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  1. Ponatinib promotes a G1 cell-cycle arrest of merlin/NF2-deficient human schwann cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrilli, Alejandra M; Garcia, Jeanine; Bott, Marga; Klingeman Plati, Stephani; Dinh, Christine T; Bracho, Olena R; Yan, Denise; Zou, Bing; Mittal, Rahul; Telischi, Fred F; Liu, Xue-Zhong; Chang, Long-Sheng; Welling, D Bradley; Copik, Alicja J; Fernández-Valle, Cristina

    2017-05-09

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is a genetic syndrome that predisposes individuals to multiple benign tumors of the central and peripheral nervous systems, including vestibular schwannomas. Currently, there are no FDA approved drug therapies for NF2. Loss of function of merlin encoded by the NF2 tumor suppressor gene leads to activation of multiple mitogenic signaling cascades, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and SRC in Schwann cells. The goal of this study was to determine whether ponatinib, an FDA-approved ABL/SRC inhibitor, reduced proliferation and/or survival of merlin-deficient human Schwann cells (HSC). Merlin-deficient HSC had higher levels of phosphorylated PDGFRα/β, and SRC than merlin-expressing HSC. A similar phosphorylation pattern was observed in phospho-protein arrays of human vestibular schwannoma samples compared to normal HSC. Ponatinib reduced merlin-deficient HSC viability in a dose-dependent manner by decreasing phosphorylation of PDGFRα/β, AKT, p70S6K, MEK1/2, ERK1/2 and STAT3. These changes were associated with decreased cyclin D1 and increased p27Kip1levels, leading to a G1 cell-cycle arrest as assessed by Western blotting and flow cytometry. Ponatinib did not modulate ABL, SRC, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), or paxillin phosphorylation levels. These results suggest that ponatinib is a potential therapeutic agent for NF2-associated schwannomas and warrants further in vivo investigation.

  2. Combinatorial Therapy Approaches for NF2-Deficient Meningiomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    TAZ in migration, invasion, and tumorigenesis of breast cancer cells. Cancer Res 2008;68:2592–8. 16. Zhao B, Kim J, Ye X, Lai ZC, Guan KL. Both TEAD ...1089–98. 17. Chan SW, Lim CJ, Loo LS, Chong YF, Huang C, Hong W. TEADs mediate nuclear retention of TAZ to promote oncogenic transforma- tion. J Biol...determined [19]. Additionally, in vitro treatment with dobutamine was shown to increase phospho-S127 of YAP1 and to inhibit YAP1-dependent TEAD

  3. Pentazocine dependence among sickle cell disease patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Sickle cell disease is a chronic disease. Severe bone pain is commonly the hallmark of clinical features. This commonly necessitates the use of analgesics especially Opioids which unfortunately have a high potential to produce dependence. The complications of dependence in patients on any psychoactive ...

  4. The cell biology of T-dependent B cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Zeine, R

    1989-01-01

    The requirement that CD4+ helper T cells recognize antigen in association with class II Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) encoded molecules constrains T cells to activation through intercellular interaction. The cell biology of the interactions between CD4+ T cells and antigen-presenting cells...... includes multipoint intermolecular interactions that probably involve aggregation of both polymorphic and monomorphic T cell surface molecules. Such aggregations have been shown in vitro to markedly enhance and, in some cases, induce T cell activation. The production of T-derived lymphokines that have been...... implicated in B cell activation is dependent on the T cell receptor for antigen and its associated CD3 signalling complex. T-dependent help for B cell activation is therefore similarly MHC-restricted and involves T-B intercellular interaction. Recent reports that describe antigen-independent B cell...

  5. c-Myc-Dependent Cell Competition in Human Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish S; Shah, Heta S; Shrivastava, Neeta

    2017-07-01

    Cell Competition is an interaction between cells for existence in heterogeneous cell populations of multicellular organisms. This phenomenon is involved in initiation and progression of cancer where heterogeneous cell populations compete directly or indirectly for the survival of the fittest based on differential gene expression. In Drosophila, cells having lower dMyc expression are eliminated by cell competition through apoptosis when present in the milieu of cells having higher dMyc expression. Thus, we designed a study to develop c-Myc (human homolog) dependent in vitro cell competition model of human cancer cells. Cells with higher c-Myc were transfected with c-myc shRNA to prepare cells with lower c-Myc and then co-cultured with the same type of cells having a higher c-Myc in equal ratio. Cells with lower c-Myc showed a significant decrease in numbers when compared with higher c-Myc cells, suggesting "loser" and "winner" status of cells, respectively. During microscopy, engulfment of loser cells by winner cells was observed with higher expression of JNK in loser cells. Furthermore, elimination of loser cells was prevented significantly, when co-cultured cells were treated with the JNK (apoptosis) inhibitor. Above results indicate elimination of loser cells in the presence of winner cells by c-Myc-dependent mechanisms of cell competition in human cancer cells. This could be an important mechanism in human tumors where normal cells are eliminated by c-Myc-overexpressed tumor cells. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1782-1791, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Anchorage Dependent Cells Attached to a Polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. Anchorage dependent cells on STS-95 will be grown on beads similar to these cells produced during previous investigations. Recombinant proteins may offer the possibility of reducing or eliminating transplant rejections. Research by Synthecon, Inc. using the BioDyn Bioreactor will focus on the preliminary process for growing a proprietary recombinant protein that can decrease rejection of transplanted tissue. The cells producing this protein are anchorage dependent, meaning that they must attach to something to grow. These cells will be cultured in the bioreactor in a medium containing polymer microbeads. Synthecon hopes that the data from this mission will lead to the development of a commercial protein that will aid in prevention of transplant rejection.

  7. Collective cell streams in epithelial monolayers depend on cell adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czirók, András; Varga, Katalin; Méhes, Előd; Szabó, András

    2013-01-01

    We report spontaneously emerging, randomly oriented, collective streaming behavior within a monolayer culture of a human keratinocyte cell line, and explore the effect of modulating cell adhesions by perturbing the function of calcium-dependent cell adhesion molecules. We demonstrate that decreasing cell adhesion induces narrower and more anisotropic cell streams, reminiscent of decreasing the Taylor scale of turbulent liquids. To explain our empirical findings, we propose a cell-based model that represents the dual nature of cell–cell adhesions. Spring-like connections provide mechanical stability, while a cellular Potts model formalism represents surface-tension driven attachment. By changing the relevance and persistence of mechanical links between cells, we are able to explain the experimentally observed changes in emergent flow patterns. (paper)

  8. Oxygen-dependent sensitization of irradiated cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewing, D.; Powers, E.L.

    1979-01-01

    Attention is focused primarily on O 2 effects in three biological systems, all tested in suspension: bacterial spores, vegetative bacterial cells, and mammalian cells. Information from these systems shows that O 2 has more than one process through which it can act. Studies with bacterial spore suspensions provide clear evidence that multiple components to oxygen-dependent radiation sensitization exist. Studies with mammalian cell suspensions also show that at least two oxygen-dependent sensitization processes can be distinguished. Similar studies with vegetative bacteria in suspension have not resolved oxic sensitization into components. The roles of water-derived radicals in radiation sensitivity and, specifically, in sensitization by O 2 were examined. OH radicals are clearly implicated in damage in all three biological test systems. However, the specific roles proposed for OH radicals are different in these organisms. In bacterial spores, OH radical removal in itself does not protect in anoxia or in high concentrations of O 2 . OH radical removal over a limited intermediate range of O 2 concentrations will, however, protect. OH radical scavenging probably results in the formation of the actual protector. In bacteria, the supposition is that OH radical removal will protect both in anoxia and in the presence of O 2 . OH radicals probably react with a cellular target molecule and leave a radicalsite; this is the site which can then react with O 2 to cause damage; DNA is the likely cellular target. In mammalian cells, a reaction scheme, similar to that proposed for bacteria, has been suggested for O 2 -dependent sensitization

  9. Algorithms using Java for Spreadsheet Dependent Cell Recomputation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Francoeur, Joe

    2002-01-01

    Java implementations of algorithms used by spreadsheets to antomatically recompute the set of cells dependent on a changed cell are described using a mathematical model for spreadsheets based on graph theory...

  10. BMP signaling regulates satellite cell-dependent postnatal muscle growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stantzou, Amalia; Schirwis, Elija; Swist, Sandra; Alonso-Martin, Sonia; Polydorou, Ioanna; Zarrouki, Faouzi; Mouisel, Etienne; Beley, Cyriaque; Julien, Anaïs; Le Grand, Fabien; Garcia, Luis; Colnot, Céline; Birchmeier, Carmen; Braun, Thomas; Schuelke, Markus; Relaix, Frédéric; Amthor, Helge

    2017-08-01

    Postnatal growth of skeletal muscle largely depends on the expansion and differentiation of resident stem cells, the so-called satellite cells. Here, we demonstrate that postnatal satellite cells express components of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling machinery. Overexpression of noggin in postnatal mice (to antagonize BMP ligands), satellite cell-specific knockout of Alk3 (the gene encoding the BMP transmembrane receptor) or overexpression of inhibitory SMAD6 decreased satellite cell proliferation and accretion during myofiber growth, and ultimately retarded muscle growth. Moreover, reduced BMP signaling diminished the adult satellite cell pool. Abrogation of BMP signaling in satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts strongly diminished cell proliferation and upregulated the expression of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p57 In conclusion, these results show that BMP signaling defines postnatal muscle development by regulating satellite cell-dependent myofiber growth and the generation of the adult muscle stem cell pool. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. The cell biology of T-dependent B cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Zeine, R

    1989-01-01

    The requirement that CD4+ helper T cells recognize antigen in association with class II Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) encoded molecules constrains T cells to activation through intercellular interaction. The cell biology of the interactions between CD4+ T cells and antigen-presenting cells...

  12. Energy-dependent cell cohesion in myxobacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Gilmore, D F; White, D

    1985-01-01

    Cohesion in the myxobacterium Stigmatella aurantiaca was characterized. Two classes of cohesion were revealed, termed class A and class B. Class A cohesion is a characteristic of vegetative cells grown in tryptone or casitone (Difco Laboratories, Detroit, Mich.), whereas class B cohesion requires the addition of calcium ion for induction. Class A cohesion occurs in the presence of any cation and is temperature independent. Class B cohesion requires the presence of a cation in the calcium grou...

  13. Cyclin-dependent kinases regulate apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sujoy; Ray, Ramesh M.; Johnson, Leonard R.

    2014-01-01

    Homeostasis of the gastrointestinal epithelium is dependent upon a balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis. Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are well known for their role in cell proliferation. Previous studies from our group have shown that polyamine-depletion of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) decreases cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) activity, increases p53 and p21Cip1 protein levels, induces G1 arrest, and protects cells from camptothecin (CPT)-induced apoptosis. Although emerging evidence suggests that members of the Cdk family are involved in the regulation of apoptosis, their roles directing apoptosis of IEC-6 cells are not known. In this study, we report that inhibition of Cdk1, 2, and 9 (with the broad range Cdk inhibitor, AZD5438) in proliferating IEC-6 cells triggered DNA damage, activated p53 signaling, inhibited proliferation, and induced apoptosis. By contrast, inhibition of Cdk2 (with NU6140) increased p53 protein and activity, inhibited proliferation, but had no effect on apoptosis. Notably, AZD5438 sensitized, whereas, NU6140 rescued proliferating IEC-6 cells from CPT-induced apoptosis. However, in colon carcinoma (Caco2) cells with mutant p53, treatment with either AZD5438 or NU6140 blocked proliferation, albeit more robustly with AZD5438. Both Cdk inhibitors induced apoptosis in Caco2 cells in a p53-independent manner. In serum starved quiescent IEC-6 cells, both AZD5438 and NU6140 decreased TNF- /CPT-induced activation of p53 and, consequently, rescued cells from apoptosis, indicating that sustained Cdk activity is required for apoptosis of quiescent cells. Furthermore, AZD5438 partially reversed the protective effect of polyamine depletion whereas NU6140 had no effect. Together, these results demonstrate that Cdks possess opposing roles in the control of apoptosis in quiescent and proliferating cells. In addition, Cdk inhibitors uncouple proliferation from apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:24242917

  14. IRF8 Transcription-Factor-Dependent Classical Dendritic Cells Are Essential for Intestinal T Cell Homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luda, Katarzyna M.; Joeris, Thorsten; Persson, Emma K.

    2016-01-01

    The role of dendritic cells (DCs) in intestinal immune homeostasis remains incompletely defined. Here we show that mice lacking IRF8 transcription-factor-dependent DCs had reduced numbers of T cells in the small intestine (SI), but not large intestine (LI), including an almost complete absence...... dependent DCs in the maintenance of intestinal T cell homeostasis....

  15. Nox1-dependent superoxide production controls colon adenocarcinoma cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadok, Amine; Bourgarel-Rey, Véronique; Gattacceca, Florence; Penel, Claude; Lehmann, Maxime; Kovacic, Hervé

    2008-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are well-known mediators of various biological responses. Recently, new homologues of the catalytic subunit of NADPH oxidase have been discovered in non-phagocytic cells. These new homologues (Nox1-Nox5) produce low levels of superoxides compared to the phagocytic homologue Nox2/gp91phox. Using Nox1 siRNA, we show that Nox1-dependent superoxide production affects the migration of HT29-D4 colonic adenocarcinoma cells on collagen-I. Nox1 inhibition or down-regulation led to a decrease of superoxide production and alpha 2 beta 1 integrin membrane availability. An addition of arachidonic acid stimulated Nox1-dependent superoxide production and HT29-D4 cell migration. Pharmacological evidences using phospholipase A2, lipoxygenases and protein kinase C inhibitors show that upstream regulation of Nox1 relies on arachidonic acid metabolism. Inhibition of 12-lipoxygenase decreased basal and arachidonic acid induced Nox1-dependent superoxide production and cell migration. Migration and ROS production inhibited by a 12-lipoxygenase inhibitor were restored by the addition of 12(S)-HETE, a downstream product of 12-lipoxygenase. Protein kinase C delta inhibition by rottlerin (and also GO6983) prevented Nox1-dependent superoxide production and inhibited cell migration, while other protein kinase C inhibitors were ineffective. We conclude that Nox1 activation by arachidonic acid metabolism occurs through 12-lipoxygenase and protein kinase C delta, and controls cell migration by affecting integrin alpha 2 subunit turn-over.

  16. Temperature-dependent imaging of living cells by AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espenel, Cedric; Giocondi, Marie-Cecile; Seantier, Bastien; Dosset, Patrice; Milhiet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Le Grimellec, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Characterization of lateral organization of plasma membranes is a prerequisite to the understanding of membrane structure-function relationships in living cells. Lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions are responsible for the existence of various membrane microdomains involved in cell signalization and in numerous pathologies. Developing approaches for characterizing microdomains associate identification tools like recognition imaging with high-resolution topographical imaging. Membrane properties are markedly dependent on temperature. However, mesoscopic scale topographical information of cell surface in a temperature range covering most of cell biology experimentation is still lacking. In this work we have examined the possibility of imaging the temperature-dependent behavior of eukaryotic cells by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our results establish that the surface of living CV1 kidney cells can be imaged by AFM, between 5 and 37 deg. C, both in contact and tapping modes. These first temperature-dependent data show that large cell structures appeared essentially stable at a microscopic scale. On the other hand, as shown by contact mode AFM, the surface was highly dynamic at a mesoscopic scale, with marked changes in apparent topography, friction, and deflection signals. When keeping the scanning conditions constant, a progressive loss in the image contrast was however observed, using tapping mode, on decreasing the temperature

  17. Cell fate determination by ubiquitin-dependent regulation of translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Achim; Iwasaki, Shintaro; McGourty, Colleen; Medina-Ruiz, Sofia; Teerikorpi, Nia; Fedrigo, Indro; Ingolia, Nicholas T.; Rape, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Metazoan development depends on accurate execution of differentiation programs that allow pluripotent stem cells to adopt specific fates 1. Differentiation requires changes to chromatin architecture and transcriptional networks, yet whether other regulatory events support cell fate determination is less well understood. Here, we have identified the vertebrate-specific ubiquitin ligase CUL3KBTBD8 as an essential regulator of neural crest specification. CUL3KBTBD8 monoubiquitylates NOLC1 and its paralog TCOF1, whose mutation underlies the neurocristopathy Treacher Collins Syndrome 2,3. Ubiquitylation drives formation of a TCOF1-NOLC1 platform that connects RNA polymerase I with ribosome modification enzymes and remodels the translational program of differentiating cells in favor of neural crest specification. We conclude that ubiquitin-dependent regulation of translation is an important feature of cell fate determination. PMID:26399832

  18. In vivo localization of cloned IL-2-dependent T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, A.M.; Palladino, M.A.; Oettgen, H.; De Sousa, M.

    1983-01-01

    The quantitative organ distribution and tissue microenvironment positioning of radioisotopically labeled cloned T cells were characterized. Intravenous (iv) injection of 51chromium ( 51 Cr)-labeled, long-term cultured cloned T-helper cells and cells from several cloned cytolytic T-lymphocyte lines (CTLL) resulted in poor localization of these cells in recipient lymphoid tissues, similar to results reported for activated lymphoblastoid cells. Simultaneous administration of interleukin 2 (IL-2) with labeled cells resulted in enhanced recovery from recipient spleen. By the intraperitoneal (ip) injection route, overall percentage recovery of injected radioactivity was lower than by the iv route, but significant localization to lymph nodes occurred. Examination of autoradiographs of tissue sections from recipients of [ 3 H]adenosine-labeled cells showed most label associated with intact, isolated cells in the liver, lungs, spleen, and small intestine. By 24 hr after iv injection, labeled cells in spleen sections were distributed to both nonlymphoid and T- and B-lymphoid areas. These findings suggest that poor localization of these cells to recipient lymphoid tissue is due both to intrinsic characteristics of cultured lymphocytes and to the possible reduced viability of IL-2-dependent cells in vivo

  19. Path dependence of lithium ion cells aging under storage conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Laisuo; Zhang, Jianbo; Huang, Jun; Ge, Hao; Li, Zhe; Xie, Fengchao; Liaw, Bor Yann

    2016-05-01

    This work investigates path dependence of lithium ion cells that are stored under static and non-static conditions. In the static storage tests, the levels of temperature and state of charge (SOC) are kept constant. The results of 12 tests from a combination of three temperatures and four SOCs show that, as expected, the cell ages faster at higher temperature and higher SOC. However, the cell aging mode, while consistent for all the evaluated temperatures, is different at 95% SOC from that at lower SOCs. In the non-static storage tests, the levels of temperature and SOC vary with time during the test process. The effect of the sequence of stress levels on cell aging is studied statistically using the statistical method of analysis of variation (ANOVA). It is found that cell capacity fade is path independent of both SOC and temperature, while cell resistance increase is path dependent on SOC and path independent of temperature. Finally, rate-based empirical aging models are adopted to fit the cell aging in the static storage tests. The aging model for capacity fade is demonstrated to be applicable to the non-static tests with errors between -3% and +3% for all the tested conditions over 180 days.

  20. Context-dependent incremental timing cells in the primate hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakon, John J; Naya, Yuji; Wirth, Sylvia; Suzuki, Wendy A

    2014-12-23

    We examined timing-related signals in primate hippocampal cells as animals performed an object-place (OP) associative learning task. We found hippocampal cells with firing rates that incrementally increased or decreased across the memory delay interval of the task, which we refer to as incremental timing cells (ITCs). Three distinct categories of ITCs were identified. Agnostic ITCs did not distinguish between different trial types. The remaining two categories of cells signaled time and trial context together: One category of cells tracked time depending on the behavioral action required for a correct response (i.e., early vs. late release), whereas the other category of cells tracked time only for those trials cued with a specific OP combination. The context-sensitive ITCs were observed more often during sessions where behavioral learning was observed and exhibited reduced incremental firing on incorrect trials. Thus, single primate hippocampal cells signal information about trial timing, which can be linked with trial type/context in a learning-dependent manner.

  1. Parathyroid hormone dependent T cell proliferation in uremic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewin, E; Ladefoged, Jens; Brandi, L

    1993-01-01

    was normalized. Rat PTH 1-84 stimulated in vitro the PHA-induced proliferation of T cells in a dose dependent manner. This effect was significant in CRF rat lymphocytes, but not in lymphocytes obtained from normal rats. Based upon the present results it is suggested that the secondary hyperparathyroidism...

  2. Involvement of IRF4 dependent dendritic cells in T cell dependent colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pool, Lieneke; Rivollier, Aymeric Marie Christian; Agace, William Winston

    to bacterial derived luminal antigen, localize to the intestinal mucosa and induce colitis. Adoptive transfer of naïve T cells into CD11cCre.IRF4fl/fl.RAG-1-/- mice resulted in reduced monocyte recruitment to the intestine and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) compared to Cre- controls. Inflammatory cytokines...... including IFNγ, TNFα and IL-6 also were reduced in the serum and intestinal tissues of these mice. Additionally CD11cCre.IRF4fl/fl.RAG-1-/- mice displayed significantly reduced numbers of CD4+ T cells in intestinal draining mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen but not the colonic lamina propria. Collectively...

  3. IRF8 dependent classical dendritic cells are essential for intestinal T cell homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luda, K.; Joeris, Thorsten; Persson, E. K.

    2016-01-01

    The role of dendritic cells (DCs) in intestinal immune homeostasis remains incompletely defined. Here we show that mice lacking IRF8 dependent DCs have reduced numbers of T cells in the small intestine (SI), but not large intestine (LI), including an almost complete absence of SI CD8ab+ andCD4+CD8...... dependent DCs in the maintenance of intestinal T cell homeostasis....

  4. Sex-Dependent Gene Expression in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ronen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Males and females have a variety of sexually dimorphic traits, most of which result from hormonal differences. However, differences between male and female embryos initiate very early in development, before hormonal influence begins, suggesting the presence of genetically driven sexual dimorphisms. By comparing the gene expression profiles of male and X-inactivated female human pluripotent stem cells, we detected Y-chromosome-driven effects. We discovered that the sex-determining gene SRY is expressed in human male pluripotent stem cells and is induced by reprogramming. In addition, we detected more than 200 differentially expressed autosomal genes in male and female embryonic stem cells. Some of these genes are involved in steroid metabolism pathways and lead to sex-dependent differentiation in response to the estrogen precursor estrone. Thus, we propose that the presence of the Y chromosome and specifically SRY may drive sex-specific differences in the growth and differentiation of pluripotent stem cells.

  5. Extracellular adenosine controls NKT-cell-dependent hepatitis induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Meenakshi; Kini, Radhika; Madasu, Manasa; Ohta, Akiko; Nowak, Michael; Exley, Mark; Sitkovsky, Michail; Ohta, Akio

    2014-04-01

    Extracellular adenosine regulates inflammatory responses via the A2A adenosine receptor (A2AR). A2AR deficiency results in much exaggerated acute hepatitis, indicating nonredundancy of adenosine-A2AR pathway in inhibiting immune activation. To identify a critical target of immunoregulatory effect of extracellular adenosine, we focused on NKT cells, which play an indispensable role in hepatitis. An A2AR agonist abolished NKT-cell-dependent induction of acute hepatitis by concanavalin A (Con A) or α-galactosylceramide in mice, corresponding to downregulation of activation markers and cytokines in NKT cells and of NK-cell co-activation. These results show that A2AR signaling can downregulate NKT-cell activation and suppress NKT-cell-triggered inflammatory responses. Next, we hypothesized that NKT cells might be under physiological control of the adenosine-A2AR pathway. Indeed, both Con A and α-galactosylceramide induced more severe hepatitis in A2AR-deficient mice than in WT controls. Transfer of A2AR-deficient NKT cells into A2AR-expressing recipients resulted in exaggeration of Con A-induced liver damage, suggesting that NKT-cell activation is controlled by endogenous adenosine via A2AR, and this physiological regulatory mechanism of NKT cells is critical in the control of tissue-damaging inflammation. The current study suggests the possibility to manipulate NKT-cell activity in inflammatory disorders through intervention to the adenosine-A2AR pathway. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Cell-geometry-dependent changes in plasma membrane order direct stem cell signalling and fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Erlach, Thomas C; Bertazzo, Sergio; Wozniak, Michele A; Horejs, Christine-Maria; Maynard, Stephanie A; Attwood, Simon; Robinson, Benjamin K; Autefage, Hélène; Kallepitis, Charalambos; Del Río Hernández, Armando; Chen, Christopher S; Goldoni, Silvia; Stevens, Molly M

    2018-03-01

    Cell size and shape affect cellular processes such as cell survival, growth and differentiation 1-4 , thus establishing cell geometry as a fundamental regulator of cell physiology. The contributions of the cytoskeleton, specifically actomyosin tension, to these effects have been described, but the exact biophysical mechanisms that translate changes in cell geometry to changes in cell behaviour remain mostly unresolved. Using a variety of innovative materials techniques, we demonstrate that the nanostructure and lipid assembly within the cell plasma membrane are regulated by cell geometry in a ligand-independent manner. These biophysical changes trigger signalling events involving the serine/threonine kinase Akt/protein kinase B (PKB) that direct cell-geometry-dependent mesenchymal stem cell differentiation. Our study defines a central regulatory role by plasma membrane ordered lipid raft microdomains in modulating stem cell differentiation with potential translational applications.

  7. Timing-dependent actions of NGF required for cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaehoon Chung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Continuous NGF stimulation induces PC12 cell differentiation. However, why continuous NGF stimulation is required for differentiation is unclear. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanisms of the timing-dependent requirement of NGF action for cell differentiation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To address the timing-dependency of the NGF action, we performed a discontinuous stimulation assay consisting of a first transient stimulation followed by an interval and then a second sustained stimulation and quantified the neurite extension level. Consequently, we observed a timing-dependent action of NGF on cell differentiation, and discontinuous NGF stimulation similarly induced differentiation. The first stimulation did not induce neurite extension, whereas the second stimulation induced fast neurite extension; therefore, the first stimulation is likely required as a prerequisite condition. These observations indicate that the action of NGF can be divided into two processes: an initial stimulation-driven latent process and a second stimulation-driven extension process. The latent process appears to require the activities of ERK and transcription, but not PI3K, whereas the extension-process requires the activities of ERK and PI3K, but not transcription. We also found that during the first stimulation, the activity of NGF can be replaced by PACAP, but not by insulin, EGF, bFGF or forskolin; during the second stimulation, however, the activity of NGF cannot be replaced by any of these stimulants. These findings allowed us to identify potential genes specifically involved in the latent process, rather than in other processes, using a microarray. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate that NGF induces the differentiation of PC12 cells via mechanically distinct processes: an ERK-driven and transcription-dependent latent process, and an ERK- and PI3K-driven and transcription-independent extension process.

  8. Glycosynapses: microdomains controlling carbohydrate-dependent cell adhesion and signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Hakomori Senitiroh

    2004-01-01

    The concept of microdomains in plasma membranes was developed over two decades, following observation of polarity of membrane based on clustering of specific membrane components. Microdomains involved in carbohydrate-dependent cell adhesion with concurrent signal transduction that affect cellular phenotype are termed "glycosynapse". Three types of glycosynapse have been distinguished: "type 1" having glycosphingolipid associated with signal transducers (small G-proteins, cSrc, Src family kina...

  9. Bleb Expansion in Migrating Cells Depends on Supply of Membrane from Cell Surface Invaginations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, Mohammad; Tarbashevich, Katsiaryna; Mildner, Karina; Begemann, Isabell; Garcia, Jamie; Paksa, Azadeh; Reichman-Fried, Michal; Mahabaleshwar, Harsha; Blaser, Heiko; Hartwig, Johannes; Zeuschner, Dagmar; Galic, Milos; Bagnat, Michel; Betz, Timo; Raz, Erez

    2017-12-04

    Cell migration is essential for morphogenesis, organ formation, and homeostasis, with relevance for clinical conditions. The migration of primordial germ cells (PGCs) is a useful model for studying this process in the context of the developing embryo. Zebrafish PGC migration depends on the formation of cellular protrusions in form of blebs, a type of protrusion found in various cell types. Here we report on the mechanisms allowing the inflation of the membrane during bleb formation. We show that the rapid expansion of the protrusion depends on membrane invaginations that are localized preferentially at the cell front. The formation of these invaginations requires the function of Cdc42, and their unfolding allows bleb inflation and dynamic cell-shape changes performed by migrating cells. Inhibiting the formation and release of the invaginations strongly interfered with bleb formation, cell motility, and the ability of the cells to reach their target. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. CD3-positive B cells: a storage-dependent phenomenon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Nagel

    Full Text Available The majority of clinical studies requires extensive management of human specimen including e.g. overnight shipping of blood samples in order to convey the samples in a central laboratory or to simultaneously analyze large numbers of patients. Storage of blood samples for periods of time before in vitro/ex vivo testing is known to influence the antigen expression on the surface of lymphocytes. In this context, the present results show for the first time that the T cell antigen CD3 can be substantially detected on the surface of human B cells after ex vivo storage and that the degree of this phenomenon critically depends on temperature and duration after blood withdrawal. The appearance of CD3 on the B cell surface seems to be a result of contact-dependent antigen exchange between T and B lymphocytes and is not attributed to endogenous production by B cells. Since cellular subsets are often classified by phenotypic analyses, our results indicate that ex vivo cellular classification in peripheral blood might result in misleading interpretations. Therefore, in order to obtain results reflecting the in vivo situation, it is suggested to minimize times of ex vivo blood storage after isolation of PBMC. Moreover, to enable reproducibility of results between different research groups and multicenter studies, we would emphasize the necessity to specify and standardize the storage conditions, which might be the basis of particular findings.

  11. Cell-substrate interaction with cell-membrane-stress dependent adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H; Yang, B

    2012-01-10

    Cell-substrate interaction is examined in a two-dimensional mechanics model. The cell and substrate are treated as a shell and an elastic solid, respectively. Their interaction through adhesion is treated using nonlinear springs. Compared to previous cell mechanics models, the present model introduces a cohesive force law that is dependent not only on cell-substrate distance but also on internal cell-membrane stress. It is postulated that a living cell would establish focal adhesion sites with density dependent on the cell-membrane stress. The formulated mechanics problem is numerically solved using coupled finite elements and boundary elements for the cell and the substrate, respectively. The nodes in the adhesion zone from either side are linked by the cohesive springs. The specific cases of a cell adhering to a homogeneous substrate and a heterogeneous bimaterial substrate are examined. The analyses show that the substrate stiffness affects the adhesion behavior significantly and regulates the direction of cell adhesion, in good agreement with the experimental results in the literature. By introducing a reactive parameter (i.e., cell-membrane stress) linking biological responses of a living cell to a mechanical environment, the present model offers a unified mechanistic vehicle for characterization and prediction of living cell responses to various kinds of mechanical stimuli including local extracellular matrix and neighboring cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The quest for targets executing MYC-dependent cell transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus eHartl

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available MYC represents a transcription factor with oncogenic potential converting multiple cellular signals into a broad transcriptional response, thereby controlling the expression of numerous protein-coding and non-coding RNAs important for cell proliferation, metabolism, differentiation, and apoptosis. Constitutive activation of MYC leads to neoplastic cell transformation, and deregulated MYC alleles are frequently observed in many human cancer cell types. Multiple approaches have been performed to isolate genes differentially expressed in cells containing aberrantly activated MYC proteins leading to the identification of thousands of putative targets. Functional analyses of genes differentially expressed in MYC-transformed cells had revealed that so far more than forty upregulated or downregulated MYC targets are actively involved in cell transformation or tumorigenesis. However, for determination which of the known, or yet unidentified targets are responsible for processing the oncogenic MYC program, further systematic and selective approaches are required. The search for critical targets in MYC-dependent tumor cells is exacerbated by the fact that during tumor development, cancer cells progressively evolve in a multistep process thereby acquiring their characteristic features in an additive manner. Functional expression cloning, combinatorial gene expression and appropriate in vivo tests could represent adequate tools for dissecting the complex scenario of MYC-specified cell transformation. In this context, the central goal is to identify a minimal set of targets that suffices to phenocopy oncogenic MYC. Recently developed genomic editing tools could be employed to confirm the requirement of crucial transformation-associated targets.Knowledge about essential MYC regulated genes is beneficial to expedite the development of specific inhibitors to interfere with growth and viability of human tumor cells in which MYC is aberrantly activated

  13. Cobalt stimulates HIF-1-dependent but inhibits HIF-2-dependent gene expression in liver cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Befani, Christina; Mylonis, Ilias; Gkotinakou, Ioanna-Maria; Georgoulias, Panagiotis; Hu, Cheng-Jun; Simos, George; Liakos, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are transcriptional regulators that mediate the cellular response to low oxygen. Although HIF-1 is usually considered as the principal mediator of hypoxic adaptation, several tissues and different cell types express both HIF-1 and HIF-2 isoforms under hypoxia or when treated with hypoxia mimetic chemicals such as cobalt. However, the similarities or differences between HIF-1 and HIF-2, in terms of their tissue- and inducer-specific activation and function, are not adequately characterized. To address this issue, we investigated the effects of true hypoxia and hypoxia mimetics on HIF-1 and HIF-2 induction and specific gene transcriptional activity in two hepatic cancer cell lines, Huh7 and HepG2. Both hypoxia and cobalt caused rapid induction of both HIF-1α and HIF-2α proteins. Hypoxia induced erythropoietin (EPO) expression and secretion in a HIF-2-dependent way. Surprisingly, however, EPO expression was not induced when cells were treated with cobalt. In agreement, both HIF-1- and HIF-2-dependent promoters (of PGK and SOD2 genes, respectively) were activated by hypoxia while cobalt only activated the HIF-1-dependent PGK promoter. Unlike cobalt, other hypoxia mimetics such as DFO and DMOG activated both types of promoters. Furthermore, cobalt impaired the hypoxic stimulation of HIF-2, but not HIF-1, activity and cobalt-induced HIF-2α interacted poorly with USF-2, a HIF-2-specific co-activator. These data show that, despite similar induction of HIF-1α and HIF-2α protein expression, HIF-1 and HIF-2 specific gene activating functions respond differently to different stimuli and suggest the operation of oxygen-independent and gene- or tissue-specific regulatory mechanisms involving additional transcription factors or co-activators. PMID:23958427

  14. Cell-cycle-dependent regulation of cell motility and determination of the role of Rac1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walmod, Peter S.; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Prag, S.

    2004-01-01

    was accompanied by changes in morphology reflecting the larger volume of cells in G2 than in G1. Furthermore, L-cells and HeLa-cells appeared to be less adherent in the G2 phase. Transfection of L-cells with constitutively active Rac1 led to a general increase in the speed and rate of diffusion in G2 to levels...... comparable to those of control cells in G1. In contrast, transfection with dominant-negative Rac1 reduced cell speed and resulted in cellular displacements, which were identical in G1 and G2. These observations indicate that migration of cultured cells is regulated in a cell-cycle-dependent manner......, and that an enhancement of Rac1 activity is sufficient for a delay of the reduced cell displacement otherwise seen in G2....

  15. Angular-dependent light scattering from cancer cells in different phases of the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaogang; Wan, Nan; Weng, Lingdong; Zhou, Yong

    2017-10-10

    Cancer cells in different phases of the cell cycle result in significant differences in light scattering properties. In order to harvest cancer cells in particular phases of the cell cycle, we cultured cancer cells through the process of synchronization. Flow cytometric analysis was applied to check the results of cell synchronization and prepare for light scattering measurements. Angular-dependent light scattering measurements of cancer cells arrested in the G1, S, and G2 phases have been performed. Based on integral calculations for scattering intensities from 5° to 10° and from 110° to 150°, conclusions have been reached. Clearly, the sizes of the cancer cells in different phases of the cell cycle dominated the forward scatter. Accompanying the increase of cell size with the progression of the cell cycle, the forward scattering intensity also increased. Meanwhile, the DNA content of cancer cells in every phase of the cell cycle is responsible for light scattering at large scatter angles. The higher the DNA content of cancer cells was, the greater the positive effect on the high-scattering intensity. As expected, understanding the relationships between the light scattering from cancer cells and cell cycles will aid in the development of cancer diagnoses. Also, it may assist in the guidance of antineoplastic drugs clinically.

  16. IRF8 Transcription-Factor-Dependent Classical Dendritic Cells Are Essential for Intestinal T Cell Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luda, Katarzyna M; Joeris, Thorsten; Persson, Emma K; Rivollier, Aymeric; Demiri, Mimoza; Sitnik, Katarzyna M; Pool, Lieneke; Holm, Jacob B; Melo-Gonzalez, Felipe; Richter, Lisa; Lambrecht, Bart N; Kristiansen, Karsten; Travis, Mark A; Svensson-Frej, Marcus; Kotarsky, Knut; Agace, William W

    2016-04-19

    The role of dendritic cells (DCs) in intestinal immune homeostasis remains incompletely defined. Here we show that mice lacking IRF8 transcription-factor-dependent DCs had reduced numbers of T cells in the small intestine (SI), but not large intestine (LI), including an almost complete absence of SI CD8αβ(+) and CD4(+)CD8αα(+) T cells; the latter requiring β8 integrin expression by migratory IRF8 dependent CD103(+)CD11b(-) DCs. SI homing receptor induction was impaired during T cell priming in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), which correlated with a reduction in aldehyde dehydrogenase activity by SI-derived MLN DCs, and inefficient T cell localization to the SI. These mice also lacked intestinal T helper 1 (Th1) cells, and failed to support Th1 cell differentiation in MLN and mount Th1 cell responses to Trichuris muris infection. Collectively these results highlight multiple non-redundant roles for IRF8 dependent DCs in the maintenance of intestinal T cell homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Abnormal mitosis triggers p53-dependent cell cycle arrest in human tetraploid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuffer, Christian; Kuznetsova, Anastasia Yurievna; Storchová, Zuzana

    2013-08-01

    Erroneously arising tetraploid mammalian cells are chromosomally instable and may facilitate cell transformation. An increasing body of evidence shows that the propagation of mammalian tetraploid cells is limited by a p53-dependent arrest. The trigger of this arrest has not been identified so far. Here we show by live cell imaging of tetraploid cells generated by an induced cytokinesis failure that most tetraploids arrest and die in a p53-dependent manner after the first tetraploid mitosis. Furthermore, we found that the main trigger is a mitotic defect, in particular, chromosome missegregation during bipolar mitosis or spindle multipolarity. Both a transient multipolar spindle followed by efficient clustering in anaphase as well as a multipolar spindle followed by multipolar mitosis inhibited subsequent proliferation to a similar degree. We found that the tetraploid cells did not accumulate double-strand breaks that could cause the cell cycle arrest after tetraploid mitosis. In contrast, tetraploid cells showed increased levels of oxidative DNA damage coinciding with the p53 activation. To further elucidate the pathways involved in the proliferation control of tetraploid cells, we knocked down specific kinases that had been previously linked to the cell cycle arrest and p53 phosphorylation. Our results suggest that the checkpoint kinase ATM phosphorylates p53 in tetraploid cells after abnormal mitosis and thus contributes to proliferation control of human aberrantly arising tetraploids.

  18. Volume-dependent K+ transport in rabbit red blood cells comparison with oxygenated human SS cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Rohil, N.; Jennings, M.L.

    1989-07-01

    In this study the volume-dependent or N-ethylmaleimide (NEM)-stimulated, ouabain-insensitive K+ influx and efflux were measured with the tracer 86Rb+ in rabbit red blood cells. The purpose of the work was to examine the rabbit as a potential model for cell volume regulation in human SS red blood cells and also to investigate the relationship between the NEM-reactive sulfhydryl group(s) and the signal by which cell swelling activates the transport. Ouabain-resistant K+ efflux and influx increase nearly threefold in cells swollen hypotonically by 15%. Pretreatment with 2 mM NEM stimulates efflux 5-fold and influx 10-fold (each measured in an isotonic medium). The ouabain-resistant K+ efflux was dependent on the major anion in the medium. The anion dependence of K+ efflux in swollen or NEM-stimulated cells was as follows: Br- greater than Cl- much greater than NO3- = acetate. The magnitudes of both the swelling- and the NEM-stimulated fluxes are much higher in young cells (density separated but excluding reticulocytes) than in older cells. Swelling- or NEM-stimulated K+ efflux in rabbit red blood cells was inhibited 50% by 1 mM furosemide, and the inhibitory potency of furosemide was enhanced by extracellular K+, as is known to be true for human AA and low-K+ sheep red blood cells. The swelling-stimulated flux in both rabbit and human SS cells has a pH optimum at approximately 7.4. We conclude that rabbit red blood cells are a good model for swelling-stimulated K+ transport in human SS cells.

  19. Studies on ADCC (antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity) using sheep red blood cells as target cells, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Yukinobu; Takaya, Masatoshi; Arimori, Shigeru

    1979-01-01

    A non-specific cytotoxic mediator from effector cells (human peripheral blood leukocytes) was investigated in the ADCC (antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity) system using antibody-coated sheep red blood cells (SRBC) as target cells. 51 Cr-labelled homologous (sheep) or heterologous (human) red blood cells were used as adjacent cells. Either crude lymphocyte fraction, phagocyte depleted fraction or granulocyte rich fraction separated from human peripheral leukocytes showed moderate cytotoxic effect on homologous adjacent cells, however no cytotoxic activity on heterologous adjacent cells was demonstrated in any leukocyte fraction. This suggests that the cytotoxic effects on homologous adjacent cells were resulted from the translocation of antibody molecules to adjacent cells from antibody-coated target cells. We concluded that the cytotoxic mechanism in this ADCC system was not mediated by non-specific soluble factors released from either human peripheral lymphocytes, monocytes or granulocytes. (author)

  20. SGLT1-Mediated Transport in Caco-2 Cells Is Highly Dependent on Cell Bank Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffansen, Bente; Pedersen, Maria D L; Laghmoch, Abdel M; Nielsen, Carsten U

    2017-09-01

    The human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cell line is a well-established in vitro model for studying transport phenomena for prediction of intestinal nutrient and drug absorption. However, substances depending on transporters such predictions are complicated due to variable transporter expression and limited knowledge about transporter function during multiple cell passaging and cell thawings. In the case of sodium glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1), a key transporter of oral absorption of d-glucose, one reason for compromised prediction could be inadequate expression of SGLT1 in Caco-2 cells and thereby limited sensitivity in the determination of SGLT1-mediated permeability (P SGLT1 ). Here, the objective is to characterize and compare SGLT1-mediated uptake in Caco-2 cells obtained from different cell banks. SGLT1-mediated uptake of the standard SGLT1 substrate, methyl-α-d-glucopyranoside, in Caco-2 cells was shown to be highly dependent on cell bank origin. The most robust and reliable SGLT1 functionality was identified in Caco-2 cells from Deutsche Sammlung für Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen (DSMZ), whereas cells from the American Type Culture Collection and European Collection of Authenticated Cell Cultures have lower SGLT1 transport activity. Transepithelial P SGLT1 across Caco-2 cells from DSMZ showed that P SGLT1 likely accounts for approximately 97% of absorptive methyl-α-d-glucopyranoside P app(a-b) . In conclusion, Caco-2 cells from DSMZ provide a robust in vitro model for studying SGLT1-mediated uptake and transport-over multiple cell passages and independent cell stock thawings. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Microtubule length dependence of motor traffic in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunxin

    2012-10-01

    Motor proteins in living cells, such as kinesin and dynein, can move processively along the microtubule (MT), and can also detach from or attach to MT stochastically. Experiments found that the traffic of motors along MT may be jammed; thus various theoretical models were designed to understand this process. However, previous studies mainly focused on motor attachment/detachment rate dependent properties. Leduc et al. recently found that the traffic jam of motor protein Kip3 depends on MT length (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 109, 6100 (2012)). Therefore, this study discusses the MT length-dependent properties of motor traffic. The results showed that MT length has one critical value N(c); a traffic jam occurs only when MT length N > N(c). The jammed MT length increases with total MT length N , whereas the non-jammed MT length may not change monotonically with N . The critical value N(c) increases with motor detachment rate from MT, but decreases with motor attachment rate to MT. Therefore, the traffic of motors will be more likely to be jammed when the MT is long, motor detachment rate is high, and motor detachment rate is low.

  2. Ouabain modulates cell contacts as well as functions that depend on cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larre, Isabel; Contreras, Ruben G; Cereijido, Marcelino

    2011-01-01

    Ouabain, a toxic of vegetal origin used for centuries to treat heart failure, has recently been demonstrated to have an endogenous counterpart, most probably ouabain itself, which behaves as a hormone. Therefore, the challenge now is to discover the physiological role of hormone ouabain. We have recently shown that it modulates cell contacts such as gap junctions, which communicate neighboring cells, as well as tight junctions (TJs), which are one of the two differentiated features of epithelial cells, the other being apical/basolateral polarity. The importance of cell contacts can be hardly overestimated, since the most complex object in the universe, the brain, assembles itself depending on what cells contacts what other(s) how, when, and how is the molecular composition and special arrangement of the contacts involved. In the present chapter, we detail the protocols used to demonstrate the effect of ouabain on the molecular structure and functional properties of one of those cell-cell contacts: the TJ.

  3. SGLT1-Mediated Transport in Caco-2 Cells Is Highly Dependent on Cell Bank Origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffansen, Bente; Pedersen, Maria D L; Laghmoch, Abdel M

    2017-01-01

    The human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cell line is a well-established in vitro model for studying transport phenomena for prediction of intestinal nutrient and drug absorption. However, substances depending on transporters such predictions are complicated due to variable transporter expression...... and limited knowledge about transporter function during multiple cell passaging and cell thawings. In the case of sodium glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1), a key transporter of oral absorption of d-glucose, one reason for compromised prediction could be inadequate expression of SGLT1 in Caco-2 cells and thereby...... limited sensitivity in the determination of SGLT1-mediated permeability (PSGLT1). Here, the objective is to characterize and compare SGLT1-mediated uptake in Caco-2 cells obtained from different cell banks. SGLT1-mediated uptake of the standard SGLT1 substrate, methyl-α-d-glucopyranoside, in Caco-2 cells...

  4. Mobility dependent recombination models for organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenpfahl, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    Modern solar cell technologies are driven by the effort to enhance power conversion efficiencies. A main mechanism limiting power conversion efficiencies is charge carrier recombination which is a direct function of the encounter probability of both recombination partners. In inorganic solar cells with rather high charge carrier mobilities, charge carrier recombination is often dominated by energetic states which subsequently trap both recombination partners for recombination. Free charge carriers move fast enough for Coulomb attraction to be irrelevant for the encounter probability. Thus, charge carrier recombination is independent of charge carrier mobilities. In organic semiconductors charge carrier mobilities are much lower. Therefore, electrons and holes have more time react to mutual Coulomb-forces. This results in the strong charge carrier mobility dependencies of the observed charge carrier recombination rates. In 1903 Paul Langevin published a fundamental model to describe the recombination of ions in gas-phase or aqueous solutions, known today as Langevin recombination. During the last decades this model was used to interpret and model recombination in organic semiconductors. However, certain experiments especially with bulk-heterojunction solar cells reveal much lower recombination rates than predicted by Langevin. In search of an explanation, many material and device properties such as morphology and energetic properties have been examined in order to extend the validity of the Langevin model. A key argument for most of these extended models is, that electron and hole must find each other at a mutual spatial location. This encounter may be limited for instance by trapping of charges in trap states, by selective electrodes separating electrons and holes, or simply by the morphology of the involved semiconductors, making it impossible for electrons and holes to recombine at high rates. In this review, we discuss the development of mobility limited

  5. Cell cycle dependency of 67gallium uptake and cytotoxicity in human cell lines of hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Leeuwen-Stok, E A; Jonkhoff, A R; Visser-Platier, A W; Dräger, L M; Teule, G J; Huijgens, P C; Schuurhuis, G J

    1998-11-01

    67Gallium (67Ga) is a radionuclide which accumulates in hematological malignancies and is used for diagnostic imaging. We investigated in this in vitro study the cell cycle dependency of cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of 67Ga. Cell cycle synchronization of cells was achieved by counterflow centrifugal elutriation and the use of cytostatic drugs. The human lymphoma cell lines U-937 and U-715 were used and in elutriation experiments we also used the leukemic cell line HL-60. The transferrin receptor (CD71) expression, 67Ga uptake and cell proliferation inhibition were the parameters measured. We also studied cytotoxicity in various schedules for combination of 67Ga and drugs and the residual proliferative capacity was measured. The CD71 expression in the three cell lines increased from 106-177% on S phase cells and from 118-233% on G2M cells, as compared to the G0/G1 cell fraction. The 67Ga uptake varied from 108-127% for S cells and 128-139% for G2M cells. The drugs chosen induced cell cycle phase accumulation in S and/or G2M phase during preincubation. 67Ga preincubation induced accumulation in the G2M phase. Almost all combinations of 67Ga and drugs resulted in a non-interactive effect, except for methotrexate which resulted in an antagonistic effect. No preferential effect of any of the incubation schemes was seen. CD71 expression and 67Ga uptake were increased in S and G2M cells. Combination of 67Ga with drugs which arrest cells in these cell cycle phases did not result in a change in cytotoxicity. However, these results implicate that 67Ga and the cytostatic drugs tested except for methotrexate might be used together or sequentially in therapy.

  6. SRT1720 induces lysosomal-dependent cell death of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahusen, Tyler J; Deng, Chu-Xia

    2015-01-01

    SRT1720 is an activator of SIRT1, a NAD(+)-dependent protein and histone deacetylase that plays an important role in numerous biologic processes. Several studies have illustrated that SRT1720 treatment could improve metabolic conditions in mouse models and in a study in cancer SRT1720 caused increased apoptosis of myeloma cells. However, the effect of SRT1720 on cancer may be complex, as some recent studies have demonstrated that SRT1720 may not directly activate SIRT1 and another study showed that SRT1720 treatment could promote lung metastasis. To further investigate the role of SRT1720 in breast cancer, we treated SIRT1 knockdown and control breast cancer cell lines with SRT1720 both in vitro and in vivo. We showed that SRT1720 more effectively decreased the viability of basal-type MDA-MB-231 and BT20 cells as compared with luminal-type MCF-7 breast cancer cells or nontumorigenic MCF-10A cells. We demonstrated that SRT1720 induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization and necrosis, which could be blocked by lysosomal inhibitors. In contrast, SRT1720-induced cell death occurred in vitro irrespective of SIRT1 status, whereas in nude mice, SRT1720 exhibited a more profound effect in inhibiting the growth of allograft tumors of SIRT1 proficient cells as compared with tumors of SIRT1-deficient cells. Thus, SRT1720 causes lysosomal-dependent necrosis and may be used as a therapeutic agent for breast cancer treatment. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Cell cycle dependent association of EBP50 with protein phosphatase 2A in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Boratkó

    Full Text Available Ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50 is a phosphorylatable PDZ domain-containing adaptor protein that is abundantly expressed in epithelium but was not yet studied in the endothelium. We report unusual nuclear localization of EBP50 in bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells (BPAEC. Immunofluorescent staining and cellular fractionation demonstrated that EBP50 is present in the nuclear and perinuclear region in interphase cells. In the prophase of mitosis EBP50 redistributes to the cytoplasmic region in a phosphorylation dependent manner and during mitosis EBP50 co-localizes with protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A. Furthermore, in vitro wound healing of BPAEC expressing phospho-mimic mutant of EBP50 was accelerated indicating that EBP50 is involved in the regulation of the cell division. Cell cycle dependent specific interactions were detected between EBP50 and the subunits of PP2A (A, C, and Bα with immunoprecipitation and pull-down experiments. The interaction of EBP50 with the Bα containing form of PP2A suggests that this holoenzyme of PP2A can be responsible for the dephosphorylation of EBP50 in cytokinesis. Moreover, the results underline the significance of EBP50 in cell division via reversible phosphorylation of the protein with cyclin dependent kinase and PP2A in normal cells.

  8. Cell-contact-dependent activation of CD4+T cells by adhesion molecules on synovial fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Masato; Hashimoto, Motomu; Matsuo, Takashi; Fujii, Takao; Furu, Moritoshi; Ito, Hiromu; Yoshitomi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Jun; Ito, Yoshinaga; Akizuki, Shuji; Nakashima, Ran; Imura, Yoshitaka; Yukawa, Naoichiro; Yoshifuji, Hajime; Ohmura, Koichiro; Mimori, Tsuneyo

    2017-05-01

    To determine how cell-cell contact with synovial fibroblasts (SF) influence on the proliferation and cytokine production of CD4 +  T cells. Naïve CD4 +  T cells were cultured with SF from rheumatoid arthritis patients, stimulated by anti-CD3/28 antibody, and CD4 +  T cell proliferation and IFN-γ/IL-17 production were analyzed. To study the role of adhesion molecules, cell contact was blocked by transwell plate or anti-intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1)/vascular cell adhesion molecule-1(VCAM-1) antibody. To study the direct role of adhesion molecules for CD4 +  T cells, CD161 +  or CD161 - naïve CD4 +  T cells were stimulated on plastic plates coated by recombinant ICAM-1 or VCAM-1, and the source of IFN-γ/IL-17 were analyzed. SF enhanced naïve CD4 +  T cell proliferation and IFN-γ/IL-17 production in cell-contact and in part ICAM-1-/VCAM-1-dependent manner. Plate-coated ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 enhanced naïve CD4 +  T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production, while VCAM-1 efficiently promoting IL-17 production. CD161 +  naïve T cells upregulating LFA-1 and VLA-4 were the major source of IFN-γ/IL-17 upon interaction with ICAM-1/VCAM-1. CD4 +  T cells rapidly expand and secrete IFN-γ/IL-17 upon cell-contact with SF via adhesion molecules. Interfering with ICAM-1-/VCAM-1 may be beneficial for inhibiting RA synovitis.

  9. Glycosynapses: microdomains controlling carbohydrate-dependent cell adhesion and signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senitiroh Hakomori

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The concept of microdomains in plasma membranes was developed over two decades, following observation of polarity of membrane based on clustering of specific membrane components. Microdomains involved in carbohydrate-dependent cell adhesion with concurrent signal transduction that affect cellular phenotype are termed "glycosynapse". Three types of glycosynapse have been distinguished: "type 1" having glycosphingolipid associated with signal transducers (small G-proteins, cSrc, Src family kinases and proteolipids; "type 2" having O-linked mucin-type glycoprotein associated with Src family kinases; and "type 3" having N-linked integrin receptor complexed with tetraspanin and ganglioside. Different cell types are characterized by presence of specific types of glycosynapse or their combinations, whose adhesion induces signal transduction to either facilitate or inhibit signaling. E.g., signaling through type 3 glycosynapse inhibits cell motility and differentiation. Glycosynapses are distinct from classically-known microdomains termed "caveolae", "caveolar membrane", or more recently "lipid raft", which are not involved in carbohydrate-dependent cell adhesion. Type 1 and type 3 glycosynapses are resistant to cholesterol-binding reagents, whereas structure and function of "caveolar membrane" or "lipid raft" are disrupted by these reagents. Various data indicate a functional role of glycosynapses during differentiation, development, and oncogenic transformation.O conceito de microdomínios em membrana plasmática foi desenvolvido há mais de duas décadas, após a observação da polaridade da membrana baseada no agrupamento de componentes específicos da membrana. Microdomínios envolvidos na adesão celular dependente de carboidrato, com transdução de sinal que afeta o fenótipo celular são denominados ''glicosinapses''. Três tipos de glicosinapse foram observados: ''tipo 1'' que possue glicoesfingolipídio associado com transdutores de sinal

  10. Establishment of cell lines from adult T-cell leukemia cells dependent on negatively charged polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagami, Yoshitoyo; Uchiyama, Susumu; Kato, Harumi; Okada, Yasutaka; Seto, Masao; Kinoshita, Tomohiro

    2017-07-05

    Growing adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) cells in vitro is difficult. Here, we examined the effects of static electricity in the culture medium on the proliferation of ATLL cells. Six out of 10 ATLL cells did not proliferate in vitro and thus had to be cultured in a medium containing negatively charged polymers. In the presence of poly-γ-glutamic acid (PGA) or chondroitin sulfate (CDR), cell lines (HKOX3-PGA, HKOX3-CDR) were established from the same single ATLL case using interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, and feeder cells expressing OX40L (OX40L + HK). Dextran sulfate inhibited growth in both HKOX3 cell lines. Both PGA and OX40L + HK were indispensable for HKOX3-PGA growth, but HKOX3-CDR could proliferate in the presence of CDR or OX40L + HK alone. Thus, the specific action of each negatively charged polymer promoted the growth of specific ATLL cells in vitro.

  11. Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cell Area-Dependent Parameter Fluctuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Trindade

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic solar cell efficiency is known to be active area dependent and is usually a problem in the upscale factor for market applications. In this work, a detailed study of organic photovoltaic devices with active layer based on poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT and 1-(3-methoxycarbonyl-propyl-1-phenyl-(6,6C61 (PCBM is made, evaluating the effect of the change on the active area from 10−2 to 4 cm4. The device structure was kept simple in order to allow the understanding of the physical effects involved. Device figures of merit were extracted from the equivalent circuit using a genetic-based algorithm, and their relationship with the active area was compared. It is observed that the efficiency drops significantly with the active area increase (as the fill factor while the parallel and series resistance, adjusted to the active area, seems to be relatively constant and increases linearly, respectively. The short circuit current and the generated photocurrent also drop significantly with the active area increase. The open circuit voltage does not show major changes. These results are discussed considering the main influences for the observed efficiency data. Particularly, as the basic circuit model seems to fail to explain the macroscopic results, the behavior can be related with the enlargement of defect interaction.

  12. HERG K+ channel-dependent apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human glioblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo Staudacher

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GB is associated with poor patient survival owing to uncontrolled tumor proliferation and resistance to apoptosis. Human ether-a-go-go-related gene K(+ channels (hERG; Kv11.1, KCNH2 are expressed in multiple cancer cells including GB and control cell proliferation and death. We hypothesized that pharmacological targeting of hERG protein would inhibit tumor growth by inducing apoptosis of GB cells. The small molecule hERG ligand doxazosin induced concentration-dependent apoptosis of human LNT-229 (EC50 = 35 µM and U87MG (EC50 = 29 µM GB cells, accompanied by cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase. Apoptosis was associated with 64% reduction of hERG protein. HERG suppression via siRNA-mediated knock down mimicked pro-apoptotic effects of doxazosin. Antagonism of doxazosin binding by the non-apoptotic hERG ligand terazosin resulted in rescue of protein expression and in increased survival of GB cells. At the molecular level doxazosin-dependent apoptosis was characterized by activation of pro-apoptotic factors (phospho-erythropoietin-producing human hepatocellular carcinoma receptor tyrosine kinase A2, phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, growth arrest and DNA damage inducible gene 153, cleaved caspases 9, 7, and 3, and by inactivation of anti-apoptotic poly-ADP-ribose-polymerase, respectively. In summary, this work identifies doxazosin as small molecule compound that promotes apoptosis and exerts anti-proliferative effects in human GB cells. Suppression of hERG protein is a crucial molecular event in GB cell apoptosis. Doxazosin and future derivatives are proposed as novel options for more effective GB treatment.

  13. Temperature-dependent rate models of vascular cambium cell mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew B. Dickinson; Edward A. Johnson

    2004-01-01

    We use two rate-process models to describe cell mortality at elevated temperatures as a means of understanding vascular cambium cell death during surface fires. In the models, cell death is caused by irreversible damage to cellular molecules that occurs at rates that increase exponentially with temperature. The models differ in whether cells show cumulative effects of...

  14. Mitochondrial Sirt3 supports cell proliferation by regulating glutamine-dependent oxidation in renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jieun; Koh, Eunjin; Lee, Yu Shin; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Kang, Hyeok Gu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Brain Korea 21 PLUS Project for Medical Sciences, Institute of Genetic Science, Integrated Genomic Research Center for Metabolic Regulation, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Young Eun; Han, Woong Kyu [Department of Urology, Urological Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyung Hwa [Department of Urology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seongnam 463-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung-Sup, E-mail: KYUNGSUP59@yuhs.ac [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Brain Korea 21 PLUS Project for Medical Sciences, Institute of Genetic Science, Integrated Genomic Research Center for Metabolic Regulation, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-03

    Clear cell renal carcinoma (RCC), the most common malignancy arising in the adult kidney, exhibits increased aerobic glycolysis and low mitochondrial respiration due to von Hippel-Lindau gene defects and constitutive hypoxia-inducible factor-α expression. Sirt3 is a major mitochondrial deacetylase that mediates various types of energy metabolism. However, the role of Sirt3 as a tumor suppressor or oncogene in cancer depends on cell types. We show increased Sirt3 expression in the mitochondrial fraction of human RCC tissues. Sirt3 depletion by lentiviral short-hairpin RNA, as well as the stable expression of the inactive mutant of Sirt3, inhibited cell proliferation and tumor growth in xenograft nude mice, respectively. Furthermore, mitochondrial pyruvate, which was used for oxidation in RCC, might be derived from glutamine, but not from glucose and cytosolic pyruvate, due to depletion of mitochondrial pyruvate carrier and the relatively high expression of malic enzyme 2. Depletion of Sirt3 suppressed glutamate dehydrogenase activity, leading to impaired mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Our findings suggest that Sirt3 plays a tumor-progressive role in human RCC by regulating glutamine-derived mitochondrial respiration, particularly in cells where mitochondrial usage of cytosolic pyruvate is severely compromised. -- Highlights: •Sirt3 is required for the maintenance of RCC cell proliferation. •Mitochondrial usage of cytosolic pyruvate is severely compromised in RCC. •Sirt3 supports glutamine-dependent oxidation in RCC.

  15. Mitochondrial Sirt3 supports cell proliferation by regulating glutamine-dependent oxidation in renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jieun; Koh, Eunjin; Lee, Yu Shin; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Kang, Hyeok Gu; Yoon, Young Eun; Han, Woong Kyu; Choi, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Kyung-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell renal carcinoma (RCC), the most common malignancy arising in the adult kidney, exhibits increased aerobic glycolysis and low mitochondrial respiration due to von Hippel-Lindau gene defects and constitutive hypoxia-inducible factor-α expression. Sirt3 is a major mitochondrial deacetylase that mediates various types of energy metabolism. However, the role of Sirt3 as a tumor suppressor or oncogene in cancer depends on cell types. We show increased Sirt3 expression in the mitochondrial fraction of human RCC tissues. Sirt3 depletion by lentiviral short-hairpin RNA, as well as the stable expression of the inactive mutant of Sirt3, inhibited cell proliferation and tumor growth in xenograft nude mice, respectively. Furthermore, mitochondrial pyruvate, which was used for oxidation in RCC, might be derived from glutamine, but not from glucose and cytosolic pyruvate, due to depletion of mitochondrial pyruvate carrier and the relatively high expression of malic enzyme 2. Depletion of Sirt3 suppressed glutamate dehydrogenase activity, leading to impaired mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Our findings suggest that Sirt3 plays a tumor-progressive role in human RCC by regulating glutamine-derived mitochondrial respiration, particularly in cells where mitochondrial usage of cytosolic pyruvate is severely compromised. -- Highlights: •Sirt3 is required for the maintenance of RCC cell proliferation. •Mitochondrial usage of cytosolic pyruvate is severely compromised in RCC. •Sirt3 supports glutamine-dependent oxidation in RCC.

  16. The Single Cell Proteome Project - Cell-Cycle Dependent Protein Expression in Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dovichi, Norman J

    2005-01-01

    .... Capillary sieving electrophoresis and capillary micellar electrophoresis were used to characterize proteins in single cells in one-dimensional separations, while the two techniques were combined...

  17. Capture of cell culture-derived influenza virus by lectins: strain independent, but host cell dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opitz, Lars; Zimmermann, Anke; Lehmann, Sylvia; Genzel, Yvonne; Lübben, Holger; Reichl, Udo; Wolff, Michael W

    2008-12-01

    Strategies to control influenza outbreaks are focused mainly on prophylactic vaccination. Human influenza vaccines are trivalent blends of different virus subtypes. Therefore and due to frequent antigenic drifts, strain independent manufacturing processes are required for vaccine production. This study verifies the strain independency of a capture method based on Euonymus europaeus lectin-affinity chromatography (EEL-AC) for downstream processing of influenza viruses under various culture conditions propagated in MDCK cells. A comprehensive lectin binding screening was conducted for two influenza virus types from the season 2007/2008 (A/Wisconsin/67/2005, B/Malaysia/2506/2004) including a comparison of virus-lectin interaction by surface plasmon resonance technology. EEL-AC resulted in a reproducible high product recovery rate and a high degree of contaminant removal in the case of both MDCK cell-derived influenza virus types demonstrating clearly the general applicability of EEL-AC. In addition, host cell dependency of EEL-AC was studied with two industrial relevant cell lines: Vero and MDCK cells. However, the choice of the host cell lines is known to lead to different product glycosylation profiles. Hence, altered lectin specificities have been observed between the two cell lines, requiring process adaptations between different influenza vaccine production systems.

  18. Cell cycle age dependence for radiation-induced G2 arrest: evidence for time-dependent repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowley, R.

    1985-01-01

    Exponentially growing eucaryotic cells, irradiated in interphase, are delayed in progression to mitosis chiefly by arrest in G 2 . The sensitivity of Chinese hamster ovary cells to G 2 arrest induction by X rays increases through the cell cycle, up to the X-ray transition point (TP) in G 2 . This age response can be explained by cell cycle age-dependent changes in susceptibility of the target(s) for G 2 arrest and/or by changes in capability for postirradiation recovery from G 2 arrest damage. Discrimination between sensitivity changes and repair phenomena is possible only if the level of G 2 arrest-causing damage sustained by a cell at the time of irradiation and the level ultimately expressed as arrest can be determined. The ability of caffeine to ameliorate radiation-induced G 2 arrest, while inhibiting repair of G 2 arrest-causing damage makes such an analysis possible. In the presence of caffeine, progression of irradiated cells was relatively unperturbed, but on caffeine removal, G 2 arrest was expressed. The duration of G 2 arrest was independent of the length of the prior caffeine exposure. This finding indicates that the target for G 2 arrest induction is present throughout the cell cycle and that the level of G 2 arrest damage incurred is initially constant for all cell cycle phases. The data are consistent with the existence of a time-dependent recovery mechanism to explain the age dependence for radiation induction of G 2 arrest

  19. Modelling T cell proliferation: Dynamics heterogeneity depending on cell differentiation, age, and genetic background

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Cell proliferation is the common characteristic of all biological systems. The immune system insures the maintenance of body integrity on the basis of a continuous production of diversified T lymphocytes in the thymus. This involves processes of proliferation, differentiation, selection, death and migration of lymphocytes to peripheral tissues, where proliferation also occurs upon antigen recognition. Quantification of cell proliferation dynamics requires specific experimental methods and mathematical modelling. Here, we assess the impact of genetics and aging on the immune system by investigating the dynamics of proliferation of T lymphocytes across their differentiation through thymus and spleen in mice. Our investigation is based on single-cell multicolour flow cytometry analysis revealing the active incorporation of a thymidine analogue during S phase after pulse-chase-pulse experiments in vivo, versus cell DNA content. A generic mathematical model of state transition simulates through Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs) the evolution of single cell behaviour during various durations of labelling. It allows us to fit our data, to deduce proliferation rates and estimate cell cycle durations in sub-populations. Our model is simple and flexible and is validated with other durations of pulse/chase experiments. Our results reveal that T cell proliferation is highly heterogeneous but with a specific “signature” that depends upon genetic origins, is specific to cell differentiation stages in thymus and spleen and is altered with age. In conclusion, our model allows us to infer proliferation rates and cell cycle phase durations from complex experimental 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) data, revealing T cell proliferation heterogeneity and specific signatures. PMID:28288157

  20. Reptin regulates pluripotency of embryonic stem cells and somatic cell reprogramming through Oct4-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Eun Kyoung; Cheon, Hyo Cheon; Jang, Il Ho; Choi, Eun Jung; Heo, Soon Chul; Kang, Kyung Taek; Bae, Kwang Hee; Cho, Yee Sook; Seo, Jeong Kon; Yoon, Jong Hyuk; Lee, Taehoon G; Kim, Jae Ho

    2014-12-01

    Oct4 has been implicated in regulation of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in Oct4-dependent regulation of pluripotency and reprogramming have not been clear. To gain insight into the mechanism of regulation of Oct4-mediated self-renewal of ESCs and reprogramming of somatic cells, we attempted to identify Oct4-binding proteins using affinity purification and mass spectrometry. We identified Reptin, a key component of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes, as an Oct4-binding protein. Depletion of endogenous Reptin using lentiviral short hairpin RNA (shRNA) led to a decrease in the number and size of alkaline phosphatase-positive colonies of mouse ESCs. In addition, shRNA-mediated silencing of Reptin resulted in decreased expression of pluripotency-specific marker genes, including Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, and SSEA-1. Results of the Oct4 reporter assay showed synergism between Oct4 and Reptin, and depletion of endogenous Reptin abolished Oct4 transcriptional activity. Results of a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed the overlapping interaction of Reptin and Oct4 to CR4 in the Oct4 enhancer in ESCs. Knockdown of Reptin using shRNA suppressed the reprogramming of mouse embryonic fibroblasts to induced pluripotent stem cells, whereas overexpression of Reptin resulted in enhanced efficiency of induced pluripotent stem cell generation. These results strongly suggest that Reptin plays a key role in maintaining the pluripotency of ESCs and in establishing the pluripotency during reprogramming of somatic cells by regulation of Oct4-mediated gene regulation. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  1. Imiquimod activates p53-dependent apoptosis in a human basal cell carcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shi-Wei; Chang, Shu-Hao; Mu, Szu-Wei; Jiang, Hsin-Yi; Wang, Sin-Ting; Kao, Jun-Kai; Huang, Jau-Ling; Wu, Chun-Ying; Chen, Yi-Ju; Shieh, Jeng-Jer

    2016-03-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 controls DNA repair, cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy and numerous other cellular processes. Imiquimod (IMQ), a synthetic toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 ligand for the treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma (BCC), eliminates cancer cells by activating cell-mediated immunity and directly inducing apoptosis and autophagy in cancer cells. To evaluate the role of p53 in IMQ-induced cell death in skin cancer cells. The expression, phosphorylation and subcellular localization of p53 were detected by real-time PCR, luciferase reporter assay, cycloheximide chase analysis, immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Using BCC/KMC1 cell line as a model, the upstream signaling of p53 activation was dissected by over-expression of TLR7/8, the addition of ROS scavenger, ATM/ATR inhibitors and pan-caspase inhibitor. The role of p53 in IMQ-induced apoptosis and autophagy was assessed by genetically silencing p53 and evaluated by a DNA content assay, immunoblotting, LC3 puncta detection and acridine orange staining. IMQ induced p53 mRNA expression and protein accumulation, increased Ser15 phosphorylation, promoted nuclear translocation and up-regulated its target genes in skin cancer cells in a TLR7/8-independent manner. In BCC/KMC1 cells, the induction of p53 by IMQ was achieved through increased ROS production to stimulate the ATM/ATR-Chk1/Chk2 axis but was not mediated by inducing DNA damage. The pharmacological inhibition of ATM/ATR significantly suppressed IMQ-induced p53 activation and apoptosis. Silencing of p53 significantly decreased the IMQ-induced caspase cascade activation and apoptosis but enhanced autophagy. Mutant p53 skin cancer cell lines were more resistant to IMQ-induced apoptosis than wildtype p53 skin cancer cell lines. IMQ induced ROS production to stimulate ATM/ATR pathways and contributed to p53-dependent apoptosis in a skin basal cell carcinoma cell line BCC/KMC1. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology

  2. Backup pathways of NHEJ in cells of higher eukaryotes: Cell cycle dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliakis, George

    2009-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by ionizing radiation (IR) in cells of higher eukaryotes are predominantly repaired by a pathway of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) utilizing Ku, DNA-PKcs, DNA ligase IV, XRCC4 and XLF/Cernunnos (D-NHEJ) as central components. Work carried out in our laboratory and elsewhere shows that when this pathway is chemically or genetically compromised, cells do not shunt DSBs to homologous recombination repair (HRR) but instead use another form of NHEJ operating as a backup (B-NHEJ). Here I review our efforts to characterize this repair pathway and discuss its dependence on the cell cycle as well as on the growth conditions. I present evidence that B-NHEJ utilizes ligase III, PARP-1 and histone H1. When B-NHEJ is examined throughout the cell cycle, significantly higher activity is observed in G2 phase that cannot be attributed to HRR. Furthermore, the activity of B-NHEJ is compromised when cells enter the plateau phase of growth. Together, these observations uncover a repair pathway with unexpected biochemical constitution and interesting cell cycle and growth factor regulation. They generate a framework for investigating the mechanistic basis of HRR contribution to DSB repair.

  3. Arctigenin inhibits osteoclast differentiation and function by suppressing both calcineurin-dependent and osteoblastic cell-dependent NFATc1 pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruhito Yamashita

    Full Text Available Arctigenin, a lignan-derived compound, is a constituent of the seeds of Arctium lappa. Arctigenin was previously shown to inhibit osteoclastogenesis; however, this inhibitory mechanism has yet to be elucidated. Here, we showed that arctigenin inhibited the action of nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1, a key transcription factor for osteoclastogenesis. NFATc1 in osteoclast precursors was activated through two distinct pathways: the calcineurin-dependent and osteoblastic cell-dependent pathways. Among the several lignan-derived compounds examined, arctigenin most strongly inhibited receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL-induced osteoclast-like cell formation in mouse bone marrow macrophage (BMM cultures, in which the calcineurin-dependent NFATc1 pathway was activated. Arctigenin suppressed neither the activation of nuclear factor κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases nor the up-regulation of c-Fos expression in BMMs treated with RANKL. However, arctigenin suppressed RANKL-induced NFATc1 expression. Interestingly, the treatment of osteoclast-like cells with arctigenin converted NFATc1 into a lower molecular weight species, which was translocated into the nucleus even in the absence of RANKL. Nevertheless, arctigenin as well as cyclosporin A (CsA, a calcineurin inhibitor, suppressed the NFAT-luciferase reporter activity induced by ionomycin and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate in BMMs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed that arctigenin inhibited the recruitment of NFATc1 to the promoter region of the NFATc1 target gene. Arctigenin, but not CsA suppressed osteoclast-like cell formation in co-cultures of osteoblastic cells and bone marrow cells, in which the osteoblastic cell-dependent NFATc1 pathway was activated. The forced expression of constitutively active NFATc1 rescued osteoclastogenesis in BMM cultures treated with CsA, but not that treated with arctigenin. Arctigenin also suppressed the

  4. Arctigenin inhibits osteoclast differentiation and function by suppressing both calcineurin-dependent and osteoblastic cell-dependent NFATc1 pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Teruhito; Uehara, Shunsuke; Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Li, Feng; Kadota, Shigetoshi; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Arctigenin, a lignan-derived compound, is a constituent of the seeds of Arctium lappa. Arctigenin was previously shown to inhibit osteoclastogenesis; however, this inhibitory mechanism has yet to be elucidated. Here, we showed that arctigenin inhibited the action of nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), a key transcription factor for osteoclastogenesis. NFATc1 in osteoclast precursors was activated through two distinct pathways: the calcineurin-dependent and osteoblastic cell-dependent pathways. Among the several lignan-derived compounds examined, arctigenin most strongly inhibited receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast-like cell formation in mouse bone marrow macrophage (BMM) cultures, in which the calcineurin-dependent NFATc1 pathway was activated. Arctigenin suppressed neither the activation of nuclear factor κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases nor the up-regulation of c-Fos expression in BMMs treated with RANKL. However, arctigenin suppressed RANKL-induced NFATc1 expression. Interestingly, the treatment of osteoclast-like cells with arctigenin converted NFATc1 into a lower molecular weight species, which was translocated into the nucleus even in the absence of RANKL. Nevertheless, arctigenin as well as cyclosporin A (CsA), a calcineurin inhibitor, suppressed the NFAT-luciferase reporter activity induced by ionomycin and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate in BMMs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed that arctigenin inhibited the recruitment of NFATc1 to the promoter region of the NFATc1 target gene. Arctigenin, but not CsA suppressed osteoclast-like cell formation in co-cultures of osteoblastic cells and bone marrow cells, in which the osteoblastic cell-dependent NFATc1 pathway was activated. The forced expression of constitutively active NFATc1 rescued osteoclastogenesis in BMM cultures treated with CsA, but not that treated with arctigenin. Arctigenin also suppressed the pit

  5. Sensitivity of Bladder Cancer Cells to Curcumin and Its Derivatives Depends on the Extracellular Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Paul J.; Han, Zhiyong; Sindhwani, Puneet; Hurst, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Because the response of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents depends upon the supporting extracellular matrix (ECM), the response in vivo may not be reproduced in 2-dimensional cell culture. The dose-response to curcumin and two derivatives by bladder cancer cells grown on both normal (SISgel) and cancer-derived ECM (Matrigel) and on plastic were contrasted. Cells grown on Matrigel were resistant to curcumins, but cells growing on SISgel, which mimic cancer cells suppressed by normal ECM, were nearly as sensitive as cells grown on plastic. SV40-immortalized urothelial cells, which are models for premalignant cells, were the most sensitive, but even aggressive cell lines were nearly as sensitive when grown on SISgel as on plastic. Curcumin response depends highly on the supporting ECM, and cells grown on plastic poorly models cells growing on natural ECM. Curcumin could prove an effective chemopreventive for bladder cancer recurrence when administered intravesically post-therapy. PMID:17465196

  6. T cells suppress memory-dependent rapid mucous cell metaplasia in mouse airways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitendra S. Chand

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway epithelial cells (AECs are crucial for mucosal and adaptive immunity but whether these cells respond in a memory-dependent manner is poorly studied. Previously, we have reported that LPS intratracheal instillation in rodents causes extensive neutrophilic inflammation and airway epithelial cell hyperplasia accompanied by mucous cell metaplasia (MCM. And the resolution process required a period of 40 d for the inflammation to subside and the lung epithelia to resemble the non-exposed condition. Therefore, the present study investigated the memory-dependent response of airway epithelial cells to a secondary LPS challenge after the initial inflammation was resolved. Methods Airway epithelial and mucous cells were assessed in response to a secondary LPS challenge in F344/N rats, and in C57BL/6 wild-type (Foxn1WT and T cell-deficient athymic (Foxn1nu mice that were instilled with LPS or saline 40 d earlier. Epithelial expression of TLR4, EGFR, and phosphorylated-ERK1/2 (pERK were also analyzed. Results LPS-pretreated F344/N rats responded with elevated numbers of AECs after saline challenge and with 3-4-fold increased MCM following the LPS challenge in LPS- compared with saline-pretreated rats. LPS-pretreated rats showed 5-fold higher number of AECs expressing TLR4 apically than saline-pretreated rats. Also, the expression of EGFR was increased in LPS-pretreated rats along with the number of AECs with active or nuclear pERK, and the levels were further increased upon LPS challenge. LPS-pretreated Foxn1nu compared with Foxn1WT mice showed increased MCM and elevated levels of TLR4, EGFR, and nuclear pERK at 40 d after LPS instillation. LPS challenge further augmented MCM rapidly in Foxn1nu compared with Foxn1WT mice. Conclusion Together, these data suggest that AECs preserve an ‘innate memory’ that drives a rapid mucous phenotype via spatiotemporal regulation of TLR4 and EGFR. Further, T cells may suppress the sustained

  7. Cell cycle phase specificity of putative cyclin-dependent kinase variants in synchronized alfalfa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyar, Z; Mészáros, T; Miskolczi, P; Deák, M; Fehér, A; Brown, S; Kondorosi, E; Athanasiadis, A; Pongor, S; Bilgin, M; Bakó, L; Koncz, C; Dudits, D

    1997-02-01

    The eukaryotic cell division cycle is coordinated by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), represented by a single major serine/threonine kinase in yeasts (Cdc2/CDC28) and a family of kinases (CDK1 to CDK8) in human cells. Previously, two cdc2 homologs, cdc2MsA and cdc2MsB, have been identified in alfalfa (Medicago sativa). By isolating cDNAs using a cdc2MsA probe, we demonstrate here that at least four additional cdc2 homologous genes are expressed in the tetraploid alfalfa. Proteins encoded by the new cdc2MsC to cdc2MsF cDNAs share the characteristic functional domains of CDKs with the conserved and plant-specific sequence elements. Transcripts from cdc2MsA, cdc2MsB, cdc2MsC, and cdc2MsE genes are synthesized throughout the cell cycle, whereas the amounts of cdc2MsD and cdc2MsF mRNAs peak during G2-to-M phases. The translation of Cdc2MsA/B, Cdc2MsD, and Cdc2MsF proteins follows the pattern of transcript accumulation. The multiplicity of kinase complexes with cell cycle phase-dependent activities was revealed by in vitro phosphorylation experiments. Proteins bound to p13suc1-Sepharose or immunoprecipitated with Cdc2MsA/B antibodies from cells at G1-to-S and G2-to-M phase boundaries showed elevated kinase activities. the Cdc2MsF antibodies separated a G2-to-M phase-related kinase complex. Detection of histone H1 phosphorylation activities in fractions immunoprecipitated with antimitotic cyclin (CyclinMs2) antibodies from G2-to-M phase cells indicates the complex formation between this cyclin and a kinase partner in alfalfa. The observed fluctuation of transcript levels, amounts, and activities of kinases in different cell cycle phases reflects a multilevel regulatory system during cell cycle progression in plants.

  8. Voltage-Dependent Intrinsic Bursting in Olfactory Bulb Golgi Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressler, R. Todd; Rozman, Peter A.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2013-01-01

    In the mammalian olfactory bulb (OB), local synaptic circuits modulate the evolving pattern of activity in mitral and tufted cells following olfactory sensory stimulation. GABAergic granule cells, the most numerous interneuron subtype in this brain region, have been extensively studied. However, classic studies using Golgi staining methods…

  9. Müller stem cell dependent retinal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chohan, Annu; Singh, Usha; Kumar, Atul; Kaur, Jasbir

    2017-01-01

    Müller Stem cells to treat ocular diseases has triggered enthusiasm across all medical and scientific communities. Recent development in the field of stem cells has widened the prospects of applying cell based therapies to regenerate ocular tissues that have been irreversibly damaged by disease or injury. Ocular tissues such as the lens and the retina are now known to possess cell having remarkable regenerative abilities. Recent studies have shown that the Müller glia, a cell found in all vertebrate retinas, is the primary source of new neurons, and therefore are considered as the cellular basis for retinal regeneration in mammalian retinas. Here, we review the current status of retinal regeneration of the human eye by Müller stem cells. This review elucidates the current status of retinal regeneration by Müller stem cells, along with major retinal degenerative diseases where these stem cells play regenerative role in retinal repair and replacement. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Parathyroid hormone dependent T cell proliferation in uremic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewin, E; Ladefoged, Jens; Brandi, L

    1993-01-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is combined with an impairment of the immune system. The T cell may be a target for the action of parathyroid hormone (PTH). Rats with CRF have high blood levels of PTH. Therefore, the present investigation examined some aspects of the T cell function in both normal...

  11. [The cell as a gravity-dependent biomechanic system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tairbekov, M G

    2000-01-01

    In the period of 1995-1997 experimental and theoretical studies with various biomechanic objects, i.e. individual cells and cell associations, were performed under changed gravity (0.00001-5 g). Experimental investigations were conducted using clinostats and centrifuges to model effects of hypo- and hypergravity, and aboard space vehicles in real microgravity. Cell cultures in vitro including fibroblasts and osteoblasts on a solid glass or plastic substrate served as objects of the studies. Changes in value and direction of the gravity vector were found to modify the morphophysiological characteristics of cells: structural organization (spatial rearrangement of the intracell component, changes in forms, sizes and quantity of cells) and functional activity (alterations in energy expenditure and intensity of intracellular metabolism). The data suggest that there should be mechanisms of gravitational sensitivity in living systems on the cellular level. As was stated, sensitivity of unicellular free-living organisms to gravity is mostly defined by the motor activity determined by the level of general metabolism. Morphological characteristics (form, size and mass) are of secondary importance. Theoretical analysis resulted in correction of one of the principle postulates of gravitational biology stating a direct link between size (mass) and gravitational sensitivity of organism. Described were consistent patterns of growth, development, and behavior of unicellular cultures in gravitational fields. Strengthening of the force of gravity (hypergravity) leads to eventual deceleration of cell growth and diminution of biomass gain. On the other hand, the spaceflight environment (microgravity) stimulates growth mechanisms. In our opinion, behind these gravitational effects are altered levels of energy spent by cells to overcome the force of gravity. Opposite trends were observed in experiments with cell cultures in vitro. During space microgravity, fibroblast cultures on the

  12. Another brick in the cell wall: biosynthesis dependent growth model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelin Barbacci

    Full Text Available Expansive growth of plant cell is conditioned by the cell wall ability to extend irreversibly. This process is possible if (i a tensile stress is developed in the cell wall due to the coupling effect between turgor pressure and the modulation of its mechanical properties through enzymatic and physicochemical reactions and if (ii new cell wall elements can be synthesized and assembled to the existing wall. In other words, expansive growth is the result of coupling effects between mechanical, thermal and chemical energy. To have a better understanding of this process, models must describe the interplay between physical or mechanical variable with biological events. In this paper we propose a general unified and theoretical framework to model growth in function of energy forms and their coupling. This framework is based on irreversible thermodynamics. It is then applied to model growth of the internodal cell of Chara corallina modulated by changes in pressure and temperature. The results describe accurately cell growth in term of length increment but also in term of cell pectate biosynthesis and incorporation to the expanding wall. Moreover, the classical growth model based on Lockhart's equation such as the one proposed by Ortega, appears as a particular and restrictive case of the more general growth equation developed in this paper.

  13. Another Brick in the Cell Wall: Biosynthesis Dependent Growth Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbacci, Adelin; Lahaye, Marc; Magnenet, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Expansive growth of plant cell is conditioned by the cell wall ability to extend irreversibly. This process is possible if (i) a tensile stress is developed in the cell wall due to the coupling effect between turgor pressure and the modulation of its mechanical properties through enzymatic and physicochemical reactions and if (ii) new cell wall elements can be synthesized and assembled to the existing wall. In other words, expansive growth is the result of coupling effects between mechanical, thermal and chemical energy. To have a better understanding of this process, models must describe the interplay between physical or mechanical variable with biological events. In this paper we propose a general unified and theoretical framework to model growth in function of energy forms and their coupling. This framework is based on irreversible thermodynamics. It is then applied to model growth of the internodal cell of Chara corallina modulated by changes in pressure and temperature. The results describe accurately cell growth in term of length increment but also in term of cell pectate biosynthesis and incorporation to the expanding wall. Moreover, the classical growth model based on Lockhart's equation such as the one proposed by Ortega, appears as a particular and restrictive case of the more general growth equation developed in this paper. PMID:24066142

  14. T cell-dependence of Lassa fever pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Flatz

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Lassa virus (LASV, the causative agent of Lassa fever (LF, is endemic in West Africa, accounting for substantial morbidity and mortality. In spite of ongoing research efforts, LF pathogenesis and mechanisms of LASV immune control remain poorly understood. While normal laboratory mice are resistant to LASV, we report that mice expressing humanized instead of murine MHC class I (MHC-I failed to control LASV infection and develop severe LF. Infection of MHC-I knockout mice confirmed a key role for MHC-I-restricted T cell responses in controlling LASV. Intriguingly we found that T cell depletion in LASV-infected HHD mice prevented disease, irrespective of high-level viremia. Widespread activation of monocyte/macrophage lineage cells, manifest through inducible NO synthase expression, and elevated IL-12p40 serum levels indicated a systemic inflammatory condition. The absence of extensive monocyte/macrophage activation in T cell-depleted mice suggested that T cell responses contribute to deleterious innate inflammatory reactions and LF pathogenesis. Our observations in mice indicate a dual role for T cells, not only protecting from LASV, but also enhancing LF pathogenesis. The possibility of T cell-driven enhancement and immunopathogenesis should be given consideration in future LF vaccine development.

  15. Calculation of absorbed dose of anchorage-dependent cells from internal beta-rays irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jianwei; Huang Gang; Li Shijun

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To elicit the formula of internal dosimetry in anchorage-dependent cells by beta-emitting radionuclides from uniformly distributed volume sources. Methods: By means of the definition of absorbed dose and the MIRD (Medical International Radiation Dose) scheme the formula of internal dosimetry was reasonably deduced. Firstly, studying the systems of suspension culture cells. Then, taking account of the speciality of the systems of the anchorage-dependent cells and the directions of irradiation, the absorbed dose of anchorage -dependent cells was calculated by the accumulated radioactivity, beta-ray energy, and the volume of the cultured systems. Results: The formula of internal dosimetry of suspension culture cells and anchorage-dependent cells were achieved. At the same time, the formula of internal dosimetry of suspension culture cells was compared with that of MIRD and was confirmed accurate. Conclusion: The formula of internal dosimetry is concise, reliable and accurate

  16. Cell cycle-dependent microtubule-based dynamic transport of cytoplasmic dynein in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Kobayashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cytoplasmic dynein complex is a large multi-subunit microtubule (MT-associated molecular motor involved in various cellular functions including organelle positioning, vesicle transport and cell division. However, regulatory mechanism of the cell-cycle dependent distribution of dynein has not fully been understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report live-cell imaging of cytoplasmic dynein in HeLa cells, by expressing multifunctional green fluorescent protein (mfGFP-tagged 74-kDa intermediate chain (IC74. IC74-mfGFP was successfully incorporated into functional dynein complex. In interphase, dynein moved bi-directionally along with MTs, which might carry cargos such as transport vesicles. A substantial fraction of dynein moved toward cell periphery together with EB1, a member of MT plus end-tracking proteins (+TIPs, suggesting +TIPs-mediated transport of dynein. In late-interphase and prophase, dynein was localized at the centrosomes and the radial MT array. In prometaphase and metaphase, dynein was localized at spindle MTs where it frequently moved from spindle poles toward chromosomes or cell cortex. +TIPs may be involved in the transport of spindle dyneins. Possible kinetochore and cortical dyneins were also observed. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that cytoplasmic dynein is transported to the site of action in preparation for the following cellular events, primarily by the MT-based transport. The MT-based transport may have greater advantage than simple diffusion of soluble dynein in rapid and efficient transport of the limited concentration of the protein.

  17. Nanosilica induced dose-dependent cytotoxicity and cell type-dependent multinucleation in HepG2 and L-02 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yongbo [Capital Medical University, Beijing Key Laboratory for Pediatric Diseases of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Pediatric Research Institute, Beijing Children’s Hospital (China); Duan, Junchao; Li, Yang; Yu, Yang; Hu, Hejing; Wu, Jing; Zhang, Yannan; Li, Yanbo; CaixiaGuo; Zhou, Xianqing; Sun, Zhiwei, E-mail: zwsun@ccmu.edu.cn [Capital Medical University, School of Public Health (China)

    2016-11-15

    The prevalent exposure to nanosilica gained concerns about health effects of these particles on human beings. Although nanosilica-induced multinucleation has been confirmed previously, the underlying mechanism was still not clear; this study was to investigate the origination of multinucleated cells caused by nanosilica (62 nm) in both HepG2 and L-02 cells. Cell viability and cellular uptake was determined by MTT assay and transmission electron microscope (TEM), respectively. Giemsa staining was applied to detect multinucleation. To clarify the origination of multinucleated cells, fluorescent probes, PKH26 and PKH67, time-lapse observation were further conducted by confocal microscopy. Results indicated that nanosilica particles were internalized into cells and induced cytotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner. Quantification analysis showed that nanosilica significantly increased the rates of binucleated and multinucleated cells, which suggested mitotic catastrophe induction. Moreover, dynamic visualization verified that multinucleation resulted from cell fusion in HepG2 cells not in L-02 cells after nanosilica exposure, suggesting cell type-dependent multinucleation formation. Both multinucleation and cell fusion were involved in genetic instability, which emphasized the significance to explore the multinucleation induced by nanosilica via environmental, occupational and consumer product exposure.

  18. Inflammasome-Dependent Induction of Adaptive NK Cell Memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boorn, Jasper G.; Jakobs, Christopher; Hagen, Christian; Renn, Marcel; Luiten, Rosalie M.; Melief, Cornelis J. M.; Tüting, Thomas; Garbi, Natalio; Hartmann, Gunther; Hornung, Veit

    2016-01-01

    Monobenzone is a pro-hapten that is exclusively metabolized by melanocytes, thereby haptenizing melanocyte-specific antigens, which results in cytotoxic autoimmunity specifically against pigmented cells. Studying monobenzone in a setting of contact hypersensitivity (CHS), we observed that

  19. Complement-dependent transport of antigen into B cell follicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez, Santiago F.; Lukacs-Kornek, Veronika; Kuligowski, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    an additional novel pathway in which complement C3 and its receptors enhance humoral immunity through delivery of Ag to the B cell compartment. In this review, we discuss this pathway and highlight several novel exceptions recently found with a model influenza vaccine, such as mannose-binding lectin...... opsonization of influenza and uptake by macrophages, and the capture of virus by dendritic cells residing in the medullary compartment of peripheral lymph nodes....

  20. Contribution of NK cell education to both direct and anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent NK cell functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Anne B; Kent, Stephen J; Parsons, Matthew S

    2018-03-07

    Antibody Fc-dependent functions are linked to prevention and control of HIV-1 infection. Basic NK cell biology is likely key to understanding the contributions anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent NK cell activation and cytolysis make to HIV-1 susceptibility and disease progression. The importance of NK cell education through inhibitory receptors specific for self-HLA-I in determining the potency of anti-HIV-1 antibody mediated NK cell activation and cytolysis is controversial. To address this issue more definitively we utilized HLA-I genotyping, flow cytometry staining panels and cytolysis assays to assess the functionality of educated and non-educated peripheral blood NK cells. We now demonstrate that educated NK cells are superior in terms of their capacity to become activated and/or mediate cytolysis following anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent stimulation. The profiles of activation observed were similar to those observed upon direct stimulation of NK cells with HLA-I devoid target cells. Non-educated NK cells make significantly lower contributions to total NK cell activation than would be expected from their frequency within the total NK cell population (i.e., are hypofunctional) and educated NK cells make similar or higher contributions as their frequency in the total NK cell population. Finally, NK cells educated through at least one killer immunoglobulin-like receptor and NKG2A exhibited the most significant difference between actual and expected contribution to the total NK cell response, based on their frequency within the total NK cell population, suggesting summation of NK cell education through inhibitory receptors determines overall NK cell functionality. These observations have potential implications for understanding HIV-1 vaccine efficacy and disease progression. IMPORTANCE NK cells are major mediators of anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent functions, including cytokine production and cytolysis. The mechanisms controlling the capacity of individual NK cells to

  1. Cell age dependent variations in oxidative protective enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blakely, E.A.; Chang, P.Y.; Lommel, L.; Tobias, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    Activity levels of antioxidant enzymes were correlated before and after heavy-ion exposures with cellular radiosensitivity. In preliminary feasibility experiments with human T-1 cells relatively high antioxidant enzyme levels were shown in the unirradiated G 1 phase prior to the normal DNA synthetic phase. Endogenous cellular levels of three antioxidant enzymes were measured at various times in the unirradiated human T-1 cell division cycle. The enzymes measured were: catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GSHPX). Unlike the case in Chinese hamster V79 cells the early data with the synchronized human cell show that in very early G 1 phase (e.g., approximately 1.5 hours after mitotic selection) there are significant peaks in the levels (U/mg cell protein) of both CAT and SOD. Both enzymes show increases as the unirradiated cells progressed from mitosis into G 1 phase while the levels of GSHPX measured in duplicate samples were somewhat more variable than was the case for the other two enzymes. Studies were made in collaboration with the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute

  2. Idelalisib induces PUMA-dependent apoptosis in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shida; Zhu, Zhiyong; Zhang, Xiaobing; Zhang, Ning; Yao, Zhicheng

    2017-01-24

    Idelalisib, a PI3K inhibitor, specifically targeting p110δ, has been approved for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma and follicular lymphoma. However, the mechanisms of action of idelalisib in colon cancer cells are not well understood. We investigated how idelalisib suppresses colon cancer cells growth and potentiates effects of other chemotherapeutic drugs. In this study, we found that idelalisib treatment induces PUMA in colon cancer cells irrespective of p53 status through the p65 pathway following AKT inhibition and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) activation. PUMA is necessary for idelalisib-induced apoptosis in colon cancer cells. Idelalisib also synergized with 5-FU or regorafenib to induce marked apoptosis via PUMA in colon cancer cells. Furthermore, PUMA deficiency suppressed apoptosis and antitumor effect of idelalisib in xenograft model. These results demonstrate a critical role of PUMA in mediating the anticancer effects of idelalisib in colon cancer cells and suggest that PUMA induction can be used as an indicator of idelalisib sensitivity, and also have important implications for it clinical applications.

  3. An unusual dependence of human herpesvirus-8 glycoproteins-induced cell-to-cell fusion on heparan sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, Vaibhav; Darmani, Nissar A.; Thrush, Gerald R.; Shukla, Deepak

    2009-01-01

    Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) is known to interact with cell surface heparan sulfate (HS) for entry into a target cell. Here we investigated the role of HS during HHV-8 glycoproteins-induced cell fusion. Interestingly, the observed fusion demonstrated an unusual dependence on HS as evident from following lines of evidence: (1) a significant reduction in cell-to-cell fusion occurred when target cells were treated with heparinase; (2) in a competition assay, when the effector cells expressing HHV-8 glycoproteins were challenged with soluble HS, cell-to-cell fusion was reduced; and, (3) co-expression of HHV-8 glycoproteins gH-gL on target cells resulted in inhibition of cell surface HS expression. Taken together, our results indicate that cell surface HS can play an additional role during HHV-8 pathogenesis.

  4. Brain Region-Dependent Rejection of Neural Precursor Cell Transplants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Fainstein

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The concept of CNS as an immune-privileged site has been challenged by the occurrence of immune surveillance and allogeneic graft rejection in the brain. Here we examined whether the immune response to allogeneic neural grafts is determined by the site of implantation in the CNS. Dramatic regional differences were observed between immune responses to allogeneic neural precursor/stem cell (NPC grafts in the striatum vs. the hippocampus. Striatal grafts were heavily infiltrated with IBA-1+ microglia/macrophages and CD3+ T cells and completely rejected. In contrast, hippocampal grafts exhibited milder IBA-1+ cell infiltration, were not penetrated efficiently by CD3+ cells, and survived efficiently for at least 2 months. To evaluate whether the hippocampal protective effect is universal, astrocytes were then transplanted. Allogeneic astrocyte grafts elicited a vigorous rejection process from the hippocampus. CD200, a major immune-inhibitory signal, plays an important role in protecting grafts from rejection. Indeed, CD200 knock out NPC grafts were rejected more efficiently than wild type NPCs from the striatum. However, lack of CD200 expression did not elicit NPC graft rejection from the hippocampus. In conclusion, the hippocampus has partial immune-privilege properties that are restricted to NPCs and are CD200-independent. The unique hippocampal milieu may be protective for allogeneic NPC grafts, through host-graft interactions enabling sustained immune-regulatory properties of transplanted NPCs. These findings have implications for providing adequate immunosuppression in clinical translation of cell therapy.

  5. Quantitative comparison of HTLV-1 and HIV-1 cell-to-cell infection with new replication dependent vectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy Mazurov

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We have developed an efficient method to quantify cell-to-cell infection with single-cycle, replication dependent reporter vectors. This system was used to examine the mechanisms of infection with HTLV-1 and HIV-1 vectors in lymphocyte cell lines. Effector cells transfected with reporter vector, packaging vector, and Env expression plasmid produced virus-like particles that transduced reporter gene activity into cocultured target cells with zero background. Reporter gene expression was detected exclusively in target cells and required an Env-expression plasmid and a viral packaging vector, which provided essential structural and enzymatic proteins for virus replication. Cell-cell fusion did not contribute to infection, as reporter protein was rarely detected in syncytia. Coculture of transfected Jurkat T cells and target Raji/CD4 B cells enhanced HIV-1 infection two fold and HTLV-1 infection ten thousand fold in comparison with cell-free infection of Raji/CD4 cells. Agents that interfere with actin and tubulin polymerization strongly inhibited HTLV-1 and modestly decreased HIV-1 cell-to-cell infection, an indication that cytoskeletal remodeling was more important for HTLV-1 transmission. Time course studies showed that HTLV-1 transmission occurred very rapidly after cell mixing, whereas slower kinetics of HIV-1 coculture infection implies a different mechanism of infectious transmission. HTLV-1 Tax was demonstrated to play an important role in altering cell-cell interactions that enhance virus infection and replication. Interestingly, superantigen-induced synapses between Jurkat cells and Raji/CD4 cells did not enhance infection for either HTLV-1 or HIV-1. In general, the dependence on cell-to-cell infection was determined by the virus, the effector and target cell types, and by the nature of the cell-cell interaction.

  6. Effect of operating current dependent series resistance on the fill factor of a solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadu, Meena; Kapoor, A.; Tripathi, K.N. [Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi, South Campus, Benito Juarez road, -110 021 New Delhi (India)

    2002-02-01

    The fill factor of a solar cell depends upon the series resistance, reverse saturation current, diode quality factor, operating current and voltage. Since the series resistance itself depends upon the operating current (or voltage), it makes the evaluation of fill factor very complicated. In this paper, we have evaluated the fill factor of a solar cell, taking into account operating current dependence of the series resistance.

  7. CD47-dependent immunomodulatory and angiogenic activities of extracellular vesicles produced by T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Sukhbir; Singh, Satya P; Elkahloun, Abdel G; Wu, Weiwei; Abu-Asab, Mones S; Roberts, David D

    2014-07-01

    Intercellular communication is critical for integrating complex signals in multicellular eukaryotes. Vascular endothelial cells and T lymphocytes closely interact during the recirculation and trans-endothelial migration of T cells. In addition to direct cell-cell contact, we show that T cell derived extracellular vesicles can interact with endothelial cells and modulate their cellular functions. Thrombospondin-1 and its receptor CD47 are expressed on exosomes/ectosomes derived from T cells, and these extracellular vesicles are internalized and modulate signaling in both T cells and endothelial cells. Extracellular vesicles released from cells expressing or lacking CD47 differentially regulate activation of T cells induced by engaging the T cell receptor. Similarly, T cell-derived extracellular vesicles modulate endothelial cell responses to vascular endothelial growth factor and tube formation in a CD47-dependent manner. Uptake of T cell derived extracellular vesicles by recipient endothelial cells globally alters gene expression in a CD47-dependent manner. CD47 also regulates the mRNA content of extracellular vesicles in a manner consistent with some of the resulting alterations in target endothelial cell gene expression. Therefore, the thrombospondin-1 receptor CD47 directly or indirectly regulates intercellular communication mediated by the transfer of extracellular vesicles between vascular cells. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. cAMP-dependent cell differentiation triggered by activated CRHR1 in hippocampal neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, Carolina; Bonfiglio, Juan José; Dos Santos Claro, Paula A; Senin, Sergio A; Armando, Natalia G; Deussing, Jan M; Silberstein, Susana

    2017-05-16

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) activates the atypical soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) in addition to transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs). Both cAMP sources were shown to be required for the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 triggered by activated G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) CRHR1 in neuronal and neuroendocrine contexts. Here, we show that activated CRHR1 promotes growth arrest and neurite elongation in neuronal hippocampal cells (HT22-CRHR1 cells). By characterising CRHR1 signalling mechanisms involved in the neuritogenic effect, we demonstrate that neurite outgrowth in HT22-CRHR1 cells takes place by a sAC-dependent, ERK1/2-independent signalling cascade. Both tmACs and sAC are involved in corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH)-mediated CREB phosphorylation and c-fos induction, but only sAC-generated cAMP pools are critical for the neuritogenic effect of CRH, further highlighting the engagement of two sources of cAMP downstream of the activation of a GPCR, and reinforcing the notion that restricted cAMP microdomains may regulate independent cellular processes.

  9. CXCR3 surface expression in human airway epithelial cells: cell cycle dependence and effect on cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Mark O; Yang, Yi; Ji, Rong; Reddy, P J; Shahabuddin, Syed; Litvin, Judith; Rogers, Thomas J; Kelsen, Steven G

    2006-05-01

    We recently demonstrated that human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) constitutively express the CXC chemokine receptor CXCR3, which when activated, induces directed cell migration. The present study in HBEC examined the relative expression of the CXCR3 splice variants CXCR3-A and -B, cell cycle dependence of CXCR3 expression, and the effects of the CXCR3 ligand, the interferon-gamma-inducible CXC chemokine I-TAC/CXCL11, on DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. Both CXCR3-A and -B mRNA, assessed by real-time RT-PCR, were expressed in normal HBEC (NHBEC) and the HBEC line 16-HBE. However, CXCR3-B mRNA was 39- and 6-fold greater than CXCR3-A mRNA in NHBEC and 16-HBE, respectively. Although most HBEC (>80%) assessed by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy contained intracellular CXCR3, only a minority (75%) were in the S + G(2)/M phases of the cell cycle. Stimulation of CXCR3 with I-TAC enhanced thymidine incorporation and cell proliferation and increased p38 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. These data indicate that 1) human airway epithelial cells primarily express CXCR3-B mRNA, 2) surface expression of CXCR3 is largely confined to the S + G(2)/M phases of the cell cycle, and 3) activation of CXCR3 induces DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, and activation of MAPK pathways. We speculate that activation of CXCR3 exerts a mitogenic effect in HBEC, which may be important during airway mucosal injury in obstructive airway diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  10. A nucleic acid dependent chemical photocatalysis in live human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arian, Dumitru; Cló, Emiliano; Gothelf, Kurt V

    2010-01-01

    Only two nucleic acid directed chemical reactions that are compatible with live cells have been reported to date. Neither of these processes generate toxic species from nontoxic starting materials. Reactions of the latter type could be applied as gene-specific drugs, for example, in the treatment...

  11. The Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitor Roflumilast Protects against Cigarette Smoke Extract-Induced Mitophagy-Dependent Cell Death in Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyung, Sun Young; Kim, Yu Jin; Son, Eun Suk; Jeong, Sung Hwan; Park, Jeong Woong

    2018-04-01

    Recent studies show that mitophagy, the autophagy-dependent turnover of mitochondria, mediates pulmonary epithelial cell death in response to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) exposure and contributes to the development of emphysema in vivo during chronic cigarette smoke (CS) exposure, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of mitophagy in the regulation of CSE-exposed lung bronchial epithelial cell (Beas-2B) death. We also investigated the role of a phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor, roflumilast, in CSE-induced mitophagy-dependent cell death. Our results demonstrated that CSE induces mitophagy in Beas-2B cells through mitochondrial dysfunction and increased the expression levels of the mitophagy regulator protein, PTEN-induced putative kinase-1 (PINK1), and the mitochondrial fission protein, dynamin-1-like protein (DRP1). CSE-induced epithelial cell death was significantly increased in Beas-2B cells exposed to CSE but was decreased by small interfering RNA-dependent knockdown of DRP1. Treatment with roflumilast in Beas-2B cells inhibited CSE-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and mitophagy by inhibiting the expression of phospho-DRP1 and -PINK1. Roflumilast protected against cell death and increased cell viability, as determined by the lactate dehydrogenase release test and the MTT assay, respectively, in Beas-2B cells exposed to CSE. These findings suggest that roflumilast plays a protective role in CS-induced mitophagy-dependent cell death. Copyright©2018. The Korean Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases.

  12. EGFR-Dependent Regulation of Matrix-Independent Epithelial Cell Survival. Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    cervical dysplasia, oral leukoplakia and lobular carcinoma of the breast may contain numerous clones of initiated or dysplastic cells, yet have an...Independent Epithelial Cell Survival PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ulrich Rodeck, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Thomas...2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER EGFR-Dependent Regulation of Matrix-Independent Epithelial Cell Survival 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  13. T-dependent B-cell activation is signalled by an early increase in potassium influx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Kaplan, J G

    1982-01-01

    (previously demonstrated when B and T lymphocytes were separately stimulated) also occurs when B cells are stimulated through cooperation with mitogen-activated T cells, and is also detectable early in culture. T-dependent activation of B cells is therefore detectable considerably earlier than by conventional...

  14. The effect of Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 on voltage-dependent calcium channels in PC12 cells varies according to channel type and cell differentiation state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Kotaro; Asada, Akiko; Saito, Taro; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi

    2014-08-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a Ser/Thr kinase that plays an important role in the release of neurotransmitter from pre-synaptic terminals triggered by Ca(2+) influx into the pre-synaptic cytoplasm through voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs). It is reported that Cdk5 regulates L-, P/Q-, or N-type VDCC, but there is conflicting data as to the effect of Cdk5 on VDCC activity. To clarify the mechanisms involved, we examined the role of Cdk5 in regulating the Ca(2+) -channel property of VDCCs, using PC12 cells expressing endogenous, functional L-, P/Q-, and N-type VDCCs. The Ca(2+) influx, induced by membrane depolarization with high K(+) , was monitored with a fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator protein in both undifferentiated and nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells. Overall, Ca(2+) influx was increased by expression of Cdk5-p35 in undifferentiated PC12 cells but suppressed in differentiated PC12 cells. Moreover, we found that different VDCCs are distinctly regulated by Cdk5-p35 depending on the differentiation states of PC12 cells. These results indicate that Cdk5-p35 regulates L-, P/Q-, or N-type VDCCs in a cellular context-dependent manner. Calcium (Ca(2+) ) influx through voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs) triggers neurotransmitter release from pre-synaptic terminal of neurons. The channel activity of VDCCs is regulated by Cdk5-p35, a neuronal Ser/Thr kinase. However, there have been debates about the regulation of VDCCs by Cdk5. Using PC12 cells, we show that Cdk5-p35 regulates VDCCs in a type (L, P/Q, and N) and differentiation-dependent manner. NGF = nerve growth factor. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  15. Electrophysiological Characteristics of Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes are Cell Line-Dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Hannes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Modelling of cardiac development, physiology and pharmacology by differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs requires comparability of cardiac differentiation between different ESC lines. To investigate whether the outcome of cardiac differentiation is consistent between different ESC lines, we compared electrophysiological properties of ESC-derived cardiomyocytes (ESC-CMs of different murine ESC lines. Methods: Two wild-type (D3 and R1 and two transgenic ESC lines (D3/aPIG44 and CGR8/AMPIGX-7 were differentiated under identical culture conditions. The transgenic cell lines expressed enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP and puromycin-N-acetyltransferase under control of the cardiac specific α-myosin heavy chain (αMHC promoter. Action potentials (APs were recorded using sharp electrodes and multielectrode arrays in beating clusters of ESC-CMs. Results: Spontaneous AP frequency and AP duration (APD as well as maximal upstroke velocity differed markedly between unpurified CMs of the four ESC lines. APD heterogeneity was negligible in D3/aPIG44, moderate in D3 and R1 and extensive in CGR8/AMPIGX-7. Interspike intervals calculated from long-term recordings showed a high degree of variability within and between recordings in CGR8/AMPIGX-7, but not in D3/aPIG44. Purification of the αMHC+ population by puromycin treatment posed only minor changes to APD in D3/aPIG44, but significantly shortened APD in CGR8/AMPIGX-7. Conclusion: Electrophysiological properties of ESC-CMs are strongly cell line-dependent and can be influenced by purification of cardiomyocytes by antibiotic selection. Thus, conclusions on cardiac development, physiology and pharmacology derived from single stem cell lines have to be interpreted carefully.

  16. Arctigenin Inhibits Osteoclast Differentiation and Function by Suppressing Both Calcineurin-Dependent and Osteoblastic Cell-Dependent NFATc1 Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashita, Teruhito; Uehara, Shunsuke; Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Li, Feng; Kadota, Shigetoshi; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Arctigenin, a lignan-derived compound, is a constituent of the seeds of Arctium lappa. Arctigenin was previously shown to inhibit osteoclastogenesis; however, this inhibitory mechanism has yet to be elucidated. Here, we showed that arctigenin inhibited the action of nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), a key transcription factor for osteoclastogenesis. NFATc1 in osteoclast precursors was activated through two distinct pathways: the calcineurin-dependent and osteoblasti...

  17. Establishment of LIF-dependent human iPS cells closely related to basic FGF-dependent authentic iPS cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Hirai

    Full Text Available Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs can be divided into a leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF-dependent naïve type and a basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF-dependent primed type. Although the former are more undifferentiated than the latter, they require signal transduction inhibitors and sustained expression of the transgenes used for iPSC production. We used a transcriptionally enhanced version of OCT4 to establish LIF-dependent human iPSCs without the use of inhibitors and sustained transgene expression. These cells belong to the primed type of pluripotent stem cell, similar to bFGF-dependent iPSCs. Thus, the particular cytokine required for iPSC production does not necessarily define stem cell phenotypes as previously thought. It is likely that the bFGF and LIF signaling pathways converge on unidentified OCT4 target genes. These findings suggest that our LIF-dependent human iPSCs could provide a novel model to investigate the role of cytokine signaling in cellular reprogramming.

  18. Influenza Hemifusion Phenotype Depends on Membrane Context: Differences in Cell-Cell and Virus-Cell Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawada, Katarzyna E; Okamoto, Kenta; Kasson, Peter M

    2018-03-02

    Influenza viral entry into the host cell cytoplasm is accomplished by a process of membrane fusion mediated by the viral hemagglutinin protein. Hemagglutinin acts in a pH-triggered fashion, inserting a short fusion peptide into the host membrane followed by refolding of a coiled-coil structure to draw the viral envelope and host membranes together. Mutations to this fusion peptide provide an important window into viral fusion mechanisms and protein-membrane interactions. Here, we show that a well-described fusion peptide mutant, G1S, has a phenotype that depends strongly on the viral membrane context. The G1S mutant is well known to cause a "hemifusion" phenotype based on experiments in transfected cells, where cells expressing G1S hemagglutinin can undergo lipid mixing in a pH-triggered fashion similar to virus but will not support fusion pores. We compare fusion by the G1S hemagglutinin mutant expressed either in cells or in influenza virions and show that this hemifusion phenotype occurs in transfected cells but that native virions are able to support full fusion, albeit at a slower rate and 10-100× reduced infectious titer. We explain this with a quantitative model where the G1S mutant, instead of causing an absolute block of fusion, alters the protein stoichiometry required for fusion. This change slightly slows fusion at high hemagglutinin density, as on the viral surface, but at lower hemagglutinin density produces a hemifusion phenotype. The quantitative model thus reproduces the observed virus-cell and cell-cell fusion phenotypes, yielding a unified explanation where membrane context can control the observed viral fusion phenotype. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Diphtheria Toxin-Induced Cell Death Triggers Wnt-Dependent Hair Cell Regeneration in Neonatal Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lingxiang; Lu, Jingrong; Chiang, Hao; Wu, Hao; Edge, Albert S B; Shi, Fuxin

    2016-09-07

    Cochlear hair cells (HCs), the sensory cells that respond to sound, do not regenerate after damage in adult mammals, and their loss is a major cause of deafness. Here we show that HC regeneration in newborn mouse ears occurred spontaneously when the original cells were ablated by treatment with diphtheria toxin (DT) in ears that had been engineered to overexpress the DT receptor, but was not detectable when HCs were ablated in vivo by the aminoglycoside antibiotic neomycin. A variety of Wnts (Wnt1, Wnt2, Wnt2b, Wnt4, Wnt5a, Wnt7b, Wnt9a, Wnt9b, and Wnt11) and Wnt pathway component Krm2 were upregulated after DT damage. Nuclear β-catenin was upregulated in HCs and supporting cells of the DT-damaged cochlea. Pharmacological inhibition of Wnt decreased spontaneous regeneration, confirming a role of Wnt signaling in HC regeneration. Inhibition of Notch signaling further potentiated supporting cell proliferation and HC differentiation that occurred spontaneously. The absence of new HCs in the neomycin ears was correlated to less robust Wnt pathway activation, but the ears subjected to neomycin treatment nonetheless showed increased cell division and HC differentiation after subsequent forced upregulation of β-catenin. These studies suggest, first, that Wnt signaling plays a key role in regeneration, and, second, that the outcome of a regenerative response to damage in the newborn cochlea is determined by reaching a threshold level of Wnt signaling rather than its complete absence or presence. Sensory HCs of the inner ear do not regenerate in the adult, and their loss is a major cause of deafness. We found that HCs regenerated spontaneously in the newborn mouse after diphtheria toxin (DT)-induced, but not neomycin-induced, HC death. Regeneration depended on activation of Wnt signaling, and regeneration in DT-treated ears correlated to a higher level of Wnt activation than occurred in nonregenerating neomycin-treated ears. This is significant because insufficient

  20. Alloprimed CD8+ T cells Regulate Alloantibody and Eliminate Alloprimed B cells through Perforin- and FasL-dependent mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerer, J.M.; Pham, T.A.; Wright, C.L.; Tobin, K.J.; Sanghavi, P.B.; Elzein, S.M.; Sanders, V.M.; Bumgardner, G.L.

    2014-01-01

    While it is well known that CD4+ T cells and B cells collaborate for antibody production, our group previously reported that CD8+ T cells downregulate alloantibody responses following transplantation. However, the exact mechanism involved in CD8+ T cell-mediated downregulation of alloantibody remains unclear. We also reported that alloantibody production is enhanced when either perforin or FasL is deficient in transplant recipients. Here, we report that CD8+ T cell-deficient transplant recipient mice (high alloantibody producers) exhibit an increased number of primed B cells compared to wild-type transplant recipients. Furthermore, CD8+ T cells require FasL, perforin, and allospecificity to downregulate posttransplant alloantibody production. In vivo CD8-mediated clearance of alloprimed B cells was also FasL- and perforin-dependent. In vitro data demonstrated that recipient CD8+ T cells directly induce apoptosis of alloprimed IgG1+ B cells in co-culture in an allospecific and MHC class I-dependent fashion. Altogether these data are consistent with the interpretation that CD8+ T cells downregulate posttransplant alloantibody production by FasL- and perforin-dependent direct elimination of alloprimed IgG1+ B cells. PMID:24472191

  1. Uptake kinetics and nanotoxicity of silica nanoparticles are cell type dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blechinger, Julia; Bauer, Alexander T; Torrano, Adriano A; Gorzelanny, Christian; Bräuchle, Christoph; Schneider, Stefan W

    2013-12-09

    In this study, it is shown that the cytotoxic response of cells as well as the uptake kinetics of nanoparticles (NPs) is cell type dependent. We use silica NPs with a diameter of 310 nm labeled with perylene dye and 304 nm unlabeled particles to evaluate cell type-dependent uptake and cytotoxicity on human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) and cancer cells derived from the cervix carcinoma (HeLa). Besides their size, the particles are characterized concerning homogeneity of the labeling and their zeta potential. The cellular uptake of the labeled NPs is quantified by imaging the cells via confocal microscopy in a time-dependent manner, with subsequent image analysis via a custom-made and freely available digital method, Particle_in_Cell-3D. We find that within the first 4 h of interaction, the uptake of silica NPs into the cytoplasm is up to 10 times more efficient in HUVEC than in HeLa cells. Interestingly, after 10 or 24 h of interaction, the number of intracellular particles for HeLa cells by far surpasses the one for HUVEC. Inhibitor studies show that these endothelial cells internalize 310 nm SiO₂ NPs via the clathrin-dependent pathway. Remarkably, the differences in the amount of taken up NPs are not directly reflected by the metabolic activity and membrane integrity of the individual cell types. Interaction with NPs leads to a concentration-dependent decrease in mitochondrial activity and an increase in membrane leakage for HUVEC, whereas HeLa cells show only a reduced mitochondrial activity and no membrane leakage. In addition, silica NPs lead to HUVEC cell death while HeLa cells survive. These findings indicate that HUVEC are more sensitive than HeLa cells upon silica NP exposure. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. New steroidal aromatase inhibitors: Suppression of estrogen-dependent breast cancer cell proliferation and induction of cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roleira Fernanda MF

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aromatase, the cytochrome P-450 enzyme (CYP19 responsible for estrogen biosynthesis, is an important target for the treatment of estrogen-dependent breast cancer. In fact, the use of synthetic aromatase inhibitors (AI, which induce suppression of estrogen synthesis, has shown to be an effective alternative to the classical tamoxifen for the treatment of postmenopausal patients with ER-positive breast cancer. New AIs obtained, in our laboratory, by modification of the A and D-rings of the natural substrate of aromatase, compounds 3a and 4a, showed previously to efficiently suppress aromatase activity in placental microsomes. In the present study we have investigated the effects of these compounds on cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and induction of cell death using the estrogen-dependent human breast cancer cell line stably transfected with the aromatase gene, MCF-7 aro cells. Results The new steroids inhibit hormone-dependent proliferation of MCF-7aro cells in a time and dose-dependent manner, causing cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and inducing cell death with features of apoptosis and autophagic cell death. Conclusion Our in vitro studies showed that the two steroidal AIs, 3a and 4a, are potent inhibitors of breast cancer cell proliferation. Moreover, it was also shown that the antiproliferative effects of these two steroids on MCF-7aro cells are mediated by disrupting cell cycle progression, through cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and induction of cell death, being the dominant mechanism autophagic cell death. Our results are important for the elucidation of the cellular effects of steroidal AIs on breast cancer.

  3. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Dependent Regression of Pulmonary Metastasis from Ewing's

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Anita Hayes-Jordan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ewing’s sarcoma (ES is the second most common bone tumor in children. Survival has not improved over the last decade and once pulmonary metastatic disease is present, survival is dismal. Mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC therapy has shown potential benefit for Kaposi's sarcoma; however, the role of progenitor cell therapies for cancer remains controversial. MSC treatment of ES or pulmonary metastatic disease has not been demonstrated. We have developed an orthotopic xenograft model of ES in which animals develop spontaneous pulmonary metastases. Within this model, we demonstrate the use of MSCs to target ES lung metastasis. Materials and MethodsHuman ES cells were transfected with luciferase and injected into the rib of nude mice. Development of pulmonary metastases was confirmed by imaging. After flow cytometry based characterization, MSC’s were injected into the tail vein of nude mice with established local ES tumor or pulmonary metastasis. Mice were treated with intravenous MSCs weekly followed by bioluminescent imaging.ResultsThe intravenous injection of MSCs in an ES model decreases the volume of pulmonary metastatic lesions; however, no effect on primary chest wall tumor size is observed. Thus verifying the MSC preferential homing to the lung. MSCs are found to ‘home to’ the pulmonary parenchyma and remain engrafted up to 5 days after delivery. DiscussionMSC treatment of ES slows growth of pulmonary metastasis. MSC’s have more affinity for pulmonary metastasis and can effect a greater decrease in tumor growth in the lungs compared to the primary tumor site

  4. Regulation of CCR7-dependent cell migration through?CCR7 homodimer formation

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Daichi; Endo, Masataka; Ochi, Hirotaka; Hojo, Hironobu; Miyasaka, Masayuki; Hayasaka, Haruko

    2017-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR7 contributes to various physiological and pathological processes including T cell maturation, T cell migration from the blood into secondary lymphoid tissues, and tumor cell metastasis to lymph nodes. Although a previous study suggested that the efficacy of CCR7 ligand-dependent T cell migration correlates with CCR7 homo- and heterodimer formation, the exact extent of contribution of the CCR7 dimerization remains unclear. Here, by inducing or disrupting CCR7 dimers,...

  5. Recombinant cells and organisms having persistent nonstandard amino acid dependence and methods of making them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, George M.; Mandell, Daniel J.; Lajoie, Marc J.

    2017-12-05

    Recombinant cells and recombinant organisms persistently expressing nonstandard amino acids (NSAAs) are provided. Methods of making recombinant cells and recombinant organisms dependent on persistently expressing NSAAs for survival are also provided. These methods may be used to make safe recombinant cells and recombinant organisms and/or to provide a selective pressure to maintain one or more reassigned codon functions in recombinant cells and recombinant organisms.

  6. YAP/TAZ enhance mammalian embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in a Tead-dependent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Dasol; Byun, Sung-Hyun; Park, Soojeong; Kim, Juwan; Kim, Inhee; Ha, Soobong; Kwon, Mookwang; Yoon, Keejung, E-mail: keejung@skku.edu

    2015-02-27

    Mammalian brain development is regulated by multiple signaling pathways controlling cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. Here we show that YAP/TAZ enhance embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in a cell autonomous fashion using diverse experimental approaches. Introduction of retroviral vectors expressing YAP or TAZ into the mouse embryonic brain induced cell localization in the ventricular zone (VZ), which is the embryonic neural stem cell niche. This change in cell distribution in the cortical layer is due to the increased stemness of infected cells; YAP-expressing cells were colabeled with Sox2, a neural stem cell marker, and YAP/TAZ increased the frequency and size of neurospheres, indicating enhanced self-renewal- and proliferative ability of neural stem cells. These effects appear to be TEA domain family transcription factor (Tead)–dependent; a Tead binding-defective YAP mutant lost the ability to promote neural stem cell characteristics. Consistently, in utero gene transfer of a constitutively active form of Tead2 (Tead2-VP16) recapitulated all the features of YAP/TAZ overexpression, and dominant negative Tead2-EnR resulted in marked cell exit from the VZ toward outer cortical layers. Taken together, these results indicate that the Tead-dependent YAP/TAZ signaling pathway plays important roles in neural stem cell maintenance by enhancing stemness of neural stem cells during mammalian brain development. - Highlights: • Roles of YAP and Tead in vivo during mammalian brain development are clarified. • Expression of YAP promotes embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in vivo in a cell autonomous fashion. • Enhancement of neural stem cell characteristics by YAP depends on Tead. • Transcriptionally active form of Tead alone can recapitulate the effects of YAP. • Transcriptionally repressive form of Tead severely reduces stem cell characteristics.

  7. Blimp-1-Dependent IL-10 Production by Tr1 Cells Regulates TNF-Mediated Tissue Pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Montes de Oca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor (TNF is critical for controlling many intracellular infections, but can also contribute to inflammation. It can promote the destruction of important cell populations and trigger dramatic tissue remodeling following establishment of chronic disease. Therefore, a better understanding of TNF regulation is needed to allow pathogen control without causing or exacerbating disease. IL-10 is an important regulatory cytokine with broad activities, including the suppression of inflammation. IL-10 is produced by different immune cells; however, its regulation and function appears to be cell-specific and context-dependent. Recently, IL-10 produced by Th1 (Tr1 cells was shown to protect host tissues from inflammation induced following infection. Here, we identify a novel pathway of TNF regulation by IL-10 from Tr1 cells during parasitic infection. We report elevated Blimp-1 mRNA levels in CD4+ T cells from visceral leishmaniasis (VL patients, and demonstrate IL-12 was essential for Blimp-1 expression and Tr1 cell development in experimental VL. Critically, we show Blimp-1-dependent IL-10 production by Tr1 cells prevents tissue damage caused by IFNγ-dependent TNF production. Therefore, we identify Blimp-1-dependent IL-10 produced by Tr1 cells as a key regulator of TNF-mediated pathology and identify Tr1 cells as potential therapeutic tools to control inflammation.

  8. p53-Dependent suppression of genome instability in germ cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otozai, Shinji [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Osaka University School of Medicine, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ishikawa-Fujiwara, Tomoko [Department of Radiation Biology and Medical Genetics, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, B4, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Oda, Shoji [Department of Integrated Biosciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8562 (Japan); Kamei, Yasuhiro [Department of Radiation Biology and Medical Genetics, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, B4, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ryo, Haruko [Nomura Project, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Osaka 565-0085 (Japan); Sato, Ayuko [Department of Pathology, Hyogo College of Medicine, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan); Nomura, Taisei [Nomura Project, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Osaka 565-0085 (Japan); Mitani, Hiroshi [Department of Integrated Biosciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8562 (Japan); Tsujimura, Tohru [Department of Pathology, Hyogo College of Medicine, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan); Inohara, Hidenori [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Osaka University School of Medicine, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Todo, Takeshi, E-mail: todo@radbio.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Biology and Medical Genetics, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, B4, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Radiation-induced microsatellite instability (MSI) was investigated in medaka fish. • msh2{sup −/−} fish had a high frequency of spontaneous MSI. • p53{sup −/−} fish had a high frequency of radiation-induced MSI. • p53 and msh2 suppress MSI by different pathways: mismatch removal and apoptosis. - Abstract: Radiation increases mutation frequencies at tandem repeat loci. Germline mutations in γ-ray-irradiated medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) were studied, focusing on the microsatellite loci. Mismatch-repair genes suppress microsatellite mutation by directly removing altered sequences at the nucleotide level, whereas the p53 gene suppresses genetic alterations by eliminating damaged cells. The contribution of these two defense mechanisms to radiation-induced microsatellite instability was addressed. The spontaneous mutation frequency was significantly higher in msh2{sup −/−} males than in wild-type fish, whereas there was no difference in the frequency of radiation-induced mutations between msh2{sup −/−} and wild-type fish. By contrast, irradiated p53{sup −/−} fish exhibited markedly increased mutation frequencies, whereas their spontaneous mutation frequency was the same as that of wild-type fish. In the spermatogonia of the testis, radiation induced a high level of apoptosis both in wild-type and msh2{sup −/−} fish, but negligible levels in p53{sup −/−} fish. The results demonstrate that the msh2 and p53 genes protect genome integrity against spontaneous and radiation-induced mutation by two different pathways: direct removal of mismatches and elimination of damaged cells.

  9. ATP-dependent modification of gamma irradiation effects on red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galutzov, B.; Ivanov, S.; Ratcheva-Kantcheva, M.

    1987-01-01

    The in vitro gamma irradiation effects on human red blood cell membrane properties were investigated. Osmotic fragility, rate of hemolysis, electrophoretic mobility and cell size distribution were monitored during nutrient-free in vitro storage and postirradiation incubation at the 1st, 5th and 25th hour. Experimental results confirm a time-dependent radiation-induced cell membrane damage. The increase of osmotic fragility, rate of hemolysis and cell size and the decrease in electrophoretic mobility are discussed as compared to membrane destabilization during in vitro ageing. Exogeneous ATP treatment of erythrocytes before and after irradiation results in some dose-dependent membrane protection. (author)

  10. Dose-dependent regulation of target gene expression and cell proliferation by c-Myc levels

    OpenAIRE

    Schuhmacher, Marino; Eick, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    The proto-oncogene c-myc encodes a basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper transcription factor (c-Myc). c-Myc plays a crucial role in cell growth and proliferation. Here, we examined how expression of c-Myc target genes and cell proliferation depend on variation of c-Myc protein levels. We show that proliferation rates, the number of cells in S-phase, and cell size increased in a dose-dependent manner in response to increasing c-Myc levels. Likewise, the mRNA levels of c-Myc responsive genes s...

  11. Cell cycle-regulated expression of mammalian CDC6 is dependent on E2F

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hateboer, G; Wobst, A; Petersen, B O

    1998-01-01

    The E2F transcription factors are essential regulators of cell growth in multicellular organisms, controlling the expression of a number of genes whose products are involved in DNA replication and cell proliferation. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the MBF and SBF transcription complexes have...... of this gene is dependent on E2F. In vivo footprinting data demonstrate that the identified E2F sites are occupied in resting cells and in exponentially growing cells, suggesting that E2F is responsible for downregulating the promoter in early phases of the cell cycle and the subsequent upregulation when cells...

  12. Mast cells express tyrosine hydroxylase and store dopamine in a serglycin-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönnberg, Elin; Calounova, Gabriela; Pejler, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Here we show that mast cells contain dopamine and that mast cell activation causes dopamine depletion, indicating its presence within secretory granules. Dopamine storage increased during mast cell maturation from bone marrow precursors, and was dependent on the presence of serglycin. Moreover, the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, the key enzyme in dopamine biosynthesis, was induced during mast cell maturation; histidine decarboxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase 1 were also induced. Mast cell activation caused a robust induction of histidine decarboxylase, but no stimulation of tyrosine hydroxylase or tryptophan hydroxylase 1 expression. The present study points toward a possible role of dopamine in mast cell function.

  13. YAP/TAZ enhance mammalian embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in a Tead-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dasol; Byun, Sung-Hyun; Park, Soojeong; Kim, Juwan; Kim, Inhee; Ha, Soobong; Kwon, Mookwang; Yoon, Keejung

    2015-02-27

    Mammalian brain development is regulated by multiple signaling pathways controlling cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. Here we show that YAP/TAZ enhance embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in a cell autonomous fashion using diverse experimental approaches. Introduction of retroviral vectors expressing YAP or TAZ into the mouse embryonic brain induced cell localization in the ventricular zone (VZ), which is the embryonic neural stem cell niche. This change in cell distribution in the cortical layer is due to the increased stemness of infected cells; YAP-expressing cells were colabeled with Sox2, a neural stem cell marker, and YAP/TAZ increased the frequency and size of neurospheres, indicating enhanced self-renewal- and proliferative ability of neural stem cells. These effects appear to be TEA domain family transcription factor (Tead)-dependent; a Tead binding-defective YAP mutant lost the ability to promote neural stem cell characteristics. Consistently, in utero gene transfer of a constitutively active form of Tead2 (Tead2-VP16) recapitulated all the features of YAP/TAZ overexpression, and dominant negative Tead2-EnR resulted in marked cell exit from the VZ toward outer cortical layers. Taken together, these results indicate that the Tead-dependent YAP/TAZ signaling pathway plays important roles in neural stem cell maintenance by enhancing stemness of neural stem cells during mammalian brain development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. MDCK cells expressing constitutively active Yes-associated protein (YAP) undergo apical extrusion depending on neighboring cell status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Takanori; Ishihara, Erika; Miyamura, Norio; Narumi, Rika; Kajita, Mihoko; Fujita, Yasuyuki; Suzuki, Akira; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Nishina, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Cell competition is a cell-cell interaction by which a cell compares its fitness to that of neighboring cells. The cell with the relatively lower fitness level is the “loser” and actively eliminated, while the cell with the relatively higher fitness level is the “winner” and survives. Recent studies have shown that cells with high Yes-associated protein (YAP) activity win cell competitions but the mechanism is unknown. Here, we report the unexpected finding that cells overexpressing constitutively active YAP undergo apical extrusion and are losers, rather than winners, in competitions with normal mammalian epithelial cells. Inhibitors of metabolism-related proteins such as phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), or p70S6 kinase (p70S6K) suppressed this apical extrusion, as did knockdown of vimentin or filamin in neighboring cells. Interestingly, YAP-overexpressing cells switched from losers to winners when co-cultured with cells expressing K-Ras (G12V) or v-Src. Thus, the role of YAP in deciding cell competitions depends on metabolic factors and the status of neighboring cells. PMID:27324860

  15. Ouabain Induces Apoptotic Cell Death Through Caspase- and Mitochondria-dependent Pathways in Human Osteosarcoma U-2 OS Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Wen-Hsiang; Liu, Ko-Lin; Shih, Yung-Luen; Chuang, Ying-Ying; Chou, Jason; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Jair, Herng-Woei; Lee, Ming-Zhe; Au, Man-Kuan; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2018-01-01

    Ouabain, a plant-derived product/substance with Na + /K + -ATPase inhibiting properties, has been shown to exert anti-cancer activity on human cancer cells. This is the first study to investigate the effect of ouabain on apoptotic cell death of human osteosarcoma-derived U-2 OS cells. Flow cytometry was used to examine cell viability, cell cycle, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), Ca 2+ , mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and caspase activity. Morphological changes were examined by contrast-phase microscopy, while apoptosis-associated protein levels were analyzed by western blot. Ouabain, at concentrations of 5-60 μM, significantly decreased the total viable cells and induced cell morphological changes in a time-dependent manner. It also time-dependently decreased G 0 /G 1 phase and increased S and G 2 /M phase in U-2 OS cells. The production of ROS and the levels of MMPs (ΔΨ m ) were inhibited, while Ca 2+ production in U-2 OS cells was increased. Regarding cell apoptosis, flow cytometry assay revealed increased caspase-3, -8, and -9 activities in U-2 OS cells. Moreover, western blot results showed that ouabain increased the expression of pro-apoptotic protein Bax and decreased the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in U-2 OS cells. Furthermore, results also showed that ouabain increased cytochrome c release, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and endonuclease (Endo) G that is associated with apoptosis through caspase-dependent and -independent pathway in U-2 OS cells. Our findings provide important insight into the cytotoxic effects of ouabain on U-2 OS cells, in vitro, which are mediated at least partly via cell apoptosis induction. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  16. Glucose regulates rat beta cell number through age-dependent effects on beta cell survival and proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zerihun Assefa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glucose effects on beta cell survival and DNA-synthesis suggest a role as regulator of beta cell mass but data on beta cell numbers are lacking. We examined outcome of these influences on the number of beta cells isolated at different growth stages in their population. METHODS: Beta cells from neonatal, young-adult and old rats were cultured serum-free for 15 days. Their number was counted by automated whole-well imaging distinguishing influences on cell survival and on proliferative activity. RESULTS: Elevated glucose (10-20 versus 5 mmol/l increased the number of living beta cells from 8-week rats to 30%, following a time- and concentration-dependent recruitment of quiescent cells into DNA-synthesis; a glucokinase-activator lowered the threshold but did not raise total numbers of glucose-recruitable cells. No glucose-induced increase occurred in beta cells from 40-week rats. Neonatal beta cells doubled in number at 5 mmol/l involving a larger activated fraction that did not increase at higher concentrations; however, their higher susceptibility to glucose toxicity at 20 mmol/l resulted in 20% lower living cell numbers than at start. None of the age groups exhibited a repetitively proliferating subpopulation. CONCLUSIONS: Chronically elevated glucose levels increased the number of beta cells from young-adult but not from old rats; they interfered with expansion of neonatal beta cells and reduced their number. These effects are attributed to age-dependent differences in basal and glucose-induced proliferative activity and in cellular susceptibility to glucose toxicity. They also reflect age-dependent variations in the functional heterogeneity of the rat beta cell population.

  17. Glucose Regulates Rat Beta Cell Number through Age-Dependent Effects on Beta Cell Survival and Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyaert, Christophe; Stangé, Geert; Martens, Geert A.; Ling, Zhidong; Hellemans, Karine; Pipeleers, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Background Glucose effects on beta cell survival and DNA-synthesis suggest a role as regulator of beta cell mass but data on beta cell numbers are lacking. We examined outcome of these influences on the number of beta cells isolated at different growth stages in their population. Methods Beta cells from neonatal, young-adult and old rats were cultured serum-free for 15 days. Their number was counted by automated whole-well imaging distinguishing influences on cell survival and on proliferative activity. Results Elevated glucose (10–20 versus 5 mmol/l) increased the number of living beta cells from 8-week rats to 30%, following a time- and concentration-dependent recruitment of quiescent cells into DNA-synthesis; a glucokinase-activator lowered the threshold but did not raise total numbers of glucose-recruitable cells. No glucose-induced increase occurred in beta cells from 40-week rats. Neonatal beta cells doubled in number at 5 mmol/l involving a larger activated fraction that did not increase at higher concentrations; however, their higher susceptibility to glucose toxicity at 20 mmol/l resulted in 20% lower living cell numbers than at start. None of the age groups exhibited a repetitively proliferating subpopulation. Conclusions Chronically elevated glucose levels increased the number of beta cells from young-adult but not from old rats; they interfered with expansion of neonatal beta cells and reduced their number. These effects are attributed to age-dependent differences in basal and glucose-induced proliferative activity and in cellular susceptibility to glucose toxicity. They also reflect age-dependent variations in the functional heterogeneity of the rat beta cell population. PMID:24416358

  18. CD151 promotes α3β1 integrin-dependent organization of carcinoma cell junctions and restrains collective cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zevian, Shannin C; Johnson, Jessica L; Winterwood, Nicole E; Walters, Katherine S; Herndon, Mary E; Henry, Michael D; Stipp, Christopher S

    2015-01-01

    Integrins function in collective migration both as major receptors for extracellular matrix and by crosstalk to adherens junctions. Despite extensive research, important questions remain about how integrin signaling mechanisms are integrated into collective migration programs. Tetraspanins form cell surface complexes with a subset of integrins and thus are good candidates for regulating the balance of integrin functional inputs into cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions. For example, tetraspanin CD151 directly associates with α3β1 integrin in carcinoma cells and promotes rapid α3β1-dependent single cell motility, but CD151 also promotes organized adherens junctions and restrains collective carcinoma cell migration on 2D substrates. However, the individual roles of CD151s integrin partners in CD151s pro-junction activity in carcinoma cells were not well understood. Here we find that CD151 promotes organized carcinoma cell junctions via α3β1 integrin, by a mechanism that requires the a3b1 ligand, laminin-332. Loss of CD151 promotes collective 3D invasion and growth in vitro and in vivo, and the enhanced invasion of CD151-silenced cells is α3 integrin dependent, suggesting that CD151 can regulate the balance between α3β1s pro-junction and pro-migratory activities in collective invasion. An analysis of human cancer cases revealed that changes in CD151 expression can be linked to either better or worse clinical outcomes depending on context, including potentially divergent roles for CD151 in different subsets of breast cancer cases. Thus, the role of the CD151-α3β1 complex in carcinoma progression is context dependent, and may depend on the mode of tumor cell invasion.

  19. The oxidative burst reaction in mammalian cells depends on gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, Astrid; Schoppmann, Kathrin; Sromicki, Juri; Brungs, Sonja; von der Wiesche, Melanie; Hock, Bertold; Kolanus, Waldemar; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Ullrich, Oliver

    2013-12-20

    Gravity has been a constant force throughout the Earth's evolutionary history. Thus, one of the fundamental biological questions is if and how complex cellular and molecular functions of life on Earth require gravity. In this study, we investigated the influence of gravity on the oxidative burst reaction in macrophages, one of the key elements in innate immune response and cellular signaling. An important step is the production of superoxide by the NADPH oxidase, which is rapidly converted to H2O2 by spontaneous and enzymatic dismutation. The phagozytosis-mediated oxidative burst under altered gravity conditions was studied in NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages by means of a luminol assay. Ground-based experiments in "functional weightlessness" were performed using a 2 D clinostat combined with a photomultiplier (PMT clinostat). The same technical set-up was used during the 13th DLR and 51st ESA parabolic flight campaign. Furthermore, hypergravity conditions were provided by using the Multi-Sample Incubation Centrifuge (MuSIC) and the Short Arm Human Centrifuge (SAHC). The results demonstrate that release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during the oxidative burst reaction depends greatly on gravity conditions. ROS release is 1.) reduced in microgravity, 2.) enhanced in hypergravity and 3.) responds rapidly and reversible to altered gravity within seconds. We substantiated the effect of altered gravity on oxidative burst reaction in two independent experimental systems, parabolic flights and 2D clinostat / centrifuge experiments. Furthermore, the results obtained in simulated microgravity (2D clinorotation experiments) were proven by experiments in real microgravity as in both cases a pronounced reduction in ROS was observed. Our experiments indicate that gravity-sensitive steps are located both in the initial activation pathways and in the final oxidative burst reaction itself, which could be explained by the role of cytoskeletal dynamics in the assembly and function

  20. The temperature dependence of cell mechanics measured by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunyer, R; Trepat, X; Farré, R; Navajas, D; Fredberg, J J

    2009-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a complex polymer network that regulates the structural stability of living cells. Although the cytoskeleton plays a key role in many important cell functions, the mechanisms that regulate its mechanical behaviour are poorly understood. Potential mechanisms include the entropic elasticity of cytoskeletal filaments, glassy-like inelastic rearrangements of cross-linking proteins and the activity of contractile molecular motors that sets the tensional stress (prestress) borne by the cytoskeleton filaments. The contribution of these mechanisms can be assessed by studying how cell mechanics depends on temperature. The aim of this work was to elucidate the effect of temperature on cell mechanics using atomic force microscopy. We measured the complex shear modulus (G*) of human alveolar epithelial cells over a wide frequency range (0.1–25.6 Hz) at different temperatures (13–37 °C). In addition, we probed cell prestress by mapping the contractile forces that cells exert on the substrate by means of traction microscopy. To assess the role of actomyosin contraction in the temperature-induced changes in G* and cell prestress, we inhibited the Rho kinase pathway of the myosin light chain phosphorylation with Y-27632. Our results show that with increasing temperature, cells become stiffer and more solid-like. Cell prestress also increases with temperature. Inhibiting actomyosin contraction attenuated the temperature dependence of G* and prestress. We conclude that the dependence of cell mechanics with temperature is dominated by the contractile activity of molecular motors

  1. IL-17-producing NKT cells depend exclusively on IL-7 for homeostasis and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, K E; Kim, H-O; Kyparissoudis, K; Corpuz, T M; Pinget, G V; Uldrich, A P; Brink, R; Belz, G T; Cho, J-H; Godfrey, D I; Sprent, J

    2014-09-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are innate-like T cells that rapidly recognize pathogens and produce cytokines that shape the ensuing immune response. IL-17-producing NKT cells are enriched in barrier tissues, such as the lung, skin, and peripheral lymph nodes, and the factors that maintain this population in the periphery have not been elucidated. Here we show that NKT17 cells deviate from other NKT cells in their survival requirements. In contrast to conventional NKT cells that are maintained by IL-15, RORγt(+) NKT cells are IL-15 independent and instead rely completely on IL-7. IL-7 initiates a T-cell receptor-independent (TCR-independent) expansion of NKT17 cells, thus supporting their homeostasis. Without IL-7, survival is dramatically impaired, yet residual cells remain lineage committed with no downregulation of RORγt evident. Their preferential response to IL-7 does not reflect enhanced signaling through STAT proteins, but instead is modulated via the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. The ability to compete for IL-7 is dependent on high-density IL-7 receptor expression, which would promote uptake of low levels of IL-7 produced in the non-lymphoid sites of lung and skin. This dependence on IL-7 is also reported for RORγt(+) innate lymphoid cells and CD4(+) Th17 cells, and suggests common survival requirements for functionally similar cells.

  2. The regulation of SIRT2 function by cyclin-dependent kinases affects cell motility.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pandithage, R.; Lilischkis, R.; Harting, K.; Wolf, A.; Jedamzik, B.; Luscher-Firzlaff, J.; Vervoorts, J.; Lasonder, E.; Kremmer, E.; Knoll, B.; Luscher, B.

    2008-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) fulfill key functions in many cellular processes, including cell cycle progression and cytoskeletal dynamics. A limited number of Cdk substrates have been identified with few demonstrated to be regulated by Cdk-dependent phosphorylation. We identify on protein

  3. Single cell analysis facilitates staging of Blimp1-dependent primordial germ cells derived from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J Vincent

    Full Text Available The cell intrinsic programming that regulates mammalian primordial germ cell (PGC development in the pre-gonadal stage is challenging to investigate. To overcome this we created a transgene-free method for generating PGCs in vitro (iPGCs from mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs. Using labeling for SSEA1 and cKit, two cell surface molecules used previously to isolate presumptive iPGCs, we show that not all SSEA1+/cKit+ double positive cells exhibit a PGC identity. Instead, we determined that selecting for cKit(bright cells within the SSEA1+ fraction significantly enriches for the putative iPGC population. Single cell analysis comparing SSEA1+/cKit(bright iPGCs to ESCs and embryonic PGCs demonstrates that 97% of single iPGCs co-express PGC signature genes Blimp1, Stella, Dnd1, Prdm14 and Dazl at similar levels to e9.5-10.5 PGCs, whereas 90% of single mouse ESC do not co-express PGC signature genes. For the 10% of ESCs that co-express PGC signature genes, the levels are significantly lower than iPGCs. Microarray analysis shows that iPGCs are transcriptionally distinct from ESCs and repress gene ontology groups associated with mesoderm and heart development. At the level of chromatin, iPGCs contain 5-methyl cytosine bases in their DNA at imprinted and non-imprinted loci, and are enriched in histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation, yet do not have detectable levels of Mvh protein, consistent with a Blimp1-positive pre-gonadal PGC identity. In order to determine whether iPGC formation is dependent upon Blimp1, we generated Blimp1 null ESCs and found that loss of Blimp1 significantly depletes SSEA1/cKit(bright iPGCs. Taken together, the generation of Blimp1-positive iPGCs from ESCs constitutes a robust model for examining cell-intrinsic regulation of PGCs during the Blimp1-positive stage of development.

  4. Extracellular matrix-dependent myosin dynamics during G1-S phase cell cycle progression in hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhadriraju, Kiran; Hansen, Linda K.

    2004-01-01

    Cell spreading and proliferation are tightly coupled in anchorage-dependent cells. While adhesion-dependent proliferation signals require an intact actin cytoskeleton, and some of these signals such as ERK activation have been characterized, the role of myosin in spreading and cell cycle progression under different extracellular matrix (ECM) conditions is not known. Studies presented here examine changes in myosin activity in freshly isolated hepatocytes under ECM conditions that promote either proliferation (high fibronectin density) or growth arrest (low fibronectin density). Three different measures were obtained and related to both spreading and cell cycle progression: myosin protein levels and association with cytoskeleton, myosin light chain phosphorylation, and its ATPase activity. During the first 48 h in culture, corresponding with transit through G1 phase, there was a six-fold increase in both myosin protein levels and myosin association with actin cytoskeleton. There was also a steady increase in myosin light chain phosphorylation and ATPase activity with spreading, which did not occur in non-spread, growth-arrested cells on low density of fibronectin. Myosin-inhibiting drugs blocked ERK activation, cyclin D1 expression, and S phase entry. Overexpression of the cell cycle protein cyclin D1 overcame both ECM-dependent and actomyosin-dependent inhibition of DNA synthesis, suggesting that cyclin D1 is a key event downstream of myosin-dependent cell cycle regulation

  5. High-speed broadband monitoring of cell viscoelasticity in real time shows myosin-dependent oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bo; Ren, Juan; Zheng, Xi; Liu, Yue; Zou, Qingze

    2017-12-01

    Study of the dynamic evolutions of cell viscoelasticity is important as during cell activities such as cell metastasis and invasion, the rheological behaviors of the cells also change dynamically, reflecting the biophysical and biochemical connections between the outer cortex and the intracellular structures. Although the time variations of the static modulus of cells have been investigated, few studies have been reported on the dynamic variations of the frequency-dependent viscoelasticity of cells. Measuring and monitoring such dynamic evolutions of cells at nanoscale can be challenging as the measurement needs to meet two objectives inherently contradictory to each other-the measurement must be broadband (to cover a large frequency spectrum) but also rapid (to capture the time-elapsed changes). In this study, we exploited a recently developed control-based nanomechanical protocol of atomic force microscope to monitor in real time the dynamic evolutions of the viscoelasticity of live human prostate cancer cells (PC-3 cells) and study its dependence on myosin activities. We found that the viscoelasticity of PC-3 cells, followed the power law, and oscillated at a period of about 200 s. Both the amplitude and the frequency of the oscillation strongly depended on the intracellular calcium and blebbistatin-sensitive motor proteins.

  6. User activity dependent paging scheme in a multi-cell campus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Technological Development ... WLAN, which will take advantage of the unique campus setting and activities We, therefore, · propose a User-Activity Dependent Paging Scheme (UADPS) in a Multi-Cell Campus WLAN Environment a paging algorithm that considers mobile devices in a multi cell WLAN.

  7. Effects of hepatocyte growth factor on glutathione synthesis, growth, and apoptosis is cell density-dependent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Heping; Magilnick, Nathaniel; Xia Meng; Lu, Shelly C.

    2008-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a potent hepatocyte mitogen that exerts opposing effects depending on cell density. Glutathione (GSH) is the main non-protein thiol in mammalian cells that modulates growth and apoptosis. We previously showed that GSH level is inversely related to cell density of hepatocytes and is positively related to growth. Our current work examined whether HGF can modulate GSH synthesis in a cell density-dependent manner and how GSH in turn influence HGF's effects. We found HGF treatment of H4IIE cells increased cell GSH levels only under subconfluent density. The increase in cell GSH under low density was due to increased transcription of GSH synthetic enzymes. This correlated with increased protein levels and nuclear binding activities of c-Jun, c-Fos, p65, p50, Nrf1 and Nrf2 to the promoter region of these genes. HGF acts as a mitogen in H4IIE cells under low cell density and protects against tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-induced apoptosis by limiting JNK activation. However, HGF is pro-apoptotic under high cell density and exacerbates TNFα-induced apoptosis by potentiating JNK activation. The increase in cell GSH under low cell density allows HGF to exert its full mitogenic effect but is not necessary for its anti-apoptotic effect

  8. T Cell Subset and Stimulation Strength-Dependent Modulation of T Cell Activation by Kv1.3 Blockers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai-Ping Fung-Leung

    Full Text Available Kv1.3 is a voltage-gated potassium channel expressed on T cells that plays an important role in T cell activation. Previous studies have shown that blocking Kv1.3 channels in human T cells during activation results in reduced calcium entry, cytokine production, and proliferation. The aim of the present study was to further explore the effects of Kv1.3 blockers on the response of different human T cell subsets under various stimulation conditions. Our studies show that, unlike the immune suppressor cyclosporine A, the inhibitory effect of Kv1.3 blockers was partial and stimulation strength dependent, with reduced inhibitory efficacy on T cells under strengthened anti-CD3/CD28 stimulations. T cell responses to allergens including house dust mites and ragweed were partially reduced by Kv1.3 blockers. The effect of Kv1.3 inhibition was dependent on T cell subsets, with stronger effects on CCR7- effector memory compared to CCR7+ central memory CD4 T cells. Calcium entry studies also revealed a population of CD4 T cells resistant to Kv1.3 blockade. Activation of CD4 T cells was accompanied with an increase in Kv1.3 currents but Kv1.3 transcripts were found to be reduced, suggesting a posttranscriptional mechanism in the regulation of Kv1.3 activities. In summary, Kv1.3 blockers inhibit T cell activation in a manner that is highly dependent on the T cell identity and stimulation strength, These findings suggest that Kv1.3 blockers inhibit T cells in a unique, conditional manner, further refining our understanding of the therapeutic potential of Kv1.3 blockers.

  9. ATP- and gap junction-dependent intercellular calcium signaling in osteoblastic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, N R; Geist, S T; Civitelli, R

    1997-01-01

    mechanically induced calcium waves in two rat osteosarcoma cell lines that differ in the gap junction proteins they express, in their ability to pass microinjected dye from cell to cell, and in their expression of P2Y2 (P2U) purinergic receptors. ROS 17/2.8 cells, which express the gap junction protein...... connexin43 (Cx43), are well dye coupled, and lack P2U receptors, transmitted slow gap junction-dependent calcium waves that did not require release of intracellular calcium stores. UMR 106-01 cells predominantly express the gap junction protein connexin 45 (Cx45), are poorly dye coupled, and express P2U...

  10. Stage-dependent prognostic impact of molecular signatures in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber T

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Weber,1,2 Matthias Meinhardt,3 Stefan Zastrow,1 Andreas Wienke,4 Kati Erdmann,1 Jörg Hofmann,1 Susanne Fuessel,1 Manfred P Wirth11Department of Urology, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany; 2Department of Oncology and Hematology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale, Germany; 3Institute of Pathology, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany; 4Institute of Medical Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Informatics, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale, GermanyPurpose: To enhance prognostic information of protein biomarkers for clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs, we analyzed them within prognostic groups of ccRCC harboring different tumor characteristics of this clinically and molecularly heterogeneous tumor entity.Methods: Tissue microarrays from 145 patients with primary ccRCC were immunohistochemically analyzed for VHL (von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor, Ki67 (marker of proliferation 1, p53 (tumor protein p53, p21 (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A, survivin (baculoviral IAP repeat containing 5, and UEA-1 (ulex europaeus agglutinin I to assess microvessel-density.Results: When analyzing all patients, nuclear staining of Ki67 (hazard ratio [HR] 1.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04–1.12 and nuclear survivin (nS; HR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01–1.08 were significantly associated with disease-specific survival (DSS. In the cohort of patients with advanced localized or metastasized ccRCC, high staining of Ki67, p53 and nS predicted shorter DSS (Ki67: HR 1.07, 95% CI 1.02–1.11; p53: HR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01–1.09; nS: HR 1.08, 95% CI 1.02–1.14. In organ-confined ccRCC, patients with high p21-staining had a longer DSS (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.92–0.99. In a multivariate model with stepwise backward elimination, tumor size and p21-staining showed a significant association with DSS in patients with "organ-confined" ccRCCs. The p21-staining increased the concordance index of tumor size from

  11. Cell cycle-dependent differentiation dynamics balances growth and endocrine differentiation in the pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Yung Hae; Larsen, Hjalte List; Rué, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Organogenesis relies on the spatiotemporal balancing of differentiation and proliferation driven by an expanding pool of progenitor cells. In the mouse pancreas, lineage tracing at the population level has shown that the expanding pancreas progenitors can initially give rise to all endocrine...... differentiation process is consistent with a simple model of cell cycle-dependent stochastic priming of progenitors to endocrine fate. The findings provide insights to define control parameters to optimize the generation of β-cells in vitro....

  12. Cell-surface metalloprotease ADAM12 is internalized by a clathrin- and Grb2-dependent mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dorte Stautz; Leyme, Anthony; Grandal, Michael Vibo

    2012-01-01

    ADAM12 (A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease 12), a member of the ADAMs family of transmembrane proteins, is involved in ectodomain shedding, cell-adhesion and signaling, with important implications in cancer. Therefore, mechanisms that regulate the levels and activity of ADAM12 at the cell...... that regulates ADAM cell surface levels and show that ADAM12 internalization involves the clathrin-dependent pathway and Grb2.......-surface are possibly crucial in these contexts. We here investigated internalization and subsequent recycling or degradation of ADAM12 as a potentially important regulatory mechanism. Our results show that ADAM12 is constitutively internalized primarily via the clathrin-dependent pathway and is subsequently detected...

  13. Polyunsaturated fatty acids induce ovarian cancer cell death through ROS-dependent MAP kinase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Aiko; Yamamoto, Akane; Murota, Kaeko; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi; Iwamori, Masao; Fukushima, Nobuyuki

    2017-11-04

    Free fatty acids not only play a role in cell membrane construction and energy production but also exert diverse cellular effects through receptor and non-receptor mechanisms. Moreover, epidemiological and clinical studies have so far suggested that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) could have health benefits and the advantage as therapeutic use in cancer treatment. However, the underlying mechanisms of PUFA-induced cellular effects remained to be cleared. Here, we examined the effects of ω-3 and ω-6 PUFAs on cell death in ovarian cancer cell lines. ω-3 PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and ω-6 PUFA, γ-linolenic acid (γ-LNA) induced cell death in KF28 cells at the levels of physiological concentrations, but not HAC2 cells. Pharmacological and biochemical analyses demonstrated that cell death induced by DHA and γ-LNA was correlated with activation of JNK and p38 MAP kinases, and further an upstream MAP kinase kinase, apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1, which is stimulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, an antioxidant vitamin E attenuated PUFA-induced cell death and MAP kinase activation. These findings indicate that PUFA-induced cell death involves ROS-dependent MAP kinase activation and is a cell type-specific action. A further study of the underlying mechanisms for ROS-dependent cell death induced by PUFAs will lead to the discovery of a new target for cancer therapy or diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechanistic insights into selective killing of OXPHOS-dependent cancer cells by arctigenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecht, Karin; Riebel, Virginie; Couttet, Philippe; Paech, Franziska; Wolf, Armin; Chibout, Salah-Dine; Pognan, Francois; Krähenbühl, Stephan; Uteng, Marianne

    2017-04-01

    Arctigenin has previously been identified as a potential anti-tumor treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer. However, the mechanism of how arctigenin kills cancer cells is not fully understood. In the present work we studied the mechanism of toxicity by arctigenin in the human pancreatic cell line, Panc-1, with special emphasis on the mitochondria. A comparison of Panc-1 cells cultured in glucose versus galactose medium was applied, allowing assessments of effects in glycolytic versus oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS)-dependent Panc-1 cells. For control purposes, the mitochondrial toxic response to treatment with arctigenin was compared to the anti-cancer drug, sorafenib, which is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor known for mitochondrial toxic off-target effects (Will et al., 2008). In both Panc-1 OXPHOS-dependent and glycolytic cells, arctigenin dissipated the mitochondrial membrane potential, which was demonstrated to be due to inhibition of the mitochondrial complexes II and IV. However, arctigenin selectively killed only the OXPHOS-dependent Panc-1 cells. This selective killing of OXPHOS-dependent Panc-1 cells was accompanied by generation of ER stress, mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and caspase activation leading to apoptosis and aponecrosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. CD47 limits antibody dependent phagocytosis against non-malignant B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Sandra; Turman, Sean; Lekstrom, Kristen; Wilson, Susan; Herbst, Ronald; Wang, Yue

    2017-05-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of CD47 in protecting malignant B cells from antibody dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP). Combined treatment of anti-CD47 and -CD20 antibodies synergistically augment elimination of tumor B cells in xenograft mouse models. This has led to the development of novel reagents that can potentially enhance killing of malignant B cells in patients. B cell depleting therapy is also a promising treatment for autoimmune patients. In the current study, we aimed to investigate whether or not CD47 protects non-malignant B cells from ADCP. We show that CD47 is expressed on all B cells in mice, with the highest level on plasma cells in bone marrow and spleen. Although its expression is dispensable for B cell development in mice, CD47 on B cells limits antibody mediated phagocytosis. B cell depletion following in vivo anti-CD19 treatment is more efficient in CD47-/- mice than in wild type mice. In vitro, both naïve and activated B cells from CD47-/- mice are more sensitive to ADCP than wild type B cells. Lastly, we show in an ADCP assay that blocking CD47 can enhance anti-CD19 antibody mediated phagocytosis of wild type B cells. These results suggest that in addition to its already demonstrated benefit in cancer, targeting CD47 may be used as an adjunct in combination with B cell depletion antibodies for treatment of autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Curcumin inhibition of integrin (alpha6beta4)-dependent breast cancer cell motility and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong Im; Huang, Huang; Cheepala, Satish; Huang, Shile; Chung, Jun

    2008-10-01

    Curcumin, a polyphenol natural product isolated from the rhizome of the plant Curcuma longa, has emerged as a promising anticancer therapeutic agent. However, the mechanism by which curcumin inhibits cancer cell functions such as cell growth, survival, and cell motility is largely unknown. We explored whether curcumin affects the function of integrin alpha(6)beta(4), a laminin adhesion receptor with an established role in invasion and migration of cancer cells. Here we show that curcumin significantly reduced alpha(6)beta(4)-dependent breast cancer cell motility and invasion in a concentration-dependent manner without affecting apoptosis in MDA-MB-435/beta4 (beta(4)-integrin transfectants) and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. Further, curcumin selectively reduced the basal phosphorylation of beta(4) integrin (Y1494), which has been reported to be essential in mediating alpha(6)beta(4)-dependent phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation and cell motility. Consistent with this finding, curcumin also blocked alpha(6)beta(4)-dependent Akt activation and expression of the cell motility-promoting factor ENPP2 in MDA-MB-435/beta4 cell line. A multimodality approach using curcumin in combination with other pharmacologic inhibitors of alpha(6)beta(4) signaling pathways showed an additive effect to block breast cancer cell motility and invasion. Taken together, these findings show that curcumin inhibits breast cancer cell motility and invasion by directly inhibiting the function of alpha(6)beta(4) integrin, and suggest that curcumin can serve as an effective therapeutic agent in tumors that overexpress alpha(6)beta(4).

  17. Responses of single germinal-center B cells in T-cell-dependent microculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, A; Cebra, J J

    1991-01-01

    B cells purified from the germinal centers (GCs) of murine Peyer's patches can be stimulated in a clonal microculture containing helper T cells and dendritic cells to divide and secrete immunoglobulin. Intraclonal isotype switching occurs, and a variety of immunoglobulin isotypes, including IgA, is secreted. Memory cells, which generate clones secreting IgA exclusively, are only rarely identified in the GC B-cell subset. Such memory cells can, however, be readily identified among unfractionated Peyer's patch B cells, and in non-GC subsets of B cells. The results suggest that the GC does not contain IgA memory cells that can be restimulated in vitro to secrete only IgA. When division of GC B cells is prevented by irradiation or aphidicholin treatment, a large subset that secretes IgA as the sole immunoglobulin isotype is seen, and the output of presumably single B cells is large enough to be scored by RIA. Both helper T cells and dendritic cells are required for the phenomenon. The data indicate that commitment to IgA secretion occurs in Peyer's patch GCs and suggest that the prolific cell division known to be supported in GCs may forestall terminal differentiation of preplasmablasts to immunoglobulin secretion.

  18. B7h-expressing dendritic cells and plasma B cells mediate distinct outcomes of ICOS costimulation in T cell-dependent antibody responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larimore Kevin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ICOS-B7h costimulatory receptor-ligand pair is required for germinal center formation, the production of isotype-switched antibodies, and antibody affinity maturation in response to T cell-dependent antigens. However, the potentially distinct roles of regulated B7h expression on B cells and dendritic cells in T cell-dependent antibody responses have not been defined. Results We generated transgenic mice with lineage-restricted B7h expression to assess the cell-type specific roles of B7h expression on B cells and dendritic cells in regulating T cell-dependent antibody responses. Our results show that endogenous B7h expression is reduced on B cells after activation in vitro and is also reduced in vivo on antibody-secreting plasma B cells in comparison to both naïve and germinal center B cells from which they are derived. Increasing the level of B7h expression on activated and plasma B cells in B-B7hTg mice led to an increase in the number of antibody-secreting plasma cells generated after immunization and a corresponding increase in the concentration of antigen-specific high affinity serum IgG antibodies of all isotypes, without affecting the number of responding germinal center B cells. In contrast, ICOS costimulation mediated by dendritic cells in DC-B7hTg mice contributed to germinal center formation and selectively increased IgG2a production without affecting the overall magnitude of antibody responses. Conclusions Using transgenic mice with lineage-restricted B7h expression, we have revealed distinct roles of ICOS costimulation mediated by dendritic cells and B cells in the regulation of T cell-dependent antibody responses.

  19. A new class of cyclin dependent kinase in Chlamydomonas is required for coupling cell size to cell division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yubing; Liu, Dianyi; López-Paz, Cristina; Olson, Bradley JSC; Umen, James G

    2016-01-01

    Proliferating cells actively control their size by mechanisms that are poorly understood. The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii divides by multiple fission, wherein a ‘counting’ mechanism couples mother cell-size to cell division number allowing production of uniform-sized daughters. We identified a sizer protein, CDKG1, that acts through the retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor pathway as a D-cyclin-dependent RB kinase to regulate mitotic counting. Loss of CDKG1 leads to fewer mitotic divisions and large daughters, while mis-expression of CDKG1 causes supernumerous mitotic divisions and small daughters. The concentration of nuclear-localized CDKG1 in pre-mitotic cells is set by mother cell size, and its progressive dilution and degradation with each round of cell division may provide a link between mother cell-size and mitotic division number. Cell-size-dependent accumulation of limiting cell cycle regulators such as CDKG1 is a potentially general mechanism for size control. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10767.001 PMID:27015111

  20. Plumbagin Nanoparticles Induce Dose and pH Dependent Toxicity on Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Harikrishnan A; Snima, K S; Kamath, Ravindranath C; Nair, Shantikumar V; Lakshmanan, Vinoth-Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Stable nano-formulation of Plumbagin nanoparticles from Plumbago zeylanica root extract was explored as a potential natural drug against prostate cancer. Size and morphology analysis by DLS, SEM and AFM revealed the average size of nanoparticles prepared was 100±50nm. In vitro cytotoxicity showed concentration and time dependent toxicity on prostate cancer cells. However, plumbagin crude extract found to be highly toxic to normal cells when compared to plumbagin nanoformulation, thus confirming nano plumbagin cytocompatibility with normal cells and dose dependent toxicity to prostate cells. In vitro hemolysis assay confirmed the blood biocompatibility of the plumbagin nanoparticles. In wound healing assay, plumbagin nanoparticles provided clues that it might play an important role in the anti-migration of prostate cancer cells. DNA fragmentation revealed that partial apoptosis induction by plumbagin nanoparticles could be expected as a potent anti-cancer effect towards prostate cancer.

  1. Vitamin E δ-tocotrienol induces p27(Kip1)-dependent cell-cycle arrest in pancreatic cancer cells via an E2F-1-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodul, Pamela J; Dong, Yanbin; Husain, Kazim; Pimiento, Jose M; Chen, Jiandong; Zhang, Anying; Francois, Rony; Pledger, Warren J; Coppola, Domenico; Sebti, Said M; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Malafa, Mokenge P

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin E δ-tocotrienol has been shown to have antitumor activity, but the precise molecular mechanism by which it inhibits the proliferation of cancer cells remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that δ-tocotrienol exerted significant cell growth inhibition pancreatic ductal cancer (PDCA) cells without affecting normal human pancreatic ductal epithelial cell growth. We also showed that δ-tocotrienol-induced growth inhibition occurred concomitantly with G(1) cell-cycle arrest and increased p27(Kip1) nuclear accumulation. This finding is significant considering that loss of nuclear p27(Kip1) expression is a well-established adverse prognostic factor in PDCA. Furthermore, δ-tocotrienol inactivated RAF-MEK-ERK signaling, a pathway known to suppress p27(Kip1) expression. To determine whether p27(Kip1) induction is required for δ-tocotrienol inhibition of PDCA cell proliferation, we stably silenced the CDKN1B gene, encoding p27(Kip1), in MIAPaCa-2 PDCA cells and demonstrated that p27(Kip1) silencing suppressed cell-cycle arrest induced by δ-tocotrienol. Furthermore, δ-tocotrienol induced p27(Kip1) mRNA expression but not its protein degradation. p27(Kip1) gene promoter activity was induced by δ-tocotrienol through the promoter's E2F-1 binding site, and this activity was attenuated by E2F-1 depletion using E2F-1 small interfering RNA. Finally, decreased proliferation, mediated by Ki67 and p27(Kip1) expression by δ-tocotrienol, was confirmed in vivo in a nude mouse xenograft pancreatic cancer model. Our findings reveal a new mechanism, dependent on p27(Kip1) induction, by which δ-tocotrienol can inhibit proliferation in PDCA cells, providing a new rationale for p27(Kip1) as a biomarker for δ-tocotrienol efficacy in pancreatic cancer prevention and therapy.

  2. Vitamin E δ-tocotrienol induces p27(Kip1-dependent cell-cycle arrest in pancreatic cancer cells via an E2F-1-dependent mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela J Hodul

    Full Text Available Vitamin E δ-tocotrienol has been shown to have antitumor activity, but the precise molecular mechanism by which it inhibits the proliferation of cancer cells remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that δ-tocotrienol exerted significant cell growth inhibition pancreatic ductal cancer (PDCA cells without affecting normal human pancreatic ductal epithelial cell growth. We also showed that δ-tocotrienol-induced growth inhibition occurred concomitantly with G(1 cell-cycle arrest and increased p27(Kip1 nuclear accumulation. This finding is significant considering that loss of nuclear p27(Kip1 expression is a well-established adverse prognostic factor in PDCA. Furthermore, δ-tocotrienol inactivated RAF-MEK-ERK signaling, a pathway known to suppress p27(Kip1 expression. To determine whether p27(Kip1 induction is required for δ-tocotrienol inhibition of PDCA cell proliferation, we stably silenced the CDKN1B gene, encoding p27(Kip1, in MIAPaCa-2 PDCA cells and demonstrated that p27(Kip1 silencing suppressed cell-cycle arrest induced by δ-tocotrienol. Furthermore, δ-tocotrienol induced p27(Kip1 mRNA expression but not its protein degradation. p27(Kip1 gene promoter activity was induced by δ-tocotrienol through the promoter's E2F-1 binding site, and this activity was attenuated by E2F-1 depletion using E2F-1 small interfering RNA. Finally, decreased proliferation, mediated by Ki67 and p27(Kip1 expression by δ-tocotrienol, was confirmed in vivo in a nude mouse xenograft pancreatic cancer model. Our findings reveal a new mechanism, dependent on p27(Kip1 induction, by which δ-tocotrienol can inhibit proliferation in PDCA cells, providing a new rationale for p27(Kip1 as a biomarker for δ-tocotrienol efficacy in pancreatic cancer prevention and therapy.

  3. Activation of neural stem cells from quiescence drives reactive hippocampal neurogenesis after alcohol dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Dayna M; Nickell, Chelsea G; Chen, Kevin Y; McClain, Justin A; Heath, Megan M; Deeny, M Ayumi; Nixon, Kimberly

    2018-05-01

    Neural stem cell-driven adult neurogenesis contributes to the integrity of the hippocampus. Excessive alcohol consumption in alcoholism results in hippocampal degeneration that may recover with abstinence. Reactive, increased adult neurogenesis during abstinence following alcohol dependence may contribute to recovery, but the mechanism driving reactive neurogenesis is not known. Therefore, adult, male rats were exposed to alcohol for four days and various markers were used to examine cell cycle dynamics, the percentage and number of neural progenitor cell subtypes, and the percentage of quiescent versus activated progenitors. Using a screen for cell cycle perturbation, we showed that the cell cycle is not likely altered at 7 days in abstinence. As the vast majority of Bromodeoxyuridine-positive (+) cells were co-labeled with progenitor cell marker, Sox2, we then developed a quadruple fluorescent labeling scheme to examine Type-1, -2a, -2b and -3 progenitor cells simultaneously. Prior alcohol dependence indiscriminately increased all subtypes at 7 days, the peak of the reactive proliferation. An evaluation of the time course of reactive cell proliferation revealed that cells begin proliferating at 5 days post alcohol, where only actively dividing Type 2 progenitors were increased by alcohol. Furthermore, prior alcohol increased the percentage of actively dividing Sox2+ progenitors, which supported that reactive neurogenesis is likely due to the activation of progenitors out of quiescence. These observations were associated with granule cell number returning to normal at 28 days. Therefore, activating stem and progenitor cells out of quiescence may be the mechanism underlying hippocampal recovery in abstinence following alcohol dependence. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Combined effects of starvation and butyrate on autophagy-dependent gingival epithelial cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, M; Murofushi, T; Tsuda, H; Mikami, Y; Zhao, N; Ochiai, K; Kurita-Ochiai, T; Yamamoto, M; Otsuka, K; Suzuki, N

    2017-06-01

    Bacteria in the dental biofilm surrounding marginal gingival grooves cause periodontal diseases. Numerous bacteria within the biofilm consume nutrients from the gingival crevicular fluid. Furthermore, some gram-negative bacteria in mature dental biofilms produce butyrate. Thus, gingival epithelial cells in close proximity to mature dental biofilms are at risk of both starvation and exposure to butyrate. In the present study, we determined the combined effects of starvation and butyrate exposure on gingival epithelial cell death and the underlying mechanisms. The Ca9-22 cell line was used as an in vitro counterpart of gingival epithelial cells. Cell death was measured as the amount of total DNA in the dead cells using SYTOX Green dye, which penetrates through membranes of dead cells and emits fluorescence when it intercalates into double-stranded DNA. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity, the amount of autophagy, and acetylation of histone H3 were determined using western blot. Gene expression levels of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3b (lc3b) were determined using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Butyrate-induced cell death occurred in a dose-dependent manner whether cells were starved or fed. However, the induction of cell death was two to four times higher when cells were placed under starvation conditions compared to when they were fed. Moreover, both starvation and butyrate exposure induced AMPK activity and autophagy. While AMPK inactivation resulted in decreased autophagy and butyrate-induced cell death under conditions of starvation, AMPK activation resulted in butyrate-induced cell death when cells were fed. Combined with the results of our previous report, which demonstrated butyrate-induced autophagy-dependent cell death, the results of this study suggest that the combination of starvation and butyrate exposure activates AMPK inducing autophagy and subsequent cell death. Notably, this combination markedly

  5. Mechanical properties of cancer cells depend on number of passages: Atomic force microscopy indentation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokukin, Maxim E.; Guz, Natalia V.; Sokolov, Igor

    2017-08-01

    Here we investigate one of the key questions in cell biology, if the properties of cell lines depend on the number of passages in-vitro. It is generally assumed that the change of cell properties (phenotypic drift) is insignificant when the number of passages is low (cell body and parameters of the pericellular brush layer from indentation force curves, which are recorded by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Using this method, we tested the change of the cell properties of human cancer breast epithelial cell line, MCF-7 (ATCC® HTB-22™), within the passages between 2 and 10. In contrast to the previous expectations, we observed a substantial transient change of the elastic modulus of the cell body during the first four passages (up to 4 times). The changes in the parameters of the pericellular coat were less dramatic (up to 2 times) but still statistically significant.

  6. Cadmium Induces p53-Dependent Apoptosis in Human Prostate Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aimola, Pierpaolo; Carmignani, Marco; Volpe, Anna Rita; Di Benedetto, Altomare; Claudio, Luigi; Waalkes, Michael P.; van Bokhoven, Adrie; Tokar, Erik J.; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Cadmium, a widespread toxic pollutant of occupational and environmental concern, is a known human carcinogen. The prostate is a potential target for cadmium carcinogenesis, although the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Furthermore, cadmium may induce cell death by apoptosis in various cell types, and it has been hypothesized that a key factor in cadmium-induced malignant transformation is acquisition of apoptotic resistance. We investigated the in vitro effects produced by cadmium exposure in normal or tumor cells derived from human prostate epithelium, including RWPE-1 and its cadmium-transformed derivative CTPE, the primary adenocarcinoma 22Rv1 and CWR-R1 cells and LNCaP, PC-3 and DU145 metastatic cancer cell lines. Cells were treated for 24 hours with different concentrations of CdCl2 and apoptosis, cell cycle distribution and expression of tumor suppressor proteins were analyzed. Subsequently, cellular response to cadmium was evaluated after siRNA-mediated p53 silencing in wild type p53-expressing RWPE-1 and LNCaP cells, and after adenoviral p53 overexpression in p53-deficient DU145 and PC-3 cell lines. The cell lines exhibited different sensitivity to cadmium, and 24-hour exposure to different CdCl2 concentrations induced dose- and cell type-dependent apoptotic response and inhibition of cell proliferation that correlated with accumulation of functional p53 and overexpression of p21 in wild type p53-expressing cell lines. On the other hand, p53 silencing was able to suppress cadmium-induced apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that cadmium can induce p53-dependent apoptosis in human prostate epithelial cells and suggest p53 mutation as a possible contributing factor for the acquisition of apoptotic resistance in cadmium prostatic carcinogenesis. PMID:22448262

  7. Cell cycle-dependent activity of the volume- and Ca2+-activated anion currents in Ehrlich lettre ascites cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Thomas Kjaer; Bergdahl, Andreas; Christophersen, Palle

    2007-01-01

    Recent evidence implicates the volume-regulated anion current (VRAC) and other anion currents in control or modulation of cell cycle progression; however, the precise involvement of anion channels in this process is unclear. Here, Cl- currents in Ehrlich Lettre Ascites (ELA) cells were monitored......+ in the pipette), was unaltered from G0 to G1, but decreased in early S phase. A novel high-affinity anion channel inhibitor, the acidic di-aryl-urea NS3728, which inhibited both VRAC and CaCC, attenuated ELA cell growth, suggesting a possible mechanistic link between cell cycle progression and cell cycle......-dependent changes in the capacity for conductive Cl- transport. It is suggested that in ELA cells, entrance into the S phase requires an increase in VRAC activity and/or an increased potential for regulatory volume decrease (RVD), and at the same time a decrease in CaCC magnitude....

  8. Tributyltin induces G2/M cell cycle arrest via NAD(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase in human embryonic carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asanagi, Miki; Yamada, Shigeru; Hirata, Naoya; Itagaki, Hiroshi; Kotake, Yaichiro; Sekino, Yuko; Kanda, Yasunari

    2016-04-01

    Organotin compounds, such as tributyltin (TBT), are well-known endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). We have recently reported that TBT induces growth arrest in the human embryonic carcinoma cell line NT2/D1 at nanomolar levels by inhibiting NAD(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD-IDH), which catalyzes the irreversible conversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate. However, the molecular mechanisms by which NAD-IDH mediates TBT toxicity remain unclear. In the present study, we examined whether TBT at nanomolar levels affects cell cycle progression in NT2/D1 cells. Propidium iodide staining revealed that TBT reduced the ratio of cells in the G1 phase and increased the ratio of cells in the G2/M phase. TBT also reduced cell division cycle 25C (cdc25C) and cyclin B1, which are key regulators of G2/M progression. Furthermore, apigenin, an inhibitor of NAD-IDH, mimicked the effects of TBT. The G2/M arrest induced by TBT was abolished by NAD-IDHα knockdown. Treatment with a cell-permeable α-ketoglutarate analogue recovered the effect of TBT, suggesting the involvement of NAD-IDH. Taken together, our data suggest that TBT at nanomolar levels induced G2/M cell cycle arrest via NAD-IDH in NT2/D1 cells. Thus, cell cycle analysis in embryonic cells could be used to assess cytotoxicity associated with nanomolar level exposure of EDCs.

  9. Opening of voltage dependent anion channels promotes reactive oxygen species generation, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHart, David N; Fang, Diana; Heslop, Kareem; Li, Li; Lemasters, John J; Maldonado, Eduardo N

    2018-02-01

    Enhancement of aerobic glycolysis and suppression of mitochondrial metabolism characterize the pro-proliferative Warburg phenotype of cancer cells. High free tubulin in cancer cells closes voltage dependent anion channels (VDAC) to decrease mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ), an effect antagonized by erastin, the canonical promotor of ferroptosis. Previously, we identified six compounds (X1-X6) that also block tubulin-dependent mitochondrial depolarization. Here, we hypothesized that VDAC opening after erastin and X1-X6 increases mitochondrial metabolism and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, leading to ROS-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction, bioenergetic failure and cell death. Accordingly, we characterized erastin and the two most potent structurally unrelated lead compounds, X1 and X4, on ROS formation, mitochondrial function and cell viability. Erastin, X1 and X4 increased ΔΨ followed closely by an increase in mitochondrial ROS generation within 30-60 min. Subsequently, mitochondria began to depolarize after an hour or longer indicative of mitochondrial dysfunction. N-acetylcysteine (NAC, glutathione precursor and ROS scavenger) and MitoQ (mitochondrially targeted antioxidant) blocked increased ROS formation after X1 and prevented mitochondrial dysfunction. Erastin, X1 and X4 selectively promoted cell killing in HepG2 and Huh7 human hepatocarcinoma cells compared to primary rat hepatocytes. X1 and X4-dependent cell death was blocked by NAC. These results suggest that ferroptosis induced by erastin and our erastin-like lead compounds was caused by VDAC opening, leading to increased ΔΨ, mitochondrial ROS generation and oxidative stress-induced cell death. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nanomechanical Phenotype of Melanoma Cells Depends Solely on the Amount of Endogenous Pigment in the Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarna, Michal; Zadlo, Andrzej; Czuba-Pelech, Barbara; Urbanska, Krystyna

    2018-02-18

    Cancer cells have unique nanomechanical properties, i.e., they behave as if they were elastic. This property of cancer cells is believed to be one of the main reasons for their facilitated ability to spread and metastasize. Thus, the so-called nanomechanical phenotype of cancer cells is viewed as an important indicator of the cells' metastatic behavior. One of the most highly metastatic cancer cells are melanoma cells, which have a very unusual property: they can synthesize the pigment melanin in large amounts, becoming heavily pigmented. So far, the role of melanin in melanoma remains unclear, particularly the impact of the pigment on metastatic behavior of melanoma cells. Importantly, until recently the potential mechanical role of melanin in melanoma metastasis was completely ignored. In this work, we examined melanoma cells isolated from hamster tumors containing endogenous melanin pigment. Applying an array of advanced microscopy and spectroscopy techniques, we determined that melanin is the dominating factor responsible for the mechanical properties of melanoma cells. Our results indicate that the nanomechanical phenotype of melanoma cells may be a reliable marker of the cells' metastatic behavior and point to the important mechanical role of melanin in the process of metastasis of melanoma.

  11. Neurofibromin 1 Impairs Natural Killer T-Cell-Dependent Antitumor Immunity against a T-Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyun Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromin 1 (NF1 is a tumor suppressor gene encoding a Ras GTPase that negatively regulates Ras signaling pathways. Mutations in NF1 are linked to neurofibromatosis type 1, juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia and Watson syndrome. In terms of antitumor immunity, CD1d-dependent natural killer T (NKT cells play an important role in the innate antitumor immune response. Generally, Type-I NKT cells protect (and Type-II NKT cells impair host antitumor immunity. We have previously shown that CD1d-mediated antigen presentation to NKT cells is regulated by cell signaling pathways. To study whether a haploinsufficiency in NF1 would affect CD1d-dependent activation of NKT cells, we analyzed the NKT-cell population as well as the functional expression of CD1d in Nf1+/− mice. Nf1+/− mice were found to have similar levels of NKT cells as wildtype (WT littermates. Interestingly, however, reduced CD1d expression was observed in Nf1+/− mice compared with their WT littermates. When inoculated with a T-cell lymphoma in vivo, Nf1+/− mice survived longer than their WT littermates. Furthermore, blocking CD1d in vivo significantly enhanced antitumor activity in WT, but not in Nf1+/− mice. In contrast, a deficiency in Type-I NKT cells increased antitumor activity in Nf1+/− mice, but not in WT littermates. Therefore, these data suggest that normal NF1 expression impairs CD1d-mediated NKT-cell activation and antitumor activity against a T-cell lymphoma.

  12. Isolated dorsal root ganglion neurones inhibit receptor-dependent adenylyl cyclase activity in associated glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, KY; Yeung, BHS; Wong, YH; Wise, H

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hyper-nociceptive PGE2 EP4 receptors and prostacyclin (IP) receptors are present in adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones and glial cells in culture. The present study has investigated the cell-specific expression of two other Gs-protein coupled hyper-nociceptive receptor systems: β-adrenoceptors and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptors in isolated DRG cells and has examined the influence of neurone–glial cell interactions in regulating adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity. Experimental Approach Agonist-stimulated AC activity was determined in mixed DRG cell cultures from adult rats and compared with activity in DRG neurone-enriched cell cultures and pure DRG glial cell cultures. Key Results Pharmacological analysis showed the presence of Gs-coupled β2-adrenoceptors and CGRP receptors, but not β1-adrenoceptors, in all three DRG cell preparations. Agonist-stimulated AC activity was weakest in DRG neurone-enriched cell cultures. DRG neurones inhibited IP receptor-stimulated glial cell AC activity by a process dependent on both cell–cell contact and neurone-derived soluble factors, but this is unlikely to involve purine or glutamine receptor activation. Conclusions and Implications Gs-coupled hyper-nociceptive receptors are readily expressed on DRG glial cells in isolated cell cultures and the activity of CGRP, EP4 and IP receptors, but not β2-adrenoceptors, in glial cells is inhibited by DRG neurones. Studies using isolated DRG cells should be aware that hyper-nociceptive ligands may stimulate receptors on glial cells in addition to neurones, and that variable numbers of neurones and glial cells will influence absolute measures of AC activity and affect downstream functional responses. PMID:22924655

  13. SAP modulates B cell functions in a genetic background-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detre, Cynthia; Yigit, Burcu; Keszei, Marton; Castro, Wilson; Magelky, Erica M; Terhorst, Cox

    2013-06-01

    Mutations affecting the SLAM-associated protein (SAP) are responsible for the X-linked lympho-proliferative syndrome (XLP), a severe primary immunodeficiency syndrome with disease manifestations that include fatal mononucleosis, B cell lymphoma and dysgammaglobulinemia. It is well accepted that insufficient help by SAP-/- CD4+ T cells, in particular during the germinal center reaction, is a component of dysgammaglobulinemia in XLP patients and SAP-/- animals. It is however not well understood whether in XLP patients and SAP-/- mice B cell functions are affected, even though B cells themselves do not express SAP. Here we report that B cell intrinsic responses to haptenated protein antigens are impaired in SAP-/- mice and in Rag-/- mice into which B cells derived from SAP-/- mice together with wt CD4+ T cells had been transferred. This impaired B cells functions are in part depending on the genetic background of the SAP-/- mouse, which affects B cell homeostasis. Surprisingly, stimulation with an agonistic anti-CD40 causes strong in vivo and in vitro B cell responses in SAP-/- mice. Taken together, the data demonstrate that genetic factors play an important role in the SAP-related B cell functions. The finding that anti-CD40 can in part restore impaired B cell responses in SAP-/- mice, suggests potentially novel therapeutic interventions in subsets of XLP patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. ATP driven clathrin dependent entry of carbon nanospheres prefer cells with glucose receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvi Ruthrotha B

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intrinsically fluorescent glucose derived carbon nanospheres (CSP efficiently enter mammalian cells and also cross the blood brain barrier (BBB. However, the mechanistic details of CSP entry inside mammalian cells and its specificity are not known. Results In this report, the biochemical and cellular mechanism of CSP entry into the living cell have been investigated. By employing confocal imaging we show that CSP entry into the mammalian cells is an ATP-dependent clathrin mediated endocytosis process. Zeta potential studies suggest that it has a strong preference for cells which possess high levels of glucose transporters such as the glial cells, thereby enabling it to target individual organs/tissues such as the brain with increased specificity. Conclusion The endocytosis of Glucose derived CSP into mammalian cells is an ATP dependent process mediated by clathrin coated pits. CSPs utilize the surface functional groups to target cells containing glucose transporters on its membrane thereby implicating a potential application for specific targeting of the brain or cancer cells.

  15. Latrunculin B-induced plant dwarfism: Plant cell elongation is F-actin-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluska, F; Jasik, J; Edelmann, H G; Salajová, T; Volkmann, D

    2001-03-01

    Marine macrolides latrunculins are highly specific toxins which effectively depolymerize actin filaments (generally F-actin) in all eukaryotic cells. We show that latrunculin B is effective on diverse cell types in higher plants and describe the use of this drug in probing F-actin-dependent growth and in plant development-related processes. In contrast to other eukaryotic organisms, cell divisions occurs in plant cells devoid of all actin filaments. However, the alignment of the division planes is often distorted. In addition to cell division, postembryonic development and morphogenesis also continue in the absence of F-actin. These experimental data suggest that F-actin is of little importance in the morphogenesis of higher plants, and that plants can develop more or less normally without F-actin. In contrast, F-actin turns out to be essential for cell elongation. When latrunculin B was added during germination, morphologically normal Arabidopsis and rye seedlings developed but, as a result of the absence of cell elongation, these were stunted, resembling either genetic dwarfs or environmental bonsai plants. In conclusion, F-actin is essential for the plant cell elongation, while this F-actin-dependent cell elongation is not an essential feature of plant-specific developmental programs.

  16. FGF7 supports hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and niche-dependent myeloblastoma cells via autocrine action on bone marrow stromal cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishino, Ruri; Minami, Kaori; Tanaka, Satowa [Laboratory of Hematology, Division of Medical Biophysics, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 7-10-2 Tomogaoka, Suma-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan); Nagai, Mami [Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 159-8555 (Japan); Matsui, Keiji; Hasegawa, Natsumi [Laboratory of Hematology, Division of Medical Biophysics, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 7-10-2 Tomogaoka, Suma-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan); Roeder, Robert G. [Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Asano, Shigetaka [Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 159-8555 (Japan); Ito, Mitsuhiro, E-mail: itomi@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Hematology, Division of Medical Biophysics, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 7-10-2 Tomogaoka, Suma-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan); Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 159-8555 (Japan); Department of Family and Community Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan)

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •FGF7 is downregulated in MED1-deficient mesenchymal cells. •FGF7 produced by mesenchymal stromal cells is a novel hematopoietic niche molecule. •FGF7 supports hematopoietic progenitor cells and niche-dependent leukemia cells. •FGF7 activates FGFR2IIIb of bone marrow stromal cells in an autocrine manner. •FGF7 indirectly acts on hematopoietic cells lacking FGFR2IIIb via stromal cells. -- Abstract: FGF1 and FGF2 support hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) under stress conditions. In this study, we show that fibroblast growth factor (FGF7) may be a novel niche factor for HSPC support and leukemic growth. FGF7 expression was attenuated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient for the MED1 subunit of the Mediator transcriptional coregulator complex. When normal mouse bone marrow (BM) cells were cocultured with Med1{sup +/+} MEFs or BM stromal cells in the presence of anti-FGF7 antibody, the growth of BM cells and the number of long-time culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs) decreased significantly. Anti-FGF7 antibody also attenuated the proliferation and cobblestone formation of MB1 stromal cell-dependent myeloblastoma cells. The addition of recombinant FGF7 to the coculture of BM cells and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs increased BM cells and LTC-ICs. FGF7 and its cognate receptor, FGFR2IIIb, were undetectable in BM cells, but MEFs and BM stromal cells expressed both. FGF7 activated downstream targets of FGFR2IIIb in Med1{sup +/+} and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs and BM stromal cells. Taken together, we propose that FGF7 supports HSPCs and leukemia-initiating cells indirectly via FGFR2IIIb expressed on stromal cells.

  17. Schedule-dependent cytotoxicity of etoposide (VP-16) and cyclophosphamide in leukemia cell line K-562.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazawa, Yuki; Matsumura, Kazunori; Takekuma, Yoh; Sugawara, Mitsuru

    2012-01-01

    In allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT) in patients with leukemia, the combination of VP-16 and cyclophosphamide (CY) is commonly used for the conditioning regimen. In the present study, we demonstrated schedule-dependent cytotoxicity of VP-16 and CY in K-562 cells. K-562 cells were pretreated with low concentrations (2.5 and 5 µg/mL) of 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (40487S), which is a preactivated analog of CY. It was confirmed that these concentrations did not influence cell viability. Cells subsequently exposed to 0.5-100 µg/mL of VP-16 showed reduced the viability compared to that of control cells not treated with 40487S. In contrast, there was no change in the viability of K-562 cells pretreated with low concentrations (0.5 and 1 µg/mL) of VP-16. It was confirmed that these concentrations did not influence cell viability. Viability of subsequently exposed to 1-20 µg/mL was not different from that of control cells not treated with VP-16. VP-16 caused cell cycle arrest at G₂/M phase. On the other hand, 40487S arrested the cell cycle at S phase. Thymidine-synchronized cells, VP-16 showed cell cycle specificity for cell killing from early-S to mid-S phase. On the other hand, 40487S showed cell cycle-independent cytotoxicity. Exposure of cells to VP-16 after 40487S induced a greater cytotoxic effect on K-562 cells. The findings may lead to improvements in clinical combination chemotherapy.

  18. Upconversion NaYF4 Nanoparticles for Size Dependent Cell Imaging and Concentration Dependent Detection of Rhodamine B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigang Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs based on NaYF4 nanocrystals with strong upconversion luminescence are synthesized by the solvothermal method. The emission color of these NaYF4 upconversion nanoparticles can be easily modulated by the doping. These NaYF4 upconversion nanocrystals can be employed as fluorescence donors to pump fluorescent organic molecules. For example, the efficient luminescence resonant energy transfer (LRET can be achieved by controlling the distance between NaYF4:Yb3+/Er3+ UCNPs and Rhodamine B (RB. NaYF4:Yb3+/Er3+ UCNPs can emit green light at the wavelength of ~540 nm while RB can efficiently absorb the green light of ~540 nm to emit red light of 610 nm. The LRET efficiency is highly dependent on the concentration of NaYF4 upconversion fluorescent donors. For the fixed concentration of 3.2 µg/mL RB, the optimal concentration of NaYF4:Yb3+/Er3+ UCNPs is equal to 4 mg/mL which generates the highest LRET signal ratio. In addition, it is addressed that the upconversion nanoparticles with diameter of 200 nm are suitable for imaging the cells larger than 10 µm with clear differentiation between cell walls and cytoplasm.

  19. Cell-fate determination by ubiquitin-dependent regulation of translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Achim; Iwasaki, Shintaro; McGourty, Colleen A; Medina-Ruiz, Sofia; Teerikorpi, Nia; Fedrigo, Indro; Ingolia, Nicholas T; Rape, Michael

    2015-09-24

    Metazoan development depends on the accurate execution of differentiation programs that allow pluripotent stem cells to adopt specific fates. Differentiation requires changes to chromatin architecture and transcriptional networks, yet whether other regulatory events support cell-fate determination is less well understood. Here we identify the ubiquitin ligase CUL3 in complex with its vertebrate-specific substrate adaptor KBTBD8 (CUL3(KBTBD8)) as an essential regulator of human and Xenopus tropicalis neural crest specification. CUL3(KBTBD8) monoubiquitylates NOLC1 and its paralogue TCOF1, the mutation of which underlies the neurocristopathy Treacher Collins syndrome. Ubiquitylation drives formation of a TCOF1-NOLC1 platform that connects RNA polymerase I with ribosome modification enzymes and remodels the translational program of differentiating cells in favour of neural crest specification. We conclude that ubiquitin-dependent regulation of translation is an important feature of cell-fate determination.

  20. XIAP Restricts TNF- and RIP3-Dependent Cell Death and Inflammasome Activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yabal, Monica; Müller, Nicole; Adler, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    of XIAP or deletion of its RING domain lead to excessive cell death and IL-1β secretion from dendritic cells triggered by diverse Toll-like receptor stimuli. Aberrant IL-1β secretion is TNF dependent and requires RIP3 but is independent of cIAP1/cIAP2. The observed cell death also requires TNF and RIP3...... but proceeds independently of caspase-1/caspase-11 or caspase-8 function. Loss of XIAP results in aberrantly elevated ubiquitylation of RIP1 outside of TNFR complex I. Virally infected Xiap(-/-) mice present with symptoms reminiscent of XLP-2. Our data show that XIAP controls RIP3-dependent cell death and IL-1...

  1. A NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase coordinates metabolism with cell division in Caulobacter crescentus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufay, François; Coppine, Jérôme; Mayard, Aurélie; Laloux, Géraldine; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2015-01-01

    Coupling cell cycle with nutrient availability is a crucial process for all living cells. But how bacteria control cell division according to metabolic supplies remains poorly understood. Here, we describe a molecular mechanism that coordinates central metabolism with cell division in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. This mechanism involves the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase GdhZ and the oxidoreductase-like KidO. While enzymatically active GdhZ directly interferes with FtsZ polymerization by stimulating its GTPase activity, KidO bound to NADH destabilizes lateral interactions between FtsZ protofilaments. Both GdhZ and KidO share the same regulatory network to concomitantly stimulate the rapid disassembly of the Z-ring, necessary for the subsequent release of progeny cells. Thus, this mechanism illustrates how proteins initially dedicated to metabolism coordinate cell cycle progression with nutrient availability. PMID:25953831

  2. CD8 T Cell Sensory Adaptation Dependent on TCR Avidity for Self-Antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marquez, M.-E.; Ellmeier, W.; Sanchez-Guajardo, Vanesa Maria

    2005-01-01

    Adaptation of the T cell activation threshold may be one mechanism to control autoreactivity. To investigate its occurrence in vivo, we engineered a transgenic mouse model with increased TCR-dependent excitability by expressing a Zap70 gain-of-function mutant (ZAP-YEEI) in postselection CD8...... thymocytes and T cells. Increased basal phosphorylation of the Zap70 substrate linker for activation of T cells was detected in ZAP-YEEI-bearing CD8 T cells. However, these cells were not activated, but had reduced levels of TCR and CD5. Moreover, they produced lower cytokine amounts and showed faster......-YEEI suggested that signal tuning occurred during thymic maturation. Importantly, although P14 ﰌ ZAP-YEEI peripheral CD8 T cells were reduced in number and showed lower Ag-induced cytokine production and limited lymphopenia-driven proliferation, the peripheral survival/ expansion and Ag responsiveness of HY ﰌ...

  3. Synthetic lethal interaction between oncogenic KRAS dependency and STK33 suppression in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Claudia; Fröhling, Stefan; Dunn, Ian F; Schinzel, Anna C; Barbie, David A; Kim, So Young; Silver, Serena J; Tamayo, Pablo; Wadlow, Raymond C; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Döhner, Konstanze; Bullinger, Lars; Sandy, Peter; Boehm, Jesse S; Root, David E; Jacks, Tyler; Hahn, William C; Gilliland, D Gary

    2009-05-29

    An alternative to therapeutic targeting of oncogenes is to perform "synthetic lethality" screens for genes that are essential only in the context of specific cancer-causing mutations. We used high-throughput RNA interference (RNAi) to identify synthetic lethal interactions in cancer cells harboring mutant KRAS, the most commonly mutated human oncogene. We find that cells that are dependent on mutant KRAS exhibit sensitivity to suppression of the serine/threonine kinase STK33 irrespective of tissue origin, whereas STK33 is not required by KRAS-independent cells. STK33 promotes cancer cell viability in a kinase activity-dependent manner by regulating the suppression of mitochondrial apoptosis mediated through S6K1-induced inactivation of the death agonist BAD selectively in mutant KRAS-dependent cells. These observations identify STK33 as a target for treatment of mutant KRAS-driven cancers and demonstrate the potential of RNAi screens for discovering functional dependencies created by oncogenic mutations that may enable therapeutic intervention for cancers with "undruggable" genetic alterations.

  4. Large-Scale Profiling of Kinase Dependencies in Cancer Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James; Ryan, Colm J; Brough, Rachel; Bajrami, Ilirjana; Pemberton, Helen N; Chong, Irene Y; Costa-Cabral, Sara; Frankum, Jessica; Gulati, Aditi; Holme, Harriet; Miller, Rowan; Postel-Vinay, Sophie; Rafiq, Rumana; Wei, Wenbin; Williamson, Chris T; Quigley, David A; Tym, Joe; Al-Lazikani, Bissan; Fenton, Timothy; Natrajan, Rachael; Strauss, Sandra J; Ashworth, Alan; Lord, Christopher J

    2016-03-15

    One approach to identifying cancer-specific vulnerabilities and therapeutic targets is to profile genetic dependencies in cancer cell lines. Here, we describe data from a series of siRNA screens that identify the kinase genetic dependencies in 117 cancer cell lines from ten cancer types. By integrating the siRNA screen data with molecular profiling data, including exome sequencing data, we show how vulnerabilities/genetic dependencies that are associated with mutations in specific cancer driver genes can be identified. By integrating additional data sets into this analysis, including protein-protein interaction data, we also demonstrate that the genetic dependencies associated with many cancer driver genes form dense connections on functional interaction networks. We demonstrate the utility of this resource by using it to predict the drug sensitivity of genetically or histologically defined subsets of tumor cell lines, including an increased sensitivity of osteosarcoma cell lines to FGFR inhibitors and SMAD4 mutant tumor cells to mitotic inhibitors. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Large-Scale Profiling of Kinase Dependencies in Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Campbell

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available One approach to identifying cancer-specific vulnerabilities and therapeutic targets is to profile genetic dependencies in cancer cell lines. Here, we describe data from a series of siRNA screens that identify the kinase genetic dependencies in 117 cancer cell lines from ten cancer types. By integrating the siRNA screen data with molecular profiling data, including exome sequencing data, we show how vulnerabilities/genetic dependencies that are associated with mutations in specific cancer driver genes can be identified. By integrating additional data sets into this analysis, including protein-protein interaction data, we also demonstrate that the genetic dependencies associated with many cancer driver genes form dense connections on functional interaction networks. We demonstrate the utility of this resource by using it to predict the drug sensitivity of genetically or histologically defined subsets of tumor cell lines, including an increased sensitivity of osteosarcoma cell lines to FGFR inhibitors and SMAD4 mutant tumor cells to mitotic inhibitors.

  6. Cell Context Dependent p53 Genome-Wide Binding Patterns and Enrichment at Repeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botcheva, Krassimira; McCorkle, Sean R.

    2014-01-01

    The p53 ability to elicit stress specific and cell type specific responses is well recognized, but how that specificity is established remains to be defined. Whether upon activation p53 binds to its genomic targets in a cell type and stress type dependent manner is still an open question. Here we show that the p53 binding to the human genome is selective and cell context-dependent. We mapped the genomic binding sites for the endogenous wild type p53 protein in the human cancer cell line HCT116 and compared them to those we previously determined in the normal cell line IMR90. We report distinct p53 genome-wide binding landscapes in two different cell lines, analyzed under the same treatment and experimental conditions, using the same ChIP-seq approach. This is evidence for cell context dependent p53 genomic binding. The observed differences affect the p53 binding sites distribution with respect to major genomic and epigenomic elements (promoter regions, CpG islands and repeats). We correlated the high-confidence p53 ChIP-seq peaks positions with the annotated human repeats (UCSC Human Genome Browser) and observed both common and cell line specific trends. In HCT116, the p53 binding was specifically enriched at LINE repeats, compared to IMR90 cells. The p53 genome-wide binding patterns in HCT116 and IMR90 likely reflect the different epigenetic landscapes in these two cell lines, resulting from cancer-associated changes (accumulated in HCT116) superimposed on tissue specific differences (HCT116 has epithelial, while IMR90 has mesenchymal origin). Our data support the model for p53 binding to the human genome in a highly selective manner, mobilizing distinct sets of genes, contributing to distinct pathways. PMID:25415302

  7. Nanomechanical Phenotype of Melanoma Cells Depends Solely on the Amount of Endogenous Pigment in the Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Sarna

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells have unique nanomechanical properties, i.e., they behave as if they were elastic. This property of cancer cells is believed to be one of the main reasons for their facilitated ability to spread and metastasize. Thus, the so-called nanomechanical phenotype of cancer cells is viewed as an important indicator of the cells’ metastatic behavior. One of the most highly metastatic cancer cells are melanoma cells, which have a very unusual property: they can synthesize the pigment melanin in large amounts, becoming heavily pigmented. So far, the role of melanin in melanoma remains unclear, particularly the impact of the pigment on metastatic behavior of melanoma cells. Importantly, until recently the potential mechanical role of melanin in melanoma metastasis was completely ignored. In this work, we examined melanoma cells isolated from hamster tumors containing endogenous melanin pigment. Applying an array of advanced microscopy and spectroscopy techniques, we determined that melanin is the dominating factor responsible for the mechanical properties of melanoma cells. Our results indicate that the nanomechanical phenotype of melanoma cells may be a reliable marker of the cells’ metastatic behavior and point to the important mechanical role of melanin in the process of metastasis of melanoma.

  8. NBT-II carcinoma behaviour is not dependent on cell-cell communication through gap junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesueur, F; Mesnil, M; Delouvée, A; Girault, J M; Yamasaki, H; Thiery, J P; Jouanneau, J

    2002-05-31

    To study the mechanism(s) underlying the proliferation of heterogeneous cell populations within a solid tumour, the NBT-II rat bladder carcinoma system was used. It has been first investigated whether the different cell populations are coupled through gap junctions (GJIC). Cells overexpressing the Cx43 were generated to test for any tumour suppressive activity in vivo. To determine whether GJIC is essential for tumour proliferation and the establishment of a cooperative community effect, NBT-II cells that are incompetent for cell coupling were generated. The data report that (i) carcinoma cells expressing or not FGF-1 are coupled through GJIC in vitro and in coculture and express the gap junction protein Cx43, (ii) overexpression of Cx43 in these cells does not affect their in vitro coupling capacities and in vivo tumourigenic growth properties, (iii) inhibition of GJIC through antisense strategy has no in vivo obvious consequence on the tumour growth properties of the carcinoma, and (iv) the community effect between two carcinoma cell populations does not critically involve cell coupling through gap junctions.

  9. Modified Adherence Method (MAM) for Electrofusion of Anchorage-Dependent Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ušaj, Marko; Kandušer, Maša

    2015-01-01

    The artificially induced cell fusion is a useful experimental tool in biology, biotechnology and medicine. The electrofusion is a physical method for cell fusion that applies high-voltage electric pulses. The use of electric pulses causes cell membrane structural changes which bring the cell membrane in the so-called fusogenic state. When such fusogenic membranes are in close contact cell fusion takes place. Physical contact between fusion partners can be achieved by various methods and one of them is modified adherence method (MAM) described in detail here on B16-F1 cell line. The method is based on the fact that living cells form contacts in confluent culture. However, instead of using confluent cell culture, in modified adherence method cells are plated in suitable concentration and allowed to form contacts for only short predetermined period of time. During that time the cells are only slightly attached to the dish surface maintaining the spherical shape. Observed high fusion yields up to 50 % obtained by MAM in situ by dual-color fluorescence microscopy are among the highest in field of electrofusion. The method can be readily adapted to other anchorage-dependent cell lines.

  10. APELA promotes tumour growth and cell migration in ovarian cancer in a p53-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yuyin; Tsai, Shu-Huei; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Wang, Evan Y; Anglesio, Michael S; Cochrane, Dawn R; Fuller, Megan; Gibb, Ewan A; Wei, Wei; Huntsman, David G; Karsan, Aly; Hoodless, Pamela A

    2017-12-01

    APELA is a small, secreted peptide that can function as a ligand for the G-protein coupled receptor, Apelin Receptor (APLNR, APJ). APELA plays an essential role in endoderm differentiation and cardiac development during embryogenesis. We investigated whether APELA exerts any functions in cancer progression. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) RNA sequencing datasets, microarray from an OCCC mouse model, and RNA isolated from fresh frozen and FFPE patient tissue were used to assess APELA expression. APELA knockout ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCCC) cell lines were generated using CRISPR/Cas9. APELA was expressed in various ovarian cancer histotypes and was especially elevated in OCCC. Disruption of APELA expression in OCCC cell lines suppressed cell growth and migration, and altered cell-cycle progression. Moreover, addition of human recombinant APELA peptide to the OCCC cell line OVISE promoted cell growth and migration. Interestingly, OVISE cells do not express APLNR, suggesting that APELA can function through an APLNR-independent pathway. Furthermore, APELA affected cell growth and cell cycle progression in a p53-dependent manner. In addition, APELA knockdown induced p53 expression in cancer cell lines. Our findings uncover a potential oncogenic role for APELA in promoting ovarian tumour progression and provide a possible therapeutic strategy in ovarian cancer by targeting APELA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Targeting cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) but not CDK4/6 or CDK2 is selectively lethal to MYC-dependent human breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jian; Sergio, C Marcelo; Sutherland, Robert L; Musgrove, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Although MYC is an attractive therapeutic target for breast cancer treatment, it has proven challenging to inhibit MYC directly, and clinically effective pharmaceutical agents targeting MYC are not yet available. An alternative approach is to identify genes that are synthetically lethal in MYC-dependent cancer. Recent studies have identified several cell cycle kinases as MYC synthetic-lethal genes. We therefore investigated the therapeutic potential of specific cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibition in MYC-driven breast cancer. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA), MYC expression was depleted in 26 human breast cancer cell lines and cell proliferation evaluated by BrdU incorporation. MYC-dependent and MYC-independent cell lines were classified based on their sensitivity to siRNA-mediated MYC knockdown. We then inhibited CDKs including CDK4/6, CDK2 and CDK1 individually using either RNAi or small molecule inhibitors, and compared sensitivity to CDK inhibition with MYC dependence in breast cancer cells. Breast cancer cells displayed a wide range of sensitivity to siRNA-mediated MYC knockdown. The sensitivity was correlated with MYC protein expression and MYC phosphorylation level. Sensitivity to siRNA-mediated MYC knockdown did not parallel sensitivity to the CDK4/6 inhibitor PD0332991; instead MYC-independent cell lines were generally sensitive to PD0332991. Cell cycle arrest induced by MYC knockdown was accompanied by a decrease in CDK2 activity, but inactivation of CDK2 did not selectively affect the viability of MYC-dependent breast cancer cells. In contrast, CDK1 inactivation significantly induced apoptosis and reduced viability of MYC-dependent cells but not MYC- independent cells. This selective induction of apoptosis by CDK1 inhibitors was associated with up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic molecule BIM and was p53-independent. Overall, these results suggest that further investigation of CDK1 inhibition as a potential therapy for MYC-dependent breast cancer

  12. Differential pathway dependency discovery associated with drug response across cancer cell lines* | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effort to personalize treatment plans for cancer patients involves the identification of drug treatments that can effectively target the disease while minimizing the likelihood of adverse reactions. In this study, the gene-expression profile of 810 cancer cell lines and their response data to 368 small molecules from the Cancer Therapeutics Research Portal (CTRP) are analyzed to identify pathways with significant rewiring between genes, or differential gene dependency, between sensitive and non-sensitive cell lines.

  13. Metabolic stress induces a Wnt-dependent cancer stem cell-like state transition

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, E; Yang, J; Ku, M; Kim, N H; Park, Y; Park, C B; Suh, J-S; Park, E S; Yook, J I; Mills, G B; Huh, Y-M; Cheong, J-H

    2015-01-01

    Reciprocal interactions between cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment drive multiple clinically significant behaviors including dormancy, invasion, and metastasis as well as therapy resistance. These microenvironment-dependent phenotypes share typical characteristics with cancer stem cells (CSC). However, it is poorly understood how metabolic stress in the confined tumor microenvironment contributes to the emergence and maintenance of CSC-like phenotypes. Here, we demonstrate that chron...

  14. Salinomycin activates AMP-activated protein kinase-dependent autophagy in cultured osteoblastoma cells: a negative regulator against cell apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun-qing Zhu

    Full Text Available The malignant osteoblastoma has poor prognosis, thus the search for novel and more efficient chemo-agents against this disease is urgent. Salinomycin induces broad anti-cancer effects both in vivo and in vitro, however, its role in osteoblastoma is still not clear.Salinomycin induced both apoptosis and autophagy in cultured U2OS and MG-63 osteoblastoma cells. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA, or by RNA interference (RNAi of light chain 3B (LC3B, enhanced salinomycin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Salinomycin induced a profound AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK activation, which was required for autophagy induction. AMPK inhibition by compound C, or by AMPKα RNAi prevented salinomycin-induced autophagy activation, while facilitating cancer cell death and apoptosis. On the other hand, the AMPK agonist AICAR promoted autophagy activation in U2OS cells. Salinomycin-induced AMPK activation was dependent on reactive oxygen species (ROS production in osteoblastoma cells. Antioxidant n-acetyl cysteine (NAC significantly inhibited salinomycin-induced AMPK activation and autophagy induction.Salinomycin activates AMPK-dependent autophagy in osteoblastoma cells, which serves as a negative regulator against cell apoptosis. AMPK-autophagy inhibition might be a novel strategy to sensitize salinomycin's effect in cancer cells.

  15. Salinomycin activates AMP-activated protein kinase-dependent autophagy in cultured osteoblastoma cells: a negative regulator against cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lun-qing; Zhen, Yun-fang; Zhang, Ya; Guo, Zhi-xiong; Dai, Jin; Wang, Xiao-dong

    2013-01-01

    The malignant osteoblastoma has poor prognosis, thus the search for novel and more efficient chemo-agents against this disease is urgent. Salinomycin induces broad anti-cancer effects both in vivo and in vitro, however, its role in osteoblastoma is still not clear. Salinomycin induced both apoptosis and autophagy in cultured U2OS and MG-63 osteoblastoma cells. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), or by RNA interference (RNAi) of light chain 3B (LC3B), enhanced salinomycin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Salinomycin induced a profound AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, which was required for autophagy induction. AMPK inhibition by compound C, or by AMPKα RNAi prevented salinomycin-induced autophagy activation, while facilitating cancer cell death and apoptosis. On the other hand, the AMPK agonist AICAR promoted autophagy activation in U2OS cells. Salinomycin-induced AMPK activation was dependent on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in osteoblastoma cells. Antioxidant n-acetyl cysteine (NAC) significantly inhibited salinomycin-induced AMPK activation and autophagy induction. Salinomycin activates AMPK-dependent autophagy in osteoblastoma cells, which serves as a negative regulator against cell apoptosis. AMPK-autophagy inhibition might be a novel strategy to sensitize salinomycin's effect in cancer cells.

  16. Salinomycin Activates AMP-Activated Protein Kinase-Dependent Autophagy in Cultured Osteoblastoma Cells: A Negative Regulator against Cell Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya; Guo, Zhi-xiong; Dai, Jin; Wang, Xiao-dong

    2013-01-01

    Background The malignant osteoblastoma has poor prognosis, thus the search for novel and more efficient chemo-agents against this disease is urgent. Salinomycin induces broad anti-cancer effects both in vivo and in vitro, however, its role in osteoblastoma is still not clear. Key Findings Salinomycin induced both apoptosis and autophagy in cultured U2OS and MG-63 osteoblastoma cells. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), or by RNA interference (RNAi) of light chain 3B (LC3B), enhanced salinomycin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Salinomycin induced a profound AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, which was required for autophagy induction. AMPK inhibition by compound C, or by AMPKα RNAi prevented salinomycin-induced autophagy activation, while facilitating cancer cell death and apoptosis. On the other hand, the AMPK agonist AICAR promoted autophagy activation in U2OS cells. Salinomycin-induced AMPK activation was dependent on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in osteoblastoma cells. Antioxidant n-acetyl cysteine (NAC) significantly inhibited salinomycin-induced AMPK activation and autophagy induction. Conclusions Salinomycin activates AMPK-dependent autophagy in osteoblastoma cells, which serves as a negative regulator against cell apoptosis. AMPK-autophagy inhibition might be a novel strategy to sensitize salinomycin’s effect in cancer cells. PMID:24358342

  17. Type I CD20 Antibodies Recruit the B Cell Receptor for Complement-Dependent Lysis of Malignant B Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelberts, Patrick J.; Voorhorst, Marleen; Schuurman, Janine; van Meerten, Tom; Bakker, Joost M.; Vink, Tom; Mackus, Wendy J. M.; Breij, Esther C. W.; Derer, Stefanie; Valerius, Thomas; van de Winkel, Jan G. J.; Parren, Paul W. H. I.; Beurskens, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Human IgG1 type I CD20 Abs, such as rituximab and ofatumumab (OFA), efficiently induce complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) of CD20(+) B cells by binding of C1 to hexamerized Fc domains. Unexpectedly, we found that type I CD20 Ab F(ab ')2 fragments, as well as C1q-binding-deficient IgG mutants,

  18. Differentiation-Dependent KLF4 Expression Promotes Lytic Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay M Nawandar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is a human herpesvirus associated with B-cell and epithelial cell malignancies. EBV lytically infects normal differentiated oral epithelial cells, where it causes a tongue lesion known as oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL in immunosuppressed patients. However, the cellular mechanism(s that enable EBV to establish exclusively lytic infection in normal differentiated oral epithelial cells are not currently understood. Here we show that a cellular transcription factor known to promote epithelial cell differentiation, KLF4, induces differentiation-dependent lytic EBV infection by binding to and activating the two EBV immediate-early gene (BZLF1 and BRLF1 promoters. We demonstrate that latently EBV-infected, telomerase-immortalized normal oral keratinocyte (NOKs cells undergo lytic viral reactivation confined to the more differentiated cell layers in organotypic raft culture. Furthermore, we show that endogenous KLF4 expression is required for efficient lytic viral reactivation in response to phorbol ester and sodium butyrate treatment in several different EBV-infected epithelial cell lines, and that the combination of KLF4 and another differentiation-dependent cellular transcription factor, BLIMP1, is highly synergistic for inducing lytic EBV infection. We confirm that both KLF4 and BLIMP1 are expressed in differentiated, but not undifferentiated, epithelial cells in normal tongue tissue, and show that KLF4 and BLIMP1 are both expressed in a patient-derived OHL lesion. In contrast, KLF4 protein is not detectably expressed in B cells, where EBV normally enters latent infection, although KLF4 over-expression is sufficient to induce lytic EBV reactivation in Burkitt lymphoma cells. Thus, KLF4, together with BLIMP1, plays a critical role in mediating lytic EBV reactivation in epithelial cells.

  19. BAFF promotes autoantibody production via TACI-dependent activation of transitional B cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Holly M.; Thouvenel, Christopher D.; Leach, Sarah; Arkatkar, Tanvi; Metzler, Genita; Scharping, Nicole E.; Kolhatkar, Nikita S.; Rawlings, David J.; Jackson, Shaun W.

    2016-01-01

    Mice overexpressing B cell activating factor of the TNF family (BAFF) develop systemic autoimmunity characterized by class-switched anti-nuclear antibodies. Transmembrane activator and CAML interactor (TACI) signals are critical for BAFF-mediated autoimmunity, but the B cell developmental subsets undergoing TACI-dependent activation in settings of excess BAFF remains unclear. We now report that, whereas surface TACI expression is usually limited to mature B cells, excess BAFF promotes the expansion of TACI-expressing transitional B cells. TACIhi transitional cells from BAFF-Tg mice are characterized by an activated, cycling phenotype; and the TACIhi cell subset is specifically enriched for autoreactivity, expresses activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and T-bet and exhibits evidence of somatic hypermutation. Consistent with a potential contribution to BAFF-mediated humoral autoimmunity, TACIhi transitional B cells from BAFF-Tg mice spontaneously produce class-switched autoantibodies ex vivo. These combined findings highlight a novel mechanism whereby BAFF promotes humoral autoimmunity via direct, TACI-dependent activation of transitional B cells. PMID:27022196

  20. Cutting Edge: BAFF Promotes Autoantibody Production via TACI-Dependent Activation of Transitional B Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Holly M; Thouvenel, Christopher D; Leach, Sarah; Arkatkar, Tanvi; Metzler, Genita; Scharping, Nicole E; Kolhatkar, Nikita S; Rawlings, David J; Jackson, Shaun W

    2016-05-01

    Mice overexpressing B cell activating factor of the TNF family (BAFF) develop systemic autoimmunity characterized by class-switched anti-nuclear Abs. Transmembrane activator and CAML interactor (TACI) signals are critical for BAFF-mediated autoimmunity, but the B cell developmental subsets undergoing TACI-dependent activation in settings of excess BAFF remain unclear. We report that, although surface TACI expression is usually limited to mature B cells, excess BAFF promotes the expansion of TACI-expressing transitional B cells. TACI(+) transitional cells from BAFF-transgenic mice are characterized by an activated, cycling phenotype, and the TACI(+) cell subset is specifically enriched for autoreactivity, expresses activation-induced cytidine deaminase and T-bet, and exhibits evidence of somatic hypermutation. Consistent with a potential contribution to BAFF-mediated humoral autoimmunity, TACI(+) transitional B cells from BAFF-transgenic mice spontaneously produce class-switched autoantibodies ex vivo. These combined findings highlight a novel mechanism through which BAFF promotes humoral autoimmunity via direct, TACI-dependent activation of transitional B cells. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  1. The Yeast Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Routes Carbon Fluxes to Fuel Cell Cycle Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, Jennifer C; Kuehne, Andreas; Zamboni, Nicola; Skotheim, Jan M

    2016-05-19

    Cell division entails a sequence of processes whose specific demands for biosynthetic precursors and energy place dynamic requirements on metabolism. However, little is known about how metabolic fluxes are coordinated with the cell division cycle. Here, we examine budding yeast to show that more than half of all measured metabolites change significantly through the cell division cycle. Cell cycle-dependent changes in central carbon metabolism are controlled by the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk1), a major cell cycle regulator, and the metabolic regulator protein kinase A. At the G1/S transition, Cdk1 phosphorylates and activates the enzyme Nth1, which funnels the storage carbohydrate trehalose into central carbon metabolism. Trehalose utilization fuels anabolic processes required to reliably complete cell division. Thus, the cell cycle entrains carbon metabolism to fuel biosynthesis. Because the oscillation of Cdk activity is a conserved feature of the eukaryotic cell cycle, we anticipate its frequent use in dynamically regulating metabolism for efficient proliferation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Centchroman induces redox-dependent apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in human endometrial cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyam, Hari; Singh, Neetu; Kaushik, Shweta; Sharma, Ramesh; Balapure, Anil K

    2017-04-01

    Centchroman (CC) or Ormeloxifene has been shown to induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in various types of cancer cells. This has, however, not been addressed for endometrial cancer cells where its (CC) mechanism of action remains unclear. This study focuses on the basis of antineoplasticity of CC by blocking the targets involved in the cell cycle, survival and apoptosis in endometrial cancer cells. Ishikawa Human Endometrial Cancer Cells were cultured under estrogen deprived medium, exposed to CC and analyzed for proliferation and apoptosis. Additionally, we also analyzed oxidative stress induced by CC. Cell viability studies confirmed the IC 50 of CC in Ishikawa cells to be 20 µM after 48 h treatment. CC arrests the cells in G0/G1 phase through cyclin D1 and cyclin E mediated pathways. Phosphatidylserine externalization, nuclear morphology changes, DNA fragmentation, PARP cleavage, and alteration of Bcl-2 family protein expression clearly suggest ongoing apoptosis in the CC treated cells. Activation of caspase 3 & 9, up-regulation of AIF and inhibition of apoptosis by z-VAD-fmk clearly explains the participation of the intrinsic pathway of programmed cell death. Further, the increase of ROS, loss of MMP, inhibition of antioxidant (MnSOD, Cu/Zn-SOD and GST) and inhibition of apoptosis with L-NAC suggests CC induced oxidative stress leading to apoptosis via mitochondria mediated pathway. Therefore, CC could be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of Endometrial Cancer adjunct to its utility as a contraceptive and an anti-breast cancer agent.

  3. Differentiation-Dependent Glycosylation of Cells in Squamous Cell Epithelia Detected by a Mammalian Lectin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plzák, J.; Holíková, Z.; Smetana Jr., K.; Dvořánková, B.; Hercogová, J.; Kaltner, H.; Motlík, Jan; Gabius, H. J.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 171, - (2002), s. 135-144 ISSN 1422-6405 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A065; GA AV ČR KSK5052113 Keywords : carcinoma * basal cell * cell differentiation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.442, year: 2002

  4. Clarifying CB2 receptor-dependent and independent effects of THC on human lung epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarafian, Theodore; Montes, Cindy; Harui, Airi; Beedanagari, Sudheer R.; Kiertscher, Sylvia; Stripecke, Renata; Hossepian, Derik; Kitchen, Christina; Kern, Rita; Belperio, John; Roth, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    Marijuana smoking is associated with a number of abnormal findings in the lungs of habitual smokers. Previous studies revealed that Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) caused mitochondrial injury in primary lung epithelial cells and in the cell line, A549 [Sarafian, T. A., Kouyoumjian, S., Khoshaghideh, F., Tashkin, D. P., and Roth, M. D. (2003). Delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol disrupts mitochondrial function and cell energetics. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 284, L298-306; Sarafian, T., Habib, N., Mao, J. T., Tsu, I. H., Yamamoto, M. L., Hsu, E., Tashkin, D. P., and Roth, M. D. (2005). Gene expression changes in human small airway epithelial cells exposed to Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol. Toxicol Lett 158, 95-107]. The role of cannabinoid receptors in this injury was unclear, as was the potential impact on cell function. In order to investigate these questions, A549 cells were engineered to over-express the type 2 cannabinoid receptor (CB2R) using a self-inactivating lentiviral vector. This transduction resulted in a 60-fold increase in CB2R mRNA relative to cells transduced with a control vector. Transduced cell lines were used to study the effects of THC on chemotactic activity and mitochondrial function. Chemotaxis in response to a 10% serum gradient was suppressed in a concentration-dependent manner by exposure to THC. CB2R-transduced cells exhibited less intrinsic chemotactic activity (p m ) in both control and CB2R-transduced cells. However, these decreases did not play a significant role in chemotaxis inhibition since cyclosporine A, which protected against ATP loss, did not increase cell migration. Moreover, CB2R-transduced cells displayed higher Ψ m than did control cells. Since both Ψ m and chemotaxis are regulated by intracellular signaling, we investigated the effects of THC on the activation of multiple signaling pathways. Serum exposure activated several signaling events of which phosphorylation of IκB-α and JNK was regulated in a CB2R- and THC-dependent

  5. Progesterone Receptor–Cyclin D1 Complexes Induce Cell Cycle–Dependent Transcriptional Programs in Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressing, Gwen E.; Knutson, Todd P.; Schiewer, Matthew J.; Daniel, Andrea R.; Hagan, Christy R.; Diep, Caroline H.; Knudsen, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    The progesterone receptor (PR) and its coactivators are direct targets of activated cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) in response to peptide growth factors, progesterone, and deregulation of cell cycle inhibitors. Herein, using the T47D breast cancer model, we probed mechanisms of cell cycle–dependent PR action. In the absence of exogenous progestin, the PR is specifically phosphorylated during the G2/M phase. Accordingly, numerous PR target genes are cell cycle regulated, including HSPB8, a heat-shock protein whose high expression is associated with tamoxifen resistance. Progestin-induced HSPB8 expression required cyclin D1 and was insensitive to antiestrogens but blocked by antiprogestins or inhibition of specificity factor 1 (SP1). HSPB8 expression increased with or without ligand when cells were G2/M synchronized or contained high levels of cyclin D1. Knockdown of PRs abrogated ligand-independent HSPB8 expression in synchronized cells. Notably, PRs and cyclin D1 copurified in whole-cell lysates of transiently transfected COS-1 cells and in PR-positive T47D breast cancer cells expressing endogenous cyclin D1. PRs, cyclin D1, and SP1 were recruited to the HSPB8 promoter in progestin-treated T47D breast cancer cells. Mutation of PR Ser345 to Ala (S345A) or inhibition of CDK2 activity using roscovitine disrupted PR/cyclin D1 interactions with DNA and blocked HSPB8 mRNA expression. Interaction of phosphorylated PRs with SP1 and cyclin D1 provides a mechanism for targeting transcriptionally active PRs to selected gene promoters relevant to breast cancer progression. Understanding the functional linkage between PRs and cell cycle regulatory proteins will provide keys to targeting novel PR/cyclin D1 cross talk in both hormone-responsive disease and HSPB8-high refractory disease with high HSPB8 expression. PMID:24606123

  6. KCa3.1 channel inhibition leads to an ICAM-1 dependent increase of cell-cell adhesion between A549 lung cancer and HMEC-1 endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulk, Etmar; Kramko, Nadzeya; Liashkovich, Ivan; Glaser, Felix; Schillers, Hermann; Schnittler, Hans-Joachim; Oberleithner, Hans; Schwab, Albrecht

    2017-01-01

    Early metastasis leads to poor prognosis of lung cancer patients, whose 5-year survival rate is only 15%. We could recently show that the Ca2+ sensitive K+ channel KCa3.1 promotes aggressive behavior of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and that it can serve as a prognostic marker in NSCLC. Since NSCLC patients die of metastases, we investigated whether KCa3.1 channels contribute to poor patient prognosis by regulating distinct steps of the metastatic cascade. We investigated the extravasation of NSCLC cells and focused on their adhesion to endothelial cells and on transendothelial migration. We quantified the adhesion forces between NSCLC cells and endothelial cells by applying single cell force spectroscopy, and we monitored transendothelial migration using live-cell imaging. Inhibition of KCa3.1 channels with senicapoc or KCa3.1 silencing increases the adhesion force of A549 lung cancer cells to human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1). Western blotting, immunofluorescence staining and biotinylation assays indicate that the elevated adhesion force is due to increased expression of ICAM-1 in both cell lines when KCa3.1 channels are downregulated. Consistent with this interpretation, an anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibody abolishes the KCa3.1-dependent increase in adhesion. Senicapoc inhibits transendothelial migration of A549 cells by 50%. Selectively silencing KCa3.1 channels in either NSCLC or endothelial cells reveals that transendothelial migration depends predominantly on endothelial KCa3.1 channels. In conclusion, our findings disclose a novel function of KCa3.1 channels in cancer. KCa3.1 channels regulate ICAM-1 dependent cell-cell adhesion between endothelial and cancer cells that affects the transmigration step of the metastatic cascade. PMID:29348824

  7. Stimulation of hair follicle stem cell proliferation through an IL-1 dependent activation of γδT-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Abhik; Pincha, Neha; Rana, Isha; Ghosh, Subhasri; Witherden, Deborah; Kandyba, Eve; MacLeod, Amanda; Kobielak, Krzysztof; Havran, Wendy L

    2017-01-01

    The cutaneous wound-healing program is a product of a complex interplay among diverse cell types within the skin. One fundamental process that is mediated by these reciprocal interactions is the mobilization of local stem cell pools to promote tissue regeneration and repair. Using the ablation of epidermal caspase-8 as a model of wound healing in Mus musculus, we analyzed the signaling components responsible for epithelial stem cell proliferation. We found that IL-1α and IL-7 secreted from keratinocytes work in tandem to expand the activated population of resident epidermal γδT-cells. A downstream effect of activated γδT-cells is the preferential proliferation of hair follicle stem cells. By contrast, IL-1α-dependent stimulation of dermal fibroblasts optimally stimulates epidermal stem cell proliferation. These findings provide new mechanistic insights into the regulation and function of epidermal cell–immune cell interactions and into how components that are classically associated with inflammation can differentially influence distinct stem cell niches within a tissue. PMID:29199946

  8. VEGF secretion during hypoxia depends on free radicals-induced Fyn kinase activity in mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Roman, Jonathan; Ibarra-Sanchez, Alfredo; Lamas, Monica; Gonzalez Espinosa, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) secrete functional VEGF but do not degranulate after Cobalt chloride-induced hypoxia. → CoCl 2 -induced VEGF secretion in mast cells occurs by a Ca 2+ -insensitive but brefeldin A and Tetanus toxin-sensitive mechanism. → Trolox and N-acetylcysteine inhibit hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion but only Trolox inhibits FcεRI-dependent anaphylactic degranulation in mast cells. → Src family kinase Fyn activation after free radical production is necessary for hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion in mast cells. -- Abstract: Mast cells (MC) have an important role in pathologic conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), where hypoxia conduce to deleterious inflammatory response. MC contribute to hypoxia-induced angiogenesis producing factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), but the mechanisms behind the control of hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion in this cell type is poorly understood. We used the hypoxia-mimicking agent cobalt chloride (CoCl 2 ) to analyze VEGF secretion in murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). We found that CoCl 2 promotes a sustained production of functional VEGF, able to induce proliferation of endothelial cells in vitro. CoCl 2 -induced VEGF secretion was independent of calcium rise but dependent on tetanus toxin-sensitive vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs). VEGF exocytosis required free radicals formation and the activation of Src family kinases. Interestingly, an important deficiency on CoCl 2 -induced VEGF secretion was observed in Fyn kinase-deficient BMMCs. Moreover, Fyn kinase was activated by CoCl 2 in WT cells and this activation was prevented by treatment with antioxidants such as Trolox and N-acetylcysteine. Our results show that BMMCs are able to release VEGF under hypoxic conditions through a tetanus toxin-sensitive mechanism, promoted by free radicals-dependent Fyn kinase activation.

  9. VEGF secretion during hypoxia depends on free radicals-induced Fyn kinase activity in mast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Roman, Jonathan; Ibarra-Sanchez, Alfredo; Lamas, Monica [Departamento de Farmacobiologia, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN (Cinvestav, IPN) (Mexico); Gonzalez Espinosa, Claudia, E-mail: cgonzal@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Farmacobiologia, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN (Cinvestav, IPN) (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) secrete functional VEGF but do not degranulate after Cobalt chloride-induced hypoxia. {yields} CoCl{sub 2}-induced VEGF secretion in mast cells occurs by a Ca{sup 2+}-insensitive but brefeldin A and Tetanus toxin-sensitive mechanism. {yields} Trolox and N-acetylcysteine inhibit hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion but only Trolox inhibits Fc{epsilon}RI-dependent anaphylactic degranulation in mast cells. {yields} Src family kinase Fyn activation after free radical production is necessary for hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion in mast cells. -- Abstract: Mast cells (MC) have an important role in pathologic conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), where hypoxia conduce to deleterious inflammatory response. MC contribute to hypoxia-induced angiogenesis producing factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), but the mechanisms behind the control of hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion in this cell type is poorly understood. We used the hypoxia-mimicking agent cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}) to analyze VEGF secretion in murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). We found that CoCl{sub 2} promotes a sustained production of functional VEGF, able to induce proliferation of endothelial cells in vitro. CoCl{sub 2}-induced VEGF secretion was independent of calcium rise but dependent on tetanus toxin-sensitive vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs). VEGF exocytosis required free radicals formation and the activation of Src family kinases. Interestingly, an important deficiency on CoCl{sub 2}-induced VEGF secretion was observed in Fyn kinase-deficient BMMCs. Moreover, Fyn kinase was activated by CoCl{sub 2} in WT cells and this activation was prevented by treatment with antioxidants such as Trolox and N-acetylcysteine. Our results show that BMMCs are able to release VEGF under hypoxic conditions through a tetanus toxin-sensitive mechanism, promoted by free radicals-dependent

  10. Blocking Tumor Necrosis Factor α Enhances CD8 T-cell-Dependent Immunity in Experimental Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Florie; Rochotte, Julia; Colacios, Céline; Montfort, Anne; Tilkin-Mariamé, Anne-Françoise; Touriol, Christian; Rochaix, Philippe; Lajoie-Mazenc, Isabelle; Andrieu-Abadie, Nathalie; Levade, Thierry; Benoist, Hervé; Ségui, Bruno

    2015-07-01

    TNF plays a dual, still enigmatic role in melanoma, either acting as a cytotoxic cytokine or favoring a tumorigenic inflammatory microenvironment. Herein, the tumor growth of melanoma cell lines expressing major histocompatibility complex class I molecules at high levels (MHC-I(high)) was dramatically impaired in TNF-deficient mice, and this was associated with enhanced tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T lymphocytes. Immunodepletion of CD8 T cells fully restored melanoma growth in TNF(-/-) mice. Systemic administration of Etanercept inhibited MHC-I(high) melanoma growth in immunocompetent but not in immunodeficient (IFNγ(-/-), nude, or CD8(-/-)) mice. MHC-I(high) melanoma growth was also reduced in mice lacking TNF-R1, but not TNF-R2. TNF(-/-) and TNF-R1(-/-) mice as well as Etanercept-treated WT mice displayed enhanced intratumor content of high endothelial venules surrounded by high CD8(+) T-cell density. Adoptive transfer of activated TNF-R1-deficient or -proficient CD8(+) T cells in CD8-deficient mice bearing B16K1 tumors demonstrated that TNF-R1 deficiency facilitates the accumulation of live CD8(+) T cells into the tumors. Moreover, in vitro experiments indicated that TNF triggered activated CD8(+) T cell death in a TNF-R1-dependent manner, likely limiting the accumulation of tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells in TNF/TNF-R1-proficient animals. Collectively, our observations indicate that TNF-R1-dependent TNF signaling impairs tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T-cell accumulation and may serve as a putative target to favor CD8(+) T-cell-dependent immune response in melanoma. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Isolation of TPO-dependent subclones from the multipotent 32D cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabile, Giovanni; Di Noia, Antonella; Alfani, Elena; Vannucchi, Alessandro Maria; Sanchez, Massimo; Bosco, Domenico; Migliaccio, Anna Rita; Migliaccio, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    Using thrombopoietin (TPO), as selective pressure, several TPO-dependent clones were isolated from the murine multipotential IL-3-dependent cell line 32D. Four of them were fully characterized. They depended on TPO for survival and proliferation and, although retaining the capacity to grow in IL-3, did not respond to either EPO, G-CSF or GM-CSF. 32D TPO cells were heterogeneous in morphology and ranged from small cells, with a DNA content nearly tetraploid and a modal chromosome no. 66, to cells 50-75 microm in diameter containing multiple (up to 5-6) interconnected nuclei with a clear megakaryocyte (Mk) morphology by electron microscopy. Cell sorter isolation and single cell cloning experiments indicated that the small cells were those capable to proliferate in TPO and to generate the larger ones over time. 32D TPO cells expressed Mk-specific markers by FACS (CD41, CD61 and 2D5) and RT-PCR (acetyl cholinesterase E and platelet factor 4) and their unique profile, by gene array analysis, included expression of urokinase plasminogen activator surface receptor (CD87 or uPAR), plasminogen activator inhibitor and coagulation factor II (thrombin) receptor (Cf2r). In addition, by quantitative RT-PCR, 32D TPO clones expressed levels of Gata1 similar to those expressed by freshly isolated Mks (DeltaCt approximately 4.7 in both cases). In conclusion, the 32D TPO subclones described here are among the few pure Mk cell lines isolated so far and, for their unique properties, may prove themselves as a useful model to study Mk differentiation.

  12. Hair Follicle Stem Cell Faith Is Dependent on Chromatin Remodeling Capacity Following Low-Dose Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, Nadine; Timm, Sara; Rübe, Claudia E

    2018-04-01

    The main function of the skin, to protect against the environment, is supported by the activity of different stem cell populations. The main focus of this study was elucidating the coping mechanisms of stem cells against the stimulation of constant exposure to genotoxic stresses, both endogenous and exogenous, to ensure long-term function. Investigation of various mouse strains, differing in their DNA repair capacity, enables us to clarify fractionated low-dose irradiation (LDR)-induced consequences for different stem cell populations of the murine hair follicle (HF) in their physiological stem cell niche. Using microscopic techniques combined with flow cytometry, we could show that LDR induces accumulation of persisting; pKu70-independent 53BP1-foci ("chromatin-alterations") in heterochromatic regions of the HF stem cells (HFSCs). These remaining chromatin-alterations result in varying stem cell consequences. CD34-positive HFSCs react by ataxia telangiectasia mutated-dependent, premature senescence, which correlates with global chromatin compaction, whereby apoptosis is prevented by the activity of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit. However, distinctively highly damaged HFSCs seem to be sorted out of the niche by differentiation, transferring their chromatin-alterations to more proliferative G protein-coupled receptor 5-positive stem cells. Consequentially, the loss of basal HFSCs is compensated by increased proliferation within the stem cell pool. Despite the initial success of these mechanisms in stem cell population maintenance, the combined effect of the chromatin-alterations and the modification in stem cell pool composition may lead to downstream long-term functional loss of tissue or organs. Stem Cells 2018;36:574-588. © AlphaMed Press 2018.

  13. Time dependency of morphological remodeling of endothelial cells in response to substrate stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goli-Malekabadi, Zahra; Tafazzoli-shadpour, Mohammad; Tamayol, Ali; Seyedjafari, Ehsan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Substrate stiffness regulates cellular behavior as cells experience different stiffness values of tissues in the body. For example, endothelial cells (ECs) covering the inner layer of blood vessels are exposed to different stiffness values due to various pathologic and physiologic conditions. Despite numerous studies, cells by time span sense mechanical properties of the substrate, but the response is not well understood. We hypothesized that time is a major determinant influencing the behavior of cells seeded on substrates of varying stiffness. Methods: We monitored cell spreading, internal structure, 3D topography, and the viability of ECs over 24 hours of culture on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates with two different degrees of elastic modulus. Results: Despite significant differences in cell spreading after cell seeding, cells showed a similar shape and internal structure after 24 hours of culture on both soft and stiff substrates. However, 3D topographical images confirmed existence of rich lamellipodia and filopodia around the cells cultured on stiffer PDMS substrates. Conclusion: It was concluded that the response of ECs to the substrate stiffness was time dependent with initial enhanced cellular spreading and viability on stiffer substrates. Results can provide a better comprehension of cell mechanotransduction for tissue engineering applications. PMID:28546952

  14. Cell type-dependent uptake, localization, and cytotoxicity of 1.9 nm gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulter, Jonathan A; Jain, Suneil; Butterworth, Karl T; Taggart, Laura E; Dickson, Glenn R; McMahon, Stephen J; Hyland, Wendy B; Muir, Mark F; Trainor, Coleman; Hounsell, Alan R; O’Sullivan, Joe M; Schettino, Giuseppe; Currell, Fred J; Hirst, David G; Prise, Kevin M

    2012-01-01

    Background This follow-up study aims to determine the physical parameters which govern the differential radiosensitization capacity of two tumor cell lines and one immortalized normal cell line to 1.9 nm gold nanoparticles. In addition to comparing the uptake potential, localization, and cytotoxicity of 1.9 nm gold nanoparticles, the current study also draws on comparisons between nanoparticle size and total nanoparticle uptake based on previously published data. Methods We quantified gold nanoparticle uptake using atomic emission spectroscopy and imaged intracellular localization by transmission electron microscopy. Cell growth delay and clonogenic assays were used to determine cytotoxicity and radiosensitization potential, respectively. Mechanistic data were obtained by Western blot, flow cytometry, and assays for reactive oxygen species. Results Gold nanoparticle uptake was preferentially observed in tumor cells, resulting in an increased expression of cleaved caspase proteins and an accumulation of cells in sub G1 phase. Despite this, gold nanoparticle cytotoxicity remained low, with immortalized normal cells exhibiting an LD50 concentration approximately 14 times higher than tumor cells. The surviving fraction for gold nanoparticle-treated cells at 3 Gy compared with that of untreated control cells indicated a strong dependence on cell type in respect to radiosensitization potential. Conclusion Gold nanoparticles were most avidly endocytosed and localized within cytoplasmic vesicles during the first 6 hours of exposure. The lack of significant cytotoxicity in the absence of radiation, and the generation of gold nanoparticle-induced reactive oxygen species provide a potential mechanism for previously reported radiosensitization at megavoltage energies. PMID:22701316

  15. Isolation of cell cycle-dependent gamma ray-sensitive Chinese hamster ovary cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamato, T.D.; Weinstein, R.; Giaccia, A.; Mackenzie, L.

    1983-01-01

    A technique for the isolation of gamma ray-sensitive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell mutants is described, which uses nylon cloth replica plating and photography with dark-field illumination to directly monitor colonies for growth after gamma irradiation. Two gamma ray-sensitive mutants were isolated using this method. One of these cells (XR-1) had a two-slope survival curve: an initial steep slope and then a flattening of the curve at about 10% survival. Subsequently, it was found that this cell is sensitive to gamma irradiation in G1, early S, and late G2 phases of the cell cycle, whereas in the resistant phase (late S phase) its survival approaches that of the parental cells. The D37 in the sensitive G1 period is approximately 30 rads, compared with 300 rads of the parental cell. This mutant cell is also sensitive to killing by the DNA breaking agent, bleomycin, but is relatively insensitive to UV light and ethyl methane sulfonate, suggesting that the defect is specific for agents that produce DNA strand breakage

  16. CELL EXPANSION-DEPENDENT INFLAMMATORY AND METABOLIC PROFILE OF HUMAN BONE MARROW MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PATRICIA PRIETO

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy has emerged as a promising new area in regenerative medicine allowing the recovery of viable tissues. Among the many sources of adult stem cells, bone marrow-derived are easy to expand in culture via plastic adherence and their multipotentiality for differentiation make them ideal for clinical applications. Interestingly, several studies have indicated that MSCs expansion in vitro may be limited mainly due to cell aging related to the number of cell divisions in culture. We have determined that MSCs exhibit a progressive decline across successive passages in the expression of stem cell markers, in plasticity and in the inflammatory response, presenting low immunogenicity. We have exposed human MSCs after several passages to TLRs ligands and analyzed their inflammatory response. These cells responded to pro-inflammatory stimuli (i.e., NOS-2 expression and to anti-inflammatory cytokines (i.e., HO1 and Arg1 until two expansions, rapidly declining upon subculture. Moreover, in the first passages, MSCs were capable to release IL1β, IL6 and IL8, as well as to produce active MMPs allowing them to migrate. Interestingly enough, after two passages, anaerobic glycolysis was enhanced releasing high levels of lactate to the extracellular medium. All these results may have important implications for the safety and efficacy of MSCs-based cell therapies.

  17. Concentration-dependent fluorescence live-cell imaging and tracking of intracellular nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Ji Hye; Joo, Sang-Woo [Department of Chemistry, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Keunchang [Logos Biosystems, Incorporated, Anyang 431-070 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, So Yeong, E-mail: leeso@snu.ac.kr, E-mail: sjoo@ssu.ac.kr [Laboratory of Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-10

    Using live-cell imaging techniques we investigated concentration-dependent intracellular movements of fluorescence nanoparticles (NPs) in real-time after their entry into HeLa cells via incubation. Intracellular particle traces appeared to be a mixture of both random and fairly unidirectional movements of the particles. At rather low concentrations of NPs, a majority of the non-random intracellular particle trajectories are assumed to mostly go along microtubule networks after endocytosis, as evidenced from the inhibition test with nocodazole. On the other hand, as the concentrations of NPs increased, random motions were more frequently observed inside the cells.

  18. Concentration-dependent fluorescence live-cell imaging and tracking of intracellular nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Ji Hye; Joo, Sang-Woo; Cho, Keunchang; Lee, So Yeong

    2011-01-01

    Using live-cell imaging techniques we investigated concentration-dependent intracellular movements of fluorescence nanoparticles (NPs) in real-time after their entry into HeLa cells via incubation. Intracellular particle traces appeared to be a mixture of both random and fairly unidirectional movements of the particles. At rather low concentrations of NPs, a majority of the non-random intracellular particle trajectories are assumed to mostly go along microtubule networks after endocytosis, as evidenced from the inhibition test with nocodazole. On the other hand, as the concentrations of NPs increased, random motions were more frequently observed inside the cells.

  19. Enhanced radiosensitization of enzalutamide via schedule dependent administration to androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghashghaei, Maryam; Paliouras, Miltiadis; Heravi, Mitra; Bekerat, Hamed; Trifiro, Mark; Niazi, Tamim M; Muanza, Thierry

    2018-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a progressive disease and the most diagnosed cancer in men. The current standard of care for high-risk localized PCa is a combination of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and radiation (XRT). The majority of these patients however become resistant due to incomplete responses to ADT as a result of selective cells maintaining androgen receptor (AR) activity. Improvement can be made if increasing radiosensitivity is realized. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the efficacy of the next-generation PCa drug Enzalutamide (ENZA), as a radiosensitizer in XRT therapy. Using a number of androgen-dependent (LNCaP, PC3-T877A) and androgen-independent (C4-2, 22RV1, PC3, PC3-AR V7) cell lines, the effect of ENZA as a radiosensitizer was studied alone or in combination with ADT and/or XRT. Cell viability and cell survival were assessed, along with determination of cell cycle arrest, DNA damage response and repair, apoptosis and senescence. Our results indicated that either ENZA alone (in AR positive, androgen-dependent PCa cells) or in combination with ADT (in AR positive, hormone-insensitive PCa cells) potentiates radiation response [Dose enhancement factor (DEF) of 1.75 in LNCAP and 1.35 in C4-2] stronger than ADT + XRT conditions. Additionally, ENZA sensitized androgen dependent PCa cells to XRT in a schedule-dependent manner, where concurrent administration of ENZA and radiation lead to a maximal radiosensitization when compared to either drug administration prior or after XRT. In LNCaP cells, ENZA treatment significantly prolonged the presence of XRT-induced phospho-γH2AX up to 24 h after treatment; suggesting enhanced DNA damage. It also significantly increased XRT-induced apoptosis and senescence. Our data indicates that ENZA acts as a much stronger radiosensitizer compared to ADT. We have also observed that its efficacy is schedule dependent and related to increased levels of DNA damage and a delay of DNA repair processes

  20. Cytokine-dependent induction of CD4+ T cells with cytotoxic potential during influenza virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Laiqing; Yao, Shuyu; Pham, Duy; Jiang, Li; Wright, Jeffrey; Sawant, Deepali; Dent, Alexander L; Braciale, Thomas J; Kaplan, Mark H; Sun, Jie

    2013-11-01

    Recent evidence has identified the role of granzyme B- and perforin-expressing CD4(+) T cells with cytotoxic potential in antiviral immunity. However, the in vivo cytokine cues and downstream pathways governing the differentiation of these cells are unclear. Here, we have identified that CD4(+) T cells with cytotoxic potential are specifically induced at the site of infection during influenza virus infection. The development of CD4(+) T cells with cytotoxic potential in vivo was dependent on the cooperation of the STAT2-dependent type I interferon signaling and the interleukin-2/interleukin-2 receptor alpha pathway for the induction of the transcription factors T-bet and Blimp-1. We showed that Blimp-1 promoted the binding of T-bet to the promoters of cytolytic genes in CD4(+) T cells and was required for the cytolytic function of the in vitro- and in vivo-generated CD4(+) T cells with cytotoxic potential. Thus, our data define the molecular basis of regulation of the in vivo development of this functionally cytotoxic Th subset during acute respiratory virus infection. The potential implications for the functions of these cells are discussed.

  1. TLR4-dependent recognition of lipopolysaccharide by epithelial cells requires sCD14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäckhed, Fredrik; Meijer, Lisa; Normark, Staffan; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta

    2002-08-01

    Epithelial cells lining the urinary bladder mucosa are engaged in numerous functions that act in concert to prevent exposure of the sensitive upper urinary tract to bacteria. This protective effect was recently suggested to be achieved mainly by compartmentalized, organ-specific expression of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) receptor Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 within epithelial cells of the urogenital tract. Here, we show that bladder epithelial cells recognize similarly low amounts of LPS as macrophages. LPS responsiveness measured as secretion of the chemoattractant interleukin 8 demonstrates a dependency on TLR4 in epithelial cells, which is similar to the situation in macrophages. The TLR4-mediated LPS response in bladder epithelial cells also uses the co-receptor CD14 for efficient LPS signalling. However, bladder epithelial cells do not express endogenous CD14 and are therefore dependent on the soluble form of CD14 that is present in body fluids. Furthermore, we demonstrate that epithelial chemokine production is augmented by type 1-mediated attachment of uropathogenic Escherichia coli in the absence, but not in the presence, of CD14. Collectively, our findings strengthen the role for bladder epithelial cells as important players in the innate immune system within the urinary tract.

  2. Uptake of label-free graphene oxide by Caco-2 cells is dependent on the cell differentiation status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucki, Melanie; Diener, Liliane; Bohmer, Nils; Hirsch, Cordula; Krug, Harald F; Palermo, Vincenzo; Wick, Peter

    2017-06-21

    Understanding the interaction of graphene-related materials (GRM) with human cells is a key to the assessment of their potential risks for human health. There is a knowledge gap regarding the potential uptake of GRM by human intestinal cells after unintended ingestion. Therefore the aim of our study was to investigate the interaction of label-free graphene oxide (GO) with the intestinal cell line Caco-2 in vitro and to shed light on the influence of the cell phenotype given by the differentiation status on cellular uptake behaviour. Internalisation of two label-free GOs with different lateral size and thickness by undifferentiated and differentiated Caco-2 cells was analysed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Semi-quantification of cells associated with GRM was performed by flow cytometry. Undifferentiated Caco-2 cells showed significant amounts of cell-associated GRM, whereas differentiated Caco-2 cells exhibited low adhesion of GO sheets. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed internalisation of both applied GO (small and large) by undifferentiated Caco-2 cells. Even large GO sheets with lateral dimensions up to 10 µm, were found internalised by undifferentiated cells, presumably by macropinocytosis. In contrast, no GO uptake could be found for differentiated Caco-2 cells exhibiting an enterocyte-like morphology with apical brush border. Our results show that the internalisation of GO is highly dependent on the cell differentiation status of human intestinal cells. During differentiation Caco-2 cells undergo intense phenotypic changes which lead to a dramatic decrease in GRM internalisation. The results support the hypothesis that the cell surface topography of differentiated Caco-2 cells given by the brush border leads to low adhesion of GO sheets and sterical hindrance for material uptake. In addition, the mechanical properties of GRM, especially flexibility of the sheets, seem to be an important factor for

  3. Overexpression of the cochaperone CHIP enhances Hsp70-dependent folding activity in mammalian cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampinga, HH; Kanon, B; Salomons, FA; Kabakov, AE; Patterson, C

    CHIP is a cochaperone of Hsp70 that inhibits Hsp70-dependent refolding in vitro. However, the effect of altered expression of CHIP on the fate of unfolded proteins in mammalian cells has not been determined. Surprisingly, we found that overexpression of CHIP in fibroblasts increased the refolding of

  4. Nr4a1-Dependent Ly6Clow Monocytes Monitor Endothelial Cells and Orchestrate Their Disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Leo M.; Stamatiades, Efstathios G.; Auffray, Cedric; Hanna, Richard N.; Glover, Leanne; Vizcay-Barrena, Gema; Hedrick, Catherine C.; Cook, H. Terence; Diebold, Sandra; Geissmann, Frederic

    2013-01-01

    Summary The functions of Nr4a1-dependent Ly6Clow monocytes remain enigmatic. We show that they are enriched within capillaries and scavenge microparticles from their lumenal side in a steady state. In the kidney cortex, perturbation of homeostasis by a TLR7-dependent nucleic acid “danger” signal, which may signify viral infection or local cell death, triggers Gαi-dependent intravascular retention of Ly6Clow monocytes by the endothelium. Then, monocytes recruit neutrophils in a TLR7-dependent manner to mediate focal necrosis of endothelial cells, whereas the monocytes remove cellular debris. Prevention of Ly6Clow monocyte development, crawling, or retention in Nr4a1−/−, Itgal−/−, and Tlr7host−/−BM+/+ and Cx3cr1−/− mice, respectively, abolished neutrophil recruitment and endothelial killing. Prevention of neutrophil recruitment in Tlr7host+/+BM−/− mice or by neutrophil depletion also abolished endothelial cell necrosis. Therefore, Ly6Clow monocytes are intravascular housekeepers that orchestrate the necrosis by neutrophils of endothelial cells that signal a local threat sensed via TLR7 followed by the in situ phagocytosis of cellular debris. PMID:23582326

  5. Physalin B induces cell cycle arrest and triggers apoptosis in breast cancer cells through modulating p53-dependent apoptotic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Anqi; Wang, Shengpeng; Zhou, Fayang; Li, Peng; Wang, Yitao; Gan, Lishe; Lin, Ligen

    2018-05-01

    Physalin B (PB), one of the major active steroidal constituents of Cape gooseberry (Physalis alkekengi L.), possesses a wide spectrum of biological activities. Although the anticancer activity of PB was reported in previous studies, the underlying mechanisms are still not well stated. In this study, the anticancer effect and the underlying mechanisms of PB were investigated in breast cancer cells. PB significantly reduced the viability of three human breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and T-47D, in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. PB induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and promoted cleavage of PARP (poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase), caspases 3, caspase 7 and caspase 9 to stimulate cell apoptosis. Further studies showed that PB induced breast cancer cells apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner in MCF-7 cells. PB also suppressed the phosphorylation of Akt (protein kinase B) and PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase), and increased the phosphorylation of GSK-3β (glycogen synthase kinase 3β). Taken together, our results indicated that PB might serve as a potential therapeutic agent for breast cancer. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Saikosaponin d induces cell death through caspase-3-dependent, caspase-3-independent and mitochondrial pathways in mammalian hepatic stellate cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Ming-Feng; Huang, S. Joseph; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Liu, Pei-Shan; Lin, Kun-I; Liu, Ching-Wen; Hsieh, Wen-Chuan; Shiu, Li-Yen; Chen, Chang-Han

    2016-01-01

    Saikosaponin d (SSd) is one of the main active triterpene saponins in Bupleurum falcatum. It has a steroid-like structure, and is reported to have pharmacological activities, including liver protection in rat, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction in several cancer cell lines. However, the biological functions and molecular mechanisms of mammalian cells under SSd treatment are still unclear. The cytotoxicity and apoptosis of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) upon SSd treatment were discovered by MTT assay, colony formation assay and flow cytometry. The collage I/III, caspase activity and apoptotic related genes were examined by quantitative PCR, Western blotting, immunofluorescence and ELISA. The mitochondrial functions were monitored by flow cytometry, MitoTracker staining, ATP production and XF24 bioenergetic assay. This study found that SSd triggers cell death via an apoptosis path. An example of this path might be typical apoptotic morphology, increased sub-G1 phase cell population, inhibition of cell proliferation and activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9. However, the apoptotic effects induced by SSd are partially blocked by the caspase-3 inhibitor, Z-DEVD-FMK, suggesting that SSd may trigger both HSC-T6 and LX-2 cell apoptosis through caspase-3-dependent and independent pathways. We also found that SSd can trigger BAX and BAK translocation from the cytosol to the mitochondria, resulting in mitochondrial function inhibition, membrane potential disruption. Finally, SSd also increases the release of apoptotic factors. The overall analytical data indicate that SSd-elicited cell death may occur through caspase-3-dependent, caspase-3-independent and mitochondrial pathways in mammalian HSCs, and thus can delay the formation of liver fibrosis by reducing the level of HSCs

  7. Retinal degeneration depends on Bmi1 function and reactivation of cell cycle proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zencak, Dusan; Schouwey, Karine; Chen, Danian; Ekström, Per; Tanger, Ellen; Bremner, Rod; van Lohuizen, Maarten; Arsenijevic, Yvan

    2013-02-12

    The epigenetic regulator Bmi1 controls proliferation in many organs. Reexpression of cell cycle proteins such as cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) is a hallmark of neuronal apoptosis in neurodegenerative diseases. Here we address the potential role of Bmi1 as a key regulator of cell cycle proteins during neuronal apoptosis. We show that several cell cycle proteins are expressed in different models of retinal degeneration and required in the Rd1 photoreceptor death process. Deleting E2f1, a downstream target of CDKs, provided temporary protection in Rd1 mice. Most importantly, genetic ablation of Bmi1 provided extensive photoreceptor survival and improvement of retinal function in Rd1 mice, mediated by a decrease in cell cycle markers and regulators independent of p16(Ink4a) and p19(Arf). These data reveal that Bmi1 controls the cell cycle-related death process, highlighting this pathway as a promising therapeutic target for neuroprotection in retinal dystrophies.

  8. Clinical Cancer Therapy by NK Cells via Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kory L. Alderson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are powerful effector cells that can be directed to eliminate tumor cells through tumor-targeted monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. Some tumor-targeted mAbs have been successfully applied in the clinic and are included in the standard of care for certain malignancies. Strategies to augment the antitumor response by NK cells have led to an increased understanding of how to improve their effector responses. Next-generation reagents, such as molecularly modified mAbs and mAb-cytokine fusion proteins (immunocytokines, ICs designed to augment NK-mediated killing, are showing promise in preclinical and some clinical settings. Continued research into the antitumor effects induced by NK cells and tumor-targeted mAbs suggests that additional intrinsic and extrinsic factors may influence the antitumor response. Therefore more research is needed that focuses on evaluating which NK cell and tumor criteria are best predictive of a clinical response and which combination immunotherapy regimens to pursue for distinct clinical settings.

  9. Regulatory domain selectivity in the cell-type specific PKN-dependence of cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Lachmann

    Full Text Available The mammalian protein kinase N (PKN family of Serine/Threonine kinases comprises three isoforms, which are targets for Rho family GTPases. Small GTPases are major regulators of the cellular cytoskeleton, generating interest in the role(s of specific PKN isoforms in processes such as cell migration and invasion. It has been reported that PKN3 is required for prostate tumour cell invasion but not PKN1 or 2. Here we employ a cell model, the 5637 bladder tumour cell line where PKN2 is relatively highly expressed, to assess the potential redundancy of these isoforms in migratory responses. It is established that PKN2 has a critical role in the migration and invasion of these cells. Furthermore, using a PKN wild-type and chimera rescue strategy, it is shown that PKN isoforms are not simply redundant in supporting migration, but appear to be linked through isoform specific regulatory domain properties to selective upstream signals. It is concluded that intervention in PKNs may need to be directed at multiple isoforms to be effective in different cell types.

  10. Regulatory domain selectivity in the cell-type specific PKN-dependence of cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachmann, Sylvie; Jevons, Amy; De Rycker, Manu; Casamassima, Adele; Radtke, Simone; Collazos, Alejandra; Parker, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian protein kinase N (PKN) family of Serine/Threonine kinases comprises three isoforms, which are targets for Rho family GTPases. Small GTPases are major regulators of the cellular cytoskeleton, generating interest in the role(s) of specific PKN isoforms in processes such as cell migration and invasion. It has been reported that PKN3 is required for prostate tumour cell invasion but not PKN1 or 2. Here we employ a cell model, the 5637 bladder tumour cell line where PKN2 is relatively highly expressed, to assess the potential redundancy of these isoforms in migratory responses. It is established that PKN2 has a critical role in the migration and invasion of these cells. Furthermore, using a PKN wild-type and chimera rescue strategy, it is shown that PKN isoforms are not simply redundant in supporting migration, but appear to be linked through isoform specific regulatory domain properties to selective upstream signals. It is concluded that intervention in PKNs may need to be directed at multiple isoforms to be effective in different cell types.

  11. Transfer of immunity by transfer of bone marrow cells: T-cell dependency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marusic, M.

    1978-01-01

    Thymectomized, lethally irradiated mice reconstituted with normal bone marrow cells succumbed when challenged ip with rat Yoshida ascites sarcoma (YAS) cells 40 days after irradiation and reconstitution. In contrast, thymectomized irradiated mice reconstituted with bone marrow cells from YAS-immune donors rejected the subsequent tumor challenge. Pretreatment of the bone marrow cells from immune donors with anti-Thy 1.2 antiserum and complement completely abolished the transfer of anti-YAS resistance. Bone marrow cells from donors thymectomized 2 months before immunization enabled almost all recipients to reject YAS, but bone marrow cells from donors thymectomized 8 months before immunization protected only 50 percent of the recipients. Further analysis showed that mice thymectomized 8 months before immunization failed to generate anti-YAS antibody response, whereas the antibody response of mice thymectomized 2 months before immunization did not differ from that of non-thymectomized age-matched control mice. The data suggest that the immune reaction of mice against xenogeneic YAS requires long-lived T 2 lymphocytes

  12. 2-Methoxy-6-acetyl-7-methyljuglone (MAM), a natural naphthoquinone, induces NO-dependent apoptosis and necroptosis by H2O2-dependent JNK activation in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wen; Bao, Jiaolin; Lin, Wei; Gao, Hongwei; Zhao, Wenwen; Zhang, Qingwen; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung; Lu, Jinjian; Chen, Xiuping

    2016-03-01

    Redox signaling plays a fundamental role in maintaining cell physiological activities. A deregulation of this balance through oxidative stress or nitrosative stress has been implicated in cancer. Here, we reported that 2-methoxy-6-acetyl-7-methyl juglone (MAM), a natural naphthoquinone isolated from Polygonum cuspidatum Sieb. et Zucc, caused hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) dependent activation of JNK and induced the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), thereby leading to nitric oxide (NO) generation in multiple cancer cells. Nitrosative stress induced necroptosis in A549 lung cancer cells, but resulted in caspase-dependent intrinsic apoptosis in B16-F10 melanoma and MCF7 breast cancer cells. In addition, a decrease in GSH/GSSG levels accompanied with increased ROS production was observed. Reversal of ROS generation and cell death in GSH pretreated cells indicated the involvement of GSH depletion in MAM mediated cytotoxicity. In summary, a natural product MAM induced NO-dependent multiple forms of cell death in cancer cells mediated by H2O2-dependent JNK activation in cancer cells. GSH depletion might play an initial role in MAM-induced cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Time-resolved sign-dependent switching in a hybrid aligned nematic liquid crystal cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taphouse, T S; Cornford, S L; Birkett, J E; Sambles, J R

    2008-01-01

    An optical waveguide technique is used to determine the director tilt profile across a hybrid aligned nematic (HAN) liquid crystal cell, in which the optical response is dependent on the sign of the applied voltage. Two physical models are shown that fit the equilibrium experimental data, but with alternative explanations for this sign dependence. Models with either a flexoelectric coefficient of 2.25x10 -11 C m -1 or a bound surface charge of 12.2 μC m -2 are shown that fit this equilibrium data. In an attempt to resolve this degeneracy sign-dependent switching data are analysed. However, neither model can explain these switching data, which are affected by slow transients of ∼100 ms which are believed to be due to the motion of free ions in the liquid crystal. From the form of these slow transients, it is suggested that the equilibrium position of the ions is next to a cell substrate

  14. Magnitude-dependent proliferation and contractility modulation of human bladder smooth muscle cells under physiological stretch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, De-Yi; Wazir, Romel; Du, Caigan; Tian, Ye; Yue, Xuan; Wei, Tang-Qiang; Wang, Kun-Jie

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and test a kind of stretch pattern which is based on modified BOSE BioDynamic system to produce optimum physiological stretch during bladder cycle. Moreover, we aimed to emphasize the effects of physiological stretch's amplitude upon proliferation and contractility of human bladder smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs). HBSMCs were seeded onto silicone membrane and subjected to stretch simulating bladder cycle at the range of stretches and time according to customized software on modified BOSE BioDynamic bioreactor. Morphological changes were assessed using immunofluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscope. Cell proliferation and cell viability were determined by BrdU incorporation assay and Cell Counting Kit-8, respectively. Contractility of the cells was determined using collagen gel contraction assay. RT-PCR was used to assess phenotypic and contractility markers. HBSMCs were found to show morphologically spindle-shaped and orientation at various elongations in the modified bioreactor. Stretch-induced proliferation and viability depended on the magnitude of stretch, and stretches also regulate contractility and contraction markers in a magnitude-dependent manner. We described and tested a kind of stretch pattern which delivers physiological stretch implemented during bladder cycle. The findings also showed that mechanical stretch can promote magnitude-dependent morphological, proliferative and contractile modulation of HBSMCs in vitro.

  15. 4SC-202 activates ASK1-dependent mitochondrial apoptosis pathway to inhibit hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Meili; Wan, Fuqiang; Li, Zhengling; Zhang, Fenghua

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the potential anti-hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell activity by 4SC-202, a novel class I HDAC inhibitor (HDACi). The associated signaling mechanisms were also analyzed. We showed that 4SC-202 treatment induced potent cytotoxic and proliferation–inhibitory activities against established HCC cell lines (HepG2, HepB3, SMMC-7721) and patient-derived primary HCC cells. Further, adding 4SC-202 in HCC cells activated mitochondrial apoptosis pathway, which was evidenced by mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening, cytochrome C cytosol release and caspase-3/-9 activation. Inhibition of this apoptosis pathway, by caspase-3/-9 inhibitors, mPTP blockers, or by shRNA-mediated knockdown of cyclophilin-D (Cyp-D, a key component of mPTP), significantly attenuated 4SC-202-induced HCC cell death and apoptosis. Reversely, over-expression of Cyp-D enhanced 4SC-202's sensitivity in HCC cells. Further studies showed that 4SC-202 induced apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) activation, causing it translocation to mitochondria and physical association with Cyp-D. This mitochondrial ASK1-Cyp-D complexation appeared required for mediating 4SC-202-induced apoptosis activation. ASK1 stable knockdown by targeted-shRNAs largely inhibited 4SC-202-induced mPTP opening, cytochrome C release, and following HCC cell apoptotic death. Together, we suggest that 4SC-202 activates ASK1-dependent mitochondrial apoptosis pathway to potently inhibit human HCC cells. - Highlights: • 4SC-202 exerts potent anti-proliferative and cytotoxic activity against established/primary HCC cells. • SC-202-induced anti-HCC cell activity relies on caspase-dependent apoptosis activation. • 4SC-202 activates Cyp-D-dependent mitochondrial apoptosis pathway in HCC cells. • 4SC-202 activates ASK1 in HCC cells, causing it translocation to mitochondria. • Mitochondrial ASK1-Cyp-D complexation mediates 4SC-202's activity in HCC cells.

  16. 4SC-202 activates ASK1-dependent mitochondrial apoptosis pathway to inhibit hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Meili, E-mail: fumeilidrlinyi@tom.com [Department of Infectious Disease, Linyi People' s Hospital, Linyi 276000 (China); Wan, Fuqiang [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Linyi Tumor Hospital, Linyi 276000 (China); Li, Zhengling [Department of Nursing, Tengzhou Central People' s Hospital, Tengzhou 277500 (China); Zhang, Fenghua [Department of Operating Room, Linyi People' s Hospital, Linyi 276000 (China)

    2016-03-04

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the potential anti-hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell activity by 4SC-202, a novel class I HDAC inhibitor (HDACi). The associated signaling mechanisms were also analyzed. We showed that 4SC-202 treatment induced potent cytotoxic and proliferation–inhibitory activities against established HCC cell lines (HepG2, HepB3, SMMC-7721) and patient-derived primary HCC cells. Further, adding 4SC-202 in HCC cells activated mitochondrial apoptosis pathway, which was evidenced by mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening, cytochrome C cytosol release and caspase-3/-9 activation. Inhibition of this apoptosis pathway, by caspase-3/-9 inhibitors, mPTP blockers, or by shRNA-mediated knockdown of cyclophilin-D (Cyp-D, a key component of mPTP), significantly attenuated 4SC-202-induced HCC cell death and apoptosis. Reversely, over-expression of Cyp-D enhanced 4SC-202's sensitivity in HCC cells. Further studies showed that 4SC-202 induced apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) activation, causing it translocation to mitochondria and physical association with Cyp-D. This mitochondrial ASK1-Cyp-D complexation appeared required for mediating 4SC-202-induced apoptosis activation. ASK1 stable knockdown by targeted-shRNAs largely inhibited 4SC-202-induced mPTP opening, cytochrome C release, and following HCC cell apoptotic death. Together, we suggest that 4SC-202 activates ASK1-dependent mitochondrial apoptosis pathway to potently inhibit human HCC cells. - Highlights: • 4SC-202 exerts potent anti-proliferative and cytotoxic activity against established/primary HCC cells. • SC-202-induced anti-HCC cell activity relies on caspase-dependent apoptosis activation. • 4SC-202 activates Cyp-D-dependent mitochondrial apoptosis pathway in HCC cells. • 4SC-202 activates ASK1 in HCC cells, causing it translocation to mitochondria. • Mitochondrial ASK1-Cyp-D complexation mediates 4SC-202's activity in HCC cells.

  17. Double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase regulates the motility of breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Xu

    Full Text Available Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR is an interferon-induced protein kinase that plays a central role in the anti-viral process. Due to its pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative action, there is an increased interest in PKR modulation as an anti-tumor strategy. PKR is overexpressed in breast cancer cells; however, the role of PKR in breast cancer cells is unclear. The expression/activity of PKR appears inversely related to the aggressiveness of breast cancer cells. The current study investigated the role of PKR in the motility/migration of breast cancer cells. The activation of PKR by a synthesized dsRNA (PIC significantly decreased the motility of several breast cancer cell lines (BT474, MDA-MB231 and SKBR3. PIC inhibited cell migration and blocked cell membrane ruffling without affecting cell viability. PIC also induced the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and impaired the formation of lamellipodia. These effects of PIC were reversed by the pretreatment of a selective PKR inhibitor. PIC also activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and its downstream MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2. PIC-induced activation of p38 MAPK and MK2 was attenuated by the PKR inhibitor and the PKR siRNA, but a selective p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB203580 or other MAPK inhibitors did not affect PKR activity, indicating that PKR is upstream of p38 MAPK/MK2. Cofilin is an actin severing protein and regulates membrane ruffling, lamellipodia formation and cell migration. PIC inhibited cofilin activity by enhancing its phosphorylation at Ser3. PIC activated LIM kinase 1 (LIMK1, an upstream kinase of cofilin in a p38 MAPK-dependent manner. We concluded that the activation of PKR suppressed cell motility by regulating the p38 MAPK/MK2/LIMK/cofilin pathway.

  18. Fenofibrate suppressed proliferation and migration of human neuroblastoma cells via oxidative stress dependent of TXNIP upregulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Cunjin; Shi, Aiming; Cao, Guowen [Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, 215004 (China); Tao, Tao [Department of Urology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing, 210009 (China); Chen, Ruidong [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, 215004 (China); Hu, Zhanhong; Shen, Zhu; Tao, Hong; Cao, Bin [Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, 215004 (China); Hu, Duanmin, E-mail: hudmsdfey@sina.com [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, 215004 (China); Bao, Junjie, E-mail: baojjsdfey@sina.com [Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, 215004 (China)

    2015-05-15

    There are no appropriate drugs for metastatic neuroblastoma (NB), which is the most common extra-cranial solid tumor for childhood. Thioredoxin binding protein (TXNIP), the endogenous inhibitor of ROS elimination, has been identified as a tumor suppressor in various solid tumors. It reported that fenofibrate exerts anti-tumor effects in several human cancer cell lines. However, its detail mechanisms remain unclear. The present study assessed the effects of fenofibrate on NB cells and investigated TXNIP role in its anti-tumor mechanisms. We used MTT assay to detect cells proliferation, starch wound test to investigate cells migration, H{sub 2}DCF-DA to detect intracellular ROS, siRNA to interfere TXNIP and peroxisome proliferator-androgen receptor-alpha (PPAR-α) expression, western blot to determine protein levels, flow cytometry to analyze apoptosis. Fenofibrate suppressed proliferation and migration of NB cells, remarkably increased intracellular ROS, upregulated TXNIP expression, promoted cell apoptosis. Furthermore, inhibition of TXNIP expression attenuated anti-tumor effects of fenofibrate, while inhibition of PPAR-α had no influences. Our results indicated the anti-tumor role of fenofibrate on NB cells by exacerbating oxidative stress and inducing apoptosis was dependent on the upregulation of TXNIP. - Highlights: • We found that fenofibrate suppressed proliferation and migration of NB cells. • We found that fenofibrate remarkably increased intracellular ROS, upregulated TXNIP expression, and promoted cell apoptosis. • Inhibition of TXNIP expression attenuated anti-tumor effects of fenofibrate, while inhibition of PPAR-α had no influences. • Our results indicated the anti-tumor role of fenofibrate on NB cells was dependent on the upregulation of TXNIP.

  19. p53-dependent adaptive responses in human cells exposed to space radiations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Su, Xiaoming; Suzuki, Hiromi; Omori, Katsunori; Seki, Masaya; Hashizume, Toko; Shimazu, Toru; Ishioka, Noriaki; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2010-11-15

    It has been reported that priming irradiation or conditioning irradiation with a low dose of X-rays in the range of 0.02-0.1 Gy induces a p53-dependent adaptive response in mammalian cells. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of space radiations on the adaptive response. Two human lymphoblastoid cell lines were used; one cell line bears a wild-type p53 (wtp53) gene, and another cell line bears a mutated p53 (mp53) gene. The cells were frozen during transportation on the space shuttle and while in orbit in the International Space Station freezer for 133 days between November 15, 2008 and March 29, 2009. After the frozen samples were returned to Earth, the cells were cultured for 6 h and then exposed to a challenging X-ray-irradiation (2 Gy). Cellular sensitivity, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations were scored using dye-exclusion assays, Hoechst33342 staining assays, and chromosomal banding techniques, respectively. In cells exposed to space radiations, adaptive responses such as the induction of radioresistance and the depression of radiation-induced apoptosis and chromosome aberrations were observed in wtp53 cells but not in mp53 cells. These results have confirmed the hypothesis that p53-dependent adaptive responses are apparently induced by space radiations within a specific range of low doses. The cells exhibited this effect owing to space radiations exposure, even though the doses in space were very low. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Enhancement of antibody-dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity: a new era in cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajasekaran N

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Narendiran Rajasekaran,1,* Cariad Chester,1,* Atsushi Yonezawa,1,2 Xing Zhao,1,3 Holbrook E Kohrt1 1Division of Oncology, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA; 2Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto, Japan; 3Tissue Engineering and Stem Cells Research Center, Department of Immunology, Guiyang Medical University, Guiyang, Guizhou Province, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The therapeutic efficacy of some anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs depends on the capacity of the mAb to recognize the tumor-associated antigen and induce cytotoxicity via a network of immune effector cells. This process of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC against tumor cells is triggered by the interaction of the fragment crystallizable (Fc portion of the mAb with the Fc receptors on effector cells like natural killer cells, macrophages, γδ T cells, and dendritic cells. By augmenting ADCC, the antitumor activity of mAbs can be significantly increased. Currently, identifying and developing therapeutic agents that enhance ADCC is a growing area of research. Combining existing tumor-targeting mAbs and ADCC-promoting agents that stimulate effector cells will translate to greater clinical responses. In this review, we discuss strategies for enhancing ADCC and emphasize the potential of combination treatments that include US Food and Drug Administration-approved mAbs and immunostimulatory therapeutics. Keywords: ADCC, NK cell, reovirus, TLR, CD137

  1. Fenofibrate suppressed proliferation and migration of human neuroblastoma cells via oxidative stress dependent of TXNIP upregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Cunjin; Shi, Aiming; Cao, Guowen; Tao, Tao; Chen, Ruidong; Hu, Zhanhong; Shen, Zhu; Tao, Hong; Cao, Bin; Hu, Duanmin; Bao, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    There are no appropriate drugs for metastatic neuroblastoma (NB), which is the most common extra-cranial solid tumor for childhood. Thioredoxin binding protein (TXNIP), the endogenous inhibitor of ROS elimination, has been identified as a tumor suppressor in various solid tumors. It reported that fenofibrate exerts anti-tumor effects in several human cancer cell lines. However, its detail mechanisms remain unclear. The present study assessed the effects of fenofibrate on NB cells and investigated TXNIP role in its anti-tumor mechanisms. We used MTT assay to detect cells proliferation, starch wound test to investigate cells migration, H 2 DCF-DA to detect intracellular ROS, siRNA to interfere TXNIP and peroxisome proliferator-androgen receptor-alpha (PPAR-α) expression, western blot to determine protein levels, flow cytometry to analyze apoptosis. Fenofibrate suppressed proliferation and migration of NB cells, remarkably increased intracellular ROS, upregulated TXNIP expression, promoted cell apoptosis. Furthermore, inhibition of TXNIP expression attenuated anti-tumor effects of fenofibrate, while inhibition of PPAR-α had no influences. Our results indicated the anti-tumor role of fenofibrate on NB cells by exacerbating oxidative stress and inducing apoptosis was dependent on the upregulation of TXNIP. - Highlights: • We found that fenofibrate suppressed proliferation and migration of NB cells. • We found that fenofibrate remarkably increased intracellular ROS, upregulated TXNIP expression, and promoted cell apoptosis. • Inhibition of TXNIP expression attenuated anti-tumor effects of fenofibrate, while inhibition of PPAR-α had no influences. • Our results indicated the anti-tumor role of fenofibrate on NB cells was dependent on the upregulation of TXNIP

  2. Effect of Gonadectomy on the Androgen-Dependent Behavior of Ganglion Cell-Like Cells in Djungarian Hamsters (Phodopus sungorus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahira, Rei; Yoshida, Rumika; Michishita, Masaki; Ohkusu-Tsukada, Kozo; Takahashi, Kimimasa

    2016-02-01

    Ganglion cell-like (GL) cells reside in the dermis of the ventral skin of mature male Djungarian hamsters (Phodopus sugorus) and express androgen receptor (AR). To assess whether GL cells have androgen-dependent behavior, we evaluated the histologic changes of GL cells after gonadectomy. Five male and 5 female hamsters were gonadectomized at the age of 4 wk and necropsied 14 wk later. The number, distribution, and proliferative activity of GL cells in the thoracoabdominal and dorsal skins were evaluated histologically and compared with those of corresponding intact animals. GL cells were more numerous, were distributed throughout the skin more widely, and had higher proliferative activity in the intact male hamsters than in their gonadectomized counterparts. Similar trends regarding these 3 parameters were seen in ovariectomized compared with intact female hamsters and between intact male and intact female hamsters. These results suggest that the GL cells of Djungarian hamsters demonstrate sex-associated differences in their distribution and proliferative activity and that androgen may be involved in the development of these cells.

  3. Fluorescent peptide biosensor for probing the relative abundance of cyclin-dependent kinases in living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Kurzawa

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependant kinases play a central role in coordinating cell growth and division, and in sustaining proliferation of cancer cells, thereby constituting attractive pharmacological targets. However, there are no direct means of assessing their relative abundance in living cells, current approaches being limited to antigenic and proteomic analysis of fixed cells. In order to probe the relative abundance of these kinases directly in living cells, we have developed a fluorescent peptide biosensor with biligand affinity for CDKs and cyclins in vitro, that retains endogenous CDK/cyclin complexes from cell extracts, and that bears an environmentally-sensitive probe, whose fluorescence increases in a sensitive fashion upon recognition of its targets. CDKSENS was introduced into living cells, through complexation with the cell-penetrating carrier CADY2 and applied to assess the relative abundance of CDK/Cyclins through fluorescence imaging and ratiometric quantification. This peptide biosensor technology affords direct and sensitive readout of CDK/cyclin complex levels, and reports on differences in complex formation when tampering with a single CDK or cyclin. CDKSENS further allows for detection of differences between different healthy and cancer cell lines, thereby enabling to distinguish cells that express high levels of these heterodimeric kinases, from cells that present decreased or defective assemblies. This fluorescent biosensor technology provides information on the overall status of CDK/Cyclin complexes which cannot be obtained through antigenic detection of individual subunits, in a non-invasive fashion which does not require cell fixation or extraction procedures. As such it provides promising perspectives for monitoring the response to therapeutics that affect CDK/Cyclin abundance, for cell-based drug discovery strategies and fluorescence-based cancer diagnostics.

  4. Inflammatory response of disc cells against Propionibacterium acnes depends on the presence of lumbar Modic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudli, Stefan; Miller, S; Demir-Deviren, S; Lotz, J C

    2017-09-07

    Intervertebral disc with Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) is suggested to be an etiology of Modic type I changes in the adjacent bone marrow. However it is unknown if disc cells can respond to P. acnes and if bone marrow cells respond to bacterial and disc metabolites draining from infected discs. Human disc cells (n = 10) were co-cultured with 10- and 100-fold excess of P. acnes over disc cells for 3 h and 24 h. Lipopolysaccharide was used as positive control. Expression of IL1, IL6, IL8, and CCL2 by disc cells was quantified by quantitative PCR. Lipase activity was measured in culture supernatants (n = 6). Human vertebral bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMNCs) (n = 2) were cultured in conditioned media from disc cell/P. acnes co-cultures and expression of IL1, IL6, IL8, and CCL2 was measured after 24 h. All disc cells responded to lipopolysaccharide but only 6/10 responded to P. acnes with increased cytokine expression. Cytokine increase was time- but not P. acnes concentration-dependent. Disc cell responsiveness was associated with the presence of lumbar Modic changes in the donor. Lipase activity was increased independent of disc cell responsiveness. BMNCs responded with inflammatory activity only when cultured in supernatants from responsive disc cell lines. Disc cell responsiveness to P. acnes associates with the presence of lumbar Modic changes. Furthermore, bone marrow cells had an inflammatory response to the cocktail of disc cytokines and P. acnes metabolites. These data indicate that low virulent P. acnes infection of the disc is a potential exacerbating factor to Modic changes.

  5. Role of CSL-dependent and independent Notch signaling pathways in cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chong; Xing, Rui; Liu, Jing; Xing, Feiyue

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis is a normally biological phenomenon in various organisms, involving complexly molecular mechanisms with a series of signaling processes. Notch signaling is found evolutionarily conserved in many species, playing a critical role in embryonic development, normal tissue homeostasis, angiogenesis and immunoregulation. The focus of this review is on currently novel advances about roles of CSL-dependent and independent Notch signaling pathways in cell apoptosis. The CSL can bind Notch intracellular domain (NIC) to act as a switch in mediating transcriptional activation or inactivation of the Notch signaling pathway downstream genes in the nucleus. It shows that CSL-dependent signaling regulates the cell apoptosis through Hes-1-PTEN-AKT-mTOR signaling, but rather the CSL-independent signaling mediates the cell apoptosis possibly via NIC-mTORC2-AKT-mTOR signaling, providing a new insight into apoptotic mechanisms.

  6. Mitochondrial modulation of oxygen-dependent radiosensitivity in some human tumour cell lines.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Anoopkumar-Dukie, S

    2009-10-01

    Oxygen-dependent radiosensitivity of tumour cells reflects direct oxidative damage to DNA, but non-nuclear mechanisms including signalling pathways may also contribute. Mitochondria are likely candidates because not only do they integrate signals from each of the main kinase pathways but mitochondrial kinases responsive to oxidative stress communicate to the rest of the cell. Using pharmacological and immunochemical methods, we tested the role of mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) and the Bcl-2 proteins in oxygen-dependent radiosensitivity. Drug-treated or untreated cervical cancer HeLa, breast cancer MCF-7 and melanoma MeWo cell lines were irradiated at 6.2 Gy under normoxic and hypoxic conditions then allowed to proliferate for 7 days. The MPT blocker cyclosporin A (2 microM) strongly protected HeLa but not the other two lines against oxygen-dependent radiosensitivity. By contrast, bongkrekic acid (50 microM), which blocks MPT by targeting the adenine nucleotide transporter, had only marginal effect and calcineurin inhibitor FK-506 (0.1 microM) had none. Nor was evidence found for the modulation of oxygen-dependent radiosensitivity by Bax\\/Bcl-2 signalling, mitochondrial ATP-dependent potassium (mitoK(ATP)) channels or mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. In conclusion, calcineurin-independent protection by cyclosporin A suggests that MPT but not mitoK(ATP) or the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway plays a causal role in oxygen-dependent radiosensitivity of HeLa cells. Targeting MPT may therefore improve the effectiveness of radiotherapy in some solid tumours.

  7. Characterization of bicarbonate-dependent potassium uptake in cultured corneal endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savion, N.; Farzame, N.; Berlin, H.B.

    1989-01-01

    Bovine corneal endothelial (BCE) cells in culture demonstrated 86Rb+ uptake which was mostly ouabain-sensitive with some (15 to 50%) ouabain-insensitive uptake that was dependent on the presence of bicarbonate in the incubation medium. Bovine smooth muscle (SM) cells demonstrated ouabain-sensitive 86Rb+ uptake but the ouabain-insensitive 86Rb+ uptake was not bicarbonate-dependent. Although omission of bicarbonate from the incubation buffer resulted in some reduction in the pH, this change was not responsible for the reduction in the ouabain-insensitive 86Rb+ uptake. Furthermore, the removal of bicarbonate decreased the 86Rb+ influx but not its efflux. This ouabain-insensitive and bicarbonate-dependent 86Rb+ influx in BCE cells proceeded at a linear rate for at least 60 min and increased as a function of bicarbonate concentration such that almost maximal uptake was observed at a concentration of about 10 to 15 mM. Saturation of the bicarbonate-dependent 86Rb+ pump in BCE cells occurred at a concentration of 2 mM Rb+ in the incubation buffer, similar to the previously observed value for the Na+, K+-ATPase. Competition experiments with both unlabeled Rb+ and K+ demonstrated that likewise in the Na+, K+-ATPase the 86Rb+ influx represented physiological influx of K+. Furthermore, the energy requirements of the bicarbonate-dependent 86Rb+ uptake were similar to those of the 86Rb+ uptake via the Na+, K+-ATPase. The results described in this work demonstrated a novel bicarbonate-dependent K+ pump in addition to the Na+, K+-ATPase pump.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Cell-cycle-dependent efficacy of photodynamic therapy with ATX-S10(Na).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Munetaka; Furuta, Takahisa; Takahira, Kenichiro; Kajimura, Masayoshi; Hanai, Hiroyuki; Kohno, Eiji; Hirano, Toru; Hishida, Akira

    2005-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a useful strategy for treating various cancers. Details of the mechanisms of PDT have not been made clear yet. We intended to study the efficacy of PDT in relation to the cell cycle. HeLa S3 cells were synchronized by the thymidine block method. Cells in different cell cycle phases after release were treated with the water-soluble photosensitizer, ATX-S10(Na). The cellular viability after PDT was determined by the MTT assay. Intracellular levels of ATX-S10(Na) in different cell cycle phases were also determined. We found that cells in the S and G(2)/M phases were hypersensitive to PDT with ATX-S10(Na) in comparison with those in the G(1) phase, and that cellular levels of ATX-S10(Na) were increased in cells in the S and G(2)/M phases compared to those in the G(1) phase. We conclude that cellular ATX-S10(Na) levels differ among the different cell cycle phases, which is associated with the cell-cycle-dependent efficacy of PDT with ATX-S10(Na).

  9. Autotaxin induces lung epithelial cell migration through lysoPLD activity-dependent and -independent pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; He, Donghong; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Zhong, Mintao; Salgia, Ravi; Morris, Andrew J.; Smyth, Susan S.; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Zhao, Yutong

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Lung cell migration is a crucial step for re-epithelialization that in turn is essential for remodeling and repair after lung injury. We hypothesize that secreted autotaxin (ATX), which exhibits lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD) activity, stimulates lung epithelial cell migration through lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) generation-dependent and -independent pathways. Release of endogenous ATX protein and activity was detected in lung epithelial cell culture medium. ATX with V5 tag (ATX-V5) overexpressed conditional medium had higher LPA levels compared to control medium and stimulated cell migration through Gαi-coupled LPA receptors, cytoskeleton rearrangement, phosphorylation of PKCδ and cortactin at the leading edge of migrating cells. Inhibition of PKCδ attenuated ATX-V5 overexpressed conditional medium-mediated phosphorylation of cortactin. In addition, a recombinant ATX mutant, lacking lysoPLD activity, or heat-inactived ATX also induced lung epithelial cell migration. Extracelluar ATX bound to LPA receptor and integrin β4 complex on A549 cell surface. Finally, intratracheal administration of lipopolysaccharide into mouse airway induced ATX release and LPA production in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. These results suggested a significant role for ATX in lung epithelial cell migration and remodeling through its ability to induce LPA production-mediated phosphorylation of PKCδ and cortactin. In addition we also demonstrated assocation of ATX with epithelial cell surface LPA receptor and integrin β4. PMID:21696367

  10. Proinflammatory Cytokines Induce Endocrine Differentiation in Pancreatic Ductal Cells via STAT3-Dependent NGN3 Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Achel Valdez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A major goal of diabetes research is to develop strategies that replenish pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells. One emerging strategy is to harness pancreatic plasticity—the ability of pancreatic cells to undergo cellular interconversions—a phenomenon implicated in physiological stress and pancreatic injury. Here, we investigate the effects of inflammatory cytokine stress on the differentiation potential of ductal cells in a human cell line, in mouse ductal cells by pancreatic intraductal injection, and during the progression of autoimmune diabetes in the non-obese diabetic (NOD mouse model. We find that inflammatory cytokine insults stimulate epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT as well as the endocrine program in human pancreatic ductal cells via STAT3-dependent NGN3 activation. Furthermore, we show that inflammatory cytokines activate ductal-to-endocrine cell reprogramming in vivo independent of hyperglycemic stress. Together, our findings provide evidence that inflammatory cytokines direct ductal-to-endocrine cell differentiation, with implications for beta cell regeneration.

  11. Cell contact-dependent outer membrane exchange in myxobacteria: genetic determinants and mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darshankumar T Pathak

    Full Text Available Biofilms are dense microbial communities. Although widely distributed and medically important, how biofilm cells interact with one another is poorly understood. Recently, we described a novel process whereby myxobacterial biofilm cells exchange their outer membrane (OM lipoproteins. For the first time we report here the identification of two host proteins, TraAB, required for transfer. These proteins are predicted to localize in the cell envelope; and TraA encodes a distant PA14 lectin-like domain, a cysteine-rich tandem repeat region, and a putative C-terminal protein sorting tag named MYXO-CTERM, while TraB encodes an OmpA-like domain. Importantly, TraAB are required in donors and recipients, suggesting bidirectional transfer. By use of a lipophilic fluorescent dye, we also discovered that OM lipids are exchanged. Similar to lipoproteins, dye transfer requires TraAB function, gliding motility and a structured biofilm. Importantly, OM exchange was found to regulate swarming and development behaviors, suggesting a new role in cell-cell communication. A working model proposes TraA is a cell surface receptor that mediates cell-cell adhesion for OM fusion, in which lipoproteins/lipids are transferred by lateral diffusion. We further hypothesize that cell contact-dependent exchange helps myxobacteria to coordinate their social behaviors.

  12. Regulatory T Cell Migration Is Dependent on Glucokinase-Mediated Glycolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, Madhav; Cheung, Kenneth C P; Fu, Hongmei; Bonacina, Fabrizia; Wang, Guosu; Coe, David; Ward, Eleanor J; Colamatteo, Alessandra; Jangani, Maryam; Baragetti, Andrea; Matarese, Giuseppe; Smith, David M; Haas, Robert; Mauro, Claudio; Wraith, David C; Okkenhaug, Klaus; Catapano, Alberico L; De Rosa, Veronica; Norata, Giuseppe D; Marelli-Berg, Federica M

    2017-11-21

    Migration of activated regulatory T (Treg) cells to inflamed tissue is crucial for their immune-modulatory function. While metabolic reprogramming during Treg cell differentiation has been extensively studied, the bioenergetics of Treg cell trafficking remains undefined. We have investigated the metabolic demands of migrating Treg cells in vitro and in vivo. We show that glycolysis was instrumental for their migration and was initiated by pro-migratory stimuli via a PI3K-mTORC2-mediated pathway culminating in induction of the enzyme glucokinase (GCK). Subsequently, GCK promoted cytoskeletal rearrangements by associating with actin. Treg cells lacking this pathway were functionally suppressive but failed to migrate to skin allografts and inhibit rejection. Similarly, human carriers of a loss-of-function GCK regulatory protein gene-leading to increased GCK activity-had reduced numbers of circulating Treg cells. These cells displayed enhanced migratory activity but similar suppressive function, while conventional T cells were unaffected. Thus, GCK-dependent glycolysis regulates Treg cell migration. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Modeling activity and target-dependent developmental cell death of mouse retinal ganglion cells ex vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Voyatzis

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death is widespread during the development of the central nervous system and serves multiple purposes including the establishment of neural connections. In the mouse retina a substantial reduction of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs occurs during the first postnatal week, coinciding with the formation of retinotopic maps in the superior colliculus (SC. We previously established a retino-collicular culture preparation which recapitulates the progressive topographic ordering of RGC projections during early post-natal life. Here, we questioned whether this model could also be suitable to examine the mechanisms underlying developmental cell death of RGCs. Brn3a was used as a marker of the RGCs. A developmental decline in the number of Brn3a-immunolabelled neurons was found in the retinal explant with a timing that paralleled that observed in vivo. In contrast, the density of photoreceptors or of starburst amacrine cells increased, mimicking the evolution of these cell populations in vivo. Blockade of neural activity with tetrodotoxin increased the number of surviving Brn3a-labelled neurons in the retinal explant, as did the increase in target availability when one retinal explant was confronted with 2 or 4 collicular slices. Thus, this ex vivo model reproduces the developmental reduction of RGCs and recapitulates its regulation by neural activity and target availability. It therefore offers a simple way to analyze developmental cell death in this classic system. Using this model, we show that ephrin-A signaling does not participate to the regulation of the Brn3a population size in the retina, indicating that eprhin-A-mediated elimination of exuberant projections does not involve developmental cell death.

  14. Cytotoxicity of atropine to human corneal endothelial cells by inducing mitochondrion-dependent apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Qian; Fan, Ting-Jun; Tian, Cheng-Lei

    2016-07-01

    Atropine, a widely used topical anticholinergic drug, might have adverse effects on human corneas in vivo. However, its cytotoxic effect on human corneal endothelium (HCE) and its possible mechanisms are unclear. Here, we investigated the cytotoxicity of atropine and its underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms using an in vitro model of HCE cells and verified the cytotoxicity using cat corneal endothelium (CCE) in vivo. Our results showed that atropine at concentrations above 0.3125 g/L could induce abnormal morphology and viability decline in a dose- and time-dependent manner in vitro. The cytotoxicity of atropine was proven by the induced density decrease and abnormality of morphology and ultrastructure of CCE cells in vivo. Meanwhile, atropine could also induce dose- and time-dependent elevation of plasma membrane permeability, G1 phase arrest, phosphatidylserine externalization, DNA fragmentation, and apoptotic body formation of HCE cells. Moreover, 2.5 g/L atropine could also induce caspase-2/-3/-9 activation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential disruption, downregulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, upregulation of pro-apoptotic Bax and Bad, and upregulation of cytoplasmic cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor. In conclusion, atropine above 1/128 of its clinical therapeutic dosage has a dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity to HCE cells in vitro which is confirmed by CCE cells in vivo, and its cytotoxicity is achieved by inducing HCE cell apoptosis via a death receptor-mediated mitochondrion-dependent signaling pathway. Our findings provide new insights into the cytotoxicity and apoptosis-inducing effect of atropine which should be used with great caution in eye clinic. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  15. Eriocalyxin B induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells through caspase- and p53-dependent pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lin [School of Biomedical Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Yue, Grace G.L. [Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Lau, Clara B.S. [Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Sun, Handong [State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, Kunming Institute of Botany, CAS, Yunnan (China); Fung, Kwok Pui [School of Biomedical Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Leung, Ping Chung [Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Han, Quanbin, E-mail: simonhan@hkbu.edu.hk [Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); School of Chinese Medicine, The Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong (China); Leung, Po Sing, E-mail: psleung@cuhk.edu.hk [School of Biomedical Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2012-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is difficult to detect early and responds poorly to chemotherapy. A breakthrough in the development of new therapeutic agents is urgently needed. Eriocalyxin B (EriB), isolated from the Isodon eriocalyx plant, is an ent-kaurane diterpenoid with promise as a broad-spectrum anti-cancer agent. The anti-leukemic activity of EriB, including the underlying mechanisms involved, has been particularly well documented. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time EriB's potent cytotoxicity against four pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines, namely PANC-1, SW1990, CAPAN-1, and CAPAN-2. The effects were comparable to that of the chemotherapeutic camptothecin (CAM), but with much lower toxicity against normal human liver WRL68 cells. EriB's cytoxicity against CAPAN-2 cells was found to involve caspase-dependent apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. Moreover, the p53 pathway was found to be activated by EriB in these cells. Furthermore, in vivo studies showed that EriB inhibited the growth of human pancreatic tumor xenografts in BALB/c nude mice without significant secondary adverse effects. These results suggest that EriB should be considered a candidate for pancreatic cancer treatment. -- Highlights: ► We study Eriocalyxin B (EriB)'s cytotoxic effects on pancreatic cancer cell lines. ► EriB inhibits cell proliferation via mediation of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. ► The effects are involved in caspase-dependent apoptosis and p53 pathway. ► In vivo study also shows EriB inhibits the growth of human pancreatic tumor. ► EriB can be a good candidate for chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer.

  16. Clarifying CB2 Receptor-Dependent and Independent Effects of THC on Human Lung Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarafian, Theodore; Montes, Cindy; Harui, Airi; Beedanagari, Sudheer R.; Kiertscher, Sylvia; Stripecke, Renata; Hossepian, Derik; Kitchen, Christina; Kern, Rita; Belperio, John; Roth, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    Marijuana smoking is associated with a number of abnormal findings in the lungs of habitual smokers. Previous studies revealed that Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) caused mitochondrial injury in primary lung epithelial cells and in the cell line, A549 (Sarafian et al., 2003; Sarafian et al., 2005). The role of cannabinoid receptors in this injury was unclear, as was the potential impact on cell function. In order to investigate these questions, A549 cells were engineered to over-express the type 2 cannabinoid receptor (CB2R) using a self-inactivating lentiviral vector. This transduction resulted in a 60-fold increase in CB2R mRNA relative to cells transduced with a control vector. Transduced cell lines were used to study the effects of THC on chemotactic activity and mitochondrial function. Chemotaxis in response to a 10 % serum gradient was suppressed in a concentration-dependent manner by exposure to THC. CB2R-transduced cells exhibited less intrinsic chemotactic activity (p < 0.05) and were 80- to 100-fold more sensitive to the inhibitory effects of THC. Studies using SR144528, a selective CB2R antagonist, verified that these effects were mediated by the CB2R. Marijuana smoke extract, but not smoke extracts from tobacco or placebo marijuana cigarettes, reproduced these effects (p < 0.05). THC decreased ATP level and mitochondrial membrane potential (Ψm) in both control and CB2R-transduced cells. However, these decreases did not play a significant role in chemotaxis inhibition since cyclosporine A, which protected against ATP loss, did not increase cell migration. Moreover, CB2R-transduced cells displayed higher Ψm than did control cells. Since both Ψm and chemotaxis are regulated by intracellular signaling, we investigated the effects of THC on the activation of multiple signaling pathways. Serum exposure activated several signaling events of which phosphorylation of IκB-α and JNK were regulated in a CB2R-and THC-dependent manner. We conclude that airway

  17. Temperature dependence of conductivity measurement for PEDOT:PSS and corresponding solar cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Fernanda; Myers, Brooke; Lucas, Tyler; Barnes, Brandon; Wang, Weining

    Conducting polymers have been studied and used widely; applications include light-emitting diodes, solar cells, and sensors. In our previous work, we have shown that conducting polymers can be used as the back contact of CdTe solar cells. Our results show that the efficiency of the CdTe solar cell increases as the conductivity of the polymer increases. For this reason, it is of interest to study the polymer conductivity's temperature dependence, and how it affects the solar cell. In this work, we show our studies on temperature dependence of conductivity measurement for poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS), and its effect on the CdTe/PEDOT:PSS solar cells. A series of PEDOT:PSS with different conductivities were studied, and a temperature-varying apparatus built in house, using a thermoelectric cooler module, was used to vary the temperature of the polymer films. The activation energy of PEDOT:PSS with different conductivity will be reported. The effect of the temperature on the short-circuit current, open-circuit voltage and efficiency of the solar cells will also be discussed. Clare Boothe Luce Foundation, Cottrell College Science Award from Research Corporation for Science Advancement.

  18. Treatment schedule-dependent effect of 5-fluorouracil and platinum derivatives in colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takara, Kohji; Fujita, Megumi; Minegaki, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Minoru; Yokoyama, Teruyoshi; Okumura, Katsuhiko

    2012-02-14

    Combination chemotherapy for treating cancer often is superior in clinical efficacy to monotherapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the schedule-dependent effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and platinum derivatives (cisplatin or oxaliplatin) in colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines, and to explore factors affecting it. Two human CRC-derived cell lines, DLD-1 and HCT116, were used. Three treatment schedules were tested, and growth inhibitory effects were evaluated with a WST-1 assay. Combined effects were assessed with isobolograms and a combination index. Cellular accumulation and DNA-binding of platinum were measured with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Exposure to 5-FU followed by cisplatin produced synergistic effects in DLD-1 cells, and the amount of platinum bound to DNA was substantially increased as compared with that for other schedules. 5-FU and oxaliplatin also tended to be synergistic when 5-FU was given first, but no significant change in the cellular kinetics of platinum was observed. On the other hand, in HCT116 cells, the combined effects of 5-FU and platinum derivatives were comparable among the three schedules. Exposure to 5-FU followed by cisplatin had a synergistic effect in DLD-1 cells, suggesting that the amount of platinum bound to DNA contributes to this result. Also, the effect was dependent on the type of platinum derivative and cell. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ribosomal stress induces L11- and p53-dependent apoptosis in mouse pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado-Palacin, Lucia; Llanos, Susana; Serrano, Manuel

    2012-02-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is the most demanding energetic process in proliferating cells and it is emerging as a critical sensor of cellular homeostasis. Upon disturbance of ribosome biogenesis, specific free ribosomal proteins, most notably L11, bind and inhibit Mdm2, resulting in activation of the tumor suppressor p53. This pathway has been characterized in somatic and cancer cells, but its function in embryonic pluripotent cells has remained unexplored. Here, we show that treatment with low doses of Actinomycin D or depletion of ribosomal protein L37, two well-established inducers of ribosomal stress, activate p53 in an L11-dependent manner in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Activation of p53 results in transcriptional induction of p53 targets, including p21, Mdm2, Pidd, Puma, Noxa and Bax. Finally, ribosomal stress elicits L11- and p53-dependent apoptosis in ESCs/iPSCs. These results extend to pluripotent cells the functionality of the ribosomal stress pathway and we speculate that this could be a relevant cellular checkpoint during early embryogenesis.

  20. Chromosome conformation maps in fission yeast reveal cell cycle dependent sub nuclear structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grand, Ralph S; Pichugina, Tatyana; Gehlen, Lutz R; Jones, M Beatrix; Tsai, Peter; Allison, Jane R; Martienssen, Robert; O'Sullivan, Justin M

    2014-11-10

    Successful progression through the cell cycle requires spatial and temporal regulation of gene transcript levels and the number, positions and condensation levels of chromosomes. Here we present a high resolution survey of genome interactions in Schizosaccharomyces pombe using synchronized cells to investigate cell cycle dependent changes in genome organization and transcription. Cell cycle dependent interactions were captured between and within S. pombe chromosomes. Known features of genome organization (e.g. the clustering of telomeres and retrotransposon long terminal repeats (LTRs)) were observed throughout the cell cycle. There were clear correlations between transcript levels and chromosomal interactions between genes, consistent with a role for interactions in transcriptional regulation at specific stages of the cell cycle. In silico reconstructions of the chromosome organization within the S. pombe nuclei were made by polymer modeling. These models suggest that groups of genes with high and low, or differentially regulated transcript levels have preferred positions within the S. pombe nucleus. We conclude that the S. pombe nucleus is spatially divided into functional sub-nuclear domains that correlate with gene activity. The observation that chromosomal interactions are maintained even when chromosomes are fully condensed in M phase implicates genome organization in epigenetic inheritance and bookmarking. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Bullatacin Triggered ABCB1-Overexpressing Cell Apoptosis via the Mitochondrial-Dependent Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Ju Liang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper was to explore bullatacin-mediated multidrug-resistant cell apoptosis at extremely low concentration. To investigate its precise mechanisms, the pathway of cell apoptosis induced by bullatacin was examined. Bullatacin causes an upregulation of ROS and a downregulation of ΔΨm in a concentration-dependent manner in ABCB1-overexpressing KBv200 cells. In addition, cleavers of caspase-9, caspase-3, and PARP were observed following the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria after bullatacin treatment. However, neither cleavage of caspase-8 nor change of expression level of bcl-2, bax and Fas was observed by the same treatment. Pretreating KBv200 cells with N-acetylcysteine, an antioxidant modulator, resulted in a significant reduction of ROS generation and cell apoptosis induced by bullatacin. Bullatacin-induced apoptosis was antagonized by z-LEHD-fmk, a caspase-9 inhibitor, but not by z-IETD-fmk, a caspase-8 inhibitor. These implied that apoptosis of KBv200 cells induced by bullatacin was associated with the mitochondria-dependent pathway that was limited to activation of apical caspase-9.

  2. MR marrow signs of iron overload in transfusion-dependent patients with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, T.L.; Sheth, S.S.; Hurlet, A.; Comerci, S.C.; Ruzal-Shapiro, C.; Piomelli, S.; Berdon, W.E.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) marrow signal in the axial and appendicular skeleton of 13 transfusion-dependent and chelated pediatric patients with sickle cell anemia (SSD) was compared with marrow signal in six non-transfusion-dependent patients with SSD. Hepatic, pancreatic, and renal MR signal were also evaluated. Indication for hypertransfusion therapy was primarily prior history of stroke. Transfusion-dependent patients had evidence of iron deposition throughout the imaged marrow and the liver, despite deferoxamine chelation therapy. Non-transfusion-dependent patients did not demonstrate grossly apparent signs of iron overload. Red marrow restoration was present in the spine, pelvis, and long bones and, in some patients, within the epiphyses. Marrow edema secondary to vaso-occlusive crises was evident in the metaphyses and diaphyses of long bones in areas of both red and fatty marrow and was best seen using fat-saturated T2-weighted imaging techniques. (orig.). With 4 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Trophic significance of solitary cells of the prymnesiophyte Phaeocystis globosa depends on cell type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutz, Jörg; Koski, Marja

    2006-01-01

    With the use of five different isolates of Phaeocystis globosa solitary cells from the North Sea, we conducted experiments to reveal whether grazing and development of the nauplii of the calanoid copepod Temora longicornis varies in response to the cell type. Two P. globosa strains representing...... experiments, revealed that neither the production of transparent exopolymer particles and chitinous threads nor toxicity can explain the observed response. The cohesion of the threads into pentagonal stars was observed only in the avoided mesoflagellate and might cause a mechanical hindrance for the ingestion...

  4. Cell cycle stage dependent variations in drug-induced topoisomerase II mediated DNA cleavage and cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estey, E.; Adlakha, R.C.; Hittelman, W.N.; Zwelling, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    The DNA cleavage produced by 4'-(9-acridinylamino)methanesulfon-m-anisidide (m-AMSA) in mammalian cells is putatively mediated by topoisomerase II. The authors found that in synchronized HeLa cells the frequency of such cleavage was 4-15-fold greater in mitosis than in S while the DNA of G 1 and G 2 cells exhibited an intermediate susceptibility to cleavage. The hypersensitivity of mitotic DNA to m-AMSA-induced cleavage was acquired relatively abruptly in late G 2 and was lost similarly abruptly in early G 1 . The susceptibility of mitotic cells to m-AMSA-induced DNA cleavage was not clearly paralleled by an increase in topoisomerase II activity in 350 mM NaCl extracts from mitotic cells compared to similar extracts from cells in G 1 , S, or G 2 . Furthermore, equal amounts of decatenating activity from cells in mitosis and S produced equal amounts of m-AMSA-induced cleavage of simian virus 40 (SV40) DNA; i.e., the interaction between m-AMSA and extractable enzyme was similar in mitosis and S. The DNA of mitotic cells was also hypersensitive to cleavage by 4'-demethylepipodophyllotoxin 4-(4,6-O-ethylidene-β-D-glucopyranoside) (etoposide), a drug that produces topoisomerase II mediated DNA cleavage without binding to DNA. Cell cycle stage dependent fluctuations in m-AMSA-induced DNA cleavage may result from fluctuations in the structure of chromatin per se that occur during the cell cycle. Surprisingly, cell cycle stage dependent differences in m-AMSA-induced DNA cleavage did not correlate with differences in the susceptibility to the cytotoxic effects of the drug. In fact, cells in S were most sensitive to these effects. These results are an exception to the previously observed parallel between the susceptibility of mammalian cells to drug-induced DNA cleavage and the susceptibility of the cells to drug-induced cytotoxicity and indicate the complexity of any relationship between the two phenomena

  5. Taxifolin synergizes Andrographolide-induced cell death by attenuation of autophagy and augmentation of caspase dependent and independent cell death in HeLa cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazen Alzaharna

    Full Text Available Andrographolide (Andro has emerged recently as a potential and effective anticancer agent with induction of apoptosis in some cancer cell lines while induction of G2/M arrest with weak apoptosis in others. Few studies have proved that Andro is also effective in combination therapy. The flavonoid Taxifolin (Taxi has showed anti-oxidant and antiproliferative effects against different cancer cells. Therefore, the present study investigated the cytotoxic effects of Andro alone or in combination with Taxi on HeLa cells. The combination of Andro with Taxi was synergistic at all tested concentrations and combination ratios. Andro alone induced caspase-dependent apoptosis which was enhanced by the combination with Taxi and attenuated partly by using Z-Vad-Fmk. Andro induced a protective reactive oxygen species (ROS-dependent autophagy which was attenuated by Taxi. The activation of p53 was involved in Andro-induced autophagy where the use of Taxi or pifithrin-α (PFT-α decreased it while the activation of JNK was involved in the cell death of HeLa cells but not in the induction of autophagy. The mitochondrial outer-membrane permeabilization (MOMP plays an important role in Andro-induced cell death in HeLa cells. Andro alone increased the MOMP which was further increased in the case of combination. This led to the increase in AIF and cytochrome c release from mitochondria which consequently increased caspase-dependent and independent cell death. In conclusion, Andro induced a protective autophagy in HeLa cells which was reduced by Taxi and the cell death was increased by increasing the MOMP and subsequently the caspase-dependent and independent cell death.

  6. Taxifolin synergizes Andrographolide-induced cell death by attenuation of autophagy and augmentation of caspase dependent and independent cell death in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzaharna, Mazen; Alqouqa, Iyad; Cheung, Hon-Yeung

    2017-01-01

    Andrographolide (Andro) has emerged recently as a potential and effective anticancer agent with induction of apoptosis in some cancer cell lines while induction of G2/M arrest with weak apoptosis in others. Few studies have proved that Andro is also effective in combination therapy. The flavonoid Taxifolin (Taxi) has showed anti-oxidant and antiproliferative effects against different cancer cells. Therefore, the present study investigated the cytotoxic effects of Andro alone or in combination with Taxi on HeLa cells. The combination of Andro with Taxi was synergistic at all tested concentrations and combination ratios. Andro alone induced caspase-dependent apoptosis which was enhanced by the combination with Taxi and attenuated partly by using Z-Vad-Fmk. Andro induced a protective reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent autophagy which was attenuated by Taxi. The activation of p53 was involved in Andro-induced autophagy where the use of Taxi or pifithrin-α (PFT-α) decreased it while the activation of JNK was involved in the cell death of HeLa cells but not in the induction of autophagy. The mitochondrial outer-membrane permeabilization (MOMP) plays an important role in Andro-induced cell death in HeLa cells. Andro alone increased the MOMP which was further increased in the case of combination. This led to the increase in AIF and cytochrome c release from mitochondria which consequently increased caspase-dependent and independent cell death. In conclusion, Andro induced a protective autophagy in HeLa cells which was reduced by Taxi and the cell death was increased by increasing the MOMP and subsequently the caspase-dependent and independent cell death.

  7. The Dependency in the Elasticity of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cell Wall upon Cell Viability and Membrane Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Dacia; Zhu, Chenhui; Yi, Youngwoo; Clark, Noel

    2007-03-01

    In this study the elastic spring constant of the yeast cell wall is probed with the atomic force microscope (AFM) under variable conditions. Cells were sequentially analyzed in rich growth medium (YPD), a 0.8 M NaCl rich growth medium solution and an injection of 0.01% sodium azide solution. Cells in late log phase, which have variable diameters within three to five microns, were immobilized on a patterned silicon substrate with holes approximately 3.8um in diameter and 1.5um deep that was functionalized with polyethylenimine prior to cell application. Force curves were taken moving laterally across the cell in one dimension after exposure to each medium. Spring constants of the cells, calculated from force curves, displayed a positional dependency and marked differences in high osmolarity medium and after the injection of sodium azide. This study demonstrates the ability of the AFM to investigate changes in cell morphology and correlate those findings to underlying physiological processes.

  8. Natural killer cell cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity to herpes simplex virus-infected cells in human pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonik, B; Loo, L S; West, S; Kohl, S

    1987-01-01

    Natural killer cell (NKC) cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) represent the ability of human leukocyte effector cells to destroy target cells in the absence and presence of antibody, respectively. Since these immune systems play a pivotal role in the body's primary lines of defense against a variety of pathogens including herpes simplex virus (HSV), a study was undertaken to evaluate the influence of pregnancy on these systems. Eleven uncomplicated gravidas were followed serially through each trimester and compared to 11 nonpregnant female controls. Mononuclear cells were acquired by Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation of heparinized blood. Chang liver cells infected with HSV-I were utilized as target cells in a 51Cr release assay. Mean NKC values in the pregnant patients were uniformly lower than in the controls. No similar decreases in ADCC activity were observed in a comparison between the two study populations. These data support previous observations suggesting that pregnancy represents a relatively immunocompromised state. Differences apparently exist between NKC and ADCC effector cell populations with regard to the influence of pregnancy. Although these physiologic alterations in immunoregulation may help support the fetoplacental allograph, detrimental conditions may exist regarding susceptibility to various pathogens such as HSV.

  9. Type i CD20 antibodies recruit the B cell receptor for complement-dependent lysis of malignant B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelberts, P. J.; Voorhorst, M.; Schuurman, J.

    2016-01-01

    . We hypothesized that CD20 Ab-induced clustering of the IgM or IgG BCR was involved in accessory CDC. Indeed, accessory CDC was consistently observed in B cell lines expressing an IgM BCR and in some cell lines expressing an IgG BCR, but it was absent in BCR- B cell lines. A direct relationship...... between BCR expression and accessory CDC was established by transfecting the BCR into CD20+ cells: OFA-F(ab')2 fragments were able to induce CDC in the CD20+BCR+ cell population, but not in the CD20+BCR- population. Importantly, OFA-F(ab')2 fragments were able to induce CDC ex vivo in malignant B cells...... isolated from patients with mantle cell lymphoma and Waldenström macroglobulinemia. In summary, accessory CDC represents a novel effector mechanism that is dependent on type I CD20 Ab-induced BCR clustering. Accessory CDC may contribute to the excellent capacity of type I CD20 Abs to induce CDC...

  10. Arachidonic acid supplementation enhances in vitro skeletal muscle cell growth via a COX-2-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markworth, James F; Cameron-Smith, David

    2013-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is the metabolic precursor to a diverse range of downstream bioactive lipid mediators. A positive or negative influence of individual eicosanoid species [e.g., prostaglandins (PGs), leukotrienes, and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids] has been implicated in skeletal muscle cell growth and development. The collective role of AA-derived metabolites in physiological states of skeletal muscle growth/atrophy remains unclear. The present study aimed to determine the direct effect of free AA supplementation and subsequent eicosanoid biosynthesis on skeletal myocyte growth in vitro. C2C12 (mouse) skeletal myocytes induced to differentiate with supplemental AA exhibited dose-dependent increases in the size, myonuclear content, and protein accretion of developing myotubes, independent of changes in cell density or the rate/extent of myogenic differentiation. Nonselective (indomethacin) or cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2)-selective (NS-398) nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs blunted basal myogenesis, an effect that was amplified in the presence of supplemental free AA substrate. The stimulatory effects of AA persisted in preexisting myotubes via a COX-2-dependent (NS-389-sensitive) pathway, specifically implying dependency on downstream PG biosynthesis. AA-stimulated growth was associated with markedly increased secretion of PGF(2α) and PGE(2); however, incubation of myocytes with PG-rich conditioned medium failed to mimic the effects of direct AA supplementation. In vitro AA supplementation stimulates PG release and skeletal muscle cell hypertrophy via a COX-2-dependent pathway.

  11. Light can rescue auxin-dependent synchrony of cell division in a tobacco cell line

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Qiao, F.; Petrášek, Jan; Nick, P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 2 (2010), s. 503-510 ISSN 0022-0957 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Auxin transport * cell division * NPA Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.818, year: 2010 http://jxb.oxfordjournals.org/content/61/2/503.abstract

  12. Cell-line dependent effects of hypoxia prior to irradiation in squamous cell carcinoma lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Hauth

    2017-08-01

    Conclusion: We herein report a key role of ATM in the cellular fitness of cells exposed to prolonged moderate hypoxia prior to irradiation. While DNA damage response post-irradiation seem to be mainly driven by non-homologous end joining repair pathway in these conditions, our data suggest an important role for ATM kinase in hypoxia-driven modification of radiation response.

  13. Alternative pathways of programmed cell death are activated in cells with defective caspase-dependent apoptosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ondroušková, E.; Souček, Karel; Horváth, Viktor; Šmarda, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 4 (2008), s. 599-609 ISSN 0145-2126 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/07/0834 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : apoptosis * autophagy * programmed cell death Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.390, year: 2008

  14. Characterization of V. cholerae T3SS-dependent cytotoxicity in cultured intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kelly A; Chaand, Mudit; Gregoire, Stacy; Yoshida, Takeshi; Beck, Lisa A; Ivanov, Andrei I; Dziejman, Michelle

    2016-12-01

    AM-19226 is a pathogenic, non-O1/non-O139 serogroup strain of Vibrio cholerae that uses a Type 3 Secretion System (T3SS) mediated mechanism to colonize host tissues and disrupt homeostasis, causing cholera. Co-culturing the Caco2-BBE human intestinal epithelial cell line with AM-19226 in the presence of bile results in rapid mammalian cell death that requires a functional T3SS. We examined the role of bile, sought to identify the mechanism, and evaluated the contributions of T3SS translocated effectors in in vitro cell death. Our results suggest that Caco2-BBE cytotoxicity does not proceed by apoptotic or necrotic mechanisms, but rather displays characteristics consistent with osmotic lysis. Cell death was preceded by disassembly of epithelial junctions and reorganization of the cortical membrane skeleton, although neither cell death nor cell-cell disruption required VopM or VopF, two effectors known to alter actin dynamics. Using deletion strains, we identified a subset of AM-19226 Vops that are required for host cell death, which were previously assigned roles in protein translocation and colonization, suggesting that they function other than to promote cytotoxicity. The collective results therefore suggest that cooperative Vop activities are required to achieve cytotoxicity in vitro, or alternatively, that translocon pores destabilize the membrane in a bile dependent manner. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Exposure to inhaled isobutyl nitrite reduces T cell-dependent responsiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soderberg, L.S.F.; Barnett, J.B. (Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock (United States))

    1991-03-11

    Isobutyl nitrite is a drug of abuse popular among male homosexuals and among adolescents. In order to approximate the nitrite exposures of inhalant abusers, mice were treated with 900 ppm isobutyl nitrite in an inhalation chamber for 45 min per day for 14 days. At 72 hr after the last exposure, mice were assayed for immune competence. Under these conditions, mice gained only half the weight of mice exposed to air. The spleens of nitrite exposed mice weighed 15% less and had 24% fewer cells per spleen than controls. Adjusted for equal cell numbers, T cell mitogenic and allogeneic proliferative responses were significantly reduce by 33% and 47%, respectively. Unstimulated spleen cells had elevated levels of IL-2 transcription following exposure to isobutyl nitrite suggesting that nitrite inhalation caused a nonspecific induction of T cells. In contrast, B cell proliferative responses to LPS were unaltered. Exposure to the nitrite reduced the frequency of T-dependent antibody plaque-forming cells (PFC) by 63% and the total number of reduced by 60% after as few as five daily exposures to isobutyl nitrite. Therefore, the data suggest that habitual inhalation of isobutyl nitrite impairs immune competence and that toxicity appears to be directed toward T cell functions.

  16. Viscosity-dependent variations in the cell shape and swimming manner of Leptospira.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takabe, Kyosuke; Tahara, Hajime; Islam, Md Shafiqul; Affroze, Samia; Kudo, Seishi; Nakamura, Shuichi

    2017-02-01

    Spirochaetes are spiral or flat-wave-shaped Gram-negative bacteria that have periplasmic flagella between the peptidoglycan layer and outer membrane. Rotation of the periplasmic flagella transforms the cell body shape periodically, allowing the cell to swim in aqueous environments. Because the virulence of motility-deficient mutants of pathogenic species is drastically attenuated, motility is thought to be an essential virulence factor in spirochaetes. However, it remains unknown how motility practically contributes to the infection process. We show here that the cell body configuration and motility of the zoonotic spirochaete Leptospira changes depending on the viscosity of the medium. Leptospira swim and reverse the swimming direction by transforming the cell body. Motility analysis showed that the frequency of cell shape transformation was increased by increasing the viscosity of the medium. The increased cell body transformation induced highly frequent reversal of the swimming direction. A simple kinetic model based on the experimental results shows that the viscosity-induced increase in reversal limits cell migration, resulting in the accumulation of cells in high-viscosity regions. This behaviour could facilitate the colonization of the spirochaete on host tissues covered with mucosa.

  17. Characterization of V. cholerae T3SS-dependent cytotoxicity in cultured intestinal epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kelly A.; Chaand, Mudit; Gregoire, Stacy; Yoshida, Takeshi; Beck, Lisa; Ivanov, Andrei I.; Dziejman, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Summary AM-19226 is a pathogenic, non-O1/non-O139 serogroup strain of Vibrio cholerae that uses a Type 3 Secretion System (T3SS) mediated mechanism to colonize host tissues and disrupt homeostasis, causing cholera. Co-culturing the Caco2-BBE human intestinal epithelial cell line with AM-19226 in the presence of bile results in rapid mammalian cell death that requires a functional T3SS. We examined the role of bile, sought to identify the mechanism, and evaluated the contributions of T3SS translocated effectors in in vitro cell death. Our results suggest that Caco2-BBE cytotoxicity does not proceed by apoptotic or necrotic mechanisms, but rather displays characteristics consistent with osmotic lysis. Cell death was preceded by disassembly of epithelial junctions and reorganization of the cortical membrane skeleton, although neither cell death nor cell-cell disruption required VopM or VopF, two effectors known to alter actin dynamics. Using deletion strains, we identified a subset of AM-19226 Vops that are required for host cell death, which were previously assigned roles in protein translocation and colonization, suggesting that they function other than to promote cytotoxicity. The collective results therefore suggest that cooperative Vop activities are required to achieve cytotoxicity in vitro, or alternatively, that translocon pores destabilize the membrane in a bile dependent manner. PMID:27302486

  18. SAP-Dependent and -Independent Regulation of Innate T Cell Development Involving SLAMF Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Calisto, Jaime; Wang, Ninghai; Wang, Guoxing; Yigit, Burcu; Engel, Pablo; Terhorst, Cox

    2014-01-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP) plays an essential role in the immune system mediating the function of several members of the SLAM family (SLAMF) of receptors, whose expression is essential for T, NK, and B-cell responses. Additionally, the expression of SAP in double-positive thymocytes is mandatory for natural killer T (NKT) cells and, in mouse, for innate CD8(+) T cell development. To date, only two members of the SLAMF of receptors, Slamf1 and Slamf6, have been shown to positively cooperate during NKT cell differentiation in mouse. However, it is less clear whether other members of this family may also participate in the development of these innate T cells. Here, we show that Slamf[1 + 6](-/-) and Slamf[1 + 5 + 6](-/-) B6 mice have ~70% reduction of NKT cells compared to wild-type B6 mice. Unexpectedly, the proportion of innate CD8(+) T cells slightly increased in the Slamf[1 + 5 + 6](-/-) , but not in the Slamf[1 + 6](-/-) strain, suggesting that Slamf5 may function as a negative regulator of innate CD8(+) T cell development. Accordingly, Slamf5(-/-) B6 mice showed an exclusive expansion of innate CD8(+) T cells, but not NKT cells. Interestingly, the SAP-independent Slamf7(-/-) strain showed an expansion of both splenic innate CD8(+) T cells and thymic NKT cells. On the other hand, and similar to what was recently shown in Slamf3(-/-) BALB/c mice, the proportions of thymic promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF(hi)) NKT cells and innate CD8(+) T cells significantly increased in the SAP-independent Slamf8(-/-) BALB/c strain. In summary, these results show that NKT and innate CD8(+) T cell development can be regulated in a SAP-dependent and -independent fashion by SLAMF receptors, in which Slamf1, Slamf6, and Slamf8 affect development of NKT cells, and that Slamf5, Slamf7, and Slamf8 affect the development of innate CD8(+) T cells.

  19. Mitochondria-dependent apoptosis induced by nanoscale hydroxyapatite in human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojuan; Deng, Changsheng; Tang, Shengli; Zhang, Ming

    2007-01-01

    Nanoscale hydroxyapatite (nano-HAP) has been reported to exhibit anti-cancer effect on several human cancers, but the molecular mechanism of which remains unclear. The aim of this study was to explore the mechanisms by investigating the effects of nano-HAP on human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. Our results showed that nano-HAP significantly reduced cell viability, and induced apoptosis in SGC-7901 cells characterized by hypodiploid DNA contents, morphological changes and DNA fragmentation. The increase in apoptosis was accompanied with the increased expression of Bax, a pro-apoptotic protein, and decreased expression of Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein, the decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential and the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into cytosol. Furthermore, the activation of caspases-3, and -9, but not activation of caspases-8 was induced by nano-HAP. Z-VAD-fmk, a universal caspase inhibitor, dose-dependently inhibited nano-HAP-induced apoptosis. This study demonstrates that nano-HAP inhibits the proliferation of SGC-7901 cells by inducing apoptosis, and the apoptotic pathway of nano-HAP-induced apoptosis is mediated through the mitochondrial-dependent and caspase-dependent pathway.

  20. pH-dependent and carrier-mediated transport of salicylic acid across Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanaga, H; Tamai, I; Tsuji, A

    1994-07-01

    The transport of monocarboxylic acid drugs such as salicylic acid was examined in the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line, Caco-2 cells that possess intestinal epithelia-like properties. [14C]Salicylic acid transport was pH-dependent and appeared to follow the pH-partition hypothesis. However, 10 mM unlabelled salicylic acid significantly reduced the permeability coefficient of [14C]salicylic acid. Kinetic analysis of the concentration dependence of the permeation rate of salicylic acid across Caco-2 cells showed both saturable (Kt = 5.28 +/- 0.72 mM Jmax = 36.6 +/- 3.54 nmol min-1 (mg protein)-1) and nonsaturable (kd = 0.37 +/- 0.08 microL min-1 (mg protein)-1) processes. The permeation rate of [14C]salicylic acid was competitively inhibited by both acetic acid and benzoic acid, which were demonstrated in our previous studies to be transported in the carrier-mediated-transport mechanism which is responsible for monocarboxylic acids. Furthermore, certain monocarboxylic acids significantly inhibited [14C]salicylic acid transport, whereas salicylamide and dicarboxylic acids such as succinic acid did not. From these results, it was concluded that the transcellular transport of [14C]salicylic acid across Caco-2 cells is by the pH-dependent and carrier-mediated transport mechanism specific for monocarboxylic acids.

  1. JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase limits calcium-dependent chloride secretion across colonic epithelial cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donnellan, Fergal

    2010-01-01

    Neuroimmune agonists induce epithelial Cl(-) secretion through elevations in intracellular Ca2+ or cAMP. Previously, we demonstrated that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation and subsequent ERK MAPK activation limits secretory responses to Ca2+-dependent, but not cAMP-dependent, agonists. Although JNK MAPKs are also expressed in epithelial cells, their role in regulating transport function is unknown. Here, we investigated the potential role for JNK in regulating Cl(-) secretion in T(84) colonic epithelial cells. Western blot analysis revealed that a prototypical Ca2+-dependent secretagogue, carbachol (CCh; 100 microM), induced phosphorylation of both the 46-kDa and 54-kDa isoforms of JNK. This effect was mimicked by thapsigargin (TG), which specifically elevates intracellular Ca2+, but not by forskolin (FSK; 10 microM), which elevates cAMP. CCh-induced JNK phosphorylation was attenuated by the EGFR inhibitor, tyrphostin-AG1478 (1 microM). Pretreatment of voltage-clamped T(84) cells with SP600125 (2 microM), a specific JNK inhibitor, potentiated secretory responses to both CCh and TG but not to FSK. The effects of SP600125 on CCh-induced secretion were not additive with those of the ERK inhibitor, PD98059. Finally, in apically permeabilized T(84) cell monolayers, SP600125 potentiated CCh-induced K+ conductances but not Na+\\/K+ATPase activity. These data demonstrate a novel role for JNK MAPK in regulating Ca2+ but not cAMP-dependent epithelial Cl(-) secretion. JNK activation is mediated by EGFR transactivation and exerts its antisecretory effects through inhibition of basolateral K+ channels. These data further our understanding of mechanisms regulating epithelial secretion and underscore the potential for exploitation of MAPK-dependent signaling in treatment of intestinal transport disorders.

  2. A Myc-dependent division timer complements a cell-death timer to regulate T cell and B cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzel, Susanne; Binh Giang, Tran; Kan, Andrey; Marchingo, Julia M; Lye, Bryan K; Corcoran, Lynn M; Hodgkin, Philip D

    2017-01-01

    T lymphocytes and B lymphocytes integrate activating signals to control the size of their proliferative response. Here we report that such control was achieved by timed changes in the production rate of cell-cycle-regulating proto-oncoprotein Myc, with division cessation occurring when Myc levels fell below a critical threshold. The changing pattern of the level of Myc was not affected by cell division, which identified the regulating mechanism as a cell-intrinsic, heritable temporal controller. Overexpression of Myc in stimulated T cells and B cells did not sustain cell proliferation indefinitely, as a separate 'time-to-die' mechanism, also heritable, was programmed after lymphocyte activation and led to eventual cell loss. Together the two competing cell-intrinsic timed fates created the canonical T cell and B cell immune-response pattern of rapid growth followed by loss of most cells. Furthermore, small changes in these timed processes by regulatory signals, or by oncogenic transformation, acted in synergy to greatly enhance cell numbers over time.

  3. Cell-Cycle-Dependent Reconfiguration of the DNA Methylome during Terminal Differentiation of Human B Cells into Plasma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gersende Caron

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Molecular mechanisms underlying terminal differentiation of B cells into plasma cells are major determinants of adaptive immunity but remain only partially understood. Here we present the transcriptional and epigenomic landscapes of cell subsets arising from activation of human naive B cells and differentiation into plasmablasts. Cell proliferation of activated B cells was linked to a slight decrease in DNA methylation levels, but followed by a committal step in which an S phase-synchronized differentiation switch was associated with an extensive DNA demethylation and local acquisition of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine at enhancers and genes related to plasma cell identity. Downregulation of both TGF-β1/SMAD3 signaling and p53 pathway supported this final step, allowing the emergence of a CD23-negative subpopulation in transition from B cells to plasma cells. Remarkably, hydroxymethylation of PRDM1, a gene essential for plasma cell fate, was coupled to progression in S phase, revealing an intricate connection among cell cycle, DNA (hydroxymethylation, and cell fate determination.

  4. Position-dependent patterning of spontaneous action potentials in immature cochlear inner hair cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Stuart L.; Eckrich, Tobias; Kuhn, Stephanie; Zampini, Valeria; Franz, Christoph; Ranatunga, Kishani M.; Roberts, Terri P.; Masetto, Sergio; Knipper, Marlies; Kros, Corné J.; Marcotti, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous action potential activity is crucial for mammalian sensory system development. In the auditory system, patterned firing activity has been observed in immature spiral ganglion cells and brain-stem neurons and is likely to depend on cochlear inner hair cell (IHC) action potentials. It remains uncertain whether spiking activity is intrinsic to developing IHCs and whether it shows patterning. We found that action potentials are intrinsically generated by immature IHCs of altricial rodents and that apical IHCs exhibit bursting activity as opposed to more sustained firing in basal cells. We show that the efferent neurotransmitter ACh, by fine-tuning the IHC’s resting membrane potential (Vm), is crucial for the bursting pattern in apical cells. Endogenous extracellular ATP also contributes to the Vm of apical and basal IHCs by activating SK2 channels. We hypothesize that the difference in firing pattern along the cochlea instructs the tonotopic differentiation of IHCs and auditory pathway. PMID:21572434

  5. Metformin decreases glucose oxidation and increases the dependency of prostate cancer cells on reductive glutamine metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Bell, Eric L; Keibler, Mark A; Davidson, Shawn M; Wirth, Gregory J; Fiske, Brian; Mayers, Jared R; Schwab, Matthias; Bellinger, Gary; Csibi, Alfredo; Patnaik, Akash; Blouin, Marie Jose; Cantley, Lewis C; Guarente, Leonard; Blenis, John; Pollak, Michael N; Olumi, Aria F; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2013-07-15

    Metformin inhibits cancer cell proliferation, and epidemiology studies suggest an association with increased survival in patients with cancer taking metformin; however, the mechanism by which metformin improves cancer outcomes remains controversial. To explore how metformin might directly affect cancer cells, we analyzed how metformin altered the metabolism of prostate cancer cells and tumors. We found that metformin decreased glucose oxidation and increased dependency on reductive glutamine metabolism in both cancer cell lines and in a mouse model of prostate cancer. Inhibition of glutamine anaplerosis in the presence of metformin further attenuated proliferation, whereas increasing glutamine metabolism rescued the proliferative defect induced by metformin. These data suggest that interfering with glutamine may synergize with metformin to improve outcomes in patients with prostate cancer. ©2013 AACR.

  6. Catalase and NO CATALASE ACTIVITY1 promote autophagy-dependent cell death in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hackenberg, Thomas; Juul, Trine; Auzina, Aija

    2013-01-01

    Programmed cell death often depends on generation of reactive oxygen species, which can be detoxified by antioxidative enzymes, including catalases. We previously isolated catalase-deficient mutants (cat2) in a screen for resistance to hydroxyurea-induced cell death. Here, we identify...... an Arabidopsis thaliana hydroxyurea-resistant autophagy mutant, atg2, which also shows reduced sensitivity to cell death triggered by the bacterial effector avrRpm1. To test if catalase deficiency likewise affected both hydroxyurea and avrRpm1 sensitivity, we selected mutants with extremely low catalase...... activities and showed that they carried mutations in a gene that we named NO CATALASE ACTIVITY1 (NCA1). nca1 mutants showed severely reduced activities of all three catalase isoforms in Arabidopsis, and loss of NCA1 function led to strong suppression of RPM1-triggered cell death. Basal and starvation...

  7. Sarcosine induces increase in HER2/neu expression in androgen-dependent prostate cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Malin; Bouchelouche, Pierre; Kramer-Marek, Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    -qPCR. Total expression of HER2/neu was confirmed by Western blot (WB). HER2/neu protein on the surface of living LNCaP cells was visualized by confocal microscopy using a HER2/neu-specific fluorescent probe. Exposure of LNCaP cells to 50 μM sarcosine for 24 h resulted in a 58% increase of the HER2/neu m...... epithelial cells. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of sarcosine on HER2/neu expression in prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP (androgen dependent), PC-3 and DU145 (both androgen independent). Relative amounts of HER2/neu and androgen receptor (AR) transcripts were determined using RT...

  8. Radiation-Induced Dedifferentiation of Head and Neck Cancer Cells Into Cancer Stem Cells Depends on Human Papillomavirus Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlashi, Erina, E-mail: evlashi@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Chen, Allen M.; Boyrie, Sabrina; Yu, Garrett; Nguyen, Andrea; Brower, Philip A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Hess, Clayton B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento, California (United States); Pajonk, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that the radiation response of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive and HPV-negative head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) differs and is not reflected in the radiation response of the bulk tumor populations, that radiation therapy (RT) can dedifferentiate non-stem HNSCC cells into CSCs, and that radiation-induced dedifferentiation depends on the HPV status. Methods and Materials: Records of a cohort of 162 HNSCC patients were reviewed, and their outcomes were correlated with their HPV status. Using a panel of HPV-positive and HPV-negative HNSCC cell lines expressing a reporter for CSCs, we characterized HPV-positive and HPV-negative lines via flow cytometry, sphere-forming capacity assays in vitro, and limiting dilution assays in vivo. Non-CSCs were treated with different doses of radiation, and the dedifferentiation of non-CSCs into CSCs was investigated via flow cytometry and quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction for re-expression of reprogramming factors. Results: Patients with HPV-positive tumors have superior overall survival and local–regional control. Human papillomavirus–positive HNSCC cell lines have lower numbers of CSCs, which inversely correlates with radiosensitivity. Human papillomavirus–negative HNSCC cell lines lack hierarchy owing to enhanced spontaneous dedifferentiation. Non-CSCs from HPV-negative lines show enhanced radiation-induced dedifferentiation compared with HPV-positive lines, and RT induced re-expression of Yamanaka reprogramming factors. Conclusions: Supporting the favorable prognosis of HPV-positive HNSCCs, we show that (1) HPV-positive HNSCCs have a lower frequency of CSCs; (2) RT can dedifferentiate HNSCC cells into CSCs; and (3) radiation-induced dedifferentiation depends on the HPV status of the tumor.

  9. Nuclear DAMP complex-mediated RAGE-dependent macrophage cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ruochan [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Department of Infectious Diseases and State Key Lab of Viral Hepatitis, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Fu, Sha; Fan, Xue-Gong [Department of Infectious Diseases and State Key Lab of Viral Hepatitis, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Lotze, Michael T.; Zeh, Herbert J. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Tang, Daolin, E-mail: tangd2@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Kang, Rui, E-mail: kangr@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2015-03-13

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), histone, and DNA are essential nuclear components involved in the regulation of chromosome structure and function. In addition to their nuclear function, these molecules act as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) alone or together when released extracellularly. The synergistic effect of these nuclear DNA-HMGB1-histone complexes as DAMP complexes (nDCs) on immune cells remains largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that nDCs limit survival of macrophages (e.g., RAW264.7 and peritoneal macrophages) but not cancer cells (e.g., HCT116, HepG2 and Hepa1-6). nDCs promote production of inflammatory tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) release, triggering reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis and necrosis. Moreover, the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), but not toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 and TLR-2, was required for Akt-dependent TNFα release and subsequent cell death following treatment with nDCs. Genetic depletion of RAGE by RNAi, antioxidant N-Acetyl-L-cysteine, and TNFα neutralizing antibody significantly attenuated nDC-induced cell death. These findings provide evidence supporting novel signaling mechanisms linking nDCs and inflammation in macrophage cell death. - Highlights: • Nuclear DAMP complexes (nDCs) selectively induce cell death in macrophages, but not cancer cells. • TNFα-mediated oxidative stress is required for nDC-induced death. • RAGE-mediated Akt activation is required for nDC-induced TNFα release. • Blocking RAGE and TNFα inhibits nDC-induced macrophage cell death.

  10. ZNF23 Suppresses Cutaneous Melanoma Cell Malignancy via Mitochondria-Dependent Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Cutaneous melanoma is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths with an increasing incidence worldwide. A KRAB-containing zinc finger protein member, zinc finger 23 (ZNF23, was reduced in some types of tumors and inhibited cell growth by inducing cell cycle arrest. However, the role of ZNF23 expression is still poorly understood in melanoma. Methods: The level of ZNF23 expression was detected in cutaneous melanoma, adjacent normal skin tissues and cutaneous melanoma cell lines using immunohistochemistry and western blotting. The correlations between ZNF23 expression and other clinicopathologic parameters were analyzed in melanoma patients. Ectopic expression of ZNF23 plasmid was transfected into melanoma cells, SK-MEL-1 and SK-MEL-28. MTT, flow cytometry and transwell assay were used to measure cell proliferation, apoptosis, invasion and migration abilities, respectively. Mitochondrial functions and structures were detected by mitochondrial membrane potential assay and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM method in melanoma cells transfected with overexpressing ZNF23 plasmid or empty vector. Western blotting was performed to detect the levels of ZNF23, p53, p27, Bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-3 after overexpressing of ZNF23 in melanoma cells. Results: ZNF23 was elevated in adjacent normal skin tissues compared with melanoma tissues. Patients with low level of ZNF23 expression exhibited higher incidence of lymphoid metastasis, thicker size of tumors and worse outcome. By using Cox’s regression analysis, ZNF23 expression, tumor thickness and lymph node metastasis were the independent prognostic factors for overall survival (p < 0.05. Results from cellular experiments indicated that ectopic expression of ZNF23 induced cell apoptosis by activation of caspase-3, p27, p53 expression and down-regulation of Bcl-2 through mitochondria-dependent pathway. Conclusions: Decreased ZNF23 was contributed to melanoma progression and poor survival

  11. Patterning and lifetime of plasma membrane-localized cellulose synthase is dependent on actin organization in Arabidopsis interphase cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sampathkumar, A.; Gutierrez, R.; McFarlane, H.E.; Bringmann, M.; Lindeboom, J.J.; Emons, A.M.C.; Samuels, L.; Ketelaar, T.; Ehrhardt, D.W.; Persson, S.

    2013-01-01

    The actin and microtubule cytoskeletons regulate cell shape across phyla, from bacteria to metazoans. In organisms with cell walls, the wall acts as a primary constraint of shape, and generation of specific cell shape depends on cytoskeletal organization for wall deposition and/or cell expansion. In

  12. Particle shape dependence of CD8+ T cell activation by artificial antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunshine, Joel C; Perica, Karlo; Schneck, Jonathan P; Green, Jordan J

    2014-01-01

    Previous work developing particle-based acellular, artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPCs) has focused exclusively on spherical platforms. To explore the role of shape, we generated ellipsoidal PLGA microparticles with varying aspect ratios (ARs) and synthesized aAPCs from them. The ellipsoidal biomimetic aAPCs with high-AR showed significantly enhanced in vitro and in vivo activity above spherical aAPCs with particle volume and antigen content held constant. Confocal imaging indicates that CD8+ T cells preferentially migrate to and are activated by interaction with the long axis of the aAPC. Importantly, enhanced activity of high-AR aAPCs was seen in a mouse melanoma model, with high-AR aAPCs improving melanoma survival compared to non-cognate aAPCs (p = 0.004) and cognate spherical aAPCs (p = 0.05). These findings indicate that particle geometry is a critical design criterion in the generation of aAPCs, and may offer insight into the essential role of geometry in the interaction between CD8+ T cells and biological APCs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Detergent sclerosants at sub-lytic concentrations induce endothelial cell apoptosis through a caspase dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley-Andrade, Osvaldo; Cheung, Kelvin; Chew, An-Ning; Connor, David Ewan; Parsi, Kurosh

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the apoptotic effects of detergent sclerosants sodium tetradecylsulphate (STS) and polidocanol (POL) on endothelial cells at sub-lytic concentrations. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were isolated and labelled with antibodies to assess for apoptosis and examined with confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Isolated HUVECs viability was assessed using propidium iodide staining. Early apoptosis was determined by increased phosphatidylserine exposure by lactadherin binding. Caspase 3, 8, 9 and Bax activation as well as inhibitory assays with Pan Caspase (Z-VAD-FMK) and Bax (BI-6C9) were assessed to identify apoptotic pathways. Porimin activation was used to assess cell membrane permeability. Cell lysis reached almost 100 % with STS at 0.3 % and with POL at 0.6 %. Apoptosis was seen with both STS and POL at concentrations ranging from 0.075 to 0.15 %. PS exposure increased with both STS and POL and exhibited a dose-dependent trend. Active Caspase 3, 8 and 9 but not Bax were increased in HUVECs stimulated with low concentrations of both STS and POL. Inhibitory assays demonstrated Caspase 3, 8, 9 inhibition at low concentrations (0.075 to 0.6 %) with both STS and POL. Both agents increased the activation of porimin at all concentrations. Both sclerosants induced endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis at sub-lytic concentrations through a caspase-dependant pathway. Both agents induced EC oncosis.

  14. Age-Dependent Differences in Systemic and Cell-Autonomous Immunity to L. monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley M. Sherrid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Host defense against infection can broadly be categorized into systemic immunity and cell-autonomous immunity. Systemic immunity is crucial for all multicellular organisms, increasing in importance with increasing cellular complexity of the host. The systemic immune response to Listeria monocytogenes has been studied extensively in murine models; however, the clinical applicability of these findings to the human newborn remains incompletely understood. Furthermore, the ability to control infection at the level of an individual cell, known as “cell-autonomous immunity,” appears most relevant following infection with L. monocytogenes; as the main target, the monocyte is centrally important to innate as well as adaptive systemic immunity to listeriosis. We thus suggest that the overall increased risk to suffer and die from L. monocytogenes infection in the newborn period is a direct consequence of age-dependent differences in cell-autonomous immunity of the monocyte to L. monocytogenes. We here review what is known about age-dependent differences in systemic innate and adaptive as well as cell-autonomous immunity to infection with Listeria monocytogenes.

  15. Repression of SRF target genes is critical for Myc-dependent apoptosis of epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Katrin E; Haikala, Heidi M; von Eyss, Björn; Wolf, Elmar; Esnault, Cyril; Rosenwald, Andreas; Treisman, Richard; Klefström, Juha; Eilers, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic levels of Myc expression sensitize cells to multiple apoptotic stimuli, and this protects long-lived organisms from cancer development. How cells discriminate physiological from supraphysiological levels of Myc is largely unknown. Here, we show that induction of apoptosis by Myc in breast epithelial cells requires association of Myc with Miz1. Gene expression and ChIP-Sequencing experiments show that high levels of Myc invade target sites that lack consensus E-boxes in a complex with Miz1 and repress transcription. Myc/Miz1-repressed genes encode proteins involved in cell adhesion and migration and include several integrins. Promoters of repressed genes are enriched for binding sites of the serum-response factor (SRF). Restoring SRF activity antagonizes Myc repression of SRF target genes, attenuates Myc-induced apoptosis, and reverts a Myc-dependent decrease in Akt phosphorylation and activity, a well-characterized suppressor of Myc-induced apoptosis. We propose that high levels of Myc engage Miz1 in repressive DNA binding complexes and suppress an SRF-dependent transcriptional program that supports survival of epithelial cells. PMID:25896507

  16. Inflammation kinase PKR phosphorylates α-synuclein and causes α-synuclein-dependent cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimer, Lasse; Lund, Louise Buur; Betzer, Cristine

    2018-01-01

    Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and multiple system atrophy comprise a group of neurodegenerative diseases termed synucleinopathies. Synucleinopathie are, characterized by presence of inclusion bodies in degenerating brain cells which contain aggregated α-synuclein phosphorylated...... on Ser129. Although the inflammation-associated serine-threonine kinase, PKR (EIF2AK2), promotes cellular protection against infection, we demonstrate a pro-degenerative role of activated PKR in an α-synuclein-dependent cell model of multiple system atrophy, where inhibition and silencing of PKR decrease...

  17. Advanced nickel/hydrogen dependent pressure vessel (DPV) cell and battery concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Dwight B.; Fox, C. L.; Miller, L. E.

    The dependent pressure vessel (DPV) nickel/hydrogen (NiH 2) design is being developed by Eagle-Picher Industries, Inc. (EPI) as an advanced battery for military and commercial aerospace and terrestrial applications. The DPV cell design offers high specific energy and energy density as well as reduced cost, while retaining the established individual pressure vessel (IPV) technology, flight heritage and database. This advanced DPV design also offers a more efficient mechanical, electrical and thermal cell and battery configuration and a reduced parts count. The DPV battery design promotes compact, minimum volume packaging and weight efficiency, and delivers cost and weight savings with minimal design risks.

  18. Ubiquitin-specific protease 2 decreases p53-dependent apoptosis in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Tianling; Biskup, Edyta; Rahbek Gjerdrum, Lise Mette; Niazi, Omid; Ødum, Niels; Gniadecki, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of advanced cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) is challenging because they are resistant to conventional chemotherapy. USP2 has been shown to promote resistance to chemotherapeutic agents in several cancer models. We show here USP2 is expressed in quiescent and activated T-cells and its expression is 50% lower in CTCL cell lines (MyLa2000, SeAx and Hut-78) than in normal T-cells. USP2 is expressed in neoplastic cells in early, plaque-stage mycosis fungoides (MF) and is downregulated in advanced tumor stages. Upon treatment with psoralen with UVA (PUVA) or a p53 activator, nutlin3a, USP2 expression is significantly increased in MyLa2000 (p53wt/wt), but not in SeAx (p53mut) or Hut-78 (p53−/−). USP2 knockdown decreases MyLa2000 cell viability after PUVA by 50% but not Hut-78, suggesting that the function of USP2 in CTCL cells is p53-dependent. Furthermore, USP2 knockdown results in a decreased Mdm2 expression and upregulation of p53. Taken together, our findings suggest that USP2 stabilizes Mdm2 which antagonizes pro-apoptotic activity of p53 and possibly contributes to therapeutic resistance in CTCL. PMID:27351221

  19. Bistable Epigenetic States Explain Age-Dependent Decline in Mesenchymal Stem Cell Heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidouche, Zahia; Rother, Karen; Przybilla, Jens; Krinner, Axel; Clay, Denis; Hopp, Lydia; Fabian, Claire; Stolzing, Alexandra; Binder, Hans; Charbord, Pierre; Galle, Joerg

    2017-03-01

    The molecular mechanisms by which heterogeneity, a major characteristic of stem cells, is achieved are yet unclear. We here study the expression of the membrane stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) in mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) clones. We show that subpopulations with varying Sca-1 expression profiles regenerate the Sca-1 profile of the mother population within a few days. However, after extensive replication in vitro, the expression profiles shift to lower values and the regeneration time increases. Study of the promoter of Ly6a unravels that the expression level of Sca-1 is related to the promoter occupancy by the activating histone mark H3K4me3. We demonstrate that these findings can be consistently explained by a computational model that considers positive feedback between promoter H3K4me3 modification and gene transcription. This feedback implicates bistable epigenetic states which the cells occupy with an age-dependent frequency due to persistent histone (de-)modification. Our results provide evidence that MSC heterogeneity, and presumably that of other stem cells, is associated with bistable epigenetic states and suggest that MSCs are subject to permanent state fluctuations. Stem Cells 2017;35:694-704. © The Authors Stem Cells published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  20. Localized cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity is required for myogenic cell fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Naohiro

    2008-01-01

    Multinucleated myotubes are formed by fusion of mononucleated myogenic progenitor cells (myoblasts) during terminal skeletal muscle differentiation. In addition, myoblasts fuse with myotubes, but terminally differentiated myotubes have not been shown to fuse with each other. We show here that an adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin, and other reagents that elevate intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels induced cell fusion between small bipolar myotubes in vitro. Then an extra-large myotube, designated a 'myosheet,' was produced by both primary and established mouse myogenic cells. Myotube-to-myotube fusion always occurred between the leading edge of lamellipodia at the polar end of one myotube and the lateral plasma membrane of the other. Forskolin enhanced the formation of lamellipodia where cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) was accumulated. Blocking enzymatic activity or anchoring of PKA suppressed forskolin-enhanced lamellipodium formation and prevented fusion of multinucleated myotubes. Localized PKA activity was also required for fusion of mononucleated myoblasts. The present results suggest that localized PKA plays a pivotal role in the early steps of myogenic cell fusion, such as cell-to-cell contact/recognition through lamellipodium formation. Furthermore, the localized cAMP-PKA pathway might be involved in the specification of the fusion-competent areas of the plasma membrane in lamellipodia of myogenic cells

  1. Cordycepin, a Natural Antineoplastic Agent, Induces Apoptosis of Breast Cancer Cells via Caspase-dependent Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Di; Zhang, Yongfeng; Lu, Jiahui; Wang, Yang; Wang, Junyue; Meng, Qingfan; Lee, Robert J; Wang, Di; Teng, Lesheng

    2016-01-01

    Cordycepin, a major compound separated from Cordyceps sinensis, is known as a potential novel candidate for cancer therapy. Breast cancer, the most typical cancer diagnosed among women, remains a global health problem. In this study, the anti-breast cancer property of cordycepin and its underlying mechanisms was investigated. The direct effects of cordycepin on breast cancer cells both in in vitro and in vivo experiments were evaluated. Cordycepin exerted cytotoxicity in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells confirmed by reduced cell viability, inhibition of cell proliferation, enhanced lactate dehydrogenase release and reactive oxygen species accumulation, induced mitochondrial dysfunction and nuclear apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. Cordycepin increased the activation of pro-apoptotic proteins, including caspase-8, caspase-9, caspase-3 and Bax, and suppressed the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2). The inhibition on MCF-7-xenografted tumor growth in nude mice further confirmed cordycepin's anti-breast cancer effect. These aforementioned results reveal that cordycepin induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cells via caspase-dependent pathways. The data shed light on the possibility of cordycepin being a safe agent for breast cancer treatment.

  2. Temperature dependence of an abiotic glucose/air alkaline fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Dane; Scott, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    The temperature dependence of a previously developed glucose fuel cell is explored. This cell uses a small molecule dye mediator to transport oxidizable electrons from glucose to a carbon felt anode. This reaction is driven by an air breathing MnO2 cathode. This research investigates how the temperature of the system affects the power production of the fuel cell. Cell performance is observed using either methyl viologen, indigo carmine, trypan blue, or hydroquinone as a mediator at temperatures of 15, 19, 27, 32, 37, 42, and 49 °C. Cyclic voltammetry of the cell anode at the given temperatures with the individual dyes is also presented. The highest power production amongst all of the cells occurs at 32 °C. This occurs with the mediator indigo carmine or with the mediator methyl viologen. These sustained powers are 2.31 mW cm-2 and 2.39 mW cm-2, respectively. This is approximately a 350% increase for these cells compared to their power produced at room temperature. This dramatic increase is likely due to increased solubility of the mediator dye at higher temperatures.

  3. Andrographolide Induces Autophagic Cell Death and Inhibits Invasion and Metastasis of Human Osteosarcoma Cells in An Autophagy-Dependent Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Osteosarcoma (OS is the most common primary malignant tumor of bone tissue. Although treatment effectiveness has improved, the OS survival rate has fluctuated in recent years. Andrographolide (AG has been reported to have antitumor activity against a variety of tumors. Our aim was to investigate the effects and potential mechanisms of AG in human osteosarcoma. Methods: Cell viability and morphological changes were assessed by MTT and live/dead assays. Apoptosis was detected using Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining, DAPI, and caspase-3 assays. Autophagy was detected with mRFP-GFP-LC3 adenovirus transfection and western blot. Cell migration and invasion were detected by wound healing assay and Transwell® experiments. Results: AG dose-dependently reduced the viability of osteosarcoma cells. No increase in apoptosis was detected in AG-treated human OS MG-63 and U-2OS cells, and the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD did not attenuate AG-induced cell death. However, AG induced autophagy by suppressing PI3K/Akt/mTOR and enhancing JNK signaling pathways. 3-MA and Beclin-1 siRNA could reverse the cytotoxic effects of AG. In addition, AG inhibited the invasion and metastasis of OS, and this effect could be reversed with Beclin-1 siRNA. Conclusion: AG inhibits viability and induces autophagic death in OS cells. AG-induced autophagy inhibits the invasion and metastasis of OS.

  4. Andrographolide Induces Autophagic Cell Death and Inhibits Invasion and Metastasis of Human Osteosarcoma Cells in An Autophagy-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Zhang, Yan; Zou, Jilong; Yan, Lixin; Yu, Xiufeng; Lu, Peng; Wu, Xiaomeng; Li, Qiaozhi; Gu, Rui; Zhu, Daling

    2017-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant tumor of bone tissue. Although treatment effectiveness has improved, the OS survival rate has fluctuated in recent years. Andrographolide (AG) has been reported to have antitumor activity against a variety of tumors. Our aim was to investigate the effects and potential mechanisms of AG in human osteosarcoma. Cell viability and morphological changes were assessed by MTT and live/dead assays. Apoptosis was detected using Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining, DAPI, and caspase-3 assays. Autophagy was detected with mRFP-GFP-LC3 adenovirus transfection and western blot. Cell migration and invasion were detected by wound healing assay and Transwell® experiments. AG dose-dependently reduced the viability of osteosarcoma cells. No increase in apoptosis was detected in AG-treated human OS MG-63 and U-2OS cells, and the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD did not attenuate AG-induced cell death. However, AG induced autophagy by suppressing PI3K/Akt/mTOR and enhancing JNK signaling pathways. 3-MA and Beclin-1 siRNA could reverse the cytotoxic effects of AG. In addition, AG inhibited the invasion and metastasis of OS, and this effect could be reversed with Beclin-1 siRNA. AG inhibits viability and induces autophagic death in OS cells. AG-induced autophagy inhibits the invasion and metastasis of OS. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Cell cycle- and cell growth-regulated proteolysis of mammalian CDC6 is dependent on APC-CDH1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, B O; Wagener, C; Marinoni, F

    2000-01-01

    CDC6 is conserved during evolution and is essential and limiting for the initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication. Human CDC6 activity is regulated by periodic transcription and CDK-regulated subcellular localization. Here, we show that, in addition to being absent from nonproliferating cells, CDC6...... is targeted for ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis by the anaphase promoting complex (APC)/cyclosome in G(1). A combination of point mutations in the destruction box and KEN-box motifs in CDC6 stabilizes the protein in G(1) and in quiescent cells. Furthermore, APC, in association with CDH1, ubiquitinates CDC6...... in vitro, and both APC and CDH1 are required and limiting for CDC6 proteolysis in vivo. Although a stable mutant of CDC6 is biologically active, overexpression of this mutant or wild-type CDC6 is not sufficient to induce multiple rounds of DNA replication in the same cell cycle. The APC-CDH1-dependent...

  6. Idarubicin induces mTOR-dependent cytotoxic autophagy in leukemic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristic, Biljana [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 1, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Bosnjak, Mihajlo [Institute of Histology and Embryology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Arsikin, Katarina [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 1, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Mircic, Aleksandar; Suzin-Zivkovic, Violeta [Institute of Histology and Embryology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Bogdanovic, Andrija [Clinic for Hematology, Clinical Centre of Serbia, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Perovic, Vladimir [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 1, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Martinovic, Tamara; Kravic-Stevovic, Tamara; Bumbasirevic, Vladimir [Institute of Histology and Embryology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Trajkovic, Vladimir, E-mail: vtrajkovic@med.bg.ac.rs [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 1, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Harhaji-Trajkovic, Ljubica, E-mail: buajk@yahoo.com [Institute for Biological Research, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Despot Stefan Blvd. 142, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2014-08-01

    We investigated if the antileukemic drug idarubicin induces autophagy, a process of programmed cellular self-digestion, in leukemic cell lines and primary leukemic cells. Transmission electron microscopy and acridine orange staining demonstrated the presence of autophagic vesicles and intracellular acidification, respectively, in idarubicin-treated REH leukemic cell line. Idarubicin increased punctuation/aggregation of microtubule-associated light chain 3B (LC3B), enhanced the conversion of LC3B-I to autophagosome-associated LC3B-II in the presence of proteolysis inhibitors, and promoted the degradation of the selective autophagic target p62, thus indicating the increase in autophagic flux. Idarubicin inhibited the phosphorylation of the main autophagy repressor mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and its downstream target p70S6 kinase. The treatment with the mTOR activator leucine prevented idarubicin-mediated autophagy induction. Idarubicin-induced mTOR repression was associated with the activation of the mTOR inhibitor AMP-activated protein kinase and down-regulation of the mTOR activator Akt. The suppression of autophagy by pharmacological inhibitors or LC3B and beclin-1 genetic knockdown rescued REH cells from idarubicin-mediated oxidative stress, mitochondrial depolarization, caspase activation and apoptotic DNA fragmentation. Idarubicin also caused mTOR inhibition and cytotoxic autophagy in K562 leukemic cell line and leukocytes from chronic myeloid leukemia patients, but not healthy controls. By demonstrating mTOR-dependent cytotoxic autophagy in idarubicin-treated leukemic cells, our results warrant caution when considering combining idarubicin with autophagy inhibitors in leukemia therapy. - Highlights: • Idarubicin induces autophagy in leukemic cell lines and primary leukemic cells. • Idarubicin induces autophagy by inhibiting mTOR in leukemic cells. • mTOR suppression by idarubicin is associated with AMPK activation and Akt blockade.

  7. Intracellular CHO Cell Metabolite Profiling Reveals Steady-State Dependent Metabolic Fingerprints in Perfusion Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karst, Daniel J; Steinhoff, Robert F; Kopp, Marie R G; Serra, Elisa; Soos, Miroslav; Zenobi, Renato; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2017-07-01

    Perfusion cell culture processes allow the steady-state culture of mammalian cells at high viable cell density, which is beneficial for overall product yields and homogeneity of product quality in the manufacturing of therapeutic proteins. In this study, the extent of metabolic steady state and the change of the metabolite profile between different steady states of an industrial Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line producing a monoclonal antibody (mAb) was investigated in stirred tank perfusion bioreactors. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) of daily cell extracts revealed more than a hundred peaks, among which 76 metabolites were identified by tandem MS (MS/MS) and high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) MS. Nucleotide ratios (Uridine (U)-ratio, nucleotide triphosphate (NTP)-ratio and energy charge (EC)) and multivariate analysis of all features indicated a consistent metabolite profile for a stable culture performed at 40 × 10 6 cells/mL over 26 days of culture. Conversely, the reactor was operated continuously so as to reach three distinct steady states one after the other at 20, 60, and 40 × 10 6 cells/mL. In each case, a stable metabolite profile was achieved after an initial transient phase of approximately three days at constant cell density when varying between these set points. Clear clustering according to cell density was observed by principal component analysis, indicating steady-state dependent metabolite profiles. In particular, varying levels of nucleotides, nucleotide sugar, and lipid precursors explained most of the variance between the different cell density set points. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:879-890, 2017. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  8. Extracellular Ca(2+)-dependent enhancement of cytocidal potency of zoledronic acid in human oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Sayaka; Arai, Naoya; Tomihara, Kei; Takashina, Michinori; Hattori, Yuichi; Noguchi, Makoto

    2015-08-15

    Direct antitumor effects of bisphosphonates (BPs) have been demonstrated in various cancer cells in vitro. However, the effective concentrations of BPs are typically much higher than their clinically relevant concentrations. Oral cancers frequently invade jawbone and may lead to the release of Ca(2+) in primary lesions. We investigated the effects of the combined application of zoledronic acid (ZA) and Ca(2+) on proliferation and apoptosis of oral cancer cells. Human oral cancer cells, breast cancer cells, and colon cancer cells were treated with ZA at a wide range of concentrations in different Ca(2+) concentration environments. Under a standard Ca(2+) concentration (0.6mM), micromolar concentrations of ZA were required to inhibit oral cancer cell proliferation. Increasing extracellular Ca(2+) concentrations greatly enhanced the potency of the ZA cytocidal effect. The ability of Ca(2+) to enhance the cytocidal effects of ZA was negated by the Ca(2+)-selective chelator EGTA. In contrast, the cytocidal effect of ZA was less pronounced in breast and colon cancer cells regardless of whether extracellular Ca(2+) was elevated. In oral cancer cells incubated with 1.6mM Ca(2+), ZA up-regulated mitochondrial Bax expression and increased mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. This was associated with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased release of cytochrome c. We suggest that ZA can specifically produce potent cytocidal activity in oral cancer cells in an extracellular Ca(2+)-dependent manner, implying that BPs may be useful for treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma with jawbone invasion leading to the hypercalcemic state. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Analysis of the sign-dependent switching observed in a hybrid aligned nematic cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornford, S L; Taphouse, T S; Sambles, J R

    2009-01-01

    An optical waveguide experiment was used to study the influence of dc electric fields on a hybrid aligned nematic liquid crystal cell. This dc switching differed from ac switching in two ways: first, the equilibrium states depended on the sign of the applied voltage, and second, there was transient activity over long (∼100 ms) timescales. To understand both of these, a numerical model of the cell's dynamics, which included both the Ericksen-Leslie theory and a drift-diffusion model of mobile ions, has been developed. Comparing modelling with observations, we find that the transients are caused by the motion of tiny concentrations of ionic impurities, and that the sign dependence is caused by an asymmetric distribution of surface charge, rather than the flexoelectric effect.

  10. Wavelength-Dependent Differential Interference Contrast Microscopy: Selectively Imaging Nanoparticle Probes in Live Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Wei; Wang, Gufeng; Fang, Ning; and Yeung, Edward S.

    2009-11-15

    Gold and silver nanoparticles display extraordinarily large apparent refractive indices near their plasmon resonance (PR) wavelengths. These nanoparticles show good contrast in a narrow spectral band but are poorly resolved at other wavelengths in differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. The wavelength dependence of DIC contrast of gold/silver nanoparticles is interpreted in terms of Mie's theory and DIC working principles. We further exploit this wavelength dependence by modifying a DIC microscope to enable simultaneous imaging at two wavelengths. We demonstrate that gold/silver nanoparticles immobilized on the same glass slides through hybridization can be differentiated and imaged separately. High-contrast, video-rate images of living cells can be recorded both with and without illuminating the gold nanoparticle probes, providing definitive probe identification. Dual-wavelength DIC microscopy thus presents a new approach to the simultaneous detection of multiple probes of interest for high-speed live-cell imaging.

  11. Rotating Hele-Shaw cell with a time-dependent angular velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjos, Pedro H. A.; Alvarez, Victor M. M.; Dias, Eduardo O.; Miranda, José A.

    2017-12-01

    Despite the large number of existing studies of viscous flows in rotating Hele-Shaw cells, most investigations analyze rotational motion with a constant angular velocity, under vanishing Reynolds number conditions in which inertial effects can be neglected. In this work, we examine the linear and weakly nonlinear dynamics of the interface between two immiscible fluids in a rotating Hele-Shaw cell, considering the action of a time-dependent angular velocity, and taking into account the contribution of inertia. By using a generalized Darcy's law, we derive a second-order mode-coupling equation which describes the time evolution of the interfacial perturbation amplitudes. For arbitrary values of viscosity and density ratios, and for a range of values of a rotational Reynolds number, we investigate how the time-dependent angular velocity and inertia affect the important finger competition events that traditionally arise in rotating Hele-Shaw flows.

  12. Spectral and directional dependence of light-trapping in solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulbrich, Carolin

    2011-02-17

    This thesis investigates the directional and spectral dependence of light-incoupling and light-trapping in solar cells. The light-trapping does not notably change under increased angles of incidence. To enhance the incoupling at the front of the solar cell, the effects of a textured surface structure on the cover glass of the solar cell are investigated. The texture reduces the reflectance at the air-glass interface and, additionally, reduces the reflection losses originating at the interface between the glass and the transparent conductive oxide (TCO) as well as the TCO and the silicon (Si) absorber due to the randomization of light. On samples without a textured TCO/Si interface, the textured foil induces additional light-trapping in the photovoltaically active absorber material. This effect is not observed for samples with a textured TCO/Si interface. In this case, using tandem solar cells, a redistribution of light absorption in the top and bottom subcells is detected. The antireflective texture increases the short circuit current density in thin film silicon tandem solar cells by up to 1 mA/cm{sup 2}, and the conversion efficiency by up to 0.7 % absolute. The increase in the annual yield of solar cells is estimated to be up to 10 %. Further, the spectral dependence of the efficiency and annual yield of a tandem solar cell was investigated. The daily variation of the incident spectrum causes a change in the current matching of the serial connected subcells. Simulations determine the optimum subcell layer thicknesses of tandem solar cells. The thicknesses optimized in respect to the annual yield overlap in a wide range for both investigated locations with those for the AM1.5g standard spectrum. Though, a slight top limitation is favorable. Matching the short circuit currents of the subcells maximizes the overall current, but minimizes the fill factor. This thesis introduces a new definition for the matching condition of tandem solar cells. This definition

  13. Differential Aspartate Usage Identifies a Subset of Cancer Cells Particularly Dependent on OGDH

    OpenAIRE

    Eric L. Allen; Danielle B. Ulanet; David Pirman; Christopher E. Mahoney; John Coco; Yaguang Si; Ying Chen; Lingling Huang; Jinmin Ren; Sung Choe; Michelle F. Clasquin; Erin Artin; Zi Peng Fan; Giovanni Cianchetta; Joshua Murtie

    2016-01-01

    Although aberrant metabolism in tumors has been well described, the identification of cancer subsets with particular metabolic vulnerabilities has remained challenging. Here, we conducted an siRNA screen focusing on enzymes involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and uncovered a striking range of cancer cell dependencies on OGDH, the E1 subunit of the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex. Using an integrative metabolomics approach, we identified differential aspartate utilization,...

  14. Superantigen presentation by human retinal pigment epithelial cells to T cells is dependent on CD2-CD58 and CD18-CD54 molecule interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Junker, N; Kaestel, C G

    2001-01-01

    Human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells are capable of presenting bacterial superantigens (SAg) to T cells in vitro by ligation of MHC class II molecules on RPE cells with the T cell receptor. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the involvement of adhesion molecules in presentation....... Proliferation was measured by (3)H-thymidine incorporation assay. In selected experiments, either RPE or T cells were pre-treated with blocking antibodies specific for cell surface molecules. For comparison, dendritic cells were used as superantigen presenting cells for T cells. This study showed...... that presentation of SEA by RPE cells to resting T cells was dependent on the presence of the molecules CD2, CD58 and CD18, CD54. The cycling status of T cells was decisive, thus resting T cells but not activated T cells were capable to proliferate in response to SEA presentation. Proliferation of T cells induced...

  15. Proteomic Analysis of Calcium- and Phosphorylation-dependentCalmodulin Complexes in Mammalian Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Deok-Jin; Wang, Daojing

    2006-05-26

    Protein conformational changes due to cofactor binding (e.g. metal ions, heme) and/or posttranslational modifications (e.g. phosphorylation) modulate dynamic protein complexes. Calmodulin (CaM) plays an essential role in regulating calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) signaling and homeostasis. No systematic approach on the identification of phosphorylation-dependent Ca{sup 2+}/CaM binding proteins has been published. Herein, we report a proteome-wide study of phosphorylation-dependent CaM binding proteins from mammalian cells. This method, termed 'Dynamic Phosphoprotein Complex Trapping', 'DPPC Trapping' for short, utilizes a combination of in vivo and in vitro assays. The basic strategy is to drastically shift the equilibrium towards endogenous phosphorylation of Ser, Thr, and Tyr at the global scale by inhibiting corresponding phosphatases in vivo. The phosphorylation-dependent calmodulin-binding proteins are then trapped in vitro in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner by CaM-Sepharose chromatography. Finally, the isolated calmodulin-binding proteins are separated by SDS-PAGE and identified by LC/MS/MS. In parallel, the phosphorylation-dependent binding is visualized by silver staining and/or Western blotting. Using this method, we selectively identified over 120 CaM-associated proteins including many previously uncharacterized. We verified ubiquitin-protein ligase EDD1, inositol 1, 4, 5-triphosphate receptor type 1 (IP{sub 3}R1), and ATP-dependent RNA helicase DEAD box protein 3 (DDX3), as phosphorylation-dependent CaM binding proteins. To demonstrate the utilities of our method in understanding biological pathways, we showed that pSer/Thr of IP{sub 3}R1 in vivo by staurosporine-sensitive kinase(s), but not by PKA/PKG/PKC, significantly reduced the affinity of its Ca{sup 2+}-dependent CaM binding. However, pSer/Thr of IP{sub 3}R1 did not substantially affect its Ca{sup 2+}-independent CaM binding. We further showed that phosphatase PP1, but not PP2A or PP2B

  16. History-dependent excitability as a single-cell substrate of transient memory for information discrimination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Baroni

    Full Text Available Neurons react differently to incoming stimuli depending upon their previous history of stimulation. This property can be considered as a single-cell substrate for transient memory, or context-dependent information processing: depending upon the current context that the neuron "sees" through the subset of the network impinging on it in the immediate past, the same synaptic event can evoke a postsynaptic spike or just a subthreshold depolarization. We propose a formal definition of History-Dependent Excitability (HDE as a measure of the propensity to firing in any moment in time, linking the subthreshold history-dependent dynamics with spike generation. This definition allows the quantitative assessment of the intrinsic memory for different single-neuron dynamics and input statistics. We illustrate the concept of HDE by considering two general dynamical mechanisms: the passive behavior of an Integrate and Fire (IF neuron, and the inductive behavior of a Generalized Integrate and Fire (GIF neuron with subthreshold damped oscillations. This framework allows us to characterize the sensitivity of different model neurons to the detailed temporal structure of incoming stimuli. While a neuron with intrinsic oscillations discriminates equally well between input trains with the same or different frequency, a passive neuron discriminates better between inputs with different frequencies. This suggests that passive neurons are better suited to rate-based computation, while neurons with subthreshold oscillations are advantageous in a temporal coding scheme. We also address the influence of intrinsic properties in single-cell processing as a function of input statistics, and show that intrinsic oscillations enhance discrimination sensitivity at high input rates. Finally, we discuss how the recognition of these cell-specific discrimination properties might further our understanding of neuronal network computations and their relationships to the distribution and

  17. Curcumin analog WZ35 induced cell death via ROS-dependent ER stress and G2/M cell cycle arrest in human prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiuhua; Chen, Minxiao; Zou, Peng; Kanchana, Karvannan; Weng, Qiaoyou; Chen, Wenbo; Zhong, Peng; Ji, Jiansong; Zhou, Huiping; He, Langchong; Liang, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy among men. The Discovery of new agents for the treatment of prostate cancer is urgently needed. Compound WZ35, a novel analog of the natural product curcumin, exhibited good anti-prostate cancer activity, with an IC 50 of 2.2 μM in PC-3 cells. However, the underlying mechanism of WZ35 against prostate cancer cells is still unclear. Human prostate cancer PC-3 cells and DU145 cells were treated with WZ35 for further proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, and mechanism analyses. NAC and CHOP siRNA were used to validate the role of ROS and ER stress, respectively, in the anti-cancer actions of WZ35. Our results show that WZ35 exhibited much higher cell growth inhibition than curcumin by inducing ER stress-dependent cell apoptosis in human prostate cells. The reduction of CHOP expression by siRNA partially abrogated WZ35-induced cell apoptosis. WZ35 also dose-dependently induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. Furthermore, we found that WZ35 treatment for 30 min significantly induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in PC-3 cells. Co-treatment with the ROS scavenger NAC completely abrogated the induction of WZ35 on cell apoptosis, ER stress activation, and cell cycle arrest, indicating an upstream role of ROS generation in mediating the anti-cancer effect of WZ35. Taken together, this work presents the novel anticancer candidate WZ35 for the treatment of prostate cancer, and importantly, reveals that increased ROS generation might be an effective strategy in human prostate cancer treatment. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1851-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  18. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulated robust human colon cancer cell invasion. ► Anti-matrix metalloproteinase1 antibody pre-treatment blocks cell invasion. ► Bile acids stimulate MMP1 expression, cell migration and MMP1-dependent invasion. -- Abstract: Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers – this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre-treatment with anti-MMP1 antibody. This study contributes to understanding

  19. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: jraufman@medicine.umaryland.edu [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulated robust human colon cancer cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-matrix metalloproteinase1 antibody pre-treatment blocks cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acids stimulate MMP1 expression, cell migration and MMP1-dependent invasion. -- Abstract: Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers - this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre

  20. Glutamate-Dependent BMAL1 Regulation in Cultured Bergmann Glia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi-Castañeda, Donají; Waliszewski, Stefan M; Zepeda, Rossana C; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C R; Caba, Mario; Ortega, Arturo

    2015-05-01

    Glutamate, the major excitatory amino acid, activates a wide variety of signal transduction cascades. This neurotransmitter is involved in photic entrainment of circadian rhythms, which regulate physiological and behavioral functions. The circadian clock in vertebrates is based on a transcription-translation feedback loop in which Brain and muscle aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)-like protein 1 (BMAL1) acts as transcriptional activator of others clock genes. This protein is expressed in nearly all suprachiasmatic nucleus neurons, as well as in the granular layer of the cerebellum. In this context, we decided to investigate the role of glutamate in the molecular mechanisms involved in the processes of transcription/translation of BMAL1 protein. To this end, primary cultures of chick cerebellar Bergmann glial cells were stimulated with glutamatergic ligands and we found that BMAL1 levels increased in a dose- and time dependent manner. Additionally, we studied the phosphorylation of serine residues in BMAL1 under glutamate stimulation and we were able to detect an increase in the phosphorylation of this protein. The increased expression of BMAL1 is most probably the result of a stabilization of the protein after it has been phosphorylated by the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase and/or the Ca(2+)/diacylglycerol dependent protein kinase. The present results strongly suggest that glutamate participates in regulating BMAL1 in glial cells and that these cells might prove to be important in the control of circadian rhythms in the cerebellum.

  1. GATA Factor-Dependent Positive-Feedback Circuit in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

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    Koichi R. Katsumura

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The master regulatory transcription factor GATA-2 triggers hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell generation. GATA2 haploinsufficiency is implicated in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS and acute myeloid leukemia (AML, and GATA2 overexpression portends a poor prognosis for AML. However, the constituents of the GATA-2-dependent genetic network mediating pathogenesis are unknown. We described a p38-dependent mechanism that phosphorylates GATA-2 and increases GATA-2 target gene activation. We demonstrate that this mechanism establishes a growth-promoting chemokine/cytokine circuit in AML cells. p38/ERK-dependent GATA-2 phosphorylation facilitated positive autoregulation of GATA2 transcription and expression of target genes, including IL1B and CXCL2. IL-1β and CXCL2 enhanced GATA-2 phosphorylation, which increased GATA-2-mediated transcriptional activation. p38/ERK-GATA-2 stimulated AML cell proliferation via CXCL2 induction. As GATA2 mRNA correlated with IL1B and CXCL2 mRNAs in AML-M5 and high expression of these genes predicted poor prognosis of cytogenetically normal AML, we propose that the circuit is functionally important in specific AML contexts.

  2. Coercivity temperature dependence of Sm2Co17-type sintered magnets with different cell and cell boundary microchemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nengjun; Zhu, Minggang; Song, Liwei; Fang, Yikun; Song, KuiKui; Wang, Qiang; Li, Wei

    2018-04-01

    High maximum energy product ((BH)max) Sm(CobalFe0.18Cu0.07Zr0.03)7.7 magnet (type-A) and high temperature Sm(CobalFe0.1Cu0.09Zr0.03)7.2 magnet (type-B) were prepared by a traditional powder metallurgical technology. A record (BH)max of 98.7 kJ/m3 with a coercivity (Hcj) of 501.5 kA/m at 773 K was achieved for the type-B magnet, which is much higher than that of type-A magnet (63.7 kJ/m3). The microstructures of the magnets were revealed by high-resolution transmission electron microscope. The average cell size of the type-A and B magnet are 110 nm and 90 nm, respectively. Moreover, the type-B magnet shows a wider cell boundary than the type-A magnet. Additionally, the element distribution of the cell/cell boundary interfaces was measured by energy-dispersive spectroscopy. The cell phase of the type-A magnet contains a higher Fe content as about 17 at%, comparing with that of the type-B magnet (∼8.9 at%). On the other hand, the Cu content of the cell boundary phase is 18 at% almost twice higher than the type-B magnet (8.6 at%). Theoretical Hcj temperature dependence of these two kinds of magnets indicates that the lower Cu content in the cell boundary phase and the appropriate Fe content in the cell phase are the key factors for the high Hcj for the type-B magnet at elevated temperature.

  3. Anti-HIV-1 B cell responses are dependent on B cell precursor frequency and antigen-binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosenovic, Pia; Kara, Ervin E; Pettersson, Anna-Klara; McGuire, Andrew T; Gray, Matthew; Hartweger, Harald; Thientosapol, Eddy S; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2018-04-16

    The discovery that humans can produce potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) to several different epitopes on the HIV-1 spike has reinvigorated efforts to develop an antibody-based HIV-1 vaccine. Antibody cloning from single cells revealed that nearly all bNAbs show unusual features that could help explain why it has not been possible to elicit them by traditional vaccination and instead would require a sequence of different immunogens. This idea is supported by experiments with genetically modified immunoglobulin (Ig) knock-in mice. Sequential immunization with a series of specifically designed immunogens was required to shepherd the development of bNAbs. However, knock-in mice contain superphysiologic numbers of bNAb precursor-expressing B cells, and therefore how these results can be translated to a more physiologic setting remains to be determined. Here we make use of adoptive transfer experiments using knock-in B cells that carry a synthetic intermediate in the pathway to anti-HIV-1 bNAb development to examine how the relationship between B cell receptor affinity and precursor frequency affects germinal center (GC) B cell recruitment and clonal expansion. Immunization with soluble HIV-1 antigens can recruit bNAb precursor B cells to the GC when there are as few as 10 such cells per mouse. However, at low precursor frequencies, the extent of clonal expansion is directly proportional to the affinity of the antigen for the B cell receptor, and recruitment to GCs is variable and dependent on recirculation.

  4. Mechanosensory organ regeneration in zebrafish depends on a population of multipotent progenitor cells kept latent by Schwann cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Mario; Ceci, Maria Laura; Gutiérrez, Daniela; Anguita-Salinas, Consuelo; Allende, Miguel L

    2016-04-07

    Regenerating damaged tissue is a complex process, requiring progenitor cells that must be stimulated to undergo proliferation, differentiation and, often, migratory behaviors and morphological changes. Multiple cell types, both resident within the damaged tissue and recruited to the lesion site, have been shown to participate. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the activation of progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation after injury, and their regulation by different cells types, are not fully understood. The zebrafish lateral line is a suitable system to study regeneration because most of its components are fully restored after damage. The posterior lateral line (PLL) is a mechanosensory system that develops embryonically and is initially composed of seven to eight neuromasts distributed along the trunk and tail, connected by a continuous stripe of interneuromastic cells (INCs). The INCs remain in a quiescent state owing to the presence of underlying Schwann cells. They become activated during development to form intercalary neuromasts. However, no studies have described if INCs can participate in a regenerative event, for example, after the total loss of a neuromast. We used electroablation in transgenic larvae expressing fluorescent proteins in PLL components to completely ablate single neuromasts in larvae and adult fish. This injury results in discontinuity of the INCs, Schwann cells, and the PLL nerve. In vivo imaging showed that the INCs fill the gap left after the injury and can regenerate a new neuromast in the injury zone. Further, a single INC is able to divide and form all cell types in a regenerated neuromast and, during this process, it transiently expresses the sox2 gene, a neural progenitor cell marker. We demonstrate a critical role for Schwann cells as negative regulators of INC proliferation and neuromast regeneration, and that this inhibitory property is completely dependent on active ErbB signaling. The potential

  5. Interaction between x-irradiated plateau-phase bone marrow stromal cell lines and co-cultivated factor-dependent cell lines leading to leukemogenesis in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naparstek, E.; Anklesaria, P.; FitzGerald, T.J.; Sakakeeny, M.A.; Greenberger, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Plateau-phase mouse clonal bone marrow stromal cell lines D2XRII and C3H cl 11 produce decreasing levels of M-CSF (CSF-1), a specific macrophage progenitor cell humoral regulator, following X-irradiation in vitro. The decrease did not go below 40% of control levels, even after irradiation doses of 50,000 rad (500 Gy). In contrast, a distinct humoral regulator stimulating growth of GM-CSF/IL-3 factor-dependent (FD) hematopoietic progenitor cell lines was detected following radiation to doses above 2000 rad. This humoral factor was not detectable in conditioned medium from irradiated cells, weakly detected using factor-dependent target cell populations in agar overlay, and was prominently detected by liquid co-cultivation of factor-dependent cells with irradiated stromal cell cultures. Subclonal lines of FD cells, derived after co-cultivation revealed karyotypic abnormalities and induced myeloblastic tumors in syngeneic mice. Five-eight weeks co-cultivation was required for induction of factor independence and malignancy and was associated with dense cell to cell contact between FD cells and stromal cells demonstrated by light and electron microscopy. Increases in hematopoietic to stromal cell surface area, total number of adherent cells per flask, total non-adherent cell colonies per flask, and cumulative non-adherent cell production were observed after irradiation. The present data may prove very relevant to an understanding of the cell to cell interactions during X-irradiation-induced leukemia

  6. The genomic response of Ishikawa cells to bisphenol A exposure is dose- and time-dependent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naciff, Jorge M.; Khambatta, Zubin S.; Reichling, Timothy D.; Carr, Gregory J.; Tiesman, Jay P.; Singleton, David W.; Khan, Sohaib A.; Daston, George P.

    2010-01-01

    A reliable in vitro model to determine the potential estrogenic activity of chemicals of interest is still unavailable. To further investigate the usefulness of a human-derived cell line, we determined the transcriptional changes induced by bisphenol A (BPA) in Ishikawa cells at various doses (1 nM, 100 nM, 10 μM, and 100 μM) and time points (8, 24 and 48 h) by comparing the response of approximately 38,500 human genes and ESTs between treatment groups and controls (vehicle-treated). By trend analysis, we determined that the expression of 2794 genes was modified by BPA in a dose- and time-dependent manner (p ≤ 0.0001). However, the majority of gene expression changes induced in Ishikawa cells were elicited by the highest doses of BPA evaluated (10-100 μM), while the genomic response of the cells exposed to low doses of BPA was essentially negligible. By comparing the Ishikawa cells' response to BPA vs.17α-ethynyl estradiol we determined that the change in the expression of 307 genes was identical in the direction of the change, although the magnitude of the change for some genes was different. Further, the response of Ishikawa cells to high doses of BPA shared similarities to the estrogenic response of the rat uterus, specifically, 362 genes were regulated in a similar manner in vivo as well as in vitro. Gene ontology analysis indicated that BPA results in changes to multiple molecular pathways affecting various biological processes particularly associated with cell organization and biogenesis, regulation of translation, cell proliferation, and intracellular transport; processes also affected by estrogen exposure in the uterus of the rat. These results indicate that Ishikawa cells are capable of generating a biologically relevant estrogenic response after exposure to chemicals with varied estrogenic activity, and offer an in vitro model to assess this mode of action.

  7. Basal metabolic state governs AIF-dependent growth support in pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, Andrew J.; Wilkinson, Amanda S.; Wilkinson, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), named for its involvement in cell death pathways, is a mitochondrial protein that regulates metabolic homeostasis. In addition to supporting the survival of healthy cells, AIF also plays a contributory role to the development of cancer through its enzymatic activity, and we have previously shown that AIF preferentially supports advanced-stage prostate cancer cells. Here we further evaluated the role of AIF in tumorigenesis by exploring its function in pancreatic cancer, a disease setting that most often presents at an advanced stage by the time of diagnosis. A bioinformatics approach was first employed to investigate AIF mRNA transcript levels in pancreatic tumor specimens vs. normal tissues. AIF-deficient pancreatic cancer cell lines were then established via lentiviral infection. Immunoblot analysis was used to determine relative protein quantities within cells. Cell viability was measured by flow cytometry; in vitro and Matrigel™ growth/survival using Coulter™ counting and phase contrast microscopy; and glucose consumption in the absence and presence of Matrigel™ using spectrophotometric methods. Archival gene expression data revealed a modest elevation of AIF transcript levels in subsets of pancreatic tumor specimens, suggesting a possible role in disease progression. AIF expression was then suppressed in a panel of five pancreatic cancer cell lines that display diverse metabolic phenotypes. AIF ablation selectively crippled the growth of cells in vitro in a manner that directly correlated with the loss of mitochondrial respiratory chain subunits and altered glucose metabolism, and these effects were exacerbated in the presence of Matrigel™ substrate. This suggests a critical metabolic role for AIF to pancreatic tumorigenesis, while the spectrum of sensitivities to AIF ablation depends on basal cellular metabolic phenotypes. Altogether these data indicate that AIF supports the growth and survival of metabolically defined

  8. Potentiation of NMDA receptor-dependent cell responses by extracellular high mobility group box 1 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Pedrazzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Extracellular high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 protein can operate in a synergistic fashion with different signal molecules promoting an increase of cell Ca(2+ influx. However, the mechanisms responsible for this effect of HMGB1 are still unknown. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate that, at concentrations of agonist per se ineffective, HMGB1 potentiates the activation of the ionotropic glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR in isolated hippocampal nerve terminals and in a neuroblastoma cell line. This effect was abolished by the NMDA channel blocker MK-801. The HMGB1-facilitated NMDAR opening was followed by activation of the Ca(2+-dependent enzymes calpain and nitric oxide synthase in neuroblastoma cells, resulting in an increased production of NO, a consequent enhanced cell motility, and onset of morphological differentiation. We have also identified NMDAR as the mediator of HMGB1-stimulated murine erythroleukemia cell differentiation, induced by hexamethylenebisacetamide. The potentiation of NMDAR activation involved a peptide of HMGB1 located in the B box at the amino acids 130-139. This HMGB1 fragment did not overlap with binding sites for other cell surface receptors of HMGB1, such as the advanced glycation end products or the Toll-like receptor 4. Moreover, in a competition assay, the HMGB1((130-139 peptide displaced the NMDAR/HMGB1 interaction, suggesting that it comprised the molecular and functional site of HMGB1 regulating the NMDA receptor complex. CONCLUSION: We propose that the multifunctional cytokine-like molecule HMGB1 released by activated, stressed, and damaged or necrotic cells can facilitate NMDAR-mediated cell responses, both in the central nervous system and in peripheral tissues, independently of other known cell surface receptors for HMGB1.

  9. Particle Size-Dependent Antibacterial Activity and Murine Cell Cytotoxicity Induced by Graphene Oxide Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have indicated that graphene and its derivative graphene oxide (GO engage in a wide range of antibacterial activities with limited toxicity to human cells. Here, we systematically evaluate the dependence of GO toxicity on the size of the nanoparticles used in treatments: we compare the cytotoxic effects of graphene quantum dots (GQDs, <15 nm, small GOs (SGOs, 50–200 nm, and large GOs (LGOs, 0.5–3 μm. We synthesize the results of bacterial colony count assays and SEM-based observations of morphological changes to assess the antibacterial properties that these GOs bring into effect against E. coli. We also use Live/Dead assays and morphological analysis to investigate changes to mammalian (Murine macrophage-like Raw 264.7 cells induced by the presence of the various GO particle types. Our results demonstrate that LGOs, SGOs, and GQDs possess antibacterial activities and cause mammalian cell cytotoxicity at descending levels of potency. Placing our observations in the context of previous simulation results, we suggest that both the lateral size and surface area of GO particles contribute to cytotoxic effects. We hope that the size dependence elucidated here provides a useful schematic for tuning GO-cell interactions in biomedical applications.

  10. Cutting Edge: BAFF Overexpression Reduces Atherosclerosis via TACI-Dependent B Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Shaun W; Scharping, Nicole E; Jacobs, Holly M; Wang, Shari; Chait, Alan; Rawlings, David J

    2016-12-15

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus exhibit accelerated atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall. The impact of B cells in atherosclerosis is controversial, with both protective and pathogenic roles described. For example, natural IgM binding conserved oxidized lipid epitopes protect against atherosclerosis, whereas anti-oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) IgG likely promotes disease. Because BAFF promotes B cell class-switch recombination and humoral autoimmunity, we hypothesized that excess BAFF would accelerate atherosclerosis. In contrast, BAFF overexpression markedly reduced hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mice. BAFF-mediated atheroprotection required B cells and was associated with increased protective anti-oxLDL IgM. Surprisingly, high-titer anti-oxLDL IgM production and reduced atherosclerosis was dependent on the BAFF family receptor transmembrane activator and CAML interactor. In summary, we identified a novel role for B cell-specific, BAFF-dependent transmembrane activator and CAML interactor signals in atherosclerosis pathogenesis, of particular relevance to the use of BAFF-targeted therapies in systemic lupus erythematosus. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  11. Activity-dependent plasticity of spike pauses in cerebellar Purkinje cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasselli, Giorgio; He, Qionger; Wan, Vivian; Adelman, John P.; Ohtsuki, Gen; Hansel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Summary Plasticity of intrinsic excitability has been described in several types of neurons, but the significance of non-synaptic mechanisms in brain plasticity and learning remains elusive. Cerebellar Purkinje cells are inhibitory neurons that spontaneously fire action potentials at high frequencies and regulate activity in their target cells in the cerebellar nuclei by generating a characteristic spike burst–pause sequence upon synaptic activation. Using patch-clamp recordings from mouse Purkinje cells, we find that depolarization-triggered intrinsic plasticity enhances spike firing and shortens the duration of spike pauses. Pause plasticity is absent from mice lacking SK2-type potassium channels (SK2−/− mice) and in occlusion experiments using the SK channel blocker apamin, while apamin wash-in mimics pause reduction. Our findings demonstrate that spike pauses can be regulated through an activity-dependent, exclusively non-synaptic, SK2 channel-dependent mechanism and suggest that pause plasticity—by altering the Purkinje cell output—may be crucial to cerebellar information storage and learning. PMID:26972012

  12. Activity-Dependent Plasticity of Spike Pauses in Cerebellar Purkinje Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Grasselli

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The plasticity of intrinsic excitability has been described in several types of neurons, but the significance of non-synaptic mechanisms in brain plasticity and learning remains elusive. Cerebellar Purkinje cells are inhibitory neurons that spontaneously fire action potentials at high frequencies and regulate activity in their target cells in the cerebellar nuclei by generating a characteristic spike burst-pause sequence upon synaptic activation. Using patch-clamp recordings from mouse Purkinje cells, we find that depolarization-triggered intrinsic plasticity enhances spike firing and shortens the duration of spike pauses. Pause plasticity is absent from mice lacking SK2-type potassium channels (SK2−/− mice and in occlusion experiments using the SK channel blocker apamin, while apamin wash-in mimics pause reduction. Our findings demonstrate that spike pauses can be regulated through an activity-dependent, exclusively non-synaptic, SK2 channel-dependent mechanism and suggest that pause plasticity—by altering the Purkinje cell output—may be crucial to cerebellar information storage and learning.

  13. Clock-dependent temporal regulation of IL-33/ST2-mediated mast cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawauchi, Takahiro; Ishimaru, Kayoko; Nakamura, Yuki; Nakano, Nobuhiro; Hara, Mutsuko; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Shibata, Shigenobu; Nakao, Atsuhito

    2017-07-01

    Interleukin-33 (IL-33) is an alarmin cytokine that binds to the interleukin 1 receptor-like 1 protein ST2. Clock is a key circadian gene that is essential for endogenous clockworks in mammals. This study investigated whether Clock temporally regulated IL-33-mediated responses in mast cells. The kinetics of IL-33-mediated IL-6, IL-13, and TNF-α productions were compared between bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) from wild-type and Clock-mutated mice (Clock Δ19/Δ19 mice). The kinetics of the neutrophil influx into the peritoneal cavity or expression of IL-13 and Gob-5 in the lung in response to IL-33 were compared between wild-type and Clock Δ19/Δ19 mice. We also examined the kinetics of ST2 expression in mast cells and its association with Clock expression. There was a time-of-day-dependent variation in IL-33-mediated IL-6, IL-13, and TNF-α production in wild-type BMMCs, which was absent in Clock-mutated BMMCs. IL-33-induced neutrophil infiltration into the peritoneal cavity also showed a time-of-day-dependent variation in wild-type mice, which was absent in Clock Δ19/Δ19 mice. Furthermore, IL-33-induced IL-13 and Gob-5 expression in the lung exhibited a time-of-day-dependent variation in wild-type mice. These temporal variations in IL-33-mediated mast cell responses were associated with temporal variations of ST2 expression in mast cells. In addition, CLOCK bound to the promoter region of ST2 and Clock deletion resulted in down-regulation of ST2 expression in mast cells. CLOCK temporally gates mast cell responses to IL-33 via regulation of ST2 expression. Our findings provide novel insights into IL-33/mast cell-associated physiology and pathologies. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Voltage Dependent Anion Channel Is Redistributed during Japanese Encephalitis Virus Infection of Insect Cells

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    Chanida Fongsaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the availability of an effective vaccine, Japanese encephalitis remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in many parts of Asia. Japanese encephalitis is caused by the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV, a mosquito transmitted flavivirus. Many of the details of the virus replication cycle in mosquito cells remain unknown. This study sought to determine whether GRP78, a well-characterized flavivirus E protein interacting protein, interacted with JEV E protein in insect cells, and whether this interaction was mediated at the cell surface. GRP78 was shown to interact with JEV E protein by coimmunoprecipitation, and was additionally shown to interact with voltage dependent anion protein (VDAC through the same methodology. Antibody inhibition experiments showed that neither GRP78 nor VDAC played a role in JEV internalization to insect cells. Interestingly, VDAC was shown to be significantly relocalized in response to JEV infection, and significant levels of colocalization between VDAC and GRP78 and VDAC and ribosomal L28 protein were seen in JEV infected but not uninfected cells. This is the first report of relocalization of VDAC in response to JEV infection and suggests that this may be a part of the JEV replication strategy in insect cells.

  15. Neutrophil Attack Triggers Extracellular Trap-Dependent Candida Cell Wall Remodeling and Altered Immune Recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Hopke

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens hide immunogenic epitopes from the host to evade immunity, persist and cause infection. The opportunistic human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, which can cause fatal disease in immunocompromised patient populations, offers a good example as it masks the inflammatory epitope β-glucan in its cell wall from host recognition. It has been demonstrated previously that β-glucan becomes exposed during infection in vivo but the mechanism behind this exposure was unknown. Here, we show that this unmasking involves neutrophil extracellular trap (NET mediated attack, which triggers changes in fungal cell wall architecture that enhance immune recognition by the Dectin-1 β-glucan receptor in vitro. Furthermore, using a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis, we demonstrate the requirement for neutrophils in triggering these fungal cell wall changes in vivo. Importantly, we found that fungal epitope unmasking requires an active fungal response in addition to the stimulus provided by neutrophil attack. NET-mediated damage initiates fungal MAP kinase-driven responses, particularly by Hog1, that dynamically relocalize cell wall remodeling machinery including Chs3, Phr1 and Sur7. Neutrophil-initiated cell wall disruptions augment some macrophage cytokine responses to attacked fungi. This work provides insight into host-pathogen interactions during disseminated candidiasis, including valuable information about how the C. albicans cell wall responds to the biotic stress of immune attack. Our results highlight the important but underappreciated concept that pattern recognition during infection is dynamic and depends on the host-pathogen dialog.

  16. TEL/ETV6 induces apoptosis in 32D cells through p53-dependent pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagata, Tetsuya; Maki, Kazuhiro; Waga, Kazuo; Mitani, Kinuko

    2006-01-01

    TEL is an ETS family transcription factor that is critical for maintaining hematopoietic stem cells in adult bone marrow. To investigate the roles of TEL in myeloid proliferation and differentiation, we introduced TEL cDNA into mouse myeloid 32Dcl3 cells. Overexpression of TEL repressed interleukin-3-dependent proliferation through blocking cell cycle progression. Also, the presence of TEL triggered apoptosis through the mitochondrial intrinsic pathway on exposure to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. We found an increase in p53 protein and its DNA binding in the TEL-overexpressing cells. Forced expression of TEL stimulated transcription via the p53-responsive element and increased the expression of cellular target genes for p53 such as cell cycle regulator p21 and apoptosis inducer Puma. Consistently, induction of apoptosis was delayed by pifithrin-α treatment and completely blocked by increased expression of Bcl-2 in the TEL-overexpressing cells. These data collectively suggest that TEL exerts a tumor suppressive function through augmenting the p53 pathway and facilitates normal development of myelopoiesis

  17. Bias-dependent high saturation solar LBIC scanning of solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorster, F.J.; van Dyk, E.E. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)

    2007-06-15

    A light beam-induced current measurement system that uses concentrated solar radiation as a beam probe to map spatially distributed defects on a solar cell has been developed and tested [F.J. Vorster, E.E. van Dyk, Rev. Sci. Instrum., submitted for review]. The induced current response from a flat plate EFG Si solar cell was mapped as a function of surface position and cell bias by using a solar light beam induced current (S-LBIC) mapping system while at the same time dynamically biasing the whole cell with an external voltage. This paper examines the issues relating to transient capacitive effects as well as the electrical behaviour of typical solar cell defect mechanisms under spot illumination. By examining the bias dependence of the S-LBIC maps, various defect mechanisms of photovoltaic (PV) cells under concentrated solar irradiance may be identified. The techniques employed to interpret the spatially distributed IV curves as well as initial results are discussed. (author)

  18. Dose-dependent effects of ouabain on spiral ganglion neurons and Schwann cells in mouse cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Jian; Guan, Hong-Xia; Yang, Kun; Xiao, Bo-Kui; Liao, Hua; Jiang, Yang; Zhou, Tao; Hua, Qing-Quan

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed in fully investigating the toxicities of ouabain to mouse cochlea and the related cellular environment, and providing an optimal animal model system for cell transplantation in the treatment of auditory neuropathy (AN) and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Different dosages of ouabain were applied to mouse round window. The auditory brainstem responses and distortion product otoacoustic emissions were used to evaluate the cochlear function. The immunohistochemical staining and cochlea surface preparation were performed to detect the spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), Schwann cells and hair cells. Ouabain at the dosages of 0.5 mM, 1 mM and 3 mM selectively and permanently destroyed SGNs and their functions, while leaving the hair cells relatively intact. Ouabain at 3 mM resulted in the most severe SGNs loss and induced significant loss of Schwann cells started as early as 7 days and with further damages at 14 and 30 days after ouabain exposure. The application of ouabain to mouse round window induces damages of SGNs and Schwann cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, this study established a reliable and accurate animal model system of AN and SNHL.

  19. Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin-dependent induction of host cell death by membrane-derived vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Thay

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus causes a wide spectrum of infections in humans, ranging from superficial cutaneous infections, infections in the circum-oral region, to life-threatening bacteremia. It was recently demonstrated that Gram-positive organisms such as S. aureus liberate membrane-derived vesicles (MVs, which analogously to outer membrane vesicles (OMVs of Gram-negative bacteria can play a role in delivering virulence factors to host cells. In the present study we have shown that cholesterol-dependent fusion of S. aureus MVs with the plasma membrane represents a route for delivery of a key virulence factor, α-toxin (α-hemolysin; Hla to human cells. Most S. aureus strains produce this 33-kDa pore-forming protein, which can lyse a wide range of human cells, and induce apoptosis in T-lymphocytes. Our results revealed a tight association of biologically active α-toxin with membrane-derived vesicles isolated from S. aureus strain 8325-4. Concomitantly, α-toxin contributed to HeLa cell cytotoxicity of MVs, and was the main vesicle-associated protein responsible for erythrocyte lysis. In contrast, MVs obtained from an isogenic hla mutant were significantly attenuated with regards to both causing lysis of erythrocytes and death of HeLa cells. This is to our knowledge the first recognition of an S. aureus MV-associated factor contributing to host cell cytotoxicity.

  20. Age-Dependent Defects of Regulatory B Cells in Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Gene Knockout Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadafumi Yokoyama

    Full Text Available The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS is a rare X-linked primary immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent infections, thrombocytopenia, eczema, and high incidence of malignancy and autoimmunity. The cellular mechanisms underlying autoimmune complications in WAS have been extensively studied; however, they remain incompletely defined. We investigated the characteristics of IL-10-producing CD19+CD1dhighCD5+ B cells (CD1dhighCD5+ Breg obtained from Was gene knockout (WKO mice and found that their numbers were significantly lower in these mice compared to wild type (WT controls. Moreover, we found a significant age-dependent reduction of the percentage of IL-10-expressing cells in WKO CD1dhighCD5+ Breg cells as compared to age-matched WT control mice. CD1dhighCD5+ Breg cells from older WKO mice did not suppress the in vitro production of inflammatory cytokines from activated CD4+ T cells. Interestingly, CD1dhighCD5+ Breg cells from older WKO mice displayed a basal activated phenotype which may prevent normal cellular responses, among which is the expression of IL-10. These defects may contribute to the susceptibility to autoimmunity with age in patients with WAS.

  1. Non-small cell lung cancer cyclooxygenase-2-dependent invasion is mediated by CD44.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohadwala, M; Luo, J; Zhu, L; Lin, Y; Dougherty, G J; Sharma, S; Huang, M; Pold, M; Batra, R K; Dubinett, S M

    2001-06-15

    Elevated tumor cyclooxygenase (COX-2) expression is associated with increased angiogenesis, tumor invasion, and suppression of host immunity. We have previously shown that genetic inhibition of tumor COX-2 expression reverses the immunosuppression induced by non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). To assess the impact of COX-2 expression in lung cancer invasiveness, NSCLC cell lines were transduced with a retroviral vector expressing the human COX-2 cDNA in the sense (COX-2-S) and antisense (COX-2-AS) orientations. COX-2-S clones expressed significantly more COX-2 protein, produced 10-fold more prostaglandin E(2), and demonstrated an enhanced invasive capacity compared with control vector-transduced or parental cells. CD44, the cell surface receptor for hyaluronate, was overexpressed in COX-2-S cells, and specific blockade of CD44 significantly decreased tumor cell invasion. In contrast, COX-2-AS clones had a very limited capacity for invasion and showed diminished expression of CD44. These findings suggest that a COX-2-mediated, CD44-dependent pathway is operative in NSCLC invasion. Because tumor COX-2 expression appears to have a multifaceted role in conferring the malignant phenotype, COX-2 may be an important target for gene or pharmacologic therapy in NSCLC.

  2. Arginine dependence of tumor cells: targeting a chink in cancer's armor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, M D; Bhaumik, J; Babykutty, S; Banerjee, U C; Fukumura, D

    2016-09-22

    Arginine, one among the 20 most common natural amino acids, has a pivotal role in cellular physiology as it is being involved in numerous cellular metabolic and signaling pathways. Dependence on arginine is diverse for both tumor and normal cells. Because of decreased expression of argininosuccinate synthetase and/or ornithine transcarbamoylase, several types of tumor are auxotrophic for arginine. Deprivation of arginine exploits a significant vulnerability of these tumor cells and leads to their rapid demise. Hence, enzyme-mediated arginine depletion is a potential strategy for the selective destruction of tumor cells. Arginase, arginine deiminase and arginine decarboxylase are potential enzymes that may be used for arginine deprivation therapy. These arginine catabolizing enzymes not only reduce tumor growth but also make them susceptible to concomitantly administered anti-cancer therapeutics. Most of these enzymes are currently under clinical investigations and if successful will potentially be advanced as anti-cancer modalities.

  3. Serratia marcescens Induces Apoptotic Cell Death in Host Immune Cells via a Lipopolysaccharide- and Flagella-dependent Mechanism*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kenichi; Adachi, Tatsuo; Imamura, Katsutoshi; Takano, Shinya; Usui, Kimihito; Suzuki, Kazushi; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Takeshi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2012-01-01

    Injection of Serratia marcescens into the blood (hemolymph) of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, induced the activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), followed by caspase activation and apoptosis of blood cells (hemocytes). This process impaired the innate immune response in which pathogen cell wall components, such as glucan, stimulate hemocytes, leading to the activation of insect cytokine paralytic peptide. S. marcescens induced apoptotic cell death of silkworm hemocytes and mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. We searched for S. marcescens transposon mutants with attenuated ability to induce apoptosis of silkworm hemocytes. Among the genes identified, disruption mutants of wecA (a gene involved in lipopolysaccharide O-antigen synthesis), and flhD and fliR (essential genes in flagella synthesis) showed reduced motility and impaired induction of mouse macrophage cell death. These findings suggest that S. marcescens induces apoptosis of host immune cells via lipopolysaccharide- and flagella-dependent motility, leading to the suppression of host innate immunity. PMID:22859304

  4. Albendazole inhibits HIF-1α-dependent glycolysis and VEGF expression in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fang; Du, Jin; Wang, Jianjun

    2017-04-01

    Albendazole (ABZ) has an anti-tumor ability and inhibits HIF-1α activity. HIF-1α is associated with glycolysis and vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) expression, which plays an important role in cancer progression. These clues indicate that ABZ exerts an anti-cancer effect by regulating glycolysis and VEGF expression. The aim of this study is to clarify the effects of ABZ on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and explore the underlying molecular mechanisms. The expression levels of HIF-1α and VEGF were detected using western blot analysis, and the effect of ABZ on glycolysis was evaluated by measuring the relative activities of hexokinase (HK), pyruvate kinase (PK), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and detecting the production of lactate in A549 and H1299 cells. The results showed that ABZ decreased the expression levels of HIF-1α and VEGF and suppressed glycolysis in under hypoxia, but not normoxic condition. Inhibiting HIF-1α also suppressed glycolysis and VEGF expression. Additionally, ABZ inhibited the volume and weight, decreased the relative activities of HK, PK, and LDH, and reduced the levels of HIF-1α and VEGF of A549 xenografts in mouse models. In conclusion, ABZ inhibited growth of NSCLC cells by suppressing HIF-1α-dependent glycolysis and VEGF expression.

  5. Slaying the Trojan horse: natural killer cells exhibit robust anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent activation and cytolysis against allogeneic T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooneratne, Shayarana L; Richard, Jonathan; Lee, Wen Shi; Finzi, Andrés; Kent, Stephen J; Parsons, Matthew S

    2015-01-01

    Many attempts to design prophylactic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccines have focused on the induction of neutralizing antibodies (Abs) that block infection by free virions. Despite the focus on viral particles, virus-infected cells, which can be found within mucosal secretions, are more infectious than free virus both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, assessment of human transmission couples suggests infected seminal lymphocytes might be responsible for a proportion of HIV-1 transmissions. Although vaccines that induce neutralizing Abs are sought, only some broadly neutralizing Abs efficiently block cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1. As HIV-1 vaccines need to elicit immune responses capable of controlling both free and cell-associated virus, we evaluated the potential of natural killer (NK) cells to respond in an Ab-dependent manner to allogeneic T cells bearing HIV-1 antigens. This study presents data measuring Ab-dependent anti-HIV-1 NK cell responses to primary and transformed allogeneic T-cell targets. We found that NK cells are robustly activated in an anti-HIV-1 Ab-dependent manner against allogeneic targets and that tested target cells are subject to Ab-dependent cytolysis. Furthermore, the educated KIR3DL1(+) NK cell subset from HLA-Bw4(+) individuals exhibits an activation advantage over the KIR3DL1(-) subset that contains both NK cells educated through other receptor/ligand combinations and uneducated NK cells. These results are intriguing and important for understanding the regulation of Ab-dependent NK cell responses and are potentially valuable for designing Ab-dependent therapies and/or vaccines. NK cell-mediated anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent functions have been associated with protection from infection and disease progression; however, their role in protecting from infection with allogeneic cells infected with HIV-1 is unknown. We found that HIV-1-specific ADCC antibodies bound to allogeneic cells infected with HIV-1 or coated

  6. Effect of histamine on Ca(2+)-dependent signaling pathways in rat conjunctival goblet cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dayu; Carozza, Richard B; Shatos, Marie A; Hodges, Robin R; Dartt, Darlene A

    2012-10-05

    The purpose of this study was to determine the Ca(2+)-dependent cellular signaling pathways used by histamine to stimulate conjunctival goblet cell secretion. Cultured rat goblet cells were grown in RPMI 1640. Goblet cell secretion of high molecular weight glycoconjugates was measured by an enzyme-linked lectin assay. Intracellular [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)](i)) was measured by loading cultured cells with the Ca(2+) sensitive dye fura-2. The level of [Ca(2+)](i) was measured using fluorescence microscopy. Extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) 2 was depleted using small interfering RNA (siRNA). Histamine-stimulated conjunctival goblet cell secretion of high molecular weight glycoproteins was blocked by removal of extracellular Ca(2+) and depletion of ERK2 by siRNA. Histamine increase in [Ca(2+)](i) was desensitized by repeated addition of agonist and blocked by a phospholipase C antagonist. Histamine at higher doses increased [Ca(2+)](i) by stimulating influx of extracellular Ca(2+), but at a lower dose released Ca(2+) from intracellular stores. Activation of each histamine receptor subtype (H(1)-H(4)) increased [Ca(2+)](i) and histamine stimulation was blocked by antagonists of each receptor subtype. The H(2) receptor subtype increase in [Ca(2+)](i) was cAMP dependent. We conclude that histamine activates phospholipase C to release intracellular Ca(2+) that induces the influx of extracellular Ca(2+) and activates ERK1/2 to stimulate conjunctival goblet cell mucous secretion, and that activation of all four histamine receptor subtypes can increase [Ca(2+)](i).

  7. Co-Effect of Histamine on Ca2+-Dependent Signaling Pathways in Rat Conjunctival Goblet Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dayu; Carozza, Richard B.; Shatos, Marie A.; Hodges, Robin R.; Dartt, Darlene A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine the Ca2+-dependent cellular signaling pathways used by histamine to stimulate conjunctival goblet cell secretion. Methods. Cultured rat goblet cells were grown in RPMI 1640. Goblet cell secretion of high molecular weight glycoconjugates was measured by an enzyme-linked lectin assay. Intracellular [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]i) was measured by loading cultured cells with the Ca2+ sensitive dye fura-2. The level of [Ca2+]i was measured using fluorescence microscopy. Extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) 2 was depleted using small interfering RNA (siRNA). Results. Histamine-stimulated conjunctival goblet cell secretion of high molecular weight glycoproteins was blocked by removal of extracellular Ca2+ and depletion of ERK2 by siRNA. Histamine increase in [Ca2+]i was desensitized by repeated addition of agonist and blocked by a phospholipase C antagonist. Histamine at higher doses increased [Ca2+]i by stimulating influx of extracellular Ca2+, but at a lower dose released Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Activation of each histamine receptor subtype (H1–H4) increased [Ca2+]i and histamine stimulation was blocked by antagonists of each receptor subtype. The H2 receptor subtype increase in [Ca2+]i was cAMP dependent. Conclusions. We conclude that histamine activates phospholipase C to release intracellular Ca2+ that induces the influx of extracellular Ca2+ and activates ERK1/2 to stimulate conjunctival goblet cell mucous secretion, and that activation of all four histamine receptor subtypes can increase [Ca2+]i. PMID:22956601

  8. Regulation of resveratrol production in Vitis amurensis cell cultures by calcium-dependent protein kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleynova, O A; Dubrovina, A S; Manyakhin, A Y; Karetin, Y A; Kiselev, K V

    2015-02-01

    Resveratrol is a naturally occurring plant stilbene that exhibits a wide range of valuable biological and pharmacological properties. Although the beneficial effects of trans-resveratrol to human health and plant protection against fungal pathogens are well-established, little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating stilbene biosynthesis in plant cells. It has been recently shown that overexpression of the calcium-dependent protein kinase VaCPK20 gene considerably increased resveratrol accumulation in cell cultures of Vitis amurensis. It is possible that calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) play an important role in the regulation of resveratrol biosynthesis. In the present work, we investigated the effects of overexpression of other members of the CDPK multigene family (VaCPK9, VaCPK13, VaCPK21, and VaCPK29) on resveratrol accumulation and growth parameters of grape cell cultures. The obtained data show that overexpression of VaCPK29 increased resveratrol content 1.6-2.4-fold and fresh biomass accumulation 1.1-1.4-fold in the four independently transformed cell lines of V. amurensis compared with that in the empty vector-transformed calli. However, overexpression of the VaCPK9, VaCPK13, and VaCPK21 genes did not considerably affect resveratrol content and fresh/dry biomass accumulation in the independently transformed cell lines of V. amurensis. VaCPK29-transformed calli were capable of producing between 1.02 and 1.39 mg/l of resveratrol, while the control calli produced 0.48 to 0.79 mg/l of resveratrol. The data indicate that the VaCPK9, VaCPK13, and VaCPK21 genes are not involved in the regulation of stilbene biosynthesis in grape cells, while the VaCPK29 and VaCPK20 genes are implicated in resveratrol biosynthesis as positive regulators.

  9. IL-4 and -5 prime human mast cells for different profiles of IgE-dependent cytokine production

    OpenAIRE

    Ochi, Hiroshi; De Jesus, Nidia H.; Hsieh, Fred H.; Austen, K. Frank; Boyce, Joshua A.

    2000-01-01

    Mast cells (MC) are stem cell factor-dependent tissue-based hematopoietic cells with substantial functional heterogeneity. Cord blood-derived human MC (hMC) express functional receptors for IL-5, and IL-5 mediates stem cell factor-dependent comitogenesis of hMC in vitro. Although IL-5 is not required for normal hMC development, we considered that it might prime hMC for their high-affinity Fc receptor for IgE (FcɛRI)-dependent generation of cytokines, as previously demonstrated for IL-4. Compa...

  10. Radiation quality dependence of signal transmission and bystander induced cell killing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Giuseppe; Bertolotti, Alessia; Facoetti, Angelica; Grande, Sveva; Mariotti, Luca; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Ranza, Elena; Simone, Giustina; Sorrentino, Eugenio; Antonella Tabocchini, Maria

    Low dose radiobiological studies have shown effects, observable in cells that are in the vicinity of irradiated cells, which are due to the release by irradiated cells of several cellular mediators among which Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species (ROS, NRS), and cytokines are likely to play a key role. Despite the large number in the literature of studies on bystander effects induced by ionizing radiation the results are still conflicting, and further studies are therefore needed on the possible underlying mechanisms. The dependence on radiation quality deserve particular attention because bystander mechanisms are probably more important with high-LET irradi-ations, where many cells are not hit (bystander). Moreover, due to the different patterns of energy deposition, the cellular response to low LET and high LET radiation can be different. Understanding whether these cells can contribute to the adverse effects of low radiation doses in a radiation quality-dependent fashion might have important implications in risk estimates for both cancer induction and non-cancer diseases. In this context, we addressed to the study of the bystander induced cell killing after incubation with "conditioned medium" from primary human fibroblasts irradiated with 0.1 and 0.5 Gy of α-particles or γ-rays. Medium transfer was performed after 1h incubation from irradiation. The results have confirmed a reduction in clonogenic survival after incubation with medium from α-irradiated cells, independently of the dose; similar results were obtained after γ-irradiation, although in this case a slight dose depen-dence could be envisaged. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and Interleukin-8 (IL-8) levels were measured in the conditioned medium collected up to 20 hours after irradiation with α-particles and γ-rays in the dose-range of 0.1-1.0 Gy, in parallel with evaluation of their receptor expression in irradi-ated and bystander cells. Concerning IL-6, we observed the strongest modulation of its release

  11. MTAP deletion confers enhanced dependency on the PRMT5 arginine methyltransferase in cancer cells | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The discovery of cancer dependencies has the potential to inform therapeutic strategies and to identify putative drug targets. Integrating data from comprehensive genomic profiling of cancer cell lines and from functional characterization of cancer cell dependencies, we discovered that loss of the enzyme methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) confers a selective dependence on protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) and its binding partner WDR77. MTAP is frequently lost due to its proximity to the commonly deleted tumor suppressor gene, CDKN2A.

  12. DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase As Molecular Target for Radiosensitization of Neuroblastoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Emmy M Dolman

    Full Text Available Tumor cells might resist therapy with ionizing radiation (IR by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ of IR-induced double-strand breaks. One of the key players in NHEJ is DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK. The catalytic subunit of DNA-PK, i.e. DNA-PKcs, can be inhibited with the small-molecule inhibitor NU7026. In the current study, the in vitro potential of NU7026 to radiosensitize neuroblastoma cells was investigated. DNA-PKcs is encoded by the PRKDC (protein kinase, DNA-activated, catalytic polypeptide gene. We showed that PRKDC levels were enhanced in neuroblastoma patients and correlated with a more advanced tumor stage and poor prognosis, making DNA-PKcs an interesting target for radiosensitization of neuroblastoma tumors. Optimal dose finding for combination treatment with NU7026 and IR was performed using NGP cells. One hour pre-treatment with 10 μM NU7026 synergistically sensitized NGP cells to 0.63 Gy IR. Radiosensitizing effects of NU7026 increased in time, with maximum effects observed from 96 h after IR-exposure on. Combined treatment of NGP cells with 10 μM NU7026 and 0.63 Gy IR resulted in apoptosis, while no apoptotic response was observed for either of the therapies alone. Inhibition of IR-induced DNA-PK activation by NU7026 confirmed the capability of NGP cells to, at least partially, resist IR by NHEJ. NU7026 also synergistically radiosensitized other neuroblastoma cell lines, while no synergistic effect was observed for low DNA-PKcs-expressing non-cancerous fibroblasts. Results obtained for NU7026 were confirmed by PRKDC knockdown in NGP cells. Taken together, the current study shows that DNA-PKcs is a promising target for neuroblastoma radiosensitization.

  13. Delivery of CdiA nuclease toxins into target cells during contact-dependent growth inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Julia S; Nikolakakis, Kiel C; Willett, Julia L E; Aoki, Stephanie K; Hayes, Christopher S; Low, David A

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) is mediated by the CdiB/CdiA family of two-partner secretion proteins. CDI systems deploy a variety of distinct toxins, which are contained within the polymorphic C-terminal region (CdiA-CT) of CdiA proteins. Several CdiA-CTs are nucleases, suggesting that the toxins are transported into the target cell cytoplasm to interact with their substrates. To analyze CdiA transfer to target bacteria, we used the CDI system of uropathogenic Escherichia coli 536 (UPEC536) as a model. Antibodies recognizing the amino- and carboxyl-termini of CdiA(UPEC536) were used to visualize transfer of CdiA from CDI(UPEC536+) inhibitor cells to target cells using fluorescence microscopy. The results indicate that the entire CdiA(UPEC536) protein is deposited onto the surface of target bacteria. CdiA(UPEC536) transfer to bamA101 mutants is reduced, consistent with low expression of the CDI receptor BamA on these cells. Notably, our results indicate that the C-terminal CdiA-CT toxin region of CdiA(UPEC536) is translocated into target cells, but the N-terminal region remains at the cell surface based on protease sensitivity. These results suggest that the CdiA-CT toxin domain is cleaved from CdiA(UPEC536) prior to translocation. Delivery of a heterologous Dickeya dadantii CdiA-CT toxin, which has DNase activity, was also visualized. Following incubation with CDI(+) inhibitor cells targets became anucleate, showing that the D.dadantii CdiA-CT was delivered intracellularly. Together, these results demonstrate that diverse CDI toxins are efficiently translocated across target cell envelopes.

  14. Hormonal regulation of Na+/K+-dependent ATPase activity and pump function in corneal endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatou, Shin

    2011-10-01

    Na- and K-dependent ATPase (Na,K-ATPase) in the basolateral membrane of corneal endothelial cells plays an important role in the pump function of the corneal endothelium. We investigated the role of dexamethasone in the regulation of Na,K-ATPase activity and pump function in these cells. Mouse corneal endothelial cells were exposed to dexamethasone or insulin. ATPase activity was evaluated by spectrophotometric measurement, and pump function was measured using an Ussing chamber. Western blotting and immunocytochemistry were performed to measure the expression of the Na,K-ATPase α1-subunit. Dexamethasone increased Na,K-ATPase activity and the pump function of endothelial cells. Western blot analysis indicated that dexamethasone increased the expression of the Na,K-ATPase α1-subunit but decreased the ratio of active to inactive Na,K-ATPase α1-subunit. Insulin increased Na,K-ATPase activity and pump function of cultured corneal endothelial cells. These effects were transient and blocked by protein kinase C inhibitors and inhibitors of protein phosphatases 1 (PP1) and 2A (PP2A). Western blot analysis indicated that insulin decreased the amount of inactive Na,K-ATPase α1-subunit, but the expression of total Na,K-ATPase α1-subunit was unchanged. Immunocytochemistry showed that insulin increased cell surface expression of the Na,K-ATPase α1-subunit. Our results suggest that dexamethasone and insulin stimulate Na,K-ATPase activity in mouse corneal endothelial cells. The effect of dexamethasone activation in these cells was mediated by Na,K-ATPase synthesis and an increased enzymatic activity because of dephosphorylation of Na,K-ATPase α1-subunits. The effect of insulin is mediated by the protein kinase C, PP1, and/or PP2A pathways.

  15. Anti-neoplastic drugs increase caveolin-1-dependent migration, invasion and metastasis of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Valdivia, Natalia I; Calderón, Claudia C; Díaz, Jorge E; Lobos-González, Lorena; Sepulveda, Hugo; Ortíz, Rina J; Martinez, Samuel; Silva, Veronica; Maldonado, Horacio J; Silva, Patricio; Wehinger, Sergio; Burzio, Verónica A; Torres, Vicente A; Montecino, Martín; Leyton, Lisette; Quest, Andrew F G

    2017-12-19

    Expression of the scaffolding protein Caveolin-1 (CAV1) enhances migration and invasion of metastatic cancer cells. Yet, CAV1 also functions as a tumor suppressor in early stages of cancer, where expression is suppressed by epigenetic mechanisms. Thus, we sought to identify stimuli/mechanisms that revert epigenetic CAV1 silencing in cancer cells and evaluate how this affects their metastatic potential. We reasoned that restricted tissue availability of anti-neoplastic drugs during chemotherapy might expose cancer cells to sub-therapeutic concentrations, which activate signaling pathways and the expression of CAV1 to favor the acquisition of more aggressive traits. Here, we used in vitro [2D, invasion] and in vivo (metastasis) assays, as well as genetic and biochemical approaches to address this question. Colon and breast cancer cells were identified where CAV1 levels were low due to epigenetic suppression and could be reverted by treatment with the methyltransferase inhibitor 5'-azacytidine. Exposure of these cells to anti-neoplastic drugs for short periods of time (24-48 h) increased CAV1 expression through ROS production and MEK/ERK activation. In colon cancer cells, increased CAV1 expression enhanced migration and invasion in vitro via pathways requiring Src-family kinases, as well as Rac-1 activity. Finally, elevated CAV1 expression in colon cancer cells following exposure in vitro to sub-cytotoxic drug concentrations increased their metastatic potential in vivo . Therefore exposure of cancer cells to anti-neoplastic drugs at non-lethal drug concentrations induces signaling events and changes in transcription that favor CAV1-dependent migration, invasion and metastasis. Importantly, this may occur in the absence of selection for drug-resistance.

  16. Acute doxorubicin insult in the mouse ovary is cell- and follicle-type dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elon C Roti Roti

    Full Text Available Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI is one of the many unintended consequences of chemotherapy faced by the growing number of female cancer survivors. While ovarian repercussions of chemotherapy have long been recognized, the acute insult phase and primary sites of damage are not well-studied, hampering efforts to design effective intervention therapies to protect the ovary. Utilizing doxorubicin (DXR as a model chemotherapy agent, we defined the acute timeline for drug accumulation, induced DNA damage, and subsequent cellular and follicular demise in the mouse ovary. DXR accumulated first in the core ovarian stroma cells, then redistributed outwards into the cortex and follicles in a time-dependent manner, without further increase in total ovarian drug levels after four hours post-injection. Consistent with early drug accumulation and intimate interactions with the blood supply, stroma cell-enriched populations exhibited an earlier DNA damage response (measurable at 2 hours than granulosa cells (measurable at 4 hours, as quantified by the comet assay. Granulosa cell-enriched populations were more sensitive however, responding with greater levels of DNA damage. The oocyte DNA damage response was delayed, and not measurable above background until 10-12 hours post-DXR injection. By 8 hours post-DXR injection and prior to the oocyte DNA damage response, the number of primary, secondary, and antral follicles exhibiting TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling-positive granulosa cells plateaued, indicating late-stage apoptosis and suggesting damage to the oocytes is subsequent to somatic cell failure. Primordial follicles accumulate significant DXR by 4 hours post-injection, but do not exhibit TUNEL-positive granulosa cells until 48 hours post-injection, indicating delayed demise. Taken together, the data suggest effective intervention therapies designed to protect the ovary from chemotherapy accumulation and induced insult

  17. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3 is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma and promotes tumor cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Chunyang; Xie, Haiyang; Zhou, Lin; Zhou, Wuhua; Zhang, Wu; Ding, Songming; Wei, Bajin; Yu, Xiaobo; Su, Rong; Zheng, Shusen

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► CDKN3 is commonly overexpressed in HCC and is associated with poor clinical outcome. ► Overexpression of CDKN3 could stimulate the proliferation of HCC cells by promoting G1/S transition. ► CDKN3 could inhibit the expression of p21 in HCC cells. ► Overexpression of CDKN3 has no effect on apoptosis and invasion of HCC cells. ► We identified 61 genes co-expressed with CDKN3, and BIRC5 was located at the center of the co-expression network. -- Abstract: Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3 (CDKN3) belongs to the protein phosphatases family and has a dual function in cell cycling. The function of this gene has been studied in several kinds of cancers, but its role in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains to be elucidated. In this study, we found that CDKN3 was frequently overexpressed in both HCC cell lines and clinical samples, and this overexpression was correlated with poor tumor differentiation and advanced tumor stage. Functional studies showed that overexpression of CDKN3 could promote cell proliferation by stimulating G1-S transition but has no impact on cell apoptosis and invasion. Microarray-based co-expression analysis identified a total of 61 genes co-expressed with CDKN3, with most of them involved in cell proliferation, and BIRC5 was located at the center of CDKN3 co-expression network. These results suggest that CDKN3 acts as an oncogene in human hepatocellular carcinoma and antagonism of CDKN3 may be of interest for the treatment of HCC.

  18. Differential surface phenotype and context-dependent reactivity of functionally diverse NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Garth; Godfrey, Dale I

    2018-03-05

    Natural Killer T (NKT) cells are a functionally diverse population that recognizes lipid-based antigens in association with the antigen-presenting molecule CD1d. Here, we define a technique to separate the functionally distinct thymic NKT1, NKT2 and NKT17 cell subsets by their surface expression of CD278 (ICOS) and the activation-associated glycoform of CD43, enabling the investigation of subset-specific effector-functions. We report that all three subsets express the transcription factor GATA-3 and the potential to produce IL-4 and IL-10 following activation. This questions the notion that NKT2 cells are the predominant source of IL-4 within the NKT cell pool, and suggests that IL-10-production may be more indicative of NKT cell plasticity than the existence of a distinct regulatory lineage or subset. We also show that many NKT17 cells are CD4 + and are biased toward Vβ8.3 TCR gene usage. Lastly, we demonstrate that the toll-like receptor (TLR) ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS) can induce a NKT17 cell-biased response, even in the absence of exogenous antigen, and that combining LPS with α-GalCer resulted in enhanced IL-17A-production, and reduced levels of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10. This study provides a novel means to examine the context-dependent reactivity of the functionally heterogeneous NKT cell population and provides important new insight into the functional biology of these subsets. © 2018 Australasian Society for Immunology Inc.

  19. Suppression of DNA-dependent protein kinase sensitize cells to radiation without affecting DSB repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafsson, Ann-Sofie; Abramenkovs, Andris; Stenerlöw, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We reduced the level of DNA-PKcs with siRNA and examined cells after γ-irradiation. • Low DNA-PKcs levels lead to radiosensitivity but did not affect repair of DSB. • Low DNA-PKcs levels may block progression of mitosis. • DNA-PKcs role in mitotic progression is independent of its role in DSB repair. • We suggest different mechanisms by which loss of DNA-PKcs function sensitize cells. - Abstract: Efficient and correct repair of DNA double-strand break (DSB) is critical for cell survival. Defects in the DNA repair may lead to cell death, genomic instability and development of cancer. The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) is an essential component of the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) which is the major DSB repair pathway in mammalian cells. In the present study, by using siRNA against DNA-PKcs in four human cell lines, we examined how low levels of DNA-PKcs affected cellular response to ionizing radiation. Decrease of DNA-PKcs levels by 80–95%, induced by siRNA treatment, lead to extreme radiosensitivity, similar to that seen in cells completely lacking DNA-PKcs and low levels of DNA-PKcs promoted cell accumulation in G2/M phase after irradiation and blocked progression of mitosis. Surprisingly, low levels of DNA-PKcs did not affect the repair capacity and the removal of 53BP1 or γ-H2AX foci and rejoining of DSB appeared normal. This was in strong contrast to cells completely lacking DNA-PKcs and cells treated with the DNA-PKcs inhibitor NU7441, in which DSB repair were severely compromised. This suggests that there are different mechanisms by which loss of DNA-PKcs functions can sensitize cells to ionizing radiation. Further, foci of phosphorylated DNA-PKcs (T2609 and S2056) co-localized with DSB and this was independent of the amount of DNA-PKcs but foci of DNA-PKcs was only seen in siRNA-treated cells. Our study emphasizes on the critical role of DNA-PKcs for maintaining survival after radiation exposure

  20. Suppression of DNA-dependent protein kinase sensitize cells to radiation without affecting DSB repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, Ann-Sofie, E-mail: ann-sofie.gustafsson@bms.uu.se; Abramenkovs, Andris; Stenerlöw, Bo

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • We reduced the level of DNA-PKcs with siRNA and examined cells after γ-irradiation. • Low DNA-PKcs levels lead to radiosensitivity but did not affect repair of DSB. • Low DNA-PKcs levels may block progression of mitosis. • DNA-PKcs role in mitotic progression is independent of its role in DSB repair. • We suggest different mechanisms by which loss of DNA-PKcs function sensitize cells. - Abstract: Efficient and correct repair of DNA double-strand break (DSB) is critical for cell survival. Defects in the DNA repair may lead to cell death, genomic instability and development of cancer. The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) is an essential component of the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) which is the major DSB repair pathway in mammalian cells. In the present study, by using siRNA against DNA-PKcs in four human cell lines, we examined how low levels of DNA-PKcs affected cellular response to ionizing radiation. Decrease of DNA-PKcs levels by 80–95%, induced by siRNA treatment, lead to extreme radiosensitivity, similar to that seen in cells completely lacking DNA-PKcs and low levels of DNA-PKcs promoted cell accumulation in G2/M phase after irradiation and blocked progression of mitosis. Surprisingly, low levels of DNA-PKcs did not affect the repair capacity and the removal of 53BP1 or γ-H2AX foci and rejoining of DSB appeared normal. This was in strong contrast to cells completely lacking DNA-PKcs and cells treated with the DNA-PKcs inhibitor NU7441, in which DSB repair were severely compromised. This suggests that there are different mechanisms by which loss of DNA-PKcs functions can sensitize cells to ionizing radiation. Further, foci of phosphorylated DNA-PKcs (T2609 and S2056) co-localized with DSB and this was independent of the amount of DNA-PKcs but foci of DNA-PKcs was only seen in siRNA-treated cells. Our study emphasizes on the critical role of DNA-PKcs for maintaining survival after radiation exposure

  1. Oxygen-dependent sensitization of irradiated cells. [Role of OH radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, D.; Powers, E. L.

    1979-01-01

    Attention is focused primarily on O/sub 2/ effects in three biological systems, all tested in suspension: bacterial spores, vegetative bacterial cells, and mammalian cells. Information from these systems shows that O/sub 2/ has more than one process through which it can act. Studies with bacterial spore suspensions provide clear evidence that multiple components to oxygen-dependent radiation sensitization exist. Studies with mammalian cell suspensions also show that at least two oxygen-dependent sensitization processes can be distinguished. Similar studies with vegetative bacteria in suspension have not resolved oxic sensitization into components. The roles of water-derived radicals in radiation sensitivity and, specifically, in sensitization by O/sub 2/ were examined. OH radicals are clearly implicated in damage in all three biological test systems. However, the specific roles proposed for OH radicals are different in these organisms. In bacterial spores, OH radical removal in itself does not protect in anoxia or in high concentrations of O/sub 2/. OH radical removal over a limited intermediate range of O/sub 2/ concentrations will, however, protect. OH radical scavenging probably results in the formation of the actual protector. In bacteria, the supposition is that OH radical removal will protect both in anoxia and in the presence of O/sub 2/. OH radicals probably react with a cellular target molecule and leave a radicalsite; this is the site which can then react with O/sub 2/ to cause damage; DNA is the likely cellular target. In mammalian cells, a reaction scheme, similar to that proposed for bacteria, has been suggested for O/sub 2/-dependent sensitization. (ERB)

  2. Heme Oxygenase-1 Inhibits HLA Class I Antibody-Dependent Endothelial Cell Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Zilian

    Full Text Available Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR is a key limiting factor for long-term graft survival in solid organ transplantation. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I (HLA I antibodies (Abs play a major role in the pathogenesis of AMR via their interactions with HLA molecules on vascular endothelial cells (ECs. The antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase (HO-1 has anti-inflammatory functions in the endothelium. As complement-independent effects of HLA I Abs can activate ECs, it was the goal of the current study to investigate the role of HO-1 on activation of human ECs by HLA I Abs. In cell cultures of various primary human macro- and microvascular ECs treatment with monoclonal pan- and allele-specific HLA I Abs up-regulated the expression of inducible proinflammatory adhesion molecules and chemokines (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 [VCAM-1], intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 [ICAM-1], interleukin-8 [IL-8] and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 [MCP-1]. Pharmacological induction of HO-1 with cobalt-protoporphyrin IX reduced, whereas inhibition of HO-1 with either zinc-protoporphyrin IX or siRNA-mediated knockdown increased HLA I Ab-dependent up-regulation of VCAM-1. Treatment with two carbon monoxide (CO-releasing molecules, which liberate the gaseous HO product CO, blocked HLA I Ab-dependent EC activation. Finally, in an in vitro adhesion assay exposure of ECs to HLA I Abs led to increased monocyte binding, which was counteracted by up-regulation of HO-1. In conclusion, HLA I Ab-dependent EC activation is modulated by endothelial HO-1 and targeted induction of this enzyme may be a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of AMR in solid organ transplantation.

  3. Pyruvate kinase isoenzyme M2 is a glycolytic sensor differentially regulating cell proliferation, cell size and apoptotic cell death dependent on glucose supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spoden, Gilles A.; Rostek, Ursula; Lechner, Stefan; Mitterberger, Maria; Mazurek, Sybille; Zwerschke, Werner

    2009-01-01

    The glycolytic key regulator pyruvate kinase M2 (M2-PK or PKM2) can switch between a highly active tetrameric and an inactive dimeric form. The transition between the two conformations regulates the glycolytic flux in tumor cells. We developed specific M2-PK-binding peptide aptamers which inhibit M2-PK, but not the 96% homologous M1-PK isoenzyme. In this study we demonstrate that, at normal blood glucose concentrations, peptide aptamer-mediated inhibition of M2-PK induces a significant decrease of the population doubling (PDL rate) and cell proliferation rate as well as an increase in cell size, whereas under glucose restriction an increase in PDL and cell proliferation rates but a decrease in cell size was observed. Moreover, M2-PK inhibition rescues cells from glucose starvation-induced apoptotic cell death by increasing the metabolic activity. These findings suggest that M2-PK is a metabolic sensor which regulates cell proliferation, cell growth and apoptotic cell death in a glucose supply-dependent manner.

  4. Caspase-2-dependent dendritic cell death, maturation, and priming of T cells in response to Brucella abortus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinna; He, Yongqun

    2012-01-01

    Smooth virulent Brucella abortus strain 2308 (S2308) causes zoonotic brucellosis in cattle and humans. Rough B. abortus strain RB51, derived from S2308, is a live attenuated cattle vaccine strain licensed in the USA and many other countries. Our previous report indicated that RB51, but not S2308, induces a caspase-2-dependent apoptotic and necrotic macrophage cell death. Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen presenting cells critical for bridging innate and adaptive immune responses. In contrast to Brucella-infected macrophages, here we report that S2308 induced higher levels of apoptotic and necrotic cell death in wild type bone marrow-derived DCs (WT BMDCs) than RB51. The RB51 and S2308-induced BMDC cell death was regulated by caspase-2, indicated by the minimal cell death in RB51 and S2308-infected BMDCs isolated from caspase-2 knockout mice (Casp2KO BMDCs). More S2308 bacteria were taken up by Casp2KO BMDCs than wild type BMDCs. Higher levels of S2308 and RB51 cells were found in infected Casp2KO BMDCs compared to infected WT BMDCs at different time points. RB51-infected wild type BMDCs were mature and activated as shown by significantly up-regulated expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, MHC-I, and MHC-II. RB51 induced the production of cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, IFN-γ and IL12/IL23p40 in infected BMDCs. RB51-infected WT BMDCs also stimulated the proliferation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells compared to uninfected WT BMDCs. However, the maturation, activation, and cytokine secretion are significantly impaired in Casp2KO BMDCs infected with RB51 or Salmonella (control). S2308-infected WT and Casp2KO BMDCs were not activated and could not induce cytokine production. These results demonstrated that virulent smooth strain S2308 induced more apoptotic and necrotic dendritic cell death than live attenuated rough vaccine strain RB51; however, RB51, but not its parent strain S2308, induced caspase-2-mediated DC maturation, cytokine production, antigen presentation, and T

  5. Caspase-2-dependent dendritic cell death, maturation, and priming of T cells in response to Brucella abortus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinna Li

    Full Text Available Smooth virulent Brucella abortus strain 2308 (S2308 causes zoonotic brucellosis in cattle and humans. Rough B. abortus strain RB51, derived from S2308, is a live attenuated cattle vaccine strain licensed in the USA and many other countries. Our previous report indicated that RB51, but not S2308, induces a caspase-2-dependent apoptotic and necrotic macrophage cell death. Dendritic cells (DCs are professional antigen presenting cells critical for bridging innate and adaptive immune responses. In contrast to Brucella-infected macrophages, here we report that S2308 induced higher levels of apoptotic and necrotic cell death in wild type bone marrow-derived DCs (WT BMDCs than RB51. The RB51 and S2308-induced BMDC cell death was regulated by caspase-2, indicated by the minimal cell death in RB51 and S2308-infected BMDCs isolated from caspase-2 knockout mice (Casp2KO BMDCs. More S2308 bacteria were taken up by Casp2KO BMDCs than wild type BMDCs. Higher levels of S2308 and RB51 cells were found in infected Casp2KO BMDCs compared to infected WT BMDCs at different time points. RB51-infected wild type BMDCs were mature and activated as shown by significantly up-regulated expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, MHC-I, and MHC-II. RB51 induced the production of cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, IFN-γ and IL12/IL23p40 in infected BMDCs. RB51-infected WT BMDCs also stimulated the proliferation of CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells compared to uninfected WT BMDCs. However, the maturation, activation, and cytokine secretion are significantly impaired in Casp2KO BMDCs infected with RB51 or Salmonella (control. S2308-infected WT and Casp2KO BMDCs were not activated and could not induce cytokine production. These results demonstrated that virulent smooth strain S2308 induced more apoptotic and necrotic dendritic cell death than live attenuated rough vaccine strain RB51; however, RB51, but not its parent strain S2308, induced caspase-2-mediated DC maturation, cytokine production, antigen

  6. A single amino acid substitution controls DAF-dependent phenotype of echovirus 11 in rhabdomyosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoselov, Alexey V; Rezaykin, Alexey V; Sergeev, Alexander G; Fadeyev, Fedor A; Grigoryeva, Julia V; Sokolova, Zoya I

    2012-06-01

    Decay accelerating factor (DAF, CD55) is used by DAF-dependent (Daf+) variants of echovirus 11 (EV11) as a primary cellular receptor. The interaction of EV11 with DAF is completely reversible, therefore DAF-dependent variants require an unidentified coreceptor to initiate uncoating. Daf- variants of EV11, which do not interact with DAF, use an alternative primary cellular receptor. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis whether the coreceptor, which is necessary for the uncoating of DAF-dependent variants, may act as an alternative primary receptor for the Daf- variants of EV11. By using the model of the two closely related daf+ and daf- clones of EV11 in rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cell line, it was shown that a single amino acid substitution in the capsid protein VP2 could control the expression of the DAF-dependent phenotype. Anti-DAF monoclonal antibody has blocked the infection of RD cells by the DAF-dependent daf+ clone, but not by the daf- clone of EV11. Since the structural proteins of the two clones differed only in the receptor binding site for DAF, the unidentified non-DAF primary receptor for the daf- clone might have the same conformation as the uncoating coreceptor required for the daf+ clone. Despite the difference in primary receptors, both daf+ and daf- clones were equally inhibited by a monoclonal antibody to beta2-microglobulin. The monoclonal antibody B9.12.1 to class I human leukocyte antigen molecules showed no inhibitory effect in regards to either clone. The hypothesis of convergent intracellular traffic of Daf+ and Daf- variants of EV11 is discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Differential dependence on host cell glycosaminoglycans for infection of epithelial cells by high-risk HPV types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Cruz

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV infection is the leading cause of cervical cancer world-wide. Here, we show that native HPV particles produced in a differentiated epithelium have developed different strategies to infect the host. Using biochemical inhibition assays and glycosaminoglycan (GAG-negative cells, we show that of the four most common cancer-causing HPV types, HPV18, HPV31, and HPV45 are largely dependent on GAGs to initiate infection. In contrast, HPV16 can bind and enter through a GAG-independent mechanism. Infections of primary human keratinocytes, natural host cells for HPV infections, support our conclusions. Further, this renders the different virus types differentially susceptible to carrageenan, a microbicide targeting virus entry. Our data demonstrates that ordered maturation of papillomavirus particles in a differentiating epithelium may alter the virus entry mechanism. This study should facilitate a better understanding of the attachment and infection by the main oncogenic HPV types, and development of inhibitors of HPV infection.

  8. Differentiation-dependent secretion of proangiogenic factors by mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison I Hoch

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are a promising cell population for cell-based bone repair due to their proliferative potential, ability to differentiate into bone-forming osteoblasts, and their secretion of potent trophic factors that stimulate angiogenesis and neovascularization. To promote bone healing, autogenous or allogeneic MSCs are transplanted into bone defects after differentiation to varying degrees down the osteogenic lineage. However, the contribution of the stage of osteogenic differentiation upon angiogenic factor secretion is unclear. We hypothesized that the proangiogenic potential of MSCs was dependent upon their stage of osteogenic differentiation. After 7 days of culture, we observed the greatest osteogenic differentiation of MSCs when cells were cultured with dexamethasone (OM+. Conversely, VEGF protein secretion and upregulation of angiogenic genes were greatest in MSCs cultured in growth media (GM. Using conditioned media from MSCs in each culture condition, GM-conditioned media maximized proliferation and enhanced chemotactic migration and tubule formation of endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs. The addition of a neutralizing VEGF(165/121 antibody to conditioned media attenuated ECFC proliferation and chemotactic migration. ECFCs seeded on microcarrier beads and co-cultured with MSCs previously cultured in GM in a fibrin gel exhibited superior sprouting compared to MSCs previously cultured in OM+. These results confirm that MSCs induced farther down the osteogenic lineage possess reduced proangiogenic potential, thereby providing important findings for consideration when using MSCs for bone repair.

  9. Spatial regulation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase during chemotactic cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Alan K; Baldor, Linda C; Hogan, Brian P

    2005-10-04

    Historically, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) has a paradoxical role in cell motility, having been shown to both facilitate and inhibit actin cytoskeletal dynamics and cell migration. In an effort to understand this dichotomy, we show here that PKA is regulated in subcellular space during cell migration. Immunofluorescence microscopy and biochemical enrichment of pseudopodia showed that type II regulatory subunits of PKA and PKA activity are enriched in protrusive cellular structures formed during chemotaxis. This enrichment correlates with increased phosphorylation of key cytoskeletal substrates for PKA, including the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and the protein tyrosine phosphatase containing a PEST motif. Importantly, inhibition of PKA activity or its ability to interact with A kinase anchoring proteins inhibited the activity of the Rac GTPase within pseudopodia. This effect correlated with both decreased guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity and increased GTPase activating protein activity. Finally, inhibition of PKA anchoring, like inhibition of total PKA activity, inhibited pseudopod formation and chemotactic cell migration. These data demonstrate that spatial regulation of PKA via anchoring is an important facet of normal chemotactic cell movement.

  10. Cell cycle-dependent alteration in NAC1 nuclear body dynamics and morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Pei-Hsun; Hung, Shen-Hsiu; Ren, Tina; Tseng, Yiider; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2011-01-01

    NAC1, a BTB/POZ family member, has been suggested to participate in maintaining the stemness of embryonic stem cells and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of human cancer. In ovarian cancer, NAC1 upregulation is associated with disease aggressiveness and with the development of chemoresistance. Like other BTB/POZ proteins, NAC1 forms discrete nuclear bodies in non-dividing cells. To investigate the biological role of NAC1 nuclear bodies, we characterized the expression dynamics of NAC1 nuclear bodies during different phases of the cell cycle. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assays revealed that NAC1 was rapidly exchanged between the nucleoplasm and NAC1 nuclear bodies in interphase cells. The number of NAC1 bodies significantly increased and their size decreased in the S phase as compared to the G 0 /G 1 and G 2 phases. NAC1 nuclear bodies disappeared and NAC1 became diffuse during mitosis. NAC1 nuclear bodies reappeared immediately after completion of mitosis. These results indicate that a cell cycle-dependent regulatory mechanism controls NAC1 body formation in the nucleus and suggest that NAC1 body dynamics are associated with mitosis or cytokinesis

  11. Mycobacterium leprae induces NF-κB-dependent transcription repression in human Schwann cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Renata M.S.; Calegari-Silva, Teresa Cristina; Hernandez, Maristela O.; Saliba, Alessandra M.; Redner, Paulo; Pessolani, Maria Cristina V.; Sarno, Euzenir N.; Sampaio, Elizabeth P.; Lopes, Ulisses G.

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy, invades peripheral nerve Schwann cells, resulting in deformities associated with this disease. NF-κB is an important transcription factor involved in the regulation of host immune antimicrobial responses. We aimed in this work to investigate NF-κB signaling pathways in the human ST88-14 Schwannoma cell line infected with M. leprae. Gel shift and supershift assays indicate that two NF-κB dimers, p65/p50 and p50/p50, translocate to the nucleus in Schwann cells treated with lethally irradiated M. leprae. Consistent with p65/p50 and p50/p50 activation, we observed IκB-α degradation and reduction of p105 levels. The nuclear translocation of p50/p50 complex due to M. leprae treatment correlated with repression of NF-κB-driven transcription induced by TNF-α. Moreover, thalidomide inhibited p50 homodimer nuclear translocation induced by M. leprae and consequently rescues Schwann cells from NF-κB-dependent transcriptional repression. Here, we report for the first time that M. leprae induces NF-κB activation in Schwann cells and thalidomide is able to modulate this activation

  12. Planar Optical Nanoantennas Resolve Cholesterol-Dependent Nanoscale Heterogeneities in the Plasma Membrane of Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Raju; Winkler, Pamina M.; Flauraud, Valentin; Borgman, Kyra J. E.; Manzo, Carlo; Brugger, Jürgen; Rigneault, Hervé; Wenger, Jérôme; García-Parajo, María F.

    2017-10-01

    Optical nanoantennas can efficiently confine light into nanoscopic hotspots, enabling single-molecule detection sensitivity at biological relevant conditions. This innovative approach to breach the diffraction limit offers a versatile platform to investigate the dynamics of individual biomolecules in living cell membranes and their partitioning into cholesterol-dependent lipid nanodomains. Here, we present optical nanoantenna arrays with accessible surface hotspots to study the characteristic diffusion dynamics of phosphoethanolamine (PE) and sphingomyelin (SM) in the plasma membrane of living cells at the nanoscale. Fluorescence burst analysis and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy performed on nanoantennas of different gap sizes show that, unlike PE, SM is transiently trapped in cholesterol-enriched nanodomains of 10 nm diameter with short characteristic times around 100 {\\mu}s. The removal of cholesterol led to the free diffusion of SM, consistent with the dispersion of nanodomains. Our results are consistent with the existence of highly transient and fluctuating nanoscale assemblies enriched by cholesterol and sphingolipids in living cell membranes, also known as lipid rafts. Quantitative data on sphingolipids partitioning into lipid rafts is crucial to understand the spatiotemporal heterogeneous organization of transient molecular complexes on the membrane of living cells at the nanoscale. The proposed technique is fully biocompatible and thus provides various opportunities for biophysics and live cell research to reveal details that remain hidden in confocal diffraction-limited measurements.

  13. Size-dependent isolation of primordial germ cells from avian species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyung M; Kim, Young M; Ono, Tamao; Han, Jae Y

    2017-06-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs), the precursors of sperm or ova, could be used to generate transgenic animals and interspecies germ-line chimeras, which would facilitate the recovery of endangered species by making their access and manipulation in vitro easier. During early embryogenesis in avian species, PGCs are transported via the bloodstream to the gonadal anlagen. PGCs of most avian species-particularly wild or endangered birds-are not readily isolated from the embryonic bloodstream because germ-cell markers have not yet been defined for them. Here, we report a rapid, efficient, and convenient method for PGC isolation from various avian species. Blood PGCs were isolated based on the difference in size between PGCs and other blood cells, using a microporous membrane. The efficiency of this size-dependent isolation for the White Leghorn chicken was not significantly different from that of magnetic-activated cell sorting, and the isolated cells expressed chicken PGC-related genes and PGC-specific markers. The utility of the method was then verified in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica), Mallard duck (Anas platyrhynchos), and Muscovy duck (Cairina moschata). Immunocytochemistry and an in vivo migration assay indicated that this method was able to enrich for true embryonic blood PGCs without specific antibodies, and could be applied to the development of avian interspecies chimeras for restoration of wild or endangered species. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Bufalin Induces Reactive Oxygen Species Dependent Bax Translocation and Apoptosis in ASTC-a-1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Sun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bufalin has been shown to induce cancer cell death through apoptotic pathways. However, the molecular mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we used the confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM to monitor the spatio-temporal dynamics of reactive oxygen species (ROS production, Bax translocation and caspase-3 activation during bufalin-induced apoptosis in living human lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1 cells. Bufalin induced ROS production and apoptotic cell death, demonstrated by Hoechst 33258 staining as well as flow cytometry analysis. Bax redistributed from cytosol to mitochondria from 12 to 48 h after bufalin treatment in living cells expressed with green fluorescent protein Bax. Treatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC, a ROS scavenger, inhibited ROS generation and Bax translocation and led to a significant protection against bufalin-induced apoptosis. Our results also revealed that bufalin induced a prominent increase of caspase-3 activation blocked potently by NAC. Taken together, bufalin induced ROS-mediated Bax translocation, mitochondrial permeability transition and caspase-3 activation, implying that bufalin induced apoptosis via ROS-dependent mitochondrial death pathway in ASTC-a-1 cells.

  15. Dying glioma cells establish a proangiogenic microenvironment through a caspase 3 dependent mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiao; Yu, Yang; He, Sijia; Cheng, Jin; Gong, Yanping; Zhang, Zhengxiang; Yang, Xuguang; Xu, Bing; Liu, Xinjian; Li, Chuan-Yuan; Tian, Ling; Huang, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Vascular recovery or re-angiogenesis after radiotherapy plays a significant role in tumor recurrence, whereas molecular mechanisms of this process remain elusive. In this work, we found that dying glioma cells promoted post-irradiation angiogenesis through a caspase 3 dependent mechanism. Evidence in vitro and in vivo indicated that caspase 3 inhibition undermined proangiogenic effects of dying glioma cells. Proteolytic inactivation of caspase 3 in glioma cells reduced tumorigenicity. Importantly, we identified that NF-κB/COX-2/PGE2 axis acted as downstream signaling of caspase 3, mediating proangiogenic response after irradiation. Additionally, VEGF-A, regulated by caspase 3 possibly through phosphorylated eIF4E, was recognized as another downstream factor participating in the proangiogenic response. In conclusion, these data demonstrated that caspase 3 in dying glioma cells supported the proangiogenic response after irradiation by governing NF-κB/COX-2/PGE2 axis and p-eIF4E/VEGF-A signaling. While inducing caspase 3 activation has been a generally-adopted notion in cancer therapeutics, our study counterintuitively illustrated that caspase 3 activation in dying glioma cells unfavorably supported post-irradiation angiogenesis, suggesting that radiotherapy combined with caspase 3 inhibitors may be more effective strategies due to restricted post-irradiation angiogenesis. PMID:27826040

  16. Neural Cell Apoptosis Induced by Microwave Exposure Through Mitochondria-dependent Caspase-3 Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Hongyan; Lin, Tao; Wang, Dewen; Peng, Ruiyun; Wang, Shuiming; Gao, Yabing; Xu, Xinping; Li, Yang; Wang, Shaoxia; Zhao, Li; Wang, Lifeng; Zhou, Hongmei

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether microwave (MW) radiation induces neural cell apoptosis, differentiated PC12 cells and Wistar rats were exposed to 2.856GHz for 5min and 15min, respectively, at an average power density of 30 mW/cm2. JC-1 and TUNEL staining detected significant apoptotic events, such as the loss of mitochondria membrane potential and DNA fragmentation, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy and Hoechst staining were used to observe chromatin ultrastructure and apoptotic body formation. Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining was used to quantify the level of apoptosis. The expressions of Bax, Bcl-2, cytochrome c, cleaved caspase-3 and PARP were examined by immunoblotting or immunocytochemistry. Caspase-3 activity was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed chromatin condensation and apoptotic body formation in neural cells 6h after microwave exposure. Moreover, the mitochondria membrane potential decreased, DNA fragmentation increased, leading to an increase in the apoptotic cell percentage. Furthermore, the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, expression of cytochrome c, cleaved caspase-3 and PARP all increased. In conclusion, microwave radiation induced neural cell apoptosis via the classical mitochondria-dependent caspase-3 pathway. This study may provide the experimental basis for further investigation of the mechanism of the neurological effects induced by microwave radiation. PMID:24688304

  17. EGFR overexpressing cells and tumors are dependent on autophagy for growth and survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jutten, Barry; Keulers, Tom G.; Schaaf, Marco B.E.; Savelkouls, Kim; Theys, Jan; Span, Paul N.; Vooijs, Marc A.; Bussink, Johan; Rouschop, Kasper M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed, amplified or mutated in various human epithelial tumors, and is associated with tumor aggressiveness and therapy resistance. Autophagy activation provides a survival advantage for cells in the tumor microenvironment. In the current study, we assessed the potential of autophagy inhibition (using chloroquine (CQ)) in treatment of EGFR expressing tumors. Material and methods: Quantitative PCR, immunohistochemistry, clonogenic survival, proliferation assays and in vivo tumor growth were used to assess this potential. Results: We show that EGFR overexpressing xenografts are sensitive to CQ treatment and are sensitized to irradiation by autophagy inhibition. In HNSSC xenografts, a correlation between EGFR and expression of the autophagy marker LC3b is observed, suggesting a role for autophagy in EGFR expressing tumors. This observation was substantiated in cell lines, showing high EGFR expressing cells to be more sensitive to CQ addition as reflected by decreased proliferation and survival. Surprisingly high EGFR expressing cells display a lower autophagic flux. Conclusions: The EGFR high expressing cells and tumors investigated in this study are highly dependent on autophagy for growth and survival. Inhibition of autophagy may therefore provide a novel treatment opportunity for EGFR overexpressing tumors

  18. Vorinostat and metformin sensitize EGFR-TKI resistant NSCLC cells via BIM-dependent apoptosis induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hengyi; Wang, Yubo; Lin, Caiyu; Lu, Conghua; Han, Rui; Jiao, Lin; Li, Li; He, Yong

    2017-11-07

    There is a close relationship between low expression of BIM and resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI). Vorinostat is a pan-histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) that augments BIM expression in various types of tumor cells, however, this effect is attenuated by the high expression of anti-apoptotic proteins in EGFR-TKI resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Vorinostat in combination with metformin - a compound that can inhibit anti-apoptotic proteins expression, might cooperate to activate apoptotic signaling and overcome EGFR-TKI resistance. This study aimed to investigate the cooperative effect and evaluate possible molecular mechanisms. The results showed that vorinostat combined with gefitinib augmented BIM expression and increased the sensitivity of EGFR-TKI resistant NSCLC cells to gefitinib, adding metformin simultaneously could obviously inhibit the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins, and further increased expression levels of BIM and BAX, and as a result, further improved the sensitivity of gefitinib both on the NSCLC cells with intrinsic and acquired resistance to EGFR-TKI. In addition, autophagy induced by gefitinib and vorinostat could be significantly suppressed by metformin, which might also contribute to enhance apoptosis and improve sensitivity of gefitinib. These results suggested that the combination of vorinostat and metformin might represent a novel strategy to overcome EGFR-TKI resistance associated with BIM-dependent apoptosis in larger heterogeneous populations.

  19. Cell-to-Cell Measles Virus Spread between Human Neurons Is Dependent on Hemagglutinin and Hyperfusogenic Fusion Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuma; Watanabe, Shumpei; Fukuda, Yoshinari; Hashiguchi, Takao; Yanagi, Yusuke; Ohno, Shinji

    2018-03-15

    Measles virus (MV) usually causes acute infection but in rare cases persists in the brain, resulting in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE). Since human neurons, an important target affected in the disease, do not express the known MV receptors (signaling lymphocyte activation molecule [SLAM] and nectin 4), how MV infects neurons and spreads between them is unknown. Recent studies have shown that many virus strains isolated from SSPE patients possess substitutions in the extracellular domain of the fusion (F) protein which confer enhanced fusion activity. Hyperfusogenic viruses with such mutations, unlike the wild-type MV, can induce cell-cell fusion even in SLAM- and nectin 4-negative cells and spread efficiently in human primary neurons and the brains of animal models. We show here that a hyperfusogenic mutant MV, IC323-F(T461I)-EGFP (IC323 with a fusion-enhancing T461I substitution in the F protein and expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein), but not the wild-type MV, spreads in differentiated NT2 cells, a widely used human neuron model. Confocal time-lapse imaging revealed the cell-to-cell spread of IC323-F(T461I)-EGFP between NT2 neurons without syncytium formation. The production of virus particles was strongly suppressed in NT2 neurons, also supporting cell-to-cell viral transmission. The spread of IC323-F(T461I)-EGFP was inhibited by a fusion inhibitor peptide as well as by some but not all of the anti-hemagglutinin antibodies which neutralize SLAM- or nectin-4-dependent MV infection, suggesting the presence of a distinct neuronal receptor. Our results indicate that MV spreads in a cell-to-cell manner between human neurons without causing syncytium formation and that the spread is dependent on the hyperfusogenic F protein, the hemagglutinin, and the putative neuronal receptor for MV. IMPORTANCE Measles virus (MV), in rare cases, persists in the human central nervous system (CNS) and causes subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) several

  20. Piperlongumine inhibits LMP1/MYC-dependent mouse B-lymphoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Seong-Su; Tompkins, Van S.; Son, Dong-Ju; Kamberos, Natalie L.; Stunz, Laura L.; Halwani, Ahmad; Bishop, Gail A.; Janz, Siegfried

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Mouse model of human Burkitt lymphoma revealed cancer inhibition by PL. •Treatment with PL led to apoptosis of malignant but not normal B cells. •PL inhibited LMP1–NF-κB–Myc-dependent target genes including p21-encoding Cdkn1a. •PL holds promise for new interventions approaches to hematologic malignancies. -- Abstract: Piperlongumine (PL), isolated from the fruit of Long pepper, Piper longum, is a cancer-inhibiting compound that selectively kills tumor cells while sparing their normal counterparts. Here we evaluated the efficacy with which PL suppresses malignant B cells derived from a newly developed, double-transgenic mouse model of human endemic Burkitt lymphoma (BL), designated mCD40-LMP1/iMyc Eμ . PL inhibited tumor cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner and induced apoptosis of neoplastic but not normal B cells. Treatment with PL resulted in downregulation of EBV-encoded LMP1, cellular Myc, constitutive NF-κB activity, and a host of LMP1-Myc-NF-κB-regulated target genes including Aurka, Bcat1, Bub1b, Ccnb1, Chek1, Fancd2, Tfrc and Xrcc6. Of note, p21 Cip1 -encoding Cdkn1a was suppressed independent of changes in Trp53 mRNA levels and p53 DNA-binding activity. Considering the central role of the LMP1–NF-κB–Myc axis in B-lineage neoplasia, these findings further our understanding of the mechanisms by which PL inhibits B-lymphoma and provide a preclinical rationale for the inclusion of PL in new interventions in blood cancers

  1. Piperlongumine inhibits LMP1/MYC-dependent mouse B-lymphoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seong-Su; Tompkins, Van S. [Department of Pathology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Son, Dong-Ju [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kamberos, Natalie L. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Stunz, Laura L. [Deparment of Microbiology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Iowa City VAMC, Iowa City, IA (United States); Halwani, Ahmad [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Bishop, Gail A. [Deparment of Microbiology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Iowa City VAMC, Iowa City, IA (United States); Janz, Siegfried, E-mail: siegfried-janz@uiowa.edu [Department of Pathology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Mouse model of human Burkitt lymphoma revealed cancer inhibition by PL. •Treatment with PL led to apoptosis of malignant but not normal B cells. •PL inhibited LMP1–NF-κB–Myc-dependent target genes including p21-encoding Cdkn1a. •PL holds promise for new interventions approaches to hematologic malignancies. -- Abstract: Piperlongumine (PL), isolated from the fruit of Long pepper, Piper longum, is a cancer-inhibiting compound that selectively kills tumor cells while sparing their normal counterparts. Here we evaluated the efficacy with which PL suppresses malignant B cells derived from a newly developed, double-transgenic mouse model of human endemic Burkitt lymphoma (BL), designated mCD40-LMP1/iMyc{sup Eμ}. PL inhibited tumor cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner and induced apoptosis of neoplastic but not normal B cells. Treatment with PL resulted in downregulation of EBV-encoded LMP1, cellular Myc, constitutive NF-κB activity, and a host of LMP1-Myc-NF-κB-regulated target genes including Aurka, Bcat1, Bub1b, Ccnb1, Chek1, Fancd2, Tfrc and Xrcc6. Of note, p21{sup Cip1}-encoding Cdkn1a was suppressed independent of changes in Trp53 mRNA levels and p53 DNA-binding activity. Considering the central role of the LMP1–NF-κB–Myc axis in B-lineage neoplasia, these findings further our understanding of the mechanisms by which PL inhibits B-lymphoma and provide a preclinical rationale for the inclusion of PL in new interventions in blood cancers.

  2. Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Imparts a Regulatory Program in Dendritic Cells and T Cells via Galectin-1-Dependent Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncini, Carolina V; Ilarregui, Juan M; Batalla, Estela I; Engels, Steef; Cerliani, Juan P; Cucher, Marcela A; van Kooyk, Yvette; González-Cappa, Stella M; Rabinovich, Gabriel A

    2015-10-01

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1), an endogenous glycan-binding protein, is widely distributed at sites of inflammation and microbial invasion. Despite considerable progress regarding the immunoregulatory activity of this lectin, the role of endogenous Gal-1 during acute parasite infections is uncertain. In this study, we show that Gal-1 functions as a negative regulator to limit host-protective immunity following intradermal infection with Trypanosoma cruzi. Concomitant with the upregulation of immune inhibitory mediators, including IL-10, TGF-β1, IDO, and programmed death ligand 2, T. cruzi infection induced an early increase of Gal-1 expression in vivo. Compared to their wild-type (WT) counterpart, Gal-1-deficient (Lgals1(-/-)) mice exhibited reduced mortality and lower parasite load in muscle tissue. Resistance of Lgals1(-/-) mice to T. cruzi infection was associated with a failure in the activation of Gal-1-driven tolerogenic circuits, otherwise orchestrated by WT dendritic cells, leading to secondary dysfunction in the induction of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells. This effect was accompanied by an increased number of CD8(+) T cells and higher frequency of IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) T cells in muscle tissues and draining lymph nodes as well as reduced parasite burden in heart and hindlimb skeletal muscle. Moreover, dendritic cells lacking Gal-1 interrupted the Gal-1-mediated tolerogenic circuit and reinforced T cell-dependent anti-parasite immunity when adoptively transferred into WT mice. Thus, endogenous Gal-1 may influence T. cruzi infection by fueling tolerogenic circuits that hinder anti-parasite immunity. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. The flavoprotein Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers high-temperature stress tolerance on yeast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Akira; Kawahara, Nobuhiro [Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan); Takagi, Hiroshi, E-mail: hiro@bs.naist.jp [Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NO is produced from L-arginine in response to elevated temperature in yeast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tah18 was first identified as the yeast protein involved in NO synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers tolerance to high-temperature on yeast cells. -- Abstract: Nitric oxide (NO) is a ubiquitous signaling molecule involved in the regulation of a large number of cellular functions. In the unicellular eukaryote yeast, NO may be involved in stress response pathways, but its role is poorly understood due to the lack of mammalian NO synthase (NOS) orthologues. Previously, we have proposed the oxidative stress-induced L-arginine synthesis and its physiological role under stress conditions in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, our experimental results indicated that increased conversion of L-proline into L-arginine led to NO production in response to elevated temperature. We also showed that the flavoprotein Tah18, which was previously reported to transfer electrons to the Fe-S cluster protein Dre2, was involved in NO synthesis in yeast. Gene knockdown analysis demonstrated that Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers high-temperature stress tolerance on yeast cells. As it appears that such a unique cell protection mechanism is specific to yeasts and fungi, it represents a promising target for antifungal activity.

  4. Viral single-strand DNA induces p53-dependent apoptosis in human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L Hirsch

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are primed for rapid apoptosis following mild forms of genotoxic stress. A natural form of such cellular stress occurs in response to recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV single-strand DNA genomes, which exploit the host DNA damage response for replication and genome persistence. Herein, we discovered a unique DNA damage response induced by rAAV transduction specific to pluripotent hESCs. Within hours following rAAV transduction, host DNA damage signaling was elicited as measured by increased gamma-H2AX, ser15-p53 phosphorylation, and subsequent p53-dependent transcriptional activation. Nucleotide incorporation assays demonstrated that rAAV transduced cells accumulated in early S-phase followed by the induction of apoptosis. This lethal signaling sequalae required p53 in a manner independent of transcriptional induction of Puma, Bax and Bcl-2 and was not evident in cells differentiated towards a neural lineage. Consistent with a lethal DNA damage response induced upon rAAV transduction of hESCs, empty AAV protein capsids demonstrated no toxicity. In contrast, DNA microinjections demonstrated that the minimal AAV origin of replication and, in particular, a 40 nucleotide G-rich tetrad repeat sequence, was sufficient for hESC apoptosis. Our data support a model in which rAAV transduction of hESCs induces a p53-dependent lethal response that is elicited by a telomeric sequence within the AAV origin of replication.

  5. Induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in breast cancer cells is calcium signal dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, F M; Azimi, I; Faville, R A; Peters, A A; Jalink, K; Putney, J W; Goodhill, G J; Thompson, E W; Roberts-Thomson, S J; Monteith, G R

    2014-05-01

    Signals from the tumor microenvironment trigger cancer cells to adopt an invasive phenotype through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Relatively little is known regarding key signal transduction pathways that serve as cytosolic bridges between cell surface receptors and nuclear transcription factors to induce EMT. A better understanding of these early EMT events may identify potential targets for the control of metastasis. One rapid intracellular signaling pathway that has not yet been explored during EMT induction is calcium. Here we show that stimuli used to induce EMT produce a transient increase in cytosolic calcium levels in human breast cancer cells. Attenuation of the calcium signal by intracellular calcium chelation significantly reduced epidermal growth factor (EGF)- and hypoxia-induced EMT. Intracellular calcium chelation also inhibited EGF-induced activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), while preserving other signal transduction pathways such as Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation. To identify calcium-permeable channels that may regulate EMT induction in breast cancer cells, we performed a targeted siRNA-based screen. We found that transient receptor potential-melastatin-like 7 (TRPM7) channel expression regulated EGF-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and expression of the EMT marker vimentin. Although intracellular calcium chelation almost completely blocked the induction of many EMT markers, including vimentin, Twist and N-cadherin, the effect of TRPM7 silencing was specific for vimentin protein expression and STAT3 phosphorylation. These results indicate that TRPM7 is a partial regulator of EMT in breast cancer cells, and that other calcium-permeable ion channels are also involved in calcium-dependent EMT induction. In summary, this work establishes an important role for the intracellular calcium signal in the induction of EMT in human breast cancer cells. Manipulation of

  6. Folic acid-capped PEGylated magnetic nanoparticles enter cancer cells mostly via clathrin-dependent endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard-Vannier, Emilie; Hervé-Aubert, Katel; Kaaki, Karine; Blondy, Thibaut; Shebanova, Anastasia; Shaitan, Konstantin V; Ignatova, Anastasia A; Saboungi, Marie-Louise; Feofanov, Alexey V; Chourpa, Igor

    2017-06-01

    This work is focused on mechanisms of uptake in cancer cells of rationally designed, covalently assembled nanoparticles, made of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), fluorophores (doxorubicin or Nile Blue), polyethylene glycol (PEG) and folic acid (FA), referred hereinafter as SFP-FA. SFP-FA were characterized by DLS, zetametry and fluorescence spectroscopy. The SFP-FA uptake in cancer cells was monitored using fluorescence-based methods like fluorescence-assisted cell sorting, CLSM with single-photon and two-photon excitation. The SFP-FA endocytosis was also analyzed with electron microscopy approaches: TEM, HAADF-STEM and EELS. The SFP-FA have zeta potential below -6mW and stable hydrodynamic diameter close to 100nm in aqueous suspensions of pH range from 5 to 8. They contain ca. 109 PEG-FA, 480 PEG-OCH 3 and 22-27 fluorophore molecules per SPION. The fluorophores protected under the PEG shell allows a reliable detection of intracellular NPs. SFP-FA readily enter into all the cancer cell lines studied and accumulate in lysosomes, mostly via clathrin-dependent endocytosis, whatever the FR status on the cells. The present study highlights the advantages of rational design of nanosystems as well as the possible involvement of direct molecular interactions of PEG and FA with cellular membranes, not limited to FA-FR recognition, in the mechanisms of their endocytosis. Composition, magnetic and optical properties of the SFP-FA as well their ability to enter cancer cells are promising for their applications in cancer theranosis. Combination of complementary analytical approaches is relevant to understand the nanoparticles behavior in suspension and in contact with cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Critical role of SAP in progression and reactivation but not maintenance of T cell-dependent humoral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ming-Chao; Veillette, André

    2013-03-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP) is a small adaptor molecule mutated in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease, a human immunodeficiency. SAP plays a critical role in the initiation of T cell-dependent B cell responses leading to germinal center reaction, the production of high-affinity antibodies, and B cell memory. However, whether SAP has a role in these responses beyond their initiation is not known. It is important to address this matter not only for mechanistic reasons but also because blockade of the SAP pathway is being contemplated as a means to treat autoimmune diseases in humans. Using an inducibly SAP deficient mouse, we found that SAP was required not only for the initiation but also for the progression of primary T cell-driven B cell responses to haptens. It was also necessary for the reactivation of T cell-dependent B cell immunity during secondary immune responses. These activities consistently correlated with the requirement of SAP for full expression of the lineage commitment factor Bcl-6 in follicular T helper (T(FH)) cells. However, once memory B cells and long-lived antibody-secreting cells were established, SAP became dispensable for maintaining T cell-dependent B cell responses. Thus, SAP is pivotal for nearly all phases, but not for maintenance, of T cell-driven B cell humoral immunity. These findings may have implications for the treatment of immune disorders by targeting the SAP pathway.

  8. Transport of Ebolavirus Nucleocapsids Is Dependent on Actin Polymerization: Live-Cell Imaging Analysis of Ebolavirus-Infected Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schudt, Gordian; Dolnik, Olga; Kolesnikova, Larissa; Biedenkopf, Nadine; Herwig, Astrid; Becker, Stephan

    2015-10-01

    Transport of ebolavirus (EBOV) nucleocapsids from perinuclear viral inclusions, where they are formed, to the site of budding at the plasma membrane represents an obligatory step of virus assembly. Until now, no live-cell studies on EBOV nucleocapsid transport have been performed, and participation of host cellular factors in this process, as well as the trajectories and speed of nucleocapsid transport, remain unknown. Live-cell imaging of EBOV-infected cells treated with different inhibitors of cellular cytoskeleton was used for the identification of cellular proteins involved in the nucleocapsid transport. EBOV nucleocapsids were visualized by expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled nucleocapsid viral protein 30 (VP30) in EBOV-infected cells. Incorporation of the fusion protein VP30-GFP into EBOV nucleocapsids was confirmed by Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence analyses. Importantly, VP30-GFP fluorescence was readily detectable in the densely packed nucleocapsids inside perinuclear viral inclusions and in the dispersed rod-like nucleocapsids located outside of viral inclusions. Live-cell imaging of EBOV-infected cells revealed exit of single nucleocapsids from the viral inclusions and their intricate transport within the cytoplasm before budding at the plasma membrane. Nucleocapsid transport was arrested upon depolymerization of actin filaments (F-actin) and inhibition of the actin-nucleating Arp2/3 complex, and it was not altered upon depolymerization of microtubules or inhibition of N-WASP. Actin comet tails were often detected at the rear end of nucleocapsids. Marginally located nucleocapsids entered filopodia, moved inside, and budded from the tip of these thin cellular protrusions. Live-cell imaging of EBOV-infected cells revealed actin-dependent long-distance transport of EBOV nucleocapsids before budding at the cell surface. These findings provide useful insights into EBOV assembly and have potential application in the development

  9. Hormone-dependent nuclear export of estradiol receptor and DNA synthesis in breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Maria; Castoria, Gabriella; Migliaccio, Antimo; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Di Stasio, Rosina; Ciociola, Alessandra; Bottero, Daniela; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Appella, Ettore; Auricchio, Ferdinando

    2008-01-01

    In breast cancer cells, cytoplasmic localization of the estradiol receptor α (ERα) regulates estradiol-dependent S phase entry. We identified a nuclear export sequence (NES) in ERα and show that its export is dependent on both estradiol-mediated phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT activation and chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1). A Tat peptide containing the ERα NES disrupts ERα–CRM1 interaction and prevents nuclear export of ERα- and estradiol-induced DNA synthesis. NES-ERα mutants do not exit the nucleus and inhibit estradiol-induced S phase entry; ERα-dependent transcription is normal. ERα is associated with Forkhead proteins in the nucleus, and estradiol stimulates nuclear exit of both proteins. ERα knockdown or ERα NES mutations prevent ERα and Forkhead nuclear export. A mutant of forkhead in rhabdomyosarcoma (FKHR), which cannot be phosphorylated by estradiol-activated AKT, does not associate with ERα and is trapped in the nucleus, blocking S phase entry. In conclusion, estradiol-induced AKT-dependent phosphorylation of FKHR drives its association with ERα, thereby triggering complex export from the nucleus necessary for initiation of DNA synthesis and S phase entry. PMID:18644889

  10. Differential Aspartate Usage Identifies a Subset of Cancer Cells Particularly Dependent on OGDH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric L. Allen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Although aberrant metabolism in tumors has been well described, the identification of cancer subsets with particular metabolic vulnerabilities has remained challenging. Here, we conducted an siRNA screen focusing on enzymes involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle and uncovered a striking range of cancer cell dependencies on OGDH, the E1 subunit of the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex. Using an integrative metabolomics approach, we identified differential aspartate utilization, via the malate-aspartate shuttle, as a predictor of whether OGDH is required for proliferation in 3D culture assays and for the growth of xenograft tumors. These findings highlight an anaplerotic role of aspartate and, more broadly, suggest that differential nutrient utilization patterns can identify subsets of cancers with distinct metabolic dependencies for potential pharmacological intervention.

  11. Differential Aspartate Usage Identifies a Subset of Cancer Cells Particularly Dependent on OGDH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Eric L; Ulanet, Danielle B; Pirman, David; Mahoney, Christopher E; Coco, John; Si, Yaguang; Chen, Ying; Huang, Lingling; Ren, Jinmin; Choe, Sung; Clasquin, Michelle F; Artin, Erin; Fan, Zi Peng; Cianchetta, Giovanni; Murtie, Joshua; Dorsch, Marion; Jin, Shengfang; Smolen, Gromoslaw A

    2016-10-11

    Although aberrant metabolism in tumors has been well described, the identification of cancer subsets with particular metabolic vulnerabilities has remained challenging. Here, we conducted an siRNA screen focusing on enzymes involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and uncovered a striking range of cancer cell dependencies on OGDH, the E1 subunit of the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex. Using an integrative metabolomics approach, we identified differential aspartate utilization, via the malate-aspartate shuttle, as a predictor of whether OGDH is required for proliferation in 3D culture assays and for the growth of xenograft tumors. These findings highlight an anaplerotic role of aspartate and, more broadly, suggest that differential nutrient utilization patterns can identify subsets of cancers with distinct metabolic dependencies for potential pharmacological intervention. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Probing Temperature-Dependent Recombination Kinetics in Polymer:Fullerene Solar Cells by Electric Noise Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Landi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of solvent additives on the temperature behavior of both charge carrier transport and recombination kinetics in bulk heterojunction solar cells has been investigated by electric noise spectroscopy. The observed differences in charge carrier lifetime and mobility are attributed to a different film ordering and donor-acceptor phase segregation in the blend. The measured temperature dependence indicates that bimolecular recombination is the dominant loss mechanism in the active layer, affecting the device performance. Blend devices prepared with a high-boiling-point solvent additive show a decreased recombination rate at the donor-acceptor interface as compared to the ones prepared with the reference solvent. A clear correlation between the device performance and the morphological properties is discussed in terms of the temperature dependence of the mobility-lifetime product.

  13. Flow-through 3D biofuel cell anode for NAD+-dependent enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rincon, Rosalba A.; Lau, Carolin; Garcia, Kristen E.; Atanassov, Plamen

    2011-01-01

    NAD + -dependent enzymes require the presence of catalysts for cofactor regeneration in order to be employed in enzymatic biofuel cells. Poly-(methylene green) catalysts have proven to help the oxidation reaction of NADH allowing for the use of such enzymes in electrocatalytic oxidation reactions. In this paper we present the development of 3D anode based on NAD + -dependent malate dehydrogenase. The 3D material chosen was reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) which was modified with poly-(MG) for NADH oxidation and it also accommodated the porous immobilization matrix for MDH consisting of MWCNTs embedded in chitosan; allowing for mass transport of the substrate to the electrode. Scanning electron microscopy was used in order to characterize the poly-(MG)-modified RVC, and electrochemical evaluation of the anode was performed.

  14. Discovery and Characterization of Super-Enhancer Associated Dependencies in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapuy, Bjoern; McKeown, Michael R.; Lin, Charles Y.; Monti, Stefano; Roemer, Margaretha G.M.; Qi, Jun; Rahl, Peter B.; Sun, Heather H.; Yeda, Kelly T.; Doench, John G; Reichert, Elaine; Kung, Andrew L.; Rodig, Scott J.; Young, Richard A.; Shipp, Margaret A.; Bradner, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) is a biologically heterogeneous and clinically aggressive disease. Here, we explore the role of BET bromodomain proteins in DLBCL, using integrative chemical genetics and functional epigenomics. We observe highly asymmetric loading of BRD4 at enhancers, with approximately 33% of all BRD4 localizing to enhancers at 1.6% of occupied genes. These super-enhancers prove particularly sensitive to bromodomain inhibition, explaining the selective effect of BET inhibitors on oncogenic and lineage-specific transcriptional circuits. Functional study of genes marked by super-enhancers identifies DLBCLs dependent on OCA-B and suggests a strategy for discovering unrecognized cancer dependencies. Translational studies performed on a comprehensive panel of DLBCLs establish a therapeutic rationale for evaluating BET inhibitors in this disease. PMID:24332044

  15. TAP-Dependent and -Independent Peptide Import into Dendritic Cell Phagosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawand, Myriam; Abramova, Anastasia; Manceau, Valérie; Springer, Sebastian; van Endert, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Cross-presentation of phagocytosed Ags by MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules is thought to involve transport of cytosolic peptides into dendritic cell phagosomes, mediated by TAP transporters recruited from the endoplasmic reticulum. However, because pure and tightly sealed phagosomes are difficult to obtain, direct evidence for peptide transport into phagosomes has remained limited. Moreover, the parameters determining peptide uptake by, and survival in, phagosomes remain little characterized. In this study, we monitored peptide import into phagosomes by flow cytometry using two types of fluorescent reporter peptides, one of which directly bound to intraphagosomal beads. We observed that a peptide with high TAP affinity is imported into phagosomes in a TAP- and ATP-dependent manner, as expected. However, surprisingly, import of the OVA peptide SIINFEKL, a CD8 + T cell epitope frequently used to study cross-presentation, is ATP-dependent but substantially TAP-independent. The half-life of both reporter peptides is shortened by enhanced phagosome maturation triggered by TLR signaling. Conversely, formation of complexes with MHC-I molecules enhances peptide accumulation in phagosomes. Collectively, these results confirm that TAP can import peptides into phagosomes, but they suggest that some peptides, including the popular SIINFEKL, can enter phagosomes also via a second unknown energy-dependent mechanism. Therefore, the frequently reported TAP dependence of cross-presentation of phagocytosed OVA may principally reflect a requirement for recycling MHC-I molecules rather than SIINFEKL import into phagosomes via TAP. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  16. Activation of the TASK-2 channel after cell swelling is dependent on tyrosine phosphorylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Signe Skyum; Lambert, Ian Henry; Gammeltoft, Steen

    2010-01-01

    , it is demonstrated that mpV(pic) increased the volume-sensitive part of the K(+) efflux 1.3 times. To exclude K(+) efflux via a KCl cotransporter, cellular Cl(-) was substituted with NO(3)(-). Also under these conditions K(+) efflux was completely blocked by genistein. Thus tyrosine kinases seem to be involved...... together with Western blotting and antibodies against phosphotyrosines revealed a cell swelling-induced, time-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of the channel. Even though we found an inhibiting effect of PP2 on RVD, neither Src nor the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) seem to be involved. Inhibitors...

  17. Glucagon Couples Hepatic Amino Acid Catabolism to mTOR-Dependent Regulation of α-Cell Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J. Solloway

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the regulation of islet cell mass has important implications for the discovery of regenerative therapies for diabetes. The liver plays a central role in metabolism and the regulation of endocrine cell number, but liver-derived factors that regulate α-cell and β-cell mass remain unidentified. We propose a nutrient-sensing circuit between liver and pancreas in which glucagon-dependent control of hepatic amino acid metabolism regulates α-cell mass. We found that glucagon receptor inhibition reduced hepatic amino acid catabolism, increased serum amino acids, and induced α-cell proliferation in an mTOR-dependent manner. In addition, mTOR inhibition blocked amino-acid-dependent α-cell replication ex vivo and enabled conversion of α-cells into β-like cells in vivo. Serum amino acids and α-cell proliferation were increased in neonatal mice but fell throughout postnatal development in a glucagon-dependent manner. These data reveal that amino acids act as sensors of glucagon signaling and can function as growth factors that increase α-cell proliferation.

  18. POTASSIUM-DEPENDENT SODIUM EXTRUSION BY CELLS OF PORPHYRA PERFORATA, A RED MARINE ALGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppley, Richard W.

    1958-01-01

    Potassium-free artificial sea water causes a loss of cell potassium and a gain of cell sodium in Porphyra perforata, which is not attributable to an inhibition of respiration. On adding KCl or RbCl to such low potassium, high sodium tissues, net accumulation of potassium or rubidium takes place, accompanied by net extrusion of sodium. Rates of potassium or rubidium accumulation and sodium extrusion are proportional to the amount of KCl or RbCl added only at low concentrations. Saturation of rates is evident at KCl or RbCl concentrations above 20–30 mM, suggesting the role of an ion carrier mechanism of transport. Evidence for and against mutually dependent sodium extrusion and potassium or rubidium accumulation is discussed. PMID:13587912

  19. Errant gardeners: glial-cell-dependent synaptic pruning and neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neniskyte, Urte; Gross, Cornelius T

    2017-11-01

    The final stage of brain development is associated with the generation and maturation of neuronal synapses. However, the same period is also associated with a peak in synapse elimination - a process known as synaptic pruning - that has been proposed to be crucial for the maturation of remaining synaptic connections. Recent studies have pointed to a key role for glial cells in synaptic pruning in various parts of the nervous system and have identified a set of critical signalling pathways between glia and neurons. At the same time, brain imaging and post-mortem anatomical studies suggest that insufficient or excessive synaptic pruning may underlie several neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism, schizophrenia and epilepsy. Here, we review current data on the cellular, physiological and molecular mechanisms of glial-cell-dependent synaptic pruning and outline their potential contribution to neurodevelopmental disorders.

  20. Spectroscopy of Technological Defects in Si Solar Cells by Analysis of Temperature Dependent Generation Currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jevgenij PAVLOV

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of solar cells considerably depends on the technological defects introduced by the formation of junctions, passivation layers and electrodes. Identification of these defects present in the high conductivity base layer of modern solar cells by usage of the standard techniques, such as capacitance deep level spectroscopy, is restricted by extremely small size of samples with inherent enhanced leakage current on sample boundaries. Therefore, it is important to develop the alternative methods for the defect spectroscopy in the high conductivity junction structures, to directly control a relative low concentration of the technological defects. In this work, the spectroscopy of deep traps has been performed by combining the temperature scans of the thermal generation currents extracted from barrier capacitance charging transients and capacitance deep level transient spectroscopy techniques. The dominant carrier traps ascribed to the Cu and Ni impurities were revealed. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.3.5194

  1. IL-33-dependent group 2 innate lymphoid cells promote cutaneous wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siracusa, Mark C; Kim, Brian S; Wang, Kelvin; Bayat, Ardeshir; Artis, David; Volk, Susan W

    2015-01-01

    Breaches in the skin barrier initiate an inflammatory immune response that is critical for successful wound healing. Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a recently identified population of immune cells that reside at epithelial barrier surfaces such as the skin, lung and gut and promote pro-inflammatory or epithelial repair functions following exposure to allergens, pathogens or chemical irritants. However, the potential role of ILCs in regulating cutaneous wound healing remains undefined. Here, we demonstrate that cutaneous injury promotes an IL-33-dependent group 2 ILC (ILC2) response and that abrogation of this response impairs re-epithelialization and efficient wound closure. Additionally, we provide evidence suggesting that an analogous ILC2 response is operational in acute wounds of human skin. Together, these results indicate that IL-33-responsive ILC2s are an important link between the cutaneous epithelium and the immune system, acting to promote the restoration of skin integrity following injury. PMID:26802241

  2. Intravital imaging reveals p53-dependent cancer cell death induced by phototherapy via calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missiroli, Sonia; Poletti, Federica; Ramirez, Fabian Galindo; Morciano, Giampaolo; Morganti, Claudia; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Mammano, Fabio; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    One challenge in biology is signal transduction monitoring in a physiological context. Intravital imaging techniques are revolutionizing our understanding of tumor and host cell behaviors in the tumor environment. However, these deep tissue imaging techniques have not yet been adopted to investigate the second messenger calcium (Ca2+). In the present study, we established conditions that allow the in vivo detection of Ca2+ signaling in three-dimensional tumor masses in mouse models. By combining intravital imaging and a skinfold chamber technique, we determined the ability of photodynamic cancer therapy to induce an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and, consequently, an increase in cell death in a p53-dependent pathway. PMID:25544762

  3. Phosphate-dependent luminal ATP metabolism regulates transcellular calcium transport in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uekawa, Atsushi; Yamanaka, Hitoki; Lieben, Liesbet; Kimira, Yoshifumi; Uehara, Mariko; Yamamoto, Yoko; Kato, Shigeaki; Ito, Kosei; Carmeliet, Geert; Masuyama, Ritsuko

    2018-01-05

    Extracellular low phosphate strongly enhances intestinal calcium absorption independently of active vitamin D [1,25(OH) 2 D 3 ] signaling, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly characterized. To elucidate the phosphate-dependent regulation of calcium transport, we investigated part of the enteral environment that is involved in 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 -independent calcium absorption, which responds to dietary phosphate levels in mice that lack intestinal vitamin D receptor ( Vdr) activity. Impaired calcium absorption in intestinal Vdr-null mice was improved by dietary phosphate restriction. Accordingly, calcium transport in cultured intestinal epithelial cells was increased when the apical side was exposed to low phosphate levels (0.5 mM) compared with normal or high phosphate levels (1.0 or 5.0 mM, respectively). Mechanistically, low phosphate increased ATP in the apical side medium and allowed calcium entry into epithelial cells via the P2X7 purinoreceptor, which results in increased calcium transport. We found that luminal ATP was regulated by the release and degradation of ATP at the epithelium, and phosphate restriction increased ATP release from epithelial cells via connexin-43 hemichannels. Furthermore, ATP degradation by ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase-1 was reduced, which was caused by the reduction of the MAPK cascade. These findings indicate that luminal ATP metabolism regulates transcellular calcium transport in the intestine by an 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 -independent mechanism in response to dietary phosphate levels.-Uekawa, A., Yamanaka, H., Lieben, L., Kimira, Y., Uehara, M., Yamamoto, Y., Kato, S., Ito, K., Carmeliet, G., Masuyama, R. Phosphate-dependent luminal ATP metabolism regulates transcellular calcium transport in intestinal epithelial cells.

  4. Dehydroepiandrosterone inhibits intracellular calcium release in beta-cells by a plasma membrane-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongmin; Ren, Min; Bing, Xinyu; Stotts, Corey; Deorah, Sundeep; Love-Homan, Laurie; Dillon, Joseph S

    2006-08-01

    Both dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulfate (DHEAS) affect glucose stimulated insulin secretion, though their cellular mechanisms of action are not well characterized. We tested the hypothesis that human physiological concentrations of DHEA alter insulin secretion by an action initiated at the plasma membrane of beta-cells. DHEA alone had no effect on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in a rat beta-cell line (INS-1). However, it caused an immediate and dose-dependent inhibition of carbachol-induced Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores, with a 25% inhibition at zero. One nanometer DHEA. DHEA also inhibited the Ca(2+) mobilizing effect of bombesin (29% decrease), but did not inhibit the influx of extracellular Ca(2+) evoked by glyburide (100 microM) or glucose (15 mM). The steroids (androstenedione, 17-alpha-hydroxypregnenolone, and DHEAS) had no inhibitory effect on carbachol-induced intracellular Ca(2+) release. The action of DHEA depended on a signal initiated at the plasma membrane, since membrane impermeant DHEA-BSA complexes also inhibited the carbachol effect on [Ca(2+)](i) (39% decrease). The inhibition of carbachol-induced Ca(2+) release by DHEA was blocked by pertussis toxin (PTX). DHEA also inhibited the carbachol induction of phosphoinositide generation, with a maximal inhibition at 0.1 nM DHEA. Furthermore, DHEA inhibited insulin secretion induced by carbachol in INS-1 cells by 25%, and in human pancreatic islets by 53%. Taken together, this is the first report showing that human physiological concentrations of DHEA decrease agonist-induced Ca(2+) release by a rapid, non-genomic mechanism in INS-1 cells. Furthermore, these data provide evidence consistent with the existence of a specific plasma membrane DHEA receptor, mediating this signal transduction pathway by pertussis toxin-sensitive G-proteins.

  5. Traumatically injured astrocytes release a proteomic signature modulated by STAT3 dependent cell survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Jaclynn; Kwon, Eunice; Paez, Pablo; Yan, Weihong; Czerwieniec, Gregg; Loo, Joseph A.; Sofroniew, Michael V.; Wanner, Ina-Beate

    2015-01-01

    Molecular markers associated with CNS injury are of diagnostic interest. Mechanical trauma generates cellular deformation associated with membrane permeability with unknown molecular consequences. We used an in vitro model of stretch-injury and proteomic analyses to determine protein changes in murine astrocytes and their surrounding fluids. Abrupt pressure-pulse stretching resulted in the rapid release of 59 astrocytic proteins with profiles reflecting cell injury and cell death, i.e. mechanoporation and cell lysis. This acute trauma-release proteome was overrepresented with metabolic proteins compared to the uninjured cellular proteome, bearing relevance for post-traumatic metabolic depression. Astrocyte-specific deletion of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3-CKO) resulted in reduced stretch-injury tolerance, elevated necrosis and increased protein release. Consistent with more lysed cells, more protein complexes, nuclear and transport proteins were released from STAT3-CKO versus non-transgenic astrocytes. STAT3-CKO astrocytes had reduced basal expression of GFAP, lactate dehydrogenase B (LDHB), aldolase C (ALDOC) and astrocytic phosphoprotein 15 (PEA15), and elevated levels of tropomyosin (TPM4) and α actinin 4 (ACTN4). Stretching caused STAT3 dependent cellular depletion of PEA15 and GFAP, and its filament disassembly in subpopulations of injured astrocytes. PEA15 and ALDOC signals were low in injured astrocytes acutely after mouse spinal cord crush injury and robustly expressed in reactive astrocytes one day post-injury. In contrast, α crystallin (CRYAB) was present in acutely injured astrocytes, and absent from uninjured and reactive astrocytes, demonstrating novel marker differences among post-injury astrocytes. These findings reveal a proteomic signature of traumatically-injured astrocytes reflecting STAT3-dependent cellular survival with potential diagnostic value. PMID:26683444

  6. Caspase-1-dependent and -independent cell death pathways in Burkholderia pseudomallei infection of macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Bast

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The cytosolic pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei and causative agent of melioidosis has been shown to regulate IL-1β and IL-18 production through NOD-like receptor NLRP3 and pyroptosis via NLRC4. Downstream signalling pathways of those receptors and other cell death mechanisms induced during B. pseudomallei infection have not been addressed so far in detail. Furthermore, the role of B. pseudomallei factors in inflammasome activation is still ill defined. In the present study we show that caspase-1 processing and pyroptosis is exclusively dependent on NLRC4, but not on NLRP3 in the early phase of macrophage infection, whereas at later time points caspase-1 activation and cell death is NLRC4- independent. In the early phase we identified an activation pathway involving caspases-9, -7 and PARP downstream of NLRC4 and caspase-1. Analyses of caspase-1/11-deficient infected macrophages revealed a strong induction of apoptosis, which is dependent on activation of apoptotic initiator and effector caspases. The early activation pathway of caspase-1 in macrophages was markedly reduced or completely abolished after infection with a B. pseudomallei flagellin FliC or a T3SS3 BsaU mutant. Studies using cells transfected with the wild-type and mutated T3SS3 effector protein BopE indicated also a role of this protein in caspase-1 processing. A T3SS3 inner rod protein BsaK mutant failed to activate caspase-1, revealed higher intracellular counts, reduced cell death and IL-1β secretion during early but not during late macrophage infection compared to the wild-type. Intranasal infection of BALB/c mice with the BsaK mutant displayed a strongly decreased mortality, lower bacterial loads in organs, and reduced levels of IL-1β, myeloperoxidase and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In conclusion, our results indicate a major role for a functional T3SS3 in early NLRC4-mediated caspase-1 activation and pyroptosis and a contribution of late caspase-1

  7. Encephalitozoon intestinalis inhibits dendritic cell differentiation through an IL-6-dependent mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Elisa Bernal Silva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AbstractMicrosporidia are a group of intracellular pathogens causing self-limited and severe diseases in immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals, respectively. A cellular type 1 adaptive response, mediated by IL-12, IFNg, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells has been shown to be essential for host resistance, and dendritic cells (DC play a key role at eliciting anti-microsporidial immunity. We investigated the in vitro response of DC and DC precursors/progenitors to infection with Encephalitozoon intestinalis (Ei, a common agent of human microsporidosis. Ei-exposed DC cultures up-regulated the surface expression of MHC class II and the costimulatory molecules CD86 and CD40, only when high loads of spores were used. A vigorous secretion of IL-6 but not of IL-1b or IL-12p70 was also observed in these cultures. Ei-exposed DC cultures consisted of immature infected and mature bystander DC, as assessed by MHC class II and costimulatory molecules expression, suggesting that intracellular Ei spores deliver inhibitory signals in DC. Moreover, Ei selectively inhibited the secretion of IL-12p70 in LPS-stimulated DC. Whereas Ei-exposed DC promoted allogeneic naïve T cell proliferation and IL-2 and IFNg secretion in DC-CD4+ T cell co-cultures, separated co-cultures with bystander or infected DCs showed stimulation or inhibition of IFNg secretion, respectively. When DC precursors/progenitors were exposed to Ei spores, a significant inhibition of DC differentiation was observed without shifting the development towards cells phenotypically or functionally compatible with myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Neutralization experiments demonstrated that this inhibitory effect is IL-6-dependent. Altogether this investigation reveals a novel potential mechanism of immune escape of microsporidian parasites through the modulation of DC differentiation and maturation.

  8. Cbl enforces Vav1 dependence and a restricted pathway of T cell development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Chiang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Extensive studies of pre-TCR- and TCR-dependent signaling have led to characterization of a pathway deemed essential for efficient T cell development, and comprised of a cascade of sequential events involving phosphorylation of Lck and ZAP-70, followed by phosphorylation of LAT and SLP-76, and subsequent additional downstream events. Of interest, however, reports from our lab as well as others have indicated that the requirements for ZAP-70, LAT, and SLP-76 are partially reversed by inactivation of c-Cbl (Cbl, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets multiple molecules for ubiquitination and degradation. Analysis of signaling events in these Cbl knockout models, including the recently reported analysis of SLP-76 transgenes defective in interaction with Vav1, suggested that activation of Vav1 might be a critical event in alternative pathways of T cell development. To extend the analysis of signaling requirements for thymic development, we have therefore assessed the effect of Cbl inactivation on the T cell developmental defects that occur in Vav1-deficient mice. The defects in Vav1-deficient thymic development, including a marked defect in DN3-DN4 transition, were completely reversed by Cbl inactivation, accompanied by enhanced phosphorylation of PLC-γ1 and ERKs in response to pre-TCR/TCR cross-linking of Vav1⁻/⁻Cbl⁻/⁻ DP thymocytes. Taken together, these results suggest a substantially modified paradigm for pre-TCR/TCR signaling and T cell development. The observed consensus pathways of T cell development, including requirements for ZAP-70, LAT, SLP-76, and Vav1, appear to reflect the restriction by Cbl of an otherwise much broader set of molecular pathways capable of mediating T cell development.

  9. Integrin-dependent response to laminin-511 regulates breast tumor cell invasion and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusuma, Nicole; Denoyer, Delphine; Eble, Johannes A; Redvers, Richard P; Parker, Belinda S; Pelzer, Rebecca; Anderson, Robin L; Pouliot, Normand

    2012-02-01

    The basement membrane protein, laminin (LM)-511, is a potent adhesive and migratory substrate for metastatic breast tumor cells in vitro. Its expression correlates with tumor grade and metastatic potential in vivo. These observations suggest that responsiveness to autocrine or paracrine-derived LM-511 may be an important property regulating breast cancer metastasis in vivo. To address this, we compared the metastatic potential of 4T1 mammary carcinoma cells to that of 4T1 variants isolated by repeated chemotactic migration toward LM-511 in vitro (4T1LMF4) followed by serial injection into the mammary gland and recovery of spontaneous metastases from bone (4T1BM2). Variant subpopulations exhibited a distinct morphology on LM-511 and increased expression of β1 and β4 integrins compared to parental 4T1 cells. Importantly, mice inoculated with 4T1LMF4 and 4T1BM2 variants showed a 2.5- to 4-fold increase in the incidence of spontaneous metastasis to bone compared to 4T1 tumor-bearing mice. Functionally, 4T1BM2 variants were more adherent and more invasive toward LM-511 than parental 4T1 cells. Treatment of 4T1BM2 cells with lebein-1, a disintegrin with selectivity toward LM-type integrin receptors, potently inhibited their migration and invasion toward LM-511. Similarly, α3β1 integrin-dependent migration and invasion of human MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells toward LM-511 were significantly inhibited by lebein-1. Taken together, these results provide strong evidence that LM-511 contributes to the metastasis of breast tumors and suggest that targeting integrin-LM-511 interactions with lebein-1 or other inhibitors of LM-511 receptors may have therapeutic potential for patients with advanced breast cancer. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  10. Differential regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in neuroblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao, Lan; Paul, Pritha; Lee, Sora; Qiao, Jingbo; Wang, Yongsheng; Chung, Dai H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •GRP-R signaling differentially regulated the expression of p21 and p27. •Silencing GRP/GRP-R downregulated p21, while p27 expression was upregulated. •Inhibition of GRP/GRP-R signaling enhanced PTEN expression, correlative to the increased expression of p27. •PTEN and p27 co-localized in cytoplasm and silencing PTEN decreased p27 expression. -- Abstract: Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) and its receptor (GRP-R) are highly expressed in undifferentiated neuroblastoma, and they play critical roles in oncogenesis. We previously reported that GRP activates the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway to promote DNA synthesis and cell cycle progression in neuroblastoma cells. Conversely, GRP-R silencing induces cell cycle arrest. Here, we speculated that GRP/GRP-R signaling induces neuroblastoma cell proliferation via regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors. Surprisingly, we found that GRP/GRP-R differentially induced expressions of p21 and p27. Silencing GRP/GRP-R decreased p21, but it increased p27 expressions in neuroblastoma cells. Furthermore, we found that the intracellular localization of p21 and p27 in the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments, respectively. In addition, we found that GRP/GRP-R silencing increased the expression and accumulation of PTEN in the cytoplasm of neuroblastoma cells where it co-localized with p27, thus suggesting that p27 promotes the function of PTEN as a tumor suppressor by stabilizing PTEN in the cytoplasm. GRP/GRP-R regulation of CDK inhibitors and tumor suppressor PTEN may be critical for tumoriogenesis of neuroblastoma

  11. Differential regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in neuroblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Lan [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Paul, Pritha; Lee, Sora [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Qiao, Jingbo [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Wang, Yongsheng [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Chung, Dai H., E-mail: dai.chung@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2013-05-31

    Highlights: •GRP-R signaling differentially regulated the expression of p21 and p27. •Silencing GRP/GRP-R downregulated p21, while p27 expression was upregulated. •Inhibition of GRP/GRP-R signaling enhanced PTEN expression, correlative to the increased expression of p27. •PTEN and p27 co-localized in cytoplasm and silencing PTEN decreased p27 expression. -- Abstract: Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) and its receptor (GRP-R) are highly expressed in undifferentiated neuroblastoma, and they play critical roles in oncogenesis. We previously reported that GRP activates the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway to promote DNA synthesis and cell cycle progression in neuroblastoma cells. Conversely, GRP-R silencing induces cell cycle arrest. Here, we speculated that GRP/GRP-R signaling induces neuroblastoma cell proliferation via regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors. Surprisingly, we found that GRP/GRP-R differentially induced expressions of p21 and p27. Silencing GRP/GRP-R decreased p21, but it increased p27 expressions in neuroblastoma cells. Furthermore, we found that the intracellular localization of p21 and p27 in the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments, respectively. In addition, we found that GRP/GRP-R silencing increased the expression and accumulation of PTEN in the cytoplasm of neuroblastoma cells where it co-localized with p27, thus suggesting that p27 promotes the function of PTEN as a tumor suppressor by stabilizing PTEN in the cytoplasm. GRP/GRP-R regulation of CDK inhibitors and tumor suppressor PTEN may be critical for tumoriogenesis of neuroblastoma.

  12. Higher sensitivity to cadmium induced cell death of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons: A cholinesterase dependent mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Pino, Javier; Zeballos, Garbriela; Anadon, María José; Capo, Miguel Andrés; Díaz, María Jesús; García, Jimena; Frejo, María Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium is an environmental pollutant, which is a cause of concern because it can be greatly concentrated in the organism causing severe damage to a variety of organs including the nervous system which is one of the most affected. Cadmium has been reported to produce learning and memory dysfunctions and Alzheimer like symptoms, though the mechanism is unknown. On the other hand, cholinergic system in central nervous system (CNS) is implicated on learning and memory regulation, and it has been reported that cadmium can affect cholinergic transmission and it can also induce selective toxicity on cholinergic system at peripheral level, producing cholinergic neurons loss, which may explain cadmium effects on learning and memory processes if produced on central level. The present study is aimed at researching the selective neurotoxicity induced by cadmium on cholinergic system in CNS. For this purpose we evaluated, in basal forebrain region, the cadmium toxic effects on neuronal viability and the cholinergic mechanisms related to it on NS56 cholinergic mourine septal cell line. This study proves that cadmium induces a more pronounced, but not selective, cell death on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) on cholinergic neurons. Moreover, MTT and LDH assays showed a dose dependent decrease of cell viability in NS56 cells. The ACh treatment of SN56 cells did not revert cell viability reduction induced by cadmium, but siRNA transfection against AChE partially reduced it. Our present results provide new understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the harmful effects of cadmium on the function and viability of neurons, and the possible relevance of cadmium in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases

  13. The human red cell voltage-dependent cation channel. Part III: Distribution homogeneity and pH dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennekou, P.; Barksmann, T. L.; Christophersen, P.

    2006-01-01

    The homogeneity of the distribution of the non-selective voltage-dependent cation channel (the NSVDC channel) in the human erythrocyte, and the pH dependence was investigated. Activation of this channel caused a uniform cellular dehydration, which was characterized by the changes in the erythrocy...... - but not the extracellular - pH. The apparent pKA value for the effect was estimated to be 6.5, and the specific histidine reagent 2.4'-dibromoacetophenone (DBAB) inactivated the NSVDC channel....

  14. Immune complexes stimulate CCR7-dependent dendritic cell migration to lymph nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clatworthy, Menna R.; Aronin, Caren E. Petrie; Mathews, Rebeccah J.; Morgan, Nicole; Smith, Kenneth G.C.; Germain, Ronald N.

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies are critical for defence against a variety of microbes but may also be pathogenic in some autoimmune diseases. Many effector functions of antibody are mediated by Fcγ receptors (FcγRs), which are found on most immune cells, including dendritic cells (DCs). DCs are important antigen presenting cells and play a central role in inducing antigen-specific tolerance or immunity1,2. Following antigen acquisition in peripheral tissues, DCs migrate to draining lymph nodes via lymphatics to present antigen to T cells. In this study we demonstrate that FcγR engagement by IgG immune complexes (IC) stimulates DC migration from peripheral tissues to the paracortex of draining lymph nodes. In vitro, IC-stimulated murine and human DCs showed enhanced directional migration in a CCL19 gradient and increased CCR7 expression. Using intravital two-photon microscopy, we observed that local administration of IC resulted in dermal DC mobilisation. We confirmed that dermal DC migration to lymph nodes was CCR7-dependent and increased in the absence of the inhibitory receptor, FcγRIIb. These observations have relevance to autoimmunity, because autoantibody-containing serum from mice and humans with SLE also increased dermal DC migration to lymph nodes in vivo, suggesting that this process may occur in lupus, potentially driving the inappropriate localisation of autoantigen-bearing DCs. PMID:25384086

  15. Tributyltin induces mitochondrial fission through NAD-IDH dependent mitofusin degradation in human embryonic carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shigeru; Kotake, Yaichiro; Nakano, Mizuho; Sekino, Yuko; Kanda, Yasunari

    2015-08-01

    Organotin compounds, such as tributyltin (TBT), are well-known endocrine disruptors. TBT acts at the nanomolar level through genomic pathways via the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)/retinoid X receptor (RXR). We recently reported that TBT inhibits cell growth and the ATP content in the human embryonic carcinoma cell line NT2/D1 via a non-genomic pathway involving NAD(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD-IDH), which metabolizes isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate. However, the molecular mechanisms by which NAD-IDH mediates TBT toxicity remain unclear. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of TBT on mitochondrial NAD-IDH and energy production. Staining with MitoTracker revealed that nanomolar TBT levels induced mitochondrial fragmentation. TBT also degraded the mitochondrial fusion proteins, mitofusins 1 and 2. Interestingly, apigenin, an inhibitor of NAD-IDH, mimicked the effects of TBT. Incubation with an α-ketoglutarate analogue partially recovered TBT-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, supporting the involvement of NAD-IDH. Our data suggest that nanomolar TBT levels impair mitochondrial quality control via NAD-IDH in NT2/D1 cells. Thus, mitochondrial function in embryonic cells could be used to assess cytotoxicity associated with metal exposure.

  16. Ionotropic Receptor-dependent moist and dry cells control hygrosensation in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Zachary A; Silbering, Ana F; Cruz, Joyner; Yang, Ludi; Croset, Vincent; Benton, Richard; Garrity, Paul A

    2017-06-16

    Insects use hygrosensation (humidity sensing) to avoid desiccation and, in vectors such as mosquitoes, to locate vertebrate hosts. Sensory neurons activated by either dry or moist air ('dry cells' and 'moist cells') have been described in many insects, but their behavioral roles and the molecular basis of their hygrosensitivity remain unclear. We recently reported that Drosophila hygrosensation relies on three Ionotropic Receptors (IRs) required for dry cell function: IR25a, IR93a and IR40a (Knecht et al., 2016). Here, we discover Drosophila moist cells and show that they require IR25a and IR93a together with IR68a, a conserved, but orphan IR. Both IR68a- and IR40a-dependent pathways drive hygrosensory behavior: each is important for dry-seeking by hydrated flies and together they underlie moist-seeking by dehydrated flies. These studies reveal that humidity sensing in Drosophila , and likely other insects, involves the combined activity of two molecularly related but neuronally distinct hygrosensing systems.

  17. RNAi screen reveals an Abl kinase-dependent host cell pathway involved in Pseudomonas aeruginosa internalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia F Pielage

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Internalization of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa by non-phagocytic cells is promoted by rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton, but the host pathways usurped by this bacterium are not clearly understood. We used RNAi-mediated gene inactivation of approximately 80 genes known to regulate the actin cytoskeleton in Drosophila S2 cells to identify host molecules essential for entry of P. aeruginosa. This work revealed Abl tyrosine kinase, the adaptor protein Crk, the small GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42, and p21-activated kinase as components of a host signaling pathway that leads to internalization of P. aeruginosa. Using a variety of complementary approaches, we validated the role of this pathway in mammalian cells. Remarkably, ExoS and ExoT, type III secreted toxins of P. aeruginosa, target this pathway by interfering with GTPase function and, in the case of ExoT, by abrogating P. aeruginosa-induced Abl-dependent Crk phosphorylation. Altogether, this work reveals that P. aeruginosa utilizes the Abl pathway for entering host cells and reveals unexpected complexity by which the P. aeruginosa type III secretion system modulates this internalization pathway. Our results furthermore demonstrate the applicability of using RNAi screens to identify host signaling cascades usurped by microbial pathogens that may be potential targets for novel therapies directed against treatment of antibiotic-resistant infections.

  18. Chalcone-Induced Apoptosis through Caspase-Dependent Intrinsic Pathways in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Tagle, Rodrigo; Escobar, Carlos A.; Romero, Valentina; Montorfano, Ignacio; Armisén, Ricardo; Borgna, Vincenzo; Jeldes, Emanuel; Pizarro, Luis; Simon, Felipe; Echeverria, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers worldwide. Chemoprevention of HCC can be achieved through the use of natural or synthetic compounds that reverse, suppress or prevent the development of cancer progression. In this study, we investigated the antiproliferative effects and the mechanism of action of two compounds, 2,3,4′-trimethoxy-2′-hydroxy-chalcone (CH1) and 3′-bromo-3,4-dimethoxy-chalcone (CH2), over human hepatoma cells (HepG2 and Huh-7) and cultured mouse hepatocytes (HepM). Cytotoxic effects were observed over the HepG2 and Huh-7, and no effects were observed over the HepM. For HepG2 cells, treated separately with each chalcone, typical apoptotic laddering and nuclear condensation were observed. Additionally, the caspases and Bcl-2 family proteins activation by using Western blotting and immunocytochemistry were studied. Caspase-8 was not activated, but caspase-3 and -9 were both activated by chalcones in HepG2 cells. Chalcones also induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation after 4, 8 and 24 h of treatment in HepG2 cells. These results suggest that apoptosis in HepG2 was induced through: (i) a caspase-dependent intrinsic pathway; and (ii) by alterations in the cellular levels of Bcl-2 family proteins, and also, that the chalcone moiety could be a potent candidate as novel anticancer agents acting on human hepatomas. PMID:26907262

  19. Chalcone-Induced Apoptosis through Caspase-Dependent Intrinsic Pathways in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Ramirez-Tagle

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers worldwide. Chemoprevention of HCC can be achieved through the use of natural or synthetic compounds that reverse, suppress or prevent the development of cancer progression. In this study, we investigated the antiproliferative effects and the mechanism of action of two compounds, 2,3,4′-trimethoxy-2′-hydroxy-chalcone (CH1 and 3′-bromo-3,4-dimethoxy-chalcone (CH2, over human hepatoma cells (HepG2 and Huh-7 and cultured mouse hepatocytes (HepM. Cytotoxic effects were observed over the HepG2 and Huh-7, and no effects were observed over the HepM. For HepG2 cells, treated separately with each chalcone, typical apoptotic laddering and nuclear condensation were observed. Additionally, the caspases and Bcl-2 family proteins activation by using Western blotting and immunocytochemistry were studied. Caspase-8 was not activated, but caspase-3 and -9 were both activated by chalcones in HepG2 cells. Chalcones also induced reactive oxygen species (ROS accumulation after 4, 8 and 24 h of treatment in HepG2 cells. These results suggest that apoptosis in HepG2 was induced through: (i a caspase-dependent intrinsic pathway; and (ii by alterations in the cellular levels of Bcl-2 family proteins, and also, that the chalcone moiety could be a potent candidate as novel anticancer agents acting on human hepatomas.

  20. Frank-ter Haar syndrome protein Tks4 regulates epidermal growth factor-dependent cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bögel, Gábor; Gujdár, Annamária; Geiszt, Miklós; Lányi, Árpád; Fekete, Anna; Sipeki, Szabolcs; Downward, Julian; Buday, László

    2012-09-07

    Mutations in the SH3PXD2B gene coding for the Tks4 protein are responsible for the autosomal recessive Frank-ter Haar syndrome. Tks4, a substrate of Src tyrosine kinase, is implicated in the regulation of podosome formation. Here, we report a novel role for Tks4 in the EGF signaling pathway. In EGF-treated cells, Tks4 is tyrosine-phosphorylated and associated with the activated EGF receptor. This association is not direct but requires the presence of Src tyrosine kinase. In addition, treatment of cells with LY294002, an inhibitor of PI 3-kinase, or mutations of the PX domain reduces tyrosine phosphorylation and membrane translocation of Tks4. Furthermore, a PX domain mutant (R43W) Tks4 carrying a reported point mutation in a Frank-ter Haar syndrome patient showed aberrant intracellular expression and reduced phosphoinositide binding. Finally, silencing of Tks4 was shown to markedly inhibit HeLa cell migration in a Boyden chamber assay in response to EGF or serum. Our results therefore reveal a new function for Tks4 in the regulation of growth factor-dependent cell migration.

  1. Recombinase-Dependent Mouse Lines for Chemogenetic Activation of Genetically Defined Cell Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natale R. Sciolino

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemogenetic technologies, including the mutated human Gq-coupled M3 muscarinic receptor (hM3Dq, have greatly facilitated our ability to directly link changes in cellular activity to altered physiology and behavior. Here, we extend the hM3Dq toolkit with recombinase-responsive mouse lines that permit hM3Dq expression in virtually any cell type. These alleles encode a fusion protein designed to increase effective expression levels by concentrating hM3Dq to the cell body and dendrites. To illustrate their broad utility, we targeted three different genetically defined cell populations: noradrenergic neurons of the compact, bilateral locus coeruleus and two dispersed populations, Camk2a+ neurons and GFAP+ glia. In all three populations, we observed reproducible expression and confirmed that activation of hM3Dq is sufficient to dose-dependently evoke phenotypic changes, without extreme phenotypes associated with hM3Dq overexpression. These alleles offer the ability to non-invasively control activity of diverse cell types to uncover their function and dysfunction at any developmental stage.

  2. VCP phosphorylation-dependent interaction partners prevent apoptosis in Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chou Yu

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated that valosin-containing protein (VCP is associated with H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis. By identifying the interactome of VCP overexpressed in AGS cells using a subtractive proteomics approach, we aimed to characterize the cellular responses mediated by VCP and its functional roles in H. pylori-associated gastric cancer. VCP immunoprecipitations followed by proteomic analysis identified 288 putative interacting proteins, 18 VCP-binding proteins belonged to the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. H. pylori infection increased the interaction between Akt and VCP, Akt-dependent phosphorylation of VCP, levels of ubiquitinated proteins, and aggresome formation in AGS cells. Furthermore, phosphorylated VCP co-localized with the aggresome, bound ubiquitinated proteins, and increased the degradation of cellular regulators to protect H. pylori-infected AGS cells from apoptosis. Our study demonstrates that VCP phosphorylation following H. pylori infection promotes both gastric epithelial cell survival, mediated by the PI3K/Akt pathway, and the degradation of cellular regulators. These findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms of H. pylori infection induced gastric carcinogenesis.

  3. Actin-dependent activation of serum response factor in T cells by the viral oncoprotein tip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsch Kristin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Serum response factor (SRF acts as a multifunctional transcription factor regulated by mutually exclusive interactions with ternary complex factors (TCFs or myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTFs. Binding of Rho- and actin-regulated MRTF:SRF complexes to target gene promoters requires an SRF-binding site only, whereas MAPK-regulated TCF:SRF complexes in addition rely on flanking sequences present in the serum response element (SRE. Here, we report on the activation of an SRE luciferase reporter by Tip, the viral oncoprotein essentially contributing to human T-cell transformation by Herpesvirus saimiri. SRE activation in Tip-expressing Jurkat T cells could not be attributed to triggering of the MAPK pathway. Therefore, we further analyzed the contribution of MRTF complexes. Indeed, Tip also activated a reporter construct responsive to MRTF:SRF. Activation of this reporter was abrogated by overexpression of a dominant negative mutant of the MRTF-family member MAL. Moreover, enrichment of monomeric actin suppressed the Tip-induced reporter activity. Further upstream, the Rho-family GTPase Rac, was found to be required for MRTF:SRF reporter activation by Tip. Initiation of this pathway was strictly dependent on Tip's ability to interact with Lck and on the activity of this Src-family kinase. Independent of Tip, T-cell stimulation orchestrates Src-family kinase, MAPK and actin pathways to induce SRF. These findings establish actin-regulated transcription in human T cells and suggest its role in viral oncogenesis.

  4. Chalcone-Induced Apoptosis through Caspase-Dependent Intrinsic Pathways in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Tagle, Rodrigo; Escobar, Carlos A; Romero, Valentina; Montorfano, Ignacio; Armisén, Ricardo; Borgna, Vincenzo; Jeldes, Emanuel; Pizarro, Luis; Simon, Felipe; Echeverria, Cesar

    2016-02-22

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers worldwide. Chemoprevention of HCC can be achieved through the use of natural or synthetic compounds that reverse, suppress or prevent the development of cancer progression. In this study, we investigated the antiproliferative effects and the mechanism of action of two compounds, 2,3,4'-trimethoxy-2'-hydroxy-chalcone (CH1) and 3'-bromo-3,4-dimethoxy-chalcone (CH2), over human hepatoma cells (HepG2 and Huh-7) and cultured mouse hepatocytes (HepM). Cytotoxic effects were observed over the HepG2 and Huh-7, and no effects were observed over the HepM. For HepG2 cells, treated separately with each chalcone, typical apoptotic laddering and nuclear condensation were observed. Additionally, the caspases and Bcl-2 family proteins activation by using Western blotting and immunocytochemistry were studied. Caspase-8 was not activated, but caspase-3 and -9 were both activated by chalcones in HepG2 cells. Chalcones also induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation after 4, 8 and 24 h of treatment in HepG2 cells. These results suggest that apoptosis in HepG2 was induced through: (i) a caspase-dependent intrinsic pathway; and (ii) by alterations in the cellular levels of Bcl-2 family proteins, and also, that the chalcone moiety could be a potent candidate as novel anticancer agents acting on human hepatomas.

  5. Overexpression of Drosophila frataxin triggers cell death in an iron-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edenharter, Oliver; Clement, Janik; Schneuwly, Stephan; Navarro, Juan A

    2017-12-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is the most important autosomal recessive ataxia in the Caucasian population. FRDA patients display severe neurological and cardiac symptoms that reflect a strong cellular and axonal degeneration. FRDA is caused by a loss of function of the mitochondrial protein frataxin which impairs the biosynthesis of iron-sulfur clusters and in turn the catalytic activity of several enzymes in the Krebs cycle and the respiratory chain leading to a diminished energy production. Although FRDA is due to frataxin depletion, overexpression might also be very helpful to better understand cellular functions of frataxin. In this work, we have increased frataxin expression in neurons to elucidate specific roles that frataxin might play in these tissues. Using molecular, biochemical, histological and behavioral methods, we report that frataxin overexpression is sufficient to increase oxidative phosphorylation, modify mitochondrial morphology, alter iron homeostasis and trigger oxidative stress-dependent cell death. Interestingly, genetic manipulation of mitochondrial iron metabolism by silencing mitoferrin successfully improves cell survival under oxidative-attack conditions, although enhancing antioxidant defenses or mitochondrial fusion failed to ameliorate frataxin overexpression phenotypes. This result suggests that cell degeneration is directly related to enhanced incorporation of iron into the mitochondria. Drosophila frataxin overexpression might also provide an alternative approach to identify processes that are important in FRDA such as changes in mitochondrial morphology and oxidative stress induced cell death.

  6. Rb suppresses collective invasion, circulation and metastasis of breast cancer cells in CD44-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui-Jin Kim

    Full Text Available Basal-like breast carcinomas (BLCs present with extratumoral lymphovascular invasion, are highly metastatic, presumably through a hematogenous route, have augmented expression of CD44 oncoprotein and relatively low levels of retinoblastoma (Rb tumor suppressor. However, the causal relation among these features is not clear. Here, we show that Rb acts as a key suppressor of multiple stages of metastatic progression. Firstly, Rb suppresses collective cell migration (CCM and CD44-dependent formation of F-actin positive protrusions in vitro and cell-cluster based lymphovascular invasion in vivo. Secondly, Rb inhibits the release of single cancer cells and cell clusters into the hematogenous circulation and subsequent metastatic growth in lungs. Finally, CD44 expression is required for collective motility and all subsequent stages of metastatic progression initiated by loss of Rb function. Altogether, our results suggest that Rb/CD44 pathway is a crucial regulator of CCM and metastatic progression of BLCs and a promising target for anti-BLCs therapy.

  7. An experimental analysis of illumination intensity and temperature dependency of photovoltaic cell parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuce, Erdem; Cuce, Pinar Mert; Bali, Tulin

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • R sh is rather sensitive to the variations in T c . • For higher G values, G ∗ is not affected from the variations in light intensity. • Ideality factor decreases linearly with increasing T c . • A linear decrease of R s and R sh has been observed with increasing T c . • Fill factor increases exponentially with G while it decreases linearly with T c . - Abstract: It is well known that accurate knowledge of photovoltaic cell parameters from the measured current–voltage characteristics is of vital importance for the quality control and the performance assessment of photovoltaic cells/modules. Although many attempts have been made so far for a thorough analysis of cell parameters, there are still significant discrepancies between the previously published results. In this regard, a detailed investigation of cell parameters through a comprehensive experimental and statistical work is important to elucidate the aforementioned contradictions. Therefore in the present work, effects of two main environmental factors on performance parameters of mono-crystalline and poly-crystalline silicon photovoltaic modules have been experimentally investigated. The experiments have been carried out under a calibrated solar simulator for various intensity levels and cell temperatures in the range 200–500 W/m 2 and 15–60 °C, respectively. The results indicated that light intensity has a dominant effect on current parameters. Photocurrent, short circuit current and maximum current increase linearly with increasing intensity level. A new term, solar intensity coefficient, has been defined first time to characterize the solar radiation dependency of current parameters. On the other hand, it has been observed that cell temperature has a dramatic effect on voltage parameters. Open circuit voltage and maximum voltage considerably decrease with increasing cell temperature. Temperature coefficients of voltage parameters have been calculated for each case. Shunt

  8. FAK/src-family dependent activation of the Ste20-like kinase SLK is required for microtubule-dependent focal adhesion turnover and cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Wagner

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell migration involves a multitude of signals that converge on cytoskeletal reorganization, essential for development, immune responses and tissue repair. Using knockdown and dominant negative approaches, we show that the microtubule-associated Ste20-like kinase SLK is required for focal adhesion turnover and cell migration downstream of the FAK/c-src complex. Our results show that SLK co-localizes with paxillin, Rac1 and the microtubules at the leading edge of migrating cells and is activated by scratch wounding. SLK activation is dependent on FAK/c-src/MAPK signaling, whereas SLK recruitment to the leading edge is src-dependent but FAK independent. Our results show that SLK represents a novel focal adhesion disassembly signal.

  9. B-cell lymphoma 2 inhibitor ABT-737 induces Beclin1- and reactive oxygen species-dependent autophagy in Adriamycin-resistant human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiaoxiao; Li, Xiaoning; Zhang, Dan; Xie, Yingjun; Sun, Baozhen; Li, Hang; Sun, Liankun; Zhang, Xuewen

    2017-03-01

    ABT-737, a B-cell lymphoma 2 homology 3 mimetic, not only induces cell apoptosis by inhibiting the interaction of B-cell lymphoma 2 and Bax but also induces cell autophagy by interrupting the interaction of B-cell lymphoma 2 and Beclin1. Several recent studies have reported that ABT-737 has antitumor efficacy in diverse cancers. However, another study showed that hepatocellular carcinoma cells with high B-cell lymphoma 2 expression were resistant to ABT-737 compared to hepatocellular carcinoma cells with low B-cell lymphoma 2 expression. It was also found that ABT-737-induced autophagy is crucial for drug resistance. Here, we observed that of B-cell lymphoma 2 expression in Adriamycin-resistant human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2/ADM cells is higher than that in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells. Therefore, we further confirmed the mechanism and effect of autophagy induced by ABT-737 on apoptosis in HepG2/ADM cells with high B-cell lymphoma 2 expression. Our results showed that ABT-737 induced apoptosis and autophagy in time- and dose-dependent manner in HepG2/ADM cells, and this ABT-737-induced autophagy was Beclin1-dependent. In addition, we demonstrated that ABT-737 induced reactive oxygen species-mediated autophagy, and the reactive oxygen species-inhibitor N-acetyl-l-cysteine suppressed the reactive oxygen species-induced autophagy and ABT-737-induced increase in HepG2/ADM cell apoptosis. Furthermore, autophagy inhibitors increased HepG2/ADM cell apoptosis. In conclusion, our study further confirms that Beclin1- and reactive oxygen species-dependent autophagy induced by ABT-737 also plays a protective function in HepG2/ADM cells, which show B-cell lymphoma 2 expression higher than that in HepG2 cells.

  10. Manganese nanoparticle activates mitochondrial dependent apoptotic signaling and autophagy in dopaminergic neuronal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afeseh Ngwa, Hilary; Kanthasamy, Arthi [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Iowa Center for Advanced Neurotoxicology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Gu, Yan; Fang, Ning [Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Anantharam, Vellareddy [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Iowa Center for Advanced Neurotoxicology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Kanthasamy, Anumantha G., E-mail: akanthas@iastate.edu [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Iowa Center for Advanced Neurotoxicology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    The production of man-made nanoparticles for various modern applications has increased exponentially in recent years, but the potential health effects of most nanoparticles are not well characterized. Unfortunately, in vitro nanoparticle toxicity studies are extremely limited by yet unresolved problems relating to dosimetry. In the present study, we systematically characterized manganese (Mn) nanoparticle sizes and examined the nanoparticle-induced oxidative signaling in dopaminergic neuronal cells. Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies revealed that Mn nanoparticles range in size from single nanoparticles ({approx} 25 nM) to larger agglomerates when in treatment media. Manganese nanoparticles were effectively internalized in N27 dopaminergic neuronal cells, and they induced a time-dependent upregulation of the transporter protein transferrin. Exposure to 25-400 {mu}g/mL Mn nanoparticles induced cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Mn nanoparticles also significantly increased ROS, accompanied by a caspase-mediated proteolytic cleavage of proapoptotic protein kinase C{delta} (PKC{delta}), as well as activation loop phosphorylation. Blocking Mn nanoparticle-induced ROS failed to protect against the neurotoxic effects, suggesting the involvement of other pathways. Further mechanistic studies revealed changes in Beclin 1 and LC3, indicating that Mn nanoparticles induce autophagy. Primary mesencephalic neuron exposure to Mn nanoparticles induced loss of TH positive dopaminergic neurons and neuronal processes. Collectively, our results suggest that Mn nanoparticles effectively enter dopaminergic neuronal cells and exert neurotoxic effects by activating an apoptotic signaling pathway and autophagy, emphasizing the need for assessing possible health risks associated with an increased use of Mn nanoparticles in modern applications. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mn nanoparticles

  11. An Fc engineering approach that modulates antibody-dependent cytokine release without altering cell-killing functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinder, Michelle; Greenplate, Allison R; Strohl, William R; Jordan, Robert E; Brezski, Randall J

    2015-01-01

    Cytotoxic therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) often mediate target cell-killing by eliciting immune effector functions via Fc region interactions with cellular and humoral components of the immune system. Key functions include antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). However, there has been increased appreciation that along with cell-killing functions, the induction of antibody-dependent cytokine release (ADCR) can also influence disease microenvironments and therapeutic outcomes. Historically, most Fc engineering approaches have been aimed toward modulating ADCC, ADCP, or CDC. In the present study, we describe an Fc engineering approach that, while not resulting in impaired ADCC or ADCP, profoundly affects ADCR. As such, when peripheral blood mononuclear cells are used as effector cells against mAb-opsonized tumor cells, the described mAb variants elicit a similar profile and quantity of cytokines as IgG1. In contrast, although the variants elicit similar levels of tumor cell-killing as IgG1 with macrophage effector cells, the variants do not elicit macrophage-mediated ADCR against mAb-opsonized tumor cells. This study demonstrates that Fc engineering approaches can be employed to uncouple macrophage-mediated phagocytic and subsequent cell-killing functions from cytokine release.

  12. Statins induce regulatory T cell recruitment via a CCL1 dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira, Emilia; León, Beatriz; Barber, Domingo F; Jiménez-Baranda, Sonia; Goya, Iñigo; Almonacid, Luis; Márquez, Gabriel; Zaballos, Angel; Martínez-A, Carlos; Stein, Jens V; Ardavín, Carlos; Mañes, Santos

    2008-09-01

    The statins, a group of inhibitors of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, are reported to influence a variety of immune system activities through 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase-dependent and -independent mechanisms. How statin treatment regulates immune system function in vivo nonetheless remains to be fully defined. We analyzed the immunomodulatory effects of lovastatin in a Candida albicans-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction in mice. In this model, lovastatin administration reduced the acute inflammatory response elicited by C. albicans challenge. This anti-inflammatory activity of lovastatin was associated with a shift from a Th1 to a Th2 immune response, as well as an increase in the percentage of regulatory T cells at the inflammation site and in the regional draining lymph node. The lovastatin-induced increase in regulatory T cells in the inflamed skin was dependent on expression of CCL1, a chemokine that is locally up-regulated by statin administration. The anti-inflammatory effect of lovastatin was abrogated in CCL1-deficient mice. These results suggest that local regulation of chemokine expression may be an important process in statin-induced modulation of the immune system.

  13. TNFR1-dependent cell death drives inflammation in Sharpin-deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, James A; Anderton, Holly; Etemadi, Nima; Nachbur, Ueli; Darding, Maurice; Peltzer, Nieves; Lalaoui, Najoua; Lawlor, Kate E; Vanyai, Hannah; Hall, Cathrine; Bankovacki, Aleks; Gangoda, Lahiru; Wong, Wendy Wei-Lynn; Corbin, Jason; Huang, Chunzi; Mocarski, Edward S; Murphy, James M; Alexander, Warren S; Voss, Anne K; Vaux, David L; Kaiser, William J; Walczak, Henning; Silke, John

    2014-01-01

    SHARPIN regulates immune signaling and contributes to full transcriptional activity and prevention of cell death in response to TNF in vitro. The inactivating mouse Sharpin cpdm mutation causes TNF-dependent multi-organ inflammation, characterized by dermatitis, liver inflammation, splenomegaly, and loss of Peyer's patches. TNF-dependent cell death has been proposed to cause the inflammatory phenotype and consistent with this we show Tnfr1, but not Tnfr2, deficiency suppresses the phenotype (and it does so more efficiently than Il1r1 loss). TNFR1-induced apoptosis can proceed through caspase-8 and BID, but reduction in or loss of these players generally did not suppress inflammation, although Casp8 heterozygosity significantly delayed dermatitis. Ripk3 or Mlkl deficiency partially ameliorated the multi-organ phenotype, and combined Ripk3 deletion and Casp8 heterozygosity almost completely suppressed it, even restoring Peyer's patches. Unexpectedly, Sharpin, Ripk3 and Casp8 triple deficiency caused perinatal lethality. These results provide unexpected insights into the developmental importance of SHARPIN. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03464.001 PMID:25443632

  14. Butein Inhibits Angiogenesis of Human Endothelial Progenitor Cells via the Translation Dependent Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Hu Chung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Compelling evidence indicates that bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs can contribute to postnatal neovascularization and tumor angiogenesis. EPCs have been shown to play a “catalytic” role in metastatic progression by mediating the angiogenic switch. Understanding the pharmacological functions and molecular targets of natural products is critical for drug development. Butein, a natural chalcone derivative, has been reported to exert potent anticancer activity. However, the antiangiogenic activity of butein has not been addressed. In this study, we found that butein inhibited serum- and vascular endothelial growth factor- (VEGF- induced cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation of human EPCs in a concentration dependent manner without cytotoxic effect. Furthermore, butein markedly abrogated VEGF-induced vessels sprouting from aortic rings and suppressed microvessel formation in the Matrigel implant assay in vivo. In addition, butein concentration-dependently repressed the phosphorylation of Akt, mTOR, and the major downstream effectors, p70S6K, 4E-BP1, and eIF4E in EPCs. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that butein exhibits the antiangiogenic effect both in vitro and in vivo by targeting the translational machinery. Butein is a promising angiogenesis inhibitor with the potential for treatment of cancer and other angiogenesis-related diseases.

  15. Cell cycle-dependent SUMO-1 conjugation to nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jae Sung; Kim, Ha Na; Kim, Sun-Jick; Bang, Jiyoung; Kim, Eun-A; Sung, Ki Sa; Yoon, Hyun-Joo; Yoo, Hae Yong; Choi, Cheol Yong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •NuMA is modified by SUMO-1 in a cell cycle-dependent manner. •NuMA lysine 1766 is the primary target site for SUMOylation. •SUMOylation-deficient NuMA induces multiple spindle poles during mitosis. •SUMOylated NuMA induces microtubule bundling. -- Abstract: Covalent conjugation of proteins with small ubiquitin-like modifier 1 (SUMO-1) plays a critical role in a variety of cellular functions including cell cycle control, replication, and transcriptional regulation. Nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA) localizes to spindle poles during mitosis, and is an essential component in the formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles. Here we show that NuMA is a target for covalent conjugation to SUMO-1. We find that the lysine 1766 residue is the primary NuMA acceptor site for SUMO-1 conjugation. Interestingly, SUMO modification of endogenous NuMA occurs at the entry into mitosis and this modification is reversed after exiting from mitosis. Knockdown of Ubc9 or forced expression of SENP1 results in impairment of the localization of NuMA to mitotic spindle poles during mitosis. The SUMOylation-deficient NuMA mutant is defective in microtubule bundling, and multiple spindles are induced during mitosis. The mitosis-dependent dynamic SUMO-1 modification of NuMA might contribute to NuMA-mediated formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles during mitosis

  16. Cell cycle-dependent SUMO-1 conjugation to nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jae Sung; Kim, Ha Na; Kim, Sun-Jick; Bang, Jiyoung; Kim, Eun-A; Sung, Ki Sa [Department of Biological Sciences, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Hyun-Joo [TissueGene Inc. 9605 Medical Center Dr., Rockville, MD 20850 (United States); Yoo, Hae Yong [Department of Health Sciences and Technology, Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Cheol Yong, E-mail: choicy@skku.ac.kr [Department of Biological Sciences, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •NuMA is modified by SUMO-1 in a cell cycle-dependent manner. •NuMA lysine 1766 is the primary target site for SUMOylation. •SUMOylation-deficient NuMA induces multiple spindle poles during mitosis. •SUMOylated NuMA induces microtubule bundling. -- Abstract: Covalent conjugation of proteins with small ubiquitin-like modifier 1 (SUMO-1) plays a critical role in a variety of cellular functions including cell cycle control, replication, and transcriptional regulation. Nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA) localizes to spindle poles during mitosis, and is an essential component in the formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles. Here we show that NuMA is a target for covalent conjugation to SUMO-1. We find that the lysine 1766 residue is the primary NuMA acceptor site for SUMO-1 conjugation. Interestingly, SUMO modification of endogenous NuMA occurs at the entry into mitosis and this modification is reversed after exiting from mitosis. Knockdown of Ubc9 or forced expression of SENP1 results in impairment of the localization of NuMA to mitotic spindle poles during mitosis. The SUMOylation-deficient NuMA mutant is defective in microtubule bundling, and multiple spindles are induced during mitosis. The mitosis-dependent dynamic SUMO-1 modification of NuMA might contribute to NuMA-mediated formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles during mitosis.

  17. Intrinsic tolerance in autologous collagen-induced arthritis is generated by CD152-dependent CD4+ suppressor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treschow, Alexandra P; Bäcklund, Johan; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2005-01-01

    . We found that expression of heterologous rat CII sequence in the cartilage of mice positively selects autoreactive CD4(+) T cells with suppressive capacity. Although CD4(+)CD25(+) cells did not play a prominent role in this suppression, CD152-expressing T cells played a crucial role in this tolerance....... MMC CD4(+) T cells were able to suppress proliferation of wild-type cells in vitro where this suppression required cell-to-cell contact. The suppressive capability of MMC cells was also demonstrated in vivo, as transfer of such cells into wild-type arthritis susceptible mice delayed arthritis onset....... This study also determined that both tolerance and disease resistance were CD152-dependent as demonstrated by Ab treatment experiments. These findings could have relevance for RA because the transgenic mice used express the same CII epitope in cartilage as humans and because autoreactive T cells, specific...

  18. Rosiglitazone inhibits HMC-1 cell migration and adhesion through a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guqin; Yang, Jiong; Li, Ping; Cao, Jie; Nie, Hanxiang

    2014-02-01

    Mast cells play an important role in a variety of inflammatory diseases, particularly asthma and atopy. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a member of the large nuclear hormone receptor transcription factor superfamily, and has been recently implicated in the anti-inflammatory response. To investigate a possible role for PPARγ in human mast cells, we studied the effects of a PPARγ ligand, rosiglitazone (RG), on stem cell factor (SCF)-induced migration and fibronectin-induced adhesion in human mast cell-1(HMC-1) cells. It was found that HMC-1 cells expressed PPARγ mRNA. RG inhibited SCF-induced HMC-1 cell migration and fibronectin-induced HMC-1 cell adhesion, the selective PPARγ antagonist GW9662 prevented the inhibitory effect of RG on HMC-1 cells. In conclusion, RG inhibits the migration and adhesion of HMC-1 cells by a PPARγ-dependent mechanism.

  19. Virulence-Dependent Alterations in the Kinetics of Immune Cells during Pulmonary Infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seung Jung; Kim, HongMin; Kwon, Kee Woong; Kim, So Jeong; Eum, Seok-Yong; Cho, Sang-Nae; Shin, Sung Jae

    2015-01-01

    A better understanding of the kinetics of accumulated immune cells that are involved in pathophysiology during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection may help to facilitate the development of vaccines and immunological interventions. However, the kinetics of innate and adaptive cells that are associated with pathogenesis during Mtb infection and their relationship to Mtb virulence are not clearly understood. In this study, we used a mouse model to compare the bacterial burden, inflammation and kinetics of immune cells during aerogenic infection in the lung between laboratory-adapted strains (Mtb H37Rv and H37Ra) and Mtb K strain, a hyper-virulent W-Beijing lineage strain. The Mtb K strain multiplied more than 10- and 3.54-fold more rapidly than H37Ra and H37Rv, respectively, during the early stage of infection (at 28 days post-infection) and resulted in exacerbated lung pathology at 56 to 112 days post-infection. Similar numbers of innate immune cells had infiltrated, regardless of the strain, by 14 days post-infection. High, time-dependent frequencies of F4/80-CD11c+CD11b-Siglec-H+PDCA-1+ plasmacytoid DCs and CD11c-CD11b+Gr-1int cells were observed in the lungs of mice that were infected with the Mtb K strain. Regarding adaptive immunity, Th1 and Th17 T cells that express T-bet and RORγt, respectively, significantly increased in the lungs that were infected with the laboratory-adapted strains, and the population of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells was remarkably increased at 112 days post-infection in the lungs of mice that were infected with the K strain. Collectively, our findings indicate that the highly virulent Mtb K strain may trigger the accumulation of pDCs and Gr1intCD11b+ cells with the concomitant down-regulation of the Th1 response and the maintenance of an up-regulated Th2 response without inducing a Th17 response during chronic infection. These results will help to determine which immune system components must be considered for the development

  20. CD40L induces multidrug resistance to apoptosis in breast carcinoma and lymphoma cells through caspase independent and dependent pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voorzanger-Rousselot, Nathalie; Alberti, Laurent; Blay, Jean-Yves

    2006-01-01

    CD40L was found to reduce doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines through caspase-3 dependent mechanism. Whether this represents a general mechanism for other tumor types is unknown. The resistance induced by CD40L against apoptosis induced by a panel of cytotoxic chemotherapeutic drugs in non Hodgkin's lymphoma and breast carcinoma cell lines was investigated. Doxorubicin, cisplatyl, etoposide, vinblastin and paclitaxel increased apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in breast carcinoma as well as in non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines. Co-culture with irradiated L cells expressing CD40L significantly reduced the percentage of apoptotic cells in breast carcinoma and non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines treated with these drugs. In breast carcinoma cell lines, these 5 drugs induced an inconsistent increase of caspase-3/7 activity, while in non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines all 5 drugs increased caspase-3/7 activity up to 28-fold above baseline. Co-culture with CD40L L cells reduced (-39% to -89%) the activation of caspase-3/7 induced by these agents in all 5 non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines, but in none of the 2 breast carcinoma cell lines. Co culture with CD40L L cells also blocked the apoptosis induced by exogenous ceramides in breast carcinoma and non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines through a caspase-3-like, 8-like and 9-like dependent pathways. These results indicate that CD40L expressed on adjacent non tumoral cells induces multidrug resistance to cytotoxic agents and ceramides in both breast carcinoma and non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines, albeit through a caspase independent and dependent pathway respectively

  1. ECM-dependent HIF induction directs trophoblast stem cell fate via LIMK1-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangement.

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    Hwa J Choi

    Full Text Available The Hypoxia-inducible Factor (HIF family of transcriptional regulators coordinates the expression of dozens of genes in response to oxygen deprivation. Mammalian development occurs in a hypoxic environment and HIF-null mice therefore die in utero due to multiple embryonic and placental defects. Mouse embryonic stem cells do not differentiate into placental cells; therefore, trophoblast stem cells (TSCs are used to study mouse placental development. Consistent with a requirement for HIF activity during placental development in utero, TSCs derived from HIF-null mice exhibit severe differentiation defects and fail to form trophoblast giant cells (TGCs in vitro. Interestingly, differentiating TSCs induce HIF activity independent of oxygen tension via unclear mechanisms. Here, we show that altering the extracellular matrix (ECM composition upon which TSCs are cultured changes their differentiation potential from TGCs to multinucleated syncytiotropholasts (SynTs and blocks oxygen-independent HIF induction. We further find that modulation of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Kinase-1/2 (MAP2K1/2, MEK-1/2 signaling by ECM composition is responsible for this effect. In the absence of ECM-dependent cues, hypoxia-signaling pathways activate this MAPK cascade to drive HIF induction and redirect TSC fate along the TGC lineage. In addition, we show that integrity of the microtubule and actin cytoskeleton is critical for TGC fate determination. HIF-2α ensures TSC cytoskeletal integrity and promotes invasive TGC formation by interacting with c-MYC to induce non-canonical expression of Lim domain kinase 1-an enzyme that regulates microtubule and actin stability, as well as cell invasion. Thus, we find that HIF can integrate positional and metabolic cues from within the TSC niche to regulate placental development by modulating the cellular cytoskeleton via non-canonical gene expression.

  2. Common elements in interleukin 4 and insulin signaling pathways in factor-dependent hematopoietic cells.

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    Wang, L M; Keegan, A D; Li, W; Lienhard, G E; Pacini, S; Gutkind, J S; Myers, M G; Sun, X J; White, M F; Aaronson, S A

    1993-05-01

    Interleukin 4 (IL-4), insulin, and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) efficiently induced DNA synthesis in the IL-3-dependent murine myeloid cell lines FDC-P1 and FDC-P2. Although these factors could not individually sustain long-term growth of these lines, a combination of IL-4 with either insulin or IGF-I did support continuous growth. The principal tyrosine-phosphorylated substrate observed in FDC cells stimulated with IL-4, previously designated 4PS, was of the same size (170 kDa) as the major substrate phosphorylated in response to insulin or IGF-I. These substrates had phosphopeptides of the same size when analyzed by digestion with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, and each tightly associated with the 85-kDa component of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase after factor stimulation. IRS-1, the principal substrate phosphorylated in response to insulin or IGF-I stimulation in nonhematopoietic cells, is similar in size to 4PS. However, anti-IRS-1 antibodies failed to efficiently precipitate 4PS, and some phosphopeptides generated by V8 protease digestion of IRS-1 were distinct in size from the phosphopeptides of 4PS. Nevertheless, IL-4, insulin, and IGF-I were capable of stimulating tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 in FDC cells that expressed this substrate as a result of transfection. These findings indicate that (i) IL-4, insulin, and IGF-I use signal transduction pathways in FDC lines that have at least one major feature in common, the rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of 4PS, and (ii) insulin and IGF-I stimulation of hematopoietic cell lines leads to the phosphorylation of a substrate that may be related to but is not identical to IRS-1.

  3. Dimethylfumarate attenuates restenosis after acute vascular injury by cell-specific and Nrf2-dependent mechanisms

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    Chang Joo Oh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs and incomplete re-endothelialization is a major clinical problem limiting the long-term efficacy of percutaneous coronary angioplasty. We tested if dimethylfumarate (DMF, an anti-psoriasis drug, could inhibit abnormal vascular remodeling via NF−E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2-NAD(PH quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1 activity. DMF significantly attenuated neointimal hyperplasia induced by balloon injury in rat carotid arteries via suppression of the G1 to S phase transition resulting from induction of p21 protein in VSMCs. Initially, DMF increased p21 protein stability through an enhancement in Nrf2 activity without an increase in p21 mRNA. Later on, DMF stimulated p21 mRNA expression through a process dependent on p53 activity. However, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 or NQO1 activity, well-known target genes induced by Nrf2, were dispensable for the DMF induction of p21 protein and the effect on the VSMC proliferation. Likewise, DMF protected endothelial cells from TNF-α-induced apoptosis and the dysfunction characterized by decreased eNOS expression. With knock-down of Nrf2 or NQO1, DMF failed to prevent TNF-α-induced cell apoptosis and decreased eNOS expression. Also, CD31 expression, an endothelial specific marker, was restored in vivo by DMF. In conclusion, DMF prevented abnormal proliferation in VSMCs by G1 cell cycle arrest via p21 upregulation driven by Nrf2 and p53 activity, and had a beneficial effect on TNF-α-induced apoptosis and dysfunction in endothelial cells through Nrf2–NQO1 activity suggesting that DMF might be a therapeutic drug for patients with vascular disease.

  4. Runx-dependent expression of PKC is critical for cell survival in the sea urchin embryo

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    McCarthy John J

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Runx transcription factors play critical roles in the developmental control of cell fate and contribute variously as oncoproteins and tumor suppressors to leukemia and other cancers. To discover fundamental Runx functions in the cell biology of animal development, we have employed morpholino antisense-mediated knockdown of the sea urchin Runx protein SpRunt-1. Previously we showed that embryos depleted of SpRunt-1 arrest development at early gastrula stage and underexpress the conventional protein kinase C SpPKC1. Results We report here that SpRunt-1 deficiency leads to ectopic cell proliferation and extensive apoptosis. Suppression of the apoptosis by pharmacological inhibition of caspase-3 prevents the ectopic proliferation and rescues gastrulation, indicating that many of the overt defects obtained by knockdown of SpRunt-1 are secondary to the apoptosis. Inhibition or knockdown of SpPKC1 also causes apoptosis, while cell survival is rescued in SpRunt-1 morphant embryos coinjected with SpPKC1 mRNA, suggesting that the apoptosis associated with SpRunt-1 deficiency is caused by the deficit in SpPKC1 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation indicates that SpRunt-1 interacts physically with SpPKC1 in vivo, and cis-regulatory analysis shows that this interaction activates SpPKC1 transcription. Conclusions Our results show that Runx-dependent activation of SpPKC1 is essential for maintaining protein kinase C activity at levels conducive to cell survival during embryogenesis.

  5. Nitric Oxide Mediates Activity-Dependent Plasticity of Retinal Bipolar Cell Output via S-Nitrosylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooker, Ryan E.; Lipin, Mikhail Y.; Leuranguer, Valerie; Rozsa, Eva; Bramley, Jayne R.; Harding, Jacqueline L.; Reynolds, Melissa M.

    2013-01-01

    Coding a wide range of light intensities in natural scenes poses a challenge for the retina: adaptation to bright light should not compromise sensitivity to dim light. Here we report a novel form of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity, specifically, a “weighted potentiation” that selectively increases output of Mb-type bipolar cells in the goldfish retina in response to weak inputs but leaves the input–output ratio for strong stimuli unaffected. In retinal slice preparation, strong depolarization of bipolar terminals significantly lowered the threshold for calcium spike initiation, which originated from a shift in activation of voltage-gated calcium currents (ICa) to more negative potentials. The process depended upon glutamate-evoked retrograde nitric oxide (NO) signaling as it was eliminated by pretreatment with an NO synthase blocker, TRIM. The NO-dependent ICa modulation was cGMP independent but could be blocked by N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), indicating that NO acted via an S-nitrosylation mechanism. Importantly, the NO action resulted in a weighted potentiation of Mb output in response to small (≤−30 mV) depolarizations. Coincidentally, light flashes with intensity ≥2.4 × 108 photons/cm2/s lowered the latency of scotopic (≤2.4 × 108 photons/cm2/s) light-evoked calcium spikes in Mb axon terminals in an NEM-sensitive manner, but light responses above cone threshold (≥3.5 × 109 photons/cm2/s) were unaltered. Under bright scotopic/mesopic conditions, this novel form of Mb output potentiation selectively amplifies dim retinal inputs at Mb → ganglion cell synapses. We propose that this process might counteract decreases in retinal sensitivity during light adaptation by preventing the loss of visual information carried by dim scotopic signals. PMID:24305814

  6. Shape-dependent regulation of proliferation in normal and malignant human cells and its alteration by interferon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulesh, D.A.; Greene, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between cell morphology, proliferation, and contact inhibition was studied in normal and malignant human cells which varied in their sensitivity to contact inhibition. Their ability to proliferate was examined under conditions where the cells were constrained into different shapes by plating onto plastic surfaces coated with poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate). Poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) can precisely vary the shape of cells without toxicity. Cell proliferation was quantitated by cell counts and labeling indices were determined by autoradiography. The normal JHU-1 foreskin fibroblasts and IMR-90 lung fibroblasts exhibited contact-inhibited growth with a saturation density of 2.9 X 10(5) and 2.0 X 10(5) cells/cm2, respectively. These cells also exhibited stringent dependency on cell shape with a mitotic index of less than 3% at poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) concentrations at which the cells were rounded versus a labeling index of 75-90% when the cells were flat. The malignant bladder carcinoma line RT-4 exhibited partial contact-inhibited growth. Its dependency on cell shape was less stringent than that of normal cells with a mitotic index of 37-40% when rounded and 79% when flat. The malignant fibrosarcoma line, HT1080, was not contact inhibited and was entirely shape independent with a mitotic index of 70-90% regardless of cell shape. Treatment of HT1080 cells with low concentration of human fibroblast interferon (less than 40 units/ml) restored shape-dependent proliferation while having little effect on normal cells. Subantiproliferative doses of interferon were also shown to restore contact-inhibited proliferation control to malignant cells previously lacking it

  7. Specification and spatial arrangement of cells in the germline stem cell niche of the Drosophila ovary depend on the Maf transcription factor Traffic jam.

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    Panchal, Trupti; Chen, Xi; Alchits, Ekaterina; Oh, Youjin; Poon, James; Kouptsova, Jane; Laski, Frank A; Godt, Dorothea

    2017-05-01

    Germline stem cells in the Drosophila ovary are maintained by a somatic niche. The niche is structurally and functionally complex and contains four cell types, the escort, cap, and terminal filament cells and the newly identified transition cell. We find that the large Maf transcription factor Traffic jam (Tj) is essential for determining niche cell fates and architecture, enabling each niche in the ovary to support a normal complement of 2-3 germline stem cells. In particular, we focused on the question of how cap cells form. Cap cells express Tj and are considered the key component of a mature germline stem cell niche. We conclude that Tj controls the specification of cap cells, as the complete loss of Tj function caused the development of additional terminal filament cells at the expense of cap cells, and terminal filament cells developed cap cell characteristics when induced to express Tj. Further, we propose that Tj controls the morphogenetic behavior of cap cells as they adopted the shape and spatial organization of terminal filament cells but otherwise appeared to retain their fate when Tj expression was only partially reduced. Our data indicate that Tj contributes to the establishment of germline stem cells by promoting the cap cell fate, and controls the stem cell-carrying capacity of the niche by regulating niche architecture. Analysis of the interactions between Tj and the Notch (N) pathway indicates that Tj and N have distinct functions in the cap cell specification program. We propose that formation of cap cells depends on the combined activities of Tj and the N pathway, with Tj promoting the cap cell fate by blocking the terminal filament cell fate, and N supporting cap cells by preventing the escort cell fate and/or controlling the number of cap cell precursors.

  8. Specification and spatial arrangement of cells in the germline stem cell niche of the Drosophila ovary depend on the Maf transcription factor Traffic jam.

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    Trupti Panchal

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Germline stem cells in the Drosophila ovary are maintained by a somatic niche. The niche is structurally and functionally complex and contains four cell types, the escort, cap, and terminal filament cells and the newly identified transition cell. We find that the large Maf transcription factor Traffic jam (Tj is essential for determining niche cell fates and architecture, enabling each niche in the ovary to support a normal complement of 2-3 germline stem cells. In particular, we focused on the question of how cap cells form. Cap cells express Tj and are considered the key component of a mature germline stem cell niche. We conclude that Tj controls the specification of cap cells, as the complete loss of Tj function caused the development of additional terminal filament cells at the expense of cap cells, and terminal filament cells developed cap cell characteristics when induced to express Tj. Further, we propose that Tj controls the morphogenetic behavior of cap cells as they adopted the shape and spatial organization of terminal filament cells but otherwise appeared to retain their fate when Tj expression was only partially reduced. Our data indicate that Tj contributes to the establishment of germline stem cells by promoting the cap cell fate, and controls the stem cell-carrying capacity of the niche by regulating niche architecture. Analysis of the interactions between Tj and the Notch (N pathway indicates that Tj and N have distinct functions in the cap cell specification program. We propose that formation of cap cells depends on the combined activities of Tj and the N pathway, with Tj promoting the cap cell fate by blocking the terminal filament cell fate, and N supporting cap cells by preventing the escort cell fate and/or controlling the number of cap cell precursors.

  9. Vasomotion dynamics following calcium spiking depend on both cell signalling and limited constriction velocity in rat mesenteric small arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanBavel, Ed; van der Meulen, Esther T.; Spaan, Jos A. E.

    2008-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell contraction depends on intracellular calcium. However, calcium-contraction coupling involves a complex array of intracellular processes. Quantitating the dynamical relation between calcium perturbations and resulting changes in tone may help identifying these processes.

  10. Coronavirus cell entry occurs through the endo-/lysosomal pathway in a proteolysis-dependent manner.

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    Christine Burkard

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Enveloped viruses need to fuse with a host cell membrane in order to deliver their genome into the host cell. While some viruses fuse with the plasma membrane, many viruses are endocytosed prior to fusion. Specific cues in the endosomal microenvironment induce conformational changes in the viral fusion proteins leading to viral and host membrane fusion. In the present study we investigated the entry of coronaviruses (CoVs. Using siRNA gene silencing, we found that proteins known to be important for late endosomal maturation and endosome-