time annealing at 600 °C or annealing at higher temperatures to liberate soluble Si into the Ni substrate. The epitaxy is attributed to the excellent lattice match between the Ni3Si and the Ni. The annealing behavior follows the predictions of the Ni-Si phase diagram for this nickel-rich binary system.

  10. New views on the hypothesis of respiratory cancer risk from soluble nickel exposure; and reconsideration of this risk's historical sources in nickel refineries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heller James G

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction While epidemiological methods have grown in sophistication during the 20th century, their application in historical occupational (and environmental health research has also led to a corresponding growth in uncertainty in the validity and reliability of the attribution of risk in the resulting studies, particularly where study periods extend back in time to the immediate postwar era (1945–70 when exposure measurements were sporadic, unsystematically collected and primitive in technique; and, more so, to the pre-WWII era (when exposure data were essentially non-existent. These uncertainties propagate with animal studies that are designed to confirm the carcinogenicity by inhalation exposure of a chemical putatively responsible for historical workplace cancers since exact exposure conditions were never well characterized. In this report, we present a weight of scientific evidence examination of the human and toxicological evidence to show that soluble nickel is not carcinogenic; and, furthermore, that the carcinogenic potencies previously assigned by regulators to sulphidic and oxidic nickel compounds for the purposes of developing occupational exposure limits have likely been overestimated. Methods Published, file and archival evidence covering the pertinent epidemiology, biostatistics, confounding factors, toxicology, industrial hygiene and exposure factors, and other risky exposures were examined to evaluate the soluble nickel carcinogenicity hypothesis; and the likely contribution of a competing workplace carcinogen (arsenic on sulphidic and oxidic nickel risk estimates. Findings Sharp contrasts in available land area and topography, and consequent intensity of production and refinery process layouts, likely account for differences in nickel species exposures in the Kristiansand (KNR and Port Colborne (PCNR refineries. These differences indicate mixed sulphidic and oxidic nickel and arsenic exposures in KNR's historical

  11. Nickel exposure from keys: alternatives for protection and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Dathan; Scheman, Andrew J; Jacob, Sharon E

    2013-01-01

    Keys are an important exposure source of metal allergens to consumers and confer a significant problem for nickel-allergic individuals because of repeated daily use. The aims of this study were to investigate the frequency of nickel and cobalt release in keys and to consider the effectiveness of coatings for preventing metallic allergen release from common metal allergen-releasing keys. Keys from a variety of common stores were nickel and cobalt spot tested. Nickel-releasing keys were coated with enamel sprays, subjected to a use test, and retested to assess for metal allergen release. Of 55 tested keys, 80% showed a strong positive result to the nickel spot test. None of the tested keys exhibited cobalt release. No keys initially released nickel after enamel coatings. Key coatings chipped at the portion inserted into a lock after 30 insertions, and keys were found to release nickel. The handle of the key was not found to release nickel after 60 insertions. Nickel release from keys is very common; nickel-allergic consumers should consider purchasing keys that do not release nickel (eg, brass, anodized). Enamel coating may be useful in protecting nickel-sensitive individuals from their keys but cannot consistently prevent nickel-release from portions used frequently.

  12. Characteristics of nickel-allergic dermatitis patients seen in private dermatology clinics in Denmark: a questionnaire study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Hald, Marianne; Avnstorp, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The use of nickel in certain consumer goods has been regulated in Denmark since 1990. The aim of this study was to reveal the clinical characteristics of nickel-allergic patients seen in seven private dermatology clinics and to identify current sources of nickel that may elicit nickel dermatitis...

  13. Urine nickel concentrations in nickel-exposed workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernacki, E J; Parsons, G E; Roy, B R; Mikac-Devic, M; Kennedy, C D; Sunderman, F W

    1978-01-01

    Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry was employed for analyses of nickel concentrations in urine samples from nickel-exposed workers in 10 occupational groups and from non-exposed workers in two control groups. Mean concentrations of nickel in urine were greatest in workers who were exposed to inhalation of aerosols of soluble nickel salts (e.g., workers in nickel plating operations and in an electrolytic nickel refinery). Less marked increases in urine nickel concentrations were found in groups of metal sprayers, nickel battery workers, bench mechanics and are welders. No significant increases in mean concentrations of nickel were found in urine samples from workers who performed grinding, buffing and polishing of nickel-containing alloys or workers in a coal gasification plant who employed Raney nickel as a hydrogenation catalyst. Measurements of nickel concentrations in urine are more sensitive and practical than measurements of serum nickel concentrations for evaluation of nickel exposures in industrial workers.

  14. Mechanical Properties of Electrolyte Jet Electrodeposited Nickel Foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinsong Chen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Principles of the preparation of nickel foam by electrolyte jet electrodeposition were introduced, Nickel foam samples with different porosity were fabricated. Effect of different porosity on microhardness and uniaxial tensile properties of nickel foam was discussed. The results show that the microhardness of nickel foam is 320~400 HV, lower than entitative metal clearly. The lower the porosity of nickel foam, the higher the microhardness is. During the process of uniaxial tensile, nickel foam is characterized by three distinct regions, e.g. elastic deforming region, plastic plateau region and densification region. The higher the porosity of nickel foam, the lower the plastic plateau and the poorer the strength of nickel foam, accordingly

  15. Systemic contact dermatitis after oral exposure to nickel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Stab; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2006-01-01

    Systemic contact dermatitis can be elicited experimentally in nickel-sensitive individuals by oral nickel exposure. A crucial point interpreting such experiments has been the relevance of nickel exposure from drinking water and diet. The aim of this meta-analysis study on former nickel......-exposure investigations was to provide the best possible estimation of threshold values of nickel doses that may cause systemic contact dermatitis in nickel-sensitive patients. 17 relevant investigations were identified, and statistical analyses were performed in a stepwise procedure. 9 studies were included in the final...... of the doses that, theoretically, would cause systemic contact dermatitis in exposed nickel-sensitive patients. The results from the 2 most sensitive groups show that 1% of these individuals may react with systemic contact dermatitis at normal daily nickel exposure from drinking water and diet, i.e. 0...

  16. Systemic contact dermatitis due to nickel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taruli Olivia

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Systemic contact dermatitis (SCD is a systemic reactivation of a previous allergic contact dermatitis. The initial exposure may usually be topical, followed by oral, intravenous or inhalation exposure leading to a systemic hypersensitivity reaction. A case of a 27 year-old male with SCD due to nickel is reported Case Report: A 27 year-old male presented with recurrent pruritic eruption consist of deep seated vesicles on both palmar and left plantar since 6 months before admission. This complaint began after patient consumed excessive amounts of chocolate, canned food, and beans. The patient worked as a technician in a food factory. History of allergy due to nickel was acknowledged since childhood. The clinical presentation was diffuse deep seated vesicles, and multiple erythematous macules to plaques, with collarette scale. Patch test using the European standard showed a +3 result to nickel. The patient was diagnosed as systemic contact dermatitis due to nickel. The treatments were topical corticosteroid and patient education of avoidance of both contact and systemic exposure to nickel. The patient showed clinical improvement after 2 weeks. Discussion: SCD was diagnosed due to the history of massive consumption of food containing nickel in a patient who had initial sensitization to nickel, with clinical features and the patch test result. Advice to be aware of nickel and its avoidance is important in SCD management.

  17. Metallic nickel nano- and fine particles induce JB6 cell apoptosis through a caspase-8/AIF mediated cytochrome c-independent pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castranova Vincent

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carcinogenicity of nickel compounds has been well documented. However, the carcinogenic effect of metallic nickel is still unclear. The present study investigates metallic nickel nano- and fine particle-induced apoptosis and the signal pathways involved in this process in JB6 cells. The data obtained from this study will be of benefit for elucidating the pathological and carcinogenic potential of metallic nickel particles. Results Using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay, we found that metallic nickel nanoparticles exhibited higher cytotoxicity than fine particles. Both metallic nickel nano- and fine particles induced JB6 cell apoptosis. Metallic nickel nanoparticles produced higher apoptotic induction than fine particles. Western-blot analysis showed an activation of proapoptotic factors including Fas (CD95, Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD, caspase-8, death receptor 3 (DR3 and BID in apoptotic cells induced by metallic nickel particles. Immunoprecipitation (IP western blot analysis demonstrated the formation of the Fas-related death-inducing signaling complex (DISC in the apoptotic process. Furthermore, lamin A and beta-actin were cleaved. Moreover, we found that apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF was up-regulated and released from mitochondria to cytoplasm. Interestingly, although an up-regulation of cytochrome c was detected in the mitochondria of metallic nickel particle-treated cells, no cytochrome c release from mitochondria to cytoplasm was found. In addition, activation of antiapoptotic factors including phospho-Akt (protein kinase B and Bcl-2 was detected. Further studies demonstrated that metallic nickel particles caused no significant changes in the mitochondrial membrane permeability after 24 h treatment. Conclusion In this study, metallic nickel nanoparticles caused higher cytotoxicity and apoptotic induction than fine particles in JB6 cells. Apoptotic cell death

  18. Environmental and human toxicology of nickel - a review; Umwelt- und Humantoxikologie von Nickel - eine aktuelle Uebersicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyersmann, D. [Fachbereich Biologie und Chemie, Univ. Bremen (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    Nickel is a relatively rare element, and its concentrations in ambient air, soils and waters are very low. Higher burdens of nickel are found in nickel industries and their proximity. The human uptake of nickel from the ambient air is neglectably low, except in industrial exposures. The main fraction of human nickel uptake is from food, nearly 50% stems from vegetables. Only about 2% of the oral uptake of nickel are resorbed and distributed over all organs investigated. The uptake of nickel compounds through the skin generally is very low. However, chronic skin contact with nickel and nickel compounds causes a specific contact allergy. This disease was observed after occupational exposure but also frequently in the general population. The number of new cases has dropped considerably due to reinforced prevention. Epidemiological studies with workers of nickel smelting and refining plants have demonstrated increased risks of nose and lung cancer. Human data are supported by results from animal experiments which have shown that inhalation of various nickel compounds caused lung cancer. Furthermore, animal experiments have yielded evidence that oral and inhalative exposure to nickel compounds impair reproduction. National and international agencies have classified various nickel compounds as carcinogenic to humans. The unit cancer risk attributed to life-long inhalation of 1 {mu}g Ni/m{sup 3} air is estimated to be between 2 x 10{sup -4} and 7 x 10{sup -4}. Occupational exposure limits in Germany have been the Technical Guidance Values of 0.5 mg/m{sup 3} for nickel and weakly soluble nickel compounds and of 0.05 mg/m{sup 3} for inhalable droplets of soluble nickel salts. The German limit value for ambient immission is 0.015 mg Ni/m{sup 2}. d, and for emission 0,5 mg Ni/m{sup 3}. Limit values for nickel in air are to be taken not as safe thresholds but as guidance values for the delimitation of the cancer risk. (orig.)

  19. How does exposure to nickel and cadmium affect the transcriptome of yellow perch (Perca flavescens) – Results from a 1000 candidate-gene microarray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bougas, Bérénice; Normandeau, Eric; Pierron, Fabien; Campbell, Peter G.C.; Bernatchez, Louis; Couture, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The transcriptional responses of Perca flavescens to both metal and non metal stressors were measured with a 1000 candidate-gene microarray. •475, 287 and 176 genes were differentially transcribed depending on temperature, Ni and Cd concentrations, respectively. •Genes involved in iron metabolism, transcriptional and translational processes, vitamin metabolism, blood coagulation, and calcium transport were impacted by metals. •The developed microarray contributes to a better characterization of the impact of different stressors on the transcriptome. -- Abstract: The molecular mechanisms underlying nickel (Ni) and cadmium (Cd) toxicity and their specific effects on fish are poorly understood. Documenting gene transcription profiles offers a powerful approach toward identifying the molecular mechanisms affected by these metals and to discover biomarkers of their toxicity. However, confounding environmental factors can complicate the interpretation of the results and the detection of biomarkers for fish captured in their natural environment. In the present study, a 1000 candidate-gene microarray, developed from a previous RNA-seq study on a subset of individual fish from contrasting level of metal contamination, was used to investigate the transcriptional response to metal (Ni and Cd) and non metal (temperature, oxygen, and diet) stressors in yellow perch (Perca flavescens). Specifically, we aimed at (1) identifying transcriptional signatures specific to Ni and Cd exposure, (2) investigating the mechanisms of their toxicity, and (3) developing a predictive tool to identify the sublethal effects of Ni and Cd contaminants in fish sampled from natural environments. A total of 475 genes displayed significantly different transcription levels when temperature varied while 287 and 176 genes were differentially transcribed at different concentrations of Ni and Cd, respectively. These metals were found to mainly affect the transcription level of genes

  20. How does exposure to nickel and cadmium affect the transcriptome of yellow perch (Perca flavescens) – Results from a 1000 candidate-gene microarray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bougas, Bérénice, E-mail: Berenice.Bougas@ete.inrs.ca [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre INRS Eau Terre et Environnement, 490, rue de la Couronne, Québec, Québec G1K 9A9 (Canada); Département de biologie, Institut de Biologie Intégrative et des Systèmes (IBIS), Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6 (Canada); Normandeau, Eric [Département de biologie, Institut de Biologie Intégrative et des Systèmes (IBIS), Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6 (Canada); Pierron, Fabien [Université de Bordeaux, EPOC, UMR 5805, F-33400 Talence (France); CNRS, EPOC, UMR 5805, F-33400 Talence (France); Campbell, Peter G.C. [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre INRS Eau Terre et Environnement, 490, rue de la Couronne, Québec, Québec G1K 9A9 (Canada); Bernatchez, Louis [Département de biologie, Institut de Biologie Intégrative et des Systèmes (IBIS), Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6 (Canada); Couture, Patrice [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre INRS Eau Terre et Environnement, 490, rue de la Couronne, Québec, Québec G1K 9A9 (Canada)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •The transcriptional responses of Perca flavescens to both metal and non metal stressors were measured with a 1000 candidate-gene microarray. •475, 287 and 176 genes were differentially transcribed depending on temperature, Ni and Cd concentrations, respectively. •Genes involved in iron metabolism, transcriptional and translational processes, vitamin metabolism, blood coagulation, and calcium transport were impacted by metals. •The developed microarray contributes to a better characterization of the impact of different stressors on the transcriptome. -- Abstract: The molecular mechanisms underlying nickel (Ni) and cadmium (Cd) toxicity and their specific effects on fish are poorly understood. Documenting gene transcription profiles offers a powerful approach toward identifying the molecular mechanisms affected by these metals and to discover biomarkers of their toxicity. However, confounding environmental factors can complicate the interpretation of the results and the detection of biomarkers for fish captured in their natural environment. In the present study, a 1000 candidate-gene microarray, developed from a previous RNA-seq study on a subset of individual fish from contrasting level of metal contamination, was used to investigate the transcriptional response to metal (Ni and Cd) and non metal (temperature, oxygen, and diet) stressors in yellow perch (Perca flavescens). Specifically, we aimed at (1) identifying transcriptional signatures specific to Ni and Cd exposure, (2) investigating the mechanisms of their toxicity, and (3) developing a predictive tool to identify the sublethal effects of Ni and Cd contaminants in fish sampled from natural environments. A total of 475 genes displayed significantly different transcription levels when temperature varied while 287 and 176 genes were differentially transcribed at different concentrations of Ni and Cd, respectively. These metals were found to mainly affect the transcription level of genes

  1. A Cross-Talk Between NFAT and NF-κB Pathways is Crucial for Nickel-Induced COX-2 Expression in Beas-2B Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, T.; Li, X.; Ding, J.; Luo, W.; Li, J.; Huang, C.

    2013-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a critical enzyme implicated in chronic inflammation-associated cancer development. Our studies have shown that the exposure of Beas-2B cells, a human bronchial epithelial cell line, to lung carcinogenic nickel compounds results in increased COX-2 expression. However, the signaling pathways leading to nickel-induced COX-2 expression are not well understood. In the current study, we found that the exposure of Beas-2B cells to nickel compounds resulted in the activation of both nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). The expression of COX-2 induced upon nickel exposure was inhibited by either a NFAT pharmacological inhibitor or the knockdown of NFAT3 by specific siRNA. We further found that the activation of NFAT and NF-κB was dependent on each other. Since our previous studies have shown that NF-κB activation is critical for nickel-induced COX-2 expression in Beas-2B cells exposed to nickel compounds under same experimental condition, we anticipate that there might be a cross-talk between the activation of NFAT and NF-κB for the COX-2 induction due to nickel exposure in Beas-2B cells. Furthermore, we showed that the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by introduction of mitochondrial catalase inhibited the activation of both NFAT and NF-κB, and the induction of COX-2 due to nickel exposure. Taken together, our results defining the evidence showing a key role of the cross-talk between NFAT and NF-κB pathways in regulating nickel-induced COX-2 expression, further provide insight into the understanding of the molecular mechanisms linking nickel exposure to its lung carcinogenic effects. PMID:21486220

  2. A review of nickel hydrogen battery technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smithrick, J.J.; Odonnell, P.M.

    1995-05-01

    This paper on nickel hydrogen batteries is an overview of the various nickel hydrogen battery design options, technical accomplishments, validation test results and trends. There is more than one nickel hydrogen battery design, each having its advantage for specific applications. The major battery designs are individual pressure vessel (IPV), common pressure vessel (CPV), bipolar and low pressure metal hydride. State-of-the-art (SOA) nickel hydrogen batteries are replacing nickel cadmium batteries in almost all geosynchronous orbit (GEO) applications requiring power above 1 kW. However, for the more severe low earth orbit (LEO) applications (greater than 30,000 cycles), the current cycle life of 4000 to 10,000 cycles at 60 percent DOD should be improved. A NASA Lewis Research Center innovative advanced design IPV nickel hydrogen cell led to a breakthrough in cycle life enabling LEO applications at deep depths of discharge (DOD). A trend for some future satellites is to increase the power level to greater than 6 kW. Another trend is to decrease the power to less than 1 kW for small low cost satellites. Hence, the challenge is to reduce battery mass, volume and cost. A key is to develop a light weight nickel electrode and alternate battery designs. A common pressure vessel (CPV) nickel hydrogen battery is emerging as a viable alternative to the IPV design. It has the advantage of reduced mass, volume and manufacturing costs. A 10 Ah CPV battery has successfully provided power on the relatively short lived Clementine Spacecraft. A bipolar nickel hydrogen battery design has been demonstrated (15,000 LEO cycles, 40 percent DOD). The advantage is also a significant reduction in volume, a modest reduction in mass, and like most bipolar designs, features a high pulse power capability. A low pressure aerospace nickel metal hydride battery cell has been developed and is on the market.

  3. Carbon formation on nickel and nickel-copper alloy catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alstrup, I.; Soerensen, O.; Rostrup-Nielsen, J.R. [Haldor Topsoe Research Labs., Lyngby (Denmark); Tavares, M.T.; Bernardo, C.A.

    1998-05-01

    Equilibrium, kinetic and morphological studies of carbon formation in CH{sub 4} + H{sub 2}, CO, and CO + H{sub 2} gases on silica supported nickel and nickel-copper catalysts are reviewed. The equilibrium deviates in all cases from graphite equilibrium and more so in CO + CO{sub 2} than in CH{sub 4} + H{sub 2}. A kinetic model based on information from surface science results with chemisorption of CH{sub 4} and possibly also the first dehydrogenation step as rate controlling describes carbon formation on nickel catalyst in CH{sub 4} + H{sub 2} well. The kinetics of carbon formation in CO and CO + H{sub 2} gases are in agreement with CO disproportionation as rate determining step. The presence of hydrogen influences strongly the chemisorption of CO. Carbon filaments are formed when hydrogen is present in the gas while encapsulating carbon dominates in pure CO. Small amounts of Cu alloying promotes while larger amounts (Cu : Ni {>=} 0.1) inhibits carbon formation and changes the morphology of the filaments (``octopus`` carbon formation). Adsorption induced nickel segregation changes the kinetics of the alloy catalysts at high carbon activities. Modifications suggested in some very recent papers on the basis of new results are also briefly discussed. (orig.) 31 refs.

  4. Epicutaneous exposure to nickel induces nickel allergy in mice via a MyD88-dependent and interleukin-1-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennegaard, Marie T; Dyring-Andersen, Beatrice; Skov, Lone; Nielsen, Morten M; Schmidt, Jonas D; Bzorek, Michael; Poulsen, Steen S; Thomsen, Allan R; Woetmann, Anders; Thyssen, Jacob P; Johansen, Jeanne D; Odum, Niels; Menné, Torkil; Geisler, Carsten; Bonefeld, Charlotte M

    2014-10-01

    Several attempts to establish a model in mice that reflects nickel allergy in humans have been made. Most models use intradermal injection of nickel in combination with adjuvant to induce nickel allergy. However, such models poorly reflect induction of nickel allergy following long-lasting epicutaneous exposure to nickel. To develop a mouse model reflecting nickel allergy in humans induced by epicutaneous exposure to nickel, and to investigate the mechanisms involved in such allergic responses. Mice were exposed to NiCl2 on the dorsal side of the ears. Inflammation was evaluated by the swelling and cell infiltration of the ears. T cell responses were determined as numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the draining lymph nodes. Localization of nickel was examined by dimethylglyoxime staining. Epicutaneous exposure to nickel results in prolonged localization of nickel in the epidermis, and induces nickel allergy in mice. The allergic response to nickel following epicutaneous exposure is MyD88-dependent and interleukin (IL)-1 receptor-dependent, but independent of toll-like receptor (TLR)-4. This new model for nickel allergy that reflects epicutaneous exposure to nickel in humans shows that nickel allergy is dependent on MyD88 and IL-1 receptor signalling, but independent of TLR4. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Nickel allergy in patch-tested female hairdressers and assessment of nickel release from hairdressers' scissors and crochet hooks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Milting, Kristina; Bregnhøj, Anne

    2009-01-01

    the proportion of hairdressers' scissors and crochet hooks that released an excessive amount of nickel and to determine the prevalence of nickel allergy among patch-tested female hairdressers. MATERIALS: Random hairdressers' stores in Copenhagen were visited. The dimethylglyoxime (DMG) test was used to assess...... excessive nickel release. The prevalence of nickel allergy among female hairdressers from the database at Gentofte Hospital was compared with the prevalence of nickel allergy among other consecutively patch-tested dermatitis patients. RESULTS: DMG testing showed that 1 (0.5%; 95% CI = 0 - 2.0) of 200 pairs...

  6. Contaminated nickel scrap processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Hayden, H.W.; Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Wilson, D.F.

    1994-12-01

    The DOE will soon choose between treating contaminated nickel scrap as a legacy waste and developing high-volume nickel decontamination processes. In addition to reducing the volume of legacy wastes, a decontamination process could make 200,000 tons of this strategic metal available for domestic use. Contaminants in DOE nickel scrap include 234 Th, 234 Pa, 137 Cs, 239 Pu (trace), 60 Co, U, 99 Tc, and 237 Np (trace). This report reviews several industrial-scale processes -- electrorefining, electrowinning, vapormetallurgy, and leaching -- used for the purification of nickel. Conventional nickel electrolysis processes are particularly attractive because they use side-stream purification of process solutions to improve the purity of nickel metal. Additionally, nickel purification by electrolysis is effective in a variety of electrolyte systems, including sulfate, chloride, and nitrate. Conventional electrorefining processes typically use a mixed electrolyte which includes sulfate, chloride, and borate. The use of an electrorefining or electrowinning system for scrap nickel recovery could be combined effectively with a variety of processes, including cementation, solvent extraction, ion exchange, complex-formation, and surface sorption, developed for uranium and transuranic purification. Selected processes were reviewed and evaluated for use in nickel side-stream purification. 80 refs

  7. Contaminated nickel scrap processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Hayden, H.W.; Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Wilson, D.F.

    1994-12-01

    The DOE will soon choose between treating contaminated nickel scrap as a legacy waste and developing high-volume nickel decontamination processes. In addition to reducing the volume of legacy wastes, a decontamination process could make 200,000 tons of this strategic metal available for domestic use. Contaminants in DOE nickel scrap include {sup 234}Th, {sup 234}Pa, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 239}Pu (trace), {sup 60}Co, U, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 237}Np (trace). This report reviews several industrial-scale processes -- electrorefining, electrowinning, vapormetallurgy, and leaching -- used for the purification of nickel. Conventional nickel electrolysis processes are particularly attractive because they use side-stream purification of process solutions to improve the purity of nickel metal. Additionally, nickel purification by electrolysis is effective in a variety of electrolyte systems, including sulfate, chloride, and nitrate. Conventional electrorefining processes typically use a mixed electrolyte which includes sulfate, chloride, and borate. The use of an electrorefining or electrowinning system for scrap nickel recovery could be combined effectively with a variety of processes, including cementation, solvent extraction, ion exchange, complex-formation, and surface sorption, developed for uranium and transuranic purification. Selected processes were reviewed and evaluated for use in nickel side-stream purification. 80 refs.

  8. Carcinogenicity assessment of water-soluble nickel compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Julie E; Prueitt, Robyn L; Dodge, David G; Thakali, Sagar

    2009-01-01

    IARC is reassessing the human carcinogenicity of nickel compounds in 2009. To address the inconsistencies among results from studies of water-soluble nickel compounds, we conducted a weight-of-evidence analysis of the relevant epidemiological, toxicological, and carcinogenic mode-of-action data. We found the epidemiological evidence to be limited, in that some, but not all, data suggest that exposure to soluble nickel compounds leads to increased cancer risk in the presence of certain forms of insoluble nickel. Although there is no evidence that soluble nickel acts as a complete carcinogen in animals, there is limited evidence that suggests it may act as a tumor promoter. The mode-of-action data suggest that soluble nickel compounds will not be able to cause genotoxic effects in vivo because they cannot deliver sufficient nickel ions to nuclear sites of target cells. Although the mode-of-action data suggest several possible non-genotoxic effects of the nickel ion, it is unclear whether soluble nickel compounds can elicit these effects in vivo or whether these effects, if elicited, would result in tumor promotion. The mode-of-action data equally support soluble nickel as a promoter or as not being a causal factor in carcinogenesis at all. The weight of evidence does not indicate that soluble nickel compounds are complete carcinogens, and there is only limited evidence that they could act as tumor promoters.

  9. Protective effects of zinc acetate toward the toxicity of nickelous acetate in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waalkes, M.P.; Kasprzak, K.S.; Ohshima, M.; Poirier, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effects of zinc pretreatment on the acute toxicity of nickel. Male Fischer rats received either nickel alone (i.p.), zinc alone (s.c.), zinc plus nickel, or saline (i.p. and s.c.; controls). Zinc pretreatment significantly increased the 14-day survival of nickel-related rats. Zinc did not, however, prevent the reduction in weight gain over 2 weeks seen with nickel treatment. Histopathologically, at 120 h following nickel exposure, kidneys in the group receiving nickel alone generally showed moderate nephropathy (multifocal proximal tubule degeneration with necrosis) while in the zinc plus nickel group the nephropathy was generally mild. Zinc pretreatment had no apparent effect on the pharmacokinetics of nickel over 24 h as assessed by urinary excretion, blood levels or organ distribution. Zinc pretreatment also did not alter the subcellular distribution of renal nickel 6 h after nickel exposure. Enhanced synthesis of metallothionein did not appear to play a critical role in the reduction of nickel toxicity, since renal concentrations of this metalbuilding protein, although elevated compared to control, were not different in rats receiving zinc and nickel or zinc alone. Zinc pretreatment did, however, have marked effect on nickel-induced hyperglycemia, reducing both the duration and severity of elevated blood glucose levels. Results of the study show that zinc can prevent some of the toxic effects of nickel and that the mechanism of this action does not appear to involve either metalothionein or alterations in the pharmacokinetics of nickel. (author)

  10. Epicutaneous exposure to nickel induces nickel allergy in mice via a MyD88-dependent and interleukin-1-dependent pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennegaard, Marie T; Dyring-Andersen, Beatrice; Skov, Lone

    2014-01-01

    -lasting epicutaneous exposure to nickel. OBJECTIVE: To develop a mouse model reflecting nickel allergy in humans induced by epicutaneous exposure to nickel, and to investigate the mechanisms involved in such allergic responses. METHODS: Mice were exposed to NiCl2 on the dorsal side of the ears. Inflammation...... was evaluated by the swelling and cell infiltration of the ears. T cell responses were determined as numbers of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the draining lymph nodes. Localization of nickel was examined by dimethylglyoxime staining. RESULTS: Epicutaneous exposure to nickel results in prolonged localization...... of nickel in the epidermis, and induces nickel allergy in mice. The allergic response to nickel following epicutaneous exposure is MyD88-dependent and interleukin (IL)-1 receptor-dependent, but independent of toll-like receptor (TLR)-4. CONCLUSION: This new model for nickel allergy that reflects...

  11. Effects of nickel on irradiation embrittlement of light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    , results from tests of national steels demonstrated that, for a given high level of nickel in the material, and all other factors being equal, high manganese content leads to much greater irradiation-induced embrittlement than low manganese content for both WWER-1000 and PWR materials. Experimental results and microstructural investigations for a very high nickel steel (∼3.5 wt%) have indicated that, when there is very little content manganese, the radiation sensitivity is very low, even for such a high nickel steel. This TECDOC can be used by research institutes, utilities, vendor organizations, regulators, and others to gain a better understanding of the effects of nickel on irradiation embrittlement of LWR RPV steels

  12. Synthesis of Nickel and Nickel Hydroxide Nanopowders by Simplified Chemical Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeerapan Tientong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nickel nanopowders were synthesized by a chemical reduction of nickel ions with hydrazine hydrate at pH ~12.5. Sonication of the solutions created a temperature of 54–65°C to activate the reduction reaction of nickel nanoparticles. The solution pH affected the composition of the resulting nanoparticles. Nickel hydroxide nanoparticles were formed from an alkaline solution (pH~10 of nickel-hydrazine complexed by dropwise titration. X-ray diffraction of the powder and the analysis of the resulting Williamson-Hall plots revealed that the particle size of the powders ranged from 12 to 14 nm. Addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone into the synthesis decreased the nickel nanoparticle size to approximately 7 nm. Dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the particles were in the nanometer range. The structure of the synthesized nickel and nickel hydroxide nanoparticles was identified by X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  13. Effect of tetraethylthiuramdisulphide and diethyldithiocarbamate on nickel toxicokinetics in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalsgaard, G.; Andersen, O.

    1994-01-01

    A new experimental pharmacokinetic model using the γ-emitting isotope 57 Ni for studying nickel toxicokinetics was employed in a recent investigation in order to quantitatively study, for the first time, the effect of tetraethylthiuram disulphide (disulfiram, Antabuse, TTD) and sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) on whole-body retention and organ distribution of nickel in mice. TTD or its decomposition product DDC given orally by stomach tube shortly after oral administration of a low dose of nickel chloride labelled with 57 Ni resulted in an approximately ten times higher whole-body retention of nickel compared to the retention in a control group exposed to nickel only. These chelators increased the whole-body retention of nickel also when given by intraperitoneal injection shortly after oral or intraperitoneal administration of nickel. Oral administration of a single dose of TTD or DDC rapidly after an oral dose of nickel chloride also resulted in extensive changes in the organ distribution of nickel, thus the nickel content in the brain was at least 700 times higher than in a control group given the same dose of nickel only. If DDC was given intraperitoneally after nickel given orally, the relative organ distribution of nickel to most organs was the same as if the chelator was given orally, though the contents of the liver and lungs were lower. That TTD and DDC resulted in a transport of nickel to the brain, is underlined by the fact that after 20 hr, approximately 15% and after 45-50 hr, 30% of the total body burden of Ni was found in the brain. Stating the nickel content as concentrations, we found after 19 hr to 23 hr the highest nickel concentration in the brain, kidneys, lungs and liver, in order of decreasing concentration. From 68 hr to 122 hr the order was brain, lungs, kidneys and liver. TTD and DDC are widely used clinically. These results indicate, that long-term simultaneous administration of nickel and TTD or DDC to humans should be avoided, as

  14. Nickel nanostructured materials from liquid phase photodeposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuffrida, Salvatore; Condorelli, Guglielmo G.; Costanzo, Lucia L.; Ventimiglia, Giorgio; Nigro, Raffaella Lo; Favazza, Maria; Votrico, Enrico; Bongiorno, Corrado; Fragala, Ignazio L.

    2007-01-01

    Liquid Phase Photo-Deposition (LPPD) technique has been used to obtain both colloidal particles and thin films of metallic and chloride nickel from solutions of only precursor Ni(acac) 2 (acac=2,4-pentandionato). Metallic nickel was obtained from ethanol solutions by direct nickel(II) photoreduction at 254 nm and by acetone sensitised reaction at 300 nm. In this latter process the rate was higher than in the first one. NiCl 2 was formed from CCl 4 solution by a solvent-initiated reaction. TEM analysis, performed on colloidal particles of nickel, showed that their dimensions are in the range 2-4 nm. The films did not present carbon contamination and were characterized by AFM, XPS and GIXRD. Metallic films consisted of particles of 20-40 nm that are the result of the aggregation of smaller crystallites (4-5 nm). Larger agglomerations (around 200 nm) have been observed for NiCl 2 films

  15. NICKEL – ENVIRONMENTAL ALLERGEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henryka Langauer-Lewowicka

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Nickel (Ni is ubiquitus in our biosphere because of its emission from natural and anthropogenic sources. Its toxic and carcinogenic properties are well recognised only in workers exposed to high Ni concentrations. Nickel allergy is the most common form of cutaneus hypersensitivity in general population and also in occupationally exposed groups. As sensitizing agent Ni has a high prevalence of allergic contact dermatitis. The most important known risk factor associated with nickel allergy is ear piercing and use of other jewelry in females. In general population 17 % adults and 8 % children have Ni allergy symptoms. Permanently growing Ni allergy is regarded as serious risk for public health.

  16. Promoting Self-regulated Learning of Brazilian Preservice Student Teachers: Results of an Intervention Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Ribeiro Ganda

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Self-regulation is the process by which individuals monitor, control, and reflect on their learning. Self-regulated students have motivational, metacognitive, affective, and behavioral characteristics that enhance their learning. As the importance of self-regulated learning is well acknowledged by research nowadays, the aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of an innovative course designed to promote self-regulated learning among Brazilian preservice student teachers. The innovative approach was developed in the format of a program of intervention based heavily on self-reflection. The content involved student exposure to self-reflexive activities, lectures on the self-regulated learning framework, and theoretical tasks aimed at fostering self-regulation of students in a double perspective: as a student and as a future teacher. The efficacy of the approach was tested by comparison with both the results of students who had taken a course with theoretical content only and those who had not taken any course at all. The sample consisted of 109 students in 4 different freshman classes in a Teacher Education Program in a Brazilian public university in an inner city in the state of São Paulo. The research was conducted using a quasi-experimental design with three stages: pretest, intervention, and posttest. The classes were randomly assigned to experimental and control conditions as follows: an experimental group involving intervention, an experimental group exposed to theory, and two control groups not taking the course. Before and after the intervention program, all the participants responded to the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory and the Self-efficacy for Self-regulated Learning scales. Overall, the results showed that the intervention program format had a positive impact in enhancing student self-regulation. Moreover, students in both the experimental groups reported both higher gains in self-efficacy for self-regulated learning

  17. Effects of Nickel, Chlorpyrifos and Their Mixture on the Dictyostelium discoideum Proteome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatti, Lara; Robotti, Elisa; Marengo, Emilio; Viarengo, Aldo; Marsano, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Mixtures of chemicals can have additive, synergistic or antagonistic interactions. We investigated the effects of the exposure to nickel, the organophosphate insecticide chlorpyrifos at effect concentrations (EC) of 25% and 50% and their binary mixture (Ec25 + EC25) on Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae based on lysosomal membrane stability (LMS). We treated D. discoideum with these compounds under controlled laboratory conditions and evaluated the changes in protein levels using a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) proteomic approach. Nickel treatment at EC25 induced changes in 14 protein spots, 12 of which were down-regulated. Treatment with nickel at EC50 resulted in changes in 15 spots, 10 of which were down-regulated. Treatment with chlorpyrifos at EC25 induced changes in six spots, all of which were down-regulated; treatment with chlorpyrifos at EC50 induced changes in 13 spots, five of which were down-regulated. The mixture corresponding to EC25 of each compound induced changes in 19 spots, 13 of which were down-regulated. The data together reveal that a different protein expression signature exists for each treatment, and that only a few proteins are modulated in multiple different treatments. For a simple binary mixture, the proteomic response does not allow for the identification of each toxicant. The protein spots that showed significant differences were identified by mass spectrometry, which revealed modulations of proteins involved in metal detoxification, stress adaptation, the oxidative stress response and other cellular processes. PMID:23443088

  18. Nickel-Hydrogen Battery Reconditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Erik L.

    1997-01-01

    Reconditioning has traditionally been used as a means of maintaining the performance of normal cells and batteries. This paper describes methods and results in which reconditioning was used to improve the performance of nickel-hydrogen batteries. The following method are discussed: (1) SS/L reconditioning implementation; (2) Superbird reconditioning - pressure/capacity growth; (3) INTELSAT 7/7A reconditioning - cell voltage plateaus and life testing; and (4) N-Star reconditioning - cell voltage plateaus (capacity fading and recovery).

  19. Residual Strain Characteristics of Nickel-coated FBG Sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Won-Jae; Hwang, A-Reum; Kim, Sang-Woo

    2017-01-01

    A metal-coated FBG (fiber Bragg grating) sensor has a memory effect, which can recall the maximum strains experienced by the structure. In this study, a nickel-coated FBG sensor was fabricated through electroless (i.e., chemical plating) and electroplating. A thickness of approximately 43 μm of a nickel layer was achieved. Then, we conducted cyclic loading tests for the fabricated nickel-coated FBG sensors to verify their capability to produce residual strains. The results revealed that the residual strain induced by the nickel coating linearly increased with an increase in the maximum strain experienced by the sensor. Therefore, we verified that a nickel-coated FBG sensor has a memory effect. The fabrication methods and the results of the cycle loading test will provide basic information and guidelines in the design of a nickel-coated FBG sensor when it is applied in the development of structural health monitoring techniques.

  20. Residual Strain Characteristics of Nickel-coated FBG Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Won-Jae; Hwang, A-Reum; Kim, Sang-Woo [Hankyong National Univ., Ansung (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    A metal-coated FBG (fiber Bragg grating) sensor has a memory effect, which can recall the maximum strains experienced by the structure. In this study, a nickel-coated FBG sensor was fabricated through electroless (i.e., chemical plating) and electroplating. A thickness of approximately 43 μm of a nickel layer was achieved. Then, we conducted cyclic loading tests for the fabricated nickel-coated FBG sensors to verify their capability to produce residual strains. The results revealed that the residual strain induced by the nickel coating linearly increased with an increase in the maximum strain experienced by the sensor. Therefore, we verified that a nickel-coated FBG sensor has a memory effect. The fabrication methods and the results of the cycle loading test will provide basic information and guidelines in the design of a nickel-coated FBG sensor when it is applied in the development of structural health monitoring techniques.

  1. Essential elucidation for preparation of supported nickel phosphide upon nickel phosphate precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xuguang; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Baoquan

    2014-01-01

    Preparation of supported nickel phosphide (Ni 2 P) depends on nickel phosphate precursor, generally related to its chemical composition and supports. Study of this dependence is essential and meaningful for the preparation of supported Ni 2 P with excellent catalytic activity. The chemical nature of nickel phosphate precursor is revealed by Raman and UV–vis spectra. It is found that initial P/Ni mole ratio ≥0.8 prohibits the Ni-O-Ni bridge bonding (i.e., nickel oxide). This chemical bonding will not result in Ni 2 P structure, verified by XRD characterization results. The alumina (namely, γ-Al 2 O 3 , θ-Al 2 O 3 , or α-Al 2 O 3 ) with distinct physiochemical properties also results in diverse chemical nature of nickel phosphate, and then different nickel phosphides. The influence of alumina support on producing Ni 2 P was explained by the theory of surface energy heterogeneity, calculated by the NLDFT method based on N 2 -sorption isotherm. The uniform surface energy of α-Al 2 O 3 results only in the nickel phosphosate precursor and thus the Ni 2 P phase. - Graphical abstract: Surface energy heterogeneity in alumina (namely α-Al 2 O 3 , θ-Al 2 O 3 , and γ-Al 2 O 3 ) supported multi-oxidic precursors with different reducibilities and thus diverse nickel phosphides (i.e., Ni 3 P, Ni 12 P 5 , Ni 2 P). - Highlights: • Preparing pure Ni 2 P. • Elucidating nickel phosphate precursor. • Associating with surface energy

  2. A review of nickel hydrogen battery technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smithrick, J.J.; O`Donnell, P.M. [NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This paper on nickel hydrogen batteries is an overview of the various nickel hydrogen battery design options, technical accomplishments, validation test results and trends. There is more than one nickel hydrogen battery design, each having its advantage for specific applications. The major battery designs are individual pressure vessel (IPV), common pressure vessel (CPV), bipolar and low pressure metal hydride. State-of-the-art (SOA) nickel hydrogen batteries are replacing nickel cadmium batteries in almost all geosynchronous orbit (GEO) applications requiring power above 1 kW. However, for the more severe low earth orbit (LEO) applications (>30,000 cycles), the current cycle life of 4,000 to 10,000 cycles at 60 percent DOD should be improved. A NASA Lewis Research Center innovative advanced design IPV nickel hydrogen cell led to a breakthrough in cycle life enabling LEO applications at deep depths of discharge (DOD). A trend for some future satellites is to increase the power level to greater than 6 kW. Another trend is to decrease the power to less than 1 kW for small low cost satellites. Hence, the challenge is to reduce battery mass, volume and cost. A key is to develop a light weight nickel electrode and alternate battery designs. A common pressure vessel (CPV) nickel hydrogen battery is emerging as a viable alternative to the IPV design. It has the advantage of reduced mass, volume and manufacturing costs. A 10 Ah CPV battery has successfully provided power on the relatively short lived Clementine Spacecraft.

  3. Binding of Nickel to Testicular Glutamate–Ammonia Ligase Inhibits Its Enzymatic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    SUN, YINGBIAO; OU, YOUNG; CHENG, MIN; RUAN, YIBING; VAN DER HOORN, FRANS A.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Exposure to nickel has been shown to cause damage to the testis in several animal models. It is not known if the testis expresses protein(s) that can bind nickel. To test this, we used a nickel-binding assay to isolate testicular nickel-binding proteins. We identified glutamate–ammonia ligase (GLUL) as a prominent nickel-binding protein by mass spectrometry. Protein analysis and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction showed that GLUL is expressed in the testis, predominantly in interstitial cells. We determined that GLUL has a higher affinity for nickel than for its regular co-factor manganese. We produced an enzymatically active, recombinant GLUL protein. Upon binding, nickel interferes with the manganese-catalyzed enzymatic activity of recombinant GLUL protein. We also determined that GLUL activity in testes of animals exposed to nickel sulfate is reduced. Our results identify testicular GLUL as the first testicular protein shown to be affected by nickel exposure. PMID:21254280

  4. Austenitic stainless steel alloys with high nickel contents in high temperature liquid metal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konvicka, H.R.; Schwarz, N.F.

    1981-01-01

    Fe-Cr-Ni base alloys (nickel content: from 15 to 70 wt%, Chromium content: 15 wt%, iron: balance) together with stainless steel (W.Nr. 1.4981) have been exposed to flowing liquid sodium at 730 0 C in four intervals up to a cumulative exposure time of 1500 hours. Weight change data and the results of post-exposition microcharacterization of specimens are reported. The corrosion rates increase with increasing nickel content and tend to become constant after longer exposure times for each alloy. The corrosion rate of stainless steel is considerably reduced due to the presence of the base alloys. Different kinetics of nickel poor (up to 35% nickel) and nickel rich (> 50% nickel) alloys and nickel transport from nickel rich to nickel poor material is observed. (orig.)

  5. The study on corrosion resistance of decorative satin nickel plating

    OpenAIRE

    LU Wenya; CHENG Xianhua

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the corrosion resistance of satin nickel plating on conductive plastic.The electrochemical tests were to analyze the corrosion behavior of satin nickel plating with different processes in 3.5% NaCl solution.The results show that,because the satin nickel plating has an organic film on its surface due to process characteristics,the film results in different corrosion resistance.By increasing satin additive dosage,the nickel plating chroma decreases,the microsurface of the p...

  6. The study on corrosion resistance of decorative satin nickel plating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LU Wenya

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the corrosion resistance of satin nickel plating on conductive plastic.The electrochemical tests were to analyze the corrosion behavior of satin nickel plating with different processes in 3.5% NaCl solution.The results show that,because the satin nickel plating has an organic film on its surface due to process characteristics,the film results in different corrosion resistance.By increasing satin additive dosage,the nickel plating chroma decreases,the microsurface of the plating becomes rough,and the corrosion resistance is followed by decrease.

  7. Nickel in tap water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, K E; Nielsen, G D; Flyvholm, M A; Fregert, S; Gruvberge, B

    1983-03-01

    Nickel analyses of tap water from several sources in Copenhagen gave up to 490 X 10(-6) g X 1(-1) in the first 250 ml portions. Hot water gave higher values than cold water. After flushing for 5 min, low values were found. Considerable variation from time to time and from tap to tap was found. Drinking of only the first portion in the morning might have an influence on nickel hand eczema.

  8. Chemoorganotrophic Bioleaching of Olivine for Nickel Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Wai Chiang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Bioleaching of olivine, a natural nickel-containing magnesium-iron-silicate, was conducted by applying chemoorganotrophic bacteria and fungi. The tested fungus, Aspergillus niger, leached substantially more nickel from olivine than the tested bacterium, Paenibacillus mucilaginosus. Aspergillus niger also outperformed two other fungal species: Humicola grisae and Penicillium chrysogenum. Contrary to traditional acid leaching, the microorganisms leached nickel preferentially over magnesium and iron. An average selectivity factor of 2.2 was achieved for nickel compared to iron. The impact of ultrasonic conditioning on bioleaching was also tested, and it was found to substantially increase nickel extraction by A. niger. This is credited to an enhancement in the fungal growth rate, to the promotion of particle degradation, and to the detachment of the stagnant biofilm around the particles. Furthermore, ultrasonic conditioning enhanced the selectivity of A. niger for nickel over iron to a value of 3.5. Pre-carbonating the olivine mineral, to enhance mineral liberation and change metal speciation, was also attempted, but did not result in improvement as a consequence of the mild pH of chemoorganotrophic bioleaching.

  9. Fabrication of Nickel Nanotube Using Anodic Oxidation and Electrochemical Deposition Technologies and Its Hydrogen Storage Property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Lv

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical deposition technique was utilized to fabricate nickel nanotubes with the assistance of AAO templates. The topography and element component of the nickel nanotubes were characterized by TEM and EDS. Furthermore, the nickel nanotube was made into microelectrode and its electrochemical hydrogen storage property was studied using cyclic voltammetry. The results showed that the diameter of nickel nanotubes fabricated was around 20–100 mm, and the length of the nanotube could reach micron grade. The nickel nanotubes had hydrogen storage property, and the hydrogen storage performance was higher than that of nickel powder.

  10. A review of nickel hydrogen battery technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithrick, John J.; Odonnell, Patricia M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper on nickel hydrogen batteries is an overview of the various nickel hydrogen battery design options, technical accomplishments, validation test results and trends. There is more than one nickel hydrogen battery design, each having its advantage for specific applications. The major battery designs are individual pressure vessel (IPV), common pressure vessel (CPV), bipolar and low pressure metal hydride. State-of-the-art (SOA) nickel hydrogen batteries are replacing nickel cadmium batteries in almost all geosynchronous orbit (GEO) applications requiring power above 1 kW. However, for the more severe low earth orbit (LEO) applications (greater than 30,000 cycles), the current cycle life of 4000 to 10,000 cycles at 60 percent DOD should be improved. A NASA Lewis Research Center innovative advanced design IPV nickel hydrogen cell led to a breakthrough in cycle life enabling LEO applications at deep depths of discharge (DOD). A trend for some future satellites is to increase the power level to greater than 6 kW. Another trend is to decrease the power to less than 1 kW for small low cost satellites. Hence, the challenge is to reduce battery mass, volume and cost. A key is to develop a light weight nickel electrode and alternate battery designs. A common pressure vessel (CPV) nickel hydrogen battery is emerging as a viable alternative to the IPV design. It has the advantage of reduced mass, volume and manufacturing costs. A 10 Ah CPV battery has successfully provided power on the relatively short lived Clementine Spacecraft. A bipolar nickel hydrogen battery design has been demonstrated (15,000 LEO cycles, 40 percent DOD). The advantage is also a significant reduction in volume, a modest reduction in mass, and like most bipolar designs, features a high pulse power capability. A low pressure aerospace nickel metal hydride battery cell has been developed and is on the market. It is a prismatic design which has the advantage of a significant reduction in volume and a

  11. Nickel Allergy and Our Children's Health: A Review of Indexed Cases and a View of Future Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Sharon E; Goldenberg, Alina; Pelletier, Janice L; Fonacier, Luz S; Usatine, Richard; Silverberg, Nanette

    2015-01-01

    Nickel is the leading cause of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) from early childhood through adolescence. Studies have shown that skin piercings and other nickel-laden exposures can trigger the onset of nickel ACD in those who are susceptible. Nickel ACD causes a vast amount of cutaneous disease in children. Cases of nickel ACD in children have been reported in peer-reviewed literature from 28 states. Common items that contain inciting nickel include jewelry, coins, zippers, belts, tools, toys, chair studs, cases for cell phones and tablets, and dental appliances. The diagnosis of nickel ACD has been routinely confirmed by patch testing in children older than 6 months suspected of ACD from nickel. Unlike in Europe, there are no mandatory restrictions legislated for nickel exposure in the United States. Denmark has demonstrated that regulation of the nickel content in metals can lower the risk of ACD and the associated health care-related costs that arise from excess nickel exposure. To further awareness, this article reviews the prominent role of nickel in pediatric skin disease in the United States. It discusses the need for a campaign by caretakers to reduce nickel-related morbidity. Lastly, it promotes the model of European legislation as a successful intervention in the prevention of nickel ACD. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Results from two workshops: Developing and amending regulations and funding state radiation control programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, G.

    1993-09-01

    The first section of this document presents the results of a technical workshop on the process of regulations development and amendment sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This workshop focused on methods for reducing the time it takes to promulgate regulations to help those States that are having difficulty meeting the three-year deadline for adopting new NRC regulations. Workshop participants responded to six questions, reviewed the procedures used by various States for revising and adopting changes to their regulations, and reviewed the time-flow charts used by various States. This workshop was designed to provide guidance to States that are promulgating and revising regulations. The second section of this document summarizes the proceedings of a technical workshop, also sponsored by the NRC, on funding radiation control programs that emphasized fee schedules and effective strategies for the 1990s. This workshop focused on determining the true costs of running a program, on setting realistic fees for the various categories of licenses, and on the most efficient methods for sending invoices, recording receipts, depositing money received, and issuing licenses. Workshop participants responded to seven questions; reviewed the methods various States use to determine true costs; reviewed the procedure that the various States use to produce invoices and licenses; reviewed the procedures that the States are required to abide by when they receive money; and reviewed the method used by the NRC to determine the cost of its various programs

  13. Origin of nickel in water solution of the chalk aquifer in the north of France and influence of geochemical factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Daniel; El Khattabi, Jamal; Lefevre, Emilie; Serhal, Hani; Bastin-Lacherez, Sabine; Shahrour, Isam

    2008-01-01

    In the north of France, high registers of nickel are sometimes recorded within the chalk aquifer. In a confined context, the presence of pyrite in the covering clays or in the marcasite nodules encrusted in the clay may constitute a natural source of trace metals. With an objective of sanitary control, the limits of chemical contents regulating the quality of water destined for human consumption have been lowered by the European Framework Directive in the field of water policy (2000/60/EC). As a result, nickel limits have been reduced from 50 to 20 μg/l. The analyses, carried out on three water catchment fields in our area of study, were centred on variable parameters (Eh, O2(d), pH, Conductivity, T°), major elements (SO4, NO3) and metals (Fe, Ni, Mn, Co). The acquired data enabled us to identify from one hand, the conditions which are presented within the site, special thanks to the evolution of nitrate and iron contents and on the other hand, the natural origin (geological) of nickel for two of the three sites studied based essentially on the evaluation of the Nickel/Cobalt ratio. Thus, on the first site, the evolution of nickel content and nitrate content showed the influence of the phenomenon of denitrification on the re-mobilisation of the nickel. Whereas on the second site, a high variation of total iron content and oxygen dissolved in solution highlighted a particular phenomenon of oxidation of the pyrite through molecular oxygen. Finally, the correlation with the sulphates clearly showed behaviour of the nickel, once released, that was entirely dependent on the phenomenon of adsorption on the iron and manganese hydroxides.

  14. Electrochemical removal of nickel ions from industrial wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Njau, K.N.; Woude, van der M.E.; Visser, G.J.; Janssen, L.J.J.

    2000-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of nickel ions in dilute industrial wastewater from a galvanic nickel plating plant was carried out on a three-dimensional electrode in a gas diffusion electrode packed bed electrode cell (GBC) and also on a rotating disc electrode. To explain the experimental results,

  15. Structure investigations of electrodeposited nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertes, A.; Czako-Nagy, I.; Lakatos-Varsanyi, M.; Brauer, G.; Leidheiser, H. Jr

    1981-01-01

    Electrodeposited nickel samples were investigated by positron annihilation (lifetime and Doppler-broadening), Moessbauer effect and X-ray diffraction measurements. Two-component positron lifetime spectra were obtained. The first component is thought to result from bulk annihilation and trapping at single trapping centres (TC), their concentrations are obtained from the trapping model. The second one possibly denotes annihilation at voids, the number of which is dependent on the stress in the deposit. The Moessbauer results show differences in the magnetic orientation in the three samples examined. (author)

  16. Nanoparticles of nickel hexacyanoferrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicalho, U.O.; Santos, D.C.; Silvestrini, D.R.; Trama, B.; Carmo, D.R. do

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles of nickel hexacyanoferrate (NHNi) were prepared in three medium (aqueous, formamide and aqueous/formamide). The materials were characterized by infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), electronica spectroscopy in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) region and also by cyclic voltammetry (CV). By spectroscopic analysis of X-ray diffraction was possible to estimate the size of the particles obtained by the Scherrer equation. The graphite paste electrodes containing nanoparticles of nickel hexacyanoferrate means formamide was sensitive to different concentrations of Dipyrone. (author)

  17. Electroless nickel plating of arc discharge synthesized carbon nanotubes for metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannatham, M.; Sankaran, S.; Prathap, Haridoss

    2015-01-01

    Electroless nickel (EN) plating was performed on arc discharge synthesized multiwalled carbon nanotubes for various deposition times. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy characterization techniques are used to identify the presence of nickel deposition on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the degree of graphitization. The results indicate that impurities are less in the purified CNTs as compared to raw carbon soot. Increasing deposition time up to 60 min increases uniform deposition of nickel throughout the length of the CNTs. However, for deposition time longer than 60 min, nickel particles are seen separated from the surface of the CNTs. Uniformly coated nickel CNTs throughout their length are potential candidates for reinforcements in composite materials. Magnetic properties of the nickel coated CNTs, with deposition time of 30 and 60 min were also evaluated. The magnetic saturation of nickel coated CNTs with deposition time of 30 min is less compared to nickel coated CNTs with deposition time of 60 min.

  18. Nitrogen atom transfer mediated by a new PN3P-pincer nickel core via a putative nitrido nickel intermediate

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Changguang

    2018-02-13

    A 2nd generation PN3P-pincer azido nickel complex (PN3P)Ni(N3) reacts with isocyanides to afford monosubstituted carbodiimides under irradiation, presumably via a transient nitrido intermediate. The resulting species can further generate unsymmetrical carboddimides and the PN3P nickel halide complex, accomplishing a synthetic cycle for a complete nitrogen atom transfer reaction.

  19. Nitrogen atom transfer mediated by a new PN3P-pincer nickel core via a putative nitrido nickel intermediate

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Changguang; Wang, Xiufang; Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2018-01-01

    A 2nd generation PN3P-pincer azido nickel complex (PN3P)Ni(N3) reacts with isocyanides to afford monosubstituted carbodiimides under irradiation, presumably via a transient nitrido intermediate. The resulting species can further generate unsymmetrical carboddimides and the PN3P nickel halide complex, accomplishing a synthetic cycle for a complete nitrogen atom transfer reaction.

  20. The cost of nickel allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Carsten R; Hamann, Dathan; Hamann, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    %), followed by aluminium-bronze (62, 17%). In total, 239 denominations released nickel (28%). Coins from Bolivia, Brazil and Costa Rica did not release nickel. Fewer than one-third of the denominations or issues from China, India, the euro area and Indonesia released nickel. In the United States, the Russian...... Federation, Japan, and Mexico, one-third or more of the denominations released nickel. Conclusions. This worldwide selection of circulating coins covered countries with 75% of the world population, and shows that the majority of the world population lives in countries where coins release nickel. Pertinently...

  1. Differential gene expression profile of the calanoid copepod, Pseudodiaptomus annandalei, in response to nickel exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jie-Lan; Wang, Gui-Zhong; Mao, Ming-Guang; Wang, Ke-Jian; Li, Shao-Jing; Zeng, Chao-Shu

    2013-03-01

    To better understand the underlying mechanisms of reactions of copepods exposed to elevated level of nickel, the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used to elucidate the response of the copepod Pseudodiaptomus annandalei to nickel exposure at the gene level. P. annandale is one of a few copepod species that can be cultured relatively easy under laboratory condition, and it is considered to be a potential model species for toxicity study. In the present study, P. annandalei were exposed to nickel at a concentration of 8.86 mgL(-1) for 24h, after which the RNA was prepared for SSH using unexposed P. annandalei as drivers. A total of 474 clones on the middle scale in the SSH library were sequenced. Among these genes, 129 potential functional genes were recognized based on the BLAST searches in NCBI and Uniprot databases. These genes were then categorized into nine groups in association with different biological processes using AmiGO against the Gene Ontology database. Of the 129 genes, 127 translatable DNA sequences were predicted to be proteins, and the putative amino acid sequences were searched for conserved domains (CD) and proteins using the CD-Search service and BLASTp. Among 129 genes, 119 (92.2%) were annotated to be involved in different biological processes, while 10 genes (7.8%) were classified as an unknown-function gene group. To further confirm the up-regulation of differentially expressed genes, the quantitative real time PCR were performed to test eight randomly selected genes, in which five of them, i.e. α-tubulin, ribosomal protein L13, ferritin, separase and Myohemerythrin-1, exhibited clear up-regulation after nickel exposure. In addition, MnSOD was further studied for the differential expression pattern after nickel exposure and the results showed that MnSOD had a time- and dose-dependent expression pattern in the copepod after nickel exposure. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to investigate the toxicity

  2. Method for regeneration of electroless nickel plating solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, E.T.

    1997-03-11

    An electroless nickel(EN)/hypophosphite plating bath is provided employing acetic acid/acetate as a buffer and which is, as a result, capable of perpetual regeneration while avoiding the production of hazardous waste. A regeneration process is provided to process the spent EN plating bath solution. A concentrated starter and replenishment solution is provided for ease of operation of the plating bath. The regeneration process employs a chelating ion exchange system to remove nickel cations from spent EN plating solution. Phosphites are then removed from the solution by precipitation. The nickel cations are removed from the ion exchange system by elution with hypophosphorus acid and the nickel concentration of the eluate adjusted by addition of nickel salt. The treated solution and adjusted eluate are combined, stabilizer added, and the volume of resulting solution reduced by evaporation to form the bath starter and replenishing solution. 1 fig.

  3. Method for regeneration of electroless nickel plating solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, Erhard T.

    1997-01-01

    An electroless nickel(EN)/hypophosphite plating bath is provided employing acetic acid/acetate as a buffer and which is, as a result, capable of perpetual regeneration while avoiding the production of hazardous waste. A regeneration process is provided to process the spent EN plating bath solution. A concentrated starter and replenishment solution is provided for ease of operation of the plating bath. The regeneration process employs a chelating ion exchange system to remove nickel cations from spent EN plating solution. Phosphites are then removed from the solution by precipitation. The nickel cations are removed from the ion exchange system by elution with hypophosphorous acid and the nickel concentration of the eluate adjusted by addition of nickel salt. The treated solution and adjusted eluate are combined, stabilizer added, and the volume of resulting solution reduced by evaporation to form the bath starter and replenishing solution.

  4. Synthesis, structure characterization and catalytic activity of nickel tungstate nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi; Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi; Khalilian-Shalamzari, Morteza; Zahedi, Mir Mahdi; Hajimirsadeghi, Seiedeh Somayyeh; Omrani, Ismail

    2012-12-01

    Taguchi robust design was applied to optimize experimental parameters for controllable, simple and fast synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles. NiWO4 nanoparticles were synthesized by precipitation reaction involving addition of nickel ion solution to the tungstate aqueous reagent and then formation of nickel tungstate nucleolus which are insoluble in aqueous media. Effects of various parameters such as nickel and tungstate concentrations, flow rate of reagent addition and reactor temperature on diameter of synthesized nickel tungstate nanoparticles were investigated experimentally by the aid of orthogonal array design. The results for analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that particle size of nickel tungstate can be effectively tuned by controlling significant variables involving nickel and tungstate concentrations and flow rate; while, temperature of the reactor has a no considerable effect on the size of NiWO4 particles. The ANOVA results proposed the optimum conditions for synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles via this technique. Also, under optimum condition nanoparticles of NiWO4 were prepared and their structure and chemical composition were characterized by means of EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence. Finally, catalytic activity of the nanoparticles in a cycloaddition reaction was examined.

  5. Nickel in tap water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Nielsen, G D; Flyvholm, Morten

    1983-01-01

    Nickel analyses of tap water from several sources in Copenhagen gave up to 490 X 10(-6) g X 1(-1) in the first 250 ml portions. Hot water gave higher values than cold water. After flushing for 5 min, low values were found. Considerable variation from time to time and from tap to tap was found...

  6. cobalt (ii), nickel (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Department of Chemistry Bayero University, P. M. B. 3011, Kano, Nigeria. E-mail: hnuhu2000@yahoo.com. ABSTRACT. The manganese (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and .... water and common organic solvents, but are readily soluble in acetone. The molar conductance measurement [Table 3] of the complex compounds in.

  7. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL AND PATHOGENETIC ASPECTS OF NICKEL POISONING

    OpenAIRE

    Vladmila Bojanic; Vladimir Ilic; Biljana Jovic

    2007-01-01

    Nickel is widely distributed in the environment. High consumption of nickel containing products inevitably leads to environmental pollution by nickel and its derivatives at all stages of production, utilization, and disposal.Human exposure to nickel occurs primarily via inhalation and ingestion and is particularly high among nickel metallurgy workers. In addition, implantation of nickel-containing endoprostheses and iatrogenic administration of nickel-contaminated medica-tions leads to signif...

  8. Study on environmental results improvement plan through flexible industrial environmental regulation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Hyun Joo; Chang, Kee Bok; Lee, Young Soon [Korea Environment Institute, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-12-01

    As the economic environment has been changed to the direction of decentralization and diversification, there shows various changes in the area and method of market intervention by the government. In the environmental sector, it has been discussed to extend its use of economic incentive coming out of an existing direct regulation policy. Recently the importance on the new forms of government role such as voluntary agreements and information opening have been emphasized. Although the existing direct regulation policy has an advantage of visible and direct effect, it blocked the chance to explore technological and economical alternatives toward environmental problems by business sector. Therefore it is recognized that there is a fundamental limit on inducing the efficient pollution resisting activities from the business sector. Therefore this study analyzed and recommended theoretical characteristics on mechanism that a voluntary approach can bring appropriate results on policy objectives. 98 refs. 7 figs., 47 tabs.

  9. Structural Basis of Low-Affinity Nickel Binding to the Nickel-Responsive Transcription Factor NikR from Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.; Schreiter, E.; Stultz, C.; Drennan, C.

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli NikR regulates cellular nickel uptake by binding to the nik operon in the presence of nickel and blocking transcription of genes encoding the nickel uptake transporter. NikR has two binding affinities for the nik operon: a nanomolar dissociation constant with stoichiometric nickel and a picomolar dissociation constant with excess nickel (Bloom, S. L., and Zamble, D. B. (2004) Biochemistry 43, 10029-10038; Chivers, P. T., and Sauer, R. T. (2002) Chem. Biol. 9, 1141-1148). While it is known that the stoichiometric nickel ions bind at the NikR tetrameric interface (Schreiter, E. R., et al. (2003) Nat. Struct. Biol. 10, 794-799; Schreiter, E. R., et al. (2006) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103, 13676-13681), the binding sites for excess nickel ions have not been fully described. Here we have determined the crystal structure of NikR in the presence of excess nickel to 2.6 (angstrom) resolution and have obtained nickel anomalous data (1.4845 (angstrom)) in the presence of excess nickel for both NikR alone and NikR cocrystallized with a 30-nucleotide piece of double-stranded DNA containing the nik operon. These anomalous data show that excess nickel ions do not bind to a single location on NikR but instead reveal a total of 22 possible low-affinity nickel sites on the NikR tetramer. These sites, for which there are six different types, are all on the surface of NikR, and most are found in both the NikR alone and NikR-DNA structures. Using a combination of crystallographic data and molecular dynamics simulations, the nickel sites can be described as preferring octahedral geometry, utilizing one to three protein ligands (typically histidine) and at least two water molecules.

  10. Nickel - iron battery. Nikkel - jern batteri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, H. A.

    1989-03-15

    A newer type of nickel-iron battery, (SAFT 6v 230 Ah monobloc), which could possibly be used in relation to electrically driven light road vehicles, was tested. The same test methods used for lead batteries were utilized and results compared favourably with those reached during other testings carried out, abroad, on a SAFT nickle-iron battery and a SAB-NIFE nickel-iron battery. Description (in English) of the latter-named tests are included in the publication as is also a presentation of the SAFT battery. Testing showed that this type of battery did not last as long as had been expected, but the density of energy and effect was superior to lead batteries. However energy efficiency was rather poor in comparison to lead batteries and it was concluded that nickel-iron batteries are not suitable for stationary systems where recharging under a constant voltage is necessary. (AB).

  11. Producing bio-filter for absorbing and separating stable nickel and feasibility study to separate radioactive nickel by microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghafourian, H.; Rabbani, M.; Naseri, Y.; Sadeghi, S.

    2004-01-01

    In this research work, bio absorption of nickel has been investigated by new 16 various bacterial strains isolated from Ramsar warm springs. As the obtained results show a strain of gram negative cocobacilluse bacteria is highly capable to take up nickel in optimum pH about 6. The effect of nickel solution concentrations in 20-200 ppm have been studied. Uptake capacity of bacterial biomass regarding to concentrations below 150 ppm is most highly and nearly constant, but it will be decreased over 150 ppm, and in 200 ppm absorption of nickel reaches to near zero. No nickel was taken up by bacterial biomass. Further studies showed that after 60 minutes of contact time, Nickel uptake reaches maximum by 53%. Considering the uptake mechanism revealed that bio sorption was very limited and the uptake mainly occurs through a accumulation dependent on metabolic activities. Also the results show that the presence of the other cations such as Zn 2+ , Cu 2+ and Pb 2+ is ineffective to biological uptake of nickel. Nickel taken up by biomass can be easily recovered by HNO 3 with the concentration of 0.1 M

  12. Discharge Characteristics of the Nickel Hydroxide Electrode in 30% KOH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Jin

    1989-01-01

    The discharge behavior of the nickel hydroxide electrode has been investigated in 30% KOH at 25 .deg. C. Two voltage plateaus are displayed on the discharge curve of C/20. It is shown that the impedance of the nickel hydroxide electrode increases with decrease of the discharge potential. The discharge behavior of the nickel hydroxide electrode has been investigated in 30% KOH indicating the reduction of the β-NiOOH to the β-Ni(OH) 2 by proton diffusion process and hence the electronic conductivity change of the nickel hydroxide electrode. Furthermore, the γ-NiOOH, produced by prolonged oxidation of the β-NiOOH in 30% KOH, discharges at a slightly lower potential than the β-Ni(OH) 2 that could result in the life-limiting factor of several alkaline electrolyte storage batteries using the nickel hydroxide electrode as the positive plate

  13. Nickel recovery from electric arc furnace slag by magnetic separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakaroglou Marianna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During the pyrometallurgical treatment of the nickel-bearing laterite in the plant of G.M.M. S.A. LARCO, slag is produced after treatment in electric-arc furnace (EAF that contains 0.10 to 0.20 % Ni. Taking into account the great quantity of slag produced per year, the recovery of nickel from the EAF slag will add benefits to the entire process. The target of the current work is to investigate the possibility of nickel recovery from EAF slag by magnetic separation. To meet the target, the effect of the following parameters was studied: grain size, magnetic field intensity, thickness of slag layer, moisture content, and re-grinding of the coarser slag particles. The results show that it is possible to obtain a magnetic product with nickel grade close to that of the primary raw material or even better, with sufficient nickel recovery.

  14. Theromdynamics of carbon in nickel-based multicomponent solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, D.J.

    1978-04-01

    The activity coefficient of carbon in nickel, nickel-titanium, nickel-titanium-chromium, nickel-titanium-molybdenum and nickel-titanium-molybdenum-chromium alloys has been measured at 900, 1100 and 1215 0 C. The results indicate that carbon obeys Henry's Law over the range studied (0 to 2 at. percent). The literature for the nickel-carbon and iron-carbon systems are reviewed and corrected. For the activity of carbon in iron as a function of composition, a new relationship based on re-evaluation of the thermodynamics of the CO/CO 2 equilibrium is proposed. Calculations using this relationship reproduce the data to within 2.5 percent, but the accuracy of the calibrating standards used by many investigators to analyze for carbon is at best 5 percent. This explains the lack of agreement between the many precise sets of data. The values of the activity coefficient of carbon in the various solid solutions are used to calculate a set of parameters for the Kohler-Kaufman equation. The calculations indicate that binary interaction energies are not sufficient to describe the thermodynamics of carbon in some of the nickel-based solid solutions. The results of previous workers for carbon in nickel-iron alloys are completely described by inclusion of ternary terms in the Kohler-Kaufman equation. Most of the carbon solid solution at high temperatures in nickel and nickel-titantium alloys precipitates from solution on quenching in water. The precipitate is composed of very small particles (greater than 2.5 nm) of elemental carbon. The results of some preliminary thermomigration experiments are discussed and recommendations for further work are presented

  15. Screening of Trichoderma isolates for their potential of biosorption of nickel and cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nongmaithem, Nabakishor; Roy, Ayon; Bhattacharya, Prateek Madhab

    2016-01-01

    Fourteen Trichoderma isolates were evaluated for their tolerance to two heavy metals, nickel and cadmium. Three isolates, MT-4, UBT-18, and IBT-I, showed high levels of nickel tolerance, whereas MT-4, UBT-18, and IBT-II showed better tolerance of cadmium than the other isolates. Under nickel stress, biomass production increased up to a Ni concentration of 60ppm in all strains but then decreased as the concentrations of nickel were further increased. Among the nickel-tolerant isolates, UBT-18 produced significantly higher biomass upon exposure to nickel (up to 150ppm); however, the minimum concentration of nickel required to inhibit 50% of growth (MIC50) was highest in IBT-I. Among the cadmium-tolerant isolates, IBT-II showed both maximum biomass production and a maximum MIC50 value in cadmium stress. As the biomass of the Trichoderma isolates increased, a higher percentage of nickel removal was observed up to a concentration of 40ppm, followed by an increase in residual nickel and a decrease in biomass production at higher nickel concentrations in the medium. The increase in cadmium concentrations resulted in a decrease in biomass production and positively correlated with an increase in residual cadmium in the culture broth. Nickel and cadmium stress also influenced the sensitivity of the Trichoderma isolates to soil fungistasis. Isolates IBT-I and UBT-18 were most tolerant to fungistasis under nickel and cadmium stress, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. The Sino-American belt study: nickel and cobalt exposure, epidemiology, and clinical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Dathan; Hamann, Carsten; Li, Lin-Feng; Xiang, Hailian; Hamann, Kylin; Maibach, Howard; Taylor, James S; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2012-01-01

    Nickel and cobalt are common causes of metal allergy. The objective of this study was to investigate nickel and cobalt exposure in belt buckles by testing 701 belts purchased in China and the United States and to consider the prevalence of nickel allergy and its relevance among Chinese patients. Seven hundred one belt buckles purchased in China and the United States were tested for nickel and cobalt release. Six hundred thirty-one Chinese patients with suspected allergic contact dermatitis were patch tested and interviewed to determine clinical relevance of results. The Chinese and American literature was reviewed to investigate trends in nickel prevalence over the past decades. Sixty percent (n = 219) of belts purchased in China (n = 365) released nickel, and 0.5% (n = 2) released cobalt; 55.7% (n = 187) in the United States (n = 336) released nickel, and 0.9% (n = 3) released cobalt. Belt dermatitis was a significant clinical finding in 34.8% of Chinese nickel-allergic patients. Literature review suggests increasing nickel allergy prevalence in the United States and China. Metallic belt buckles are an important source of nickel exposure to consumers. Belts from lowest socioeconomic vendors were more likely to release nickel. Belts with silver color and dark metallic color were more likely to release nickel and cobalt, respectively. Clinical findings show belt dermatitis in China to be a problem.

  17. Comparative study of electroless nickel film on different organic acids modified cuprammonium fabric (CF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hang; Lu, Yinxiang

    2016-01-01

    Nickel films were grown on citric acid (CA), malic acid (MA) and oxalic acid (OA) modified cuprammonium fabric (CF) substrates via electroless nickel deposition. The nickel films were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Their individual deposition rate and electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE) were also investigated to compare the properties of electroless nickel films. SEM images illustrated that the nickel film on MA modified CF substrate was smooth and uniform, and the density of nickel nuclei was much higher. Compared with that of CA modified CF, the coverage of nickel nuclei on OA and MA modified CF substrate was very limited and the nickel particles size was too big. XRD analysis showed that the nickel films deposited on the different modified CF substrates had a structure with Ni (1 1 1) preferred orientation. All the nickel coatings via different acid modification were firmly adhered to the CF substrates, as demonstrated by an ultrasonic washing test. The result of tensile test indicated that the electroless nickel plating on CF has ability to strengthen the CF substrate while causes limited effect on tensile elongation. Moreover, the nickel film deposited on MA modified CF substrate showed more predominant in EMI SE than that deposited on CA or OA modified CF.

  18. Carbon deposition on nickel ferrites and nickel-magnetite surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, G.C.; Jutson, J.A.

    1988-06-01

    Carbon deposition on Commercial Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (CAGR) fuel cladding and heat exchanger surfaces lowers heat transfer efficiency and increases fuel pin temperatures. Several types of deposit have been identified including both thin dense layers and also low density columnar deposits with filamentary or convoluted laminar structure. The low-density types are often associated with particles containing iron, nickel or manganese. To identify the role of nickel in the deposition process surfaces composed of nickel-iron spinels or metallic nickel/magnetite mixtures have been exposed to γ radiation in a gas environment simulating that in the reactor. Examination of these surfaces by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) have shown that while metallic nickel (Ni(O)) catalyses the formation of filamentary low density carbon deposits, the presence of divalent nickel (Ni(II)) sites in spinel type oxides is associated only with dense deposits. (author)

  19. Nickel sensitisation in mice: a critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Pål; Wäckerle-Men, Ying; Senti, Gabriela; Kündig, Thomas M

    2010-06-01

    The market release of new domestic and industrial chemical and metal products requires certain safety certification, including testing for skin sensitisation. Although various official guidelines have described how such testing is to be done, the validity of the available test models are in part dubious, for which reason regulatory agencies and research aim to further improve and generalise the models for testing of skin sensitisation. We applied a recently published murine model of nickel allergy as to test its applicability in a regulatory setting and to study and better understand the events leading to type-IV hypersensitivity. Nickel was chosen as model hapten since it induces allergic contact dermatitis with high incidence in the general population. Typically, C57BL/6 mice were sensitised and challenged by intradermal applications of nickel, and cutaneous inflammation was analysed by the mouse ear-swelling test, by histology, and by lymphocyte reactivity in vitro. Surprisingly, the study suggested that the skin reactions observed were results of irritant reactions rather than of adaptive immune responses. Non-sensitised mice responded with cutaneous inflammation and in vitro lymphocyte reactivity which were comparable with nickel-sensitised mice. Furthermore, histological examinations as well as experiments in T-cell deficient mice demonstrated that lymphocytes were not involved and that nickel caused an irritant contact dermatitis rather a true allergic type-IV contact dermatitis. The authors question the validity of the described murine model of nickel allergy. Copyright 2010 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Nickel ferrule applicators: a source of nickel exposure in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Sharon E; Silverberg, Jonathan I; Rizk, Christopher; Silverberg, Nanette

    2015-01-01

    Eye makeup has been investigated for nickel content and found to have no direct association with nickel allergy and cosmetic dermatitis. However, the tools used (e.g., eyelash curlers, hairdressing scissors, hair curlers, and eye shadow and makeup applicators) may be sources. Nickel is ubiquitous and a wide range of sources have been reported, and makeup applicators (ferrules) now join the list. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Nickel base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, R.C.; Korenko, M.K.

    1980-01-01

    Nickel based alloy, the characteristic of which is that it mainly includes in percentages by weight: 57-63 Ni, 7-18 Cr, 10-20 Fe, 4-6 Mo, 1-2 Nb, 0.2-0.8 Si, 0.01-0.05 Zr, 1.0-2.5 Ti, 1.0-2.5 Al, 0.02-0.06 C and 0.002-0.015 B. The aim is to create new nickel-chromium alloys, hardened in a solid solution and by precipitation, that are stable, exhibit reduced swelling and resistant to plastic deformation inside the reactor. These alloys of the gamma prime type have improved mechanical strengthm swelling resistance, structural stability and welding properties compared with Inconel 625 [fr

  2. Occupational hand eczema caused by nickel and evaluated by quantitative exposure assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2011-01-01

    Background. EU legislation has reduced the epidemic of nickel contact allergy affecting the consumer, and shifted the focus towards occupational exposure. The acid wipe sampling technique was developed to quantitatively determine skin exposure to metals. Objectives. To assess the clinical...... dilution series were performed. Results. Nickel was detected in all samples from the hands. In all patients, the nickel content on the hands was higher than on the non-exposed control area. Conclusions. Occupational exposure to nickel-releasing items raised the nickel content on exposed skin as compared...

  3. Nickel accumulation by Hybanthus floribundus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Severne, B C

    1974-04-26

    Several ecotypes of Hybanthus floribundus are found across the southern part of Australia. However, the three nickel accumulating ecotypes are restricted to a broad belt in Western Australia. Nickel concentrations in this shrub were observed to decrease southwards (from 8000 to 1000 p.p.m.) as the annual rainfall increased from 7 inches to more than 30 inches. Studies have shown that nickel concentrations increase from the roots through the rootstock, into the stems and reach maximum towards the leaf tips. High nickel concentrations are also seen in seed capsules (1500 p.p.m.), seeds (2000 p.p.m.) and flowers. The maximum nickel concentration recorded is 1.6% (26% nickel in ash) in mature leaf tissue. 16 references, 2 tables.

  4. Exposure to nickel by hair mineral analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, Izabela; Mikulewicz, Marcin; Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Wołowiec, Paulina; Saeid, Agnieszka; Górecki, Henryk

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the exposure to nickel from various sources by investigation of mineral composition of human scalp hair. The research was carried out on hair sampled from subjects, including 87 males and 178 females (22 ± 2 years). The samples of hair were analyzed by ICP-OES. The effect of several factors on nickel content in hair was examined: lifestyle habits (e.g. hair coloring, hair spray, hair straighteners, hair drier, drugs); dietary factors (e.g. yoghurts, blue cheese, lettuce, lemon, mushroom, egg, butter); other (e.g. solarium, cigarette smoking, tap water pipes, tinned food, PVC foil, photocopier, amalgam filling). These outcomes were reached by linking the results of nickel level in hair with the results of questionnaire survey. Basing on the results it can be concluded that exposure to nickel ions can occur from different sources: lifestyle, eating habits and environmental exposure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Main results on the RF amplitude and phase regulation systems in operation at GANIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joubert, A.; Ducoudret, B.; Labiche, J.C.; Loyant, J.M.

    1984-06-01

    The general features of the amplitude and phase regulations and their control systems are briefly reviewed. These feedback control systems are fully under the control of the main computer aided by dedicated CAMAC microprocessors for actions such as starting, parameters tuning or phase stability surveying. Numerous results obtained with spectrum analysis method give the actual RF purity and the residual modulation and crossmodulation noise level for all RF signals picked up in the RF resonators. A typical value for the noise immunity is 80 dB below the carrier at 100 Hz deviation. Another set of results gives the actual long term phase drift between resonators (< 0.2 RF degree within 6 hours). The stability of the RF phases is confirmed by on line beam phase measurements

  6. Summary of the subsidy regulations and the exploitation result of wood on arable land

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Part of the EWAB program concerns studies on the feasibility of a large-scale implementation of energy crops in the Netherlands. Next to developments of the processing and conversion techniques attention is paid to the cultivation of crops. The aim of the study on the title subject is to gain insight in the application of relevant subsidy regulations for energy wood, and to determine the costs and benefits for the farmer of energy crops. The overview of subsidies concern support from the European Community, support for projects, and fiscal consequences of wood cultivation. Exploitation results are calculated for two concepts: (1) a four year harvest and a cultivation period of 24 years. Also, the Dutch calculations are compared to results of energy wood exploitation in Sweden; and (2) a comparison of cultivation of wheat, barley, sugar beet, potatoes and energy wood for six different production areas in the Netherlands. 3 figs., 5 appendices

  7. Nickel: makes stainless steel strong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Maeve A.

    2012-01-01

    Nickel is a silvery-white metal that is used mainly to make stainless steel and other alloys stronger and better able to withstand extreme temperatures and corrosive environments. Nickel was first identified as a unique element in 1751 by Baron Axel Fredrik Cronstedt, a Swedish mineralogist and chemist. He originally called the element kupfernickel because it was found in rock that looked like copper (kupfer) ore and because miners thought that "bad spirits" (nickel) in the rock were making it difficult for them to extract copper from it. Approximately 80 percent of the primary (not recycled) nickel consumed in the United States in 2011 was used in alloys, such as stainless steel and superalloys. Because nickel increases an alloy's resistance to corrosion and its ability to withstand extreme temperatures, equipment and parts made of nickel-bearing alloys are often used in harsh environments, such as those in chemical plants, petroleum refineries, jet engines, power generation facilities, and offshore installations. Medical equipment, cookware, and cutlery are often made of stainless steel because it is easy to clean and sterilize. All U.S. circulating coins except the penny are made of alloys that contain nickel. Nickel alloys are increasingly being used in making rechargeable batteries for portable computers, power tools, and hybrid and electric vehicles. Nickel is also plated onto such items as bathroom fixtures to reduce corrosion and provide an attractive finish.

  8. Recovery Of Nickel From Spent Nickel-Cadmium Batteries Using A Direct Reduction Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin D.J.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Most nickel is produced as Ferro-Nickel through a smelting process from Ni-bearing ore. However, these days, there have been some problems in nickel production due to exhaustion and the low-grade of Ni-bearing ore. Moreover, the smelting process results in a large amount of wastewater, slag and environmental risk. Therefore, in this research, spent Ni-Cd batteries were used as a base material instead of Ni-bearing ore for the recovery of Fe-Ni alloy through a direct reduction process. Spent Ni-Cd batteries contain 24wt% Ni, 18.5wt% Cd, 12.1% C and 27.5wt% polymers such as KOH. For pre-treatment, Cd was vaporized at 1024K. In order to evaluate the reduction conditions of nickel oxide and iron oxide, pre-treated spent Ni-Cd batteries were experimented on under various temperatures, gas-atmospheres and crucible materials. By a series of process, alloys containing 75 wt% Ni and 20 wt% Fe were produced. From the results, the reduction mechanism of nickel oxide and iron oxide were investigated.

  9. The accumulation of nickel in human lungs.

    OpenAIRE

    Edelman, D A; Roggli, V L

    1989-01-01

    Using data from published studies, lung concentrations of nickel were compare for persons with and without occupational exposure to nickel. As expected, the concentrations were much higher for persons with occupational exposure. To estimate the effects of nickel-containing tobacco smoke and nickel in the ambient air on the amount of nickel accumulated in lungs over time, a model was derived that took into account various variables related to the deposition of nickel in lungs. The model predic...

  10. Radioactivity in drinking water: regulations, monitoring results and radiation protection issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Nuccetelli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Drinking waters usually contain several natural radionuclides: tritium, radon, radium, uranium isotopes, etc. Their concentrations vary widely since they depend on the nature of the aquifer, namely, the prevailing lithology and whether there is air in it or not. AIMS: In this work a broad overview of the radioactivity in drinking water is presented: national and international regulations, for limiting the presence of radioactivity in waters intended for human consumption; results of extensive campaigns for monitoring radioactivity in drinking waters, including mineral bottled waters, carried out throughout the world in recent years; a draft of guidelines for the planning of campaigns to measure radioactivity in drinking water proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency (ARPA of Lombardia.

  11. The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) is required for the sensitivity of yeast cells to nickel ions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chong; Cao, Chunlei; Jiang, Linghuo

    2016-05-01

    Nickel is one of the toxic environment metal pollutants and is linked to various human diseases. In this study, through a functional genomics approach we have identified 16 nickel-sensitive and 22 nickel-tolerant diploid deletion mutants of budding yeast genes, many of which are novel players in the regulation of nickel homeostasis. The 16 nickel-sensitive mutants are of genes mainly involved in the protein folding, modification and destination and the cellular transport processes, while the 22 nickel-tolerant mutants are of genes encoding components of ESCRT complexes as well as protein factors involved in both the cell wall integrity maintenance and the vacuolar protein sorting process. In consistence with their phenotypes, most of these nickel-sensitive mutants show reduced intracellular nickel contents, while the majority of these nickel-tolerant mutants show elevated intracellular nickel contents, as compared to the wild type in response to nickel stress. Our data provides a basis for our understanding the regulation of nickel homeostasis and molecular mechanisms of nickel-induced human pathogenesis. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Electrolytic Recovery of Nickel from Spent Electroless Nickel Bath Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Idhayachander

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Plating industry is one of the largest polluting small scale industries and nickel plating is among the important surface finishing process in this industry. The waste generated during this operation contains toxic nickel. Nickel removal and recovery is of great interest from spent bath for environmental and economic reasons. Spent electroless nickel solution from a reed relay switch manufacturing industry situated in Chennai was taken for electrolytic recovery of nickel. Electrolytic experiment was carried out with mild steel and gold coated mild steel as cathode and the different parameters such as current density, time, mixing and pH of the solution were varied and recovery and current efficiency was studied. It was noticed that there was an increase in current efficiency up to 5 A/dm2 and after that it declines. There is no significant improvement with mixing but with modified cathode there was some improvement. Removal of nickel from the spent electroless nickel bath was 81.81% at 5 A/dm2 and pH 4.23. Under this condition, the content of nickel was reduced to 0.94 g/L from 5.16 g/L. with 62.97% current efficiency.

  13. Comparison of inorganic inhibitors of copper, nickel and copper-nickels in aqueous lithium bromide solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, A. Igual; Anton, J. Garcia; Guin-tilde on, J.L.; Herranz, V. Perez

    2004-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of copper, nickel and two copper-nickel (Cu90/Ni10 and Cu70/Ni30) alloys in 850 g/L LiBr solution in the absence and presence of three different inorganic inhibitors (chromate CrO 4 2- , molybdate MoO 4 2- , and tetraborate B 4 O 7 2- ) has been studied. Differences in inhibition efficiency are discussed in terms of potentiodynamic and cyclic measurements. The best protection is obtained by adding chromate to the 850 g/L LiBr solution while the inhibition efficiencies of molybdate and tetraborate ions were not markedly high. Very aggressive anions, such as bromides, in the present experimental conditions, notably reduce the action of the less efficient molecules (molybdate and tetraborate), but not that of the most efficient ones (chromate). The results of the investigation show that the inhibiting properties depend on the nickel content in the alloy; this element improves the general corrosion resistance of the material in the sense that it shifts free corrosion potential towards more noble values and density corrosion currents towards lower levels. The nickel content in the alloy also enlarges the passivating region of the materials in chromate and molybdate-containing solution; furthermore it decreases the current passivating values to lower values. Nickel addition improves the localized corrosion resistance in the bromide media

  14. Identification of metallic items that caused nickel dermatitis in Danish patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2010-09-01

    Nickel allergy is prevalent as assessed by epidemiological studies. In an attempt to further identify and characterize sources that may result in nickel allergy and dermatitis, we analysed items identified by nickel-allergic dermatitis patients as causative of nickel dermatitis by using the dimethylglyoxime (DMG) test. Dermatitis patients with nickel allergy of current relevance were identified over a 2-year period in a tertiary referral patch test centre. When possible, their work tools and personal items were examined with the DMG test. Among 95 nickel-allergic dermatitis patients, 70 (73.7%) had metallic items investigated for nickel release. A total of 151 items were investigated, and 66 (43.7%) gave positive DMG test reactions. Objects were nearly all purchased or acquired after the introduction of the EU Nickel Directive. Only one object had been inherited, and only two objects had been purchased outside of Denmark. DMG testing is valuable as a screening test for nickel release and should be used to identify relevant exposures in nickel-allergic patients. Mainly consumer items, but also work tools used in an occupational setting, released nickel in dermatitis patients. This study confirmed 'risk items' from previous studies, including mobile phones.

  15. Nickel hydroxide modified electrodes for urea determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Henrique Dall´Antonia

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Nickel hydroxide films were prepared by electrodeposition from a solution Ni(NO32 0,05 mol L ?¹ on ITO electrodes (Tin oxide doped with Indium on PET-like plastic film, applying a current of - 0,1 A cm ?² during different time intervals between 1800 and 7200 s. The electrochemical behavior of the nickel hydroxide electrode was investigated through a cyclic voltammogram, in NaOH 1,0 mol L ?¹, where it was observed two peaks in the profile in 0,410 and 0,280 V, corresponding to redox couple Ni(II/Ni(III. A sensor for urea presenting a satisfactory answer can be obtained when, after the deposit of the film of Ni(OH2 on the electrode of nickel, it is immersed in a solution of NaOH 1,0 mol L ?¹ and applying a potential of + 0,435 V, where the maximum of the anodic current occurs in the cyclic voltammogram. Analyzing the results it can be observed that, for a range of analite concentration between 5 to 50 m mol L ?¹, the behavior is linear and the sensibility found was of 20,3 mA cm?² (mol L?¹?¹, presenting reproducibility confirming the nickel hydroxide electrodes utilization for the determination of urea.

  16. Nickel nanostructured materials from liquid phase photodeposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giuffrida, Salvatore, E-mail: sgiuffrida@unict.it; Condorelli, Guglielmo G.; Costanzo, Lucia L.; Ventimiglia, Giorgio [Universita degli Studi di Catania and INSTM UdR di, Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche (Italy); Nigro, Raffaella Lo [IMM-CNR (Italy); Favazza, Maria; Votrico, Enrico [Universita degli Studi di Catania and INSTM UdR di, Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche (Italy); Bongiorno, Corrado [IMM-CNR (Italy); Fragala, Ignazio L. [Universita degli Studi di Catania and INSTM UdR di, Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche (Italy)

    2007-08-15

    Liquid Phase Photo-Deposition (LPPD) technique has been used to obtain both colloidal particles and thin films of metallic and chloride nickel from solutions of only precursor Ni(acac){sub 2} (acac=2,4-pentandionato). Metallic nickel was obtained from ethanol solutions by direct nickel(II) photoreduction at 254 nm and by acetone sensitised reaction at 300 nm. In this latter process the rate was higher than in the first one. NiCl{sub 2} was formed from CCl{sub 4} solution by a solvent-initiated reaction. TEM analysis, performed on colloidal particles of nickel, showed that their dimensions are in the range 2-4 nm. The films did not present carbon contamination and were characterized by AFM, XPS and GIXRD. Metallic films consisted of particles of 20-40 nm that are the result of the aggregation of smaller crystallites (4-5 nm). Larger agglomerations (around 200 nm) have been observed for NiCl{sub 2} films.

  17. REPORT FOR COMMERCIAL GRADE NICKEL CHARACTERIZATION AND BENCHMARKING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-12-20

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, has completed the collection, sample analysis, and review of analytical results to benchmark the concentrations of gross alpha-emitting radionuclides, gross beta-emitting radionuclides, and technetium-99 in commercial grade nickel. This report presents methods, change management, observations, and statistical analysis of materials procured from sellers representing nine countries on four continents. The data suggest there is a low probability of detecting alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides in commercial nickel. Technetium-99 was not detected in any samples, thus suggesting it is not present in commercial nickel.

  18. Phytoremediation of cadmium and nickel by Spirodela polyrhiza

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhuri, Devaleena; Goswami, Chandrima; Chatterjee, Sumon; Majumder, Arunabha; Mishra, A.K.; Bandyopadhyay, Kaushik

    2011-01-01

    Heavy metal pollution in surface and groundwater has considerably increased in the last few years. It is essential to have an effective removal mechanism of these toxic metals. Current research includes the need to develop environment friendly and cost effective technologies for removing heavy metals from water. In several studies cadmium and nickel have been considerably removed using phytoremediation. The removal efficiency of cadmium and nickel by Spirodela polyrhiza, common duckweed has been examined in the present study for 3 different concentrations of cadmium (1, 2 and 3 mg/L) and nickel (4, 5 and 6 mg/L). Two sets of experiments for cadmium and nickel were conducted separately. Effect of metal toxicity on Spirodela polyrhiza was evaluated in terms of relative growth factor and cadmium was found to be more toxic than nickel. Under experimental condition BCF value for cadmium removal was more than >1000 in all the 3 concentrations of cadmium. But the BCF value was found to be more than > 1000 only when input nickel concentration was 4 mg/L during phytoremediation process. Experimental results suggest that Spirodela polyrhiza has the potential of accumulating cadmium and nickel from aqueous solution at lower metal concentration. (author)

  19. Bioadsorption of nickel Mining Company by residual biomass Phyllanthus Orbicularis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Díaz-Puig

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic parameters for the adsorption of nickel were studied in the waste CalcinationPlant Company Ernesto Che Guevara biomass Phyllanthus orbicularis synthetic and industrial waste Calcination Plant enterprise solutions. The results showed that the major factors influencing the adsorption capacity of the biomass increases with increasing pH and the initial concentration of nickel in the effluent and is reduced by increasing the biomass concentration. Meanwhile, the removal efficiency of residual nickel increases with increasing pH and concentration of biomass and reduced when the initial concentration of nickel in the effluent increases. The adsorption capacity nickel biomass Phyllanthus orbicularis from synthetic solutions and industrial waste Calcination Plant Company Nickel "Comandante Ernesto Che Guevara" was 44,05 and 26,25 mg/g respectively. The adsorption process nickel biomass Phyllanthus orbicularis follows kinetics pseudo-second order and according to the values of free energy of adsorption obtained through model-RadushkevichDubinin was 267,26 kJ/mol, this nature demonstrates that corresponds to a process mediated by chemical adsorption where the formation of stable bonds between the functional groups present in the biomass and the metal ions predominates.

  20. Supercapacitors Based on Nickel Oxide/Carbon Materials Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Lota

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the thesis, the properties of nickel oxide/active carbon composites as the electrode materials for supercapacitors are discussed. Composites with a different proportion of nickel oxide/carbon materials were prepared. A nickel oxide/carbon composite was prepared by chemically precipitating nickel hydroxide on an active carbon and heating the hydroxide at 300 ∘C in the air. Phase compositions of the products were characterized using X-ray diffractometry (XRD. The morphology of the composites was observed by SEM. The electrochemical performances of composite electrodes used in electrochemical capacitors were studied in addition to the properties of electrode consisting of separate active carbon and nickel oxide only. The electrochemical measurements were carried out using cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge, and impedance spectroscopy. The composites were tested in 6 M KOH aqueous electrolyte using two- and three-electrode Swagelok systems. The results showed that adding only a few percent of nickel oxide to active carbon provided the highest value of capacity. It is the confirmation of the fact that such an amount of nickel oxide is optimal to take advantage of both components of the composite, which additionally can be a good solution as a negative electrode in asymmetric configuration of electrode materials in an electrochemical capacitor.

  1. Specification and prediction of nickel mobilization using artificial intelligence methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Raoof; Ziaii, Mansour; Ardejani, Faramarz Doulati; Maleki, Shahoo

    2011-12-01

    Groundwater and soil pollution from pyrite oxidation, acid mine drainage generation, and release and transport of toxic metals are common environmental problems associated with the mining industry. Nickel is one toxic metal considered to be a key pollutant in some mining setting; to date, its formation mechanism has not yet been fully evaluated. The goals of this study are 1) to describe the process of nickel mobilization in waste dumps by introducing a novel conceptual model, and 2) to predict nickel concentration using two algorithms, namely the support vector machine (SVM) and the general regression neural network (GRNN). The results obtained from this study have shown that considerable amount of nickel concentration can be arrived into the water flow system during the oxidation of pyrite and subsequent Acid Drainage (AMD) generation. It was concluded that pyrite, water, and oxygen are the most important factors for nickel pollution generation while pH condition, SO4, HCO3, TDS, EC, Mg, Fe, Zn, and Cu are measured quantities playing significant role in nickel mobilization. SVM and GRNN have predicted nickel concentration with a high degree of accuracy. Hence, SVM and GRNN can be considered as appropriate tools for environmental risk assessment.

  2. Chemical Looping Pilot Plant Results Using a Nickel-Based Oxygen Carrier Résultats de l’expérimentation sur un pilote opérant en boucle chimique avec un matériau transporteur d’oxygène à base de nickel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pröll T.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A chemical looping pilot plant was designed, built and operated with a design fuel power of 120 kW (lower heating value, natural gas. The system consists of two Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB reactors. Operating results are presented and evaluated for a highly reactive nickel-based oxygen carrier, total system inventory 65 kg. The performance in fuel conversion achieved is in the range of 99.8% (CH4 conversion and 92% (CO2 yield. In chemical looping reforming operation, it can be reported that thermodynamic equilibrium is reached in the fuel reactor and that all oxygen is absorbed in the air reactor as soon as the global stoichiometric air/fuel ratio is below 1 and the air reactor temperature is 900°C or more. Even though pure natural gas (98.6 vol.% CH4 without steam addition was fed to the fuel reactor, no carbon formation has been found as long as the global stoichiometric air/fuel ratio was larger than 0.4. Based on the experimental findings and on the general state of the art, it is concluded that niche applications such as industrial steam generation from natural gas or CO2-ready coupled production of H2 and N2 can be interesting pathways for immediate scale-up of the technology. Un pilote d’étude de la combustion en boucle chimique d’une puissance thermique de 120 kW a été dimensionné, construit et opéré. Il est constitué de deux lits circulants interconnectés. Les résultats d’opération qui sont présentés ont été obtenus avec un matériau transporteur d’oxygène très réactif à base de nickel. L’inventaire total du matériau est de 65 kg dans le pilote. La conversion du méthane atteinte est voisine de 99,8 % et le rendement en CO2 est de 92 %. Lorsqu’on opère en mode de reformage, l’équilibre thermodynamique est atteint dans le réacteur fioul. Tout l’oxygène est capté dans le réacteur air dès que le rapport stoechiométrique entre l’air et le méthane est inférieur à 1 et que la temp

  3. Nickel compounds induce histone ubiquitination by inhibiting histone deubiquitinating enzyme activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke Qingdong; Ellen, Thomas P.; Costa, Max

    2008-01-01

    Nickel (Ni) compounds are known carcinogens but underlying mechanisms are not clear. Epigenetic changes are likely to play an important role in nickel ion carcinogenesis. Previous studies have shown epigenetic effects of nickel ions, including the loss of histone acetylation and a pronounced increase in dimethylated H3K9 in nickel-exposed cells. In this study, we demonstrated that both water-soluble and insoluble nickel compounds induce histone ubiquitination (uH2A and uH2B) in a variety of cell lines. Investigations of the mechanism by which nickel increases histone ubiquitination in cells reveal that nickel does not affect cellular levels of the substrates of this modification, i.e., ubiquitin, histones, and other non-histone ubiquitinated proteins. In vitro ubiquitination and deubiquitination assays have been developed to further investigate possible effects of nickel on enzymes responsible for histone ubiquitination. Results from the in vitro assays demonstrate that the presence of nickel did not affect the levels of ubiquitinated histones in the ubiquitinating assay. Instead, the addition of nickel significantly prevents loss of uH2A and uH2B in the deubiquitinating assay, suggesting that nickel-induced histone ubiquitination is the result of inhibition of (a) putative deubiquitinating enzyme(s). Additional supporting evidence comes from the comparison of the response to nickel ions with a known deubiquitinating enzyme inhibitor, iodoacetamide (IAA). This study is the first to demonstrate such effects of nickel ions on histone ubiquitination. It also sheds light on the possible mechanisms involved in altering the steady state of this modification. The study provides further evidence that supports the notion that nickel ions alter epigenetic homeostasis in cells, which may lead to altered programs of gene expression and carcinogenesis

  4. Point defects in nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretto, P.

    1969-01-01

    The defects in electron irradiated nickel (20 deg. K) or neutron irradiated nickel (28 deg. K) are studied by simultaneous analysis using the magnetic after-effect, electron microscopy and electrical resistivity recovery. We use zone refined nickel (99.999 per cent) which, for some experiments, is alloyed with a small amount of iron (for example 0.1 per cent Fe). The temperature dependant electrical recovery may be divided in four stages. The sub-stages I B (31 deg. K), I C (42 deg. K), I D (from to 57 deg. K) and I E (62 deg. K) of stage I are due to the disappearance of single interstitials into vacancies. The interstitial defect has a split configuration with a migration energy of about 0.15 eV. In the close pair which disappears in stage I B the interstitial is found to be in a 3. neighbour position whilst in stage I D it is near the direction from the vacancy. In stage I E there is no longer any interaction between the interstitial and the vacancy. The stage II is due to more complicated interstitial defects: di-interstitials for stage II B (84 deg. K) and larger and larger interstitial loops for the following sub-stages. The loops may be seen by electron microscopy. Impurities can play the role of nucleation centers for the loops. Stages III A (370 deg. K) and III B (376 deg. K) are due to two types of di-vacancies. During stage IV (410 deg. K) the single vacancies migrate. Vacancy type loops and interstitial type loops grow concurrently and disappear at about 800 deg. K as observed by electron microscopy. (author) [fr

  5. Nickel, cobalt, and their alloys

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive guide to the compositions, properties, processing, performance, and applications of nickel, cobalt, and their alloys. It includes all of the essential information contained in the ASM Handbook series, as well as new or updated coverage in many areas in the nickel, cobalt, and related industries.

  6. Studies on influence of zinc immersion and fluoride on nickel electroplating on magnesium alloy AZ91D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ziping; Yu Gang; Ouyang Yuejun; He Xiaomei; Hu Bonian; Zhang Jun; Wu Zhenjun

    2009-01-01

    The effect of zinc immersion and the role of fluoride in nickel plating bath were mainly investigated in nickel electroplating on magnesium alloy AZ91D. The state of zinc immersion, the composition of zinc film and the role of fluoride in nickel plating bath were explored from the curves of open circuit potential (OCP) and potentiodynamic polarization, the images of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the patterns of energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). Results show that the optimum zinc film mixing small amount of Mg(OH) 2 and MgF 2 is obtained by zinc immersion for 30-90 s. The corrosion potential of magnesium alloy substrate attached zinc film will be increased in nickel plating bath and the quantity of MgF 2 sandwiched between magnesium alloy substrate and nickel coating will be reduced, which contributed to produce nickel coating with good performance. Fluoride in nickel plating bath serves as an activator of nickel anodic dissolution and corrosion inhibitor of magnesium alloy substrate. 1.0-1.5 mol dm -3 of F - is the optimum concentration range for dissolving nickel anode and protecting magnesium alloy substrate from over-corrosion in nickel plating bath. The nickel coating with good adhesion and high corrosion resistance on magnesium alloy AZ91D is obtained by the developed process of nickel electroplating. This nickel layer can be used as the rendering coating for further plating on magnesium alloys.

  7. Controlled synthesis of size-tunable nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles using water-in-oil microemulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Ajeet; Saxena, Amit; Shankar, Ravi; Mozumdar, Subho; De, Arnab

    2013-01-01

    Industrial demands have generated a growing need to synthesize pure metal and metal–oxide nanoparticles of a desired size. We report a novel and convenient method for the synthesis of spherical, size tunable, well dispersed, stable nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles by reduction of nickel nitrate at room temperature in a TX-100/n-hexanol/cyclohexane/water system by a reverse microemulsion route. We determined that reduction with alkaline sodium borohydrate in nitrogen atmosphere leads to the formation of nickel nanoparticles, while the use of hydrazine hydrate in aerobic conditions leads to the formation of nickel oxide nanoparticles. The influence of several reaction parameters on the size of nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles were evaluated in detail. It was found that the size can be easily controlled either by changing the molar ratio of water to surfactant or by simply altering the concentration of the reducing agent. The morphology and structure of the nanoparticles were characterized by quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), electron diffraction analysis (EDA) and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. The results show that synthesized nanoparticles are of high purity and have an average size distribution of 5–100 nm. The nanoparticles prepared by our simple methodology have been successfully used for catalyzing various chemical reactions. (paper)

  8. Inhalation carcinogenicity study with nickel metal powder in Wistar rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oller, Adriana R.; Kirkpatrick, Daniel T.; Radovsky, Ann; Bates, Hudson K.

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of nickel refinery workers have demonstrated an association between increased respiratory cancer risk and exposure to certain nickel compounds (later confirmed in animal studies). However, the lack of an association found in epidemiological analyses for nickel metal remained unconfirmed for lack of robust animal inhalation studies. In the present study, Wistar rats were exposed by whole-body inhalation to 0, 0.1, 0.4, and 1.0 mg Ni/m 3 nickel metal powder (MMAD = 1.8 μm, GSD = 2.4 μm) for 6 h/day, 5 days/week for up to 24 months. A subsequent six-month period without exposures preceded the final euthanasia. High mortality among rats exposed to 1.0 mg Ni/m 3 nickel metal resulted in the earlier termination of exposures in this group. The exposure level of 0.4 mg Ni/m 3 was established as the MTD for the study. Lung alterations associated with nickel metal exposure included alveolar proteinosis, alveolar histiocytosis, chronic inflammation, and bronchiolar-alveolar hyperplasia. No increased incidence of neoplasm of the respiratory tract was observed. Adrenal gland pheochromocytomas (benign and malignant) in males and combined cortical adenomas/carcinomas in females were induced in a dose-dependent manner by the nickel metal exposure. The incidence of pheochromocytomas was statistically increased in the 0.4 mg Ni/m 3 male group. Pheochromocytomas appear to be secondary to the lung toxicity associated with the exposure rather than being related to a direct nickel effect on the adrenal glands. The incidence of cortical tumors among 0.4 mg Ni/m 3 females, although statistically higher compared to the concurrent controls, falls within the historical control range; therefore, in the present study, this tumor is of uncertain relationship to nickel metal exposure. The lack of respiratory tumors in the present animal study is consistent with the findings of the epidemiological studies

  9. Characterization and assessment of dermal and inhalable nickel exposures in nickel production and primary user industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughson, G W; Galea, K S; Heim, K E

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the levels of nickel in the skin contaminant layer of workers involved in specific processes and tasks within the primary nickel production and primary nickel user industries. Dermal exposure samples were collected using moist wipes to recover surface contamination from defined areas of skin. These were analysed for soluble and insoluble nickel species. Personal samples of inhalable dust were also collected to determine the corresponding inhalable nickel exposures. The air samples were analysed for total inhalable dust and then for soluble, sulfidic, metallic, and oxidic nickel species. The workplace surveys were carried out in five different workplaces, including three nickel refineries, a stainless steel plant, and a powder metallurgy plant, all of which were located in Europe. Nickel refinery workers involved with electrolytic nickel recovery processes had soluble dermal nickel exposure of 0.34 microg cm(-2) [geometric mean (GM)] to the hands and forearms. The GM of soluble dermal nickel exposure for workers involved in packing nickel salts (nickel chloride hexahydrate, nickel sulphate hexahydrate, and nickel hydroxycarbonate) was 0.61 microg cm(-2). Refinery workers involved in packing nickel metal powders and end-user powder operatives in magnet production had the highest dermal exposure (GM = 2.59 microg cm(-2) soluble nickel). The hands, forearms, face, and neck of these workers all received greater dermal nickel exposure compared with the other jobs included in this study. The soluble nickel dermal exposures for stainless steel production workers were at or slightly above the limit of detection (0.02 microg cm(-2) soluble nickel). The highest inhalable nickel concentrations were observed for the workers involved in nickel powder packing (GM = 0.77 mg m(-3)), although the soluble component comprised only 2% of the total nickel content. The highest airborne soluble nickel exposures were associated with refineries using

  10. Hyposensitization in nickel allergic contact dermatitis: Clinical and immunologic monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J.J. Troost (Roger); M.M.A. Kozel (M. M A); C.G. van Helden-Meeuwsen; Th. van Joost (Theo); P.G.H. Mulder (Paul); R. Benner (Robbert); E.P. Prens (Errol)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) previously sensitized T cells cause skin damage. If an ubiquitous allergen such as nickel is involved, no effective treatment is available. Down-regulation of this allergic response has been described after antigen presentation in the

  11. Spectroscopic and thermogravimetric study of nickel sulfaquinoxaline complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tailor, Sanjay M.; Patel, Urmila H.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of sulfaquinoxaline (4-Amino-N-2-quinoxalinylbenzenesulfonamide) to form metal complexes are investigated. The nickel complex of sulfaquinoxaline is prepared by reflux method and characterized by CHN analysis and IR spectra. The results of IR spectral data suggest that the binding of nickel atom to the sulfonamidic nitrogen are in good agreement. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and differential thermogravimetric (DTG) analysis of nickel sulfaquinoxaline are carried out from ambient temperature to 750°C in inert nitrogen atmosphere. The activation energy, enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs free energy of nickel sulfaquinoxaline complex is determined from the thermal curves using Broido method. The results are reported in this paper.

  12. Monodispersed macroporous architecture of nickel-oxide film as an anode material for thin-film lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Mao-Sung; Lin, Ya-Ping

    2011-01-01

    A nickel-oxide film with monodispersed open macropores was prepared on a stainless-steel substrate by electrophoretic deposition of a polystyrene-sphere monolayer followed by anodic electrodeposition of nickel oxy-hydroxide. The deposited films convert to cubic nickel oxide after annealing at 400 o C for 1 h. Galvanostatic charge and discharge results indicate that the nickel-oxide film with monodispersed open macropores is capable of delivering a higher capacity than the bare nickel-oxide film, especially in high-rate charge and discharge processes. The lithiation capacity of macroporous nickel oxide reaches 1620 mA h g -1 at 1 C current discharge and decreases to 990 mA h g -1 at 15 C current discharge. The presence of monodispersed open macropores in the nickel-oxide film might facilitate the electrolyte penetration, diffusion, and migration. Electrochemical reactions between nickel oxide and lithium ions are therefore markedly improved by this tailored film architecture.

  13. Bloch walls in a nickel single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, J.; Treimer, W.

    2001-01-01

    We present a consistent theory for the dependence of the magnetic structure in bulk samples on external static magnetic fields and corresponding experimental results. We applied the theory of micromagnetism to this crystal and calculated the Bloch wall thickness as a function of external magnetic fields. The theoretical results agree well with the experimental data, so that the Bloch wall thickness of a 71 deg. nickel single crystal was definitely determined with some hundred of nanometer

  14. Nickel Excretion in Urine after Oral Administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menne, T.; Mikkelsen, H. I.; Solgaard, Per Bent

    1978-01-01

    In recent years the importance of internal exposure to nickel in patients with recurrent hand eczema and nickel allergy has become evident. The present study was performed in order to investigate the value of urinary nickel determinations as an index of oral nickel intake. After oral administration...

  15. Facile approach to prepare nickel cobaltite nanowire materials for supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huanlei; Gao, Qiuming; Jiang, Lei

    2011-09-05

    Excellent electrochemical performance results from the coexistence of nickel and cobalt ions, with mesoporous characteristics and nanocrystal structure. Nickel cobalt nanowire is prepared by hydrothermal and thermal decomposition processes. High capacitance of 722 F g(-1) can be obtained at 1 A g(-1) in 6 M KOH, with a capacitance retention ratio of ca. 79% at 20 A g(-1) . Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Improved mechanical and corrosion properties of nickel composite coatings by incorporation of layered silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tientong, J. [University of North Texas, Department of Chemistry, 1155 Union Circle #305070, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Ahmad, Y.H. [Center for Advanced Materials, P.O. Box 2713, Qatar University, Doha (Qatar); Nar, M.; D' Souza, N. [University of North Texas, Department of Mechanical and Energy Engineering, Denton, TX 76207 (United States); Mohamed, A.M.A. [Center for Advanced Materials, P.O. Box 2713, Qatar University, Doha (Qatar); Golden, T.D., E-mail: tgolden@unt.edu [University of North Texas, Department of Chemistry, 1155 Union Circle #305070, Denton, TX 76203 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Layered silicates as exfoliated montmorillonite are incorporated into nickel films by electrodeposition, enhancing both corrosion resistance and hardness. Films were deposited onto stainless steel from a plating solution adjusted to pH 9 containing nickel sulfate, sodium citrate, and various concentrations of exfoliated montmorillonite. The presence of the incorporated layered silicate was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The composite films were also compact and smooth like the pure nickel films deposited under the same conditions as shown by scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction results showed that incorporation of layered silicates into the film do not affect the nickel crystalline fcc structure. The nanocomposite films exhibited improved stability and adhesion. Pure nickel films cracked and peeled from the substrate when immersed in 3.5% NaCl solution within 5 days, while the nanocomposite films remained attached even after 25 days. The corrosion resistance of the nickel nanocomposites was also improved compared to nickel films. Nickel-layered silicate composites showed a 25% increase in Young's modulus and a 20% increase in hardness over pure nickel films. - Highlights: • 0.05–2% of layered silicates are incorporated into crystalline nickel films. • Resulting composite films had improved stability and adhesion. • Corrosion resistance improved for the composite films. • Hardness improved 20% and young's modulus improved 25% for the composite films.

  17. On the rational alloying of structural chromium-nickel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astaf'ev, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    A study was made on the influence of chromium nickel, phosphorus on the critical brittleness temperature of Cr-Ni-Mo-V structural steels. It is shown that the critical brittleness temperature of these steels increases at chromium content more over than 2% and nickel content more than 2% in the result of carbide transformations during tempering. Increase of nickel content in Cr-Ni-Mo-V-steels strengthens the tendency to embrittlement during slow cooling, from tempering temperature owing to development of process of phosphorus grain-boundary segregation. Two mentioned mechanisms of embrittlement determine principles of rational steel alloying. The extreme dependence of the critical brittleness temperature on chromium and nickel content, which enables to choose the optimum composition of Cr-Ni-Mo-V-steels, was established

  18. Nickel coating electroplated characterization with and without carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, A.C.; Banczek, E.P.; Cunha, M.T.; Rodrigues, P.R.P.; Terada, M.

    2010-01-01

    The metals have great application, but when their properties are not suitable they should be improved through treatments to increase corrosion resistance, mechanical and wear. The metals electrodeposition such as nickel is one of treatment options. This study aims the development a nickel coating with and without (CNT), obtained by electrodeposition on aluminum alloy AA6061. The nickel electrodeposition was performed with cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. Open circuit potential and anodic polarization curves were carried out samples characterization. The microstructure and the chemical composition of the M x O z coating were studied using the scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersion spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results indicated that the nickel coating improve the corrosion resistance of aluminum in the presence of CNT. (author)

  19. Nickel aggregates produced by radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marignier, J.L.; Belloni, J.

    1988-01-01

    Nickel aggregates with subcolloidal size and stable in water have been synthesized by inhibiting the corrosion by the medium. The protective effect of the surfactant is discussed in relation with the characteristics of various types of polyvinyl alcohol studied. The reactivity of aggregates towards oxidizing compounds, nitro blue tetrazolium, methylene blue, silver ions, oxygen, methylviologen, enables an estimation of the redox potential of nickel aggregates (E = - 04 ± 0.05 V). It has been applied to quantitative analysis of the particles in presence of nickel ions. 55 refs [fr

  20. Mechanisms of nickel toxicity in microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Macomber, Lee; Hausinger, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    Nickel has long been known to be an important human toxicant, including having the ability to form carcinomas, but until recently nickel was believed to be an issue only to microorganisms living in nickel-rich serpentine soils or areas contaminated by industrial pollution. This assumption was overturned by the discovery of a nickel defense system (RcnR/RcnA) found in microorganisms that live in a wide range of environmental niches, suggesting that nickel homeostasis is a general biological co...

  1. Respiratory carcinogenicity assessment of soluble nickel compounds.

    OpenAIRE

    Oller, Adriana R

    2002-01-01

    The many chemical forms of nickel differ in physicochemical properties and biological effects. Health assessments for each main category of nickel species are needed. The carcinogenicity assessment of water-soluble nickel compounds has proven particularly difficult. Epidemiologic evidence indicates an association between inhalation exposures to nickel refinery dust containing soluble nickel compounds and increased risk of respiratory cancers. However, the nature of this association is unclear...

  2. Electroless nickel plating of arc discharge synthesized carbon nanotubes for metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagannatham, M.; Sankaran, S.; Prathap, Haridoss

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Electroless Ni coatings have been performed on CNTs for various deposition times. • The deposition of nickel increased with increase in deposition time. • A deposition time of 60 min has been optimum for uniform coating of Ni on CNTs. • The CNTs with uniform coating of Ni are potential for reinforcements in composites. • Electroless nickel coatings are determined to be super paramagnetic behavior. - Abstract: Electroless nickel (EN) plating was performed on arc discharge synthesized multiwalled carbon nanotubes for various deposition times. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy characterization techniques are used to identify the presence of nickel deposition on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the degree of graphitization. The results indicate that impurities are less in the purified CNTs as compared to raw carbon soot. Increasing deposition time up to 60 min increases uniform deposition of nickel throughout the length of the CNTs. However, for deposition time longer than 60 min, nickel particles are seen separated from the surface of the CNTs. Uniformly coated nickel CNTs throughout their length are potential candidates for reinforcements in composite materials. Magnetic properties of the nickel coated CNTs, with deposition time of 30 and 60 min were also evaluated. The magnetic saturation of nickel coated CNTs with deposition time of 30 min is less compared to nickel coated CNTs with deposition time of 60 min

  3. Electroless nickel plating of arc discharge synthesized carbon nanotubes for metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagannatham, M.; Sankaran, S.; Prathap, Haridoss, E-mail: prathap@iitm.ac.in

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Electroless Ni coatings have been performed on CNTs for various deposition times. • The deposition of nickel increased with increase in deposition time. • A deposition time of 60 min has been optimum for uniform coating of Ni on CNTs. • The CNTs with uniform coating of Ni are potential for reinforcements in composites. • Electroless nickel coatings are determined to be super paramagnetic behavior. - Abstract: Electroless nickel (EN) plating was performed on arc discharge synthesized multiwalled carbon nanotubes for various deposition times. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy characterization techniques are used to identify the presence of nickel deposition on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the degree of graphitization. The results indicate that impurities are less in the purified CNTs as compared to raw carbon soot. Increasing deposition time up to 60 min increases uniform deposition of nickel throughout the length of the CNTs. However, for deposition time longer than 60 min, nickel particles are seen separated from the surface of the CNTs. Uniformly coated nickel CNTs throughout their length are potential candidates for reinforcements in composite materials. Magnetic properties of the nickel coated CNTs, with deposition time of 30 and 60 min were also evaluated. The magnetic saturation of nickel coated CNTs with deposition time of 30 min is less compared to nickel coated CNTs with deposition time of 60 min.

  4. Synthesis, structure characterization and catalytic activity of nickel tungstate nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi; Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi; Khalilian-Shalamzari, Morteza; Zahedi, Mir Mahdi; Hajimirsadeghi, Seiedeh Somayyeh; Omrani, Ismail

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: NiWO 4 nanoparticles were prepared via precipitation technique. Experimental parameters of procedure were optimized statistically. Highlights: ► NiWO 4 spherical nanoparticles were synthesized via direct precipitation method. ► Taguchi robust design was used for optimization of synthesis reaction parameters. ► Composition and structural properties of NiWO 4 nanoparticles were characterized. ► EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR, UV–vis and photoluminescence techniques were employed. ► Catalytic activity of the product in a cyclo-addition reaction was investigated. - Abstract: Taguchi robust design was applied to optimize experimental parameters for controllable, simple and fast synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles. NiWO 4 nanoparticles were synthesized by precipitation reaction involving addition of nickel ion solution to the tungstate aqueous reagent and then formation of nickel tungstate nucleolus which are insoluble in aqueous media. Effects of various parameters such as nickel and tungstate concentrations, flow rate of reagent addition and reactor temperature on diameter of synthesized nickel tungstate nanoparticles were investigated experimentally by the aid of orthogonal array design. The results for analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that particle size of nickel tungstate can be effectively tuned by controlling significant variables involving nickel and tungstate concentrations and flow rate; while, temperature of the reactor has a no considerable effect on the size of NiWO 4 particles. The ANOVA results proposed the optimum conditions for synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles via this technique. Also, under optimum condition nanoparticles of NiWO 4 were prepared and their structure and chemical composition were characterized by means of EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR spectroscopy, UV–vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence. Finally, catalytic activity of the nanoparticles in a cycloaddition reaction was examined.

  5. Synthesis, structure characterization and catalytic activity of nickel tungstate nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi, E-mail: pourmortazavi@yahoo.com [Faculty of Material and Manufacturing Technologies, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi, E-mail: rahiminasrabadi@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Imam Hossein University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khalilian-Shalamzari, Morteza [Department of Chemistry, Imam Hossein University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zahedi, Mir Mahdi; Hajimirsadeghi, Seiedeh Somayyeh [Islamic Azad University, Varamin Pishva Branch, Varamin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Omrani, Ismail [Department of Chemistry, Imam Hossein University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: NiWO{sub 4} nanoparticles were prepared via precipitation technique. Experimental parameters of procedure were optimized statistically. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiWO{sub 4} spherical nanoparticles were synthesized via direct precipitation method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Taguchi robust design was used for optimization of synthesis reaction parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Composition and structural properties of NiWO{sub 4} nanoparticles were characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR, UV-vis and photoluminescence techniques were employed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalytic activity of the product in a cyclo-addition reaction was investigated. - Abstract: Taguchi robust design was applied to optimize experimental parameters for controllable, simple and fast synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles. NiWO{sub 4} nanoparticles were synthesized by precipitation reaction involving addition of nickel ion solution to the tungstate aqueous reagent and then formation of nickel tungstate nucleolus which are insoluble in aqueous media. Effects of various parameters such as nickel and tungstate concentrations, flow rate of reagent addition and reactor temperature on diameter of synthesized nickel tungstate nanoparticles were investigated experimentally by the aid of orthogonal array design. The results for analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that particle size of nickel tungstate can be effectively tuned by controlling significant variables involving nickel and tungstate concentrations and flow rate; while, temperature of the reactor has a no considerable effect on the size of NiWO{sub 4} particles. The ANOVA results proposed the optimum conditions for synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles via this technique. Also, under optimum condition nanoparticles of NiWO{sub 4} were prepared and their structure and chemical composition were characterized by means of EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR spectroscopy, UV

  6. Spectrochemical analysis of impurities in nickel and in nickel oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldbart, Z.; Lorber, A.; Harel, A.

    1981-11-01

    Various spectrochemical methods are described for the quantitative determination of 23 impurities in metallic nickel and in nickel oxide. The average limit of detection is from 1 to 5 ppm and the dynamic range lies over 2.5 orders of magnitude. The elements that were determined are: Al,B,Ba,Bi,Ca,Cd,Co,Cu,Fe,Ga,Ge,In,Mg,Mn,Mo,Nb,Si,Sn,Sr,Ti,Cr,V. (author)

  7. Nickel decreases cellular iron level and converts cytosolic aconitase to iron-regulatory protein 1 in A549 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Haobin; Davidson, Todd; Singleton, Steven; Garrick, Michael D.; Costa, Max

    2005-01-01

    Nickel (Ni) compounds are well-established carcinogens and are known to initiate a hypoxic response in cells via the stabilization and transactivation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). This change may be the consequence of nickel's interference with the function of several Fe(II)-dependent enzymes. In this study, the effects of soluble nickel exposure on cellular iron homeostasis were investigated. Nickel treatment decreased both mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitase (c-aconitase) activity in A549 cells. Cytosolic aconitase was converted to iron-regulatory protein 1, a form critical for the regulation of cellular iron homeostasis. The increased activity of iron-regulatory protein 1 after nickel exposure stabilized and increased transferrin receptor (Tfr) mRNA and antagonized the iron-induced ferritin light chain protein synthesis. The decrease of aconitase activity after nickel treatment reflected neither direct interference with aconitase function nor obstruction of [4Fe-4S] cluster reconstitution by nickel. Exposure of A549 cells to soluble nickel decreased total cellular iron by about 40%, a decrease that likely caused the observed decrease in aconitase activity and the increase of iron-regulatory protein 1 activity. Iron treatment reversed the effect of nickel on cytosolic aconitase and iron-regulatory protein 1. To assess the mechanism for the observed effects, human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells over expressing divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) were compared to A549 cells expressing only endogenous transporters for inhibition of iron uptake by nickel. The inhibition data suggest that nickel can enter via DMT1 and compete with iron for entry into the cell. This disturbance of cellular iron homeostasis by nickel may have a great impact on the ability of the cell to regulate a variety of cell functions, as well as create a state of hypoxia in cells under normal oxygen tension. These effects may be very important in how nickel exerts phenotypic

  8. Dislocation density changes in nickel under creep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moiseeva, I.V.; Okrainets, P.N.; Pishchak, V.K.

    1984-01-01

    Variation in dislocation density was studied in the process of nickel creep p at t=900 deg c and σ=2 kgf/mm 2 . The dislocation structure was studied independently by the X-ray technique and transmission electron-microscopy. The e two methods show good conformity of results by comparison. It is concluded that independent determination of dislocation density under creep is possible us sing the X-ray technique

  9. Selenium plating of aluminium and nickel surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, N.; Shams, N.; Kamal, A.; Ashraf, A.

    1993-01-01

    Selenium exhibits photovoltaic and photoconductive properties. This makes selenium useful in the production of photocells, exposure meters for photographic use, in solar cells, etc. In commerce, selenium coated surfaces are extensively used as photo receptive drums in the xerography machines for reproducing documents. Laboratory experiments were designed to obtain selenium plating on different materials. Of the various electrodes tested for cathodic deposition, anodized aluminum and nickel plated copper were found to give good results. (author)

  10. Comparative study of electroless nickel film on different organic acids modified cuprammonium fabric (CF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Hang; Lu, Yinxiang, E-mail: yxlu@fudan.edu.cn

    2016-01-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • An etchant-free and moderate surface pre-treatment process was studied. • Citric acid, malic acid and oxalic acid were selected as modification agents. • High adhesive nickel coating on cuprammonium fabric was obtained. • The electromagnetic parameters were evaluated from the experimental data. - Abstract: Nickel films were grown on citric acid (CA), malic acid (MA) and oxalic acid (OA) modified cuprammonium fabric (CF) substrates via electroless nickel deposition. The nickel films were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Their individual deposition rate and electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE) were also investigated to compare the properties of electroless nickel films. SEM images illustrated that the nickel film on MA modified CF substrate was smooth and uniform, and the density of nickel nuclei was much higher. Compared with that of CA modified CF, the coverage of nickel nuclei on OA and MA modified CF substrate was very limited and the nickel particles size was too big. XRD analysis showed that the nickel films deposited on the different modified CF substrates had a structure with Ni (1 1 1) preferred orientation. All the nickel coatings via different acid modification were firmly adhered to the CF substrates, as demonstrated by an ultrasonic washing test. The result of tensile test indicated that the electroless nickel plating on CF has ability to strengthen the CF substrate while causes limited effect on tensile elongation. Moreover, the nickel film deposited on MA modified CF substrate showed more predominant in EMI SE than that deposited on CA or OA modified CF.

  11. Removing nickel from nickel-coated carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardianto, A.; Hertleer, C.; De Mey, G.; Van Langenhove, L.

    2017-10-01

    Conductive fibers/yarns are one of the most important materials for smart textiles because of their electrically conductive functionality combined with flexibility and light weight. They can be applied in many fields such as the medical sector, electronics, sensors and even as thermoelectric generators. Temperature sensors, for example, can be made using the thermocouple or thermopile principle which usually uses two different metal wires that can produce a temperature-dependent voltage. However, if metal wires are inserted into a textile structure, they will decrease the flexibility properties of the textile product. Nickel-coated Carbon Fiber (NiCF), a conductive textile yarn, has a potential use as a textile-based thermopile if we can create an alternating region of carbon and nickel along the fiber which in turn it can be used for substituting the metallic thermopile. The idea was to remove nickel from NiCF in order to obtain a yarn that contains alternating zones of carbon and nickel. Due to no literature reporting on how to remove nickel from NiCF, in this paper we investigated some chemicals to remove nickel from NiCF.

  12. Effects of electromagnetic fields on human beings. Technical aspects and research results. - Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieback, D.

    1996-01-01

    The present brochure of the Professional Association for Fine Mechanics and Electrical Engineering gives a selective account on the effects of electromagnetic fields on human beings. The second part deals with regulations for safety and health protection at working places exposed to electromagnetic fields. (VHE) [de

  13. Nickel and binary metal mixture responses in Daphnia magna: Molecular fingerprints and (sub)organismal effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenbrouck, Tine; Soetaert, Anneleen; Ven, Karlijn van der; Blust, Ronny; Coen, Wim de

    2009-01-01

    The recent development of a custom cDNA microarray platform for one of the standard organisms in aquatic toxicology, Daphnia magna, opened up new ways to mechanistic insights of toxicological responses. In this study, the mRNA expression of several genes and (sub)organismal responses (Cellular Energy Allocation, growth) were assayed after short-term waterborne metal exposure. Microarray analysis of Ni-exposed daphnids revealed several affected functional gene classes, of which the largest ones were involved in different metabolic processes (mainly protein and chitin related processes), cuticula turnover, transport and signal transduction. Furthermore, transcription of genes involved in oxygen transport and heme metabolism (haemoglobin, δ-aminolevilunate synthase) was down-regulated. Applying a Partial Least Squares regression on nickel fingerprints and biochemical (sub)organismal parameters revealed a set of co-varying genes (haemoglobin, RNA terminal phosphate cyclase, a ribosomal protein and an 'unknown' gene fragment). An inverse relationship was seen between the mRNA expression levels of different cuticula proteins and available energy reserves. In addition to the nickel exposure, daphnids were exposed to binary mixtures of nickel and cadmium or nickel and lead. Using multivariate analysis techniques, the mixture mRNA expression fingerprints (Ni 2+ + Cd 2+ , Ni 2+ + Pb 2+ ) were compared to those of the single metal treatments (Ni 2+ , Cd 2+ , Pb 2+ ). It was hypothesized that the molecular fingerprints of the mixtures would be additive combinations of the gene transcription profiles of the individual compounds present in the mixture. However, our results clearly showed additionally affected pathways after mixture treatment (e.g. additional affected genes involved in carbohydrate catabolic processes and proteolysis), indicating interactive molecular responses which are not merely the additive sum of the individual metals. These findings, although indicative of

  14. Corrosion behaviour of cladded nickel base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandl, W.; Ruczinski, D.; Nolde, M.; Blum, J.

    1995-01-01

    As a consequence of the high cost of nickel base alloys their use as surface layers is convenient. In this paper the properties of SA-as well as RES-cladded NiMo 16Cr16Ti and NiCr21Mo14W being produced in single and multi-layer technique are compared and discussed with respect to their corrosion behaviour. Decisive criteria describing the qualities of the claddings are the mass loss, the susceptibility against intergranular corrosion and the pitting corrosion resistance. The results prove that RES cladding is the most suitable technique to produce corrosion resistant nickel base coatings. The corrosion behaviour of a two-layer RES deposition shows a better resistance against pitting than a three layer SAW cladding. 7 refs

  15. Process for obtaining cobalt and lanthanum nickelate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapcov, V.; Samusi, N.; Gulea, A.; Horosun, I.; Stasiuc, V.; Petrenco, P.

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates to the process for obtaining polycrystalline ceramics of cobalt and lanthanum nickelate with the perovskite structure from coordinative hetero metallic compounds. The obtained products can be utilized in the industry in the capacity of catalysts. Summary of the invention consists in obtaining polycrystalline ceramics LaCoO 3 and LaNiO 3 with the perovskite structure by pyrolysis of the parent compounds, namely, the coordinative hetero metallic compounds of the lanthanum cobalt or lanthanum nickel. The pyrolysis of the parent compound runs during one hour at 800 C. The technical result of the invention consists in lowering the temperature of the parent compound pyrolysis containing the precise ratio of metals necessary for ceramics obtaining

  16. Thermal conductivity of nanoscale thin nickel films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Shiping; JIANG Peixue

    2005-01-01

    The inhomogeneous non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) scheme is applied to model phonon heat conduction in thin nickel films. The electronic contribution to the thermal conductivity of the film is deduced from the electrical conductivity through the use of the Wiedemann-Franz law. At the average temperature of T = 300 K, which is lower than the Debye temperature ()D = 450 K,the results show that in a film thickness range of about 1-11 nm, the calculated cross-plane thermal conductivity decreases almost linearly with the decreasing film thickness, exhibiting a remarkable reduction compared with the bulk value. The electrical and thermal conductivities are anisotropic in thin nickel films for the thickness under about 10 nm. The phonon mean free path is estimated and the size effect on the thermal conductivity is attributed to the reduction of the phonon mean free path according to the kinetic theory.

  17. Normal modes of vibration in nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birgeneau, R J [Yale Univ., New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cordes, J [Cambridge Univ., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Dolling, G; Woods, A D B

    1964-07-01

    The frequency-wave-vector dispersion relation, {nu}(q), for the normal vibrations of a nickel single crystal at 296{sup o}K has been measured for the [{zeta}00], [{zeta}00], [{zeta}{zeta}{zeta}], and [0{zeta}1] symmetric directions using inelastic neutron scattering. The results can be described in terms of the Born-von Karman theory of lattice dynamics with interactions out to fourth-nearest neighbors. The shapes of the dispersion curves are very similar to those of copper, the normal mode frequencies in nickel being about 1.24 times the corresponding frequencies in copper. The fourth-neighbor model was used to calculate the frequency distribution function g({nu}) and related thermodynamic properties. (author)

  18. Charge retention test experiences on Hubble Space Telescope nickel-hydrogen battery cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrocki, Dave E.; Driscoll, J. R.; Armantrout, J. D.; Baker, R. C.; Wajsgras, H.

    1993-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) nickel-hydrogen battery module was designed by Lockheed Missile & Space Co (LMSC) and manufactured by Eagle-Picher Ind. (EPI) for the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as an Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) for the nickel-cadmium batteries originally selected for this low earth orbit mission. The design features of the HST nickel hydrogen battery are described and the results of an extended charge retention test are summarized.

  19. Nickel Hydrogen Battery Expert System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Yvette B.; Mccall, Kurt E.

    1992-01-01

    The Nickel Cadmium Battery Expert System-2, or 'NICBES-2', which was used by the NASA HST six-battery testbed, was subsequently converted into the Nickel Hydrogen Battery Expert System, or 'NICHES'. Accounts are presently given of this conversion process and future uses being contemplated for NICHES. NICHES will calculate orbital summary data at the end of each orbit, and store these files for trend analyses and rules-generation.

  20. Adsorption of nickel on synthetic hydroxyapatite from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosskopfova, O.; Galambos, M.; Pivarciova, L.; Rajec, P.; Caplovicova, M.

    2013-01-01

    The sorption of nickel on synthetic hydroxyapatite was investigated using a batch method and radiotracer technique. The hydroxyapatite samples used in experiments were a commercial hydroxyapatite and hydroxyapatite of high crystallinity with Ca/P ratio of 1.563 and 1.688, respectively, prepared by a wet precipitation process. The sorption of nickel on hydroxyapatite was pH independent ranging from 4.5 to 6.5 as a result of buffering properties of hydroxyapatite. The adsorption of nickel was rapid and the percentage of Ni sorption on both samples of hydroxyapatite was >98 % during the first 15-30 min of the contact time for initial Ni 2+ concentration of 1 x 10 -4 mol dm -3 . The experimental data for sorption of nickel have been interpreted in the term of Langmuir isotherm and the value of maximum sorption capacity of nickel on a commercial hydroxyapatite and hydroxyapatite prepared by wet precipitation process was calculated to be 0.184 and 0.247 mmol g -1 , respectively. The sorption of Ni 2+ ions was performed by ion-exchange with Ca 2+ cations on the crystal surface of hydroxyapatite under experimental conditions. The competition effect of Co 2+ and Fe 2+ towards Ni 2+ sorption was stronger than that of Ca 2+ ions. NH 4 + ions have no apparent effect on nickel sorption. (author)

  1. Nickel deposited on the skin-visualization by DMG test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julander, Anneli; Skare, Lizbet; Vahter, Marie; Lidén, Carola

    2011-03-01

    Nickel is the most common cause of contact allergy and an important risk factor for hand eczema. Visualization techniques may be powerful in showing exposures. The dimethylglyoxime (DMG) test might be used to establish skin exposure to nickel. To develop and evaluate methods for visualization of nickel on the skin by the DMG test and hand imprints. Nickel solutions at different concentrations were applied in duplicate on the hands in healthy subjects (n = 5). The DMG test and acid wipe sampling for quantification were then performed. Hand imprints were taken after manipulation of nickel-releasing tools (n = 1), and in workers performing their normal tasks (n = 7). The imprints were developed by the DMG test. The DMG test on hands gave positive results in all subjects. The lowest concentration giving rise to a colour change was set to 0.13 µg/cm(2) for DMG testing on skin. DMG test-developed imprints worked well except when hands were heavily contaminated by other particles/dust. The DMG test may be used as a simple and powerful tool for visualization of nickel on skin. DMG test-developed hand imprints may, in the future, be used for semi-quantitative or quantitative exposure assessment. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Occupational exposure to nickel, uranium and thorium in a nickel mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azeredo, A.M.; Lipsztein, J.L.; Dias da Cunha, K.; Lourenco, M.C.; Lipsztein, J.L.; Miekeley, N.T.

    2002-01-01

    The workers involved in mining and milling ores are exposed in the workplace to many hazardous agents that can cause a health detriment. In this work, the measurements obtained in a nickel mineral processing facility in the Brazilian Central-West are presented. One of the most important hazardous agents in this facility is the aerosol present in the air that contains nickel, uranium and thorium. The aerosol is inhaled or ingested, metabolised and deposited in the whole body or in specific organs. The surveillance of internal contamination of workers was performed by analysis of urine, fecal and hair samples. The ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry) method was used to analytically determine nickel, uranium and thorium in these biological samples. Additional data were obtained by the collection of air samples in the workplace. A cascade impactor with six stages was used to collect mineral dust particles with an aerodynamic diameter in the range of 0.64 to 19.4 μm. The particles impacted in each stage of the cascade impactor were analysed by PIXE (Particle Induced X ray Emission), which permits the determination of elemental mass air concentration and the MMAD (Mass Median Aerodynamic Diameter). The concentrations of nickel, uranium and thorium were determined in the aerosol samples. All the results were analysed using statistical methods and biokinetical modelling was applied to evaluate the internal contamination and to make a risk estimation. (author)

  3. A Study On Dispersion Stability Of Nickel Nanoparticles Synthesized By Wire Explosion In Liquid Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim C.K.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, nickel nanoparticles were synthesized in ethanol using portable pulsed wire evaporation, which is a one-step physical method. From transmission electron microscopy images, it was found that the Ni nanoparticles exhibited a spherical shape with an average diameter of 7.3 nm. To prevent aggregation of the nickel nanoparticles, a polymer surfactant was added into the ethanol before the synthesis of nickel nanoparticles, and adsorbed on the freshly synthesized nickel nanoparticles during the wire explosion. The dispersion stability of the prepared nickel nanofluids was investigated by zeta-potential analyzer and Turbiscan optical analyzer. As a result, the optimum concentration of polymer surfactant to be added was suggested for the maximized dispersion stability of the nickel nanofluids.

  4. 2-Mercaptobenzimidazole, 2-Mercaptobenzothiazole, and Thioglycolic Acid in an Electroless Nickel-Plating Bath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Ozan Gezerman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of three different materials, 2-mercaptobenzimidazole, 2-mercaptobenzothiazole, and thioglycolic acid, was investigated to improve the performance of electroless nickel-plating baths. By changing the concentrations of these materials, sample plates were coated. Optical microscope images were obtained by selecting representative coated plates. From the results of the investigations, the effects of these materials on electroless nickel plating were observed, and the most appropriate amounts of these materials for nickel plating were determined. Moreover, the nickel plating speed observed with the bath solution containing 2-mercaptobenzimidazole, 2-mercaptobenzothiazole, and thioglycolic acid is higher than that in the case of traditional electroless plating baths, but the nickel consumption amount in the former case is lower. In order to minimize the waste water generated from electroless nickel-plating baths, we determined the lowest amounts of the chemicals that can be used for the concentrations reported in the literature.

  5. Biosorption of nickel with barley straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevannan, Ayyasamy; Mungroo, Rubeena; Niu, Catherine Hui

    2010-03-01

    Wastewater containing nickel sulphate generated from a nickel plating industry is of great concern. In the present work, biosorption of nickel by barley straw from nickel sulphate solution was investigated. Nickel uptake at room temperature (23+/-0.5 degrees C) was very sensitive to solution pH, showing a better uptake value at a pH of 4.85+/-0.10 among the tested values. The nickel biosorption isotherm fitted well the Langmuir equation. When the ionic strength (IS) of the solution was increased from less than 0.02-0.6M, nickel uptake was reduced to 12% of that obtained at IS of less than 0.02 M. Barley straw showed a higher nickel uptake (0.61 mmol/g) than acid washed crab shells (0.04 mmol/g), demonstrating its potential as an adsorbent for removal of nickel. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL AND PATHOGENETIC ASPECTS OF NICKEL POISONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladmila Bojanic

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Nickel is widely distributed in the environment. High consumption of nickel containing products inevitably leads to environmental pollution by nickel and its derivatives at all stages of production, utilization, and disposal.Human exposure to nickel occurs primarily via inhalation and ingestion and is particularly high among nickel metallurgy workers. In addition, implantation of nickel-containing endoprostheses and iatrogenic administration of nickel-contaminated medica-tions leads to significant parenteral exposures. Exposure to nickel compounds can produce a variety of adverse effects on human health. Nickel allergy in the form of contact dermatitis is the most common reaction.A frontal headache, vertigo, nausea, vomiting, insomnia, and irritability are the most common signs of acute poisoning with nickel compounds. The respiratory tract, kidneys and liver suffer the most significant changes like nickel pneumoconiosis, chronic rhinitis and sinonasal tumors and transitory nephropathy. Although the accumulation of nickel in the body through chronic exposure can lead to lung fibrosis, cardiovascular and kidney diseases, the most serious concerns relate to nickel’s carcinogenic activity. Nickel compounds are carcinogenic to humans and metallic nickel is possibly carcinogenic to humans.

  7. Relationship between nickel allergy and diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Ashimav

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Nickel is a ubiquitous trace element and it occurs in soil, water, air and of the biosphere. It is mostly used to manufacture stainless steel. Nickel is the commonest cause of metal allergy. Nickel allergy is a chronic and recurring skin problem; females are affected more commonly than males. Nickel allergy may develop at any age. Once developed, it tends to persist life-long. Nickel is present in most of the dietary items and food is considered to be a major source of nickel exposure for the general population. Nickel content in food may vary considerably from place to place due to the difference in nickel content of the soil. However, certain foods are routinely high in nickel content. Nickel in the diet of a nickel-sensitive person can provoke dermatitis. Careful selection of food with relatively low nickel concentration can bring a reduction in the total dietary intake of nickel per day. This can influence the outcome of the disease and can benefit the nickel sensitive patient.

  8. Developmental transitions in Arabidopsis are regulated by antisense RNAs resulting from bidirectionally transcribed genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyczmonik, Katarzyna; Wroblewska-Swiniarska, Agata; Swiezewski, Szymon

    2017-07-03

    Transcription terminators are DNA elements located at the 3' end of genes that ensure efficient cleavage of nascent RNA generating the 3' end of mRNA, as well as facilitating disengagement of elongating DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II. Surprisingly, terminators are also a potent source of antisense transcription. We have recently described an Arabidopsis antisense transcript originating from the 3' end of a master regulator of Arabidopsis thaliana seed dormancy DOG1. In this review, we discuss the broader implications of our discovery in light of recent developments in yeast and Arabidopsis. We show that, surprisingly, the key features of terminators that give rise to antisense transcription are preserved between Arabidopsis and yeast, suggesting a conserved mechanism. We also compare our discovery to known antisense-based regulatory mechanisms, highlighting the link between antisense-based gene expression regulation and major developmental transitions in plants.

  9. Cancer Stem-Like Cells Accumulated in Nickel-Induced Malignant Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Fan, Jia; Hitron, John Andrew; Son, Young-Ok; Wise, James T.F.; Roy, Ram Vinod; Kim, Donghern; Dai, Jin; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin

    2016-01-01

    Nickel compounds are known as human carcinogens. Chronic environmental exposure to nickel is a worldwide health concern. Although the mechanisms of nickel-induced carcinogenesis are not well understood, recent studies suggest that stem cells/cancer stem cells are likely important targets. This study examines the role of cancer stem cells in nickel-induced cell transformation. The nontransformed human bronchial epithelial cell line (Beas-2B) was chronically exposed to nickel chloride for 12 months to induce cell transformation. Nickel induced Beas-2B cell transformation, and cancer stem-like cells were enriched in nickel-transformed cell (BNiT) population. The BNiT cancer stem-like cells demonstrated enhanced self-renewal and distinctive differentiation properties. In vivo tumorigenesis studies show that BNiT cancer stem-like cells possess a high tumor-initiating capability. It was also demonstrated that superoxide dismutase 1 was involved in the accumulation of cancer stem-like cells; the regulation of superoxide dismutase 1 expression was different in transformed stem-like cells and nontransformed. Overall, the accumulation of stem-like cells and their enhanced stemness functions contribute to nickel-induced tumorigenesis. Our study provides additional insight into the mechanisms by which metals or other chemicals can induce carcinogenesis. PMID:26962057

  10. Long-term nickel exposure altered the bacterial community composition but not diversity in two contrasting agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Hu, Hang-Wei; Ma, Yi-Bing; Wang, Jun-Tao; Liu, Yu-Rong; He, Ji-Zheng

    2015-07-01

    Nickel pollution imposes deleterious effects on soil ecosystem. The responses of soil microorganisms to long-term nickel pollution under field conditions remain largely unknown. Here, we used high-throughput sequencing to elucidate the impacts of long-term nickel pollution on soil bacterial communities in two contrasting agricultural soils. Our results found that the soil microbial biomass carbon consistently decreased along the nickel gradients in both soils. Nickel pollution selectively favored or impeded the prevalence of several dominant bacterial guilds, in particular, Actinobacteria showed tolerance, while Acidobacteria and Planctomycetes displayed sensitivity. Despite the apparent shifts in the bacterial community composition, no clear tendency in the bacterial diversity and abundance was identified along the nickel gradients in either soil. Collectively, we provide evidence that long-term nickel pollution shifted the soil bacterial communities, resulting in the decrease of microbial biomass although the bacterial diversity was not significantly changed.

  11. Nickel speciation in several serpentine (ultramafic) topsoils via bulk synchrotron-based techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebecker, Matthew G.; Chaney, Rufus L.; Sparks, Donald L.

    2017-07-01

    Serpentine soils have elevated concentrations of trace metals including nickel, cobalt, and chromium compared to non-serpentine soils. Identifying the nickel bearing minerals allows for prediction of potential mobility of nickel. Synchrotron-based techniques can identify the solid-phase chemical forms of nickel with minimal sample treatment. Element concentrations are known to vary among soil particle sizes in serpentine soils. Sonication is a useful method to physically disperse sand, silt and clay particles in soils. Synchrotron-based techniques and sonication were employed to identify nickel species in discrete particle size fractions in several serpentine (ultramafic) topsoils to better understand solid-phase nickel geochemistry. Nickel commonly resided in primary serpentine parent material such as layered-phyllosilicate and chain-inosilicate minerals and was associated with iron oxides. In the clay fractions, nickel was associated with iron oxides and primary serpentine minerals, such as lizardite. Linear combination fitting (LCF) was used to characterize nickel species. Total metal concentration did not correlate with nickel speciation and is not an indicator of the major nickel species in the soil. Differences in soil texture were related to different nickel speciation for several particle size fractionated samples. A discussion on LCF illustrates the importance of choosing standards based not only on statistical methods such as Target Transformation but also on sample mineralogy and particle size. Results from the F-test (Hamilton test), which is an underutilized tool in the literature for LCF in soils, highlight its usefulness to determine the appropriate number of standards to for LCF. EXAFS shell fitting illustrates that destructive interference commonly found for light and heavy elements in layered double hydroxides and in phyllosilicates also can occur in inosilicate minerals, causing similar structural features and leading to false positive results in

  12. Electrosynthesis and catalytic activity of polymer-nickel particles composite electrode materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melki, Tahar; Zouaoui, Ahmed; Bendemagh, Barkahoum; Oliveira, Ione M.F. de; Oliveira, Gilver F. de; Lepretre, Jean-Claude; Bucher, Christophe; Mou tet, Jean-Claude

    2009-01-01

    Nickel-polymer composite electrode materials have been synthesized using various strategies, all comprising the electrochemical reduction of nickel(II) cations or complexes, incorporated by either ion-exchange or complexation into various poly(pyrrole-carboxylate) thin films coated by oxidative electropolymerization onto carbon electrodes. The electrocatalytic activity and the stability of the different composites have been then evaluated in the course of the electrocatalytic hydrogenation of ketones and enones in aqueous electrolytes. The best results were obtained using nickel-polymer composites synthesized by electroreduction of nickel(II) ions complexed into polycarboxylate films, which are characterized by a high catalytic activity and a good operational stability. (author)

  13. Electrosynthesis and catalytic activity of polymer-nickel particles composite electrode materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melki, Tahar; Zouaoui, Ahmed; Bendemagh, Barkahoum [Universite Ferhat Abbas, Setif (Algeria). Faculte des Sciences de l' Ingenieur. Dept. du Tronc Commun; Oliveira, Ione M.F. de; Oliveira, Gilver F. de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Lepretre, Jean-Claude [UMR-5631 CNRS-INPG-UJF, St. Martin d' Heres Cedex (France). Lab. d' Electrochimie et de Physicochimie des Materiaux et Interfaces; Bucher, Christophe; Mou tet, Jean-Claude [Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1 (France). Dept. de Chimie Moleculaire], e-mail: Jean-Claude.Moutet@ujf-grenoble.fr

    2009-07-01

    Nickel-polymer composite electrode materials have been synthesized using various strategies, all comprising the electrochemical reduction of nickel(II) cations or complexes, incorporated by either ion-exchange or complexation into various poly(pyrrole-carboxylate) thin films coated by oxidative electropolymerization onto carbon electrodes. The electrocatalytic activity and the stability of the different composites have been then evaluated in the course of the electrocatalytic hydrogenation of ketones and enones in aqueous electrolytes. The best results were obtained using nickel-polymer composites synthesized by electroreduction of nickel(II) ions complexed into polycarboxylate films, which are characterized by a high catalytic activity and a good operational stability. (author)

  14. Nickel and Cobalt Release From Children's Toys Purchased in Denmark and the United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P.; Hamann, Dathan; Hamann, Carsten R.

    2014-01-01

    from children's toys. Methods : We purchased 212 toys in 18 different retail and online stores in the United States and Denmark. Nickel and cobalt release was tested using the dimethylglyoxime and cobalt screening spot tests. Results : A total of 73 toys (34.4%) released nickel, and none released......Background : Nickel is the most common allergen detected by patch testing in children. There is an increasing number of cases in children who have not had exposure to piercing. Although the clinical relevance of nickel patch test reactions in children is sometimes uncertain, continued vigilance...

  15. Effect of nickel on growth and 14 CO2 fixation in Chlorella (Chlorella pyrenoidosa)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subrahmanyam, A.D.; Rathore, V.S.

    1996-01-01

    Influence of nickel on growth, 14 C fixation and allocation of carbon among different biochemical fractions was investigated in Chlorella pyrenoidosa. Nickel significantly reduced the fresh and dry weights of chlorella cells. 14 C fixation was significantly reduced by increasing nickel concentration in growth media. 14 C allocation into different biochemical fractions was also markedly altered by nickel. Reduction in 14 CO 2 assimilation and carbon allocation into pigment-lipid fraction and residue fraction resulted in decreased chlorophyll content and dry weight. (author). 15 refs., 4 figs

  16. Relationship between nickel allergy and diet

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma Ashimav

    2007-01-01

    Nickel is a ubiquitous trace element and it occurs in soil, water, air and of the biosphere. It is mostly used to manufacture stainless steel. Nickel is the commonest cause of metal allergy. Nickel allergy is a chronic and recurring skin problem; females are affected more commonly than males. Nickel allergy may develop at any age. Once developed, it tends to persist life-long. Nickel is present in most of the dietary items and food is considered to be a major source of nickel exposure for the...

  17. Substitution effects of a carbonated hydroxyapatite biomaterial against intoxication chloride nickel-exposed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulila, Salha; Elfeki, Abdelfattah; Oudadesse, Hassane; Elfeki, Hafed

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the potential effects of a synthetic apatite (carbonated hydroxyapatite) on the detoxification of a group of male "Wistar" rats exposed to nickel chloride. Toxicity was evaluated by rats' bioassay of nickel chloride. Wistar rats received this metal daily by gavage for seven days (4 mg/ml nickel chloride/200 g body weight, BW). To detoxify this organism, a subcutaneous implantation of the apatite is made. The results revealed that exposure to nickel induced oxidative stress, disorders in the balances of ferric phosphocalcic, renal failures, liver toxicity and significant increase in nickel rates in the bones of intoxicated rats. The application of the carbonated hydroxyapatite presented in this study restored those disorders back to normal. The synthetic apatite protected the rats against the toxic effects of nickel by lowering the levels of lipid peroxidation markers and improving the activities of defense enzymes. It also amended ferric and phosphocalcic equilibriums, protected liver and kidney functions and reduced the nickel rate in the bones of the rats. Overall, the results provided strong support for the protective role of carbonated hydroxyapatite in the detoxification of rats exposed to nickel. Those beneficial effects were further confirmed by physico-chemical characterization (X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy), which revealed its property of anionic and cationic substitution, thus supporting its promising candidacy for future biomedical application. The hydroxyapatite is an effective biomaterial to solve health problems, particularly detoxification against metals (nickel).

  18. Assessment of respiratory carcinogenicity associated with exposure to metallic nickel: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivulka, Donna J

    2005-11-01

    Human studies prior to 1990 have shown an association between respiratory cancer and exposure to some nickel compounds, but not to metallic nickel. Numerous reviews have examined the nature of the association between nickel compounds and respiratory cancer, but little has been published on metallic nickel. This paper reviews the animal and human cancer-related data on metallic nickel to determine whether the conclusions regarding metallic nickel reached a decade ago still apply. Based upon past and current human studies, metallic nickel appears to show little evidence of carcinogenicity when present at the same or higher concentrations than those seen in current workplace environments. By comparison, animal studies currently available have shown mixed results. A number of studies have shown evidence of carcinogenicity in animals exposed to nickel powders via injection, but other studies have shown no or inconsistent results in animals exposed via inhalation or intratracheal instillation. Further studies in animals via inhalation and humans would be helpful in elucidating the respiratory carcinogenic potential of metallic nickel.

  19. Drinking water pollution with nickel from water boilers; Nickel-Eintrag aus Wasserkochern ins Trinkwasser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmers, E. [Amt fuer Umweltschutz, Stuttgart (Germany). Chemisches Inst.

    1998-07-01

    The EU is planning to drop the threshold value for nickel in drinking water down to 20 {mu}g/l (present German threshold value: 50 {mu}g/l). Since ICP-MS-screenings of spot checks of water cookers were striking with respect to nickel, emissions of electrical water cookers have been investigated systematically within this study. As a result, water cookers with open heating coils are emitting relevant amounts of nickel into the water while it is brought to the boil. Investigation of eight preused water cookers with open heating coils revealed that the boiled water contained more than 50 {mu}g Ni/l in one case, more than 20 {mu}g Ni/l in two cases and, between 10 and 20 {mu}g Ni/l in two more cases, respectively. Removing of the lime by the aid of citric acid is increasing the nickel concentrations by a factor of up to 50 (max. 640 {mu}g/l). A new device was checked in a long-term test. During standard use with tapwater, Ni concentrations fall below the detection limit of 5 {mu}g Ni/l (120 cooking events). However, after removing of the lime, 5 times of cooking were necessary in order to diminish the Ni concentrations below the limit of 20 {mu}g/l. In the case of dionized water Ni concentrations below the limit of 20 {mu}g/l. In the case of deionized water Ni concentrations remained between 94 und 190 {mu}g/l. Health risk assessment: The intake of nickel with beverages made from hot water out of these cookers is in the range of 26 {mu}g/day. Considering an alltogether dietary nickel intake of 130-170 (900) {mu}g/day, this is not beyond the scope. However, according to the fact that nickel allergies (dermatitis) are very frequent (up to 13% of the population), this source should be limited or closed. (orig.) [Deutsch] Aus Anlass der geplanten Absenkung des Trinkwassergrenzwertes fuer Nickel auf 20 {mu}g/l sowie aufgrund von Auffaelligkeiten bei Stichprobenuntersuchungen wurde das Nickel-Emissionsverhalten von elektrischen Wassererhitzern betrachtet. Hierbei erwies sich

  20. Comparative cytotoxic response of nickel ferrite nanoparticles in human liver HepG2 and breast MFC-7 cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Khan, M A Majeed; Alrokayan, Salman A

    2015-09-01

    Nickel ferrite nanoparticles (NPs) have received much attention for their potential applications in biomedical fields such as magnetic resonance imaging, drug delivery and cancer hyperthermia. However, little is known about the toxicity of nickel ferrite NPs at the cellular and molecular levels. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic responses of nickel ferrite NPs in two different types of human cells (i.e., liver HepG2 and breast MCF-7). Nickel ferrite NPs induced dose-dependent cytotoxicity in both types of cells, which was demonstrated by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT), neutral red uptake (NRU) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. Nickel ferrite NPs were also found to induce oxidative stress, which was evident by the depletion of glutathione and the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation. The mitochondrial membrane potential due to nickel ferrite NP exposure was also observed. The mRNA levels for the tumor suppressor gene p53 and the apoptotic genes bax, CASP3 and CASP9 were up-regulated, while the anti-apoptotic gene bcl-2 was down-regulated following nickel ferrite NP exposure. Furthermore, the activities of apoptotic enzymes (caspase-3 and caspase-9) were also higher in both types of cells treated with nickel ferrite NPs. Cytotoxicity induced by nickel ferrite was efficiently prevented by N-acetyl cysteine (ROS scavenger) treatment, which suggested that oxidative stress might be one of the possible mechanisms of nickel ferrite NP toxicity. We also observed that MCF-7 cells were slightly more susceptible to nickel ferrite NP exposure than HepG2 cells. This study warrants further investigation to explore the potential mechanisms of different cytotoxic responses of nickel ferrite NPs in different cell lines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantitative Assessment of Serum Nickel and Chromium Levels in Orthodontic Patients: An in vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan Rai

    2011-01-01

    Results : Results obtained indicated that although nickel level in the serum was significant initially in the samples when compared to the controls, there was a gradual decrease of serum nickel level when the appliance was present for a longer duration. However, serum chromium levels showed no significant changes with time.

  2. Mechanisms of nickel toxicity in microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macomber, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Summary Nickel has long been known to be an important human toxicant, including having the ability to form carcinomas, but until recently nickel was believed to be an issue only to microorganisms living in nickel-rich serpentine soils or areas contaminated by industrial pollution. This assumption was overturned by the discovery of a nickel defense system (RcnR/RcnA) found in microorganisms that live in a wide range of environmental niches, suggesting that nickel homeostasis is a general biological concern. To date, the mechanisms of nickel toxicity in microorganisms and higher eukaryotes are poorly understood. In this review, we summarize nickel homeostasis processes used by microorganisms and highlight in vivo and in vitro effects of exposure to elevated concentrations of nickel. On the basis of this evidence we propose four mechanisms of nickel toxicity: 1) nickel replaces the essential metal of metalloproteins, 2) nickel binds to catalytic residues of non-metalloenzymes; 3) nickel binds outside the catalytic site of an enzyme to inhibit allosterically, and 4) nickel indirectly causes oxidative stress. PMID:21799955

  3. Three dimensional characterization of nickel coarsening in solid oxide cells via ex-situ ptychographic nano-tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Angelis, Salvatore; Jørgensen, Peter Stanley; Tsai, Esther Hsiao Rho

    2018-01-01

    Nickel coarsening is considered a significant cause of solid oxide cell (SOC) performance degradation. Therefore, understanding the morphological changes in the nickel-yttria stabilized zirconia (Ni-YSZ) fuel electrode is crucial for the wide spread usage of SOC technology. This paper reports...... a study of the initial 3D microstructure evolution of a SOC analyzed in the pristine state and after 3 and 8 h of annealing at 850 °C, in dry hydrogen. The analysis of the evolution of the same location of the electrode shows a substantial change of the nickel and pore network during the first 3 h...... of treatment, while only negligible changes are observed after 8 h. The nickel coarsening results in loss of connectivity in the nickel network, reduced nickel specific surface area and decreased total triple phase boundary density. For the condition of this experiment, nickel coarsening is shown...

  4. Effect of L-ascorbic acid on nickel-induced alterations in serum lipid profiles and liver histopathology in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Kusal K; Gupta, Amrita Das; Dhundasi, Salim A; Patil, Ashok M; Das, Swastika N; Ambekar, Jeevan G

    2006-01-01

    Nickel exposure greatly depletes intracellular ascorbate and alters ascorbate-cholesterol metabolism. We studied the effect of the simultaneous oral treatment with L-ascorbic acid (50 mg/100 g body weight (BW) and nickel sulfate (2.0 mg/100 g BW, i.p) on nickelinduced changes in serum lipid profiles and liver histopathology. Nickel-treated rats showed a significant increase in serum low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, total cholesterol, triglycerides, and a significant decrease in serum high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. In the liver, nickel sulfate caused a loss of normal architecture, fatty changes, extensive vacuolization in hepatocytes, eccentric nuclei, and Kupffer cell hypertrophy. Simultaneous administration of L-ascorbic acid with nickel sulfate improved both the lipid profile and liver impairments when compared with rats receiving nickel sulfate only. The results indicate that L-ascorbic acid is beneficial in preventing nickel-induced lipid alterations and hepatocellular damage.

  5. Investigation on the fates of vanadium and nickel during co-gasification of petroleum coke with biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiazhou; Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Bing; Zhao, Jiantao; Fang, Yitian

    2018-06-01

    This study investigates the volatilization behaviors and mineral transformation of vanadium and nickel during co-gasification of petroleum coke with biomass. Moreover, the evolution of occurrence modes of vanadium and nickel was also determined by the method of sequential chemical extraction. The results show that the volatilities of vanadium and nickel in petroleum coke have a certain level of growth with an increase in the temperature. With the addition of biomass, their volatilities both show an obvious decrease. Organic matter and stable forms are the dominant chemical forms of vanadium and nickel. After gasification, organic-bound vanadium and nickel decompose completely and convert into other chemical forms. The crystalline phases of vanadium trioxide, coulsonite, nickel sulfide, and elemental nickel are clearly present in petroleum coke and biomass gasification ashes. When the addition of biomass reaches 60 wt%, the diffraction peaks of orthovanadate are found while that of vanadium trioxide disappear. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Inhibition and reversal of nickel-induced transformation by the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qunwei; Salnikow, Konstantin; Kluz, Thomas; Chen, L.C.; Su, W.C.; Costa, Max

    2003-01-01

    The carcinogenic process initiated by nongenotoxic carcinogens involves modulation of gene expression. Nickel compounds have low mutagenic activity, but are highly carcinogenic. In vitro both mouse and human cells can be efficiently transformed by soluble and insoluble nickel compounds to anchorage-independent growth. Because previous studies have shown that carcinogenic nickel compounds silence genes by inhibiting histone acetylation and enhancing DNA methylation, we investigated the effect of enhancing histone acetylation on cell transformation. The exposure of nickel-transformed cells to the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) resulted in the appearance of significant number of revertants measured by their inability to grow in soft agar. Using the Affymetrix GeneChip we found that the level of expression of a significant number of genes was changed (suppressed or upregulated) in nickel-transformed clones but returned to a normal level in revertants obtained following TSA treatment. Moreover, we found that treatment of cells with TSA inhibited the ability of nickel to transform mouse PW cells to anchorage-independent growth. Treatment with TSA also inhibited the ability of nickel to transform human HOS cells, although to a lesser extent. In contrast, treatment with TSA was not able to revert established cancer cell lines as readily as the nickel-transformed cells. These data indicated that modulation of gene expression is important for nickel-induced transformation

  7. Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballereau, P.

    1999-01-01

    The different regulations relative to nuclear energy since the first of January 1999 are given here. Two points deserve to be noticed: the decree of the third august 1999 authorizing the national Agency for the radioactive waste management to install and exploit on the commune of Bures (Meuse) an underground laboratory destined to study the deep geological formations where could be stored the radioactive waste. The second point is about the uranium residues and the waste notion. The judgment of the administrative tribunal of Limoges ( 9. july 1998) forbidding the exploitation of a storage installation of depleted uranium considered as final waste and qualifying it as an industrial waste storage facility has been annulled bu the Court of Appeal. It stipulated that, according to the law number 75663 of the 15. july 1965, no criteria below can be applied to depleted uranium: production residue (possibility of an ulterior enrichment), abandonment of a personal property or simple intention to do it ( future use aimed in the authorization request made in the Prefecture). This judgment has devoted the primacy of the waste notion on this one of final waste. (N.C.)

  8. Simulating Results of Experiments on Gene Regulation of the Lactose Operon in Escherichia coli; a Problem-Solving Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchen, Trevor; Metcalfe, Judith

    1987-01-01

    Describes a simulation of the results of real experiments which use different strains of Escherichia coli. Provides an inexpensive practical problem-solving exercise to aid the teaching and understanding of the Jacob and Monod model of gene regulation. (Author/CW)

  9. Effects of formative assessments to develop self-regulation among sixth grade students: Results from a randomized controlled intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meusen-Beekman, Kelly; Joosten-ten Brinke, Desirée; Boshuizen, Els

    2018-01-01

    This article presents the results of a formative assessment intervention in writing assignments in sixth grade. We examined whether formative assessments would improve self-regulation, motivation and self-efficacy among sixth graders, and whether differential effects exist between formative

  10. Nickel affects gill and muscle development in oriental fire-bellied toad (Bombina orientalis) embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chan Jin; Song, Sang Ha; Kim, Dae Han; Gye, Myung Chan, E-mail: mcgye@hanyang.ac.kr

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Nickel inhibited the development of external gill in B. orientalis embryos. • The 168 h LC{sub 50} and EC{sub 50} values of nickel were 33.8 and 5.4 μM, respectively, in embryos. • Nickel induced abnormal tail development of embryos. • NF stage 26–31 was the most sensitive window for embryos to nickel exposure. • Nickel affected the calcium-dependent myogenic gene expression in embryos. - Abstract: The developmental toxicity of nickel was examined in the embryos of Bombina orientalis, a common amphibian in Korea. Based on a standard frog embryo teratogenesis assay, the LC{sub 50} and EC{sub 50} for malformation of nickel after 168 h of treatment were 33.8 μM and 5.4 μM, respectively. At a lethal concentration (100 μM), nickel treatment decreased the space between gill filaments and caused epithelial swelling and abnormal fusion of gill filaments. These findings suggest that nickel affects the functional development of gills, leading to embryonic death. At sublethal concentrations (1–10 μM), nickel produced multiple embryonic abnormalities, including bent tail and tail dysplasia. At 10 μM, nickel significantly decreased tail length and tail muscle fiber density in tadpoles, indicating inhibition of myogenic differentiation. Before hatching, the pre-muscular response to muscular response stages (stages 26–31) were the most sensitive period to nickel with respect to tail muscle development. During these stages, MyoD mRNA was upregulated, whereas myogenic regulatory factor 4 mRNA was downregulated by 0.1 μM nickel. Calcium-dependent kinase activities in muscular response stage embryos were significantly decreased by nickel, whereas these activities were restored by exogenous calcium. In tadpoles, 10 μM nickel significantly decreased the expression of the myosin heavy chain and the 12/101 muscle marker protein in the tail. Expression was restored by exogenous calcium. Our results indicate that nickel affects muscle development by

  11. Urinary nickel: measurement of exposure by inductively coupled plasma argon emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Chisato; Usuda, Kan; Hayashi, Satsuki; Dote, Tomotaro; Kono, Koichi

    2004-09-01

    Nickel is a rare earth metal and is widely used in modern industry. Its overexposure in human beings can provoke significant effects including lung, cardiovascular and kidney diseases. As an index of occupational exposure, urine is widely used for the monitoring of nickel concentration because it is a minimally invasive method. Recent studies have used atomic absorption spectrometry to measure nickel concentration. In this study, we introduced novel inductively coupled plasma argon emission spectrometry (ICPAES) which enables us to measure multiple elements simultaneously with smaller volume and with lower detection limits compared to conventional atomic absorption emission spectrometry, and we established the new measuring method by determining the appropriate wavelengths for nickel concentration. Furthermore, using the established new measuring method, we investigated the correlation between a single oral administration of nickel and urine elimination in rats. As a result, different concentrations of nickel standard solutions were measured by ICPAES, and among five specific wavelengths of nickel, 221.647 and 231.604 nm were chosen because they had the highest inclines of both signal to background ratio and emission intensity in simple linear regression analysis. Next, by using healthy human urine samples that had not been exposed to nickel, 231.604 nm was determined to be the most appropriate wavelength because it did not present abnormal intensity due to obstacle wavelength. Male Wistar rats received an oral administration of nickel ranging from 0.025 to 250 mg/kg, which is equivalent to 0.0015 - 15% of LD50, and during the following 24 h, urine samples were collected and the nickel concentration was measured by ICPAES. With a single oral administration of nickel, there was an increase in urine nickel concentration in a dose-dependent manner and the appropriate equation was developed. Acute renal failure was not observed in this dosage of oral nickel

  12. TGMS in Rapeseed (Brassica napus Resulted in Aberrant Transcriptional Regulation, Asynchronous Microsporocyte Meiosis, Defective Tapetum, and Fused Sexine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Qiong Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The thermo-sensitive genic male sterility (TGMS line SP2S is a spontaneous rapeseed mutation with several traits that are favorable for the production of two-line hybrids. To uncover the key cellular events and genetic regulation associated with TGMS expression, a combined study using cytological observation, transcriptome profiling, and gene expression analysis was conducted for SP2S and its near-isogenic line SP2F grown under warm conditions. Asynchronous microsporocyte meiosis and abnormal tapetal plastids and elaioplasts were demonstrated in the anther of SP2S. The tetrad microspore did not undergo mitosis before the cytoplasm degenerated. Delayed degradation of the tetrad wall, which led to tetrad microspore aggregation, resulted in postponement of sexine (outer layer of pollen exine formation and sexine fusion in the tetrad. The nexine (foot layer of exine was also absent. The delay of tetrad wall degradation and abnormality of the exine structure suggested that the defective tapetum lost important functions. Based on transcriptomic comparisons between young flower buds of SP2S and SP2F plants, a total of 465 differentially expressed transcripts (DETs were identified, including 303 up-regulated DETs and 162 down-regulated DETs in SP2S. Several genes encoding small RNA degrading nuclease 2, small RNA 2′-O-methyltransferase, thioredoxin reductase 2, regulatory subunit A alpha isoform of serine/threonine-protein phosphatase 2A, glycine rich protein 1A, transcription factor bHLH25, leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase At3g14840 like, and fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins FLA19 and FLA20 were greatly depressed in SP2S. Interestingly, a POLLENLESS3-LIKE 2 gene encoding the Arabidopsis MS5 homologous protein, which is necessary for microsporocyte meiosis, was down-regulated in SP2S. Other genes that were up-regulated in SP2S encoded glucanase A6, ethylene-responsive transcription factor 1A-like, pollen-specific SF3, stress

  13. Nickel exposure and plasma levels of biomarkers for assessing oxidative stress in nickel electroplating workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Yu-Chung; Gu, Po-Wen; Liu, Su-Hsun; Tzeng, I-Shiang; Chen, Jau-Yuan; Luo, Jiin-Chyuan John

    2017-07-01

    The mechanism of nickel-induced pathogenesis remains elusive. To examine effects of nickel exposure on plasma oxidative and anti-oxidative biomarkers. Biomarker data were collected from 154 workers with various levels of nickel exposure and from 73 controls. Correlations between nickel exposure and oxidative and anti-oxidative biomarkers were determined using linear regression models. Workers with a exposure to high nickel levels had significantly lower levels of anti-oxidants (glutathione and catalase) than those with a lower exposure to nickel; however, only glutathione showed an independent association after multivariable adjustment. Exposure to high levels of nickel may reduce serum anti-oxidative capacity.

  14. Nickel Nanoparticles Exposure and Reproductive Toxicity in Healthy Adult Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Kong

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Nickel is associated with reproductive toxicity. However, the reproductive toxicity of nickel nanoparticles (Ni NPs is unclear. Our goal was to determine the association between nickel nanoparticle exposure and reproductive toxicity. According to the one-generation reproductive toxicity standard, rats were exposed to nickel nanoparticles by gavage and we selected indicators including sex hormone levels, sperm motility, histopathology, and reproductive outcome etc. Experimental results showed nickel nanoparticles increased follicle stimulating hormone (FSH and luteinizing hormone (LH, and lowered etradiol (E2 serum levels at a dose of 15 and 45 mg/kg in female rats. Ovarian lymphocytosis, vascular dilatation and congestion, inflammatory cell infiltration, and increase in apoptotic cells were found in ovary tissues in exposure groups. For male rats, the weights decreased gradually, the ratio of epididymis weight over body weight increased, the motility of rat sperm changed, and the levels of FSH and testosterone (T diminished. Pathological results showed the shedding of epithelial cells of raw seminiferous tubule, disordered arrangement of cells in the tube, and the appearance of cell apoptosis and death in the exposure group. At the same time, Ni NPs resulted in a change of the reproductive index and the offspring development of rats. Further research is needed to elucidate exposure to human populations and mechanism of actions.

  15. Nickel nanoparticles exposure and reproductive toxicity in healthy adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lu; Tang, Meng; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Dayong; Hu, Ke; Lu, Weiqi; Wei, Chao; Liang, Geyu; Pu, Yuepu

    2014-11-17

    Nickel is associated with reproductive toxicity. However, the reproductive toxicity of nickel nanoparticles (Ni NPs) is unclear. Our goal was to determine the association between nickel nanoparticle exposure and reproductive toxicity. According to the one-generation reproductive toxicity standard, rats were exposed to nickel nanoparticles by gavage and we selected indicators including sex hormone levels, sperm motility, histopathology, and reproductive outcome etc. Experimental results showed nickel nanoparticles increased follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH), and lowered etradiol (E2) serum levels at a dose of 15 and 45 mg/kg in female rats. Ovarian lymphocytosis, vascular dilatation and congestion, inflammatory cell infiltration, and increase in apoptotic cells were found in ovary tissues in exposure groups. For male rats, the weights decreased gradually, the ratio of epididymis weight over body weight increased, the motility of rat sperm changed, and the levels of FSH and testosterone (T) diminished. Pathological results showed the shedding of epithelial cells of raw seminiferous tubule, disordered arrangement of cells in the tube, and the appearance of cell apoptosis and death in the exposure group. At the same time, Ni NPs resulted in a change of the reproductive index and the offspring development of rats. Further research is needed to elucidate exposure to human populations and mechanism of actions.

  16. Nickel proteomics data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The dataset include the following figures and tables: 1)Changes in protein expression of the 14 pathway regulators induced by Ni (II). 2)Hierarchical clustering of...

  17. Nickel may be released from laptop computers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Møller, Per

    2012-01-01

    Consumer nickel sensitization and dermatitis is caused by prolonged or repeated skin exposure to items that release nickel, for example jewellery, belts, buttons, watches, and mobile phones (1–3). We recently described a patient in whom primary nickel contact sensitization and dermatitis develope...

  18. Electrodeposition of zinc--nickel alloys coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dini, J W; Johnson, H R

    1977-10-01

    One possible substitute for cadmium in some applications is a zinc--nickel alloy deposit. Previous work by others showed that electrodeposited zinc--nickel coatings containing about 85 percent zinc and 15 percent nickel provided noticeably better corrosion resistance than pure zinc. Present work which supports this finding also shows that the corrosion resistance of the alloy deposit compares favorably with cadmium.

  19. Sintering of nickel steam reforming catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, Jens; Larsen, Niels Wessel; Falsig, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    . In this paper, particle migration and coalescence in nickel steam reforming catalysts is studied. Density functional theory calculations indicate that Ni-OH dominate nickel transport at nickel surfaces in the presence of steam and hydrogen as Ni-OH has the lowest combined energies of formation and diffusion...

  20. Phase transformation in nickel during tribotesting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershberger, J. [Energy Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Building 212 Room D204, 9700 S Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)]. E-mail: jhersh@anl.gov; Ajayi, O.O. [Energy Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Building 212 Room D204, 9700 S Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Fenske, G.R. [Energy Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Building 212 Room D204, 9700 S Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2005-12-15

    Commercially pure nickel was subjected to a polyalphaolefin-lubricated reciprocating tribotest with increasing load. A friction transition was observed and X-ray diffraction was performed on low-friction and high-friction areas. Hexagonal nickel or nickel carbide was formed at high friction. Broadening of the face-centered cubic peaks did not show dislocation structures characteristic of scuffing.

  1. Phase transformation in nickel during tribotesting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershberger, J.; Ajayi, O.O.; Fenske, G.R.

    2005-01-01

    Commercially pure nickel was subjected to a polyalphaolefin-lubricated reciprocating tribotest with increasing load. A friction transition was observed and X-ray diffraction was performed on low-friction and high-friction areas. Hexagonal nickel or nickel carbide was formed at high friction. Broadening of the face-centered cubic peaks did not show dislocation structures characteristic of scuffing

  2. Improved nickel plating of Inconel X-750

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, M. E.; Feeney, J. E.; Kuster, C. A.

    1969-01-01

    Electroplating technique with acid pickling provides a method of applying nickel plating on Inconel X-750 tubing to serve as a wetting agent during brazing. Low-stress nickel-plating bath contains no organic wetting agents that cause the nickel to blister at high temperatures.

  3. Nickel-accumulating plant from Western Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Severne, B C; Brooks, R R

    1972-01-01

    A small shrub Hybanthus floribundus (Lindl.) F. Muell. Violaceae growing in Western Australia accumulates nickel and cobalt to a very high degree. Values of up to 23% nickel in leaf ash may represent the highest relative accumulation of a metal on record. The high accumulation of nickel poses interesting problems in plant physiology and plant biochemistry. 9 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  4. Investigation of hydrogen evolution activity for the nickel, nickel-molybdenum nickel-graphite composite and nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Improved HER efficiency of Ni-Mo coatings was attributed to ‘cauliflower’ like microstructure. • RGO in nickel-RGO composite coating promoted refined grain and facilitated HER. • Synergistic effect between nickel and RGO facilitated HER due to large specific surface of RGO. - Abstract: The nickel, nickel-molybdenum alloy, nickel-graphite and nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coatings were obtained by the electrodeposition technique from a nickel sulfate bath. Nanocrystalline molybdenum, graphite and reduced graphene oxide in nickel coatings promoted hydrogen evolution reaction in 0.5 M H_2SO_4 solution at room temperature. However, the nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coating exhibited the highest electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction in 0.5 M H_2SO_4 solution at room temperature. A large number of gaps between ‘cauliflower’ like grains could decrease effective area for hydrogen evolution reaction in slight amorphous nickel-molybdenum alloy. The synergistic effect between nickel and reduced graphene oxide promoted hydrogen evolution, moreover, refined grain in nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coating and large specific surface of reduced graphene oxide also facilitated hydrogen evolution reaction.

  5. Investigation of hydrogen evolution activity for the nickel, nickel-molybdenum nickel-graphite composite and nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinlong, Lv, E-mail: ljlbuaa@126.com [Beijing Key Laboratory of Fine Ceramics, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang [Beijing Key Laboratory of Fine Ceramics, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-03-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Improved HER efficiency of Ni-Mo coatings was attributed to ‘cauliflower’ like microstructure. • RGO in nickel-RGO composite coating promoted refined grain and facilitated HER. • Synergistic effect between nickel and RGO facilitated HER due to large specific surface of RGO. - Abstract: The nickel, nickel-molybdenum alloy, nickel-graphite and nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coatings were obtained by the electrodeposition technique from a nickel sulfate bath. Nanocrystalline molybdenum, graphite and reduced graphene oxide in nickel coatings promoted hydrogen evolution reaction in 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution at room temperature. However, the nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coating exhibited the highest electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction in 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution at room temperature. A large number of gaps between ‘cauliflower’ like grains could decrease effective area for hydrogen evolution reaction in slight amorphous nickel-molybdenum alloy. The synergistic effect between nickel and reduced graphene oxide promoted hydrogen evolution, moreover, refined grain in nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coating and large specific surface of reduced graphene oxide also facilitated hydrogen evolution reaction.

  6. Electric resistance of nickel and niobium in the temperature range of 300-1300 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, I.I.; Roshchupkin, V.V.; Mozgovoj, A.G.; Semashko, N.A.

    1982-01-01

    The results of experimental investigation of nickel and niobium electric resistance on the wire samples by the potentiometric method in the temperature range of 300-1300 K are presented. Experimental data processing by the least square method is carried out; approximating equations of temperature dependence of the nickel and niobium electric resistance are prepared

  7. Homocoupling of benzyl halides catalyzed by POCOP-nickel pincer complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Tao

    2012-08-01

    Two types of POCOP-nickel(II) pincer complexes were prepared by mixing POCOP pincer ligands and NiX 2 in toluene at reflux. The resulting nickel complexes efficiently catalyze the homocoupling reactions of benzyl halides in the presence of zinc. The coupled products were obtained in excellent to quantitative yields. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ecological Considerations on Nickel Dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcussen, Poul V.

    1960-01-01

    The incidence of nickel dermatoses has shifted from the plating industry to other occupations and particularly to non-occupational causes. A Danish survey of 621 cases shows that 4% are due to nickel plating, 9·5% to other occupations, and 86·5% were not due to occupation. A primary eruption not due to occupation had occurred in 14% of the occupational cases. The importance of preventive measures for the community more than for the adequately controlled industry is underlined. PMID:14420983

  9. The effects of different nickel concentrations on some morpho-physiological characteristics of parsley (Petroselinum crispum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mitra khatib

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Nickel as a heavy metal is considered a fatal and toxic element for humans, animals and plants. However, some plants are known as hyper accumulator for nickel and sometimes seem to be useful for plant growth. Thus, investigation on the effect of nickel on plants' growth is an issue of importance. In this paper, we have studied the effect of different nickel concentrations on parsley growth and morph-physiological characteristics and its effect on absorption of some macro elements in this plant. Seeds of parsley were germinated in germinator and seedlings were transferred to hydroponics culture. The seedlings were grown in Hogland solution with different nickel concentrations (in form of nickel nitrate of: 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.5, 2 and 4 ppm. A completely randomized design with 8 treatments and 7 replications per treatment was used. Twelve weeks after treatments, morph-physiological characteristics including SPAD number, plant biomass, length of shoot and root, leaf area, leaf number and stomatal resistance were measured. The amount of absorbed nickel in plant foliages and roots of different treatments were also measured. The results revealed that the application of different nickel concentrations were decreased SPAD number, plant biomass, leaf area and leaf number, but the stomatal resistance were increased. Increase of nickel concentration resulted increasing Ni concentrations of plant foliages and roots. Nickel with 0.75 ppm concentration or higher imposed a toxic effect on parsley as general wilting and significant reduction in most morph-physiological characteristics. Keywords: Hydroponics culture, parsley, Petroselinum crispum, Nickel.

  10. Toxicity of nickel in the marine calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa: Nickel chloride versus nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, C.; Vitiello, V.; Casals, E.; Puntes, V.F.; Iamunno, F.; Pellegrini, D.; Changwen, W.; Benvenuto, G.; Buttino, I.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Acartia tonsa copepod is more sensitive to NiCl_2 than to nickel nanoparticles. • At the tested concentration egg production was not affected by both form of nickel. • Egg viability is the most sensitive end-point for both form of nickel. • Nickel dissolved in seawater increased with nanoparticle concentration. • Acartia tonsa adults were able to ingest nanoparticles. - Abstract: Nickel compounds are widely used in industries and have been massively introduced in the environment in different chemical forms. Here we report the effect of two different chemical forms of nickel, NiCl_2 and nickel nanoparticles (NiNPs), on the reproduction of the marine calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa. The behavior of nickel nanoparticles was analyzed with different techniques and with two protocols. In the “sonicated experiment” (SON) NiNP solution was sonicated while in the “non-sonicated experiment” (NON-SON) the solution was vigorously shaken by hand. Final nominal concentrations of 5, 10 and 50 mg L"−"1 and 1, 5 and 10 mg L"−"1 NiNPs were used for the acute and semichronic tests, respectively. Nanoparticle size did not change over time except for the highest concentration of 50 mg L"−"1 NiNPs, in which the diameter increased up to 843 nm after 48 h. The concentration of Ni dissolved in the water increased with NP concentration and was similar for SON and NON-SON solutions. Our results indicate that sonication does not modify toxicity for the copepod A. tonsa. Mean EC_5_0 values were similar for NON-SON (20.2 mg L"−"1) and SON experiments (22.14 mg L"−"1) in the acute test. Similarly, no differences occurred between the two different protocols in the semichronic test, with an EC_5_0 of 7.45 mg L"−"1 and 6.97 mg L"−"1 for NON-SON and SON experiments, respectively. Acute and semichronic tests, conducted exposing A. tonsa embryos to NiCl_2 concentrations from 0.025 to 0.63 mg L"−"1, showed EC_5_0 of 0.164 and 0.039 mg L"−"1, respectively

  11. Electrochemical investigation of nickel pattern electrodes in H2/H2O and CO/CO2 atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehn, A.; Høgh, Jens Valdemar Thorvald; Graczyk, M.

    2010-01-01

    performance. Both dense and porous nickel pattern electrodes were formed by heating. Holes appeared in the nickel layer of the porous pattern electrodes, where the open cavity triple phase boundaries exhibited different limiting processes than open triple phase boundary electrodes of the dense electrode...... and the partial pressure of CO was determined for the dense nickel pattern electrode, which agrees with previous results using nickel point electrodes. © 2010 The Electrochemical Society....

  12. NASA Lewis advanced IPV nickel-hydrogen technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithrick, John J.; Britton, Doris L.

    1993-01-01

    Individual pressure vessel (IPV) nickel-hydrogen technology was advanced at NASA Lewis and under Lewis contracts. Some of the advancements are as follows: to use 26 percent potassium hydroxide electrolyte to improve cycle life and performance, to modify the state of the art cell design to eliminate identified failure modes and further improve cycle life, and to develop a lightweight nickel electrode to reduce battery mass, hence reduce launch and/or increase satellite payload. A breakthrough in the LEO cycle life of individual pressure vessel nickel-hydrogen battery cells was reported. The cycle life of boiler plate cells containing 26 percent KOH electrolyte was about 40,000 accelerated LEO cycles at 80 percent DOD compared to 3,500 cycles for cells containing 31 percent KOH. Results of the boiler plate cell tests have been validated at NWSC, Crane, Indiana. Forty-eight ampere-hour flight cells containing 26 and 31 percent KOH have undergone real time LEO cycle life testing at an 80 percent DOD, 10 C. The three cells containing 26 percent KOH failed on the average at cycle 19,500. The three cells containing 31 percent KOH failed on the average at cycle 6,400. Validation testing of NASA Lewis 125 Ah advanced design IPV nickel-hydrogen flight cells is also being conducted at NWSC, Crane, Indiana under a NASA Lewis contract. This consists of characterization, storage, and cycle life testing. There was no capacity degradation after 52 days of storage with the cells in the discharged state, on open circuit, 0 C, and a hydrogen pressure of 14.5 psia. The catalyzed wall wick cells have been cycled for over 22,694 cycles with no cell failures in the continuing test. All three of the non-catalyzed wall wick cells failed (cycles 9,588; 13,900; and 20,575). Cycle life test results of the Fibrex nickel electrode has demonstrated the feasibility of an improved nickel electrode giving a higher specific energy nickel-hydrogen cell. A nickel-hydrogen boiler plate cell using an 80

  13. Nickel Ore Dispersion Evaluation and Consequences in Flotation Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    de São José, Fábio; Imbelloni, Alaine Moreira; Nogueira, Francielle Câmara; Pereira, Carlos Alberto

    2016-04-01

    Nickel ore dispersion before flotation using different reagents was investigated on a bench scale to improve metallurgical recovery and selectivity. The nickel ore had a content of 0.8 pct nickel and 14.5 pct MgO. A positive linear correlation between MgO and Ni was found. Carboxy methyl cellulose, both pure and combined with Na2CO3, was the best dispersant used. The most efficient collector was potassium amyl xanthate combined with mercaptobenzothiazole, and the addition of xanthate was decisive for this good result because it is normally more stable in the pH range used in the tests. A pH change from 7 to 9 resulted in a metal recovery increase of 49.3 pct, together with an increase of 6.25 pct of MgO in the concentrate.

  14. Evaluation of nickel-hydrogen battery for space application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billard, J. M.; Dupont, D.

    1983-01-01

    Results of electrical space qualification tests of nickel-hydrogen battery type HR 23S are presented. The results obtained for the nickel-cadmium battery type VO 23S are similar except that the voltage level and the charge conservation characteristics vary significantly. The electrical and thermal characteristics permit predictions of the following optimal applications: charge coefficient in the order of 1.3 to 1.4 at 20C; charge current density higher than C/10 at 20C; discharge current density from C/10 to C/3 at 20C; maximum discharge temperature: OC; storage temperature: -20C.

  15. Sensitization to nickel: etiology, epidemiology, immune reactions, prevention, and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostynek, Jurij J

    2006-01-01

    Nickel is a contact allergen causing Type I and Type IV hypersensitivity, mediated by reagins and allergen-specific T lymphocytes, expressing in a wide range of cutaneous eruptions following dermal or systemic exposure. As such, nickel is the most frequent cause of hypersensitivity, occupational as well as among the general population. In synoptic form, the many effects that nickel has on the organism are presented to provide a comprehensive picture of the aspects of that metal with many biologically noxious, but metallurgically indispensable characteristics. This paper reviews the epidemiology, the prognosis for occupational and non-occupational nickel allergic hypersensitivity, the types of exposure and resulting immune responses, the rate of diffusion through the skin, and immunotoxicity. Alternatives toward prevention and remediation, topical and systemic, for this pervasive and increasing form of morbidity are discussed. The merits and limitations of preventive measures in industry and private life are considered, as well as the effectiveness of topical and systemic therapy in treating nickel allergic hypersensitivity.

  16. Improvement of solvents for chemical decontamination: nickel ferrites removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa, Carlos A.; Morando, Pedro J.; Blesa, Miguel A.

    1999-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are usually included in commercial solvents for the chemical cleaning and decontamination of metal surfaces from the oxide layers grown and/or deposited from high temperature water by corrosive process. In particular oxalic acid is included in second path of AP-Citrox method. However, in some cases, their use shows low efficiency. This fact is attributed to the special passivity of the mixed oxides as nickel ferrites. This work reports a kinetic study of dissolution of a synthetic nickel ferrite (NiFe 2 O 4 ) confronted with simple oxides (NiO and Fe 2 O 3 ) in mineral acids and oxalic acid. The dissolution factor and reaction rate were determined in several conditions (reactive concentrations, pH and added ferrous ions). Experimental data of dissolution (with and without Fe(II) added) show a congruent kinetic regime. Pure nickel oxide (NiO) is rather resistant to the attack by oxalic acid solutions, and ferrous ions do not accelerate dissolution. In fact, nickel oxide dissolves better by oxidative attack that takes advantage of the higher lability of Ni 3+ . It may be concluded that oxalic acid operates to dissolve iron, and the ensuing disruption of the solid framework accelerates the release of nickel. Our results point to use more reactive solvents in iron from mixed oxides and to the possibility of using one stage decontamination method. (author)

  17. Process for electroforming nickel containing dispersed thorium oxide particles therein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malone, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    Nickel electroforming is effected by passing a direct current through a bath containing a dissolved nickel salt or a mixture of such salts, such as those present in sulfamate or Watts baths, and finely divided sol-derived thorium oxide particles of 75 to 300 angstroms, preferably 100 to 200 angstroms diameters therein, at a pH in the range of 0.4 to 1.9, preferably 0.8 to 1.3. The nickel so deposited, as on a pre-shaped stainless steel cathode, may be produced in desired shape and may be removed from the cathode and upon removal, without additional working, possesses desirable engineering properties at elevated temperatures, e.g., 1,500 to 2,200 0 F. Although the material produced is of improved high temperature stability, hardness, and ductility, compared with nickel alone, it is still ductile at room temperature and has properties equivalent or superior to nickel at room temperatures up to 1,500 0 F. Further improvements in mechanical properties of the material may be obtained by working. Also disclosed are electrodeposition baths, methods for their manufacture, and products resulting from the electrodeposition process. (U.S.)

  18. Sensitivity and specificity of the nickel spot (dimethylglyoxime) test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Skare, Lizbet; Lundgren, Lennart; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D; Maibach, Howard I; Lidén, Carola

    2010-05-01

    The accuracy of the dimethylglyoxime (DMG) nickel spot test has been questioned because of false negative and positive test reactions. The EN 1811, a European standard reference method developed by the European Committee for Standardization (CEN), is fine-tuned to estimate nickel release around the limit value of the EU Nickel Directive from products intended to come into direct and prolonged skin contact. Because assessments according to EN 1811 are expensive to perform, time consuming, and may destruct the test item, it should be of great value to know the accuracy of the DMG screening test. To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the DMG test. DMG spot testing, chemical analysis according to the EN 1811 reference method, and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) were performed concomitantly on 96 metallic components from earrings recently purchased in San Francisco. The sensitivity of the DMG test was 59.3% and the specificity was 97.5% based on DMG-test results and nickel release concentrations determined by the EN 1811 reference method. The DMG test has a high specificity but a modest sensitivity. It may serve well for screening purposes. Past exposure studies may have underestimated nickel release from consumer items.

  19. Microstructure and magnetooptics of silicon oxide with implanted nickel nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edel’man, I. S.; Petrov, D. A.; Ivantsov, R. D.; Zharkov, S. M.; Khaibullin, R. I.; Valeev, V. F.; Nuzhdin, V. I.; Stepanov, A. L.

    2011-01-01

    Metallic nickel nanoparticles of various sizes are formed in a thin near-surface layer in an amorphous SiO 2 matrix during 40-keV Ni + ion implantation at a dose of (0.25−1.0) × 10 17 ions/cm 2 . The micro-structure of the irradiated layer and the crystal structure, morphology, and sizes of nickel particles formed at various irradiation doses are studied by transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction. The magnetooptical Faraday effect and the magnetic circular dichroism in an ensemble of nickel nanoparticles are studied in the optical range. The permittivity ε tensor components are calculated for the implanted samples using an effective medium model with allowance for the results of magnetooptical measurements. The spectral dependences of the tensor ε components are found to be strongly different from those of a continuous metallic nickel film. These differences are related to a disperse structure of the magnetic nickel phase and to a surface plasma resonance in the metal nanoparticles.

  20. Nickel release from earrings purchased in the united states: the San Francisco earring study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maibach, H.I.; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan

    2008-01-01

    Background: Nickel sensitization is frequent among US patients with dermatitis and in the general population. In Europe, decreasing prevalences of nickel sensitization are observed as a result of the European Union Nickel Directive. However, no directive exists in the United States. Objectives: We...... sought to examine nickel release from inexpensive earrings and discuss possible methods of reducing nickel exposure among consumers. Methods: A total of 34 different stores and artists were visited. A total of 277 earrings were purchased and examined with the dimethylglyoxitne (DMG) test. Results: DMG......-positive earrings were identified from local artists (69%) and tourist stores (42.9%) but also chain stores targeting young (24.1%) and mature (1.7%) women. No correlation between price and outcome of DMG testing was identified. Limitations. Our study does not reflect buying trends in the United States...

  1. Heat treatment of nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.F. Jr.; Clatworthy, E.F.

    1975-01-01

    A heat treating process is described that can be used to produce desired combinations of strength, ductility, and fabricability characteristics in heat resistant age-hardenable alloys having precipitation-hardening amounts of niobium, titanium, and/or tantalum in a nickel-containing matrix. (U.S.)

  2. Electrolytic nickel deposits upon uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudin, G.; Chauvin, G.; Coriou, H.; Hure, J.

    1958-01-01

    The authors present a new possibility to protect uranium by very adherent nickel deposits got by aqueous medium electrolysis. Surface treatment of uranium is based upon the chemical etching method from Lietazke. After thermal treatments at 600, 700 and 800 deg. C, under vacuum, a good intermetallic U-Ni diffusion is observed for each case. (author) [fr

  3. Iron-nickel-chromium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karenko, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    A specification is given for iron-nickel-chromium age-hardenable alloys suitable for use in fast breeder reactor ducts and cladding, which utilize the gamma-double prime strengthening phase and are characterized in having a delta or eta phase distributed at or near grain boundaries. A range of compositions is given. (author)

  4. ELECTRODEPOSITION OF NICKEL ON URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, A.G.

    1958-08-26

    A method is described for preparing uranium objects prior to nickel electroplating. The process consiats in treating the surface of the uranium with molten ferric chloride hexahydrate, at a slightiy elevated temperature. This treatment etches the metal surface providing a structure suitable for the application of adherent electrodeposits and at the same time plates the surface with a thin protective film of iron.

  5. Nuclear orientation on rare earth nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, K.

    1998-01-01

    A hyperfine interaction study of the light rare earth elements, Ce, Pr, Nd and Pm, in the rare earth nickel and CeNi 2 Al 5 compounds by means of the low temperature nuclear orientation is summarised. The magnitudes and directions of the magnetic hyperfine fields obtained through measurements of γ-ray anisotropy and angular distributions reveal the magnetic structures of the ions. The experiments extracted peculiar results for the magnetic properties of the ions, and show certain novel features of the technique to the study of solid-state magnetism. Copyright (1998) Australian Journal of Physics

  6. Synthesis and Electrical Resistivity of Nickel Polymethacrylate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chohan, M. H.; Khalid, A. H.; Zulfiqar, M.; Butt, P. K.; Khan, Farah; Hussain, Rizwan

    Synthesis of nickel polymethacrylate was carried out using methanolic solutions of sodium hydroxide and polymethacrylic acid. The electrical resistivity of the pellets made from Ni-polymethacrylate was measured at different voltages and temperatures. Results showed that the electrical resistivity of Ni-polymethacrylate decreases significantly with voltage in high temperature regions but the decrease is insignificant at temperatures nearing room temperature. The activation energy at low temperatures is approximately 0.8 eV whereas at high temperature it is in the range 0.21-0.27 eV.

  7. Engineering the oxygen sensing regulation results in an enhanced recombinant human hemoglobin production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Ruiz, José Luis; Liu, Lifang; Petranovic, Dina

    2015-01-01

    Efficient production of appropriate oxygen carriers for transfusions (blood substitutes or artificial blood) has been pursued for many decades, and to date several strategies have been used, from synthetic polymers to cell-free hemoglobin carriers. The recent advances in the field of metabolic en...... the transcription factor HAP1, which resulted in an increase of the final recombinant active hemoglobin titer exceeding 7% of the total cellular protein....

  8. Nickel in nails, hair and plasma from nickel-hypersensitive women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Veien, Niels

    1990-01-01

    The concentrations of nickel in finger-nails, toe-nails, hair and plasma from 71 nickel-hypersensitive women and 20 non-hypersensitive women were determined. Nickel concentrations in finger-nails were significantly higher than in toe-nails in both the nickel-hypersensitive group and the control...... group. Nickel-sensitive women had significantly higher levels of nickel in toe-nails, hair and plasma than had control subjects, whereas there was no significant difference in nickel concentration in finger-nails between the two groups. No correlation could be demonstrated between nickel levels in any...... combination of nails, hair and plasma in the nickel-hypersensitive or in the control group....

  9. Nickel toxicity on seed germination and growth in radish (Raphanus sativus) and its recovery using copper and boron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Shiv Shankar; Shukla, Rajni; Sharma, Y K

    2009-05-01

    Effect of various concentrations of nickel (100, 200, 500 and 1000 microM) and recovery treatments of boron (50 and 100 microM) and copper (15 and 75 microM) each with 200 microM and 500 microM of nickel on germination, growth, biomass, chlorophyll, carotenoids, pheophytin, amylase, protein, sugar as well as activity of catalase and peroxidase were studied in radish (Raphanus sativus cv. Early menu) seedlings. Nickel treatments caused a considerable reduction in germination percentage, growth and biomass. The different pigments were also decreased with nickel treatments. However boron addition with nickel recovered the negative effect on pigment contents. Among biochemical estimations, amylase activity and total proteins were found to be reduced in nickel treatments. Peroxidase and catalase activity were induced other than higher total sugar with nickel treatments. The combination of nickel with boron resulted into increased protein contents. This combination also reduced the catalase and peroxidase activity. The influence of nickel with copper failed to produce significant recovery except 200 microM nickel in combination with 15 microM copper with regard to catalase and peroxidase activity. The effect of nickel on hydrolyzing enzyme amylase was observed to be inhibitory resulting into poor germination followed by poor seedlings growth. The stress protecting enzymes peroxidase and catalase seem to be induced under the influence of nickel, and providing protection to the seedlings. The application of boron with nickel showed improved germination and growth. The level of catalase and peroxidase were found to be significantly reduced showing normal growth and biomass of seedlings.

  10. Pulsed laser dewetting of nickel catalyst for carbon nanofiber growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Y F; Pearce, R C; Simpson, M L; Rack, P D; Melechko, A V; Hensley, D K

    2008-01-01

    We present a pulsed laser dewetting technique that produces single nickel catalyst particles from lithographically patterned disks for subsequent carbon nanofiber growth through plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Unlike the case for standard heat treated Ni catalyst disks, for which multiple nickel particles and consequently multiple carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are observed, single vertically aligned CNFs could be obtained from the laser dewetted catalyst. Different laser dewetting parameters were tested in this study, such as the laser energy density and the laser processing time measured by the total number of laser pulses. Various nickel disk radii and thicknesses were attempted and the resultant number of carbon nanofibers was found to be a function of the initial disk dimension and the number of laser pulses

  11. Tungsen--nickel--cobalt alloy and method of producing same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickinson, J.M.; Riley, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    An improved tungsten alloy having a tungsten content of approximately 95 weight percent, a nickel content of about 3 weight percent, and the balance being cobalt of about 2 weight percent is described. A method for producing this tungsten--nickel--cobalt alloy is further described and comprises coating the tungsten particles with a nickel--cobalt alloy, pressing the coated particles into a compact shape, heating the compact in hydrogen to a temperature in the range of 1400 0 C and holding at this elevated temperature for a period of about 2 hours, increasing this elevated temperature to about 1500 0 C and holding for 1 hour at this temperature, cooling to about 1200 0 C and replacing the hydrogen atmosphere with an inert argon atmosphere while maintaining this elevated temperature for a period of about 1 / 2 hour, and cooling the resulting alloy to room temperature in this argon atmosphere

  12. Devices for fatigue testing of electroplated nickel (MEMS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristian Pontoppidan; Ravnkilde, J. T.; Ginnerup, Morten

    2002-01-01

    μm and an effective length from 4μm to 27μm. Maximum stresses of the test beam were calculated to be 500MPa to 2100MPa by use of FEM tools. The test results indicate very promising fatigue properties of nano-nickel, as none of the test devices have shown fatigue failure or even initiation of cracks......In-situ fatigue test devices with integrated electrostatic actuator were fabricated in electroplated nanocrystalline nickel (nano-nickel). The devices feature in-plane approximately pure bending with fixed displacement of the test specimen of the dimensions: widths from 2μm to 3.7μm, a height of 7...... after 108 cycles. The combination of high strength and toughness, which is known for nanocrystalline materials, together with very small test specimens and low surface roughness could be the explanation for the good fatigue properties....

  13. Lives saved by laws and regulations that resulted from the Bloomberg road safety program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ted R; Levy, David T; Swedler, David I

    2018-04-01

    To estimate lives saved during 2008-2023 by traffic safety laws passed in six developing countries while participating in the Bloomberg Road Safety Program (BRSP). BRSP-funded local staff identified relevant laws and described enforcement to the study team. We analyzed road crash death estimates for 2004-2013 from the Global Burden of Disease and projected estimates absent intervention forward to 2023. We amalgamated developing country and US literature to estimate crash death reductions by country resulting from laws governing drink driving, motorcycle helmets, safety belt use, and traffic fines. BRSP helped win approval of traffic safety laws in Brazil, China, Kenya, Mexico, Turkey, and Vietnam. In 2008-2013, those laws saved an estimated 19,000 lives. Many laws only took effect in 2014. The laws will save an estimated 90,000 lives in 2014-2023. Of the 109,000 lives saved, drink driving laws will account for 84%, increased motorcyclist protection for 13%, increased fines and penalty points for 2%, and safety belt usage mandates for 1%. Drink driving reductions in China will account for 56% of the savings and reduced drink driving and motorcycling deaths in Vietnam for 35%. The savings in China will result from a narrow intervention with just 4% estimated effectiveness against drink driving deaths. As a percentage of deaths anticipated without BRSP effort, the largest reductions will be 11% in Vietnam and 5% in Kenya. Viewed as a public health measure, improving traffic safety provided large health gains in developing nations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Use of Raman spectroscopy in the analysis of nickel allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alda, Javier; Castillo-Martinez, Claudio; Valdes-Rodriguez, Rodrigo; Hernández-Blanco, Diana; Moncada, Benjamin; González, Francisco J.

    2013-06-01

    Raman spectra of the skin of subjects with nickel allergy are analyzed and compared to the spectra of healthy subjects to detect possible biochemical differences in the structure of the skin that could help diagnose metal allergies in a noninvasive manner. Results show differences between the two groups of Raman spectra. These spectral differences can be classified using principal component analysis. Based on these findings, a novel computational technique to make a fast evaluation and classification of the Raman spectra of the skin is presented and proposed as a noninvasive technique for the detection of nickel allergy.

  15. Nickel metal with various morphologies: synthesis and performances for catalytic carbon dioxide reforming with methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teabpinyok, Nopporn; Samingprai, Sutheerawat; Chareonpanich, Metta

    2012-12-01

    In this research, nickel metal of three different morphologies including nanostar, icosahedra, and microsphere structures were synthesized. It was found nanostar nickel revealed the Ni(111) crystallographic plane with particle size in the range of 150-200 nm and BET surface area of 13 m2/g. The icosahedra nickel also showed the Ni(111) crystallographic plane with larger particle size (300-400 nm) and BET surface area of 20 m2/g, whereas microsphere nickel exhibited the relatively large cluster size (approximately 3 microm) and BET surface area (114 m2/g) as a result of an aggregation of Ni(101) nanoplates. The obtained nickel catalysts were tested for the activity in carbon dioxide reforming with methane. Based on the similar specific surface area of catalysts, nanostar nickel showed the highest carbon dioxide and methane conversions due to its crystallographic structure. At 700 degrees C, nanostar nickel catalyst exhibited the highest carbon dioxide and methane conversions of 17.6 and 10.5 times higher than those of microsphere nickel catalyst, respectively.

  16. Nickel on the market: a baseline survey of articles in 'prolonged contact' with skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringborg, Evelina; Lidén, Carola; Julander, Anneli

    2016-08-01

    In April 2014, the European Chemicals Agency defined the concept of 'prolonged contact with skin' as used in the EU nickel restriction. To establish a baseline of nickel-releasing items on the Swedish market conforming with the EU nickel restriction according to the definition of 'prolonged contact' with the skin. We performed a limited market survey in Stockholm, Sweden. Items with metallic parts that come into contact with the skin, except those explicitly mentioned in the legal text, were chosen. The dimethylglyoxime (DMG) test was used to evaluate nickel release. One hundred and forty-one items belonging to one of three categories - accessories, utensils for needlework, painting and writing (called utensils), and electronic devices - were tested in the study. Forty-four percent of all items were DMG test-positive (releasing nickel), and 9% gave a doubtful DMG test result. The large proportion of nickel-releasing items in the present study shows clearly that broader parts of industry need to take action to prevent nickel allergy. The high proportion of DMG test-positive items indicates that there is still much work to be done to reduce the nickel exposure of the population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Electroplated tin-nickel coatings as a replacement for nickel to eliminate nickel dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Per; Boyce, Jan M.; Nielsen, Lars Pleth

    2013-01-01

    . The main focus will be on the corrosion properties where the following corrosion investigations will be covered; corrosion potential measurements for the different coatings, estimation of corrosion rates for materials in galvanic coupling with tin/nickel coatings, salt spray test, medical tests...

  18. Effect of Ni +-ION bombardment on nickel and binary nickel alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roarty, K. B.; Sprague, J. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Smidt, F. A.

    1981-03-01

    Pure nickel and four binary nickel alloys have been subjected to high energy Ni ion bombardment at 675, 625 and 525°C. After irradiation, each specimen was studied by transmission electron microscopy. The pure nickel control was found to swell appreciably (1 to 5%) and the Ni-Al and the Ni-Ti samples were found to swell at all temperatures, but to a lesser degree (0.01 to 0.35%). The Ni-Mo contained a significant density of voids only at 525° C, while swelling was suppressed at all temperatures in the Ni-Si alloy. The dislocation structure progressed from loops to tangles as temperature increased in all materials except the Ni-Ti, in which there was an absence of loops at all temperatures. Dislocation densities decreased as temperature increased in all samples. These results do not correlate well with the relative behavior of the same alloys observed after neutron irradiation at 455°C. The differences between these two sets of data appear to be caused by different mechanisms controlling void nucleation in ion and neutron irradiation of these alloys.

  19. Dose per unit area - a study of elicitation of nickel allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Louise Arup; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Experimental sensitization depends upon the amount of allergen per unit skin area and is largely independent of the area size. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed at testing if this also applies for elicitation of nickel allergy. PATIENTS/METHODS: 20 nickel allergic individuals were tested...... with a patch test and a repeated open application test (ROAT). Nickel was applied on small and large areas. The varying parameters were area, total dose and dose per unit area. RESULTS: In the patch test, at a low concentration [15 microg nickel (microg Ni)/cm(2)], there were significantly higher scores...... on the large area with the same dose per area as the small area. At higher concentrations of nickel, no significant differences were found. In the ROAT at low concentration (6.64 microg Ni/cm(2)), it was found that the latency period until a reaction appeared was significantly shorter on the large area...

  20. Toxic effects of lead and nickel nitrate on rat liver chromatin components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani-Chadegani Iii, Azra; Fani, Nesa; Abdossamadi, Sayeh; Shahmir, Nosrat

    2011-01-01

    The biological activity of heavy metals is related to their physicochemical interaction with biological receptors. In the present study, the effect of low concentrations of nickel nitrate and lead nitrate (lead nitrate to chromatin compared to nickel nitrate. Also, the binding affinity of lead nitrate to histone proteins free in solution was higher than nickel. On the basis of the results, it is concluded that lead reacts with chromatin components even at very low concentrations and induce chromatin aggregation through histone-DNA cross-links. Whereas, nickel nitrate is less effective on chromatin at low concentrations, suggesting higher toxicity of lead nitrate on chromatin compared to nickel. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Initial deposition mechanism of electroless nickel plating on AZ91D magnesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Y.; Shan, D.; Han, E.

    2006-01-01

    The pretreatment processes and initial deposition mechanism of electroless nickel plating on AZ91D magnesium alloy were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). The results showed that alkaline cleaning could remove the greases and oils from the substrate surface. Acid etching could wipe off the metal chippings and oxides. The hydrofluoric acid activating process which could improve the adhesion of coating to substrate played a key role in the subsequent process of electroless nickel plating. The nickel coating was deposited preferentially on the primary α phase and then spread to the eutectic α phase and β phase. The nickel initially nucleated on the primary α phase by a replacement reaction, then grew depending on the autocatalysis function of nickel. The coating on the β phase displayed better adhesion than that on the α phase due to the nails fixing effect. (author)

  2. Site-selective electroless nickel plating on patterned thin films of macromolecular metal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Mutsumi; Yamagiwa, Hiroki; Asakawa, Daisuke; Noguchi, Makoto; Kurashina, Tadashi; Fukawa, Tadashi; Shirai, Hirofusa

    2010-12-01

    We demonstrate a simple route to depositing nickel layer patterns using photocross-linked polymer thin films containing palladium catalysts, which can be used as adhesive interlayers for fabrication of nickel patterns on glass and plastic substrates. Electroless nickel patterns can be obtained in three steps: (i) the pattern formation of partially quaterized poly(vinyl pyridine) by UV irradiation, (ii) the formation of macromolecular metal complex with palladium, and (iii) the nickel metallization using electroless plating bath. Metallization is site-selective and allows for a high resolution. And the resulting nickel layered structure shows good adhesion with glass and plastic substrates. The direct patterning of metallic layers onto insulating substrates indicates a great potential for fabricating micro/nano devices.

  3. results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salabura Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available HADES experiment at GSI is the only high precision experiment probing nuclear matter in the beam energy range of a few AGeV. Pion, proton and ion beams are used to study rare dielectron and strangeness probes to diagnose properties of strongly interacting matter in this energy regime. Selected results from p + A and A + A collisions are presented and discussed.

  4. Surfactant-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis of nickel oxide and lithium-doped nickel oxide thin films, toward electrochromic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denayer, Jessica [Group of Research in Energy and Environment for MATerials (GREENMAT), University of Liège, allée de la chimie 3, 4000 Liège (Belgium); Bister, Geoffroy [Environmental and Material Research Association (CRIBC-INISMa), avenue gouverneur cornez 4, 7000 Mons (Belgium); Simonis, Priscilla [Laboratory LPS, University of Namur, rue de bruxelles 61, 5000 Namur (Belgium); Colson, Pierre; Maho, Anthony [Group of Research in Energy and Environment for MATerials (GREENMAT), University of Liège, allée de la chimie 3, 4000 Liège (Belgium); Aubry, Philippe [Environmental and Material Research Association (CRIBC-INISMa), avenue gouverneur cornez 4, 7000 Mons (Belgium); Vertruyen, Bénédicte [Group of Research in Energy and Environment for MATerials (GREENMAT), University of Liège, allée de la chimie 3, 4000 Liège (Belgium); Henrist, Catherine, E-mail: catherine.henrist@ulg.ac.be [Group of Research in Energy and Environment for MATerials (GREENMAT), University of Liège, allée de la chimie 3, 4000 Liège (Belgium); Lardot, Véronique; Cambier, Francis [Environmental and Material Research Association (CRIBC-INISMa), avenue gouverneur cornez 4, 7000 Mons (Belgium); Cloots, Rudi [Group of Research in Energy and Environment for MATerials (GREENMAT), University of Liège, allée de la chimie 3, 4000 Liège (Belgium)

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • Surfactant-assisted USP: a novel and low cost process to obtain high quality nickel oxide films, with or without lithium dopant. • Increased uniformity and reduced light scattering thanks to the addition of a surfactant. • Improved electrochromic performance (coloration efficiency and contrast) for lithium-doped films by comparison with the undoped NiO film. - Abstract: Lithium-doped nickel oxide and undoped nickel oxide thin films have been deposited on FTO/glass substrates by a surfactant-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. The addition of polyethylene glycol in the sprayed solution has led to improved uniformity and reduced light scattering compared to films made without surfactant. Furthermore, the presence of lithium ions in NiO films has resulted in improved electrochromic performances (coloration contrast and efficiency), but with a slight decrease of the electrochromic switching kinetics.

  5. Effects of nickel exposure on testicular function, oxidative stress, and male reproductive dysfunction in Spodoptera litura Fabricius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongxia; Wu, Wenjing; Guo, Jixing; Xiao, Rong; Jiang, Fengze; Zheng, Lingyan; Zhang, Guren

    2016-04-01

    Nickel is an environmental pollutant that adversely affects the male reproductive system. In the present study, the effects of nickel exposure on Spodoptera litura Fabricius were investigated by feeding larvae artificial diets containing different doses of nickel for three generations. Damage to testes and effects on male reproduction were examined. The amount of nickel that accumulated in the testes of newly emerged males increased as the nickel dose in the diet increased during a single generation. Nickel exposure increased the amount of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and decreased the amount of glutathione in treatment groups compared with the control. The activity levels of the antioxidant response indices superoxide dismutases, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase in the testes showed variable dose-dependent relationships with nickel doses and duration of exposure. Nickel doses also disrupted the development of the testes by decreasing the weight and volume of testes and the number of eupyrene and apyrene sperm bundles in treatment groups compared with the control. When the nickel-treated males mated with normal females, fecundity was inhibited by the higher nickel doses in all three generations, but fecundity significantly increased during the second generation, which received 5 mg kg(-1) nickel. Hatching rates in all treatments significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner in the three successive generations. The effects of nickel on these parameters correlated with the duration of nickel exposure. Results indicate assays of testes may be a novel and efficient means of evaluating the effects of heavy metals on phytophagous insects in an agricultural environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Magnetoelectric effect in a sandwich structure of gallium arsenide–nickel–tin–nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galichyan, T. A.; Filippov, D. A.; Tihonov, A. A.; Laletin, V. M.; Firsova, T. O.; Manicheva, I. N.

    2018-04-01

    The results of investigation of the magnetoelectric effect in a nickel-tin-nickel sandwich structure obtained by galvanic deposition of gallium arsenide on a substrate are presented. The technology of constructing such structures is described and the experimental results of the frequency dependence of the effect are presented. It is shown that the use of tin as an intermediate layer reduces the mechanical stresses resulting from the incommensurability of the phases, which permits obtaining qualitative structures with the nickel thickness of about 70 μm. The resulting structures exhibit good adhesion between the layers and have a high quality factor.

  7. Gene expression dose-response changes in microarrays after exposure of human peripheral lung epithelial cells to nickel(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Robert Y S; Zhao, Ailian; Alvord, W Gregory; Powell, Douglas A; Bare, Robert M; Masuda, Akira; Takahashi, Takashi; Anderson, Lucy M; Kasprzak, Kazimierz S

    2003-08-15

    Occupational exposure to nickel compounds is associated with lung cancer risk; both genotoxic and epigenetic mechanisms have been proposed. For comprehensive examination of the acute effects of nickel(II) acetate on gene expression in cultured human peripheral lung epithelial HPL1D cells, microarray analyses were carried out with cDNA chips (approximately 8000 cDNAs). Cells were exposed for 24 h to nontoxic (50, 100, and 200 microM) or toxic (400, 800, and 1600 microM) nickel(II) concentrations. Cluster analysis was applied to the 868 genes with > or = 2-fold change at any concentration. Two main clusters showed marked up- or down-regulation at the highest, toxic concentrations. The data further subdivided into 10 highly cohesive clusters with high probability, and of these only 2 had the same response trend at low nontoxic as at high concentrations, an observation of clear relevance to the process of high- to low-dose extrapolation in risk assessment. There were 113 genes showing > or = 2-fold change at the three lower nontoxic concentrations, those most relevant to in vivo carcinogenesis. In addition to expected responses of metallothionein, ferritin, and heat-shock proteins, the results revealed for the first time changed expression of some potential cancer-related genes in response to low-dose Ni(II): RhoA, dyskerin, interferon regulatory factor 1, RAD21 homologue, and tumor protein, translationally controlled. Overall, most of the genes impacted by nontoxic concentrations of nickel(II) acetate related to gene transcription, protein synthesis and stability, cytoskeleton, signaling, metabolism, cell membrane, and extracellular matrix.

  8. Results from unannounced visits to check compliance with smoke-free regulations in three types of indoor places in Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyan Wu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Beijing Tobocco control regulation come into force in 2015. According to the regulation, all indoor areas are smoke free. To assess compliance with the Beijing Regulations, identify weaknesses and problems, and provide scientific evidence for policy making by the government and other authorities. Methods on site, unannounced visits. We conducted unannounced visits to a sample of 821 places in three types of places across the sixteen districts of Beijing, including medical and health facilities (including health and family planning commissions, CDCs, health inspection institutes and a variety of hospitals, colleges (including vocational schools and taxis (including Shouqi Group vehicles booked online. Results Among medical and health facilities, all posted smoke-free signage, and no cigarette end or smoking paraphernalia was found indoors, except in private hospitals, community health service centers and few maternal and child care centers. Among colleges, 96.9% of them posted smoke-free signage, cigarette end was found indoors in 9.9% of colleges, smell of smoking was detected indoors in 1.9% of colleges, and ashtray was found indoors in 0.6% of colleges. Among taxies, 6% of drivers of online booked vehicles permit passengers to smoke inside their car, and no smell of smoking, container of cigarette ends/ashes, or driver smoking was detected in these online booked vehicles. Among the conventional cruising taxis, 48.4% of taxi drivers permit passengers to smoke inside their car, smell of smoking was found in 9.6% of taxies, and 1.6% of taxi drivers smoke in their car. Conclusions Smoking in violation of the Regulations is serious in the taxi sector, and targeted stronger supervision and administration are needed.

  9. Nickel brittling by hydrogen. Temperature effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapitz, P.A; Fernandez, S; Alvarez, M.G

    2006-01-01

    The results of a study on the effect of different variables on the susceptibility to brittling by hydrogen and the velocity of propagation of fissures in nickel wire (99.7% purity) are described. The hydrogen load was carried out by cathodic polarization in H 2 SO 4 0.5m solution. The susceptibility to brittling by hydrogen was determined with traction tests at slow deformation speed and constant cathodic potential, and the later observation of the fracture surface by scanning electron microscopy. The variables studied were: applied cathodic overpower, speed of initial deformation and temperature. The results showed that the speed of fissure propagation in the nickel by brittleness from hydrogen is a function of the applied potential and the speed of deformation used. Without tension, the hydrogen load by cathodic polarization at room temperature leads to the formation of cavities similar to those observed when the hydrogenation is performed in the presence of gaseous hydrogen at high pressure and temperature (CW)

  10. Comparative Studies of the Speciation Patterns of Nickel and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results of speciation stdies of nickel and chromium in wastewater, surface and groundwater systems using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) and differential pulse adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (DPAdCSV) are presented. Dimethylglyoxime ...

  11. The interaction of water and hydrogen with nickel surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shan, Junjun

    2009-01-01

    As nickel and platinum are in the same group of the periodic table, the Ni(111) and Pt(111) surfaces may be expected to show similar interaction with water and hydrogen. However in this thesis, we show these interactions for Ni(111) are quite different from those of Pt(111). Moreover, our results

  12. Highly Dispersed Nickel-Containing Mesoporous Silica with Superior Stability in Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane: The Effect of Anchoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjia Cai

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of nickel-containing mesoporous silica samples (Ni-SiO2 with different nickel content (3.1%–13.2% were synthesized by the evaporation-induced self-assembly method. Their catalytic activity was tested in carbon dioxide reforming of methane. The characterization results revealed that the catalysts, e.g., 6.7%Ni-SiO2, with highly dispersed small nickel particles, exhibited excellent catalytic activity and long-term stability. The metallic nickel particle size was significantly affected by the metal anchoring effect between metallic nickel particles and unreduced nickel ions in the silica matrix. A strong anchoring effect was suggested to account for the remaining of small Ni particle size and the improved catalytic performance.

  13. Assessment of nickel and cobalt release from 200 unused hand-held work tools for sale in Denmark — Sources of occupational metal contact dermatitis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P.; Jensen, Peter; Lidén, Carola

    2011-01-01

    IntroductionNickel and cobalt allergy remain frequent in dermatitis patients. It is important to determine possible nickel and cobalt exposures at work as these may offer important information to regulators and physicians who perform patch testing. Clinical relevance of metal exposure is usually ...

  14. Assessment of nickel and cobalt release from 200 unused hand-held work tools for sale in Denmark - Sources of occupational metal contact dermatitis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Jensen, Peter; Lidén, Carola

    2011-01-01

    Nickel and cobalt allergy remain frequent in dermatitis patients. It is important to determine possible nickel and cobalt exposures at work as these may offer important information to regulators and physicians who perform patch testing. Clinical relevance of metal exposure is usually assessed...

  15. Nickel and cobalt base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlle, P.

    1994-01-01

    Nickel base alloys have a good resistance to pitting, cavernous or cracks corrosion. Nevertheless, all the nickel base alloys are not equivalent. Some differences exit between all the families (Ni, Ni-Cu, Ni-Cr-Fe, Ni-Cr-Fe-Mo/W-Cu, Ni-Cr-Mo/W, Ni-Mo). Cobalt base alloys in corrosive conditions are generally used for its wear and cracks resistance, with a compromise to its localised corrosion resistance properties. The choice must be done from the perfect knowledge of the corrosive medium and of the alloys characteristics (chemical, metallurgical). A synthesis of the corrosion resistance in three medium (6% FeCl 3 , 4% NaCl + 1% HCl + 0.1% Fe 2 (SO 4 ) 3 , 11.5% H 2 SO 4 + 1.2% HCl + 1% Fe 2 (SO 4 ) 3 + 1% CuCl 2 ) is presented. (A.B.). 11 refs., 1 fig., 12 tabs

  16. Effect on growth and nickel content of cabbage plants watered with nickel solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, O B

    1979-01-01

    Chinese cabbage plants were watered with different concentrations of NiCl/sub 2/ solutions and the effect on growth and uptake of nickel in the plants were studied. No toxic effect on plant growth was observed. A higher content of nickel was found in the plants exposed to more concentrated nickel solutions. Nickel contamination and its clinical consequences are discussed. 29 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  17. Nickel-titanium alloys: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo do Amaral Ferreira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: A systematic review on nickel-titanium wires was performed. The strategy was focused on Entrez-PubMed-OLDMEDLINE, Scopus and BioMed Central from 1963 to 2008. METHODS: Papers in English and French describing the behavior of these wires and laboratorial methods to identify crystalline transformation were considered. A total of 29 papers were selected. RESULTS: Nickel-titanium wires show exceptional features in terms of elasticity and shape memory effects. However, clinical applications request a deeper knowledge of these properties in order to allow the professional to use them in a rational manner. In addition, the necessary information regarding each alloy often does not correspond to the information given by the manufacturer. Many alloys called "superelastic" do not present this effect; they just behave as less stiff alloys, with a larger springback if compared to the stainless steel wires. CONCLUSIONS: Laboratory tests are the only means to observe the real behavior of these materials, including temperature transition range (TTR and applied tensions. However, it is also possible to determine in which TTR these alloys change the crystalline structure.

  18. Joining of boron carbide using nickel interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vosughi, A.; Hadian, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Carbide ceramics such as boron carbide due to their unique properties such as low density, high refractoriness, and high strength to weight ratio have many applications in different industries. This study focuses on direct bonding of boron carbide for high temperature applications using nickel interlayer. The process variables such as bonding time, temperature, and pressure have been investigated. The microstructure of the joint area was studied using electron scanning microscope technique. At all the bonding temperatures ranging from 1150 to 1300 d eg C a reaction layer formed across the ceramic/metal interface. The thickness of the reaction layer increased by increasing temperature. The strength of the bonded samples was measured using shear testing method. The highest strength value obtained was about 100 MPa and belonged to the samples bonded at 1250 for 75 min bonding time. The strength of the joints decreased by increasing the bonding temperature above 1250 d eg C . The results of this study showed that direct bonding technique along with nickel interlayer can be successfully utilized for bonding boron carbide ceramic to itself. This method may be used for bonding boron carbide to metals as well.

  19. Low carbon manganese-nickel-niobium steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heisterkamp, F.; Hulka, K.

    1983-11-01

    Experimental heats of a low carbon-manganese-0.5% nickel-0.15% niobium steel have been rolled to plates between 13.5 and 50 mm thickness and to a 16 mm hot strip. Various combinations of soaking temperatures form 1100 0 C to 1300 0 C and of finish rolling temperatures between 710 0 C and 930 0 C have been investigated. From mechanical properties obtained, one can conclude that the investigated steel composition provides very good properties e.g. for pipe steels X65 to X75. In particular, the toughness at low temperature is outstanding despite relaxed rolling conditions. Metalographic and special investigations such as electron microscopy, texture evaluation and chemical extraction, correlated with applied rolling schedules and the mechanical properties obtained resulted in a comprehensive understanding about the benefits of high niobium metallurgy combined with nickel addition. All practically applied welding processes generated mechanical properties, in particular toughness of the weldment, that meet arctic specifications.(Author) [pt

  20. Aluminium alloys containing iron and nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coriou, H.; Fournier, R.; Grall, L.; Hure, J.; Herenguel, J.; Lelong, P.

    1958-01-01

    The first part of this report addresses mechanism, kinetics and structure factors of aluminium alloys containing iron and nickel in water and high temperature steam. The studied alloys contain from 0.3 to 0.7 per cent of iron, and 0.2 to 1.0 per cent of nickel. Corrosion resistance and corrosion structure have been studied. The experimental installation, process and samples are presented. Corrosion structures in water at 350 C are identified and discussed (structure of corrosion products, structure of metal-oxide interface), and then in steam at different temperatures (350-395 C). Corrosion kinetics is experimentally studied (weight variation in time) in water at 350 C and in steam at different temperatures. Reactions occurring at over-heated steam (more than 400 C) are studied, and the case of welded alloys is also addressed. The second part addresses the metallurgical mechanism and processes influencing aluminium alloy resistance to corrosion by high temperature water as it appeared that separated phases protect the solid solution through a neighbourhood action. In order to avoid deep local corrosions, it seems necessary to multiply protective phases in an as uniform as possible way. Some processes enabling this result are described. They belong to conventional metallurgy or to powder metallurgy (with sintering and extrusion)

  1. Effect of charge state and stoichiometry on the structure and reactivity of nickel oxide clusters with CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Reilly, Nelly M.; Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    2009-02-01

    The collision induced fragmentation and reactivity of cationic and anionic nickel oxide clusters with carbon monoxide were studied experimentally using guided-ion-beam mass spectrometry. Anionic clusters with a stoichiometry containing one more oxygen atom than nickel atom (NiO2-, Ni2O3-, Ni3O4- and Ni4O5-) were found to exhibit dominant products resulting from the transfer of a single oxygen atom to CO, suggesting the formation of CO2. Of these four species, Ni2O3- and Ni4O5- were observed to be the most reactive having oxygen transfer products accounting for approximately 5% and 10% of the total ion intensity at a maximum pressure of 15 mTorr of CO. Our findings, therefore, indicate that anionic nickel oxide clusters containing an even number of nickel atoms and an odd number of oxygen atoms are more reactive than those with an odd number of nickel atoms and an even number of oxygen atoms. The majority of cationic nickel oxides, in contrast to anionic species, reacted preferentially through the adsorption of CO onto the cluster accompanied by the loss of either molecular O2 or nickel oxide units. The adsorption of CO onto positively charged nickel oxides, therefore, is exothermic enough to break apart the gas-phase clusters. Collision induced dissociation experiments, employing inert xenon gas, were also conducted to gain insight into the structural properties of nickel oxide clusters. The fragmentation products were found to vary considerably with size and stoichiometry as well as ionic charge state. In general, cationic clusters favored the collisional loss of molecular O2 while anionic clusters fragmented through the loss of both atomic oxygen and nickel oxide units. Our results provide insight into the effect of ionic charge state on the structure of nickel oxide clusters. Furthermore, we establish how the size and stoichiometry of nickel oxide clusters influences their ability to oxidize CO, an important reaction for environmental pollution abatement.

  2. Nickel silicide thin films as masking and structural layers for silicon bulk micro-machining by potassium hydroxide wet etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaskaran, M; Sriram, S; Sim, L W

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the feasibility of using titanium and nickel silicide thin films as mask materials for silicon bulk micro-machining. Thin films of nickel silicide were found to be more resistant to wet etching in potassium hydroxide. The use of nickel silicide as a structural material, by fabricating micro-beams of varying dimensions, is demonstrated. The micro-structures were realized using these thin films with wet etching using potassium hydroxide solution on (1 0 0) and (1 1 0) silicon substrates. These results show that nickel silicide is a suitable alternative to silicon nitride for silicon bulk micro-machining

  3. Flare up of Nickel Contact Dermatits Following Oral Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C R Srinivas

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient having contact dermatitis due to nickel on the wrist, sides of neck, thighs and legs, confirmed by patch tests with nickel sulphate, showed aggravation of the dermatitis following oral provocation with 25 mg nickel sulphate.

  4. Corrosion Characterization in Nickel Plated 110 ksi Low Alloy Steel and Incoloy 925: An Experimental Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kiran; Vincent, S.; Barbadikar, Dipika; Kumar, Shresh; Anwar, Rebin; Fernandes, Nevil

    2018-04-01

    Incoloy 925 is an age hardenable Nickel-Iron-Chromium alloy with the addition of Molybdenum, Copper, Titanium and Aluminium used in many applications in oil and gas industry. Nickel alloys are preferred mostly in corrosive environments where there is high concentration of H2S, CO2, chlorides and free Sulphur as sufficient nickel content provides protection against chloride-ion stress-corrosion cracking. But unfortunately, Nickel alloys are very expensive. Plating an alloy steel part with nickel would cost much lesser than a part make of nickel alloy for large quantities. A brief study will be carried out to compare the performance of nickel plated alloy steel with that of an Incoloy 925 part by conducting corrosion tests. Tests will be carried out using different coating thicknesses of Nickel on low alloy steel in 0.1 M NaCl solution and results will be verified. From the test results we can confirm that Nickel plated low alloy steel is found to exhibit fairly good corrosion in comparison with Incoloy 925 and thus can be an excellent candidate to replace Incoloy materials.

  5. Air Force standards for nickel hydrogen battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Warren; Milden, Martin

    1994-01-01

    The topics discussed are presented in viewgraph form and include Air Force nickel hydrogen standardization goals, philosophy, project outline, cell level standardization, battery level standardization, and schedule.

  6. On the reflectivity of nickel neutron mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adib, M.; Maayouf, R.M.A.; Abdel-Kawy, A.; Habib, N. (Atomic Energy Establishment, Cairo (Egypt). Reactor and Neutron Physics Dept.); Kenawy, M.A.; Wahba, M.; Ashry, A.H. (Ain Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt))

    1991-02-01

    Neutron reflectivities were determined for 300 nm thick films of natural nickel and nickel 58 coated on glass plates. The measurements were performed at glancing angles between 40' and 60'. The incident neutron beam from one of the ET-RR-1 reactor horizontal channels covered neutron wavelengths between 0.55 and 0.80 nm. It was found that nickel 58, because of the high value of its critical glancing angle, is more efficient as a neutron mirror than natural nickel. (orig.).

  7. METHOD OF APPLYING NICKEL COATINGS ON URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, A.G.

    1959-07-14

    A method is presented for protectively coating uranium which comprises etching the uranium in an aqueous etching solution containing chloride ions, electroplating a coating of nickel on the etched uranium and heating the nickel plated uranium by immersion thereof in a molten bath composed of a material selected from the group consisting of sodium chloride, potassium chloride, lithium chloride, and mixtures thereof, maintained at a temperature of between 700 and 800 deg C, for a time sufficient to alloy the nickel and uranium and form an integral protective coating of corrosion-resistant uranium-nickel alloy.

  8. [Nickel levels in female dermatological patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwegler, U; Twardella, D; Fedorov, M; Darsow, U; Schaller, K-H; Habernegg, R; Behrendt, H; Fromme, H

    2009-07-01

    Nickel levels in urine were determined among 163 female dermatological patients aged 18 to 46 years. Data on life-style factors were collected in parallel via a questionnaire. Urinary nickel excretion was in the normal range of the German female population (0.2-46.1 microg Ni/g creatinine). The 95th percentile (3.9 microg Ni/l urine) exceeded the German reference value (3.0 microg Ni/l urine). In the multivariate regression analyses we found a statistically significant increase of ln-transformed nickel levels with increase in age and in women using dietary supplements. The following variables were not associated with Nickel urine levels: suffering from nickel eczema, smoking, drinking stagnated water, eating foods with high nickel contents and using nickel-containing kitchen utensils as, for example, an electric kettle with an open heater coil. We conclude that personal urinary levels should be assessed with simultaneous consideration of habits and life-style factors. A German national survery would be useful. Those patients who experience the exacerbation of their eczema in cases of oral provocation, for example, by a high nickel diet should be aware of potential sources of nickel, such as supplements.

  9. Nickel-induced cytokine production from mononuclear cells in nickel-sensitive individuals and controls. Cytokine profiles in nickel-sensitive individuals with nickel allergy-related hand eczema before and after nickel challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, L; Christensen, J M; Kristiansen, J

    2000-01-01

    Exposure to nickel is a major cause of allergic contact dermatitis which is considered to be an inflammatory response induced by antigen-specific T cells. Here we describe the in vitro analysis of the nickel-specific T-cell-derived cytokine response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 35...... was somewhat of a surprise, since previous studies have suggested a Th1 response in nickel-mediated allergic contact dermatitis. Subsequently, the nickel-allergic individuals were randomized to experimental exposure to nickel or vehicle in a double-blind design. A daily 10-min exposure of one finger to 10 ppm...... nickel solution for 1 week followed by 100 ppm for an additional week evoked a clinical response of hand eczema in the nickel-exposed group. Blood samples were drawn on days 7 and 14 after the start of this exposure to occupationally relevant concentrations of nickel. No statistically significant...

  10. Electrometric investigation of the formation of different thiotungstates of nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, S [Paraiba Univ., Joao Pessoa (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica

    1983-02-01

    The reactions of nickel chloride with Na/sub 2/S.WS/sub 3/, 3Na/sub 2/S.4WS/sub 3/, Na/sub 2/S.2WS/sub 3/ and Na/sub 2/S.4WS/sub 3/ have been investigated by pH and conductance measurements. The end-points obtained from the sharp breaks and inflections in titration curves provide definite evidence for the formation of two nickel thiotungstates having molecular formulae NiS.WS/sub 3/ and 3NiS.4WS/sub 3/ in the vicinity of pH 7.6 and 6.9 respectively. The titrations of nickel chloride with Na/sub 2/S.WS/sub 3/ and Na/sub 2/S.4WS/sub 3/ failed to provide any dependable results for the formation of the corresponding nickel thiotungstates. The precipitates obtained at the end-points were analysed gravimetrically and the results support those obtained by the electrometric study.

  11. Nickel patch test reactivity and the menstrual cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohold, A E; Halkier-Sørensen, L; Thestrup-Pedersen, K

    1994-01-01

    Premenstrual exacerbation of allergic contact dermatitis and varying allergic patch test responses have been reported at different points of the period. Using a dilution series of nickel sulphate, we studied the variation in patch test reactivity in nickel allergic women in relation to the menstr......Premenstrual exacerbation of allergic contact dermatitis and varying allergic patch test responses have been reported at different points of the period. Using a dilution series of nickel sulphate, we studied the variation in patch test reactivity in nickel allergic women in relation...... were tested first on day 7-10 and the other half first on day 20-24. There was no difference in the degree of patch test reactivity, when the results from day 7-10 and day 20-24 were compared (p > 0.4). However, when we compared the patch test results from the first and second test procedure, we found...... of positive patch tests led to an increased skin reactivity towards the same allergen, when the patients were retested weeks later....

  12. Risk assessment of nickel carcinogenicity and occupational lung cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, H M; Zhang, Q F

    1994-01-01

    Recent progress in risk assessment of nickel carcinogenicity and its correlation with occupational lung cancer in nickel-exposed workers is reviewed. Epidemiological investigations provide reliable data indicating the close relation between nickel exposure and high lung cancer risk, especially in nickel refineries. The nickel species-specific effects and the dose-response relationship between nickel exposure and lung cancer are among the main questions that are explored extensively. It is als...

  13. Modeling of filling gas centrifuge cascade for nickel isotope separation by feed flow input to different stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlov Alexey A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents results of research filling gas centrifuge cascade by process gas fed into different stages. The modeling of filling cascade was done for nickel isotope separation. Analysis of the research results shows that nickel isotope concentrations of light and heavy fraction flows after filling cascade depend on feed stage number.

  14. Nickel exposure induces oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA in Neuro2a cells: the neuroprotective roles of melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shang-Cheng; He, Min-Di; Lu, Yong-Hui; Li, Li; Zhong, Min; Zhang, Yan-Wen; Wang, Yuan; Yu, Zheng-Ping; Zhou, Zhou

    2011-11-01

    Recent studies suggest that oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play important roles in the neurotoxicity of nickel. Because mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is highly vulnerable to oxidative stress and melatonin can efficiently protect mtDNA against oxidative damage in various pathological conditions, the aims of this study were to determine whether mtDNA oxidative damage was involved in the neurotoxicity of nickel and to assay the neuroprotective effects of melatonin in mtDNA. In this study, we exposed mouse neuroblastoma cell lines (Neuro2a) to different concentrations of nickel chloride (NiCl(2), 0.125, 0.25, and 0.5 mm) for 24 hr. We found that nickel significantly increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial superoxide levels. In addition, nickel exposure increased mitochondrial 8-hydroxyguanine (8-OHdG) content and reduced mtDNA content and mtDNA transcript levels. Consistent with this finding, nickel was found to destroy mtDNA nucleoid structure and decrease protein levels of Tfam, a key protein component for nucleoid organization. However, all the oxidative damage to mtDNA induced by nickel was efficiently attenuated by melatonin pretreatment. Our results suggest that oxidative damage to mtDNA may account for the neurotoxicity of nickel. Melatonin has great pharmacological potential in protecting mtDNA against the adverse effects of nickel in the nervous system. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Development and characterization of protective nickel coatings by CVD process for non-ferrous metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haq, A.U.

    2012-01-01

    Objective of this thesis is the formation of adhesive and corrosion resistant nickel film on aluminum, aluminum-lithium (Li 0.5 %) alloy and copper substrates by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. Different surface preparation treatments such as electropolishing, anodizing and pickling are applied to the aforementioned substrates and its effect on the adhesion and corrosion resistance of nickel coating is studied. Nickel coating is deposited on different substrates by using already optimized parameters of 190-200 degree C deposition temperature, 9-8 x 10/sup -1/ Torr pressure during deposition, pure nickel-tetra-carbonyl gas, and induction heating source and 5 minutes deposition time. Substrates subjected to pickling treatment show excellent adhesion of nickel coating with a value of 5B based on ASTM standard while electropolished substrates show valve of 3B. XRD characterization of the nickel film show characteristic peaks of nickel confirming its phase purity. The SEM images show that nickel coating follows the surface features of the substrate. The pickled surface results in film with rough morphology than electropolished or anodized surface. The corrosion resistance of both uncoated and coated substrates is studied by monitoring its open circuit potential in different electrolytes (brine solution, sea and distilled water) at different temperatures. All substrates coated with nickel show 120-400mV potential difference compare with uncoated substrates in different electrolytes. (author)

  16. Mathematical modeling of the nickel/metal hydride battery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paxton, Blaine Kermit [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1995-09-01

    A group of compounds referred to as metal hydrides, when used as electrode materials, is a less toxic alternative to the cadmium hydroxide electrode found in nickel/cadmium secondary battery systems. For this and other reasons, the nickel/metal hydride battery system is becoming a popular rechargeable battery for electric vehicle and consumer electronics applications. A model of this battery system is presented. Specifically the metal hydride material, LaNi{sub 5}H{sub 6}, is chosen for investigation due to the wealth of information available in the literature on this compound. The model results are compared to experiments found in the literature. Fundamental analyses as well as engineering optimizations are performed from the results of the battery model. In order to examine diffusion limitations in the nickel oxide electrode, a ``pseudo 2-D model`` is developed. This model allows for the theoretical examination of the effects of a diffusion coefficient that is a function of the state of charge of the active material. It is found using present data from the literature that diffusion in the solid phase is usually not an important limitation in the nickel oxide electrode. This finding is contrary to the conclusions reached by other authors. Although diffusion in the nickel oxide active material is treated rigorously with the pseudo 2-D model, a general methodology is presented for determining the best constant diffusion coefficient to use in a standard one-dimensional battery model. The diffusion coefficients determined by this method are shown to be able to partially capture the behavior that results from a diffusion coefficient that varies with the state of charge of the active material.

  17. Comparative in vitro biocompatibility of nickel-titanium, pure nickel, pure titanium, and stainless steel: genotoxicity and atomic absorption evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assad, M; Lemieux, N; Rivard, C H; Yahia, L H

    1999-01-01

    The genotoxicity level of nickel-titanium (NiTi) was compared to that of its pure constituents, pure nickel (Ni) and pure titanium (Ti) powders, and also to 316L stainless steel (316L SS) as clinical reference material. In order to do so, a dynamic in vitro semiphysiological extraction was performed with all metals using agitation and ISO requirements. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were then cultured in the presence of all material extracts, and their comparative genotoxicity levels were assessed using electron microscopy-in situ end-labeling (EM-ISEL) coupled to immunogold staining. Cellular chromatin exposition to pure Ni and 316L SS demonstrated a significantly stronger gold binding than exposition to NiTi, pure Ti, or the untreated control. In parallel, graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) was also performed on all extraction media. The release of Ni atoms took the following decreasing distribution for the different resulting semiphysiological solutions: pure Ni, 316L SS, NiTi, Ti, and controls. Ti elements were detected after elution of pure titanium only. Both pure titanium and nickel-titanium specimens obtained a relative in vitro biocompatibility. Therefore, this quantitative in vitro study provides optimistic results for the eventual use of nickel-titanium alloys as surgical implant materials.

  18. Nickel, copper and cobalt coalescence in copper cliff converter slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this investigation is to assess the effect of various additives on coalescence of nickel, copper and cobalt from slags generated during nickel extraction. The analyzed fluxes were silica and lime while examined reductants were pig iron, ferrosilicon and copper-silicon compound. Slag was settled at the different holding temperatures for various times in conditions that simulated the industrial environment. The newly formed matte and slag were characterized by their chemical composition and morphology. Silica flux generated higher partition coefficients for nickel and copper than the addition of lime. Additives used as reducing agents had higher valuable metal recovery rates and corresponding partition coefficients than fluxes. Microstructural studies showed that slag formed after adding reductants consisted of primarily fayalite, with some minute traces of magnetite as the secondary phase. Addition of 5 wt% of pig iron, ferrosilicon and copper-silicon alloys favored the formation of a metallized matte which increased Cu, Ni and Co recoveries. Addition of copper-silicon alloys with low silicon content was efficient in copper recovery but coalescence of the other metals was low. Slag treated with the ferrosilicon facilitated the highest cobalt recovery while copper-silicon alloys with silicon content above 10 wt% resulted in high coalescence of nickel and copper, 87 % and 72 % respectively.

  19. Surface characterization of nickel titanium orthodontic arch wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Manu; Seema, Saraswathy; Tiwari, Brijesh; Sharma, Himanshu S.; Londhe, Sanjay; Arora, Vimal

    2015-01-01

    Background Surface roughness of nickel titanium orthodontic arch wires poses several clinical challenges. Surface modification with aesthetic/metallic/non metallic materials is therefore a recent innovation, with clinical efficacy yet to be comprehensively evaluated. Methods One conventional and five types of surface modified nickel titanium arch wires were surface characterized with scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive analysis, Raman spectroscopy, Atomic force microscopy and 3D profilometry. Root mean square roughness values were analyzed by one way analysis of variance and post hoc Duncan's multiple range tests. Results Study groups demonstrated considerable reduction in roughness values from conventional in a material specific pattern: Group I; conventional (578.56 nm) > Group V; Teflon (365.33 nm) > Group III; nitride (301.51 nm) > Group VI (i); rhodium (290.64 nm) > Group VI (ii); silver (252.22 nm) > Group IV; titanium (229.51 nm) > Group II; resin (158.60 nm). It also showed the defects with aesthetic (resin/Teflon) and nitride surfaces and smooth topography achieved with metals; titanium/silver/rhodium. Conclusions Resin, Teflon, titanium, silver, rhodium and nitrides were effective in decreasing surface roughness of nickel titanium arch wires albeit; certain flaws. Findings have clinical implications, considering their potential in lessening biofilm adhesion, reducing friction, improving corrosion resistance and preventing nickel leach and allergic reactions. PMID:26843749

  20. Stress corrosion crack tip microstructure in nickel-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shei, S.A.; Yang, W.J.

    1994-04-01

    Stress corrosion cracking behavior of several nickel-base alloys in high temperature caustic environments has been evaluated. The crack tip and fracture surfaces were examined using Auger/ESCA and Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) to determine the near crack tip microstructure and microchemistry. Results showed formation of chromium-rich oxides at or near the crack tip and nickel-rich de-alloying layers away from the crack tip. The stress corrosion resistance of different nickel-base alloys in caustic may be explained by the preferential oxidation and dissolution of different alloying elements at the crack tip. Alloy 600 (UNS N06600) shows good general corrosion and intergranular attack resistance in caustic because of its high nickel content. Thermally treated Alloy 690 (UNS N06690) and Alloy 600 provide good stress corrosion cracking resistance because of high chromium contents along grain boundaries. Alloy 625 (UNS N06625) does not show as good stress corrosion cracking resistance as Alloy 690 or Alloy 600 because of its high molybdenum content

  1. Carcinogenic risk assessment and management of ionising radiation, asbestos and nickel: a comparative approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, T.; Lepicard, S.; Oudiz, A.; Heriard Dubreuil, G.; Gadbois, S.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the similarities as well as the differences of risk assessment and management of ionizing radiation, asbestos and nickel in France. The comparison has been performed at three levels of analysis: concepts, regulation and practices. Ionizing radiation (IR) is compared with asbestos as far as occupational exposure is concerned and to nickel and nickel compounds as far as general population exposure is concerned. The three main stages of risk assessment were considered: hazard identification, exposure-risk relationship, exposure assessment. Alternative risk management policies were reviewed. The main results are the following: At the conceptual level, the risk assessment and management frameworks present many similarities: exposure-risk relationships exist, and low dose extrapolation is considered as legitimate. Comparison of protection strategies can be carried out with reference to the 'optimization' principle developed for IR. At the regulatory level, the status of the IR dose limits differs from the status of the exposure limit values set for asbestos and nickel. For IR, compliance with the dose limit cannot be seen as the final objective of protection: the burden is put on the requirement to maintain the doses as low as reasonably achievable, social and economical factors being taken into account (ALARA). In most of the situations, actual exposure to IR in industry appear to be significantly lower than the dose limit. In the case of asbestos and nickel, the exposure limit values are very low and compliance with the limits is indeed a quite ambitious objective. At the practical level, some noticeable differences exist as far as the decision aiding procedures are concerned. A process which may be considered as an ALARA approach is applied, in the case of nickel: seeking for the 'best available technologies', defining and implementing with stakeholdes regional plans for air quality. In the case of asbestos, the predictive

  2. Distribution ratios on Dowex 50W resins of metal leached in the caron nickel recovery process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, B.A.; Metsa, J.C.; Mullins, M.E.

    1980-05-01

    Pressurized ion exchange on Dowex 50W-X8 and 50W-X12 resins was investigated using elution techniques to determine distribution ratios for copper, nickel, and cobalt complexes contained in ammonium carbonate solution, a mixture which approximates the waste liquor from the Caron nickel recovery process. Results were determined for different feed concentrations, as well as for different concentrations and pH values of the ammonium carbonate eluant. Distribution ratios were compared with those previously obtained from a continuous annular chromatographic system. Separation of copper and nickel was not conclusively observed at any of the conditions examined

  3. Distribution ratios on Dowex 50W resins of metal leached in the caron nickel recovery process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, B.A.; Metsa, J.C.; Mullins, M.E.

    1980-05-01

    Pressurized ion exchange on Dowex 50W-X8 and 50W-X12 resins was investigated using elution techniques to determine distribution ratios for copper, nickel, and cobalt complexes contained in ammonium carbonate solution, a mixture which approximates the waste liquor from the Caron nickel recovery process. Results were determined for different feed concentrations, as well as for different concentrations and pH values of the ammonium carbonate eluant. Distribution ratios were compared with those previously obtained from a continuous annular chromatographic system. Separation of copper and nickel was not conclusively observed at any of the conditions examined.

  4. Research on rejection performance of reverse osmosis to nickel in simulated radioactive wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Jinsong; Wang Xiaowei

    2013-01-01

    In order to reveal the rejection performance of the reverse osmosis applied in the radioactive wastewater treatment, treatment experiments were carried out on a pilot reverse osmosis equipment using wastewater containing nickel nuclide. Results showed that the rejection ratio of reverse osmosis to nickel was almost not affected by the operation pressure and the ratio of reclaiming, and had no direct relation with the salt rejection ratio. The ratio of nickel rejection reached 95% in the experiment condition and could meet the requirement on the disposal of radioactive wastewater produced by nuclear powered installations. (authors)

  5. SERS spectra of pyridine adsorbed on nickel film prepared by magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Daoyong; Ouyang, Yu; Chen, Li; Cao, Weiran; Shi, Shaohua

    2011-02-01

    As a repeating well and cheaper enhancement substrate, the nickel film was fabricated with magnetron sputtering coating instrument. Surface enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) of pyridine adsorbed on this nickel film are compared with the experimental values of gaseous pyridine, the theoretical value of pyridine solution listed in other literatures and our method is better than electro-chemical etching electrode method for large scale preparation. The enhancement factor of the nickel film is calculated and the result indicates that magnetron sputtering coating technology is feasible for obtaining good SERS active surface.

  6. Isotope exchange behaviour of nickel xanthate in presence of substituted anilines and isomeric picolines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naidu, G.R.K.; Naidu, P.R.

    1981-01-01

    The isotope exchange behaviour of nickel xanthate was investigated in the presence of aniline, N-methylaniline, N,N-dimethylaniline and three picoline isomers at 25 deg C. The results showed that the labelled free nickel(II) replaces inactive nickel(II) in the complex. Hence the complex is labile in the presence of all bases except β- and γ-picolines. The observed lability has been attributed to an adduct formation between the complex and the bases. The inert behaviour observed in the presence of β- and ν-picolines has been ascribed to the steric effect of the methyl groups on the adduct formation. (author)

  7. Synthesis and growth mechanism of sponge-like nickel using a hydrothermal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Bin; Yin, Xueguo; Hua, Weidong; Ma, Yilong; Sun, Jianchun; Li, Chunhong; Chen, Dengming; Guo, Donglin; Li, Kejian

    2018-05-01

    Sponge-like nickel composed of micro-chains with a diameter of 1-5 μm was selectively synthesized by the hydrothermal method, using sodium hydroxide (NaOH) as the alkaline reagent, aqueous hydrazine as reducing agent and citric acid as a coordination agent. The time-dependent samples prepared at different NaOH concentrations were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR). The results showed that the agglomerates of nickel citrate hydrazine complex nanoplates were first precipitated and then reduced to prickly nickel micro-chains at a lower NaOH concentration, which played a role in the further formation of sponge-like nickel. Also, the probable growth mechanism of the sponge-like nickel was proposed. The magnetic properties of sponge-like nickel were studied using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The sponge-like nickel exhibited a ferromagnetic behavior with a saturation magnetization value of 43.8 emu g-1 and a coercivity value of 120.7 Oe.

  8. Removal of Nickel from Aqueous Solution by Hard-Shell Pistachios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayan Shamohammadi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Nickel is one of the heavy metals which commonly can be found in industrial wastewater. Many studies have been done on agricultural waste for the removal of nickel from aqueous solutions. The purpose of this study is to identify hard-shell pistachios as a local attraction for removal of nickel from aqueous solution. Nickel adsorption isotherm models are studied using shell pistachios. Pistachio shell was chosen which its particle size is between 800-600 microns. The stock solution of nickel ions was prepared mixing nickel nitrate with distilled water. The results showed that the maximum absorption efficiency occurs (73.3% at pH=8. Also, it was shown that with increasing adsorbent dose, equilibrium time decreased within constant concentration. Examination of uptake isotherm models showed that models of Freundlich, BET, Radke-Praunitz, Redlich-Peterson and Sips describe data in 97% level of confidence well,  however Freundlich and Sips isotherm models has the lowest error factor 0.10597 and 0/10598 respectively and the highest correlation coefficient (0.9785. Comparison of adsorbent capacity within removal of nickel from aqueous solution shows that Pistachio shell with special absorbent surface of 1.7 m2/g and uptake capacity of 0.3984 mg/g is proper than adsorbents of Kaolinite, Bagasse, sludge-ash.

  9. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Cellulose by Integrating Dispersed Nickel Catalyst with HZSM-5 Zeolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xiaojuan; Bi, Yadong; Zhou, Wei; Chen, Hui; Hu, Jianli

    2018-01-01

    The effect of integrating dispersed nickel catalyst with HZSM-5 zeolite on upgrading of vapors produced from pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass was investigated. The active component nickel nitrate was introduced onto the cellulose substrate by impregnation technique. Based on TGA experimental results, we discovered that nickel nitrate first released crystallization water, and then successively decomposed into nickel oxide which was reduced in-situ to metallic nickel through carbothermal reduction reaction. In-situ generated nickel nanoparticles were found highly dispersed over carbon substrate, which were responsible for catalyzing reforming and cracking of tars. In catalytic fast pyrolysis of cellulose, the addition of nickel nitrate caused more char formation at the expense of the yield of the condensable liquid products. In addition, the selectivity of linear oxygenates was increased whereas the yield of laevoglucose was reduced. Oxygen-containing compounds in pyrolysis vapors were deoxygenated into aromatics using HZSM-5. Moreover, the amount of condensable liquid products was decreased with the addition of HZSM-5.

  10. Separation and Preconcentration of Trace Amounts of Nickel from Aqueous Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyhaneh Rahnama

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new method for preconcentration and measurement of trace amounts of nickel in aqueous samples by magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE via magnetic carbon nanotubes (Mag-CNTs was developed. In order to increase selectivity, α-Furildioxime was used as chelating agent. In order to do extraction, optimum amount of ligand was added to the nickel sample and pH was set on 9, then 7 ml. of adsorbent was added and stirred for 15 minutes. After that, aqueous phase and adsorbent were separated by a strong magnet. Finally, the absorption was measured via flame atomic absorption spectrometry by analyte elution from the absorbent with an appropriate solution. Parameters affecting the extraction and preconcentration of nickel were investigated and optimized. Under optimum conditions, the calibration curve was linear in concentration range from 2.5 to 375 µg L-1 and the detection limit was 0.8 µg L-1 of nickel. The method was applied for determination of nickel in aqueous samples. The relative efficiency values of nickel measurement in aqueous samples were from 98.7% to 102.1%.  Results indicated that Mag-CNTs can be used as an effective and inexpensive absorbent for preconcentration and extraction of nickel from actual samples.

  11. Phases in lanthanum-nickel-aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosley, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    Lanthanum-nickel-aluminum (LANA) alloys will be used to pump, store and separate hydrogen isotopes in the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF). The aluminum content (y) of the primary LaNi 5 -phase is controlled to produce the desired pressure-temperature behavior for adsorption and desorption of hydrogen. However, secondary phases cause decreased capacity and some may cause undesirable retention of tritium. Twenty-three alloys purchased from Ergenics, Inc. for development of RTF processes have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) to determine the distributions and compositions of constituent phases. This memorandum reports the results of these characterization studies. Knowledge of the structural characteristics of these alloys is a useful first step in selecting materials for specific process development tests and in interpreting results of those tests. Once this information is coupled with data on hydrogen plateau pressures, retention and capacity, secondary phase limits for RTF alloys can be specified

  12. Nickel concentrations in fingernails as a measure of occupational exposure to nickel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, K; Gammelgaard, Bente; Menné, T

    1991-01-01

    in nails (p less than 0.001). The difference between the 2 levels was also significant (p less than 0.001). No correlation between the nickel concentration in fingernails and the duration of exposure could be demonstrated. It was concluded that the higher the nickel level in the fingernails, the greater...... is the possibility that the person is occupationally exposed to nickel. Nail analysis is suggested as a measure of occupational exposure to nickel.......The nickel concentration in fingernails from 2 groups of people occupationally exposed to nickel was determined. In one group, comprising 83 persons moderately exposed to nickel, the mean +/- standard deviation (SD) was 29.2 micrograms/g +/- 56.7 micrograms/g and the median 13.8 micrograms/g (range...

  13. Prevalence of nickel allergy in Europe following the EU Nickel Directive - a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlström, Malin G; Thyssen, Jacob P; Menné, Torkil

    2017-01-01

    .4% versus 19.8%) (p = 0.02), in female dermatitis patients aged ≤17 years (14.3% versus 29.2%) (p women: 20.2% versus 36.6%) (p men: 4.9% versus 6.6%) (p ..., and generally remained high, affecting 8-18% of the general population. A consistent pattern of decreasing prevalence of nickel allergy in some EU countries was observed, although the prevalence among young women remains high. Steps should be taken for better prevention of nickel allergy in EU countries.......Nickel contact allergy remains a problem in EU countries, despite the EU Nickel Directive. To study the prevalence of nickel allergy in EU countries following the implementation of the EU Nickel Directive, we performed a systematic search in PubMed for studies that examined the prevalence of nickel...

  14. Electrolyte management considerations in modern nickel/hydrogen and nickel/cadmium cells and battery designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thaller, L.H. [The Aerospace Corporation, El Segundo, CA (United States); Zimmermann, A.H. [The Aerospace Corporation, El Segundo, CA (United States)

    1996-11-01

    While attention has been paid to understanding and modeling abnormal nickel/hydrogen cell behaviors, not enough attention has been paid to the potassium ion content in these cells, and more recently, in batteries. This paper will review three general areas where the potassium ion content can impact the performance and life of nickel/hydrogen and nickel/cadmium cells. Sample calculations of the concentration or volume changes that can take place within operating cells will be presented. With the aid of an accurate model of an operating cell or battery, the impact of changes of potassium ion content within a potential cell design can be estimated. All three of these areas are directly related to the volume tolerance and pore size engineering aspects of the components used in the cell or battery design. the three areas follow. (i) The gamma phase uptake of potassium ion can result in a lowering of the electrolyte concentration. This leads to a higher electrolyte resistance as well as electrolyte diffusional limitations on the discharge rate. This phenomenon also impacts the response of the cell to a reconditioning cycle. (ii) The transport of water vapor from a warmer to a cooler portion of the cell or battery under the driving force of a vapor pressure gradient has already impacted cells when water vapor condenses on a colder cell wall. This paper will explore the convective and diffusive movement of gases saturated with water vapor from a warmer plate pack to a cooler one, both with and without liquid communication. (iii) The impact of low level shunt currents in multicell configurations results in the net movement of potassium hydroxide from one part of the battery to another. This movement impacts the electrolyte volume/vapor pressure relationship within the cell or battery. (orig.)

  15. Coin exposure may cause allergic nickel dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Gawkrodger, David J; White, Ian R

    2012-01-01

    Nickel is used in coins because the metal has beneficial properties, including price, colour, weight, and corrosion resistance, and also because it is easy to stamp. It has often been claimed that the duration of skin contact with coins is too short to cause nickel release and dermatitis. However...

  16. Microwave dielectric properties of nanostructured nickel ferrite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Abstract. Nickel ferrite is one of the important ferrites used in microwave devices. In the present work, we have synthesized nanoparticles of nickel ferrite using chemical precipitation technique. The crystal structure and grain size of the particles are studied using XRD. The microwave dielectric properties of nanostructured.

  17. Technology development for producing nickel metallic filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubler, C.H.

    1990-01-01

    A technology to produce metallic filters by Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN-Brazilian CNEN) providing the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-Brazilian CNEN) in obtaining nickel alloy filters used for filtration process of uranium hexafluoride, was developed. The experiences carried out for producing nickel conical trunk filters from powder metallurgy are related. (M.C.K.)

  18. Method of nickel-plating large components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilbuer, K.

    1997-01-01

    The invention concerns a method of nickel-plating components, according to which even large components can be provided with an adequate layer of nickel which is pore- and stress-free and such that water is not lost. According to the invention, the component is heated and, after heating, is pickled, rinsed, scoured, plated in an electrolysis process, and rinsed again. (author)

  19. Evolution of the nickel/zirconia interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinde, S.L.; Olson, D.A.; De Jonghe, L.C.; Miller, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The changes taking place at the nickel zirconia interface during oxidation in air at 900 0 C were studied using analytical electron microscopy (AEM). The nickel oxide layer growing at the interface and the stabilizers used in zirconia interact, giving different interface morphologies

  20. Lead-nickel electrochemical batteries

    CERN Document Server

    Glaize, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The lead-acid accumulator was introduced in the middle of the 19th Century, the diverse variants of nickel accumulators between the beginning and the end of the 20th Century. Although old, these technologies are always very present on numerous markets. Unfortunately they are still not used in optimal conditions, often because of the misunderstanding of the internal electrochemical phenomena.This book will show that batteries are complex systems, made commercially available thanks to considerable amounts of scientific research, empiricism and practical knowledge. However, the design of

  1. Nickel-hydrogen battery testing for Hubble Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggett, Randy M.; Whitt, Thomas H.

    1989-01-01

    The authors identify objectives and provide data from several nickel-hydrogen battery tests designed to evaluate the possibility of launching Ni-H2 batteries on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Test results from a 14-cell battery, a 12-cell battery, and a 4-cell pack are presented. Results of a thermal vacuum test to verify the battery-module/bay heat rejection capacity are reported. A 6-battery system simulation breadboard is described, and test results are presented.

  2. Analysis of the dynamic behavior of porous nickel electrodes in alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Real, Silvia G; Visintin, Arnaldo; Castro, Elida B

    2004-01-01

    The nickel electrode is important for its electrocatalytic properties, when it is used in water electrolysis, and for use as a positive terminal in alkaline nickel-cadmium, nickel-iron, nickel-zinc, nickel-hydrogen and nickel-metal hydride batteries. Since there are many factors related to the functioning of these batteries that have still not been clarified, such as the memory effect associated with the change in structure of the nickel hydroxide and the phenomenon of 'battery sudden death', that produce serious problems mostly in spaces uses, this work discusses the dynamic behavior of the porous nickel hydroxide electrode. This electrode possesses outstanding properties such as high power density, good cyclability and elevated specific energy, which make it unique for the above-mentioned applications. The electrochemical storage of energy in this electrode is based on the reversible characteristics of nickel hydroxide/oxhydroxide redox coupling. The reversibility of the process is an important factor in battery materials. In the case of the Ni oxide, during the electrode discharge H + is inserted and this process inverts during the charging. This work presents the results obtained with the use of impedance spectroscopy for different discharge states of the electrode material in order to correlate its electrochemical properties according to the development of physical chemical models. These models include the charging and discharging processes, the process of proton diffusion in the solid and the porous nature of the material. Knowledge about the functioning of the electrode material is obtained by adjusting the experimental data according to the model and the parametric identification to determine values associated with such variables as area of active material, diffusion coefficient of the H + , conductivity of the solid as a function of the discharge state and kinetic constants of the charge transfer process (CW)

  3. Effect of nickel and iron co-exposure on human lung cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salnikow, Konstantin; Li Xiaomei; Lippmann, Morton

    2004-01-01

    Exposure to ambient air particulate matter (PM) is associated with increased mortality and morbidity in susceptible populations. The epidemiological data also suggest a relationship between PM air pollution and impairment of cardiopulmonary function. The mechanisms that may be responsible for these effects are not fully understood and are likely related to perturbations of cellular and molecular functions. One type of PM, residual oil fly ash (ROFA), is of particular interest. ROFA does not contain much organic material, but does contain relatively high quantities of transition metals, predominantly nickel, vanadium, and iron, as well as black carbon and sulfates. In this study, we investigated the effect of two metals (iron and nickel) on the induction of 'hypoxia-like' stress and the production of interleukins (ILs) in minimally transformed human airway epithelial cells (1HAEo - ). We found that exposure to soluble nickel sulfate results in the induction of hypoxia-inducible genes and IL-8 production by the 1HAEo - cells. The simultaneous addition of iron in either ferric or ferrous form and nickel completely inhibited IL-8 production and had no effect on 'hypoxia-like' stress caused by nickel, suggesting the existence of two different pathways for the induction 'hypoxia-like' stress and IL-8 production. The effect of nickel was not related to the blocking of iron entry into cells since the level of intracellular iron was not affected by co-exposure with nickel. The obtained data indicate that nickel can induce different signaling pathways with or without interference with iron metabolism. Our observations suggest that in some cases the excess of iron in PM can cancel the effects of nickel

  4. Predicting patient exposure to nickel released from cardiovascular devices using multi-scale modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylor, David M; Craven, Brent A; Chandrasekar, Vaishnavi; Simon, David D; Brown, Ronald P; Sussman, Eric M

    2018-04-01

    Many cardiovascular device alloys contain nickel, which if released in sufficient quantities, can lead to adverse health effects. However, in-vivo nickel release from implanted devices and subsequent biodistribution of nickel ions to local tissues and systemic circulation are not well understood. To address this uncertainty, we have developed a multi-scale (material, tissue, and system) biokinetic model. The model links nickel release from an implanted cardiovascular device to concentrations in peri-implant tissue, as well as in serum and urine, which can be readily monitored. The model was parameterized for a specific cardiovascular implant, nitinol septal occluders, using in-vitro nickel release test results, studies of ex-vivo uptake into heart tissue, and in-vivo and clinical measurements from the literature. Our results show that the model accurately predicts nickel concentrations in peri-implant tissue in an animal model and in serum and urine of septal occluder patients. The congruity of the model with these data suggests it may provide useful insight to establish nickel exposure limits and interpret biomonitoring data. Finally, we use the model to predict local and systemic nickel exposure due to passive release from nitinol devices produced using a wide range of manufacturing processes, as well as general relationships between release rate and exposure. These relationships suggest that peri-implant tissue and serum levels of nickel will remain below 5 μg/g and 10 μg/l, respectively, in patients who have received implanted nitinol cardiovascular devices provided the rate of nickel release per device surface area does not exceed 0.074 μg/(cm 2  d) and is less than 32 μg/d in total. The uncertainty in whether in-vitro tests used to evaluate metal ion release from medical products are representative of clinical environments is one of the largest roadblocks to establishing the associated patient risk. We have developed and validated a multi

  5. Research, development, and demonstration of nickel-zinc batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report for 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-03-01

    Progress in the development of nickel-zinc batteries for electric vehicles is reported. Information is presented on nickel electrode preparation and testing; zinc electrode preparation with additives and test results; separator development and the evaluation of polymer-blend separator films; sealed Ni-Zn cells; and the optimization of electric vehicle-type Ni-Zn cells. (LCL)

  6. Recent progress in nickel carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunderman, F.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Positive bacterial mutagenesis tests have been obtained with Ni(II) in Corynybacterium, but not in E. coli, S. typhimurium, or B. subtilis. Transformation assays of several soluble and crystalline Ni compounds have been positive in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Ni(II) binds to DNA, RNA, and nucleoproteins, and becomes localized in nucleoli. Genotoxic effects of Ni include: (a) chromosomal aberrations, including sister-chromatid exchanges, (b) DNA strandbreaks and DNA-protein crosslinks, (c) inhibition of DNA and RNA synthesis, (d) infidelity of DNA transcription, and (e) mutations at the HGPRTase locus in Chinese hamster cells and the TK locus in mouse lymphoma cells. These findings are consistent with somatic mutation as the mechanism for initiation of nickel carcinogenesis. Ni compounds cause reversible transition of double-stranded poly(dG-dC) DNA from the right-handed B-helix to the left-handed Z-helix, suggesting a mechanism whereby nickel might modulate oncogene expression. 99 references, 4 tables.

  7. The determination of sulphur in copper, nickel and aluminium alloys by proton activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandecasteele, C.; Dewaele, J.; Esprit, M.; Goethals, P.

    1981-01-01

    The 34 S(p,n) 34 sup(m)Cl reaction, induced by 13 MeV protons is used for the determination of sulphur in copper, nickel and aluminium alloys. The 34 sup(m)Cl is separated by repeated precipitation as silver chloride. The results obtained were resp. 3.08 +- 0.47, 1.47 +- 0.17 and -1 for copper, nickel and aluminium alloys. (orig.)

  8. Boundary conditions for diffusion in the pack-aluminizing of nickel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, R.; Seigle, L. L.; Menon, N. B.

    1973-01-01

    The surface compositions of nickel specimens coated for various lengths of time in aluminizing packs at 2000 F were studied, in order to obtain information about the kinetics of the pack-cementation process in the formation of aluminide coatings. The results obtained indicate that the surface compositions of the coated nickel specimens are independent of time, at least for time between 0.5 and 20 hrs. Another important observation is that the specimens gained weight during the coating process.

  9. 2-Mercaptobenzimidazole, 2-Mercaptobenzothiazole, and Thioglycolic Acid in an Electroless Nickel-Plating Bath

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmet Ozan Gezerman; Burcu Didem Çorbacıoğlu

    2015-01-01

    The use of three different materials, 2-mercaptobenzimidazole, 2-mercaptobenzothiazole, and thioglycolic acid, was investigated to improve the performance of electroless nickel-plating baths. By changing the concentrations of these materials, sample plates were coated. Optical microscope images were obtained by selecting representative coated plates. From the results of the investigations, the effects of these materials on electroless nickel plating were observed, and the most appropriate amo...

  10. Benefits from flywheel energy storage for area regulation in California - demonstration results : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems program.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyer, James M. (Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA)

    2009-10-01

    This report documents a high-level analysis of the benefit and cost for flywheel energy storage used to provide area regulation for the electricity supply and transmission system in California. Area regulation is an 'ancillary service' needed for a reliable and stable regional electricity grid. The analysis was based on results from a demonstration, in California, of flywheel energy storage developed by Beacon Power Corporation (the system's manufacturer). Demonstrated was flywheel storage systems ability to provide 'rapid-response' regulation. Flywheel storage output can be varied much more rapidly than the output from conventional regulation sources, making flywheels more attractive than conventional regulation resources. The performance of the flywheel storage system demonstrated was generally consistent with requirements for a possible new class of regulation resources - 'rapid-response' energy-storage-based regulation - in California. In short, it was demonstrated that Beacon Power Corporation's flywheel system follows a rapidly changing control signal (the ACE, which changes every four seconds). Based on the results and on expected plant cost and performance, the Beacon Power flywheel storage system has a good chance of being a financially viable regulation resource. Results indicate a benefit/cost ratio of 1.5 to 1.8 using what may be somewhat conservative assumptions. A benefit/cost ratio of one indicates that, based on the financial assumptions used, the investment's financial returns just meet the investors target.

  11. In situ photoelectrochemistry and Raman spectroscopic characterization on the surface oxide film of nickel electrode in 30 wt.% KOH solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nan Junmin; Yang Yong; Lin Zugeng

    2006-01-01

    The oxide films of nickel electrode formed in 30 wt.% KOH solution under potentiodynamic conditions were characterized by means of electrochemical, in situ PhotoElectrochemistry Measurement (PEM) and Confocal Microprobe Raman spectroscopic techniques. The results showed that a composite oxide film was produced on nickel electrode, in which aroused cathodic or anodic photocurrent depending upon polarization potentials. The cathodic photocurrent at -0.8 V was raised from the amorphous film containing nickel hydroxide and nickel monoxide, and mainly attributed to the formation of NiO through the separation of the cavity and electron when laser light irradiates nickel electrode. With the potential increasing to more positive values, Ni 3 O 4 and high-valence nickel oxides with the structure of NiO 2 were formed successively. The composite film formed in positive potential aroused anodic photocurrent from 0.33 V. The anodic photocurrent was attributed the formation of oxygen through the cavity reaction with hydroxyl on solution interface. In addition, it is demonstrated that the reduction resultants of high-valence nickel oxides were amorphous, and the oxide film could not be reduced completely. A stable oxide film could be gradually formed on the surface of nickel electrode with the cycling and aging in 30 wt.% KOH solution

  12. Excessive nickel release from earrings purchased from independent shops and street markets--a field study from Warsaw and London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyssen, J P; Menné, T; Lidén, C; White, I R; White, J; Spiewak, R; Johansen, J D

    2011-09-01

    Nickel allergy is frequent and cause morbidity and increased health care costs. The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of inexpensive earrings randomly purchased from stores and street markets in two capitals that gave positive dimethylglyoxime (DMG) test reactions and to determine whether the degree of nickel release was related to shop category. Random inexpensive metallic earrings were purchased from stores and vendors in London and Warsaw. A qualitative investigation of nickel release by using the DMG test was performed. DMG testing revealed that respectively 15.1% (n=205) and 18.4% (n=206) of earrings purchased in London and Warsaw released nickel as indicated by positive test outcomes. Stratification by store category showed that DMG test-positive jewellery were mainly purchased from street markets and from stores that were not part of national or international chains. Despite the EU Nickel Directive having resulted in decreasing prevalence of nickel allergy, a large proportion of inexpensive earrings still release nickel in concentrations that may result in nickel allergy and dermatitis. Authorities should prioritize information campaigns and random inspections as a legislation that is not followed is of limited value. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2010 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  13. Toxicity of nickel in the marine calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa: Nickel chloride versus nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, C. [Istituto per la Protezione e Ricerca Ambientale ISPRA-STS Livorno, Piazzale dei marmi 12, 57123 Livorno (Italy); Academic Centre for Innovation and Development in the Food Industry (CAISIAL), Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, 80055 Portici (Italy); Vitiello, V. [Istituto per la Protezione e Ricerca Ambientale ISPRA-STS Livorno, Piazzale dei marmi 12, 57123 Livorno (Italy); Casals, E. [Institut Català de Nanotecnologia, Campus de la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelone, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Puntes, V.F. [Institut Català de Nanotecnologia, Campus de la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelone, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Institut Català de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), Passeig Lluís Companys, 23, 08010 Barcelona (Spain); Iamunno, F. [Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Villa Comunale, Napoli (Italy); Pellegrini, D. [Istituto per la Protezione e Ricerca Ambientale ISPRA-STS Livorno, Piazzale dei marmi 12, 57123 Livorno (Italy); Changwen, W. [Zhejiang Ocean University, 1 Rd. South Haida, Lincheng New Area, Dinghai District Zhoushan City, 316022 (China); Benvenuto, G. [Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Villa Comunale, Napoli (Italy); Buttino, I., E-mail: isabella.buttino@isprambiente.it [Istituto per la Protezione e Ricerca Ambientale ISPRA-STS Livorno, Piazzale dei marmi 12, 57123 Livorno (Italy)

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • Acartia tonsa copepod is more sensitive to NiCl{sub 2} than to nickel nanoparticles. • At the tested concentration egg production was not affected by both form of nickel. • Egg viability is the most sensitive end-point for both form of nickel. • Nickel dissolved in seawater increased with nanoparticle concentration. • Acartia tonsa adults were able to ingest nanoparticles. - Abstract: Nickel compounds are widely used in industries and have been massively introduced in the environment in different chemical forms. Here we report the effect of two different chemical forms of nickel, NiCl{sub 2} and nickel nanoparticles (NiNPs), on the reproduction of the marine calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa. The behavior of nickel nanoparticles was analyzed with different techniques and with two protocols. In the “sonicated experiment” (SON) NiNP solution was sonicated while in the “non-sonicated experiment” (NON-SON) the solution was vigorously shaken by hand. Final nominal concentrations of 5, 10 and 50 mg L{sup −1} and 1, 5 and 10 mg L{sup −1} NiNPs were used for the acute and semichronic tests, respectively. Nanoparticle size did not change over time except for the highest concentration of 50 mg L{sup −1} NiNPs, in which the diameter increased up to 843 nm after 48 h. The concentration of Ni dissolved in the water increased with NP concentration and was similar for SON and NON-SON solutions. Our results indicate that sonication does not modify toxicity for the copepod A. tonsa. Mean EC{sub 50} values were similar for NON-SON (20.2 mg L{sup −1}) and SON experiments (22.14 mg L{sup −1}) in the acute test. Similarly, no differences occurred between the two different protocols in the semichronic test, with an EC{sub 50} of 7.45 mg L{sup −1} and 6.97 mg L{sup −1} for NON-SON and SON experiments, respectively. Acute and semichronic tests, conducted exposing A. tonsa embryos to NiCl{sub 2} concentrations from 0.025 to 0.63 mg L{sup −1

  14. Nickel accumulation and storage in bradyrhizobium japonicum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, R.J.; Pihl, T.D.; Stults, L.; Sray, W.

    1990-01-01

    Hydrogenase-depressed (chemolithotrophic growth conditions) and heterotrophically grown cultures of Bradyrhizobium japonicum accumulated nickel about equally over a 3-h period. Both types of cultures accumulated nickel primarily in a form that was not exchangeable with NiCl 2 , and they accumulated much more Ni than would be needed for the Ni-containing hydrogenase. The nickel accumulated by heterotrophically incubated cultures could later be mobilized to allow active hydrogenase synthesis during derepression in the absence of nickel, while cells both grown with Ni and the derepressed without nickel had low hydrogenase activities. The level of activity in cells grown with Ni and then derepressed without nickel was about the same as that in cultures derepressed in the presence of nickel. The Ni accumulated by heterotrophically grown cultures was associated principally with soluble proteins rather than particulate material, and this Ni was not lost upon dialyzing an extract containing the soluble proteins against either Ni-containing or EDTA-containing buffer. However, this Ni was lost upon pronase or low pH treatments. The soluble Ni-binding proteins were partially purified by gel filtration and DEAE chromatography. They were not antigenically related to hydrogenase peptides. Much of the 63 Ni eluted as a single peak of 48 kilodaltons. Experiments involving immunuprecipitation of 63 Ni-containing hydrogenase suggested that the stored source of Ni in heterotrophic cultures that could later be mobilized into hydrogenase resided in the nonexchangeable Ni-containing fraction rather than in loosely bound or ionic forms

  15. Preparation of one-dimensional nickel nanowires by self-assembly process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dapeng; Sun Dongbai; Yu Hongying; Qiu Zhigang; Meng Huimin

    2009-01-01

    Self-assembly nickel nanowires were prepared by soft template method in ethylene glycol solutions. The structure and micro-morphology of the products were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). The results showed that the products were pure nickel powders with face-centered cubic (fcc) structure. A growth model was presented to explain the growth mechanism. The effects of pH value, surfactant, reaction temperature and reaction time on the synthesis of nickel nanowires were discussed. When pH > 11.5, the reaction temperature was between 80 deg. C and 90 deg. C, and the concentration of cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) was higher than 7.0 x 10 -3 , zigzag nickel nanowires with slenderness ratio about 20 could be synthesized

  16. Clad modified optical fiber gas sensors based on nanocrystalline nickel oxide embedded coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamini, K.; Renganathan, B.; Ganesan, A. R.; Prakash, T.

    2017-07-01

    A clad modified optical fiber gas sensor for sensing volatile organic compound vapours (VOCs) such as formaldehyde (HCHO), ammonia (NH3), ethanol (C2H5OH) and methanol (CH3OH) up to 500 ppm was studied using nanocrystalline nickel oxide embedded coatings. Prior to the measurements, nickel oxide in two different crystallite sizes such as 24 nm and 76 nm was synthesized by calcination of reverse precipitated nickel hydroxide subsequently at 450 °C and 900 °C for 30 min. Then, samples physical properties were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Our gas sensing measurement concludes that the lower crystallite size (24 nm) nickel oxide nanocrystals exhibits superior performance to formaldehyde and ethanol vapours as compared with other two VOCs, the observed experimental results were discussed in detail.

  17. Development of process technologies for improvement of electroless nickel coatings properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barba-Pingarrón, A; Trujillo-Barragán, M; Hernandez-Gallegos, M A; Valdez-Navarro, R; Bolarín-Miró, A; Jesús, F Sánchez – de; Vargas-Mendoza, L; Molera-Sola, P

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes research and technology developments that enable to improve nickel electroless coating properties. This work deals with: (a) different methods in order to achieve Ni-P-Mo coatings. (b) Other development is related with coatings with addition of hard particles such as SiC, WC or Al 2 O 3 ,(c) Electroless nickel deposits on PBT and austempered ductile iron (ADI). (d) In addition, nickel coatings were deposited on powder metallic pieces and finally, electroless nickel coatings, in conjunction with layers from thermal spray process were formed. Characterization of all coatings by means of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, micro-hardness, wear and corrosion tests were carried out. Results indicate positive increment in both mechanical and electrochemical properties which enhance field applications in Mexican industry.

  18. Dispersion of nano-nickel into γ-Al2O3 studied by positron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun Zhu; Wang, S.J.; Luo, X.H.

    2003-01-01

    The positron annihilation lifetime spectra were measured as a function of the content of the nano-nickel, of temperature, as well as of the heating time for the supported nano-nickel catalyst that was prepared by mechanical mixture nano-metal nickel particles with gamma-alumina (γ-Al 2 O 3 ). The lifetime spectra were well resolved into four lifetime components. The longest lifetime τ 4 was assigned to ortho-positronium annihilating in the secondary pore of the γ-Al 2 O 3 . The results showed that part of the nano-nickel had entered into γ-Al 2 O 3 by thermal diffusion at heating above 200 deg. C and had interacted with the face of the γ-Al 2 O 3 , but the length of diffusion is not very large

  19. Dispersion of nano-nickel into γ-Al 2O 3 studied by positron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Zhu; Wang, S. J.; Luo, X. H.

    2003-10-01

    The positron annihilation lifetime spectra were measured as a function of the content of the nano-nickel, of temperature, as well as of the heating time for the supported nano-nickel catalyst that was prepared by mechanical mixture nano-metal nickel particles with gamma-alumina ( γ-Al 2O 3). The lifetime spectra were well resolved into four lifetime components. The longest lifetime τ4 was assigned to ortho-positronium annihilating in the secondary pore of the γ-Al 2O 3. The results showed that part of the nano-nickel had entered into γ-Al 2O 3 by thermal diffusion at heating above 200°C and had interacted with the face of the γ-Al 2O 3, but the length of diffusion is not very large.

  20. Dislocation mechanism of void growth at twin boundary of nanotwinned nickel based on molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yanqiu; Jiang, Shuyong; Zhu, Xiaoming; Zhao, Yanan

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation was performed to investigate dislocation mechanism of void growth at twin boundary (TB) of nanotwinned nickel. Simulation results show that the deformation of nanotwinned nickel containing a void at TB is dominated by the slip involving both leading and trailing partials, where the trailing partials are the dissociation products of stair-rod dislocations formed by the leading partials. The growth of a void at TB is attributed to the successive emission of the leading partials followed by trailing partials as well as the escape of these partial dislocations from the void surface. - Highlights: • Dislocation mechanism of void growth at TB of nanotwinned nickel is investigated. • Deformation of the nanotwinned nickel is dominated by leading and trailing partials. • Growth of void at TB is caused by successive emission and escape of these partials.

  1. Development of a Micro-Fiber Nickel Electrode for Nickel-Hydrogen Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Doris L.

    1996-01-01

    The development of a high specific energy battery is one of the objectives of the lightweight nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) program at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The approach has been to improve the nickel electrode by continuing combined in-house and contract efforts to develop a more efficient and lighter weight electrode for the nickel-hydrogen fuel cell. Small fiber diameter nickel plaques are used as conductive supports for the nickel hydroxide active material. These plaques are commercial products and have an advantage of increased surface area available for the deposition of active materials. Initial tests include activation and capacity measurements at different discharge levels followed by half-cell cycle testing at 80 percent depth-of-discharge in a low Earth orbit regime. The electrodes that pass the initial tests are life cycle tested in a boiler plate nickel-hydrogen cell before flightweight designs are built and tested.

  2. ISO New England: Results of Ancillary Service Pilot Programs, Alternative Technology Regulation Pilot Program and Demand Response Reserves Pilot Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowell, Jon [ISO New England, Holyoke, MA (United States); Yoshimura, Henry [ISO New England, Holyoke, MA (United States)

    2011-10-26

    This PowerPoint presentation compares performance of pilot program assets and generation resources in alternative technology regulation and demand response reserves for flywheels and residential electric thermal storage.

  3. Down regulation of APETALA3 homolog resulted in defect of floral structure critical to explosive pollen release in Cornus canadensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Liu; Lu Li; Qiu-Yun (Jenny) Xiang

    2017-01-01

    In mature buds of the dwarf dogwood lineage (DW) of Cornus,petals and filaments form an "x"-like box containing mechanical energy from the filaments to allow explosive pollen dispersal.As a start to understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for the origin of this unique structure in Cornus,we cloned and characterized the sequences of APETALA3 (AP3) homologs from Cornus canadensis of the DW lineage and five other Cornus species,given the function of AP3 on petal and stamen development in Arabidopsis,and tested the function of CorcanAP3 using a stable Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system.The cloned CorAP3s (AP3-like genes in Cornus) were confirmed to belong to the euAP3 lineage.qRT-PCR analysis indicated strong increase of CorcanAP3 expression in floral buds of wildtype C.canadensis.A hairpin construct of CorcanAP3 was successfully introduced into wild type plants of C.canadensis,resulting in significant reduction of CorcanAP3 expression and abnormal floral development.The abnormal floral buds lost the "x" form and opened immaturely due to delay or retard of petal and stamen elongation and the push of style elongation.The results suggested CorcanAP3 may function to regulate the coordinated rate of development of petals and stamens in C.canadensis,necessary for the x-structure formation,although the exact molecular mechanism remains unclear.Comparison among six Comus species indicated a greater ratio of stamen to petal and style growth in C.canadensis,suggesting an evolutionary change of CorAP3 expression pattern in the DW lineage,leading to the greater growth of filaments to form the "x"-box.

  4. Nickel and titanium nanoboride composite coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimova, K A; Galevsky, G V; Rudneva, V V; Kozyrev, N A; Orshanskaya, E G

    2015-01-01

    Electrodeposition conditions, structural-physical and mechanical properties (microhardness, cohesion with a base, wear resistance, corrosion currents) of electroplated composite coatings on the base of nickel with nano and micro-powders of titanium boride are investigated. It has been found out that electro-crystallization of nickel with boride nanoparticles is the cause of coating formation with structural fragments of small sizes, low porosity and improved physical and mechanical properties. Titanium nano-boride is a component of composite coating, as well as an effective modifier of nickel matrix. Nano-boride of the electrolyte improves efficiency of the latter due to increased permissible upper limit of the cathodic current density. (paper)

  5. Clinical bending of nickel titanium wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Chain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the evolution and the involvement of Nickel Titanium wires in the field of Orthodontics. The treatment plan has evolved with the use of low force Nickel Titanium wires. Because of their high springback, low stiffness, they are the key initial wires in leveling and alignment but have poor formability. Since poor formability limits its ability to create variable arch forms thus; limits the form of treatment. We have devised a method to bend the Nickel Titanium wires to help in our inventory but also customized the wire according to the treatment.

  6. Determination of electroless deposition by chemical nickeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Badida

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Increasing of technical level and reliability of machine products in compliance with the economical and ecological terms belongs to the main trends of the industrial development. During the utilisation of these products there arise their each other contacts and the interaction with the environment. That is the reason for their surface degradation by wear effect, corrosion and other influences. The chemical nickel-plating allows autocatalytic deposition of nickel from water solutions in the form of coherent, technically very profitable coating without usage of external source of electric current. The research was aimed at evaluating the surface changes after chemical nickel-plating at various changes of technological parameters.

  7. Solidification Mapping of a Nickel Alloy 718 Laboratory VAR Ingot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Trevor J.; Taleff, Eric M.; Lopez, Felipe; Beaman, Joe; Williamson, Rodney

    The solidification microstructure of a laboratory-scale Nickel alloy 718 vacuum arc remelted (VAR) ingot was analyzed. The cylindrical, 210-mm-diameter ingot was sectioned along a plane bisecting it length-wise, and this mid-plane surface was ground and etched using Canada's reagent to reveal segregation contrast. Over 350 photographs were taken of the etched mid-plane surface and stitched together to form a single mosaic image. Image data in the resulting mosaic were processed using a variety of algorithms to extract quantities such as primary dendrite orientation, primary dendrite arm spacing (PDAS), and secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS) as a function of location. These quantities were used to calculate pool shape and solidification rate during solidification using existing empirical relationships for Nickel Alloy 718. The details and outcomes of this approach, along with the resulting comparison to experimental processing conditions and computational models, are presented.

  8. Aluminium alloys containing iron and nickel; Alliages d'aluminium contenant du fer et du nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coriou, H.; Fournier, R.; Grall, L.; Hure, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie atomique, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, Departement de Metallurgie et de Chimie Appliquee (France); Herenguel, J.; Lelong, P. [Centre de Recherches d' Antony, des Trefileries et Laminoirs du Havre (France)

    1958-07-01

    The first part of this report addresses mechanism, kinetics and structure factors of aluminium alloys containing iron and nickel in water and high temperature steam. The studied alloys contain from 0.3 to 0.7 per cent of iron, and 0.2 to 1.0 per cent of nickel. Corrosion resistance and corrosion structure have been studied. The experimental installation, process and samples are presented. Corrosion structures in water at 350 C are identified and discussed (structure of corrosion products, structure of metal-oxide interface), and then in steam at different temperatures (350-395 C). Corrosion kinetics is experimentally studied (weight variation in time) in water at 350 C and in steam at different temperatures. Reactions occurring at over-heated steam (more than 400 C) are studied, and the case of welded alloys is also addressed. The second part addresses the metallurgical mechanism and processes influencing aluminium alloy resistance to corrosion by high temperature water as it appeared that separated phases protect the solid solution through a neighbourhood action. In order to avoid deep local corrosions, it seems necessary to multiply protective phases in an as uniform as possible way. Some processes enabling this result are described. They belong to conventional metallurgy or to powder metallurgy (with sintering and extrusion)

  9. L-carnitine protects against nickel-induced neurotoxicity by maintaining mitochondrial function in Neuro-2a cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Mindi; Xu Shangcheng; Lu Yonghui; Li Li; Zhong Min; Zhang Yanwen; Wang Yuan; Li Min; Yang Ju; Zhang Guangbin; Yu Zhengping; Zhou Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is thought to be a part of the mechanism underlying nickel-induced neurotoxicity. L-carnitine (LC), a quaternary ammonium compound biosynthesized from the amino acids lysine and methionine in all mammalian species, manifests its neuroprotective effects by improving mitochondrial energetics and function. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether LC could efficiently protect against nickel-induced neurotoxicity. Here, we exposed a mouse neuroblastoma cell line (Neuro-2a) to different concentrations of nickel chloride (NiCl 2 ) (0.25, 0.5, 1, and 2 mM) for 24 h, or to 0.5 mM and 1 mM NiCl 2 for various periods (0, 3, 6, 12, or 24 h). We found that nickel significantly increased the cell viability loss and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release in Neuro-2a cells. In addition, nickel exposure significantly elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ m ), reduced adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) concentrations and decreased mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy numbers and mtRNA transcript levels. However, all of the cytotoxicities and mitochondrial dysfunctions that were triggered by nickel were efficiently attenuated by pretreatment with LC. These protective effects of LC may be attributable to its role in maintaining mitochondrial function in nickel-treated cells. Our results suggest that LC may have great pharmacological potential in protecting against the adverse effects of nickel in the nervous system.

  10. Metallic nickel nanoparticles and their effect on the embryonic development of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanold, Julia Maxi; Wang, Jiabin; Brümmer, Franz; Šiller, Lidija

    2016-01-01

    The presence of nanoparticles in many industrial applications and daily products is making it nowadays crucial to assess their impact when exposed to the environment. Metallic nickel nanoparticles (Ni NPs) are of high industrial interest due to their ability to catalyze the reversible hydration of CO_2 to carbonic acid at ambient conditions. We characterized metallic Ni NPs by XRD, HRTEM and EDS and determined the solubility of free nickel ions from 3 mg/L metallic Ni NPs in seawater by ICP-MS over 96 h, which was below 3%. Further, embryonic development of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus was investigated for 48 h in the presence of metallic Ni NPs (0.03 mg/L to 3 mg/L), but no lethal effects were observed. However, 3 mg/L metallic Ni NPs caused a size reduction similar to 1.2 mg/L NiCl_2*6 H_2O. The obtained results contribute to current studies on metallic Ni NPs and point to their consequences for the marine ecosystem. - Highlights: • Low solubility of nickel ions from metallic nickel nanoparticles in seawater. • No lethality of sea urchin embryos up to 3 mg/L metallic nickel nanoparticles. • Considerable size reduction after 48 h was comparable to the reduction for 1.2 mg/L nickel salt. • Contributes to the overall understanding of metallic Ni NPs in the marine environment. - Metallic nickel nanoparticles display weak dissolution rates in seawater, but higher concentrations resulted in similar effects on sea urchin embryonic development as nickel salt.

  11. Data on electrical properties of nickel modified potassium polytitanates compacted powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffman, V G; Gorokhovsky, A V; Gorshkov, N V; Fedorov, F S; Tretychenko, E V; Sevrugin, A V

    2015-09-01

    Potassium polytitanates are new promising type of ferroelectric ceramic materials with high ionic conductivity, highly polarizable structure and extremely high permittivity. Its structure is formed by [TiO6] octahedral units to layers with mobile potassium and hydroxonium ions in-between. The treatment in solutions containing nickel ions allows forming heterostructured materials which consist of potassium polytitanate particles intercalated by Ni(2+) ions and/or decorated by nickel oxides NiO x . This modification route is fully dependant on solution pH, i.e. in acidic solutions the intercalation process prevails, in alkaline solutions potassium polytitanate is mostly decorated by the oxides. Therefore, electronic structure and electrical properties can be regulated depending on modification conditions, pH and ions concentration. Here we report the data on electric properties of potassium titanate modified in nickel sulfate solutions at different pH.

  12. Data on electrical properties of nickel modified potassium polytitanates compacted powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.G. Goffman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Potassium polytitanates are new promising type of ferroelectric ceramic materials with high ionic conductivity, highly polarizable structure and extremely high permittivity. Its structure is formed by [TiO6] octahedral units to layers with mobile potassium and hydroxonium ions in-between. The treatment in solutions containing nickel ions allows forming heterostructured materials which consist of potassium polytitanate particles intercalated by Ni2+ ions and/or decorated by nickel oxides NiOx. This modification route is fully dependant on solution pH, i.e. in acidic solutions the intercalation process prevails, in alkaline solutions potassium polytitanate is mostly decorated by the oxides. Therefore, electronic structure and electrical properties can be regulated depending on modification conditions, pH and ions concentration. Here we report the data on electric properties of potassium titanate modified in nickel sulfate solutions at different pH.

  13. Bioleaching of a low-grade nickel-copper sulfide by mixture of four thermophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuzhen; Zhong, Hui; Hu, Yuehua; Zhao, Jiancun; He, Zhiguo; Gu, Guohua

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated thermophilic bioleaching of a low grade nickel-copper sulfide using mixture of four acidophilic thermophiles. Effects of 0.2g/L l-cysteine on the bioleaching process were further evaluated. It aimed at offering new alternatives for enhancing metal recoveries from nickel-copper sulfide. Results showed a recovery of 80.4% nickel and 68.2% copper in 16-day bioleaching without l-cysteine; while 83.7% nickel and 81.4% copper were recovered in the presence of l-cysteine. Moreover, nickel recovery was always higher than copper recovery. l-Cysteine was found contributing to lower pH value, faster microbial growth, higher Oxidation-Reduction Potential (ORP), higher zeta potential and absorbing on the sulfide surfaces through amino, carboxyl and sulfhydryl groups. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) patterns of leached residues showed generation of S, jarosite and ammoniojarosite. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) results revealed that l-cysteine could have variant impacts on different microorganisms and changed the microbial community composition dramatically during nickel-copper sulfide bioleaching. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Bioleaching of nickel by Aspergillus humicola SKP102 isolated from Indian lateritic overburden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchhanda Ghosh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The lateritic deposits spread over the Eastern Ghats of Sukinda Valley, Odisha, India, produce a huge amount of overburden annually as a byproduct of chromite mining. This chromite mining overburden contains nickel, the only source of the metal in the country. During this study Aspergillus humicola SKP102, an indigenous fungus isolated from the mining overburden was employed for the leaching of nickel. About 53.89% of the nickel could be leached by the fungus when grown in batch mode using a Czapek dox medium containing 2% (w/v of the mining overburden. The parameters affecting bioleaching were optimized in order to grow the fungus and leach the metal. Of the different options of cheap carbon sources, straw infusion and molasses emerged as viable options for the growth of the fungus and the leaching of nickel. Two-step and indirect techniques were also used for this purpose, and they resulted in 53.09% and 65.04% Ni leaching respectively. Adding diluted sulfuric acid to the leaching medium resulted in 97.05% nickel recovery from the overburden pulp. A. humicola SKP102 could be a potential tool for leaching nickel from the mining overburden.

  15. Comparative evaluation of nickel discharge from brackets in artificial saliva at different time intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jithesh, C; Venkataramana, V; Penumatsa, Narendravarma; Reddy, S N; Poornima, K Y; Rajasigamani, K

    2015-08-01

    To determine and compare the potential difference of nickel release from three different orthodontic brackets, in different artificial pH, in different time intervals. Twenty-seven samples of three different orthodontic brackets were selected and grouped as 1, 2, and 3. Each group was divided into three subgroups depending on the type of orthodontic brackets, salivary pH and the time interval. The Nickel release from each subgroup were analyzed by using inductively coupled plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrophotometer (Perkin Elmer, Optima 2100 DV, USA) model. Quantitative analysis of nickel was performed three times, and the mean value was used as result. ANOVA (F-test) was used to test the significant difference among the groups at 0.05 level of significance (P brackets have the highest at all 4.2 pH except in 120 h. The study result shows that the nickel release from the recycled stainless steel brackets is highest. Metal slot ceramic bracket release significantly less nickel. So, recycled stainless steel brackets should not be used for nickel allergic patients. Metal slot ceramic brackets are advisable.

  16. Absorption and retention of nickel from drinking water in relation to food intake and nickel sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, G D; Søderberg, U; Jørgensen, P J; Templeton, D M; Rasmussen, S N; Andersen, K E; Grandjean, P

    1999-01-01

    Two studies were performed to examine the influence of fasting and food intake on the absorption and retention of nickel added to drinking water and to determine if nickel sensitization played any role in this regard. First, eight nonallergic male volunteers fasted overnight before being given nickel in drinking water (12 micrograms Ni/kg) and, at different time intervals, standardized 1400-kJ portions of scrambled eggs. When nickel was ingested in water 30 min or 1 h prior to the meal, peak nickel concentrations in serum occurred 1 h after the water intake, and the peak was 13-fold higher than the one seen 1 h after simultaneous intake of nickel-containing water and scrambled eggs. In the latter case, a smaller, delayed peak occurred 3 h after the meal. Median urinary nickel excretion half-times varied between 19.9 and 26.7 h. Within 3 days, the amount of nickel excreted corresponded to 2.5% of the nickel ingested when it was mixed into the scrambled eggs. Increasing amounts were excreted as the interval between the water and the meal increased, with 25.8% of the administered dose being excreted when the eggs were served 4 h prior to the nickel-containing drinking water. In the second experiment, a stable nickel isotope, 61Ni, was given in drinking water to 20 nickel-sensitized women and 20 age-matched controls, both groups having vesicular hand eczema of the pompholyx type. Nine of 20 nickel allergic eczema patients experienced aggravation of hand eczema after nickel administration, and three also developed a maculopapular exanthema. No exacerbation was seen in the control group. The course of nickel absorption and excretion in the allergic groups did not differ and was similar to the pattern seen in the first study, although the absorption in the women was less. A sex-related difference in gastric emptying rates may play a role. Thus, food intake and gastric emptying are of substantial significance for the bioavailability of nickel from aqueous solutions

  17. Melt refining of uranium contaminated copper, nickel, and mild steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Xinwen; Liu Wencang; Zhang Yuan

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the experiment results on melt refining of uranium contaminated metallic discards such as copper, nickel, and mild steel. Based on recommended processes, uranium contents in ingots shall decrease below 1 ppm; metal recovery is higher than 96%; and slag production is below 5% in weight of the metal to be refined. The uranium in the slag is homogeneously distributed. The slag seems to be hard ceramics, insoluble in water, and can be directly disposed of after proper packaging

  18. Nickel hydrogen multicell common pressure vessel battery development update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagrodnik, Jeffrey P.; Jones, Kenneth R.

    1992-01-01

    The technology background and design qualification of the multicell common pressure vessel nickel hydrogen battery are described. The results of full flight qualification, including random vibration at 19.5 g for two minutes in each axis, electrical characterization in a thermal vacuum chamber, and mass spectroscopy vessel leak detection are reviewed and 12.7 cm qualification and 25.4 cm design adaptation are discussed.

  19. A low pressure bipolar nickel-hydrogen battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golben, M.; Nechev, K.; DaCosta, D.H.; Rosso, M.J.

    1997-12-01

    Ergenics is developing a low pressure high power rechargeable battery for electric vehicles and other large battery applications. The Hy-Stor{trademark} battery couples a bipolar nickel-hydrogen electrochemical system with the high energy storage density of metal hydride technology. In addition to its long cycle life, high specific power, and energy density, this battery offers safety and economic advantages over other rechargeable batteries. Results from preliminary testing of the first Hy-Stor battery are presented.

  20. Determining the mechanical properties of high porosity nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frappier, J.C.; Poirier, J.

    1975-01-01

    The following tests were carried out on high porosity (40 to 70%) sintered nickel: tensile tests, compression tests, diametral crushing tests, using strain gauges and extensometers. Results were obtained on the relationship elastic properties - porosity, Poisson coefficient in relation to deformation, variations of yield strength, and breaking stress. these various properties were also studied in relation to the sintering methods and the properties of the powders used [fr

  1. Knowledge About E-Cigarette Constituents and Regulation: Results From a National Survey of U.S. Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders-Jackson, Ashley N; Tan, Andy S L; Bigman, Cabral A; Henriksen, Lisa

    2015-10-01

    To examine young adults' knowledge of e-cigarette constituents and regulation and its association with product use and self-reported exposure to marketing. Young adults (18-34 years, N = 1,247) from a U.S. web panel were surveyed in March 2014. Using multinomial logistic regressions, self-reported exposure to marketing was examined as a predictor of whether participants responded correctly (reference category), incorrectly, or "don't know" to four knowledge items-whether e-cigarettes contain nicotine, contain toxic chemicals, are regulated by government for safety, and are regulated for use as a cessation aid. Analyses adjusted for demographics and smoking status and were weighted to match the U.S. young adult population. Most respondents did not know if e-cigarettes, contain toxic chemicals (48%), are regulated for safety (61%), and are regulated as cessation aids (68%); fewer than 37% answered all of these items correctly. Current users of e-cigarettes (past 30 days) had a lower likelihood of being incorrect about safety testing (p = .006) and being regulated as a cessation aid (p = .017). Higher exposure to e-cigarette marketing was associated with a lower likelihood of responding "don't know" than being correct, and with a higher likelihood of being incorrect as opposed to correct about e-cigarettes containing nicotine. Knowledge about e-cigarette constituents and regulation was low among young adults, who are the largest consumer group for these products. Interventions, such as warning labels or information campaigns, may be necessary to educate and correct misinformation about these products. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Front-Loaded Linezolid Regimens Result in Increased Killing and Suppression of the Accessory Gene Regulator System of Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Tanya; Parasrampuria, Ridhi; Brazeau, Daniel A.; Forrest, Alan; Kelchlin, Pamela A.; Holden, Patricia N.; Peloquin, Charles A.; Hanna, Debra; Bulitta, Jurgen B.

    2012-01-01

    Front loading is a strategy used to optimize the pharmacodynamic profile of an antibiotic through the administration of high doses early in therapy for a short duration. Our aims were to evaluate the impact of front loading of linezolid regimens on bacterial killing and suppression of resistance and on RNAIII, the effector molecule of the accessory gene regulator system (encoded by agr) in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Time-killing experiments over 48 h were utilized for linezolid against four strains of MRSA: USA100, USA300, USA400, and ATCC 29213. A hollow-fiber infection model simulated traditional and front-loaded human therapeutic regimens of linezolid versus USA300 at 106 CFU/ml over 240 h. Over 48 h in time-kill experiments, linezolid displayed bacteriostatic activity, with reductions of >1 log10 CFU/ml for all strains. Front-loaded regimens that were administered over 5 days, 1,200 mg every 12 h (q12h) (total, 10 doses) and 2,400 mg q12h (total, 10 doses) followed by 300 mg q12h thereafter, resulted in sustained bactericidal activity, with reductions of the area under the CFU curve of −6.15 and −6.03, respectively, reaching undetectable limits at the 10-day study endpoint. All regimens displayed a reduction in RNAIII relative expression at 24 h and 240 h compared with that of the growth control. Monte Carlo simulations predicted a linezolid are promising and may be of utility in severe MRSA infections, where early aggressive therapy is necessary. PMID:22526313

  3. Safety evaluation of traces of nickel and chrome in cosmetics: The case of Dead Sea mud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma'or, Ze'evi; Halicz, Ludwik; Portugal-Cohen, Meital; Russo, Matteo Zanotti; Robino, Federica; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Rogiers, Vera

    2015-12-01

    Metal impurities such as nickel and chrome are present in natural ingredients-containing cosmetic products. These traces are unavoidable due to the ubiquitous nature of these elements. Dead Sea mud is a popular natural ingredient of cosmetic products in which nickel and chrome residues are likely to occur. To analyze the potential systemic and local toxicity of Dead Sea mud taking into consideration Dead Sea muds' natural content of nickel and chrome. The following endpoints were evaluated: (Regulation No. 1223/20, 21/12/2009) systemic and (SCCS's Notes of Guidance) local toxicity of topical application of Dead Sea mud; health reports during the last five years of commercial marketing of Dead Sea mud. Following exposure to Dead Sea mud, MoS (margin of safety) calculations for nickel and chrome indicate no toxicological concern for systemic toxicity. Skin sensitization is also not to be expected by exposure of normal healthy skin to Dead Sea mud. Topical application, however, is not recommended for already nickel-or chrome-sensitized persons. As risk assessment of impurities present in cosmetics may be a difficult exercise, the case of Dead Sea mud is taken here as an example of a natural material that may contain traces of unavoidable metals. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Point defects in nickel; Les defauts ponctuels dans le nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peretto, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    The defects in electron irradiated nickel (20 deg. K) or neutron irradiated nickel (28 deg. K) are studied by simultaneous analysis using the magnetic after-effect, electron microscopy and electrical resistivity recovery. We use zone refined nickel (99.999 per cent) which, for some experiments, is alloyed with a small amount of iron (for example 0.1 per cent Fe). The temperature dependant electrical recovery may be divided in four stages. The sub-stages I{sub B} (31 deg. K), I{sub C} (42 deg. K), I{sub D} (from to 57 deg. K) and I{sub E} (62 deg. K) of stage I are due to the disappearance of single interstitials into vacancies. The interstitial defect has a split configuration with a migration energy of about 0.15 eV. In the close pair which disappears in stage I{sub B} the interstitial is found to be in a 3. neighbour position whilst in stage I{sub D} it is near the <110> direction from the vacancy. In stage I{sub E} there is no longer any interaction between the interstitial and the vacancy. The stage II is due to more complicated interstitial defects: di-interstitials for stage II{sub B} (84 deg. K) and larger and larger interstitial loops for the following sub-stages. The loops may be seen by electron microscopy. Impurities can play the role of nucleation centers for the loops. Stages III{sub A} (370 deg. K) and III{sub B} (376 deg. K) are due to two types of di-vacancies. During stage IV (410 deg. K) the single vacancies migrate. Vacancy type loops and interstitial type loops grow concurrently and disappear at about 800 deg. K as observed by electron microscopy. (author) [French] Les defauts crees dans le nickel par irradiation avec des electrons a la temperature de 20 deg. K et par irradiation avec des neutrons a la temperature de 28 deg. K sont etudies par l'analyse simultanee du trainage magnetique, de la microscopie electronique et de la restauration de la resistivite electrique. Les echantillons sont en nickel, purifie par la methode de la zone fondue

  5. Point defects in nickel; Les defauts ponctuels dans le nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peretto, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    The defects in electron irradiated nickel (20 deg. K) or neutron irradiated nickel (28 deg. K) are studied by simultaneous analysis using the magnetic after-effect, electron microscopy and electrical resistivity recovery. We use zone refined nickel (99.999 per cent) which, for some experiments, is alloyed with a small amount of iron (for example 0.1 per cent Fe). The temperature dependant electrical recovery may be divided in four stages. The sub-stages I{sub B} (31 deg. K), I{sub C} (42 deg. K), I{sub D} (from to 57 deg. K) and I{sub E} (62 deg. K) of stage I are due to the disappearance of single interstitials into vacancies. The interstitial defect has a split configuration with a migration energy of about 0.15 eV. In the close pair which disappears in stage I{sub B} the interstitial is found to be in a 3. neighbour position whilst in stage I{sub D} it is near the <110> direction from the vacancy. In stage I{sub E} there is no longer any interaction between the interstitial and the vacancy. The stage II is due to more complicated interstitial defects: di-interstitials for stage II{sub B} (84 deg. K) and larger and larger interstitial loops for the following sub-stages. The loops may be seen by electron microscopy. Impurities can play the role of nucleation centers for the loops. Stages III{sub A} (370 deg. K) and III{sub B} (376 deg. K) are due to two types of di-vacancies. During stage IV (410 deg. K) the single vacancies migrate. Vacancy type loops and interstitial type loops grow concurrently and disappear at about 800 deg. K as observed by electron microscopy. (author) [French] Les defauts crees dans le nickel par irradiation avec des electrons a la temperature de 20 deg. K et par irradiation avec des neutrons a la temperature de 28 deg. K sont etudies par l'analyse simultanee du trainage magnetique, de la microscopie electronique et de la restauration de la resistivite electrique. Les echantillons sont en nickel, purifie par la methode de la zone

  6. Stainless steel leaches nickel and chromium into foods during cooking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamerud, Kristin L; Hobbie, Kevin A; Anderson, Kim A

    2013-10-02

    Toxicological studies show that oral doses of nickel and chromium can cause cutaneous adverse reactions such as dermatitis. Additional dietary sources, such as leaching from stainless steel cookware during food preparation, are not well characterized. This study examined stainless steel grades, cooking time, repetitive cooking cycles, and multiple types of tomato sauces for their effects on nickel and chromium leaching. Trials included three types of stainless steels and a stainless steel saucepan, cooking times of 2-20 h, 10 consecutive cooking cycles, and four commercial tomato sauces. After a simulated cooking process, samples were analyzed by ICP-MS for Ni and Cr. After 6 h of cooking, Ni and Cr concentrations in tomato sauce increased up to 26- and 7-fold, respectively, depending on the grade of stainless steel. Longer cooking durations resulted in additional increases in metal leaching, where Ni concentrations increased 34-fold and Cr increased approximately 35-fold from sauces cooked without stainless steel. Cooking with new stainless steel resulted in the largest increases. Metal leaching decreases with sequential cooking cycles and stabilized after the sixth cooking cycle, although significant metal contributions to foods were still observed. The tenth cooking cycle resulted in an average of 88 μg of Ni and 86 μg of Cr leached per 126 g serving of tomato sauce. Stainless steel cookware can be an overlooked source of nickel and chromium, where the contribution is dependent on stainless steel grade, cooking time, and cookware usage.

  7. Stainless Steel Leaches Nickel and Chromium into Foods During Cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamerud, Kristin L.; Hobbie, Kevin A.; Anderson, Kim A.

    2014-01-01

    Toxicological studies show that oral doses of nickel and chromium can cause cutaneous adverse reactions such as dermatitis. Additional dietary sources, such as leaching from stainless steel cookware during food preparation, are not well characterized. This study examined stainless steel grades, cooking time, repetitive cooking cycles, and multiple types of tomato sauces for their effects on nickel and chromium leaching. Trials included three types of stainless steels and a stainless steel saucepan; cooking times of 2 to 20 hours, ten consecutive cooking cycles, and four commercial tomato sauces. After a simulated cooking process, samples were analyzed by ICP-MS for Ni and Cr. After six hours of cooking, Ni and Cr concentrations in tomato sauce increased up to 26- and 7-fold respectively, depending on the grade of stainless steel. Longer cooking durations resulted in additional increases in metal leaching, where Ni concentrations increased 34 fold and Cr increased approximately 35 fold from sauces cooked without stainless steel. Cooking with new stainless steel resulted in the largest increases. Metal leaching decreases with sequential cooking cycles and stabilized after the sixth cooking cycle, though significant metal contributions to foods were still observed. The tenth cooking cycle, resulted in an average of 88 μg of Ni and 86 μg of Cr leached per 126 g serving of tomato sauce. Stainless steel cookware can be an overlooked source of nickel and chromium, where the contribution is dependent on stainless steel grade, cooking time, and cookware usage. PMID:23984718

  8. Effects of cobalt in nickel-base superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien, J. K.; Jarrett, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    The role of cobalt in a representative wrought nickel-base superalloy was determined. The results show cobalt affecting the solubility of elements in the gamma matrix, resulting in enhanced gamma' volume fraction, in the stabilization of MC-type carbides, and in the stabilization of sigma phase. In the particular alloy studied, these microstructural and microchemistry changes are insufficient in extent to impact on tensile strength, yield strength, and in the ductilities. Depending on the heat treatment, creep and stress rupture resistance can be cobalt sensitive. In the coarse grain, fully solutioned and aged condition, all of the alloy's 17% cobalt can be replaced by nickel without deleteriously affecting this resistance. In the fine grain, partially solutioned and aged condition, this resistance is deleteriously affected only when one-half or more of the initial cobalt content is removed. The structure and property results are discussed with respect to existing theories and with respect to other recent and earlier findings on the impact of cobalt, if any, on the performance of nickel-base superalloys.

  9. Synthesis, Structure, Characterization, and Decomposition of Nickel Dithiocarbamates: Effect of Precursor Structure and Processing Conditions on Solid-State Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Kulis, Michael J.; McNatt, Jeremiah S.; Duffy, Norman V.; Hoops, Michael D.; Gorse, Elizabeth; Fanwick, Philip E.; Masnovi, John; Cowen, Jonathan E.; Dominey, Raymond N.

    2016-01-01

    Single-crystal X-ray structures of four nickel dithiocarbamate complexes, the homoleptic mixed-organic bis-dithiocarbamates Ni[S2CN(isopropyl)(benzyl)]2, Ni[S2CN(ethyl)(n-butyl)]2, and Ni[S2CN(phenyl)(benzyl)]2, as well as the heteroleptic mixed-ligand complex NiCl[P(phenyl)3][(S2CN(phenyl)(benzyl)], were determined. Synthetic, spectroscopic, structural, thermal, and sulfide materials studies are discussed in light of prior literature. The spectroscopic results are routine. A slightly distorted square-planar nickel coordination environment was observed for all four complexes. The organic residues adopt conformations to minimize steric interactions. Steric effects also may determine puckering, if any, about the nickel and nitrogen atoms, both of which are planar or nearly so. A trans-influence affects the Ni-S bond distances. Nitrogen atoms interact with the CS2 carbons with a bond order of about 1.5, and the other substituents on nitrogen display transoid conformations. There are no strong intermolecular interactions, consistent with prior observations of the volatility of nickel dithiocarbamate complexes. Thermogravimetric analysis of the homoleptic species under inert atmosphere is consistent with production of 1:1 nickel sulfide phases. Thermolysis of nickel dithiocarbamates under flowing nitrogen produced hexagonal or -NiS as the major phase; thermolysis under flowing forming gas produced millerite (-NiS) at 300 C, godlevskite (Ni9S8) at 325 and 350 C, and heazlewoodite (Ni3S2) at 400 and 450 C. Failure to exclude oxygen results in production of nickel oxide. Nickel sulfide phases produced seem to be primarily influenced by processing conditions, in agreement with prior literature. Nickel dithiocarbamate complexes demonstrate significant promise to serve as single-source precursors to nickel sulfides, a quite interesting family of materials with numerous potential applications.

  10. Annealing texture of rolled nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshchaninov, I.V.; Khayutin, S.G.

    1976-01-01

    A texture of pure nickel and binary alloys after the 95% rolling and annealing has been studied. Insoluble additives (Mg, Zr) slacken the cubic texture in nickel and neral slackening of the texture (Zr). In the case of alloying with silicium (up to 2%) the texture practically coinsides with that of a technical-grade nickel. The remaining soluble additives either do not change the texture of pure nickel (C, Nb) or enhance the sharpness and intensity of the cubic compontnt (Al, Cu, Mn, Cr, Mo, W, Co -at their content 0.5 to 2.0%). A model is proposed by which variation of the annealing texture upon alloying is caused by dissimilar effect of the alloying elements on the mobility of high- and low-angle grain boundaries

  11. Detoxification of rats subjected to nickel chloride by a biomaterial-based carbonated orthophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulila, S; El Feki, A; Oudadesse, H; Kallel, C; El Feki, H

    2014-09-01

    Recently, the therapeutic approaches of the detoxification against the metals (nickel) in the body are the use of biomaterials such as carbonated hydroxyapatite. The aim of this study is therefore to analyze the physiological and physicochemical parameters of strain white rats "Wistar" receiving nickel chloride and to study the protective associative of apatite against adverse effects of this metal, and this in comparison with control rats. Our results showed that the nickel induced in rats an oxidative stress objectified by elevated levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and conjugated dienes associated with inhibition of the activity of the antioxidant defense system such as glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase in the liver, kidney, spleen and erythrocyte. Disorders balances of ferric, phosphocalcic, a renal failure and a liver toxicity were observed in rats exposed to nickel. As well as a significant increase in the rate of nickel in the bones and microcytic anemia was revealed. However, the implantation of carbonated hydroxyapatite in capsule form protects rats intoxicated by the nickel against the toxic effects of this metal by lowering the levels of markers of lipid peroxidation and improving the activities of defense enzymes. Our implantation technique is effective to correct ferric balance and phosphocalcic equilibrium, to protect liver and kidney function, to reduce the rate of bone nickel and to correct anemia. They clearly explain the beneficial and protective of our biomaterial which aims the detoxification of rats receiving nickel by substituting cationic (Ca(2+) by Ni(2+)) and anionic (OH(-) by Cl(-)) confirmed by physicochemical characterization like the IR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. These techniques have shown on the one hand a duplication of OH(-) bands (IR) and on the other hand the increase of the volume of the apatite cell after these substitutions (X-ray diffraction). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson

  12. Templated synthesis of nickel nanoparticles: Toward heterostructured nanocomposites for efficient hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Nicholas Cole [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The world is currently facing an energy and environmental crisis for which new technologies are needed. Development of cost-competitive materials for catalysis and hydrogen storage on-board motor vehicles is crucial to lead subsequent generations into a more sustainable and energy independent future. This thesis presents work toward the scalable synthesis of bimetallic heterostructures that can enable hydrogen to compete with carbonaceous fuels by meeting the necessary gravimetric and volumetric energy densities and by enhancing hydrogen sorption/desorption kinetics near ambient temperatures and pressures. Utilizing the well-known phenomenon of hydrogen spillover, these bimetallic heterostructures could work by lowering the activation energy for hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of metals. Herein, we report a novel method for the scalable synthesis of silica templated zero-valent nickel particles (Ni$\\subset$ SiO2) that hold promise for the synthesis of nickel nanorods for use in bimetallic heterostructures for hydrogen storage. Our synthesis proceeds by chemical reduction of a nickel-hydrazine complex with sodium borohydride followed by calcination under hydrogen gas to yield silica encapsulated nickel particles. Transmission electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the general morphology of the resultant nanocapsules as well as the crystalline phases of the incorporated Ni0 nanocrystals. The structures display strong magnetic behavior at room temperature and preliminary data suggests nickel particle size can be controlled by varying the amount of nickel precursor used in the synthesis. Calcination under different environments and TEM analysis provides evidence for an atomic migration mechanism of particle formation. Ni$\\subset$SiO2 nanocapsules were used as seeds to induce heterogeneous nucleation and subsequent growth within the nanocapsule via electroless nickel plating. Nickel nanoparticle

  13. Nickel Oxide (NiO nanoparticles prepared by solid-state thermal decomposition of Nickel (II schiff base precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliakbar Dehno Khalaji

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, plate-like NiO nanoparticles were prepared by one-pot solid-state thermal decomposition of nickel (II Schiff base complex as new precursor. First, the nickel (II Schiff base precursor was prepared by solid-state grinding using nickel (II nitrate hexahydrate, Ni(NO32∙6H2O, and the Schiff base ligand N,N′-bis-(salicylidene benzene-1,4-diamine for 30 min without using any solvent, catalyst, template or surfactant. It was characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and elemental analysis (CHN. The resultant solid was subsequently annealed in the electrical furnace at 450 °C for 3 h in air atmosphere. Nanoparticles of NiO were produced and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD at 2θ degree 0-140°, FT-IR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The XRD and FT-IR results showed that the product is pure and has good crystallinity with cubic structure because no characteristic peaks of impurity were observed, while the SEM and TEM results showed that the obtained product is tiny, aggregated with plate-like shape, narrow size distribution with an average size between 10-40 nm. Results show that the solid state thermal decomposition method is simple, environmentally friendly, safe and suitable for preparation of NiO nanoparticles. This method can also be used to synthesize nanoparticles of other metal oxides.

  14. Interaction with diurnal and circadian regulation results in dynamic metabolic and transcriptional changes during cold acclimation in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Espinoza

    Full Text Available In plants, there is a large overlap between cold and circadian regulated genes and in Arabidopsis, we have shown that cold (4°C affects the expression of clock oscillator genes. However, a broader insight into the significance of diurnal and/or circadian regulation of cold responses, particularly for metabolic pathways, and their physiological relevance is lacking. Here, we performed an integrated analysis of transcripts and primary metabolites using microarrays and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. As expected, expression of diurnally regulated genes was massively affected during cold acclimation. Our data indicate that disruption of clock function at the transcriptional level extends to metabolic regulation. About 80% of metabolites that showed diurnal cycles maintained these during cold treatment. In particular, maltose content showed a massive night-specific increase in the cold. However, under free-running conditions, maltose was the only metabolite that maintained any oscillations in the cold. Furthermore, although starch accumulates during cold acclimation we show it is still degraded at night, indicating significance beyond the previously demonstrated role of maltose and starch breakdown in the initial phase of cold acclimation. Levels of some conventional cold induced metabolites, such as γ-aminobutyric acid, galactinol, raffinose and putrescine, exhibited diurnal and circadian oscillations and transcripts encoding their biosynthetic enzymes often also cycled and preceded their cold-induction, in agreement with transcriptional regulation. However, the accumulation of other cold-responsive metabolites, for instance homoserine, methionine and maltose, did not have consistent transcriptional regulation, implying that metabolic reconfiguration involves complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. These data demonstrate the importance of understanding cold acclimation in the correct day-night context, and are further

  15. Surfactant free nickel sulphide nanoparticles for high capacitance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandhini, S.; Muralidharan, G.

    2018-04-01

    The surfactant free nickel sulphide nanoparticles were synthesized via facile hydrothermal method towards supercapacitor applications. The formation of crystalline spherical nanoparticles was confirmed through structural and morphological studies. Electrochemical behaviour of the electrode was analyzed using cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge-discharge studies (GCD) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The CV studies imply that specific capacitance of the electrode arises from a combination of surface adsorption and Faradic reaction. The NiS electrode delivered a specific capacitance of about 529 F g-1 at a current density of 2 A g-1 (GCD measurements). A profitable charge transfer resistance of 0.5 Ω was obtained from EIS. The 100 % of capacity retention even after 2000 repeated charge-discharge cycles could be observed in 2 M KOH electrolyte at a much larger rate of 30 A g-1. The experimental results suggest that nickel sulphide is a potential candidate for supercapacitor applications.

  16. Numerical simulation and optimization of nickel-hydrogen batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Li-Jun; Qin, Ming-Jun; Zhu, Peng; Yang, Li

    2008-05-01

    A three-dimensional, transient numerical model of an individual pressure vessel (IPV) nickel-hydrogen battery has been developed based on energy conservation law, mechanisms of heat and mass transfer, and electrochemical reactions in the battery. The model, containing all components of a battery including the battery shell, was utilized to simulate the transient temperature of the battery, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technology. The comparison of the model prediction and experimental data shows a good agreement, which means that the present model can be used for the engineering design and parameter optimization of nickel-hydrogen batteries in aerospace power systems. Two kinds of optimization schemes were provided and evaluated by the simulated temperature field. Based on the model, the temperature simulation during five successive periods in a designed space battery was conducted and the simulation results meet the requirement of safe operation.

  17. Nickel/Diamond Composite Coating Prepared by High Speed Electrodeposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Yan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nickel/diamond composite coatings were prepared on the basis of a new high speed electroplating bath. The influence of additives, plating parameters and diamond concentration on internal stress was investigated in order to find the solution to decrease the stress introduced by high current density; the micro morphology of the coatings were observed by SEM. The bath and depositing parameters were optimized that thick nickel/diamond composite coatings with low internal stress can be high speed electroplated with a high cathode current density of 30A/dm2. The results show that when plated with bath composition and parameters as follows: sodium dodecyl sulfate 0.5g/L, ammonium acetate 3g/L, sodium citrate 1.5g/L, diamond particles 30g/L; pH value 3-4, temperature 50℃, the composite coatings prepared in high speed have the lowest internal stress.

  18. Research in Nickel/Metal Hydride Batteries 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwo-Hsiung Young

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Continuing from a special issue in Batteries in 2016, nineteen new papers focusing on recent research activities in the field of nickel/metal hydride (Ni/MH batteries have been selected for the 2017 Special Issue of Ni/MH Batteries. These papers summarize the international joint-efforts in Ni/MH battery research from BASF, Wayne State University, Michigan State University, FDK Corp. (Japan, Institute for Energy Technology (Norway, Central South University (China, University of Science and Technology Beijing (China, Zhengzhou University of Light Industry (China, Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology (China, Shenzhen Highpower (China, and University of the Witwatersrand (South Africa from 2016–2017 through reviews of AB2 metal hydride alloys, Chinese and EU Patent Applications, as well as descriptions of research results in metal hydride alloys, nickel hydroxide, electrolyte, and new cell type, comparison work, and projections of future works.

  19. The association between null mutations in the filaggrin gene and contact sensitization to nickel and other chemicals in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, J P; Johansen, J D; Linneberg, A

    2010-01-01

    It was recently shown that filaggrin gene (FLG) null mutations are positively associated with nickel sensitization. We have hypothesized that histidine-rich filaggrin proteins in the epidermis chelate nickel ions and prevent their skin penetration and exposure to Langerhans cells. Furthermore, we...... have proposed that the low degree of genetic predisposition to nickel sensitization found by a Danish twin study was explained by a high prevalence of ear piercing among participants resulting in 'bypassing' of the filaggrin proteins....

  20. Development of nickel hydrogen battery expert system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiva, Sajjan G.

    1990-01-01

    The Hubble Telescope Battery Testbed employs the nickel-cadmium battery expert system (NICBES-2) which supports the evaluation of performances of Hubble Telescope spacecraft batteries and provides alarm diagnosis and action advice. NICBES-2 also provides a reasoning system along with a battery domain knowledge base to achieve this battery health management function. An effort to modify NICBES-2 to accommodate nickel-hydrogen battery environment in testbed is described.

  1. Crystallite size effects in stacking faulted nickel hydroxide and its electrochemical behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramesh, T.N.

    2009-01-01

    β-Nickel hydroxide comprises a long range periodic arrangement of atoms with a stacking sequence of AC AC AC-having an ideal composition Ni(OH) 2 . Variation in the preparative conditions can lead to the changes in the stacking sequence (AC AC BA CB AC AC or AC AC AB AC AC). This type of variation in stacking sequence can result in the formation of stacking fault in nickel hydroxide. The stability of the stacking fault depends on the free energy content of the sample. Stacking faults in nickel hydroxide is essential for better electrochemical activity. Also there are reports correlating particle size to the better electrochemical activity. Here we present the effect of crystallite size on the stacking faulted nickel hydroxide samples. The electrochemical performance of stacking faulted nickel hydroxide with small crystallite size exchanges 0.8e/Ni, while the samples with larger crystallite size exchange 0.4e/Ni. Hence a right combination of crystallite size and stacking fault content has to be controlled for good electrochemical activity of nickel hydroxide

  2. Precipitation formation in recrystallized nickel-plated non-sag tungsten wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Z.H.

    1994-01-01

    It is well established that some metals, such as palladium and nickel, can easily penetrate into tungsten by fast diffusion via crystal defects such as grain boundaries and dislocations. As a result of the fast penetration of these so called activators the recrystallization temperature of heavily drawn non-sag tungsten wire can be lower from about 2,000 C to about 1,000 C, thus the application of the tungsten wire, serving as reinforcement material in metal matrix composites used at high temperatures, is limited. An interesting question is in which form these activators exist in the recrystallized tungsten wire. It is generally believed that W-Ni intermediate compounds could form in the recrystallized material, presumably at grain boundaries. The free energy difference between the pure tungsten fibbers and the precipitating W(Ni) solid solution was suggested as the chemical driving force which governed the recrystallization process. The presence of nickel in small particles had also been observed in recrystallized grains of nickel plated tungsten wires using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. These particles were considered to be nickel rich precipitates. However, a detailed investigation of the precipitation process has not been reported. In the present work an investigation of the structure, composition and distribution of nickel rich particles precipitated in recrystallized grains of nickel plated heavily drawn non-sage tungsten wires was carried out using analytical electron microscopy (AEM)

  3. Hydrothermal synthesis of nickel hydroxide nanostructures in mixed solvents of water and alcohol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Lixia; Zhu Yingjie; Tong Hua; Liang Zhenhua; Li Liang; Zhang Ling

    2007-01-01

    Nickel hydroxide nanosheets and flowers have been hydrothermally synthesized using Ni(CH 3 COO) 2 .4H 2 O in mixed solvents of ethylene glycol (EG) or ethanol and deionized water at 200 deg. C for different time. The phase and morphology of the obtained products can be controlled by adjusting the experimental parameters, including the hydrothermal time and the volume ratio of water to EG or ethanol. The possible reaction mechanism and growth of the nanosheets and nanoflowers are discussed based on the experimental results. Porous nickel oxide nanosheets are obtained by heating nickel hydroxide nanosheets in air at 400 deg. C. The products were characterized by using various methods including X-ray diffraction (XRD), fourier transform infrared (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected-area electron diffraction (SAED), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The electrochemical property of β-Ni(OH) 2 nanosheets was investigated through the cyclic voltammogram (CV) measurement. - Graphical abstract: Nickel hydroxide nanosheets and flowers have been hydrothermally synthesized using Ni(CH 3 COO) 2 .4H 2 O in mixed solvents of ethylene glycol (EG) or ethanol and deionized water at 200 deg. C for different reaction time. Porous nickel oxide nanosheets are obtained by heating nickel hydroxide nanosheets in air at 400 deg. C

  4. Global nickel anomaly links Siberian Traps eruptions and the latest Permian mass extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampino, Michael R; Rodriguez, Sedelia; Baransky, Eva; Cai, Yue

    2017-09-29

    Anomalous peaks of nickel abundance have been reported in Permian-Triassic boundary sections in China, Israel, Eastern Europe, Spitzbergen, and the Austrian Carnic Alps. New solution ICP-MS results of enhanced nickel from P-T boundary sections in Hungary, Japan, and Spiti, India suggest that the nickel anomalies at the end of the Permian were a worldwide phenomenon. We propose that the source of the nickel anomalies at the P-T boundary were Ni-rich volatiles released by the Siberian volcanism, and by coeval Ni-rich magma intrusions. The peaks in nickel abundance correlate with negative δ 13 C and δ 18 O anomalies, suggesting that explosive reactions between magma and coal during the Siberian flood-basalt eruptions released large amounts of CO 2 and CH 4 into the atmosphere, causing severe global warming and subsequent mass extinction. The nickel anomalies may provide a timeline in P-T boundary sections, and the timing of the peaks supports the Siberian Traps as a contributor to the latest Permian mass extinction.

  5. Evaluation of cyclic flexural fatigue of M-wire nickel-titanium rotary instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hadlaq, Solaiman M S; Aljarbou, Fahad A; AlThumairy, Riyadh I

    2010-02-01

    This study was conducted to investigate cyclic flexural fatigue resistance of GT series X rotary files made from the newly developed M-wire nickel-titanium alloy compared with GT and Profile nickel-titanium files made from a conventional nickel-titanium alloy. Fifteen files, size 30/0.04, of each type were used to evaluate the cyclic flexural fatigue resistance. A simple device was specifically constructed to measure the time each file type required to fail under cyclic flexural fatigue testing. The results of this experiment indicated that the GT series X files had superior cyclic flexural fatigue resistance than the other 2 file types made from a conventional nickel-titanium alloy (P = .004). On the other hand, the difference between the Profile and the GT files was not statistically significant. The findings of this study suggest that size 30/0.04 nickel-titanium rotary files made from the newly developed M-wire alloy have better cyclic flexural fatigue resistance than files of similar design and size made from the conventional nickel-titanium alloy. Copyright 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Toxicity of nickel in the marine calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa: Nickel chloride versus nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, C; Vitiello, V; Casals, E; Puntes, V F; Iamunno, F; Pellegrini, D; Changwen, W; Benvenuto, G; Buttino, I

    2016-01-01

    Nickel compounds are widely used in industries and have been massively introduced in the environment in different chemical forms. Here we report the effect of two different chemical forms of nickel, NiCl2 and nickel nanoparticles (NiNPs), on the reproduction of the marine calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa. The behavior of nickel nanoparticles was analyzed with different techniques and with two protocols. In the "sonicated experiment" (SON) NiNP solution was sonicated while in the "non-sonicated experiment" (NON-SON) the solution was vigorously shaken by hand. Final nominal concentrations of 5, 10 and 50mgL(-1) and 1, 5 and 10mgL(-1) NiNPs were used for the acute and semichronic tests, respectively. Nanoparticle size did not change over time except for the highest concentration of 50mgL(-1) NiNPs, in which the diameter increased up to 843nm after 48h. The concentration of Ni dissolved in the water increased with NP concentration and was similar for SON and NON-SON solutions. Our results indicate that sonication does not modify toxicity for the copepod A. tonsa. Mean EC50 values were similar for NON-SON (20.2mgL(-1)) and SON experiments (22.14mgL(-1)) in the acute test. Similarly, no differences occurred between the two different protocols in the semichronic test, with an EC50 of 7.45mgL(-1) and 6.97mgL(-1) for NON-SON and SON experiments, respectively. Acute and semichronic tests, conducted exposing A. tonsa embryos to NiCl2 concentrations from 0.025 to 0.63mgL(-1), showed EC50 of 0.164 and 0.039mgL(-1), respectively. Overall, A. tonsa is more sensitive to NiCl2 than NiNPs with EC50 being one order of magnitude higher for NiNPs. Finally, we exposed adult copepods for 4 days to NiCl2 and NiNPs (chronic exposure) to study the effect on fecundity in terms of daily egg production and naupliar viability. Egg production is not affected by either form of nickel, whereas egg viability is significantly reduced by 0.025mgL(-1) NiCl2 and by 8.5mgL(-1) NiNPs. At NiNP concentration

  7. Oxidation characteristics of porous-nickel prepared by powder metallurgy and cast-nickel at 1273 K in air for total oxidation time of 100 h

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamiaa Z. Mohamed

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation behavior of two types of inhomogeneous nickel was investigated in air at 1273 K for a total oxidation time of 100 h. The two types were porous sintered-nickel and microstructurally inhomogeneous cast-nickel. The porous-nickel samples were fabricated by compacting Ni powder followed by sintering in vacuum at 1473 K for 2 h. The oxidation kinetics of the samples was determined gravimetrically. The topography and the cross-section microstructure of each oxidized sample were observed using optical and scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffractometry and X-ray energy dispersive analysis were used to determine the nature of the formed oxide phases. The kinetic results revealed that the porous-nickel samples had higher trend for irreproducibility. The average oxidation rate for porous- and cast-nickel samples was initially rapid, and then decreased gradually to become linear. Linear rate constants were 5.5 × 10−8 g/cm2 s and 3.4 × 10−8 g/cm2 s for the porous- and cast-nickel samples, respectively. Initially a single-porous non-adherent NiO layer was noticed on the porous- and cast-nickel samples. After a longer time of oxidation, a non-adherent duplex NiO scale was formed. The two layers of the duplex scales were different in color. NiO particles were observed in most of the pores of the porous-nickel samples. Finally, the linear oxidation kinetics and the formation of porous non-adherent duplex oxide scales on the inhomogeneous nickel substrates demonstrated that the addition of new layers of NiO occurred at the scale/metal interface due to the thermodynamically possible reaction between Ni and the molecular oxygen migrating inwardly.

  8. Oxidation characteristics of porous-nickel prepared by powder metallurgy and cast-nickel at 1273 K in air for total oxidation time of 100 h.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Lamiaa Z; Ghanem, Wafaa A; El Kady, Omayma A; Lotfy, Mohamed M; Ahmed, Hafiz A; Elrefaie, Fawzi A

    2017-11-01

    The oxidation behavior of two types of inhomogeneous nickel was investigated in air at 1273 K for a total oxidation time of 100 h. The two types were porous sintered-nickel and microstructurally inhomogeneous cast-nickel. The porous-nickel samples were fabricated by compacting Ni powder followed by sintering in vacuum at 1473 K for 2 h. The oxidation kinetics of the samples was determined gravimetrically. The topography and the cross-section microstructure of each oxidized sample were observed using optical and scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffractometry and X-ray energy dispersive analysis were used to determine the nature of the formed oxide phases. The kinetic results revealed that the porous-nickel samples had higher trend for irreproducibility. The average oxidation rate for porous- and cast-nickel samples was initially rapid, and then decreased gradually to become linear. Linear rate constants were 5.5 × 10 -8  g/cm 2  s and 3.4 × 10 -8  g/cm 2  s for the porous- and cast-nickel samples, respectively. Initially a single-porous non-adherent NiO layer was noticed on the porous- and cast-nickel samples. After a longer time of oxidation, a non-adherent duplex NiO scale was formed. The two layers of the duplex scales were different in color. NiO particles were observed in most of the pores of the porous-nickel samples. Finally, the linear oxidation kinetics and the formation of porous non-adherent duplex oxide scales on the inhomogeneous nickel substrates demonstrated that the addition of new layers of NiO occurred at the scale/metal interface due to the thermodynamically possible reaction between Ni and the molecular oxygen migrating inwardly.

  9. Impacts of Nickel Nanoparticles on Mineral Carbonation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Bodor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents experimental results regarding the use of pure nickel nanoparticles (NiNP as a mineral carbonation additive. The aim was to confirm if the catalytic effect of NiNP, which has been reported to increase the dissolution of CO2 and the dissociation of carbonic acid in water, is capable of accelerating mineral carbonation processes. The impacts of NiNP on the CO2 mineralization by four alkaline materials (pure CaO and MgO, and AOD and CC steelmaking slags, on the product mineralogy, on the particle size distribution, and on the morphology of resulting materials were investigated. NiNP-containing solution was found to reach more acidic pH values upon CO2 bubbling, confirming a higher quantity of bicarbonate ions. This effect resulted in acceleration of mineral carbonation in the first fifteen minutes of reaction time when NiNP was present. After this initial stage, however, no benefit of NiNP addition was seen, resulting in very similar carbonation extents after one hour of reaction time. It was also found that increasing solids content decreased the benefit of NiNP, even in the early stages. These results suggest that NiNP has little contribution to mineral carbonation processes when the dissolution of alkaline earth metals is rate limiting.

  10. Nickel-induced hypersensitivity: etiology, immune reactions, prevention and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostýnek, Jurij J

    2002-08-01

    As a contact allergen causing type I and type IV hypersensitivity, mediated by reagins and allergen-specific T lymphocytes, expressed in a wide range of cutaneous eruptions following dermal or systemic exposure, nickel has acquired the distinction of being among the most frequent causes of hypersensitivity, occupationally as well as among the general population. In synoptic form the many effects that nickel has on the organism are presented, to provide a comprehensive picture of the aspects of that metal with many biologically noxious, but metallurgically indispensable characteristics. This paper reviews the epidemiology, the prognosis for occupational and non-occupational nickel allergic hypersensitivity (NAH), the many types of exposure and the resulting immune responses, immunotoxicity and rate of diffusion through the skin. Alternatives towards prevention and remediation, topical and systemic, for this pervasive and increasing form of morbidity resulting from multiple types of exposure are discussed. Merits and limitations of preventive measures in industry and private life are considered, as well as the effectiveness of topical and systemic therapy in treating NAH.

  11. Nickel-titanium alloys: stress-related temperature transitional range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, M; Beshers, D N

    2000-12-01

    The inducement of mechanical stress within nickel-titanium wires can influence the transitional temperature range of the alloy and therefore the expression of the superelastic properties. An analogous variation of the transitional temperature range may be expected during orthodontic therapy, when the archwires are engaged into the brackets. To investigate this possibility, samples of currently used orthodontic nickel-titanium wires (Sentalloy, GAC; Copper Ni-Ti superelastic at 27 degrees C, 35 degrees C, 40 degrees C, Ormco; Nitinol Heat-Activated, 3M-Unitek) were subjected to temperature cycles ranging between 4 degrees C and 60 degrees C. The wires were mounted in a plexiglass loading device designed to simulate clinical situations of minimum and severe dental crowding. Electrical resistivity was used to monitor the phase transformations. The data were analyzed with paired t tests. The results confirmed the presence of displacements of the transitional temperature ranges toward higher temperatures when stress was induced. Because nickel-titanium wires are most commonly used during the aligning stage in cases of severe dental crowding, particular attention was given to the performance of the orthodontic wires under maximum loading. An alloy with a stress-related transitional temperature range corresponding to the fluctuations of the oral temperature should express superelastic properties more consistently than others. According to our results, Copper Ni-Ti 27 degrees C and Nitinol Heat-Activated wires may be considered suitable alloys for the alignment stage.

  12. Implementation of training programs in self-regulated learning strategies in Moodle format: results of a experience in higher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, José Carlos; Cerezo, Rebeca; Bernardo, Ana; Rosário, Pedro; Valle, Antonio; Fernández, Estrella; Suárez, Natalia

    2011-04-01

    This paper tests the efficacy of an intervention program in virtual format intended to train studying and self-regulation strategies in university students. The aim of this intervention is to promote a series of strategies which allow students to manage their learning processes in a more proficient and autonomous way. The program has been developed in Moodle format and hosted by the Virtual Campus of the University of Oviedo. The present study had a semi-experimental design, included an experimental group (n=167) and a control one (n=206), and used pretest and posttest measures (self-regulated learning strategies' declarative knowledge, self-regulated learning macro-strategy planning-execution-assessment, self-regulated learning strategies on text, surface and deep learning approaches, and academic achievement). Data suggest that the students enrolled in the training program, comparing with students in the control group, showed a significant improvement in their declarative knowledge, general and on text use of learning strategies, increased their deep approach to learning, decreased their use of a surface approach and, in what concerns to academic achievement, statistically significant differences have been found in favour of the experimental group.

  13. Lifelong Learning as a goal - Do autonomy and self-regulation in school result in well prepared pupils?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lüftenegger, M.; Schober, B.; Van de Schoot, R.; Wagner, P.; Finsterwald, M.; Spiel, C.

    2012-01-01

    Fostering lifelong learning (LLL) is a topic of high relevance for current educational policy. School lays the cornerstone for the key components of LLL, specifically persistent motivation to learn and self-regulated learning behavior. The present study investigated the impact of classroom

  14. Nickel acts as an adjuvant during cobalt sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld, Charlotte Menne; Nielsen, Morten Milek; Vennegaard, Marie T.

    2015-01-01

    Metal allergy is the most frequent form of contact allergy with nickel and cobalt being the main culprits. Typically, exposure comes from metal-alloys where nickel and cobalt co-exist. Importantly, very little is known about how co-exposure to nickel and cobalt affects the immune system. We...... investigated these effects by using a recently developed mouse model. Mice were epicutaneously sensitized with i) nickel alone, ii) nickel in the presence of cobalt, iii) cobalt alone, or iv) cobalt in the presence of nickel, and then followed by challenge with either nickel or cobalt alone. We found...... that sensitization with nickel alone induced more local inflammation than cobalt alone as measured by increased ear-swelling. Furthermore, the presence of nickel during sensitization to cobalt led to a stronger challenge response to cobalt as seen by increased ear-swelling and increased B and T cell responses...

  15. Effects of repeated skin exposure to low nickel concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, N H; Menné, T; Kristiansen, J

    1999-01-01

    and nickel allergy, either on normal or on SLS-treated forearm skin. The present study strongly suggests that the changes observed were specific to nickel exposure. Standardized methods to assess trace to moderate nickel exposure on the hands, and the associated effects in nickel-sensitized subjects......We studied the effects of repeated daily exposure to low nickel concentrations on the hands of patients with hand eczema and nickel allergy. The concentrations used were chosen to represent the range of trace to moderate occupational nickel exposure. The study was double-blinded and placebo...... controlled. Patients immersed a finger for 10 min daily into a 10-p.p.m. nickel concentration in water for the first week, and during the second week into a 100-p.p.m. nickel concentration. This regimen significantly increased (P = 0.05) local vesicle formation and blood flow (P = 0.03) as compared...

  16. Redox stress proteins are involved in adaptation response of the hyperthermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus to nickel challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scaloni Andrea

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to nickel (Ni and its chemical derivatives has been associated with severe health effects in human. On the contrary, poor knowledge has been acquired on target physiological processes or molecular mechanisms of this metal in model organisms, including Bacteria and Archaea. In this study, we describe an analysis focused at identifying proteins involved in the recovery of the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus strain MT4 from Ni-induced stress. Results To this purpose, Sulfolobus solfataricus was grown in the presence of the highest nickel sulphate concentration still allowing cells to survive; crude extracts from treated and untreated cells were compared at the proteome level by using a bi-dimensional chromatography approach. We identified several proteins specifically repressed or induced as result of Ni treatment. Observed up-regulated proteins were largely endowed with the ability to trigger recovery from oxidative and osmotic stress in other biological systems. It is noteworthy that most of the proteins induced following Ni treatment perform similar functions and a few have eukaryal homologue counterparts. Conclusion These findings suggest a series of preferential gene expression pathways activated in adaptation response to metal challenge.

  17. High-performance reagent modes for flotation recovery of platiniferous copper and nickel sulfides from hard-to-beneficiate ores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveeva, T. N.; Chanturiya, V. A.

    2017-07-01

    The paper presents the results of the recent research performed in IPKON Russian Academy of Sciences that deals with development and substantiation of new selective reagents for effective flotation recovery of non-ferrous and noble metals from refractory ores. The choice and development of new selective reagents PTTC, OPDTC, modified butylxanthate (BXm) and modified diethyl-dithiocarbamate (DEDTCm) to float platiniferous copper and nickel sulfide minerals from hard-to-beneficiate ores is substantiated. The mechanism of reagents adsorption and regulation of minerals floatability is discussed. The study of reagent modes indicates that by combining PTTC with the modified xanthate results in 6 - 7 % increase in the recovery of copper, nickel and PGM in the flotation of the low-sulfide platiniferous Cu-Ni ore from the Fedorovo-Panskoye deposit. The substitution of OPDTC for BX makes it possible to increase recovery of Pt by 13 %, Pd by 9 % and 2 - 4 times the noble metal content in the flotation concentrate.

  18. Experimental nickel elicitation thresholds--a review focusing on occluded nickel exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Louise Arup; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2005-01-01

    Nickel (Ni) is the most frequent cause of contact allergy among the female population. This makes it interesting to examine thresholds for elicitation under different conditions. Even though Ni exposure may be open, occluded, penetrating or oral, most dose-response studies in the literature concern...... single occluded application. The aims of this study were to assess thresholds of response by making a statistical analysis of available dose-response studies with single occluded exposure and comparing the results to thresholds from other modes of exposure. 8 occluded Ni dose-response studies were...... 10% reacted in occluded exposure. When combining the exposure to Ni with an irritant, divagating results were found, although the literature shows evidence of an augmented response when combining exposure to an allergen and an irritant. The thresholds of penetrating exposure were found to be lower...

  19. Corrosion properties of plasma deposited nickel and nickel-based alloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Voleník, Karel; Pražák, M.; Kalabisová, E.; Kreislová, K.; Had, J.; Neufuss, Karel

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 3 (2003), s. 215-226 ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/99/0298 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : plasma deposits, nickel, nickel-based alloys Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials

  20. Performance improvement of pasted nickel electrodes with multi-wall carbon nanotubes for rechargeable nickel batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Q.S.; Aravindaraj, G.K.; Sultana, H.; Chan, S.L.I.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were employed as a functional additive to improve the electrochemical performance of pasted nickel-foam electrodes for rechargeable nickel-based batteries. The nickel electrodes were prepared with spherical β-Ni(OH) 2 powder as the active material and various amounts of CNTs as additives. Galvanostatic charge/discharge cycling tests showed that in comparison with the electrode without CNTs, the pasted nickel electrode with added CNTs exhibited better electrochemical properties in the chargeability, specific discharge capacity, active material utilization, discharge voltage, high-rate capability and cycling stability. Meanwhile, the CNT addition also lowered the packing density of Ni(OH) 2 particles in the three-dimensional porous nickel-foam substrate, which could lead to the decrease in the active material loading and discharge capacity of the electrode. Hence, the amount of CNTs added to Ni(OH) 2 should be optimized to obtain a high-performance nickel electrode, and an optimum amount of CNT addition was found to be 3 wt.%. The superior electrochemical performance of the nickel electrode with CNTs could be attributed to lower electrochemical impedance and less γ-NiOOH formed during charge/discharge cycling, as indicated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses. Thus, it was an effective method to improve the electrochemical properties of pasted nickel electrodes by adding an appropriate amount of CNTs to spherical Ni(OH) 2 as the active material

  1. Absorption and retention of nickel from drinking water in relation to food intake and nickel sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, G D; Søderberg, U; Jørgensen, Poul Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    nickel in drinking water (12 micrograms Ni/kg) and, at different time intervals, standardized 1400-kJ portions of scrambled eggs. When nickel was ingested in water 30 min or 1 h prior to the meal, peak nickel concentrations in serum occurred 1 h after the water intake, and the peak was 13-fold higher...... than the one seen 1 h after simultaneous intake of nickel-containing water and scrambled eggs. In the latter case, a smaller, delayed peak occurred 3 h after the meal. Median urinary nickel excretion half-times varied between 19.9 and 26.7 h. Within 3 days, the amount of nickel excreted corresponded...... to 2.5% of the nickel ingested when it was mixed into the scrambled eggs. Increasing amounts were excreted as the interval between the water and the meal increased, with 25.8% of the administered dose being excreted when the eggs were served 4 h prior to the nickel-containing drinking water...

  2. AN ELECTROPLATING METHOD OF FORMING PLATINGS OF NICKEL, COBALT, NICKEL ALLOYS OR COBALT ALLOYS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    An electroplating method of forming platings of nickel, cobalt, nickel alloys or cobalt alloys with reduced stresses in an electrodepositing bath of the type: Watt's bath, chloride bath or a combination thereof, by employing pulse plating with periodic reverse pulse and a sulfonated naphthalene...

  3. Repeated patch testing to nickel during childhood do not induce nickel sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard Christiansen, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Background: Previously, patch test reactivity to nickel sulphate in a cohort of unselected infants tested repeatedly at 3-72 months of age has been reported. A reproducible positive reaction at 12 and 18 months was selected as a sign of nickel sensitivity, provided a patch test with an empty Finn...

  4. Exposure of nickel and the relevance of nickel sensitivity among hospital cleaners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemmensen, O J; Menne, T; Kaaber, K; Solgaard, P

    1981-01-01

    The nickel content of water specimens from consecutive stages during the cleaning process in a Danish hospital was analyzed. Statistically significant increases of the nickel concentrations were found from step to step of the cleaning, eventually exceeding the theoretical sensitizing safety limit. The relevance of the findings in relation to hand eczema is discussed.

  5. Elucidating the mechanisms of nickel compound uptake: A review of particulate and nano-nickel endocytosis and toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz, Alexandra; Costa, Max, E-mail: Max.Costa@nyumc.org

    2012-04-01

    Nickel (Ni) is a worldwide pollutant and contaminant that humans are exposed to through various avenues resulting in multiple toxic responses — most alarming is its clear carcinogenic nature. A variety of particulate Ni compounds persist in the environment and can be distinguished by characteristics such as solubility, structure, and surface charge. These characteristics influence cellular uptake and toxicity. Some particulate forms of Ni are carcinogenic and are directly and rapidly endocytized by cells. A series of studies conducted in the 1980s observed this process, and we have reanalyzed the results of these studies to help elucidate the molecular mechanism of particulate Ni uptake. Originally the process of uptake observed was described as phagocytosis, however in the context of recent research we hypothesize that the process is macropinocytosis and/or clathrin mediated endocytosis. Primary considerations in determining the route of uptake here include calcium dependence, particle size, and inhibition through temperature and pharmacological approaches. Particle characteristics that influenced uptake include size, charge, surface characteristics, and structure. This discussion is relevant in the context of nanoparticle studies and the emerging interest in nano-nickel (nano-Ni), where toxicity assessments require a clear understanding of the parameters of particulate uptake and where establishment of such parameters is often obscured through inconsistencies across experimental systems. In this regard, this review aims to carefully document one system (particulate nickel compound uptake) and characterize its properties.

  6. An evaluation of two types of nickel-titanium wires in terms of micromorphology and nickel ions' release following oral environment exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazal, Abdul Razzak A; Hajeer, Mohammad Y; Al-Sabbagh, Rabab; Alghoraibi, Ibrahim; Aldiry, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare superelastic and heat-activated nickel-titanium orthodontic wires' surface morphology and potential release of nickel ions following exposure to oral environment conditions. Twenty-four 20-mm-length distal cuts of superelastic (NiTi Force I®) and 24 20-mm-length distal cuts of heat-activated (Therma-Ti Lite®) nickel-titanium wires (American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, WI, USA) were divided into two equal groups: 12 wire segments left unused and 12 segments passively exposed to oral environment for 1 month. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to analyze surface morphology of the wires which were then immersed in artificial saliva for 1 month to determine potential nickel ions' release by means of atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Heat-activated nickel-titanium (NiTi) wires were rougher than superelastic wires, and both types of wires released almost the same amount of Ni ions. After clinical exposure, more surface roughness was recorded for superelastic NiTi wires and heat-activated NiTi wires. However, retrieved superelastic NiTi wires released less Ni ions in artificial saliva after clinical exposure, and the same result was recorded regarding heat-activated wires. Both types of NiTi wires were obviously affected by oral environment conditions; their surface roughness significantly increased while the amount of the released Ni ions significantly declined.

  7. Nickel allergy from adolescence to adulthood in the TOACS cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortz, Charlotte G; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    2013-01-01

    Background In 1995, we established a cohort of 1501 unselected eighth-grade schoolchildren to investigate the course of nickel allergy into adult life. Objectives To follow the course of nickel allergy and clinically relevant nickel dermatitis over 15 years from adolescence to adulthood, and the ......Background In 1995, we established a cohort of 1501 unselected eighth-grade schoolchildren to investigate the course of nickel allergy into adult life. Objectives To follow the course of nickel allergy and clinically relevant nickel dermatitis over 15 years from adolescence to adulthood...

  8. Monomethylfumarate affects polarization of monocyte-derived dendritic cells resulting in down-regulated Th1 lymphocyte responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litjens, Nicolle H R; Rademaker, Mirjam; Ravensbergen, Bep

    2004-01-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris, a type-1 cytokine-mediated chronic skin disease, can be treated successfully with fumaric acid esters (FAE). Beneficial effects of this medication coincided with decreased production of IFN-gamma. Since dendritic cells (DC) regulate the differentiation of T helper (Th) cells......% of that by the respective Th cells cocultured with control DC. IL-4 production by primed, but not naive Th cells cocultured with MMF-DC was decreased as compared to cocultures with control DC. IL-10 production by naive and primed Th cells cocultured with MMF-DC and control DC did not differ. In addition, MMF inhibited LPS......-induced NF-kappaB activation in DC. Together, beneficial effects of FAE in psoriasis involve modulation of DC polarization by MMF such that these cells down-regulate IFN-gamma production by Th cells....

  9. Histidine protects against zinc and nickel toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John T Murphy

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Zinc is an essential trace element involved in a wide range of biological processes and human diseases. Zinc excess is deleterious, and animals require mechanisms to protect against zinc toxicity. To identify genes that modulate zinc tolerance, we performed a forward genetic screen for Caenorhabditis elegans mutants that were resistant to zinc toxicity. Here we demonstrate that mutations of the C. elegans histidine ammonia lyase (haly-1 gene promote zinc tolerance. C. elegans haly-1 encodes a protein that is homologous to vertebrate HAL, an enzyme that converts histidine to urocanic acid. haly-1 mutant animals displayed elevated levels of histidine, indicating that C. elegans HALY-1 protein is an enzyme involved in histidine catabolism. These results suggest the model that elevated histidine chelates zinc and thereby reduces zinc toxicity. Supporting this hypothesis, we demonstrated that dietary histidine promotes zinc tolerance. Nickel is another metal that binds histidine with high affinity. We demonstrated that haly-1 mutant animals are resistant to nickel toxicity and dietary histidine promotes nickel tolerance in wild-type animals. These studies identify a novel role for haly-1 and histidine in zinc metabolism and may be relevant for other animals.

  10. Nickel and vanadium extraction from the Syrian petroleum coke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlewit, H.; Alibrahim, M.

    2007-01-01

    Syrian petroleum coke samples were characterized and submitted for salt-roasting treatment in electric furnace to evaluate the convenience of this procedure for the extraction of the vanadium, nickel and sulfur from coke. Both solution and solid residue remaining after salt roasting were separated by filtration and were analyzed for vanadium, nickel and sulfur. The solution was analyzed by UV-Visible spectroscopy for vanadium and nickel and gravimetrically for sulfur. The solid residue and the untreated samples of petroleum coke were analyzed by XRF spectrometry. Results showed that more than 90% of sulfur and 60% of vanadium could be extracted by salt roasting treatment. An alternative procedure has been suggested, in which, more than 80% of sulfur and small percentage of vanadium can be leached by 0.75 M of Na 2 CO 3 solution at 70-80 Co. Vanadium was selectively extracted by DEHPA/TBP from the loaded leached solution. The extraction procedure flowsheet was also suggested. (authors)

  11. SAFT 4{1/2} inch nickel hydrogen battery cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duquesne, D.; Lacout, B.; Sennet, A. [SAFT Advanced Batteries, Poitiers (France)

    1995-12-31

    SAFT Advanced Batteries has now produced over 400 high capacity 4{1/2} inch Nickel Hydrogen Battery Cells for flight programs. The 4.5 inch diameter, rabbit-ear cell design is designed to provide the anticipated energy required at the lowest practical weight. SAFT has incorporated into the design of the dry-powder nickel electrode, truly hermetic ceramic to metal seals, qualified terminal feedthroughs, high reliability mechanical design, composite pure platinum negative electrode, and zircar separator, plus more than 25 years experience in aerospace nickel cell technology, resulting in a 4{1/2} inch configuration with the 3{1/2} inch cell design carryover heritage. General performance requirements for GEO missions that SAFT cells meet are 15 years in orbit lifetime, 80% DOD, low mass to energy ratios, and flexible capacity by modifying number of electrodes in the stack. This design is qualified for geostationary orbits based on SAFT`s 3{1/2} inch qualification heritage, design verification, and cycling performed by customer Space Systems/LORAL in support of the INTELSAT VIIA and N-STAR flight programs.

  12. Analysis of cytotoxic effects of nickel on human blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Mohammad Hadi; Hosseini Shirazi, Seyed Farshad; Aghvami, Marjan; Salimi, Ahmad; Pourahmad, Jalal

    2018-02-01

    Nickel compounds possess many applications in different industrial processes. Human beings are exposed to nickel commonly through occupational exposure and food. Although a few studies so far have investigated the effects of nickel compounds on human lymphocytes, the complete mechanism of cytotoxicity of this metal on human lymphocytes is yet to be determined. The intention of this paper was to determine the cytotoxicity mechanism of water soluble NiCl 2 toward human lymphocytes using the accelerated cytotoxicity mechanisms screening (ACMS) technique. Human lymphocytes were isolated from the blood of healthy subjects based on Ficoll-Paque PLUS standard method. For the assessment of cell viability, lymphocytes were incubated with 0.05-1 mM NiCl 2 for 12 h. Determination of mechanistic parameters was performed 2, 4 and 6 h after treatment of cells with ½ EC50 12h , EC50 12h and 2EC50 12h of NiCl 2 . Our results demonstrate that cytotoxicity of NiCl 2 on human lymphocytes is associated with increased ROS formation, mitochondrial membrane potential collapse, glutathione depletion, lysosomal membrane damage, cellular proteolysis and activation of caspase-3 before cytotoxicity ensued.

  13. Temperature dependent quasiparticle renormalization in nickel and iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovsyannikov, Ruslan; Thirupathaiah, Setti; Sanchez-Barriga, Jaime; Fink, Joerg; Duerr, Hermann [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, BESSY II, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    One of the fundamental consequences of electron correlation effects is that the bare particles in solids become 'dressed' with an excitation cloud resulting in quasiparticles. Such a quasiparticle will carry the same spin and charge as the original particle, but will have a renormalized mass and a finite lifetime. The properties of many-body interactions are described with a complex function called self energy which is directly accessible to modern high-resolution angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Ferromagnetic metals like nickel or iron offers the exciting possibility to study the spin dependence of quasiparticle coupling to bosonic modes. Utilizing the exchange split band structure as an intrinsic 'spin detector' it is possible to distinguish between electron-phonon and electron-magnon coupling phenomena. In this contribution we will report a systematic investigation of the k- and temperature dependence of the electron-boson coupling in nickel and iron metals as well as discuss origin of earlier observed anomalous lifetime broadening of majority spin states of nickel at Fermi level.

  14. Size-dependent magnetic properties of branchlike nickel oxide nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Branchlike nickel oxide nanocrystals with narrow size distribution are obtained by a solution growth method. The size-dependent of magnetic properties of the nickel oxides were investigated. The results of magnetic characterization indicate that the NiO nanocrystals with size below 12.8 nm show very weak ferromagnetic state at room temperature due to the uncompensated spins. Both of the average blocking temperature (Tb and the irreversible temperature (Tirr increase with the increase of nanoparticle sizes, while both the remnant magnetization and the coercivity at 300 K increase with the decrease of the particle sizes. Moreover, the disappearance of two-magnon (2M band and redshift of one-phonon longitudinal (1LO and two-phonon LO in vibrational properties due to size reduction are observed. Compared to the one with the spherical morphological, it is also found that nano-structured nickel oxides with the branchlike morphology have larger remnant magnetization and the coercivity at 5 K due to their larger surface-to-volume ratio and greater degree of broken symmetry at the surface or the higher proportion of broken bonds.

  15. Tentative investigation on neutron mirror fabrication with electroless nickel plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Jiang; Morita, Shin-ya; Yamagata, Yutaka; Takeda, Shin; Kato, Jun-ichi; Hino, Masahiro; Furusaka, Michihiro

    2013-01-01

    Neutron optics becomes highly required due to the rapid development of neutron technology. In this paper, we attempt to fabricate the neutron mirror by using a metal substrate made of electroless nickel plating to take place of glass concerning about mirror's optical performance and manufacturing method. A new manufacture process chain of neutron mirror is proposed by following the steps of fast milling and precision cutting of aluminium/stainless, electroless nickel plating, ultra-precision cutting by diamond tools, super-smooth polishing and super mirror coating to obtain high form accuracy and good surface roughness time-efficiently. Some tentative investigations are carried out. A workpiece (□ 50 x 50 mm 2 ) with flat surface made of electroless nickel plating is machined by ultra-precision cutting and polishing. The surface roughness with 0.728 nm rms (0.588 nm Ra) is acquired. According to results of reflectometry, the neutron beam can be reflected effectively with high intensity and little scattering. (author)

  16. Copper, Aluminum and Nickel: A New Monocrystalline Orthodontic Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierenga, Mark

    Introduction: This study was designed to evaluate, via tensile and bend testing, the mechanical properties of a newly-developed monocrystalline orthodontic archwire comprised of a blend of copper, aluminum, and nickel (CuAlNi). Methods: The sample was comprised of three shape memory alloys; CuAlNi, copper nickel titanium (CuNiTi), and nickel titanium (NiTi); from various orthodontic manufacturers in both 0.018" round and 0.019" x 0.025" rectangular dimensions. Additional data was gathered for similarly sized stainless steel and beta-titanium archwires as a point of reference for drawing conclusions about the relative properties of the archwires. Measurements of loading and unloading forces were recorded in both tension and deflection testing. Repeated-measure ANOVA (alpha= 0.05) was used to compare loading and unloading forces across wires and one-way ANOVA (alpha= 0.05) was used to compare elastic moduli and hysteresis. To identify significant differences, Tukey post-hoc comparisons were performed. Results: The modulus of elasticity, deflection forces, and hysteresis profiles of CuAlNi were significantly different than the other superelastic wires tested. In all tests, CuAlNi had a statistically significant lower modulus of elasticity compared to the CuNiTi and NiTi wires (P orthodontic metallurgy.

  17. Antibiotic distribution channels in Thailand: results of key-informant interviews, reviews of drug regulations and database searches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommanustweechai, Angkana; Chanvatik, Sunicha; Sermsinsiri, Varavoot; Sivilaikul, Somsajee; Patcharanarumol, Walaiporn; Yeung, Shunmay; Tangcharoensathien, Viroj

    2018-02-01

    To analyse how antibiotics are imported, manufactured, distributed and regulated in Thailand. We gathered information, on antibiotic distribution in Thailand, in in-depth interviews - with 43 key informants from farms, health facilities, pharmaceutical and animal feed industries, private pharmacies and regulators- and in database and literature searches. In 2016-2017, licensed antibiotic distribution in Thailand involves over 700 importers and about 24 000 distributors - e.g. retail pharmacies and wholesalers. Thailand imports antibiotics and active pharmaceutical ingredients. There is no system for monitoring the distribution of active ingredients, some of which are used directly on farms, without being processed. Most antibiotics can be bought from pharmacies, for home or farm use, without a prescription. Although the 1987 Drug Act classified most antibiotics as "dangerous drugs", it only classified a few of them as prescription-only medicines and placed no restrictions on the quantities of antibiotics that could be sold to any individual. Pharmacists working in pharmacies are covered by some of the Act's regulations, but the quality of their dispensing and prescribing appears to be largely reliant on their competences. In Thailand, most antibiotics are easily and widely available from retail pharmacies, without a prescription. If the inappropriate use of active pharmaceutical ingredients and antibiotics is to be reduced, we need to reclassify and restrict access to certain antibiotics and to develop systems to audit the dispensing of antibiotics in the retail sector and track the movements of active ingredients.

  18. Protection of uranium by electrodeposition of nickel and diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauvin, G.; Coriou, H.; Hure, J.

    1959-01-01

    This work forms part of the overall scheme for investigating uranium canning for nuclear reactors. It is necessary to: - Protect the fuel (uranium) against corrosion by the cooling medium (heavy water, CO 2 , etc.), in the case of a rupture of the can; - Avoid dangerous U-Al diffusion (when it is question of an aluminium can) by using an intermediate layer of a metal whose rate of diffusion in uranium is very much less than that of aluminium under the same conditions. In the present work based on the use of an intermediate layer of nickel the following points are apparent: 1) After having treated the uranium surface it is possible to electroplate nickel on it in such a way that after annealing without the application of any pressure these deposits give a very good intermetallic U-Ni diffusion. Though this diffusion is inferior to that of the UAl system, it enables the protection to be reinforced and thus the corrosion resistance to be increased. 2) When no other factor varies, the experiments show that the quality of the diffusion zones obtained depends on the nature of the electrolytic nickel bath. 3) The classical nickel baths used previously for this type of work contain 20 to 40 g/l of boric acid acting as an electrolytic buffer. As a result of this, the deposits are highly contaminated by boron (400 to 500 ppm of boron). We shall show that with a bath which does not contain nuclear poisons, a very clean U-Ni diffusion zone can be obtained. 4) After annealing for 100 hours at 700 deg. C, microscopic examination of the diffusion front reveals the existence of five layers under bright field illumination and six Layers in polarised light: at least four of these layers are well crystallised. 5) Important irregularities in the interface between uranium and the first intermetallic compound U 6 Ni seem to be result of barriers to the diffusion caused by certain impurities in the uranium. 6) Of the seven definite compounds which can be formed during the diffusion, that

  19. Nitric oxide and bcl-2 mediated the apoptosis induced by nickel(II) in human T hybridoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan Fuqin; Zhang Dongmei; Wang Xinchang; Chen Junhui

    2007-01-01

    Although effects of nickel(II) on the immune system have long been recognized, little is known about the effects of nickel(II) on the induction of apoptosis and related signaling events in T cells. In the present study, we investigated the roles and signaling pathways of nickel(II) in the induction of apoptosis in a human T cell line jurkat. The results showed that the cytotoxic effects of Ni involved significant morphological changes and chromosomal condensation (Hoechst 33258 staining). Analyses of hypodiploid cells and FITC-Annexin V and PI double staining showed significant increase of apoptosis in jurkat cells 6, 12 and 24 h after nickel(II) treatment. Flow cytometry analysis also revealed that the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) occurred concomitantly with the onset of NiCl 2 -induced apoptosis. Induction of apoptotic cell death by nickel was mediated by reduction of bcl-2 expression. Furthermore, nickel stimulated the generation of nitric oxide (NO). These results suggest that nickel(II) chloride induces jurkat cells apoptosis via nitric oxide generation, mitochondrial depolarization and bcl-2 suppression

  20. Cytotoxicity and intracellular dissolution of nickel nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Perez, Jose E.

    2015-12-22

    The assessment of cytotoxicity of nanostructures is a fundamental step for their development as biomedical tools. As widely used nanostructures, nickel nanowires (Ni NWs) seem promising candidates for such applications. In this work, Ni NWs were synthesized and then characterized using vibrating sample magnetometry, energy dispersive X-Ray analysis and electron microscopy. After exposure to the NWs, cytotoxicity was evaluated in terms of cell viability, cell membrane damage and induced apoptosis/necrosis on the model human cell line HCT 116. The influence of NW to cell ratio (10:1 to 1000:1) and exposure times up to 72 hours was analyzed for Ni NWs of 5.4 µm in length, as well as for Ni ions. The results show that cytotoxicity markedly increases past 24 hours of incubation. Cellular uptake of NWs takes place through the phagocytosis pathway, with a fraction of the dose of NWs dissolved inside the cells. Cell death results from a combination of apoptosis and necrosis, where the latter is the outcome of the secondary necrosis pathway. The cytotoxicity of Ni ions and Ni NWs dissolution studies suggest a synergistic toxicity between NW aspect ratio and dissolved Ni, with the cytotoxic effects markedly increasing after 24 hours of incubation.

  1. Cytotoxicity and intracellular dissolution of nickel nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Jose E; Contreras, Maria F; Vilanova, Enrique; Felix, Laura P; Margineanu, Michael B; Luongo, Giovanni; Porter, Alexandra E; Dunlop, Iain E; Ravasi, Timothy; Kosel, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    The assessment of cytotoxicity of nanostructures is a fundamental step for their development as biomedical tools. As widely used nanostructures, nickel nanowires (Ni NWs) seem promising candidates for such applications. In this work, Ni NWs were synthesized and then characterized using vibrating sample magnetometry, energy dispersive X-Ray analysis, and electron microscopy. After exposure to the NWs, cytotoxicity was evaluated in terms of cell viability, cell membrane damage, and induced apoptosis/necrosis on the model human cell line HCT 116. The influence of NW to cell ratio (10:1 to 1000:1) and exposure times up to 72 hours was analyzed for Ni NWs of 5.4 μm in length, as well as for Ni ions. The results show that cytotoxicity markedly increases past 24 hours of incubation. Cellular uptake of NWs takes place through the phagocytosis pathway, with a fraction of the dose of NWs dissolved inside the cells. Cell death results from a combination of apoptosis and necrosis, where the latter is the outcome of the secondary necrosis pathway. The cytotoxicity of Ni ions and Ni NWs dissolution studies suggest a synergistic toxicity between NW aspect ratio and dissolved Ni, with the cytotoxic effects markedly increasing after 24 hours of incubation.

  2. Cytotoxicity and intracellular dissolution of nickel nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Perez, Jose E.; Contreras, Maria F.; Vidal, Enrique Vilanova; Felix Servin, Laura P.; Margineanu, Michael B.; Luongo, Giovanni; Porter, Alexandra E.; Dunlop, Iain E.; Ravasi, Timothy; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of cytotoxicity of nanostructures is a fundamental step for their development as biomedical tools. As widely used nanostructures, nickel nanowires (Ni NWs) seem promising candidates for such applications. In this work, Ni NWs were synthesized and then characterized using vibrating sample magnetometry, energy dispersive X-Ray analysis and electron microscopy. After exposure to the NWs, cytotoxicity was evaluated in terms of cell viability, cell membrane damage and induced apoptosis/necrosis on the model human cell line HCT 116. The influence of NW to cell ratio (10:1 to 1000:1) and exposure times up to 72 hours was analyzed for Ni NWs of 5.4 µm in length, as well as for Ni ions. The results show that cytotoxicity markedly increases past 24 hours of incubation. Cellular uptake of NWs takes place through the phagocytosis pathway, with a fraction of the dose of NWs dissolved inside the cells. Cell death results from a combination of apoptosis and necrosis, where the latter is the outcome of the secondary necrosis pathway. The cytotoxicity of Ni ions and Ni NWs dissolution studies suggest a synergistic toxicity between NW aspect ratio and dissolved Ni, with the cytotoxic effects markedly increasing after 24 hours of incubation.

  3. In situ coating nickel organic complexes on free-standing nickel wire films for volumetric-energy-dense supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Min; Xu, Shusheng; Yao, Lu; Zhou, Chao; Hu, Nantao; Yang, Zhi; Hu, Jing; Zhang, Liying; Zhou, Zhihua; Wei, Hao; Zhang, Yafei

    2018-07-06

    A self-free-standing core-sheath structured hybrid membrane electrodes based on nickel and nickel based metal-organic complexes (Ni@Ni-OC) was designed and constructed for high volumetric supercapacitors. The self-standing Ni@Ni-OC film electrode had a high volumetric specific capacity of 1225.5 C cm -3 at 0.3 A cm -3 and an excellent rate capability. Moreover, when countered with graphene-carbon nanotube (G-CNT) film electrode, the as-assembled Ni@Ni-OC//G-CNT hybrid supercapacitor device delivered an extraordinary volumetric capacitance of 85 F cm -3 at 0.5 A cm -3 and an outstanding energy density of 33.8 at 483 mW cm -3 . Furthermore, the hybrid supercapacitor showed no capacitance loss after 10 000 cycles at 2 A cm -3 , indicating its excellent cycle stability. These fascinating performances can be ascribed to its unique core-sheath structure that high capacity nano-porous nickel based metal-organic complexes (Ni-OC) in situ coated on highly conductive Ni wires. The impressive results presented here may pave the way to construct s self-standing membrane electrode for applications in high volumetric-performance energy storage.

  4. Bulk diffusion and solubility of silver and nickel in lead, lead-silver and lead-nickel solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amenzou-Badrour, H.; Moya, G.; Bernardini, J.

    1988-01-01

    The results of a study of solubility and bulk diffusion of /sup 110/Ag and /sup 63/Ni in lead, lead-silver and lead-nickel solid solutions in the temperature range 220 to 88 0 C are reported. Owing to the low solubility of silver and nickel in lead, Fick's solution corresponding to the boundary condition of a constant concentration of solute at the surface has been used. Depth profile concentration analysis suggests a fundamental difference between the diffusion mechanisms of silver and nickel. Since silver penetration profiles in pure lead give diffusion coefficients independent of the penetration depth and silver concentration, it is suggested that slight decreases of silver diffusivity in lead-silver solid solutions have no significance. This implies that the interstitial silver atoms do not associate significantly with each other to form Ag-Ag dimers. In contrast, different behaviors of /sup 63/Ni depth profile concentration in pure lead and saturated PbNi solid solutions agree with a Ni-Ni interaction leading to the formation of less mobile dimers near the surface in pure lead

  5. Cobalt release from inexpensive jewellery: has the use of cobalt replaced nickel following regulatory intervention?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Jellesen, Morten S; Menné, Torkil

    2010-01-01

    Before the introduction of the EU Nickel Directive, concern was raised that manufacturers of jewellery might turn from the use of nickel to cobalt following the regulatory intervention on nickel exposure.......Before the introduction of the EU Nickel Directive, concern was raised that manufacturers of jewellery might turn from the use of nickel to cobalt following the regulatory intervention on nickel exposure....

  6. Comprehensive Transcriptome Analysis of Response to Nickel Stress in White Birch (Betula papyrifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Theriault

    Full Text Available White birch (Betula papyrifera is a dominant tree species of the Boreal Forest. Recent studies have shown that it is fairly resistant to heavy metal contamination, specifically to nickel. Knowledge of regulation of genes associated with metal resistance in higher plants is very sketchy. Availability and annotation of the dwarf birch (B. nana enables the use of high throughout sequencing approaches to understanding responses to environmental challenges in other Betula species such as B. papyrifera. The main objectives of this study are to 1 develop and characterize the B. papyrifera transcriptome, 2 assess gene expression dynamics of B. papyrifera in response to nickel stress, and 3 describe gene function based on ontology. Nickel resistant and susceptible genotypes were selected and used for transcriptome analysis. A total of 208,058 trinity genes were identified and were assembled to 275,545 total trinity transcripts. The transcripts were mapped to protein sequences and based on best match; we annotated the B. papyrifera genes and assigned gene ontology. In total, 215,700 transcripts were annotated and were compared to the published B. nana genome. Overall, a genomic match for 61% transcripts with the reference genome was found. Expression profiles were generated and 62,587 genes were found to be significantly differentially expressed among the nickel resistant, susceptible, and untreated libraries. The main nickel resistance mechanism in B. papyrifera is a downregulation of genes associated with translation (in ribosome, binding, and transporter activities. Five candidate genes associated to nickel resistance were identified. They include Glutathione S-transferase, thioredoxin family protein, putative transmembrane protein and two Nramp transporters. These genes could be useful for genetic engineering of birch trees.

  7. Solid solution strengthening and diffusion in nickel- and cobalt-based superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehman, Hamad ur

    2016-07-01

    Nickel and cobalt-based superalloys with a γ-γ{sup '} microstructure are known for their excellent creep resistance at high temperatures. Their microstructure is engineered using different alloying elements, that partition either to the fcc γ matrix or to the ordered γ{sup '} phase. In the present work the effect of alloying elements on their segregation behaviour in nickel-based superalloys, diffusion in cobalt-based superalloys and the temperature dependent solid solution strengthening in nickel-based alloys is investigated. The effect of dendritic segregation on the local mechanical properties of individual phases in the as-cast, heat treated and creep deformed state of a nickel-based superalloy is investigated. The local chemical composition is characterized using Electron Probe Micro Analysis and then correlated with the mechanical properties of individual phases using nanoindentation. Furthermore, the temperature dependant solid solution hardening contribution of Ta, W and Re towards fcc nickel is studied. The room temperature hardening is determined by a diffusion couple approach using nanoindentation and energy dispersive X-ray analysis for relating hardness to the chemical composition. The high temperature properties are determined using compression strain rate jump tests. The results show that at lower temperatures, the solute size is prevalent and the elements with the largest size difference with nickel, induce the greatest hardening consistent with a classical solid solution strengthening theory. At higher temperatures, the solutes interact with the dislocations such that the slowest diffusing solute poses maximal resistance to dislocation glide and climb. Lastly, the diffusion of different technically relevant solutes in fcc cobalt is investigated using diffusion couples. The results show that the large atoms diffuse faster in cobalt-based superalloys similar to their nickel-based counterparts.

  8. Solid solution strengthening and diffusion in nickel- and cobalt-based superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, Hamad ur

    2016-01-01

    Nickel and cobalt-based superalloys with a γ-γ ' microstructure are known for their excellent creep resistance at high temperatures. Their microstructure is engineered using different alloying elements, that partition either to the fcc γ matrix or to the ordered γ ' phase. In the present work the effect of alloying elements on their segregation behaviour in nickel-based superalloys, diffusion in cobalt-based superalloys and the temperature dependent solid solution strengthening in nickel-based alloys is investigated. The effect of dendritic segregation on the local mechanical properties of individual phases in the as-cast, heat treated and creep deformed state of a nickel-based superalloy is investigated. The local chemical composition is characterized using Electron Probe Micro Analysis and then correlated with the mechanical properties of individual phases using nanoindentation. Furthermore, the temperature dependant solid solution hardening contribution of Ta, W and Re towards fcc nickel is studied. The room temperature hardening is determined by a diffusion couple approach using nanoindentation and energy dispersive X-ray analysis for relating hardness to the chemical composition. The high temperature properties are determined using compression strain rate jump tests. The results show that at lower temperatures, the solute size is prevalent and the elements with the largest size difference with nickel, induce the greatest hardening consistent with a classical solid solution strengthening theory. At higher temperatures, the solutes interact with the dislocations such that the slowest diffusing solute poses maximal resistance to dislocation glide and climb. Lastly, the diffusion of different technically relevant solutes in fcc cobalt is investigated using diffusion couples. The results show that the large atoms diffuse faster in cobalt-based superalloys similar to their nickel-based counterparts.

  9. Contribution to the study of point defects formed in nickel by electron bombardment; Contribution a l'etude des defauts ponctuels crees par bombardement electronique dans le nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oddou, J L [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 38 - Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-12-01

    After a short account of the experimental techniques employed in our studies, the experimental results obtained on pure nickel samples are exposed. The apparition of the successive annihilation stages of point defects created by electron bombardment is established by isochronal heat treatments: the annihilation kinetics and the corresponding activation energies are determined. The effect of the incident particle doses is also studied. The experimental results are then compared with R.A. Johnson's theoretical calculations of the stability and the migration of point defects in nickel, and taking into account the results obtained by Peretto in magnetic after effect measurements. This leads us to a model in good agreement with calculations and experiment for the first stages. In a second chapter the behaviour of nickel doped by certain impurities is studied. First, the results concerning the rate of increase of resistivity (function of sample purity) is investigated. Two possible explanations of the observed phenomenon are proposed: either a deviation with respect to Mathiessen's law, or an increase of the number of defects formed in the presence of impurity atoms. Finally, a study of the resistivity recovery of the doped samples permits us to suggest an order of magnitude for the binding energy interstitial/impurity atom in the nickel matrix. (author) [French] Apres avoir brievement rappele les techniques experimentales que nous avons utilisees pour cette etude, nous exposons les resultats experimentaux obtenus sur des echantillons de nickel pur. Les stades successifs d'annihilation des defauts ponctuels crees par bombardement electronique sont mis en evidence par traitements thermiques isochrones; les cinetiques de disparition, et les energies d'activation correspondantes sont determinees. Nous etudions egalement l'effet de la dose des particules incidentes. Les resultats experimentaux sont ensuite compares avec les calculs theoriques de R.A JOHNSON sur la stabilite

  10. Numerous dilemmas surrounding the 1917 nickel coins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelić Svetlana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Law on Extraordinary Loans Amounting to 200 Million Dinars and the Minting of Silver and Nickel Coins in 1916 was the legal basis for minting the 5-, 10-, and 20-para nickel coins of the Kingdom of Serbia featuring the year 1917 as their minting year. Some authors believe that these coins were minted in the Minting House in Paris, whereas the others agree that they were certainly minted in France, but in a still unidentified minting house. There are authors who in recent reference literature underline the possibility of their minting in the USA Gorham Company, in Providence, Rhode Island. These coins had all the characteristics of the nickel coins of the Kingdom of Serbia from 1883, 1884, 1904 and 1912. Although, according to the Law, the Minister of Finance was authorized to mint 10 million dinars of these nickel coins, only 5 million pieces in each denomination were actually minted, in the total nominal value of just 1,750,000 dinars. The general opinion is that after the war only a small amount of these nickel coins reached Serbia, because the ships transporting the Serbian coins from the minting house sank on their way. The only varying aspect in this explanation is the location from which the ships were sailing towards Corfu, i.e. from the USA or from France. These coins stopped being legal tender as of 30 November 1931.

  11. PECULIARITIES OF FORMATION OF STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES AT THERMO-MECHANICAL PROCESSING OF ROLLED WIRE OF NICKEL

    OpenAIRE

    V. A. Lutsenko

    2012-01-01

    There are results of researches of the mechanical properties and structure of the wire rod made of low-carbon nickel molybdenum steel after reduction to toughness thermomechanical treatment in the stream of high-speed wire mill.

  12. Bioavailability of nickel in man: effects of foods and chemically-defined dietary constituents on the absorption of inorganic nickel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomons, N W; Viteri, F; Shuler, T R; Nielsen, F H

    1982-01-01

    By serial determination of the change in plasma nickel concentration following a standard dose of 22.4 mg of nickel sulfate hexahydrate containing 5 mg of elemental nickel, the bioavailability of nickel was estimated in human subjects. Plasma nickel concentration was stable in the fasting state and after an unlabeled test meal, but after the standard dose of nickel in water was elevated 48.8, 73.0, 80.0, and 53.3 microgram/1, respectively, at hours 1, 2, 3, and 4. Plasma nickel did not rise above fasting levels when 5 mg of nickel was added to two standard meals: a typical Guatemalan meal and a North American breakfast. When 5 mg of nickel was added to five beverages-whole cow milk, coffee, tea, orange juice, and Coca Cola-the rise in plasma nickel was significantly suppressed with all but Coca Cola. Response to nickel also was suppressed in the presence of 1 g of ascorbic acid. Phytic acid in a 2:1 molar ratio with nickel, however, did not affect the rise in plasma nickel. The chelate of iron and ethylenediaminetetraacetate, NaFeEDTA, an iron-fortifying agent suggested for application in Central America, slightly but not significantly depressed plasma nickel rise at 2 hours, whereas disodium EDTA depressed plasma nickel levels significantly below the fasting nickel curve at 3 and 4 hours postdose. These studies suggest that the differential responses of inorganic nickel to distinct foods, beverages, and chemically-defined dietary constituents could be important to human nutrition.

  13. Synthesis, characterization and crystal structure of new nickel ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A novel nickel molybdenum complex with the 2,6-pyridine dicarboxylic acid ligand was success- ... made for preparing nanoparticles with controllable size and shape. 2. ... Formula weight ..... talline nickel molybdates J. Alloys Compd.

  14. THE LOCAL LASER-STIMULATED ELECTRODEPOSITION OF THE NICKEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Zabludovskyi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The mask-free method for obtaining the local nickel coatings using laser radiation is developed. The parameters of local nickel coatings are calculated. The rate of electroplating process is estimated.

  15. Occupational exposure to nickel salts in electrolytic plating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiilunen, M; Aitio, A; Tossavainen, A

    1997-04-01

    An occupational hygiene survey was made in 38 nickel plating shops in Finland and exposure to nickel was studied by means of biological measurements and, in three shops, by using air measurements. The average after-shift urinary nickel concentration of 163 workers was 0.16 mumol l.-1 (range 0.001-4.99 mumol l.-1). After the 1-5 week vacation the urinary nickel concentration was higher than the upper reference limit of non-exposed Finns indicating that a part of water-soluble nickel salts is accumulated in the body. Urinary nickel concentrations in the shops considered clean in the industrial hygiene walk-through were not different from those observed in the shops considered dirty. The correlation between the concentrations of nickel in the air and in the urine was low, and the amount of nickel excreted in the urine exceeded the calculated inhaled amounts, indicating exposure by other routes such as ingestion.

  16. The study of chlorination of nickel oxide by chlorine and calcium chloride in the presence of active additives

    OpenAIRE

    Ilic, Ilija; Krstev, Boris; Stopic, Srecko; Cerovic, K

    1997-01-01

    Chlorination of nickel oxide by chlorine and calcium chloride in the presence of C, BaS and S were studied, both experimentally and theoretically. Chlorination of nickel oxide by chlorine was carried out in the temperature range 573-873 K and by calcium chloride in the temperature range 1023-1223 K. The results obtained of the chlorination of nickel oxide by chlorine showed that C has the strongest and S the weakest effect on the process. Addition of BaS has a favorable effect on the chlorina...

  17. Electrochromic characteristics of a nickel borate thin film investigated by in situ XAFS and UV/vis spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Masaaki; Iida, Tsuyoshi; Mineo, Takehiro

    2014-01-01

    The electrochromic transition of a nickel borate thin film between colorless and brown was examined by means of in situ XAFS and UV/vis spectroscopy. The XAFS spectra showed that the average valence state of the nickel species in the film changed from +2.1 to +3.8 following the application of an electrode potential. Additionally, a broad peak at 700 nm was observed during in situ UV/vis absorption measurements on the application of a positive potential. These results suggest that the nickel borate film reversibly forms a NiOOH structure with a domain size of several nanometers during the electrochromic reaction. (author)

  18. Three dimensional characterization of nickel coarsening in solid oxide cells via ex-situ ptychographic nano-tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Salvatore; Jørgensen, Peter Stanley; Tsai, Esther Hsiao Rho; Holler, Mirko; Kreka, Kosova; Bowen, Jacob R.

    2018-04-01

    Nickel coarsening is considered a significant cause of solid oxide cell (SOC) performance degradation. Therefore, understanding the morphological changes in the nickel-yttria stabilized zirconia (Ni-YSZ) fuel electrode is crucial for the wide spread usage of SOC technology. This paper reports a study of the initial 3D microstructure evolution of a SOC analyzed in the pristine state and after 3 and 8 h of annealing at 850 °C, in dry hydrogen. The analysis of the evolution of the same location of the electrode shows a substantial change of the nickel and pore network during the first 3 h of treatment, while only negligible changes are observed after 8 h. The nickel coarsening results in loss of connectivity in the nickel network, reduced nickel specific surface area and decreased total triple phase boundary density. For the condition of this experiment, nickel coarsening is shown to be predominantly curvature driven, and changes in the electrode microstructure parameters are discussed in terms of local microstructural evolution.

  19. Nonlinear oxidation kinetics of nickel cermets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galinski, Henning; Bieberle-Huetter, Anja; Rupp, Jennifer L.M.; Gauckler, Ludwig J.

    2011-01-01

    The oxidation of a cermet of screen-printed nickel (Ni) and gadolinia-doped ceria (CGO) with an approximate median porosity of 50 vol.% has been studied via in situ X-ray diffraction and focused ion beam nanotomography in the temperature range 773-848 K. The oxidation kinetics of Ni to NiO is found to be highly nonlinear with an apparent activation energy of 2.8(2) eV in this temperature range. The nonlinear oxidation kinetics found is in good agreement with theoretical works on oxide growth driven by nonlinear inbuilt fields. Stress-induced Kirkendall void formation has been identified as the physical process that enhances the oxidation of Ni/CGO cermets. Compressive stresses within the Ni matrix result from the thermal expansion mismatch of Ni and CGO and cause plastic deformation as they exceed the yield stress of the Ni matrix. The pore size distribution of Kirkendall voids formed has been measured by FIB nanotomography and shows a significant temperature dependence. It is shown that even one cycle of reoxidation changes irreversibly the microstructure of the cermet which can be interpreted as the onset and main contribution to the mechanical degradation of the cermet.

  20. Magnetic behavior of arrays of nickel nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karim, S.; Maaz, K.; Ahmed, M.; Nisar, A.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, there is an increasing interest in magnetic nano wires because of their unusual properties compared to the bulk materials. To understand the complexity of nano wire arrays and to improve their potential in various applications more studies are still needed, for example, to understand completely the effect of geometrical factors, i.e. aspect ratio, areal density etc., on magnetic properties of these arrays. In this work, arrays of nickel nano wires with aspect ratio is proportional to 1200 and diameter ranging between 25-100 nm were fabricated by electrodeposition in etched ion track templates. Samples with areal density from 1 X 10/sup 6/ cm/sup -2/ to 1 X 10/ sup 8/ cm/sup -2/ were prepared. Measurements of magnetic hysteresis loops were performed at room temperature with SQUID magnetometer and magnetic properties of arrays of different diameters and aspect ratios were compared. Coercivity of the wires showed strong dependence on aspect ratio, diameter and microstructure. Room temperature coercivity of the wires showed a maximum at is proportional to 40 nm diameter and arrays with high density of nano wires showed lower coercivity. The results were discussed by taking into account anisotropies originating from the shape, crystalline structure and magnetostatic interactions among the wires and by previous experimental observations in literature. (Orig./A.B.)

  1. Supercapacitors Based on Nickel Oxide/Carbon Materials Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Lota, Katarzyna; Sierczynska, Agnieszka; Lota, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    In the thesis, the properties of nickel oxide/active carbon composites as the electrode materials for supercapacitors are discussed. Composites with a different proportion of nickel oxide/carbon materials were prepared. A nickel oxide/carbon composite was prepared by chemically precipitating nickel hydroxide on an active carbon and heating the hydroxide at 300 ∘C in the air. Phase compositions of the products were characterized using X-ray diffractometry (XRD). The morphology of the composite...

  2. Effects of deposition temperature on electrodeposition of zinc–nickel alloy coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao, Xiaoping; Li, Helin; Zhao, Wenzhen; Li, Dejun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Both normal and anomalous deposition can be realized by changing bath temperature. ► The Ni content in Zn–Ni alloy deposit increases sharply as temperature reach 60 °C. ► The abrupt change in coating composition is caused by the shift of cathodic potential. ► The deposition temperature has great effect on microstructure of Zn–Ni alloy deposit. -- Abstract: Zinc–nickel alloy coatings were electrodeposited on carbon steel substrates from the ammonium chloride bath at different temperatures. The composition, phase structure and morphology of these coatings were analyzed by energy dispersive spectrometer, X-ray diffractometer and scanning electron microscopy respectively. Chronopotentiometry and potentiostatic methods were also employed to analyze the possible causes of the composition and structure changes induced by deposition temperature. It has been shown that both normal and anomalous co-deposition of zinc and nickel could be realized by changing deposition temperature under galvanostatic conditions. The abrupt changes in the composition and phase structure of the zinc–nickel alloy coatings were observed when deposition temperature reached 60 °C. The sharply decrease of current efficiency for zinc–nickel co-deposition was also observed when deposition temperature is higher than 40 °C. Analysis of the partial current densities showed that the decrease of current efficiency with the rise of deposition temperature was due to the enhancement of the hydrogen evolution. It was also confirmed that the ennoblement of cathodic potential was the cause for the increase of nickel content in zinc–nickel alloy coatings as a result of deposition temperature rise. The good zinc–nickel alloy coatings with compact morphology and single γ phase could be obtained when the deposition temperature was fixed at 30–40 °C

  3. Microstructure and corrosion behavior of electrodeposited nano-crystalline nickel coating on AZ91 Mg alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarebidaki, Arman, E-mail: arman.zare@iauyazd.ac.ir; Mahmoudikohani, Hassan, E-mail: hassanmahmoudi.k@gmail.com; Aboutalebi, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Activation, zincating, and Cu electrodeposition were used as pretreatment processes for electrodeposition of nickel coatings. • Nano-crystalline nickel coatings were successfully electrodeposited onto the AZ91 Mg alloys. • Effect of nickel electrodeposited coating on the corrosion resistance of AZ91 Mg alloy has been studied. - Abstract: In order to enhance the corrosion resistance, nickel coating was electrodeposited onto AZ91 Mg alloy. Activation, zincating, and Cu electrodeposition used as pretreatment processes for better adhesion and corrosion performance of the nickel over layer. The corrosion properties of the AZ91 Mg alloy, nickel electroplated AZ91 Mg alloy, and pure nickel was assessed via polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) methods in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution. Moreover, the structure of the coating was investigated by means of X-ray diffraction, whereas specimen’s morphology and elemental composition were analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). Measurements revealed that the coating has a nano-crystalline structure with the grain size of 95 nm. Corrosion results showed superior corrosion resistance for the coated AZ91 Mg alloy as the corrosion current density decreased from 2.5 × 10{sup −4} A cm{sup −2}, for the uncoated sample, to 1.5 × 10{sup −5} A cm{sup −2}, for coated specimen and the corrosion potential increased from −1.55 V to −0.98 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) at the same condition.

  4. Electrodeposition of nickel nano wire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nur Ubaidah Saidin; Kok Kuan Ying; Ng Inn Khuan; Nurazila Mat Zali; Siti Salwa Zainal Abidin

    2010-01-01

    Synthesis, characterization and assembly of one-dimensional nickel nano wires prepared by template directed electrodeposition are discussed in this paper. Parallel arrays of high aspect ratio nickel nano wires were electrodeposited using electrolytes with different cations and pH. The nano wires were characterized using X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the orientations of the electro deposited Ni nano wires were governed by the deposition current and the electrolyte conditions. Free standing nickel nano wires can be obtained by dissolving the template. Due to the magnetic nature of the nano wires, magnetic alignment was employed to assemble and position the free standing nano wires in the device structure. (author)

  5. Effect of power quality on windings temperature of marine induction motors. Part II: Results of investigations and recommendations for related regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnacinski, P.; Mindykowski, J.; Tarasiuk, T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the effect of lowered voltage quality in ship power systems on windings temperature of low-power induction cage machines. The results of investigations carried out with experimental and analytical methods are presented. The thermal impact of power quality disturbances permitted by ship classification societies is discussed. A proposal of new power quality regulations for ship classification societies is made.

  6. Chemistry of nickel and copper production from sulphide ores | Love ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nickel is one of Zimbabwe's principle metallurgical exports. It is processed to a very high level of purity and hence has a high value. The economics of nickel production can be difficult, as the selling value of nickel varies tremendously with time, from a low of US$ 3 900 per ton in late 1998 to US$ 10 100 per ton in May 2000, ...

  7. Impact of nickel (Ni) on hematological parameters and behavioral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-17

    Oct 17, 2011 ... The effect of nickel on hematological parameters and behaviour in Cyprinus carpio after a 96 h exposure to nickel test was investigated. .... important food item in human diet. Nickel is a natural element in the earth's makeup. This must be a factor in assessing its ability to harm the environment. Although,.

  8. Relationship between nickel and cobalt sensitization in hard metal workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rystedt, I; Fischer, T

    1983-05-01

    Eight hundred fifty-three hard metal workers were examined and patch tested with 20 substances from their environment, including nickel and cobalt. Nickel sensitivity was found in 2 men and 38 women. 88% of the nickel-sensitive individuals had developed a jewelry dermatitis prior to employment in the hard metal industry or before the appearance of hand eczema. 29% of the hard metal workers gave a history of slight irritant dermatitis. In the nickel sensitized group, 40% had had severe hand eczema which generally appeared 6-12 months after starting employment. In 25% of the cases, nickel sensitive individuals developed cobalt allergy, compared with 5% in the total population investigated. Most facts indicate that nickel sensitivity and irritant hand eczema precede cobalt sensitization. Hard metal workers with simultaneous nickel and cobalt sensitivity had a more severe hand eczema than those with isolated cobalt or nickel sensitivity or only irritant dermatitis. 64% of the female population had pierced ear lobes. Among the nickel allergic women, 95% had pierced ear lobes. The use of earrings containing nickel after piercing is strongly suspected of being the major cause of nickel sensitivity. Piercing at an early age seems to increase the risk of incurring nickel sensitivity.

  9. Prototype nickel component demonstration. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boss, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    We have been developing a process to produce high-purity nickel structures from nickel carbonyl using chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The prototype demonstration effort had been separated into a number of independent tasks to allow Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) the greatest flexibility in tailoring the project to their needs. LANL selected three of the proposed tasks to be performed--Task 1- system modification and demonstration, Task 2-stainless steel mandrel trials, and Task 4-manufacturing study. Task 1 focused on converting the CVD system from a hot-wall to a cold-wall configuration and demonstrating the improved efficiency of the reactor type by depositing a 0.01-inch-thick nickel coating on a cylindrical substrate. Since stainless steel substrates were preferred because of their low α-emitter levels, Task 2 evaluated mandrel configurations which would allow removal of the nickel tube from the substrate. The manufacturing study was performed to develop strategies and system designs for manufacturing large quantities of the components needed for the Sudbury Nuetrino Observatory (SNO) program. Each of these tasks was successfully completed. During these efforts, BIRL successfully produced short lengths of 2-inch-diameter tubing and 6-inch-wide foil with levels of α-radiation emitting contaminants lower than either conventional nickel alloys or electroplated materials. We have produced both the tubing and foil using hot-substrate, cold-wall reactors and clearly demonstrated the advantages of higher precursor efficiency and deposition rate associated with this configuration. We also demonstrated a novel mandrel design which allowed easy removal of the nickel tubing and should dramatically simplify the production of 1.5-meter-long tubes in the production phase of the program

  10. An overview of advanced high-strength nickel-base alloys for LWR applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prybylowski, J.; Ballinger, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews our current understanding of the behavior of high strength nickel base alloys used in light water reactor (LWR) applications. Emphasis is placed on understanding the fundamental mechanisms controlling crack propagation in these environments. To provide a foundation for this survey, general mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement are first reviewed. The behavior of high strength nickel base alloys in LWR environments, as well as in other relevant environments is then reviewed. Suggested mechanisms of crack propagation are discussed. Alternate alloys and microstructural modifications that may result in improved behavior are presented. It is now clear that, at temperatures near 100C, alloy X-750, the predominant high strength nickel base alloy used today in LWR applications, is susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. A review of published data from hydrogen embrittlement studies of nickel base superalloys during electrolytic charging and in hydrogen sulfide/brine solutions suggests that other nickel base superalloys are available possessing resistance to hydrogen embrittlement superior to that of alloy X-750. Available results of tests in gaseous hydrogen suggest that reduced grain boundary precipitation and a fine distribution of intragranular precipitates that act as irreversible hydrogen traps is the optimum microstructure for hydrogen embrittlement resistance. 42 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  11. Ionic Potential and Band Narrowing as a Source of Orbital Polarization in Nickelate/Insulator Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgescu, Alexandru B.; Disa, Ankit S.; Kumah, Divine P.; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Walker, Frederick J.; Ahn, Charles H.

    Nickelate interfaces display complex, interacting electronic properties such as thickness dependent metal-insulator transitions. One large body of effort involving nickelates has aimed to split the energies of the Ni 3d orbitals (orbital polarization) to make the resulting band structure resemble that of cuprate superconductors. The most commonly studied interfacial system involves superlattices of alternating nickelate and insulating perovksite-structure layers; the resulting orbital polarization at the nickelate-insulator interface is understood as being due to confinement or structural symmetry breaking. By using first principles theory on the NdNiO3/NdAlO3 superlattice, we show that another important source of orbital polarization stems from electrostatic effects: the more ionic nature of the cations in the insulator (when compared to the nickelate) can shift the relative orbital energies of the Ni. We use density functional theory (DFT) and add electronic correlations via slave-bosons to describe the effect of correlation-induced band narrowing on the orbital polarization. Work supported by NSF Grant MRSEC DMR-1119826.

  12. Corrosion Behaviour of Nickel Plated Low Carbon Steel in Tomato Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluleke OLUWOLE

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This research work investigated the corrosion resistance of nickel plated low carbon steel in tomato fluid. It simulated the effect of continuous use of the material in a tomato environment where corrosion products are left in place. Low carbon steel samples were nickel electroplated at 4V for 20, 25, 30 and 35 mins using Watts solution.The plated samples were then subjected to tomato fluid environment for for 30 days. The electrode potentials mV (SCE were measured every day. Weight loss was determined at intervals of 5 days for the duration of the exposure period. The result showed corrosion attack on the nickel- plated steel, the severity decreasing with the increasing weight of nickel coating on substrate. The result showed that thinly plated low carbon steel generally did not have any advantage over unplated steel. The pH of the tomato solution which initially was acidic was observed to progress to neutrality after 4 days and then became alkaline at the end of the thirty days test (because of corrosion product contamination of the tomatocontributing to the reduced corrosion rates in the plated samples after 10 days. Un-plated steel was found to be unsuitable for the fabrication of tomato processing machinery without some form of surface treatment - thick nickel plating is suitable as a protective coating in this environment.

  13. Nickel adsorption on chalk and calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belova, Dina Alexandrovna; Lakshtanov, Leonid; Carneiro, J.F.

    2014-01-01

    Nickel uptake from solution by two types of chalk and calcite was investigated in batch sorption studies. The goal was to understand the difference in sorption behavior between synthetic and biogenic calcite. Experiments at atmospheric partial pressure of CO2, in solutions equilibrated with calcite...... = - 1.12 on calcite and log KNi = - 0.43 and - 0.50 on the two chalk samples. The study confirms that synthetic calcite and chalk both take up nickel, but Ni binds more strongly on the biogenic calcite than on inorganically precipitated, synthetic powder, because of the presence of trace amounts...... of polysaccharides and clay nanoparticles on the chalk surface....

  14. Nitrogen solubility in nickel base multicomponent melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bol'shov, L.A.; Stomakhin, A.Ya.; Sokolov, V.M.; Teterin, V.G.

    1984-01-01

    Applicability of various methods for calculation of nitrogen solubility in high-alloyed nickel base alloys, containing Cr, Fe, W, Mo, Ti, Nb, has been estimated. A possibility is shown to use the formUla, derived for the calculation of nitrogen solubility in iron on the basis of statistical theory for a grid model of solution which does not require limitations for the content of a solvent component. The calculation method has been used for nickel alloys, with the concentration of solvent, iron, being accepted equal to zero, and employing parameters of nitrogen interaction as determined for iron-base alloys

  15. Nickel contaminated titanium weld wire study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffin, G.R.; Sumstine, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    Attachment of thermocouples to fuel rod welding problems at Exxon Nuclear Company and INEL prompted an investigation study of the titanium filler wire material. It was found that the titanium filler wire was contaminated with nickel which was jacketed on the wire prior to the drawing process at the manufacturers. A method was developed to 100% inspect all filler wire for future welding application. This method not only indicates the presence of nickel contamination but indicates quantity of contamination. The process is capable of high speed inspection necessary for various high speed manufacturing processes

  16. Long Life Nickel Electrodes for Nickel-Hydrogen Cells: Fiber Substrates Nickel Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Howard H.

    2000-01-01

    Samples of nickel fiber mat electrodes were investigated over a wide range of fiber diameters, electrode thickness, porosity and active material loading levels. Thickness' were 0.040, 0.060 and 0.080 inches for the plaque: fiber diameters were primarily 2, 4, and 8 micron and porosity was 85, 90, and 95%. Capacities of 3.5 in. diameter electrodes were determined in the flooded condition with both 26 and 31% potassium hydroxide solution. These capacity tests indicated that the highest capacities per unit weight were obtained at the 90% porosity level with a 4 micron diameter fiber plaque. It appeared that the thinner electrodes had somewhat better performance, consistent with sintered electrode history. Limited testing with two-positive-electrode boiler plate cells was also carried out. Considerable difficulty with constructing the cells was encountered with short circuits the major problem. Nevertheless, four cells were tested. The cell with 95% porosity electrodes failed during conditioning cycling due to high voltage during charge. Discharge showed that this cell had lost nearly all of its capacity. The other three cells after 20 conditioning cycles showed capacities consistent with the flooded capacities of the electrodes. Positive electrodes made from fiber substrates may well show a weight advantage of standard sintered electrodes, but need considerably more work to prove this statement. A major problem to be investigated is the lower strength of the substrate compared to standard sintered electrodes. Problems with welding of leads were significant and implications that the electrodes would expand more than sintered electrodes need to be investigated. Loading levels were lower than had been expected based on sintered electrode experiences and the lower loading led to lower capacity values. However, lower loading causes less expansion and contraction during cycling so that stress on the substrate is reduced.

  17. Comparative Analysis of Results from a Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire Between International Students from West Asia and Xinjiang College Students in China

    OpenAIRE

    ,; ,; ,; ,

    2016-01-01

    Background The Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ) is a cognitive and emotional tool measuring how individuals deal with stressful life events. However differences exist in the results of CERQ among individuals. Objective This study was conducted to investigate the CERQ results and depressive symptoms of students at our university (both local and international students) in order to provide further guidance for psychological interventions. Methods 255 sophomore and junior interna...

  18. Molecular Mechanics and Quantum Chemistry Based Study of Nickel-N-Allyl Urea and N-Allyl Thiourea Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D. Sharma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Eigenvalue, eigenvector and overlap matrix of nickel halide complex of N-allyl urea and N-allyl thiourea have been evaluated. Our results indicate that ligand field parameters (Dq, B’ and β evaluated earlier by electronic spectra are very close to values evaluated with the help of eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Eigenvector analysis and population analysis shows that in bonding 4s, 4p, and 3dx2-y2, 3dyz orbitals of nickel are involved but the coefficient values differ in different complexes. Out of 4px, 4py, 4pz the involvement of either 4pz or 4py, is noticeable. The theoretically evaluated positions of infrared bands indicate that N-allyl urea is coordinated to nickel through its oxygen and N-allyl thiourea is coordinated to nickel through its sulphur which is in conformity with the experimental results.

  19. Effects of antimony additions on the fracture of nickel at 600 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, C.L.; Padgett, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Antimony additions (about 1 wt pct) are found to drastically lower tensile ductility and induce extensive intergranular cracking in nickel at 600 C. This effect is most pronounced at lower strain rates. These results are contrasted to results for pure nickel where ductility is high and failure occurs via plastic instability. Scanning electron microscopy revealed faceting of crack and cavity surfaces in the antimony doped nickel. Auger electron spectroscopy revealed segregation of antimony and (residual) sulfur to both grain boundaries and to the internal free surfaces of cracks and cavities. Inert ion sputter profiling showed that most of the antimony and sulfur enrichment on these surfaces is confined within a few atom layers of the interface. The embrittling influence of antimony is discussed in terms of the observed antimony and sulfur segregation to internal interfaces. Possible connections between the segregation and the observed embrittlement involve segregation effects on grain boundary sliding, grain boundary and surface diffusivities, and interfacial energetics

  20. A Palladium free method to create a Nickel coated electrode for electrochemical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thien Khanh; Vu, Thanh, Vi; Vo, Minh Xuan

    2018-04-01

    For many generations, the coating of metals provides many applications in the industry: decoration, functional, electroforming. Electroless plating of Nickel with the supports of Palladium/Tin is famous for its properties and effects. In this study, we provide another catalysis solution for the electroless plating process of Nickel. With plastic Polyvinyl Chloride substrate controlled in thickness (2 mm) and scale (200x400 mm), the efficiency of the coating process was carried out under simple lab scale condition. The result of the process is a thin film layer of Nickel coated on the surface of the substrate with exceptional adhesion and strong physical properties also. The product sample then was tested by many methods such as SEM, XRD, EDS, and FTIR to clarify its properties. According to our observation and the result we obtained, we believe there is still more room for improvement to this method, and a further investigation on its application as well can be carried on in the future.

  1. Microstructure and properties of ultrafine grain nickel 200 after hydrostatic extrusion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitek, R.; Krajewski, C.; Kamiński, J.; Spychalski, M.; Garbacz, H.; Pachla, W.; Kurzydłowski, K. J.

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents the results of the studies of the structure and properties of ultrafine grained nickel 200 obtained by hydrostatic extrusion processes. Microstructure was characterized by means of optical microscopy and electron transmission microscopy. Corrosion resistance was studied by impedance and potentiodynamic methods using an AutoLab PGSTAT 100 potentiostat in 0.1 M Na2SO4 solution and in acidified (by addition of H2SO4) 0.1 M NaCl solution at pH = 4.2 at room temperature. Microhardness tests were also performed. The results showed that hydrostatic extrusion produces a heterogeneous, ultrafine-grained microstructure in nickel 200. The corrosive resistance tests showed that the grain refinement by hydrostatic extrusion is accompanied by a decreased corrosive resistance of nickel 200.

  2. Study of the oxidation kinetics of the nickel-molybdenum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouillon, Marie-Josephe

    1974-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of the oxidation of a nickel-molybdenum alloy in the high-nickel-content part of this alloy. After a bibliographical study on the both metals, the author proposes a physical model based on observed phenomena and based on experimental results. Based on a thermodynamic study, the author compares the stability of the different oxides which may be formed, and reports a prediction of oxides obtained on the alloy during oxidation. Qualitative and quantitative studies have been performed by scanning electron microscopy coupled with electronic microprobe analysis to investigate morphological characteristics on oxidation films. A kinetic study by thermogravimetry shows a decrease of the alloy oxidation rate with respect to that of pure nickel at temperatures lower than 800 degrees C. This result is interpreted by the intervention of two opposed diffusion phenomena which act against each other [fr

  3. Frictional properties of lubrication greases with the addition of nickel nanoparticles in pneumatic cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ho; Lan, Chou-Wei; Guo, Jia-Bin

    2011-12-01

    This paper studies the influence of addition of 100 nm diameter nickel nano-particles on the friction properties of synthetic grease (Li base, VG100) in pneumatic cylinder. The friction force test of pneumatic cylinder equipment measures the frictional force between seal and cylinder bore in pneumatic cylinders. The lubricants with addition of nickel nano-particles were used for lubricating the contact interface between seal and cylinder bore. The friction force test equipment employ a load cell force sensor to measure the friction force between seals and cylinder bores. Results obtained from experimental tests are compared to determine the friction force between seals and cylinder bore in pneumatic cylinders. The study leads to the conclusion that the addition of nickel nano-particles to synthetic grease results in a decrease in friction force between seals and cylinder bores in pneumatic cylinder. This tribological behavior is closely related to the deposition of nano-particles on the rubbing surfaces

  4. Long life nickel electrodes for a nickel-hydrogen cell: Cycle life tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    In order to develop a long life nickel electrode for a Ni/H2 cell, the cycle life of nickel electrodes was tested in Ni/H2 boiler plate cells. A 19 test cell matrix was made of various nickel electrode designs including three levels each of plaque mechanical strength, median pore size of the plaque, and active material loading. Test cells were cycled to the end of their life (0.5v) in a 45 minute low Earth orbit cycle regime at 80% depth-of-discharge. It is shown that the active material loading level affects the cycle life the most with the optimum loading at 1.6 g/cc void. Mechanical strength does not affect the cycle life noticeably in the bend strength range of 400 to 700 psi. It is found that the best plaque is made of INCO nickel powder type 287 and has median pore size of 13 micron.

  5. Recovery of aluminium, nickel-copper alloys and salts from spent fluorescent lamps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabah, Mahmoud A

    2004-01-01

    This study explores a combined pyro-hydrometallurgical method to recover pure aluminium, nickel-copper alloy(s), and some valuable salts from spent fluorescent lamps (SFLs). It also examines the safe recycling of clean glass tubes for the fluorescent lamp industry. Spent lamps were decapped under water containing 35% acetone to achieve safe capture of mercury vapour. Cleaned glass tubes, if broken, were cut using a rotating diamond disc to a standard shorter length. Aluminium and copper-nickel alloys in the separated metallic parts were recovered using suitable flux to decrease metal losses going to slag. Operation variables affecting the quality of the products and the extent of recovery with the suggested method were investigated. Results revealed that total loss in the glass tube recycling operation was 2% of the SFLs. Pure aluminium meeting standard specification DIN 1712 was recovered by melting at 800 degrees C under sodium chloride/carbon flux for 20 min. Standard nickel-copper alloys with less than 0.1% tin were prepared by melting at 1250 degrees C using a sodium borate/carbon flux. De-tinning of the molten nickel-copper alloy was carried out using oxygen gas. Tin in the slag as oxide was recovered by reduction using carbon or hydrogen gas at 650-700 degrees C. Different valuable chloride salts were also obtained in good quality. Further research is recommended on the thermodynamics of nickel-copper recovery, yttrium and europium recovery, and process economics.

  6. Electrochemical study of nickel from urea-acetamide-LiBr low-temperature molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Min; Gao, Bingliang; Shi, Zhongning; Hu, Xianwei; Wang, Shixing; Li, Liangxing; Wang, Zhaowen; Yu, Jiangyu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • CV results show that the charge transfer process of Ni(II)/Ni in urea-acetamide-LiBr is irreversible. • The reduction process is a single step two-electron transfer process. • Chronoamperometry indicates that the reaction on tungsten electrode involves progressive nucleation. • EDS and XRD analyses confirm that the obtained deposits are pure nickel. -- Abstract: The electrochemical behavior of nickel was studied by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry techniques at 353 K using a tungsten electrode in urea-acetamide-LiBr low-temperature molten salt. The cyclic voltammograms indicate that the reduction of Ni(II) to Ni proceeds via a single-step, two-electron transfer process. Chronoamperometric measurements show that the electrodeposition of nickel on the tungsten electrode involves three-dimensional (3D) progressive nucleation under diffusion-controlled growth at 353 K. Nickel coatings were prepared at different cathodic potentials (−0.70 to −0.85 V) and different temperatures (343–373 K) in urea-acetamide-LiBr molten salt. The deposits were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The SEM images reveal that uniform, dense, and compact deposits were obtained at more positive cathodic potentials within the temperature range of 343–363 K. The EDS and XRD analyses confirm that the obtained deposits are pure nickel

  7. Nano Hydroxyapatite gel for removal of Nickel ions for environmental applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelfattah, W.I.; Fayed, M.SH.; Gouda, SH.R.; Awwad, S.A.

    2006-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) has been investigated for the removal of heavy metals in environmental application. However, little is known about the influences of surface modifications of the HAp. In the present study, nano HAp - polyvinyl alcohol gel was synthesized under ph control and the formed gel was used for removing nickel ions. The influence of nickel ions on the surface of HAp was studied. Reaction mechanisms were followed by ICP-MS and discussed via continuous variations method (CVM), mole ratio method (MRM) and slope ratio method (SRM). The formed gel with nickel ions was studied by various methods including UV, FTIR, XRD and SEM. The ICP-MS was used to analyze the supernatant solution to confirm the presence of Ca and / or Ni ions. The nickel ions were found to reduce the degree of crystallinity of the synthesized HAp phase. The present results indicated that nickel ions were completely adsorbed on the HAp structure with its anion. The validation of the nature of HAp gel as chelating agent or complex formation as well as physical sorption were discussed

  8. Investigation of the solubility of He in pressure-gassed and irradiated nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driesch, H.J. von den.

    1980-06-01

    The behaviour of helium in nickel and gold was investigated in pressure-gassed, homogeneously implanted surface loaded samples doped by the (p,α) and (d,a) nuclear reactions. The following results were obtained: The helium content of gassed nickel foil was mostly determined by a surface oxide film with a thickness that shows a temperature dependence similar to the helium content. Such an effect could not be detected in gassed gold foils. At gasification pressures above 300 bar a deformation of the samples could be observed that can be attributed to a change of the temperature distribution or of the convection flow. A helium solubility could not be detected for pure undeformed nickel. An upper limit of solubility of Ssub(He) -11 atom quota at 1500 K could be estimated from the measured data. Homogeneously implanted nickel samples released 1-30% of their helium content in several degassing stages at 600, 800 and 1200 K. The helium amount released, before the melting of the material is a clear function of the concentration in the investigated concentration range (10 -11 -10 -4 atom quota). A preirradiation of the samples with 6 MeV protons leads at high helium concentrations to an increased helium release before the melting of the samples. The largest quota of helium (70 to 99%) is released only during the melting of the nickel. (orig./RW) [de

  9. Hydrogen absorption kinetics of niobium with an ion-plated nickel overlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, K.

    1981-01-01

    The hydrogen absorption rate for nickel-ion-plated niobium was measured as a function of hydrogen pressure and temperature. The observed absorption curves of c(mean)/csub(e) against time (c(mean) and csub(e) are the mean and equilibrium hydrogen concentrations respectively) exhibited a marked hydrogen pressure dependence below 628 K but this was less marked above 723 K. The results were analysed on the basis of the proposed model that the rate-determining step is the hydrogen permeation through the nickel overlayer and that the permeation is driven by the hydrogen activity difference between the two interfaces, namely the H 2 -Ni and Ni-Nb interfaces. The marked pressure dependence can be attributed to the fact that the hydrogen activity coefficient in nickel is constant and that in niobium it varies markedly with concentration, i.e. with hydrogen pressure and temperature. It was also found that the change in the nickel overlayer structure caused by the dilatation of bulk niobium during hydrogen absorption enhances the hydrogen absorption rates. The temperature dependence of the hydrogen absorption rate is also discussed in comparison with that for tantalum with a vacuum-deposited nickel overlayer. (Auth.)

  10. Determination of nickel in hydrogenated fats and selected chocolate bars in Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohnalova, Lucie; Bucek, Pavel; Vobornik, Petr; Dohnal, Vlastimil

    2017-02-15

    Nickel is a metal that can be present in products containing hardened edible oils, possibly as leftover catalyst from the vegetable oil hardening process. Nickel may cause toxic effects including the promotion of cancer and contact allergy. In this work, nickel content was determined in hydrogenated vegetable fats and confectionery products, made with these fats, available on the Czech market using newly developed method combining microwave digestion and graphite furnace AAS. While concentrations of 0.086±0.014mg.kg(-1) or less were found in hydrogenated vegetable fats, the Ni content in confectionery products was significantly higher, varying between 0.742±0.066 and 3.141±0.217mg.kg(-1). Based on an average consumer basket, daily intake of nickel from vegetable fats is at least twice as low as intake from confectionery products. Based on results, the levels of nickel in neither vegetable fats nor confectionery products, do not represent a significant health risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of nickel introduced by electroplating on pyrocarbon deposition of carbon-fiber preforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Yancai

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the deposition rate and microstructure of pyrocarbon, nickel was introduced by electroplating on carbon fibers and used as a catalyst during the deposition of pyrocarbon at 1000 °C using methane as a precursor gas. The distribution of nickel catalyst and the microstructure of pyrocarbon were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and Raman micro-spectrometry. Results show that nano-sized nickel particles could be well distributed on carbon fibers and the pyrocarbon deposited catalytically had a smaller d002 value and a higher graphitization degree compared with that without catalyst. In addition, the deposition rate of pyrocarbon in each hour was measured. The deposition rate of pyrocarbon in the first hour was more than 10 times when carbon cloth substrates were doped with nickel catalysts as compared to the pure carbon cloths. The pyrocarbon gained by rapid deposition may include two parts, which are generation directly on the nickel catalyst and formation with the carbon nanofibers as crystal nucleus.

  12. Study on Solid Phase Extraction and Spectrophotometric Determination of Nickel in Waters and Biological Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Qiufen; Yang, Guangyu; Huang, Zhangjie; Yin, Jiayuan

    2004-01-01

    A sensitive, selective and rapid method for the determination of nickel based on the rapid reaction of nickel(II) with QADMAA and the solid phase extraction of the Ni(II)-QADMAA chelate with C 18 membrane disks has been developed. In the presence of pH 6.0 buffer solution and sodium dodecyl sulfonate (SDS) medium, QADMAA reacts with nickel to form a violet complex of a molar ratio of 1 : 2 (nickel to QADMAA). This chelate was enriched by solid phase extraction with C 18 membrane disks. An enrichment factor of 50 was obtained by elution of the chelates form the disks with the minimal amount of isopentyl alcohol. The molar absorptivity of the chelate was 1.32 x 10 5 L mol -1 cm -1 at 590 nm in the measured solution. Beer's law was obeyed in the range of 0.01-0.6 μg/mL. This method was applied to the determination of nickel in water and biological samples with good results

  13. The acute exposure effects of inhaled nickel nanoparticles on murine endothelial progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberda, Eric N; Cuevas, Azita K; Qu, Qingshan; Chen, Lung Chi

    2014-08-01

    The discovery of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) may help to explain observed cardiovascular effects associated with inhaled nickel nanoparticle exposures, such as increases in vascular inflammation, generation of reactive oxygen species, altered vasomotor tone and potentiated atherosclerosis in murine species. Following an acute whole body inhalation exposure to 500 µg/m(3) of nickel nanoparticles for 5 h, bone marrow EPCs from C57BL/6 mice were isolated. EPCs were harvested for their RNA or used in a variety of assays including chemotaxis, tube formation and proliferation. Gene expression was assessed for important receptors involved in EPC mobilization and homing using RT-PCR methods. EPCs, circulating endothelial progenitor cells (CEPCs), circulating endothelial cells (CECs) and endothelial microparticles (EMPs) were quantified on a BD FACSCalibur to examine endothelial damage and repair associated with the exposure. Acute exposure to inhaled nickel nanoparticles significantly increased both bone marrow EPCs as well as their levels in circulation (CEPCs). CECs were significantly elevated indicating that endothelial damage occurred due to the exposure. There was no significant difference in EMPs between the two groups. Tube formation and chemotaxis, but not proliferation, of bone marrow EPCs was impaired in the nickel nanoparticle exposed group. These results coincided with a decrease in the mRNA of receptors involved in EPC mobilization and homing. These data provide new insight into how an acute nickel nanoparticle exposure to half of the current Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) permissible exposure limit may adversely affect EPCs and exacerbate cardiovascular disease states.

  14. Effect of nickel and chromium exposure on buccal cells of electroplaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qayyum, Saba; Ara, Anjum; Usmani, Jawed Ahmad

    2012-02-01

    The electroplating industry commonly involves the use of nickel and chromium. An assessment of the genotoxic effects of these metals can be carried out by micronucleus (MN) test in buccal cells. Other nuclear anomalies (NA) observed in buccal cells viz., karyorrhexis, pyknosis and karyolysis are also the indicators of genotoxicity. The current study aims at determining the extent of genotoxic damage in relation to the duration of exposure to nickel and hexavalent chromium via micronuclei induction and other nuclear anomalies. The present investigation included 150 subjects of which 50 individuals with no history of nickel/chromium exposure (Group I) were taken as control, 50 electroplaters exposed to nickel and hexavalent chromium for duration of less than 10 years (Group II) and 50 electroplaters exposed for ≥10 years (Group III) were included. Slides of buccal cells were prepared and the frequency of MN (‰) and NA (‰) were calculated. ANOVA was applied to test significance. Results were considered significant at p exposure increased. Plasma nickel and chromium levels were also determined which showed a positive correlation with frequency MN and other nuclear abnormalities (p < 0.01).

  15. Nickel exposure promotes osmoregulatory disturbances in Oreochromis niloticus gills: histopathological and energy dispersive spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcato, A C C; Yabuki, A T; Fontanetti, C S

    2014-11-01

    Water is an essential factor for maintaining the vital functions of living beings. Nickel is the 24th most abundant element on Earth; it is a heavy metal that is genotoxic and mutagenic in its chloride form. Due to industrial use, its concentration in surface sediments increased considerably. Fish develop characteristics that make them excellent experimental models for studying aquatic toxicology. They are particularly useful because they can alert of the potential danger of chemical substances or environmental pollution. Due to water quality impairment and because there are few published studies that relate nickel to tissue alteration, this study aimed to examine the consequences of nickel in an aquatic environment. For this analysis, individuals of Oreochromis niloticus were exposed for 96 h to three different concentrations of nickel dissolved in water according to the standard established by Brazilian law and compared them to a control group. After exposure, the gills were analyzed using X-ray microanalysis, ultramorphology, and histological and histochemical analysis. The results demonstrated that all the concentrations used in the experiment altered the histophysiology of the individuals exposed. In conclusion, the nickel presents a toxic potential to fish, even at the lowest concentration tested, which is equivalent to half of the concentration allowed by law. The CONAMA resolution should be revised for this parameter because of the interference of this metal in the histophysiology of the tested organism.

  16. Genotoxic Effects Due to Exposure to Chromium and Nickel Among Electroplating Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Safty, Amal Mohamed Kamal; Samir, Aisha Mohamed; Mekkawy, Mona Kamal; Fouad, Marwa Mohamed

    Using chromium and nickel for electroplating is important in many industries. This process induces variable adverse health effects among exposed workers. The aim of this study is to detect the genotoxic effects of combined exposure to chromium and nickel among electroplating workers. This study was conducted on 41 male workers occupationally exposed to chromium and nickel in the electroplating section of a factory compared to 41 male nonexposed individuals, where full history and clinical examination were performed. Laboratory investigations included measurement of serum chromium, nickel, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and micronuclei were measured in buccal cells. In exposed workers, serum chromium ranged from 0.09 to 7.20 µg/L, serum nickel ranged from 1.20 to 28.00 µg/L, serum 8-OHdG ranged from 1.09 to12.60 ng/mL, and these results were statistically significantly increased compared to nonexposed group ( P electroplating industry are at risk of significant cytogenetic damage.

  17. Investigation into cathode polarization during deposition of rhodium-nickel and rhodium-indium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evdokimova, N.V.; Byacheslavov, P.M.; Lokshtanova, O.G.

    1979-01-01

    The results of kinetic regularities experimental investigations during electrodeposition of rhodium-nickel and rhonium-indium alloys are presented. Methods of general and partial polarization curves have been used to show the nature of polarization during the rhonium-nickel and rhodium-indium alloys deposition. It is shown that indium into the rhodium-indium alloy and nickel into the rhodium-nickel alloy deposit with great depolarization ( PHIsub(In)sup(0)=-0.33B, PHIsub(Ni)sup(0)=-0.23B). Indium and nickel in pure form do not deposit from the electrolytes of the given composition (H 2 SO 4 - 50 g/l, HNH 2 SO 3 -10 g/l). The recalculation of partial polarization curve of indium precipitation into the rhodium-indium alloy in the mixed kinetics coordinates gives a straight line with 40 mV inclination angle. This corresponds to the delayed stage of the second electron addition with the imposition of diffusion limitations

  18. A MATHEMATICAL MODEL TO PREDICT NICKEL CONCENTRATION IN KARAJ RIVER SEDIMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ramezankhani, A. A. M. Sharif, M. T. Sadatipour, R.Abdolahzadeh

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The contamination of surface waters through human activities has been intensified over the past years as population density has increased. Nickel is a metallic element and fuel combustion, nickel mining, refining waste, sewage sludge, and incineration are the major sources of nickel propagation. Nickel from various industrial wastewaters and other sources finally are disposed into water bodies. In this work, Karaj river was considered from 50º to 50º 14´longitudes and 35º 45´ to 35º 58´ latitudes and the presence of nickel was also assessed in this area. Sixteen stations were randomly selected and sediment samples were collected in polyethylene containers. Some water quality parameters such as pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, electrical conductivity, were determind by direct on-site measurements. To measure COD, 16 water samples were collected in dark bottles and transferred to laboratory spatial parameters such as slope and distance from start point were also calculated by ARCGIS 9.2. The relation between Ni concentration with spatial parameters and water quality parameters were obtained by multivariate analysis. Results showed that there was a significant relation between Ni concentration in sediments and distance from start point and electrical conductivity.

  19. Assessment of nickel release from earrings randomly purchased in China and Thailand using the dimethylglyoxime test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Carsten R; Hamann, Dathan J; Hamann, Quinlan J; Hamann, Curtis P; Boonchai, Waranya; Li, Lin-Feng; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2010-04-01

    China and Thailand produce large amounts of jewellery that are sold domestically and abroad. To identify nickel release and metal content in earrings purchased in China and Thailand. A total of 557 earrings were randomly purchased from vendors in 11 markets located in Beijing, Chengdu, Bangkok, Patong Beach, and Hat Yai. Earrings were subjected to dimethylglyoxime (DMG) tests and 26 of the DMG negative earrings were further evaluated qualitatively for major and minor metal content using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. A total of 314 Chinese earrings (31.5%) and 243 Thai earrings (29.2%) were DMG test positive. Three (11.5%) of 29 DMG negative earrings contained nickel as a major component; 7 (26.9%) of 29 DMG negative earrings contained nickel as a minor component. Excessive nickel release was frequent. This may contribute to the high prevalence of nickel allergy in both countries. Increased public education together with the adoption of a regulatory intervention in Thailand may be warranted. In China, enforcement of the 2002 Chinese National Standard GB 11887 may assist in reducing sensitization. These initiatives may eventually result in decreased morbidity among the Chinese and Thai citizens, but can potentially benefit recipient countries of these important earring producing countries.

  20. Recovery of aluminium, nickel-copper alloys and salts from spent fluorescent lamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabah, Mahmoud A.

    2004-01-01

    This study explores a combined pyro-hydrometallurgical method to recover pure aluminium, nickel-copper alloy(s), and some valuable salts from spent fluorescent lamps (SFLs). It also examines the safe recycling of clean glass tubes for the fluorescent lamp industry. Spent lamps were decapped under water containing 35% acetone to achieve safe capture of mercury vapour. Cleaned glass tubes, if broken, were cut using a rotating diamond disc to a standard shorter length. Aluminium and copper-nickel alloys in the separated metallic parts were recovered using suitable flux to decrease metal losses going to slag. Operation variables affecting the quality of the products and the extent of recovery with the suggested method were investigated. Results revealed that total loss in the glass tube recycling operation was 2% of the SFLs. Pure aluminium meeting standard specification DIN 1712 was recovered by melting at 800 deg. C under sodium chloride/carbon flux for 20 min. Standard nickel-copper alloys with less than 0.1% tin were prepared by melting at 1250 deg. C using a sodium borate/carbon flux. De-tinning of the molten nickel-copper alloy was carried out using oxygen gas. Tin in the slag as oxide was recovered by reduction using carbon or hydrogen gas at 650-700 deg. C. Different valuable chloride salts were also obtained in good quality. Further research is recommended on the thermodynamics of nickel-copper recovery, yttrium and europium recovery, and process economics