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Sample records for nickel aluminide castings

  1. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  2. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  3. High temperature performance of nickel aluminide castings for furnace fixtures and components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orth, J.E. [United Defense, Anniston, AL (United States); Sikka, V.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Materials are often the key to technological advancement. To remain competitive and create new markets, modern heat treating industries must utilize these technological advances to increase production and process efficiencies. These challenges are frequently met by increasing process temperatures and minimizing down time for maintenance and unscheduled repairs. This requirement has frequently been a challenge in the past since an increase in the process temperature typically results in a decrease in the life of the furnace fixtures and components. Nickel aluminide intermetallic alloys, based on the Ni{sub 3}Al composition and structure, are a new class of materials for use in the heat treating industries. These alloys provide excellent strength at elevated temperatures combined with very good resistance to carburization (in reducing and oxidizing environments) and high temperature oxidation. The mechanical and physical properties of cast nickel aluminide alloys are presented and compared to other commercially available cast and wrought heat resistant alloys. The advances in the development of these alloys are also discussed.

  4. Castable nickel aluminide alloys for structural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chain T.

    1992-01-01

    The specification discloses nickel aluminide alloys which include as a component from about 0.5 to about 4 at. % of one or more of the elements selected from the group consisting of molybdenum or niobium to substantially improve the mechanical properties of the alloys in the cast condition.

  5. Titanium Aluminide Casting Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünck, Matthias; Stoyanov, Todor; Schievenbusch, Jan; Michels, Heiner; Gußfeld, Alexander

    2017-08-01

    Titanium aluminide alloys have been successfully introduced into civil aircraft engine technology in recent years, and a significant order volume increase is expected in the near future. Due to its beneficial buy-to-fly ratio, investment casting bears the highest potential for cost reduction of all competing production technologies for TiAl-LPTB. However, highest mechanical properties can be achieved by TiAl forging. In view of this, Access e.V. has developed technologies for the production of TiAl investment cast parts and TiAl die cast billets for forging purposes. While these parts meet the highest requirements, establishing series production and further optimizing resource and economic efficiency are present challenges. In order to meet these goals, Access has recently been certified according to aircraft standards, aiming at qualifying parts for production on technology readiness level 6. The present work gives an overview of the phases of development and certification.

  6. Large Scale Evaluation fo Nickel Aluminide Rolls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-09-01

    This completed project was a joint effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Bethlehem Steel (now Mittal Steel) to demonstrate the effectiveness of using nickel aluminide intermetallic alloy rolls as part of an updated, energy-efficient, commercial annealing furnace system.

  7. Commercialization of nickel and iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K.

    1996-12-31

    Metallurgists are taught that intermetallics are brittle phases and should be avoided in alloys of commercial interest. This education is so deeply rooted that irrespective of significant advances made in ductilization of aluminides,the road to their acceptance commercialization is extremely difficult. This paper identifies the requirements for commercialization of any new alloys and reports the activities carried out to commercialize Ni and Fe aluminides. The paper also identifies areas which meet the current commercialization requirements and areas needing additional effort.

  8. Nickel aluminide alloy for high temperature structural use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chain T.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1991-01-01

    The specification discloses nickel aluminide alloys including nickel, aluminum, chromium, zirconium and boron wherein the concentration of zirconium is maintained in the range of from about 0.05 to about 0.35 atomic percent to improve the ductility, strength and fabricability of the alloys at 1200.degree. C. Titanium may be added in an amount equal to about 0.2 to about 0.5 atomic percent to improve the mechanical properties of the alloys and the addition of a small amount of carbon further improves hot fabricability.

  9. Large-Scale Evaluation of Nickel Aluminide Rools In A Heat-Treat Furnace at Bethlehem Steel's (now ISG) Burns Harbor Plate Mill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Mengel; Anthony Martocci; Larry Fabina; RObert Petrusha; Ronald Chango

    2003-09-01

    At Bethlehem Steel Burns Harbor Plate Division (now ISG Burns Harbor Plate Inc.)'s annealing furnace, new nickel aluminide intermetallic alloy rolls provide greater high-temperature strength and wear resistance compared to the conventional H series cast austenitic alloys currently used in the industry, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Bethlehem (ISG) partnered under a U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technology's Emerging Technology Deployment Program to demonstrate and evaluate the nickel aluminide intermetallic alloy rolls as part of an updated energy efficient large commercial annealing furnace system.

  10. PROTECTIVE LAYERS OF IRON AND NICKEL ALUMINIDES ON STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Voderova

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Intermediary phases Ni-Al and Fe-Al are promising materials due to their superior properties such as hardness and good resistance against oxidation at high temperatures. Moreover, Fe-Al phases are resistant in sulphur - containing atmospheres. Because of these characteristics, the above mentioned intermetallic phases seem to be prospective for the use in many technical applications such as energetics, chemical or automotive industry in a form of a bulk material or coatings. Presently, the protective aluminide layer is usually prepared by thermal spraying. Nevertheless, this method is not suitable for complex-shaped components. Therefore, the aim of this work was to find an alternative way to prepare layers consisting of nickel or iron aluminides by other technique than thermal spraying. At first, carbon steel samples were coated using galvanic or electroless nickel plating. Coated samples were subsequently submerged into molten aluminium at various temperatures and process durations. The influence of the temperature and duration on the intermetallic phase growth was studied by scanning electron and light microscopy. Thickness and microhardness of the intermetallic layer was also measured.

  11. PROTECTIVE LAYERS OF IRON AND NICKEL ALUMINIDES ON STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Voděrová

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Intermediary phases Ni-Al and Fe-Al are promising materials due to their superior properties such as hardness and good resistance against oxidation at high temperatures. Moreover, Fe-Al phases are resistant in sulphur - containing atmospheres. Because of these characteristics, the above mentioned intermetallic phases seem to be prospective for the use in many technical applications such as energetics, chemical or automotive industry in a form of a bulk material or coatings. Presently, the protective aluminide layer is usually prepared by thermal spraying. Nevertheless, this method is not suitable for complex-shaped components. Therefore, the aim of this work was to find an alternative way to prepare layers consisting of nickel or iron aluminides by other technique than thermal spraying. At first, carbon steel samples were coated using galvanic or electroless nickel plating. Coated samples were subsequently submerged into molten aluminium at various temperatures and process durations. The influence of the temperature and duration on the intermetallic phase growth was studied by scanning electron and light microscopy. Thickness and microhardness of the intermetallic layer was also measured.

  12. Effect of chromium on the corrosion resistance of aluminide coatings on nickel and nickel-based substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godlewski, K.; Godlewska, E.

    1987-04-01

    The aluminide and Cr-Al diffusion coatings on nickel and the nickel-based alloy EI 867 obtained by a two-step pack cementation technique were subjected to various corrosion tests consisting of oxidation under thermal cycling conditions as well as isothermal oxidation in the presence of fused Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The presence of chromium in the surface layer of aluminide coatings had a beneficial effect on their resistance to oxidation in that the oxide layer formed was less prone to spallation. This type of coating microstructure also appeared to be advantageous with respect to hot corrosion since pitting, which is typical of the degradation of aluminide coatings, was not observed. It is postulated that the chromium-enriched zone acts as a barrier to the oxidation of refractory metals (molybdenum, tungsten and vanadium) present in somewhat deeper coating layers in the form of carbide or intermetallic phases, thus preventing the onset of catastrophic corrosion.

  13. Large-scale Evaluation of Nickel Aluminide Rolls in a Heat-Treat Furnace at Bethelehem Steel's (Now ISG) Burns Harbor Plate Mill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mengel, J.

    2003-12-16

    At Bethlehem Steel Burns Harbor Plate Division (now ISG Burns Harbor Plate Inc.)'s annealing furnace, new nickel aluminide intermetallic alloy rolls provide greater high-temperature strength and wear resistance compared to the conventional H series cast austenitic alloys currently used in the industry. Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Bethlehem (ISG) partnered under a U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technology's Emerging Technology Deployment Program to demonstrate and evaluate the nickel aluminide intermetallic alloy rolls as part of an updated energy efficient large commercial annealing furnace system. Many challenges were involved in this project, including developing welding procedures for joining nickel aluminide intermetallic alloys with H-series austenitic alloys, developing commercial cast roll manufacturing specifications, working with several commercial suppliers to produce a quantity of high quality, reproducible nickel aluminide rolls for a large steel industrial annealing furnace, installing and demonstrating the capability of the rolls in this furnace, performing processing trials to evaluate the benefits of new equipment and processes, and documenting the findings. Updated furnace equipment including twenty-five new automated furnace control dampers have been installed replacing older design, less effective units. These dampers, along with upgraded flame-safety control equipment and new AC motors and roll-speed control equipment, are providing improved furnace control and additional energy efficiency. Energy data shows up to a 34% energy reduction from baseline after the installation of upgraded furnace damper controls along with up to a 34% reduction in greenhouse gases, potential for an additional 3 to 6% energy reduction per campaign of light-up and shutdown, and a 46% energy reduction from baseline for limited trials of a combination of improved damper control and straight-through plate processing. The straight

  14. Characterization of segregation in nickel and titanium aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.K.; Larson, D.J.; Russell, K.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1997-03-01

    Atom probe field ion microscopy has been used to characterize the distributions of microalloying additions in the microstructure of a variety of nickel and titanium aluminides. In Ni{sub 3}Al, boron additions were found to segregate to dislocations, low angle boundaries, stacking faults, antiphase boundaries, and grain boundaries. The boron and aluminum levels at grain boundaries were found to vary both from boundary to boundary and also along an individual boundary segment. In some cases, a boron-enriched film up to {approximately}3 nm thick was observed. In aluminum-enriched Ni{sub 3}Al, ultrafine clusters containing up to approximately 10 boron atoms were detected in the matrix. In contrast, the majority of the boron additions in NiAl was determined to be in the form of ultrafine MB{sub 2}-type precipitates. These precipitates offset the benefits of the boron segregation to the high angle grain boundaries. In molybdenum-doped NiAl, atom probe analyses indicated extremely low solubilities of the molybdenum and other trace impurities in the matrix and significant enrichments of molybdenum, nitrogen and silicon, boron, and iron at the grain boundaries. In boron-doped two phase {alpha}{sub 2} + {gamma} TiAl containing chromium, niobium, and tungsten, the boron level was found to be significantly depleted from the bulk level in both the {alpha}{sub 2} and {gamma} phases and a variety of coarse borides including TiB, TiB{sub 2} and a finer chromium-enriched (Ti, Cr){sub 2}B precipitate was observed. The tungsten and chromium were determined to partition preferentially to the {alpha}{sub 2} phase and also to segregated to the {alpha}{sub 2}-{gamma} and {gamma}-{gamma} interfaces. These results indicate that a significant proportion of the microalloying elements are consumed by the boride precipitates.

  15. Development and Processing of Nickel Aluminide-Carbide Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newport, Timothy Scott

    1996-01-01

    With the upper temperature limit of the Ni-based superalloys attained, a new class of materials is required. Intermetallics appear as likely candidates because of their attractive physical properties. With a relatively low density, high thermal conductivity, excellent oxidation resistance, high melting point, and simple crystal structure, nickel aluminide (NiAl) appears to be a potential candidate. However, NiAl is limited in structural applications due to its low room temperature fracture toughness and poor elevated temperature strength. One approach to improving these properties has been through the application of eutectic composites. Researchers have shown that containerless directional solidification of NiAl-based eutectic alloys can provide improvement in both the creep strength and fracture toughness. Although these systems have shown improvements in the mechanical properties, the presence of refractory metals increases the density significantly in some alloys. Lower density systems, such as the carbides, nitrides, and borides, may provide NiAl-based eutectic structure. With little or no information available on these systems, experimental investigation is required. The objective of this research was to locate and develop NiAl-carbide eutectic alloys. Exploratory arc-melts were performed in NiAl-refractory metal-C systems. Refractory metal systems investigated included Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, Mo, Nb, Ta, Ti, W, and Zr. Systems containing carbides with excellent stability (i.e.,HfC, NbC, TaC, TiC, and ZrC) produced large blocky cubic carbides in an NiAl matrix. The carbides appeared to have formed in the liquid state and were randomly distributed throughout the polycrystalline NiAl. The Co, Cr, Fe, Mo, and W systems contained NiAl dendrites with a two-phase interdendritic microconstituent present. Of these systems, the NiAl-Mo-C system had the most promising microstructure for in-situ composites. Three processing techniques were used to evaluate the NiAl-Mo-C system

  16. Tape casting as a fabrication process for iron aluminide (FeAl) thin sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mistler, R.E. [Richard E. Mistler Inc., Morrisville, PA (United States); Sikka, V.K. [ORNL, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Scorey, C.R.; McKernan, J.E. [Ametek Inc., 21 Toelles Road, Wallingford, CT 06492 (United States); Hajaligol, M.R. [Research and Development Center, Philip Morris USA, PO Box 26581, Richmond, VA 23261 (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The conversion of iron aluminide powder into a slurry followed by tape casting into a green sheet was investigated. Casting parameters affecting green sheet properties were studied. Application of thermo-mechanical processing including sintering, cold rolling, annealing and heat treating resulted in sheets with a fine-grain structure at essentially 100% of theoretical density. The various microstructures developed throughout the process are described, along with tensile property measurements on the fully dense product. Differences in property with sheets made by other processes are explained, and it is demonstrated that tape casting is a viable method of making thin gauge sheets of iron aluminide with a wide range of compositions. (orig.) 9 refs.

  17. Effect of Heat Treatment on Wear Resistance of Nickel Aluminide Coatings Deposited by HVOF and PTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benegra, M.; Santana, A. L. B.; Maranho, O.; Pintaude, G.

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to compare the wear resistance of nickel aluminide coatings deposited using plasma transferred arc (PTA) and high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) processes. Wear resistance was measured in rubber wheel abrasion tests. In both deposition processes, the same raw material (nickel aluminide powder) was atomized and deposited on a 316L steel plate substrate. After deposition, specimens were subjected to thermal cycling, aiming solubilization and precipitation. Coatings deposited using PTA developed different microstructures as a result of the incorporation of substrate elements. However, despite the presence of these microstructures, they performed better than coatings processed using HVOF before the heat treatment. After thermal cycling, the superficial hardness after the wear tests for both processes was similar, resulting in similar mass losses.

  18. An investigation of fracture and fatigue crack growth behavior of cast niobium aluminide intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, F.; Soboyejo, W.O. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Farkas, D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 213 Holden Hall, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0237 (United States)

    1999-05-31

    This paper presents the results of a combined experimental and theoretical study of fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth in cast Nb-15Al-xTi (x=10, 25 and 40 at%) niobium aluminide-based intermetallics. Fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth resistance are shown to improve significantly in the cast alloy containing 40 at% Ti. The improvements in the fracture toughness of the 40Ti alloy are shown to be due to the combined effects of ligament toughening, crack-tip plasticity and crack-tip blunting. The atomistic simulations show that the increased plasticity in these alloys is associated with their higher Ti content. The micromechanisms of fatigue crack growth are also elucidated. The implications of the results are discussed for potential structural application of niobium aluminide intermetallics. (orig.) 19 refs.

  19. Hertzian indentation of colloidally processed titanium carbide-nickel aluminide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, R. Bradley

    Advanced cermets based on titanium carbide (TiC), with a ductile nickel aluminide (Ni3Al) binder, have shown significant promise for use in a variety of demanding wear environments, due to a combination of high strength and good corrosion behaviour. A unique feature of TiC-Ni3Al cermets is that they show increasing strength from room temperature up to ˜1,000°C, while current materials such as tungsten carbide/cobalt (WC/Co) show significant strength degradation above ˜500°C. In this thesis, aqueous colloidal forming methods have been applied to process TiC preforms. The mechanisms and effectiveness of suspension stabilization were examined using methods such as zeta potential analysis, rheological measurements, and sedimentation trials for two common dispersants; an ammonium salt of polymethacrylate (PMA-NH 4) and two molecular weights (l,800 and 10,000) of polyethylenimine (PEI). TiC preforms were prepared by slip casting suspensions of up to 50 vol. % solids content. After drying, the TiC-based cermets were processed by melt infiltration with the Ni3Al alloy (IC-50) at 1475°C.Ni 3Al content was varied between 20 and 50 vol. % using this approach, resulting in final densities that exceeded 98% of theoretical. These samples were subjected to Hertzian indentation testing with loads ranging from 250 -- 2000 N, using WC-Co spheres with sizes ranging from 1.191 to 2.38 mm. Indentation stress-strain curves were produced from the indentation data and compared to the calculated elastic Hertzian response. The bonded interface method was used to examine the subsurface deformation of the material under load. Significant deformation of the binder and the eventual fracture of the TiC grains were observed. The nature of the quasi-plasticity of TiC-Ni 3Al and the effects of binder content on surface and subsurface deformation is examined.

  20. Piercing mandrel strengthening by surfacing with nickel aluminide-based alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorin, I. V.; Dubtsov, Yu N.; Sokolov, G. N.; Artem'ev, A. A.; Lysak, V. I.; Elsukov, S. N.

    2017-02-01

    Electrode composite wire (CW) was used for argon-arc surfacing of a thermal-resisting nickel aluminide-based alloy (Ni-Al-Cr-W-Mo-Ta system) on the butt-end surface of the non-water-cooled piercing mandrel. It was shown that multipassing surfacing forms a defect-free deposited metal based on the γ’-Ni3Al phase of various structural origins. Using high-temperature sclerometry and thermal fatigue testing methods, the metal deposited with CW containing ultrafine particle of 0.3-0.4 % wt. WC carbide features increased resistance to thermal and force effects at temperatures up to 1200 °C.

  1. Aluminide protective coatings on high–temperature creep resistant cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kubicki

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of research on aluminide protective coatings manufactured on high–temperature creep resistant cast steel. The main purpose of these coatings is protection against the high temperature corrosion, especially at high carburizing potential atmosphere. Coatings were obtained on cast steel type G–XNiCrSi36–18 with the following methods: pack cementation, paste method, cast method and slurry cementation. The phase composition, thickness and morphology of coatings were determined. Coatings capacity of carbon diffusion inhibition and thermal shocks resistance of coatings were determined with different methods. It was found, that all of the coatings reduce carbon diffusion in different degree and all coatings liable to degradation in consequence cracking and oxidation. Coating life time is mainly dependent on morphology, phase composition and service condition (thermal shocks first of all.

  2. Zirconium influence on microstructure of aluminide coatings deposited on nickel substrate by CVD method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jolanta Romanowska; Maryana Zagula-Yavorska; Jan Sieniawski

    2013-11-01

    Influence of Zr on the microstructure and phase characteristics of aluminide diffusion coatings deposited on the nickel substrate has been investigated in this study. The coatings with and without zirconium were deposited by CVD method. The cross-section chemical composition investigations revealed that during the coatings formation, there is an inward aluminum diffusion and outward nickel diffusion in both types of coatings (with and without zirconium), whereas zirconium is located far below the coating surface, at a depth of ∼17 m, between -NiAl phase and '-Ni3Al phase. XRD examinations showed that -NiAl, -NiAl and '-Ni3Al were the main components of the deposited coatings. -NiAl phase is on the surface of the coatings, whereas -NiAl and '-Ni3Al form deeper parts of the coatings. Zirconium is dissolved in NiAl on the border between -NiAl and '-Ni3Al.

  3. Physicochemical laws of the interaction of nickel aluminides with alloying elements: II. Interaction of nickel aluminides with alloying elements and/or interstitial phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povarova, K. B.; Kazanskaya, N. K.; Drozdov, A. A.; Morozov, A. E.

    2007-10-01

    The Ni-Al- X ( X is an interstitial element or phase) phase diagrams are analyzed to reveal systems that can be used as the basis for designing promising alloys and natural composites based on nickel aluminides reinforced by interstitial phases (natural composites I). The most thermally stable materials are shown to be heterophase alloys and composite materials (CMs) located in the eutectic-type (including degenerate eutectic) pseudobinary sections of ternary or multicomponent phase diagrams. They exhibit insignificant (or zero) dissolution of interstitial phases at operating temperatures and the absence of an intense interaction between CM components (natural composites II). Natural composites I based on the NiAl-or Ni3Al-interstitial phase alloys produced upon cooling from a melt can be reinforced by the refractory thermally stable rigid interstitial phases, namely, borides and carbides, that are present in pseudobinary sections in equilibrium with these nickel aluminides, since the elements forming these phases dissolve completely in matrix melts and the mutual solubility of these phases in the solid state is low. Such borides are TiB2 and HfB2 in equilibrium with β-NiAl, and such carbides are, e.g., TiC and HfC in equilibrium with β-NiAl and La2C3, NbC, and TaC in equilibrium with γ'-Ni3Al. Natural composites II should be produced using solid-phase methods (NiAl with AlN, Y2O3, Al2O3) or a combination of methods, where a refractory interstitial phase of the Al2O3 or Y2O3 type is solid and the intermetallic NiAl or Ni3Al matrix is liquid. NiAl-TiB2 (HfB2), NiAl-Al2O3 (Y2O3), and Ni3Al-La2C3 (NbC, TaC) composites are considered as examples.

  4. Environmental effect of S02-bearing atmosphere on the creep fatigue failure of aluminide-coated MM-002 nickel-base superalloy at 870°C

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Aghion, E

    1995-04-15

    Full Text Available High-temperature low-cycle fatigue (HTLCF) failure mechanisms of aluminide-coated MAR-M002 nickel-base superalloy in air, argon and Ar+5% SO2 atmospheres were investigated at 870°C. The loading conditions were constant and consisted of creep tension...

  5. Na2SO4- and NaCl- Induced Hot Corrosion Behaviors of a Nickel-Base Superalloy with Aluminide Diffusion Coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Hot-corrosion behaviors of nickel-base superalloy and aluminide diffusion coating have been investigated in conditions of contents of Na2SO4 and NaCl molten salts at 900℃ by means of XRD and SEM.Hot-corrosion scale of the superalloy and aluminide diffusion coating were analyzed and their surface morphologies were observed.The results demonstrate that both coated and uncoated specimens are not susceptible to various contents of NaCl.That may be resulted from the Al2O3 scale formation.Growth stress was characterized by the formation of convoluted scales.

  6. Numerical study of crucial parameters in tilt casting for titanium aluminides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerical modeling of the tilt casting process for TiAl alloys was investigated to achieve a tranquil mould filling and TiAl castings free of defects. Titanium alloys are very reactive in molten state, so they are widely melted in cold crucible, e.g. the Induction Skull Melting (ISM furnace. Then the crucible holding the molten metal together with the mould is rotated to transfer the metal into the mould — ISM+ tilt casting. This paper emphasizes the effect of crucial parameters on mould filling and solidification of the castings during tilt casting. All crucial parameters, such as rotation rate, rotation profile, venting, initial mould temperature, casting orientation, feeder design, change of radius in 'T' junction and mould insulation have been discussed using numerical modeling data. Simulations were performed using a 3D CFD code PHYSICA implemented with front tracking, heat transfer algorithms and a turbulence model (which accounts for an advancing solid front.

  7. Development of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, S.; Sikka, V.K.; Andleigh, V.K. [and others

    1995-06-01

    The primary reason for the poor room-temperature ductility of Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys is generally accepted to be environmental embrittlement due to hydrogen produced by the reaction of aluminum with water vapor present in the test atmosphere. In the as-cast condition, another possible reason for the low room-temperature ductility is the large grain size (0.5 to 3 mm) of the cast material. While recent studies on iron aluminides in the wrought condition have led to higher room-temperature ductility and increased high-temperature strength, limited studies have been conducted on iron aluminides in the as-cast condition. The purpose of this study was to induce grain refinement of the as-cast alloy through alloying additions to the melt and study the effect on room-temperature ductility as measured by the strain corresponding to the maximum stress obtained in a three-point bend test. A base charge of Fe-28% Al-5% Cr alloy was used; as in previous studies this ternary alloy exhibited the highest tensile ductility of several alloys tested. Iron aluminide alloys are being considered for many structural uses, especially for applications where their excellent corrosion resistance is needed. Several alloy compositions developed at ORNL have been licensed to commercial vendors for development of scale-up procedures. With the licensees and other vendors, several applications for iron aluminides are being pursued.

  8. Eutectic gamma (Nickel)/gamma vprime(Nickel Aluminide) delta (Nickel Niobium) polycrystalline nickel-base superalloys: Chemistry, processing, microstructure and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Mengtao

    Directionally solidified (D.S.) gamma(Ni)/gamma'(Ni 3A1)-delta(Ni3Nb) eutectic alloys were considered as candidate turbine blade materials. Currently, the properties of polycrystalline gamma/gamma'-delta alloys are of interest as they inherit many advantageous attributes from the D.S. gamma/gamma'-delta alloys. This thesis is therefore dedicated towards the development of a fundamental understanding of these novel eutectic alloys from several important perspectives. This thesis will first be focused on quantifying the effect of several elements. A set of Ni-Cr-Al-Nb alloy compositions with increasing levels of Cr was designed to investigate the influence of Cr on the primary phase formation, solidus and liquidus temperatures and g-d eutectic morphology. A matrix of complex gamma/gamma'-delta alloy compositions with the same (Ta+Nb) content but varying Ta/Nb ratios was designed to study the influence of Ta on elemental segregation and solid state partitioning behaviors. Thermodynamic predicaitons using the Computherm Pandat database (PanNi7) were compared to experimental results in these investigations. The second part of this thesis will provide a more general understanding of the effects of common elements. A large number of experimental alloys covering a broad range of compositions were selected for the analysis. Important alloy attributes were characterized as a function of element concentration. Linear regression analysis was performed to reveal the relative effectiveness of different elements. An extensive comparison between the experimental observations and Pandat predictions was provided to critically evaluate the strength and weakness of existing thermodynamic database model in this novel alloy system. The last part of this thesis emphasizes the development of cast and wrought processes for cast gamma/gamma'-delta alloys as a cost effective alternative to the powder metallurgy route. Hot rolling of workpieces encapsulated within a steel can was performed on

  9. Ceramic filters for bulk inoculation of nickel alloy castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Binczyk

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The work includes the results of research on production technology of ceramic filters which, besides the traditional filtering function, playalso the role of an inoculant modifying the macrostructure of cast nickel alloys. To play this additional role, filters should demonstratesufficient compression strength and ensure proper flow rate of liquid alloy. The role of an inoculant is played by cobalt aluminateintroduced to the composition of external coating in an amount from 5 to 10 wt.% . The required compression strength (over 1MPa isprovided by the supporting layers, deposited on the preform, which is a polyurethane foam. Based on a two-level fractional experiment24-1, the significance of an impact of various technological parameters (independent variables on selected functional parameters of theready filters was determined. Important effect of the number of the supporting layers and sintering temperature of filters after evaporationof polyurethane foam was stated.

  10. Microstructure and phase morphology during thermochemical processing of {alpha}{sub 2}-based titanium aluminide castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saqib, M. [Wright State Univ., Dayton, OH (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering; Apgar, L.S. [Dayton Univ., OH (United States). Graduate Materials Engineering; Eylon, D. [Dayton Univ., OH (United States). Graduate Materials Engineering; Weiss, I. [Wright State Univ., Dayton, OH (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering

    1995-12-31

    Changes in the microstructure, volume fraction and distribution of phases during different stages of thermochemical processing of Ti-25Al-10Nb-3V-1Mo (at.%) castings were investigated. Up to 14.5 at.% (0.35 wt.%) of hydrogen was introduced into the material by gas charging at temperatures between 650 and 980 C for times up to 20 h. The material was subsequently dehydrogenated by vacuum annealing at 650 C for 48 h. Investment cast Ti-25Al-10Nb-3V-1Mo alloy, hot isostatically pressed (HIP) at 1175 C at 260 MPa for 6 h, was used as the starting material. The microstructure of the as-HIP material consists of {alpha}{sub 2}, B2 and orthorhombic phases. The {alpha}{sub 2} phase exists in equiaxed, Widmanstaeten and cellular morphologies. The B2 phase is observed mainly along {alpha}{sub 2}/{alpha}{sub 2} boundaries. Some {alpha}{sub 2} Widmanstaeten also contain very fine orthorhombic phase in a plate-like morphology. Hydrogenation of the material modified the microstructure; however, the morphology of the {alpha}{sub 2} and B2 phases did not change. Furthermore, hydride precipitation and a higher volume fraction of the orthorhombic phase were observed compared with the as-HIP material. Following dehydrogenation, the hydrogen level in the material was found to be less than 0.1 at.% (0.0025wt.%). Transmission electron microscopy of the dehydrogenated material did not reveal the presence of hydride precipitates; however, the high volume fraction of the orthorhombic phase was found to persist following dehydrogenation. (orig.)

  11. Addition of a nickel aluminide coating to Inconel 600 using a solar furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawers, J.C.; Alman, D.E.; Lewandowski, A.; Petty, A.V.; Pitts, J. (Bureau of Mines, Albany, OR (United States). Albany Research Center)

    1994-11-15

    Three different coating application techniques have been investigated for placing a nickel-aluminium coating onto an Inconel 600 substrate using a solar furnace. In the first, a sheet of pure aluminium was melted onto the substrate. A duplex sheet of pure aluminium was melted onto the substrate. A duplex surface coating resulted, the outer layer being a mixture of pure aluminium and NiAl[sub 3], the inner layer being pure NiAl[sub 3] firmly bonded to the substrate. The second method involved melting pre-alloyed NiAl powder onto the substrate and gave a firmly bonded composite mixture of NiAl and Ni[sub 2]Al[sub 3] intermetallics. The third method was less successful. Elemental Al and Ni powders did not wet the substrate when melted and resulted only in poorly bonded intermetallic balls. Given the right technique, however, it has been demonstrated that solar radiation can be very effective in rapidly heating and melting a surface coating onto a processed bulk material with minimal thermal damage. (5 figures, 7 references). (UK)

  12. Morphological Study of Directionally Freeze-Cast Nickel Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hyungyung; Kim, Min Jeong; Choi, Hyelim; Sung, Yung-Eun; Choe, Heeman; Dunand, David C.

    2016-03-01

    Nickel foams, consisting of 51 to 62 pct aligned, elongated pores surrounded by a network of Ni walls, were fabricated by reduction and sintering of directionally cast suspensions of nanometric NiO powders in water. Use of dispersant in the slurry considerably affected the foam morphology and microstructure at both the micro- and macro-scale, most likely by modifying ice solidification into dendrites (creating the aligned, elongated macro-pores) and NiO powder accumulation in the inter-dendritic space (creating the Ni walls with micro-pores). The mean width of the Ni walls, in foams solidified with and without dispersant, was 21 ± 5 and 75 ± 13 µm, respectively. Additionally, the foams with the dispersant showed less dense walls and rougher surfaces than those without the dispersant. Moreover, the fraction of closed pores present in the foam walls with the dispersant was higher than that of the samples without dispersant. We finally verified the potential energy application of the Ni foam produced in this study by carrying out a preliminary single-cell performance test with the Ni foam sample as the gas diffusion layer on the anode side of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell.

  13. Wedlable nickel aluminide alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-11-19

    A Ni.sub.3 Al alloy with improved weldability is described. It contains about 6-12 wt % Al, about 6-12 wt % Cr, about 0-3 wt % Mo, about 1.5-6 wt % Zr, about 0-0.02 wt % B and at least one of about 0-0.15 wt % C, about 0-0.20 wt % Si, about 0-0.01 wt % S and about 0-0.30 wt % Fe with the balance being Ni.

  14. Alumina matrix ceramic-nickel composites formed by centrifugal slip casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Zygmuntowicz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on the possibility of fabricating the alumina matrix ceramic-nickel composites with gradient concentration of metal particles. Centrifugal slip casting method was chosen for the composite fabrication. This method allows fabrication of the graded distribution of nickel particles in the hollow cylinder composites. The horizontal rotation axis was applied. The samples were characterized by XRD, SEM and quantitative description of the microstructure. The macroscopic as well as SEM observations of the prepared composites confirmed the gradient concentration of Ni particles in the composite materials. The application of the centrifugal slip casting method allows for the graded distribution of metal particles in the samples.

  15. Effects of surface finishing conditions on the biocompatibility of a nickel-chromium dental casting alloy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGinley, Emma Louise

    2011-07-01

    To assess the effects of surface finishing condition (polished or alumina particle air abraded) on the biocompatibility of direct and indirect exposure to a nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) d.Sign®10 dental casting alloy on oral keratinocytes. Biocompatibility was performed by assessing cellular viability and morphology, metabolic activity, cellular toxicity and presence of inflammatory cytokine markers.

  16. Spatially varying microhardness in a platinum-modified nickel aluminide bond coat in a thermal barrier coating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue White 418, Cleveland, OH 44106-7204 (United States); Heuer, A.H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue White 418, Cleveland, OH 44106-7204 (United States)]. E-mail: heuer@case.edu

    2006-04-15

    hardness of a Pt-modified Ni aluminide bond coat and its ZrO{sub 2} top coat in an electron beam-physical vapor deposition ZrO{sub 2}-based thermal barrier coating system has been studied as a function of temperature in as-deposited and aged (1200 deg. C/1 h) coupon samples, and in a used blade taken out of service after a (modest) fraction of life. A marked brittle to ductile transition at 580 {+-} 30 deg. C was observed in the as-deposited material, in agreement with previous uniaxial tensile data in this system. Significant spatial variation in the hardness of the bond coats were observed at room temperature and could be correlated with spatially varying microstructures.

  17. Creep curve modelling of a conventionally cast nickel base superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupinc, V.; Maldini, M. [CNR - IENI, Milan (Italy); Poggio, E.; Vacchieri, E. [Ansaldo Energia S.p.A., Genoa (Italy)

    2010-07-01

    Constant load creep tests on Rene 80, a nickel base superalloy for gas turbine blade application, were run in the temperature interval 800-950 C with applied stresses producing rupture times up to 1000 h. Creep curves are generally dominated by a long accelerating/tertiary creep that follows a relatively small decelerating/primary creep. No steady state stage has been observed. Analysis of the creep curves has shown that a single damage parameter can describe the long accelerating/tertiary state in the explored temperature range. The damage appears to be dependent on the accumulated creep strain and, as a first approximation, independent on the applied stress and temperature. The whole creep curve, primary and tertiary stages, has been modelled by a simple set of coupled differential equations obtained using the formalism of the Continuum Damage Mechanics. The proposed set of equations has an analytical solution, strain vs. time, for creep curves at constant temperature and stress. (orig.)

  18. Effect of Nickel Equivalent on Austenite Transition Ratio in Ni-Mn-Cu Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janus A.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Determined was quantitative effect of nickel equivalent value on austenite decomposition degree during cooling-down castings of Ni-Mn- Cu cast iron. Chemical composition of the alloy was 1.8 to 5.0 % C, 1.3 to 3.0 % Si, 3.1 to 7.7 % Ni, 0.4 to 6.3 % Mn, 0.1 to 4.9 % Cu, 0.14 to 0.16 % P and 0.03 to 0.04 % S. Analysed were castings with representative wall thickness 10, 15 and 20 mm. Scope of the examination comprised chemical analysis (including WDS, microscopic observations (optical and scanning microscopy, image analyser, as well as Brinell hardness and HV microhardness measurements of structural components.

  19. Synthesis of alpha-aluminum oxide and hafnium-doped beta-nickel aluminide coatings on single crystal nickel-based superalloy by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Limin

    to proactively control the concentration and distribution of Hf as a beneficial dopant in the aluminide coating matrix. A laboratory-scale, hot-wall CVD reactor was specifically constructed to perform critical Hf doping experiments through "continuous" and "sequential" doping procedures. The continuous doping procedure, in which HfCl4 and AlCl3 were simultaneously introduced with H2, required a relatively high HfCl4 concentration in the gas phase to incorporate an average Hf concentration of ˜0.1 wt% in the beta-NiAl coating matrix. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  20. Method of manufacturing aluminide sheet by thermomechanical processing of aluminide powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Scorey, Clive; Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleishhauer, Grier; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton; German, Randall M.

    2003-12-09

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  1. Method of manufacturing aluminide sheet by thermomechanical processing of aluminide powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Midlothian, VA); Scorey, Clive (Cheshire, CT); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Midlothian, VA); Fleischhauer, Grier (Midlothian, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA); German, Randall M. (State College, PA)

    2000-01-01

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr.ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  2. Method of manufacturing aluminide sheet by thermomechanical processing of aluminide powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajaligol, M.R.; Scorey, C.; Sikka, V.K.; Deevi, S.C.; Fleischhauer, G.; Lilly, A.C. Jr.; German, R.M.

    2000-02-29

    A powder metallurgical process is disclosed of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as {<=}1% Cr, {>=}0.05% Zr{<=}2% Ti, {<=}2% Mo, {<=}1% Ni, {<=}0.75% C, {<=}0.1% B, {<=}1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, {<=}1% rare earth metal, and/or {<=}3% Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 {mu}m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  3. Physical metallurgy of nickel aluminides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G K Dey

    2003-02-01

    A description of the important physical metallurgy aspects of Ni$_3Al and NiAl encompassing structure, crystallographic defects, slip systems and phase stability has been presented in this article. The microstructures generated in the two alloys by conventional as well as novel processing techniques have been discussed. The effect of alloying additions on the microstructure has been enumerated. Besides description of the aforementioned physical metallurgy aspects, an important purpose of this review is to focus on the reasons of brittleness in the two alloys and means of alleviating this problem primarily by alloying. The effect of alloying on the slip behaviour has also been described.

  4. Prediction of recrystallisation in single crystal nickel-based superalloys during investment casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panwisawas Chinnapat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Production of gas turbines for jet propulsion and power generation requires the manufacture of turbine blades from single crystal nickel-based superalloys, most typically using investment casting. During the necessary subsequent solution heat treatment, the formation of recrystallised grains can occur. The introduction of grain boundaries into a single crystal component is potentially detrimental to performance, and therefore manufacturing processes and/or component geometries should be designed to prevent their occurrence. If the boundaries have very low strength, they can degrade the creep and fatigue properties. The root cause for recrystallisation is microscale plasticity caused by differential thermal contraction of metal, mould and core; when the plastic deformation is sufficiently large, recrystallisation takes place. In this work, numerical and thermo-mechanical modelling is carried out, with the aim of establishing computational methods by which recrystallisation during the heat treatment of single crystal nickel-based superalloys can be predicted and prevented prior to their occurrence. Elasto-plastic law is used to predict the plastic strain necessary for recrystallisation. The modelling result shows that recrystallisation is most likely to occur following 1.5–2.5% plastic strain applied at temperatures between 1000 ∘C and 1300 ∘C; this is validated with tensile tests at these elevated temperatures. This emphasises that high temperature deformation is more damaging than low temperature deformation.

  5. Evaluation of porosity of precision castings made of high-temperature creep resisting nickel superalloys; Beurteilung der Porositaet von Praezisionsguessen aus hochtemperaturkriechfesten Nickel-Superlegierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roskosz, Stanislaw [Silesian Univ. of Technology, Katowice (Poland). Dept. of Materials Science

    2013-08-01

    The subject matter of the paper is the quantitative evaluation of gaseous and shrinkage porosity in construction elements of a low-pressure aircraft engine turbine using quantitative metallography methods. The research material consisted of blades and blade segments with a polycrystalline structure made of IN 713C and MAR M247 superalloys. One of the major problems that occur in the precision castings is their porosity: gaseous, which is the result of emission of dissolved gases from the superalloy during solidification, and shrinkage, being the result of shrinkage of the superalloy and from a lack of feeding of the interdendritic space. The comprehensive procedure of porosity evaluation includes: an automatic decimal-to-binary conversion of pores, a selective quantitative evaluation of gaseous and shrinkage porosity, the development of measuring conditions of quantitative metallography parameters, and the application of structural maps showing the varied porosity distribution over the cross-sections of castings of blades and blade segments. The developed practical procedure of selective measurement of gaseous and shrinkage porosity in the examination of precision castings made of high-temperature creep resisting nickel superalloys is presented. (orig.)

  6. Weld overlay cladding with iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-08-01

    The hot and cold cracking tendencies of some early iron aluminide alloy compositions have limited their use in applications where good weldability is required. Using hot crack testing techniques invented at ORNL, and experimental determinations of preheat and postweld heat treatment needed to avoid cold cracking, we have developed iron aluminide filler metal compositions which can be successfully used to weld overlay clad various substrate materials, including 9Cr-1Mo steel, 2-1/4Cr-1Mo steel, and 300-series austenitic stainless steels. Dilution must be carefully controlled to avoid crack-sensitive deposit compositions. The technique used to produce the current filler metal compositions is aspiration-casting, i.e. drawing the liquid from the melt into glass rods. Future development efforts will involve fabrication of composite wires of similar compositions to permit mechanized gas tungsten arc (GTA) and/or gas metal arc (GMA) welding.

  7. Fiber laser cladding of nickel-based alloy on cast iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arias-González, F., E-mail: felipeag@uvigo.es [Applied Physics Dpt., University of Vigo, EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, Vigo E-36310 (Spain); Val, J. del [Applied Physics Dpt., University of Vigo, EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, Vigo E-36310 (Spain); Comesaña, R. [Materials Engineering, Applied Mechanics and Construction Dpt., University of Vigo, EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, Vigo E-36310 (Spain); Penide, J.; Lusquiños, F.; Quintero, F.; Riveiro, A.; Boutinguiza, M.; Pou, J. [Applied Physics Dpt., University of Vigo, EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, Vigo E-36310 (Spain)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Fiber laser cladding of Ni-based alloy on cast iron was experimentally studied. • Two different types of cast iron have been analyzed: gray and ductile cast iron. • Suitable processing parameters to generate a Ni-based coating were determined. • Dilution is higher in gray cast iron samples than in ductile cast iron. • Ni-based coating presents higher hardness than cast iron but similar Young's modulus. - Abstract: Gray cast iron is a ferrous alloy characterized by a carbon-rich phase in form of lamellar graphite in an iron matrix while ductile cast iron presents a carbon-rich phase in form of spheroidal graphite. Graphite presents a higher laser beam absorption than iron matrix and its morphology has also a strong influence on thermal conductivity of the material. The laser cladding process of cast iron is complicated by its heterogeneous microstructure which generates non-homogeneous thermal fields. In this research work, a comparison between different types of cast iron substrates (with different graphite morphology) has been carried out to analyze its impact on the process results. A fiber laser was used to generate a NiCrBSi coating over flat substrates of gray cast iron (EN-GJL-250) and nodular cast iron (EN-GJS-400-15). The relationship between processing parameters (laser irradiance and scanning speed) and geometry of a single laser track was examined. Moreover, microstructure and composition were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The hardness and elastic modulus were analyzed by means of micro- and nanoindentation. A hardfacing coating was generated by fiber laser cladding. Suitable processing parameters to generate the Ni-based alloy coating were determined. For the same processing parameters, gray cast iron samples present higher dilution than cast iron samples. The elastic modulus is similar for the coating and the substrate, while the Ni

  8. Effects of Hard Surface Grinding and Activation on Electroless-Nickel Plating on Cast Aluminium Alloy Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olawale Olarewaju Ajibola

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work examined effects of hard surface polishing grits and activation on electroless-nickel (EN plating on cast aluminium alloy substrates in sodium hypophosphite baths. As-received aluminium alloy sample sourced from automobile hydraulic brake master cylinder piston was melted in electric furnace and sand cast into rod. The cast samples were polished using different grits (60 μm–1200 μm before plating. The effects on adhesion, appearance, and quantity of EN deposits on substrates were studied. Observation shows that the quantity of EN deposit is partly dependent on the alloy type and roughness of the surface of the substrates, whereas the adhesion and brightness are not solely controlled by the degree of surface polishing. The best yield in terms of adhesion and appearance was obtained from the activation in zincate and palladium chloride solutions. Higher plating rates (g/mm2/min of 3.01E-05, 2.41E-05, and 2.90E-05 were obtained from chromate, zincate, and chloride than 8.49E-06, 8.86E-06, and 1.69E-05 as obtained from HCl etched, NaOH, and H2O activated surfaces, respectively.

  9. Casting accuracy of a nickel and beryllium-free cobalt-chromium alloy for crown and bridge prostheses and resin-bonded bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, O

    1985-01-01

    In the 1970's economic factors dictated the development of alternatives to gold alloys in dentistry in the USA and in Europe. A similar development has not occurred in Sweden because of different laws. Alloys that contain nickel and beryllium present a health hazard and are therefore of little interest to the Swedish market. A review of the literature shows that castings of base-metal alloys are less accurate than castings of conventional gold alloys and of low gold alloys. However, in long-span-bridges and in thin resin-bonded cast restorations, their physical and mechanical properties are superior to those of the gold alloys. In this study the casting accuracy of a nickel- and beryllium-free cobalt-chromium alloy, Neobond II Special, is investigated. Neobond II Special was found to be less accurate than Sjödings C-guld. The marginal discrepancies of the castings were small, however, when the castings were oversized. It also proved to be technique sensitive to conventional dental laboratory procedures. Thus, it seems difficult to get castings with an acceptable retention as well as small marginal discrepancies when using the base-metal alloy.

  10. Fiber laser cladding of nickel-based alloy on cast iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-González, F.; del Val, J.; Comesaña, R.; Penide, J.; Lusquiños, F.; Quintero, F.; Riveiro, A.; Boutinguiza, M.; Pou, J.

    2016-06-01

    Gray cast iron is a ferrous alloy characterized by a carbon-rich phase in form of lamellar graphite in an iron matrix while ductile cast iron presents a carbon-rich phase in form of spheroidal graphite. Graphite presents a higher laser beam absorption than iron matrix and its morphology has also a strong influence on thermal conductivity of the material. The laser cladding process of cast iron is complicated by its heterogeneous microstructure which generates non-homogeneous thermal fields. In this research work, a comparison between different types of cast iron substrates (with different graphite morphology) has been carried out to analyze its impact on the process results. A fiber laser was used to generate a NiCrBSi coating over flat substrates of gray cast iron (EN-GJL-250) and nodular cast iron (EN-GJS-400-15). The relationship between processing parameters (laser irradiance and scanning speed) and geometry of a single laser track was examined. Moreover, microstructure and composition were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The hardness and elastic modulus were analyzed by means of micro- and nanoindentation. A hardfacing coating was generated by fiber laser cladding. Suitable processing parameters to generate the Ni-based alloy coating were determined. For the same processing parameters, gray cast iron samples present higher dilution than cast iron samples. The elastic modulus is similar for the coating and the substrate, while the Ni-based coating obtained presents a significantly superior hardness than cast iron.

  11. Influences of processing parameters on microstructure during investment casting of nickel-base single crystal superalloy DD3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Sifeng

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The effects of solidification variables on the as-cast microstructures of nickel-base single crystal superalloy DD3 have been investigated by using the modified Bridgman apparatus. The experiments were performed under a thermal gradient of approximately 45 K·cm-1 and at withdrawal rates ranging from 30 to 200 m·s-1. The experimental results show that the primary and secondary dendritic arm spacings (PDAS and SDAS decrease when the withdrawal rate is increased. Compared with the theoretical models of PDAS, the results are in good agreement with Trivedi’s model. The relationships of PDAS and SDAS with withdrawal rates can be described as l1 = 649.7V -0.24±0.02 and l2 = 281V -0.32±0.03, respectively. In addition, the size of the γ′ phase significantly decreases with increasing withdrawal rate.

  12. Changes of structure in nickel-based cast materials IN 100 and IN 713C after creep load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillhoefer, H.; Track, W.; Wege, R.

    1987-01-01

    Creep values of the nickel-based cast alloys IN 100 and IN 713C were determined at the Institute for Materials of the Darmstadt Technical College on behalf of the FVV Working Party on 'Long Term Creep' and these were evaluated with the aim of: Producing documentation of structural changes, documentation of changes of the ..gamma.. separation phase depending on temperature, stress and time. Clearing up the stress to which ..gamma.. separation particles remain stable; from this one can judge how sensible it is to produce a defined hardened structure in IN 100 by heat treatment. Formulating subjects and tasks for an FVV Research Project 'Creep equations'. (orig./IHOE).

  13. Manufacturing techniques for titanium aluminide based alloys and metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Kunal B.

    Dual phase titanium aluminides composed vastly of gamma phase (TiAl) with moderate amount of alpha2 phase (Ti3Al) have been considered for several high temperature aerospace and automobile applications. High specific strength coupled with good high temperature performance in the areas of creep and oxidation resistance makes titanium aluminides "materials of choice" for next generation propulsion systems. Titanium alumnides are primarily being considered as potential replacements for Ni-based superalloys in gas turbine engine components with aim of developing more efficient and leaner engines exhibiting high thrust-to-weight ratio. Thermo-mechanical treatments have shown to enhance the mechanical performance of titanium aluminides. Additionally, small additions of interstitial elements have shown further and significant improvement in the mechanical performance of titanium alumnide alloys. However, titanium aluminides lack considerably in room temperature ductility and as a result manufacturing processes of these aluminides have greatly suffered. Traditional ingot metallurgy and investment casting based methods to produce titanium aluminide parts in addition to being expensive, have also been unsuccessful in producing titanium aluminides with the desired mechanical properties. Hence, the manufacturing costs associated with these methods have completely outweighed the benefits offered by titanium aluminides. Over the last two decades, several powder metallurgy based manufacturing techniques have been studied to produce titanium aluminide parts. These techniques have been successful in producing titanium aluminide parts with a homogeneous and refined microstructure. These powder metallurgy techniques also hold the potential of significant cost reduction depending on the wide market acceptance of titanium aluminides. In the present study, a powder metallurgy based rapid consolidation technique has been used to produce near-net shape parts of titanium aluminides. Micron

  14. Marginal accuracy of nickel chromium copings fabricated by conventional and accelerated casting procedures, produced with ringless and metal ring investment procedures: A comparative in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Deepa; Shetty, Y. Bharath; Miranda, Glynis Anita; Prabhu, M. Bharath; Karkera, Reshma

    2015-01-01

    Background: Conventional investing and casting techniques are time-consuming and usually requires 2–4 h for completion. Accelerated nonstandard, casting techniques have been reported to achieve similar quality results in significantly less time, namely, in 30–40 min. During casting, it is essential to achieve compensation for the shrinkage of solidifying alloy by investment expansion. The metal casting ring restricts the thermal expansion of investment because the thermal expansion of the ring is lesser than that of the investment. The use of casting ring was challenged with the introduction of the ringless technique. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 test samples of nickel chromium (Ni-Cr) cast copings were obtained from the patterns fabricated using inlay casting wax. The 20 wax patterns were invested using metal ring and 20 wax patterns were invested using the ringless investment system. Of both the groups, 10 samples underwent conventional casting, and the other 10 underwent accelerated casting. The patterns were casted using the induction casting technique. All the test samples of cast copings were evaluated for vertical marginal gaps at four points on the die employing a stereo optical microscope. Results: The vertical marginal discrepancy data obtained were tabulated. Mean and standard deviations were obtained. Vertical discrepancies were analyzed using analysis of variance and Tukey honestly significantly different. The data obtained were found to be very highly significant (P < 0.001). Mean vertical gap was the maximum for Group II (53.64 μm) followed by Group IV (47.62 μm), Group I (44.83 μm) and Group III (35.35 μm). Conclusion: The Ni-Cr cast copings fabricated with the conventional casting using ringless investment system showed significantly better marginal fit than that of cast copings fabricated from conventional and accelerated casting with metal ring investment and accelerated casting using ringless investment since those copings had

  15. Nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    The agricultural significance of nickel (Ni) is becoming increasingly apparent; yet, relative few farmers, growers, specialists or researchers know much about its function in crops, nor symptoms of deficiency or toxicity. The body of knowledge is reviewed regarding Ni’s background, uptake, transloc...

  16. Cyclic-Oxidation Behavior of Multilayered Pt/Ru-Modified Aluminide Coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingxue Song; Hideyuki Murakami; Chungen Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Multilayered Pt/Ru modified aluminide coating for thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems has been investigated. 2 μm Pt+2μm Ru+2 μm Pt was first deposited on nickel-base superalloy DZ125 by electrodeposition, and then the coating was treated by annealing and a conventional pack-cementation aluminizing process. The cyclic oxidation tests were carried out at 1423 K in air. It was found that the thermal cyclic oxidation resistance of Pt/Ru-modified aluminide coating was comparable to that of Pt-modified aluminide coating, which was much better than simply aluminized DZ125. The addition of Ru to Pt-modified aluminide coating increased the resistance to rumpling. The microstructures and phase constitutions of the coating before and after oxidation were investigated.

  17. Development of a Nickel-base Cast Superalloy with High Strength and Superior Creep Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jieshan HOU; Jianting GUO; Lanzhang ZHOU; Zhijun LI

    2005-01-01

    Derived from Russian alloy CHS88U, six experimental Ni-base alloys named as A to F in the Ni-Cr-Co-W-Ti-Al-Hf system are designed, evaluated and processed. One of these alloys, F, shows excellent high temperature tensile strength and ductility with superior creep rupture properties. As predicted by using modeling tools such as PHACOM and NEW PHACOMP, there is hardly the tendency for formation of topologically close-packed phase (TCP) phase in alloy F. Furthermore, through microstructural observation, it is also found that no TCP phase is formed in alloy F after long-time exposure at high temperature. So alloy F has well balance of phase stability and mechanical properties in view of application for gas turbines. It is proved that d-electron approach can be applied for design and development of nickel-base superalloys for gas turbine application.

  18. Effect of Processing Parameters on the Protective Quality of Electroless Nickel-Phosphorus on Cast Aluminium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olawale Olarewaju Ajibola

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of temperature, pH, and time variations on the protective amount and quality of electroless nickel (EN deposition on cast aluminium alloy (CAA substrates were studied. The temperature, pH, and plating time were varied while the surface condition of the substrate was kept constant in acid or alkaline bath. Within solution pH of 5.0–5.5 range, the best quality is obtained in acid solution pH of 5.2. At lower pH (5.0–5.1, good adhesion characterised the EN deposition. Within the range of plating solution pH of 7.0 to 11.5, the highest quantity and quality of EN deposition are obtained on CAA substrate in solution pH of 10.5. It is characterised with few pores and discontinuous metallic EN film. The quantity of EN deposition is time dependent, whereas the adhesion and brightness are not time controlled. The best fit models were developed from the trends of result data obtained from the experiments. The surface morphologies and the chemical composition of the coating were studied using the Jeol JSM-7600F field emission scanning electron microscope.

  19. Erosive Wear Behavior of Nickel-Based High Alloy White Cast Iron Under Mining Conditions Using Orthogonal Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandh, J.; Natarajan, S.; Babu, S. P. Kumaresh

    2013-09-01

    Nihard Grade-4, a nickel-bearing cast iron widely used in slurry pumps and hydrodynamic components, is evaluated for its erosive wear response under mining conditions using a statistical approach. Experiments were conducted by varying the factors namely velocity, slurry concentration, angle of impingement, and pH in three levels, using L9 orthogonal array. Analysis of variance was used to rank the factors influencing erosive wear. The results indicate that velocity is the most influencing factor followed by the angle of impingement, slurry concentration, and pH. Interaction effects of velocity, slurry concentration, angle of impingement, and pH on erosion rate have been discussed. Wear morphology was also studied using SEM characterization technique. At lower angle (30°) of impingement, the erosion of material is by micro fracture and shallow ploughing with the plastic deformation of the ductile austenitic matrix. At the normal angle (90°) of impingement, the material loss from the surface is found because of deep indentation, forming protruded lips which are removed by means of repeated impact of the erodent.

  20. 红土镍矿冶炼镍硬铸铁试验%LATERITE NICKEL ORE SMELTING HARD CAST IRON TEST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴传智; 韦江林; 刘泽; 陆遥遥

    2015-01-01

    为实现最终产品工艺的节能减排,在150 kW单相矿热炉中进行红土镍矿和铬矿直接生产镍硬Ⅳ型铸铁,产品含Ni 5.89%和Cr 8.96%,符合镍硬Ⅳ型铸铁的成分要求,可达到试验预期效果。因此,利用红土镍矿、铬矿通过矿热炉冶炼一步法生产镍硬Ⅳ型铸铁在技术上是可行的。%In order to achieve the energy saving and emission reduction of the final product process, Ⅳ Ni-hard cast iron is produced with lateritic nickel ore and chrome ore in 150 kW single phase submerged arc furnace and gets a Ni 5.89%and Cr 8.96% product, which fulfills the request of composition and can achieve the desired effect. It is feasible in technic of producingⅣNi-hard cast iron with lateritic nickel ore and chrome ore by one-step method.

  1. Processing of carbon containing gamma titanium aluminide alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, J.D.H.; Froebel, U.; Oehring, M.; Appel, F. [Inst. for Materials Research, GKSS Research Centre, Geesthacht (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Gamma-based titanium aluminide alloys have received much attention over the last decade with the intention of being used in turbine applications. In the as-cast state these alloys are relatively brittle when compared with conventional materials. In order to meet property requirements, optimisation of both alloy composition and microstructure are necessary. Alloys based on Ti-45Al-(5-10)Nb (at.%) with carbon additions seems capable of meeting many of the properties necessary for application. This paper addresses the reasons behind the choice of this alloy composition and discusses a relevant processing route. (orig.)

  2. A Study of Effects of Precipitation Hardening of Low-Alloy Copper-Nickel Spheroidal Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szykowny T.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available One type of spheroidal cast iron, with additions of 0.51% Cu and 0.72% Ni, was subjected to precipitation hardening. Assuming that the greatest increase in hardness after the shortest time of ageing is facilitated by chemical homogenisation and fragmentation of cast iron grain matrix, precipitation hardening after pre-normalisation was executed. Hardness (HB, microhardness (HV, qualitative and quantitative metalographic (LM, SEM and X-ray structural (XRD tests were performed. The acquired result of 13.2% increase in hardness after ca. 5-hour ageing of pre-normalised cast iron confirmed the assumption.

  3. Sliding wear resistance of iron aluminides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Garima Sharma; M Sundararaman; N Prabhu; G L Goswami

    2003-04-01

    Room temperature dry sliding wear behaviour of iron aluminides containing 28% aluminium and various amounts of chromium has been investigated using pin on disk wear tester. The aluminides were heat treated to have ordered 3 structure. It was found that wear rate of the aluminides increased with the increase of applied normal load and sliding speed. Wear resistance of the aluminides increased with increase in chromium content. SEM observation of the worn surface showed that the microcutting and microploughing were the dominant sliding wear mechanisms.

  4. Freeform Fabrication of Titanium Aluminide via Electron Beam Melting Using Prealloyed and Blended Powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Cormier

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium aluminide (TiAl is an intermetallic compound possessing excellent high-temperature performance while having significantly lower density than nickel-based superalloys. This paper presents preliminary results of experiments aimed at processing TiAl via the electron beam melting (EBM process. Two processing routes are explored. The first uses prealloyed powder, whereas the second explores controlled reaction synthesis. Issues such as processing parameters, vaporization of alloying elements, microstructure, and properties are discussed.

  5. Precipitation-strengthening effects in iron-aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziasz, P.J.; McKamey, C.G.; Goodwin, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to produce precipitation to improve both high-temperature strength and room-temperature ductibility in FeAl-type(B2 phase) iron-aluminides. Previous work has focused on primarily wrought products, but stable precipitates can also refine the grain size and affect the properties of as-cast and/or welded material as well. New work began in FY 1994 on the properties of these weldable, strong FeAl alloys in the as-cast condition. Because the end product of this project is components for industry testing, simpler and better (cheaper, near-net-shape) processing methods must be developed for industrial applications of FeAl alloys.

  6. The Effect of Zirconium Addition on the Oxidation Resistance of Aluminide Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagula-Yavorska, Maryana; Pytel, Maciej; Romanowska, Jolanta; Sieniawski, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Nickel, Mar M247, and Mar M200 superalloys were coated with zirconium-doped aluminide deposited by the chemical vapor deposition method. All coatings consisted of two layers: an additive one, comprising of the β-NiAl phase and the interdiffusion one. The interdiffusion layer on pure nickel consisted of the γ'-Ni3Al phase and β-NiAl phase on superalloys. Precipitations of zirconium-rich particles were found near the coating's surface and at the interface between the additive and the interdiffusion layer. Zirconium doping of aluminide coating improved the oxidation resistance of aluminide coatings deposited both on the nickel substrate and on the Mar M200 superalloy. Precipitations of ZrO2 embedded by the Al2O3 oxide were formed during oxidation. It seems that the ZrO2 oxide increases adhesion of the Al2O3 oxide to the coating and decreases the propensity of the Al2O3 oxide rumpling and spalling.

  7. The Influence of Impurities in Feed Ingots on the Quality of Castings Made from Nickel Superalloy IN-713C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binczyk F.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of research on the impact of impurities in the feed ingots (master heat on the precipitation of impurities in the ATD thermal analysis probe castings. This impurities occur mostly inside shrinkage cavities and in interdendritic space. Additionally, insufficient filtration of liquid alloy during pouring promotes the transfer of impurities into the casting. The technology of melting superalloys in vacuum furnace prevents the removal of slag from the surface of molten metal. Because of that, the effective method of quality assessment of feed ingots in order to evaluate the existence of impurities is needed. The effectiveness of ATD analysis in evaluation of purity of feed ingots was researched. In addition the similarities of non-metallic inclusions in feed ingots and in castings were observed.

  8. Corrosion performance of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.

    1993-03-01

    Iron aluminides are being developed for use as structural materials and/or cladding alloys in fossil energy systems. Extensive development has been in progress on Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys to improve the engineering ductility of these alloys. This paper describes results from the ongoing program to evaluate the corrosion performance of these alloys. The experimental program at Argonne National Laboratory involvesthermogravimetric analyses of alloys exposed to environments that simulate coal gasification and fluidized-bed combustion. Experiments were conducted at 650--1000{degrees}C in simulated oxygen/sulfur gas mixtures. In addition, oxidation/sulfidation behavior of several alumina-forming Fe-Al and Fe-Cr-Ni-Al alloys was determined for comparison with the corrosion rates obtained on iron aluminides. Other aspects of the program are corrosion evaluation of the aluminides in the presence of HC1-containing gases and in the presence of slag from a slogging gasifier. Results are used to establish threshold Al levels in the alloys for development of protective alumina scales. Thermal cycling tests are used to examine the spalling resistance of the scales.

  9. Corrosion performance of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.

    1993-03-01

    Iron aluminides are being developed for use as structural materials and/or cladding alloys in fossil energy systems. Extensive development has been in progress on Fe[sub 3]Al-based alloys to improve the engineering ductility of these alloys. This paper describes results from the ongoing program to evaluate the corrosion performance of these alloys. The experimental program at Argonne National Laboratory involvesthermogravimetric analyses of alloys exposed to environments that simulate coal gasification and fluidized-bed combustion. Experiments were conducted at 650--1000[degrees]C in simulated oxygen/sulfur gas mixtures. In addition, oxidation/sulfidation behavior of several alumina-forming Fe-Al and Fe-Cr-Ni-Al alloys was determined for comparison with the corrosion rates obtained on iron aluminides. Other aspects of the program are corrosion evaluation of the aluminides in the presence of HC1-containing gases and in the presence of slag from a slogging gasifier. Results are used to establish threshold Al levels in the alloys for development of protective alumina scales. Thermal cycling tests are used to examine the spalling resistance of the scales.

  10. Welding and Joining of Titanium Aluminides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Cao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Welding and joining of titanium aluminides is the key to making them more attractive in industrial fields. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent progress in welding and joining of titanium aluminides, as well as to introduce current research and application. The possible methods available for titanium aluminides involve brazing, diffusion bonding, fusion welding, friction welding and reactive joining. Of the numerous methods, solid-state diffusion bonding and vacuum brazing have been most heavily investigated for producing reliable joints. The current state of understanding and development of every welding and joining method for titanium aluminides is addressed respectively. The focus is on the fundamental understanding of microstructure characteristics and processing–microstructure–property relationships in the welding and joining of titanium aluminides to themselves and to other materials.

  11. Microstructure and mechanical properties of TiAl castings produced by zirconia ceramic mould

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Jing

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Owing to their low density and attractive high-temperature properties, gamma titanium aluminide alloys (TiAl alloys, hereafter have significant potential application in the aerospace and automobile industries, in which these materials may replace the heavier nickel-based superalloys at service temperatures of 600 – 900℃. Investment casting of TiAl alloys has become the most promising cost-effective technique for the manufacturing of TiAl components. Ceramic moulds are fundamental to fabricating the TiAl casting components. In the present work, ceramic mould with a zirconia primary coat was designed and fabricated successfully. Investment casting of TiAl blades and tensile test of specimens was carried out to verify the correctness and feasibility of the proposed method. The tensile test results indicate that, at room temperature, the tensile strength and the elongation are about 450 MPa and 0.8%, respectively. At 700℃, the tensile strength decreases to about 410 MPa and the elongation increases to 2.7%. Microstructure and mechanical properties of investment cast TiAl alloy are discussed.

  12. OXIDATION RESISTANCE OF NANOCRYSTAL ODS ALUMINIDE COATINGS PRODUCED BY PACK ALUMINIZING PROCESS ASSISTED BY BALL PEENING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.L. Zhan; Y.D. He; W. Gao

    2006-01-01

    Nanocrystal ODS (oxide dispersion strengthening) aluminide coatings were produced on a stainless steel and nickel-based superalloy by the pack aluminizing process assisted by ball peening. Pure Al powders and 1% of ultra-fine Y2O3 powders were mixed by ball milling. The ultra-fine Y2O3powders were dispersed in Al particles. Ball peening welded the Al particles onto the substrate and accelerated the formation of aluminide coating. Nanocrystal ODS aluminide coatings were produced by the outward growth at a much low temperature (below 600℃) in a short treatment time.The effects of the operation temperature and treatment time on the formation of the coatings were analyzed. SEM (scanning electron microscope), AFM (atomic force microscope), EDS (energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy), XRF (X-ray fluorescence spectrometer) and XRD (X-ray diffraction )methods were applied to investigate the microstructure of the coatings. High-temperature oxidation tests were carried out to evaluate the oxidation resistance of the ODS aluminide coatings.

  13. Al2O3 Scale Development on Iron Aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Thaidigsmann, Katja; Ager, Joel; Hou, Peggy Y.

    2005-11-10

    The structure and phase of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale that forms on an Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloy (Fe-28Al-5Cr) (at %) was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). Oxidation was performed at 900 C and 1000 C for up to 190 min. TEM revealed that single-layer scales were formed after short oxidation times. Electron diffraction was used to show that the scales are composed of nanoscale crystallites of the {theta}, {gamma}, and {alpha} phases of alumina. Band-like structure was observed extending along three 120{sup o}-separated directions within the surface plane. Textured {theta} and {gamma} grains were the main components of the bands, while mixed {alpha} and transient phases were found between the bands. Extended oxidation produced a double-layered scale structure, with a continuous {alpha} layer at the scale/alloy interface, and a {gamma}/{theta} layer at the gas surface. The mechanism for the formation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scales on iron aluminide alloys is discussed and compared to that for nickel aluminide alloys.

  14. 高镍铸铁排气歧管低周热疲劳研究%Low Cycle Thermal Fatigue of High Nickel Cast Iron Exhaust Manifold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁守利; 王超; 刘志恩; 李雪妮

    2014-01-01

    针对某新开发的车用高镍铸铁排气歧管进行了低周热疲劳寿命预测研究,为获取准确的热边界条件,采用STAR-CCM+与有限元软件进行基于疲劳寿命试验条件的非稳态耦合传热分析,得到了排气歧管的对流换热系数和温度场,建立了具有真实装配关系并施加螺栓预紧力的排气歧管有限元模型,在对等效塑性应变分析的基础上,结合Coffin-Manson公式进行寿命预测。结果表明,在排气歧管开发过程中,采用该方法可以快速对其热疲劳寿命进行评估。%The low cycle thermal fatigue life of a newly developed high nickel cast iron exhaust manifold for vehicle was pre -dicted.In order to obtain a more accurate thermal boundary condition , STAR-CCM+and FE software were applied to analyze non-steady coupled heat transfer based on fatigue life experiment .The convective heat transfer coefficient and temperature field of exhaust manifold were then obtained .The FE model of the exhaust manifold was established with accurate assembly relation a-mong different components and bolt pre -tightening loads .At last, using Coffin-Manson equation , life prediction was completed based on analysis of equivalent plastic strain .The result indicates that the analysis method could speed up thermal fatigue life prediction of an exhaust manifold during developing process .

  15. Influence of high-strain rate and temperature on the mechanical behavior of Nl-, Fe-, and Ti- based aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, G.T. III

    1996-09-01

    The majority of the strength characterization studies on ordered intermetallics have concentrated on the assessment of strength and work-hardening at conventional strain rates. Although the influence of strain rate on the structure/property relationships of pure nickel, iron, and titanium and a variety of their alloys have been extensively studied, the effect of strain rate on the stress-strain response of Ni-, Fe-, and Ti-based aluminides remains poorly understood. Dynamic constitutive behavior is however relevant to high speed impact performance of these materials such as during foreign object damage in aerospace applications, high-rate forging, and localized deformation behavior during machining. The influence of strain rate, varied between 0.001 and 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}, and temperatures, between 77 & 800K, on the compressive mechanical behavior of Ni{sub 3}A1, NiAl, Fe{sub 3}Al, Fe-40Al-0.1B, Ti-24Al-11Nb, and Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb will be presented. In this paper the influence of strain rate on the anomalous temperature dependency of the flow stresses in these aluminides will be reviewed and compared between aluminides. The rate sensitivity and work hardening of each aluminide will be discussed as a function of strain rate and temperature and contrasted to each other and to the values typical for their respective disordered base metals. 66 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Aqueous Corrosion Behavior of Iron aluminide Intermetallics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Garima; Singh, P. R.; Sharma, R. K.; Gaonkar, K. B.; Ramanujan, R. V.

    2007-12-01

    Iron aluminide intermetallics based on DO3 ordered structure are being developed for use as structural materials and cladding material for conventional engineering alloys. Aqueous corrosion behavior of iron aluminides has been studied extensively by electrochemical techniques. Studies were carried out on pure Fe (99.9%), Fe-28Al (at.%), Fe-28Al-3Cr (at.%), and AISI SS 304 so as to compare and contrast their behavior in same experimental condition. Polarization behavior under different pH conditions was examined to evaluate their performance in acidic, basic, and neutral solutions. Pitting behavior was also studied in solution containing Cl-1 ions. The stability of the passive film formed was studied by current time transients and potential decay profiles. The presence of 3 at.% Cr in iron aluminides was found to improve the aqueous corrosion resistance and makes it comparable to AISI SS 304.

  17. Nickel Dermatitis - Nickel Excretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menné, T.; Thorboe, A.

    1976-01-01

    Nickel excretion in urine in four females -sensitive to nickel with an intermittent dyshidrotic eruption was measured with flameless atomic absorption. Excretion of nickel was found to be increased in association with outbreaks of vesicles. The results support the idea that the chronic condition...... was maintained by ingestion of nickel in food....

  18. High-temperature corrosion of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Cho, W.D. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Iron aluminides are being developed for use as structural materials and/or cladding alloys in fossil energy systems. Extensive development has been in progress on Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys to improve their engineering ductility. This paper describes results from an ongoing program to evaluate the corrosion performance of these alloys. The experimental program at Argonne involves thermogravimetric analyses of alloys exposed to environments that simulate coal gasification and coal combustion. Corrosion experiments were conducted to determine the effect of gas flow rate and different levels of HCl at a gas temperature of 650 C on three heats of aluminide material, namely, FA 61, FA 129, and FAX. In addition, specimens of Type 316 stainless steel with an overlay alloying of iron aluminide were prepared by electrospark deposition and tested for their corrosion resistance. Detailed microstructural evaluations of tested specimens were performed. Results are used to assess the corrosion resistance of various iron aluminides for service in fossil energy systems that utilize coal as a feedstock.

  19. NICKEL ALUMINIDE SYNTHESIS REINFORCED WITH MOLYBDENUM BORIDE COMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Khosen ф Ri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors study obtaining a composite material NiAl - Mo2B5 while carrying out thermally coupled reactions of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis with a deoxidizing aluminothermal stage. The authors established ultimate and phase composition of the obtained composite. The microstructure is studied. It is shown that the composite consists of the intermetallic phase NiAl with Mo2B5 inclusions.

  20. PROTECTIVE LAYERS OF IRON AND NICKEL ALUMINIDES ON STEEL

    OpenAIRE

    Milena Voděrová; Pavel Novák

    2013-01-01

    Intermediary phases Ni-Al and Fe-Al are promising materials due to their superior properties such as hardness and good resistance against oxidation at high temperatures. Moreover, Fe-Al phases are resistant in sulphur - containing atmospheres. Because of these characteristics, the above mentioned intermetallic phases seem to be prospective for the use in many technical applications such as energetics, chemical or automotive industry in a form of a bulk material or coatings. Presently, the pro...

  1. Point Defects Quenched in Nickel Aluminide and Related Intermetallic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jiawen

    Point defects in the highly ordered B2 compounds NiAl, CoAl and FeAl were studied using the perturbed gammagamma angular correlations (PAC) technique. Quadrupole interactions detected at dilute ^{111}In probes on Al sites in NiAl and CoAl were identified with complexes containing one or two vacancies in the first atomic shell. Measurements on rapidly quenched NiAl and CoAl exhibited increases in site fractions of vacancy-probe complexes caused by formation of thermal defects. Site fractions were analyzed using the law of mass action to obtain absolute vacancy concentrations. PAC is shown to be a powerful new technique for the quantitative study of equilibrium defects in solids. For NiAl, the vacancy concentration quenched-in from a given temperature was found to be independent of composition over the range 50.4 -53.5 at.% Ni, identifying the Schottky defect (vacancy pair) as the dominant equilibrium defect, and ruling out the so-called triple defect. Formation energies and entropies of Schottky pairs were determined to be 2.66(8) and 3.48(12) eV, and 12(1) and 17(2) k_{rm B}, respectively, for NiAl and CoAl. The entropies suggest huge vacancy concentrations, 13%, at the melting temperatures of NiAl and CoAl. Migration energies of Ni and Co vacancies were found to be 1.8(2) and 2.5(2) eV, respectively. FeAl exhibited complex behavior. A low-temperature regime was detected in NiAl and CoAl within which vacancies are mobile but do not anneal out, so that the vacancy concentration remains constant. In NiAl, this "bottleneck" regime extends from 350 to 700 ^circC. Vacancies were found to be bound to the In probes with an energy very close to 0.20 eV in NiAl and CoAl. An explanation of the bottleneck is proposed in terms of saturation of all lattice sinks. This annealing bottleneck should exist in a wide range of intermetallic compounds when there is a sufficiently high vacancy concentration.

  2. MICROSTRUCTURE AT THE INTERFACE OF TITANIUM CARBIDE AND NICKEL ALUMINIDES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Dian-hong; Wu Xing-fang; Lu Hua; N.Froumin; M.Polak

    2000-01-01

    Microstructure at the interface of titanium carbide and nickelaluminides in the samples obtained by infiltration of molten Ni3Al alloyhas studied by a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and an analyticaltransmission electron microscopy (ATEM) with an energy dispersivespectrometer (EDS). It is found that the morphology at the interfacesbetween hard phase skeleton of TiC{0.7 and metallic phases depends on theratio of Ti/C in carbide. Some periodic zigzag fringes are observed ata smooth interface between metallic phase and carbides in the sampleof Ni3Al/TiC0.7. The results of analysis using EDS show that Ti inTiC0.7 carbide is easier than that in TiC0.9 to dissolve into the moltenalloy during solid-liquid reaction. The formation of this periodic zigzagfringe,which may be a growth zone of a new Ti-Ni-Al phase,in the interfaceof TiC0.7/Ni3Al would occur during the initial stage of solidification.

  3. Hydrogen behavior in titanium aluminide alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Bao-wu; CHU Wu-yang

    2006-01-01

    This is a synthetical report about hydrogen behavior in titanium aluminide alloys in our group. There are two kinds of hydrogen solubility in titanium aluminides, one is the overall solubility at high temperature in the matrix without hydride and the other is the terminal solubility at low temperature in the matrix in equilibrium with the hydride. The former decreases but the later increases with increasing temperature. Hydrogen as a temporary β stabilizer clearly decreases the size of the α2 phase, and increases greatly the amount of β phase, and then increases evidently the mechanical properties of Ti3Al+Nb. The cathodic corrosion of TiAl during charging is due to hydride on the surface. The decrease of the strength, the strain to fracture and fracture toughness for hydrogenated samples is due to hydride. The enrichment of atomic hydrogen at the crack tip during charging under sustained load can enhance localized plastic deformation and cause hydrogen-induced delayed cracking.

  4. Focused Ion Beam Nanotomography of ruthenium-bearing nickel-base superalloys with focus on cast-microstructure and phase stability; Focused Ion Beam Nanotomographie von rutheniumhaltigen Nickelbasis-Superlegierungen mit Fokus auf Gussgefuege und Phasenstabilitaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cenanovic, Samir

    2012-12-03

    The influence of rhenium and ruthenium on the multi component system nickel-base superalloy is manifold and complex. An experimental nickel-base superalloy containing rhenium and ruthenium within defined contents, named Astra, was used to investigate the influences of these two elements on the alloy system. The last stage solidification of nickel-base superalloys after Bridgman casting and the high temperature phase stability of these alloys, could be explored with the aid of focused ion beam nanotomography. FIB-nt therefore was introduced and realized at the chair of General Materials Properties of the University Erlangen-Nuremberg. Cast Astra alloys are like other nickel-base superalloys morphologically very inhomogeneous and affected by segregation. In the interdendritic region different structures with huge γ' precipitates are formed. These inhomogeneities and remaining eutectics degrade the mechanical properties, witch makes an understanding of the subsiding processes at solidification of residual melt important for the casting process and the heat treatment. This is why the last stage solidification in the interdendritic region was analyzed. With the help of focused ion beam nanotomography, three different structures identified from 2-D sections could be assigned to one original 3-D structure. It was pointed out, that only the orientation of the plane of the 2-D cut influences the appearance in the 2-D section. The tomography information was used to explain the development during solidification and to create a model of last stage solidification. The interdendritic region is solidifying under the development of eutectic islands. The structure nucleates eutectically epitaxially at primary dendrite arms, with formation of fine γ/γ' precipitates. During solidification the γ' precipitates coarsen in a rod-like structure, and end up in large γ' precipitates. Simulations and other investigations could approve this model. First three

  5. 高温合金精密铸造技术研究进展%The Progress of Investment Casting of Nickel-Based Superalloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘林

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the principle, techniques, research statues and current problems of major processing technologies of casi superalloys, such as polycrystalline casting, directional solidification, single-crystal manufacture. The cast structure control and crystal orientation selection during solidification were analyzed. Single-crystal processing including bottom-seeding and spiral selection technique was summarized. The formation mechanism and control methods of typical cast defects in single crystal superalloys were analyzed. Finally, the possible development trends of the superalloy investment casting in future were prospected.%综述了高温合金多晶铸造、定向凝固、单晶制备等几种主要制备技术的原理、方法、研究现状和存在问题,分析了铸造高温合金晶粒组织控制、晶体取向选择和控制,介绍了单晶叶片的引晶和选晶原理和技术,对单晶铸造高温合金的缺陷进行了分析,并展望了高温合金精密铸造的今后发展方向.

  6. Aluminide Coatings for Power-Generation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y

    2003-11-17

    Aluminide coatings are of interest for many high temperature applications because of the possibility of improving the oxidation of structural alloys by forming a protective external alumina scale. In order to develop a comprehensive lifetime evaluation approach for aluminide coatings used in fossil energy systems, some of the important issues have been addressed in this report for aluminide coatings on Fe-based alloys (Task I) and on Ni-based alloys (Task II). In Task I, the oxidation behavior of iron aluminide coatings synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was studied in air + 10vol.% H{sub 2}O in the temperature range of 700-800 C and the interdiffusion behavior between the coating and substrate was investigated in air at 500-800 C. Commercial ferritic (Fe-9Cr-1Mo) and type 304L (Fe-18Cr-9Ni, nominally) austenitic stainless steels were used as the substrates. For the oxidation study, the as-deposited coating consisted of a thin (<5 {micro}m), Al-rich outer layer above a thicker (30-50 {micro}m), lower Al inner layer. The specimens were cycled to 1000 1-h cycles at 700 C and 500 1-h cycles at 800 C, respectively. The CVD coating specimens showed excellent performance in the water vapor environment at both temperatures, while the uncoated alloys were severely attacked. These results suggest that an aluminide coating can substantially improve resistance to water vapor attack under these conditions. For the interdiffusion study, the ferritic and austenitic steels were coated with relatively thicker aluminide coatings consisting of a 20-25 {micro}m outer layer and a 150-250 {micro}m inner layer. The composition profiles before and after interdiffusion testing (up to 5,000h) were measured by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The decrease of the Al content at the coating surface was not significant after extended diffusion times ({le} 5,000h) at temperatures {le} 700 C. More interdiffusion occurred at 800 C in coatings on both Fe- 9Cr-1Mo and 304L alloys; a

  7. Aluminide Coatings for Power-Generation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y

    2003-11-17

    Aluminide coatings are of interest for many high temperature applications because of the possibility of improving the oxidation of structural alloys by forming a protective external alumina scale. In order to develop a comprehensive lifetime evaluation approach for aluminide coatings used in fossil energy systems, some of the important issues have been addressed in this report for aluminide coatings on Fe-based alloys (Task I) and on Ni-based alloys (Task II). In Task I, the oxidation behavior of iron aluminide coatings synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was studied in air + 10vol.% H{sub 2}O in the temperature range of 700-800 C and the interdiffusion behavior between the coating and substrate was investigated in air at 500-800 C. Commercial ferritic (Fe-9Cr-1Mo) and type 304L (Fe-18Cr-9Ni, nominally) austenitic stainless steels were used as the substrates. For the oxidation study, the as-deposited coating consisted of a thin (<5 {micro}m), Al-rich outer layer above a thicker (30-50 {micro}m), lower Al inner layer. The specimens were cycled to 1000 1-h cycles at 700 C and 500 1-h cycles at 800 C, respectively. The CVD coating specimens showed excellent performance in the water vapor environment at both temperatures, while the uncoated alloys were severely attacked. These results suggest that an aluminide coating can substantially improve resistance to water vapor attack under these conditions. For the interdiffusion study, the ferritic and austenitic steels were coated with relatively thicker aluminide coatings consisting of a 20-25 {micro}m outer layer and a 150-250 {micro}m inner layer. The composition profiles before and after interdiffusion testing (up to 5,000h) were measured by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The decrease of the Al content at the coating surface was not significant after extended diffusion times ({le} 5,000h) at temperatures {le} 700 C. More interdiffusion occurred at 800 C in coatings on both Fe- 9Cr-1Mo and 304L alloys; a

  8. Titanium aluminide intermetallic alloys with improved wear resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Jun; Lin, Hua-Tay; Blau, Peter J.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    2014-07-08

    The invention is directed to a method for producing a titanium aluminide intermetallic alloy composition having an improved wear resistance, the method comprising heating a titanium aluminide intermetallic alloy material in an oxygen-containing environment at a temperature and for a time sufficient to produce a top oxide layer and underlying oxygen-diffused layer, followed by removal of the top oxide layer such that the oxygen-diffused layer is exposed. The invention is also directed to the resulting oxygen-diffused titanium aluminide intermetallic alloy, as well as mechanical components or devices containing the improved alloy composition.

  9. Synthesis of advanced aluminide intermetallic coatings by low-energy Al-ion radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Mingli; Gu, Yan; Zhao, Panpan; Zhu, Shenglong; Wang, Fuhui

    2016-05-19

    Metals that work at high temperatures (for instance, superalloys in gas-turbines) depend on thermally grown oxide (TGO, commonly alumina) to withstand corrosion attack. Nickel Aluminide (NiAl) as one superior alumina TGO former plays an important role in protective coatings for turbine blades in gas-turbine engines used for aircraft propulsion and power generation. Lowering TGO growth rate is essentially favored for offering sustainable protection, especially in thermal barrier coatings (TBC). However, it can only be achieved currently by a strategy of adding the third element (Pt or reactive elements) into NiAl during traditional diffusion- or deposition-based synthesis of the coating. Here we present a highly flexible Al-ion radiation-based synthesis of advanced NiAl coatings, achieving low TGO growth rate without relying on the third element addition. Our results expand the strategy for lowering TGO growth rate and demonstrate potentials for ion radiation in advancing materials synthesis.

  10. Synthesis of advanced aluminide intermetallic coatings by low-energy Al-ion radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Mingli; Gu, Yan; Zhao, Panpan; Zhu, Shenglong; Wang, Fuhui

    2016-05-01

    Metals that work at high temperatures (for instance, superalloys in gas-turbines) depend on thermally grown oxide (TGO, commonly alumina) to withstand corrosion attack. Nickel Aluminide (NiAl) as one superior alumina TGO former plays an important role in protective coatings for turbine blades in gas-turbine engines used for aircraft propulsion and power generation. Lowering TGO growth rate is essentially favored for offering sustainable protection, especially in thermal barrier coatings (TBC). However, it can only be achieved currently by a strategy of adding the third element (Pt or reactive elements) into NiAl during traditional diffusion- or deposition-based synthesis of the coating. Here we present a highly flexible Al-ion radiation-based synthesis of advanced NiAl coatings, achieving low TGO growth rate without relying on the third element addition. Our results expand the strategy for lowering TGO growth rate and demonstrate potentials for ion radiation in advancing materials synthesis.

  11. Effects of carbon concentration on microstructure and mechanical properties of as-cast nickel-free Co–28Cr–9W-based dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanaka, Kenta, E-mail: k_yamanaka@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Mori, Manami [Department of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Sendai National College of Technology, 48 Nodayama, Medeshima-Shiote, Natori 981-1239 (Japan); Chiba, Akihiko [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    We determined the effects of carbon concentration on the microstructures and tensile properties of the Ni-free Co–29Cr–9W–1Si–C (mass%) cast alloys used in dental applications. Alloy specimens prepared with carbon concentrations in the range 0.01–0.27 mass% were conventionally cast. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) revealed that precipitates had formed in all the alloy specimens. The σ phase, a chromium-rich intermetallic compound, had formed in the region between the dendrite arms of the low-carbon-content (e.g., 0.01C) alloys. Adding carbon to the alloys increased the amount of interdendritic precipitates that formed and changed the precipitation behavior; the precipitated phase changed from the σ phase to the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide with increasing carbon concentration. Adding a small amount of carbon (i.e., 0.04 mass%) to the alloys dramatically enhanced the 0.2% proof stress, which subsequently gradually increased with increasing content of carbon in the alloys. Elongation-to-failure, on the other hand, increased with increasing carbon content and showed a maximum at carbon concentrations of ∼ 0.1 mass%. The M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide formed at the interdendritic region may govern the tensile properties of the as-cast Co–Cr–W alloys similar to how it governed those of the hot-rolled alloys prepared in our previous study. - Highlights: • Microstructure and tensile properties of C-doped Co–Cr–W cast alloys was studied. • Adding carbon stabilized the γ matrix and changed the precipitation behavior. • Formation of carbide precipitates strengthened C-doped Co–Cr–Mo alloys. • A maximum tensile elongation was obtained at carbon concentrations of ∼0.1 mass%.

  12. Comparison of marginal accuracy of castings fabricated by conventional casting technique and accelerated casting technique: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Srikanth Reddy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Conventional casting technique is time consuming when compared to accelerated casting technique. In this study, marginal accuracy of castings fabricated using accelerated and conventional casting technique was compared. Materials and Methods: 20 wax patterns were fabricated and the marginal discrepancy between the die and patterns were measured using Optical stereomicroscope. Ten wax patterns were used for Conventional casting and the rest for Accelerated casting. A Nickel-Chromium alloy was used for the casting. The castings were measured for marginal discrepancies and compared. Results: Castings fabricated using Conventional casting technique showed less vertical marginal discrepancy than the castings fabricated by Accelerated casting technique. The values were statistically highly significant. Conclusion: Conventional casting technique produced better marginal accuracy when compared to Accelerated casting. The vertical marginal discrepancy produced by the Accelerated casting technique was well within the maximum clinical tolerance limits. Clinical Implication: Accelerated casting technique can be used to save lab time to fabricate clinical crowns with acceptable vertical marginal discrepancy.

  13. Nickel Electroplating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Toru Murakami; Yasuo Uchikoshiki; Kazutoshi Komori

    2004-01-01

    Nickel electroplating has been used practically for decades, is easy to plate, but there is an unknown interest in it.Nickel electroplating as a basis of surface treatment is shown practically from basics to the applied electronics use. At first the basics of nickel electroplating, for example, purpose, use, merit & demerit, nickel plating solution, current efficiency,limiting current density, additional agents and their behaviors are surveyed. And the points of nickel deposition already practically used such as decorative nickel plating, satin nickel plating and functional nickel plating, which has very high throwing power and has been used for electronics, are described in detail.

  14. Nickel Electroplating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ToruMurakami; YasuoUchikoshiki; KazutoshiKomori

    2004-01-01

    Nickel electroplating has been used practically for decades, is easy to plate, but there is an unknown interest in it. Nickel electroplating as a basis of surface treatment is shown practically from basics to the applied electronics use. At first the basics of nickel electroplating, for example, purpose, use, merit & demerit, nickel plating solution, current efficiency, limiting current density, additional agents and their behaviors are surveyed. And the points of nickel deposition already practically used such as decorative nickel plating, satin nickel plating and functional nickel plating, which has very high throwing power and has been used for electronics, are described in detail.

  15. Manufacturing Techniques for Titanium Aluminide Based Alloys and Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    a) LPT blade casting (b) Portion of disk and some blades ready for assembly [10...the production of high-pressure aero-engine compressor blades from a TiAl ingot [30...have become front- runners in replacing Nickel-based superalloys in gas turbine engines. Replacement of Ni-based superalloys parts with titanium

  16. Phase composition, microstructure and microhardness of electroless nickel composite coating co-deposited with SiC on cast aluminium LM24 alloy substrate

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Electroless Ni–P (EN) and composite Ni–P–SiC (ENC) coatings were developed on cast aluminium alloy substrate, LM24. The coating phase composition, microstructure and microhardness were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microhardness tester, respectively, on as-plated and heat-treated specimens. The original microstructure of the Ni–P matrix is not affected by the inclusion of the hard particles SiC. No formation of Ni–Si phase was observed up t...

  17. Characterisation of phase composition, microstructure and microhardness of electroless nickel composite coating co-deposited with SiC on casting aluminium LM24 alloy substrate

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Electroless Ni-P (EN) and composite Ni-P-SiC (ENC) coatings were developed on cast aluminium alloy, LM24. The coating phase composition, microstructure and microhardness were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microhardness tester, respectively, on as-plated and heat-treated specimens. The original microstructure of the Ni-P matrix is not affected by the inclusion of the hard particles SiC. No formation of Ni-Si phase was observed upto 500°C of ...

  18. An Analysis of the Weldability of Ductile Cast Iron Using Inconel 625 for the Root Weld and Electrodes Coated in 97.6% Nickel for the Filler Welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco-Javier Cárcel-Carrasco

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the weldability of ductile cast iron when the root weld is applied with a tungsten inert gas (TIG welding process employing an Inconel 625 source rod, and when the filler welds are applied with electrodes coated with 97.6% Ni. The welds were performed on ductile cast iron specimen test plates sized 300 mm × 90 mm × 10 mm with edges tapered at angles of 60°. The plates were subjected to two heat treatments. This article analyzes the influence on weldability of the various types of electrodes and the effect of preheat treatments. Finally, a microstructure analysis is made of the material next to the weld in the metal-weld interface and in the weld itself. The microstructure produced is correlated with the strength of the welds. We treat an alloy with 97.6% Ni, which prevents the formation of carbides. With a heat treatment at 900 °C and 97.6% Ni, there is a dissolution of all carbides, forming nodules in ferritic matrix graphite.

  19. Processing of Intermetallic Titanium Aluminide Wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uta Kühn

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study shows the possibility of processing titanium aluminide wires by cold deformation and annealing. An accumulative swaging and bundling technique is used to co-deform Ti and Al. Subsequently, a two step heat treatment is applied to form the desired intermetallics, which strongly depends on the ratio of Ti and Al in the final composite and therefore on the geometry of the starting composite. In a first step, the whole amount of Al is transformed to TiAl3 by Al diffusion into Ti. This involves the formation of 12% porosity. In a second step, the complete microstructure is transformed into the equilibrium state of -TiAl and TiAl3. Using this approach, it is possible to obtain various kinds of gradient materials, since there is an intrinsic concentration gradient installed due to the swaging and bundling technique, but the processing of pure -TiAl wires is possible as well.

  20. High temperature mechanical properties of iron aluminides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris, D. G.

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Considerable attention has been given to the iron aluminide family of intermetallics over the past years since they offer considerable potential as engineering materials for intermediate to high temperature applications, particularly in cases where extreme oxidation or corrosion resistance is required. Despite efforts at alloy development, however, high temperature strength remains low and creep resistance poor. Reasons for the poor high-temperature strength of iron aluminides will be discussed, based on the ordered crystal structure, the dislocation structure found in the material, and the mechanisms of dislocation pinning operating. Alternative ways of improving high temperature strength by microstructural modification and the inclusion of second phase particles will also be considered.

    Durante los últimos años se ha prestado mucha atención a la familia de intermetálicos Fe-Al, puesto que estos constituyen un considerable potencial como materiales de ingeniería en aplicaciones a temperaturas intermedias o altas, sobre todo en casos donde se necesita alta resistencia a la oxidación o corrosión. A pesar del considerable esfuerzo desarrollado para obtener aleaciones con mejores propiedades, su resistencia mecánica a alta temperatura no es muy elevada. Se discutirán los aspectos que contribuyen a la baja resistencia mecánica a temperatura elevada en función de la estructura de dislocaciones y los mecanismos de anclaje que operan en este intermetálico. Se considerarán, también, maneras alternativas para mejorar la resistencia a temperatura elevada mediante la modificación de la microestructura y la incorporación de partículas de segunda fase.

  1. Plasma electrolytic oxidation of Titanium Aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, R.; Sieber, M.; Grund, T.; Lampke, T.; Wielage, B.

    2016-03-01

    Due to their outstanding specific mechanical and high-temperature properties, titanium aluminides exhibit a high potential for lightweight components exposed to high temperatures. However, their application is limited through their low wear resistance and the increasing high-temperature oxidation starting from about 750 °C. By the use of oxide ceramic coatings, these constraints can be set aside and the possible applications of titanium aluminides can be extended. The plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) represents a process for the generation of oxide ceramic conversion coatings with high thickness. The current work aims at the clarification of different electrolyte components’ influences on the oxide layer evolution on alloy TNM-B1 (Ti43.5Al4Nb1Mo0.1B) and the creation of compact and wear resistant coatings. Model experiments were applied using a ramp-wise increase of the anodic potential in order to show the influence of electrolyte components on the discharge initiation and the early stage of the oxide layer growth. The production of PEO layers with technically relevant thicknesses close to 100 μm was conducted in alkaline electrolytes with varying amounts of Na2SiO3·5H2O and K4P2O7 under symmetrically pulsed current conditions. Coating properties were evaluated with regard to morphology, chemical composition, hardness and wear resistance. The addition of phosphates and silicates leads to an increasing substrate passivation and the growth of compact oxide layers with higher thicknesses. Optimal electrolyte compositions for maximum coating hardness and thickness were identified by statistical analysis. Under these conditions, a homogeneous inner layer with low porosity can be achieved. The frictional wear behavior of the compact coating layer is superior to a hard anodized layer on aluminum.

  2. As-Cast Acicular Ductile Aluminum Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S M Mostafavi Kashani; S M A Boutorabi

    2009-01-01

    The effects of nickel (2.2%)and molybdenum (0.6%)additions on the kinetics, microstructure, and me-chanical properties of ductile aluminum cast iron were studied under the as-cast and tempered conditions. Test bars machined from cast to size samples were used for mechanical and metallurgical studies. The results showed that adding nickel and molybdenum to the base iron produced an upper bainitic structure, resulting in an increase in strength and hardness. The same trend was shown when the test bars were tempered at 300 ℃ in the range of 300℃ to 400 ℃. The elongation increased with increasing the temperature from 300 ℃ to 400 ℃. The carbon content of the retained austenite also increased with increasing the temperature. The results also showed that the kinetics, mi-crostructure, and mechanical properties of this iron were similar to those of Ni-Mo alloyed silicon ductile iron.

  3. Erosion-corrosion behavior of austenitic cast iron in an acidic slurry medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ke; Sun, Lan; Liu, Yu-zhen; Fan, Hong-yuan

    2015-06-01

    A series of austenitic cast iron samples with different compositions were cast and a part of nickel in the samples was replaced by manganese for economic reason. Erosion-corrosion tests were conducted under 2wt% sulfuric acid and 15wt% quartz sand. The results show that the matrix of cast irons remains austenite after a portion of nickel is replaced with manganese. (Fe,Cr)3C is a common phase in the cast irons, and nickel is the main alloying element in high-nickel cast iron; whereas, (Fe,Mn)3C is observed with the increased manganese content in low-nickel cast iron. Under erosion-corrosion tests, the weight-loss rates of the cast irons increase with increasing time. Wear plays a more important role than corrosion in determining the weight loss. It is indicated that the processes of weight loss for the cast irons with high and low nickel contents are different. The erosion resistance of the cast iron containing 7.29wt% nickel and 6.94wt% manganese is equivalent to that of the cast iron containing 13.29wt% nickel.

  4. Microstructure formation and properties of abrasion resistant cast steel

    OpenAIRE

    S. Parzych; Krawczyk, J.

    2010-01-01

    The so-called adamitic cast steels are characterised by a high abrasion resistance. These cast steels are of a pearlitic matrix with uniformly distributed hypereutectoid cementite precipitates. Apart from hypereutectoid cementite very often transformed ledeburite also occurs in the microstructure of these cast steels. Such cast steels contain chromium (app. 1 %) and nickel (app. 0.5 %) as alloy additions and sometimes their silicon content is increased. The presence of molybdenum is also perm...

  5. Impact Behavior and Fracture Mechanism of Ductile Cast Iron with Minor Nickel Addition at Low Temperature%低镍球墨铸铁低温冲击性能及断裂机理研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈江; 黄兴民; 高杰维; 董海; 戴光泽

    2012-01-01

    使用激光共聚焦显微镜、扫描电镜和示波冲击等实验手段研究了镍元素(0.0%~0.9%,质量分数,下同)对球墨铸铁的微观组织和低温冲击性能的影响,对低温断裂机理进行了探讨.结果表明:含镍0.7%退火态球墨铸铁的韧脆转变温度低于-60℃,其-70℃下冲击功高于12J;适量镍元素添加能有效地细化晶粒和强化基体,改善球墨铸铁的低温冲击性能.%Utilizing laser confocal microscopy, SEM, instrumented impact and other experimental methods, the influence of nickel content(0. 0%-0. 9%,mass fraction, the same below) on the micro-structure and low temperature impact toughness of ductile cast iron(DCI) was investigated. The fracture mechanism of DCIs was studied further at different temperatures by using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). The results show that ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of as-annealed DCIs with 0. 7% Ni content is lower than —60℃ , the impact energy of Charpy-type test is still higher than 12J at —70℃. Minor Ni addition of proper quantities might favor the grain refinement and matrix strengthen, low temperature impact toughness properties of DCIs are markedly improved.

  6. Effects of titanium and zirconium on iron aluminide weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, R.P.; Edwards, G.R. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); David, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Iron aluminides form a coarse fusion zone microstructure when gas-tungsten arc welded. This microstructure is susceptible to hydrogen cracking when water vapor is present in the welding environment. Because fusion zone microstructural refinement can reduce the hydrogen cracking susceptibility, titanium was used to inoculate the weld pool in iron aluminide alloy FA-129. Although the fusion zone microstructure was significantly refined by this method, the fracture stress was found to decrease with titanium additions. This decrease is attributed to an increase in inclusions at the grain boundaries.

  7. HIGH TEMPERATURE OXIDATION PERFORMANCE OF ALUMINIDE COATINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pint, B.A.; Zhang, Y.; Haynes, J.A.; Wright, I.G.

    2003-04-22

    In order to determine the potential benefits and limitations of aluminide coatings, coatings made by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on Fe- and Ni-base alloy substrates are being evaluated in various high-temperature environments. Testing of coatings on representative ferritic (Fe-9Cr-1Mo) and austenitic (type 304L stainless steel) alloys has found that high frequency thermal cycling (1h cycle time) can significantly degrade the coating. Based on comparison with similar specimens with no thermal cycling or a longer cycle time (100h), this degradation was not due to Al loss from the coating but most likely because of the thermal expansion mismatch between the coating and the substrate. Several coated Ni-base alloys were tested in a high pressure (20atm) steam-CO2 environment for the ZEST (zero-emission steam turbine) program. Coated specimens showed less mass loss than the uncoated specimens after 1000h at 900 C and preliminary characterization examined the post-test coating structure and extent of attack.

  8. Method to increase fatigue limits under high temperature stress of castings made of nickel-based super alloys from monocrystals or with columnar structure. Verfahren zur Erhoehung der Dauerfestigkeit bei Hochtemperaturbeanspruchung von als Einkristall oder mit saeulenfoermigem Gefuege hergestellten Gussteilen aus Superlegierungen auf Nickelbasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, M.L.; Leverant, G.R.

    1977-04-21

    Castings manufactured as monocrystals or of columnar structure exhibit increased endurance limits under high-temperature stress if the nickel super alloy with alternating amounts of Cr, Al, Ti, Nb, Co, Mo, Ta, W, B, Zr contains less than 0.01 wt.% C. This has the effect of suppressing the formation of a separate metal monocarbide phase. In conventional Ni-super alloys cracks are present in the monocarbide structure following annealing and these have been chown to extend further during fatigue tests.

  9. Effects of titanium and zirconium on iron aluminide weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulac, B.L.; Edwards, G.R. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Center for Welding, Joining, and Coatings Research; Burt, R.P. [Alumax Technical Center, Golden, CO (United States); David, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1997-12-01

    When gas-tungsten arc welded, iron aluminides form a coarse fusion zone microstructure which is susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Titanium inoculation effectively refined the fusion zone microstructure in iron aluminide weldments, but the inoculated weldments had a reduced fracture strength despite the presence of a finer microstructure. The weldments fractured by transgranular cleavage which nucleated at cracked second phase particles. With titanium inoculation, second phase particles in the fusion zone changed shape and also became more concentrated at the grain boundaries, which increased the particle spacing in the fusion zone. The observed decrease in fracture strength with titanium inoculation was attributed to increased spacing of second phase particles in the fusion zone. Current research has focused on the weldability of zirconium- and carbon-alloyed iron aluminides. Preliminary work performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has shown that zirconium and carbon additions affect the weldability of the alloy as well as the mechanical properties and fracture behavior of the weldments. A sigmajig hot cracking test apparatus has been constructed and tested at Colorado School of Mines. Preliminary characterization of hot cracking of three zirconium- and carbon-alloyed iron aluminides, each containing a different total concentration of zirconium at a constant zirconium/carbon ratio of ten, is in progress. Future testing will include low zirconium alloys at zirconium/carbon ratios of five and one, as well as high zirconium alloys (1.5 to 2.0 atomic percent) at zirconium/carbon ratios of ten to forty.

  10. Nickel Farm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    Most plants find nickel to be pretty nasty stuff, and they won’t grow in soils rich in the metal.Streptanthus polygaloides. on the other hand.loves nickel.This member of the mustard family grows only in high-nickel soil in the shadow of the Sierra Nevada,in central California.Streptanthus is a rare type of plant known as a "hyperaccumulator." All plants take up nutrients

  11. Thermodynamic stability of austenitic Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Janus

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The performed research was aimed at determining thermodynamic stability of structures of Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron castings. Examined were 35 alloys. The castings were tempered at 900 °C for 2 hours. Two cooling speeds were used: furnace-cooling and water-cooling. In the alloys with the nickel equivalent value less than 20,0 %, partial transition of austenite to martensite took place. The austenite decomposition ratio and the related growth of hardness was higher for smaller nickel equivalent value and was clearly larger in annealed castings than in hardened ones. Obtaining thermodynamically stable structure of castings requires larger than 20,0 % value of the nickel equivalent.

  12. Preparation of Silica Based Ceramic Core in Casting of Nickel-Based Alloy Hollow Blade%镍基合金空心叶片浇铸用硅基陶瓷型芯的制备及性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康海峰; 李飞; 赵彦杰; 徐华苹; 孙宝德

    2013-01-01

    The silica based ceramic cores were formed by hot pressure molding method.The composition,porosity,expansion coefficient,microstructure and mechanical property of the sintered ceramic cores were characterized.The test results show that the pores of the ceramic cores are distributed in multiple peaks,and mainly locate from 0.1μm to 5 μm.With the temperature increasing to 1400℃,the expansion coefficient is decreased and the downtrend is suddenly intensified between 1170℃ and 1350℃.The β-cristobalite phase and amorphous quartz coexist in the ceramic cores sintered at 1200℃.Heated at 1550℃ for 2h,the compactness of the ceramic cores increases,and the pore structure is more distinct,furthermore,both the quantity and the length of the cracks at the exterior and interior of the ceramic cores increase.Besides,the nickel-based alloy hollow blade was casted using the ceramic cores manufactured at the temperature of 1550℃ successfully.%采用热压注工艺成型氧化硅基陶瓷型芯.分析焙烧后型芯的化学成分、微观结构、孔隙率、线膨胀系数以及力学性能.结果表明:型芯的孔径呈多峰分布,且主要分布在0.1 ~5μm之间;从室温至1400℃,型芯的线膨胀系数随温度的升高而减小,在1170~1350℃之间其线膨胀系数下降趋势骤然加剧;经1200℃焙烧制备的陶瓷型芯主晶相为β-方石英相与无定形石英玻璃共存,经1550℃高温2h处理后型芯烧结程度提高,骨架致密度增大,孔结构更加分明,表面及内部裂纹的数量、长度均增大.采用实验室自制的硅基陶瓷型芯进行镍基高温合金单晶空心叶片的浇注实验,结果表明所制备的型芯可以满足单晶叶片精密铸造的要求.

  13. Iron aluminide knife and method thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, V.K.

    1997-08-05

    Fabricating an article of manufacture having a Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloy cutting edge is discussed. The fabrication comprises the steps of casting an Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloy, extruding into rectangular cross section, rolling into a sheet at 800 C for a period of time followed by rolling at 650 C, cutting the rolled sheet into an article having an edge, and grinding the edge of the article to form a cutting edge. 1 fig.

  14. Iron aluminide knife and method thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1997-01-01

    Fabricating an article of manufacture having a Fe.sub.3 Al-based alloy cutting edge. The fabrication comprises the steps of casting an Fe.sub.3 Al-based alloy, extruding into rectangular cross section, rolling into a sheet at 800.degree. C. for a period of time followed by rolling at 650.degree. C., cutting the rolled sheet into an article having an edge, and grinding the edge of the article to form a cutting edge.

  15. Examination of the platinum effect on the oxidation behavior ofnickel-aluminide coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Peggy Y.; Tolpygo, V.K.

    2007-05-15

    Oxidation resistant nickel-aluminide coatings are designed to develop a protective alumina scale during high temperature exposure. It is well established that platinum additions, typically about 6-8 at%, provide substantial improvements in oxidation resistance of such coatings, yet the nature of the platinum effect is still not fully understood. In this work, the oxidation behavior of two commercial NiAl and NiPtAl coatings deposited on the same Ni-base single crystal alloy CMSX-4 was analyzed. Cyclic and isothermal oxidation tests were conducted at 1150 C in air. Microstructure development and alumina/coating interface chemistry were studied as a function of oxidation time. Numerous voids developed at the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/NiAl interface, and sulfur was found to segregate at the void surfaces and at the contact interface, leading to spallation of the scale over the convex areas along ridges on the coating surface. The presence of platinum prevented sulfur segregation and void formation at the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/NiPtAl interface. As a result, the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale on the NiPtAl coating remained adherent and virtually no spallation was observed even after prolonged cyclic oxidation.

  16. Caste System

    OpenAIRE

    Hoff, Karla

    2016-01-01

    In standard economics, individuals are rational actors and economic forces undermine institutions that impose large inefficiencies. The persistence of the caste system is evidence of the need for psychologically more realistic models of decision-making in economics. The caste system divides South Asian society into hereditary groups whose lowest ranks are represented as innately polluted. ...

  17. A comparative study of the centrifugal and vacuum-pressure techniques of casting removable partial denture frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, J J; Ancowitz, S J; Fenster, R K; Pelleu, G B

    1981-01-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate two techniques for casting accuracy on removable partial denture frameworks: centrifugal casting and vacuum-pressure casting. A standard metal die with predetermined reference points in a horizontal plane was duplicated in refractory investment. The casts were waxed, and castings of nickel-chrome alloy were fabricated by the two techniques. Both the casts and the castings were measured between the reference points with a measuring microscope. With both casting methods, the differences between the casts and the castings were significant, but no significant differences were found between castings produced by the two techniques. Vertical measurements at three designated points also showed no significant differences between the castings. Our findings indicate that dental laboratories should be able to use the vacuum-pressure method of casting removable partial denture frameworks and achieve accuracy similar to that obtained by the centrifugal method of casting.

  18. Iron aluminide alloy container for solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkins, Roddie Reagan (Knoxville, TN); Singh, Prabhakar (Export, PA); Sikka, Vinod Kumar (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-01-01

    A container for fuel cells is made from an iron aluminide alloy. The container alloy preferably includes from about 13 to about 22 weight percent Al, from about 2 to about 8 weight percent Cr, from about 0.1 to about 4 weight percent M selected from Zr and Hf, from about 0.005 to about 0.5 weight percent B or from about 0.001 to about 1 weight percent C, and the balance Fe and incidental impurities. The iron aluminide container alloy is extremely resistant to corrosion and metal loss when exposed to dual reducing and oxidizing atmospheres at elevated temperatures. The alloy is particularly useful for containment vessels for solid oxide fuel cells, as a replacement for stainless steel alloys which are currently used.

  19. Electron Beam Welding to Join Gamma Titanium Aluminide Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Thomas Joseph (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method is provided for welding two gamma titanium aluminide articles together. The method includes preheating the two articles to a welding temperature of from about 1700 F to about 2100 F, thereafter electron beam welding the two articles together at the welding temperature and in a welding vacuum to form a welded structure, and thereafter annealing the welded structure at an annealing temperature of from about 1800 F to about 2200 F, to form a joined structure.

  20. Iron aluminide weld overlay coatings for boiler tube protection in coal-fired low NOx boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banovic, S.W.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Energy Research Center

    1997-12-01

    Iron aluminide weld overlay coatings are currently being considered for enhanced sulfidation resistance in coal-fired low NO{sub x} boilers. The use of these materials is currently limited due to hydrogen cracking susceptibility, which generally increases with an increase in aluminum concentration of the deposit. The overall objective of this program is to attain an optimum aluminum content with good weldability and improved sulfidation resistance with respect to conventional materials presently in use. Research has been initiated using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) in order to achieve this end. Under different sets of GTAW parameters (wire feed speed, current), both single and multiple pass overlays were produced. Characterization of all weldments was conducted using light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and electron probe microanalysis. Resultant deposits exhibited a wide range of aluminum contents (5--43 wt%). It was found that the GTAW overlays with aluminum contents above {approximately}10 wt% resulted in cracked coatings. Preliminary corrosion experiments of 5 to 10 wt% Al cast alloys in relatively simple H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}S gas mixtures exhibited corrosion rates lower than 304 stainless steel.

  1. Effect of cerium addition on microstructures of carbon-alloyed iron aluminides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Sriram; R Balasubramaniam; M N Mungole; S Bharagava; R G Baligidad

    2005-10-01

    The effect of Ce addition on the microstructure of carbon-alloyed Fe3Al-based intermetallic has been studied. Three different alloys of composition, Fe–18.5Al–3.6C, Fe–20.0Al–2.0C and Fe–19.2Al–3.3C–0.07Ce (in at%), were prepared by electroslag remelting process. Their microstructures were characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopies. Stereological methods were utilized to understand the observed microstructures. All the alloys exhibited a typical two-phase microstructure consisting of Fe3AlC carbides in an iron aluminide matrix. In the alloy without Ce addition, large bulky carbides were equally distributed throughout the matrix with many smaller precipitates interspersed in between. In the alloy with Ce addition, the carbide grain sizes were finer and uniformly distributed throughout the matrix. The effect of Ce addition on the carbide morphology has been explained based on the known effect of Ce in modifying carbide morphology in cast irons.

  2. Preparation of aluminide coatings at relatively low temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN Zhao-lin; HE Ye-dong; WANG De-ren; GAO Wei

    2006-01-01

    A method was presented to prepare aluminide coatings on metals by combining the pack aluminizing with the ball impact process. This technique applied mechanical vibration to a retort, which was loaded with pack-aluminizing powder, specimens and alloy balls. Pack aluminizing was carried out with repeated ball impact, which accelerated chemical reactions and atomic diffusion.Aluminide coatings were formed at a relatively lower temperature (below 600 ℃) and in a shorter treatment time, compared with the conventional pack aluminizing. The effects of the operation temperature and the treatment time on the formation of the coatings were analysed. The SEM, EDS and XRD analysis results show that the aluminide coatings appear to be homogeneous, with a high density and free of porosity, and have excellent adherence to the substrate. The coatings mainly consist of Al-rich phases such as η-Fe2Al5,θ-FeAl3 and CrAl5. Oxidation resistance was studied by high-temperature tests. The formation mechanism of the Al-coatings was also investigated. This technique provides a new approach for industrial diffusion coatings with great energy and time savings.

  3. Ceramic Conversion Treatment of Titanium Aluminide for Improved Tribological Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JingXIA; ChenxiLI; HanshanDONG; TomBELL

    2004-01-01

    Gamma-based titanium aluminides have great potential in the automotive industries (e.g. valves in a car engine), but tribological property could be one of the crucial factors in determining the life and performance of a titanium aluminide part. A surface modification technique, namely ceramic conversion (CC) treatment has been developed to improve the tribological properties of a γ-based titanium aluminide (Ti-48A1-2Nb-2Cr-B), and the surface properties were fully characterised. The results indicate that ceramic conversion treatment can produce an oxide layer consisting of a top TiO2 surface followed by a mixture of TiO2 and Al2O3. Such hardened layer has significantly improved the load-bearing capacity and wear resistance of the intermetallics, as evidenced by an increase of scuffing load up to 4 times and a wear rate reduction of two orders of magnitude. The coefficient of friction has also been reduced from 0.5-0.7 for the untreated to an average of 0.22 for the CC-treated alloy under dry sliding contact conditions.

  4. Ceramic Conversion Treatment of Titanium Aluminide for Improved Tribological Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing XIA; Chenxi LI; Hanshan DONG; Tom BELL

    2004-01-01

    Gamma-based titanium aluminides have great potential in the automotive industries (e.g. valves in a car engine),but tribological property could be one of the crucial factors in determining the life and performance of a titanium aluminide part. A surface modification technique, namely ceramic conversion (CC) treatment has been developed to improve the tribological properties of a γ-based titanium aluminide (Ti-48Al-2Nb-2Cr-B), and the surface properties were fully characterised. The results indicate that ceramic conversion treatment can produce an oxide layer consisting of a top TiO2 surface followed by a mixture of TiO2 and Al2O3. Such hardened layer has significantly improved the load-bearing capacity and wear resistance of the intermetallics, as evidenced by an increase of scuffing load up to 4 times and a wear rate reduction of two orders of magnitude. The coefficient of friction has also been reduced from 0.5-0.7 for the untreated to an average of 0.22 for the CC-treated alloy under dry sliding contact conditions.

  5. Nickel allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, L A; Johansen, J D; Menné, T

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The frequency of nickel allergy varies between different population groups. Exposure regulation has proven effective in decreasing the frequency. Experimental studies with other allergens have shown a significant relation between patch test reactivity and repeated open application test.......78 microg nickel cm(-2) in the patch test. The threshold for the ROAT (in microg nickel cm(-2) per application) was significantly lower than the threshold for the patch test, while the dose-response for the accumulated ROAT dose at 1 week, 2 weeks and 3 weeks was very similar to the patch test dose......-response; indeed, there was no statistically significant difference. CONCLUSIONS: For elicitation of nickel allergy the elicitation threshold for the patch test is higher than the elicitation threshold (per application) for the ROAT, but is approximately the same as the accumulated elicitation threshold...

  6. Hair casts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweta S Parmar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hair casts or pseudonits are circumferential concretions,which cover the hair shaft in such a way that, it could be easily removed. They are thin, cylindrical, and elongated in length. We present an unusual case of an 8-year-old girl presenting with hair casts. Occurrence of these is unusual, and they may have varied associations. This patient was suffering from developmental delay. It is commonly misdiagnosed as and very important to differentiate from pediculosis capitis.

  7. Cast construction elements for heat treatment furnaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Piekarski

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The study presents sketches and photos of the cast creep-resistant components used in various types of heat treatment furnaces. The shape of the elements results from the type of the operation carried out in the furnace, while dimensions are adjusted to the size of the furnace working chamber. The castings are mainly made from the high-alloyed, austenitic chromium-nickel or nickel-chromium steel, selecting the grade in accordance with the furnace operating conditions described by the rated temperature, the type and parameters of the applied operating atmosphere, and the charge weight. Typical examples in this family of construction elements are: crucibles, roller tracks, radiant tubes and guides. The majority of castings are produced in sand moulds.

  8. Solidification and casting

    CERN Document Server

    Cantor, Brian

    2002-01-01

    INDUSTRIAL PERSPECTIVEDirect chillcasting of aluminium alloysContinuous casting of aluminium alloysContinuous casting of steelsCastings in the automotive industryCast aluminium-silicon piston alloysMODELLING AND SIMULATIONModelling direct chill castingMold filling simulation of die castingThe ten casting rulesGrain selection in single crystal superalloy castingsDefects in aluminium shape castingPattern formation during solidificationPeritectic solidificationSTRUCTURE AND DEFECTSHetergeneous nucleation in aluminium alloysCo

  9. Nickel metallomics: general themes guiding nickel homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydor, Andrew M; Zamble, Deborah B

    2013-01-01

    The nickel metallome describes the distribution and speciation of nickel within the cells of organisms that utilize this element. This distribution is a consequence of nickel homeostasis, which includes import, storage, and export of nickel, incorporation into metalloenzymes, and the modulation of these and associated cellular systems through nickel-regulated transcription. In this chapter, we review the current knowledge of the most common nickel proteins in prokaryotic organisms with a focus on their coordination environments. Several underlying themes emerge upon review of these nickel systems, which illustrate the common principles applied by nature to shape the nickel metallome of the cell.

  10. Preparation of Si-modified aluminide coating by CVD process%硅改性铝化物涂层的CVD制备工艺

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘磊; 杨甫; 吴勇

    2016-01-01

    研究了CVD法制备硅改性铝化物涂层工艺。结果表明,采用先渗硅后渗铝的两步法工艺可在Inconel 718表面获得铝-硅涂层。铝-硅涂层分为明显的两层结构,内层富硅,外层富铝。硅的加入阻碍高温条件下Al原子的内扩散,并促进了试样表面Al2 O3膜的生成。铝-硅涂层具有比单一的铝化物涂层更为优秀的耐高温氧化性能。%CVD process was studied to form Silicon modified aluminide coatings. The results show that Al-Si coatings can be formed on the surface of Inconel 718 nickel-based super alloy by two steps method. The first step is siliconizing and second step is aluminizing. The Al-Si coatings is two layers structure in which the inner layer is Si-rich and outer layer is Al-rich. The addition of Si decreases the internal diffusion rate of Al atoms under high temperature, and promote the formation of Al2 O3 film on the surface. The high temperature oxidation resistance of Al-Si coatings is better than that of single aluminide coatings.

  11. Degradation of nonmodified and rhodium modified aluminide coating deposited on CMSX 4 superalloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagula-Yavorska, Maryana; Wierzbińska, Małgorzata; Gancarczyk, Kamil; Sieniawski, Jan

    2016-07-01

    The Ni-base superalloy CMSX 4 used in the turbine blades of aircraft engines was coated with rhodium layer (0.5-μm thick). Next coated CMSX 4 superalloy was aluminized by the CVD method. The rhodium modified aluminide coating and nonmodified aluminide coating were oxidized at 1100°C at the air atmosphere. The rhodium modified aluminide coating showed about twice better oxidation resistance than the nonmodified one. The spallation equal 62% of the total area was observed on the surface of the nonmodified coating whereas only 36% spallation area was observed on the surface of the rhodium modified aluminide coating after the oxidation test. The oxide layer formed on the surface of the nonmodified coating was composed of nonprotective (Ni,Cr)Al2 O4 and (Ni,Cr)O phases. Aluminium in the coating reacts with oxygen, forming a protective α-Al2 O3 oxide on the surface of the rhodium modified aluminide coating. When the oxide cracks and spalls due to oxidation, additional aluminium from the coating diffuses to the surface to form the oxide. The presence of protective Al2 O3 oxide on the surface of the rhodium modified aluminide coating slows coating degradation. Therefore, rhodium modified aluminide coating has better oxidation resistance than the nonmodified one.

  12. Interdiffusion Behavior in Aluminide Coatings for Power Generation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.; Pint, B.A.; Haynes, J.A.; Cooley, K.M.; Wright, I.G.

    2003-04-22

    One of the critical issues for the application of iron aluminide coatings is the loss of Al from the coating into the Fe-base substrate alloys which do not contain aluminum. The interdiffusion behavior between chemical vapor deposited (CVD) aluminide coatings and ferritic and austenitic substrates is being studied for times up to 10,000h in the temperature range of 500-800 C. Coatings were synthesized using a laboratory-scale CVD reactor on representative commercial ferritic (Fe-9Cr-1Mo) and austenitic (type 304L stainless steel) alloys. The aluminide coatings on both alloys typically consisted of a relatively thin (20-25 {micro}m) Al-rich outer layer and a thicker (150- 250 {micro}m) inner layer with less Al. The composition profiles before and after interdiffusion testing were measured by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The decrease of the Al content at the coating surface was not significant after extended diffusion times ({le} 5000h) at temperatures {le} 700 C. More interdiffusion occurred at 800 C in coatings on both Fe-9Cr-1Mo and 304L alloys. Particularly, a two-phase microstructure was formed in the outer coating layer on 304L after interdiffusion of 2000h at 800 C. The interdiffusion behavior also was simulated using a computer model COSIM (Coating Oxidation and Substrate Interdiffusion Model), which was originally developed for MCrAlY overlay coatings by NASA. Reasonable agreement was observed between the simulated and experimental composition profiles although more work is needed to confirm assumptions made in the model.

  13. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Iron Aluminide by CVD Coated Powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asit Biswas Andrew J. Sherman

    2006-09-25

    This I &I Category2 program developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of iron, aluminum and aluminum oxide coated iron powders and the availability of high temperature oxidation, corrosion and erosion resistant coating for future power generation equipment and can be used for retrofitting existing fossil-fired power plant equipment. This coating will provide enhanced life and performance of Coal-Fired Boilers components such as fire side corrosion on the outer diameter (OD) of the water wall and superheater tubing as well as on the inner diameter (ID) and OD of larger diameter headers. The program also developed a manufacturing route for readily available thermal spray powders for iron aluminide coating and fabrication of net shape component by powder metallurgy route using this CVD coated powders. This coating can also be applid on jet engine compressor blade and housing, industrial heat treating furnace fixtures, magnetic electronic parts, heating element, piping and tubing for fossil energy application and automotive application, chemical processing equipment , heat exchanger, and structural member of aircraft. The program also resulted in developing a new fabrication route of thermal spray coating and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron aluminide composites enabling more precise control over material microstructures.

  14. Nodular cast iron and casting monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    In this paper quality monitoring of nodular cast iron and casting made of it is presented. A control system of initial liquid cast iron to spheroidization, after spheroidization and inoculation with using of TDA method was shown. An application of an ultrasonic method to assessment of the graphite form and the metal matrix microstructure of castings was investigated.

  15. Nodular cast iron and casting monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper quality monitoring of nodular cast iron and casting made of it is presented. A control system of initial liquid cast iron to spheroidization, after spheroidization and inoculation with using of TDA method was shown. An application of an ultrasonic method to assessment of the graphite form and the metal matrix microstructure of castings was investigated.

  16. Protective Aluminide Coatings for NiCr Alloys in Combustion Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Maziasz, Philip J [ORNL; Schauer, J [TRW; Levin, V [TRW

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory exposures that simulated the oxidation-related attack in natural gas-fired reciprocating engines were conducted on Ni-Cr alloys with and without aluminide coatings. Exposure of uncoated Ni-Cr alloy specimens to humid air at 800 C resulted in a mass loss due to CrO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2} evaporation and internal oxidation. Both model and commercial aluminide coatings reduced the amount of attack. The reaction products and Al interdiffusion were evaluated.

  17. Chromium and reactive element modified aluminide diffusion coatings on superalloys - Environmental testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Robert; Rapp, Robert A.; Smialek, James L.

    1993-01-01

    The high temperature performance of reactive element (RE)-doped and Cr/RE-modified aluminide diffusion coatings on commercial Ni-base alloy substrates was determined. In isothermal oxidation at 1100 C in air, RE-doped aluminide coatings on IN 713LC substrates formed a continuous slow-growing n-Al2O3 scale after 44 hrs of exposure. The coatings were protected by either an outer ridge Al2O3 scale with an inner compact Al2O3 scale rich in RE or by a continuous compact scale without any noticeable cracks or flaws. The cyclic oxidation behavior of Cr/RE-modified aluminide coatings on Rene 80 and IN 713LC alloys and of RE-doped aluminide coatings on IN 713LC alloys at 1100 C in static air was determined. Pack powder entrapment from the powder contacting (PC) process detracted significantly from the overall cyclic oxidation performance. Type I hot corrosion behavior of Cr/RE-modified aluminide coatings on Rene 80 and Mar-M247 alloy substrates at 900 C in a catalyzed 0.1 percent SO3/O3 gas mixture was determined. The modified coatings produced from the PC arrangement provided significantly better resistance to hot corrosion attack than commercial low-activity aluminide coatings produced by the above pack arrangement.

  18. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF NICKEL ALUMINIDE (NI3AL) NANOSTRUCTURED COATED ECONOMISER TUBE IN BOILER

    OpenAIRE

    * Gokulakannan A, Karuppasamy K

    2016-01-01

    Thermal Power Stations all over the world are facing the problem of boiler tube leakage frequently. The consequences of which affects the performance of power plant and huge amount of money loss. Hot corrosion and erosion are recognized as serious problems in coal based power generation plants in India. The maximum number of cause of failure in economizer unit is due to flue gas erosion. The corrosion resistant coatings used conventionally are having some limitations like degradation of the c...

  19. Evolution of the Structure of Local Regions of Fused Metal in Explosion-Welded Nickel-Aluminum Composites Under Heat Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmorgun, V. G.; Bogdanov, A. I.; Gurevich, L. M.

    2016-03-01

    The methods of electron, optical, and atomic force microscopy are used to study the structure, morphology and phase composition of local regions of fused metal in an explosion-welded nickel-aluminum composite. It is shown that the diffusion zone formed due to the heat treatment repeats the contour of the fuse in the first stage and then "absorbs" it upon duration of the hold thus leveling the phase composition. ANi2Al3 Aluminide layer forms on the side of nickel and a NiAl3 layer forms on the side of aluminum.

  20. Repairing sealing surfaces on aluminum castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    Approach using stylus nickel plating instead of copper and cadmium plating has simplified repair procedure. Damaged sealing surfaces are stylus nickelplated in one step. Superficial scratches and porous areas are removed more easily from repaired surface by simply lapping sealing areas to required finish. Although method is aimed for aerospace components, it may be easily incorporated into conventional aluminumcasting technology. One-step repair can be considered for cast-aluminum automobile and aircraft engines to reduce time and costs.

  1. A Model for Creep and Creep Damage in the γ-Titanium Aluminide Ti-45Al-2Mn-2Nb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Harrison

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Gamma titanium aluminides (γ-TiAl display significantly improved high temperature mechanical properties over conventional titanium alloys. Due to their low densities, these alloys are increasingly becoming strong candidates to replace nickel-base superalloys in future gas turbine aeroengine components. To determine the safe operating life of such components, a good understanding of their creep properties is essential. Of particular importance to gas turbine component design is the ability to accurately predict the rate of accumulation of creep strain to ensure that excessive deformation does not occur during the component’s service life and to quantify the effects of creep on fatigue life. The theta (θ projection technique is an illustrative example of a creep curve method which has, in this paper, been utilised to accurately represent the creep behaviour of the γ-TiAl alloy Ti -45Al-2Mn-2Nb. Furthermore, a continuum damage approach based on the θ-projection method has also been used to represent tertiary creep damage and accurately predict creep rupture.

  2. Casting materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhry, Anil R. (Xenia, OH); Dzugan, Robert (Cincinnati, OH); Harrington, Richard M. (Cincinnati, OH); Neece, Faurice D. (Lyndurst, OH); Singh, Nipendra P. (Pepper Pike, OH)

    2011-06-14

    A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

  3. Development of Improved Iron-Aluminide Filter Tubes and Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkins, R.R.; Sutton, T.G.; Miller, C.J.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    2008-01-14

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was to explore and develop advanced manufacturing techniques to fabricate sintered iron-aluminide intermetallic porous bodies used for gas filtration so as to reduce production costs while maintaining or improving performance in advanced coal gasification and combustion systems. The use of a power turbine fired with coal-derived synthesis gas requires some form of gas cleaning in order to protect turbine and downstream components from degradation by erosion, corrosion, and/or deposition. Hot-gas filtration is one form of cleaning that offers the ability to remove particles from the gases produced by gasification processes without having to substantially cool and, possibly, reheat them before their introduction into the turbine. This technology depends critically on materials durability and reliability, which have been the subject of study for a number of years.

  4. The UK Casting Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jincheng Liu

    2006-01-01

    The casting production in the UK in 2004 is presented and analysed. The UK casting industry has played an important role in world casting and manufacturing production. However recent years the rapid development of some developing countries has been shifting the casting production from the western industrialized countries including the UK. The UK casting industry and associated research and technology organizations, universities have been working together very hard to face the serious competition to make the UK casting industry have a sustainable future. The UK casting industry remains strong and plays an important role in world casting and manufacturing production.

  5. Prediction of Microporosity in Complex Thin-Wall Castings with the Dimensionless Niyama Criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Maodong; Gao, Haiyan; Wang, Jun; Ling, Lishibao; Sun, Baode

    2013-01-01

    The dimensionless Niyama criterion was used to predict the formation of microporosity in nickel-based superalloy casting, which extended the model application from a simple plate casting to complex thin-wall superalloy casting. The physical characteristics of the superalloy were calculated by JMatPro software. The relation between the volume percentage of microporosity and the dimensionless Niyama values were constructed. Quantitative metallographic measurements of the microporosity of the practical thin-wall casting were carried out. The prediction agreed well with the experiment in general, except for some thick-wall sites in the casting. PMID:28809243

  6. Research and Application of Centrifugal Casting Process for Nickel-based Composite Pipe%离心浇铸镍基复合管的研究及应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张锡洲; 苏孔荣; 王庆潮; 李亮

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of centrifugal casting composite pipes used in harsh working conditions of high acid gas field was analyzed to reduce the costs in exploration and transportation of high-sulfur gas and improve the security in exploitation and transportation, and the design and manufacturing process for centrifugal casting composite pipes and the data in performance test were studied. L360QS/825 material for composite pipes was successfully developed and applied in Puguang gas field.%为大幅度降低高含硫天然气开采和输送成本,提高天然气开采和输送安全性,对离心浇铸复合管材在高酸气田恶劣工况使用的可行性进行了分析,对离心浇铸复合管材设计、制造工艺以及性能检测数据进行了研究.成功研制出了L360QS/825复合管材,并在普光气田进行了成功的应用.

  7. Moldless casting by laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Marc A.; Shannon, G. J.; Steen, William M.

    1997-09-01

    The principle of laser cladding involves the use of high power carbon-dioxide lasers and powder deposition technology to provide wear and corrosion resistant surface coatings to engineering components. By injecting metal powder into a laser generated melt pool on a moving substrate a solidified metal track can be produced. Deposition of successive tracks produces a multi-layer build. Laser direct casting (LDC) utilizes a coaxial nozzle enabling consistent omnidirectional deposition to produce 3D components from a selection of metal powders. The influence of the principal process parameters over the process features namely, powder catchment efficiency, beam shape and build rates are presented with several successfully generated 3D components. Nickel, stainless steel and satellite powders were deposited at laser powders of 0.4 to 1.4 kW and speeds of 500 to 1000 mm/min achieving build rates of 3 to 9 mm3/s. Fully dense metallurgical structures have been produced with no cracking or porosity and powder catchment efficiencies up to 85% have been achieved.

  8. CA Investment Casting Process of Complex Castings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    CA (Computer aided) investment casting technique used in superalloy castings of aerospace engine parts was presented. CA investment casting integrated computer application, RP (Rapid Prototyping) process, solidification simulation and investment casting process. It broke the bottle neck of making metal die. Solid model of complex parts were produced by UGII or other software, then translated into STL(Stereolithography) file, after RP process of SLS(Selective Laser Sintering), wax pattern used in investment ...

  9. Cast irons

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Cast iron offers the design engineer a low-cost, high-strength material that can be easily melted and poured into a wide variety of useful, and sometimes complex, shapes. This latest handbook from ASM covers the entire spectrum of one of the most widely used and versatile of all engineered materials. The reader will find the basic, but vital, information on metallurgy, solidification characteristics, and properties. Extensive reviews are presented on the low-alloy gray, ductile, compacted graphite, and malleable irons. New and expanded material has been added covering high-alloy white irons used for abrasion resistance and high-alloy graphitic irons for heat and corrosion resistance. Also discussed are melting furnaces and foundry practices such as melting, inoculation, alloying, pouring, gating and rising, and molding. Heat treating practices including stress relieving, annealing, normalizing, hardening and tempering, autempering (of ductile irons), and surface-hardening treatments are covered, too. ASM Spec...

  10. Corrosion performance of Fe-Cr-Al and Fe aluminide alloys in complex gas environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Johnson, R.N. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Alumina-forming structural alloys can offer superior resistance to corrosion in the presence of sulfur-containing environments, which are prevalent in coal-fired fossil energy systems. Further, Fe aluminides are being developed for use as structural materials and/or cladding alloys in these systems. Extensive development has been in progress on Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys to improve their engineering ductility. In addition, surface coatings of Fe aluminide are being developed to impart corrosion resistance to structural alloys. This paper describes results from an ongoing program that is evaluating the corrosion performance of alumina-forming structural alloys, Fe-Al and Fe aluminide bulk alloys, and Fe aluminide coatings in environments typical of coal-gasification and combustion atmospheres. Experiments were conducted at 650-1000{degrees}C in simulated oxygen/sulfur gas mixtures. Other aspects of the program are corrosion evaluation of the aluminides in the presence of HCl-containing gases. Results are used to establish threshold Al levels in the alloys for development of protective alumina scales and to determine the modes of corrosion degradation that occur in the materials when they are exposed to S/Cl-containing gaseous environments.

  11. The ancient Chinese casting techniques

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    In the course of Chinese civilization, which lasted more than 5,000 years, casting production has made a huge contribution. In this paper, some representative metal castings were presented. According to their forming techniques, they can be grouped into stone mould casting, clay mould casting, ablation casting, lost wax casting, stack casting, permanent mould casting, sand casting, etc. According to their materials, they can be categorized into tin bronze, bimetallic bronze, malleable cast ir...

  12. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  13. Effect of Energy Input on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Titanium Aluminide Alloy Fabricated by the Additive Manufacturing Process of Electron Beam Melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashfaq Mohammad

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Titanium aluminides qualify adequately for advanced aero-engine applications in place of conventional nickel based superalloys. The combination of high temperature properties and lower density gives an edge to the titanium aluminide alloys. Nevertheless, challenges remain on how to process these essentially intermetallic alloys in to an actual product. Electron Beam Melting (EBM, an Additive Manufacturing Method, can build complex shaped solid parts from a given feedstock powder, thus overcoming the shortcomings of the conventional processing techniques such as machining and forging. The amount of energy supplied by the electron beam has considerable influence on the final build quality in the EBM process. Energy input is decided by the beam voltage, beam scan speed, beam current, and track offset distance. In the current work, beam current and track offset were varied to reflect three levels of energy input. Microstructural and mechanical properties were evaluated for these samples. The microstructure gradually coarsened from top to bottom along the build direction. Whereas higher energy favored lath microstructure, lower energy tended toward equiaxed grains. Computed tomography analysis revealed a greater amount of porosity in low energy samples. In addition, the lack of bonding defects led to premature failure in the tension test of low energy samples. Increase in energy to a medium level largely cancelled out the porosity, thereby increasing the strength. However, this trend did not continue with the high energy samples. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction investigations were carried out to understand this non-linear behavior of the strength in the three samples. Overall, the results of this work suggest that the input energy should be considered primarily whenever any new alloy system has to be processed through the EBM route.

  14. Effect of Energy Input on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Titanium Aluminide Alloy Fabricated by the Additive Manufacturing Process of Electron Beam Melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Ashfaq; Alahmari, Abdulrahman M; Mohammed, Muneer Khan; Renganayagalu, Ravi Kottan; Moiduddin, Khaja

    2017-02-21

    Titanium aluminides qualify adequately for advanced aero-engine applications in place of conventional nickel based superalloys. The combination of high temperature properties and lower density gives an edge to the titanium aluminide alloys. Nevertheless, challenges remain on how to process these essentially intermetallic alloys in to an actual product. Electron Beam Melting (EBM), an Additive Manufacturing Method, can build complex shaped solid parts from a given feedstock powder, thus overcoming the shortcomings of the conventional processing techniques such as machining and forging. The amount of energy supplied by the electron beam has considerable influence on the final build quality in the EBM process. Energy input is decided by the beam voltage, beam scan speed, beam current, and track offset distance. In the current work, beam current and track offset were varied to reflect three levels of energy input. Microstructural and mechanical properties were evaluated for these samples. The microstructure gradually coarsened from top to bottom along the build direction. Whereas higher energy favored lath microstructure, lower energy tended toward equiaxed grains. Computed tomography analysis revealed a greater amount of porosity in low energy samples. In addition, the lack of bonding defects led to premature failure in the tension test of low energy samples. Increase in energy to a medium level largely cancelled out the porosity, thereby increasing the strength. However, this trend did not continue with the high energy samples. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction investigations were carried out to understand this non-linear behavior of the strength in the three samples. Overall, the results of this work suggest that the input energy should be considered primarily whenever any new alloy system has to be processed through the EBM route.

  15. Effect of Energy Input on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Titanium Aluminide Alloy Fabricated by the Additive Manufacturing Process of Electron Beam Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Ashfaq; Alahmari, Abdulrahman M.; Mohammed, Muneer Khan; Renganayagalu, Ravi Kottan; Moiduddin, Khaja

    2017-01-01

    Titanium aluminides qualify adequately for advanced aero-engine applications in place of conventional nickel based superalloys. The combination of high temperature properties and lower density gives an edge to the titanium aluminide alloys. Nevertheless, challenges remain on how to process these essentially intermetallic alloys in to an actual product. Electron Beam Melting (EBM), an Additive Manufacturing Method, can build complex shaped solid parts from a given feedstock powder, thus overcoming the shortcomings of the conventional processing techniques such as machining and forging. The amount of energy supplied by the electron beam has considerable influence on the final build quality in the EBM process. Energy input is decided by the beam voltage, beam scan speed, beam current, and track offset distance. In the current work, beam current and track offset were varied to reflect three levels of energy input. Microstructural and mechanical properties were evaluated for these samples. The microstructure gradually coarsened from top to bottom along the build direction. Whereas higher energy favored lath microstructure, lower energy tended toward equiaxed grains. Computed tomography analysis revealed a greater amount of porosity in low energy samples. In addition, the lack of bonding defects led to premature failure in the tension test of low energy samples. Increase in energy to a medium level largely cancelled out the porosity, thereby increasing the strength. However, this trend did not continue with the high energy samples. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction investigations were carried out to understand this non-linear behavior of the strength in the three samples. Overall, the results of this work suggest that the input energy should be considered primarily whenever any new alloy system has to be processed through the EBM route. PMID:28772572

  16. TDA method application to austenite transformation in nodular cast iron with carbides assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gumienny

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the possibility of TDA method using to austenite transformation in nodular cast iron with carbides assessment is presented. Studies were conducted on cast iron with about 2% molybdenum and 0,70% to 4,50% nickel. On diagrams, where TDA curves are pre- sented, on time axis a logarithmic scale was applied. It has not been used up to now. It was found, that during cooling and crystallization of cast iron in TDA probe, on the derivative curve there is a slight thermal effect from austenite to upper bainite or martensite transformation. Depending on nickel concentration austeniteupper bainite transformation start temperature changed (Bus, while MS temperature was independent of it. An influence of nickel on eutectic transformation temperature in nodular cast iron with carbides was determined too.

  17. Development of niobium aluminide-based composites with improved toughness using treated reinforcements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woytera, S.A.; Bhagat, R.B.; Amateau, M.F. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Applied Research Lab.

    1996-03-01

    Many ordered intermetallic compounds exhibit attractive properties for high temperature structural aerospace applications. The major obstacles limiting the use of these materials are their low ductility and toughness at room temperature and poor creep resistance at elevated temperatures. In this investigation treated silicon carbide whisker and niobium particle reinforced niobium aluminide matrix composites have been fabricated by reaction hot pressing in vacuum. Elemental matrix powders react exothermally and form the niobium aluminide matrix in situ. A suitable hot pressing cycle has been established for the successful development of the niobium aluminide matrix, while reducing adverse reactions between the matrix and the reinforcements. The composites with treated reinforcements are expected to have high resistance to creep at elevated temperatures and they show relatively low hardness and higher toughness in comparison with the composites reinforced with untreated whiskers.

  18. Evaluation of Iron Aluminide Coatings for Oxidation Protection in Water Vapor Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ying [Tennessee Technological University; Wang, Y. Q. [Tennessee Technological University; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Long-term (> 10,000h) oxidation behavior of aluminide coatings made by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or pack cementation on representative ferritic (Fe-9Cr-1Mo) and austenitic (type 304L stainless steel) are being studied in air + 10% water vapor in the temperature range of 650-800 C. Unlike the uncoated alloys, which are severely attacked in this environment, the CVD aluminide coatings have not failed after 16,000h at 700 C or 10,000h at 800 C. The pack aluminide coatings also show good oxidation protection after testing for {approx}5,000h at 700 C. In addition, initial efforts have been made to fabricate coatings at lower aluminizing temperatures and the current results suggest that FeAl coatings can be synthesized at temperatures as low as 700 C.

  19. Structure of the welding zone between titanium and orthorhombic titanium aluminide for explosion welding: I. Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybin, V. V.; Grinberg, B. A.; Ivanov, M. A.; Kuz'min, S. V.; Lysak, V. I.; Elkina, O. A.; Patselov, A. M.; Inozemtsev, A. V.; Antonova, O. V.; Kozhevnikov, V. E.

    2011-10-01

    The structures of the interfaces and transition zones of bimetallic metal-intermetallide joints produced by explosion welding under various conditions have been studied. The welded materials were commercial-purity titanium and orthorhombic titanium aluminide of two alloying schemes. The specific features of the structure and substructure of the zones under study are discussed. Wave formation and formation of isolated vortex zones, as well as tracks of particles related to the transfer of particles of one metal into the other one, were observed. A possible scenario of formation of interfaces, depending on the composition of titanium aluminide and welding conditions, is proposed.

  20. Ordered iron aluminide alloys having an improved room-temperature ductility and method thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1992-01-01

    A process is disclosed for improving the room temperature ductility and strength of iron aluminide intermetallic alloys. The process involves thermomechanically working an iron aluminide alloy by means which produce an elongated grain structure. The worked alloy is then heated at a temperature in the range of about 650.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. to produce a B2-type crystal structure. The alloy is rapidly cooled in a moisture free atmosphere to retain the B2-type crystal structure at room temperature, thus providing an alloy having improved room temperature ductility and strength.

  1. A Finite Difference Method for Determining Interdiffusivity of Aluminide Coating Formed on Superalloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua WEI; Xiaofeng SUN; Qi ZHENG; Guichen HOU; Hengrong GUAN; Zhuangqi HU

    2004-01-01

    A numerical method has been developed to extract the composition-dependent interdiffusivity from the concentration profiles in the aluminide coating prepared by pack cementation. The procedure is based on the classic finite difference method (FDM). In order to simplify the model, effect of some alloying elements on interdiffusivity can be negligible.Calculated results indicate the interdiffusivity in aluminide coating strongly depends on the composition and give the formulas used to calculate interdiffusivity at 850, 950 and 1050℃. The effect on interdiffusivity is briefly discussed.

  2. A respiratory model for uranium aluminide based on occupational data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggett, R W; Eckerman, K F; Boice, J D

    2005-12-01

    As part of an epidemiological study, doses from intake of radionuclides were estimated for workers employed during a 52-year period at the Rocketdyne/Atomics International facility in California. The facility was involved in a variety of research programmes, including nuclear fuel fabrication, spent nuclear fuel decladding, and reactor operation and disassembly. Most of the documented intakes involved inhalation of enriched uranium (U), fission products, or plutonium (Pu). Highest doses were estimated for a group of workers exposed to airborne uranium aluminide (UAl(x)) during the fabrication of reactor fuel plates. Much of the exposure to UAl(x) occurred early in the fuel fabrication programme, before it was recognised that intake and lung retention were being underestimated from urinary data due to an unexpected delayed dissolution of the inhaled material. In workers who had been removed from exposure, the rate of urinary excretion of U increased for a few months, peaked, and then declined at a rate consistent with moderately soluble material. This pattern differs markedly from the monotonically decreasing absorption rates represented by the default absorption types in the Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM) of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). This paper summarises the findings on the behaviour of UAl(x) in these workers and describes material-specific parameter values of the HRTM based on this information.

  3. Phase evolution and alloying mechanism of titanium aluminide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, J.S.; Li, K.; Li, X.B. [Research Center of Laser Fusion, Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Shu, Y.J. [Institute of Chemical Materials, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Tang, Y.J., E-mail: tangyongjian2000@sina.com [Research Center of Laser Fusion, Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • An evolution of phase composition of TiAl alloy nanoparticles was investigated. • An alloying mechanism was analyzed according to the variation of phase composition. • The alloying reaction was possible to perform between the small clusters of Ti and Al. • The alloying product is determined by the temperature of Ti and Al small clusters. • The alloying mechanism can be explained based on Gibbs free energy of alloying reaction. - Abstract: The evolution of phase composition of titanium aluminide nanoparticles synthesized by the flow-levitation method was systematically investigated by adjustment of the evaporating temperature of the mixed metallic droplet and the X-ray diffraction spectrum. Their alloying mechanism was analyzed according to the variation of phase composition. ε(h, l)-TiAl{sub 3,} γ-TiAl and α{sub 2}-Ti{sub 3}Al phases are gradually formed in TiAl alloy nanoparticles with the increasing of evaporating temperature of the mixed droplet. The alloying reaction is possible to perform between the small clusters of Ti and Al during the cooling process with high cooling rate. And the alloying mechanism can be explained based on the Gibbs free energy of alloying reaction of Ti and Al small clusters.

  4. Corrosion performance of iron aluminides in fossil energy environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.

    1997-12-01

    Corrosion of metallic structural materials in complex gas environments of coal gasification and combustion is a potential problem. The corrosion process is dictated by concentrations of two key constituents: sulfur as H{sub 2}S or SO{sub 2} and chlorine as HCl. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the current status of the corrosion performance of alumina scales that are thermally grown on Fe-base alloys, including iron aluminides, in multicomponent gas environments of typical coal-conversion systems. Mechanisms of scale development/breakdown, performance envelopes for long-term usage of these materials, approaches to modifying the surfaces of engineering alloys by cladding or coating them with intermetallics, and in-service experience with these materials are emphasized. The results are compared with the performance of chromia-forming alloys in similar environments. The paper also discusses the available information on corrosion performance of alloys whose surfaces were enriched with Al by the electrospark deposition process or by weld overlay techniques.

  5. Corrosion performance of iron aluminides in single- and multioxidant environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.

    1998-06-22

    Iron aluminide intermetallics are being developed for use as structural materials and/or as cladding for conventional engineering alloys. In addition to their strength advantages, these materials exhibit excellent resistance to corrosion in single- and multioxidant environments at elevated temperatures through the formation of slow-growing, adherent alumina scales. Even though these intermetallics develop protective oxide scales in single-oxidant environments, the simultaneous presence of several reactants in the environment (typical of practical systems) can lead to development of oxide scales that are nonprotective and that undergo breakaway corrosion, or to nonoxide scales that are detrimental to the performance of the underlying alloy. This paper describes the corrosion performance of Fe-Al intermetallics in environments that contain sulfur, carbon, chlorine, and oxygen and that are typical of fossil energy systems. Emphasis is on mechanisms of scale development and breakdown, performance envelopes for long-term usage of these materials, and approaches to modifying the surfaces of engineering alloys by cladding or coating them with intermetallics to improve their corrosion resistance.

  6. Magnetron-sputtered coatings for titanium aluminide alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godlewska, E.; Mitoraj, M.; Mania, R. [AGH-UST, Cracow (Poland). Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics; Zimowski, S.; Kot, M. [AGH-UST, Cracow (Poland). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Robotics

    2010-07-01

    Third-generation titanium aluminide alloys fulfil major requirements as lightweight materials for structural applications at moderate temperatures and loads. They are known for attractive combination of physical, chemical and mechanical properties, e.g. low density, good oxidation resistance and strength. Still a lot of work is being done to develop protection systems enabling their use at temperatures exceeding current limit of about 600-650 C. The protection systems under investigation include thick thermal barriers similar to the state-of-the-art coatings for superalloys but also thin layers functioning as diffusion barriers for gases to prevent embrittlement. The paper presents investigations on surface modification of a ({alpha}+{gamma}{sub 2}) Ti-46-8Nb alloy by means of magnetron sputtering of two-component targets: Cr-0.5Si, Cr-5Si, CrSi{sub 2} and Ti-10Si. Targets were obtained from elemental powders by hot pressing. The properties of thus produced surface layers were evaluated on the basis of nanoindentation and scratch tests in the as-received condition and after exposure to air at elevated temperature. Surfaces and cross-sections of the oxidized specimens were examined by SEM, EDS and XRD/GID. (orig.)

  7. Micromechanical Characterization and Texture Analysis of Direct Cast Titanium Alloys Strips

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This research was conducted to determine a post-processing technique to optimize mechanical and material properties of a number of Titanium based alloys and aluminides processed via Melt Overflow Solidification Technique (MORST). This technique was developed by NASA for the development of thin sheet titanium and titanium aluminides used in high temperature applications. The materials investigated in this study included conventional titanium alloy strips and foils, Ti-1100, Ti-24Al-11Nb (Alpha-2), and Ti-48Al-2Ta (Gamma). The methodology used included micro-characterization, heat-treatment, mechanical processing and mechanical testing. Characterization techniques included optical, electron microscopy, and x-ray texture analysis. The processing included heat-treatment and mechanical deformation through cold rolling. The initial as-cast materials were evaluated for their microstructure and mechanical properties. Different heat-treatment and rolling steps were chosen to process these materials. The properties were evaluated further and a processing relationship was established in order to obtain an optimum processing condition. The results showed that the as-cast material exhibited a Widmanstatten (fine grain) microstructure that developed into a microstructure with larger grains through processing steps. The texture intensity showed little change for all processing performed in this investigation.

  8. Cast Steels for Creep-resistant Parts Used in Heat Treatment Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Drotlew

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Creep-resistant parts of heat treatment furnaces are in most cases made from high-alloyed chromium-nickel and nickel-chromium ironalloys, both cast and wrought. This paper presents the types of casting alloys used for this particular purpose, since the majority of furnace components are made by the casting process. Standards were cited which give symbols of alloy grades used in technical specifications by the domestic industry. It has been indicated that castings made currently are based on a wider spectrum of the creep-resistant alloy grades than the number of alloys covered by the standards. Alloy grades recommended by the technical literature for individual parts of the furnace equipment were given. The recommendations reflect both the type of the technological process used and the technical tasks performed by individual parts of the furnace equipment. Comments were also made on the role of individual alloying elements in shaping the performance properties of castings.

  9. Cast Steels for Creep-Resistant Parts Used in Heat Treatment Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drotlew A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Creep-resistant parts of heat treatment furnaces are in most cases made from high-alloyed chromium-nickel and nickel-chromium iron alloys, both cast and wrought. This paper presents the types of casting alloys used for this particular purpose, since the majority of furnace components are made by the casting process. Standards were cited which give symbols of alloy grades used in technical specifications by the domestic industry. It has been indicated that castings made currently are based on a wider spectrum of the creep-resistant alloy grades than the number of alloys covered by the standards. Alloy grades recommended by the technical literature for individual parts of the furnace equipment were given. The recommendations reflect both the type of the technological process used and the technical tasks performed by individual parts of the furnace equipment. Comments were also made on the role of individual alloying elements in shaping the performance properties of castings.

  10. A heat treatment procedure to produce fine-grained lamellar microstructures in a P/M titanium aluminide alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Peter

    A process for fabricating advanced aerospace titanium aluminide alloys starting from metal powders (the hot isostatically consolidated P/M process) is presented in this thesis. This process does not suffer the difficulties of chemical inhomogeneities and coarse grain structure of castings. In addition heat treatments which take advantage of the refined structure of HIP processed materials are developed to achieve microstructure control and subsequent mechanical property control. It is shown that a better "property balance" is possible after the heat treatment of HIP consolidated materials than it is with alternative processing. It is well understood that the standard microstructures (near-gamma, duplex, nearly lamellar, and fully lamellar) do not have the balanced mechanical properties (tensile, yield, creep and fatigue strength, ductility and fracture toughness) necessary for optimal performance in aero engine and automotive applications. In this work a fine-grained fully lamellar (FGFL) microstructure is developed for property control and in particular for achieving a much improved property balance. A heat treatment procedure for this purpose which consists of cyclic processing in the alpha transus temperature region to achieve an FGFL structure with grain sizes in the range of 50 mum to 150 mum is presented. Compared with conventional duplex structured materials, the minimum creep rate is an order of magnitude lower with only a 10% loss in tensile yield strength. Moreover, a three-fold increase in tensile elongation is possible by converting to an FGFL structure with only a 30% loss in minimum creep rate. These are attractive trade-offs when considering the use of these alloys for aerospace purposes. A thorough literature review of the mechanisms of formation of standard microstructures and their deformation under mechanical loading is contained in the thesis. In addition, conventional techniques to produce FGFL microstructures in wrought and cast materials are

  11. LLNL casting technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, A. B.; Comfort, W. J., III

    1994-01-01

    Competition to produce cast parts of higher quality, lower rejection rate, and lower cost is a fundamental factor in the global economy. To gain an edge on foreign competitors, the US casting industry must cut manufacturing costs and reduce the time from design to market. Casting research and development (R&D) are the key to increasing US competiveness in the casting arena. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the home of a wide range of R&D projects that push the boundaries of state-of-the art casting. LLNL casting expertise and technology include: casting modeling research and development, including numerical simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer, reaction/solidification kinetics, and part distortion with residual stresses; special facilities to cast toxic material; extensive experience casting metals and nonmetals; advanced measurement and instrumentation systems. Department of Energy (DOE) funding provides the leverage for LLNL to collaborate with industrial partners to share this advanced casting expertise and technology. At the same time, collaboration with industrial partners provides LLNL technologists with broader insights into casting industry issues, casting process data, and the collective experience of industry experts. Casting R&D is also an excellent example of dual-use technology; it is the cornerstone for increasing US industrial competitiveness and minimizing waste nuclear material in weapon component production. Annual funding for casting projects at LLNL is $10M, which represents 1% of the total LLNL budget. Metal casting accounts for about 80% of the funding. Funding is nearly equally divided between development directed toward US industrial competitiveness and weapon component casting.

  12. Nickel transfer by fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isnardo, D; Vidal, J; Panyella, D; Vilaplana, J

    2015-06-01

    We investigated fingers as a potential source of nickel transfer to the face in patients with allergic contact dermatitis to nickel and a history of facial dermatitis. Samples were collected from the fingers and cheeks of volunteers using the stripping method with standard adhesive tape, and nickel levels were quantified using mass spectrometry. Fingers and cheeks of individuals who had handled coins were both positive for nickel, with levels ranging from 14.67 to 58.64 ppm and 1.28 to 8.52 ppm, respectively. The levels in a control group were considerably and significantly lower. Transfer of nickel from a person's fingers to their face after handling a nickel-containing object could explain the presence of facial dermatitis in patients with nickel hypersensitivity.

  13. Development of Oxidation Protection Coatings for Gamma Titanium Aluminide Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, T. A.; Bird, R. K.; Sankaran, S. N.

    2003-01-01

    Metallic material systems play a key role in meeting the stringent weight and durability requirements for reusable launch vehicle (RLV) airframe hot structures. Gamma titanium aluminides (gamma-TiAl) have been identified as high-payoff materials for high-temperature applications. The low density and good elevated temperature mechanical properties of gamma-TiAl alloys make them attractive candidates for durable lightweight hot structure and thermal protection systems at temperatures as high as 871 C. However, oxidation significantly degrades gamma-TiAl alloys under the high-temperature service conditions associated with the RLV operating environment. This paper discusses ongoing efforts at NASA Langley Research Center to develop durable ultrathin coatings for protecting gamma-TiAl alloys from high-temperature oxidation environments. In addition to offering oxidation protection, these multifunctional coatings are being engineered to provide thermal control features to help minimize heat input into the hot structures. This paper describes the coating development effort and discusses the effects of long-term high-temperature exposures on the microstructure of coated and uncoated gamma-TiAl alloys. The alloy of primary consideration was the Plansee alloy gamma-Met, but limited studies of the newer alloy gamma-Met-PX were also included. The oxidation behavior of the uncoated materials was evaluated over the temperature range of 704 C to 871 C. Sol-gel-based coatings were applied to the gamma-TiAl samples by dipping and spraying, and the performance evaluated at 871 C. Results showed that the coatings improve the oxidation resistance, but that further development is necessary.

  14. Perfluorodiethoxymethane on nickel and nickel oxide surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, Joyce [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1994-03-03

    The interaction of perfluorodiethoxymethane with a nickel single crystal, Ni(100); a nickel crystal with chemisorbed oxygen, Ni(100)-c(2x2)O; and a nickel crystal with nickel oxide crystallites, NiO(100) is investigated in an ultra high vacuum environment using thermal desorption spectroscopy and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy. Nickel, a component of hard disk drives and stainless steel, is used to represent metal surfaces in these "real" systems. Perfluorodiethoxymethane is used in this study as a model compound of industrial perfluoropolyether lubricants. These lubricants are known for their exceptional stability, except in the presence of metals. Perfluorodiethoxymethane contains the acetal group (-OCF2O-), believed to be particularly vulnerable to attack in the presence of Lewis acids. Since the surfaces studied show increasing Lewis acidity at the nickel atom sites, one might expect to see increasing decomposition of perfluorodiethoxymethane due to acidic attack of the acetal group. No decomposition of perfluorodiethoxymethane is observed on the clean Ni(100) surface, while more research is needed to determine whether a small decomposition pathway is observed on the oxygenated surfaces, or whether sample impurities are interfering with results. The strength of the bonding of perfluorodiethoxymethane to the surface is found to increase as the nickel atoms sites become more acidic in moving from Ni(100) to Ni (100)-c(2x2)O to NiO (100).

  15. Analysis of the solidified structure of rheocast and VADER processed nickel-base superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apelian, D.; Cheng, J.-J. A.

    1986-01-01

    Conventional 'ingot' processing of highly alloyed compositions results in a cast product which suffers from extensive macrosegregation, hot tears, and heterogeneities. By controlling the solidification journey, one can produce a fine grained cast product. This is achieved by manipulating the melt in the mushy zone. Rheocasting and vacuum arc double electrode remelting (VADER) are two such technologies where the melt is processed in the mushy zone. IN-100, a nickel based superalloy, was rheocast as well as VADER processed. The resultant cast structures are analyzed, compared and discussed both onmicro- and macrostructural levels. The effect of the rheocast processing variables (stirring seed, time and temperature) on the cast microstructure are also discussed.

  16. Trials to manufacture and test castings from Inconel alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Uhl

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the methods of producing and testing the Inconel 740 nickel alloy in as-cast state. An assumption has been made that the obtained alloy should be characterised by a normative chemical composition and mechanical properties similar to those that are obtained in the process of plastic forming. The alloy was fabricated by conventional process and vacuum metallurgy in the form of pilot castings enabling various types of tests to be carried out. Within the test and investigations programme, moulding materials were chosen, castings were poured and subjected to the process of heat treatment, followed by tests and examinations of alloy properties (mechanical tests, cooling curves. The outcome of the investigations was cast alloy characterised by chemical composition close to the normative one but of the mechanical properties inferior to those obtained by plastic forming.

  17. Characterization of Ni-Cr alloys using different casting techniques and molds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Teng, Fu-Yuan; Hung, Chun-Cheng

    2014-02-01

    This study differentiated the mechanical properties of nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) alloys under various casting techniques (different casting molds and casting atmospheres). These techniques were sampled by a sand mold using a centrifugal machine in ambient air (group I) and electromagnetic induction in an automatic argon castimatic casting machine (group II). The specimen casting used a graphite mold by a castimatic casting machine (group III). The characteristics of the Ni-Cr alloys, yield and ultimate tensile strength, bending modulus, microhardness, diffraction phase, grindability, ability to spring back, as well as ground microstructure and pattern under different casting conditions were evaluated. The group III specimens exhibited the highest values in terms of strength, modulus, hardness, and grindability at a grind rate of 500 rpm. Moreover, group III alloys exhibited smaller grain sizes, higher ability to spring back, and greater ductility than those casted by sand investment (groups I and II). The main factor, "casting mold," significantly influenced all mechanical properties. The graphite mold casting of the Ni-Cr dental alloys in a controlled atmosphere argon casting system provided an excellent combination of high mechanical properties and good ability to spring back, and preserved the ductile properties for application in Ni-Cr porcelain-fused system. The results can offer recommendations to assist a prosthetic technician in selecting the appropriate casting techniques to obtain the desired alloy properties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Band gap tuning of nickelates for photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lei; Wang, Le; You, Lu; Zhou, Yang; Fang, Liang; Wang, Shiwei; Wang, Junling

    2016-11-01

    Hybrid perovskites have achieved tremendous success as a light absorber in solar cells during the past few years. However, the stability issue casts shadow on their practical applications. Perovskite oxides may offer an alternative. In this study, the metal-insulator transition in perovskite neodymium nickelates (NdNiO3) is systematically tuned by adjusting the oxygen partial pressure during film growth. Room temperature insulating films with different band gaps are obtained. Testing photovoltaic cells have been prepared by combining the nickelates with Nb-doped SrTiO3, and photovoltaic performance has been optimized. Our study offers a new route for designing novel photovoltaic materials.

  19. Microstructure formation and properties of abrasion resistant cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Parzych

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The so-called adamitic cast steels are characterised by a high abrasion resistance. These cast steels are of a pearlitic matrix with uniformly distributed hypereutectoid cementite precipitates. Apart from hypereutectoid cementite very often transformed ledeburite also occurs in the microstructure of these cast steels. Such cast steels contain chromium (app. 1 % and nickel (app. 0.5 % as alloy additions and sometimes their silicon content is increased. The presence of molybdenum is also permissible (app. 0.4 %. The basic problem in application of these steels for structural elements constitutes their insufficient crack resistance. An improvement of mechanical properties by changes of morphology of hypereutectoid cementite and transformed ledeburite precipitates by means of the heat treatment application was the aim of this study. G200CrNiMo4-3-3 cast steel was the investigated material. Changes in the morphology of hypereutectoid cementite and transformed ledeburite obtained due to the heat treatment are described in detail in the present paper. An influence of the microstructure changes on impact toughness of the investigated cast steel is presented. Investigations performed within this study will serve for the microstructure optimisation on account of functional qualities of this cast steel.

  20. Glovebox Advanced Casting System Casting Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fielding, Randall Sidney [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Casting optimization in the GACS included three broad areas; casting of U-10Zr pins, incorporation of an integral FCCI barrier, and development of a permanent crucible coating. U-10Zr casting was improved over last year’s results by modifying the crucible design to minimize contact with the colder mold. Through these modifications casting of a three pin batch was successful. Incorporation of an integral FCCI barrier also was optimized through furnace chamber pressure changes during the casting cycle to reduce gas pressures in the mold cavities which led to three full length pins being cast which incorporated FCCI barriers of three different thicknesses. Permanent crucible coatings were tested against a base case; 1500°C for 10 minutes in a U-20Pu-10Zr molten alloy. None of the candidate coating materials showed evidence of failure upon initial visual examination. In all areas of work a large amount of characterization will be needed to fully determine the effects of the optimization activities. The characterization activities and future work will occur next year.

  1. High integrity automotive castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, D. [Eck Industries Inc., St. Manitowoc, WI (United States)

    2007-07-01

    This paper described the High Integrity Magnesium Automotive Casting (HI-MAC) program, which was developed to ensure the widespread adoption of magnesium in structural castings. The program will encourage the use of low pressure permanent molds, squeeze casting, and electromagnetic pumping of magnesium into dies. The HI-MAC program is currently investigating new heat treatment methods, and is in the process of creating improved fluid flow and solidification modelling to produce high volume automotive components. In order to address key technology barriers, the program has been divided into 8 tasks: (1) squeeze casting process development; (2) low pressure casting technology; (3) thermal treatment; (4) microstructure control; (5) computer modelling and properties; (6) controlled molten metal transfer and filling; (7) emerging casting technologies; and (8) technology transfer throughout the automotive value chain. Technical challenges were outlined for each of the tasks. 1 ref., 3 tabs., 5 figs.

  2. Improving Metal Casting Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Don Sirois, an Auburn University research associate, and Bruce Strom, a mechanical engineering Co-Op Student, are evaluating the dimensional characteristics of an aluminum automobile engine casting. More accurate metal casting processes may reduce the weight of some cast metal products used in automobiles, such as engines. Research in low gravity has taken an important first step toward making metal products used in homes, automobiles, and aircraft less expensive, safer, and more durable. Auburn University and industry are partnering with NASA to develop one of the first accurate computer model predictions of molten metals and molding materials used in a manufacturing process called casting. Ford Motor Company's casting plant in Cleveland, Ohio is using NASA-sponsored computer modeling information to improve the casting process of automobile and light-truck engine blocks.

  3. Performance Steel Castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    alloys , foundry, muzzle brake, supply center, tooling, sources Notice Distribution Statement A Format Information Report created in Microsoft Word...Development of Sand Properties 103 Advanced Modeling Dataset.. 105 High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) Steels 107 Steel Casting and Engineering Support...University, University of Northern Iowa, Non- Ferrous Founders’ Society, QuesTek, buyCASTINGS.com, Spokane Industries, Nova Precision Casting, Waukesha

  4. A simplified technique for fabricating esthetic cast metal occlusal surfaces for dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, W A; Ivanhoe, J R; Adrian, E D

    1990-06-01

    This article describes a simplified method for making esthetic cast metal occlusal surfaces. Monoplane posterior acrylic resin block teeth, cast in a nickel-chrome alloy, are coated with silane and an esthetic composite resin veneer is applied to the buccal surface. These veneered posterior metal teeth are incorporated in the wax setup and the dentures are processed and finished. The dentist's routine technique for delivering dentures to the patient can be followed.

  5. Repair welding of cast iron coated electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żuk, M.; Górka, J.; Dojka, R.; Czupryński, A.

    2017-08-01

    Welding cast iron is a complex production procedure. Repair welding was used to repair damaged or poorly made castings. This is due to a tendency to cracking of the material during welding as well as after it. Welding cast iron can be carried out on hot or on cold. Hot welding requires high heat material and the use of welding material in the form of cast iron. In the case of cold welding, it is possible to use different materials. Mostly used filler metals are nickel and copper based. The work shows the course of research concerning repairmen of ductile iron with arc welding method. For the reparation process four types of ESAB company coated electrodes dedicated for cast iron were used with diameter 3.2 and 4 mm: ES 18-8-6B (4mm), EB 150 (4mm), OK NiCl, EŻM. In the cast iron examined during the testing grooves were made using plasma methods, in order to simulate the removed casting flaws. Then the welding process with coated electrodes was executed. The process utilized low welding current row of 100A, so there would only be a small amount of heat delivered to the heat affected zone (HAZ). Short stitches were made, after welding it was hammered, in order to remove stresses. After the repair welding the part of studies commenced which purpose was finding surface defects using visual testing (VT) and penetration testing (PT). In the second part, a series of macro and microscopic studies were executed witch the purpose of disclosuring the structure. Then the hardness tests for welds cross sections were performed. An important aspect of welding cast iron is the colour of the padding weld after welding, more precisely the difference between the base material and padding weld, the use of different materials extra gives the extra ability to select the best variant. The research of four types of coated electrode was executed, based on the demands the best option in terms of aesthetic, strength and hardness.

  6. Evolution of halictine castes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knerer, Gerd

    1980-03-01

    Social halictine bees have female castes that range from species with no size differences to those with a discrete bimodality. Female caste differences are inversely correlated with the number of males produced in the first brood. It is proposed that the sexual dimorphism of solitary forms is being usurped by the female caste system of species in the process of turning social. Thus, caste differences and summer male suppression are greatest in the social species originating from solitary precursors with distinct sexual dimorphism, and are least in species evolving from solitary ancestors with a continuous sexual polymorphism.

  7. Microstructural and mechanical property characterization of ingot metallurgy ODS iron aluminide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K.; Howell, C.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hall, F.; Valykeo, J. [Hoskins Mfg. Co., Hamburg, MI (United States)

    1997-12-01

    This paper deals with a novel, lower cost method of producing a oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron-aluminide alloy. A large 250-kg batch of ODS iron-aluminide alloy designated as FAS was produced by Hoskins Manufacturing Company (Hoskins) [Hamburg, Michigan] using the new process. Plate and bar stock of the ODS alloy were the two major products received. Each of the products was characterized for its microstructure, including grain size and uniformity of oxide dispersion. Tensile tests were completed from room temperature to 1100 C. Only 100-h creep tests were completed at 800 and 1000 C. The results of these tests are compared with the commercial ODS alloy designated as MA-956. An assessment of these data is used to develop future plans for additional work and identifying applications.

  8. Nickel Curie Point Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaverina, Chris; Lisensky, George

    2014-01-01

    Ferromagnetic materials such as nickel, iron, or cobalt lose the electron alignment that makes them attracted to a magnet when sufficient thermal energy is added. The temperature at which this change occurs is called the "Curie temperature," or "Curie point." Nickel has a Curie point of 627 K, so a candle flame is a sufficient…

  9. Caste in Itself, Caste and Class, or Caste in Class

    OpenAIRE

    Ramkrishna Mukherjee

    2015-01-01

    After the British conquered Bengal and eventually the whole of India,they set out to administer the colony. In this context they encountered two phenomena with which they were not familiar: (1) the relation of people to land for production (and not for revenue receiving, household living, etc.), and (2) the caste system of India, viz. the jati strati?cation of society.

  10. The influence of Si on oxidation resistance of aluminide coatings on TiAl alloy

    OpenAIRE

    M. Goral; G. Moskal; L. Swadzba

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Increasing oxidation resistance of TiAl intermetallic alloy by depositing aluminide coating by slurrymethod and investigation of the influence of Si addition on isothermal oxidation of TiAlNb intermetallic alloy.Design/methodology/approach: : The isothermal oxidation resistance tests were done in the chamber furnaceat 900ºC for 500h time in the air atmosphere. The structure of coatings was investigated by light and scanningmicroscopy. The chemical composition of coatings and scales w...

  11. Two-Phase (TiAl+TiCrAl) Coating Alloys for Titanium Aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Brindley, William J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A coating for protecting titanium aluminide alloys, including the TiAl gamma + Ti3Al (alpha(sub 2)) class, from oxidative attack and interstitial embrittlement at temperatures up to at least 1000 C. is disclosed. This protective coating consists essentially of titanium, aluminum. and chromium in the following approximate atomic ratio: Ti(41.5-34.5)Al(49-53)Cr(9.5-12.5)

  12. Corrosion resistant iron aluminides exhibiting improved mechanical properties and corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chain T.; McKamey, Claudette G.; Tortorelli, Peter F.; David, Stan A.

    1994-01-01

    The specification discloses a corrosion-resistant intermetallic alloy comprising, in atomic percent, an FeAl iron aluminide containing from about 30 to about 40% aluminum alloyed with from about 0.01 to 0.4% zirconium and from 0.01 to about 0.8% boron. The alloy exhibits considerably improved room temperature ductility for enhanced usefulness in structural applications. The high temperature strength and fabricability is improved by alloying with molybdenum, carbon, chromium and vanadium.

  13. Formation of vortices during explosion welding (titanium-orthorhombic titanium aluminide)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybin, V. V.; Greenberg, B. A.; Antonova, O. V.; Elkina, O. A.; Ivanov, M. A.; Inozemtsev, A. V.; Patselov, A. M.; Sidorov, I. I.

    2009-10-01

    The possibility of cladding commercially pure titanium by a plate of orthorhombic titanium aluminide has been investigated. The bimetallic joints of orthorhombic titanium aluminide (Ti-30Al-16Nb-1Zr-1Mo) with commercially pure titanium have been obtained by explosion welding. It has been found that the weld joint investigated had a multilayer structure consisting of a zone of continuous deformation observed in both materials, a zone of titanium recrystallization, and a transition zone near the interface. Wave formation and formation of isolated vortex zones have been observed. It has been found that upon explosion welding the bonding of the surfaces is effected via melting and subsequent mixing (in the zone of vortices) and the transfer of particles of one metal into another with the formation of particle tracks (outside the zone of vortices). A possible scenario of the formation of the vortex zone in the melt with a subsequent eutectic decomposition is proposed. The structure of the vortex zones was found to consist of an ultrafine mixture of α and β grains (both phases are disordered) with the grain size changing in the limits of 50-300 nm. The regions of transition from the vortex zone to the region of continuous deformation of the aluminide and to the recrystallized zone of titanium have been investigated.

  14. A New Process for Titanium Aluminides Production from TiO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.R.Kamali; H. Razavizadeh; S.M.M. Hadavi

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a new process for producing titanium aluminides, in particular TiAl, from TiO2 raw material. On the basis of obtained results, the non-completed reaction of TiO2 with Al and Ca in a special reaction vessel results in the production of granulates of titanium aluminides especially Ti3Al and other TiAl phases as the metallic product and Ca12Al14O33 as the non-metallic product. By adding KClO4 in the mixture, a nearly completed reaction can be carried out. The products of this reaction are titanium aluminide particularly TiAl as the metallic part and CaAl4O7 (grossite) as the non-metallic slag part. Both product and slag are produced in a separated form. This process, called KRH-method is described in this article.The scanning electron microscopic microstructure of metallic part of the product shows different phases: the matrix phase is TiAl, where the needle form precipitation is TiAl2 and the plate form precipitation includes TiAl and Ti3Al phases. The microstructure of the remelted metallic part indicates dendritic phase with a lamellar structure comprising of TiAl and Ti3Al phases. The interdendritic phase of TiAl is also seen.

  15. Method of manufacturing iron aluminide by thermomechanical processing of elemental powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deevi, S.C.; Lilly, A.C. Jr.; Sikka, V.K.; Hajaligol, M.R.

    2000-03-07

    A powder metallurgical process is dislosed for preparing iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 20 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as {<=}1% Cr, {>=}05% Zr or ZrO{sub 2} stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element, {<=}2% Ti, {<=}2% Mo, {<=}1% Zr, {<=}1% C, {<=}0.1% B, {<=}30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, {<=}1 % rare earth metal, {<=}1% oxygen, and/or {<=}3% Cu. The process includes forming a mixture of aluminum powder and iron powder, shaping the mixture into an article such as by cold rolling the mixture into a sheet, and sintering the article at a temperature sufficient to react the iron and aluminum powders and form iron aluminide. The sintering can be followed by hot or cold rolling to reduce porosity created during the sintering step and optional annealing steps in a vacuum or inert atmosphere.

  16. Method of manufacturing iron aluminide by thermomechanical processing of elemental powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deevi, Seetharama C. (Midlothian, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hajaligol, Mohammed R. (Richmond, VA)

    2000-01-01

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 20 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1 % rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a mixture of aluminum powder and iron powder, shaping the mixture into an article such as by cold rolling the mixture into a sheet, and sintering the article at a temperature sufficient to react the iron and aluminum powders and form iron aluminide. The sintering can be followed by hot or cold rolling to reduce porosity created during the sintering step and optional annealing steps in a vacuum or inert atmosphere.

  17. Additive manufacturing of a high niobium-containing titanium aluminide alloy by selective electron beam melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, H.P., E-mail: thpfys@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Porous Metal Materials, Northwest Institute for Nonferrous Metal Research, Xi' an 710016 (China); Yang, G.Y.; Jia, W.P.; He, W.W.; Lu, S.L. [State Key Laboratory of Porous Metal Materials, Northwest Institute for Nonferrous Metal Research, Xi' an 710016 (China); Qian, M., E-mail: ma.qian@rmit.edu.au [State Key Laboratory of Porous Metal Materials, Northwest Institute for Nonferrous Metal Research, Xi' an 710016 (China); RMIT University, School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Centre for Additive Manufacturing, Melbourne, VIC 3001 (Australia)

    2015-06-11

    Additive manufacturing (AM) offers a radical net-shape manufacturing approach for titanium aluminide alloys but significant challenges still remain. A study has been made of the AM of a high niobium-containing titanium aluminide alloy (Ti–45Al–7Nb–0.3W, in at% throughout the paper) using selective electron beam melting (SEBM). The formation of various types of microstructural defects, including banded structures caused by the vaporization of aluminum, was investigated with respect to different processing parameters. To avoid both micro- and macro-cracks, the use of higher preheating temperatures and an intermediate reheating process (to reheat each solidified layer during SEBM) was assessed in detail. These measures enabled effective release of the thermal stress that developed during SEBM and therefore the avoidance of cracks. In addition, the processing conditions for the production of a fine full lamellar microstructure were identified. As a result, the Ti–45Al–7Nb–0.3W alloy fabricated showed outstanding properties (compression strength: 2750 MPa; strain-to-fracture: 37%). SEBM can be used to fabricate high performance titanium aluminide alloys with appropriate processing parameters and pathways.

  18. Characterization of the alumina film with cerium doped on the iron-aluminide diffusion coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhan, Q., E-mail: zhanqin1983@163.com; Yang, H.G.; Zhao, W.W.; Yuan, X.M.; Hu, Y.

    2013-11-15

    An iron-aluminide layer with a thin alumina film on the top as a composite tritium permeation barrier (TPB) coating was characterized under different oxidation conditions. The TPB coating was prepared initially on a China Low Activation Ferritic-Martensitic (CLAM) steel by a pack cementation aluminizing process and then an alumina film was formed on the surface of this iron-aluminide diffusion layer by an oxidizing process. To modify the properties of the FeAl/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite TPB coatings, the rare earth element (cerium) was introduced as a dopant while oxidizing. Characterization showed that a continuous oxide scale with a thickness of about 300–400 nm was formed on the FeAl diffusion layer. The film was mainly composed of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped with a little CeO{sub 2}. In addition, the concentration of α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} increased with elevated temperature while oxidizing. The phase transformation behavior of alumina scale on the surface of an iron-aluminide layer was studied in this paper.

  19. Higher Education's Caste System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannone, Ron

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the history of the present caste system in higher education. He shows how the public's perception of this caste system is based on image and not usually on the quality of teaching and curriculum in colleges and universities. Finally, he discusses a model for accessibility to higher education and how higher…

  20. A cast orientation index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanhoe, J R; Mahanna, G K

    1994-12-01

    This article describes a technique that allows multiple master casts to be precisely oriented to the same path of insertion and withdrawal. This technique is useful in situations where multiple fixed prosthodontic preparations require surveyed restorations and a single master cast is not available.

  1. Caste and power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roy, Dayabati

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the institution of caste and its operation in a micro-level village setting of West Bengal, an Indian state, where state politics at grass roots level is vibrant with functioning local self-government and entrenched political parties. This ethnographic study reveals that caste...

  2. Hot hardness of nickel-rich nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, S. R.

    1976-01-01

    Rockwell A hardness of cast nickel-chromium-aluminum (NiCrAl) alloys was examined from ambient to 1150 K and compared to cast NiAl and IN-100. Alloy constitution was either gamma, gamma prime + gamma or gamma + beta + alpha + gamma prime. Below 1000 K beta containing NiCrAl alloys have hardnesses comparable to IN-100; above 1000 K they soften faster than IN-100. At 1150 K the hardness of beta-containing NiCrAl alloys decreases with increasing beta-content. The beta-containing NiCrAl alloys were harder than beta-NiAl. The ultimate tensile strengths of the NiCrAl alloys were estimated. The effects of NiCrAl coatings on strength and fatigue life of cooled turbine components were deduced.

  3. Multi-layers castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In paper is presented the possibility of making of multi-layers cast steel castings in result of connection of casting and welding coating technologies. First layer was composite surface layer on the basis of Fe-Cr-C alloy, which was put directly in founding process of cast carbon steel 200–450 with use of preparation of mould cavity method. Second layer were padding welds, which were put with use of TIG – Tungsten Inert Gas surfacing by welding technology with filler on Ni matrix, Ni and Co matrix with wolfram carbides WC and on the basis on Fe-Cr-C alloy, which has the same chemical composition with alloy, which was used for making of composite surface layer. Usability for industrial applications of surface layers of castings were estimated by criterion of hardness and abrasive wear resistance of type metal-mineral.

  4. Electroplated tin-nickel coatings as a replacement for nickel to eliminate nickel dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Per; Boyce, Jan M.; Nielsen, Lars Pleth

    2013-01-01

    Nickel dermatitis (skin allergy) is a growing problem in numerous countries. The alarming frequency of sensitization to nickel especially in the US caused nickel to be selected as the "Allergen of the Year" in 2008 by the American Contact Dermatitis Society. Nickel as coating in contact with skin...

  5. NICKEL – ENVIRONMENTAL ALLERGEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henryka Langauer-Lewowicka

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Nickel (Ni is ubiquitus in our biosphere because of its emission from natural and anthropogenic sources. Its toxic and carcinogenic properties are well recognised only in workers exposed to high Ni concentrations. Nickel allergy is the most common form of cutaneus hypersensitivity in general population and also in occupationally exposed groups. As sensitizing agent Ni has a high prevalence of allergic contact dermatitis. The most important known risk factor associated with nickel allergy is ear piercing and use of other jewelry in females. In general population 17 % adults and 8 % children have Ni allergy symptoms. Permanently growing Ni allergy is regarded as serious risk for public health.

  6. Caste in Itself, Caste and Class, or Caste in Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramkrishna Mukherjee

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available After the British conquered Bengal and eventually the whole of India,they set out to administer the colony. In this context they encountered two phenomena with which they were not familiar: (1 the relation of people to land for production (and not for revenue receiving, household living, etc., and (2 the caste system of India, viz. the jati strati?cation of society.

  7. The ancient Chinese casting techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Derui

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In the course of Chinese civilization, which lasted more than 5,000 years, casting production has made a huge contribution. In this paper, some representative metal castings were presented. According to their forming techniques, they can be grouped into stone mould casting, clay mould casting, ablation casting, lost wax casting, stack casting, permanent mould casting, sand casting, etc. According to their materials, they can be categorized into tin bronze, bimetallic bronze, malleable cast iron, ductile cast iron, brass, cupronickel alloy (Packtong, etc. According to their surface decorative techniques they can be devided into gem inlay, gilding, gold and silver inlay, copper inlay, engraved decoration, surface tin-enrichment, mother-of-pearl inlay, burnished works with gold or silver inlay, surface coloring and cloisonné enamel, etc.

  8. Macro- and microhardness of IN-713C nickel superalloy constituents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Binczyk

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigations of the effect of modification and cooling rate on the macrohardness of castings and microhardness of phase constituents in IN-713C nickel superalloy were described. As an inoculant, cobalt aluminate CoAl2O4 in composition with aluminium powder and colloidal silica was used. Changes in the cooling rate were obtained using a cast stepped test piece with steps of 6, 11 and 17 mm thickness. Macrohardness of the cast test piece steps was measured by Brinell technique, while Vickers method was used to measure the microhardness of γ and γ’ phases present in the alloy matrix, as well as the hardness of eutectic carbide precipitates.A significant effect of the cooling rate and modification treatment on the results of the measurements was stated, and difficulties in performing correctly the microhardness measurements due to the precipitates dimensions, especially after the modification treatment, were highlighted.

  9. Clean Metal Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS as a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components.

  10. Structure of the welding zone between titanium and orthorhombic titanium aluminide for explosion welding: II. Local melting zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinberg, B. A.; Ivanov, M. A.; Rybin, V. V.; Kuz'min, S. V.; Lysak, V. I.; Elkina, O. A.; Patselov, A. M.; Antonova, O. V.; Inozemtsev, A. V.

    2011-10-01

    The structure and chemical composition of the local melting zones that form during explosion welding of orthorhombic titanium aluminide with commercial-purity titanium near a wavy interface between them are studied. The Rayleigh number is estimated to propose a possible mechanism for the formation of a concentric structure in these zones. Titanium aluminide fragments are detected near the zone boundaries. It is assumed that the fragmentation in the transition zone is caused by the division of a material into loosely coupled microvolumes under the action of a strong external action in a time comparable with the explosion time. Outside the transition zone, fragmentation occurs via a traditional way beginning from dislocation accumulation. Both processes occur in titanium aluminide and only one process (banded structure formation) takes place in titanium.

  11. Crystallization of Low-alloyed Construction Cast Steel Modified with V and Ti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Studnicki

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper crystallization studies of low-alloyed construction cast steel were presented for different additions of chromium, nickel and molybdenum modified with vanadium and titanium. Studies were conducted using developed TDA stand, which additionally enabled evaluation of cooling rate influence on crystallization process of investigated alloys.

  12. Pack Cementation Aluminide Coatings on Superalloys: Codeposition of Cr and Reactive Elements (RE). Technical Report 1. Chromium and Reactive Element(RE)- Modified Aluminide Diffusion Coatings on Superalloys: Environmental Testing. Technical Report 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    Y, or Si) into commercial Ni-base alloy substrates (IN 713LC, Mar - M247 , Ren6 80, Ren6 80H, and Ren6 N4). The growth mechanisms and kinetics for the...34] A RE (Zr,Hf,Y)-doped aluminide coating with low Cr was therefore 17 developed for IN 713LC and Mar - M247 alloys using the "above pack" arrangement...concentrations and ionic conductivity. A Si-modified, Cr-enriched aluminide diffusion coating on Mar - M247 Ni-base alloy substrates was attempted using a

  13. Symptomatic stent cast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keohane, John; Moore, Michael; O'Mahony, Seamus; Crosbie, Orla

    2008-02-01

    Biliary stent occlusion is a major complication of endoscopic stent insertion and results in repeat procedures. Various theories as to the etiology have been proposed, the most frequently studied is the attachment of gram negative bacteria within the stent. Several studies have shown prolongation of stent patency with antibiotic prophylaxis. We report the case of stent occlusion from a cast of a previously inserted straight biliary stent; a "stent cast" in an 86-year-old woman with obstructive jaundice. This was retrieved with the lithotrypter and she made an uneventful recovery. This is the first reported case of a biliary stent cast.

  14. CENTRIFUGAL CASTING MACHINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuck, A.B.

    1958-04-01

    A device is described that is specifically designed to cast uraniumn fuel rods in a vacuunn, in order to obtain flawless, nonoxidized castings which subsequently require a maximum of machining or wastage of the expensive processed material. A chamber surrounded with heating elements is connected to the molds, and the entire apparatus is housed in an airtight container. A charge of uranium is placed in the chamber, heated, then is allowed to flow into the molds While being rotated. Water circulating through passages in the molds chills the casting to form a fine grained fuel rod in nearly finished form.

  15. Symptomatic stent cast.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keohane, John

    2012-02-03

    Biliary stent occlusion is a major complication of endoscopic stent insertion and results in repeat procedures. Various theories as to the etiology have been proposed, the most frequently studied is the attachment of gram negative bacteria within the stent. Several studies have shown prolongation of stent patency with antibiotic prophylaxis. We report the case of stent occlusion from a cast of a previously inserted straight biliary stent; a "stent cast" in an 86-year-old woman with obstructive jaundice. This was retrieved with the lithotrypter and she made an uneventful recovery. This is the first reported case of a biliary stent cast.

  16. Bainite obtaining in cast iron with carbides castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In these paper the possibility of upper and lower bainite obtaining in cast iron with carbides castings are presented. Conditions, when in cast iron with carbides castings during continuous free air cooling austenite transformation to upper bainite or its mixture with lower bainte proceeds, have been given. A mechanism of this transformation has been given, Si, Ni, Mn and Mo distribution in the eutectic cell has been tested and hardness of tested castings has been determined.

  17. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2011-01-01

    White Cast Iron (Ⅰ) White cast iron or ‘white iron' refers to the type of cast iron in which all of the carbon exists as carbide;there is no graphite in the as-cast structure and the fractured surface shows a white colour.White cast iron can be divided in three classes:· Normal white cast iron — this iron contains only C,Si,Mn,P and S,with no other alloying elements.· Low-alloy white cast iron — the total mass fraction of alloying elements is less than 5%.

  18. Observations on the brittle to ductile transition temperatures of B2 nickel aluminides with and without zirconium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, S. V.; Noebe, R. D.; Bowman, R.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of a zirconium addition (0.05 at. pct) to a stoichiometric NiAl alloy on the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature (BDTT) of this alloy was investigated. Constant velocity tensile tests were conducted to fracture between 300 and 1100 K under initial strain rate 0.00014/sec, and the true stress and true strain values were determined from plots of load vs time after subtracting the elastic strain. The inelastic strain was measured under a traveling microscope. Microstructural characterization of as-extruded and fractured specimens was carried out by SEM and TEM. It was found that, while the addition of 0.05 at. pct Zr strengthened the NiAl alloy, it increased its BDTT; this shift in the BDTT could not be attributed either to variations in grain size or to impurity contents. Little or no room-temperature ductility was observed for either alloy.

  19. An Investigation of the Hot Corrosion Protectivity Behavior of Platinum Modified Aluminide Coatings on Nickel-Based Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-01

    clerical./organizational efforts provided an invaluable service at a time when it was most needed . Last, but certainly not least, I wish to thank my...recorded, the surface area of each sample was calculated. The specimens were then cleaned with ethanol to remove surface oils and preheated in. a convection...Shepard, S.B., "NAVSEA Marine Gas Turbine Materials Development Program," Naval Engineers Journal, pp. 65- 75, August 1981. 3. Zein , C., and others

  20. Soil, nickel and low nickel food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chami, Ziad Al; Cavoski, Ivana; Mondelli, Donato; Mimiola, Giancarlo; Miano, Teodoro

    2013-04-01

    Nickel is an ubiquitous trace element and occurs in soil, water, air and in the biosphere. Ni is an essential element for several plants, microorganisms and vertebrates. Human requirement for Ni has not been conclusively demonstrated. Nickel is normally present in human tissues at low concentration and, under conditions of high exposure, these levels may increase significantly. Food is the major source of Ni exposure. Nickel is present in many food products, especially vegetables. The amount of Ni present in vegetables is increasing because of environmental contamination and cultural practices. It has been demonstrated that the consumption of a Ni-rich diet can cause an increase of immunological disorders including Systemic Ni Allergy Syndrome (SNAS). The SNAS patients are currently treated with a diet that is closely Ni-free. Therefore, there is a need to produce certified and guaranteed vegetables with a low Ni concentration in the market. The proposed research aims to develop new methods for vegetable production and innovative cultural practices through a suitable choice of agricultural soil, cultivar, amendments and fertilizers as well as good agricultural practices in order to reduce Ni plant uptake and its translocation to the edible plant parts and therefore to produce Ni-free food products for SNAS patients.

  1. Mechanisms of defect complex formation and environmental-assisted fracture behavior of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, B.R.; Muratov, L.S.; Kang, B.S.J.; Li, K.Z. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Iron aluminide has excellent corrosion resistance in high-temperature oxidizing-sulfidizing environments; however, there are problems at room and medium temperature with hydrogen embrittlement as related to exposure to moisture. In this research, a coordinated computational modeling/experimental study of mechanisms related to environmental-assisted fracture behavior of selected iron aluminides is being undertaken. The modeling and the experimental work will connect at the level of coordinated understanding of the mechanisms for hydrogen penetration and for loss of strength and susceptibility to fracture. The focus of the modeling component at this point is on the challenging question of accurately predicting the iron vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell} and the subsequent tendency, if present, for vacancy clustering. The authors have successfully performed, on an ab initio basis, the first calculation of the vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell}. These calculations include lattice relaxation effects which are quite large. This has significant implications for vacancy clustering effects with consequences to be explored for hydrogen diffusion. The experimental work at this stage has focused on the relationship of the choice and concentration of additives to the improvement of resistance to hydrogen embrittlement and hence to the fracture behavior. For this reason, comparative crack growth tests of FA-186, FA-187, and FA-189 iron aluminides (all with basic composition of Fe-28A{ell}-5Cr, at % with micro-alloying additives of Zr, C or B) under, air, oxygen, or water environment have been performed. These tests showed that the alloys are susceptible to room temperature hydrogen embrittlement in both B2 and DO{sub 3} conditions. Test results indicated that FA-187, and FA-189 are intrinsically more brittle than FA-186.

  2. Differential scanning calorimetry and reaction kinetics studies of {gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2} Ti aluminide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R.K., E-mail: rohitkumar_gupta@vssc.gov.in [Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, ISRO, Trivandrum 695 022 (India); Pant, Bhanu [Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, ISRO, Trivandrum 695 022 (India); Agarwala, Vijaya [Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247 667 (India); Sinha, P.P. [Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, ISRO, Trivandrum 695 022 (India)

    2012-12-14

    Reaction synthesis method for titanium aluminide processing consists of an exothermic reaction among alloying elements present and primarily between titanium and aluminium particles at specific temperature range. Study of this reaction helps in understanding the process of aluminide formation. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study is the suitable method to study such reactions. In the present work, five different alloy mixtures based on Ti48Al2Cr2Nb0.1B are prepared and DSC study is carried out. Onset temperature, peak temperature and completion temperature of the major exothermic reaction is analyzed at different heating rates. Further, kinetics of the reaction is studied using Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation. Activation energy and Avrami parameter are calculated and compared with the reported works on binary alloy. It has been observed that exothermic reaction is triggered by melting of aluminium. Boron assists in increasing the enthalpy of reaction by boride formation. Primary reaction product is found to be TiAl{sub 3}. Activation energy as well as Avrami parameter is found to have marginal variation due to small change in alloying elements in different alloys and due to heating rates in the same alloy. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reaction kinetics studies of Ti-aluminide alloy powder mixtures carried out. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Five compositions studied through non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of minor boron addition and role of Ti particle size is noted. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation energies using JMA equations are between 169.5 and 192.49 kJ mol{sup -1}.

  3. Evaluation of the intrinsic and extrinsic fracture behavior of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, B.S.; Yao, Qizhou; Cooper, B.R. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Comparative creep crack growth tests of FA-186 and FA-187 iron aluminides under either dry oxygen or air environment showed that both alloys are susceptible to room temperature hydrogen embrittlement. Test results also revealed that FA-187 is intrinsically a more brittle material than FA-186. Atomistic computational modeling is being undertaken to find the preferred geometries, structures and formation energies of iron vacancies and vacancy pairs (Fe-Fe) in FeAl and Fe{sub 3}Al. An indication of vacancy clustering in Fe{sub 3}Al, with consequences for dislocation behavior, may be important for understanding the role of dislocation assisted diffusion in the hydrogen embrittlement mechanism.

  4. Saturated bonds and anomalous electronic transport in transition-metal aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, T.

    2006-05-22

    This thesis deals with the special electronic properties of the transition-metal aluminides. Following quasicrystals and their approximants it is shown that even materials with small elementary cells exhibit the same surprising effects. So among the transition-metal aluminides also semi-metallic and semiconducting compounds exist, although if they consist of classic-metallic components like Fe, Al, or Cr. These properties are furthermore coupled with a deep pseusogap respectively gap in the density of states and strongly covalent bonds. Bonds are described in this thesis by two eseential properties. First by the bond charge and second by the energetic effect of the bond. It results that in the caes of semiconducting transition-metal aluminides both a saturation of certain bonds and a bond-antibond alteration in the Fermi level is present. By the analysis of the near-order in form of the so-calles coordination polyeders it has been succeeded to establish a simple rule for semiconductors, the five-fold coordination for Al. This rule states that aluminium atoms with their three valence electrons are not able to build more than five saturated bonds to their nearest transition-metal neighbours. In excellent agreement with the bond angles predicted theoretically under assumption of equal-type bonds it results that all binary transition-element aluminide semiconductors exhibit for the Al atoms the same near order. Typical values for specific resistances of the studied materials at room temperature lie in the range of some 100 {mu}{omega}cm, which is farly larger than some 10 {mu}{omega}cm as in the case of the unalloyed metals. SUrprising is furthermore a high transport anisotropy with a ratio of the specific resistances up to 3.0. An essential result of this thesis can be seen in the coupling of the properties of the electronic transport and the bond properties. The small conducitivities could be explained by small values in the density of states and a bond

  5. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical compatibility of ceramic reinforcement materials with niobium aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1990-01-01

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with three niobium aluminides, Nb3Al, Nb2Al, and NbAl3, were examined from thermodynamic considerations. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, nitrides, oxides, silicides, and Engel-Brewer compounds. Thermodynamics of the Nb-Al system were reviewed and activities of Nb and Al were derived at desired calculation temperatures. Criteria for chemical compatibility between the reinforcement material and Nb-Al compounds have been defined and several chemically compatible reinforcement materials have been identified.

  6. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with niobium aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1989-01-01

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with three niobium aluminides, Nb3Al, Nb2Al, and NbAl3, were examined from thermodynamic considerations. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, nitrides, oxides, silicides, and Engel-Brewer compounds. Thermodynamics of the Nb-Al system were reviewed and activities of Nb and Al were derived at desired calculation temperatures. Criteria for chemical compatibility between the reinforcement material and Nb-Al compounds have been defined and several chemically compatible reinforcement materials have been identified.

  7. Pulse Reversal Plating of Nickel and Nickel Alloys for MEMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Peter Torben

    2001-01-01

    and material distribution is even more important. Using a bath consisting mostly of nickel chloride, pulse reversal plating of both pure nickel and nickel-cobalt alloys has been used to fabricate tools for micro-injection molding. Pulse reversal plating of ternary soft-magnetic alloys, comprising 45-65 percent...

  8. Development of volume deposition on cast iron by additive manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niyanth S, Niyanth [ORNL; Dehoff, Ryan R [ORNL; Jordan, Brian H [ORNL; Babu, Suresh S. [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2016-11-10

    ORNL partnered with Cummins to demonstrate the feasibility of using additive manufacturing techniques to help develop repair techniques for refurbished cast iron engine blocks. Cummins is interested in the refurbished engine business due to the increased cost savings and reduced emissions. It is expected that by refurbishing engines could help reduce the green house gas emissions by as much as 85%. Though such repair techniques are possible in principle there has been no major industry in the automotive sector that has deployed this technology. Therefore phase-1 would seek to evaluate the feasibility of using the laser directed energy deposition technique to repair cast iron engine blocks. The objective of the phase-1 would be to explore various strategies and understand the challenges involved. During phase-1 deposits were made using Inconel-718, Nickel, Nr-Cr-B braze filler. Inconel 718 builds showed significant cracking in the heat-affected zone in the cast iron. Nickel was used to reduce the cracking in the cast iron substrate, however the Ni builds did not wet the substrate sufficiently resulting in poor dimensional tolerance. In order to increase wetting the Ni was alloyed with the Ni-Cr-B braze to decrease the surface tension of Ni. This however resulted in significant cracks in the build due to shrinkage stresses associated with multiple thermal cycling. Hence to reduce the residual stresses in the builds the DMD-103D equipment was modified and the cast iron block was pre heated using cartridge heaters. Inconel-718 alloyed with Ni was deposited on the engine block. The pre-heated deposits showed a reduced susceptibility to cracking. If awarded the phase-2 of the project would aim to develop process parameters to achieve a crack free deposit engine block.

  9. Effect of hydrogen on the mechanical behaviour of carbon-alloyed Fe3Al-based iron aluminides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Sen; R Balasubramaniam

    2002-06-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the mechanical behaviour of two carbon-alloyed iron aluminides was studied. Weakening of some carbide–metal interfaces in the presence of hydrogen was indicated. The effect of cathodic hydrogen charging on the microstructure has also been addressed.

  10. Electronic spectroscopy and electronic structure of the smallest metal clusters: the diatomic 3D transition metal aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behm, Jane M.; Morse, Michael D.

    1994-06-01

    A systematic study of the electronic spectroscopy, electronic structure, and chemical bonding has been initiated for the 3d series of diatomic transition metal aluminides. This report provides a review of the progress to date, with specific emphasis on AlCa, AlV, AlCr, AlMn, AlCo, AlNi, AlCu, and AlZn.

  11. Influence of different etchants on the representation of microstructures in nickel alloys; Einfluss verschiedener Aetzmittel auf die Gefuegedarstellung in Nickellegierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speicher, Magdalena; Scheck, Rudi; Maile, Karl [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Materialpruefungsanstalt

    2016-04-15

    This work presents a comparison of selected nickel alloys of the same condition which were treated by means of specifically chosen etching techniques. Microstructures on microscope images of wrought Alloy 617, a casting variant of Alloy 625, a polycrystalline casting alloy IN-738 LC, as well as of a monocrystalline superalloy CM 247 LC SX, respectively, are juxtaposed and evaluated. This approach allows for a comprehensive optical microscopy characterization of the characteristic microstructural features.

  12. NICKEL-BASE ALLOY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, H.; Manly, W.D.; Roche, T.K.

    1960-01-19

    A nickel-base alloy was developed which is particularly useful for the containment of molten fluoride salts in reactors. The alloy is resistant to both salt corrosion and oxidation and may be used at temperatures as high as 1800 deg F. Basically, the alloy consists of 15 to 22 wt.% molybdenum, a small amount of carbon, and 6 to 8 wt.% chromium, the balance being nickel. Up to 4 wt.% of tungsten, tantalum, vanadium, or niobium may be added to strengthen the alloy.

  13. Melt Cast High Explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Cudziło

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available [b]Abstract[/b]. This paper reviews the current state and future developments of melt-cast high explosives. First the compositions, properties and methods of preparation of trinitrotoluene based (TNT conventional mixtures with aluminum, hexogen (RDX or octogen (HMX are described. In the newer, less sensitive explosive formulations, TNT is replaced with dinitroanisole (DNANDNANDNAN and nitrotriazolone (NTONTONTO, nitroguanidine (NG or ammonium perchlorate (AP are the replacement for RDRDX and HMX. Plasticized wax or polymer-based binder systems for melt castable explosives are also included. Hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HPTB is the binder of choice, but polyethylene glycol, and polycaprolactone with energetic plasticizers are also used. The most advanced melt-cast explosives are compositions containing energetic thermoplastic elastomers and novel highly energetic compounds (including nitrogen rich molecules in whose particles are nanosized and practically defect-less.[b]Keywords[/b]: melt-cast explosives, detonation parameters

  14. Nucleation and growth of titanium aluminide in an explosion-welded laminate composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataev, I. A.; Bataev, A. A.; Mali, V. I.; Pavlyukova, D. V.; Yartsev, P. S.; Golovin, E. D.

    2012-10-01

    Processes of nucleation and growth of titanium aluminide in a 23-layer aluminum-titanium composite produced by explosion welding have been studied. In the vortex zones of seven upper welds, microvolumes of melted metal whose microhardness is ˜5500 MPa have been revealed, which corresponds to the microhardness of the intermetallic compound Al3Ti. No formation of titanium aluminide in welded junctions that were not subjected to additional heat treatment has been revealed by X-ray diffraction. The holding of the composites at 630°C is accompanied by the formation of interlayers of intermetallic compounds of the Al3Ti type. Intermetallic compounds of two morphological types are formed in the welds. In the regions of vortex zones, compact precipitates of Al3Ti are formed; in the other regions of the welds, intermetallic compounds in the form of a film are precipitated. The intermetallic compounds of the first type grow more rapidly and in final account absorb the precipitates of the film type. The activation of diffusion in the upper junctions that occurs upon heating of the welded composites is favored by the nonequilibrium state of the material caused by the strain hardening of the initial samples. In the welds located deeper than the 13th layer, no signs of the formation of compact intermetallic compounds have been revealed upon the annealing for 5 h and less.

  15. Pack Aluminide Coatings Formed at 650 ℃ for Enhancing Oxidation Resistance of Low Alloy Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z. D. Xiang; S. R. Rose; P. K. Datta

    2004-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the feasibility of forming iron aluminide coatings on a commercial 9Cr-lMo (wt.%)alloy steel by pack cementation at 650 ℃ in an attempt to improve its high temperature oxidation resistance. Pack powders containing Al, Al2O3 and a series of halide salts were used to carry out the coating deposition experiments, which enabled identification of the most suitable activator for the pack aluminising process at the intended temperature. The effect of pack aluminium content on the growth kinetics and microstructure of the coatings was then studied by keeping deposition conditions and pack activator content constant while increasing the pack aluminium content from 1.4 wt.% to 6 wt.%. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) techniques were used to analyse the phases and microstructures of the coatings formed and to determine depth profiles of coating elements in the coating layer. Oxidation resistance of the coating was studied at 650 ℃ in air by intermittent weight measurement at room temperature. It was observed that the coating could substantially enhance the oxidation resistance of the steel under these testing conditions, which was attributed to the capability of the iron aluminide phases to form alumina scale on the coating surface through preferential Al oxidation.

  16. Formation of alumina-aluminide coatings on ferritic-martensitic T91 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choudhary R.K.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, alumina-aluminide coatings were formed on ferritic-martensitic T91 steel substrate. First, coatings of aluminum were deposited electrochemically on T91 steel in a room temperature AlCl3-1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride ionic liquid, then the obtained coating was subjected to a two stage heat treatment procedure consisting of prolonged heat treatment of the sample in vacuum at 300 ○C followed by oxidative heat treatment in air at 650 ○C for 16 hours. X-ray diffraction measurement of the oxidatively heat treated samples indicated formation of Fe-Al and Cr-Al intermetallics and presence of amorphous alumina. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurement confirmed 50 wt- % O in the oxidized coating. Microscratch adhesion test conducted on alumina-aluminide coating formed on T91 steel substrate showed no major adhesive detachment up to 20 N loads. However, adhesive failure was observed at a few discrete points on the coating along the scratch track.

  17. Development of high toughness, high strength aluminide-bonded carbide ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becher, P.F.; Plucknett, K.P.; Tiegs, T.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Cemented carbides are widely used in applications where resistance to abrasion and wear are important, particularly in combination with high strength and stiffness. In the present case, ductile aluminides have been used as a binder phase to fabricate dense carbide cermets by either sintering of mixed powders or a melt-infiltration sintering process. The choice of an aluminide binder was based on the exceptional high temperature strength and chemical stability exhibited by these alloys. For example, TiC-based composites with a Ni{sub 3}Al binder phase exhibit improved oxidation resistance, Young`s moduli > 375 GPa, high fracture strengths (> 1 GPa) that are retained to {ge} 900{degrees}C, and fracture toughness values of 10 to 15 MPa{radical}m, identical to that measured in commercial cobalt-bonded WC with the same test method. The thermal diffusivity values at 200{degrees}C for these composites are {approximately} 0.070 to 0.075 cm{sup 2}/s while the thermal expansion coefficients rise with Ni3Al content from {approximately} 8 to {approximately}11 x 10{sup {minus}6}/{degrees}C over the range of 8 to 40 vol. % Ni{sub 3}Al. The oxidation and acidic corrosion resistances are quite promising as well. Finally, these materials also exhibit good electrical conductivity allowing them to be sectioned and shaped by electrical discharge machining (EDM) processes.

  18. Pack Aluminide Coatings Formed at 650℃ for Enhancing Oxidation Resistance of Low Alloy Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.D.Xiang; S.R.Rose; P.K.Datta

    2004-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the feasibility of forming iron aluminide coatings on a commercial 9Cr-1Mo (wt.%) alloy steel by pack cementation at 650℃ in an attempt to improve its high temperature oxidation resistance. Pack powders containing Al, Al2O3 and a series of halide salts were used to carry out the coating deposition experiments, which enabled identification of the most suitable activator for the pack aluminising process at the intended temperature. The effect of pack aluminium content on the growth kinetics and microstructure of the coatings was then studied by keeping deposition conditions and pack activator content constant while increasing the pack aluminium content from 1.4 wt.% to 6 wt.%. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) techniques were used to analyse the phases and microstructures of the coatings formed and to determine depth profiles of coating elements in the coating layer. Oxidation resistance of the coating was studied at 650 ~C in air by intermittent weight measurement at room temperature. It was observed that the coating could substantially enhance the oxidation resistance of the steel under these testing conditions, which was attributed to the capability of the iron aluminide phases to form alumina scale on the coating surface through preferential A1 oxidation.

  19. Single-step gas phase synthesis of stable iron aluminide nanoparticles with soft magnetic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome Vernieres

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Soft magnetic alloys at the nanoscale level have long generated a vivid interest as candidate materials for technological and biomedical purposes. Consequently, controlling the structure of bimetallic nanoparticles in order to optimize their magnetic properties, such as high magnetization and low coercivity, can significantly boost their potential for related applications. However, traditional synthesis methods stumble upon the long standing challenge of developing true nanoalloys with effective control over morphology and stability against oxidation. Herein, we report on a single-step approach to the gas phase synthesis of soft magnetic bimetallic iron aluminide nanoparticles, using a versatile co-sputter inert gas condensation technique. This method allowed for precise morphological control of the particles; they consisted of an alloy iron aluminide crystalline core (DO3 phase and an alumina shell, which reduced inter-particle interactions and also prevented further oxidation and segregation of the bimetallic core. Remarkably, the as-deposited alloy nanoparticles show interesting soft magnetic properties, in that they combine a high saturation magnetization (170 emu/g and low coercivity (less than 20 Oe at room temperature. Additional functionality is tenable by modifying the surface of the particles with a polymer, to ensure their good colloidal dispersion in aqueous environments.

  20. Microstructural Study on Oxidation Resistance of Nonmodified and Platinum Modified Aluminide Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagula-Yavorska, Maryana; Sieniawski, Jan

    2014-03-01

    Platinum electroplating layers (3 and 7 μm thick) were deposited on the surface of the Inconel 713 LC, CMSX 4, and Inconel 625 Ni-base superalloys. Diffusion treatment at 1050°C for 2 h under argon atmosphere was performed after electroplating. Diffusion treated samples were aluminized according to the low activity CVD process at 1050°C for 8 h. The nonmodified aluminide coatings consist of NiAl phase. Platinum modification let to obtain the (Ni,Pt)Al phase in coatings. The coated samples were subjected to cyclic oxidation testing at 1100°C. It was discovered that increase of the platinum electroplating thickness from 3 to 7 μm provides the improvement of oxidation resistance of aluminide coatings. Increase of the platinum thickness causes decreases in weight change and decreases in parabolic constant during oxidation. The platinum provides the pure Al2O3 oxide formation, slow growth oxide layer, and delay the oxide spalling during heating-cooling thermal cycles.

  1. High-temperature oxidation/sulfidation resistance of iron-aluminide coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Wright, I.G.; Goodwin, G.M.; Howell, M.

    1996-04-01

    Iron aluminides containing > 20-25 at. % Al have oxidation and sulfidation resistance at temperatures well above those at which these alloys have adequate mechanical strength. Accordingly, these alloys may find application as coatings or claddings on more conventional higher-strength materials which are generally less corrosion-resistant at high temperatures. To this end, iron-aluminide coatings were prepared by gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc weld-overlay techniques. Specimens were cut from weld deposits and exposed to a highly aggressive oxidizing-sulfidizing (H2S-H2-H2O-Ar) environment at 800 C. All the weld overlayers showed good corrosion behavior under isothermal conditions, including a gas metal arc-produced deposit with only 21 at. % Al. Rapid degradation in corrosion resistance was observed under thermal cycling conditions when the initally grown scales spalled and the rate of reaction was then not controlled by formation of slowly growing Al oxide. Higher starting Al concentrations (> {approximately} 25 at. %) are needed to assure overall oxidation-sulfidation resistance of the weld overlays, but hydrogen cracking susceptibility must be minimized in order to physically separate the corrosive species from the reactive substrate material.

  2. Formation and Characterization of Titanium Modified Aluminide Coatings on IN738LC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Moradi; Fakhreddin Ashrafizadeh

    2004-01-01

    Up to now, the aluminide coatings used to protect industrial components at high temperature and corrosive environments have been modified by Pt, Cr, Si and Ni. In this investigation, aluminide coatings were modified by titanium and the microstructural feature and formation mechanism were evaluated. The coatings were formed on a Ni-based superalloy(IN738LC) by a two stage process including titanizing at first and aluminizing thereafter. Pack cementation titanizing performed at temperatures 950℃ and 1050℃ in several mixtures of Ti, Al2O3 and NH4Cl. At the second stage,aluminum diffused into surface of the specimens by an industrial aluminizing process known as Elcoatl01(4 hrs at 1050℃C). The modified coatings were characterized by means of standard optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy,energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-Ray diffraction methods. The results show that Ti in the coatings is mainly present in the form of TiNi and Al67CrsTi25. Titanium modified coatings grew with a mechanism similar to simple aluminizing; this includes inward diffusion of Al from the pack to the substrate and then outward diffusion of Ni from the substrate to the coating. The advantages and characteristics of this two-stage modified coating is discussed and the process parameters are proposed to obtain a coating of optimum microstructure.

  3. Struktura i svojstva plazma sprej Aps - Nikal - Aluminid prevlake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihailo Rade Mrdak

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cilj ovog istraživanja je da se optimizacijom parametara deponovanja dobiju optimalne strukturne i mehaničke karakteristike Ni20Al slojeva, koji će se primeniti na delu za radarsku stanicu. Prah je deponovan atmosferskim plazma sprej (APS postupkom sa plazma sprej (PS odstojanjem 80, 90 i 100 mm. Prevlaka sa najboljim karakteristikama deponovana je na utvrđivaču  turbo- gasnog motora GTD 2PV8 za radarsku stanicu, da bi se smanjio uticaj oksidacije  i vibracija na habanje na 450–500°C. Procene Ni20Al slojeva prevlake urađene su na osnovu njihovih mikrostruktura, mikrotvrdoća i zatezne čvrstoće. Najbolju strukturu i mehaničke  karakteristike pokazali su slojevi deponovani sa plazma sprej odstojanjem od 80 mm. Morfologija površine deponovane prevlake i morfologija loma najboljih slojeva ispitana je na SEM-u (skening elektronskom mikroskopu. Mikrostruktura slojeva deponovanih prevlaka ispitana je na svetlosnom mikroskopu. Mikrostrukturna analiza deponovanih slojevima urađena je u skladu sa standardom Pratt-Whitney. Procena mehaničkih karakteristika slojeva urađena je ispitivanjem mikrotvrdoće metodom HV0.3 i čvrstoće spoja ispitivanjem na zatezanje. Istraživanja su pokazala da plazma sprej odstojanje bitno utiče na mehaničke osobine i mikrostrukture prevlaka. Efekat primene Ni20Al prevlake ispitan je na utvrđivaču  turbogasnog motora GTD 2PV8 na radarskoj stanici.   Uvod   Kompozitni nikal-aluminid prah Ni20Al razvijen je za potrebe vazduhoplovne industrije. Važna karakteristika je dobro deponovanje praha plazma sprejom na atmosferskom pritisku (APS. Ovaj materijal ima dobru otpornost na oksidaciju,  koroziju i eroziju. Materijal se može proizvoditi kao legura ili kao  kompozitni prah. Najvažnija karakteristika nikal-aluminida je velika čvrstoća i žilavost  sa odličnom otpornošću na visoke temperature. NiAl prevlake deponovane plazma sprejom našle su široku primenu za zaštitu delova koji su izlo

  4. Aluminum Alloy and Article Cast Therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Chen, Po-Shou (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A cast article from an aluminum alloy, which has improved mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, has the following composition in weight percent: Silicon 14 - 25.0, Copper 5.5 - 8.0, Iron 0.05 - 1.2, Magnesium 0.5 - 1.5, Nickel 0.05 - 0.9, Manganese 0.05 - 1.0, Titanium 0.05 - 1.2, Zirconium 0.05 - 1.2, Vanadium 0.05 - 1.2, Zinc 0.05 - 0.9, Phosphorus 0.001 - 0.1, and the balance is Aluminum, wherein the silicon-to-magnesium ratio is 10 - 25, and the copper-to-magnesium ratio is 4 - 15. The aluminum alloy contains a simultaneous dispersion of three types of Al3X compound particles (X=Ti, V, Zr) having a LI2, crystal structure, and their lattice parameters are coherent to the aluminum matrix lattice. A process for producing this cast article is also disclosed, as well as a metal matrix composite, which includes the aluminum alloy serving as a matrix and containing up to about 60% by volume of a secondary filler material.

  5. Casting Characteristics of Aluminum Die Casting Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The research program investigates the casting characteristics of selected aluminum die casting alloys. Specifically, the alloys' tendencies towards die soldering and sludge formation, and the alloys' fluidity and machinability are evaluated. It was found that: When the Fe and Mn contents of the alloy are low; caution has to be taken against possible die soldering. When the alloy has a high sludge factor, particularly a high level of Fe, measures must be taken to prevent the formation of large hardspots. For this kind of alloy, the Fe content should be kept at its lowest allowable level and the Mn content should be at its highest possible level. If there are problems in die filling, measures other than changing the alloy chemistry need to be considered first. In terms of alloy chemistry, the elements that form high temperature compounds must be kept at their lowest allowable levels. The alloys should not have machining problems when appropriate machining techniques and machining parameters are used.

  6. Evaluation of marginal gap of Ni-Cr copings made with conventional and accelerated casting techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan Kumar Tannamala

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Conventional casting techniques following the manufacturers′ recommendations are time consuming. Accelerated casting techniques have been reported, but their accuracy with base metal alloys has not been adequately studied. Aim: We measured the vertical marginal gap of nickel-chromium copings made by conventional and accelerated casting techniques and determined the clinical acceptability of the cast copings in this study. Settings and Design: Experimental design, in vitro study, lab settings. Materials and Methods: Ten copings each were cast by conventional and accelerated casting techniques. All copings were identical, only their mold preparation schedules differed. Microscopic measurements were recorded at ×80 magnification on the perpendicular to the axial wall at four predetermined sites. The marginal gap values were evaluated by paired t test. Results: The mean marginal gap by conventional technique (34.02 μm is approximately 10 μm lesser than that of accelerated casting technique (44.62 μm. As the P value is less than 0.0001, there is highly significant difference between the two techniques with regard to vertical marginal gap. Conclusion: The accelerated casting technique is time saving and the marginal gap measured was within the clinically acceptable limits and could be an alternative to time-consuming conventional techniques.

  7. Influence of S. mutans on base-metal dental casting alloy toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, E L; Dowling, A H; Moran, G P; Fleming, G J P

    2013-01-01

    We have highlighted that exposure of base-metal dental casting alloys to the acidogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans significantly increases cellular toxicity following exposure to immortalized human TR146 oral keratinocytes. With Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), S. mutans-treated nickel-based (Ni-based) and cobalt-chromium-based (Co-Cr-based) dental casting alloys were shown to leach elevated levels of metal ions compared with untreated dental casting alloys. We targeted several biological parameters: cell morphology, viable cell counts, cell metabolic activity, cell toxicity, and inflammatory cytokine expression. S. mutans-treated dental casting alloys disrupted cell morphology, elicited significantly decreased viable cell counts (p S. mutans-treated Ni-based dental casting alloys induced elevated levels of cellular toxicity compared with S. mutans-treated Co-Cr-based dental casting alloys. While our findings indicated that the exacerbated release of metal ions from S. mutans-treated base-metal dental casting alloys was the likely result of the pH reduction during S. mutans growth, the exact nature of mechanisms leading to accelerated dissolution of alloy-discs is not yet fully understood. Given the predominance of S. mutans oral carriage and the exacerbated cytotoxicity observed in TR146 cells following exposure to S. mutans-treated base-metal dental casting alloys, the implications for the long-term stability of base-metal dental restorations in the oral cavity are a cause for concern.

  8. The Effect of Low Concentrations Nb and C on the Structure and High-Temperature Strength of Fe3Al Aluminide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratochvíl, Petr; Švec, Martin; Vodičková, Věra

    2017-09-01

    The Fe3Al iron aluminide alloyed by low concentrations of Nb and C ( c Nb, c C) is studied. The influence of the c Nb/ c C ratio on the structure and high-temperature yield strength of iron aluminide was investigated. The structure and phase composition were studied by scanning electron microscope equipped with EDS and EBSD. The strengthening mechanisms are detected as strengthening by incoherent precipitates of NbC and as a solid solution hardening by Nb atoms.

  9. Nickel in tap water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Nielsen, G D; Flyvholm, Morten

    1983-01-01

    Nickel analyses of tap water from several sources in Copenhagen gave up to 490 X 10(-6) g X 1(-1) in the first 250 ml portions. Hot water gave higher values than cold water. After flushing for 5 min, low values were found. Considerable variation from time to time and from tap to tap was found...

  10. Iron induced nickel deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is increasingly apparent that economic loss due to nickel (Ni) deficiency likely occurs in horticultural and agronomic crops. While most soils contain sufficient Ni to meet crop requirements, situations of Ni deficiency can arise due to antagonistic interactions with other metals. This study asse...

  11. Nickel in tap water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Nielsen, G D; Flyvholm, Morten

    1983-01-01

    Nickel analyses of tap water from several sources in Copenhagen gave up to 490 X 10(-6) g X 1(-1) in the first 250 ml portions. Hot water gave higher values than cold water. After flushing for 5 min, low values were found. Considerable variation from time to time and from tap to tap was found...

  12. cobalt (ii), nickel (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. The manganese (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and copper (II) complexes of N, N' – ... temperature and coordinated water were determined ... indicating fairly stable complex compounds (Table 1). The complex compounds are insoluble [Table 2] in water and common organic solvents, but are readily soluble in ...

  13. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Ph.D Liu Jincheng

    2010-01-01

    @@ Note: This book consists of five sections: Chapter 1 Introduction, Chapter 2 Grey Iron, Chapter 3 Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron, Chapter 4 Vermicular Cast Iron, and Chapter 5 White Cast Iron. CHINA FOUNDRY publishes this book in several parts serially, starting from the first issue of 2009.

  14. Evaluation of an improved centrifugal casting machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, T E; White, L E

    1985-05-01

    A Type III gold alloy, a silver-palladium alloy, and a base metal alloy were cast in two different centrifugal casting machines. With the number of complete cast mesh squares as an indicator of castability, the Airspin casting machine produced superior castings with all three alloys. The base metal alloy produced the greatest number of complete squares with both casting machines.

  15. ToxCast Dashboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ToxCast Dashboard helps users examine high-throughput assay data to inform chemical safety decisions. To date, it has data on over 9,000 chemicals and information from more than 1,000 high-throughput assay endpoint components.

  16. Prediction of maximum casting defect size in MAR-M-247 alloy processed by hot isostatic pressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Šmíd

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Nickel based MAR-M-247 superalloy treated by hot isostatic pressing was investigated with the aim to identify the influence of casting defect size on fatigue life. Two testing temperatures of 650 and 800°C and one stress amplitude were chosen for fatigue tests. The Murakami approach and the largest extreme value distribution theory were applied. It has been found that the maximum size of casting defects in a specimen can be satisfactorily predicted. Fatigue life of specimens was in the good agreement with assumptions based on the evaluation and prediction of the casting defect size.

  17. Control of cast iron and casts manufacturing by Inmold method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the usability of cast iron spheroidizing process in mould control by ATD method as well as by ultrasonic method were presented. Structure of instrumentation needed for control form performance of cast iron spheroidizing by Inmold method was illustrated. Author, pointed out that amount of magnesium master alloy should obtain 0,8 ÷ 1,0% of mass in form at all. Such quantity of preliminary alloy assure of obtain of nodular graphite in cast iron. In consequence of this, is reduce the cast iron liquidus temperature and decrease of recalescence temperature of graphite-eutectic crystallization in compare with initial cast iron. Control of casts can be carried out by ultrasonic method. In plain cast iron, ferritic-pearlitic microstructure is obtaining. Additives of 1,5% Cu ensure pearlitic structure.

  18. New method for diagnosing cast compactness based on laser ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Swornowski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Technologically advanced materials, such as alloys of aluminum, nickel or titanium are currently used increasingly often in significantly loaded components utilized in the aviation industry, among others in the construction of jet turbine engine blades. The article presents a method for diagnosing the condition of the inside of cast blades with the use of laser ultrasonography. The inspection is based on finding hidden flaws with a size of between 10 and 30μm. Laser ultrasonography offers a number of improvements over the non-destructive methods used so far, e.g. the possibility to diagnose the cast on a selected depth, high signal-to-noise ratio and good sensitivity. The article includes a brief overview of non-destructive inspection methods used in foundry engineering and sample results of inspecting the inner structure of a turbo jet engine blade using the method described in the article.

  19. 49 CFR 173.198 - Nickel carbonyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nickel carbonyl. 173.198 Section 173.198... Nickel carbonyl. (a) Nickel carbonyl must be packed in specification steel or nickel cylinders as prescribed for any compressed gas except acetylene. A cylinder used exclusively for nickel carbonyl may...

  20. The casting of western sculpture during the XIXth century: sand casting versus lost wax casting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beentjes, T.P.C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper will discuss research into bronze casting techniques as practiced during the XIXth and early XXth century. Both natural sand casting (fonte au sable naturel) and lost wax casting (fonte à la cire perdue) were employed during this period and sometimes rivalled for commissions. Before the X

  1. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2010-01-01

    @@ Chapter 3 Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron(I) Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron, SG iron in short, refers to the cast iron in which graphite precipitates as spheroidal shape during solidification of liquid iron. The graphite in common commercial cast iron can only be changed from flake to spheroidal shape by spheroidising treatment. Since spheroidal graphite reduces the cutting effect of stress concentration, the metal matrix strength of SG iron can be applied around 70%-90%, thus the mechanical property of SG iron is significantly superior to other cast irons;even the tensile strength of SG iron is higher than that carbon steel.

  2. PERSPECTIVE SOURCES OF METALS RESOURCES (CU, NI FOR CAST IRON ALLOYING, ARISING ON THE TERRITORY OF THE REPUBLIC OF BELARUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. L. Tribushevski

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the practical foundation of combined resources-economy technologies of the alloyed cast iron melting using wastes of galvanic productions, containing sulfates and hydroxides of these metals, instead of metallic nickel and copper.

  3. Nickel ferrule applicators: a source of nickel exposure in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Sharon E; Silverberg, Jonathan I; Rizk, Christopher; Silverberg, Nanette

    2015-01-01

    Eye makeup has been investigated for nickel content and found to have no direct association with nickel allergy and cosmetic dermatitis. However, the tools used (e.g., eyelash curlers, hairdressing scissors, hair curlers, and eye shadow and makeup applicators) may be sources. Nickel is ubiquitous and a wide range of sources have been reported, and makeup applicators (ferrules) now join the list. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Cast iron - a predictable material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorg C. Sturm

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available High strength compacted graphite iron (CGI or alloyed cast iron components are substituting previously used non-ferrous castings in automotive power train applications. The mechanical engineering industry has recognized the value in substituting forged or welded structures with stiff and light-weight cast iron castings. New products such as wind turbines have opened new markets for an entire suite of highly reliable ductile iron cast components. During the last 20 years, casting process simulation has developed from predicting hot spots and solidification to an integral assessment tool for foundries for the entire manufacturing route of castings. The support of the feeding related layout of the casting is still one of the most important duties for casting process simulation. Depending on the alloy poured, different feeding behaviors and self-feeding capabilities need to be considered to provide a defect free casting. Therefore, it is not enough to base the prediction of shrinkage defects solely on hot spots derived from temperature fields. To be able to quantitatively predict these defects, solidification simulation had to be combined with density and mass transport calculations, in order to evaluate the impact of the solidification morphology on the feeding behavior as well as to consider alloy dependent feeding ranges. For cast iron foundries, the use of casting process simulation has become an important instrument to predict the robustness and reliability of their processes, especially since the influence of alloying elements, melting practice and metallurgy need to be considered to quantify the special shrinkage and solidification behavior of cast iron. This allows the prediction of local structures, phases and ultimately the local mechanical properties of cast irons, to asses casting quality in the foundry but also to make use of this quantitative information during design of the casting. Casting quality issues related to thermally driven

  5. Temperature of phase transformations in heat-resistant nickel-base alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A. D.; Ukhlinov, A. G.

    1997-11-01

    The study of phase transformations in heating and cooling of alloys is needed for choosing optimum regimes of their melting, plastic deformation, and heat treatment. In the present paper differential thermal analysis is used to determine the temperature of phase transformations in complexly alloyed nickel-base alloys. Industrial nickel alloys with intermetallic reinforcement manufactured by means of vacuum arc remelting (VAR) and hot deformation (HD) were studied. Alloy KhN56MBYuD was studied after different metallurgical processes, namely, electroslag remelting (ESR), centrifugal casting (CC), powder spraying (PS), and hot isostatic pressing (HIP). All the alloys were studied in the initial state and after heat treatment.

  6. Melting and casting of FeAl-based cast alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wilkening, D. [Columbia Falls Aluminum Co., Columbia Falls, MT (United States); Liebetrau, J.; Mackey, B. [AFFCO, L.L.C., Anaconda, MT (United States)

    1998-11-01

    The FeAl-based intermetallic alloys are of great interest because of their low density, low raw material cost, and excellent resistance to high-temperature oxidation, sulfidation, carburization, and molten salts. The applications based on these unique properties of FeAl require methods to melt and cast these alloys into complex-shaped castings and centrifugal cast tubes. This paper addresses the melting-related issues and the effect of chemistry on the microstructure and hardness of castings. It is concluded that the use of the Exo-Melt{trademark} process for melting and the proper selection of the aluminum melt stock can result in porosity-free castings. The FeAl alloys can be melted and cast from the virgin and revert stock. A large variation in carbon content of the alloys is possible before the precipitation of graphite flakes occurs. Titanium is a very potent addition to refine the grain size of castings. A range of complex sand castings and two different sizes of centrifugal cast tubes of the alloy have already been cast.

  7. Melting and casting of FeAl-based cast alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.; Wilkening, D. [Columbia Falls Aluminum Co., 2000 Aluminum Dr., Columbia Falls, MT 59912 (United States); Liebetrau, J.; Mackey, B. [AFFCO, L.L.C., P.O. Box 1071, Anaconda, MT 59711 (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The FeAl-based intermetallic alloys are of great interest because of their low density, low raw material cost, and excellent resistance to high-temperature oxidation, sulfidation, carburization, and molten salts. The applications based on these unique properties of FeAl require methods to melt and cast these alloys into complex-shaped castings and centrifugal cast tubes. This paper addresses the melting-related issues and the effect of chemistry on the microstructure and hardness of castings. It is concluded that the use of the Exo-Melt{sup TM} process for melting and the proper selection of the aluminum melt stock can result in porosity-free castings. The FeAl alloys can be melted and cast from the virgin and revert stock. A large variation in carbon content of the alloys is possible before the precipitation of graphite flakes occurs. Titanium is a very potent addition to refine the grain size of castings. A range of complex sand castings and two different sizes of centrifugal cast tubes of the alloy have already been cast. (orig.) 18 refs.

  8. Thin coatings for protecting titanium aluminides in high-temperature oxidizing environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, K. E.; Taylor, P. J.; Clark, R. K.; Wallace, T. A.

    1991-01-01

    Titanium aluminides have high specific strengths at high temperatures but are susceptible to environmental attack. Their use in many aerospace applications would require that they be protected with coatings that, for structural efficiency, must be thin. It is conceivable that acceptable coatings might be found in several oxide systems, and consequently, oxide coatings of many compositions were prepared from sol-gels for study. Response-surface methodology was used to refine coating compositions and factorial experiments were used to develop coating strategies. Oxygen permeability diagrams of two-layer coatings for several oxide systems, an analysis of multiple-layer coatings on rough and polished surfaces, and modeling of the oxidation weight gain are presented.

  9. Simulation and experimental approach to CVD-FBR aluminide coatings on ferritic steels under steam oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal, J. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Dep. CC. Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Avenida Complutense s/n, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Alcala, G. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Dep. CC. Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Avenida Complutense s/n, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, 28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: galcades@yahoo.es; Bolivar, F.J.; Sanchez, L.; Hierro, M.P.; Perez, F.J. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Dep. CC. Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Avenida Complutense s/n, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-07-15

    The ferritic steels used to produce structural components for steam turbines are susceptible to strong corrosion and creep damage due to the extreme working conditions pushed to increase the process efficiency and to reduce pollutants release. The response of aluminide coatings on the P-92 ferritic steel, deposited by CVD-FBR, during oxidation in a simulated steam environment was studied. The analyses were performed at 650 deg. C in order to simulate the working conditions of a steam turbine, and 800 deg. C in order to produce a critical accelerated oxidation test. The Thermo-Calc software was used to predict the different solid phases that could be generated during the oxidation process, in both, coated and uncoated samples. In order to validate the thermodynamic results, the oxides scales produced during steam tests were characterized by different techniques such as XRD, SEM and EDS. The preliminary results obtained are discussed in the present work.

  10. Oxidation behaviors of the aluminide coated TZM alloy via pack cementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.; Kim, J. M.; Lee, S.; Park, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    TZM is a traditional alloy for high temperature applications, in which (Ti, Zr)C particles are dispersed in a Mo matrix. However, due to easy formation of an oxide layer on the TZM alloy under ambient atmosphere, an oxidation protective coating is needed for any high temperature structural applications of TZM. In this study, aluminium pack cementation coatings have been carried out on TZM alloys, resulting in the formation of Al8Mo3 layer on the surface of TZM alloys. In order to examine the oxidation stability, the TZM alloy was exposed in an aerobic atmosphere. For the aluminide coated TZM alloys, an alumina layer was produced at the outer surface layer. The alminide coated TZM alloys showed excellent oxidation resistance. The coating layer kinetics and the corresponding oxidation stability are also discussed in terms of microstructural observations.

  11. Oxidation Behavior of Pd-Modified Aluminide Coating at High Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    (Ni,Pd)Al coating, prepared by low pressure pack cementation on the Ni-base superalloy M38 where Pd-20 wt pct Nialloy was predeposited, consists of a single β-(Ni,Pd)Al phase. The initial isothermal oxidation behavior of (Ni,Pd)Alcoating was investigated by TGA, XRD, SEM/EDS at 800~1100℃. Results show that oxidation kinetics accordpreferably with parabolic law at 800, 900 and 1100℃, but not at 1000℃. θ-Al2O3 was observed at 800~1100℃. ltis found that Pd plays an important role in accelerating the diffusion of Ti from the substrate to the coating surfacein the aluminide coating.

  12. Analysis of Solidification Parameters and Macrostructure of IN-713C Castings after Complex Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binczyk F.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a research results concerning impact of volume modification (ceramic filter containning cobalt aluminate and hafnium powder and simultaneous surface and volume modification on solidification and stereological parameters of macrostructure of castings made from post-production scrap of nickel superalloy IN-713C. Research included investigation of the influence of chemical composition on the temperature Tliq i Tsol and evaluation of following macrostructure parameters: the number of grains per mm2, average grain area and shape coefficient. Results indicate high influence of carbon content on Tliq. Macrostructure of sample castings indicate positive effect of surface and volume modification, however impact of surface modification is more pronounced.

  13. Analysis of Solidification Parameters and Macrostructure of IN-713C Castings after Complex Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Binczyk

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a research results concerning impact of volume modification (ceramic filter containning cobalt aluminate and hafnium powder and simultaneous surface and volume modification on solidification and stereological parameters of macrostructure of castings made from post-production scrap of nickel superalloy IN-713C. Research included investigation of the influence of chemical composition on the temperature Tliq i Tsol and evaluation of following macrostructure parameters: the number of grains per mm2, average grain area and shape coefficient. Results indicate high influence of carbon content on Tliq. Macrostructure of sample castings indicate positive effect of surface and volume modification, however impact of surface modification is more pronounced.

  14. [Casting faults and structural studies on bonded alloys comparing centrifugal castings and vacuum pressure castings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, P; Küfmann, W

    1978-07-01

    The casting processes in use today such as centrifugal casting and vacuum pressure casting were compared with one another. An effort was made to answer the question whether the occurrence of shrink cavities and the mean diameter of the grain of the alloy is dependent on the method of casting. 80 crowns were made by both processes from the baked alloys Degudent Universal, Degudent N and the trial alloy 4437 of the firm Degusa. Slice sections were examined for macro and micro-porosity and the structural appearance was evaluated by linear analysis. Statistical analysis showed that casting faults and casting structure is independent of the method used and their causes must be found in the conditions of casting and the composition of the alloy.

  15. Effects of surface condition on aqueous corrosion and environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin, R.L.; Buchanan, R.A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Effects of retained high-temperature surface oxides, produced during thermomechanical processing and/or heat treatment, on the aqueous-corrosion and environmental-embrittlement characteristics of Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminides (FA-84, FA-129 and FAL-Mo), a FeAl-based iron aluminide (FA-385), and a disordered low-aluminum Fe-Al alloy (FAPY) were evaluated. All tests were conducted at room temperature in a mild acid-chloride solution. In cyclic-anodic-polarization testing for aqueous-corrosion behavior, the surface conditions examined were: as-received (i.e., with the retained high-temperature oxides), mechanically cleaned and chemically cleaned. For all materials, the polarization tests showed the critical pitting potentials to be significantly lower in the as-received condition than in the mechanically-cleaned and chemically-cleaned conditions. These results indicate detrimental effects of the retained high-temperature oxides in terms of increased susceptibilities to localized corrosion. In 200-hour U-bend stress-corrosion-cracking tests for environmental-embrittlement behavior, conducted at open-circuit corrosion potentials and at a hydrogen-charging potential of {minus}1500 mV (SHE), the above materials (except FA-385) were examined with retained oxides and with mechanically cleaned surfaces. At the open-circuit corrosion potentials, none of the materials in either surface condition underwent cracking. At the hydrogen-charging potential, none of the materials with retained oxides underwent cracking, but FA-84, FA-129 and FAL-Mo in the mechanically cleaned condition did undergo cracking. These results suggest beneficial effects of the retained high-temperature oxides in terms of increased resistance to environmental hydrogen embrittlement.

  16. Comparison between field and laboratory steam oxidation testing on aluminide coatings on P92

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agueero, A.; Gonzalez, V.; Gutierrez, M. [Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial, Ctra. Ajalvir Km 4, 28850 Torrejon de Ardoz (Spain); Knoedler, R.; Straub, S. [Alstom Power Systems GmbH, Boveristrasse 22, 68309 Mannheim (Germany); Muelas, R. [Ingenieria y Servicios Aeroespaciales, P Pintor Rosales 34, 28008 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-06-15

    Steam oxidation has become an important issue for steam power plants as operating temperatures increase from the current 550 to 600-650 C. For the last 10 years several groups have been carrying out steam oxidation testing of both uncoated substrates and coatings in the laboratory. On the other hand, field testing results are very scarce. In this paper, a comparison of laboratory steam oxidation testing with field test results carried out by Alstom at the Kraftwerk Westfalen power station located in Hamm, Germany will be presented. Both slurry deposited aluminide coatings and uncoated P92 steel have been included in the study. Under steam (atmospheric pressure) and isothermal conditions in the laboratory at 650 C, spallation of oxides formed on ferritic steels occurs after significantly longer time when compared to exposure to real operating conditions. Oxide spallation results in serious damage in steam power plants by obstructing heat exchanger tubes, erosion of valves and turbine blades, etc. Moreover, the thickness of the oxide scales formed under field testing conditions is significantly higher after similar exposure. On the other hand, aluminide coated P92, which exhibit thickness through cracks, have shown to be stable in the laboratory for up to 60 000 h at 650 C under steam, without evidence of crack propagation. However, field test results indicate that some degree of crack propagation occurs but without causing substrate attack up to 21 700 h of exposure. Moreover, the aluminium oxide observed in both laboratory and field tested specimens is different. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Nickel: makes stainless steel strong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Maeve A.

    2012-01-01

    Nickel is a silvery-white metal that is used mainly to make stainless steel and other alloys stronger and better able to withstand extreme temperatures and corrosive environments. Nickel was first identified as a unique element in 1751 by Baron Axel Fredrik Cronstedt, a Swedish mineralogist and chemist. He originally called the element kupfernickel because it was found in rock that looked like copper (kupfer) ore and because miners thought that "bad spirits" (nickel) in the rock were making it difficult for them to extract copper from it. Approximately 80 percent of the primary (not recycled) nickel consumed in the United States in 2011 was used in alloys, such as stainless steel and superalloys. Because nickel increases an alloy's resistance to corrosion and its ability to withstand extreme temperatures, equipment and parts made of nickel-bearing alloys are often used in harsh environments, such as those in chemical plants, petroleum refineries, jet engines, power generation facilities, and offshore installations. Medical equipment, cookware, and cutlery are often made of stainless steel because it is easy to clean and sterilize. All U.S. circulating coins except the penny are made of alloys that contain nickel. Nickel alloys are increasingly being used in making rechargeable batteries for portable computers, power tools, and hybrid and electric vehicles. Nickel is also plated onto such items as bathroom fixtures to reduce corrosion and provide an attractive finish.

  18. Light metal compound casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Konrad J.M.PAPIS; Joerg F.LOEFFLER; Peter J.UGGOWITZER

    2009-01-01

    'Compound casting'simplifies joining processes by directly casting a metallic melt onto a solid metal substrate. A continuously metallurgic transition is very important for industrial applications, such as joint structures of spaceframe constructions in transport industry. In this project, 'compound casting' of light metals is investigated, aiming at weight-saving. The substrate used is a wrought aluminium alloy of type AA5xxx, containing magnesium as main alloying element. The melts are aluminium alloys, containing various alloying elements (Cu, Si, Zn), and magnesium. By replacing the natural oxygen layer with a zinc layer, the inherent wetting difficulties were avoided, and compounds with flawless interfaces were successfully produced (no contraction defects, cracks or oxides). Electron microscopy and EDX investigations as well as optical micrographs of the interfacial areas revealed their continu-ously metallic constitution. Diffusion of alloying elements leads to heat-treatable microstructures in the vicinity of the joining interfaces in Al-Al couples. This permits significant variability of mechanical properties. Without significantly cutting down on wettability, the formation of low-melting intermetallic phases (Al3Mg2 and AI12Mg17 IMPs) at the interface of Al-Mg couples was avoided by applying a protec-tive coating to the substrate.

  19. Lightweight Electrode For Nickel/Hydrogen Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Doris L.

    1994-01-01

    Improved substrate for nickel electrode increases specific energy of nickel/hydrogen cell. Consists of 50 percent by weight nickel fiber, 35 percent nickel powder, and 15 percent cobalt powder. Porosity and thickness of nickel electrodes affect specific energy, initial performance, and cycle life of cell. Substrate easily manufactured with much larger porosities than those of heavy-sintered state-of-art nickel substrate.

  20. The accumulation of nickel in human lungs.

    OpenAIRE

    Edelman, D A; Roggli, V L

    1989-01-01

    Using data from published studies, lung concentrations of nickel were compare for persons with and without occupational exposure to nickel. As expected, the concentrations were much higher for persons with occupational exposure. To estimate the effects of nickel-containing tobacco smoke and nickel in the ambient air on the amount of nickel accumulated in lungs over time, a model was derived that took into account various variables related to the deposition of nickel in lungs. The model predic...

  1. Bimetallic layered castings alloy steel – carbon cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wróbel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In paper is presented technology of bimetallic layered castings based on founding method of layer coating directly in cast processso-called method of mould cavity preparation. Prepared castings consist two fundamental parts i.e. bearing part and working part (layer. The bearing part of bimetallic layered casting is typical foundry material i.e. ferritic-pearlitic carbon cast steel, whereas working part (layer is plate of austenitic alloy steel sort X10CrNi 18-8. The ratio of thickness between bearing and working part is 8:1. The quality of the bimetallic layered castings was evaluated on the basis of ultrasonic NDT (non-destructive testing, structure and macro- and microhardness researches.

  2. Casting larger polycrystalline silicon ingots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Tomlinson, T.; Cliber, J.; Shea, S.; Narayanan, M.

    1995-08-01

    Solarex has developed and patented a directional solidification casting process specifically designed for photovoltaics. In this process, silicon feedstock is melted in a ceramic crucible and solidified into a large grained semicrystalline silicon ingot. In-house manufacture of low cost, high purity ceramics is a key to the low cost fabrication of Solarex polycrystalline wafers. The casting process is performed in Solarex designed casting stations. The casting operation is computer controlled. There are no moving parts (except for the loading and unloading) so the growth process proceeds with virtually no operator intervention Today Solarex casting stations are used to produce ingots from which 4 bricks, each 11.4 cm by 11.4 cm in cross section, are cut. The stations themselves are physically capable of holding larger ingots, that would yield either: 4 bricks, 15 cm by 15 an; or 9 bricks, 11.4 cm by 11.4 an in cross-section. One of the tasks in the Solarex Cast Polycrystalline Silicon PVMaT Program is to design and modify one of the castings stations to cast these larger ingots. If successful, this effort will increase the production capacity of Solarex`s casting stations by 73% and reduce the labor content for casting by an equivalent percentage.

  3. Effect of niobium alloying level on the oxidation behavior of titanium aluminides at 850°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banu, Alexandra; Marcu, Maria; Petrescu, Simona; Ionescu, Nicolae; Paraschiv, Alexandru

    2016-12-01

    This work addresses the alloying of titanium aluminides used in aircraft engine applications and automobiles. The oxidation resistance behavior of two titanium aluminides of α2 + γ(Ti3Al + TiAl) and orthorhombic Ti2NbAl, recognized as candidates for high-temperature applications, was investigated by exposure of the alloys for 100 h in air. Thus, oxidation resistance was expressed as the mass gain rate, whereas surface aspects were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy in conjunction with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and the type of oxidation products was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The orthorhombic Ti2NbAl alloy was embrittled, and pores and microcracks were formed as a result of oxygen diffusion through the external oxide layer formed during thermal oxidation for 100 h.

  4. Effect of niobium alloying level on the oxidation behavior of titanium aluminides at 850°C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexandra Banu; Maria Marcu; Simona Petrescu; Nicolae Ionescu; Alexandru Paraschiv

    2016-01-01

    This work addresses the alloying of titanium aluminides used in aircraft engine applications and automobiles. The oxidation resis-tance behavior of two titanium aluminides ofα2+γ (Ti3Al + TiAl) and orthorhombic Ti2NbAl, recognized as candidates for high-temperature applications, was investigated by exposure of the alloys for 100 h in air. Thus, oxidation resistance was expressed as the mass gain rate, whereas surface aspects were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy in conjunction with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and the type of oxidation products was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The orthorhombic Ti2NbAl alloy was embrittled, and pores and microcracks were formed as a result of oxygen diffusion through the external oxide layer formed during thermal oxidation for 100 h.

  5. Nickel Excretion in Urine after Oral Administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menne, T.; Mikkelsen, H. I.; Solgaard, Per Bent

    1978-01-01

    In recent years the importance of internal exposure to nickel in patients with recurrent hand eczema and nickel allergy has become evident. The present study was performed in order to investigate the value of urinary nickel determinations as an index of oral nickel intake. After oral administration...... of 5.6 mg nickel (as the sulfate), increased nickel excretion was found over the following 2-3 days. We conclude that consecutive urinary nickel determinations are able to disclose variations in oral intake of nickel....

  6. Evaluation of effect of recasting of nickel-chromium alloy on its castability using different investment materials: An in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Abhinav Sharma; Shobha J Rodrigues; Thilak B Shetty; Vidya K Shenoy; Mahesh Mundathaje; Sharon Saldanha

    2016-01-01

    Context: Castability has been found to be affected by many aspects of the entire casting system. Very few references in dental literature are available regarding recasting of the base metal alloys. Aims: To evaluate and compare the castability of fresh and reused nickel-chromium alloy and to evaluate the effect of two brands of investment materials on castability of nickel-chromium alloy. Subjects and Methods: For the experimental purpose of evaluation of the effect of recasting of nick...

  7. Effect of Chemical Composition on Structure and Corrosion Resistance of Ni-Mn-Cu Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medyński D.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, a relationship between chemical composition of Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron and its structure, hardness and corrosion resistance is determined. The examinations showed a decrease of thermodynamic stability of austenite together with decreasing nickel equivalent value, in cast iron solidifying according to both the stable and the metastable systems. As a result of increasing degree of austenite transformation, the created martensite caused a significant hardness increase, accompanied by small decline of corrosion resistance. It was found at the same time that solidification way of the alloy and its matrix structure affect corrosion resistance to a much smaller extent than the nickel equivalent value, in particular concentration of elements with high electrochemical potential.

  8. Electrolytic Recovery of Nickel from Spent Electroless Nickel Bath Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Idhayachander

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Plating industry is one of the largest polluting small scale industries and nickel plating is among the important surface finishing process in this industry. The waste generated during this operation contains toxic nickel. Nickel removal and recovery is of great interest from spent bath for environmental and economic reasons. Spent electroless nickel solution from a reed relay switch manufacturing industry situated in Chennai was taken for electrolytic recovery of nickel. Electrolytic experiment was carried out with mild steel and gold coated mild steel as cathode and the different parameters such as current density, time, mixing and pH of the solution were varied and recovery and current efficiency was studied. It was noticed that there was an increase in current efficiency up to 5 A/dm2 and after that it declines. There is no significant improvement with mixing but with modified cathode there was some improvement. Removal of nickel from the spent electroless nickel bath was 81.81% at 5 A/dm2 and pH 4.23. Under this condition, the content of nickel was reduced to 0.94 g/L from 5.16 g/L. with 62.97% current efficiency.

  9. Nickel release from nickel-plated metals and stainless steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haudrechy, P; Foussereau, J; Mantout, B; Baroux, B

    1994-10-01

    Nickel release from nickel-plated metals often induces allergic contact dermatitis, but, for nickel-containing stainless steels, the effect is not well-known. In this paper, AISI 304, 316L, 303 and 430 type stainless steels, nickel and nickel-plated materials were investigated. 4 tests were performed: patch tests, leaching experiments, dimethylglyoxime (DMG) spot tests and electrochemical tests. Patch tests showed that 96% of the patients were intolerant to Ni-plated samples, and 14% to a high-sulfur stainless steel (303), while nickel-containing stainless steels with a low sulfur content elicited no reactions. Leaching experiments confirmed the patch tests: in acidic artificial sweat, Ni-plated samples released about 100 micrograms/cm2/week of nickel, while low-sulfur stainless steels released less than 0.03 microgram/cm2/week of nickel, and AISI 303 about 1.5 micrograms/cm2/week. Attention is drawn to the irrelevance of the DMG spot test, which reveals Ni present in the metal bulk but not its dissolution rate. Electrochemical experiments showed that 304 and 316 grades remain passive in the environments tested, while Ni-plated steels and AISI 303 can suffer significant cation dissolution. Thus, Ni-containing 304 and 316 steels should not induce contact dermatitis, while 303 should be avoided. A reliable nitric acid spot test is proposed to distinguish this grade from other stainless steels.

  10. Removal of nickel from spent electroless nickel-plating bath with nickel foam cathode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于秀娟; 郑彤; 魏杰; 周定

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemical method was used to remove nickel ion from spent electroless nickel plating bath(pH = 5.3). An electrolytic cell was composed of a porous nickel foam cathode and an inert RuO2/Ti anode.Nickel ions were reduced and deposited on the surface of the nickel foam cathode. The effect of current density(i), linear velocity of wastewater (v), gap between cathode and anode (dc/A) and reaction time (t) on nickelremoval rate and current efficiency were studied. As reaction time prolonged, nickel removal rate increasedwhile current efficiency decreased. And larger v and smaller dc/A can enhance nickel removal rate and increasecurrent efficiency by promoting mass transfer and dropping concentration polarization. The effect of current den-sity on nickel removal by electrochemistry was related to other parameters. After three hours' electrolysis withi = 1.0 A/dm2, v = 18.5 cm/min and dc/A = 0. 5 cm, nickel removal rate and current efficiency reached85.6% and 29. 1%, respectively.

  11. Fracture Mechanisms in Steel Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Stradomski

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The investigations were inspired with the problem of cracking of steel castings during the production process. A single mechanism of decohesion - the intergranular one - occurs in the case of hot cracking, while a variety of structural factors is decisive for hot cracking initiation, depending on chemical composition of the cast steel. The low-carbon and low-alloyed steel castings crack due to the presence of the type II sulphides, the cause of cracking of the high-carbon tool cast steels is the net of secondary cementite and/or ledeburite precipitated along the boundaries of solidified grains. Also the brittle phosphor and carbide eutectics precipitated in the final stage solidification are responsible for cracking of castings made of Hadfield steel. The examination of mechanical properties at 1050°C revealed low or very low strength of high-carbon cast steels.

  12. Effect of oxygen partial pressure on oxidation performance of iron-aluminide layers on 316L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hong-guang; Zhan, Qin; Zhao, Wei-wei; Yuan, Xiao-ming [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China). Dept. of Reactor Engineering Research and Design

    2009-07-01

    Tritium permeation barriers (TPB) are required in fusion technology in order to reduce the tritium permeation rate through the structural materials such as type 316 stainless steel. Iron-aluminide layers with alumina on top have been selected as the reference materials for TPB. Aluminide were prepared on the 316L (00Cr17Ni14Mo2) stainless steel by a specific aluminizing process and its oxidation behaviors have been studied in CIAE. This paper is focused on the effect of oxygen partial pressure on the characterization of the surface alumina films. Alumina films were formed on the Fe-Al coatings under the oxygen partial pressure below 200Pa, which is mainly composed of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with the thickness upto 300nm, and a little CeO{sub 2} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. It shows the formation of alumina films because of the selective oxidation of the aluminide on the top surface. (orig.)

  13. Improved Casting Furnace Conceptual Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fielding, Randall Sidney [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tolman, David Donald [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-02-01

    In an attempt to ensure more consistent casting results and remove some schedule variance associated with casting, an improved casting furnace concept has been developed. The improved furnace uses the existing arc melter hardware and glovebox utilities. The furnace concept was designed around physical and operational requirements such as; a charge sized of less than 30 grams, high heating rates and minimal additional footprint. The conceptual model is shown in the report as well as a summary of how the requirements were met.

  14. Electroless nickel plated graphite fibers and surface behavior in Gr(Ni)/6061Al composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chun-yu; WU Gao-hui; ZHANG Qiang; ZHANG Yun-he; XIU Zi-yang; CHEN Guo-qin

    2006-01-01

    The electroless nickel plated graphite fibers reinforced aluminum matrix composites (Gr(Ni)/Al) were produced by squeeze casting, and the microstructure of Gr(Ni)/Al composite and surface behavior of Ni-P coating were studied. The optimum process of electroless Ni-P plating included: burning to get rid of glue→degreasing→neutralization→acidulating→sensitizing→activation→electroless plating. The surface analysis results show that the electroless nickel plating can diffuse into the graphite fiber surface during the squeeze casting, and the Ni-P coating and aluminum alloys can produce brittle phase NiAl3 or NiAl. The X-ray diffraction(XRD) results indicate that Al4C3 is so little that no Al4C3 peaks are found, and the harmful hl4C3 can be decreased by the electroless plating Ni-P coating. The coating improves the interfacial bonding of continuous graphite fibers reinforced aluminum matrix composites.

  15. Analysis of thermal-chemical interactions at the ceramic mould – molten nickel alloy interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Śleziona

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A model of thermal-chemical interactions at the ceramic mould – molten nickel alloy interface was described. Studies were carried out on mould coated with a layer of modifier based on zirconium silicate and cobalt aluminate. The thermodynamic calculations indicated thepossibility of chemical reactions taking place between the chemically active nickel alloy constituents (Al, Ti, Hf, Ta and Nb andcomponents of the modifying coating. The result of such interactions is possible formation on the surface of mould and casting of “newcompounds” which can be the source of casting defects, like burns-on, pitting, etc., the fact proved by extensive X-ray microanalysis. Inaddition, the possibility of crack formation on mould surface and of the molten metal penetration into thus formed crevices was observed.

  16. Nickel, cobalt, and their alloys

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive guide to the compositions, properties, processing, performance, and applications of nickel, cobalt, and their alloys. It includes all of the essential information contained in the ASM Handbook series, as well as new or updated coverage in many areas in the nickel, cobalt, and related industries.

  17. Nickel: Impact on horticultural characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowledge by practitioners regarding the potential impact of nickel nutritional physiology on pecan orchard profitability is a limiting factor in optimization of physiological efficiency of orchard enterprises. Knowledge by farmers and extension specialists about the role of nickel, a newly recogni...

  18. Nickel: Relevance to orchard profitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nutritional physiology of essential micronutrients in pecan, especially that of nickel, is a limiting factor in optimization of physiological efficiency of orchard enterprises. Knowledge by farmers and extension specialists about the role of nickel, a newly recognized micronutrient, is meager. ...

  19. The cost of nickel allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Carsten R; Hamann, Dathan; Hamann, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    Federation, Japan, and Mexico, one-third or more of the denominations released nickel. Conclusions. This worldwide selection of circulating coins covered countries with 75% of the world population, and shows that the majority of the world population lives in countries where coins release nickel. Pertinently...

  20. Characterization and assessment of dermal and inhalable nickel exposures in nickel production and primary user industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughson, G W; Galea, K S; Heim, K E

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the levels of nickel in the skin contaminant layer of workers involved in specific processes and tasks within the primary nickel production and primary nickel user industries. Dermal exposure samples were collected using moist wipes to recover surface contamination from defined areas of skin. These were analysed for soluble and insoluble nickel species. Personal samples of inhalable dust were also collected to determine the corresponding inhalable nickel exposures. The air samples were analysed for total inhalable dust and then for soluble, sulfidic, metallic, and oxidic nickel species. The workplace surveys were carried out in five different workplaces, including three nickel refineries, a stainless steel plant, and a powder metallurgy plant, all of which were located in Europe. Nickel refinery workers involved with electrolytic nickel recovery processes had soluble dermal nickel exposure of 0.34 microg cm(-2) [geometric mean (GM)] to the hands and forearms. The GM of soluble dermal nickel exposure for workers involved in packing nickel salts (nickel chloride hexahydrate, nickel sulphate hexahydrate, and nickel hydroxycarbonate) was 0.61 microg cm(-2). Refinery workers involved in packing nickel metal powders and end-user powder operatives in magnet production had the highest dermal exposure (GM = 2.59 microg cm(-2) soluble nickel). The hands, forearms, face, and neck of these workers all received greater dermal nickel exposure compared with the other jobs included in this study. The soluble nickel dermal exposures for stainless steel production workers were at or slightly above the limit of detection (0.02 microg cm(-2) soluble nickel). The highest inhalable nickel concentrations were observed for the workers involved in nickel powder packing (GM = 0.77 mg m(-3)), although the soluble component comprised only 2% of the total nickel content. The highest airborne soluble nickel exposures were associated with refineries using

  1. Preparation of aluminide coatings on the inner surface of tubes by heat treatment of Al coatings electrodeposited from an ionic liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Dongpeng; Chen, Yimin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Ling, Guoping, E-mail: linggp@zju.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Liu, Kezhao; Chen, Chang’an; Zhang, Guikai [National Key Laboratory of Surface Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Al coating is prepared on the inner surface of one-meter tube. • Al coating shows good adherence to the substrate. • The thickness of Al coating is uniform along the tube. • Aluminide coating is obtained by heat treating Al coating. • Structure of aluminide coating is regulated by different thickness of Al coating. - Abstract: Aluminide coatings were prepared on the inner surface of 316L stainless steel tubes with size of Ø 12 mm × 1000 mm by heat-treating Al coatings electrodeposited from AlCl{sub 3}-1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium chloride (AlCl{sub 3}–EMIC) ionic liquid at room temperature. Studies on the electrolytic etching pretreatment of stainless tubes before Al coating electrodeposition were carried out. The Al coating showed good adherence to the substrate after electrolytic etching at 10 mA/cm{sup 2} for 10 min. The thickness of Al coatings was uniform along the tube. The structure of prepared aluminide coatings can be regulated by different thickness of Al coating. The outer layer of aluminide coatings was FeAl, Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} and FeAl{sub 3} for the samples of 1-μm, 5-μm and 10-μm thick Al coatings, respectively.

  2. Effect of Grinding Temperatures on the Surface Integrity of a Nickel-based Superalloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to investigat e the influence of temperatures on workpiece surface integrity in surface grinding of a cast nickel-based superalloy with alumina abrasive wheels. Temperatur e response at the wheel-workpiece interface was measured using a grindable foil /workpiece thermocouple. Specimens with different grinding temperatures were obt ained through changing grinding conditions including depth of cut, workpiece fee d speed, and coolant supply. Changes in surface roughnes...

  3. A Novel Low-Temperature Fiffusion Aluminide Coating for Ultrasupercritical Coal-Fried Boiler Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ying

    2009-12-31

    An ultrasupercritical (USC) boiler with higher steam temperature and pressure is expected to increase the efficiency of the coal-fired power plant and also decrease emissions of air pollutants. Ferritic/martensitic alloys have been developed with good creep strength for the key components in coal-fired USC plants. However, they typically suffer excessive steam-side oxidation, which contributes to one of main degradation mechanisms along with the fire-side corrosion in coal-fired boilers. As the steam temperature further increases in USC boilers, oxidation of the tube internals becomes an increasing concern, and protective coatings such as aluminide-based diffusion coatings need to be considered. However, conventional aluminizing processes via pack cementation or chemical vapor deposition are typically carried out at elevated temperatures (1000-1150 C). Thermochemical treatment of ferritic/martensitic alloys at such high temperatures could severely degrade their mechanical properties, particularly the alloy's creep resistance. The research focus of this project was to develop an aluminide coating with good oxidation resistance at temperatures {le} 700 C so that the coating processing would not detrimentally alter the creep performance of the ferritic/martensitic alloys. Nevertheless, when the aluminizing temperature is lowered, brittle Al-rich intermetallic phases, such as Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} and FeAl{sub 3}, tend to form in the coating, which may reduce the resistance to fatigue cracking. Al-containing binary masteralloys were selected based on thermodynamic calculations to reduce the Al activity in the pack cementation process and thus to prevent the formation of brittle Al-rich intermetallic phases. Thermodynamic computations were carried out using commercial software HSC 5.0 for a series of packs containing various Cr-Al binary masteralloys. The calculation results indicate that the equilibrium partial pressures of Al halides at 700 C were a function of Al

  4. Development of Refractories for Continuous Casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Shouxin; JIN Congjin; YAO Jinfu; LI Zeya

    2004-01-01

    The paper introduces refractories for continuous casting, especially, refractories for continuous casting for clean steel in baosteel. Developing direction of refractories for continuous casting has been pointed out to satisfy the new metallurgical operating practice.

  5. Segregation in cast products

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Ghosh

    2001-02-01

    Microsegregation gets eliminated significantly if subsequent hot working and/or annealing are done on cast products. Macrosegregation however persists, causing problems in quality, and hence, has to be attended to. Microsegregation is a consequence of rejection of solutes by the solid into the interdendritic liquid. Scheil’s equation is mostly employed. However, other equations have been proposed, which take into account diffusion in solid phase and/or incomplete mixing in liquid. Macrosegregation results from movements of microsegregated regions over macroscopic distances due to motion of liquid and free crystals. Motion of impure interdendritic liquid causes regions of positive macrosegregation, whereas purer solid crystals yield negative macrosegregation. Flow of interdendritic liquid is primarily natural convection due to thermal and solutal buoyancy, and partly forced convection due to suction by shrinkage cavity formation etc. The present paper briefly deals with fundamentals of the above and contains some recent studies as well. Experimental investigations in molten alloys do not allow visualization of the complex flow pattern as well as other phenomena, such as dendrite-tip detachment. Experiments with room temperature analogues, and mathematical modelling have supplemented these efforts. However, the complexity of the phenomena demands simplifying assumptions. The agreement with experimental data is mostly qualitative. The paper also briefly discusses centreline macrosegregation during continuous casting of steel, methods to avoid it, and the, importance of early columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET) as well as the fundamentals of CET.

  6. Biomaterials by freeze casting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegst, Ulrike G K; Schecter, Matthew; Donius, Amalie E; Hunger, Philipp M

    2010-04-28

    The functional requirements for synthetic tissue substitutes appear deceptively simple: they should provide a porous matrix with interconnecting porosity and surface properties that promote rapid tissue ingrowth; at the same time, they should possess sufficient stiffness, strength and toughness to prevent crushing under physiological loads until full integration and healing are reached. Despite extensive efforts and first encouraging results, current biomaterials for tissue regeneration tend to suffer common limitations: insufficient tissue-material interaction and an inherent lack of strength and toughness associated with porosity. The challenge persists to synthesize materials that mimic both structure and mechanical performance of the natural tissue and permit strong tissue-implant interfaces to be formed. In the case of bone substitute materials, for example, the goal is to engineer high-performance composites with effective properties that, similar to natural mineralized tissue, exceed by orders of magnitude the properties of its constituents. It is still difficult with current technology to emulate in synthetic biomaterials multi-level hierarchical composite structures that are thought to be the origin of the observed mechanical property amplification in biological materials. Freeze casting permits to manufacture such complex, hybrid materials through excellent control of structural and mechanical properties. As a processing technique for the manufacture of biomaterials, freeze casting therefore has great promise.

  7. Nickel-hydrogen cell reversal characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, Charles

    1994-01-01

    Nickel-hydrogen cell reversal characteristics are being studied as part of a TRW program directed towards development of a high current battery cell bypass switch. The following are discussed: cell bypass switch; nickel-hydrogen cell reversal characteristics; and nickel-hydrogen cell chemistry: discharge/reversal and overdischarge (reversal) with nickel and hydrogen precharge.

  8. Nickel-Free Alternatives Raise Awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Hannah; Goldenberg, Alina; Sheehan, Michael Patrick; Patel, Amy; Jacob, Sharon E

    2015-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis to nickel is a global health problem. Worldwide, nickel continues to be the most prevalent and relevant contact allergen detected in tested populations for the last 30 years. Thus, the need for nickel-free products is palpable. We present a sustainable resource to aid providers and consumers in locating a wide variety of nickel free alternatives.

  9. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2009-01-01

    @@ This book consists of five sections:Chapter 1 Introduction,Chapter 2 Grey Iron,Chapter 3 Ductile Iron,Chapter 4Vermicular Cast Iron,and Chapter 5 White Cast Iron. CHINA FOUNDRY publishs this book in several parts serially,starting from the first issue of 2009.

  10. Theory of batchwise centrifugal casting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P. Maarten; Nijmeijer, Arian; Verweij, Henk

    1998-01-01

    In batchwise centrifugal casting a cylindrical mold is filled with suspension and rotated rapidly around its axis. This results in the movement of the particulate phase toward the cylinder wall and the formation of a tubular cast. Theory is presented for particle transport in the suspension phase an

  11. Lost Foam Casting in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Sheng-ping; WU Zhi-chao

    2006-01-01

    @@ 1. Lost Foam Casting Committee of Foundry Institution of Chinese Mechanical Engineering Society (FICMES) From the beginning of the 1990s, China entered a research and expansion climax in lost foam casting technology realm after the United States, Germany, and Japan etc.

  12. Education and Caste in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Chandra Pal Singh

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyses the policy of reservation for lower castes in India. This policy is similar to that of affirmative action in the United States. The paper provides a brief overview of the caste system and discusses the types of groups that are eligible for reservation, based on data from government reports. The stance of this paper is that…

  13. Ni{sub 3}Al technology transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K.; Viswanathan, S.; Santella, M.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Ductile Ni{sub 3}Al and Ni{sub 3}Al-based alloys have been identified for a range of applications. These applications require the use of material in a variety of product forms such as sheet, plate, bar, wire, tubing, piping, and castings. Although significant progress has been made in the melting, casting, and near-net-shape forming of nickel aluminides, some issues still remain. These include the need for: (1) high-strength castable composition for many applications that have been identified; (2) castability (mold type, fluidity, hot-shortness, porosity, etc.); (3) weld reparability of castings; and (4) workability of cast or powder metallurgy product to sheet, bar, and wire. The four issues listed above can be {open_quotes}show stoppers{close_quotes} for the commercial application of nickel aluminides. This report describes the work completed to address some of these issues during FY 1996.

  14. Ni{sub 3}Al technology transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K.; Santella, M.L.; Alexander, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    Ductile Ni{sub 3}Al and Ni{sub 3}Al-based alloys have been identified for a range of applications. These applications require the use of material in a variety of product forms such as sheet, plate, bar, tubing, piping, and castings. Although significant progress has been made in the melting, casting, and near-net-shape forming of nickel aluminides, some issues still remain. These include the need for (1)high-strength castable composition for turbochargers, furnace furniture, and hot-die applications; (2) castability (fluidity, hot-shortness, porosity, etc.); (3) weld reparability of castings; and (4) hot fabricability of cast ingots. All of the issues listed above can be {open_quotes}show stoppers{close_quotes} for the commercial application of nickel aluminides. This report describes work completed to address some of these issues during the fourth quarter of FY 1994.

  15. Investigation of hydrogen evolution activity for the nickel, nickel-molybdenum nickel-graphite composite and nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang

    2016-03-01

    The nickel, nickel-molybdenum alloy, nickel-graphite and nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coatings were obtained by the electrodeposition technique from a nickel sulfate bath. Nanocrystalline molybdenum, graphite and reduced graphene oxide in nickel coatings promoted hydrogen evolution reaction in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution at room temperature. However, the nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coating exhibited the highest electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution at room temperature. A large number of gaps between 'cauliflower' like grains could decrease effective area for hydrogen evolution reaction in slight amorphous nickel-molybdenum alloy. The synergistic effect between nickel and reduced graphene oxide promoted hydrogen evolution, moreover, refined grain in nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coating and large specific surface of reduced graphene oxide also facilitated hydrogen evolution reaction.

  16. Fatigue life prediction for integrally cast turbine wheels while taking into account short cracks using the nickel base alloy IN 713 C as an example; Lebensdauervorhersage fuer integralgegossene Turbinenraeder unter Beruecksichtigung kurzer Risse am Beispiel der Nickelbasis-Legierung IN 713 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, U.; Sonsino, C.M.

    1994-12-31

    The cast alloy IN 713 C (cast condition) frequently used in turbine wheels was used to determine fatigue strength results under quasi-operational conditions within the range of low cycle fatigue with the objective of transferring the initial crack and crack propagation behavior to notched specimens and later to turbine wheels, while taking into account an inhomogeneous stress and strain distribution, respectively. This transferability relates only to results below 600 C, because this temperature occurs in the critical region of the turbine wheel, the hub. (orig.) [Deutsch] Es wurden mit der fuer Turbinenraeder haeufig eingesetzten Gusslegierung IN 713 C (Gusszustand) Schwingfestigkeitsergebnisse und betriebsnahen Bedingungen im Bereich der Niedrigschwingspielzahl-Ermuedung ermittelt, mit dem Ziel das an ungekerbten Proben bestimmte Anriss- und Rissfortschrittsverhalten auf gekerbte Proben und spaeter auf Turbinenraeder unter Beruecksichtigung einer inhomogenen Spannungs-bzw. Dehnungsverteilung uebertragen zu koennen. Die Uebertragbarkeit bezieht sich dabei nur auf die Ergebnisse unter 600 C, weil diese Temperatur im kritischen Bereich des Turbinenrades, der Nabe, auftritt. (orig.)

  17. Refinement and fracture mechanisms of as-cast QT700-6 alloy by alloying method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-qiang Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The as-cast QT700-6 alloy was synthesized with addition of a certain amount of copper, nickel, niobium and stannum elements by alloying method in a medium frequency induction furnace, aiming at improving its strength and toughness. Microstructures of the as-cast QT700-6 alloy were observed using a scanning-electron microscope (SEM and the mechanical properties were investigated using a universal tensile test machine. Results indicate that the ratio of pearlite/ferrite is about 9:1 and the graphite size is less than 40 μm in diameter in the as-cast QT700-6 alloy. The predominant refinement mechanism is attributed to the formation of niobium carbides, which increases the heterogeneous nucleus and hinders the growth of graphite. Meanwhile, niobium carbides also exist around the grain boundaries, which improve the strength of the ductile iron. The tensile strength and elongation of the as-cast QT700-6 alloy reach over 700 MPa and 6%, respectively, when the addition amount of niobium is 0.8%. The addition of copper and nickel elements contributed to the decrease of eutectoid transformation temperature, resulting in the decrease of pearlite lamellar spacing (about 248 nm, which is also beneficial to enhancing the tensile strength. The main fracture mechanism is cleavage fracture with the appearance of a small amount of dimples.

  18. Characteristics of flake graphite in Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron. Part 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Janus

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper continues the article published by Archives of Foundry Engineering, vol. 9, issue 1/2009, pp. 185-290, that presented influence of chemical composition of hypo- and hypereutectic nickel-manganese-copper alloyed cast iron on properties of the contained flake graphite. In this second part of the research, effect of chemical composition of hypereutectic cast iron containing 3.5÷5.1% C, 1.7÷2.8% Si, 3.5÷10.5 %Ni, 2.0÷8.0% Mn, 0.1÷3.5% Cu, 0.14÷0.17% P and 0.02÷0.04% S on properties of flake graphite is determined. Evolution of graphite properties with changing eutecticity degree of the examined cast iron is presented. For selected castings, histograms of primary and eutectic graphite are presented, showing quantities of graphite precipitates in individual size ranges and their shape determined by the coefficient ξ defined as ratio of a precipitate area to square of its circumference. Moreover, presented are equations obtained by discriminant analysis to determine chemical composition of Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron which guarantee the most favourable distribution of A-type graphite from the point of view of castings properties.

  19. The degradation processes in high loaded casts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ďuriníková

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work are described structural changes of jet engine DV – 2 turbine blades and effect of degradation process. Turbine blades work in aggressively environs and because of that there are rate among high loaded cast stock. As an experimental material we have chose nickel superalloy ŽS6K with surface heat - resisting alitize layer. Evaluation is slant on largeness wearing over work of certain number of hour in operation. Effect working environs and overrun working temperatures is show changes measures as well as changes macrostructure of basic material blades. Evaluate is advance quantitative metallography through the medium metallographic software NIS element. Quantitative analysis evaluate thickness measures, quality control outer look and lack mixture in the seat, which is not splash, is precede by lack of near another applied protective layer. Allowance is knot on last examination in the area ratings protective heat-resisting layers and gives records for others possible ratings and experiments in this area.

  20. 21 CFR 184.1537 - Nickel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Nickel. 184.1537 Section 184.1537 Food and Drugs... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1537 Nickel. (a) Elemental nickel (CAS Reg. No. 7440-02-0) is obtained from nickel ore by transforming it to nickel sulfide (Ni3S2). The sulfide is roasted in air to give...

  1. Development and Application of Die-Casting High Speed Steel Rolls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Zhi-qiang; FU Han-guang; DING Yu-cheng

    2005-01-01

    Due to its high hardness, good red hardness and excellent wear resistance at high temperature, high speed steel (HSS) is fit for the roll manufacture. In order to overcome the segregation of centrifugal casting of HSS roll, die-cast processes were developed and its effects on the properties of the HSS roll were investigated. It was found that pressure, pressing time and speed are three important factors affecting shrinkage cavity. For pouring temperature of 1 400-1 450 ℃, pressure of 150-160 MPa, pressing time of 120-150 s and pressing speed of 14-16 mm/s, a compact HSS roll was obtained, which has no segregation and small working allowance. In the high speed wire rod rolling mill, service life of the HSS roll is 5 to 8 times longer than that of high nickel chromium infinite chilled cast iron roll.

  2. Capacity fade in nickel cadmium and nickel hydrogen cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Tim; Hayden, Jeff; Pickett, David F.; Abrams-Blakemore, Bruce; Liptak, ED

    1993-01-01

    Research and operational experience with capacity fade in nickel cadmium and nickel hydrogen cells are summarized in outline form. The theoretical causes of capacity fade are reviewed and the role of cell storage, positive electrodes, and cobalt additives are addressed. Three examples of observed capacity fade are discussed: INTELSAT 5, INTELSAT 6, and an Explorer platform. Finally, prevention and recovery methods are addressed and the current status of Eagle Picher/Hughes research is discussed.

  3. EVOLUTION OF AS—CAST MICROSTRUCTURES OF 356 ALUMINIUM ALLOY CAST BY LIQUIDUS CASTING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.Dong; G.M.Lu; 等

    2003-01-01

    A new method (liquidus casting)was used for 356 Al alloy semi-solid slurry mak-ing.The structures of 356 Al alloy cast by a fe mould and semi-continuous casting machine at different temperatures were inves tigated.How the globular grains form was qlso discussed.The results show that either being cast by single Fe mould or semi-continuous machine,the microstructures are not conventional dendrites but fine and net-globular grains.The average grain size is smaller than 30μm and suitable enough for thixoforming,meanwhile it can improve the mechanical properties of fol-lowing products.Under the suitable casting velocity and cooling intensity,most of global grains prolong their global browth and collide with each other before dendritic growth because of the large amount of the nucleation sites.

  4. Property Enrichment of Aged Nickel Base Superalloy Supercast 247A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavakumar Avala

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The commercial nickel-base superalloy Supercast 247A can be used for applications in which is required high mechanical strength and corrosion resistance at elevated temperatures, such as turbine blades and automotive turbocharger rotors. The mechanical properties are totally connected to the morphology, size and distribution of γ' phase and carbides. In order to improve the mechanical properties, the material is subjected to solution and aging heat treatment, to raise the volume fraction of γ' phase in the matrix and to form carbides at grain boundaries. In the present study the Supercast 247A superalloy was remelted and cast to obtain the desired polycrystalline test bars by controlling casting parameters, followed by the investigation of precipitation morphology and mechanical properties with respect to solution treatment and aging treatment. The experimental results show that by well controlled casting parameters the Supercast 247A owns excellent castability to form a superalloy with fine grain structure, resistance to indentation as well as superior strength.

  5. In-Pile Experiment of a New Hafnium Aluminide Composite Material to Enable Fast Neutron Testing in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen; Douglas L. Porter; James R. Parry; Heng Ban

    2010-06-01

    A new hafnium aluminide composite material is being developed as a key component in a Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL) system designed to provide fast neutron flux test capability in the Advanced Test Reactor. An absorber block comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) particles (~23% by volume) dispersed in an aluminum matrix can absorb thermal neutrons and transfer heat from the experiment to pressurized water cooling channels. However, the thermophysical properties, such as thermal conductivity, of this material and the effect of irradiation are not known. This paper describes the design of an in-pile experiment to obtain such data to enable design and optimization of the BFFL neutron filter.

  6. Studies on Mechanical Behaviour of Aluminium/Nickel Coated Silicon Carbide Reinforced Functionally Graded Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mohandas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work is to fabricate functionally graded aluminium (Al-Si6Cu/ nickel coated SiC metal matrix composite using centrifugal casting route. SiC particles (53-80 µm were coated with nickel using electroless coating technique to enhance the wettability with aluminium matrix. Several attempts were made to coat nickel on SiC by varying the process temperature (65 °C, 75 °C, and 85 °C to obtain a uniform coating. Silicon particles coated with nickel were characterised using EDS enabled Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope and it was found that the maximum nickel coating on SiC occurred at a process temperature of 75°C. This nickel coated SiC particles were used as the reinforcement for the manufacture of functionally graded metal matrix composite and a cast specimen of dimensions 150×90×15 mm was obtained. To ensure the graded properties in the fabricated composites, microstructure (at a distance of 1, 7 and 14 mm and hardness (at a distance of 1, 3, 7, 10 and 14 mm from outer periphery taken in the radial direction was analysed using Zeiss Axiovert metallurgical microscope and Vickers micro hardness tester respectively. The microstructure reveals presence of more SiC particles at the outer periphery compared to inner periphery and the hardness test shows that the hardness also decreased from outer periphery (90 HV to inner periphery (78 HV.Tensile strength of specimen from outer zone (1-7mm and inner zone (8-14 mm of casting was also tested and found out a value of 153.3 Mpa and 123.3 Mpa for the outer zone and inner zone respectively. An important observation made was that the outer periphery of casting was particle rich and the inner periphery was particle deficient because of centrifugal force and variation in density between aluminium matrix and reinforcement. Functionally graded Al/SiC metal matrix composite could be extensively used in automotive industry especially in the manufacture of liners and brake drums.

  7. Excessive nickel release from mobile phones--a persistent cause of nickel allergy and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter; Johansen, Jeanne D; Zachariae, Claus;

    2011-01-01

    Despite the political intention to limit nickel allergy and dermatitis in Europeans, nickel allergy remains frequent. There are several explanations for the persistence of nickel allergy and dermatitis, including the increasing use of mobile phones. Before regulation of nickel release from mobile...... phones, we showed that eight (19.5%) of 41 mobile phones marketed in Denmark between 2003 and 2007 released nickel in concentrations that may result in nickel allergy and dermatitis. In 2009, the EU Nickel Directive was revised to include nickel-releasing mobile phones....

  8. Excessive nickel release from mobile phones--a persistent cause of nickel allergy and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter; Johansen, Jeanne D; Zachariae, Claus;

    2011-01-01

    phones, we showed that eight (19.5%) of 41 mobile phones marketed in Denmark between 2003 and 2007 released nickel in concentrations that may result in nickel allergy and dermatitis. In 2009, the EU Nickel Directive was revised to include nickel-releasing mobile phones.......Despite the political intention to limit nickel allergy and dermatitis in Europeans, nickel allergy remains frequent. There are several explanations for the persistence of nickel allergy and dermatitis, including the increasing use of mobile phones. Before regulation of nickel release from mobile...

  9. The influence of processing on microstructure and properties of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, R.N.; Wright, J.K.; Anderson, M.T. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.

    1997-12-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron aluminide alloys based on Fe3Al have been formed by reaction synthesis from elemental powders followed by hot extrusion. The resulting alloys have approximately 2.5% by volume Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles dispersed throughout the material. A proper combination of extrusion temperature, extrusion ratio, and post-consolidation heat treatment results in a secondary recrystallized microstructure with grain sizes greater than 25mm. ODS material with 5% Cr addition exhibits approximately an order of magnitude increase in time to failure at 650 C compared to a similar alloy without the oxide dispersion. Addition of Nb and Mo along with Cr results in decreased minimum creep rates, however, the time to rupture is greatly reduced due to fracture at low strains initiated at large Nb particles that were not put into solution. The activation energy for creep in the 5% Cr ODS material is on the order of 210 kJ/mole and the power law creep exponent is 9--9.5. Transmission electron microscopy examination of the substructure of deformed samples indicates some formation of low angle dislocation boundaries, however, most of the dislocations are pinned at particles. The TEM observations and the value of the creep exponent are indicative of dislocation breakaway from particles as the rate controlling deformation mechanism. The TEM results indicate that particles smaller than about 100nm and larger than about 500 nm do not contribute significantly to dislocation pinning.

  10. Deformation behaviour of {gamma}+{alpha}{sub 2} Ti aluminide processed through reaction synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R.K., E-mail: rohitkumar_gupta@vssc.gov.in [Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, ISRO, Trivandrum, Kerala 695 022 (India); Pant, Bhanu [Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, ISRO, Trivandrum, Kerala 695 022 (India); Kumar, Vinod [SAIL-RDCIS, Ranchi (India); Agarwala, Vijaya [Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee 247 667 (India); Sinha, P.P. [Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, ISRO, Trivandrum, Kerala 695 022 (India)

    2013-01-01

    {gamma}+{alpha}{sub 2} titanium aluminide alloys made through reaction synthesis have been used for deformation study. Hot isothermal compression test is carried out to study the deformation characteristics of the alloys using Gleeble thermomechanical simulator. Three alloys based on Ti48Al2Cr2Nb0.1B (at%) are tested at different temperatures and at different strain rates. True stress-true strain plots are analyzed along with analysis of tested specimens. Tested specimens are observed under optical and electron microscopes. Presence of various deformation morphologies and phases were confirmed. Microhardness evaluation and transmission electron microscopic examination are used to confirm the presence of different phases. It is found that dynamic recrystallization is mainly playing role in deformation of these alloys. Presence of dynamically recrystallized (DRX) grains and lamellar microstructures is confirmed at the intergranular area and inside the grains, respectively. A nucleation model is suggested for DRX and lamellar grain nucleation during deformation. Attempt has been made to quantify the presence of various phases through optical microscopy. Hot workability map is also suggested on the basis of microstructural and visual observation of compression tested specimens.

  11. Sintering Behavior and Microstructure Formation of Titanium Aluminide Alloys Processed by Metal Injection Molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyama, Juliano; Oehring, Michael; Ebel, Thomas; Kainer, Karl Ulrich; Pyczak, Florian

    2017-04-01

    The sintering behavior of metal injection molded titanium aluminide alloys, their microstructure formation and resulting mechanical properties were investigated. As reference material, the alloy Ti-45Al-5Nb-0.2B-0.2C at.% (TNB-V5) was selected. Additionally, two other variations with Mo and Mo + Si additions were prepared: Ti-45Al-3Nb-1Mo-0.2B-0.2C at.% and Ti-45Al-3Nb-1Mo-1Si-0.2B-0.2C at.%. The results indicate that the optimum sintering temperature was slightly above the solidus line. With proper sintering parameters, very low porosities (phase transformations upon cooling could be described as L + β → β → α + β → α → α + γ → α2 + γ, which was in agreement with the microstructures observed. The effects of Mo and Si were opposite regarding the sintering behavior. Mo addition led to an increase in the optimum sintering temperature, whereas Si caused a significant decrease.

  12. Sintering Behavior and Microstructure Formation of Titanium Aluminide Alloys Processed by Metal Injection Molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyama, Juliano; Oehring, Michael; Ebel, Thomas; Kainer, Karl Ulrich; Pyczak, Florian

    2017-01-01

    The sintering behavior of metal injection molded titanium aluminide alloys, their microstructure formation and resulting mechanical properties were investigated. As reference material, the alloy Ti-45Al-5Nb-0.2B-0.2C at.% (TNB-V5) was selected. Additionally, two other variations with Mo and Mo + Si additions were prepared: Ti-45Al-3Nb-1Mo-0.2B-0.2C at.% and Ti-45Al-3Nb-1Mo-1Si-0.2B-0.2C at.%. The results indicate that the optimum sintering temperature was slightly above the solidus line. With proper sintering parameters, very low porosities (<0.5%) and fine microstructures with a colony size <85 µm could be achieved. Considering the sintering temperatures applied, the phase transformations upon cooling could be described as L + β → β → α + β → α → α + γ → α2 + γ, which was in agreement with the microstructures observed. The effects of Mo and Si were opposite regarding the sintering behavior. Mo addition led to an increase in the optimum sintering temperature, whereas Si caused a significant decrease.

  13. Mechanism of spallation in platinum aluminide/electron beam physical vapor-deposited thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, M.; Vaidyanathan, K.; Barber, B.; Cheng, J.; Jordan, E. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    1999-02-01

    The spallation failure of a commercial thermal barrier coating (TBC), consisting of a single-crystal RENE N5 superalloy, a platinum aluminide (Pt-Al) bond coat, and an electron beam-deposited 7 wt pct yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramic layer (7YSZ), was studied following cyclic furnace testing. In the uncycled state and prior to deposition of the ceramic, the Pt-Al bond-coat surface contains a cellular network of ridges corresponding to the underlying bond-coat grain-boundary structure. With thermal cycling, the ridges and associated grain boundaries are the sites of preferential oxidation and cracking, which results in the formation of cavities that are partially filled with oxide. Using a fluorescent penetrant dye in conjunction with a direct-pull test, it is shown that, when specimens are cycled to about 80 pct of life, these grain-boundary regions show extensive debonding. The roles of oxidation and cyclic stress in localized grain boundary region spallation are discussed. The additional factors leading to large-scale TBC spallation are described.

  14. Microcracking and macroscopic failure in intermetallic titanium aluminides; Mikrorissbildung und makroskopisches Versagen in intermetallischen Titanaluminiden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesand-Valk, B. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofforschung

    2000-07-01

    This paper deals with the correlations between microstructural disorder, that means statistical distribution of phases and local material properties, and macroscopic failure of disordered multiphase materials. On a microscopic level the microstructural disorder leads to randomly distributed local damage before failure (in brittle materials to microcracks) and eventually to localisation of damage. On a macroscopic level the value and scatter of fracture strength and its dependence on specimen size are essentially determined by the microstructural disorder. The failure behaviour is treated by using the discrete chain-of-bundles-model, which treats the details of the microstructure not explicitly but as locally distributed fluctuations of characteristical material parameters. The model has been verified by comparing with experimental results for four intermetallic titanium aluminides and its validity has been demonstrated. (orig.) [German] Die Arbeit behandelt die Zusammenhaenge zwischen der Stochastizitaet des Gefueges, das heisst, einer statistischen Verteilung von Phasen und lokalen Materialeigenschaften und dem makroskopischen Versagen von ungeordneten mehrphasigen Werkstoffen. Auf mikroskopischer Ebene fuehrt die Stochastizitaet des Gefueges vor dem Versagen zu lokalen Schaedigungen (in sproeden Werkstoffen zu Mikrorissen) und schliesslich (abhaengig vom Grad der Unordnung) zur Lokalisierung des Bruchgeschehens. Makroskopisch werden die Groesse und Streuung von Bruchfestigkeitswerten und ihre Probengroessenabhaengigkeit durch die mikrostrukturelle Unordnung wesentlich bestimmt. Dieses Versagensverhalten wird in dem diskreten Chain-of-Bundles-Modell beschrieben, das die Details der Mikrostruktur nicht explizit sondern als lokale statistische Schwankungen von charakteristischen Werkstoffparametern erfasst. Am Beispiel von vier ausgewaehlten Titan-Aluminiden wird das Modell validiert und verifiziert. (orig.)

  15. Processing and characterization of niobium aluminide-based composites. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woytera, S.A.; Bhagat, R.B.

    1995-11-01

    Many ordered intermetallic compounds exhibit attractive properties for high temperature structural aerospace applications. These materials provide an alternative to and surpass the performance of existing high temperature superalloys and ceramics. High melting point, low density, high strength, and relatively good corrosion resistance are the attractive properties that have led to the current thrust of research in these materials. However, the major obstacles limiting the use of these materials are their low ductility and toughness at room temperature and poor creep resistance at elevated temperatures. Previous studies have shown that micro and macro-alloying of several systems lead to improvements in low temperature ductility and toughness, while the use of suitable ceramic reinforcements lead to increases in creep resistance. However, the reinforcements of the composites are not protected from reaction with the matrix at elevated temperatures. Thus, they do not have appropriate microstructures for thermal stability and are likely to have poor creep resistance at elevated temperatures. In this investigation a novel approach has been devised to address both low and high temperature problems by the incorporation of `treated` refractory metal and ceramic reinforcements into a niobium aluminide matrix. The `treated` ductile phase is to improve room temperature toughness and the `treated` ceramic phase is to improve creep resistance. The `treatment`, an oxide layer produced on the reinforcements (niobium and silicon carbide whiskers) by elevated temperature exposure, is to protect them from reacting with the matrix materials during hot pressing or subsequent use at elevated temperatures.

  16. Nickel-Magnesia Cermet Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1952-06-01

    alumin " oxide cermet. To develop a bond between these tw components it in first necessary to produce a controlled film of Cr 203 on the Cr grains...somewhat more refractory. A cobalt - magnesia cermet may be made in the same way as the nickel - magnesia cermet, the bond being through the agency...of the oxide CoO. However, cobalt is not as oxidation resistant as nickel and is more strategic. Iron will wet probably all oxides and silicates and

  17. NUMERICAL MODELING OF HARDENING OF UNINTERRUPTEDLY-CASTED BRONZE CASTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Marukovich

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The three-dimensional numerical model for calculation of thermal fields during solidification of continuously casted bronze casting is developed. Coefficients of heat transfer on borders of calculation areas on the basis of the solution of inverse heat transfer conduction problem are determined. The analysis of thermal fields, depending on loop variables of drawing and the sizes of not cooled zone of crystallizer is curried out.

  18. Evaluation of effect of recasting of nickel-chromium alloy on its castability using different investment materials: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinav Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Within the limitations of the study, it was concluded that there was no significant difference found in castability of different percentage combinations of new and once casted alloy using two investment materials. The addition of new alloy during recasting to maintain the castability of nickel-chromium alloy may therefore not be required.

  19. Thermo-mechanical fatigue behaviour of the near-{gamma}-titanium aluminide alloy TNB-V5 under uniaxial and multiaxial loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brookes, Stephen Peter

    2009-12-19

    With increasing environmental awareness and the general need to economise on the use of fossil fuels, there is growing pressure for industry to produce lighter, more efficient, gas turbine engines. One such material that will help to achieve these improvements is the intermetallic gamma titanium aluminide ({gamma}-TiAl) alloy. At only half the density of current nickel-based superalloys its weight saving capability is highly desirable, however, its mechanical properties have not yet been fully explored especially, when it is to be considered for structural components in aeronautical gas turbine engines. Critical components in these engines typically experience large variations in temperatures and multiaxial states of stress under non-isothermal conditions. These stress states are known as tri-axial thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF). The work presented here investigates the effects these multi-axial stresses, have on a {gamma}-TiAl, (Ti-45Al-5Nb-0.2B-0.2C) alloy under TMF conditions. The uniaxial, torsional and axialtorsional TMF behaviour of this {gamma}-TiAl alloy have been examined at 400 - 800 C with strain amplitudes ranging from 0.15% to 0.7%. The tests were conducted at both thermomechanical in-phase (IP) and out-of-phase (OP). Selected tests additionally contained a 180 seconds hold period. Fatigue lifetimes are strongly influenced by the strain amplitude, a small increase in amplitude reduces the lifetime considerably. The uniaxial IP tests showed significantly longer fatigue lifetimes than of all the tests performed. Torsional loading although have shorter fatigue lifetimes than the uniaxial IP loading they have longer fatigue lifetimes than the uniaxial OP loading. The non-proportional axial-torsional 90 degree OP test is most damaging which resulted in a shorter lifetime than the uniaxial OP test with the same Mises equivalent mechanical strain amplitude. A hold period at maximum temperatures reduced the lifetime for all tests regardless of the temperature

  20. Relationship between nickel allergy and diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Ashimav

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Nickel is a ubiquitous trace element and it occurs in soil, water, air and of the biosphere. It is mostly used to manufacture stainless steel. Nickel is the commonest cause of metal allergy. Nickel allergy is a chronic and recurring skin problem; females are affected more commonly than males. Nickel allergy may develop at any age. Once developed, it tends to persist life-long. Nickel is present in most of the dietary items and food is considered to be a major source of nickel exposure for the general population. Nickel content in food may vary considerably from place to place due to the difference in nickel content of the soil. However, certain foods are routinely high in nickel content. Nickel in the diet of a nickel-sensitive person can provoke dermatitis. Careful selection of food with relatively low nickel concentration can bring a reduction in the total dietary intake of nickel per day. This can influence the outcome of the disease and can benefit the nickel sensitive patient.

  1. Modelling of flow phenomena during DC casting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, J.

    2005-01-01

    Modelling of Flow Phenomena during DC Casting Jan Zuidema The production of aluminium ingots, by semi-continuous casting, is a complex process. DC Casting stands for direct chill casting. During this process liquid aluminium transforms to solid aluminium while cooling down. This is not an instanta

  2. Modelling of flow phenomena during DC casting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, J.

    2005-01-01

    Modelling of Flow Phenomena during DC Casting Jan Zuidema The production of aluminium ingots, by semi-continuous casting, is a complex process. DC Casting stands for direct chill casting. During this process liquid aluminium transforms to solid aluminium while cooling down. This is not an

  3. Oxidation and thermal fatigue of coated and uncoated NX-188 nickel-base alloy in a high velocity gas stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. R.; Young, S. G.

    1972-01-01

    A cast nickel-base superalloy, NX-188, coated and uncoated, was tested in a high-velocity gas stream for resistance to oxidation and thermal fatigue by cycling between room temperature and 980, 1040, and 1090 C. Contrary to the behavior of more conventional nickel-base alloys, uncoated NX-188 exhibited the greatest weight loss at the lowest test temperature. In general, on the basis of weight change and metallographic observations a coating consisting of vapor-deposited Fe-Cr-Al-Y over a chromized substrate exhibited the best overall performance in resistance to oxidation and thermal fatigue.

  4. Study of the influence of Cu and Ni on the kinetics of strain-induced martensite in austempered ductile cast iron; Estudio de la influencia del Cu y Ni en la cinetica de transformacion martensitica inducida por deformacion en fundiciones nodulares austemperadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman, D.; Navea, L.; Garin, J.; Aguilar, C.; Guzman, A.

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this work was to study the influence of copper and nickel on the kinetics of strain-induced martensite in austempered ductile cast iron. The austempered ductile cast irons were obtained from two ductile cast irons with different copper and nickel contents by means of austempering treatment. The deformation was carried out using a rolling mill. The quantification of the phases was obtained by means of X ray diffraction, while the microstructural characterization was carried out using optical and scanning electron microscopy. It was proved that the kinetics of strain-induced martensite in austempered ductile cast iron can be modeled using the equations proposed by Olson- Cohen and Chang et al. Based on the results obtained from these analyses, it is possible to conclude that the nickel and copper complicate the martensite transformation because these elements increase the staking fault energy of the austenite and its thermodynamic stability. (Author)

  5. Process for Producing a Cast Article from a Hypereutectic Aluminum-Silicon Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Chen, Po-Shou (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A process for making a cast article from an aluminum alloy includes first casting an article from an alloy having the following composition, in weight percent: Silicon (Si) 14.0-25.0, Copper (CU) 5.5-8.0, Iron (Fe) 0-0.8, Magnesium (Mg) 0.5-1.5, Nickel (Ni) 0.05-1.2, Manganese (Mn) 0-1.0, Titanium (Ti) 0.05-1.2, Zirconium (Zr) 0.12-1.2, Vanadium (V) 0.05-1.2, Zinc (Zn) 0-0.9, Phosphorus (P) 0.001-0.1, Aluminum, balance. In this alloy the ration of Si:Mg is 15-35, and the ratio of Cu:Mg is 4-15. After an article is cast from the alloy, the cast article is aged at a temperature within the range of 400 F to 500 F for a time period within the range of four to 16 hours. It has been found especially advantageous if the cast article is first exposed to a solutionizing step prior to the aging step. This solutionizing step is carried out by exposing the cast article to a temperature within the range of 875 F to 1025 F for a time period of fifteen minutes to four hours. It has also been found to be especially advantageous if the solutionizing step is followed directly with a quenching step, wherein the cast article is quenched in a quenching medium such as water at a temperature within the range of 120 F to 300 F. The resulting cast article is highly suitable in a number of high temperature applications, such as heavy-duty pistons for internal combustion engines.

  6. Standard Specification for Copper-Aluminum-Silicon-Cobalt Alloy, Copper-Nickel-Silicon-Magnesium Alloy, Copper-Nickel-Silicon Alloy, Copper-Nickel-Aluminum-Magnesium Alloy, and Copper-Nickel-Tin Alloy Sheet and Strip

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    Standard Specification for Copper-Aluminum-Silicon-Cobalt Alloy, Copper-Nickel-Silicon-Magnesium Alloy, Copper-Nickel-Silicon Alloy, Copper-Nickel-Aluminum-Magnesium Alloy, and Copper-Nickel-Tin Alloy Sheet and Strip

  7. Experiments shed new light on nickel-fluorine reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, J.; Gunther, W.; Jarry, R. L.

    1967-01-01

    Isotopic tracer experiments and scale-impingement experiments show fluorine to be the migrating species through the nickel fluoride scale formed during the fluorination of nickel. This is in contrast to nickel oxide scales, where nickel is the migrating species.

  8. Oxidation Resistant Ti-Al-Fe Diffusion Barrier for FeCrAlY Coatings on Titanium Aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P. (Inventor); Smialke, James L. (Inventor); Brindley, William J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A diffusion barrier to help protect titanium aluminide alloys, including the coated alloys of the TiAl gamma + Ti3Al (alpha2) class, from oxidative attack and interstitial embrittlement at temperatures up to at least 1000 C is disclosed. The coating may comprise FeCrAlX alloys. The diffusion barrier comprises titanium, aluminum, and iron in the following approximate atomic percent: Ti-(50-55)Al-(9-20)Fe. This alloy is also suitable as an oxidative or structural coating for such substrates.

  9. Mechanisms of spallation of electron beam physical vapor deposited thermal barrier coatings with and without platinum aluminide bond coat ridges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidyanathan, K.; Gell, M. [Connecticut Univ., Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Metallurgy; Jordan, E. [Dept. Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut, CT-06269, Storrs (United States)

    2000-11-01

    Grain boundary ridges, that form on the surface of platinum aluminide [(Ni,Pt)Al] bond coats prior to the deposition of the yttria stabilized zirconia ceramic layer by the electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) process, were shown to be the sites for spallation damage initiation in (Ni,Pt)Al/EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings. When these ridges are removed prior to deposition of the ceramic layer, a 3 x life improvement is achieved. This study compares the spallation mechanisms in specimens with and without bond coat ridges, in order to explain the improvement in spallation life. (orig.)

  10. Processing of Advanced Cast Alloys for A-USC Steam Turbine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Hawk, Jeffery A.; Cowen, Christopher J.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    2012-02-01

    The high-temperature components within conventional supercritical coal-fired power plants are manufactured from ferritic/martensitic steels. To reduce greenhouse-gas emissions, the efficiency of pulverized coal steam power plants must be increased to as high a temperature and pressure as feasible. The proposed steam temperature in the DOE/NETL Advanced Ultra Supercritical power plant is high enough (760°C) that ferritic/martensitic steels will not work for the majority of high-temperature components in the turbine or for pipes and tubes in the boiler due to temperature limitations of this class of materials. Thus, Ni-based superalloys are being considered for many of these components. Off-the-shelf forged nickel alloys have shown good promise at these temperatures, but further improvements can be made through experimentation within the nominal chemistry range as well as through thermomechanical processing and subsequent heat treatment. However, cast nickel-based superalloys, which possess high strength, creep resistance, and weldability, are typically not available, particularly those with good ductility and toughness that are weldable in thick sections. To address those issues related to thick casting for turbine casings, for example, cast analogs of selected wrought nickel-based superalloys such as alloy 263, Haynes 282, and Nimonic 105 have been produced. Alloy design criteria, melt processing experiences, and heat treatment are discussed with respect to the as-processed and heat-treated microstructures and selected mechanical properties. The discussion concludes with the prospects for full-scale development of a thick section casting for a steam turbine valve chest or rotor casing.

  11. Some Theoretical Considerations on Caste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudan Subedi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Caste as a system of social stratification was an encompassing system in the past. There was reciprocal system of exchange goods and services. With time, occupation and mode of generation of livelihood of various caste groups changed, and the traditional form of jajmani system fizzled out. This paper provides an account of changing perspectives of caste relations in social science writing and political discourse. The discourse of caste has been shifted from ritual hierarchy and social discrimination to an instrument to mobilize people for economic and political gain. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/dsaj.v7i0.10437 Dhaulagiri Journal of Sociology and Anthropology Vol. 7, 2013; 51-86

  12. The CAST Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Autiero, D; Cébrian, S; Carmona, J M; Chesi, Enrico Guido; Davenport, M; Delattre, M; Di Lella, L; Formenti, F; Gomez, H; Hasinoff, M; Irastorza, I G; Lakic, B; Luzón, G; Morales, J; Musa, L; Ortiz, A; Placci, A; Rodríguez, A; Ruz, J; Villar, J A; Zioutas, K

    2007-01-01

    One of the three X-ray detectors of the CAST experiment searching for solar axions is a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with a multi-wire proportional counter (MWPC) as a readout structure. Its design has been optimized to provide high sensitivity to the detection of the low intensity X-ray signal expected in the CAST experiment. A low hardware threshold of 0.8 keV is safely set during normal data taking periods, and the overall efficiency for the detection of photons coming from conversion of solar axions is 62 %. Shielding has been installed around the detector, lowering the background level to 4.10 x 10^-5 counts/cm^2/s/keV between 1 and 10 keV. During phase I of the CAST experiment the TPC has provided robust and stable operation, thus contributing with a competitive result to the overall CAST limit on axion-photon coupling and mass.

  13. Casting Using A Polystyrene Pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Peter; Guenther, Bengamin; Vranas, Thomas; Veneris, Peter; Joyner, Michael

    1993-01-01

    New technique for making metal aircraft models saves significant amount of time and effort in comparison with conventional lost-wax method. Produces inexpensive, effective wind-tunnel models. Metal wind-tunnel model cast by use of polystyrene pattern.

  14. Prediction of maximum casting defect size in MAR-M-247 alloy processed by hot isostatic pressing

    OpenAIRE

    Miroslav Šmíd; Stanislava Fintová; Ludvík Kunz; Pavel Hutař; Karel Hrbáček

    2015-01-01

    Nickel based MAR-M-247 superalloy treated by hot isostatic pressing was investigated with the aim to identify the influence of casting defect size on fatigue life. Two testing temperatures of 650 and 800°C and one stress amplitude were chosen for fatigue tests. The Murakami approach and the largest extreme value distribution theory were applied. It has been found that the maximum size of casting defects in a specimen can be satisfactorily predicted. Fatigue life of specimens was in the good a...

  15. Agile Manufacturing Development of Castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    responsible for con- verting the available 2D CATIA casting design into a 3D Pro/Engineering geometric model of the casting, for use by Clinkenbeard...changes to the draw- ings. MWM. As the part designer, MWM reviewed and evalu- ated proposed changes to the design. MWM also updated the CATIA ...creation of solid models of the cores and molds, using IGES translations of the CATIA files secured from MWM through GE Transportation Sys- tems. Due

  16. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2011-01-01

    @@ Vermicular graphite cast iron(VG iron for short in the following sections)is a type of cast iron in which the graphite is intermediate in shape between flake and spheroidal.Compared with the normal flake graphite in grey iron, the graphite in VG iron is shorter and thicker and shows a curved, more rounded shape.Because its outer contour is exactly like a worm, hence it is called vermicular graphite.

  17. Inoculation of chromium white cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kopyciński

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been proved that an addition of boron carbide introduced as an inoculant to the chromium white cast iron changes the structureof castings. Castings after inoculation revealed a different structure with numerous grains. Primary precipitates of chromium carbide also appeared, reducing the mechanical properties of as-cast parts. Properly established heat treatment regime makes chromium iron castings regain their, originally high, mechanical properties.

  18. Light metal compound casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Konrad; J.; M.; PAPIS; Joerg; F.; LOEFFLER; Peter; J.; UGGOWITZER

    2009-01-01

    ‘Compound casting’simplifies joining processes by directly casting a metallic melt onto a solid metal substrate. A continuously metallurgic transition is very important for industrial applications, such as joint structures of spaceframe constructions in transport industry. In this project, ‘compound casting’ of light metals is investigated, aiming at weight-saving. The substrate used is a wrought aluminium alloy of type AA5xxx, containing magnesium as main alloying element. The melts are aluminium alloys, containing various alloying elements (Cu, Si, Zn), and magnesium. By replacing the natural oxygen layer with a zinc layer, the inherent wetting difficulties were avoided, and compounds with flawless interfaces were successfully produced (no contraction defects, cracks or oxides). Electron microscopy and EDX investigations as well as optical micrographs of the interfacial areas revealed their continu- ously metallic constitution. Diffusion of alloying elements leads to heat-treatable microstructures in the vicinity of the joining interfaces in Al-Al couples. This permits significant variability of mechanical properties. Without significantly cutting down on wettability, the formation of low-melting intermetallic phases (Al3Mg2 and Al12Mg17 IMPs) at the interface of Al-Mg couples was avoided by applying a protective coating to the substrate.

  19. Solid solution strengthening and diffusion in nickel- and cobalt-based superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehman, Hamad ur

    2016-07-01

    Nickel and cobalt-based superalloys with a γ-γ{sup '} microstructure are known for their excellent creep resistance at high temperatures. Their microstructure is engineered using different alloying elements, that partition either to the fcc γ matrix or to the ordered γ{sup '} phase. In the present work the effect of alloying elements on their segregation behaviour in nickel-based superalloys, diffusion in cobalt-based superalloys and the temperature dependent solid solution strengthening in nickel-based alloys is investigated. The effect of dendritic segregation on the local mechanical properties of individual phases in the as-cast, heat treated and creep deformed state of a nickel-based superalloy is investigated. The local chemical composition is characterized using Electron Probe Micro Analysis and then correlated with the mechanical properties of individual phases using nanoindentation. Furthermore, the temperature dependant solid solution hardening contribution of Ta, W and Re towards fcc nickel is studied. The room temperature hardening is determined by a diffusion couple approach using nanoindentation and energy dispersive X-ray analysis for relating hardness to the chemical composition. The high temperature properties are determined using compression strain rate jump tests. The results show that at lower temperatures, the solute size is prevalent and the elements with the largest size difference with nickel, induce the greatest hardening consistent with a classical solid solution strengthening theory. At higher temperatures, the solutes interact with the dislocations such that the slowest diffusing solute poses maximal resistance to dislocation glide and climb. Lastly, the diffusion of different technically relevant solutes in fcc cobalt is investigated using diffusion couples. The results show that the large atoms diffuse faster in cobalt-based superalloys similar to their nickel-based counterparts.

  20. In-service testing of Ni{sub 3}Al coupons and trays in carburizing furnaces at Delphi Saginaw. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K.; Santella, M.L.; Viswanathan, S.; Swindeman, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chatterjee, M. [General Motors Corporaion, Saginaw Division (United States)

    1998-08-01

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) report deals with the development of nickel aluminide alloy for improved longer life heat-resistant fixture assemblies for batch and continuous pusher carburizing furnaces. The nickel aluminide development was compared in both coupon and component testing with the currently used Fe-Ni-Cr heat-resisting alloy known as HU. The specific goals of the CRADA were: (1) casting process development, (2) characterization and possible modification of the alloy composition to optimize its manufacturing ability and performance under typical furnace operating conditions, and (3) testing and evaluation of specimens and prototype fixtures. In support of the CRADA objectives, coupons of nickel aluminide and the HU alloy were installed in both batch and pusher furnaces. The coupons were taken from two silicon levels and contained welds made with two different filler compositions (IC-221LA and IC-221W). Both nickel-aluminide and HU coupons were removed from the batch and pusher carburizing furnace at time intervals ranging from one month to one year. The exposed coupons were cut and mounted for metallographic, hardness, and microprobe analysis. The results of the microstructural analysis have been transmitted to General Motors Corporation, Saginaw Division (Delphi Saginaw) through reports that were presented at periodic CRADA review meetings. Based on coupon testing and verification of the coupon results with the testing of trays, Delphi Saginaw moved forward with the use of six additional trays in a batch furnace and two assemblies in a pusher furnace. Fifty percent of the trays and fixtures are in the as-cast condition and the remaining trays and fixtures are in the preoxidized condition. The successful operating experience of two assemblies in the pusher furnace for nearly a year formed the basis for a production run of 63 more assemblies. The production run required melting of 94 heats weighing 500 lb. each. Twenty

  1. EVOLUTION OF AS-CAST MICROSTRUCTURES OF 356 ALUMINIUM ALLOY CAST BY LIQUIDUS CASTING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Dong; G.M. Lu; J.Z. Cui; Z.H. Zhao

    2003-01-01

    A new method (liquidus casting) was used for 356 Al alloy semi-solid slurry mak-ing. The structures of 356 Al alloy cast by a Fe mould and semi-continuous castingmachine at different temperatures were investigated. How the globular grains formwas also discussed. The results show that either being cast by single Fe mould orsemi-continuous machine, the microstructures are not conventional dendrites but fineand net-globular grains. The average grain size is smaller than 30μm and suitableenough for thixoforming, meanwhile it can improve the mechanical properties of fol-lowing products. Under the suitable casting velocity and cooling intensity, most ofglobal grains prolong their global growth and collide with each other before dendriticgrowth because of the large amount of the nucleation sites.

  2. Nickel and cobalt allergy before and after nickel regulation--evaluation of a public health intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan

    2011-09-01

    Over the 20th century, the frequent use of nickel in consumer products resulted in an increasing prevalence of nickel allergy. Risk items included suspenders in the 1950s-1960s; buttons, zippers and rivets in the 1970s; and ear-piercing jewellery in the 1980s. When subjects allergic to nickel were exposed to nickel in high concentrations, it often resulted in allergic nickel contact dermatitis and hand eczema. In 1990, the Danish government began to regulate consumer nickel exposure as a response to the increasing nickel allergy problem. In 1994, the EU Nickel Directive was passed, a regulation that was based on the Danish and Swedish nickel regulations. These major public health interventions were expected to change the epidemiology of nickel allergy and dermatitis in Europe. Furthermore, it was debated whether nickel would be replaced by cobalt in inexpensive jewellery and result in higher prevalence of cobalt allergy. An evaluation of the possible effects of the European nickel regulations is of importance to ensure protection of consumers and dermatitis patients. This doctoral thesis aimed to evaluate the effects of regulatory interventions on nickel exposure by investigating the development of nickel allergy and dermatitis before and after nickel regulation. Furthermore, a change in the association between nickel allergy and hand eczema was evaluated. The nickel spot test was validated to determine its value when used for screening purposes. Possible explanations for the persistence of nickel allergy were explored including genetic predisposition and consumer nickel exposure from jewellery and accessories. A cobalt spot test was developed and validated. Finally, it was evaluated whether a cobalt allergy epidemic had replaced the nickel allergy epidemic after nickel regulation in terms of increasing cobalt sensitization and cobalt exposure. The thesis showed that the prevalence of nickel allergy decreased significantly after nickel regulation in young Danish

  3. The effects of platinum on nickel electrodes in the nickel hydrogen cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Albert H.

    1991-01-01

    Interactions of platinum and platinum compounds with the nickel electrode that are possible in the nickel hydrogen cell, where both the nickel electrode and a platinum catalyst hydrogen electrode are in intimate contact with the alkaline electrolyte, are examined. Additionally, a mechanism of nickel cobalt oxyhydroxide formation in NiH2 cells is presented.

  4. AN ELECTROPLATING METHOD OF FORMING PLATINGS OF NICKEL, COBALT, NICKEL ALLOYS OR COBALT ALLOYS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    An electroplating method of forming platings of nickel, cobalt, nickel alloys or cobalt alloys with reduced stresses in an electrodepositing bath of the type: Watt's bath, chloride bath or a combination thereof, by employing pulse plating with periodic reverse pulse and a sulfonated naphthalene...... additive. This method makes it possible to deposit nickel, cobalt, nickel or cobalt platings without internal stresses....

  5. Nickel and nickel-phosphorous matrix composite electrocoatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nicolas SPYRELLIS; Evangelia A. PAVLATOU; Styliani SPANOU; Alexandros ZOIKIS-KARATHANASIS

    2009-01-01

    Nickel and nickel-phosphorous matrix composite coatings reinforced by TiO2, SiC and WC particles were produced under direct and pulse current conditions from an additive-free Watts' type bath. The influence of the variable electrolysis parameters (type of current, frequency of current pulses and current density) and the reinforcing particles properties (type, size and concentration in the bath) on the surface morphology and the structure of the deposits was examined. It is demonstrated that the embedding of ceramic particles modifies in various ways the nickel electrocrystallisation process. On the other hand, Ni-P amorphous matrix is not affected by the occlusion of the particles. Overall, the imposition of pulse current conditions leads to composite coatings with increased embedded percentage and more homogenous distribution of particles in the matrix than coatings produced under direct current regime.

  6. Nickel hydrogen battery cell storage matrix test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, James R.; Dodson, Gary W.

    1993-01-01

    Test were conducted to evaluate post storage performance of nickel hydrogen cells with various design variables, the most significant being nickel precharge versus hydrogen precharge. Test procedures and results are presented in outline and graphic form.

  7. Nickel-responsive transcriptional regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musiani, Francesco; Zambelli, Barbara; Bazzani, Micaela; Mazzei, Luca; Ciurli, Stefano

    2015-09-01

    Nickel is an essential micronutrient for a large number of living organisms, but it is also a toxic metal ion when it accumulates beyond the sustainable level as it may result if and when its cellular trafficking is not properly governed. Therefore, the homeostasis and metabolism of nickel is tightly regulated through metal-specific protein networks that respond to the available Ni(II) concentration. These are directed by specific nickel sensors, able to couple Ni(II) binding to a change in their DNA binding affinity and/or specificity, thus translating the cellular level of Ni(II) into a modification of the expression of the proteins devoted to modulating nickel uptake, efflux and cellular utilization. This review describes the Ni(II)-dependent transcriptional regulators discovered so far, focusing on their structural features, metal coordination modes and metal binding thermodynamics. Understanding these properties is essential to comprehend how these sensors correlate nickel availability to metal coordination and functional responses. A broad and comparative study, described here, reveals some general traits that characterize the binding stoichiometry and Ni(II) affinity of these metallo-sensors.

  8. A study on the formation of iron aluminide (FeAl) from elemental powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sina, H.; Corneliusson, J.; Turba, K.; Iyengar, S.

    2015-07-05

    Highlights: • Fe–40 at.% Al discs with coarse iron powder showed precombustion and combustion peaks. • Loose powder mixtures and discs with fine iron powder showed only combustion peaks. • Slower heating rate and fine aluminum particles promote precombustion. • The major product formed during both the reactions was Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5}. • Heating the samples to 1000 °C yielded a stable FeAl phase as the final product. - Abstract: The formation of iron aluminide (FeAl) during the heating of Fe–40 at.% Al powder mixture has been studied using a differential scanning calorimeter. The effect of particle size of the reactants, compaction of the powder mixtures as well as the heating rate on combustion behavior has been investigated. On heating compacted discs containing relatively coarser iron powder, DSC data show two consecutive exothermic peaks corresponding to precombustion and combustion reactions. The product formed during both these reactions is Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} and there is a volume expansion in the sample. The precombustion reaction could be improved by a slower heating rate as well as a better surface coverage of iron particles using relatively finer aluminum powder. The combustion reaction was observed to be weaker after a strong precombustion stage. Heating the samples to 1000 °C resulted in the formation of a single and stable FeAl phase through the diffusional reaction between Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} and residual iron. DSC results for compacted discs containing relatively finer iron powder and for the non-compacted samples showed a single combustion exotherm during heating, with Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} as the product and traces of FeAl. X-ray diffraction and EDS data confirmed the formation of FeAl as the final product after heating these samples to 1000 °C.

  9. Untouchable castes of Uttar Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharinin Artem Igorevich

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Untouchable Castes of Uttar Pradesh are examined in this article. This region is one of the most populated in India. Also it is one of the most social mixed-composed in whole State. That’s why main conclusions which were made on this material can be extrapolated to all social space of country. The authors choose four ethno-caste groups, which represent the majority in untouchables and the three smallest in jaties. Their positions in regional hierarchy and economic specialization are analyzed in detail. There are a lot of information about their number, social structure, literacy rating, endogamy, day-to-day practices, customs and other features. Special accents were pointed on mind orientation of their elites toward integration in modern society or, conversely, toward the conservation of traditional forms of existence. The issues of origin and social evolution of untouchable castes of Uttar Pradesh are examined. There is assessment of castes’ sanskritization or other forms of social selfdevelopment. The quality of “scheduled” castes social environment is analyzed. As a marks of its positiveness the data about discrimination untouchables from other social groups and degree of political representativeness of “scheduled” castes, accessibility of education and labour were chosen. The conclusions were made about development degree of some castes. The factors that play role in positive changes in contemporary conditions were determined. The authors put forward their own hypothesis of future development of untouchable castes in Uttar Pradesh. Empiric base of this article was established on sources that have Indian origin and historical and social research of outstanding western indologies.

  10. Recent Advances in the Synthesis and Stabilization of Nickel and Nickel Oxide Nanoparticles: A Green Adeptness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran Din, Muhammad; Rani, Aneela

    2016-01-01

    Green protocols for the synthesis of nanoparticles have been attracting a lot of attention because they are eco-friendly, rapid, and cost-effective. Nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles have been synthesized by green routes and characterized for impact of green chemistry on the properties and biological effects of nanoparticles in the last five years. Green synthesis, properties, and applications of nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles have been reported in the literature. This review summarizes the synthesis of nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles using different biological systems. This review also provides comparative overview of influence of chemical synthesis and green synthesis on structural properties of nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles and their biological behavior. It concludes that green methods for synthesis of nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles are better than chemical synthetic methods.

  11. The EU Nickel Directive revisited--future steps towards better protection against nickel allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Uter, Wolfgang; McFadden, John;

    2011-01-01

    In July 2001, the EU Nickel Directive came into full force to protect European citizens against nickel allergy and dermatitis. Prior to this intervention, Northern European governments had already begun to regulate consumer nickel exposure. According to part 2 of the EU Nickel Directive...... and the Danish nickel regulation, consumer items intended to be in direct and prolonged contact with the skin were not allowed to release more than 0.5 µg nickel/cm2/week. It was considered unlikely that nickel allergy would disappear altogether as a proportion of individuals reacted below the level defined...... by the EU Nickel Directive. Despite this, the EU Nickel Directive part 2 was expected to work as an operational limit that would sufficiently protect European consumers against nickel allergy and dermatitis. This review presents the accumulation of epidemiological studies that evaluated the possible effect...

  12. The Deactivation of Nickel Hydroxide to Hypophosphite Electrooxidation on a Nickel Electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue ZENG; Min MO; Jian Long YI; Xin Jun TANG; Hui Xian WANG

    2004-01-01

    The deactivation of nickel hydroxide to the electrooxidation of hypophosphite on a nickel electrode was studied by means of in situ UV-Vis subtractive reflectance spectroscopy. The experimental results show that when the potential is lower than -1.0 V (SCE), the surface on nickel electrode is free of nickel hydroxide, on which hypophosphite is active. When the potential moves positively to about-0.75V, two absorbency bands around 300 nm and 550 nm, which were ascribed to the formation of α-nickel hydroxide, were observed, nickel is oxidized to α-nickel hydroxide.Severe deactivation of the surface occurs when the nickel surface is covered with nickel hydroxide,which separates the hypophosphite ion from nickel substrate.

  13. The EU Nickel Directive revisited--future steps towards better protection against nickel allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Uter, Wolfgang; McFadden, John;

    2011-01-01

    and the Danish nickel regulation, consumer items intended to be in direct and prolonged contact with the skin were not allowed to release more than 0.5 µg nickel/cm2/week. It was considered unlikely that nickel allergy would disappear altogether as a proportion of individuals reacted below the level defined......In July 2001, the EU Nickel Directive came into full force to protect European citizens against nickel allergy and dermatitis. Prior to this intervention, Northern European governments had already begun to regulate consumer nickel exposure. According to part 2 of the EU Nickel Directive...... by the EU Nickel Directive. Despite this, the EU Nickel Directive part 2 was expected to work as an operational limit that would sufficiently protect European consumers against nickel allergy and dermatitis. This review presents the accumulation of epidemiological studies that evaluated the possible effect...

  14. The Influence of Cobalt on the Microstructure of the Nickel-Base Superalloy MAR-M247

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathal, M. V.; Maier, R. D.; Ebert, L. J.

    1982-10-01

    The influence of cobalt on the microstructure of MAR-M247, a cast nickel-base superalloy, was investigated. Nickel was substituted for Co to produce 0, 5, and the standard 10 pct Co versions of MAR-M247. The microstructures of the alloys were examined using optical and electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, phase extraction, and differential thermal analysis. Samples were examined in as-cast, heat treated, long-time aged, and stress-rupture tested conditions. As Co was removed from MAR-M247, the γ' volume fraction decreased, the mean γ' particle size increased, the W and Ti concentrations in the γ' increased, the Cr and Al concentrations in the γ phase decreased, and the amount of carbides increased. This increase in carbide precipitation caused a change from discrete grain boundary carbides to a grain boundary film as Co level decreased.

  15. Evaluation of iron aluminide weld overlays for erosion - corrosion resistant boiler tube coatings in low NO{sub x} boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DuPont, J.N.; Banovic, S.W.; Marder, A.R. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Low NOx burners are being installed in many fossil fired power plants in order to comply with new Clean Air Regulations. Due to the operating characteristics of these burners, boiler tube sulfidation corrosion is often enhanced and premature tube failures can occur. Failures due to oxidation and solid particle erosion are also a concern. A program was initiated in early 1996 to evaluate the use of iron aluminide weld overlays for erosion/corrosion protection of boiler tubes in Low NOx boilers. Composite iron/aluminum wires will be used with the Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) process to prepare overlays on boiler tubes steels with aluminum contents from 8 to 16wt%. The weldability of the composite wires will be evaluated as a function of chemical composition and welding parameters. The effect of overlay composition on corrosion (oxidation and sulfidation) and solid particle erosion will also be evaluated. The laboratory studies will be complemented by field exposures of both iron aluminide weld overlays and co-extruded tubing under actual boiler conditions.

  16. Development of vacuum die-casting process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masashi Uchida

    2009-01-01

    The vacuum die-casting process, started 25 years ago in Japan, has been widely applied. This technology contributes very much to improvement of castings quality. The main factor causing the defects of die castings is the trapped air in the mold cavity, while the key technology of vacuum die-casting process is to avoid the trapped air effectively by evacuating the cavity before casting. At the same time, due to the shot speed and the casting pressure reduced in half, the service life of the die is prolonged and the productivity is enhanced, as well. Vacuum die-casting process is of great significance in improving the die castings quality and making up the shortcomings of super-high-speed shot casting.

  17. Nickel may be released from laptop computers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Møller, Per

    2012-01-01

    Consumer nickel sensitization and dermatitis is caused by prolonged or repeated skin exposure to items that release nickel, for example jewellery, belts, buttons, watches, and mobile phones (1–3). We recently described a patient in whom primary nickel contact sensitization and dermatitis develope...... following the use of an Apple laptop computer (4). To estimate nickel release from Apple laptop computers, we investigated a random sample of 20 devices....

  18. Pulse reversal plating of nickel alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Peter Torben

    2007-01-01

    ), internal stress and material distribution are even more important. With baths based upon nickel chloride, and nickel and cobalt chlorides, pulse reversal plating of both pure nickel and nickel-cobalt alloys has been used to fabricate tools for microinjection moulding. Pulse reversal plating of ternary soft...... magnetic alloys, comprising 45-65%Co, 15-35%Fe and 15-35%Ni, is also reported....

  19. Fillability of Thin-Wall Steel Castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert C. Voigt; Joseph Bertoletti; Andrew Kaley; Sandi Ricotta; Travis Sunday

    2002-07-30

    The use of steel components is being challenged by lighter nonferrous or cast iron components. The development of techniques for enhancing and ensuring the filability of thin-wall mold cavities is most critical for thinner wall cast steel production. The purpose of this research was to develop thin-wall casting techniques that can be used to reliably produce thin-wall castings from traditional gravity poured sand casting processes. The focus of the research was to enhance the filling behavior to prevent misrunds. Experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of various foundry variables on the filling of thin section steel castings. These variables include casting design, heat transfer, gating design, and metal fluidity. Wall thickness and pouring temperature have the greatest effect on casting fill. As wall thickness increases the volume to surface area of the casting increases, which increases the solidification time, allowing the metal to flow further in thicker sect ions. Pouring time is another significant variable affecting casting fill. Increases or decreases of 20% in the pouring time were found to have a significant effect on the filling of thin-wall production castings. Gating variables, including venting, pouring head height, and mold tilting also significantly affected thin-wall casting fill. Filters offer less turbulent, steadier flow, which is appropriate for thicker castings, but they do not enhance thin-wall casting fill.

  20. Corrosion-resistant nickel-base alloys for gas turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, J.W.; Hulsizer, W.R.

    1976-08-01

    Laboratory corrosion screening procedures used during the past ten years in developing nickel-base superalloys for gas turbine applications are described. Hot salt corrosion tests have included crucible and salt shower exposures. Reproducible techniques were established and alloy composition effects defined, leading to development of M313, IN-587, a IN-792. Correlations have been made with corrosion results in burner rigs, and engine experience confirming anticipated behavior is now becoming available. During this work a number of limitations of these accelerated laboratory tests were uncovered; these are discussed. Finally, brief descriptions of the states of development of alloy MA 755E (an oxide dispersion-strengthened superalloy) and IN-939 (a cast 23 percent chromium superalloy) are outlined as examples of advanced corrosion resistant, high strength materials of the future.

  1. Investigation of hydrogen evolution activity for the nickel, nickel-molybdenum nickel-graphite composite and nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinlong, Lv, E-mail: ljlbuaa@126.com [Beijing Key Laboratory of Fine Ceramics, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang [Beijing Key Laboratory of Fine Ceramics, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-03-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Improved HER efficiency of Ni-Mo coatings was attributed to ‘cauliflower’ like microstructure. • RGO in nickel-RGO composite coating promoted refined grain and facilitated HER. • Synergistic effect between nickel and RGO facilitated HER due to large specific surface of RGO. - Abstract: The nickel, nickel-molybdenum alloy, nickel-graphite and nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coatings were obtained by the electrodeposition technique from a nickel sulfate bath. Nanocrystalline molybdenum, graphite and reduced graphene oxide in nickel coatings promoted hydrogen evolution reaction in 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution at room temperature. However, the nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coating exhibited the highest electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction in 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution at room temperature. A large number of gaps between ‘cauliflower’ like grains could decrease effective area for hydrogen evolution reaction in slight amorphous nickel-molybdenum alloy. The synergistic effect between nickel and reduced graphene oxide promoted hydrogen evolution, moreover, refined grain in nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coating and large specific surface of reduced graphene oxide also facilitated hydrogen evolution reaction.

  2. Influencia del contenido de Mg,Cu y Ni en la estructura y propiedades mecánicas de las aleaciones Al-7Si fundidas. // Mg,Cu and Nickel content influence in the structure and mechanical properties of Al-7Si casting alloys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Lavaert

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available El diseño de aleaciones de aluminio de alta calidad involucra la selección adecuada de los elementos de aleación y lacorrecta aplicación del tratamiento térmico, con la desventaja del necesario aumento del tiempo del proceso. En el presentetrabajo se analiza la influencia de la adición de diferentes elementos de aleación sobre la estructura y propiedadesmecánicas de la aleación base Al7SiMg (A356. Las propiedades fueron analizadas para la aleación en estado fundido,después de la modificación y con tratamiento térmico con el fin de evaluar la posibilidad de eliminar el tratamientoposterior mediante una correcta selección de los elementos de adición.Palabras claves: Aleaciones de aluminio, elementos de aleación, diseño de aleación, fundición, propiedadesmecánicas, tratamiento térmico.______________________________________________________________________________Abstract.The design of high quality aluminum alloys involves the appropriate selection of the alloy elements and the correct application of thethermal treatment, with the disadvantage of the necessary increase of time process. Presently work analyzed the influence of theaddition of different alloy elements on the structure and mechanical properties of the alloy Al7SiMg bases (A356. The properties wereanalyzed for the alloy in fused state after modification and with thermal treatment with the purpose of evaluating the possibility toeliminate the later treatment by means of a correct selection of the addition elements.Key words. Aluminum alloys, alloy design, mechanical properties, casting, thermal treatment.

  3. Research progress on squeeze casting in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yuanyuan; Zhang Weiwen; Zhao Haidong; You Dongdong; Zhang Datong; Shao Ming; Zhang Wen

    2014-01-01

    Squeeze casting is a technology with short route, high efficiency and precise forming, possessing features of casting and plastic processing. It is widely used to produce high performance metallic structural parts. As energy conservation and environmental protection concerns have risen, lightweight and high performance metal parts are urgently needed, which accelerated the development of squeeze casting technology over the past two decades in China. In this paper, research progress on squeeze casting aloys, typical parts manufacturing and development of squeeze casting equipment in China are introduced. The future trend and development priorities of squeeze casting are discussed.

  4. Nickel electrode for alkaline batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charkey, A.; Januszkiewicz, S.

    1985-10-08

    A nickel electrode including a conductive support and a layer on the support including a mixture of a nickel active material and a graphite diluent containing a spinel type oxide, the spinel type oxide having the formula M/sub 2/Co/sub 2/O/sub 4/, where M/sub 2/ is Co, Ni, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn or Cd, or combinations thereof, and having a weight which is in the range of 1-30 percent of the weight of the diluent.

  5. Electrochemical Characterisation of Nanocrystalline Nickel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepika Sachdeva

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Nanocry stalline nickel (nc-Ni coatings were produced by pulse electro deposition using Watts bath with sodium citrate and saccharin added as grain refining agents. The electrochemical nature of nc-Ni coatings, evaluated in 1M H2SO4 solution by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The corrosion rate of bulk nickel was lower than that of nc-Ni after stabilisation of free corrosion potential.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(4, pp.525-530, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1673

  6. CAST Physics Proposal to SPSC

    CERN Document Server

    CAST, Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The CAST experiment has the potential to search for solar axions (dark matter particle candidates) or other particles with similar coupling. E.g., paraphtons (Hidden Sector), chameleons (dark energy), while considering the possibility whether CAST could be transformed to an antenna for relic axions with rest mass up to 0.1 to 1meV. While axion searches suggest detectors with lower background, paraphoton and chameleon searches require detectors with sub-keV threshold energy and the use of transparent windows in front of the Micromegas detectors, which cover 3 out of the 4 CAST magnet exits. Ongoing theoretical estimates and experimental investigations will define the priorities of the suggested 4 physics items of this proposal for the period 2012-2014.

  7. Energy Consumption of Die Casting Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerald Brevick; clark Mount-Campbell; Carroll Mobley

    2004-03-15

    Molten metal processing is inherently energy intensive and roughly 25% of the cost of die-cast products can be traced to some form of energy consumption [1]. The obvious major energy requirements are for melting and holding molten alloy in preparation for casting. The proper selection and maintenance of melting and holding equipment are clearly important factors in minimizing energy consumption in die-casting operations [2]. In addition to energy consumption, furnace selection also influences metal loss due to oxidation, metal quality, and maintenance requirements. Other important factors influencing energy consumption in a die-casting facility include geographic location, alloy(s) cast, starting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting machine, related equipment (robots, trim presses), and downstream processing (machining, plating, assembly, etc.). Each of these factors also may influence the casting quality and productivity of a die-casting enterprise. In a die-casting enterprise, decisions regarding these issues are made frequently and are based on a large number of factors. Therefore, it is not surprising that energy consumption can vary significantly from one die-casting enterprise to the next, and within a single enterprise as function of time.

  8. Sintered Nickel Powder Wicks for Flat Vertical Heat Pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geir Hansen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication and performance of wicks for flat heat pipe applications produced by sintering a filamentary nickel powder has been investigated. Tape casting was used as an intermediate step in the wick production process. Thermogravimetric analysis was used to study the burn-off of the organic binder used and to study the oxidation and reduction processes of the nickel. The wicks produced were flat, rectangular and intended for liquid transport in the upwards vertical direction. Rate-of-rise experiments using heptane were used to test the flow characteristics of the wicks. The wick porosities were measured using isopropanol. The heat transfer limitation constituted by the vapour static pressure and the capillary pressure was discussed. The influence on wick performance by using pore former in the manufacturing was studied. When Pcap/Psat > 1, the use of a pore former to increase the wick permeability will always improve the wick performance. When Pcap/Psat < 1, it was shown that if the effective pore radius and the permeability increase with an equal percentage the overall influence on the wick capacity is negative. A criterion for a successful pore former introduction is proposed and the concept of a pore former evaluation plot is presented.

  9. Nickel isotopes and methanogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubeck, A.; Ivarsson, M.

    2013-12-01

    Methanogens require Ni for their growth and as a consequence the microbial fractionation of Ni isotopes can be used as a biomarker for activity of methanogenic communities1. Anaerobic laboratory experiments was performed using methanogens to investigate methanogenic growth in a modified nutrient media2 with olivine Fo91 (5g/l) added as an additional mineral nutrient source and as the only H2 provider. One of the investigated methanogens showed an increased growth in the experiments with added olivine. There were also a close relationship between the mobilized Ni and the growth of the methanogen. Ni is an element that previously has been neglected in the study of fossilized microorganisms and their interaction with mineral substrates and, thus, there are no records or published data of Ni in association with microfossils. However, we have detected enrichments of Ni in fossilized microorganisms and ichno-fossils, respectively, from three separate locations. Ni is not present in the host rock in any of the samples. Thus, Ni is present in association with fossilized microorganisms from environments and more extensive analysis is required to understand the magnitude, uptake, preservation and fractionation of Ni in microfossils. In order to analyze Ni isotope fractionation from microbe-mineral interaction, we plan to use a high-resolution Laser-Ablation Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (LMS)3. In situ profile ablation will provide detailed and localized data on fractionation patterns between microfossils and their host rock. Also, this technique will allow us to identify the change in Ni isotopic fractionation in rock samples caused by abiotic and biogenic processes in a faster and easier way and with less risk for contamination compared to the wet chemistry analyses of Ni isotopes. 1. Cameron, V., Vance, D., Archer, C. & House, C. H. A biomarker based on the stable isotopes of nickel. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 106, 10944-10948 (2009). 2. Schn

  10. Influence of solidification variables on the cast microstructure and porosity in directionally solidified Mar-M247

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitesell, Harry Smith, III

    The solidification microstructure is critical in determining the amount and distribution of porosity that develops during the freezing of castings. As the solidification velocity Vs increases, the microstructural length scales (primary and secondary dendrite arm spacings) decrease; thus (1) the mushy zone permeability would be expected to decrease; and (2) nucleated pores would be increasingly isolated. Although the first effect would tend to increase the observed porosity, the second effect would tend to decrease the porosity. As solidification velocity decreases, the cooling rate decreases allowing additional time for carbide growth. Large carbide size may block feeding in the intercellular spaces increasing observed porosity. To better understand these competitive mechanisms, a series of controlled unidirectional experiments were performed on bars of nickel-base superalloy Mar-M247. Samples were produced with constant dendrite arm spacing throughout an extended length of each cast bar. The axial thermal gradient and withdrawal velocity imposed on each casting were varied between castings to produce a range of microstructures from aligned cellular dendritic to aligned dendritic to misaligned dendritic. Macrosegregation effects along the lengths of the bars were evaluated and the resultant impact upon the density along the lengths of each casting was also characterized. The density measurements were found to be very sensitive to both (1) compositional macrosegregation in these castings and (2) internal porosity. Statistical analyses of microporosity in castings were based upon metallographic measurements. The development of microporosity in the unidirectionally solidified castings is shown to be dependent upon the hydrogen gas content of the samples and the imposed solidification velocity through the sample's cast microstructures. An optimum intermediate withdrawal velocity of 0.005--0.01 cm/s was found, which led to closely spaced dendrite arms, a large number of

  11. WEAR-RESISTANCE OF CHROMIC CAST IRONS OF EUTECTIC COMPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. E. Baranovskij

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Casting of wear-resistant chrome cast irons in combined molds and iron chills is studied. Application of these ways of casting results in blending of carbides and increasing of hardness of castings.

  12. Casting behavior of titanium alloys in a centrifugal casting machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K; Miyakawa, O; Takada, Y; Okuno, O; Okabe, T

    2003-05-01

    Since dental casting requires replication of complex shapes with great accuracy, this study examined how well some commercial titanium alloys and experimental titanium-copper alloys filled a mold cavity. The metals examined were three types of commercial dental titanium [commercially pure titanium (hereinafter noted as CP-Ti), Ti-6Al-4V (T64) and Ti-6Al-7Nb (T67)], and experimental titanium-copper alloys [3%, 5% and 10% Cu (mass %)]. The volume percentage filling the cavity was evaluated in castings prepared in a very thin perforated sheet pattern and cast in a centrifugal casting machine. The flow behavior of the molten metal was also examined using a so-called "tracer element technique." The amounts of CP-Ti and all the Ti-Cu alloys filling the cavity were similar; less T64 and T67 filled the cavity. However, the Ti-Cu alloys failed to reach the end of the cavities due to a lower fluidity compared to the other metals. A mold prepared with specially designed perforated sheets was effective at differentiating the flow behavior of the metals tested. The present technique also revealed that the more viscous Ti-Cu alloys with a wide freezing range failed to sequentially flow to the end of the cavity.

  13. Assaying environmental nickel toxicity using model nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudel, David; Douglas, Chandler D; Huffnagle, Ian M; Besser, John M; Ingersoll, Christopher G

    2013-01-01

    Although nickel exposure results in allergic reactions, respiratory conditions, and cancer in humans and rodents, the ramifications of excess nickel in the environment for animal and human health remain largely undescribed. Nickel and other cationic metals travel through waterways and bind to soils and sediments. To evaluate the potential toxic effects of nickel at environmental contaminant levels (8.9-7,600 µg Ni/g dry weight of sediment and 50-800 µg NiCl2/L of water), we conducted assays using two cosmopolitan nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus. We assayed the effects of both sediment-bound and aqueous nickel upon animal growth, developmental survival, lifespan, and fecundity. Uncontaminated sediments were collected from sites in the Midwestern United States and spiked with a range of nickel concentrations. We found that nickel-spiked sediment substantially impairs both survival from larval to adult stages and adult longevity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, while aqueous nickel showed no adverse effects on either survivorship or longevity, we observed a significant decrease in fecundity, indicating that aqueous nickel could have a negative impact on nematode physiology. Intriguingly, C. elegans and P. pacificus exhibit similar, but not identical, responses to nickel exposure. Moreover, P. pacificus could be tested successfully in sediments inhospitable to C. elegans. Our results add to a growing body of literature documenting the impact of nickel on animal physiology, and suggest that environmental toxicological studies could gain an advantage by widening their repertoire of nematode species.

  14. Assaying environmental nickel toxicity using model nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Rudel

    Full Text Available Although nickel exposure results in allergic reactions, respiratory conditions, and cancer in humans and rodents, the ramifications of excess nickel in the environment for animal and human health remain largely undescribed. Nickel and other cationic metals travel through waterways and bind to soils and sediments. To evaluate the potential toxic effects of nickel at environmental contaminant levels (8.9-7,600 µg Ni/g dry weight of sediment and 50-800 µg NiCl2/L of water, we conducted assays using two cosmopolitan nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus. We assayed the effects of both sediment-bound and aqueous nickel upon animal growth, developmental survival, lifespan, and fecundity. Uncontaminated sediments were collected from sites in the Midwestern United States and spiked with a range of nickel concentrations. We found that nickel-spiked sediment substantially impairs both survival from larval to adult stages and adult longevity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, while aqueous nickel showed no adverse effects on either survivorship or longevity, we observed a significant decrease in fecundity, indicating that aqueous nickel could have a negative impact on nematode physiology. Intriguingly, C. elegans and P. pacificus exhibit similar, but not identical, responses to nickel exposure. Moreover, P. pacificus could be tested successfully in sediments inhospitable to C. elegans. Our results add to a growing body of literature documenting the impact of nickel on animal physiology, and suggest that environmental toxicological studies could gain an advantage by widening their repertoire of nematode species.

  15. Assaying environmental nickel toxicity using model nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudel, David; Douglas, Chandler; Huffnagle, Ian; Besser, John M.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    Although nickel exposure results in allergic reactions, respiratory conditions, and cancer in humans and rodents, the ramifications of excess nickel in the environment for animal and human health remain largely undescribed. Nickel and other cationic metals travel through waterways and bind to soils and sediments. To evaluate the potential toxic effects of nickel at environmental contaminant levels (8.9-7,600 µg Ni/g dry weight of sediment and 50-800 µg NiCl2/L of water), we conducted assays using two cosmopolitan nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus. We assayed the effects of both sediment-bound and aqueous nickel upon animal growth, developmental survival, lifespan, and fecundity. Uncontaminated sediments were collected from sites in the Midwestern United States and spiked with a range of nickel concentrations. We found that nickel-spiked sediment substantially impairs both survival from larval to adult stages and adult longevity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, while aqueous nickel showed no adverse effects on either survivorship or longevity, we observed a significant decrease in fecundity, indicating that aqueous nickel could have a negative impact on nematode physiology. Intriguingly, C. elegansand P. pacificus exhibit similar, but not identical, responses to nickel exposure. Moreover, P. pacificus could be tested successfully in sediments inhospitable to C. elegans. Our results add to a growing body of literature documenting the impact of nickel on animal physiology, and suggest that environmental toxicological studies could gain an advantage by widening their repertoire of nematode species.

  16. CAST-IRONS AT HIGH TEMPERATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Krutilin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigations of physical-mechanical characteristics of cast iron slugs, received by semicontinuos way of casting, at temperatures from 850 up to 1100^ С are given. 

  17. Coin exposure may cause allergic nickel dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Gawkrodger, David J; White, Ian R;

    2012-01-01

    Nickel is used in coins because the metal has beneficial properties, including price, colour, weight, and corrosion resistance, and also because it is easy to stamp. It has often been claimed that the duration of skin contact with coins is too short to cause nickel release and dermatitis. However......, it is well known by dermatologists specialized in occupational skin diseases, and by their nickel-allergic patients, that hand eczema in cashiers and other professionals who handle coins may be caused or aggravated by nickel release from coins. In this review, we present evidence from past studies showing...... that nickel-containing coins can indeed pose a risk for those who handle them. For protection of the health of consumers, cashiers, and other workers who handle coins, it is suggested that coins without nickel release should be used as a substitute for the high nickel-releasing coins currently in widespread...

  18. Nickel in nails, hair and plasma from nickel-hypersensitive women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Veien, Niels

    1990-01-01

    The concentrations of nickel in finger-nails, toe-nails, hair and plasma from 71 nickel-hypersensitive women and 20 non-hypersensitive women were determined. Nickel concentrations in finger-nails were significantly higher than in toe-nails in both the nickel-hypersensitive group and the control...... group. Nickel-sensitive women had significantly higher levels of nickel in toe-nails, hair and plasma than had control subjects, whereas there was no significant difference in nickel concentration in finger-nails between the two groups. No correlation could be demonstrated between nickel levels in any...... combination of nails, hair and plasma in the nickel-hypersensitive or in the control group....

  19. Restructuring of porous nickel electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenhart, S.J.; Macdonald, D.D.; Pound, B.G.

    1984-08-01

    A transmission line model for the electrochemical impedance of porous electrodes was used to study the degradation of nickel battery plates throughout their cycle life. The model was shown to successfully account for changes in the observed electrode properties in terms of simultaneous restructuring of the active mass and rupture of particleparticle ohmic contacts.

  20. Effect of silver addition on the properties of nickel-titanium alloys for dental application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Keun-Taek; Joo, Uk-Hyon; Park, Gee-Ho; Hwang, Chung-Ju; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2006-02-01

    Equiatomic and near-equiatomic nickel-titanium alloys exhibit a shape-memory effect and superelasticity. However, the properties of such alloys are extremely sensitive to the precise nickel-titanium ratio and the addition of alloying elements. High corrosion resistance is necessary for biomedical applications, especially orthodontic. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of silver addition to nickel-titanium alloys for dental and medical application. Arc melting, homogenization, hot rolling, and solution heat treatment were performed to prepare the nickel-titanium-silver (NiTi-Ag) specimens. The properties of the ternary NiTi-Ag alloys such as phase-transformation temperature, microstructure, microhardness, corrosion resistance, and cytotoxicity were investigated. The NiTi-Ag alloys showed low silver recovery rate for the cast alloy, due to silver's low evaporation temperature, and low silver solubility in nickel-titanium. Silver addition to nickel-titanium increased the transition temperature range to 100 degrees C and stabilized the martensitic phase (monoclinic structure) at room temperature, because the martensitic transformation starting temperature (Ms) was above room temperature. Martensitic and austenitic phases existed in X-ray diffraction patterns of solution-annealed NiTi-Ag alloys. The silver addition was considered to improve the corrosion resistance and form a stable passive film. Significantly, the mechanical properties of the silver-added alloys were dependent upon the amount of alloying addition. There was no toxicity in the NiTi-Ag alloys, as the response index showed none or mild levels.

  1. CONTINUOUSLY-CYCLIC CASTING OF HOLLOW CYLINDER SLUGS OF HIGH-CHROMIUM CAST IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Marukovich

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of castings formation is presented and the package of measures dircted on increase of stability of casting process is developed. Parametres of casting of hollow cylindrical billets by the method of directional solidification out of white high-chromium cast iron are defined.

  2. Developing technological process of obtaining giality casts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Issagulov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the process of manufacturing castings using sand-resin forms and alloying furnace. Were the optimal technological parameters of manufacturing shell molds for the manufacture of castings of heating equipment. Using the same upon receipt of castings by casting in shell molds furnace alloying and deoxidation of the metal will provide consumers with quality products and have a positive impact on the economy in general engineering.

  3. PECULIARITIES OF PROCESSES OF CARBIDE FORMATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF Cr, Mn AND Ni IN WHITE CAST IRONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Netrebko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During crystallization of castings from white cast iron, carbides Me3С, Me7С3, Me23С6 were formed depending on chromium and carbon content. Impeded chromium diffusion caused formation of thermodynamically unstable and non-uniform phases (carbides. During heat treatment process stable equilibrium phases were formed as a result of rearrangement of the carbides’ crystal lattice, replacement of iron, manganese, nickel and silicon atoms by chromium atoms. The allocated atoms concentrated, forming inclusions of austenite inside the carbides. Holding during 9 hours at 720 °С and annealing decreased the non-uniformity of chromium distribution in the metallic base of cast iron containing 11,5 % Cr, and increased it in the cast iron containing 21,5 % Cr. Holding during 4.5 hours at 1050 °С and normalization decreased the non-uniformity of chromium distribution in the metallic base of cast iron containing 21,5 % Cr, and increased it in cast iron containing 11,5 % Cr.

  4. Material Removal and Specific Energy in the Dynamic Scratching of Gamma Titanium Aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong [ORNL; Lin, Hua-Tay [ORNL; Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL

    2006-11-01

    Mechanical responses of three gamma titanium aluminides (TiAls) (denoted as Alloy A, Alloy B and Alloy C) subjected to dynamic scratching were studied by using a single-grit pendulum (rotating) scratch tester. The maximum depth of groove was ~ 0.07 mm, and the scratch velocity used was ~ 1.0 m/s. Normal and tangential forces were monitored. The material removal mechanisms were examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the scratches were measured by using a laser profilometer. The mechanical properties of the tested TiAls were characterized by the instantaneous specific energy, scratch resistance and scratch hardness as related to the depth of groove. Extensive thermal softening was observed in the dynamic scratch of the tested TiAls, which facilitated both the detachments of developing chips and the pile-ups of materials on side ridges. Sizable fractures were observed in the transverse direction on the tested TiAls; these fractures tended to participate in the chip formation, depending on the microstructure of the TiAl and the size of the scratch groove. Specific energy and scratch hardness are depth-dependent to various degrees for the tested TiAls. The materiel removal might be subjected to different mechanisms, but the overall response of materials can be effectively characterized by the HEM (Hwang, Evans and Malkin) model and the PSR (proportional specimen resistance) model. The obtained depth-independent specific energy and scratch hardness can be used to screen the candidate materials for the specific purpose depending on whether the application is scratch-dominant or impact-dominant. Among the three tested TiAls, the TiAl with larger colony or grain size exhibits a stronger capability of energy dissipation in the material loss or material removal (higher depth-independent specific energy), while the TiAl with smaller colony size show a higher resistance against the indentation (higher depth-independent scratch hardness). The observations and

  5. Material Removal and Specific Energy in the Dynamic Scratching of Gamma Titanium Aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H.; Lin, H.-T.; Wereszczak, A.A.

    2006-11-30

    Mechanical responses of three gamma titanium aluminides (TiAls) (denoted as Alloy A, Alloy B and Alloy C) subjected to dynamic scratching were studied by using a single-grit pendulum (rotating) scratch tester. The maximum depth of groove was {approx} 0.07 mm, and the scratch velocity was {approx} 1.0 m/s. Normal and tangential forces were monitored. The material removal mechanisms were examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the scratches were measured by using a laser profilometer. The mechanical properties of the tested TiAls were characterized by the instantaneous specific energy, scratch resistance and scratch hardness as related to the groove depth. Extensive thermal softening was observed in the dynamic scratch test of the TiAls, which facilitated both the detachment of developing chips and pile-up of material on side ridges. Sizable fractures were observed in the transverse direction in the tested TiAls; these fractures tended to participate in the chip formation, depending on the microstructure of the TiAl and the size of the scratch groove. Specific energy and scratch hardness are depth-dependent to various degrees for the TiAls tested. The material removal might be subjected to different mechanisms, but the overall material response can be effectively characterized by the HEM (Hwang, Evans and Malkin) model and the PSR (proportional specimen resistance) model. The depth-independent specific energy and scratch hardness can be used to screen candidate materials for the applications that are scratch-dominated versus impact-dominated. Among the three tested TiAls, the TiAl with larger colony or grain size exhibits a stronger capability of energy dissipation during material removal (higher depth-independent specific energy), while the TiAl with smaller colony size shows a higher resistance to indentation (higher depth-independent scratch hardness). The observations and conclusions in this study can serve as a base line for the further

  6. Squeeze Casting of Steel Weapon Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-09-01

    equipment. The squeeze casting process also differs from rheo- casting.(10-12) Unlike the former, the rheocasting process (8) "Ferrous Die Casting...various phases of rheocasting . At least so far, the process has not been applied to fabrication of complex steel components of the type that are under

  7. Pressure distribution in centrifugal dental casting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, J P

    1978-02-01

    Equations are developed for liquid metal pressure in centrifugal dental casting, given the instantaneous rotational velocity, density, and certain dimensions of the casting machine and casting pattern. A "reference parabola" is introduced making the fluid pressure concept more understandable. A specially designed specimen demonstrates experimentally the reference parabola at freezing.

  8. Prediction of Microporosity in Shrouded Impeller Castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, S. Nelson, C.D.

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Morris Bean and Company was to link computer models of heat and fluid flow with previously developed quality criteria for the prediction of microporosity in a Al-4.5% Cu alloy shrouded impeller casting. The results may be used to analyze the casting process design for the commercial production of 206 o alloy shrouded impeller castings. Test impeller castings were poured in the laboratory for the purpose of obtaining thermal data and porosity distributions. Also, a simulation of the test impeller casting was conducted and the results validated with porosity measurements on the test castings. A comparison of the predicted and measured microporosity distributions indicated an excellent correlation between experiments and prediction. The results of the experimental and modeling studies undertaken in this project indicate that the quality criteria developed for the prediction of microporosity in Al-4.5% Cu alloy castings can accurately predict regions of elevated microporosity even in complex castings such as the shrouded impeller casting. Accordingly, it should be possible to use quality criteria for porosity prediction in conjunction with computer models of heat and fluid flow to optimize the casting process for the production of shrouded impeller castings. Since high levels of microporosity may be expected to result in poor fatigue properties, casting designs that are optimized for low levels of microporosity should exhibit superior fatigue life.

  9. When Your Child Needs a Cast

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old When Your Child Needs a Cast KidsHealth > For Parents > When Your Child Needs a Cast Print A A A What's in ... A cast wraps around the broken area and needs to be removed by a doctor when the ...

  10. Polymer-templated mesoporous carbons synthesized in the presence of nickel nanoparticles, nickel oxide nanoparticles, and nickel nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choma, Jerzy; Jedynak, Katarzyna; Marszewski, Michal; Jaroniec, Mietek

    2012-02-01

    Mesoporous carbon composites, containing nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles, were obtained by soft-templating method. Samples were synthesized under acidic conditions using resorcinol and formaldehyde as carbon precursors, poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) triblock co-polymer Lutrol F127 as a soft template and nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles, and nickel nitrate as metal precursors. In addition, a one set of samples was obtained by impregnation of mesoporous carbons with a nickel nitrate solution followed by further annealing at 400 °C. Wide angle X-ray powder diffraction along with thermogravimetric analysis proved the presence of nickel nanoparticles in the final composites obtained using nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles, and Ni(NO3)2 solution. Whereas, the impregnation of carbons with a nickel nitrate solution followed by annealing at 400 °C resulted in needle-like nickel oxide nanoparticles present inside the composites’ pores. Low-temperature (-196 °C) nitrogen physisorption, X-ray powder diffraction, and thermogravimetric analysis confirmed good adsorption and structural properties of the synthesized nickel-carbon composites, in particular, the samples possessed high surface areas (>600 m2/g), large total pore volumes (>0.50 cm3/g), and maxima of pore size distribution functions at circa 7 nm. It was found that the composites were partially graphitized during carbonization process at 850 °C. The samples are stable in an air environment below temperature of 500 °C. All these features make the synthesized nickel-carbon composites attractive materials for adsorption, catalysis, energy storage, and environmental applications.

  11. The CAST time projection chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autiero, D.; Beltrán, B.; Carmona, J. M.; Cebrián, S.; Chesi, E.; Davenport, M.; Delattre, M.; Di Lella, L.; Formenti, F.; Irastorza, I. G.; Gómez, H.; Hasinoff, M.; Lakic, B.; Luzón, G.; Morales, J.; Musa, L.; Ortiz, A.; Placci, A.; Rodrigurez, A.; Ruz, J.; Villar, J. A.; Zioutas, K.

    2007-06-01

    One of the three x-ray detectors of the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) experiment searching for solar axions is a time projection chamber (TPC) with a multi-wire proportional counter (MWPC) as a readout structure. Its design has been optimized to provide high sensitivity to the detection of the low intensity x-ray signal expected in the CAST experiment. A low hardware threshold of 0.8 keV is set to a safe level during normal data taking periods, and the overall efficiency for the detection of photons coming from conversion of solar axions is 62%. Shielding has been installed around the detector, lowering the background level to 4.10 × 10-5 counts cm-2 s-1 keV-1 between 1 and 10 keV. During phase I of the CAST experiment the TPC has provided robust and stable operation, thus contributing with a competitive result to the overall CAST limit on axion photon coupling and mass.

  12. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2010-01-01

    @@ Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron(Ⅲ) 3.6 Solidification morphology of SG iron Solidification morphology refers to the description of change,distribution and interrelationship of the solidification structures such as graphite spheroids,austenite,eutectic cells,etc.[99

  13. Cern Axion Solar Telescope (CAST)

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The CERN Solar Axion Telescope, CAST, aims to shed light on a 30-year-old riddle of particle physics by detecting axions originating from the 15 million degree plasma in the Sun 's core. Axions were proposed as an extension to the Standard Model of particle physics to explain why CP violation is observed in weak but not strong interactions.

  14. Advanced Lost Foam Casting Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles E. Bates; Harry E. Littleton; Don Askeland; Taras Molibog; Jason Hopper; Ben Vatankhah

    2000-11-30

    This report describes the research done under the six tasks to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. Task 1: Pattern Pyrolysis Products and Pattern Properties Task 2: Coating Quality Control Task 3: Fill and Solidification Code Task 4: Alternate Pattern Materials Task 5: Casting Distortion Task 6: Technology Transfer

  15. CENTRIFUGAL CASTING OF ANTIFRICTION SILUMIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ju. Stetsenko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that the way of centrifugal casting into water-cooled mould with vertical rotation axis enables to receive hollow slugs with diameter 100–250 mm, with height under 200 mm with wall thickness under 15 mm of antifriction silumin АК15М3, which will replace expensive antifriction bronze.

  16. Search for chameleons with CAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anastassopoulos, V.; Arik, M.; Aune, S.

    2015-01-01

    energy threshold used for axions from 1 keV to 400 eV CAST became sensitive to the converted solar chameleon spectrum which peaks around 600 eV. Even though we have not observed any excess above background, we can provide a 95% C.L. limit for the coupling strength of chameleons to photons of βΥ≤1011...

  17. Tape casting of magnesium oxide.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayala, Alicia; Corral, Erica L.; Loehman, Ronald E.; Bencoe, Denise Nora; Reiterer, Markus; Shah, Raja A.

    2008-02-01

    A tape casting procedure for fabricating ceramic magnesium oxide tapes has been developed as a method to produce flat sheets of sintered MgO that are thin and porous. Thickness of single layer tapes is in the range of 200-400 {micro}m with corresponding surface roughness values in the range of 10-20 {micro}m as measured by laser profilometry. Development of the tape casting technique required optimization of pretreatment for the starting magnesium oxide (MgO) powder as well as a detailed study of the casting slurry preparation and subsequent heat treatments for sintering and final tape flattening. Milling time of the ceramic powder, plasticizer, and binder mixture was identified as a primary factor affecting surface morphology of the tapes. In general, longer milling times resulted in green tapes with a noticeably smoother surface. This work demonstrates that meticulous control of the entire tape casting operation is necessary to obtain high-quality MgO tapes.

  18. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2010-01-01

    @@ Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron(Ⅳ) 3.7 Segregation of SG iron The non-uniform distribution of solute elements during solidification results in the micro segregation of SG iron.As for the redistribution of elements in the phases of the solidification structure,there is no intrinsic difference between SG iron and grey iron[132].

  19. Graphite Formation in Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanescu, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    In the first phase of the project it was proven that by changing the ratio between the thermal gradient and the growth rate for commercial cast iron samples solidifying in a Bridgman type furnace, it is possible to produce all types of graphite structures, from flake to spheroidal, and all types of matrices, from ferritic to white at a certain given level of cerium. KC-135 flight experiments have shown that in a low-gravity environment, no flotation occurs even in spheroidal graphite cast irons with carbon equivalent as high as 5%, while extensive graphite flotation occurred in both flake and spheroidal graphite cast irons, in high carbon samples solidified in a high gravity environment. This opens the way for production of iron-carbon composite materials, with high carbon content (e.g., 10%) in a low gravity environment. By using KC-135 flights, the influence of some basic elements on the solidification of cast iron will be studied. The mechanism of flake to spheroidal graphite transition will be studied, by using quenching experiments at both low and one gravity for different G/R ratios.

  20. Nickel foam-supported polyaniline cathode prepared with electrophoresis for improvement of rechargeable Zn battery performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yang; Zhu, Derong; Si, Shihui; Li, Degeng; Wu, Sen

    2015-06-01

    Porous nickel foam is used as a substrate for the development of rechargeable zinc//polyaniline battery, and the cathode electrophoresis of PANI microparticles in non-aqueous solution is applied to the fabrication of Ni foam supported PANI electrode, in which the corrosion of the nickel foam substrate is prohibited. The Ni foam supported PANI cathode with high loading is prepared by PANI electrophoretic deposition, and followed by PANI slurry casting under vacuum filtration. The electrochemical charge storage performance for PANI material is significantly improved by using nickel foam substrate via the electrophoretic interlayer. The specific capacity of the nickel foam-PANI electrode with the electrophoretic layer is higher than the composite electrode without the electrophoretic layer, and the specific capacity of PANI supported by Ni foam reaches up to 183.28 mAh g-1 at the working current of 2.5 mA cm-2. The present electrophoresis deposition method plays the facile procedure for the immobilization of PANI microparticles onto the surface of non-platinum metals, and it becomes feasible to the use of the Ni foam supported PANI composite cathode for the Zn/PANI battery in weak acidic electrolyte.

  1. Calorimetric examination of mixtures for modification of nickel and cobalt superalloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Binczyk

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The study presents the results of thermodynamic calculations and calorimetric examination of thermal reactions taking place at hightemperatures between the nanoparticle inoculants and metallic constituents of nickel and cobalt superalloys. The calculations andmeasurements were made for different compositions, containing cobalt aluminate CoAl2O4, cobalt oxide CoO*Co2O3, zircon flourZrSi2O4, powdered and metallic Al, powdered Ti, and IN-713C alloy. The obtained results have indicated the possibility of using certainmixtures as potential inoculating additives for the volume modification of nickel and cobalt superalloys. A characteristic feature of these alloys is the formation of a detrimental structure containing very large columnar crystal, present even in castings of a very high solidification rate. It has been proved that the inoculant most effective in the formation of the structure of equiaxial grains is the inoculant based on cobalt aluminate, colloidal silica and powdered aluminium.

  2. Technological parameters of die casting and quality of casting from EN AC46500 alloy

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Die casting represents the highest technological level of metal mold casting. This technology enables production of almost all final products without necessity of further processing. The important aspect of efficiency and production is a proper casting parameters setting. In the submitted paper following die casting parameters are analyzed: plunger pressing speed and pressure. The studied parameters most significantly affect a qualitative of castings from EN AC46500 alloy and they influence t...

  3. Nickel inhibits mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppala, Radha; McKinney, Richard W; Brant, Kelly A; Fabisiak, James P; Goetzman, Eric S

    2015-08-07

    Nickel exposure is associated with changes in cellular energy metabolism which may contribute to its carcinogenic properties. Here, we demonstrate that nickel strongly represses mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation-the pathway by which fatty acids are catabolized for energy-in both primary human lung fibroblasts and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. At the concentrations used, nickel suppresses fatty acid oxidation without globally suppressing mitochondrial function as evidenced by increased glucose oxidation to CO2. Pre-treatment with l-carnitine, previously shown to prevent nickel-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in neuroblastoma cells, did not prevent the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation. The effect of nickel on fatty acid oxidation occurred only with prolonged exposure (>5 h), suggesting that direct inhibition of the active sites of metabolic enzymes is not the mechanism of action. Nickel is a known hypoxia-mimetic that activates hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1α). Nickel-induced inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was blunted in HIF1α knockout fibroblasts, implicating HIF1α as one contributor to the mechanism. Additionally, nickel down-regulated the protein levels of the key fatty acid oxidation enzyme very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid oxidation by nickel, concurrent with increased glucose metabolism, represents a form of metabolic reprogramming that may contribute to nickel-induced carcinogenesis.

  4. Nickel nanofibers synthesized by the electrospinning method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Yi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Anhui 230000 (China); Zhang, Xuebin, E-mail: zzhhxxbb@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Anhui 230000 (China); Zhu, Yajun; Li, Bin; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Jingcheng; Feng, Yi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Anhui 230000 (China)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: ► The nickel nanofibers have been obtained by electrospinning method. ► The nickel nanofibers had rough surface which was consisted of mass nanoparticles. ► The average diameter of nickel nanofibers is about 135 nm and high degree of crystallization. ► The Hc, Ms, and Mr were estimated to be 185 Oe, 51.9 and 16.9 emu/g respectively. - Abstract: In this paper, nickel nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning polyvinyl alcohol/nickel nitrate precursor solution followed by high temperature calcination in air and deoxidation in hydrogen atmosphere. The thermal stability of the as-electrospun PVA/Ni(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} composite nanofibers were characterized by TG–DSC. The morphologies and structures of the as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), field-emission scanning electronmicroscope (FE-SEM) and field-emission transmission electron microscopy (FE-TEM). The hysteresis loops (M–H loops) were measured by Physical Property Measurement System (PPMS). The results indicate that: the PVA and the nickel nitrate were almost completely decomposed at 460 °C and the products were pure nickel nanofibers with face-centered cubic (fcc) structure. Furthermore, the as-prepared nickel nanofibers had a continuous structure with rough surface and high degree of crystallization. The average diameter of nickel nanofibers was about 135 nm. The nanofibers showed a stronger coercivity of 185 Oe than value of bulk nickel.

  5. Influence of casting procedures on the corrosion resistance of clinical dental alloys containing palladium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viennot, Stéphane; Lissac, Michèle; Malquarti, Guillaume; Dalard, Francis; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2006-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the in vitro corrosion resistance in artificial saliva of two palladium-silver alloys (a Pd-Ag (Pors on 4) and an Ag-Pd (Palliag LTG)), with and without casting defects; 1 nickel-chrome alloy and 1 high-gold alloy, cast under recommended conditions, served as controls. For each of the palladium-based alloys, three specimens corresponding to three different casting conditions were used: under recommended conditions, with the use of a graphite-containing investment and crucible, and by reusing the sprues and sprue button. The electrochemical tests were run in Fusayama-Meyer artificial saliva. The open-circuit potential was recorded in mV/SCE at t=24h. Then, potentiodynamic polarization was performed to measure the polarization resistance (R(p)) in kOmega cm(2) and the corrosion current (i(corr)) in microA cm(-2). Data were evaluated with one-way analysis of variance and multiple comparisons test (alpha=0.05). In addition, each specimen was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Compared to the control alloys, the electrochemical experiments in artificial saliva indicated satisfactory corrosion resistance for the Pd-Ag and Ag-Pd alloys; these results are related to their high noble metal content and stable substructure. The Pd-Ag alloy displayed superior electrochemical properties to those of the Ag-Pd alloy regardless of the casting condition. The use of the graphite-containing crucible and investment during the cast process did not dramatically reduce the corrosion resistance values, but the reuse of sprues and the sprue button did. The optimal corrosion resistance values were obtained for the alloys cast according to the recommended conditions.

  6. Prediction of Part Distortion in Die Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Allen Miller

    2005-03-30

    The die casting process is one of the net shape manufacturing techniques and is widely used to produce high production castings with tight tolerances for many industries. An understanding of the stress distribution and the deformation pattern of parts produced by die casting will result in less deviation from the part design specification, a better die design and eventually more productivity and cost savings. This report presents methods that can be used to simulate the die casting process in order to predict the deformation and stresses in the produced part and assesses the degree to which distortion modeling is practical for die casting at the current time. A coupled thermal-mechanical finite elements model was used to simulate the die casting process. The simulation models the effect of thermal and mechanical interaction between the casting and the die. It also includes the temperature dependant material properties of the casting. Based on a designed experiment, a sensitivity analysis was conducted on the model to investigate the effect of key factors. These factors include the casting material model, material properties and thermal interaction between casting and dies. To verify the casting distortion predictions, it was compared against the measured dimensions of produced parts. The comparison included dimensions along and across the parting plane and the flatness of one surface.

  7. Process development of thin strip steel casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sussman, R.C.; Williams, R.S.

    1990-12-01

    An important new frontier is being opened in steel processing with the emergence of thin strip casting. Casting steel directly to thin strip has enormous benefits in energy savings by potentially eliminating the need for hot reduction in a hot strip mill. This has been the driving force for numerous current research efforts into the direct strip casting of steel. The US Department of Energy initiated a program to evaluate the development of thin strip casting in the steel industry. In earlier phases of this program, planar flow casting on an experimental caster was studied by a team of engineers from Westinghouse Electric corporation and Armco Inc. A subsequent research program was designed as a fundamental and developmental study of both planar and melt overflow casting processes. This study was arranged as several separate and distinct tasks which were often completed by different teams of researchers. An early task was to design and build a water model to study fluid flow through different designs of planar flow casting nozzles. Another important task was mathematically modeling of melt overflow casting process. A mathematical solidification model for the formation of the strip in the melt overflow process was written. A study of the material and conditioning of casting substrates was made on the small wheel caster using the melt overflow casting process. This report discusses work on the development of thin steel casting.

  8. Continuous squeeze casting process by mass production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Xia; Rich Jacques

    2006-01-01

    Squeeze casting has become the most competitive casting process in the automotive industry because of its many advantages over high pressure die casting (HPDC). Many squeeze casting R & D and small amount volume making have been implemented around the world, but the mass production control still exists problem. SPX Contech squeeze casting process P2000 successfully achieved the goal of mass production; it includes lower metal turbulence, less gas entrapment, minimum volumetric shrinkage, and thus less porosity. Like other casting processes, however, the quality of squeeze castings is still sensitive to process control and gate and runner design. Casting defects can form in both die-filling and metal solidification phases. The occurrence of casting defects is directly attributed to improper adjustment or lack of control of process parameters including metal filling velocity, temperature, dwell time, cooling pattern, casting design, and etc. This paper presents examples using P2000 techniques to improve part quality in the following areas: runner & gate design, casting & runner layout in the die, squeeze pin application, high thermal conductivityinserts, cooling/heating systems, spray & lubricant techniques,and part stress calculation from shrinkage or displacement prediction after stress relief.

  9. Process development of thin strip steel casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sussman, R.C.; Williams, R.S.

    1990-12-01

    An important new frontier is being opened in steel processing with the emergence of thin strip casting. Casting steel directly to thin strip has enormous benefits in energy savings by potentially eliminating the need for hot reduction in a hot strip mill. This has been the driving force for numerous current research efforts into the direct strip casting of steel. The US Department of Energy initiated a program to evaluate the development of thin strip casting in the steel industry. In earlier phases of this program, planar flow casting on an experimental caster was studied by a team of engineers from Westinghouse Electric corporation and Armco Inc. A subsequent research program was designed as a fundamental and developmental study of both planar and melt overflow casting processes. This study was arranged as several separate and distinct tasks which were often completed by different teams of researchers. An early task was to design and build a water model to study fluid flow through different designs of planar flow casting nozzles. Another important task was mathematically modeling of melt overflow casting process. A mathematical solidification model for the formation of the strip in the melt overflow process was written. A study of the material and conditioning of casting substrates was made on the small wheel caster using the melt overflow casting process. This report discusses work on the development of thin steel casting.

  10. Simulating a high pressure die casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldak, J.; Zhou, J.; Downey, D.; Aldea, V.; Li, G.; Mocanita, M. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    High pressure die casting is simulated for parts with complex geometry such as a large automotive transmission case. The closed die is filled in approximately 40 ms, the casting cools in the closed die for approximately 40s, to open the die, eject the casting and spray the die cavity surface requires another 40s. This 3D cyclic process is simulated using the following coupled composite solvers: the energy equation in the die and in the casting with solidification; filling of the casting by a droplet or a Navier-Stokes solver, and thermal stress analysis of the casting machine, casting and die during the cycle. This thermal analysis can be done for both starting and stopping transients and for the cyclic steady state. The software enables this analysis to be done almost automatically by designers. (author)

  11. Absorption and retention of nickel from drinking water in relation to food intake and nickel sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, G D; Søderberg, U; Jørgensen, Poul Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    Two studies were performed to examine the influence of fasting and food intake on the absorption and retention of nickel added to drinking water and to determine if nickel sensitization played any role in this regard. First, eight nonallergic male volunteers fasted overnight before being given...... nickel in drinking water (12 micrograms Ni/kg) and, at different time intervals, standardized 1400-kJ portions of scrambled eggs. When nickel was ingested in water 30 min or 1 h prior to the meal, peak nickel concentrations in serum occurred 1 h after the water intake, and the peak was 13-fold higher...... than the one seen 1 h after simultaneous intake of nickel-containing water and scrambled eggs. In the latter case, a smaller, delayed peak occurred 3 h after the meal. Median urinary nickel excretion half-times varied between 19.9 and 26.7 h. Within 3 days, the amount of nickel excreted corresponded...

  12. Repeated patch testing to nickel during childhood do not induce nickel sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard Christiansen, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Background: Previously, patch test reactivity to nickel sulphate in a cohort of unselected infants tested repeatedly at 3-72 months of age has been reported. A reproducible positive reaction at 12 and 18 months was selected as a sign of nickel sensitivity, provided a patch test with an empty Finn...... chamber was negative. The objective of this study is to follow-up on infants with suspected nickel sensitivity. Methods: A total of 562 infants were included in the cohort and patch tested with nickel sulphate. The 26 children with a positive patch test to nickel sulphate at 12 and 18 months were offered...... repeated patch test to nickel sulphate at 3 (36 months), 6 (72 months) and 14 years of age. Results: At 3 years, 24 of 26 nickel sensitive children were retested and a positive reaction was seen in 7 children, a negative reaction in 16 and 1 child was excluded due to reaction to both nickel and the empty...

  13. Diffusion aluminide coatings for internal surface of rhenium- and rhenium-ruthenium-containing single-crystal superalloys turbine blades: Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubovadzhyan, S. A.; Galoyan, A. G.

    2012-09-01

    Process of formation rhenium or refractory carbides based diffusion barrier layer (coating) on internal surface of rhenium- and rhenium-ruthenium-containing single-crystal high-temperature alloys (superalloy) turbine blades, prior to diffusion aluminide coating deposition, is studied. It is shown that diffusion barrier layer is preventing deleterious secondary reaction zone formation under aluminide coating during long-term high-temperature operation. The kinetics of powder carburizing process of rhenium- and rhenium-ruthenium-containing high-temperature alloys is investigated, and conditions for carburizing these alloys are determined. The phase composition of the surface layer after carburizing is studied, and the effect of the fractional composition of a carbon-based powder mixture on the carburizing rate is determined.

  14. 40 CFR 415.470 - Applicability; description of the nickel salts production subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... nickel salts production subcategory. 415.470 Section 415.470 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel Salts Production Subcategory § 415.470 Applicability; description of the nickel... nickel salts, including (a) nickel sulfate, nickel chloride, nickel nitrate, and nickel fluoborate,...

  15. Market for nickel-cadmium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putois, F.

    Besides the lead/acid battery market, which has seen a tremendous development linked with the car industry, the alkaline rechargeable battery market has also been expanded for more than twenty years, especially in the field of portable applications with nickel-cadmium batteries. Today, nickel-cadmium batteries have to face newcomers on the market, such as nickel-metal hydride, which is another alkaline couple, and rechargeable lithium batteries; these new battery systems have better performances in some areas. This work illustrates the status of the market for nickel-cadmium batteries and their applications. Also, for two major applications—the cordless tool and the electric vehicles—the competitive situation of nickel-cadmium batteries; facing new systems such as nickel-metal hydride and lithium ion cells are discussed.

  16. Aluminum-Silicon Alloy Having Improved Properties At Elevated Temperatures and Process for Producing Cast Articles Therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Chen, Po-Shou (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A process for making a cast article from an aluminum alloy includes first casting an article from an alloy having the following composition, in weight percent: Silicon 11.0-14.0, Copper 5.6-8.0, Iron 0-0.8, Magnesium 0.5-1.5, Nickel 0.05-0.9, Manganese 0-1.0, Titanium 0.05-1.2, Zirconium 0.12-1.2, Vanadium 0.05-1.2, Zinc 0.05-0.9, Strontium 0.001-0.1, Aluminum balance . In this alloy the ratio of silicon to magnesium is 10 to 25, and the ratio of copper to magnesium is 4 to 15. After an article is cast from the alloy, the cast article is aged at a temperature within the range of 400F to 500F for a time period within the range of four to 16 hours. It has been found especially advantageous if the cast article is first exposed to a solutionizing step prior to the aging step. This solutionizing step is carried out by exposing the cast article to a temperature within the range of 900F to 1000F for a time period of fifteen minutes to four hours. It has also been found to be especially advantageous if the solutionizing step is followed directly with a quenching step, wherein the cast article is quenched in a quenching medium such as water at a temperature within the range of 120F to 300F. The resulting cast article is suitable in a number of high temperature applications, such as heavy-duty pistons for internal combustion engines.

  17. Recent Advances in the Synthesis and Stabilization of Nickel and Nickel Oxide Nanoparticles: A Green Adeptness

    OpenAIRE

    Imran Din, Muhammad; Rani, Aneela

    2016-01-01

    Green protocols for the synthesis of nanoparticles have been attracting a lot of attention because they are eco-friendly, rapid, and cost-effective. Nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles have been synthesized by green routes and characterized for impact of green chemistry on the properties and biological effects of nanoparticles in the last five years. Green synthesis, properties, and applications of nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles have been reported in the literature. This review summa...

  18. Inner surface roughness of complete cast crowns made by centrifugal casting machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, H; Raptis, C N; Asgar, K

    1981-05-01

    Six variables that could affect the surface roughness of a casting were investigated. The variables were (1) type of alloy, (2) mold temperature, (3) metal casting temperature, (4) casting machine, (5) sandblasting, and (6) location of each section. It was determined that the training portion of a complete cast crown had rougher surfaces than the leading portion. Higher mold and casting temperatures produced rougher castings, and this effect was more pronounced in the case of the base metal alloy. Sandblasting reduced the roughness, but produced scratched surfaces. Sandblasting had a more pronounced affect on the surface roughness of the base metal alloy cast either at a higher mold temperature or metal casting temperature. The morphology and the roughness profile of the original cast surface differed considerably with the type of alloy used.

  19. Deformation mechanisms of IN713C nickel based superalloy during Small Punch Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, M., E-mail: m.p.coleman@swansea.ac.uk; Alshehri, H.; Banik, R.; Harrison, W.; Birosca, S.

    2016-01-05

    The role of local microstructure is critical in materials performance and integrity in a cast alloy. The grain size and grain boundary distributions as well as local texture can create various microstructure/microtexture clusters that cause deformation localisation in the alloy. Inconel 713C nickel base superalloys are used as turbocharger turbine wheels for modern diesel engines, produced via investment casting. In such an alloy localised deformation is highly expected during service, as the strain distribution is not uniform in the component due to casting geometrical factors in addition to non-homogenous microstructure and microtexture in the cast alloy. In the current investigation Small Punch (SP) tensile tests were carried out on IN713C at room temperature and 650 °C in an air environment under stroke control at a rate of 0.02 mm/s. The fracture surface examination and microstructure characterisation as well as detailed texture analyses were performed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD). Finite Element (FE) analysis of the SP test was also implemented to investigate the role of stress state on the local deformation. It was evident that microstructure parameters such as grain morphology and original texture existed in the disc were the most influential factors in governing the deformation texture in mixed columnar/equiaxed (transition) disc microstructure. Whereas, the temperature was the determining parameter in grain rotations and texture changes for wholly columnar disc microstructures.

  20. Recent advances in homogeneous nickel catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasker, Sarah Z; Standley, Eric A; Jamison, Timothy F

    2014-05-15

    Tremendous advances have been made in nickel catalysis over the past decade. Several key properties of nickel, such as facile oxidative addition and ready access to multiple oxidation states, have allowed the development of a broad range of innovative reactions. In recent years, these properties have been increasingly understood and used to perform transformations long considered exceptionally challenging. Here we discuss some of the most recent and significant developments in homogeneous nickel catalysis, with an emphasis on both synthetic outcome and mechanism.

  1. Thermomagnetic analysis of hydrogenated nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, S. S. M.; Miraglia, S.; Lafuente, A.; Fruchart, D.

    2002-04-01

    The effect of hydrogen inserted by electrolytic charging on the magnetic properties of nickel is discussed by taking into account the thermomagnetic analysis (TMA), X-ray diffraction and saturation magnetization results. After hydrogenation, thin foils of nickel presented a biphasic structure of metastable β-NiH x ( x=0.67±0.07) and α-Ni (with <0.03 at% H). During room temperature aging the β-NiH x hydride decomposes into α-Ni and H 2. The TMA heating curves obtained just after hydrogenation show two magnetic transitions, the first one in the range 100-120°C and the second that of Curie point of Ni. Between the first and the second transition an abrupt increase of magnetization is observed, which is due to the formation of more ferromagnetic nickel from the hydride decomposition. On the other hand, the first transition of the TMA curve can only be attributed to the ferromagnetism of some regions of phase β.

  2. Low patch test reactivity to nickel in unselected adolescents tested repeatedly with nickel in infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Elisabeth Soegaard; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is questionable how repeated patch tests with nickel sulphate in infancy affect nickel patch test reactivity at a later age. METHODS: The DARC cohort encompasses 562 infants invited to a clinical examination including patch tests with nickel sulphate 6 times during the first 36 mon...

  3. Assessment of functional integrity of liver among workers exposed to soluble nickel compounds during nickel plating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalahasthi Ravi Babu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the functional integrity of liver among workers exposed to nickel during nickel-plating process. The functional integrity of liver was assessed in 69 workers who are exposed to nickel during nickel plating and considered as nickel-exposed workers; and 50 administrative workers residing in same city, but away from the place of work of study group, were considered as control group. The level of urine nickel was measured by using a flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Using kits supplied by Bayer Diagnostics, we determined serum markers of liver function tests. Results: The levels of urine nickel were significantly increased in high-and moderate-exposure groups as compared to control group. The levels of serum transaminases -viz, alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase-were significantly increased in nickel-exposed workers, who had high urine nickel levels as compared to control group. The level of serum albumin was negatively correlated with urine nickel levels. The levels of serum transaminases and serum g- glutamyl- transpeptidase were positively and significantly correlated with urine nickel levels. Conclusion: Results indicate that workers who had high urine nickel levels had a consistent effect on hepatic inflammatory function.

  4. Search for chameleons with CAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Anastassopoulos

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present a search for (solar chameleons with the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST. This novel experimental technique, in the field of dark energy research, exploits both the chameleon coupling to matter (βm and to photons (βγ via the Primakoff effect. By reducing the X-ray detection energy threshold used for axions from 1 keV to 400 eV CAST became sensitive to the converted solar chameleon spectrum which peaks around 600 eV. Even though we have not observed any excess above background, we can provide a 95% C.L. limit for the coupling strength of chameleons to photons of βγ≲1011 for 1<βm<106.

  5. Pressure rig for repetitive casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Peter (Inventor); Hutto, William R. (Inventor); Philips, Albert R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The invention is a pressure rig for repetitive casting of metal. The pressure rig performs like a piston for feeding molten metal into a mold. Pressure is applied to an expandable rubber diaphragm which expands like a balloon to force the metal into the mold. A ceramic cavity which holds molten metal is lined with blanket-type insulating material, necessitating only a relining for subsequent use and eliminating the lengthy cavity preparation inherent in previous rigs. In addition, the expandable rubber diaphragm is protected by the insulating material thereby decreasing its vulnerability to heat damage. As a result of the improved design the life expectancy of the pressure rig contemplated by the present invention is more than doubled. Moreover, the improved heat protection has allowed the casting of brass and other alloys with higher melting temperatures than possible in the conventional pressure rigs.

  6. Innovative algorithm for cast detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Francesca; Schettini, Raimondo; Gallina, Paolo

    2001-12-01

    The paper describes a method for detecting a color cast (i.e. a superimposed dominant color) in a digital image without any a priori knowledge of its semantic content. The color gamut of the image is first mapped in the CIELab color space. The color distribution of the whole image and of the so-called Near Neutral Objects (NNO) is then investigated using statistical tools then, to determine the presence of a cast. The boundaries of the near neutral objects in the color space are set adaptively by the algorithm on the basis of a preliminary analysis of the image color gamut. The method we propose has been tuned and successfully tested on a large data set of images, downloaded from personal web-pages or acquired using various digital and traditional cameras.

  7. Search for chameleons with CAST

    CERN Document Server

    Anastassopoulos, V; Aune, S; Barth, K; Belov, A; Bräuninger, H; Cantatore, G; Carmona, J M; Cetin, S A; Christensen, F; Collar, J I; Dafni, T; Davenport, M; Desch, K; Dermenev, A; Eleftheriadis, C; Fanourakis, G; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Friedrich, P; Galán, J; García, J A; Gardikiotis, A; Garza, J G; Gazis, E N; Geralis, T; Giomataris, I; Hailey, C; Haug, F; Hasinoff, M D; Hofmann, D H H; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Jacoby, J; Jakobsen, A; Jakovčić, K; Kaminski, J; Karuza, M; Kavuk, M; Krčmar, M; Krieger, C; Krüger, A; Lakić, B; Laurent, J M; Liolios, A; Ljubičić, A; Luzón, G; Neff, S; Ortega, I; Papaevangelou, T; Pivovarov, M J; Raffelt, G; Riege, H; Rosu, M; Ruz, J; Savvidis, I; Solanki, S K; Vafeiadis, T; Villar, J A; Vogel, J K; Yildiz, S C; Zioutas, K; Brax, P; Lavrentyev, I; Upadhye, A

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present a search for (solar) chameleons with the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST). This novel experimental technique, in the field of dark energy research, exploits both the chameleon coupling to matter ($\\beta_{\\rm m}$) and to photons ($\\beta_{\\gamma}$) via the Primakoff effect. By reducing the X-ray detection energy threshold used for axions from 1$\\,$keV to 400$\\,$eV CAST became sensitive to the converted solar chameleon spectrum which peaks around 600$\\,$eV. Even though we have not observed any excess above background, we can provide a 95% C.L. limit for the coupling strength of chameleons to photons of $\\beta_{\\gamma}\\!\\lesssim\\!10^{11}$ for $1<\\beta_{\\rm m}<10^6$.

  8. In-depth study of the mechanical properties for Fe{sub 3}Al based iron aluminide fabricated using the wire-arc additive manufacturing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Chen; Pan, Zengxi, E-mail: zengxi@uow.edu.au; Cuiuri, Dominic; Dong, Bosheng; Li, Huijun

    2016-07-04

    An innovative wire-arc additive manufacturing (WAAM) process is used to fabricate iron aluminide alloy in-situ, through separate feeding of pure Fe and Al wires into a molten pool that is generated by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. This paper investigates the morphologies, chemical compositions and mechanical properties of the as-fabricated 30 at% Al iron aluminide wall components, and how these properties vary at different locations within the buildup wall. The tensile properties are also measured in different loading orientations; as epitaxial growth of large columnar grains is observed in the microstructures. Fe{sub 3}Al is the only phase detected in the middle buildup section of the wall structure, which constitutes the majority of the deposited material. The bottom section of the structure contains a dilution affected region where some acicular Fe{sub 3}AlC{sub 0.5} precipitates can be observed, induced by carbon from the steel substrate that was used for fabrication. The microhardness and chemical composition indicate relatively homogeneous material properties throughout the buildup wall. However, the tensile properties are very different in the longitudinal direction and normal directions, due to epitaxial growth of large columnar grains. In general, the results have demonstrated that the WAAM process is capable of producing full density in-situ-alloyed iron aluminide components with tensile properties that are comparable to powder metallurgy methods.

  9. Effects of Platinum Additions and Sulfur Impurities on the Microstructure and Scale Adhesion Behavior of Single-Phase CVD Aluminide Bond Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooley, K.M.; Haynes, J.A.; Lee, W.Y.; Pint, B.A.; Wright, I.G.; Zhang, Y.

    1999-02-28

    The adhesion of alumina scales to aluminide bond coats is a life-limiting factor for some advanced thermal barrier coating systems. This study investigated the effects of aluminide bond coat sulfur and platinum contents on alumina scale adhesion and coating microstructural evolution during isothermal and cyclic oxidation testing at 1150 C. Low-sulfur NiAl and NiPtAl bond coats were fabricated by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Lowering the sulfur contents of CVD NiAl bond coatings significantly improved scale adhesion, but localized scale spallation eventually initiated along coating grain boundaries. Further improvements in scale adhesion were obtained with Pt additions. The observed influences of Pt additions included: (1) mitigation of the detrimental effects of high sulfur levels, (2) drastic reductions in void growth along the scale-metal interface, (3) alteration of the oxide-metal interface morphology, and (4) elimination of Ta-rich oxides in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scales during thermal cycling. The results of this study also suggested that the microstructure (especially the grain size) of CVD aluminide bond coatings plays a significant role in scale adhesion.

  10. Nickel-induced cytokine production from mononuclear cells in nickel-sensitive individuals and controls. Cytokine profiles in nickel-sensitive individuals with nickel allergy-related hand eczema before and after nickel challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, L; Christensen, J M; Kristiansen, J

    2000-01-01

    Exposure to nickel is a major cause of allergic contact dermatitis which is considered to be an inflammatory response induced by antigen-specific T cells. Here we describe the in vitro analysis of the nickel-specific T-cell-derived cytokine response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 35...... was somewhat of a surprise, since previous studies have suggested a Th1 response in nickel-mediated allergic contact dermatitis. Subsequently, the nickel-allergic individuals were randomized to experimental exposure to nickel or vehicle in a double-blind design. A daily 10-min exposure of one finger to 10 ppm...... nickel solution for 1 week followed by 100 ppm for an additional week evoked a clinical response of hand eczema in the nickel-exposed group. Blood samples were drawn on days 7 and 14 after the start of this exposure to occupationally relevant concentrations of nickel. No statistically significant...

  11. Preparation of Nickel Materials with Fractal Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A way of manufacturing nickel material with fractal structure has been studied. Some algae with natural fractalstructure were used as the basic substrates. The nickel was coated on the substrates by both electroless depositionand electrodeposition. After elimination of the foundational algae by erosion, dissolution etc, the pure nickel materialswith fractal structure were obtained. At last, the specific surface area was analyzed by BET analyses and the fractaldimension of the nickel material was calculated by means of box-counting technique. The comparison of fractaldimension between Ni structure and natural algae was also given.

  12. Mineral resource of the month: nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuck, Peter H.

    2006-01-01

    Together with chromium, nickel makes steel more resistant to corrosion. Stainless steel thus accounts for more than 65 percent of primary nickel consumption in the world. One of the more common grades of stainless steel is Type 304, which contains 18 to 20 percent chromium and 10.5 to 12 percent nickel. Owing to their high corrosion resistance, nickel-bearing stainless steels are widely used in the transportation sector, the energy sector, the food preparation and processing industry, the beverage industry, the pharmaceutical industry and the medical community.

  13. Sintering of nickel steam reforming catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, Jens; Larsen, Niels Wessel; Falsig, Hanne;

    2014-01-01

    . In this paper, particle migration and coalescence in nickel steam reforming catalysts is studied. Density functional theory calculations indicate that Ni-OH dominate nickel transport at nickel surfaces in the presence of steam and hydrogen as Ni-OH has the lowest combined energies of formation and diffusion...... compared to other potential nickel transport species. The relation between experimental catalyst sintering data and the effective mass diffusion constant for Ni-OH is established by numerical modelling of the particle migration and coalescence process. Using this relation, the effective mass diffusion...

  14. On the reflectivity of nickel neutron mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adib, M.; Maayouf, R.M.A.; Abdel-Kawy, A.; Habib, N. (Atomic Energy Establishment, Cairo (Egypt). Reactor and Neutron Physics Dept.); Kenawy, M.A.; Wahba, M.; Ashry, A.H. (Ain Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt))

    1991-02-01

    Neutron reflectivities were determined for 300 nm thick films of natural nickel and nickel 58 coated on glass plates. The measurements were performed at glancing angles between 40' and 60'. The incident neutron beam from one of the ET-RR-1 reactor horizontal channels covered neutron wavelengths between 0.55 and 0.80 nm. It was found that nickel 58, because of the high value of its critical glancing angle, is more efficient as a neutron mirror than natural nickel. (orig.).

  15. Rapid Cycle Casting of Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    such as macrosegregation, hot tears, and blowholes are also difficult to control. Rheocasting l on the other hand, is a recent development which...viscosity. Advantages of the rheocasting process are: * Reduced attack of die or mold because of the reduced tempera- ture (by 1000 C for steel) and...4W W ’ V6W 4 1.2 THE SD PROCESS Many metals, including steel, can be cast at still lower tempera- soliifiction(2) tures than rheocasting by

  16. Effect of cast steel production metallurgy on the emergence of casting defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Čamek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper documents metallurgical possibilities of high alloy cast steel production in open induction medium frequency furnaces and an electric arc furnace in a gravity die casting foundry. The observation was focused on the emergence of gas defects in steel castings. The content of gases achieved during the metallurgical processes was evaluated for every unit of the production equipment and the casting ladle before casting into disposable sand moulds. The sand mould area was considered to be constant. The aim was to evaluate the current metallurgical possibilities of affecting the content of gases in high alloy cast steel in the current technical conditions of the foundry.

  17. Computer precision simulation for titanium casting centrifugal mold filling of prescision titanium castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daming XU

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Computer simulation codes were developed based on proposed mathematical model for centrifugal mold filling processes and previous computer software for 3D mold filling and solidification of castings. Sample simulations were implemented for mold filling processes of precision titanium castings under gravity and different centrifugal casting techniques. The computation results show that the alloy melt has a much stronger mold filling ability for thin section castings unde a centrifugal force field than that only under the gravity. A "return back" mold filling manner is showed to be a reasonable technique for centrifugal casting processes, especially for thin section prcision castings.

  18. [The cast structure after vacuum-pressure casting and centrifugal casting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, W; Jung, T; Quast, U

    1975-02-01

    Evaluation of polished sections revealed the following: 1. Grain size in marginal areas of the crown is, in general, smaller than it is in the occlusal region. 2. Grain size varies depending on the casting method applied. Differences in hardness were found only to a limited extent. They were not always in line with the grain structure. This phenomenon deviating from the rule cannot satisfactorily be explained. The piping distribution was in accordance with observations made so far.

  19. Advanced casting technologies for lightweight automotive applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan A. Luo

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an overview of alloy and process developments in aluminum and magnesium castings for lightweight automotive applications. Wear-resistant aluminum alloys, creep-resistant and high strength/ductility magnesium alloys have been developed for automotive applications. On the process front, vacuum-assisted die casting and high vacuum die casting technologies have been developed for high-integrity body and chassis applications. Thin-wall and hollow casting components are being produced by low-pressure die casting processes for structural applications. Overcasting technology is gaining traction and has enabled mixed material designs for automotive sub-systems such as engine cradles and instrument panel beams. Simulation tools developed to predict the interfacial interactions of the dissimilar components and the structural integrity of the overcast systems are being validated in the casting trials.

  20. Chilling Tendency and Chill of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E. Fra(s); M. Górny; W. Kapturkiewicz; H. López

    2008-01-01

    An analytical expression is presented for the susceptibility of liquid cast iron to solidify according tothe Fe-C-X metastable system (also known as the chilling tendency of cast iron, CT). The analysis incorpo-rates the nucleation and growth processes associated with the eutectic transformation. The CT is related tothe physicochemical state of the liquid, the eutectic cells in the flake graphite, and the number of nodules innodular cast iron. In particular, the CT can be related to the critical wall thickness, Scr, or the chill width, Wcr,in wedge shaped castings. Finally, this work serves as a guide for understanding the effect of technical fac-tors such as the melt chemistry, the spheroidizing and inoculation practice, and the holding time and tam-perature on the resultant CT and chill of the cast iron. Theoretical calculations of Scr and Wcr compare wellwith experimental data for flake graphite and nodular cast iron.

  1. Clean Cast Steel Technology, Phase IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles E. Bates

    2003-02-24

    The objective of the Clean Cast Steel Technology Program was to improve casting product quality by removing or minimizing oxide defects and to allow the production of higher integrity castings for high speed machining lines. Previous research has concentrated on macro-inclusions that break, chip, or crack machine tool cutters and drills and cause immediate shutdown of the machining lines. The overall goal of the project is to reduce the amount of surface macro-inclusions and improve the machinability of steel castings. Macro-inclusions and improve the machinability of steel castings. Macro-inclusions have been identified by industrial sponsors as a major barrier to improving the quality and marketability of steel castings.

  2. Gating of Permanent Molds for ALuminum Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Tom Engle; Qingming Chang

    2004-03-30

    This report summarizes a two-year project, DE-FC07-01ID13983 that concerns the gating of aluminum castings in permanent molds. The main goal of the project is to improve the quality of aluminum castings produced in permanent molds. The approach taken was determine how the vertical type gating systems used for permanent mold castings can be designed to fill the mold cavity with a minimum of damage to the quality of the resulting casting. It is evident that somewhat different systems are preferred for different shapes and sizes of aluminum castings. The main problems caused by improper gating are entrained aluminum oxide films and entrapped gas. The project highlights the characteristic features of gating systems used in permanent mold aluminum foundries and recommends gating procedures designed to avoid common defects. The study also provides direct evidence on the filling pattern and heat flow behavior in permanent mold castings.

  3. Homogenity of Die Casting and Returning Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Malik

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Homogeneity of die castings is influenced by wide range of technological parameters as piston velocity in filling chamber of die casting machine, filling time of mould cavity, temperature of cast alloy, temperature of the mould, temperature of filling chamber, surface pressure on alloy during mould filling, final pressure and others. Based on stated parameters it is clear, that main parameters of die casting are filling time of die mould cavity and velocity of the melt in the ingates. Filling time must ensure the complete filling of the mould cavity before solidification process can negatively influence it. Among technological parameters also belong the returning material, which ratio in charge must be constrained according to requirement on final homogeneity of die castings. With the ratio of returning material influenced are the mechanical properties of castings, inner homogeneity and chemical composition.

  4. Method for casting thin metal objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pehrson, Brandon P; Moore, Alan F

    2015-04-14

    Provided herein are various embodiments of systems for casting thin metal plates and sheets. Typical embodiments include layers of mold cavities that are oriented vertically for casting the metal plates. In some embodiments, the mold cavities include a beveled edge such that the plates that are cast have a beveled edge. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled with a molten metal through an open horizontal edge of the cavity. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled through one or more vertical feed orifices. Further disclosed are methods for forming a thin cast metal plate or sheet where the thickness of the cast part is in a range from 0.005 inches to 0.2 inches, and the surface area of the cast part is in a range from 16 square inches to 144 square inches.

  5. Nanoscale nickel oxide/nickel heterostructures for active hydrogen evolution electrocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ming; Zhou, Wu; Tsai, Mon-Che; Zhou, Jigang; Guan, Mingyun; Lin, Meng-Chang; Zhang, Bo; Hu, Yongfeng; Wang, Di-Yan; Yang, Jiang; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Hwang, Bing-Joe; Dai, Hongjie

    2014-08-01

    Active, stable and cost-effective electrocatalysts are a key to water splitting for hydrogen production through electrolysis or photoelectrochemistry. Here we report nanoscale nickel oxide/nickel heterostructures formed on carbon nanotube sidewalls as highly effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction with activity similar to platinum. Partially reduced nickel interfaced with nickel oxide results from thermal decomposition of nickel hydroxide precursors bonded to carbon nanotube sidewalls. The metal ion-carbon nanotube interactions impede complete reduction and Ostwald ripening of nickel species into the less hydrogen evolution reaction active pure nickel phase. A water electrolyzer that achieves ~20 mA cm-2 at a voltage of 1.5 V, and which may be operated by a single-cell alkaline battery, is fabricated using cheap, non-precious metal-based electrocatalysts.

  6. Newly developed vacuum differential pressure casting of thin-walled complicated Al-alloy castings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The newly designed vacuum differential pressure casting (VDPC) unit was introduced, by which the capability of the VDPC process to produce thin-walled complicated Al-alloy castings, that are free from oxides, gas pore and shrinkage cavity and thus enhance overall part quality, was studied. Experimental results were compared with those of traditional gravity pouring and vacuum suction casting. The first series of experiments were focused on investigating the castability of thin section Al-alloy casting. In the second series of experiments the metallographic evidence, casting strength and soundness were examined. Finally, case studies of very interesting thin walled complicated casting applications were described. The advantages of the described technique have made possible to produce thin walled complicated Al-alloy casting (up to a section thickness of 1 mm), which is not practical for gravity pouring and vacuum suction casting.

  7. COOLING METHOD OF SILUMINA CASTINGS AK15M3 AT VERTICAL CENTRIFUGAL CASTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Yu. Stecenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The way of cooling of castings from silumin AK15M3 is developed at the vertical centrifugal casting, enabling to receive bimetallic blanks with high-disperse eutectic and hypereutectic microstructures and minimal allowance for machining.

  8. Influence of Technological Parameters of Furane Mixtures on Shrinkage Creation in Ductile Cast Iron Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasková I.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ductile cast iron (GS has noticed great development in last decades and its boom has no analogue in history humankind. Ductile iron has broaden the use of castings from cast iron into areas, which where exclusively domains for steel castings. Mainly by castings, which weight is very high, is the propensity to shrinkage creation even higher. Shrinkage creation influences mainly material, construction of casting, gating system and mould. Therefore, the main realized experiment was to ascertain the influence of technological parameters of furane mixture on shrinkage creation in castings from ductile iron. Together was poured 12 testing items in 3 moulds forto determine and compare the impact of various technological parameters forms the propensity for shrinkage in the casting of LGG.

  9. RESEARCH AND APPLICATION OF AS-CAST WEAR RESISTANCE HIGH CHROMIUM CAST IRON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The influence of alloy elements, such as boron and silicon, on the microstructure and properties of as-cast high chromium cast iron is studied. The results show that boron and silicon have a great effect on the mechanical properties and the wear resistance. Through proper addition of boron and silicon, the properties of as-cast high chromium cast iron can be improved effectively. Through analyzing the distribution of elements by scanning electron microscope, it has been shown that the addition of boron and silicon lowers the mass fraction of chromium saturated in as-cast austenite, and makes it unstable and liable to be transformed into martensite. The as-cast high chromium cast iron with proper content of boron and silicon is suitable for the manufacture of lining for asphalt concrete mixer and its wear resistance is 14 times that of lining made of low alloy white cast iron.

  10. Thermal gradient analysis of solidifying casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Suchoń

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available For description of casting solidification and crystallization process the thermal derivative analysis (TDA is commonly used. Besides the process kinetics considered in TDA method to describe the solidification process, the thermal gradient analysis can be also used for this purpose [1, 2]. In conducted studies analysis of thermal gradient distribution inside the solidifying wedge casting was shown which enabled determination of heat flow intensity on casting section.

  11. Caste and wealth inequality in India

    OpenAIRE

    Zacharias, Ajit; Vakulabharanam, Vamsi

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we conduct the novel exercise of analyzing the relationship between overall wealth inequality and caste divisions in India using nationally representative surveys on household wealth conducted during 1991–92 and 2002–03. According to our findings, the groups in India that are generally considered disadvantaged (known as Scheduled Castes or Scheduled Tribes) have, as one would expect, substantially lower wealth than the "forward" caste groups, while the Other Backward Classes an...

  12. Improved Foundry Castings Utilizing CAD/CAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    designed to simulate the heat transfer behavior during freezing and the subsequent cooling of an arbitrarily shaped 3D casting solidify- ing in a sand...variety of complex 2D and 3D geometries may be simulated by these routines. It is important, however, to be aware of the assumptions made in the design...three-dimensional with a sand mold surrounding a steel casting. The simulation program is desing - ed to simulate any shape. The shape of test casting

  13. Theory of uniqueness of Indian Caste System

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Ashwin

    2006-01-01

    Classical studies on pre-modern Indian social structure have suggested apparent differences between the Indian caste system and social stratification as one can discern in other parts of the world. However, one needs to question such dogmatic assertions that such vast differences really existed. An endeavor is made in this research paper to reflect on the nature of caste hierarchy in pre-modern India. The caste system forms the significant basis of pre-modern Indian social structure. Early wr...

  14. Maritime Cast Shop Integrated Improvement Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-20

    as well as the risers, sprues and runners that are cut off as scrap from the cast component. The post cast component clean up process should...include several steps  Revert from all sources, risers, sprues, runners and pigged material, must be weighed  The revert must be marked with alloy and...heat all surfaces of the mold to 250F. The higher interior temperature is advantageous in pouring castings with thin sections such as impeller blades

  15. Development and application of titanium alloy casting technology in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NAN Hai; XIE Cheng-mu; ZHAO Jia-qi

    2005-01-01

    The development and research of titanium cast alloy and its casting technology, especially its application inaeronautical industry in China are presented. The technology of molding, melting and casting of titanium alloy, casting quality control are introduced. The existing problems and development trend in titanium alloy casting technology are also discussed.

  16. Aluminium and nickel in human albumin solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Sandberg, E

    1989-01-01

    Five different brands of commercially available human albumin solutions for infusion were analysed for their aluminium and nickel contents by atomic absorption spectrometry. The aluminium concentrations ranged from 12 micrograms/l to 1109 micrograms/l and the nickel concentrations ranged from 17...

  17. Nickel: Impact on leaf morphology and growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nutritional physiology of essential micronutrients in pecan, especially that of nickel, is a limiting factor in optimization of physiological efficiency of orchard enterprises. Knowledge by farmers and extension specialists about the role of nickel, a newly recognized micronutrient, is meager. ...

  18. Crystallographic orientations and twinning of electrodeposited nickel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alimadadi, Hossein; da Silva Fanta, Alice Bastos; Somers, Marcel A. J.;

    2014-01-01

    A series of nickel layers was electrodeposited at different current densities from a Watts type electrolyte containing the additive 2-butyne-1,4-diol in various concentrations. The internal structure of the nickel electrodeposits was systematically investigated applying complementary microscopic...

  19. Technological Aspects of Low-Alloyed Cast Steel Massive Casting Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szajnara J.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper authors have undertaken the attempt of explaining the causes of cracks net occurrence on a massive 3-ton cast steel casting with complex geometry. Material used for casting manufacturing was the low-alloyed cast steel with increased wear resistance modified with vanadium and titanium. The studies included the primary and secondary crystallization analysis with use of TDA and the qualitative and quantitative analysis of non-metallic inclusions.

  20. Cast functional accessories for heat treatment furnaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Drotlew

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The study gives examples of the cast functional accessories operating in furnaces for the heat treatment of metals and alloys. The describeddesign solutions of castings and their respective assemblies are used for charge preparation and handling. They were put in systematicorder depending on furnace design and the technological purpose of heat treatment. Basic grades of austenitic cast steel, used for castings of this type, were enumerated, and examples of general guidelines formulated for their use were stated. The functional accessories described in this study were designed and made by the Foundry Research Laboratory of West Pomeranian University of Technology.

  1. Vacuum-sealed casting process under pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chen-xi; GUO Tai-ming; WU Chun-jing; WANG Hong

    2006-01-01

    A new casting method, the vacuum-sealed mold casting under pressure, has been developed, and thin wall iron castings with high precision and smooth surface have been produced successfully with this casting method. The experimental results show that the liquid iron has a very excellent filling ability because a high negative pressure is formed in the mold cavity during filling process. The vacuum-sealed mold under pressure has very high compressive strength greater than 650 kPa, which is 3-4 times as high as that of the molds produced by high-pressure molding process or vacuum-sealed molding process.

  2. Friction Stir Processing of Cast Superalloys Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR effort examines the feasibility of an innovative fabrication technology incorporating sand casting and friction stir processing (FSP) for producing...

  3. Interactions at the mould – modifying coating – molten nickel alloy interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Michalska

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The study describes thermal-chemical interactions that take place in the molten nickel alloy-ceramic mould system, where the mould is either coated with a modifying coating („blue” mould or is not („white” mould. The ceramic mould based on zirconium silicate was made by investment process at the WSK Rzeszów Foundry. The main component of the modifying coating was cobalt aluminate CoAl2O4 added in an amount of 10%. Thermodynamic calculations indicated the possibility of chemical reactions taking place between the chemically active nickel alloy constituents (Al, Ti, Hf, Ta and Nb and the components of a ceramic mould and modifying coating. The result of such interactions is the risk of the formation of cracks on the surface of mould and molten metal penetration into these cracks, combined with the formation of casting defects, like burns-on, pitting, etc., as proved by extensive X-ray microanalysis. Changes of chemical composition in the surface layer of castings were also reported.

  4. Action of Cryogenic chill on Mechanical properties of Nickel alloy Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B. K. Anil; Ananthaprasad, M. G.; GopalaKrishna, K.

    2016-09-01

    In the area of material science engineering, metallurgists may be at the forefront of new technologies, developing metals for new applications, or involved in the traditional manufacture. By doing so it is possible for metallurgist to apply their knowledge of metals to solve complex problems and looking for ways to improve the mechanical properties of the materials. Therefore, an investigation in the present research was made to fabricate and evaluate the microstructure and mechanical properties of composites developed using cryogenically cooled copper chills, consisting of nickel alloy matrix and garnet particles as the reinforcement. The reinforcement being added ranges from 3 to 12 wt.% in steps of 3%. A stir casting process was used to fabricate the nickel base matrix alloy fused with garnet reinforcement particle. The matrix alloy was melted in a casting furnace at around 1350°C, the garnet particulates which was preheated to 600°C, was introduced evenly into the molten metal alloy. An arrangement was made at one end of the mould by placing copper chill blocks of varying thickness brazed with MS hallow block in which liquid nitrogen was circulated for cryogenic effect. After solidification, the composite materials thus synthesized were examined for microstructural and mechanical properties as per ASTM standards.

  5. Novel material for nickel recuperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. da Rocha Filho

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Graft polymerization of N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone with chitin was studied using hydrogen peroxide for initiation. The capacity of the obtained VP-g-Ch graft copolymer for adsorption of nickel was examined. The effect of temperature, pH and solute concentration on the chelating properties of the grafted and ungrafted chitin were determined. The thermal profiles obtained showed higher thermal resistance for the VP-g-Ch than chitin. The results indicate that the obtained graft copolymer under investigation is a potentially powerful ion exchanger that can be employed for heavy metals removal from wastewater effluents.

  6. Structure investigations of electrodeposited nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vertes, A.; Czako-Nagy, I.; Lakatos-Varsani, M. (Eoetvoes Lorand Tudomanyegyetem, Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Physical Chemistry); Kajcsos, Z. (Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest. Central Research Inst. for Physics); Csordas, L. (Eoetvoes Lorand Tudomanyegyetem, Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Solid State Physics); Brauer, G. (Zentralinstitut fuer Kernforschung, Rossendorf bei Dresden (German Democratic Republic)); Leidheiser, H. Jr. (Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (USA). Center for Surface and Coatings Research)

    1982-08-01

    Nickel, electrodeposited under different conditions and yielding different values of stress, was investigated by positron annihilation (lifetime and Doppler-broadening), Moessbauer effect and X-ray diffraction measurements. Two-component positron lifetime spectra were obtained. The first component is thought to result from bulk annihilation and trapping at single trapping centres (TC). Estimations of TC-concentrations are obtained by means of the trapping model. The second one possibly denotes annihilation at voids, the number of which is dependent on the stress in the deposit. Results of Doppler-broadening measurements support this interpretation. The Moessbauer results show differences in the magnetic orientation in the three samples examined.

  7. Lead-nickel electrochemical batteries

    CERN Document Server

    Glaize, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The lead-acid accumulator was introduced in the middle of the 19th Century, the diverse variants of nickel accumulators between the beginning and the end of the 20th Century. Although old, these technologies are always very present on numerous markets. Unfortunately they are still not used in optimal conditions, often because of the misunderstanding of the internal electrochemical phenomena.This book will show that batteries are complex systems, made commercially available thanks to considerable amounts of scientific research, empiricism and practical knowledge. However, the design of

  8. Aluminium and nickel in human albumin solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Sandberg, E

    1989-01-01

    Five different brands of commercially available human albumin solutions for infusion were analysed for their aluminium and nickel contents by atomic absorption spectrometry. The aluminium concentrations ranged from 12 micrograms/l to 1109 micrograms/l and the nickel concentrations ranged from 17...... micrograms/l to 77 micrograms/l. Examination of the aluminium and nickel contents of the constituents for the production of one brand showed too low levels to explain the final contamination of the product. By following the aluminium and nickel concentrations of the same brand during the production...... of a batch of albumin solution, filtration was shown to contribute to contamination, although the largest increase in aluminium as well as nickel concentrations appeared during the bulk concentrating process. To avoid health risks to certain patients, regulations should be established requiring aluminium...

  9. APT characterization of high nickel RPV steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. K.; Sokolov, M. A.; Nanstad, R. K.; Russell, K. F.

    2006-06-01

    The microstructures of three high nickel content pressure vessel steels have been characterized by atom probe tomography to investigate the influence of high nickel levels on the response to neutron irradiation of high and low copper pressure vessel steels. The high-nickel, low-manganese, low-copper VVER-1000 weld and forging exhibited lower than predicted levels of embrittlement during neutron irradiation. The Palisades weld exhibits a Δ T41 J of 102 °C which was significantly lower than the value of 154 °C predicted by Reg. Guide 1.99 Rev. 2. Atom probe tomography revealed nickel-, manganese-, and silicon-enriched precipitates in both the VVER-1000 base and weld materials after neutron irradiation. A high number density of copper-, nickel-, manganese-, silicon- and phosphorus-enriched precipitates were observed in the Palisades weld after neutron irradiation. Atom probe tomography also revealed high levels of phosphorus segregation to the dislocations in all three materials.

  10. The temperature gradient on section of casting in process of primary crystallization of chromium cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The methodology of defining in article was introduced the temperature gradient in process of primary crystallization during cooling the casting from chromium cast iron on basis of measurements of thermal field in test DTA-K3. Insert also the preliminary results of investigations of influence temperature gradient on structure of studied wear resistance chromium cast iron.

  11. The temperature gradient on section of casting in process of primary crystallization of chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Studnicki

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The methodology of defining in article was introduced the temperature gradient in process of primary crystallization during cooling the casting from chromium cast iron on basis of measurements of thermal field in test DTA-K3. Insert also the preliminary results of investigations of influence temperature gradient on structure of studied wear resistance chromium cast iron.

  12. Spray casting project final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churnetski, S.R.; Thompson, J.E.

    1996-08-01

    Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), along with other participating organizations, has been exploring the feasibility of spray casting depleted uranium (DU) to near-net shape as a waste minimization effort. Although this technology would be useful in a variety of applications where DU was the material of choice, this effort was aimed primarily at gamma-shielding components for use in storage and transportation canisters for high-level radioactive waste, particularly in the Multipurpose Canister (MPC) application. In addition to the waste-minimization benefits, spray casting would simplify the manufacturing process by allowing the shielding components for MPC to be produced as a single component, as opposed to multiple components with many fabrication and assembly steps. In earlier experiments, surrogate materials were used to simulate the properties (specifically reactivity and density) of DU. Based on the positive results from those studies, the project participants decided that further evaluation of the issues and concerns that would accompany spraying DU was warranted. That evaluation occupied substantially all of Fiscal Year 1995, yielding conceptual designs for both an intermediate facility and a production facility and their associated engineering estimates. An intermediate facility was included in this study to allow further technology development in spraying DU. Although spraying DU to near-net shape seems to be feasible, a number of technical, engineering, and safety issues would need to be evaluated before proceeding with a production facility. This report is intended to document the results from the spray-casting project and to provide information needed by anyone interested in proceeding to the next step.

  13. The thermal fatigue behaviour of creep-resistant Ni-Cr cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Piekarski

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The study gives a summary of the results of industrial and laboratory investigations regarding an assessment of the thermal fatigue behaviour of creep-resistant austenitic cast steel. The first part of the study was devoted to the problem of textural stresses forming in castings during service, indicating them as a cause of crack formation and propagation. Stresses are forming in carbides and in matrix surrounding these carbides due to considerable differences in the values of the coefficients of thermal expansion of these phases. The second part of the study shows the results of investigations carried out to assess the effect of carbon, chromium and nickel on crack resistance of austenitic cast steel. As a criterion of assessment the amount and propagation rate of cracks forming in the specimens as a result of rapid heating followed by cooling in running water was adopted. Tests were carried out on specimens made from 11 alloys. The chemical composition of these alloys was comprised in a range of the following values: (wt-%: 18-40 %Ni, 17-30 %Cr, 1.2-1.6%Si and 0.05-0.6 %C. The specimens were subjected to 75 cycles of heating to a temperature of 900oC followed by cooling in running water. After every 15 cycles the number of the cracks was counted and their length was measured. The results of the measurements were mathematically processed. It has been proved that the main factor responsible for an increase in the number of cracks is carbon content in the alloy. In general assessment of the results of investigations, the predominant role of carbon and of chromium in the next place in shaping the crack behaviour of creep-resistant austenitic cast steel should be stressed. Attention was also drawn to the effect of high-temperature corrosion as a factor definitely deteriorating the cast steel resistance to thermal fatigue.

  14. Microdefects in cast multicrystalline silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, E.; Klinger, D.; Bergmann, S. [Inst. of Crystal Growth Berlin (Germany)

    1995-08-01

    The microdefect etching behavior of cast multicrystalline BAYSIX and SILSO samples is mainly the same as that of EFG silicon, in spite of the very different growth parameters applied to these two techniques and the different carbon contents of the investigated materials. Intentional decorating of mc silicon with copper, iron and gold did not influence the results of etching and with help of infrared transmission microscopy no metal precipitates at the assumed microdefects could be established. There are many open questions concerning the origin of the assumed, not yet doubtless proved microdefects.

  15. Control of Cast Iron Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, J.; Lillybeck, N.; Franco, N.; Stefanescu, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    The use of microgravity for industrial research in the processing of cast iron was investigated. Solidification experiments were conducted using the KC-135 and F-104 aircraft, and an experiment plan was developed for follow-on experiments using the Shuttle. Three areas of interest are identified: (1) measurement of thermophysical properties in the melt; (2) understanding of the relative roles of homogeneous nucleation, grain multiplication, and innocultants in forming the microstructure; and (3) exploring the possibility of obtaining an aligned graphite structure in hypereutectic Fe, Ni, and Co.

  16. Yield Improvement in Steel Casting (Yield II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard A. Hardin; Christoph Beckermann; Tim Hays

    2002-02-18

    This report presents work conducted on the following main projects tasks undertaken in the Yield Improvement in Steel Casting research program: Improvement of Conventional Feeding and Risering Methods, Use of Unconventional Yield Improvement Techniques, and Case Studies in Yield Improvement. Casting trials were conducted and then simulated using the precise casting conditions as recorded by the participating SFSA foundries. These results present a statistically meaningful set of experimental data on soundness versus feeding length. Comparisons between these casting trials and casting trials performed more than forty years ago by Pellini and the SFSA are quite good and appear reasonable. Comparisons between the current SFSA feeding rules and feeding rules based on the minimum Niyama criterion reveal that the Niyama-based rules are generally less conservative. The niyama-based rules also agree better with both the trials presented here, and the casting trails performed by Pellini an d the SFSA years ago. Furthermore, the use of the Niyama criterion to predict centerline shrinkage for horizontally fed plate sections has a theoretical basis according to the casting literature reviewed here. These results strongly support the use of improved feeding rules for horizontal plate sections based on the Niyama criterion, which can be tailored to the casting conditions for a given alloy and to a desired level of soundness. The reliability and repeatability of ASTM shrinkage x-ray ratings was investigated in a statistical study performed on 128 x-rays, each of which were rated seven different times. A manual ''Feeding and Risering Guidelines for Steel Castings' is given in this final report. Results of casting trials performed to test unconventional techniques for improving casting yield are presented. These use a stacked arrangement of castings and riser pressurization to increase the casting yield. Riser pressurization was demonstrated to feed a casting up to

  17. Clean cast steel technology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, C.E.; Griffin, J.A.

    1998-06-01

    This report documents the results obtained from the Clean Cast Steel Technology Program financially supported by the DOE Metal Casting Competitiveness Research Program and industry. The primary objective of this program is to develop technology for delivering steel free of oxide macroinclusions to mold cavities. The overall objective is to improve the quality of cast steel by developing and demonstrating the technology for substantially reducing surface and sub-surface oxide inclusions. Two approaches are discussed here. A total of 23 castings were produced by submerge pouring along with sixty conventionally poured castings. The submerged poured castings contained, on average, 96% fewer observable surface inclusions (11.9 vs 0.4) compared to the conventionally poured cast parts. The variation in the population of surface inclusions also decreased by 88% from 5.5 to 0.7. The machinability of the casting was also improved by submerged pouring. The submerge poured castings required fewer cutting tool changes and less operator intervention during machining. Subsequent to these trials, the foundry has decided to purchase more shrouds for continued experimentation on other problem castings where submerge pouring is possible. An examination of melting and pouring practices in four foundries has been carried out. Three of the four foundries showed significant improvement in casting quality by manipulating the melting practice. These melting practice variables can be grouped into two separate categories. The first category is the pouring and filling practice. The second category concerns the concentration of oxidizable elements contained in the steel. Silicon, manganese, and aluminum concentrations were important factors in all four foundries. Clean heats can consistently be produced through improved melting practice and reducing exposure of the steel to atmospheric oxygen during pouring and filling.

  18. The Role of Indian Caste Identity and Caste Inconsistent Norms on Status Representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Sindhuja; Sekerdej, Maciek; von Hecker, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    The Indian caste system is a complex social structure wherein social roles like one's profession became 'hereditary,' resulting in restricted social mobility and fixed status hierarchies. Furthermore, we argue that the inherent property of caste heightens group identification with one's caste. Highly identified group members would protect the identity of the group in situations when group norms are violated. In this paper, we were interested in examining the consequence of caste norm violation and how an individual's status is mentally represented. High caste norms are associated with moral values while the lower caste norms are associated with immorality. We predicted a 'black sheep effect,' that is, when high caste individuals' group identity (caste norm violation condition) is threatened their salient high caste identity would increase, thereby resulting in devaluing the status of their fellow in-group member if the latter is perceived as perpetrator. We presented participants with a social conflict situation of a victim and a perpetrator that is 'Caste norm consistent' (Lower caste individual as a perpetrator and higher caste individual as a victim) and vice versa 'Caste norm inconsistent' condition (higher caste individual as perpetrator and lower caste individual as a victim). Then, participants had to choose from nine pictorial depictions representing the protagonists in the story on a vertical line, with varying degrees of status distance. Results showed evidence for the black sheep effect and, furthermore, revealed that no other identity (religious, national, and regional) resulted in devaluing the status of fellow in-group member. These results help us understand the 'black sheep' effect in the context of moral norms and status representation and are discussed in the framework of the Indian society.

  19. Reclaim nickel and remove organics from the spent electroless nickel-plating bath by electrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xiu-juan; SHEN Jin; MENG Xian-lin; LI Shu-qin; YAN Lei; ZHOU Ding

    2006-01-01

    Typical wastes from nickel plating operations include excess drag-out solution. An electrochemical approach was made to recover the nickel and remove the organic pollutants from the spent electroless nickelplating bath. An electrolyte cell which was constructed by the cathode of porous nickel foam and the anode of Ti/RuO2 was used. During electrolysis, the nickel ion was electrodeposited at the cathode and the oxidation of the organics in the bath was conducted at the anode. The current ( i), time ( t), temperature (T) and pH of the solution affected the recovery efficiency of nickel with constant potential electrolysis. With the optimum experimental conditions of pH = 7. 6, i = 0.45 A, T = 65℃ and t = 2 h, the concentration of nickel ion was reduced from 2. 09 g/L to 0. 053 g/L and the recovery rate of nickel, the current efficiency and the consumed energy were 97.5%, 17.1%, 12.2 kWh/kg Ni, respectively. Meanwhile, total organic carbon (TOC) of the bath was reduced from 5 800 mg/L to 152. 5 mg/L and the removal efficiency of TOC was 97.3%. The recovery rate of nickel could keep to about 97% when electrodeposit was used to recover nickel for 40 hours in a laboratory batch reactor containing the spent bath. Dull nickel containing phosphorus was obtained on the cathode.

  20. Validation of stress prediction during solidification of cast components

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Paine, AP

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available designed box shaped experimental casting was used to validate the commercial finite-element code ProCAST (casting simulation software), with respect to distortions as well as residual stresses....