WorldWideScience

Sample records for next-to-next-to-leading order evolution

  1. Higgs production at next-to-next-to-leading order

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Ravindran; J Smith; W L Van Neerven

    2004-03-01

    We describe the calculation of inclusive Higgs boson production at hadronic colliders at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in perturbative quantum chromodynamics. We have used the technique developed in ref. [4]. Our results agree with those published earlier in the literature.

  2. Fragmentation Functions at Next-to-Next-to-Leading Order Accuracy

    CERN Document Server

    Anderle, Daniele P; Stratmann, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We present a first analysis of parton-to-pion fragmentation functions at next-to-next-to-leading order accuracy in QCD based on single-inclusive pion production in electron-positron annihilation. Special emphasis is put on the technical details necessary to perform the QCD scale evolution and cross section calculation in Mellin moment space. We demonstrate how the description of the data and the theoretical uncertainties are improved when next-to-next-to-leading order QCD corrections are included.

  3. Top-quark decay at next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jun; Li, Chong Sheng; Zhu, Hua Xing

    2013-01-25

    We present the complete calculation of the top-quark decay width at next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD, including next-to-leading electroweak corrections as well as finite bottom quark mass and W boson width effects. In particular, we also show the first results of the fully differential decay rates for the top-quark semileptonic decay t → W(+)(l(+)ν)b at next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD. Our method is based on the understanding of the invariant mass distribution of the final-state jet in the singular limit from effective field theory. Our result can be used to study arbitrary infrared-safe observables of top-quark decay with the highest perturbative accuracy.

  4. Nuclear and partonic dynamics in the EMC effect at Next-to-Next-to-Leading order

    CERN Document Server

    Tehrani, S Atashbar

    2014-01-01

    We study in details the parameterizations of the nuclear parton distributions at the next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) of $\\alpha_s$. In low $x$ and $Q_0^2$, we observe negative gluon distribution at this order which signals the saturation condition or the quark-gluon plasma condition. Our study also shows the gluon distribution at (NNLO) is less than next-to-leading order (NLO) of $\\alpha_s$, and the sea quark distribution at (NNLO) is larger than (NLO).

  5. Hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment to next-to-next-to-leading order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurz, Alexander [Institut für Theoretische Teilchenphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Liu, Tao [Institut für Theoretische Teilchenphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Marquard, Peter [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Steinhauser, Matthias [Institut für Theoretische Teilchenphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2014-06-27

    We compute the next-to-next-to-leading order hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment originating from the photon vacuum polarization. The corresponding three-loop kernel functions are calculated using asymptotic expansion techniques which lead to analytic expressions. Our final result, a{sub μ}{sup had,NNLO}=1.24±0.01×10{sup −10}, has the same order of magnitude as the current uncertainty of the leading order hadronic contribution and should thus be included in future analyses.

  6. Hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment to next-to-next-to-leading order

    CERN Document Server

    Kurz, Alexander; Marquard, Peter; Steinhauser, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    We compute the next-to-next-to-leading order hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment originating from the photon vacuum polarization. The corresponding three-loop kernel functions are calculated using asymptotic expansion techniques which lead to analytic expressions. Our final result, $a_\\mu^{\\rm had,NNLO} = 1.24 \\pm 0.01 \\times 10^{-10}$, has the same order of magnitude as the current uncertainty of the leading order hadronic contribution and should thus be included in future analyses.

  7. Hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment to next-to-next-to-leading order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurz, Alexander [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Liu, Tao; Steinhauser, Matthias [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik; Marquard, Peter [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    We compute the next-to-next-to-leading order hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment originating from the photon vacuum polarization. The corresponding three-loop kernel functions are calculated using asymptotic expansion techniques which lead to analytic expressions. Our final result, a{sup had,NNLO}{sub μ} = 1.24 ± 0.01 x 10{sup -10}, has the same order of magnitude as the current uncertainty of the leading order hadronic contribution and should thus be included in future analyses.

  8. Towards semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering at next-to-next-to-leading order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderle, Daniele; de Florian, Daniel; Rotstein Habarnau, Yamila

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we compute the first set of O (αs2) corrections to semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering structure functions. We start by studying the impact of the contribution of the partonic subprocesses that open at this order for the longitudinal structure function. We perform the full calculation analytically, and obtain the expression of the factorized cross section at this order. Special care is given to the study of their flavor decomposition structure. We analyze the phenomenological effect of the corrections finding that, even though expected to be small a priori, it turns out to be sizable with respect to the previous order known, calling for a full next-to-next-to-leading order calculation.

  9. Fully Differential Vector-Boson-Fusion Higgs Production at Next-to-Next-to-Leading Order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciari, Matteo; Dreyer, Frédéric A; Karlberg, Alexander; Salam, Gavin P; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2015-08-21

    We calculate the fully differential next-to-next-to-leading-order (NNLO) corrections to vector-boson fusion (VBF) Higgs boson production at proton colliders, in the limit in which there is no cross talk between the hadronic systems associated with the two protons. We achieve this using a new "projection-to-Born" method that combines an inclusive NNLO calculation in the structure-function approach and a suitably factorized next-to-leading-order VBF Higgs plus three-jet calculation, using appropriate Higgs plus two-parton counterevents. An earlier calculation of the fully inclusive cross section had found small NNLO corrections, at the 1% level. In contrast, the cross section after typical experimental VBF cuts receives NNLO contributions of about (5-6)%, while differential distributions show corrections of up to (10-12)% for some standard observables. The corrections are often outside the next-to-leading-order scale-uncertainty band.

  10. Triton charge radius to next-to-next-to-leading order in pionless effective field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanasse, Jared

    2017-02-01

    The triton point charge radius is calculated to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in pionless effective field theory ( EFT (π / )) , yielding a prediction of 1.14 ±0.19 fm (leading order), 1.59 ±0.08 fm (next-to leading order), and 1.62 ±0.03 fm (NNLO) in agreement with the current experimental extraction of 1.5978 ±0.040 fm [Angeli and Marinova, At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 99, 69 (2013)], 10.1016/j.adt.2011.12.006. The error at NNLO is due to cutoff variation (˜1 % ) within a reasonable range of calculated cutoffs and from a EFT (π / ) error estimate (˜1.5 % ). In addition new techniques are introduced to add perturbative corrections to bound- and scattering state calculations for short-range effective field theories, but with a focus on their use in EFT (π / ) .

  11. W+ W- production at hadron colliders in next to next to leading order QCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrmann, T; Grazzini, M; Kallweit, S; Maierhöfer, P; von Manteuffel, A; Pozzorini, S; Rathlev, D; Tancredi, L

    2014-11-21

    Charged gauge boson pair production at the Large Hadron Collider allows detailed probes of the fundamental structure of electroweak interactions. We present precise theoretical predictions for on-shell W+ W- production that include, for the first time, QCD effects up to next to next to leading order in perturbation theory. As compared to next to leading order, the inclusive W+ W- cross section is enhanced by 9% at 7 TeV and 12% at 14 TeV. The residual perturbative uncertainty is at the 3% level. The severe contamination of the W+ W- cross section due to top-quark resonances is discussed in detail. Comparing different definitions of top-free W+ W- production in the four and five flavor number schemes, we demonstrate that top-quark resonances can be separated from the inclusive W+ W- cross section without a significant loss of theoretical precision.

  12. The epsilon expansion at next-to-next-to-leading order with small imaginary chemical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Lehner, Christoph; Wettig, Tilo

    2010-01-01

    We discuss chiral perturbation theory for two and three quark flavors in the epsilon expansion at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) including a small imaginary chemical potential. We calculate finite-volume corrections to the low-energy constants $\\Sigma$ and $F$ and determine the non-universal modifications of the theory, i.e., modifications that cannot be mapped to random matrix theory (RMT). In the special case of two quark flavors in an asymmetric box we discuss how to minimize the finite-volume corrections and non-universal modifications by an optimal choice of the lattice geometry. Furthermore we provide a detailed calculation of a special version of the massless sunset diagram at finite volume.

  13. On top-pair hadro-production at next-to-next-to-leading order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moch, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Uwer, P. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Vogt, A. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mathematical Sciences

    2012-03-15

    We study the QCD corrections at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) to the cross section for the hadronic pair-production of top quarks. We present new results in the high-energy limit using the well-known framework of k{sub t}-factorization. We combine these findings with the known threshold corrections and present improved approximate NNLO results over the full kinematic range. This approach is employed to quantify the residual theoretical uncertainty of the approximate NNLO results which amounts to about 4% for the Tevatron and 5% for the LHC cross-section predictions. Our analytic results in the high-energy limit will provide an important check on future computations of the complete NNLO cross sections.

  14. Transverse parton distribution functions at next-to-next-to-leading order: the quark-to-quark case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrmann, Thomas; Lübbert, Thomas; Yang, Li Lin

    2012-12-14

    We present a calculation of the perturbative quark-to-quark transverse parton distribution function at next-to-next-to-leading order based on a gauge invariant operator definition. We demonstrate for the first time that such a definition works beyond the first nontrivial order. We extract from our calculation the coefficient functions relevant for a next-to-next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic Q(T) resummation in a large class of processes at hadron colliders.

  15. Differential Higgs boson pair production at next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florian, Daniel de; Mazzitelli, Javier [UNSAM, Campus Miguelete, Buenos Aires (Argentina). International Center for Advanced Studies (ICAS); Grazzini, Massimiliano; Hanga, Catalin; Lindert, Jonas M. [Zuerich Univ. (Switzerland). Physik-Inst.; Kallweit, Stefan [Mainz Univ. (Germany). PRISMA Cluster of Excellence; Maierhoefer, Philipp [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Rathlev, Dirk [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group

    2016-06-15

    We report on the first fully differential calculation for double Higgs boson production through gluon fusion in hadron collisions up to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in QCD perturbation theory. The calculation is performed in the heavy-top limit of the Standard Model, and in the phenomenological results we focus on pp collisions at √(s)=14 TeV. We present differential distributions through NNLO for various observables including the transverse-momentum and rapidity distributions of the two Higgs bosons. NNLO corrections are at the level of 10%-25% with respect to the next-to-leading order (NLO) prediction with a residual scale uncertainty of 5%-15% and an overall mild phase-space dependence. Only at NNLO the perturbative expansion starts to converge yielding overlapping scale uncertainty bands between NNLO and NLO in most of the phase-space. The calculation includes NLO predictions for pp→HH+jet+X. Corrections to the corresponding distributions exceed 50% with a residual scale dependence of 20%-30%.

  16. Differential Higgs Boson Pair Production at Next-to-Next-to-Leading Order in QCD

    CERN Document Server

    de Florian, Daniel; Hanga, Catalin; Kallweit, Stefan; Lindert, Jonas M; Maierhöfer, Philipp; Mazzitelli, Javier; Rathlev, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    We report on the first fully differential calculation for double Higgs boson production through gluon fusion in hadron collisions up to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in QCD perturbation theory. The calculation is performed in the heavy-top limit of the Standard Model, and in the phenomenological results we focus on pp collisions at 14 TeV. We present differential distributions through NNLO for various observables including the transverse-momentum and rapidity distributions of the two Higgs bosons. NNLO corrections are at the level of 10%-25% with respect to the next-to-leading order (NLO) prediction with a residual scale uncertainty of 5%-15% and an overall mild phase-space dependence. Only at NNLO the perturbative expansion starts to converge yielding overlapping scale uncertainty bands between NNLO and NLO in most of the phase-space. The calculation includes NLO predictions for pp -> HH+jet+X. Corrections to the corresponding distributions exceed 50% with a residual scale dependence of 20%-30%.

  17. Differential Higgs boson pair production at next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Florian, Daniel; Grazzini, Massimiliano; Hanga, Catalin; Kallweit, Stefan; Lindert, Jonas M.; Maierhöfer, Philipp; Mazzitelli, Javier; Rathlev, Dirk

    2016-09-01

    We report on the first fully differential calculation for double Higgs boson production through gluon fusion in hadron collisions up to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in QCD perturbation theory. The calculation is performed in the heavy-top limit of the Standard Model, and in the phenomenological results we focus on pp collisions at √{s}=14 TeV. We present differential distributions through NNLO for various observables including the transverse-momentum and rapidity distributions of the two Higgs bosons. NNLO corrections are at the level of 10%-25% with respect to the next-to-leading order (NLO) prediction with a residual scale uncertainty of 5%-15% and an overall mild phase-space dependence. Only at NNLO the perturbative expansion starts to converge yielding overlapping scale uncertainty bands between NNLO and NLO in most of the phase-space. The calculation includes NLO predictions for pp → HH + jet + X. Corrections to the corresponding distributions exceed 50% with a residual scale dependence of 20%-30%.

  18. Charm-Quark Production in Deep-Inelastic Neutrino Scattering at Next-to-Next-to-Leading Order in QCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Edmond L; Gao, Jun; Li, Chong Sheng; Liu, Ze Long; Zhu, Hua Xing

    2016-05-27

    We present a fully differential next-to-next-to-leading order calculation of charm-quark production in charged-current deep-inelastic scattering, with full charm-quark mass dependence. The next-to-next-to-leading order corrections in perturbative quantum chromodynamics are found to be comparable in size to the next-to-leading order corrections in certain kinematic regions. We compare our predictions with data on dimuon production in (anti)neutrino scattering from a heavy nucleus. Our results can be used to improve the extraction of the parton distribution function of a strange quark in the nucleon.

  19. Charm-Quark Production in Deep-Inelastic Neutrino Scattering at Next-to-Next-to-Leading Order in QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Edmond L.; Gao, Jun; Li, Chong Sheng; Liu, Ze Long; Zhu, Hua Xing

    2016-05-01

    We present a fully differential next-to-next-to-leading order calculation of charm-quark production in charged-current deep-inelastic scattering, with full charm-quark mass dependence. The next-to-next-to-leading order corrections in perturbative quantum chromodynamics are found to be comparable in size to the next-to-leading order corrections in certain kinematic regions. We compare our predictions with data on dimuon production in (anti)neutrino scattering from a heavy nucleus. Our results can be used to improve the extraction of the parton distribution function of a strange quark in the nucleon.

  20. Top quark forward-backward asymmetry in e+ e- annihilation at next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jun; Zhu, Hua Xing

    2014-12-31

    We report on a complete calculation of electroweak production of top-quark pairs in e+ e- annihilation at next-to-next-to-leading order in quantum chromodynamics. Our setup is fully differential in phase space and can be used to calculate any infrared-safe observable. Especially we calculated the next-to-next-to-leading-order corrections to the top-quark forward-backward asymmetry and found sizable effects. Our results show a large reduction of the theoretical uncertainties in predictions of the forward-backward asymmetry, and allow for a precision determination of the top-quark electroweak couplings at future e+ e- colliders.

  1. Next-to-next-to-leading order contributions to jet photoproduction and determination of αs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasen, Michael; Kramer, Gustav; Michael, Markus

    2014-04-01

    We present the first calculation of inclusive jet photoproduction with approximate next-to-next-to-leading-order contributions, obtained from a unified threshold resummation formalism. The leading coefficients for direct photoproduction are computed analytically. Together with the coefficients pertinent to parton-parton scattering, they are shown to agree with those appearing in our full next-to-leading-order calculations. For hadron-hadron scattering, numerical agreement is found with a previous calculation of jet production at the Tevatron. We show that the direct and resolved approximate next-to-next-to-leading-order contributions considerably improve the description of final ZEUS data on jet photoproduction and that the error on the determination of the strong coupling constant is significantly reduced.

  2. Complete next-to-next-to-leading order calculation of NN → NNπ in chiral effective field theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filin A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of the pion production operator calculated up-to-and-including next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO in chiral effective field theory. We include explicit Delta degrees of freedom and demonstrate that they provide essential contribution required to understand neutral pion production data. Analysis of chiral loops at NNLO reveals new mechanisms which are important, but haven’t been considered in phenomenological studies so far.

  3. Lattice chiral effective field theory with three-body interactions at next-to-next-to-leading order

    CERN Document Server

    Epelbaum, Evgeny; Lee, Dean; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2009-01-01

    We consider low-energy nucleons at next-to-next-to-leading order in lattice chiral effective field theory. Three-body interactions first appear at this order, and we discuss several methods for determining three-body interaction coefficients on the lattice. We compute the energy of the triton and low-energy neutron-deuteron scattering phase shifts in the spin-doublet and spin-quartet channels using Luescher's finite volume method. In the four-nucleon system we calculate the energy of the alpha particle using auxiliary fields and projection Monte Carlo.

  4. Top-quark pair production at next-to-next-to-leading order QCD in electron positron collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Long; Heisler, Dennis; Bernreuther, Werner; Si, Zong-Guo

    2016-01-01

    We set up a formalism, within the antenna subtraction framework, for computing the production of a massive quark-antiquark pair in electron positron collisions at next-to-next-to-leading order in the coupling $\\alpha_s$ of quantum chromodynamics at the differential level. Our formalism applies to the calculation of any infrared-safe observable. We apply this set-up to the production of top-quark top antiquark pairs in the continuum. We compute the production cross section and several distributions. We determine, in particular, the top-quark forward-backward asymmetry at order $\\alpha_s^2$. Our result agrees with previous computations of this observable.

  5. Diphoton production at hadron colliders: a fully differential QCD calculation at next-to-next-to-leading order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catani, Stefano; Cieri, Leandro; de Florian, Daniel; Ferrera, Giancarlo; Grazzini, Massimiliano

    2012-02-17

    We consider direct diphoton production in hadron collisions, and we compute the next-to-next-to-leading order QCD radiative corrections at the fully differential level. Our calculation uses the q(T) subtraction formalism, and it is implemented in a parton-level Monte Carlo program. The program allows the user to apply arbitrary kinematical cuts on the final-state photons and the associated jet activity and to compute the corresponding distributions in the form of bin histograms. We present selected numerical results related to Higgs boson searches at the LHC and corresponding results at the Tevatron.

  6. Next-to-Next-to Leading Order QCD Predictions for Single Jet Inclusive Production at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, J.; Glover, E. W. N.; Pires, J.

    2017-02-01

    We report the first calculation of fully differential jet production at leading color in all partonic channels at next-to-next-to leading order in perturbative QCD and compare to the available ATLAS 7 TeV data. We discuss the size and shape of the perturbative corrections along with their associated scale variation across a wide range in jet transverse momentum, pT, and rapidity, y . We find significant effects, especially at low pT, and discuss the possible implications for parton distribution function fits.

  7. Charm quark contribution to K+ ---> pi+ nu anti-nu at next-to-next-to-leading order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buras, Andrzej J.; /Munich, Tech. U.; Gorbahn, Martin; /Durham U., IPPP /Karlsruhe U., TTP; Haisch, Ulrich; /Fermilab /Zurich U.; Nierste, Ulrich; /Karlsruhe U., TTP

    2006-03-01

    The authors calculate the complete next-to-next-to-leading order QCD corrections to the charm contribution of the rare decay K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}. They encounter several new features, which were absent in lower orders. They discuss them in detail and present the results for the two-loop matching conditions of the Wilson coefficients, the three-loop anomalous dimensions, and the two-loop matrix elements of the relevant operators that enter the next-to-next-to-leading order renormalization group analysis of the Z-penguin and the electroweak box contribution. The inclusion of the next-to-next-to-leading order QCD corrections leads to a significant reduction of the theoretical uncertainty from {+-} 9.8% down to {+-} 2.4% in the relevant parameter P{sub c}(X), implying the leftover scale uncertainties in {Beta}(K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}) and in the determination of |V{sub td}|, sin 2{beta}, and {gamma} from the K {yields} {pi}{nu}{bar {nu}} system to be {+-} 1.3%, {+-} 1.0%, {+-} 0.006, and {+-} 1.2{sup o}, respectively. For the charm quark {ovr MS} mass m{sub c}(m{sub c}) = (1.30 {+-} 0.05) GeV and |V{sub us}| = 0.2248 the next-to-leading order value P{sub c}(X) = 0.37 {+-} 0.06 is modified to P{sub c}(X) = 0.38 {+-} 0.04 at the next-to-next-to-leading order level with the latter error fully dominated by the uncertainty in m{sub c}(m{sub c}). They present tables for P{sub c}(X) as a function of m{sub c}(m{sub c}) and {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub z}) and a very accurate analytic formula that summarizes these two dependences as well as the dominant theoretical uncertainties. Adding the recently calculated long-distance contributions they find {Beta}(K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}) = (8.0 {+-} 1.1) x 10{sup -11} with the present uncertainties in m{sub c}(m{sub c}) and the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa elements being the dominant individual sources in the quoted error. They also emphasize that improved calculations of the long

  8. Unpolarized Transverse Momentum Dependent Parton Distribution and Fragmentation Functions at next-to-next-to-leading order

    CERN Document Server

    Echevarria, Miguel G; Vladimirov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    The transverse momentum dependent parton distribution/fragmentation functions (TMDs) are essential in the factorization of a number of processes like Drell-Yan scattering, vector boson production, semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering, etc. We provide a comprehensive study of unpolarized TMDs at next-to-next-to-leading order, which includes an explicit calculation of these TMDs and an extraction of their matching coefficients onto their integrated analogues, for all flavor combinations. The obtained matching coefficients are important for any kind of phenomenology involving TMDs. In the present study each individual TMD is calculated without any reference to a specific process. We recover the known results for parton distribution functions and provide new results for the fragmentation functions. The results for the gluon transverse momentum dependent fragmentation functions are presented for the first time at one and two loops. We also discuss the structure of singularities of TMD operators and TMD matrix ...

  9. Next-to-next-to-leading order spin-orbit effects in the equations of motion of compact binary systems

    CERN Document Server

    Marsat, Sylvain; Faye, Guillaume; Blanchet, Luc

    2012-01-01

    We compute next-to-next-to-leading order spin contributions to the post-Newtonian equations of motion for binaries of compact objects, such as black holes or neutron stars. For maximally spinning black holes, those contributions are of third-and-a-half post-Newtonian (3.5PN) order, improving our knowledge of the equations of motion, already known for non-spinning objects up to this order. Building on previous work, we represent the rotation of the two bodies using a pole-dipole matter stress-energy tensor, and iterate Einstein's field equations for a set of potentials parametrizing the metric in harmonic coordinates. Checks of the result include the existence of a conserved energy, the approximate global Lorentz invariance of the equations of motion in harmonic coordinates, and the recovery of the motion of a spinning object on a Kerr background in the test-mass limit. We verified the existence of a contact transformation, together with a redefinition of the spin variables that makes our result equivalent to ...

  10. Pion production in nucleon-nucleon collisions in chiral effective field theory: next-to-next-to-leading order contributions

    CERN Document Server

    Filin, A A; Epelbaum, E; Hanhart, C; Krebs, H; Kudryavtsev, A E; Myhrer, F

    2012-01-01

    A complete calculation of the pion-nucleon loops that contribute to the transition operator for $NN\\to NN\\pi$ up-to-and-including next-to-next-to-leading order (N$^2$LO) in chiral effective field theory near threshold is presented. The evaluation is based on the so-called momentum counting scheme, which takes into account the relatively large momentum of the initial nucleons inherent in pion-production reactions. We show that the significant cancellations between the loops found at next-to-leading order (NLO) in the earlier studies are also operative at N$^2$LO. In particular, the $1/m_N$ corrections (with $m_N$ being the nucleon mass) to loop diagrams cancel at N$^2$LO, as do the contributions of the pion loops involving the low-energy constants $c_i$, i=1...4. In contrast to the NLO calculation however, the cancellation of loops at N$^2$LO is incomplete, yielding a non-vanishing contribution to the transition amplitude. Together with the one-pion exchange tree-level operators, the loop contributions provide...

  11. Resolving the Tevatron Top Quark Forward-Backward Asymmetry Puzzle: Fully Differential Next-to-Next-to-Leading-Order Calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czakon, Michal; Fiedler, Paul; Mitov, Alexander

    2015-07-31

    We determine the dominant missing standard model (SM) contribution to the top quark pair forward-backward asymmetry at the Tevatron. Contrary to past expectations, we find a large, around 27%, shift relative to the well-known value of the inclusive asymmetry in next-to-leading order QCD. Combining all known standard model corrections, we find that A(FB)(SM)=0.095±0.007. This value is in agreement with the latest DØ measurement [V. M. Abazov et al. (D0 Collaboration), Phys. Rev. D 90, 072011 (2014)] A(FB)(D∅)=0.106±0.03 and about 1.5σ below that of CDF [T. Aaltonen et al. (CDF Collaboration), Phys. Rev. D 87, 092002 (2013)] A(FB)(CDF)=0.164±0.047. Our result is derived from a fully differential calculation of the next-to-next-to leading order (NNLO) QCD corrections to inclusive top pair production at hadron colliders and includes-without any approximation-all partonic channels contributing to this process. This is the first complete fully differential calculation in NNLO QCD of a two-to-two scattering process with all colored partons.

  12. Antinucleon-nucleon interaction at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order in chiral effective field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ling-Yun; Haidenbauer, Johann; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2017-07-01

    Results for the antinucleon-nucleon (\\overline{N}N) interaction obtained at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order in chiral effective field theory (EFT) are reported. A new local regularization scheme is used for the pion-exchange contributions that has been recently suggested and applied in a pertinent study of the N N force within chiral EFT. Furthermore, an alternative strategy for estimating the uncertainty is utilized that no longer depends on a variation of the cutoffs. The low-energy constants associated with the arising contact terms are fixed by a fit to the phase shifts and inelasticities provided by a phase-shift analysis of \\overline{p}p scattering data. An excellent description of the \\overline{N}N amplitudes is achieved at the highest order considered. Moreover, because of the quantitative reproduction of partial waves up to J = 3, there is also a nice agreement on the level of \\overline{p}p observables. Specifically, total and integrated elastic and charge-exchange cross sections agree well with the results from the partial-wave analysis up to laboratory energies of 300 MeV, while differential cross sections and analyzing powers are described quantitatively up to 200-250 MeV. The low-energy structure of the \\overline{N}N amplitudes is also considered and compared to data from antiprotonic hydrogen.

  13. Global analysis of nuclear parton distribution functions and their uncertainties at next-to-next-to-leading order

    CERN Document Server

    Khanpour, Hamzeh

    2016-01-01

    We perform a next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) analysis of nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDFs) using neutral current charged-lepton ($\\ell ^\\pm$ + nucleus) deeply inelastic scattering (DIS) data and Drell-Yan (DY) cross-section ratios $\\sigma_{DY}^{A}/\\sigma_{DY}^{A^\\prime}$ for several nuclear targets. We study in details the parameterizations and the atomic mass (A) dependence of the nuclear PDFs at this order. The present nuclear PDFs global analysis provides us a complete set of nuclear PDFs, $f_i^{(A,Z)}(x,Q^2)$, with a full functional dependence on $x$, A, Q$^2$. The uncertainties of the obtained nuclear modification factors for each parton flavour are estimated using the well-known Hessian method. The nuclear charm quark distributions are also added into the analysis. We compare the parametrization results with the available data and the results of other nuclear PDFs groups. We found our nuclear PDFs to be in reasonably good agreement with them. The estimates of errors provided by our glob...

  14. Improved chiral nucleon-nucleon potential up to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epelbaum, E.; Krebs, H. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II, Bochum (Germany); Meissner, U.G. [Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik and Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Bonn (Germany); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Institute for Advanced Simulation, and Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Juelich (Germany); Forschungszentrum Juelich, JARA - High Performance Computing, Juelich (Germany)

    2015-05-15

    We present improved nucleon-nucleon potentials derived in chiral effective field theory up to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order. We argue that the nonlocal momentum-space regulator employed in the two-nucleon potentials of previous works (Nucl. Phys. A 747, 362 (2005) and Phys. Rev. C 68, 041001 (2003)) is not the most efficient choice, in particular since it affects the long-range part of the interaction. We are able to significantly reduce finite-cutoff artefacts by using an appropriate regularization in coordinate space which maintains the analytic structure of the amplitude. The new potentials do not require the additional spectral function regularization employed in (Nucl. Phys. A 747, 362 (2005)) to cut off the short-range components of the two-pion exchange and make use of the low-energy constants c{sub i} and d{sub i} determined from pion-nucleon scattering without any fine tuning. We discuss in detail the construction of the new potentials and convergence of the chiral expansion for two-nucleon observables. We also employ a simple approach for estimating the theoretical uncertainty in few-nucleon calculations from the truncation of the chiral expansion that replaces previous reliance on cutoff variation. (orig.)

  15. Improved chiral nucleon-nucleon potential up to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order

    CERN Document Server

    Epelbaum, E; Meißner, U -G

    2014-01-01

    We present improved nucleon-nucleon potentials derived in chiral effective field theory up to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order. We argue that the nonlocal momentum-space regulator employed in the two-nucleon potentials of Refs. [E. Epelbaum, W. Gloeckle, U.-G. Mei{\\ss}ner, Nucl. Phys. A747 (2005) 362], [D.R. Entem, R. Machleidt, Phys. Rev. C68 (2003) 041001] is not the most efficient choice, in particular since it affects the long-range part of the interaction. We are able to significantly reduce finite-cutoff artefacts by using an appropriate regularization in coordinate space which maintains the analytic structure of the amplitude. The new potentials do not require the additional spectral function regularization employed in Ref. [E. Epelbaum, W. Gloeckle, U.-G. Mei{\\ss}ner, Nucl. Phys. A747 (2005) 362] to cut off the short-range components of the two-pion exchange and make use of the low-energy constants c_i and d_i determined from pion-nucleon scattering without any fine tuning. We discuss in detail t...

  16. Heavy-quark pair production in gluon fusion at next-to-next-to-leading O({alpha}{sup 4}{sub s}) order. One-loop squared contributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kniehl, B.A.; Merebashvili, Z. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Koerner, J.G. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Rogal, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2008-09-15

    We calculate the next-to-next-to-leading order O({alpha}{sup 4}{sub s}) one-loop squared corrections to the production of heavy quark pairs in the gluon-gluon fusion process. Together with the previously derived results on the q anti q production channel the results of this paper complete the calculation of the oneloop squared contributions of the next-to-next-to-leading order O({alpha}{sup 4}{sub s}) radiative QCD corrections to the hadroproduction of heavy flavours. Our results, with the full mass dependence retained, are presented in a closed and very compact form, in dimensional regularization. (orig.)

  17. Next-to-next-to-leading order QCD analysis of the revised CCFR data for $xF_3$ structure function and the higher twist contributions

    CERN Document Server

    Kataev, A L; Parente, G; Sidorov, A V

    1998-01-01

    We present the results of the next-to-next-to-leading order QCD analysis of the recently revised experimental data of the CCFR collaboration for the $xF_3$ structure function using the Jacobi polynomial expansion method. The effects of the higher twist contributions are included into the fits following the infrared renormalon motivated model. The special attention is paid to the checks of the predictive abilities of the infrared renormalon model and to the independent extraction of the $x$-shape of the twist-4 contributions to the $xF_3$ structure function in the process of the leading order, next-to-leading order and next-to-next-to-leading order fits of the revised CCFR data. We stress that at the next-to-next-to-leading order the results for We obtain the following result $\\alpha_s(M_Z)^{NNLO}=0.117 \\pm 0.002(stat) \\pm 0.005 (syst)\\pm 0.003 (theory)$. The comparison of the outcomes of our next-to-leading order and next-to-next-to-leading order analysis indicate that the theoretical QCD uncertainties were u...

  18. Nuclear forces with Delta-excitations up to next-to-next-to-leading order I: peripheral nucleon-nucleon waves

    CERN Document Server

    Krebs, H; Meissner, U G; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Mei{\\ss}ner, Ulf-G.

    2007-01-01

    We study the two-nucleon force at next-to-next-to-leading order in a chiral effective field theory with explicit Delta degrees of freedom. Fixing the appearing low-energy constants from a next-to-leading order calculation of pion-nucleon threshold parameters, we find an improved convergence of most peripheral nucleon-nucleon phases compared to the theory with pions and nucleons only. In the delta-full theory, the next-to-leading order corrections are dominant in most partial waves considered.

  19. Three-Body Bound States and The Triton Charge Radius; Perturbative Corrections to Next-to-next-to-leading order in Pionless Effective Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Vanasse, Jared

    2015-01-01

    In the three-body system of ${}^3\\mathrm{H}$ we show how perturbative corrections can be added to the leading ordering triton vertex function. Using this new scheme we calculate the triton charge form factor and use it to extract the triton charge radius to next-to-leading-order, yielding a prediction of 1.58~fm. We show that a new counter-term will be needed to predict the triton charge radius at next-to-next-to-leading order.

  20. Next-to-next-to-leading order contributions to inclusive jet production in deep-inelastic scattering and determination of α{sub s}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biekoetter, Thomas; Klasen, Michael [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik; Kramer, Gustav [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik

    2015-09-15

    We present the first calculation of inclusive jet production in deep-inelastic scattering with approximate next-to-next-to-leading order (aNNLO) contributions, obtained from a unified threshold resummation formalism. The leading coefficients are computed analytically. We show that the aNNLO contributions reduce the theoretical prediction for jet production in deep-inelastic scattering, improve the description of the final HERA data in particular at high photon virtuality Q{sup 2} and increase the central fit value of the strong coupling constant.

  1. Next-to-next-to-leading order contributions to inclusive jet production in deep-inelastic scattering and determination of αs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biekötter, Thomas; Klasen, Michael; Kramer, Gustav

    2015-10-01

    We present the first calculation of inclusive jet production in deep-inelastic scattering with approximate next-to-next-to-leading order (aNNLO) contributions, obtained from a unified threshold resummation formalism. The leading coefficients are computed analytically. We show that the aNNLO contributions reduce the theoretical prediction for jet production in deep-inelastic scattering, improve the description of the final HERA data in particular at high photon virtuality Q2 and increase the central fit value of the strong coupling constant.

  2. Fully differential Higgs pair production in association with a W boson at next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai Tao; Wang, Jian

    2017-02-01

    To clarify the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism, we need to probe the Higgs self-couplings, which can be measured in Higgs pair productions. The associated production with a vector boson is special due to a clear tag in the final state. We perform a fully differential next-to-next-to-leading-order calculation of the Higgs pair production in association with a W boson at hadron colliders, and present numerical results at the 14 TeV LHC and a future 100 TeV hadron collider.

  3. Fully Differential Higgs Pair Production in Association With a $W$ Boson at Next-to-Next-to-Leading Order in QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hai Tao

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism, we need to probe the Higgs self-couplings, which can be measured in Higgs pair productions. The associated production with a vector boson is special due to a clear tag in the final state. We perform a fully differential next-to-next-to-leading-order calculation of the Higgs pair production in association with a $W$ boson at hadron colliders, and present numerical results at the 14 TeV LHC and a future 100 TeV hadron collider.

  4. Next-to-next-to-leading-order subtraction formalism in hadron collisions and its application to Higgs-boson production at the large hadron collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catani, Stefano; Grazzini, Massimiliano

    2007-06-01

    We consider higher-order QCD corrections to the production of colorless high-mass systems (lepton pairs, vector bosons, Higgs bosons, etc.) in hadron collisions. We propose a new formulation of the subtraction method to numerically compute arbitrary infrared-safe observables for this class of processes. To cancel the infrared divergences, we exploit the universal behavior of the associated transverse-momentum (qT) distributions in the small-qT region. The method is illustrated in general terms up to the next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD perturbation theory. As a first explicit application, we study Higgs-boson production through gluon fusion. Our calculation is implemented in a parton level Monte Carlo program that includes the decay of the Higgs boson into two photons. We present selected numerical results at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  5. On the next-to-next-to leading order QCD corrections to heavy-quark production in deep-inelastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, H. [KEK Theory Center, Tsukuba (Japan); Lo Presti, N.A.; Vogt, A. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mathematical Sciences; Moch, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    The contribution of quarks with masses m >> {lambda}{sub QCD} is the only part of the structure functions in deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) which is not yet known at the next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) of perturbative QCD. We present improved partial NNLO results for the most important structure function F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) near the partonic threshold, in the high-energy (small-x) limit and at high scales Q{sup 2} >> m{sup 2}; and employ these results to construct approximations for the gluon and quark coefficient functions which cover the full kinematic plane. The approximation uncertainties are carefully investigated, and found to be large only at very small values, x

  6. Next-to-next-to-leading order calculation of the strong coupling constant by using moments of event-shape variables

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Samira Shoeibi Mohsenabadi; Mohammad Ebrahim Zomorrodian

    2013-11-01

    The next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) quantum chromodynamics (QCD) correction to the first three moments of the four event-shape variables in electron–positron annihilation, the thrust, heavy jet mass, wide, and total jet broadening, is computed. It is observed that the NNLO correction gives a better agreement between the theory and the experimental data. Also, by using the above observables, the strong coupling constant () is determined and how much its value is affected by the NNLO correction is demonstrated. By combining the results for all variables at different centre-of-mass energies $(M_{Z^{°}})$ = 0.1248 ± 0.0009 $({\\text{exp.}})_{-0.0144}^{+0.0283} ({\\text{theo.}})$ is obtained.

  7. Next-to-next-to-leading order Skyrme interaction in nuclear matter: Nuclear bulk quantities at second order in perturbation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Moghrabi, Kassem

    2016-01-01

    We present the explicit form of the next-to-next-to-leading order (N$^2$LO) Skyrme interaction in momentum space by including the fourth-order gradient potentials to the standard Skyrme interaction. With the N$^2$LO Skyrme interaction, we evaluate the second-order corrections to the nuclear bulk quantities of nuclear matter: equation of state (EoS) of isospin symmetric and pure neutron matter, density-dependent in-medium effective nucleon mass, isospin-asymmetry energy, pressure and incompressibility. These second-order contributions are ultraviolet (UV) divergent due to the zero range character of the interaction and renormalized using the techniques of dimensional regularization (DR) with the minimal subtraction scheme (MS). We adjust the 18 parameters of the interaction by performing a global fit to the nuclear bulk quantities. Besides the too strong dependence $k_F^{12}$ of several second-order corrections, a very good reproduction of a realistic nuclear matter saturation curve with all the nuclear bulk q...

  8. Single-inclusive jet production in electron-nucleon collisions through next-to-next-to-leading order in perturbative QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Abelof, Gabriel; Liu, Xiaohui; Petriello, Frank

    2016-01-01

    We compute the ${\\cal O}(\\alpha^2\\alpha_s^2)$ perturbative corrections to inclusive jet production in electron-nucleon collisions. This process is of particular interest to the physics program of a future Electron Ion Collider (EIC). We include all relevant partonic processes, including deep-inelastic scattering contributions, photon-initiated corrections, and parton-parton scattering terms that first appear at this order. Upon integration over the final-state hadronic phase space we validate our results for the deep-inelastic corrections against the known next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) structure functions. Our calculation uses the $N$-jettiness subtraction scheme for performing higher-order computations, and allows for a completely differential description of the deep-inelastic scattering process. We describe the application of this method to inclusive jet production in detail, and present phenomenological results for the proposed EIC. The NNLO corrections have a non-trivial dependence on the jet kinem...

  9. Next-to-next-to-leading-order charm-quark contribution to the CP violation parameter ϵ(K) and ΔM(K).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brod, Joachim; Gorbahn, Martin

    2012-03-23

    The observables ϵ(K) and ΔM(K) play a prominent role in particle physics due to their sensitivity to new physics at short distances. To take advantage of this potential, a firm theoretical prediction of the standard-model background is essential. The charm-quark contribution is a major source of theoretical uncertainty. We address this issue by performing a next-to-next-to-leading-order QCD analysis of the charm-quark contribution η(cc) to the effective |ΔS|=2 Hamiltonian in the standard model. We find a large positive shift of 36%, leading to η(cc)=1.87(76). This result might cast doubt on the validity of the perturbative expansion; we discuss possible solutions. Finally, we give an updated value of the standard-model prediction for |ϵ(K)|=1.81(28)×10(-3) and ΔM(K)(SD)=3.1(1.2)×10(-15)  GeV.

  10. Next-to-next-to-leading order QCD analysis of spin-dependent parton distribution functions and their uncertainties: Jacobi polynomials approach

    CERN Document Server

    Shahri, F Taghavi; Tehrani, S Atashbar; Yazdi, Z Alizadeh

    2016-01-01

    We present a first global QCD analysis of next-to-next-leading-order (NNLO) contributions of the spin-dependent parton distribution functions (PPDFs) and their uncertainties using the Jacobi polynomial approach. Having the NNLO contributions of the quark-quark and gluon-quark splitting functions in perturbative QCD (Nucl. Phys. B 889 (2014) 351-400), one can obtain the evolution of longitudinally polarized parton densities of hadrons up to NNLO accuracy of QCD. A very large sets of recent and up-to-date experimental data of spin structure functions of the proton $g_1^p$, neutron $g_1^n$, and deuteron $g_1^d$ have been used in this analysis. The predictions for the NNLO calculations of the polarized parton distribution functions as well as the proton, neutron and deuteron polarized structure functions are compared with the corresponding results of the NLO approximation. We form a mutually consistent set of polarized PDFs due to the inclusion of the most available experimental data including the recently publis...

  11. The forward-backward asymmetry for massive bottom quarks at the $Z$ peak at next-to-next-to-leading order QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Bernreuther, Werner; Dekkers, Oliver; Gehrmann, Thomas; Heisler, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    We compute the order $\\alpha_s^2$ QCD corrections to the $b$-quark forward-backward asymmetry in $e^+e^-\\to b{\\bar b}$ collisions at the $Z$ boson resonance, taking the non-zero mass of the $b$ quark into account. We determine these corrections with respect to both the $b$-quark axis and the thrust axis definition of the asymmetry. We compute also the distributions of these axes with respect to the electron beam. If one neglects the flavor singlet contributions to the $b$-quark asymmetry, as was done in previous computations for massless $b$ quarks, then the second-order QCD corrections for $m_b\

  12. The forward-backward asymmetry for massive bottom quarks at the Z peak at next-to-next-to-leading order QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernreuther, Werner; Chen, Long; Dekkers, Oliver; Gehrmann, Thomas; Heisler, Dennis

    2017-01-01

    We compute the order α s 2 QCD corrections to the b-quark forward-backward asymmetry in {e}+{e}-to boverline{b} collisions at the Z boson resonance, taking the non-zero mass of the b quark into account. We determine these corrections with respect to both the b-quark axis and the thrust axis definition of the asymmetry. We compute also the distributions of these axes with respect to the electron beam. If one neglects the flavor singlet contributions to the b-quark asymmetry, as was done in previous computations for massless b quarks, then the second-order QCD corrections for m b ≠ 0 are smaller in magnitude than the corresponding corrections for m b = 0. Including the singlet contributions slightly increases the magnitude of the corrections. The massive α s 2 corrections to the b-quark forwardbackward asymmetry slightly diminish the well-known tension between the bare b-quark asymmetry and the standard model fit from 2 .9 σ to 2 .6 σ.

  13. Determination of the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_s(M_Z)$ in next-to-next-to-leading order QCD using H1 jet cross section measurements arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, V.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Bertone, V.; Bolz, A.; Boudry, V.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Buniatyan, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Cvach, J.; Currie, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feltesse, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Gehrmann, T.; Ghazaryan, S.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Gwenlan, C.; Haidt, D.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hladkỳ, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Huss, A.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jung, A.W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krücker, D.; Krüger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinski, B.; Malinovski, E.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Morozov, A.; Müller, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Niehues, J.; Nowak, G.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Polifka, R.; Rabbertz, K.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Šálek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Sefkow, F.; Shushkevich, S.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Straumann, U.; Sutton, M.R.; Sykora, T.; Thompson, P.D.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Wegener, D.; Wünsch, E.; Žáček, J.; Zhang, Z.; Žlebčík, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    The strong coupling constant $\\alpha_s(M_Z)$ is determined from inclusive jet and dijet cross sections in neutral-current deep-inelastic $ep$ scattering (DIS) measured at HERA by the H1 collaboration using next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) QCD predictions. The dependence of the NNLO predictions and of the resulting value of $\\alpha_s(M_Z)$ at the $Z$-boson mass $m_Z$ are studied as a function of the choice of the renormalisation and factorisation scales. Using inclusive jet and dijet data together, the strong coupling constant is determined to be $\\alpha_s(M_Z)=0.1157\\,(20)_{\\rm exp}\\,(29)_{\\rm th}$. Complementary, \\asmz\\ is determined together with parton distribution functions of the proton (PDFs) from jet and inclusive DIS data measured by the H1 experiment. The value $\\alpha_s(M_Z)=0.1142\\,(28)_{\\rm tot}$ obtained is consistent with the determination from jet data alone. The impact of the jet data on the PDFs is studied. The running of the strong coupling is tested at different values of the renormalis...

  14. Next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order QCD prediction for the top anti-top S-wave pair production cross section near threshold in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beneke, Martin [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department; Kiyo, Yuichiro [Juntendo Univ., Inzai (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Marquard, Peter [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Penin, Alexander [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Physics; Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik; Piclum, Jan [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Bern (Switzerland); Steinhauser, Matthias [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik

    2015-06-15

    We present the third-order QCD prediction for the production of top-anti-top quark pairs in electron-positron collisions close to the threshold in the dominant S-wave state. We observe a significant reduction of the theoretical uncertainty and discuss the sensitivity to the top quark mass and width.

  15. Next-to-Next-to-Next-to-Leading Order QCD Prediction for the Top Antitop S-Wave Pair Production Cross Section Near Threshold in e(+)e(-) Annihilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneke, Martin; Kiyo, Yuichiro; Marquard, Peter; Penin, Alexander; Piclum, Jan; Steinhauser, Matthias

    2015-11-06

    We present the third-order QCD prediction for the production of top antitop quark pairs in electron-positron collisions close to the threshold in the dominant S-wave state. We observe a significant reduction of the theoretical uncertainty and discuss the sensitivity to the top quark mass and width.

  16. Associated production of a top pair and a W boson at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy

    CERN Document Server

    Broggio, Alessandro; Ossola, Giovanni; Pecjak, Ben D

    2016-01-01

    We consider soft gluon emission corrections to the production of a top-antitop pair in association with a W boson at the Large Hadron Collider. We obtain a soft-gluon resummation formula for this production process which is valid up to next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. We evaluate the soft gluon resummation formula in Mellin space by means of an in-house parton level Monte Carlo code which allows us to obtain predictions for the total cross section as well as for several differential distributions. We study the impact of the soft-gluon resummation corrections in comparison to fixed order calculations.

  17. Associated production of a top pair and a W boson at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broggio, Alessandro; Ferroglia, Andrea; Ossola, Giovanni; Pecjak, Ben D.

    2016-09-01

    We consider soft gluon emission corrections to the production of a top-antitop pair in association with a W boson at the Large Hadron Collider. We obtain a soft-gluon resummation formula for this production process which is valid up to next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. We evaluate the soft gluon resummation formula in Mellin space by means of an in-house parton level Monte Carlo code which allows us to obtain predictions for the total cross section as well as for several differential distributions. We study the impact of the soft-gluon resummation corrections in comparison to fixed order calculations.

  18. Diphoton production at hadron colliders: transverse-momentum resummation at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cieri, Leandro [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “La Sapienza” andINFN - Sezione di Roma, I-00185 Rome (Italy); Coradeschi, Francesco [INFN - Sezione di Firenze and Dipartimento di Fisica,Università di Firenze, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Florian, Daniel de [Departamento de Física, FCEYN, Universidad de Buenos Aires (1428) Pabellón 1 Ciudad Universitaria, Capital Federal (Argentina)

    2015-06-26

    We consider the transverse-momentum (q{sub T}) distribution of a diphoton pair produced in hadron collisions. At small values of q{sub T}, we resum the logarithmically-enhanced perturbative QCD contributions up to next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. At intermediate and large values of q{sub T}, we consistently combine resummation with the known next-to-leading order perturbative result. All perturbative terms up to order α{sub S}{sup 2} are included in our computation which, after integration over q{sub T}, reproduces the known next-to-next-to-leading order result for the diphoton pair production total cross section. We present a comparison with LHC data and an estimate of the perturbative accuracy of the theoretical calculation by performing the corresponding variation of scales. In general we observe that the effect of the resummation is not only to recover the predictivity of the calculation at small transverse momentum, but also to improve substantially the agreement with the experimental data.

  19. Heavy-to-heavy quark decays at next-to-next-to-leading order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Alexey; Czarnecki, Andrzej

    2008-12-01

    Details of a recent calculation of O(αs2) corrections to the decay b→cℓνl, taking into account the c-quark mass, are described. Construction of the expansion in the mass ratio mc/mb as well as the evaluation of new four-loop master integrals are presented. The same techniques are applicable to the muon decay, μ→eνμν¯e. Analytical results are presented, for the physical cases as well as for a model with purely-vector couplings.

  20. Higgs production in heavy-quark annihilation through next-to-next-to-leading order QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlander, Robert V. [RWTH Aachen University, Institute for Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology, Aachen (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    The total inclusive cross section for charged and neutral Higgs production in heavy-quark annihilation is presented through NNLO QCD. It is shown that, aside from an overall factor, the partonic cross section is independent of the initial-state quark flavors, and that any interference terms involving two different Yukawa couplings vanish. A simple criterion for defining the central renormalization and factorization scale is proposed. Its application to the b anti bφ process yields results which are compatible with the values usually adopted for this process. Remarkably, we find little variation in these values for the other initial-state quark flavors. Finally, we disentangle the impact of the different parton luminosities from genuine hard NNLO effects and find that, for the central scales, a naive rescaling by the parton luminosities approximates the full result remarkably well. (orig.)

  1. On Higgs-exchange DIS, physical evolution kernels and fourth-order splitting functions at large x

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soar, G.; Vogt, A. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mathematical Sciences; Moch, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Vermaseren, J.A.M. [NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-12-15

    We present the coefficient functions for deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) via the exchange of a scalar {phi} directly coupling only to gluons, such as the Higgs boson in the limit of a very heavy top quark and n{sub f} effectively massless light flavours, to the third order in perturbative QCD. The two-loop results are employed to construct the next-to-next-to-leading order physical evolution kernels for the system (F{sub 2},F{sub {phi}}) of flavour-singlet structure functions. The practical relevance of these kernels as an alternative to MS factorization is bedevilled by artificial double logarithms at small values of the scaling variable x, where the large top-mass limit ceases to be appropriate. However, they show an only single-logarithmic enhancement at large x. Conjecturing that this feature persists to the next order also in the present singlet case, the three-loop coefficient functions facilitate exact predictions (backed up by their particular colour structure) of the double-logarithmic contributions to the fourth-order singlet splitting functions, i.e., of the terms (1-x){sup a} ln{sup k}(1-x) with k=4,5,6 and k=3,4,5, respectively, for the off-diagonal and diagonal quantities to all powers a in (1-x). (orig.)

  2. Average gluon and quark jet multiplicities at higher orders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolzoni, Paolo; Kniehl, Bernd A. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Kotikov, Anatoly V. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation). Bogoliubov Lab. of Theoretical Physics

    2013-05-15

    We develop a new formalism for computing and including both the perturbative and nonperturbative QCD contributions to the scale evolution of average gluon and quark jet multiplicities. The new method is motivated by recent progress in timelike small-x resummation obtained in the MS factorization scheme. We obtain next-to-next-to-leading-logarithmic (NNLL) resummed expressions, which represent generalizations of previous analytic results. Our expressions depend on two nonperturbative parameters with clear and simple physical interpretations. A global fit of these two quantities to all available experimental data sets that are compatible with regard to the jet algorithms demonstrates by its goodness how our results solve a longstanding problem of QCD. We show that the statistical and theoretical uncertainties both do not exceed 5% for scales above 10 GeV. We finally propose to use the jet multiplicity data as a new way to extract the strong-coupling constant. Including all the available theoretical input within our approach, we obtain {alpha}{sub s}{sup (5)}(M{sub Z})=0.1199{+-}0.0026 in the MS scheme in an approximation equivalent to next-to-next-to-leading order enhanced by the resummations of ln(x) terms through the NNLL level and of ln Q{sup 2} terms by the renormalization group, in excellent agreement with the present world average.

  3. Higher-order soft corrections to squark hadro-production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenfeld, U.; Moch, S.

    2009-01-15

    We present new predictions for the total cross section of squark pair-production at Tevatron and LHC through next-to-next-to-leading order within the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. The results are based on the numerically dominant soft corrections. They are exact in all logarithmically enhanced terms near threshold, include the Coulomb corrections at two loops and exact scale dependence. We translate the increased total cross section at next-to-next-to-leading order into improved exclusion limits for squark masses and we investigate the scale dependence as well as the sensitivity on the parton luminosity. (orig.)

  4. Reference results for time-like evolution up to $\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha_s^3)$

    CERN Document Server

    Bertone, Valerio; Nocera, Emanuele R

    2015-01-01

    We present high-precision numerical results for time-like Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution in the $\\overline{\\rm MS}$ factorisation scheme, for the first time up to next-to-next-to-leading order accuracy in quantum chromodynamics. First, we scrutinise the analytical expressions of the splitting functions available in the literature, in both x and N space, and check their mutual consistency. Second, we implement time-like evolution in two publicly available, entirely independent and conceptually different numerical codes, in x and N space respectively: the already existing APFEL code, which has been updated with time-like evolution, and the new MELA code, which has been specifically developed to perform the study in this work. Third, by means of a model for fragmentation functions, we provide results for the evolution in different factorisation schemes, for different ratios between renormalisation and factorisation scales and at different final scales. Our results are collected in the forma...

  5. Proper definition and evolution of generalized transverse momentum dependent distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel G. Echevarria

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We consider one of the most fundamental sets of hadronic matrix elements, namely the generalized transverse momentum dependent distributions (GTMDs, and argue that their existing definitions lack proper evolution properties. By exploiting the similarity of GTMDs with the much better understood transverse momentum distributions, we argue that the existing definitions of GTMDs have to include an additional dependence on soft gluon radiation in order to render them properly defined. With this, we manage to obtain the evolution kernel of all (unpolarized quark and gluon GTMDs, which turns out to be spin independent. As a byproduct, all large logarithms can be resummed up to next-to-next-to-leading-logarithmic accuracy with the currently known perturbative ingredients.

  6. Proper definition and evolution of generalized transverse momentum dependent distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echevarria, Miguel G., E-mail: mgechevarria@icc.ub.edu [Departament de Física Quàntica i Astrofísica and Institut de Ciències del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Idilbi, Ahmad, E-mail: ahmad.idilbi@wayne.edu [Department of Physics, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, 48202 (United States); Kanazawa, Koichi, E-mail: koichi.kanazawa@temple.edu [Department of Physics, SERC, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122 (United States); Lorcé, Cédric, E-mail: cedric.lorce@polytechnique.edu [Centre de Physique Théorique, École polytechnique, CNRS, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Metz, Andreas, E-mail: metza@temple.edu [Department of Physics, SERC, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122 (United States); Pasquini, Barbara, E-mail: barbara.pasquini@pv.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Schlegel, Marc, E-mail: marc.schlegel@uni-tuebingen.de [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Tübingen University, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, 72076 Tübingen (Germany)

    2016-08-10

    We consider one of the most fundamental sets of hadronic matrix elements, namely the generalized transverse momentum dependent distributions (GTMDs), and argue that their existing definitions lack proper evolution properties. By exploiting the similarity of GTMDs with the much better understood transverse momentum distributions, we argue that the existing definitions of GTMDs have to include an additional dependence on soft gluon radiation in order to render them properly defined. With this, we manage to obtain the evolution kernel of all (un)polarized quark and gluon GTMDs, which turns out to be spin independent. As a byproduct, all large logarithms can be resummed up to next-to-next-to-leading-logarithmic accuracy with the currently known perturbative ingredients.

  7. Higher-order corrections to the splitting functions from differential equations in QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Gituliar, O

    2016-01-01

    We report on the status an ab initio computation of the time-like splitting functions at next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD. Time-like splitting functions govern the collinear kinematics of inclusive hadron production in $e^+e^-$ annihilation and the evolution of the parton fragmentation distributions. Current knowledge about them at three loops has been inferred by means of crossing symmetry from their related space-like counterparts, the deep-inelastic structure functions and parton densities. In this approach certain parts of the off-diagonal quark-gluon splitting function are left undetermined, which calls for an independent calculation from first principles. We outline the method for calculating master integrals from differential equations which are required to attack the problem.

  8. Nonlocal higher order evolution equations

    KAUST Repository

    Rossi, Julio D.

    2010-06-01

    In this article, we study the asymptotic behaviour of solutions to the nonlocal operator ut(x, t)1/4(-1)n-1 (J*Id -1)n (u(x, t)), x ∈ ℝN, which is the nonlocal analogous to the higher order local evolution equation vt(-1)n-1(Δ)nv. We prove that the solutions of the nonlocal problem converge to the solution of the higher order problem with the right-hand side given by powers of the Laplacian when the kernel J is rescaled in an appropriate way. Moreover, we prove that solutions to both equations have the same asymptotic decay rate as t goes to infinity. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.

  9. QCD evolution of (un)polarized gluon TMDPDFs and the Higgs $q_T$-distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Echevarria, Miguel G; Mulders, Piet J; Pisano, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    We provide the proper definition of all the leading-twist (un)polarized gluon transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDPDFs), by considering the Higgs boson transverse momentum distribution in hadron-hadron collisions and deriving the factorization theorem in terms of them. We show that the evolution of all the (un)polarized gluon TMDPDFs is driven by a universal evolution kernel, which can be resummed up to next-to-next-to-leading-logarithmic accuracy. Considering the proper definition of gluon TMDPDFs, we perform an explicit next-to-leading-order calculation of the unpolarized ($f_1^g$), linearly polarized ($h_1^{\\perp g}$) and helicity ($g_{1L}^g$) gluon TMDPDFs, and show that, as expected, they are free from rapidity divergences. As a byproduct, we obtain the Wilson coefficients of the refactorization of these TMDPDFs at large transverse momentum. In particular, the coefficient of $g_{1L}^g$, which has never been calculated before, constitutes a new and necessary ingredient for a re...

  10. Kauffman's adjacent possible in word order evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrer-i-Cancho, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Word order evolution has been hypothesized to be constrained by a word order permutation ring: transitions involving orders that are closer in the permutation ring are more likely. The hypothesis can be seen as a particular case of Kauffman's adjacent possible in word order evolution. Here we consider the problem of the association of the six possible orders of S, V and O to yield a couple of primary alternating orders as a window to word order evolution. We evaluate the suitability of various competing hypotheses to predict one member of the couple from the other with the help of information theoretic model selection. Our ensemble of models includes a six-way model that is based on the word order permutation ring (Kauffman's adjacent possible) and another model based on the dual two-way of standard typology, that reduces word order to basic orders preferences (e.g., a preference for SV over VS and another for SO over OS). Our analysis indicates that the permutation ring yields the best model when favoring pa...

  11. The spontaneous market order and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Naomi

    2016-08-01

    Darwin's theory of natural selection and the idea of a spontaneous order share a fundamental feature: the claim that apparent design or order do not necessarily imply a designer or rational planning. But they also present important differences, which touch upon central questions such as the evolution of morality, the role of human agency in social evolution, the existence (or not) of directionality in undesigned processes, and the presence (nor not) of a providential element in evolutionary accounts. In this article, I explore these themes and probe the relationship between the notion of a spontaneous order and the theory of evolution by natural selection. The reflections of Nobel laureate in economics, F.A. von Hayek, provide the beginning and endpoint in this voyage, for they constitute the most pronounced effort to develop a full-fledged theory combining evolution and economics in recent times. But along the way, I also investigate the influence of classical political economy on Darwin's thought, primarily that of Adam Smith, and consider the reasons for which Darwin did not refer to Smith when discussing the principle of natural selection in The Origin of Species. I conclude that the spontaneous order, as understood by Hayek, and evolution by natural selection constitute two disparate concepts.

  12. Quasilinear evolution equations of the third order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei V. Faminskii

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is a survey concerned with certain aspects of solvability and well-posedness of initial and initial-boundary value problems for various quasilinear evolution equations of the third order. This class includes, for example, Korteweg-de Vries (KdV and Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK equations.

  13. Second-order perturbation theory for 3He and pd scattering in pionless EFT

    CERN Document Server

    König, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    This work implements pionless effective field theory with the two-nucleon system expanded around the unitarity limit at second order perturbation theory. The expansion is found to converge well. All Coulomb effects are treated in perturbation theory, including two-photon contributions at next-to-next-to-leading order. After fixing a three-nucleon force to the 3He binding energy at this order, proton-deuteron scattering in the doublet S-wave channel is calculated for moderate center-of-mass momenta.

  14. Higher-order hadronic and heavy-lepton contributions to the anomalous magnetic moment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurz, Alexander [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Liu, Tao; Steinhauser, Matthias [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik; Marquard, Peter [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    We report about recent results obtained for the muon anomalous magnetic moment. Three-loop kernel functions have been computed to obtain the next-to-next-to-leading-order hadronic vacuum polarization contributions. The numerical result, a{sub μ}{sup had,NNLO} = 1.24 ± 0.01 x 10{sup -10}, is of the same order of magnitude as the current uncertainty from the hadronic contributions. For heavy-lepton corrections, analytical results are obtained at four-loop order and compared with the known results.

  15. Higher-order hadronic and heavy-lepton contributions to the anomalous magnetic moment

    CERN Document Server

    Kurz, Alexander; Marquard, Peter; Steinhauser, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    We report about recent results obtained for the muon anomalous magnetic moment. Three-loop kernel functions have been computed to obtain the next-to-next-to-leading-order hadronic vacuum polarization contributions. The numerical result, $a_\\mu^{\\rm{had,NNLO}}=1.24\\pm 0.01 \\times 10^{-10}$, is of the same order of magnitude as the current uncertainty from the hadronic contributions. For heavy-lepton corrections, analytical results are obtained at four-loop order and compared with the known results.

  16. Large-x resummation in Q2 evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albino, S; Kniehl, B A; Kramer, G

    2008-05-16

    The standard analytic solution to the Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi equation in Mellin space is improved by resumming the large-x divergences. Explicit results are given to next-to-leading order and next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy, which significantly reduce the parton density functions' theoretical uncertainties, more than the inclusion of next-to-next-to-leading order corrections in some cases, and is, therefore, of paramount importance for the reliable interpretation of ongoing and future experiments with hadron beams or targets, including those at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  17. Quark mass relations to four-loop order in perturbative QCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquard, Peter; Smirnov, Alexander V; Smirnov, Vladimir A; Steinhauser, Matthias

    2015-04-10

    We present results for the relation between a heavy quark mass defined in the on-shell and minimal subtraction (MS[over ¯]) scheme to four-loop order. The method to compute the four-loop on-shell integral is briefly described and the new results are used to establish relations between various short-distance masses and the MS[over ¯] quark mass to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order accuracy. These relations play an important role in the accurate determination of the MS[over ¯] heavy quark masses.

  18. Evolution of mitochondrial gene orders in echinoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perseke, Marleen; Fritzsch, Guido; Ramsch, Kai; Bernt, Matthias; Merkle, Daniel; Middendorf, Martin; Bernhard, Detlef; Stadler, Peter F; Schlegel, Martin

    2008-05-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the mitochondrial gene orders of all previously published and two novel Antedon mediterranea (Crinoidea) and Ophiura albida (Ophiuroidea) complete echinoderm mitochondrial genomes shows that all major types of rearrangement operations are necessary to explain the evolution of mitochondrial genomes. In addition to protein coding genes we include all tRNA genes as well as the control region in our analysis. Surprisingly, 7 of the 16 genomes published in the GenBank database contain misannotations, mostly unannotated tRNAs and/or mistakes in the orientation of tRNAs, which we have corrected here. Although the gene orders of mt genomes appear very different, only 8 events are necessary to explain the evolutionary history of echinoderms with the exception of the ophiuroids. Only two of these rearrangements are inversions, while we identify three tandem-duplication-random-loss events and three transpositions.

  19. Higgs production in bottom-quark fusion: Matching beyond leading order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Stefano; Napoletano, Davide; Ubiali, Maria

    2016-12-01

    We compute the total cross-section for Higgs boson production in bottom-quark fusion using the so-called FONLL method for the matching of a scheme in which the b-quark is treated as a massless parton to that in which it is treated as a massive final-state particle, and extend our previous results to the case in which the next-to-next-to-leading-log five-flavour scheme result is combined with the next-to-leading-order O (αs3) four-flavour scheme computation.

  20. Next-to-Next-Leading Order analysis of electroweak vacuum stability and rising inflection point

    CERN Document Server

    Iacobellis, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    We show an analysis on the gauge-independent observables associated with two stationary configurations of the Standard Model (SM) potential (extrapolated to high energy at Next-to-Next-to-Leading-Order (NNLO)): i) the value of the top mass ensuring stability of the SM electroweak vacuum and ii) the value of the Higgs potential at a rising inflection point. We examine in detail and reappraise the experimental and theoretical uncertainties which plague their determination, keeping alive the possibility for the SM of being stable and studying applications of such configuration to models of primordial inflation.

  1. Third-order correction to top-quark pair production near threshold I. Effective theory set-up and matching coefficients

    CERN Document Server

    Beneke, M; Schuller, K

    2013-01-01

    This is the first in a series of papers, in which we compute the third-order QCD corrections to top-antitop production near threshold in e+ e- collisions. The present paper provides a detailed outline of the strategy of computation in the framework of non-relativistic effective theory and the threshold expansion, applicable more generally to heavy-quark pair production near threshold. It summarizes matching coefficients and potentials relevant to the next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order and ends with the master formula for the computation of the third-order Green function. The master formula is evaluated in part II of the series.

  2. Peripheral nucleon-nucleon scattering at fifth order of chiral perturbation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entem, D. R.; Kaiser, N.; Machleidt, R.; Nosyk, Y.

    2015-01-01

    We present the two- and three-pion-exchange contributions to the nucleon-nucleon interaction which occur at next-to-next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N4LO , fifth order) of chiral effective field theory and calculate nucleon-nucleon scattering in peripheral partial waves with L ≥3 by using low-energy constants that were extracted from π N analysis at fourth order. While the net three-pion-exchange contribution is moderate, the two-pion exchanges turn out to be sizable and prevailingly repulsive, thus compensating the excessive attraction characteristic for next-to-next-to-leading order and N3LO . As a result, the N4LO predictions for the phase shifts of peripheral partial waves are in very good agreement with the data (with the only exception being the 1F3 wave). We also discuss the issue of the order-by-order convergence of the chiral expansion for the N N interaction.

  3. Heavy quark threshold dynamics in higher order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piclum, J.H.

    2007-05-15

    In this work we discuss an important building block for the next-to-next-to-next-to leading order corrections to the pair production of top quarks at threshold. Specifically, we explain the calculation of the third order strong corrections to the matching coefficient of the vector current in non-relativistic Quantum Chromodynamics and provide the result for the fermionic part, containing at least one loop of massless quarks. As a byproduct, we obtain the matching coefficients of the axial-vector, pseudo-scalar and scalar current at the same order. Furthermore, we calculate the three-loop corrections to the quark renormalisation constants in the on-shell scheme in the framework of dimensional regularisation and dimensional reduction. Finally, we compute the third order strong corrections to the chromomagnetic interaction in Heavy Quark Effective Theory. The calculational methods are discussed in detail and results for the master integrals are given. (orig.)

  4. Complete conservative dynamics for inspiralling compact binaries with spins at fourth post-Newtonian order

    CERN Document Server

    Levi, Michele

    2016-01-01

    In this work we complete the spin dependent conservative dynamics of inspiralling compact binaries at the fourth post-Newtonian order, and in particular the recent derivation of the next-to-next-to-leading order spin-squared interaction potential. We derive the physical equations of motion of the position and the spin from a direct variation of the action. Further, we derive the quadratic in spin Hamiltonians, as well as their expressions in the center of mass frame. We construct the conserved integrals of motion, which form the Poincare algebra. This construction provided a consistency check for the validity of our result, which is crucial in particular in the current absence of another independent derivation of the next-to-next-to-leading order spin-squared interaction. Finally, we provide here the complete gauge invariant relations among the binding energy, angular momentum, and orbital frequency of an inspiralling binary with generic compact spinning components to the fourth post-Newtonian order. These hi...

  5. Equivalence of ADM Hamiltonian and Effective Field Theory approaches at fourth post-Newtonian order for binary inspirals with spins

    CERN Document Server

    Levi, Michele

    2014-01-01

    The next-to-next-to-leading order spin1-spin2 potential for an inspiralling binary, that is essential for accuracy to fourth post-Newtonian order, if both components in the binary are spinning rapidly, has been recently derived independently via the ADM Hamiltonian and the Effective Field Theory approaches, using different gauges and variables. Here we show the complete physical equivalence of the two results, thereby we first prove the equivalence of the ADM Hamiltonian and the Effective Field Theory approaches at next-to-next-to-leading order with the inclusion of spins. The main difficulty in the spinning sectors, which also prescribes the manner in which the comparison of the two results is tackled here, is the existence of redundant unphysical spin degrees of freedom, associated with the spin gauge choice of a point within the extended spinning object for its representative worldline. After gauge fixing and eliminating the unphysical degrees of freedom of the spin and its conjugate at the level of the ac...

  6. Evolution Hemivariational Inequality with Hysteresis Operator in Higher Order Term

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Leszek GASINSKI

    2008-01-01

    The authors study evolution hemivariational inequalities of semilinear type containing a hysteresis operator.For such problems we establish an existence result by reducing the order of the equation and then by the use of the time-discretization procedure.

  7. Some remarks on a second order evolution equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Aassila

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available We prove the strong asymptotic stability of solutions to a second order evolution equation when the LaSalle's invariance principle cannot be applied due to the lack of monotonicity and compactness.

  8. Heat polynomial analogs for higher order evolution equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Hile

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Polynomial solutions analogous to the heat polynomials are demonstrated for higher order linear homogeneous evolution equations with coefficients depending on the time variable. Further parallels with the heat polynomials are established when the equation is parabolic with constant coefficients and only highest order terms.

  9. Generalized Unitary Cuts and Integrand Reduction at Higher Loop Orders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frellesvig, Hjalte Axel

    precision corresponds to the next to next to leading order in the perturbative expansion of the cross section, which requires the calculation of Feynman diagrams with two or more loops. For one-loop diagrams the corresponding problem has been solved to the extend that almost all one-loop amplitudes...... of physical interest are known, and their calculation automated. This is mainly due to the technique of generalized unitarity cuts combined with integrand reduction into what is known as the OPP method. This method is sufficiently easy and fast that the one-loop contributions can be incorporated into event...... using the higher ones as subtraction terms. Combined with specialized methods to find the rational term, the OPP method provides a complete procedure for finding the one-loop corrections to any amplitude. In this thesis we will develop a method to extend the OPP method to two loops and beyond...

  10. Preliminary group classification of quasilinear third-order evolution equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ding-jiang HUANG; Hong-qing ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Group classification of quasilinear third-order evolution equations is given by using the classical infinitesimal Lie method, the technique of equivalence transfor-mations, and the theory of classification of abstract low-dimensional Lie algebras. We show that there are three equations admitting simple Lie algebras of dimension three. All non-equivalent equations admitting simple Lie algebras are nothing but these three. Furthermore, we also show that there exist two, five, twenty-nine and twenty-six non-equivalent third-order nonlinear evolution equations admitting one-, two-, three-, and four-dimensional solvable Lie algebras, respectively.

  11. Peripheral nucleon-nucleon scattering at fifth order of chiral perturbation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Entem, D R; Machleidt, R; Nosyk, Y

    2014-01-01

    We present the two- and three-pion exchange contributions to the nucleon-nucleon interaction which occur at next-to-next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N4LO, fifth order) of chiral effective field theory, and calculate nucleon-nucleon scattering in peripheral partial waves with L>=3 using low-energy constants that were extracted from pi-N analysis at fourth order. While the net three-pion exchange contribution is moderate, the two-pion exchanges turn out to be sizeable and prevailingly repulsive, thus, compensating the excessive attraction characteristic for NNLO and N3LO. As a result, the N4LO predictions for the phase shifts of peripheral partial waves are in very good agreement with the data (with the only exception of the 1F3 wave). We also discuss the issue of the order-by-order convergence of the chiral expansion for the NN interaction.

  12. Dynamics of High-Order Spin-Orbit Couplings about Linear Momenta in Compact Binary Systems*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li; Wu, Xin; Mei, Li-Jie; Huang, Guo-Qing

    2017-09-01

    This paper relates to the post-Newtonian Hamiltonian dynamics of spinning compact binaries, consisting of the Newtonian Kepler problem and the leading, next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-leading order spin-orbit couplings as linear functions of spins and momenta. When this Hamiltonian form is transformed to a Lagrangian form, besides the terms corresponding to the same order terms in the Hamiltonian, several additional terms, third post-Newtonian (3PN), 4PN, 5PN, 6PN and 7PN order spin-spin coupling terms, yield in the Lagrangian. That means that the Hamiltonian is nonequivalent to the Lagrangian at the same PN order but is exactly equivalent to the full Lagrangian without any truncations. The full Lagrangian without the spin-spin couplings truncated is integrable and regular. Whereas it is non-integrable and becomes possibly chaotic when any one of the spin-spin terms is dropped. These results are also supported numerically.

  13. Construction of Solution for the Third Order Dispersion Evolution Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li-xun; LIU Yong-zhi; WANG Kang-ning

    2004-01-01

    The Golstein's strong solution formula of the second order evolution equation expands to that of the third dispersion equation by the analogy method. The semigroup expressions of its generating operator of the third order dispersion equation are obtained, and the expression to satisfy the semigroup conditions in the three orthogonal Hilbert space of the construction is also proved. Furthermore, the necessary and sufficient conditions of the generating operator's unitary semigroup are given.

  14. Proof of NRQCD factorization at all orders in the coupling constant in heavy quarkonium production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayak, Gouranga C.

    2016-08-15

    Recently the proof of the factorization in heavy quarkonium production in the NRQCD color octet mechanism is given at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in the coupling constant by using diagrammatic method of QCD. In this paper we prove factorization in heavy quarkonium production in the NRQCD color octet mechanism at all orders in the coupling constant by using the path integral method of QCD. Our proof is valid to all powers in the relative velocity of the heavy quark. We find that the gauge invariance and the factorization at all orders in the coupling constant require gauge-completed non-perturbative NRQCD matrix elements that were introduced previously to prove factorization at NNLO. (orig.)

  15. Direct Photon Production at Next-to–Next-to-Leading Order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R. Keith; Williams, Ciaran

    2017-05-01

    We present the first calculation of direct photon production at next-to-next-to leading order (NNLO) accuracy in QCD. For this process, although the final state cuts mandate only the presence of a single electroweak boson, the underlying kinematics resembles that of a generic vector boson plus jet topology. In order to regulate the infrared singularities present at this order we use the $N$-jettiness slicing procedure, applied for the first time to a final state that at Born level includes colored partons but no required jet. We compare our predictions to ATLAS 8 TeV data and find that the inclusion of the NNLO terms in the perturbative expansion, supplemented by electroweak corrections, provides an excellent description of the data with greatly reduced theoretical uncertainties.

  16. [Evolution of gene orders in genomes of cyanobacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markov, A V; Zakharov, I A

    2009-08-01

    Genomes of 23 strains of cyanobacteria were comparatively analyzed using quantitative methods of estimation of gene order similarity. It has been found that reconstructions of phylogenesis of cyanobacteria based on the comparison of the orders of genes in chromosomes and nucleotide sequences appear to be similar. This confirms the applicability of quantitative measures of similarity of gene orders for phylogenetic reconstructions. In the evolution of marine unicellular plankton cyanobacteria, genome rearrangements are fixed with a low rate (about 3% of gene order changes per 1% of 16S rRNA changes), whereas in other groups of cyanobacteria the gene order can change several times more rapidly. The gene orders in genomes of cyanobacteria and chloroplasts preserve a considerable degree of similarity. The closest relatives of chloroplasts among the analyzed cyanobacteria are likely to be strains from hot springs belonging to the genus Synechococcus. Comparative analysis of gene orders and nucleotide sequences strongly suggests that Synechococcus strains from diferent environments (sea, fresh waters, hot springs) are not related and belong to evolutionally distant lines.

  17. Order reduction for a model of marine bacteriophage evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliarini, Silvia; Korobeinikov, Andrei

    2017-02-01

    A typical mechanistic model of viral evolution necessary includes several time scales which can differ by orders of magnitude. Such a diversity of time scales makes analysis of these models difficult. Reducing the order of a model is highly desirable when handling such a model. A typical approach applied to such slow-fast (or singularly perturbed) systems is the time scales separation technique. Constructing the so-called quasi-steady-state approximation is the usual first step in applying the technique. While this technique is commonly applied, in some cases its straightforward application can lead to unsatisfactory results. In this paper we construct the quasi-steady-state approximation for a model of evolution of marine bacteriophages based on the Beretta-Kuang model. We show that for this particular model the quasi-steady-state approximation is able to produce only qualitative but not quantitative fit.

  18. Parton distribution functions at LO, NLO and NNLO with correlated uncertainties between orders

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Britzger, D; Camarda, S; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Diaconu, C; Feltesse, J; Gizhko, A; Glazov, A; Kolesnikov, V; Lohwasser, K; Luszczak, A; Myronenko, V; Pirumov, H; Placakyte, R; Rabbertz, K; Radescu, V; Sapronov, A; Schoenig, A; Shushkevich, S; Slominski, W; Starovoitov, P; Sutton, M; Tomaszewska, J; Turkot, O; Watt, G; Wichmann, K; Lisovyi, M

    2014-01-01

    Sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs) of the proton are reported for the leading (LO), next-to-leading (NLO) and next-to-next-to leading order (NNLO) QCD calculations. The parton distribution functions are determined with the HERAFitter program using the data from the HERA experiments and preserving correlations between uncertainties for the LO, NLO and NNLO PDF sets. The sets are used to study cross-section ratios and their uncertainties when calculated at different orders in QCD. A reduction of the overall theoretical uncertainty is observed if correlations between the PDF sets are taken into account for the ratio of $WW$ di-boson to $Z$ boson production cross sections at the LHC.

  19. Evolution of MHC class I in the Order Crocodylia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Isberg, Sally R; Higgins, Damien P

    2014-01-01

    have mostly focused on model species. However, the investigation of this region in non-avian reptiles is still in its infancy. To provide insights into the evolutionary mechanisms that have shaped the diversity of this region in the Order Crocodylia, we investigated MHC class I exon 3, intron 3...... events of gene duplication, particularly in Crocodilidae. These findings enhance our understanding of MHC class I evolution and provide a preliminary framework for comparative studies of other non-avian reptiles as well as diversity assessment within Crocodylia....

  20. Evolution of order and chaos across a first-order quantum phase transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leviatan, A., E-mail: ami@phys.huji.ac.il [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Macek, M., E-mail: mmacek@phys.huji.ac.il [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2012-07-24

    We study the evolution of the dynamics across a generic first-order quantum phase transition in an interacting boson model of nuclei. The dynamics inside the phase coexistence region exhibits a very simple pattern. A classical analysis reveals a robustly regular dynamics confined to the deformed region and well separated from a chaotic dynamics ascribed to the spherical region. A quantum analysis discloses regular bands of states in the deformed region, which persist to energies well above the phase-separating barrier, in the face of a complicated environment. The impact of kinetic collective rotational terms on this intricate interplay of order and chaos is investigated.

  1. Evolution of order and chaos across a first-order quantum phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Leviatan, A

    2012-01-01

    We study the evolution of the dynamics across a generic first order quantum phase transition in an interacting boson model of nuclei. The dynamics inside the phase coexistence region exhibits a very simple pattern. A classical analysis reveals a robustly regular dynamics confined to the deformed region and well separated from a chaotic dynamics ascribed to the spherical region. A quantum analysis discloses regular bands of states in the deformed region, which persist to energies well above the phase-separating barrier, in the face of a complicated environment. The impact of kinetic collective rotational terms on this intricate interplay of order and chaos is investigated.

  2. On the solutions of fractional order of evolution equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Delgado, V. F.; Taneco-Hernández, M. A.; Gómez-Aguilar, J. F.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we present a discussion of generalized Cauchy problems in a diffusion wave process, we consider bi-fractional-order evolution equations in the Riemann-Liouville, Liouville-Caputo, and Caputo-Fabrizio sense. Through Fourier transforms and Laplace transform we derive closed-form solutions to the Cauchy problems mentioned above. Similarly, we establish fundamental solutions. Finally, we give an application of the above results to the determination of decompositions of Dirac type for bi-fractional-order equations and write a formula for the moments for the fractional vibration of a beam equation. This type of decomposition allows us to speak of internal degrees of freedom in the vibration of a beam equation.

  3. Evolution of MHC class I in the order Crocodylia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Isberg, Sally R; Higgins, Damien P; Ho, Simon Y W; Salomonsen, Jan; Skjodt, Karsten; Miles, Lee G; Gongora, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a dynamic genomic region with an essential role in the adaptive immunity of jawed vertebrates. The evolution of the MHC has been dominated by gene duplication and gene loss, commonly known as the birth-and-death process. Evolutionary studies of the MHC have mostly focused on model species. However, the investigation of this region in non-avian reptiles is still in its infancy. To provide insights into the evolutionary mechanisms that have shaped the diversity of this region in the Order Crocodylia, we investigated MHC class I exon 3, intron 3, and exon 4 across 20 species of the families Alligatoridae and Crocodilidae. We generated 124 DNA sequences and identified 31 putative functional variants as well as 14 null variants. Phylogenetic analyses revealed three gene groups, all of which were present in Crocodilidae but only one in Alligatoridae. Within these groups, variants generally appear to cluster at the genus or family level rather than in species-specific groups. In addition, we found variation in gene copy number and some indication of interlocus recombination. These results suggest that MHC class I in Crocodylia underwent independent events of gene duplication, particularly in Crocodilidae. These findings enhance our understanding of MHC class I evolution and provide a preliminary framework for comparative studies of other non-avian reptiles as well as diversity assessment within Crocodylia.

  4. Second order evolution equations which describe pseudospherical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano Ferraioli, D.; de Oliveira Silva, L. A.

    2016-06-01

    Second order evolution differential equations that describe pseudospherical surfaces are considered. These equations are equivalent to the structure equations of a metric with Gaussian curvature K = - 1, and can be seen as the compatibility condition of an associated sl (2 , R) -valued linear problem, also referred to as a zero curvature representation. Under the assumption that the linear problem is defined by 1-forms ωi =fi1 dx +fi2 dt, i = 1 , 2 , 3, with fij depending on (x , t , z ,z1 ,z2) and such that f21 = η, η ∈ R, we give a complete and explicit classification of equations of the form zt = A (x , t , z) z2 + B (x , t , z ,z1) . According to the classification, these equations are subdivided in three main classes (referred to as Types I-III) together with the corresponding linear problems. Explicit examples of differential equations of each type are determined by choosing certain arbitrary differentiable functions. Svinolupov-Sokolov equations admitting higher weakly nonlinear symmetries, Boltzmann equation and reaction-diffusion equations like Murray equation are some known examples of such equations. Other explicit examples are presented, as well.

  5. Uncertainty analysis and order-by-order optimization of chiral nuclear interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Carlsson, B D; Forssén, C; Strömberg, D Fahlin; Lilja, O; Lindby, M; Mattsson, B A; Wendt, K A

    2015-01-01

    Chiral effective field theory ($\\chi$EFT) provides a systematic approach to describe low-energy nuclear forces. Moreover, $\\chi$EFT is able to provide well-founded estimates of statistical and systematic uncertainties although this unique advantage has not yet been fully exploited. We fill this gap by performing an optimization and statistical analysis of all the low-energy constants (LECs) up to next-to-next-to-leading order. We simultaneously fit to scattering and bound-state observables in the pion-nucleon, nucleon-nucleon, and few-nucleon sectors in order to utilize the full model capabilities of $\\chi$EFT. Finally, we demonstrate methods to propagate uncertainties to other observables, such that they can easily be adopted by future works. We employ mathematical optimization and implement automatic differentiation to attain efficient and machine-precise first- and second-order derivatives of the objective function with respect to the LECs. This is also vital for the regression analysis. We use power-count...

  6. The Evolution of Elliptic Flow Under First Order Phase Transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯启春; 王清尚; 刘剑利; 任延宇; 张景波; 霍雷

    2012-01-01

    Elliptic flow for non-central Au+Au collisions at √SNN=200 GeV is investigated with a 2+1 dimensional hydrodynamic model. We analyze the softening effect by the velocity along the axis. The contribution of the elliptic flow from the QGP phase, mixed phase and hadron gas phase is studied. The relation between the sound horizon and evolution of the elliptic flow is discussed.

  7. Third order finite volume evolution Galerkin (FVEG) methods for two-dimensional wave equation system

    OpenAIRE

    Lukácová-Medvid'ová, Maria; Warnecke, Gerald; Zahaykah, Yousef

    2003-01-01

    The subject of the paper is the derivation and analysis of third order finite volume evolution Galerkin schemes for the two-dimensional wave equation system. To achieve this the first order approximate evolution operator is considered. A recovery stage is carried out at each level to generate a piecewise polynomial approximation from the piecewise constants, to feed into the calculation of the fluxes. We estimate the truncation error and give numerical examples to demonstrate the higher order...

  8. Order and Progress? The Evolution of Brazilian Defense Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    to progress from this stereotype , Brazil needed a catalyst, which came from a charismatic national leader. Toward the end of the Cardoso... advertising the military’s mission to the citizenry in order to gain a stronger voice in domestic affairs and political agendas. Defense strategy and

  9. Business evolution or revolution? Mail-order pharmacies in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersch, Martin

    2004-01-01

    It is an interesting detail of the present reform of national public health service in Germany that mail-order and internet pharmacies will be founded in future as new (e-commerce) business models. Main points of conceivable business systems can be characterised as well as critical success factors. No potential participant can ever have all the necessary resources and competences to implement a competitive business system without external support. This is why cooperation seems to be a useful tool for competence management. The Resource-based View will serve as theoretical background for analysis. The required and available competences of conceivable players can be identified. Features of resources can be described that recommend special types of cooperation with the intention of establishing and operate a business system. Especially German and international pharmaceutical wholesalers can be identified as conceivable "parents" of mail-order pharmacies in the future.

  10. Symmetry Reduction and Cauchy Problems for a Class of Fourth-Order Evolution Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ji-Na; ZHANG Shun-Li

    2008-01-01

    We exploit higher-order conditional symmetry to reduce initial-value problems for evolution equations to Cauehy problems for systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs).We classify a class of fourth-order evolution equations which admit certain higher-order generalized conditional symmetries (GCSs) and give some examples to show the main reduction procedure.These reductions cannot be derived within the framework of the standard Lie approach,which hints that the technique presented here is something essential for the dimensional reduction of evolution equations.

  11. Gene structure and evolution of transthyretin in the order Chiroptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khwanmunee, Jiraporn; Leelawatwattana, Ladda; Prapunpoj, Porntip

    2016-02-01

    Bats are mammals in the order Chiroptera. Although many extensive morphologic and molecular genetics analyses have been attempted, phylogenetic relationships of bats has not been completely resolved. The paraphyly of microbats is of particular controversy that needs to be confirmed. In this study, we attempted to use the nucleotide sequence of transthyretin (TTR) intron 1 to resolve the relationship among bats. To explore its utility, the complete sequences of TTR gene and intron 1 region of bats in Vespertilionidae: genus Eptesicus (Eptesicus fuscus) and genus Myotis (Myotis brandtii, Myotis davidii, and Myotis lucifugus), and Pteropodidae (Pteropus alecto and Pteropus vampyrus) were extracted from the retrieved sequences, whereas those of Rhinoluphus affinis and Scotophilus kuhlii were amplified and sequenced. The derived overall amino sequences of bat TTRs were found to be very similar to those in other eutherians but differed from those in other classes of vertebrates. However, missing of amino acids from N-terminal or C-terminal region was observed. The phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences suggested bat and other eutherian TTRs lineal descent from a single most recent common ancestor which differed from those of non-placental mammals and the other classes of vertebrates. The splicing of bat TTR precursor mRNAs was similar to those of other eutherian but different from those of marsupial, bird, reptile and amphibian. Based on TTR intron 1 sequence, the inferred evolutionary relationship within Chiroptera revealed more closely relatedness of R. affinis to megabats than to microbats. Accordingly, the paraphyly of microbats was suggested.

  12. Rapidity evolution of Wilson lines at the next-to-leading order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balitsky, Ian [JLAB, Old Dominion U.; Chirilli, Giovanni [LBL

    2013-12-01

    At high energies particles move very fast so the proper degrees of freedom for the fast gluons moving along the straight lines are Wilson-line operators - infinite gauge factors ordered along the line. In the framework of operator expansion in Wilson lines the energy dependence of the amplitudes is determined by the rapidity evolution of Wilson lines. We present the next-to-leading order hierarchy of the evolution equations for Wilson-line operators.

  13. Parity- and Time Reversal-Violating Pion Nucleon Couplings: Higher Order Chiral Matching Relations

    CERN Document Server

    Seng, Chien-Yeah

    2016-01-01

    Parity- and time reversal-violating (PVTV) pion-nucleon couplings govern the magnitude of long-range contributions to nucleon and atomic electric dipole moments. When these couplings arise from chiral symmetry-breaking CP-violating operators, such as the QCD $\\theta$-term or quark chromoelectric dipole moments, one may relate hadronic matrix elements entering the PVTV couplings to nucleon and pion mass shifts by exploiting the corresponding chiral transformation properties at leading order (LO) in the chiral expansion. We compute the higher-order contributions to the lowest order relations arising from chiral loops and next-to-next-to leading order (NNLO) operators. We find that for the QCD $\\theta$-term the higher order contributions are analytic in the quark masses, while for the quark chromoelectric dipole moments and chiral symmetry-breaking four-quark operators, the matching relations also receive non-analytic corrections. Numerical estimates suggest that for the isoscalar PVTV pion-nucleon coupling, the...

  14. Second-order corrections to mean-field evolution of weakly interacting Bosons, II

    CERN Document Server

    Grillakis, M; Margetis, D

    2010-01-01

    We study the evolution of a N-body weakly interacting system of Bosons. Our work forms an extension of our previous paper I, in which we derived a second-order correction to a mean-field evolution law for coherent states in the presence of small interaction potential. Here, we remove the assumption of smallness of the interaction potential and prove global existence of solutions to the equation for the second-order correction. This implies an improved Fock-space estimate for our approximation of the N-body state.

  15. Convergence analysis on Browder-Tikhonov regularization for second-order evolution hemivariational inequality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yibin XIAO; Guoji TANG; Xianjun LONG; Nanjing HUANG

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the Browder-Tikhonov regularization of a second-order evolution hemivariational inequality (SOEHVI) with non-coercive operators. With dual-ity mapping, the regularized formulations and a derived first-order evolution hemivaria-tional inequality (FOEHVI) for the problem considered are presented. By applying the Browder-Tikhonov regularization method to the derived FOEHVI, a sequence of regular-ized solutions to the regularized SOEHVI is constructed, and the strong convergence of the whole sequence of regularized solutions to a solution to the problem is proved.

  16. Uncertainty Analysis and Order-by-Order Optimization of Chiral Nuclear Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, B. D.; Ekström, A.; Forssén, C.; Strömberg, D. Fahlin; Jansen, G. R.; Lilja, O.; Lindby, M.; Mattsson, B. A.; Wendt, K. A.

    2016-01-01

    Chiral effective field theory (χ EFT ) provides a systematic approach to describe low-energy nuclear forces. Moreover, χ EFT is able to provide well-founded estimates of statistical and systematic uncertainties—although this unique advantage has not yet been fully exploited. We fill this gap by performing an optimization and statistical analysis of all the low-energy constants (LECs) up to next-to-next-to-leading order. Our optimization protocol corresponds to a simultaneous fit to scattering and bound-state observables in the pion-nucleon, nucleon-nucleon, and few-nucleon sectors, thereby utilizing the full model capabilities of χ EFT . Finally, we study the effect on other observables by demonstrating forward-error-propagation methods that can easily be adopted by future works. We employ mathematical optimization and implement automatic differentiation to attain efficient and machine-precise first- and second-order derivatives of the objective function with respect to the LECs. This is also vital for the regression analysis. We use power-counting arguments to estimate the systematic uncertainty that is inherent to χ EFT , and we construct chiral interactions at different orders with quantified uncertainties. Statistical error propagation is compared with Monte Carlo sampling, showing that statistical errors are, in general, small compared to systematic ones. In conclusion, we find that a simultaneous fit to different sets of data is critical to (i) identify the optimal set of LECs, (ii) capture all relevant correlations, (iii) reduce the statistical uncertainty, and (iv) attain order-by-order convergence in χ EFT . Furthermore, certain systematic uncertainties in the few-nucleon sector are shown to get substantially magnified in the many-body sector, in particular when varying the cutoff in the chiral potentials. The methodology and results presented in this paper open a new frontier for uncertainty quantification in ab initio nuclear theory.

  17. Combining Higher-Order Resummation with Multiple NLO Calculations and Parton Showers in GENEVA

    CERN Document Server

    Alioli, Simone; Berggren, Calvin J; Hornig, Andrew; Tackmann, Frank J; Vermilion, Christopher K; Walsh, Jonathan R; Zuberi, Saba

    2012-01-01

    We extend the lowest-order matching of tree-level matrix elements with parton showers to give a complete description at the next higher perturbative accuracy in alpha_s at both small and large jet resolutions, which has not been achieved so far. This requires the combination of the higher-order resummation of large Sudakov logarithms at small values of the jet resolution variable with the full next-to-leading order (NLO) matrix-element corrections at large values. As a by-product this combination naturally leads to a smooth connection of the NLO calculations for different jet multiplicities. In this paper, we focus on the general construction of our method and discuss its application to e+e and pp collisions. We present first results of the implementation in the GENEVA Monte Carlo framework, where we employ N-jettiness as the jet resolution variable, combining its next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic resummation with fully exclusive NLO matrix elements, and PYTHIA8 as the backend for further parton showering a...

  18. Combining higher-order resummation with multiple NLO calculations and parton showers in GENEVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alioli, Simone; Bauer, Christian W.; Berggren, Calvin; Vermilion, Christopher K.; Walsh, Jonathan R.; Zuberi, Saba [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Hornig, Andrew [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Tackmann, Frank J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Gruppe Theorie

    2012-11-15

    We extend the lowest-order matching of tree-level matrix elements with parton showers to give a complete description at the next higher perturbative accuracy in {alpha}{sub s} at both small and large jet resolutions, which has not been achieved so far. This requires the combination of the higher-order resummation of large Sudakov logarithms at small values of the jet resolution variable with the full next-to-leading order (NLO) matrix-element corrections at large values. As a by-product, this combination naturally leads to a smooth connection of the NLO calculations for different jet multiplicities. In this paper, we focus on the general construction of our method and discuss its application to e{sup +}e{sup -} and pp collisions. We present first results of the implementation in the GENEVA Monte Carlo framework. We employ N-jettiness as the jet resolution variable, combining its next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic resummation with fully exclusive NLO matrix elements, and PYTHIA 8 as the backend for further parton showering and hadronization. For hadronic collisions, we take Drell-Yan production as an example to apply our construction. For e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} jets, taking {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub Z}) = 0.1135 from fits to LEP thrust data, together with the PYTHIA 8 hadronization model, we obtain good agreement with LEP data for a variety of 2-jet observables.

  19. Localized Excitations in a Sixth-Order (1+1)-Dimensional Nonlinear Evolution Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Shou-Feng

    2005-01-01

    In this letter, by means of the Lax pair, Darboux transformation, and variable separation approach, a new exact solution of a sixth-order (1+ 1)-dimensional nonlinear evolution equation, which includes some arbitrary functions,is obtained. Abundant new localized excitations can be found by selecting appropriate functions and they are illustrated both analytically and graphically.

  20. Existence of mild solutions for impulsive fractional-order semilinear evolution equations with nonlocal conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Chauhan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work we consider a class of impulsive fractional-order semilinear evolution equations with a nonlocal initial condition. By means of solution operator and application of fixed point theorems we established the existence and uniqueness of a mild solution.

  1. The oxygen evolution reaction on cobalt Part I. Reaction order experiments and impedance measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobussen, A.G.C.; Willems, H.; Wit, J.H.W. de; Broers, G.H.J.

    1984-01-01

    It was found that the oxygen evolution reaction on cobalt in concentrated KOH solutions can be described differently for low and high overpotentials. In the overpotential range from 150 to 280 mV, the reaction has a Tafel slope of approximately 40 mV and a reaction order with respect to the KOH acti

  2. ANTI-PERIODIC SOLUTIONS FOR FIRST AND SECOND ORDER NONLINEAR EVOLUTION EQUATIONS IN BANACH SPACES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Wei; XIANG Xiaoling

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a new existence theorem of anti-periodic solutions for a class ofstrongly nonlinear evolution equations in Banach spaces is presentedThe equations con-tain nonlinear monotone operators and a nonmonotone perturbationMoreover, throughan appropriate transformation, the existence of anti-periodic solutions for a class of second-order nonlinear evolution equations is verifiedOur abstract results are illustrated by anexample from quasi-linear partial differential equations with time anti-periodic conditionsand an example from quasi-linear anti-periodic hyperbolic differential equations.

  3. Evolutional Optimization on Material Ordering and Inventory Control of Supply Chain through Incentive Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasertwattana, Kanit; Shimizu, Yoshiaki; Chiadamrong, Navee

    This paper studied the material ordering and inventory control of supply chain systems. The effect of controlling policies is analyzed under three different configurations of the supply chain systems, and the formulated problem has been solved by using an evolutional optimization method known as Differential Evolution (DE). The numerical results show that the coordinating policy with the incentive scheme outperforms the other policies and can improve the performance of the overall system as well as all members under the concept of supply chain management.

  4. Spin–orbit precession for eccentric black hole binaries at first order in the mass ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcay, Sarp; Dempsey, David; Dolan, Sam R.

    2017-04-01

    We consider spin–orbit (‘geodetic’) precession for a compact binary in strong-field gravity. Specifically, we compute ψ, the ratio of the accumulated spin-precession and orbital angles over one radial period, for a spinning compact body of mass m 1 and spin s 1, with {{s}1}\\ll Gm12/c , orbiting a non-rotating black hole. We show that ψ can be computed for eccentric orbits in both the gravitational self-force and post-Newtonian frameworks, and that the results appear to be consistent. We present a post-Newtonian expansion for ψ at next-to-next-to-leading order, and a Lorenz-gauge gravitational self-force calculation for ψ at first order in the mass ratio. The latter provides new numerical data in the strong-field regime to inform the effective one-body model of the gravitational two-body problem. We conclude that ψ complements the Detweiler redshift z as a key invariant quantity characterizing eccentric orbits in the gravitational two-body problem.

  5. Renormalization group improved bottom mass from {Upsilon} sum rules at NNLL order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang, Andre H.; Stahlhofen, Maximilian [Wien Univ. (Austria). Fakultaet fuer Physik; Ruiz-Femenia, Pedro [Wien Univ. (Austria). Fakultaet fuer Physik; Valencia Univ. - CSIC (Spain). IFIC

    2012-09-15

    We determine the bottom quark mass from non-relativistic large-n {Upsilon} sum rules with renormalization group improvement at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic order. We compute the theoretical moments within the vNRQCD formalism and account for the summation of powers of the Coulomb singularities as well as of logarithmic terms proportional to powers of {alpha}{sub s} ln(n). The renormalization group improvement leads to a substantial stabilization of the theoretical moments compared to previous fixed-order analyses, which did not account for the systematic treatment of the logarithmic {alpha}{sub s} ln(n) terms, and allows for reliable single moment fits. For the current world average of the strong coupling ({alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z})=0.1183{+-}0.0010) we obtain M{sub b}{sup 1S}=4.755{+-}0.057{sub pert} {+-}0.009{sub {alpha}{sub s}}{+-}0.003{sub exp} GeV for the bottom 1S mass and anti m{sub b}(anti m{sub b})=4.235{+-}0.055{sub pert}{+-}0.003{sub exp} GeV for the bottom MS mass, where we have quoted the perturbative error and the uncertainties from the strong coupling and the experimental data.

  6. Spin-orbit precession for eccentric black hole binaries at first order in the mass ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Akcay, Sarp; Dolan, Sam

    2016-01-01

    We consider spin-orbit ("geodetic") precession for a compact binary in strong-field gravity. Specifically, we compute $\\psi$, the ratio of the accumulated spin-precession and orbital angles over one radial period, for a spinning compact body orbiting a non-rotating black hole. We show that $\\psi$ can be computed for eccentric orbits in both the gravitational self-force and post-Newtonian frameworks, and that the results appear to be consistent. We present a post-Newtonian expansion for $\\psi$ at next-to-next-to-leading order, and a Lorenz-gauge gravitational self-force calculation for $\\psi$ at first order in the mass ratio. The latter provides new numerical data in the strong-field regime to inform the Effective One-Body model of the gravitational two-body problem. We conclude that $\\psi$ complements the Detweiler redshift $z$ as a key invariant quantity characterizing eccentric orbits in the gravitational two-body problem.

  7. High-order comparisons between post-Newtonian and perturbative self forces

    CERN Document Server

    Blanchet, Luc; Whiting, Bernard F

    2015-01-01

    Recent numerical and analytic computations based on the self-force (SF) formalism in general relativity showed that half-integral post-Newtonian (PN) terms, i.e. terms involving odd powers of 1/c, arise in the redshift factor of small mass-ratio black-hole binaries on exact circular orbits. Although those contributions might seem puzzling at first sight for conservative systems that are invariant under time-reversal, they are in fact associated with the so-called non-linear tail-of-tail effect. We shall describe here how the next-to-next-to-leading order contributions beyond the first half-integral 5.5PN conservative effect (i.e. up to order 7.5PN included) have been obtained by means of the standard PN formalism applied to binary systems of point-like objects. The resulting redshift factor in the small mass-ratio limit fully agrees with that of the SF approach.

  8. Approximated Lax pairs for the reduced order integration of nonlinear evolution equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbeau, Jean-Frédéric; Lombardi, Damiano

    2014-05-01

    A reduced-order model algorithm, called ALP, is proposed to solve nonlinear evolution partial differential equations. It is based on approximations of generalized Lax pairs. Contrary to other reduced-order methods, like Proper Orthogonal Decomposition, the basis on which the solution is searched for evolves in time according to a dynamics specific to the problem. It is therefore well-suited to solving problems with progressive front or wave propagation. Another difference with other reduced-order methods is that it is not based on an off-line/on-line strategy. Numerical examples are shown for the linear advection, KdV and FKPP equations, in one and two dimensions.

  9. Simplification of the Flux Function for a Higher-order Gas-kinetic Evolution Model

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Guangzhao; Liu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The higher-order gas-kinetic scheme for solving the Navier-Stokes equations has been studied in recent years. In addition to the use of higher-order reconstruction techniques, many terms are used in the Taylor expansion of the gas distribution functions. Therefore, a large number of coefficients need to be determined in the calculation of the time evolution of the gas distribution function at cell interfaces. As a consequence, the higher-order flux function takes much more computational time than that of a second-order gas-kinetic scheme. This paper aims to simplify the evolution model by two steps. Firstly, the coefficients related to the higher-order spatial and temporal derivatives of a distribution function are redefined to reduce the computational cost. Secondly, based on the physical analysis, some terms can be removed without loss of accuracy. Through the simplifications, the computational efficiency of the higher-order scheme is increased significantly. In addition, a self-adaptive numerical viscosity...

  10. Bi-Hamiltonian Structure of a Third-Order Nonlinear Evolution Equation on Plane Curve Motions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In the present paper, we identify the integrability of the third-order nonlinear evolution equation ut = (1/2)((uxx + u)-2)x in a Hamiltonian viewpoint. We prove that the recursion operator obtained by S. Yu. Sakovich is hereditary, and then deduce a bi-Hamiltonian structure of the equation by using some decomposition of the hereditary operator. A hierarchy associated to the equation is also shown.

  11. Minimally non-local nucleon-nucleon potentials in $\\chi$EFT at order $Q^4$

    CERN Document Server

    Piarulli, M; Schiavilla, R; Pérez, R Navarro; Amaro, J E; Arriola, E Ruiz

    2014-01-01

    We construct a coordinate-space chiral potential, including $\\Delta$-isobar intermediate states in its two-pion-exchange component. The contact interactions entering at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-next-to-leading orders ($Q^2$ and $Q^4$, respectively, $Q$ denoting generically the low momentum scale) are rearranged by Fierz transformations to yield terms at most quadratic in the relative momentum operator of the two nucleons. The low-energy constants multiplying these contact interactions are fitted to the 2013 Granada database, consisting of 2309 $pp$ and 2982 $np$ data (including, respectively, 148 and 218 normalizations) in the laboratory-energy range 0--300 MeV. For the total 5291 $pp$ and $np$ data in this range, we obtain a $\\chi^2$/datum of roughly 1.3 for a set of three models characterized by long- and short-range cutoffs, $R_{\\rm L}$ and $R_{\\rm S}$ respectively, ranging from $(R_{\\rm L},R_{\\rm S})=(1.2,0.8)$ fm down to $(0.8,0.6)$ fm. The long-range (short-range) cutoff regularizes the one- ...

  12. Emergence of order in quantum extensions of the classical quasispecies evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narnhofer, Heide; Posch, Harald A.; Thirring, Walter

    2007-10-01

    We study evolution equations which model selection and mutation within the framework of quantum mechanics. The main question is to what extent order is achieved for an ensemble of typical systems. As an indicator for mixing or purification, a quadratic entropy is used which assumes values between zero for pure states and (d-1)/d for fully mixed states. Here, d is the dimension. Whereas the classical counterpart, the quasispecies dynamics, has previously been found to be predominantly mixing, the quantum quasispecies (QS) evolution surprisingly is found to be strictly purifying for all dimensions. This is also typically true for an alternative formulation (AQS) of this quantum mechanical flow. We compare this also to analogous results for the Lindblad evolution. Although the latter may be viewed as a simple linear superposition of the purifying QS and AQS evolutions, it is found to be predominantly mixing. The reason for this behavior may be explained by the fact that the two subprocesses by themselves converge to different pure states, such that the combined process is mixing. These results also apply to high-dimensional systems.

  13. Design Of Multivariable Fractional Order Pid Controller Using Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolution Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivananaithaperumal Sudalaiandi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an automatic tuning of multivariable Fractional-Order Proportional, Integral and Derivative controller (FO-PID parameters using Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolution Strategy (CMAES algorithm. Decoupled multivariable FO-PI and FO-PID controller structures are considered. Oustaloup integer order approximation is used for the fractional integrals and derivatives. For validation, two Multi-Input Multi- Output (MIMO distillation columns described byWood and Berry and Ogunnaike and Ray are considered for the design of multivariable FO-PID controller. Optimal FO-PID controller is designed by minimizing Integral Absolute Error (IAE as objective function. The results of previously reported PI/PID controller are considered for comparison purposes. Simulation results reveal that the performance of FOPI and FO-PID controller is better than integer order PI/PID controller in terms of IAE. Also, CMAES algorithm is suitable for the design of FO-PI / FO-PID controller.

  14. Niche evolution and adaptive radiation: Testing the order of trait divergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerly, D.D.; Schwilk, D.W.; Webb, C.O.

    2006-01-01

    In the course of an adaptive radiation, the evolution of niche parameters is of particular interest for understanding modes of speciation and the consequences for coexistence of related species within communities. We pose a general question: In the course of an evolutionary radiation, do traits related to within-community niche differences (?? niche) evolve before or after differentiation of macrohabitat affinity or climatic tolerances (?? niche)? Here we introduce a new test to address this question, based on a modification of the method of independent contrasts. The divergence order test (DOT) is based on the average age of the nodes on a tree, weighted by the absolute magnitude of the contrast at each node for a particular trait. The comparison of these weighted averages reveals whether large divergences for one trait have occurred earlier or later in the course of diversification, relative to a second trait; significance is determined by bootstrapping from maximum-likelihood ancestral state reconstructions. The method is applied to the evolution of Ceanothus, a woody plant group in California, in which co-occurring species exhibit significant differences in a key leaf trait (specific leaf area) associated with contrasting physiological and life history strategies. Co-occurring species differ more for this trait than expected under a null model of community assembly. This ?? niche difference evolved early in the divergence of two major subclades within Ceanothus, whereas climatic distributions (?? niche traits) diversified later within each of the subclades. However, rapid evolution of climate parameters makes inferences of early divergence events highly uncertain, and differentiation of the ?? niche might have taken place throughout the evolution of the group, without leaving a clear phylogenetic signal. Similar patterns observed in several plant and animal groups suggest that early divergence of ?? niche traits might be a common feature of niche evolution in

  15. A THIRD-ORDER BOUSSINESQ MODEL APPLIED TO NONLINEAR EVOLUTION OF SHALLOW-WATER WAVES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The conventional Boussinesq model is extended to the third order in dispersion and nonlinearity. The new equations are shown to possess better linear dispersion characteristics. For the evolution of periodic waves over a constant depth, the computed wave envelops are spatially aperiodic and skew. The model is then applied to the study of wave focusing by a topographical lens and the results are compared with Whalin's (1971) experimental data as well as some previous results from the conventional Boussinesq model. Encouragingly, improved agreement with Whalin's experimental data is found.

  16. Grain growth by Ordered Coalescence of crystallites in Ceramics : Grain Growth Mechanisms, Microstructure Evolution and Sintering

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Jianfeng

    2013-01-01

    Grain growth and densification process play the two most crucial roles on the microstructure evolution and the achieved performances during sintering of ceramics. In this thesis, the grain growth of SrTiO3, BaTiO3-SrTiO3 solid solutions and Si3N4 ceramics during spark plasma sintering (SPS) were investigated by electron microscopy. SrTiO3 ceramics starting from nanopowders were fabricated by SPS. A novel grain growth mechanism was discovered and named as ordered coalescence (OC) of nanocrysta...

  17. Identification of Unknown Parameters and Orders via Cuckoo Search Oriented Statistically by Differential Evolution for Noncommensurate Fractional-Order Chaotic Systems

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Identification of the unknown parameters and orders of fractional chaotic systems is of vital significance in controlling and synchronization of fractional-order chaotic systems. In this paper, a non-Lyapunov novel approach is proposed to estimate the unknown parameters and orders together for non-commensurate and hyper fractional chaotic systems based on cuckoo search oriented statistically the differential evolution (CSODE). Firstly, a novel Gao's mathematical model is put and analysed in t...

  18. Evolution of optical pulses in the presence of third-order dispersion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debabrata Pal; S K Golam Ali; B Talukdar

    2009-06-01

    We model the propagation of femtosecond pulses through optical fibres by a nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation involving a perturbing term arising due to third-order dispersion in the medium. The perturbative effect of this higher-order dispersion causes the usual NLS soliton to emit a radiation field. As a result, the given initial pulse propagating through the fibre exhibits nonsolitonic behaviour. We make use of a variational method to demonstrate how an initial pulse by the interaction with the emitted radiation can evolve into a soliton. We also demonstrate that the effect of interaction between the initial pulse and radiation field can be accounted for by including, in the evolution equation, terms associated with self-steepening and stimulated Raman scattering that characterize the optical medium.

  19. Dominant NNLO Corrections to Four-Fermion Production at the WW Threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Actis, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    The recent evaluation of the parametrically dominant next-to-next-to-leading order corrections to four-fermion production near the W-pair threshold in the framework of unstable-particle effective theory is briefly summarized.

  20. Three-dimensional ordered mesoporous Co3O4 enhanced by Pd for oxygen evolution reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Qing; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Wang, Jing; Li, Qing-Yu; Xu, Chang-Wei; Lu, Xihong

    2017-01-01

    Considerable efforts have been devoted recently to design and fabrication of high performance and low cost electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution reaction (OER). However, catalytic activity of current electrocatalysts is usually restricted by high onset potential and limited active sites. Herein, we fabricated three-dimensional (3D) highly ordered mesoporous Pd-Co3O4 composite materials as excellent electrocatalysts for OER in alkaline solution with high activity and stability. Three-dimensional highly ordered mesoporous Co3O4 material was firstly synthesized using mesoporous silica KIT-6 as hard template. Then, Pd-Co3O4 nanomaterials were prepared by a simple reduction method. The as-prepared 3D mesoporous Pd-Co3O4 catalysts have ordered mesoporous structure with a high surface area of 81.0 m2 g‑1. Three-dimensional highly ordered mesoporous structure can facilitate diffusion and penetration of electrolyte and oxygen. Moreover, the catalysts can also keep catalyst particles in a well dispersed condition with more catalytic active sites. Electrochemical measurements reveal that the 3D mesoporous Pd-Co3O4 catalysts exhibit superior performance in alkaline solution with low onset potential (0.415 V vs. SCE) and excellent long-duration cycling stability.

  1. High-quality two-nucleon potentials up to fifth order of the chiral expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entem, D. R.; Machleidt, R.; Nosyk, Y.

    2017-08-01

    We present NN potentials through five orders of chiral effective field theory ranging from leading order (LO) to next-to-next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N4LO ). The construction may be perceived as consistent in the sense that the same power counting scheme as well as the same cutoff procedures are applied in all orders. Moreover, the long-range parts of these potentials are fixed by the very accurate π N low-energy constants (LECs) as determined in the Roy-Steiner equations analysis by Hoferichter, Ruiz de Elvira, and coworkers. In fact, the uncertainties of these LECs are so small that a variation within the errors leads to effects that are essentially negligible, reducing the error budget of predictions considerably. The NN potentials are fit to the world NN data below the pion-production threshold of the year 2016. The potential of the highest order (N4LO ) reproduces the world NN data with the outstanding χ2/datum of 1.15, which is the highest precision ever accomplished for any chiral NN potential to date. The NN potentials presented may serve as a solid basis for systematic ab initio calculations of nuclear structure and reactions that allow for a comprehensive error analysis. In particular, the consistent order by order development of the potentials will make possible a reliable determination of the truncation error at each order. Our family of potentials is nonlocal and, generally, of soft character. This feature is reflected in the fact that the predictions for the triton binding energy (from two-body forces only) converges to about 8.1 MeV at the highest orders. This leaves room for three-nucleon-force contributions of moderate size.

  2. B-site Cation Ordered Double Perovskites as Efficient and Stable Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Evolution Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hainan; Chen, Gao; Zhu, Yinlong; Liu, Bo; Zhou, Wei; Shao, Zongping

    2017-03-02

    Simple disordered perovskite oxides have been intensively exploited as promising electrocatalysts for catalysing the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) towards its application in water splitting, reversible fuel cells, and rechargeable metal-air batteries. Here, we demonstrated that B-site cation-ordered double perovskite Ba2BixSc0.2Co1.8-xO6-δ with two types of cobalt local environments are superior electrocatalysts for OER in alkaline solutions, demonstrating ultrahigh catalytic activity. In addition, no obvious performance degradation was observed for the Ba2Bi0.1Sc0.2Co1.7O6-δ sample after a continuous chronopotentiometry test. The critical role of the ordered [Co2+] and [Sc3+, Bi5+, Co3+] dual environments in improving OER activity was exhibited. The aforementioned results indicate that B-site cation-ordered double perovskite oxides may represent a new class of promising electrocatalysts for the OER in sustainable energy storage and conversion systems.

  3. Evolution of Bond-Order-Wave Phase in One-Dimensional Mott Insulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Xiao-Xuan; PAN Zheng-Quan; XU Zhao-Xin; DAI Jian-Hui; YING He-Ping

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, by using the level spectroscopy method and bosonization theory, we discuss the evolution of the bond-order-wave (BOW) phase in a one-dimensional half-filled extended Hubbard model with the on-site Coulomb repulsion U as well as the inter-site Coulomb repulsion V and antiferromagnetic exchange J. After clarifying the generic phase diagrams in three limiting cases with one of the parameters being fixed at zero individually, we find that the BOW phase in the U-V phase diagram is initially enlarged as J increases from zero but is eventually suppressed as J increases further in the strong-coupling regime. A three-dimensional phase diagram is suggested where the BOW phase exists in an extended region separated from the spin-density-wave and charge-density-wave phases.

  4. Second-order corrections to mean field evolution for weakly interacting Bosons. I

    CERN Document Server

    Grillakis, Manoussos G; Margetis, Dionisios

    2009-01-01

    Inspired by the works of Rodnianski and Schlein and Wu, we derive a new nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation that describes a second-order correction to the usual tensor product (mean-field) approximation for the Hamiltonian evolution of a many-particle system in Bose-Einstein condensation. We show that our new equation, if it has solutions with appropriate smoothness and decay properties, implies a new Fock space estimate. We also show that for an interaction potential $v(x)= \\epsilon \\chi(x) |x|^{-1}$, where $\\epsilon$ is sufficiently small and $\\chi \\in C_0^{\\infty}$, our program can be easily implemented locally in time. We leave global in time issues, more singular potentials and sophisticated estimates for a subsequent part (part II) of this paper.

  5. Dynamical evolution of space debris on high-elliptical orbits near high-order resonance zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Eduard; Zakharova, Polina

    Orbital evolution of objects on Molniya-type orbits is considered near high-order resonance zones. Initial conditions correspond to high-elliptical orbits with the critical inclination 63.4 degrees. High-order resonances are analyzed. Resonance orders are more than 5 and less than 50. Frequencies of perturbations caused by the effect of sectorial and tesseral harmonics of the Earth's gravitational potential are linear combinations of the mean motion of a satellite, angular velocities of motion of the pericenter and node of its orbit, and the angular velocity of the Earth. Frequencies of perturbations were calculated by taking into account secular perturbations from the Earth oblateness, the Moon, the Sun, and a solar radiation pressure. Resonance splitting effect leads to three sub-resonances. The study of dynamical evolution on long time intervals was performed on the basis of the results of numerical simulation. We used "A Numerical Model of the Motion of Artificial Earth's Satellites", developed by the Research Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics of the Tomsk State University. The model of disturbing forces taken into account the main perturbing factors: the gravitational field of the Earth, the attraction of the Moon and the Sun, the tides in the Earth’s body, the solar radiation pressure, taking into account the shadow of the Earth, the Poynting-Robertson effect, and the atmospheric drag. Area-to-mass ratio varied from small values corresponding to satellites to big ones corresponding to space debris. The locations and sizes of resonance zones were refined from numerical simulation. The Poynting-Robertson effect results in a secular decrease in the semi-major axis of a spherically symmetrical satellite. In resonance regions the effect weakens slightly. Reliable estimates of secular perturbations of the semi-major axis were obtained from the numerical simulation. Under the Poynting-Robertson effect objects pass through the regions of high-order

  6. Pangenome Analysis of Burkholderia pseudomallei: Genome Evolution Preserves Gene Order despite High Recombination Rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senanu M Spring-Pearson

    Full Text Available The pangenomic diversity in Burkholderia pseudomallei is high, with approximately 5.8% of the genome consisting of genomic islands. Genomic islands are known hotspots for recombination driven primarily by site-specific recombination associated with tRNAs. However, recombination rates in other portions of the genome are also high, a feature we expected to disrupt gene order. We analyzed the pangenome of 37 isolates of B. pseudomallei and demonstrate that the pangenome is 'open', with approximately 136 new genes identified with each new genome sequenced, and that the global core genome consists of 4568±16 homologs. Genes associated with metabolism were statistically overrepresented in the core genome, and genes associated with mobile elements, disease, and motility were primarily associated with accessory portions of the pangenome. The frequency distribution of genes present in between 1 and 37 of the genomes analyzed matches well with a model of genome evolution in which 96% of the genome has very low recombination rates but 4% of the genome recombines readily. Using homologous genes among pairs of genomes, we found that gene order was highly conserved among strains, despite the high recombination rates previously observed. High rates of gene transfer and recombination are incompatible with retaining gene order unless these processes are either highly localized to specific sites within the genome, or are characterized by symmetrical gene gain and loss. Our results demonstrate that both processes occur: localized recombination introduces many new genes at relatively few sites, and recombination throughout the genome generates the novel multi-locus sequence types previously observed while preserving gene order.

  7. Pangenome Analysis of Burkholderia pseudomallei: Genome Evolution Preserves Gene Order despite High Recombination Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring-Pearson, Senanu M; Stone, Joshua K; Doyle, Adina; Allender, Christopher J; Okinaka, Richard T; Mayo, Mark; Broomall, Stacey M; Hill, Jessica M; Karavis, Mark A; Hubbard, Kyle S; Insalaco, Joseph M; McNew, Lauren A; Rosenzweig, C Nicole; Gibbons, Henry S; Currie, Bart J; Wagner, David M; Keim, Paul; Tuanyok, Apichai

    2015-01-01

    The pangenomic diversity in Burkholderia pseudomallei is high, with approximately 5.8% of the genome consisting of genomic islands. Genomic islands are known hotspots for recombination driven primarily by site-specific recombination associated with tRNAs. However, recombination rates in other portions of the genome are also high, a feature we expected to disrupt gene order. We analyzed the pangenome of 37 isolates of B. pseudomallei and demonstrate that the pangenome is 'open', with approximately 136 new genes identified with each new genome sequenced, and that the global core genome consists of 4568±16 homologs. Genes associated with metabolism were statistically overrepresented in the core genome, and genes associated with mobile elements, disease, and motility were primarily associated with accessory portions of the pangenome. The frequency distribution of genes present in between 1 and 37 of the genomes analyzed matches well with a model of genome evolution in which 96% of the genome has very low recombination rates but 4% of the genome recombines readily. Using homologous genes among pairs of genomes, we found that gene order was highly conserved among strains, despite the high recombination rates previously observed. High rates of gene transfer and recombination are incompatible with retaining gene order unless these processes are either highly localized to specific sites within the genome, or are characterized by symmetrical gene gain and loss. Our results demonstrate that both processes occur: localized recombination introduces many new genes at relatively few sites, and recombination throughout the genome generates the novel multi-locus sequence types previously observed while preserving gene order.

  8. Gene order data from a model amphibian (Ambystoma: new perspectives on vertebrate genome structure and evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voss S Randal

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because amphibians arise from a branch of the vertebrate evolutionary tree that is juxtaposed between fishes and amniotes, they provide important comparative perspective for reconstructing character changes that have occurred during vertebrate evolution. Here, we report the first comparative study of vertebrate genome structure that includes a representative amphibian. We used 491 transcribed sequences from a salamander (Ambystoma genetic map and whole genome assemblies for human, mouse, rat, dog, chicken, zebrafish, and the freshwater pufferfish Tetraodon nigroviridis to compare gene orders and rearrangement rates. Results Ambystoma has experienced a rate of genome rearrangement that is substantially lower than mammalian species but similar to that of chicken and fish. Overall, we found greater conservation of genome structure between Ambystoma and tetrapod vertebrates, nevertheless, 57% of Ambystoma-fish orthologs are found in conserved syntenies of four or more genes. Comparisons between Ambystoma and amniotes reveal extensive conservation of segmental homology for 57% of the presumptive Ambystoma-amniote orthologs. Conclusion Our analyses suggest relatively constant interchromosomal rearrangement rates from the euteleost ancestor to the origin of mammals and illustrate the utility of amphibian mapping data in establishing ancestral amniote and tetrapod gene orders. Comparisons between Ambystoma and amniotes reveal some of the key events that have structured the human genome since diversification of the ancestral amniote lineage.

  9. Second order corrections to mean field evolution for weakly interacting Bosons in the case of 3-body interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xuwen

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the Hamiltonian evolution of N weakly interacting Bosons. Assuming triple collisions with singular potentials, its mean field approximation is given by a quintic Hartree equation. We construct a second order correction to the mean field approximation using a kernel k(t,x,y) and derive an evolution equation for k. We show the global existence for the resulting evolution equation for the correction and establish an apriori estimate comparing the approximation to the exact Hamiltonian evolution. Our error estimate is global and uniform in time. Comparing with the work in [20,11,12] where the error estimate grows in time, our approximation tracks the exact dynamics for all time with an error of the order O(1/$\\sqrt{N}$).

  10. $\\alpha_s$ from soft parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions

    CERN Document Server

    Perez-Ramos, Redamy

    2015-01-01

    The QCD coupling α s is extracted at approximate next-to-next-to-leading-order (NNLO ∗ ) accuracy from the energy evolution of the first two moments (multiplicity and mean) of the parton- to-hadron fragmentation functions at low fractional hadron momentum z. Comparisons of the experimental e + e − and DIS e ± p jet data to our NNLO ∗ +NNLL predictions, allow us to obtain α s (m 2 Z ) = 0.1205±0.0010 +0.0022 −0.0000 , in excellent agreement with the current world average.

  11. Low-energy NN scattering with a Brazilian chiral potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, E.F. [Universidade Estadual do Sudoeste da Bahia (UESB), Vitoria da Conquista, BA (Brazil); Rocha, C.A. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Sao Paulo (IFSP), SP (Brazil); Szpigel, S. [Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie (UPM), SP (Brazil); Timoteo, V.S. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: We apply the subtracted kernel method (SKM), a renormalization approach based on recursive multiple subtractions performed in the kernel of the scattering equation, to a Brazilian chiral nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions up to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-order (N3LO). We evaluate the phase shifts in the 1S0 and 3P0 channels and explicitly demonstrate that the SKM procedure is renormalization group invariant under the change of the subtraction scale through a non-relativistic Callan-Symanzik flow equation for the evolution of the renormalized NN interactions. (author)

  12. A calculation of the three-loop helicity-dependent splitting functions in QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Vogt, A; Vermaseren, J A M

    2014-01-01

    We have calculated the complete matrix of three-loop helicity-difference (`polarized') splitting functions Delta P_ik^(2), i,k = q,g, in massless perturbative QCD. In this note we briefly discuss some properties of the polarized splitting functions and our non-standard determination of the hitherto missing lower-row quantities Delta P_gq^(2) and Delta P_gg^(2). The resulting next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) corrections to the evolution of polarized parton distributions are illustrated and found to be small even at rather large values of the strong coupling constant alpha_s.

  13. Towards three-loop QCD corrections to the time-like splitting functions

    CERN Document Server

    Gituliar, Oleksandr

    2015-01-01

    We report on the status of a direct computation of the time-like splitting functions at next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD. Time-like splitting functions govern the collinear kinematics of inclusive hadron production and the evolution of the parton fragmentation distributions. Current knowledge about them at three loops has been inferred by means of crossing symmetry from their related space-like counterparts, which has left certain parts of the off-diagonal quark-gluon splitting function undetermined. This motivates an independent calculation from first principles. We review the tools and methods which are applied to attack the problem.

  14. Development and evolution of dentition pattern and tooth order in the skates and rays (batoidea; chondrichthyes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlie J Underwood

    Full Text Available Shark and ray (elasmobranch dentitions are well known for their multiple generations of teeth, with isolated teeth being common in the fossil record. However, how the diverse dentitions characteristic of elasmobranchs form is still poorly understood. Data on the development and maintenance of the dental patterning in this major vertebrate group will allow comparisons to other morphologically diverse taxa, including the bony fishes, in order to identify shared pattern characters for the vertebrate dentition as a whole. Data is especially lacking from the Batoidea (skates and rays, hence our objective is to compile data on embryonic and adult batoid tooth development contributing to ordering of the dentition, from cleared and stained specimens and micro-CT scans, with 3D rendered models. We selected species (adult and embryonic spanning phylogenetically significant batoid clades, such that our observations may raise questions about relationships within the batoids, particularly with respect to current molecular-based analyses. We include developmental data from embryos of recent model organisms Leucoraja erinacea and Raja clavata to evaluate the earliest establishment of the dentition. Characters of the batoid dentition investigated include alternate addition of teeth as offset successional tooth rows (versus single separate files, presence of a symphyseal initiator region (symphyseal tooth present, or absent, but with two parasymphyseal teeth and a restriction to tooth addition along each jaw reducing the number of tooth families, relative to addition of successor teeth within each family. Our ultimate aim is to understand the shared characters of the batoids, and whether or not these dental characters are shared more broadly within elasmobranchs, by comparing these to dentitions in shark outgroups. These developmental morphological analyses will provide a solid basis to better understand dental evolution in these important vertebrate groups as

  15. Development and evolution of dentition pattern and tooth order in the skates and rays (batoidea; chondrichthyes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Charlie J; Johanson, Zerina; Welten, Monique; Metscher, Brian; Rasch, Liam J; Fraser, Gareth J; Smith, Moya Meredith

    2015-01-01

    Shark and ray (elasmobranch) dentitions are well known for their multiple generations of teeth, with isolated teeth being common in the fossil record. However, how the diverse dentitions characteristic of elasmobranchs form is still poorly understood. Data on the development and maintenance of the dental patterning in this major vertebrate group will allow comparisons to other morphologically diverse taxa, including the bony fishes, in order to identify shared pattern characters for the vertebrate dentition as a whole. Data is especially lacking from the Batoidea (skates and rays), hence our objective is to compile data on embryonic and adult batoid tooth development contributing to ordering of the dentition, from cleared and stained specimens and micro-CT scans, with 3D rendered models. We selected species (adult and embryonic) spanning phylogenetically significant batoid clades, such that our observations may raise questions about relationships within the batoids, particularly with respect to current molecular-based analyses. We include developmental data from embryos of recent model organisms Leucoraja erinacea and Raja clavata to evaluate the earliest establishment of the dentition. Characters of the batoid dentition investigated include alternate addition of teeth as offset successional tooth rows (versus single separate files), presence of a symphyseal initiator region (symphyseal tooth present, or absent, but with two parasymphyseal teeth) and a restriction to tooth addition along each jaw reducing the number of tooth families, relative to addition of successor teeth within each family. Our ultimate aim is to understand the shared characters of the batoids, and whether or not these dental characters are shared more broadly within elasmobranchs, by comparing these to dentitions in shark outgroups. These developmental morphological analyses will provide a solid basis to better understand dental evolution in these important vertebrate groups as well as the

  16. Multivariate High Order Statistics of Measurements of the Temporal Evolution of Fission Chain-Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattingly, J.K.

    2001-03-08

    The development of high order statistical analyses applied to measurements of the temporal evolution of fission chain-reactions is described. These statistics are derived via application of Bayes' rule to conditional probabilities describing a sequence of events in a fissile system beginning with the initiation of a chain-reaction by source neutrons and ending with counting events in a collection of neutron-sensitive detectors. Two types of initiating neutron sources are considered: (1) a directly observable source introduced by the experimenter (active initiation), and (2) a source that is intrinsic to the system and is not directly observable (passive initiation). The resulting statistics describe the temporal distribution of the population of prompt neutrons in terms of the time-delays between members of a collection (an n-tuplet) of correlated detector counts, that, in turn, may be collectively correlated with a detected active source neutron emission. These developments are a unification and extension of Rossi-a, pulsed neutron, and neutron noise methods, each of which measure the temporal distribution of pairs of correlated events, to produce a method that measures the temporal distribution of n-tuplets of correlated counts of arbitrary dimension n. In general the technique should expand present capabilities in the analysis of neutron counting measurements.

  17. Evolution of Web Services in EOSDIS: Search and Order Metadata Registry (ECHO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Andrew; Ramapriyan, Hampapuram; Lowe, Dawn

    2009-01-01

    During 2005 through 2008, NASA defined and implemented a major evolutionary change in it Earth Observing system Data and Information System (EOSDIS) to modernize its capabilities. This implementation was based on a vision for 2015 developed during 2005. The EOSDIS 2015 Vision emphasizes increased end-to-end data system efficiency and operability; increased data usability; improved support for end users; and decreased operations costs. One key feature of the Evolution plan was achieving higher operational maturity (ingest, reconciliation, search and order, performance, error handling) for the NASA s Earth Observing System Clearinghouse (ECHO). The ECHO system is an operational metadata registry through which the scientific community can easily discover and exchange NASA's Earth science data and services. ECHO contains metadata for 2,726 data collections comprising over 87 million individual data granules and 34 million browse images, consisting of NASA s EOSDIS Data Centers and the United States Geological Survey's Landsat Project holdings. ECHO is a middleware component based on a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA). The system is comprised of a set of infrastructure services that enable the fundamental SOA functions: publish, discover, and access Earth science resources. It also provides additional services such as user management, data access control, and order management. The ECHO system has a data registry and a services registry. The data registry enables organizations to publish EOS and other Earth-science related data holdings to a common metadata model. These holdings are described through metadata in terms of datasets (types of data) and granules (specific data items of those types). ECHO also supports browse images, which provide a visual representation of the data. The published metadata can be mapped to and from existing standards (e.g., FGDC, ISO 19115). With ECHO, users can find the metadata stored in the data registry and then access the data either

  18. Identification of Unknown Parameters and Orders via Cuckoo Search Oriented Statistically by Differential Evolution for Noncommensurate Fractional-Order Chaotic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Gao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a non-Lyapunov novel approach is proposed to estimate the unknown parameters and orders together for noncommensurate and hyper fractional chaotic systems based on cuckoo search oriented statistically by the differential evolution (CSODE. Firstly, a novel Gaos’ mathematical model is proposed and analyzed in three submodels, not only for the unknown orders and parameters’ identification but also for systems’ reconstruction of fractional chaos systems with time delays or not. Then the problems of fractional-order chaos’ identification are converted into a multiple modal nonnegative functions’ minimization through a proper translation, which takes fractional-orders and parameters as its particular independent variables. And the objective is to find the best combinations of fractional-orders and systematic parameters of fractional order chaotic systems as special independent variables such that the objective function is minimized. Simulations are done to estimate a series of noncommensurate and hyper fractional chaotic systems with the new approaches based on CSODE, the cuckoo search, and Genetic Algorithm, respectively. The experiments’ results show that the proposed identification mechanism based on CSODE for fractional orders and parameters is a successful method for fractional-order chaotic systems, with the advantages of high precision and robustness.

  19. Aspects of Z boson production at higher orders at hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, Ryan D.

    Electroweak gauge boson production is a critical component of physics studies performed at hadron colliders. It serves as a 'standard candle' at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In this thesis, various aspects of Z boson production at hadron colliders are considered. We introduce an improved version of the simulation code FEWZ ( Fully Exclusive W and Z Production) for hadron collider production of lepton pairs through the Drell-Yan process at next-to-next-to-leading-order in quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The program is fully differential in the phase space of leptons and additional hadronic radiation. We discuss improvements in performance and user customization through phase-space constraints and predefined histograms, illustrating the new features by presenting numerous phenomenological results for LHC physics. Considering new physics effects to electroweak gauge boson production at hadron colliders, we study the supersymmetric QCD corrections to dilepton production with an associated jet at the LHC. We investigate these effects to the integrated cross section and the kinematic distributions of the final state leptons and jet. Electroweak gauge bosons are intimately related to electroweak symmetry breaking, which is achieved in the Standard Model (SM) by the Higgs boson, a scalar particle. Extending the SM scalar sector with new color-octet scalars, we investigate the phenomenology of (8, 2)1/2 doublets by studying their properties and production mechanisms at the LHC. Studying these color-octet scalars provides a window to the underlying Yukawa structure of the scalar sector. We discuss the discovery potential of color-octet scalars at the LHC and their implications on adjoint SU(5) grand unified theories.

  20. The Effect of Inhibitory Neuron on the Evolution Model of Higher-Order Coupling Neural Oscillator Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Qi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We proposed a higher-order coupling neural network model including the inhibitory neurons and examined the dynamical evolution of average number density and phase-neural coding under the spontaneous activity and external stimulating condition. The results indicated that increase of inhibitory coupling strength will cause decrease of average number density, whereas increase of excitatory coupling strength will cause increase of stable amplitude of average number density. Whether the neural oscillator population is able to enter the new synchronous oscillation or not is determined by excitatory and inhibitory coupling strength. In the presence of external stimulation, the evolution of the average number density is dependent upon the external stimulation and the coupling term in which the dominator will determine the final evolution.

  1. On modeling micro-structural evolution using a higher order strain gradient continuum theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Naaman, S. A.; Nielsen, K. L.; Niordson, C. F.

    2016-01-01

    the experimentally observed micro-structural behavior, within a framework based on continuous field quantities, poses obvious challenges, since the evolution of dislocation structures is inherently a discrete and discontinuous process. This challenge, in particular, motivates the present study, and the aim...

  2. The evolution of orientational order in sheared, 2D granular media of convex and concave elongated particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschall, Theodore; Teitel, Stephen

    We simulate granular media consisting of elongated grains in two dimensions with a uniform background shear. We study the orientational distribution and rotation over a wide range of packing fractions, and find that the distribution reaches a stable steady-state under most initial conditions. The nematic director increases with the packing fraction, but the nematic order parameter exhibits non-monotonic behavior, which occurs well below jamming. We observe the evolution of the orientational distribution starting from configurations with the director out of alignment from its steady state orientation, and the evolution of highly ordered initial states. In general, the tumbling motion caused by the background shear causes such systems to reorder into the steady-state, but some dense, highly-ordered configurations maintain their order and exhibit wagging behavior. This can occur both above and below the jamming transition. These results for smooth, convex, spherocylindrical particles are contrasted with those for concave cross-like particles. This work is supported by NSF Grant DMRPD-09-1765.

  3. From the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam Model to Higher-Order Nonlinear Evolution Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashov, Nikolay A.

    2016-02-01

    We consider generalizations of the Korteweg-de Vries equation of the fifth and seventh order obtained from the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam problem. Analytical properties of the equation are investigated taking into account the Painlevé test. It is shown that the equations of the fifth and seventh order do not have the Painlevé property. We demonstrate that there are expansions of the solution in the Laurent series and as a consequence we can find exact solutions of the equations. Solitary wave and elliptic solutions of the fifth and seventh order equations are presented.

  4. Ordering Interfluves: a Simple Proposal for Understanding Critical Zone Evolution and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecheisen, Z. S.; Richter, D., Jr.; Moon, S.; Halpin, P. N.

    2015-12-01

    A geomorphic interfluve ordering system, a reciprocal to the Hortonian-Strahler stream network order, is envisioned at the Calhoun Critical Zone Observatory (CCZO) in the South Carolina Piedmont. In this system the narrowest and most highly dissected interfluves (gentle ridges and hilltops) are 1st order and increase in rank dendritically through interfluve branching and broadening. Interfluve order attends to the structure, function, and management of residual porous-solid systems in the transport of water, solutes, and eroded solids in our deeply weathered (>30m soil/saprolite) critical zone. Recently generated geospatial data regarding the interactions of geomorphology, human land use, and forest ecology further strengthen the utility of this system. These upland networks and corresponding "land-sheds" have potential in linking recent work in the fields of geophysics and geomorphology regarding bedrock weathering front dynamics. Patterns of bedrock weathering depth, landcover & land-use change, and soil erosion are considered as they correspond to interfluve order. With LiDAR mapping and the burgeoning development and utilization of geophysical techniques and models enabling new quantitative research of critical zone landscape structure and function, many physiographic regions could benefit from a system that delineates and orders interfluve networks.

  5. Role of carbon order in structural transformations and hydrogen evolution induced by reactive ball milling in cyclohexene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakti, A.; Wonderling, N.M.; Clifford, C.E.B.; Badding, J.V.; Lueking, A.D. [Penn State University, University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Energy and Mineral Engineering

    2008-11-15

    Demineralized Summit (DS) anthracite, DS annealed at 1673 K, and graphite are used to explore the effect of precursor order on structural transformations and H{sub 2} evolution that result during reactive ball milling. Carbon structure was assessed before and after milling with temperature-programmed oxidation, X-ray diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy, N{sub 2} adsorption, He density, and solvent swelling. Graphite milled in cyclohexene is primarily nanocrystalline graphite, with 8 wt % amorphous content leading to low-temperature oxidation, swelling, increased surface area, and mesoporosity. Milling the disordered DS leads to signs of increased sp{sup 2} clustering, increased cross-linking, a significant ultramicroporosity with pores less than 8 angstrom, and low-temperature H{sub 2} evolution. The carbon fraction of annealed DS behaves similarly to graphite in the mill.

  6. The dynamic evolution of limit order book driven by order flows%订单流驱动的限价订单簿动态演化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王苏生; 江国朝; 董海玲

    2011-01-01

    The limit order book in continuous auction stock market could be viewed as a multi-server queueing system, where each price level was seen as a server. Then the limit order book could be modeled by a multi-dimensional random process. As order submission strategies of market participants often depended on the depth of limit order book, state-dependent Poisson processes were introduced to model the arrival and cancellation processes of limit order flows, namely the parameters of the Poisson processes depended on the state of limit order book. The dynamic evolution of limit order book driven by order flows was studied piecewise according to the moments of mid-price moves. The development of order quantity at each price level was proved to be a birth-death process before mid-price move. The transition probabilities and their Kolmogorov backward and forward differential equations of these birthdeath processes were given. At the moment of mid-price move, the changes of bid/ask price and order quantity at each price level caused by different types of order submissions were analyzed.%以连续竞价股票市场的限价订单簿为研究对象,将其看作一个多服务台的排队系统,每个价格档看作一个服务台,运用多维随机过程模拟限价订单簿上订单数目的演化.由于市场参与者的订单提交决策会受到限价订单簿深度的影响,因此引入状态依赖的泊松过程模拟限价订单流的到达和取消过程,即泊松过程的参数依赖于所处价格档上存量订单的数目.根据买卖中间价格改变的时刻对限价订单簿的动态演化分段进行研究,证明买卖中间价格改变前,限价订单簿内各个价格档上订单数目的发展变化服从生灭过程,并分别给出各生灭过程的转移概率和它们满足的Kolmogorov向后向前微分方程.而对于买卖中间价格发生变化的时刻,分析了不同类型的订单提交对最优买卖价格和各个价格档上订单数目的影响.

  7. Local order evolution of liquid Cu during glass transition under different pressures: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y.D., E-mail: ydli@ustc.edu [School of Physics and Material Science, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China); Lu, Q.L. [School of Physics and Material Science, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China); Wang, C.C., E-mail: ccwang@ahu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Material Science, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China); Huang, S.G. [School of Physics and Material Science, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China); Liu, C.S. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2013-01-01

    Based on the second-moment approximation of tight-binding scheme, constant-pressure molecular dynamics simulations are performed for liquid Cu during the glass transition under different pressures. By means of pair analysis technique and bond orientational order analysis we find that the dominant bond pairs are those related to fcc and hcp crystalline order not those representing icosahedral short-range order (ISRO) when the systems enter into glass transition region. Although these two kinds of bond pairs compete with each other, the system tends towards a mixture of crystalline bond pairs during glass formation. The effect on various bond pairs brought about by higher pressure is much less for liquids than for glasses. The experimental observation of a shoulder on the second peak of the structure factor for supercooled liquids might not merely attribute to ISRO, since supercooled liquid Cu exhibits such a shoulder, but does not display an enhanced icosahedral symmetry.

  8. Relativistic orbits around spinning supermassive black holes. Secular evolution to 4.5 post-Newtonian order

    CERN Document Server

    Will, Clifford M

    2016-01-01

    We derive the secular evolution of the orbital elements of a stellar-mass object orbiting a spinning massive black hole. We use the post-Newtonian approximation in harmonic coordinates, with test-body equations of motion for the conservative dynamics that are valid through 3PN order, including spin-orbit, quadrupole and (spin)$^2$ effects, and with radiation-reaction contributions linear in the mass of the body that are valid through 4.5PN order, including the 4PN damping effects of spin-orbit coupling. The evolution equations for the osculating orbit elements are iterated to high PN orders using a two-timescale approach and averaging over orbital timescales. We derive a criterion for terminating the orbit when its Carter constant drops below a critical value, whereupon the body plunges across the event horizon at the next closest approach. The results are valid for arbitrary eccentricities and arbitrary inclinations. We then analyze numerically the orbits of objects injected into high-eccentricity orbits via...

  9. The Universal Transverse Momentum Dependent Soft Function at NNLO

    CERN Document Server

    Echevarria, Miguel G; Vladimirov, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    All (un)polarized transverse momentum dependent functions (TMDs), both distribution and fragmentation functions, are defined with the same universal soft function, which cancels spurious rapidity divergences within an individual TMD and renders them well-defined hadronic quantities. Moreover, it is independent of the kinematics, whether it is Drell-Yan ($e^+e^-\\rightarrow 2$ hadrons) or deep inelastic scattering. In this paper we provide this soft function at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO), necessary for the calculation of all TMDs at the same order, and to perform the resummation of large logarithms at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-logarithmic accuracy. From the results we obtain the $D$ function at NNLO, which governs the evolution of all TMDs. This work represents the first independent and direct calculation of this quantity. Given the all order relation through a Casimir scaling between the soft function relevant for gluon TMDs and the one for quark TMDs, we also obtain the first at NNLO. The used...

  10. Higher order effects in non-linear evolution from a veto in rapidities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chachamis, G.; Lublinsky, M.; Sabio Vera, A.

    2005-02-01

    Higher order corrections to the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation have been estimated by introducing a rapidity veto which forbids subsequent emissions to be very close in rapidity and is known to mimic higher order corrections to the linear BFKL equation. The rapidity veto constraint has been first introduced using analytical arguments obtaining a power growth with energy, Q(Y)˜e, of the saturation scale of λ˜0.45. Then a numerical analysis for the non-linear Balitsky-Kovchegov equation has been carried out for phenomenological rapidities: when a veto of about two units of rapidity is introduced for a fixed value of the coupling constant of α=0.2 the saturation scale λ decreases from ˜0.6 to ˜0.3, and when running coupling effects are taken into account it decreases from ˜0.4 to ˜0.3.

  11. Unitary evolution of a pair of Unruh-DeWitt detectors calculated efficiently to an arbitrary perturbative order

    CERN Document Server

    Bradler, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    Unruh-DeWitt Hamiltonian couples a scalar field with a two-level atom serving as a particle detector model. Two such detectors held by different observers following general trajectories can be used to study entanglement behavior in quantum field theory. Lacking other methods, the unitary evolution must be studied perturbatively which is considerably time-consuming even to a low perturbative order. Here we completely solve the problem and present a simple algorithm for a perturbative calculation based on a solution of a system of linear Diophantine equations. The algorithm runs polynomially with the perturbative order. This should be contrasted with the number of perturbative contributions of the scalar phi^4 theory that is known to grow factorially. Speaking of the phi^4 model, a welcome collateral result is obtained to mechanically (almost mindlessly) calculate the interacting scalar phi^n theory without resorting to Feynman diagrams. We demonstrate it on a typical textbook example of two interacting fields ...

  12. Non-equilibrium statistical field theory for classical particles: Non-linear structure evolution with first-order interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Bartelmann, Matthias; Berg, Daniel; Kozlikin, Elena; Lilow, Robert; Viermann, Celia

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the power spectrum of density fluctuations in the statistical non-equilibrium field theory for classical, microscopic degrees of freedom to first order in the interaction potential. We specialise our result to cosmology by choosing appropriate initial conditions and propagators and show that the non-linear growth of the density power spectrum found in numerical simulations of cosmic structure evolution is reproduced well to redshift zero and for arbitrary wave numbers. The main difference of our approach to ordinary cosmological perturbation theory is that we do not perturb a dynamical equation for the density contrast. Rather, we transport the initial phase-space distribution of a canonical particle ensemble forward in time and extract any collective information from it at the time needed. Since even small perturbations of particle trajectories can lead to large fluctuations in density, our approach allows to reach high density contrast already at first order in the perturbations of the particle...

  13. Two complete mitochondrial genomes from Praticolella mexicana Perez, 2011 (Polygyridae) and gene order evolution in Helicoidea (Mollusca, Gastropoda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minton, Russell L.; Cruz, Marco A. Martinez; Farman, Mark L.; Perez, Kathryn E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Helicoidea is a diverse group of land snails with a global distribution. While much is known regarding the relationships of helicoid taxa, comparatively little is known about the evolution of the mitochondrial genome in the superfamily. We sequenced two complete mitochondrial genomes from Praticolella mexicana Perez, 2011 representing the first such data from the helicoid family Polygyridae, and used them in an evolutionary analysis of mitogenomic gene order. We found the mitochondrial genome of Praticolella mexicana to be 14,008 bp in size, possessing the typical 37 metazoan genes. Multiple alternate stop codons are used, as are incomplete stop codons. Mitogenome size and nucleotide content is consistent with other helicoid species. Our analysis of gene order suggested that Helicoidea has undergone four mitochondrial rearrangements in the past. Two rearrangements were limited to tRNA genes only, and two involved protein coding genes. PMID:27833437

  14. A Hybrid Optimization Framework with POD-based Order Reduction and Design-Space Evolution Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoman, Satyajit S.

    The main objective of this research is to develop an innovative multi-fidelity multi-disciplinary design, analysis and optimization suite that integrates certain solution generation codes and newly developed innovative tools to improve the overall optimization process. The research performed herein is divided into two parts: (1) the development of an MDAO framework by integration of variable fidelity physics-based computational codes, and (2) enhancements to such a framework by incorporating innovative features extending its robustness. The first part of this dissertation describes the development of a conceptual Multi-Fidelity Multi-Strategy and Multi-Disciplinary Design Optimization Environment (M3 DOE), in context of aircraft wing optimization. M 3 DOE provides the user a capability to optimize configurations with a choice of (i) the level of fidelity desired, (ii) the use of a single-step or multi-step optimization strategy, and (iii) combination of a series of structural and aerodynamic analyses. The modularity of M3 DOE allows it to be a part of other inclusive optimization frameworks. The M 3 DOE is demonstrated within the context of shape and sizing optimization of the wing of a Generic Business Jet aircraft. Two different optimization objectives, viz. dry weight minimization, and cruise range maximization are studied by conducting one low-fidelity and two high-fidelity optimization runs to demonstrate the application scope of M3 DOE. The second part of this dissertation describes the development of an innovative hybrid optimization framework that extends the robustness of M 3 DOE by employing a proper orthogonal decomposition-based design-space order reduction scheme combined with the evolutionary algorithm technique. The POD method of extracting dominant modes from an ensemble of candidate configurations is used for the design-space order reduction. The snapshot of candidate population is updated iteratively using evolutionary algorithm technique of

  15. A bioinformatics approach to the structure, function, and evolution of the nucleoprotein of the order mononegavirales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean B Cleveland

    Full Text Available The goal of this Bioinformatic study is to investigate sequence conservation in relation to evolutionary function/structure of the nucleoprotein of the order Mononegavirales. In the combined analysis of 63 representative nucleoprotein (N sequences from four viral families (Bornaviridae, Filoviridae, Rhabdoviridae, and Paramyxoviridae we predict the regions of protein disorder, intra-residue contact and co-evolving residues. Correlations between location and conservation of predicted regions illustrate a strong division between families while high- lighting conservation within individual families. These results suggest the conserved regions among the nucleoproteins, specifically within Rhabdoviridae and Paramyxoviradae, but also generally among all members of the order, reflect an evolutionary advantage in maintaining these sites for the viral nucleoprotein as part of the transcription/replication machinery. Results indicate conservation for disorder in the C-terminus region of the representative proteins that is important for interacting with the phosphoprotein and the large subunit polymerase during transcription and replication. Additionally, the C-terminus region of the protein preceding the disordered region, is predicted to be important for interacting with the encapsidated genome. Portions of the N-terminus are responsible for N∶N stability and interactions identified by the presence or lack of co-evolving intra-protein contact predictions. The validation of these prediction results by current structural information illustrates the benefits of the Disorder, Intra-residue contact and Compensatory mutation Correlator (DisICC pipeline as a method for quickly characterizing proteins and providing the most likely residues and regions necessary to target for disruption in viruses that have little structural information available.

  16. Analysis of gene evolution and metabolic pathways using the Candida Gene Order Browser

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Candida species are the most common cause of opportunistic fungal infection worldwide. Recent sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of Candida genomic data. We have developed the Candida Gene Order Browser (CGOB), an online tool that aids comparative syntenic analyses of Candida species. CGOB incorporates all available Candida clade genome sequences including two Candida albicans isolates (SC5314 and WO-1) and 8 closely related species (Candida dubliniensis, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Lodderomyces elongisporus, Debaryomyces hansenii, Pichia stipitis, Candida guilliermondii and Candida lusitaniae). Saccharomyces cerevisiae is also included as a reference genome. Results CGOB assignments of homology were manually curated based on sequence similarity and synteny. In total CGOB includes 65617 genes arranged into 13625 homology columns. We have also generated improved Candida gene sets by merging/removing partial genes in each genome. Interrogation of CGOB revealed that the majority of tandemly duplicated genes are under strong purifying selection in all Candida species. We identified clusters of adjacent genes involved in the same metabolic pathways (such as catabolism of biotin, galactose and N-acetyl glucosamine) and we showed that some clusters are species or lineage-specific. We also identified one example of intron gain in C. albicans. Conclusions Our analysis provides an important resource that is now available for the Candida community. CGOB is available at http://cgob.ucd.ie. PMID:20459735

  17. Analysis of gene evolution and metabolic pathways using the Candida Gene Order Browser

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzpatrick, David A

    2010-05-10

    Abstract Background Candida species are the most common cause of opportunistic fungal infection worldwide. Recent sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of Candida genomic data. We have developed the Candida Gene Order Browser (CGOB), an online tool that aids comparative syntenic analyses of Candida species. CGOB incorporates all available Candida clade genome sequences including two Candida albicans isolates (SC5314 and WO-1) and 8 closely related species (Candida dubliniensis, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Lodderomyces elongisporus, Debaryomyces hansenii, Pichia stipitis, Candida guilliermondii and Candida lusitaniae). Saccharomyces cerevisiae is also included as a reference genome. Results CGOB assignments of homology were manually curated based on sequence similarity and synteny. In total CGOB includes 65617 genes arranged into 13625 homology columns. We have also generated improved Candida gene sets by merging\\/removing partial genes in each genome. Interrogation of CGOB revealed that the majority of tandemly duplicated genes are under strong purifying selection in all Candida species. We identified clusters of adjacent genes involved in the same metabolic pathways (such as catabolism of biotin, galactose and N-acetyl glucosamine) and we showed that some clusters are species or lineage-specific. We also identified one example of intron gain in C. albicans. Conclusions Our analysis provides an important resource that is now available for the Candida community. CGOB is available at http:\\/\\/cgob.ucd.ie.

  18. Analysis of gene evolution and metabolic pathways using the Candida Gene Order Browser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byrne Kevin P

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Candida species are the most common cause of opportunistic fungal infection worldwide. Recent sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of Candida genomic data. We have developed the Candida Gene Order Browser (CGOB, an online tool that aids comparative syntenic analyses of Candida species. CGOB incorporates all available Candida clade genome sequences including two Candida albicans isolates (SC5314 and WO-1 and 8 closely related species (Candida dubliniensis, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Lodderomyces elongisporus, Debaryomyces hansenii, Pichia stipitis, Candida guilliermondii and Candida lusitaniae. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is also included as a reference genome. Results CGOB assignments of homology were manually curated based on sequence similarity and synteny. In total CGOB includes 65617 genes arranged into 13625 homology columns. We have also generated improved Candida gene sets by merging/removing partial genes in each genome. Interrogation of CGOB revealed that the majority of tandemly duplicated genes are under strong purifying selection in all Candida species. We identified clusters of adjacent genes involved in the same metabolic pathways (such as catabolism of biotin, galactose and N-acetyl glucosamine and we showed that some clusters are species or lineage-specific. We also identified one example of intron gain in C. albicans. Conclusions Our analysis provides an important resource that is now available for the Candida community. CGOB is available at http://cgob.ucd.ie.

  19. New fossil insect order Permopsocida elucidates major radiation and evolution of suction feeding in hemimetabolous insects (Hexapoda: Acercaria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Di-Ying; Bechly, Günter; Nel, Patricia; Engel, Michael S; Prokop, Jakub; Azar, Dany; Cai, Chen-Yang; van de Kamp, Thomas; Staniczek, Arnold H; Garrouste, Romain; Krogmann, Lars; Dos Santos Rolo, Tomy; Baumbach, Tilo; Ohlhoff, Rainer; Shmakov, Alexey S; Bourgoin, Thierry; Nel, André

    2016-03-10

    With nearly 100,000 species, the Acercaria (lice, plant lices, thrips, bugs) including number of economically important species is one of the most successful insect lineages. However, its phylogeny and evolution of mouthparts among other issues remain debatable. Here new methods of preparation permitted the comprehensive anatomical description of insect inclusions from mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber in astonishing detail. These "missing links" fossils, attributed to a new order Permopsocida, provide crucial evidence for reconstructing the phylogenetic relationships in the Acercaria, supporting its monophyly, and questioning the position of Psocodea as sister group of holometabolans in the most recent phylogenomic study. Permopsocida resolves as sister group of Thripida + Hemiptera and represents an evolutionary link documenting the transition from chewing to piercing mouthparts in relation to suction feeding. Identification of gut contents as angiosperm pollen documents an ecological role of Permopsocida as early pollen feeders with relatively unspecialized mouthparts. This group existed for 185 million years, but has never been diverse and was superseded by new pollenivorous pollinators during the Cretaceous co-evolution of insects and flowers. The key innovation of suction feeding with piercing mouthparts is identified as main event that triggered the huge post-Carboniferous radiation of hemipterans, and facilitated the spreading of pathogenic vectors.

  20. New fossil insect order Permopsocida elucidates major radiation and evolution of suction feeding in hemimetabolous insects (Hexapoda: Acercaria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Di-Ying; Bechly, Günter; Nel, Patricia; Engel, Michael S.; Prokop, Jakub; Azar, Dany; Cai, Chen-Yang; van de Kamp, Thomas; Staniczek, Arnold H.; Garrouste, Romain; Krogmann, Lars; Dos Santos Rolo, Tomy; Baumbach, Tilo; Ohlhoff, Rainer; Shmakov, Alexey S.; Bourgoin, Thierry; Nel, André

    2016-03-01

    With nearly 100,000 species, the Acercaria (lice, plant lices, thrips, bugs) including number of economically important species is one of the most successful insect lineages. However, its phylogeny and evolution of mouthparts among other issues remain debatable. Here new methods of preparation permitted the comprehensive anatomical description of insect inclusions from mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber in astonishing detail. These “missing links” fossils, attributed to a new order Permopsocida, provide crucial evidence for reconstructing the phylogenetic relationships in the Acercaria, supporting its monophyly, and questioning the position of Psocodea as sister group of holometabolans in the most recent phylogenomic study. Permopsocida resolves as sister group of Thripida + Hemiptera and represents an evolutionary link documenting the transition from chewing to piercing mouthparts in relation to suction feeding. Identification of gut contents as angiosperm pollen documents an ecological role of Permopsocida as early pollen feeders with relatively unspecialized mouthparts. This group existed for 185 million years, but has never been diverse and was superseded by new pollenivorous pollinators during the Cretaceous co-evolution of insects and flowers. The key innovation of suction feeding with piercing mouthparts is identified as main event that triggered the huge post-Carboniferous radiation of hemipterans, and facilitated the spreading of pathogenic vectors.

  1. Regge behaviour of distribution functions and evolution of gluon distribution function in next-to-leading order at low-x

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U Jamil; J K Sarma

    2008-09-01

    Evolution of gluon distribution function from Dokshitzer–Gribov–Lipatov–Altarelli–Parisi (DGLAP) evolution equation in next-to-leading order (NLO) at low- is presented assuming the Regge behaviour of quark and gluon at this limit. We compare our results of gluon distribution function with MRST2004, GRV98LO and GRV98NLO parametrizations and show the compatibility of Regge behaviour of quark and gluon distribution functions with perturbative quantum chromodynamics (PQCD) at low-.

  2. Charm-quark production in deep-inelastic neutrino scattering at NNLO in QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Edmond L; Li, Chong Sheng; Liu, Ze Long; Zhu, Hua Xing

    2016-01-01

    We present a fully differential next-to-next-to-leading order calculation of charm quark production in charged-current deep-inelastic scattering, with full charm-quark mass dependence. The next-to-next-to-leading order corrections in perturbative quantum chromodynamics are found to be comparable in size to the next-to-leading order corrections in certain kinematic regions. We compare our predictions with data on dimuon production in (anti-)neutrino scattering from a heavy nucleus. Our results can be used to improve the extraction of the parton distribution function of a strange quark in the nucleon.

  3. Evolution and Engineering of Precisely Controlled Ge Nanostructures on Scalable Array of Ordered Si Nano-pillars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuguang; Zhou, Tong; Li, Dehui; Zhong, Zhenyang

    2016-06-01

    The scalable array of ordered nano-pillars with precisely controllable quantum nanostructures (QNs) are ideal candidates for the exploration of the fundamental features of cavity quantum electrodynamics. It also has a great potential in the applications of innovative nano-optoelectronic devices for the future quantum communication and integrated photon circuits. Here, we present a synthesis of such hybrid system in combination of the nanosphere lithography and the self-assembly during heteroepitaxy. The precise positioning and controllable evolution of self-assembled Ge QNs, including quantum dot necklace(QDN), QD molecule(QDM) and quantum ring(QR), on Si nano-pillars are readily achieved. Considering the strain relaxation and the non-uniform Ge growth due to the thickness-dependent and anisotropic surface diffusion of adatoms on the pillars, the comprehensive scenario of the Ge growth on Si pillars is discovered. It clarifies the inherent mechanism underlying the controllable growth of the QNs on the pillar. Moreover, it inspires a deliberate two-step growth procedure to engineer the controllable QNs on the pillar. Our results pave a promising avenue to the achievement of desired nano-pillar-QNs system that facilitates the strong light-matter interaction due to both spectra and spatial coupling between the QNs and the cavity modes of a single pillar and the periodic pillars.

  4. NNLO QCD corrections to t -channel single top quark production and decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Edmond L.; Gao, Jun; Yuan, C.-P.; Zhu, Hua Xing

    2016-10-01

    We present a fully differential next-to-next-to-leading-order calculation of t -channel single top quark production and decay at the LHC under a narrow-width approximation and neglecting cross talk between incoming protons. We focus on the fiducial cross sections at 13 TeV, finding that the next-to-next-to-leading-order QCD corrections can reach the level of -6 %. The scale variations are reduced to the level of a percent. Our results can be used to improve experimental acceptance estimates and the measurements of the single top quark production cross section and the top quark electroweak couplings.

  5. Electroweak production of top-quark pairs in e+e- annihilation at NNLO in QCD: The vector current contributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Jun [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States); Zhu, Hua Xing [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2014-12-17

    We report on a calculation of the vector current contributions to the electroweak production of top quark pairs in e+e annihilation at next-to-next-to-leading order in quantum chromodynamics. Our setup is fully differential and can be used to calculate any infrared-safe observable. The real emission contributions are handled by a next-to-next-to-leading order generalization of the phase-space slicing method. As a result, we demonstrate the power of our technique by considering its application to various inclusive and exclusive observables.

  6. A new approach to the Higgs transverse-momentum resummation at NNLL+NNLO

    CERN Document Server

    Monni, Pier Francesco; Torrielli, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new approach to the resummation of the transverse-momentum distribution of a high-mass colour-singlet system in hadronic collisions. The resummation is performed in momentum space and is free of kinematic singularities in the small-transverse-momentum limit. We derive a formula for the cumulative cross section accurate at the next-to-next-to-leading-logarithmic level, and present the first matched predictions to next-to-next-to-leading order for Higgs-boson production in gluon fusion at the LHC. The proposed method can be adapted to all observables which feature kinematic cancellations in the infrared region.

  7. QCD threshold corrections for gluino pair production at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenfeld, Ulrich [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany); Moch, Sven-Olaf; Pfoh, Torsten [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    We present the complete threshold enhanced predictions in QCD for the total cross section of gluino pair production at hadron colliders at next-to-next-to-leading order. Thanks to the computation of the required one-loop hard matching coefficients our results are accurate to the next-to-next-to-leading logarithm. In a brief phenomenological study we provide predictions for the total hadronic cross sections at the LHC and we discuss the uncertainties arising from scale variations and the parton distribution functions.

  8. Rapidity renormalized TMD soft and beam functions at two loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luebbert, Thomas [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Oredsson, Joel [DESY, Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics; Stahlhofen, Maximilian [DESY, Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Mainz Univ. (Germany). PRISMA Cluster of Excellence

    2016-03-15

    We compute the transverse momentum dependent (TMD) soft function for the production of a color-neutral final state at the LHC within the rapidity renormalization group (RRG) framework to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO). We use this result to extract the universal renormalized TMD beam functions (aka TMDPDFs) in the same scheme and at the same order from known results in another scheme. We derive recurrence relations for the logarithmic structure of the soft and beam functions, which we use to cross check our calculation. We also explicitly confirm the non-Abelian exponentiation of the TMD soft function in the RRG framework at two loops. Our results provide the ingredients for resummed predictions of p {sub perpendicular} {sub to} -differential cross sections at NNLL' in the RRG formalism. The RRG provides a systematic framework to resum large (rapidity) logarithms through (R)RG evolution and assess the associated perturbative uncertainties.

  9. Parallel and convergent evolution of the dim-light vision gene RH1 in bats (Order: Chiroptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yong-Yi; Liu, Jie; Irwin, David M; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2010-01-21

    Rhodopsin, encoded by the gene Rhodopsin (RH1), is extremely sensitive to light, and is responsible for dim-light vision. Bats are nocturnal mammals that inhabit poor light environments. Megabats (Old-World fruit bats) generally have well-developed eyes, while microbats (insectivorous bats) have developed echolocation and in general their eyes were degraded, however, dramatic differences in the eyes, and their reliance on vision, exist in this group. In this study, we examined the rod opsin gene (RH1), and compared its evolution to that of two cone opsin genes (SWS1 and M/LWS). While phylogenetic reconstruction with the cone opsin genes SWS1 and M/LWS generated a species tree in accord with expectations, the RH1 gene tree united Pteropodidae (Old-World fruit bats) and Yangochiroptera, with very high bootstrap values, suggesting the possibility of convergent evolution. The hypothesis of convergent evolution was further supported when nonsynonymous sites or amino acid sequences were used to construct phylogenies. Reconstructed RH1 sequences at internal nodes of the bat species phylogeny showed that: (1) Old-World fruit bats share an amino acid change (S270G) with the tomb bat; (2) Miniopterus share two amino acid changes (V104I, M183L) with Rhinolophoidea; (3) the amino acid replacement I123V occurred independently on four branches, and the replacements L99M, L266V and I286V occurred each on two branches. The multiple parallel amino acid replacements that occurred in the evolution of bat RH1 suggest the possibility of multiple convergences of their ecological specialization (i.e., various photic environments) during adaptation for the nocturnal lifestyle, and suggest that further attention is needed on the study of the ecology and behavior of bats.

  10. Comparative Structural Models of Similarities and Differences between Vehicle and Target in Order to Teach Darwinian Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelos, Maria Fátima; Nagem, Ronaldo L.

    2010-06-01

    Our objective is to contribute to the teaching of Classical Darwinian Evolution by means of a study of analogies and metaphors. Throughout the history of knowledge about Evolution and in Science teaching, tree structures have been used an analogs to refer to Evolution, such as by Darwin in the Tree of Life passage contained in On The Origin of Species (1859). We analyze the analogies and metaphors found in the Darwinian text the Tree of Life and propose Comparative Structural Models of Similarities and Differences between the vehicle and target, considering the viability of their use in teaching Sciences. Our foundation is the Theory of Conceptual Metaphor by Lakoff and Johnson (1980) and the Methodology of Teaching with Analogies—- MECA—by Nagem et al. (2001). The analogies and metaphors were classified and analyzed and the similarities and differences were highlighted. We found conceptual metaphors in the text. The analogies and metaphors in the Tree of Life are complex and appropriate for didactic use, but require an adequate methodological approach.

  11. Temporal order of evolution of DNA replication systems inferred by comparison of cellular and viral DNA polymerases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koonin Eugene V

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The core enzymes of the DNA replication systems show striking diversity among cellular life forms and more so among viruses. In particular, and counter-intuitively, given the central role of DNA in all cells and the mechanistic uniformity of replication, the core enzymes of the replication systems of bacteria and archaea (as well as eukaryotes are unrelated or extremely distantly related. Viruses and plasmids, in addition, possess at least two unique DNA replication systems, namely, the protein-primed and rolling circle modalities of replication. This unexpected diversity makes the origin and evolution of DNA replication systems a particularly challenging and intriguing problem in evolutionary biology. Results I propose a specific succession for the emergence of different DNA replication systems, drawing argument from the differences in their representation among viruses and other selfish replicating elements. In a striking pattern, the DNA replication systems of viruses infecting bacteria and eukaryotes are dominated by the archaeal-type B-family DNA polymerase (PolB whereas the bacterial replicative DNA polymerase (PolC is present only in a handful of bacteriophage genomes. There is no apparent mechanistic impediment to the involvement of the bacterial-type replication machinery in viral DNA replication. Therefore, I hypothesize that the observed, markedly unequal distribution of the replicative DNA polymerases among the known cellular and viral replication systems has a historical explanation. I propose that, among the two types of DNA replication machineries that are found in extant life forms, the archaeal-type, PolB-based system evolved first and had already given rise to a variety of diverse viruses and other selfish elements before the advent of the bacterial, PolC-based machinery. Conceivably, at that stage of evolution, the niches for DNA-viral reproduction have been already filled with viruses replicating with the

  12. Evolution of the magnetic order in the Ho(Mn, Al) sub 2 system; neutron diffraction study

    CERN Document Server

    Golosovsky, I V; Markosyan, A S; Roisnel, T

    2002-01-01

    The neutron diffraction study of Ho(Mn sub 1 sub - sub x Al sub x) sub 2 shows the coexistence of two cubic Laves phases with different unit-cell parameters and substantially different magnetic behaviours. The first phase combines ordered ferrimagnetic and disordered antiferromagnetic components of the magnetic moments. With increasing Al content, starting from the long-range ferrimagnetic order with the induced Mn moment in HoMn sub 2 , the progressive formation of spontaneous Mn moments yields short-range order, which in turn transforms to ferromagnetic order in HoAl sub 2. The second phase with incommensurate magnetic structure is driven by the spontaneous Mn moments and exists only over limited ranges of Al content and unit-cell parameter. It has a finite correlation length and appears from a second-order transition without a magneto-volume effect.

  13. Determination of αs at NLO*+NNLL from a global fit of the low-z parton-tohadron fragmentation functions in e+e− and DIS collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez-Ramos Redamy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The QCD coupling αs is determined from a combined analysis of experimental e+e− and e±p jet data confronted to theoretical predictions of the energy evolution of the parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions (FFs moments –multiplicity, peak, width, skewness– at low fractional hadron momentum z. The impact of approximate next-to-leading order (NLO* corrections plus next-to-next-to-leading log (NNLL resummations, compared to previous LO+NLL calculations, is discussed. A global fit of the full set of existing data, amounting to 360 FF moments at collision energies √s ≈ 1–200 GeV, results in αs(mZ2 = 0.1189−0.0014+0.0025 at the Z mass.

  14. Nucleon spin structure functions at NNLO in the presence of target mass corrections and higher twist effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanpour, Hamzeh; Taheri Monfared, S.; Atashbar Tehrani, S.

    2017-04-01

    We extract polarized parton distribution functions (PPDFs), referred to as "KTA17," together with the highly correlated strong coupling αs from recent and up-to-date g1 and g2 polarized structure functions world data at next-to-next-to-leading order in perturbative QCD. The stability and reliability of the results are ensured by including nonperturbative target mass corrections as well as higher-twist terms which are particularly important at the large-x region at low Q2 . Their role in extracting the PPDFs in the nucleon is studied. Sum rules are discussed and compared with other results from the literature. This analysis is made by means of the Jacobi polynomials expansion technique to the DGLAP evolution. The uncertainties on the observables and on the PPDFs throughout this paper are computed using standard Hessian error propagation which served to provide a more realistic estimate of the PPDFs uncertainties.

  15. Determination of alpha_s at NLO*+NNLL from a global fit of the low-z parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions in e+e- and DIS collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Ramos, Redamy

    2015-01-01

    The QCD coupling alpha_s is determined from a combined analysis of experimental e+e- and e-p jet data confronted to theoretical predictions of the energy evolution of the parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions (FFs) moments --multiplicity, peak, width, skewness-- at low fractional hadron momentum z. The impact of approximate next-to-leading order (NLO*) corrections plus next-to-next-to-leading log (NNLL) resummations, compared to previous LO+NLL calculations, is discussed. A global fit of the full set of existing data, amounting to 360 FF moments at collision energies sqrt(s)~1--200 GeV, results in alpha_s(m_Z^2)=0.1189^{+0.0025}_{-0.0014} at the Z mass.

  16. Holocene landscape evolution and geoarcheology of low-order streams in the Rio Grande basin, San Juan Mountains, Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Daniel P.; Beeton, Jared M.

    2014-09-01

    This geoarcheological study investigates soil stratigraphy and geochronology of alluvial deposits to determine Holocene landscape evolution within the Hot Creek, La Jara Creek, and Alamosa River drainage basins in the San Juan Mountains of Colorado. Geomorphic mapping and radiocarbon dating indicate synchronicity in patterns of erosion, deposition, and stability between drainage basins. In all three basins, the maximum age of mapped alluvial terraces and fans is ~ 3300 cal yr BP. A depositional period seen at both Hot Creek and the Alamosa River begins ~ 3300 to 3200 cal yr BP. Based on soil development, short periods of stability followed by alluvial fan aggradation occur in the Alamosa River basin ~ 2200 cal yr BP. A period of landscape stability at Hot Creek before ~ 1100 cal yr BP is followed by a period of rapid aggradation within all three drainages between ~ 1100 and 850 cal yr BP. A final aggradation event occurred between ~ 630 and 520 cal yr BP at La Jara Creek. These patterns of landscape evolution over the past ~ 3300 yr provide the framework for an archeological model that predicts the potential for buried and surficial cultural materials in the research area.

  17. Evolution of anthozoan polyp retraction mechanisms: convergent functional morphology and evolutionary allometry of the marginal musculature in order Zoanthidea (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Hexacorallia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Timothy D; Schellinger, Jennifer L; Strimaitis, Anna M; Reuter, Kim E

    2015-06-30

    Retraction is among the most important basic behaviors of anthozoan Cnidaria polyps and is achieved through the coordinated contraction of at least six different muscle groups. Across the Anthozoa, these muscles range from unrecognizable atrophies to massive hypertrophies, producing a wide diversity of retraction abilities and functional morphologies. The marginal musculature is often the single largest component of the retraction mechanism and is composed of a diversity of muscular, attachment, and structural features. Although the arrangements of these features have defined the higher taxonomy of Zoanthidea for more than 100 years, a decade of inferring phylogenies from nucleotide sequences has demonstrated fundamental misconceptions of their evolution. Here we expand the diversity of known marginal muscle forms from two to at least ten basic states and reconstruct the evolution of its functional morphology across the most comprehensive molecular phylogeny available. We demonstrate that the evolution of these forms follows a series of transitions that are much more complex than previously hypothesized and converge on similar forms multiple times. Evolution of the marginal musculature and its attachment and support structures are partially scaled according to variation in polyp and muscle size, but also vary through evolutionary allometry. Although the retraction mechanisms are diverse and their evolutionary histories complex, their morphologies are largely reflective of the evolutionary relationships among Zoanthidea higher taxa and may offer a key feature for integrative systematics. The convergence on similar forms across multiple linages of Zoanthidea mirrors the evolution of the marginal musculature in another anthozoan order (Actiniaria). The marginal musculature varies through evolutionary allometry of functional morphologies in response to requirements for additional force and resistance, and the specific ecological and symbiotic functions of individual

  18. Lattice calculations for A=3,4,6,12 nuclei using chiral effective field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Epelbaum, Evgeny; Lee, Dean; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2010-01-01

    We present lattice calculations for the ground state energies of tritium, helium-3, helium-4, lithium-6, and carbon-12 nuclei. Our results were previously summarized in a letter publication. This paper provides full details of the calculations. We include isospin-breaking, Coulomb effects, and interactions up to next-to-next-to-leading order in chiral effective field theory.

  19. Lattice effective field theory calculations for A = 3,4,6,12 nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Epelbaum, Evgeny; Lee, Dean; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2009-01-01

    We present lattice results for the ground state energies of tritium, helium-3, helium-4, lithium-6, and carbon-12 nuclei. Our analysis includes isospin-breaking, Coulomb effects, and interactions up to next-to-next-to-leading order in chiral effective field theory.

  20. NNLO corrections to the Higgs production cross section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravindran, V. [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhusii, Allahabad, 211019 (India); Smith, J. [C.N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics, State University of New York at Stony Brook, New York 11794-3840 (United States); Neerven, W.L. van [Instituut-Lorentz, Universiteit Leiden, PO Box 9506, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2004-10-01

    We discuss the next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) corrections to the total cross section for (pseudo-) scalar Higgs boson production. The computation is carried out in the e.ective Lagrangian approach which emerges from the standard model by taking the limit mt->{approx} where mt denotes the mass of the top quark.

  1. Status Report of NNLO QCD Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Klasen, M

    2005-01-01

    We review recent progress in next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) perturbative QCD calculations with special emphasis on results ready for phenomenological applications. Important examples are new results on structure functions and jet or Higgs boson production. In addition, we describe new calculational techniques based on twistors and their potential for efficient calculations of multiparticle amplitudes.

  2. Disappearance of Static Magnetic Order and Evolution of Spin Fluctuations in Fe1+ SexTe1−x

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, G.; Xu, Z.; Wen, J.; Jie, Q.; Lin, Z.; Li, Q.; Chi, S.; Singh, D.K.; Gu, G.; Tranquada, J.M.

    2010-09-29

    We report neutron-scattering studies on static magnetic orders and spin excitations in the Fe-based chalcogenide system Fe{sub 1+{delta}}Se{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} with different Fe and Se compositions. Short-range static magnetic order with an in-plane wave vector near the (0.5,0) (using the two-Fe unit cell), together with strong low-energy magnetic excitations is found in all nonsuperconducting samples for Se doping up to 45%. When the static order disappears and bulk superconductivity emerges, the spectral weight of the magnetic excitations shifts to the region of reciprocal space near the in-plane wave vector (0.5, 0.5), corresponding to 'collinear' spin correlations. Our results suggest that there is a strong correlation between superconductivity and the character of the magnetic order/fluctuations in this system. Excess Fe appears to be important for stabilizing the magnetic order that competes with superconductivity.

  3. Comment on “Conservation Laws of Two (2 + 1-Dimensional Nonlinear Evolution Equations with Higher-Order Mixed Derivatives”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Wei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In a recent paper (Zhang (2013, the author claims that he has proposed two rules to modify Ibragimov’s theorem on conservation laws to “ensure the theorem can be applied to nonlinear evolution equations with any mixed derivatives.” In this letter, we analysis the paper. Indeed, the so-called “modification rules” are needless and the theorem of Ibragimov can be applied to construct conservation laws directly for nonlinear equations with any mixed derivatives as long as the formal Lagrangian is rewritten in symmetric form. Moreover, the conservation laws obtained by the so-called “modification rules” in the paper under discussion are equivalent to the one obtained by Ibragimov’s theorem.

  4. Spinning gland transcriptomics from two main clades of spiders (order: Araneae--insights on their molecular, anatomical and behavioral evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Prosdocimi

    Full Text Available Characterized by distinctive evolutionary adaptations, spiders provide a comprehensive system for evolutionary and developmental studies of anatomical organs, including silk and venom production. Here we performed cDNA sequencing using massively parallel sequencers (454 GS-FLX Titanium to generate ∼80,000 reads from the spinning gland of Actinopus spp. (infraorder: Mygalomorphae and Gasteracantha cancriformis (infraorder: Araneomorphae, Orbiculariae clade. Actinopus spp. retains primitive characteristics on web usage and presents a single undifferentiated spinning gland while the orbiculariae spiders have seven differentiated spinning glands and complex patterns of web usage. MIRA, Celera Assembler and CAP3 software were used to cluster NGS reads for each spider. CAP3 unigenes passed through a pipeline for automatic annotation, classification by biological function, and comparative transcriptomics. Genes related to spider silks were manually curated and analyzed. Although a single spidroin gene family was found in Actinopus spp., a vast repertoire of specialized spider silk proteins was encountered in orbiculariae. Astacin-like metalloproteases (meprin subfamily were shown to be some of the most sampled unigenes and duplicated gene families in G. cancriformis since its evolutionary split from mygalomorphs. Our results confirm that the evolution of the molecular repertoire of silk proteins was accompanied by the (i anatomical differentiation of spinning glands and (ii behavioral complexification in the web usage. Finally, a phylogenetic tree was constructed to cluster most of the known spidroins in gene clades. This is the first large-scale, multi-organism transcriptome for spider spinning glands and a first step into a broad understanding of spider web systems biology and evolution.

  5. Spinning Gland Transcriptomics from Two Main Clades of Spiders (Order: Araneae) - Insights on Their Molecular, Anatomical and Behavioral Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosdocimi, Francisco; Bittencourt, Daniela; da Silva, Felipe Rodrigues; Kirst, Matias; Motta, Paulo C.; Rech, Elibio L.

    2011-01-01

    Characterized by distinctive evolutionary adaptations, spiders provide a comprehensive system for evolutionary and developmental studies of anatomical organs, including silk and venom production. Here we performed cDNA sequencing using massively parallel sequencers (454 GS-FLX Titanium) to generate ∼80,000 reads from the spinning gland of Actinopus spp. (infraorder: Mygalomorphae) and Gasteracantha cancriformis (infraorder: Araneomorphae, Orbiculariae clade). Actinopus spp. retains primitive characteristics on web usage and presents a single undifferentiated spinning gland while the orbiculariae spiders have seven differentiated spinning glands and complex patterns of web usage. MIRA, Celera Assembler and CAP3 software were used to cluster NGS reads for each spider. CAP3 unigenes passed through a pipeline for automatic annotation, classification by biological function, and comparative transcriptomics. Genes related to spider silks were manually curated and analyzed. Although a single spidroin gene family was found in Actinopus spp., a vast repertoire of specialized spider silk proteins was encountered in orbiculariae. Astacin-like metalloproteases (meprin subfamily) were shown to be some of the most sampled unigenes and duplicated gene families in G. cancriformis since its evolutionary split from mygalomorphs. Our results confirm that the evolution of the molecular repertoire of silk proteins was accompanied by the (i) anatomical differentiation of spinning glands and (ii) behavioral complexification in the web usage. Finally, a phylogenetic tree was constructed to cluster most of the known spidroins in gene clades. This is the first large-scale, multi-organism transcriptome for spider spinning glands and a first step into a broad understanding of spider web systems biology and evolution. PMID:21738742

  6. Generation of Transparent Oxygen Evolution Electrode Consisting of Regularly Ordered Nanoparticles from Self-Assembly Cobalt Phthalocyanine as a Template

    KAUST Repository

    Ziani, Ahmed

    2016-11-04

    The decoration of (photo)electrodes for efficient photoresponse requires the use of electrocatalysts with good dispersion and high transparency for efficient light absorption by the photoelectrode. As a result of the ease of thermal evaporation and particulate self-assembly growth, the phthalocyanine molecular species can be uniformly deposited layer-by-layer on the surface of substrates. This structure can be used as a template to achieve a tunable amount of catalysts, high dispersion of the nanoparticles, and transparency of the catalysts. In this study, we present a systematic study of the structural and optical properties, surface morphologies, and electrochemical oxygen evolution reaction (OER) performance of cobalt oxide prepared from a phthalocyanine metal precursor. Cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) films with different thicknesses were deposited by thermal evaporation on different substrates. The films were annealed at 400 °C in air to form a material with the cobalt oxide phase. The final Co oxide catalysts exhibit high transparency after thermal treatment. Their OER measurements demonstrate well expected mass activity for OER. Thermally evaporated and treated transition metal oxide nanoparticles are attractive for the functionalization of (photo)anodes for water oxidation.

  7. Singularity-free Next-to-leading Order $\\Delta S= 1$ Renormalization Group Evolution and $\\epsilon_{K}^{\\prime}/\\epsilon_{K}$ in the Standard Model and Beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Kitahara, Teppei; Tremper, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The standard analytic solution of the renormalization group (RG) evolution for the $\\Delta S = 1$ Wilson coefficients involves several singularities. In practical applications one either regularizes these singularities or circumvents the problem by using numerical integrations. In this paper we derive a singularity-free solution of the next-to-leading order (NLO) RG equations, which greatly facilitates the calculation of $\\epsilon_K^{\\prime}$, the measure of direct $CP$ violation in $K\\to\\pi\\pi$ decays. Using our new RG evolution and the latest lattice results for the hadronic matrix elements, we calculate the ratio $\\epsilon_{K}^{\\prime}/\\epsilon_{K}$ (with $\\epsilon_{K}$ quantifying indirect $CP$ violation) in the Standard Model (SM) at NLO to $\\epsilon_{K}^{\\prime}/\\epsilon_{K} = ( 0.96 \\pm 4.96 ) \\times 10^{-4}$, which is 2.9$\\,\\sigma$ below the experimental value. We also present the evolution matrix in the high-energy regime for calculations of new physics contributions and derive easy-to-use approximat...

  8. Temperature evolution of the magnetic excitations in charge ordered La{sub 5/3}Sr{sub 1/3}NiO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, P G; Enderle, M [Institut Laue-Langevin, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Boothroyd, A T; Ewings, R A; Prabhakaran, D [Department of Physics, Oxford University, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Huecker, M; Tranquada, J M [Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)], E-mail: freeman@ill.fr

    2008-03-12

    Polarized- and unpolarized-neutron scattering was used to study the temperature evolution of the magnetic excitations of charge ordered La{sub 5/3}Sr{sub 1/3}NiO{sub 4}. We studied two features in detail: (i) the resonance-like scattering at 27 meV in the quasi-two-dimensional magnetic excitations from the ordered Ni{sup 2+} (S = 1) spins, and (ii) the diffuse scattering associated with quasi-one-dimensional antiferromagnetic correlations along the stripes. Although both these features persist up to at least {approx}125 K, their temperature dependences are found to be quite different. We argue from the results that the resonance-like feature observed in La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}NiO{sub 4} (x{approx}1/3) is not caused by a coupling between the spin dynamics of the two magnetic sub-systems.

  9. An investigation on the role of texture evolution and ordered phase transition in soft magnetic properties of Fe-6.5 wt%Si electrical steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Guojun; Li, Changsheng; Cai, Ban; Wang, Qiwen

    2017-05-01

    Fe-6.5 wt%Si electrical steel characterized with excellent soft magnetic properties such as almost zero magnetostriction, low eddy current and hysteresis losses characteristics has been widely applied in high frequency fields. In this work, the role of texture evolution and ordered phase transition in soft magnetic properties of annealed sheets was explored using EBSD, XRD and TEM. The results demonstrate that accompanied with the increase of annealing temperatures, an increase on the B8 is attributable to a contribution combining the sizes of recrystallization grains with APBs of ordered phases as pinning the migration of magnetic domain wall. Whereas B50 declines to a minimum value (1.479 T) and then increases to a certain value (1.695 T) due to different types and intensities of textures affecting on the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy. Meanwhile, the dislocation density gradually decreases and corresponding to a gradual decline in the internal stress, which makes the coercive force (Hc) decrease monotonically.

  10. Effect of Capillarity on Fourth Order Nonlinear Evolution Equation for Two Stokes Wave Trains in Deep Water in the Presence of Air Flowing Over Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhar A.K.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Fourth order nonlinear evolution equations, which are a good starting point for the study of nonlinear water waves, are derived for deep water surface capillary gravity waves in the presence of second waves in which air is blowing over water. Here it is assumed that the space variation of the amplitude takes place only in a direction along which the group velocity projection of the two waves overlap. A stability analysis is made for a uniform wave train in the presence of a second wave train. Graphs are plotted for the maximum growth rate of instability wave number at marginal stability and wave number separation of fastest growing sideband component against wave steepness. Significant improvements are noticed from the results obtained from the two coupled third order nonlinear Schrödinger equations.

  11. Nonlinear Effects in Gluon Distribution Predicted by GLR-MQ Evolution Equation at Next-to-leading Order in LHC Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalung, M.; Phukan, P.; Sarma, J. K.

    2017-09-01

    In this work we have solved the nonlinear GLR-MQ evolution equation upto next-to-leading order (NLO) by considering NLO terms of the gluon-gluon splitting functions and running coupling constant α s (Q 2). Here, we have incorporated a Regge-like behaviour of gluon distribution in order to obtain a solution of the GLR-MQ equation in the range of 5G e V 2 ≤ Q 2 ≤ 25G e V 2. We have studied the Q 2 evolution of the gluon distribution function G(x, Q 2) and its nonlinear effects at small-x. It can be observed from our analysis that the nonlinearities increase with decrease in the correlation radius R of two interacting gluons, as expected. We have compared our result of G(x, Q 2) as Q 2 increases and x decreases, for two different values of R, viz. R = 2G e V -1 and 5 G e V -1. We have also checked the sensitivity of the Regge intercept λ G on our results. We compare our computed results with those obtained by the global analysis to parton distribution functions (PDFs) by various collaborations where LHC data have been included viz. ABM12, CT14, MMHT14, PDF4LHC15, NNPDF3.0 and CJ15. Besides we have also shown comparison of our results with HERA PDF data viz. HERAPDF15.

  12. Intercalation synthesis of graphene-capped iron silicide atop Ni(111): Evolution of electronic structure and ferromagnetic ordering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenyuk, G. S.; Vilkov, O. Yu.; Rybkin, A. G.; Gomoyunova, M. V.; Senkovskiy, B. V.; Usachov, D. Yu.; Vyalikh, D. V.; Molodtsov, S. L.; Pronin, I. I.

    2017-01-01

    A new method for synthesis of graphene-protected iron silicides has been tested, which consists in formation of graphene on Ni(111) followed by two-step intercalation of the system with Fe and Si. Characterization of the samples was performed in situ by low-energy electron diffraction, angular-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, core-level photoelectron spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation and magnetic linear dichroism in photoemission of Fe 3p electrons. It is shown, that at 400 °C the intercalation of graphene/Ni(111) with iron occurs in a range up to 14 ML. The graphene layer strongly interacts with the topmost Fe atoms and stabilizes the fcc structure of the film. The in-plane ferromagnetic ordering of the film has a threshold nature and arises after the intercalation of 5 ML Fe due to the thickness-driven spin reorientation transition. Subsequent intercalation of graphene/Fe/Ni(111) with Si leads to the formation of the inhomogeneous system consisted of intercalated and nonintercalated areas. The intercalated islands coalesce at 2 ML Si when a Fe-Si solid solution covered with the Fe3Si surface silicide is formed. The Fe3Si silicide is ferromagnetic and has an ordered (√3 × √3)R30° structure. The graphene layer is weakly electronically coupled to the silicide phase keeping its remarkable properties ready for use.

  13. Microstructure evolution and hardness change in ordered Ni{sub 3}V intermetallic alloy by energetic ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, A.; Kaneno, Y. [Department of Materials Science, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Semboshi, S. [Kansai-Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Yoshizaki, H. [Department of Materials Science, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Saitoh, Y. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Okamoto, Y. [Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Iwase, A., E-mail: iwase@mtr.osakafu-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    Ni{sub 3}V bulk intermetallic compounds with ordered D0{sub 22} structure were irradiated with 16 MeV Au ions at room temperature. The irradiation induced phase transformation was examined by means of the transmission electron microscope (TEM), the extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurement (EXAFS) and the X-ray diffraction (XRD). We also measured the Vickers hardness for unirradiated and irradiated specimens. The TEM observation shows that by the Au irradiation, the lamellar microstructures and the super lattice spot in diffraction pattern for the unirradiated specimen disappeared. This TEM result as well as the result of XRD and EXAFS measurements means that the intrinsic D0{sub 22} structure of Ni{sub 3}V changes into the A1 (fcc) structure which is the lattice structure just below the melting point in the thermal equilibrium phase diagram. The lattice structure change from D0{sub 22} to A1 (fcc) accompanies a remarkable decrease in Vickers microhardness. The change in crystal structure was discussed in terms of the thermal spike and the sequential atomic displacements induced by the energetic heavy ion irradiation.

  14. Melt extraction from crystal mushes: Numerical model of texture evolution and calibration of crystallinity-ordering relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Špillar, Václav; Dolejš, David

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical crystal-melt interactions in magmatic systems by separation or accumulation of crystals or by extraction of interstitial melt are expected to modify the spatial distribution of crystals observed as phenocrysts in igneous rocks. Textural analysis of porphyritic products can thus provide a quantitative means of interpreting the magnitude of crystal accumulation or melt loss and reconstructing the initial crystal percentage, at which the process occurred. We present a new three-dimensional numerical model that evaluates the effects of crystal accumulation (or interstitial melt removal) on the spatial distribution of crystals. Both processes lead to increasing apparent crystallinity but also to increasing spatial ordering expressed by the clustering index (R). The trend of progressive crystal packing deviates from a random texture trend, produced by static crystal nucleation and growth, and it is universal for any texture with straight log-linear crystal size distribution. For sparse crystal suspensions (5 vol. % crystals, R = 1.03), up to 97% melt can be extracted, corresponding to a new crystallinity of 65 vol.% and R = 1.32, when the rheological threshold of crystal interlocking is reached. For initially crystal-rich suspensions, the compaction path is shorter, this is because the initial crystal population is more aggregated and it reaches the limit of interlocking sooner. Crystal suspensions with ~ 35 vol.% crystals cannot be compacted without mechanical failure. These results illustrate that the onset of the rheological threshold of magma immobility strongly depends on the spatial configuration of crystals in the mush: the primary rigid percolation threshold (~ 35 vol.% crystals) corresponds to touching or interlocking crystal framework produced by in situ closed-system crystallization, whereas the secondary rigid percolation threshold (~ 35 to ~ 75 vol.% crystals) can be reached by compaction, which is particularly spatially efficient when acting on

  15. A global phylogenetic analysis in order to determine the host species and geography dependent features present in the evolution of avian H9N2 influenza hemagglutinin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R. Dalby

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A complete phylogenetic analysis of all of the H9N2 hemagglutinin sequences that were collected between 1966 and 2012 was carried out in order to build a picture of the geographical and host specific evolution of the hemagglutinin protein. To improve the quality and applicability of the output data the sequences were divided into subsets based upon location and host species.The phylogenetic analysis of hemagglutinin reveals that the protein has distinct lineages between China and the Middle East, and that wild birds in both regions retain a distinct form of the H9 molecule, from the same lineage as the ancestral hemagglutinin. The results add further evidence to the hypothesis that the current predominant H9N2 hemagglutinin lineage might have originated in Southern China. The study also shows that there are sampling problems that affect the reliability of this and any similar analysis. This raises questions about the surveillance of H9N2 and the need for wider sampling of the virus in the environment.The results of this analysis are also consistent with a model where hemagglutinin has predominantly evolved by neutral drift punctuated by occasional selection events. These selective events have produced the current pattern of distinct lineages in the Middle East, Korea and China. This interpretation is in agreement with existing studies that have shown that there is widespread intra-country sequence evolution.

  16. Thermal evolution of the spin ordering at the concomitant spin–orbital rearrangement temperature in RVO{sub 3} (R=Lu, Yb and Tm)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Tapati, E-mail: tapati.sarkar@angstrom.uu.se [Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 534, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Ivanov, Sergey A. [Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 534, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Center of Materials Science, Karpov Institute of Physical Chemistry, 105064 Moscow K-64 (Russian Federation); Bazuev, G.V. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Science, 620999 Ekaterinburg GSP-145 (Russian Federation); Nordblad, Per; Mathieu, Roland [Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 534, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2016-07-01

    Synthesis, crystal structure and magnetization measurements of phase pure polycrystalline RVO{sub 3} (R=Lu, Yb and Tm) are reported. The compounds were stabilized in the orthorhombic structure by thermal treatment of the respective precursors (RVO{sub 4}) in a reducing atmosphere. Special pressure treatment was carried out during the synthesis to ensure phase pure samples without secondary phases. Magnetization measurements reveal the presence of two spin ordering temperatures in the samples. Interestingly, at the lower spin ordering temperature, T{sub SO2}, the uncompensated excess moment of the antiferromagnetic spin structure has different field dependences above and below T{sub SO2}, causing a jump in the thermal evolution of the magnetization that changes sign with increasing field strength. This jump is associated with the reported magnetic and orbital rearrangement in the samples, and the different spin configurations in the C- and G-type antiferromagnetic structures. - Highlights: • Magnetization measurements of polycrystalline RVO{sub 3} (R=Lu, Yb, Tm) are reported. • The samples have two spin ordering temperatures, T{sub SO1} and T{sub SO2} (T{sub SO1}>T{sub SO2}). • A magnetic field dependent jump of the excess magnetization, ΔM is observed at T{sub SO2.} • The jump in ΔM is associated with magnetic and orbital rearrangement in the samples. • ΔM is probably affected by possible phase coexistence in the samples.

  17. Effect of Entrapped Solvent on the Evolution of Lateral Order in Self-Assembled P(S-r-MMA)/PS-b-PMMA Systems with Different Thicknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giammaria, Tommaso Jacopo; Ferrarese Lupi, Federico; Seguini, Gabriele; Sparnacci, Katia; Antonioli, Diego; Gianotti, Valentina; Laus, Michele; Perego, Michele

    2017-02-14

    Block copolymers (BCPs) are emerging as a cost-effective nanofabrication tool to complement conventional optical lithography because they self-assemble in highly ordered polymeric templates with well-defined sub-20-nm periodic features. In this context, cylinder-forming polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) BCPs are revealed as an interesting material of choice because the orientation of the nanostructures with respect to the underlying substrate can be effectively controlled by a poly(styrene-random-methyl methacrylate) random copolymer (RCP) brush layer grafted to the substrate prior to BCP deposition. In this work, we investigate the self-assembly process and lateral order evolution in RCP + BCP systems consisting of cylinder-forming PS-b-PMMA (67 kg mol(-1), PS fraction of ∼70%) films with thicknesses of 30, 70, 100, and 130 nm deposited on RCP brush layers having thicknesses ranging from 2 to 20 nm. The self-assembly process is promoted by a rapid thermal processing machine operating at 250 °C for 300 s. The level of lateral order is determined by measuring the correlation length (ξ) in the self-assembled BCP films. Moreover, the amount of solvent (Φ) retained in the RCP + BCP systems is measured as a function of the thicknesses of the RCP and BCP layers, respectively. In the 30-nm-thick BCP films, an increase in Φ as a function of the thickness of the RCP brush layer significantly affects the self-assembly kinetics and the final extent of the lateral order in the BCP films. Conversely, no significant variations of ξ are observed in the 70-, 100-, and 130-nm-thick BCP films with increasing Φ.

  18. Comprehensive study of pore evolution, mesostructural stability, and simultaneous surface functionalization of ordered mesoporous carbon (FDU-15) by wet oxidation as a promising adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhangxiong; Webley, Paul A; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2010-06-15

    Fuctionalization of porous carbon materials through chemical methods orientates the development of new hybrid materials with specific functions. In this paper, a comprehensive study of pore evolution, mesostructural oxidation resistance, and simultaneous surface functionalization of ordered mesoporous carbon FDU-15 under various oxidation conditions is presented for the first time. The mesostructure and pore evolution with increasing oxidative strength are retrieved from XRD, TEM, and N(2) sorption techniques. The textural properties can be conveniently manipulated by changing the oxidation parameters, including different oxidative solution, temperature, and duration. It is revealed that the mesoporous carbon FDU-15 shows excellent structural stability under severe oxidation treatments by acidic (NH(4))(2)S(2)O(8), HNO(3), and H(2)O(2) solutions, much more stable than the mesostructural analogue CMK-3 carbon prepared by the nanocasting method. The surface area and porosity deteriorate to a large extent compared to the pristine carbon, with the micropores/small mesopores as the major contribution to the deterioration. The micropore/small mesopore can be blocked by the attached surface oxides under mild oxidation, while reopened with more carbon layer dissolution under more severe conditions. Simultaneously, high densities of surface oxygen complexes, especially carboxylic groups, can be generated. The contents and properties of the surface oxygen-containing groups are extensively studied by FTIR, TG, elemental analyses, and water and ammonia adsorption techniques. Such surface-functionalized mesoporous carbons can be used as a highly efficient adsorbent for immobilization of heavy metal ions as well as functional organic and biomolecules, with high capacities and excellent binding capabilities. Thus, we believe that the functionalized mesoporous carbon materials can be utilized as a promising solid and stable support for water treatment and organic

  19. Effect of the order of He+ and H+ ion co-implantation on damage generation and thermal evolution of complexes, platelets, and blisters in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daghbouj, N.; Cherkashin, N.; Darras, F.-X.; Paillard, V.; Fnaiech, M.; Claverie, A.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen and helium co-implantation is nowadays used to efficiently transfer thin Si layers and fabricate silicon on insulator wafers for the microelectronic industry. The synergy between the two implants which is reflected through the dramatic reduction of the total fluence needed to fracture silicon has been reported to be strongly influenced by the implantation order. Contradictory conclusions on the mechanisms involved in the formation and thermal evolution of defects and complexes have been drawn. In this work, we have experimentally studied in detail the characteristics of Si samples co-implanted with He and H, comparing the defects which are formed following each implantation and after annealing. We show that the second implant always ballistically destroys the stable defects and complexes formed after the first implant and that the redistribution of these point defects among new complexes drives the final difference observed in the samples after annealing. When H is implanted first, He precipitates in the form of nano-bubbles and agglomerates within H-related platelets and nano-cracks. When He is implanted first, the whole He fluence is ultimately used to pressurize H-related platelets which quickly evolve into micro-cracks and surface blisters. We provide detailed scenarios describing the atomic mechanisms involved during and after co-implantation and annealing which well-explain our results and the reasons for the apparent contradictions reported at the state of the art.

  20. 美元霸权与国际经济秩序演变%Dollar hegemony and international economic order evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾林娟; 杨宏哲

    2012-01-01

      Dollar hegemony of the international economic order evolved into the core of the current international re -lations.The bretton woods system established dollar hegemony ,and the dollar hegemony inner contradictions have led to the collapse of the bretton woods system .Jamaica system era,dollar hegemony for path dependence and rela-tively strong could continue to maintain .Financial crisis after age,emerging powers economic rapid rise,dollar he-gemony face unprecedented challenges.Dollar hegemony became the plunder of the wealth of the other important tool.It adds to global economic imbalances,increased international financial risk ,and restricted the international e-conomic order to be global economic development direction of evolution .Therefore,building a fair and rational inter-national economic order becomes the common goal of developing economies .%  美元霸权下的国际经济秩序演变成为当前国际关系的核心。布雷顿森林体系确立了美元霸权,而美元霸权的内在矛盾却导致了布雷顿森林体系的崩溃。牙买加体系时代,美元霸权因路径依赖和相对强势得以继续维持。后金融危机时代,新兴大国经济迅速崛起,美元霸权面临前所未有的挑战。美元霸权成为美国掠夺他国财富的重要工具,它加剧了全球经济失衡,增加了国际金融风险,制约了国际经济秩序向着有利于全球经济发展的方向演变。因此,建立公平合理的国际经济秩序成为当前发展中经济体的共同目标。

  1. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations with chiral effective field theory interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezerlis, A; Tews, I; Epelbaum, E; Gandolfi, S; Hebeler, K; Nogga, A; Schwenk, A

    2013-07-19

    We present the first quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations with chiral effective field theory (EFT) interactions. To achieve this, we remove all sources of nonlocality, which hamper the inclusion in QMC calculations, in nuclear forces to next-to-next-to-leading order. We perform auxiliary-field diffusion Monte Carlo (AFDMC) calculations for the neutron matter energy up to saturation density based on local leading-order, next-to-leading order, and next-to-next-to-leading order nucleon-nucleon interactions. Our results exhibit a systematic order-by-order convergence in chiral EFT and provide nonperturbative benchmarks with theoretical uncertainties. For the softer interactions, perturbative calculations are in excellent agreement with the AFDMC results. This work paves the way for QMC calculations with systematic chiral EFT interactions for nuclei and nuclear matter, for testing the perturbativeness of different orders, and allows for matching to lattice QCD results by varying the pion mass.

  2. Study on the Orderly Evolution of Agricultural Products Supply Chain under the Perspective of Complex Adaptation%复杂适应视域下农产品供应链有序演化问题探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘助忠; 龚荷英

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the orderly evolution of agricultural products supply system from the aspects of the connotation and evaluation of the orderly evolution,the mechanism and the trend of the evolution.System orderly evolution is the change of the system state of the system.Through the evolution of the index of the system of subject number,amount of resources, resource circulation movement and system network structure analysis,can ascertain the rule and trend of the evolution of supply chain system.Driven by the orderly evolution mechanism of agricultural products supply chain, such as selective adaptation mechanisms,cooperative competition mechanism,multi-dynamic mechanism,the agricultural supply chain system will be moving toward the direction of the energy dissipation decreases.Integration, electronic information, networks and lean are the specific trends of agricultural products supply chain system in the process of the evolution toward the direction of the energy dissipation decreases.%文中从有序演化的内涵及评价、有序演化的机制与趋势等几个方面探讨了农产品供应系统的有序演化问题。系统有序演化是系统各要素有规则的联系、运动和转化所带来的可预见的系统状态的变化。通过对系统中的主体数、资源量、资源流转运动情况以及系统网络结构等指标的演化情况分析,可探知供应链系统演化的规律与趋势。在选择性适应机制、协同竞争机制、多层动力机制等农产品供应链系统有序演化机制的推动下,农产品供应链系统将朝着能量耗散减小的方向演化。集成化、电子信息化、网络化、精益化等是农产品供应链系统在朝向能量耗散减小方向演化的进程中表现出来的具体趋势。

  3. Chiral three-nucleon force at N^4LO I: Longest-range contributions

    CERN Document Server

    Krebs, Hermann; Epelbaum, Evgeny

    2012-01-01

    We derive the sub-subleading two-pion exchange contributions to the three-nucleon force which appear at next-to-next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order in chiral effective field theory. In order to determine the low-energy constants, a complete analysis of pion-nucleon scattering at the subleading-loop order in the heavy-baryon expansion is carried out utilizing the power counting scheme employed in the derivation of the nuclear forces. We discuss the convergence of the chiral expansion for this particular three-nucleon force topology and give the values of the low-energy constants which provide the most realistic description of the three-nucleon force when the chiral expansion is truncated at next-to-next-to-leading order.

  4. Higgs boson pair production: Top quark mass effects at NLO and NNLO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Grigo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We compute next-to-next-to-leading order QCD corrections to the gluon-induced production cross section of Higgs boson pairs in the large top quark mass limit using the soft-virtual approximation. In the limit of infinitely-heavy top quark we confirm the results in the literature. We add two more expansion terms in the inverse top quark mass to the Mt→∞ result. Since the 1/Mt expansion converges poorly, we try to improve on it by factorizing the exact leading order cross section. We discuss two ways of doing that and conclude that the finite top quark mass effects shift the cross section at most by about 10% at next-to-leading order and by about 5% at next-to-next-to-leading order.

  5. Resummation Effects in Vector-Boson and Higgs Associated Production

    CERN Document Server

    Dawson, S; Lai, W K; Leibovich, A K; Lewis, I

    2012-01-01

    Fixed-order QCD radiative corrections to the vector-boson and Higgs associated production channels, pp -> VH (V=W, Z), at hadron colliders are well understood. We combine higher order perturbative QCD calculations with soft-gluon resummation of both threshold logarithms and logarithms which are important at low transverse momentum of the VH pair. We study the effects of both types of logarithms on the scale dependence of the total cross section and on various kinematic distributions. The next-to-next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic (NNNLL) resummed total cross sections at the LHC are almost identical to the fixed-order perturbative next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) rates, indicating the excellent convergence of the perturbative QCD series. Resummation of the VH transverse momentum (p_T) spectrum provides reliable results for small values of p_T and suggests that implementing a jet-veto will significantly decrease the cross sections.

  6. Top quark mass effects in Higgs boson pair production up to NNLO

    CERN Document Server

    Hoff, Jens

    2016-01-01

    We consider the production of pairs of Standard Model Higgs bosons via gluon fusion. Until recently the full dependence on the top quark mass $M_t$ was not known at next-to-leading order. For this reason we apply an approximation based on the expansion for large top quark masses up to $\\mathcal{O}(1/M_t^{12})$. At next-to-next-to-leading order we avoid the calculation of real corrections via the soft-virtual approximation and obtain top quark mass corrections up to $\\mathcal{O}(1/M_t^4)$. We use our results to estimate the residual uncertainty of the total cross section due to a finite top quark mass to be $\\mathcal{O}(10\\%)$ at next-to-leading order and $\\mathcal{O}(5\\%)$ at next-to-next-to-leading order.

  7. Vector-Boson Fusion Higgs Production at Three Loops in QCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Frédéric A; Karlberg, Alexander

    2016-08-12

    We calculate the next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-order (N^{3}LO) QCD corrections to inclusive vector-boson fusion Higgs production at proton colliders, in the limit in which there is no color exchange between the hadronic systems associated with the two colliding protons. We also provide differential cross sections for the Higgs transverse momentum and rapidity distributions. We find that the corrections are at the 1‰-2‰ level, well within the scale uncertainty of the next-to-next-to-leading-order calculation. The associated scale uncertainty of the N^{3}LO calculation is typically found to be below the 2‰ level. We also consider theoretical uncertainties due to missing higher order parton distribution functions, and provide an estimate of their importance.

  8. Vector-Boson Fusion Higgs Production at Three Loops in QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Frédéric A.; Karlberg, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    We calculate the next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-order (N3LO ) QCD corrections to inclusive vector-boson fusion Higgs production at proton colliders, in the limit in which there is no color exchange between the hadronic systems associated with the two colliding protons. We also provide differential cross sections for the Higgs transverse momentum and rapidity distributions. We find that the corrections are at the 1‰-2‰ level, well within the scale uncertainty of the next-to-next-to-leading-order calculation. The associated scale uncertainty of the N3LO calculation is typically found to be below the 2‰ level. We also consider theoretical uncertainties due to missing higher order parton distribution functions, and provide an estimate of their importance.

  9. Evolution of three-dimensional correlations during the photoinduced melting of antiferromagnetic order in La0.5Sr1.5MnO4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tobey, R. I.; Wall, S.; Foerst, M.; Bromberger, H.; Khanna, V.; Turner, J. J.; Schlotter, W.; Trigo, M.; Krupin, O.; Lee, W. S.; Chuang, Y. -D.; Moore, R.; Cavalieri, A. L.; Wilkins, S. B.; Zheng, H.; Mitchell, J. F.; Dhesi, S. S.; Cavalleri, A.; Hill, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Using time-resolved resonant soft x-ray diffraction, we measure the evolution of the full three-dimensional scattering volume of the antiferromagnetic superlattice reflection in the single-layer manganite La0.5Sr1.5MnO4 on femtosecond time scales following photoexcitation. We find that the in-plane

  10. vh@nnlo - Higgs Strahlung at hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Brein, Oliver; Zirke, Tom J E

    2012-01-01

    A numerical program for the evaluation of the inclusive cross section for associated Higgs production with a massive weak gauge boson at hadron colliders is described, sigma(pp/pbar p -> HV), V=W,Z. The calculation is performed in the framework of the Standard Model and includes next-to-next-to-leading order QCD as well as next-to-leading order electro-weak effects.

  11. A comparison of NNLO QCD predictions with 7 TeV ATLAS and CMS data for V+jet processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughezal, Radja; Liu, Xiaohui; Petriello, Frank

    2016-09-01

    We perform a detailed comparison of next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) QCD predictions for the W+jet and Z+jet processes with 7 TeV experimental data from ATLAS and CMS. We observe excellent agreement between theory and data for most studied observables, which span several orders of magnitude in both cross section and energy. For some observables, such as the HT distribution, the NNLO QCD corrections are essential for resolving existing discrepancies between theory and data.

  12. Pseudo-scalar Higgs boson production at N{sup 3}LO{sub A}+N{sup 3}LL{sup '}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Taushif; Rana, Narayan; Ravindran, V. [The Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai (India); Bonvini, Marco; Rottoli, Luca [University of Oxford, Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Kumar, M.C. [Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Department of Physics, Guwahati (India); Mathews, Prakash [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata (India)

    2016-12-15

    We consider the production of a pseudo-scalar particle A at the LHC, and present accurate theoretical predictions for its inclusive cross section in gluon fusion. The prediction is based on combining fixed-order perturbation theory and all-order threshold resummation. At fixed order we include the exact next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) plus an approximate next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N{sup 3}LO{sub A}) which is based on the recent computation at this order for the scalar case. We then add threshold resummation at next-to-next-to-next-to leading logarithmic accuracy (N{sup 3}LL{sup '}). Various forms of threshold resummation are considered, differing by the treatment of subleading terms, allowing a robust estimate of the theoretical uncertainties due to missing higher orders. With particular attention to pseudo-scalar masses of 200 and 750 GeV, we also observe that perturbative convergence is much improved when resummation is included. Additionally, results obtained with threshold resummation in direct QCD are compared with analogous results as computed in soft-collinear effective theory, which turn out to be in good agreement. We provide precise predictions for pseudo-scalar inclusive cross section at 13 TeV LHC for a wide range of masses. The results are available through updated versions of the public codes ggHiggs and TROLL. (orig.)

  13. Pseudo-scalar Higgs boson production at N$^3$LO$_{\\text{A}}$+N$^3$LL$^\\prime$

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Taushif; Kumar, M C; Mathews, Prakash; Rana, Narayan; Ravindran, V; Rottoli, Luca

    2016-01-01

    We consider the production of a pseudo-scalar particle $A$ at the LHC, and present accurate theoretical predictions for its inclusive cross section in gluon fusion. The prediction is based on combining fixed-order perturbation theory and all-order threshold resummation. At fixed order we include the exact next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) plus an approximate next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N$^3$LO$_{\\rm A}$) which is based on the recent computation at this order for the scalar case, and is therefore extremely precise. We then add threshold resummation at next-to-next-to-next-to leading logarithmic accuracy (N$^3$LL$^\\prime$). Various forms of threshold resummation are considered, differing by the treatment of subleading terms, allowing a robust estimate of the theoretical uncertainties due to missing higher orders. With particular attention to pseudo-scalar masses of $200$ GeV and $750$ GeV, we also observe that perturbative convergence is much improved when resummation is included. Additionally, re...

  14. Pseudo-scalar Higgs boson production at N^3LO_{ {A}}+N^3LL'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Taushif; Bonvini, Marco; Kumar, M. C.; Mathews, Prakash; Rana, Narayan; Ravindran, V.; Rottoli, Luca

    2016-12-01

    We consider the production of a pseudo-scalar particle A at the LHC, and present accurate theoretical predictions for its inclusive cross section in gluon fusion. The prediction is based on combining fixed-order perturbation theory and all-order threshold resummation. At fixed order we include the exact next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) plus an approximate next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N^3LO_A) which is based on the recent computation at this order for the scalar case. We then add threshold resummation at next-to-next-to-next-to leading logarithmic accuracy (N^3LL^' ). Various forms of threshold resummation are considered, differing by the treatment of subleading terms, allowing a robust estimate of the theoretical uncertainties due to missing higher orders. With particular attention to pseudo-scalar masses of 200 and 750 GeV, we also observe that perturbative convergence is much improved when resummation is included. Additionally, results obtained with threshold resummation in direct QCD are compared with analogous results as computed in soft-collinear effective theory, which turn out to be in good agreement. We provide precise predictions for pseudo-scalar inclusive cross section at 13 TeV LHC for a wide range of masses. The results are available through updated versions of the public codes ggHiggs and TROLL.

  15. Determination of $m_c$ and $m_b$ from quarkonium 1S energy levels in perturbative QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Kiyo, Yuichiro; Sumino, Yukinari

    2015-01-01

    We update determination of the $\\overline{\\rm MS}$ masses of the charm and bottom quarks, from comparisons of the masses of the charmonium and bottomonium $1S$ states with their perturbative predictions up to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order in $\\varepsilon$ expansion and using the $\\overline{\\rm MS}$ masses. Effects of non-zero charm-quark mass in the bottomonium masses are incorporated up to next-to-next-to-leading order. We obtain $\\overline m_c=1246\\pm 2 (d_3) \\pm 4 (\\alpha_s) \\pm 23 (\\text{h.o.} )~{\\rm MeV} $ and $\\overline m_b=4197\\pm 2 (d_3) \\pm 6 (\\alpha_s) \\pm 20 (\\text{h.o.} )\\pm 5 (m_c)~ {\\rm MeV} $, which agree with the current Particle Data Group values.

  16. Adequate bases of phase space master integrals for $gg \\to h$ at NNLO and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Höschele, Maik; Ueda, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    We study master integrals needed to compute the Higgs boson production cross section via gluon fusion in the infinite top quark mass limit, using a canonical form of differential equations for master integrals, recently identified by Henn, which makes their solution possible in a straightforward algebraic way. We apply the known criteria to derive such a suitable basis for all the phase space master integrals in afore mentioned process at next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD and demonstrate that the method is applicable to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order as well by solving a non-planar topology. Furthermore, we discuss in great detail how to find an adequate basis using practical examples. Special emphasis is devoted to master integrals which are coupled by their differential equations.

  17. Adequate bases of phase space master integrals for gg → h at NNLO and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höschele, Maik; Hoff, Jens; Ueda, Takahiro

    2014-09-01

    We study master integrals needed to compute the Higgs boson production cross section via gluon fusion in the infinite top quark mass limit, using a canonical form of differential equations for master integrals, recently identified by Henn, which makes their solution possible in a straightforward algebraic way. We apply the known criteria to derive such a suitable basis for all the phase space master integrals in afore mentioned process at next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD and demonstrate that the method is applicable to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order as well by solving a non-planar topology. Furthermore, we discuss in great detail how to find an adequate basis using practical examples. Special emphasis is devoted to master integrals which are coupled by their differential equations.

  18. Boosted Top Quark Pair Production in Soft Collinear Effective Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Ferroglia, Andrea; Pecjak, Ben D; Yang, Li Lin

    2014-01-01

    We review a Soft Collinear Effective Theory approach to the study of factorization and resummation of QCD effects in top-quark pair production. In particular, we consider differential cross sections such as the top-quark pair invariant mass distribution and the top-quark transverse momentum and rapidity distributions. Furthermore, we focus our attention on the large invariant mass and large transverse momentum kinematic regions, characteristic of boosted top quarks. We discuss the factorization of the differential cross section in the double soft gluon emission and small top-quark mass limit, both in Pair Invariant Mass (PIM) and One Particle Inclusive (1PI) kinematics. The factorization formulas can be employed in order to implement the simultaneous resummation of soft emission and small mass effects up to next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. The results are also used to construct improved next-to-next-to-leading order approximations for the differential cross sections.

  19. The Transverse Momentum Dependent Fragmentation Function at NNLO

    CERN Document Server

    Echevarria, Miguel G; Vladimirov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the unpolarized non-singlet transverse momentum dependent fragmentation function (TMDFF) at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO), evaluating separately TMD soft factor and TMD collinear correlator. For the first time the cancellation of spurious rapidity divergences in a properly defined individual TMD beyond the first non-trivial order is shown. This represents a strong check of the given TMD definition. We extract the matching coefficient necessary to perform the transverse momentum resummation at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-logarithmic accuracy. The universal character of the soft function, which enters the definition of all (un)polarized TMD distribution/fragmentation functions, facilitates the future calculation of all the other TMDs and their coefficients at NNLO, pushing forward the accuracy of theoretical predictions for the current and next generation of high energy colliders.

  20. Parallel evolution of the glycogen synthase 1 (muscle) gene Gys1 between Old World and New World fruit bats (Order: Chiroptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Lu; Shen, Bin; Irwin, David M; Zhang, Shuyi

    2014-10-01

    Glycogen synthase, which catalyzes the synthesis of glycogen, is especially important for Old World (Pteropodidae) and New World (Phyllostomidae) fruit bats that ingest high-carbohydrate diets. Glycogen synthase 1, encoded by the Gys1 gene, is the glycogen synthase isozyme that functions in muscles. To determine whether Gys1 has undergone adaptive evolution in bats with carbohydrate-rich diets, in comparison to insect-eating sister bat taxa, we sequenced the coding region of the Gys1 gene from 10 species of bats, including two Old World fruit bats (Pteropodidae) and a New World fruit bat (Phyllostomidae). Our results show no evidence for positive selection in the Gys1 coding sequence on the ancestral Old World and the New World Artibeus lituratus branches. Tests for convergent evolution indicated convergence of the sequences and one parallel amino acid substitution (T395A) was detected on these branches, which was likely driven by natural selection.

  1. Resummed Differential Cross Sections for Top-Quark Pairs at the LHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecjak, Benjamin D; Scott, Darren J; Wang, Xing; Yang, Li Lin

    2016-05-20

    We present state of the art resummation predictions for differential cross sections in top-quark pair production at the LHC. They are derived from a formalism which allows the simultaneous resummation of both soft and small-mass logarithms, which endanger the convergence of fixed-order perturbative series in the boosted regime, where the partonic center-of-mass energy is much larger than the mass to the top quark. We combine such a double resummation at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic^{'} (NNLL^{'}) accuracy with standard soft-gluon resummation at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy and with next-to-leading-order calculations, so that our results are applicable throughout the whole phase space. We find that the resummation effects on the differential distributions are significant, bringing theoretical predictions into better agreement with experimental data compared to fixed-order calculations. Moreover, such effects are not well described by the next-to-next-to-leading-order approximation of the resummation formula, especially in the high-energy tails of the distributions, highlighting the importance of all-orders resummation in dedicated studies of boosted top production.

  2. The temperature evolution of the out-of-plane correlation lengths of charge-stripe ordered La1.725Sr0.275NiO4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freeman, P.G.; Christensen, Niels Bech; Prabhakaran, D.;

    2010-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the magnetic order of stripe-ordered La1.725Sr0.275NiO4 is investigated by neutron diffraction. Upon cooling, the widths of the magnetic Bragg peaks are observed to broaden. The degree of broadening is found to be very different for l = odd-integer and l = even-integ...

  3. The total top-pair production cross section at NNLL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beneke, M. [Physik Department T31, James-Franck-Straße, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Institut für Theoretische Teilchenphysik und Kosmologie, RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Falgari, P., E-mail: p.falgari@uu.nl [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands); Klein, S. [Institut für Theoretische Teilchenphysik und Kosmologie, RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Piclum, J. [Physik Department T31, James-Franck-Straße, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Institut für Theoretische Teilchenphysik und Kosmologie, RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Schwinn, C. [Albert-Ludwigs Universität Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Ubiali, M.; Yan, F. [Institut für Theoretische Teilchenphysik und Kosmologie, RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    We present results for the total top-pair production cross section at the Tevatron and the LHC. Our predictions supplement fixed-order results with resummation of soft logarithms and Coulomb singularities to next-to-next-to-leading (NNLL) logarithmic accuracy and include top-antitop bound-state effects. The effects of resummation, the dependence on the PDF set used, the residual sources of theoretical uncertainty and their implication for measurements of the top-quark mass are discussed.

  4. Uncertainties of Euclidean Time Extrapolation in Lattice Effective Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lähde, Timo A; Krebs, Hermann; Lee, Dean; Meißner, Ulf-G; Rupak, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Extrapolations in Euclidean time form a central part of Nuclear Lattice Effective Field Theory (NLEFT) calculations using the Projection Monte Carlo method, as the sign problem in many cases prevents simulations at large Euclidean time. We review the next-to-next-to-leading order NLEFT results for the alpha nuclei up to $^{28}$Si, with emphasis on the Euclidean time extrapolations, their expected accuracy and potential pitfalls. We also discuss possible avenues for improving the reliability of Euclidean time extrapolations in NLEFT.

  5. Two-loop current-current operator contribution to the non-leptonic QCD penguin amplitude

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Guido; Huber, Tobias; Li, Xin-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The computation of direct CP asymmetries in charmless B decays at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in QCD is of interest to ascertain the short-distance contribution. Here we compute the two-loop penguin contractions of the current-current operators Q_{1,2} and provide a first estimate of NNLO CP asymmetries in penguin-dominated b -> s transitions.

  6. $W^\\pm Z$ production at the LHC: fiducial cross sections and distributions in NNLO QCD arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Grazzini, Massimiliano; Rathlev, Dirk; Wiesemann, Marius

    We report on the first fully differential calculation for $W^\\pm Z$ production in hadron collisions up to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in QCD perturbation theory. Leptonic decays of the $W$ and $Z$ bosons are consistently taken into account, i.e. we include all resonant and non-resonant diagrams that contribute to the process $pp\\to \\ell^{'\\pm} \

  7. Rare K ---> pi nu anti-nu decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haisch, Ulrich; /Fermilab /Zurich U.

    2005-12-01

    We present a concise review of the theoretical status of rare K {yields} {pi}{nu}{bar {nu}} decays in the standard model (SM). Particular attention is thereby devoted to the recent calculation of the next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) corrections to the charm quark contribution of K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}}, which removes the last relevant theoretical uncertainty from the K {yields} {pi}{nu}{bar {nu}} system.

  8. Chiral behavior of light meson form factors in 2+1 flavor QCD with exact chiral symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneko, T; Cossu, G; Feng, X; Fukaya, H; Hashimoto, S; Noaki, J; Onogi, T

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of chiral behavior of light meson form factors in QCD with three flavors of overlap quarks. Gauge ensembles are generated at single lattice spacing 0.12 fm with pion masses down to 300 MeV. The pion and kaon electromagnetic form factors and the kaon semileptonic form factors are precisely calculated using the all-to-all quark propagator. We discuss their chiral behavior using the next-to-next-to-leading order chiral perturbation theory.

  9. QCD aspects of diboson production based on measurements of the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, Baishali; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The production of diboson states with jets in the final state received significant attention since next-to-next-to leading order calculations became available. In this talk, we present measurements of WZ and ZZ dibosons final states, with a special focus on their production in association with jets. Several differential distributions have been measured for the first time and are compared to the state-of-the art theory predictions.

  10. Three-jet production in electron-positron collisions using the CoLoRFulNNLO method

    CERN Document Server

    Del Duca, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a subtraction method for jet cross sections at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) accuracy in the strong coupling and use it to compute event shapes in three-jet production in electron-positron collisions. We validate our method on two event shapes, thrust and C-parameter, which are already known in the literature at NNLO accuracy and compute for the first time oblateness and the energy-energy correlation at the same accuracy.

  11. Effective Field Theory approach to heavy quark fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fickinger, Michael [PRISMA Cluster of Excellence & Mainz Institute for Theoretical Physics,Johannes Gutenberg University,Staudingerweg 9, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Fleming, Sean [Department of Physics, University of Arizona,1118 E. Fourth Street, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Kim, Chul [Institute of Convergence Fundamental Studies and School of Liberal Arts,Seoul National University of Science and Technology,232 Gongneung-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul 01811 (Korea, Republic of); Mereghetti, Emanuele [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos,Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2016-11-17

    Using an approach based on Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) and Heavy Quark Effective Theory (HQET) we determine the b-quark fragmentation function from electron-positron annihilation data at the Z-boson peak at next-to-next-to leading order with next-to-next-to leading log resummation of DGLAP logarithms, and next-to-next-to-next-to leading log resummation of endpoint logarithms. This analysis improves, by one order, the previous extraction of the b-quark fragmentation function. We find that while the addition of the next order in the calculation does not much shift the extracted form of the fragmentation function, it does reduce theoretical errors indicating that the expansion is converging. Using an approach based on effective field theory allows us to systematically control theoretical errors. While the fits of theory to data are generally good, the fits seem to be hinting that higher order correction from HQET may be needed to explain the b-quark fragmentation function at smaller values of momentum fraction.

  12. Effective field theory approach to heavy quark fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Fickinger, Michael; Kim, Chul; Mereghetti, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    Using an approach based on Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) and Heavy Quark Effective Theory (HQET) we determine the $b$-quark fragmentation function from electron-positron annihilation data at the $Z$-boson peak at next-to-next-to leading order, with next-to-next-to leading log resummation of DGLAP logarithms, and next-to-next-to-next-to leading log resummation of endpoint logarithms. This analysis improves, by one order, the previous extraction of the $b$-quark fragmentation function. We find that while the addition of the next order in the calculation does not much shift the extracted form of the fragmentation function, it does reduce theoretical errors indicating that the expansion is converging. Using an approach based on effective field theory allows us to systematically control theoretical errors. While the fits of theory to data are generally good, the fits seem to be hinting that higher order correction from HQET may be needed to explain the $b$-quark fragmentation function at smaller values of...

  13. Regge-like initial input and evolution of non-singlet structure functions from DGLAP equation up to next-next-to-leading order at low and low 2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nayan Mani Nath; Mrinal Kumar Das; Jayanta Kumar Sarma

    2015-10-01

    This is an attempt to study how the features of Regge theory, along with QCD predictions, lead towards the understanding of unpolarized non-singlet structure functions $F_{2}^{\\text{NS}}$ (, 2) and 3 (, 2) at low and low 2 . Combining the features of perturbative quantum chromodynamics (pQCD) and Regge theory, an ansatz for $F_{2}^{\\text{NS}}$ (, 2) and 3 (, 2) structure functions at small was obtained, which when used as the initial input to Dokshitzer–Gribov–Lipatov–Altarelli–Parisi (DGLAP) equation, gives the 2 evolution of the non-singlet structure functions. The non-singlet structure functions, evolved in accordance with DGLAP evolution equations up to next-next-to-leading order are studied phenomenologically in comparison with the available experimental and parametrization results taken from NMC, CCFR, NuTeV, CORUS, CDHSW, NNPDF and MSTW Collaborations and a very good agreement is observed in this regard.

  14. Disappearance of static magnetic order and evolution of spin fluctuations in Fe1+δSexTe1-x

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhijun [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); City College of New York, NY (United States); Wen, Jinsheng [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Xu, Guangyong [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Jie, Qing [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lin, Zhiwei [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Li, Qiang [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Chi, Songxue [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Singh, D. K. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Gu, Genda [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tranquada, John M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2010-09-29

    We report neutron-scattering studies on static magnetic orders and spin excitations in the Fe-based chalcogenide system Fev Se1+δ Te1-x with different Fe and Se compositions. Short-range static magnetic order with an in-plane wave vector near the (0.5,0) (using the two-Fe unit cell), together with strong low-energy magnetic excitations is found in all nonsuperconducting samples for Se doping up to 45%. When the static order disappears and bulk superconductivity emerges, the spectral weight of the magnetic excitations shifts to the region of reciprocal space near the in-plane wave vector (0.5, 0.5), corresponding to “collinear” spin correlations. Our results suggest that there is a strong correlation between superconductivity and the character of the magnetic order/fluctuations in this system. Excess Fe appears to be important for stabilizing the magnetic order that competes with superconductivity.

  15. Water Splitting: Strongly Coupled Nafion Molecules and Ordered Porous CdS Networks for Enhanced Visible-Light Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Evolution (Adv. Mater. 24/2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xue-Li; Song, Ji-Peng; Ling, Tao; Hu, Zhen Peng; Yin, Peng-Fei; Davey, Kenneth; Du, Xi-Wen; Qiao, Shi-Zhang

    2016-06-01

    T. Ling, X.-W. Du, S. Z. Qiao, and co-workers report strongly coupled Nafion molecules and ordered-porous CdS networks for visible-light water splitting. The image conceptually shows how the three-dimensional ordered structure effectively harvests incoming light. As described on page 4935, the inorganic CdS skeleton is homogeneously passivated by the organic Nafion molecules to facilitate hydrogen generation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Ordered and disordered evolution of the pore mesostructure in hybrid silica anti-reflective films obtained by one-pot self-assembly method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghazzal, Mohamed N., E-mail: g_nawfel@yahoo.fr; Debecker, Damien P.; Gaigneaux, Eric M.

    2016-07-29

    Hybrid mesoporous silica films were prepared in acid-catalysed medium using a one-pot self-assembly method. A gradual content of methyl groups was introduced into the inorganic framework by co-condensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate and methyltriethoxysilane. To better understand how the ordered and disordered transition occurs in mesoporous hybrid organosilica sytem as function of the MTES molar ratio in the starting solution, textural, chemical and optical properties of the films were studied by transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), grazing-incident small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS), transmission Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) and UV–visible spectroscopy. Increasing the loading of the incorporated organic groups (up to 40% in the starting solution) led simultaneously to a disorganization of the pore mesostructure and a reduction in the pore diameter. Concomitantly, a disordered domain of the silica rings in the walls was observed, which created bond strains in the silica wall contributing also to the disorganization of the pore mesostructure. Furthermore, an optimal MTES content was identified in order to obtain antireflection coatings, exhibiting low reflection in the visible range. - Highlights: • Mesoporous hybrid silica films where prepared by one-pot co-condensation of MTES and TEOS. • Ordered and disordered mesostructures were studied as function as variable MTES molar ratio. • A rearrangement of the silica cyclic species occurred as the molar ratio of MTES increases. • Transmittance of the silica coatings is affected by the MTES molar ratio.

  17. Role of Short-Range Chemical Ordering in (GaN) 1–x (ZnO) x for Photodriven Oxygen Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Dennis P. [Department; Neuefeind, Joerg C. [Chemical; Koczkur, Kallum M. [Department; Bish, David L. [Department; Skrabalak, Sara E. [Department

    2017-07-21

    (GaN)1–x(ZnO)x (GZNO) is capable of visible-light driven water splitting, but its bandgap at x ≤ 0.15 (>2.7 eV) results in poor visible-light absorption. Unfortunately, methods to narrow its bandgap by incorporating higher ZnO concentrations are accompanied by extensive Urbach tailing near the absorption-edge, which is indicative of structural disorder or chemical inhomogeneities. We evaluated whether this disorder is intrinsic to the bond-length distribution in GZNO or is a result of defects introduced from the loss of Zn during nitridation. Here, the synthesis of GZNO derived from layered double hydroxide (LDH) precursors is described which minimizes Zn loss and chemical inhomogeneities and enhances visible-light absorption. The average and local atomic structures of LDH-derived GZNO were investigated using X-ray and neutron scattering and are correlated with their oxygen evolution rates. An isotope-contrasted neutron-scattering experiment was conducted in conjunction with reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) simulations. We showed that a bond-valence bias in the RMC refinements reproduces the short-range ordering (SRO) observed in structure refinements using isotope-contrasted neutron data. The findings suggest that positional disorder of cation–anion pairs in GZNO partially arises from SRO and influences local bond relaxations. Furthermore, particle-based oxygen evolution reactions (OERs) in AgNO3 solution reveal that the crystallite size of GZNO correlates more than positional disorder with oxygen evolution rate. These findings illustrate the importance of examining the local structure of multinary photocatalysts to identify dominant factors in particulate-based photodriven oxygen evolution.

  18. The heavy-quark forward-backward asymmetry to order {alpha}{sup 2}{sub s}; Die Vorwaerts-Rueckwaerts-Asymmetrie fuer schwere Quarks zur Ordnung {alpha}{sup 2}{sub s}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waninger, Karl Constantin

    2011-02-28

    The goal of this thesis was the computation of the forward-backward asymmetry in the e{sup +}e{sup -}-production of heavy quarks to next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD (NNLO-QCD). Final states comprising up to four partons contribute to the corrections of order {alpha}{sup 2}{sub s}. The two-parton contributions are known for a while. The novel part is the computation of the three- and four-parton contributions. One main task of these computation was to explicitly show the cancellation of the infrared singularities arising in many of the contributing expressions. The other task was to ensure a stable numerical evaluation of the forward-backward asymmetry. The ultraviolet-divergences of the one loop integrals in the three-parton contributions are removed using renormalized perturbation theory. The infrared-divergence in the the three-parton final state contribution to the symmetric and antisymmetric cross sections cancels when building the forward-backward asymmetry out of these cross sections. This has been shown explicitly in this thesis by performing a Laurent-expansion of the relevant differential cross sections around the singular point in phase space. The infrared-divergences in the second-order three-parton contribution to the forward-backward asymmetry arising in the loop integrals, which are regularized in d = 4 - 2{epsilon} dimensions are quantified by {epsilon}-poles of up to second order and proportional to the leading-order contribution to the observable. The symmetric and antisymmetric contributions to the four-parton final state exhibit one-parton and two-parton unresolved infrared-singularities. In this thesis a modified version of the dipole subtraction formalism has been used to show that the one-parton-unresolved singularities of the four-parton final state cancel the infrared-singularities in the loop integrals of the contributions from the three-parton final states. Identifying the points in the four-parton phase space corresponding to the two

  19. The evolution from long-range magnetic order to spin-glass behaviour in PrAu2(Si1- xGex)2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimmel, A.; Hemberger, J.; Kegler, C.; Nicklas, M.; Engelmayer, A.; Knebel, G.; Fritsch, V.; Reehuis, M.; Brando, M.; Loidl, A.

    1999-09-01

    We have studied the magnetic behaviour of PrAu2(Si1-xGex)2 by means of magnetic susceptibility, resistivity, and heat capacity measurements, and x-ray and neutron powder diffraction. All compounds are isostructural and crystallize in the well known ThCr2Si2-type structure. PrAu2Si2 shows the characteristic features of a canonical spin glass with a freezing temperature of TF = 3 K. Completely unexpectedly, on introducing/increasing the atomic disorder by alloying with Ge, the spin-glass transition is suppressed as is first evident from a slight decrease of the freezing temperature TF up to x = 0.10. Long-range magnetic order sets in for xicons/Journals/Common/ge" ALT="ge" ALIGN="TOP"/>0.12. Within the range 0.15icons/Journals/Common/le" ALT="le" ALIGN="TOP"/> xicons/Journals/Common/le" ALT="le" ALIGN="TOP"/>1, all compounds show the same simple AF-I-type antiferromagnetic structure with a monotonic increase of both the Néel temperature and the ordered magnetic moment for increasing Ge concentration. The magnetic phase diagram of PrAu2(Si1-xGex)2 is explained by the presence of weak disorder at a constant level at the Au sites. Clear indications of crystal-field effects have been observed.

  20. Aspect-ratio driven evolution of high-order resonant modes and near-field distributions in localized surface phonon polariton nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Chase T.; Tischler, Joseph G.; Glembocki, Orest J.; Bezares, Francisco J.; Giles, Alexander J.; Kasica, Richard; Shirey, Loretta; Owrutsky, Jeffrey C.; Chigrin, Dmitry N.; Caldwell, Joshua D.

    2016-09-01

    Polar dielectrics have garnered much attention as an alternative to plasmonic metals in the mid- to long-wave infrared spectral regime due to their low optical losses. As such, nanoscale resonators composed of these materials demonstrate figures of merit beyond those achievable in plasmonic equivalents. However, until now, only low-order, phonon-mediated, localized polariton resonances, known as surface phonon polaritons (SPhPs), have been observed in polar dielectric optical resonators. In the present work, we investigate the excitation of 16 distinct high-order, multipolar, localized surface phonon polariton resonances that are optically excited in rectangular pillars etched into a semi-insulating silicon carbide substrate. By elongating a single pillar axis we are able to significantly modify the far- and near-field properties of localized SPhP resonances, opening the door to realizing narrow-band infrared sources with tailored radiation patterns. Such control of the near-field behavior of resonances can also impact surface enhanced infrared optical sensing, which is mediated by polarization selection rules, as well as the morphology and strength of resonator hot spots. Furthermore, through the careful choice of polar dielectric material, these results can also serve as the guiding principles for the generalized design of optical devices that operate from the mid- to far-infrared.

  1. Unique Characteristics of the Pyrrolysine System in the 7th Order of Methanogens: Implications for the Evolution of a Genetic Code Expansion Cassette

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Borrel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrrolysine (Pyl, the 22nd proteogenic amino acid, was restricted until recently to few organisms. Its translational use necessitates the presence of enzymes for synthesizing it from lysine, a dedicated amber stop codon suppressor tRNA, and a specific amino-acyl tRNA synthetase. The three genomes of the recently proposed Thermoplasmata-related 7th order of methanogens contain the complete genetic set for Pyl synthesis and its translational use. Here, we have analyzed the genomic features of the Pyl-coding system in these three genomes with those previously known from Bacteria and Archaea and analyzed the phylogeny of each component. This shows unique peculiarities, notably an amber   tRNAPyl with an imperfect anticodon stem and a shortened tRNAPyl synthetase. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that a Pyl-coding system was present in the ancestor of the seventh order of methanogens and appears more closely related to Bacteria than to Methanosarcinaceae, suggesting the involvement of lateral gene transfer in the spreading of pyrrolysine between the two prokaryotic domains. We propose that the Pyl-coding system likely emerged once in Archaea, in a hydrogenotrophic and methanol-H2-dependent methylotrophic methanogen. The close relationship between methanogenesis and the Pyl system provides a possible example of expansion of a still evolving genetic code, shaped by metabolic requirements.

  2. Hard matching for boosted tops at two loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang, Andre H. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Faculty of Physics; Vienna Univ. (Austria). Erwin Schroeder International Institute for Mathematical Physics; Pathak, Aditya; Stewart, Iain W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Center for Theoretical Physics; Pietrulewicz, Piotr [DESY Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group

    2015-08-15

    Cross sections for top quarks provide very interesting physics opportunities, being both sensitive to new physics and also perturbatively tractable due to the large top quark mass. Rigorous factorization theorems for top cross sections can be derived in several kinematic scenarios, including the boosted regime in the peak region that we consider here. In the context of the corresponding factorization theorem for e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions we extract the last missing ingredient that is needed to evaluate the cross section differential in the jet-mass at two-loop order, namely the matching coefficient at the scale μ ≅ m{sub t}. Our extraction also yields the final ingredients needed to carry out logarithmic resummation at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic order (or N3LL if we ignore the missing 4-loop cusp anomalous dimension). This coefficient exhibits an amplitude level rapidity logarithm starting at O(α{sup 2}{sub s}) due to virtual top quark loops, which we treat using rapidity renormalization group (RG) evolution. Interestingly, this rapidity RG evolution appears in the matching coefficient between two effective theories around the heavy quark mass scale μ≅m{sub t}.

  3. QCD analysis of DIS structure functions in neutrino-nucleon scattering: Laplace transform and Jacobi polynomials approach

    CERN Document Server

    Nejad, S Mohammad Moosavi; Tehrani, S Atashbar; Mahdavi, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    We present a detailed QCD analysis of nucleon structure functions $xF_3 (x, Q^2)$, based on Laplace transforms and Jacobi polynomials approach. The analysis corresponds to the next-to-leading order (NLO) and next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) approximation of perturbative QCD. The Laplace transform technique, as an exact analytical solution, is used for the solution of nonsinglet DGLAP evolution equations at low- and large-$x$ values. The extracted results are used as input to obtain the $x$ and Q$^2$ evolution of $xF_3(x, Q^2)$ structure functions using the Jacobi polynomials approach. In our work, the values of the typical QCD scale $\\Lambda_{\\overline{\\rm MS}}^{(n_f)}$ and the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_s(M_Z^2)$ are determined for four quark flavors ($n_f=4$) as well. A careful estimation of the uncertainties shall be performed using the Hessian method for the valence-quark distributions, originating from the experimental errors. We compare our valence-quark PDFs sets with those of other collabora...

  4. QCD analysis of nucleon structure functions in deep-inelastic neutrino-nucleon scattering: Laplace transform and Jacobi polynomials approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejad, S. Mohammad Moosavi; Khanpour, Hamzeh; Tehrani, S. Atashbar; Mahdavi, Mahdi

    2016-10-01

    We present a detailed QCD analysis of nucleon structure functions x F3(x ,Q2) , based on Laplace transforms and the Jacobi polynomials approach. The analysis corresponds to the next-to-leading order and next-to-next-to-leading order approximations of perturbative QCD. The Laplace transform technique, as an exact analytical solution, is used for the solution of nonsinglet Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution equations at low- and large-x values. The extracted results are used as input to obtain the x and Q2 evolution of x F3(x ,Q2) structure functions using the Jacobi polynomials approach. In our work, the values of the typical QCD scale ΛMS¯ (nf) and the strong coupling constant αs(MZ2) are determined for four quark flavors (nf=4 ) as well. A careful estimation of the uncertainties shall be performed using the Hessian method for the valence-quark distributions, originating from the experimental errors. We compare our valence-quark parton distribution functions sets with those of other collaborations, in particular with the CT14, MMHT14, and NNPDF sets, which are contemporary with the present analysis. The obtained results from the analysis are in good agreement with those from the literature.

  5. Oxygen evolution catalysts on supports with a 3-D ordered array structure and intrinsic proton conductivity for proton exchange membrane steam electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Junyuan; Aili, David; Li, Qingfeng;

    2014-01-01

    with a contribution of around 10−2 S cm−1 proton conductivity. The support structure of three-dimensionally ordered hexagonal arrays displays a high specific surface area of 180 m2 g−1. Benefiting from the mixed conductivities and porous structure in the composite support materials, the supported IrO2 catalysts......, composite support materials for iridium oxide are synthesized via in situ phosphorization reaction on tin doped indium oxide and possess functionalities of high electronic and intrinsic proton conductivity. At 130 °C under a water vapor atmosphere an overall conductivity of 0.72 S cm−1 is achieved...... exhibit about five times enhancement of the OER activity in acidic electrolytes. The improved catalytic performance for the OER was further confirmed by PEM electrolyzer tests at 130 °C. A test of such a steam electrolyzer cell at 350 mA cm−2 shows good durability within a period of up to 1150 hours....

  6. Overfrustrated and underfrustrated spin glasses in d =3 and 2: Evolution of phase diagrams and chaos including spin-glass order in d =2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilker, Efe; Berker, A. Nihat

    2014-04-01

    In spin-glass systems, frustration can be adjusted continuously and considerably, without changing the antiferromagnetic bond probability p, by using locally correlated quenched randomness, as we demonstrate here on hypercubic lattices and hierarchical lattices. Such overfrustrated and underfrustrated Ising systems on hierarchical lattices in d =3 and 2 are studied. With the removal of just 51% of frustration, a spin-glass phase occurs in d =2. With the addition of just 33% frustration, the spin-glass phase disappears in d =3. Sequences of 18 different phase diagrams for different levels of frustration are calculated in both dimensions. In general, frustration lowers the spin-glass ordering temperature. At low temperatures, increased frustration favors the spin-glass phase (before it disappears) over the ferromagnetic phase and symmetrically the antiferromagnetic phase. When any amount, including infinitesimal, frustration is introduced, the chaotic rescaling of local interactions occurs in the spin-glass phase. Chaos increases with increasing frustration, as can be seen from the increased positive value of the calculated Lyapunov exponent λ, starting from λ =0 when frustration is absent. The calculated runaway exponent yR of the renormalization-group flows decreases with increasing frustration to yR=0 when the spin-glass phase disappears. From our calculations of entropy and specific-heat curves in d =3, it is shown that frustration lowers in temperature the onset of both long- and short-range order in spin-glass phases, but is more effective on the former. From calculations of the entropy as a function of antiferromagnetic bond concentration p, it is shown that the ground-state and low-temperature entropy already mostly sets in within the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases, before the spin-glass phase is reached.

  7. Overfrustrated and underfrustrated spin glasses in d=3 and 2: evolution of phase diagrams and chaos including spin-glass order in d=2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilker, Efe; Berker, A Nihat

    2014-04-01

    In spin-glass systems, frustration can be adjusted continuously and considerably, without changing the antiferromagnetic bond probability p, by using locally correlated quenched randomness, as we demonstrate here on hypercubic lattices and hierarchical lattices. Such overfrustrated and underfrustrated Ising systems on hierarchical lattices in d=3 and 2 are studied. With the removal of just 51% of frustration, a spin-glass phase occurs in d=2. With the addition of just 33% frustration, the spin-glass phase disappears in d=3. Sequences of 18 different phase diagrams for different levels of frustration are calculated in both dimensions. In general, frustration lowers the spin-glass ordering temperature. At low temperatures, increased frustration favors the spin-glass phase (before it disappears) over the ferromagnetic phase and symmetrically the antiferromagnetic phase. When any amount, including infinitesimal, frustration is introduced, the chaotic rescaling of local interactions occurs in the spin-glass phase. Chaos increases with increasing frustration, as can be seen from the increased positive value of the calculated Lyapunov exponent λ, starting from λ=0 when frustration is absent. The calculated runaway exponent yR of the renormalization-group flows decreases with increasing frustration to yR=0 when the spin-glass phase disappears. From our calculations of entropy and specific-heat curves in d=3, it is shown that frustration lowers in temperature the onset of both long- and short-range order in spin-glass phases, but is more effective on the former. From calculations of the entropy as a function of antiferromagnetic bond concentration p, it is shown that the ground-state and low-temperature entropy already mostly sets in within the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases, before the spin-glass phase is reached.

  8. Evolution of ferromagnetic order in Yb(Rh{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}Si{sub 2} with x ≤ 0.27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamann, Sandra; Lausberg, Stefan; Steinke, Lucia; Brando, Manuel; Geibel, Christoph; Steglich, Frank [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Noethnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Klingner, Christoph [Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, D-82152 Martinsried (Germany); Krellner, Cornelius [Institute of Physics, Goethe University Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Antiferromagnetic (AFM) order appears in YbRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2} at T{sub N} = 70 mK although strong ferromagnetic fluctuations are observed. The application of chemical pressure x in the series Yb(Rh{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}Si{sub 2} stabilizes the AFM phase, i.e. T{sub N} increases with increasing x. A second phase transition at T{sub L} < T{sub N} emerges with increasing x and the strength of the ferromagnetic fluctuations raises up to a maximum for x ∼ 0.27 Eventually, in pure YbCo{sub 2}Si{sub 2} both phase transitions T{sub N} and T{sub L} are of AFM nature with 4f local moments aligned along the crystallographic ab-plane. However, the sample with x = 0.27 reveals only one phase transition at 1.30 K which is surprisingly ferromagnetic with moments parallel to the c-axis. This motivates a deeper investigation of the magnetic properties in Yb(Rh{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}Si{sub 2} with the magnetic field along the c-axis. Here, we present ac-susceptibilty measurements of single crystals with x ≤ 0.27 down to a temperature of 25 mK.

  9. Conduction electrons mediating the evolution from antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic ordering in Gd (Co1-yFey) 2Zn20 (0 ≤y ≤1 )

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Baez, M.; Naranjo-Uribe, A.; Osorio-Guillén, J. M.; Rettori, C.; Avila, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    GdFe2Zn20 is a complex cagelike compound with an unusually high ferromagnetic ordering temperature (TC=86 K) for a very diluted Gd3 + magnetic sublattice, embedded in a matrix that features strong electron-electron correlations. Here, we report on a magnetic and electronic study of the substitutional intermetallic system Gd (Co1-yFey) 2Zn20 combining magnetization measurements plus first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations with temperature-dependent electron spin resonance (ESR). After accounting for electron-electron correlations and itinerant molecular field effects, the ESR results indicate that the exchange interaction between the Gd3 + is processed via a single band of d -type electrons at the Fermi level and the exchange interaction is covalent in nature [J (0) f d<0 ] with a strong conduction electron (c e ) momentum transfer dependence [Jf d(q ) ] . The DFT calculations support this scenario by indicating a major contribution of d -type c e at the Fermi level and a spin polarization in (Y,Gd ) Fe2Zn20 wherein the most stable configuration is antiferromagnetic between Gd3 + and c e spins. Our results demonstrate that the standard Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida mechanism cannot explain the ferromagnetic behavior of GdFe2Zn20 and a superexchangelike mechanism is proposed for this magnetic interaction. An "extended phase diagram" for the double substitution sequence YCo2Zn20→GdCo2Zn20→GdFe2Zn20 is presented and discussed.

  10. Transverse-momentum resummation for heavy-quark hadroproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Catani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the production of a pair of heavy quarks (QQ¯ in hadronic collisions. When the transverse momentum qT of the heavy-quark pair is much smaller than its invariant mass, the QCD perturbative expansion is affected by large logarithmic terms that must be resummed to all orders. This behavior is well known from the simpler case of hadroproduction of colorless high-mass systems, such as vector or Higgs boson(s. In the case of QQ¯ production, the final-state heavy quarks carry color charge and are responsible for additional soft radiation (through direct emission and interferences with initial-state radiation that complicates the evaluation of the logarithmically-enhanced terms in the small-qT region. We present the all-order resummation structure of the logarithmic contributions, which includes color flow evolution factors due to soft wide-angle radiation. Resummation is performed at the completely differential level with respect to the kinematical variables of the produced heavy quarks. Soft-parton radiation produces azimuthal correlations that are fully taken into account by the resummation formalism. These azimuthal correlations are entangled with those that are produced by initial-state collinear radiation. We present explicit analytical results up to next-to-leading order and next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy.

  11. China's Rise vs. International Order Evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Liru

    2008-01-01

    @@ A heated debate over the rise of China has been going on unabated in the international community for nearly two decades. However, with the elapse of time, the initial divergence of views in the mainstream opinion has gradually diminished and the gap in China policy among nations has likewise narrowed down. Instead, reason and a realistic approach have eventually taken center stage.

  12. Evolution of temporal order in living organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Vijay

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Circadian clocks are believed to have evolved in parallel with the geological history of the earth, and have since been fine-tuned under selection pressures imposed by cyclic factors in the environment. These clocks regulate a wide variety of behavioral and metabolic processes in many life forms. They enhance the fitness of organisms by improving their ability to efficiently anticipate periodic events in their external environments, especially periodic changes in light, temperature and humidity. Circadian clocks provide fitness advantage even to organisms living under constant conditions, such as those prevailing in the depth of oceans or in subterranean caves, perhaps by coordinating several metabolic processes in the internal milieu. Although the issue of adaptive significance of circadian rhythms has always remained central to circadian biology research, it has never been subjected to systematic and rigorous empirical validation. A few studies carried out on free-living animals under field conditions and simulated periodic and aperiodic conditions of the laboratory suggest that circadian rhythms are of adaptive value to their owners. However, most of these studies suffer from a number of drawbacks such as lack of population-level replication, lack of true controls and lack of adequate control on the genetic composition of the populations, which in many ways limits the potential insights gained from the studies. The present review is an effort to critically discuss studies that directly or indirectly touch upon the issue of adaptive significance of circadian rhythms and highlight some shortcomings that should be avoided while designing future experiments.

  13. Word Order

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkhoff, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The way constituents are ordered in a linguistic expression is determined by general principles and language specific rules. This article is mostly concerned with general ordering principles and the three main linguistic categories that are relevant for constituent order research: formal, functio...

  14. Two-Loop Gluon to Gluon-Gluon Splitting Amplitudes in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bern, Z.

    2004-04-30

    Splitting amplitudes are universal functions governing the collinear behavior of scattering amplitudes for massless particles. We compute the two-loop g {yields} gg splitting amplitudes in QCD, N = 1, and N = 4 super-Yang-Mills theories, which describe the limits of two-loop n-point amplitudes where two gluon momenta become parallel. They also represent an ingredient in a direct x-space computation of DGLAP evolution kernels at next-to-next-to-leading order. To obtain the splitting amplitudes, we use the unitarity sewing method. In contrast to the usual light-cone gauge treatment, our calculation does not rely on the principal-value or Mandelstam-Leibbrandt prescriptions, even though the loop integrals contain some of the denominators typically encountered in light-cone gauge. We reduce the integrals to a set of 13 master integrals using integration-by-parts and Lorentz invariance identities. The master integrals are computed with the aid of differential equations in the splitting momentum fraction z. The {epsilon}-poles of the splitting amplitudes are consistent with a formula due to Catani for the infrared singularities of two-loop scattering amplitudes. This consistency essentially provides an inductive proof of Catani's formula, as well as an ansatz for previously-unknown 1/{epsilon} pole terms having non-trivial color structure. Finite terms in the splitting amplitudes determine the collinear behavior of finite remainders in this formula.

  15. Evolution of biological complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Adami, Christoph; Ofria, Charles; Travis C. Collier

    2000-01-01

    In order to make a case for or against a trend in the evolution of complexity in biological evolution, complexity needs to be both rigorously defined and measurable. A recent information-theoretic (but intuitively evident) definition identifies genomic complexity with the amount of information a sequence stores about its environment. We investigate the evolution of genomic complexity in populations of digital organisms and monitor in detail the evolutionary transitions that increase complexit...

  16. Community Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Bródka, Piotr; Kazienko, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    The continuous interest in the social network area contributes to the fast development of this field. The new possibilities of obtaining and storing data facilitate deeper analysis of the entire social network, extracted social groups and single individuals as well. One of the most interesting research topic is the network dynamics and dynamics of social groups in particular, it means analysis of group evolution over time. It is the natural step forward after social community extraction. Having communities extracted, appropriate knowledge and methods for dynamic analysis may be applied in order to identify changes as well as to predict the future of all or some selected groups. Furthermore, knowing the most probably change of a given group some additional steps may be performed in order to change this predicted future according to specific needs. Such ability would be a powerful tool in the hands of human resource managers, personnel recruitment, marketing, telecommunication companies, etc.

  17. Transnational Normative Orders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Poul F.

    2013-01-01

    by a protracted dual movement where the expansion and densification of statehood and autonomous forms of transnational ordering gradually emerged in a mutually constitutive fashion. One implication of this is that neither the concept of the state nor the concept of nonstate transnational entities is adequately......No weakening, but rather an expansion, of statehood can be observed in the contemporary world. This does not, on the other hand, imply that extensive forms of constitutional ordering do not exist outside the realm of states. Instead, the evolution of world society has been characterized...... capable of delineating the object of constitutional analysis. Instead, the concept of normative orders has been introduced as an overarching category capable of identifying the contexts within which constitutional ordering emerges. Subsequently, a distinction between the internal and external dimensions...

  18. Order and disorder in matter

    CERN Document Server

    Careri, Giorgio

    1984-01-01

    Order and Disorder in Matter offers a comprehensive and up-to-date view of structures and processes in matter, in terms of the evolving concepts of order and disorder. Particular emphasis is given to the recent evolution of these concepts and their relationship to the more complex systems in nature.

  19. Galactic Chemical Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Mollá, M; da Costa, R; Gibson, B K; Díaz, A I

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the evolution of oxygen abundance radial gradients resulting from our chemical evolution models calculated with different prescriptions for the star formation rate (SFR) and for the gas infall rate, in order to assess their respective roles in shaping gradients. We also compare with cosmological simulations and confront all with recent observational datasets, in particular with abundances inferred from planetary nebulae. We demonstrate the critical importance in isolating the specific radial range over which a gradient is measured, in order for their temporal evolution to be useful indicators of disk growth with redshift.

  20. B-site ordered double perovskite LaBa1-xSrxZnSbO6 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1): Sr(2+)-doping-induced symmetry evolution and structure-luminescence correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pengfei; Zhou, Zhengyang; Gao, Wenliang; Cong, Rihong; Yang, Tao

    2016-03-07

    The study of perovskites has been active for a long time. Here, we rationally designed and prepared a double perovskite, LaBaZnSbO6, by selecting Zn(2+) and Sb(5+) with large size and charge differences, and, indeed, complete B-site ordering can be achieved. Careful study using powder X-ray diffraction data pinpointed its space group to be I2/m, which has rarely been seen in double perovskites. Thereafter, an interesting observation of Sr(2+)-doping-induced symmetry evolution from I2/m to P21/n was confirmed in the complete solid solutions LaBa1-xSrxZnSbO6, where the tilting system also transferred from a(-)a(-)c(0) to a(-)a(-)c(+). The transition boundary is around x = 0.4. It can also be visualized by the variation of θ (defined as c/[(a + b)/2]), which is associated with the anisotropic shrinkage of the unit cell lattice and indeed shows a minimum at x = 0.4. Such a successive modulation of both the structural symmetry and the average La/Ba/Sr-O bond distances (revealed by Rietveld refinements) motivated us to study the Eu(3+) luminescence in La0.95Eu0.05Ba1-xSrxZnSbO6. Interestingly, the maximum of charge transfer absorption of Eu(3+) shows a precise changing tendency with the A-O bond distances along with the Sr(2+) doping, clearly revealing the structure-luminescence correlations.

  1. Two-loop corrections to the triple Higgs boson production cross section

    CERN Document Server

    de Florian, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we compute the QCD corrections for the triple Higgs boson production cross section via gluon fusion, within the heavy-top approximation. We present, for the first time, analytical results for the next-to-leading order corrections, and also compute the soft and virtual contributions of the next-to-next-to-leading order cross section. We provide predictions for the total cross section and the triple Higgs invariant mass distribution. We find that the QCD corrections are large at both perturbative orders, and that the scale uncertainty is substantially reduced when the second order perturbative corrections are included.

  2. Angular coefficients of Z bosons produced in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV and decaying to $\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dobur, Didar; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Léonard, Alexandre; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Zenoni, Florian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Molina, Jorge; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Zghiche, Amina; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Davignon, Olivier; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Brochet, Sébastien; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Xiao, Hong; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Bontenackels, Michael; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behr, Joerg; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Roland, Benoit; Ron, Elias; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Vargas Trevino, Andrea Del Rocio; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Junkes, Alexandra; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Nowatschin, Dominik; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Pöhlsen, Thomas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Frensch, Felix; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Nürnberg, Andreas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Tziaferi, Eirini; Aslanoglou, Xenofon; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Makovec, Alajos; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Modak, Atanu; Mukherjee, Swagata; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Sharma, Seema; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Montecassiano, Fabio; Passaseo, Marina; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Magnani, Alice; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Moon, Chang-Seong; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Soffi, Livia; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Casasso, Stefano; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Mazza, Giovanni; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Umer, Tomo; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Park, Hyangkyu; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Ryu, Min Sang; Kim, Jae Yool; Moon, Dong Ho; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kyong Sei; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Reucroft, Steve; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Korenkov, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Mitsyn, Valeri Valentinovitch; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Tikhonenko, Elena; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Spiridonov, Alexander; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Ekmedzic, Marko; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Graziano, Alberto; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; 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Janot, Patrick; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Marrouche, Jad; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Plagge, Michael; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Wollny, Heiner; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; 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Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wimpenny, Stephen; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Barge, Derek; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Danielson, Thomas; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Pierini, Maurizio; 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Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Vidal, Richard; Whitbeck, Andrew; Whitmore, Juliana; Yang, Fan; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Yelton, John; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Zakaria, Mohammed; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sen, Sercan; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Gray, Julia; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Majumder, Devdatta; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Sekaric, Jadranka; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; 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Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Meier, Frank; Ratnikov, Fedor; Snow, Gregory R; Zvada, Marian; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Chan, Kwok Ming; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; 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Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Kunori, Shuichi; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wolfe, Evan; Wood, John; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Friis, Evan; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Levine, Aaron; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ross, Ian; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Vuosalo, Carl; Woods, Nathaniel

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the five most significant angular coefficients, $A_{0}$ through $A_{4}$, for Z bosons produced in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV and decaying to $\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ are presented as a function of the transverse momentum and rapidity of Z boson. The integrated luminosity of the dataset collected with the CMS detector at the LHC corresponds to 19.7 fb$^{-1}$. These measurements provide comprehensive information about Z boson production mechanisms, and are compared to QCD predictions at leading order, next-to-leading order, and next-to-next-to-leading order in perturbation theory.

  3. Effective String Theory Simplified

    CERN Document Server

    Hellerman, Simeon; Maltz, Jonathan; Swanson, Ian

    2014-01-01

    In this set of notes we simplify the formulation of the Poincar\\'e invariant effective string theory in D dimensions by adding an intrinsic metric and embedding its dynamics into the Polyakov formalism. We apply this formalism to classify operators order by order in the inverse physical length of the string, in a fully gauge-invariant framework. We use this classification to discuss universality and nonuniversalty of observables up to and including next-to-next-to-leading order in the long string expansion.

  4. Production of Drell-Yan pairs in pp collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavin, S.; Kauffman, R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Gupta, S. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bombay (India)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    We compute cross sections for the Drell-Yan process in N-N collisions at next-to-leading order in {alpha}s. The mass, rapidity, transverse momentum, and angular dependence of these cross sections are presented. An estimate of higher order corrections is obtained from next-to-next-to-leading order calculation of the mass distribution. We compare the results with some of the existing data to show the quality of the agreement between calculations and data. We present predictions for energies which will become available at the RHIC and LHC colliders. Uncertainties in these predictions due to choices of scale, scheme, and parton distribution are discussed.

  5. Angular coefficients of Z bosons produced in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV and decaying to $\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dobur, Didar; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Léonard, Alexandre; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Zenoni, Florian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Molina, Jorge; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo

    2015-09-01

    Measurements of the five most significant angular coefficients, $A_{0}$ through $A_{4}$, for Z bosons produced in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV and decaying to $\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ are presented as a function of the transverse momentum and rapidity of Z boson. The integrated luminosity of the dataset collected with the CMS detector at the LHC corresponds to 19.7 fb$^{-1}$. These measurements provide comprehensive information about Z boson production mechanisms, and are compared to QCD predictions at leading order, next-to-leading order, and next-to-next-to-leading order in perturbation theory.

  6. Electroweak two-loop corrections to the effective weak mixing angle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awramik, M. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik]|[Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Czakon, M. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik]|[Silesia Univ., Katowice (Poland). Dept. of Field Theory and Particle Physics; Freitas, A. [Zuerich Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2006-08-15

    Recently exact results for the complete electroweak two-loop contributions to the effective weak mixing angle were published. This paper illustrates the techniques used for this computation, in particular the methods for evaluating the loop diagrams and the proper definition of Z-pole observables at next-to-next -to-leading order. Numerical results are presented in terms of simple parametrization formulae and compared in detail with a previous result of an expansion up to next-to-leading order in the top-quark mass. Finally, an estimate of the remaining theoretical uncertainties from unknown higher-order corrections is given. (Orig.)

  7. SIMP model at NNLO in chiral perturbation theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Rasmus Lundquist; Langaeble, K.; Sannino, F.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the phenomenological viability of a recently proposed class of composite dark matter models where the relic density is determined by 3 to 2 number-changing processes in the dark sector. Here the pions of the strongly interacting field theory constitute the dark matter particles....... By performing a consistent next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-leading order chiral perturbative investigation we demonstrate that the leading order analysis cannot be used to draw conclusions about the viability of the model. We further show that higher order corrections substantially increase the tension...

  8. W production at large transverse momentum at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalves, Richard J; Kidonakis, Nikolaos; Sabio Vera, Agustín

    2005-11-25

    We study the production of W bosons at large transverse momentum in pp collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. We calculate the complete next-to-leading order (NLO) corrections to the differential cross section. We find that the NLO corrections provide a large increase to the cross section but, surprisingly, do not reduce the scale dependence relative to leading order (LO). We also calculate next-to-next-to-leading-order (NNLO) soft-gluon corrections and find that, although they are small, they significantly reduce the scale dependence thus providing a more stable result.

  9. Precision direct photon spectra at high energy and comparison to the 8 TeV ATLAS data

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    The direct photon spectrum is computed to the highest currently available precision and compared to ATLAS data from 8 TeV collisions at the LHC. The prediction includes threshold resummation at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic order through the program PeTeR, matched to next-to-leading fixed order with fragmentation effects using JetPhox and includes the resummation of leading-logarithmic electroweak Sudakov effects. Remarkably, improved agreement with data can be seen when each component of the calculation is added successively. This comparison demonstrates the importance of both threshold logs and electroweak Sudakov effects. Numerical values for the predictions are included.

  10. LHC and Tevatron results on the tt differential cross sections

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00213443; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In this talk I will present a review of the most recent $t\\bar{t}$ differential cross sections measurement performed by LHC and Tevatron experiments. After a brief introduction, I will describe the mea- surements of fiducial and full phase-space differential cross sections based on events with exactly two, one or zero charged leptons in the final state. These results are compared to predictions made with Monte Carlo generators with next-to-leading order accuracy or next-to-next-to leading order numerical calculations.

  11. The q{sub T} subtraction method for top-quark production at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonciani, Roberto [Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Catani, Stefano [INFN, Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Universita di Firenze, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Grazzini, Massimiliano; Sargsyan, Hayk; Torre, Alessandro [Universitaet Zuerich, Physik-Institut, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-12-15

    We consider QCD radiative corrections to top-quark pair production at hadron colliders. We use the q{sub T} subtraction formalism to perform a fully differential computation for this process. Our calculation is accurate up to the next-to-leading order in QCD perturbation theory and it includes all the flavour off-diagonal partonic channels at the next-to-next-to-leading order. We present a comparison of our numerical results with those obtained with the publicly available numerical programs MCFM and Top++. (orig.)

  12. Radiative neutron-proton capture in effective chiral lagrangians

    CERN Document Server

    Park, T S; Rho, M; Park, Tae Sun; Min, Dong Pil; Rho, Mannque

    1994-01-01

    We calculate the cross-section for the thermal n+p\\rightarrow d+\\gamma process in chiral perturbation theory to next-to-next-to-leading order using heavy-fermion formalism. The exchange current correction is found to be (4.5\\pm 0.3)~\\% in amplitude and the chiral perturbation at one-loop order gives the cross section \\sigma_{th}^{np}=(334\\pm 2)\\ {\\mbox mb} which is in agreement with the experimental value (334.2\\pm 0.5)\\ {\\mbox mb}. Together with the axial charge transitions, this provides a strong support for the power of chiral Lagrangians for nuclear physics.

  13. Recent achievements in the Hamiltonian treatment of the dynamics and motion of compact binaries in general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schäfer, Gerhard [Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Theoretisch-Physikalisches Institut, Max-Wien-Pl. 1, D-07743 Jena, EU (Germany)

    2014-01-14

    The current knowledge in the post-Newtonian (PN) dynamics and motion of non-spinning and spinning compact binaries will be presented based on the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner Hamiltonian approach to general relativity. The presentation will cover the binary dynamics with non-spinning components up to the 4PN order and for spinning binaries up to the next-to-next-to-leading order in the spin-orbit and spin-spin couplings. Radiation reaction will be treated for both non-spinning and spinning binaries. Explicit analytic expressions for the motion will be given, innermost stable circular orbits will be discussed.

  14. Isospin odd pi K scattering length

    CERN Document Server

    Schweizer, J

    2005-01-01

    We make use of the chiral two-loop representation of the pi K scattering amplitude [J. Bijnens, P. Dhonte and P. Talavera, JHEP 0405 (2004) 036] to investigate the isospin odd scattering length at next-to-next-to-leading order in the SU(3) expansion. This scattering length is protected against contributions of m_s in the chiral expansion, in the sense that the corrections to the current algebra result are of order M_pi^2. In view of the planned lifetime measurement on pi K atoms at CERN it is important to understand the size of these corrections.

  15. Two-point Functions at Two Loops in Three Flavour Chiral Perturbation Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Amorós, G; Talavera, P; Amoros, Gabriel; Bijnens, Johan; Talavera, Pere

    2000-01-01

    The vector and axial-vector two-point functions are calculated to next-to-next-to-leading order in Chiral Perturbation Theory for three light flavours. We also obtain expressions at the same order for the masses, $m_\\pi^2$, $m_K^2$ and $m_\\eta^2$, and the decay constants, $F_\\pi$, $F_K$ and $F_\\eta$. We present some numerical results after a simple resonance estimate of some of the new ${\\cal O}(p^6)$ constants.

  16. Isospin odd @pK scattering length [rapid communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, J.

    2005-10-01

    We make use of the chiral two-loop representation of the πK scattering amplitude [J. Bijnens, P. Dhonte, P. Talavera, JHEP 0405 (2004) 036] to investigate the isospin odd scattering length at next-to-next-to-leading order in the SU (3) expansion. This scattering length is protected against contributions of ms in the chiral expansion, in the sense that the corrections to the current algebra result are of order Mπ2. In view of the planned lifetime measurement on πK atoms at CERN it is important to understand the size of these corrections.

  17. Green's Function Monte Carlo Calculations with Two- and Three-Nucleon Interactions from Chiral Effective Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lynn, J E

    2015-01-01

    I discuss our recent work on Green's function Monte Carlo (GFMC) calculations of light nuclei using local nucleon-nucleon interactions derived from chiral effective field theory (EFT) up to next-to-next-to-leading order (N$^2$LO). I present the natural extension of this work to include the consistent three-nucleon (3N) forces at the same order in the chiral expansion. I discuss our choice of observables to fit the two low-energy constants which enter in the 3N sector at N$^2$LO and present some results for light nuclei.

  18. Tensor structure function b{sub 1}{sup d}(x,Q{sup 2}) of the deuteron at NLO and NNLO at small-x

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Saiful [R.G.I., Department of Physics, Assam, Guwahati (India); Choudhury, D.K. [Gauhati University, Department of Physics, Assam, Guwahati (India)

    2012-12-15

    The precision of the contemporary experimental data demands that the parton distribution functions (PDF's) should be corrected at least up to next-to-leading order (NLO) and preferably up to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO). A general form of tensor structure function b{sub 1}{sup d}(x,Q{sup 2}) of the deuteron at NLO and NNLO is obtained by using the solution of Dokshitzer, Gribov, Lipatov, Altarelli, Parisi (DGLAP) equation for singlet structure function at small-x. Results are compared with HERA Experiment data. (orig.)

  19. Isospin odd {pi}K scattering length

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweizer, J. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: julia.schweizer@univie.ac.at

    2005-10-13

    We make use of the chiral two-loop representation of the {pi}K scattering amplitude [J. Bijnens, P. Dhonte, P. Talavera, JHEP 0405 (2004) 036] to investigate the isospin odd scattering length at next-to-next-to-leading order in the SU(3) expansion. This scattering length is protected against contributions of m{sub s} in the chiral expansion, in the sense that the corrections to the current algebra result are of order M{sub {pi}}{sup 2}. In view of the planned lifetime measurement on {pi}K atoms at CERN it is important to understand the size of these corrections.

  20. Comparisons of Theory Predictions for the ttbar Process with Data from pp Collisions at sqrt(s)= 8 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Studies are presented comparing $t \\bar{t}$ differential distribution data collected with the CMS detector at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV to state-of-the-art theoretical predictions. The predictions are accurate to next-to-leading order quantum chromodynamics and interfaced with the PYTHIA 8 and HERWIG++ event generators. The predictions of these simulation tools and a next-to-next-to-leading order calculation are compared to unfolded data distributions. All deviations of the theory predictions from the data remain inside the envelope considered for factorization and renormalization scale variations.

  1. Charged Higgs production via vector-boson fusion at NNLO in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaro, Marco; Maltoni, Fabio [Univ. Catholique de Louvain (Belgium). CP3; Bolzoni, Paolo [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). II. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Moch, Sven-Olaf [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    We present the total cross sections at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in the strong coupling for single and double charged Higgs production via weak boson fusion. Results are obtained via the structure function approach, which builds upon the approximate, though very accurate, factorization of the QCD corrections between the two quark lines. The theoretical uncertainty on the total cross sections at the LHC from higher order corrections and the parton distribution uncertainties are estimated at the 2% level each for a wide range of Higgs boson masses. (orig.)

  2. Green’s Function Monte Carlo Calculations with Two- and Three-Nucleon Interactions from Chiral Effective Field Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn J. E.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available I discuss our recent work on Green’s function Monte Carlo (GFMC calculations of light nuclei using local nucleon-nucleon interactions derived from chiral effective field theory (EFT up to next-to-next-to-leading order (N2LO. I present the natural extension of this work to include the consistent three-nucleon (3N forces at the same order in the chiral expansion. I discuss our choice of observables to fit the two low-energy constants which enter in the 3N sector at N2LO and present some results for light nuclei.

  3. Higgs production via vector-boson fusion at NNLO in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolzoni, Paolo; Moch, Sven-Olaf [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Maltoni, Fabio; Zaro, Marco [Catholique Univ. de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (BE). Center for Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3)

    2010-03-15

    We present the total cross sections at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in the strong coupling for Higgs production via weak boson fusion. Our results are obtained via the structure function approach, which builds upon the approximate, though very accurate, factorization of the QCD corrections between the two quark lines. The theoretical uncertainty on the total cross sections at the LHC from higher order corrections and the parton distribution uncertainties are estimated at the 2% level each for a wide range of Higgs boson masses. (orig.)

  4. Reduced Order Podolsky Model

    CERN Document Server

    Thibes, Ronaldo

    2016-01-01

    We perform the canonical and path integral quantizations of a lower-order derivatives model describing Podolsky's generalized electrodynamics. The physical content of the model shows an auxiliary massive vector field coupled to the usual electromagnetic field. The equivalence with Podolsky's original model is studied at classical and quantum levels. Concerning the dynamical time evolution we obtain a theory with two first-class and two second-class constraints in phase space. We calculate explicitly the corresponding Dirac brackets involving both vector fields. We use the Senjanovic procedure to implement the second-class constraints and the Batalin-Fradkin-Vilkovisky path integral quantization scheme to deal with the symmetries generated by the first-class constraints. The physical interpretation of the results turns out to be simpler due to the reduced derivatives order permeating the equations of motion, Dirac brackets and effective action.

  5. Inverted Order

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺文婷

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the issue related to Inverted Order. There are two forms of Inversion, which are Partial Inversion and Complete Inversion. I analyze three main reasons of Inversion and its usages in details. And what’s more, under what conditions should we use Inverted construction? How can we distinguish the different usages of Complete Inversion and Partial Inversion? In this paper, I will talk more details about Inversion.%本篇论文讨论有关倒装语序的问题。倒装有两种形式,即部分倒装和完全倒装。文中分析了倒装的三个原因及其用法。具体的,在什么情况下需要使用倒装结构?我们如何区分完全倒装和部分倒装的不同用法?本篇论文将作具体阐述。

  6. NNLO QCD predictions for single jet inclusive production at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Currie, J; Pires, J

    2016-01-01

    We report the first calculation of fully differential jet production in all partonic channels at next-to-next-to leading order (NNLO) in perturbative QCD and compare to the available ATLAS 7 TeV data. We discuss the size and shape of the perturbative corrections along with their associated scale variation across a wide range in jet transverse momentum, $p_{T}$, and rapidity, $y$. We find significant effects, especially at low $p_{T}$, and discuss the possible implications for Parton Distribution Function fits.

  7. Higgs boson gluon–fusion production at threshold in N3LO QCD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalampos Anastasiou

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We present the cross-section for the threshold production of the Higgs boson at hadron-colliders at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N3LO in perturbative QCD. We present an analytic expression for the partonic cross-section at threshold and the impact of these corrections on the numerical estimates for the hadronic cross-section at the LHC. With this result we achieve a major milestone towards a complete evaluation of the cross-section at N3LO which will reduce the theoretical uncertainty in the determination of the strengths of the Higgs boson interactions.

  8. NNLOPS accurate associated HW production

    CERN Document Server

    Astill, William; Re, Emanuele; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    We present a next-to-next-to-leading order accurate description of associated HW production consistently matched to a parton shower. The method is based on reweighting events obtained with the HW plus one jet NLO accurate calculation implemented in POWHEG, extended with the MiNLO procedure, to reproduce NNLO accurate Born distributions. Since the Born kinematics is more complex than the cases treated before, we use a parametrization of the Collins-Soper angles to reduce the number of variables required for the reweighting. We present phenomenological results at 13 TeV, with cuts suggested by the Higgs Cross Section Working Group.

  9. Transverse-momentum resummation for top-quark pairs at hadron colliders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hua Xing; Li, Chong Sheng; Li, Hai Tao; Shao, Ding Yu; Yang, Li Lin

    2013-02-22

    We develop a framework for a systematic resummation of the transverse momentum distribution of top-quark pairs produced at hadron colliders based on effective field theory. Compared to Drell-Yan and Higgs production, a novel soft function matrix is required to account for the soft gluon emissions from the final states. We calculate this soft function at the next-to-leading order, and perform the resummation at the next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. We compare our results with parton shower programs and with the experimental data at the Tevatron and the LHC. We also discuss the implications for the top quark charge asymmetry.

  10. Probing Chiral Interactions in Light Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogga, A; Barrett, B R; Meissner, U; Witala, H; Epelbaum, E; Kamada, H; Navratil, P; Glockle, W; Vary, J P

    2004-01-08

    Chiral two- and three-nucleon interactions are studied in a few-nucleon systems. We investigate the cut-off dependence and convergence with respect to the chiral expansion. It is pointed out that the spectra of light nuclei are sensitive to the three-nucleon force structure. As an example, we present calculations of the 1{sup +} and 3{sup +} states of {sup 6}Li using the no-core shell model approach. The results show contributions of the next-to-next-to-leading order terms to the spectra, which are not correlated to the three-nucleon binding energy prediction.

  11. Photon pairs: Quantum chromodynamics continuum and the Higgs boson

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Edmond L Berger

    2007-11-01

    A new QCD calculation is summarized for the transverse momentum distribution of photon pairs produced by QCD subprocesses, including all-orders soft-gluon resummation valid at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. Resummation is needed to obtain reliable predictions in the range of transverse momentum where the cross-section is the largest. Results are compared with data from the Fermilab Tevatron and predictions are made for the large hadron collider. The QCD continuum is shown to have a softer spectrum than the Higgs boson signal at the LHC.

  12. Top-pair production in hadron collisions at NNLL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubiali M.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We present results for the total top-pair production cross section at the Tevatron and the LHC. Our predictions supplement fixed-order results with resummation of soft logarithms and Coulomb singularities to next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy and include top-antitop bound-state effects. The effects of resummation, the dependence on the PDF set used, the residual sources of theoretical uncertainty and their implication for measurements of the top-quark mass are discussed.

  13. pipi scattering in three flavour ChPT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijnens, Johan; Dhonte, Pierre; Talavera, Pere

    2004-01-01

    We present the scattering lengths for the pipi processes in the three flavour Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT) framework at next-to-next-to-leading order. We then combine this calculation with the determination of the parameters from Ke4, the meson masses and decay constants and compare with the results of a dispersive analysis of pipi scattering. The comparison indicates a small but nonzero value for the 1/Nc suppressed NLO low energy constants L4r and L6r.

  14. $\\pi\\pi$ Scattering in Three Flavour ChPT

    CERN Document Server

    Bijnens, J; Talavera, P; Bijnens, Johan; Dhonte, Pierre; Talavera, Pere

    2004-01-01

    We present the scattering lengths for the $\\pi\\pi$ processes in the three flavour Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT) framework at next-to-next-to-leading order. We then combine this calculation with the determination of the parameters from $K_{e4}$ and the masses and decay constants and compare with the results of a dispersive analysis of $\\pi\\pi$ scattering. The comparison indicates a small but nonzero value for the $1/N_c$ suppressed NLO low energy constants $L_4^r$ and $L_6^r$.

  15. Measurement of the forward $Z$ boson production cross-section in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casanova Mohr, Raimon; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gastaldi, Ugo; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Geraci, Angelo; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lowdon, Peter; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skillicorn, Ian; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Sterpka, Christopher Francis; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tekampe, Tobias; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    where the uncertainties are due to the sample size, systematic effects, the beam energy and the luminosity. This result is in good agreement with theoretical predictions at next-to-next-to-leading order in perturbative quantum chromodynamics. The cross-section is also measured differentially as a function of kinematic variables of the $Z$ boson. Ratios of the production cross-sections of electroweak bosons are presented using updated LHCb measurements of $W$ boson production. A precise test of the Standard Model is provided by the measurement of the ratio

  16. NNLO contributions to inclusive-jet production in DIS and determination of \\alpha_s

    CERN Document Server

    Biekötter, T; Kramer, G

    2015-01-01

    We present the first calculation of inclusive jet production in deep-inelastic scattering with approximate next-to-next-to-leading order (aNNLO) contributions, obtained from a unified threshold resummation formalism. The leading coefficients are computed analytically. We show that the aNNLO contributions reduce the theoretical prediction for jet production in deep-inelastic scattering, improve the description of the final HERA data in particular at high photon virtuality Q^2 and increase the central fit value of the strong coupling constant.

  17. Dispersion relations in application to chiral two-nucleon dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasparyan A.M.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel scheme based on the chiral Lagrangian is applied to the nucleon-nucleon interaction close to threshold. Subthreshold partial-wave amplitudes are calculated in chiral perturbation theory and analytically extrapolated above threshold. The constraints imposed by analyticity and unitarity are used to stabilize the extrapolation. A reasonable description of the empirical phase shifts up to laboratory energies Tlab ≃ 300 MeV is obtained in terms of the parameters relevant at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order. The convergence properties of the method and the comparison with the conventional potential approach are discussed.

  18. Higgs boson production in association with a jet using jettiness subtraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radja Boughezal

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We use the recently proposed jettiness-subtraction scheme to provide the complete calculation of Higgs boson production in association with a jet in hadronic collisions through next-to-next-to-leading order in perturbative QCD. This method exploits the observation that the N-jettiness event-shape variable completely describes the singularity structure of QCD when final-state colored particles are present. Our results are in agreement with a recent computation of the gg and qg partonic initial states based on sector-improved residue subtraction. We present phenomenological results for both fiducial cross sections and distributions at the LHC.

  19. Renormalizing the NN interaction with multiple subtractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timoteo, V.S. [Faculdade de Tecnologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13484-332 Limeira, SP (Brazil); Frederico, T. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Comando de Tecnologia Aeroespacial, 12228-900 Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Delfino, A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, 24210-150 Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Tomio, L. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, 01140-070 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Szpigel, S.; Duraes, F.O. [Centro de Ciencias e Humanidades, Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, 01302-907 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2010-02-15

    The aim of this work is to show how to renormalize the nucleon-nucleon interaction at next-to-next-to-leading order using a systematic subtractive renormalization approach with multiple subtractions. As an example, we calculate the phase shifts for the partial waves with total angular momentum J=2. The intermediate driving terms at each recursive step as well as the renormalized T-matrix are also shown. We conclude that our method is reliable for singular potentials such as the two-pion exchange and derivative contact interactions.

  20. Perturbative heavy quark fragmentation function through O(α2s)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, Kirill; Mitov, Alexander

    2004-08-01

    We derive the initial condition for the perturbative fragmentation function of a heavy quark through order O(α2s) in the MS¯ scheme. This initial condition is useful for computing heavy quark (or lepton, in case of QED) energy distributions from calculations with massless partons. In addition, the initial condition at O(α2s) can be used to resum collinear logarithms ln(Q2/m2) in heavy quark energy spectrum with next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy by solving the DGLAP equation.

  1. A first estimate of the NNLO nonresonant corrections to top-antitop threshold production at lepton colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Ruiz-Femenia, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    We compute the dominant term in the expansion in rho=1-M_W/m_t of the unknown next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) nonresonant contributions to the e+ e- -> W+ W- b bbar total cross section at energies close to the top-antitop threshold. Our analytic result disagrees with a previous calculation by other authors [1]. We show that our determination has the correct infrared structure needed to cancel the divergences proportional to the top width arising in the resonant production of the same final state, and we point out to a missing contribution in the computation of [1] to explain the discrepancy.

  2. Precise QCD predictions for the production of dijet final states in deep inelastic scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Currie, James; Niehues, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The production of two-jet final states in deep inelastic scattering is an important QCD precision observable. We compute it for the first time to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in perturbative QCD. Our calculation is fully differential in the lepton and jet variables and allows one to impose cuts on the jets both in the laboratory and the Breit frame. We observe that the NNLO corrections are moderate in size, except at kinematical edges, and that their inclusion leads to a substantial reduction of the scale variation uncertainty on the predictions. Our results will enable the inclusion of deep inelastic dijet data in precision phenomenology studies.

  3. HATHOR. HAdronic Top and Heavy quarks crOss section calculatoR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliev, M.; Lacker, H.; Langenfeld, U.; Uwer, P.; Wiedermann, M. [Berlin Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Moch, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    We present a program to calculate the total cross section for top-quark pair production in hadronic collisions. The program takes into account recent theoretical developments such as approximate next-to-next-to-leading order perturbative QCD corrections and it allows for studies of the theoretical uncertainty by separate variations of the factorization and renormalization scales. In addition it offers the possibility to obtain the cross section as a function of the running top-quark mass. The program can also be applied to a hypothetical fourth quark family provided the QCD couplings are standard. (orig.)

  4. Dominant NNLO corrections to four-fermion production near the W-pair production threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Actis, S; Falgari, P; Schwinn, C

    2008-01-01

    We calculate the parametrically dominant next-to-next-to-leading order corrections to four-fermion production e^- e^+ -> mu^- nubar_mu u dbar + X at centre-of-mass energies near the W-pair production threshold employing the method of unstable-particle effective theory. In total the correction is small, leading to a shift of 3 MeV in the W-mass measurement. We also discuss the implementation of realistic cuts and provide a result for the interference of single-Coulomb and soft radiative corrections that can easily be extended to include an arbitrary number of Coulomb photons.

  5. ABM11 parton distributions and benchmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekhin, Sergey [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Institut Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij, Protvino (Russian Federation); Bluemlein, Johannes; Moch, Sven-Olaf [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    We present a determination of the nucleon parton distribution functions (PDFs) and of the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s} at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in QCD based on the world data for deep-inelastic scattering and the fixed-target data for the Drell-Yan process. The analysis is performed in the fixed-flavor number scheme for n{sub f}=3,4,5 and uses the MS scheme for {alpha}{sub s} and the heavy quark masses. The fit results are compared with other PDFs and used to compute the benchmark cross sections at hadron colliders to the NNLO accuracy.

  6. Applying the Density Matrix Expansion with Coordinate-Space Chiral Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Dyhdalo, A; Furnstahl, R J

    2016-01-01

    We apply the density matrix expansion (DME) at Hartree-Fock level with long-range chiral effective field theory interactions defined in coordinate space up to next-to-next-to-leading order. We consider chiral potentials both with and without explicit Delta isobars. The challenging algebra associated with applying the DME to three-nucleon forces is tamed using a new organization scheme, which will also facilitate generalizations. We include local regulators on the interactions to mitigate the effects of singular potentials on the DME couplings and simplify the optimization of generalized Skyrme-like functionals.

  7. Evolution, epigenetics and cooperation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Patrick Bateson

    2014-04-01

    Explanations for biological evolution in terms of changes in gene frequencies refer to outcomes rather than process. Integrating epigenetic studies with older evolutionary theories has drawn attention to the ways in which evolution occurs. Adaptation at the level of the gene is givingway to adaptation at the level of the organism and higher-order assemblages of organisms. These ideas impact on the theories of how cooperation might have evolved. Two of the theories, i.e. that cooperating individuals are genetically related or that they cooperate for self-interested reasons, have been accepted for a long time. The idea that adaptation takes place at the level of groups is much more controversial. However, bringing together studies of development with those of evolution is taking away much of the heat in the debate about the evolution of group behaviour.

  8. Evolution, epigenetics and cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateson, Patrick

    2014-04-01

    Explanations for biological evolution in terms of changes in gene frequencies refer to outcomes rather than process. Integrating epigenetic studies with older evolutionary theories has drawn attention to the ways in which evolution occurs. Adaptation at the level of the gene is givingway to adaptation at the level of the organism and higher-order assemblages of organisms. These ideas impact on the theories of how cooperation might have evolved. Two of the theories, i.e. that cooperating individuals are genetically related or that they cooperate for self-interested reasons, have been accepted for a long time. The idea that adaptation takes place at the level of groups is much more controversial. However, bringing together studies of development with those of evolution is taking away much of the heat in the debate about the evolution of group behaviour.

  9. Magnetic order in ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, M. R.; Coles, B. R.; Ritter, C.; Cywinski, R.

    1996-10-01

    Neutron powder diffraction has been used to study the evolution of magnetic order with increasing Zr substitution in the C14 Laves phase compounds 0953-8984/8/41/022/img8. For compounds with x = 0.3 and x = 0.4 we find a simple antiferromagnetic structure, similar to that reported for isostructural 0953-8984/8/41/022/img9. In this structure the Fe moments at the 6h sites are aligned along the c-axis, ferromagnetically coupled within the a - b plane, with adjacent planes antiferromagnetically coupled. This spin structure results in a cancellation of the molecular field at the interplanar 2a sites, and the Fe atoms at these sites carry no ordered moment. The neutron diffraction measurements on 0953-8984/8/41/022/img10 compounds in the composition range 0953-8984/8/41/022/img11 provide evidence of a low-temperature spin-canted structure in which the antiferromagnetic structure described above is modified by the appearance of a basal-plane ferromagnetic component which in turn leads to a small ordered Fe moment at the 2a site. The temperature dependence of the staggered magnetization in the antiferromagnetic state of the x = 0.4 compounds is found to closely follow the form 0953-8984/8/41/022/img12, as predicted for weak itinerant antiferromagnets by SCR spin-fluctuation theory.

  10. Measurements of the production cross section of a Z boson in association with jets in pp collisions at √(s) = 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaboud, M. [Univ. Mohamed Premier et LPTPM, Oujda (Morocco). Faculte des Sciences; Aad, G. [CPPM, Aix-Marseille Univ. et CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Abbott, B. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States). Homer L. Dodge Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Collaboration: ATLAS Collaboration; and others

    2017-06-15

    Measurements of the production cross section of a Z boson in association with jets in proton-proton collisions at √(s) = 13 TeV are presented, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.16 fb{sup -1} collected by the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider in 2015. Inclusive and differential cross sections are measured for events containing a Z boson decaying to electrons or muons and produced in association with up to seven jets with p{sub T} > 30 GeV and vertical stroke y vertical stroke < 2.5. Predictions from different Monte Carlo generators based on leading-order and next-to-leading-order matrix elements for up to two additional partons interfaced with parton shower and fixed-order predictions at next-to-leading order and next-to-next-to-leading order are compared with the measured cross sections. Good agreement within the uncertainties is observed for most of the modelled quantities, in particular with the generators which use next-to-leading-order matrix elements and the more recent next-to-next-to-leading-order fixed-order predictions. (orig.)

  11. Early cellular evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulis, L.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the evolutionary developments that occurred subsequent to the origin of ancestral cells. Microbial physiology and ecology are potential sharp tools for shaping concepts of microbial evolution. Some popular unjustified assumptions are discussed. It is considered that certain principles derived mainly from the advances of molecular biology can be used to order the natural groups (genera) of extant prokaryotes and their patterns phylogenetically.

  12. Integral solutions of fractional evolution equations with nondense domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo Gu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we study the existence of integral solutions for two classes of fractional order evolution equations with nondensely defined linear operators. First, we consider the nonhomogeneous fractional order evolution equation and obtain its integral solution by Laplace transform and probability density function. Subsequently, based on the form of integral solution for nonhomogeneous fractional order evolution equation, we investigate the existence of integral solution for nonlinear fractional order evolution equation by noncompact measure method.

  13. Controlled quantum evolutions

    CERN Document Server

    Petroni, N C; De Siena, S; Illuminati, F; Petroni, Nicola Cufaro; Martino, Salvatore De; Siena, Silvio De; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    1999-01-01

    We perform a detailed analysis of the non stationary solutions of the evolution (Fokker-Planck) equations associated to either stationary or non stationary quantum states by the stochastic mechanics. For the excited stationary states of quantum systems with singular velocity fields we explicitely discuss the exact solutions for the HO case. Moreover the possibility of modifying the original potentials in order to implement arbitrary evolutions ruled by these equations is discussed with respect to both possible models for quantum measurements and applications to the control of particle beams in accelerators.

  14. Manufacturing network evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Cheng; Farooq, Sami; Johansen, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – This paper examines the effect of changes at the manufacturing plant level on other plants in the manufacturing network and also investigates the role of manufacturing plants on the evolution of a manufacturing network. Design/methodology/approach –The research questions are developed......, the complex phenomenon of a manufacturing network evolution is observed by combining the analysis of a manufacturing plant and network level. The historical trajectories of manufacturing networks that are presented in the case studies are examined in order to understand and determine the future shape...

  15. Stellar evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Meadows, A J

    2013-01-01

    Stellar Evolution, Second Edition covers the significant advances in the understanding of birth, life, and death of stars.This book is divided into nine chapters and begins with a description of the characteristics of stars according to their brightness, distance, size, mass, age, and chemical composition. The next chapters deal with the families, structure, and birth of stars. These topics are followed by discussions of the chemical composition and the evolution of main-sequence stars. A chapter focuses on the unique features of the sun as a star, including its evolution, magnetic fields, act

  16. Darwin and Mendel: Evolution and Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzo, Nelio; El-Hani, Charbel N.

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have shown that students' understanding of evolution is low and some sort of historical approach would be necessary in order to allow students to understand the theory of evolution. It is common to present Mendelian genetics to high school students prior to Biological Evolution, having in mind historical and epistemological…

  17. Darwin and Mendel: Evolution and Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzo, Nelio; El-Hani, Charbel N.

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have shown that students' understanding of evolution is low and some sort of historical approach would be necessary in order to allow students to understand the theory of evolution. It is common to present Mendelian genetics to high school students prior to Biological Evolution, having in mind historical and epistemological…

  18. Pion production in nucleon-nucleon collisions in chiral effective field theory with Delta(1232)-degrees of freedom

    CERN Document Server

    Filin, A A; Epelbaum, E; Hanhart, C; Krebs, H; Myhrer, F

    2013-01-01

    A calculation of the pion-production operator up to next-to-next-to-leading order for s-wave pions is performed within chiral effective field theory. In the previous study [Phys. Rev. C 85, 054001 (2012)] we discussed the contribution of the pion-nucleon loops at the same order. Here we extend that study to include explicit Delta degrees of freedom and the 1/m_N^2 corrections to the pion-production amplitude. Using the power counting scheme where the Delta-nucleon mass difference is of the order of the characteristic momentum scale in the production process, we calculate all tree-level and loop diagrams involving Delta up to next-to-next-to-leading order. The long-range part of the Delta loop contributions is found to be of similar size to that from the pion-nucleon loops which supports the counting scheme. The net effect of pion-nucleon and Delta loops is expected to play a crucial role in understanding of the neutral pion production data.

  19. Universality of transverse-momentum resummation and hard factors at the NNLO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catani, Stefano [INFN, Sezione di Firenze and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Firenze, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Cieri, Leandro [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “La Sapienza” and INFN, Sezione di Roma, I-00185 Rome (Italy); Florian, Daniel de [Departamento de Física, FCEYN, Universidad de Buenos Aires, (1428) Pabellón 1 Ciudad Universitaria, Capital Federal (Argentina); Ferrera, Giancarlo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano and INFN, Sezione di Milano, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Grazzini, Massimiliano [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Zürich, CH-8057 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2014-04-15

    We consider QCD radiative corrections to the production of colorless high-mass systems in hadron collisions. The logarithmically-enhanced contributions at small transverse momentum are treated to all perturbative orders by a universal resummation formula that depends on a single process-dependent hard factor. We show that the hard factor is directly related to the all-order virtual amplitude of the corresponding partonic process. The direct relation is universal (process-independent), and it is expressed by an all-order factorization formula that we explicitly evaluate up to the next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in QCD perturbation theory. Once the NNLO scattering amplitude is available, the corresponding hard factor is directly determined: it controls NNLO contributions in resummed calculations at full next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy, and it can be used in applications of the q{sub T} subtraction formalism to perform fully-exclusive perturbative calculations up to NNLO. The universality structure of the hard factor and its explicit NNLO form are also extended to the related formalism of threshold resummation.

  20. Measurement of jet production cross sections in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Malinovski, E.; Vazdik, Y. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Baghdasaryan, A.; Zohrabyan, H. [Yerevan Physics Institute, Yerevan (Armenia); Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T. [Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics and Technology of the Mongolian, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Bolz, A.; Huber, F.; Sauter, M.; Schoening, A. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Physikalisches Institut, Heidelberg (Germany); Boudry, V.; Specka, A. [LLR, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Brandt, G. [Universitaet Goettingen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Goettingen (Germany); Brisson, V.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F. [LAL, Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (France); Britzger, D.; Campbell, A.J.; Dodonov, V.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Haidt, D.; Katzy, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Kruecker, D.; Krueger, K.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Olsson, J.E.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; South, D.; Steder, M.; Wuensch, E. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Buniatyan, A.; Newman, P.R.; Thompson, P.D. [University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Bylinkin, A. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Bystritskaya, L.; Fedotov, A. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Avila, K.B.C.; Contreras, J.G. [CINVESTAV, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Cerny, K.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Zlebcik, R. [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Praha (Czech Republic); Chekelian, V.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Lobodzinski, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Cvach, J.; Hladky, J.; Reimer, P. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Physics, Praha (Czech Republic); Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kostka, P.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D. [University of Liverpool, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Daum, K.; Meyer, H. [Fachbereich C, Universitaet Wuppertal, Wuppertal (Germany); Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Vallee, C. [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS/IN2P3, CPPM UMR 7346, Marseille (France); Dobre, M.; Rotaru, M. [Horia Hulubei National Institute for R and D in Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Bucharest (Romania); Egli, S.; Horisberger, R.; Ozerov, D. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Roosen, R.; Mechelen, P. van [Brussels and Universiteit Antwerpen, Inter-University Institute for High Energies ULB-VUB, Antwerp (Belgium); Feltesse, J.; Schoeffel, L. [Irfu/SPP, CE Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ferencei, J. [Nuclear Physics Institute of the CAS, Rez (Czech Republic); Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland); Gouzevitch, M.; Petrukhin, A. [IPNL, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Villeurbanne (France); Grab, C. [Institut fuer Teilchenphysik, ETH, Zurich (Switzerland); Henderson, R.C.W. [University of Lancaster, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Jung, H. [Brussels and Universiteit Antwerpen, Inter-University Institute for High Energies ULB-VUB, Antwerp (Belgium); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Kapichine, M.; Morozov, A.; Spaskov, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Kogler, R. [Universitaet Hamburg, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Hamburg (Germany); Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Traynor, D. [University of London, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary, London (United Kingdom); Lange, W.; Naumann, T. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Martyn, H.U. [I. Physikalisches Institut der RWTH, Aachen (Germany); Mueller, K.; Robmann, P.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P. [Physik-Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, Zurich (Switzerland); Perez, E. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N. [University of Montenegro, Faculty of Science, Podgorica (Montenegro); Polifka, R. [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Praha (Czech Republic); University of Toronto, Department of Physics, Toronto, ON (CA); Radescu, V. [Oxford University, Department of Physics, Oxford (GB); Rostovtsev, A. [Institute for Information Transmission Problems RAS, Moscow (RU); Sankey, D.P.C. [STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire (GB); Sauvan, E. [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS/IN2P3, CPPM UMR 7346, Marseille (FR); Universite de Savoie, LAPP, Annecy-le-Vieux (FR); Shushkevich, S. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (RU); Soloviev, Y. [DESY, Hamburg (DE); Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (RU); Stella, B. [Dipartimento di Fisica Universita di Roma Tre (IT); INFN Roma 3, Rome (IT); Sykora, T. [Brussels and Universiteit Antwerpen, Inter-University Institute for High Energies ULB-VUB, Antwerp (BE); Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Praha (CZ); Tsakov, I. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (BG); Tseepeldorj, B. [Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics and Technology of the Mongolian, Ulaanbaatar (MN); Ulaanbaatar University, Ulaanbaatar (MN); Wegener, D. [Institut fuer Physik, TU Dortmund, Dortmund (DE); Collaboration: H1 Collaboration

    2017-04-15

    A precision measurement of jet cross sections in neutral current deep-inelastic scattering for photon virtualities 5.5 < Q{sup 2} < 80 GeV{sup 2} and inelasticities 0.2 < y < 0.6 is presented, using data taken with the H1 detector at HERA, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 290 pb{sup -1}. Double-differential inclusive jet, dijet and trijet cross sections are measured simultaneously and are presented as a function of jet transverse momentum observables and as a function of Q{sup 2}. Jet cross sections normalised to the inclusive neutral current DIS cross section in the respective Q{sup 2}-interval are also determined. Previous results of inclusive jet cross sections in the range 150 < Q{sup 2} < 15,000 GeV{sup 2} are extended to low transverse jet momenta 5 < P{sub T}{sup jet} < 7 GeV. The data are compared to predictions from perturbative QCD in next-to-leading order in the strong coupling, in approximate next-to-next-to-leading order and in full next-to-next-to-leading order. Using also the recently published H1 jet data at high values of Q{sup 2}, the strong coupling constant α{sub s}(M{sub Z}) is determined in next-to-leading order. (orig.)

  1. Simulating Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Robert C.; Allen, Brockenbrough

    1975-01-01

    Described are simulations that can be used to illustrate evolution by natural selection. Suggestions for simulating phenomena such as adaptive radiation, color match to background and vision of predators are offered. (BR)

  2. Schumpeter's Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Esben Sloth

    reworking of his basic theory of economic evolution in Development from 1934, and this reworking was continued in Cycles from 1939. Here Schumpeter also tried to handle the statistical and historical evidence on the waveform evolution of the capitalist economy. Capitalism from 1942 modified the model...... of economic evolution and added evolutionary contributions to other social sciences. History, which was published by his widow, was based on his evolutionary theory of the history of economic analysis. This sequential analysis of Schumpeter's six books demonstrates the progress he within his research......This draft of a book on Schumpeter is distributed for commenting. It is a stylised intellectual biography that focus on the emergence and extension of the Schumpeterian vision and analysis of economic and social evolution. The draft provides novel interpretations of Schumpeter's six major books. He...

  3. Schumpeter's Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Esben Sloth

    This draft of a book on Schumpeter is distributed for commenting. It is a stylised intellectual biography that focus on the emergence and extension of the Schumpeterian vision and analysis of economic and social evolution. The draft provides novel interpretations of Schumpeter's six major books. He...... originally developed his evolutionary research programme in Wesen from 1908 by studying the inherent limitations of Neoclassical Economics. He presented core results on economic evolution and sketched an extension evolutionary analysis to all social sciences in Entwicklung from 1912. He made a partial...... reworking of his basic theory of economic evolution in Development from 1934, and this reworking was continued in Cycles from 1939. Here Schumpeter also tried to handle the statistical and historical evidence on the waveform evolution of the capitalist economy. Capitalism from 1942 modified the model...

  4. NLO JIMWLK evolution unabridged

    CERN Document Server

    Kovner, Alex; Mulian, Yair

    2014-01-01

    In Ref. [1] we presented the JIMWLK Hamiltonian for high energy evolution of QCD amplitudes at the next-to-leading order accuracy in $\\alpha_s$. In the present paper we provide details of our original derivation, which was not reported in [1], and provide the Hamiltonian in the form appropriate for action on color singlet as well as color nonsinglet states. The rapidity evolution of the quark dipole generated by this Hamiltonian is computed and compared with the corresponding result of Balitsky and Chirilli [2]. We then establish the equivalence between the NLO JIMWLK Hamiltonian and the NLO version of the Balitsky's hierarchy [3], which includes action on nonsinglet combinations of Wilson lines. Finally, we present complete evolution equation for three-quark Wilson loop operator, thus extending the results of Grabovsky [4].

  5. Resummation prediction on the jet mass spectrum in one-jet inclusive production at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ze Long [School of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology,Peking University,Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Chong Sheng [School of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology,Peking University,Beijing 100871 (China); Center for High Energy Physics, Peking University,Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, Jian [PRISMA Cluster of Excellence Mainz Institute for Theoretical Physics,Johannes Gutenberg University,D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Wang, Yan [School of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology,Peking University,Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-04-01

    We study the factorization and resummation prediction on the jet mass spectrum in one-jet inclusive production at the LHC based on soft-collinear effective theory. The soft function with anti-k{sub T} algorithm is calculated at next-to-leading order and its validity is demonstrated by checking the agreement between the expanded leading singular terms with the exact fixed-order result. The large logarithms ln{sup n}(m{sub J}{sup 2}/p{sub T}{sup 2}) and the global logarithms ln{sup n}(s{sub 4}/p{sub T}{sup 2}) in the process are resummed to all order at next-to-leading logarithmic and next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic level, respectively. The cross section is enhanced by about 23% from the next-to-leading logarithmic level to next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic level. Comparing our resummation predictions with those from Monte Carlo tool PYTHIA and ATLAS data at the 7 TeV LHC, we find that the peak positions of the jet mass spectra agree with those from PYTHIA at parton level, and the predictions of the jet mass spectra with non-perturbative effects are in coincidence with the ATLAS data. We also show the predictions at the future 13 TeV LHC.

  6. Measurement of Jet Production Cross Sections in Deep-inelastic ep Scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, Vladimir; Begzsuren, Khurelbaatar; Belousov, Anatoli; Bolz, Arthur; Boudry, Vincent; Brandt, Gerhard; Brisson, Violette; Britzger, Daniel; Buniatyan, Armen; Bylinkin, Alexander; Bystritskaya, Lena; Campbell, Alan; Cantun~Avila, Avila,~Karla~Beatriz; Cerny, Karel; Chekelian, Vladimir; Contreras, Guillermo; Cvach, Jaroslav; Dainton, John; Daum, Karin; Diaconu, Cristinel; Dobre, Monica; Dodonov, Vitaliy; Eckerlin, Guenter; Egli, Stephan; Elsen, Eckhard; Favart, Laurent; Fedotov, Alexandre; Feltesse, Joel; Ferencei, Jozef; Fleischer, Manfred; Fomenko, Alexander; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gayler, Joerg; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, Lidia; Gogitidze, Nelly; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grab, Christoph; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Greenshaw, Timothy; Grindhammer, Guenter; Haidt, Dieter; Henderson, Rob~CW; Hladky, Jan; Hoffmann, Dirk; Horisberger, Roland; Hreus, Tomas; Huber, Florian; Jacquet, Marie; Janssen, Xavier; Jung, Hannes; Kapichine, Mikhail; Katzy, Judith; Kiesling, Christian; Klein, Max; Kleinwort, Claus; Kogler, Roman; Kostka, Peter; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kruecker, Dirk; Krueger, Katja; Landon, Murrough; Lange, Wolfgang; Laycock, Paul; Lebedev, Andrei; Levonian, Sergey; Lipka, Katerina; List, Benno; List, Jenny; Lobodzinski, Bogdan; Malinovski, Evgenij; Martyn, Hans-Ulrich; Maxfield, Steve~J; Mehta, Andrew; Meyer, Andreas; Meyer, Hinrich; Meyer, Joachim; Mikocki, Stanislav; Morozov, Anatoly; Mueller, Katharina; Naumann, Thomas; Newman, Paul~R; Niebuhr, Carsten; Nowak, Grazyna; Olsson, Jan~Erik; Ozerov, Dmitri; Pascaud, Christian; Patel, Girish; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrukhin, Alexey; Picuric, Ivana; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Polifka, Richard; Radescu, Voica; Raicevic, Natasa; Ravdandorj, Togoo; Reimer, Petr; Rizvi, Eram; Robmann, Peter; Roosen, Robert; Rostovtsev, Andrei; Rotaru, Marina; Salek, David; Sankey, Dave~PC; Sauter, Michel; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Schmitt, Stefan; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Sefkow, Felix; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Soloviev, Yuri; Sopicki, Pawel; South, David; Spaskov, Vladimir; Specka, Arnd; Steder, Michael; Stella, Bruno; Straumann, Ulrich; Sykora, Tomas; Thompson, Paul; Traynor, Daniel; Truoel, Peter; Tsakov, Ivan; Tseepeldorj, Baatar; Valkarova, Alice; Vallee, Claude; VanMechelen, Pierre; Vazdik, Iakov; Wegener, Dietrich; Wuensch, Eberhard; Zacek, Jozef; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zlebcik, Radek; Zohrabyan, Hamlet

    2017-04-04

    A precision measurement of jet cross sections in neutral current deep-inelastic scattering for photon virtualities $5.5order in the strong coupling, in approximate next-to-next-to-leading order and in full next-to-next-to-leading order. Using...

  7. Measurement of Jet Production Cross Sections in Deep-inelastic ep Scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, Vladimir; Begzsuren, Khurelbaatar; Belousov, Anatoli; Bolz, Arthur; Boudry, Vincent; Brandt, Gerhard; Brisson, Violette; Britzger, Daniel; Buniatyan, Armen; Bylinkin, Alexander; Bystritskaya, Lena; Campbell, Alan; Cantun~Avila, Avila,~Karla~Beatriz; Cerny, Karel; Chekelian, Vladimir; Contreras, Guillermo; Cvach, Jaroslav; Dainton, John; Daum, Karin; Diaconu, Cristinel; Dobre, Monica; Dodonov, Vitaliy; Eckerlin, Guenter; Egli, Stephan; Elsen, Eckhard; Favart, Laurent; Fedotov, Alexandre; Feltesse, Joel; Ferencei, Jozef; Fleischer, Manfred; Fomenko, Alexander; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gayler, Joerg; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, Lidia; Gogitidze, Nelly; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grab, Christoph; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Greenshaw, Timothy; Grindhammer, Guenter; Haidt, Dieter; Henderson, Rob~CW; Hladky, Jan; Hoffmann, Dirk; Horisberger, Roland; Hreus, Tomas; Huber, Florian; Jacquet, Marie; Janssen, Xavier; Jung, Hannes; Kapichine, Mikhail; Katzy, Judith; Kiesling, Christian; Klein, Max; Kleinwort, Claus; Kogler, Roman; Kostka, Peter; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kruecker, Dirk; Krueger, Katja; Landon, Murrough; Lange, Wolfgang; Laycock, Paul; Lebedev, Andrei; Levonian, Sergey; Lipka, Katerina; List, Benno; List, Jenny; Lobodzinski, Bogdan; Malinovski, Evgenij; Martyn, Hans-Ulrich; Maxfield, Steve~J; Mehta, Andrew; Meyer, Andreas; Meyer, Hinrich; Meyer, Joachim; Mikocki, Stanislav; Morozov, Anatoly; Mueller, Katharina; Naumann, Thomas; Newman, Paul~R; Niebuhr, Carsten; Nowak, Grazyna; Olsson, Jan~Erik; Ozerov, Dmitri; Pascaud, Christian; Patel, Girish; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrukhin, Alexey; Picuric, Ivana; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Polifka, Richard; Radescu, Voica; Raicevic, Natasa; Ravdandorj, Togoo; Reimer, Petr; Rizvi, Eram; Robmann, Peter; Roosen, Robert; Rostovtsev, Andrei; Rotaru, Marina; Salek, David; Sankey, Dave~PC; Sauter, Michel; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Schmitt, Stefan; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Sefkow, Felix; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Soloviev, Yuri; Sopicki, Pawel; South, David; Spaskov, Vladimir; Specka, Arnd; Steder, Michael; Stella, Bruno; Straumann, Ulrich; Sykora, Tomas; Thompson, Paul; Traynor, Daniel; Truoel, Peter; Tsakov, Ivan; Tseepeldorj, Baatar; Valkarova, Alice; Vallee, Claude; VanMechelen, Pierre; Vazdik, Iakov; Wegener, Dietrich; Wuensch, Eberhard; Zacek, Jozef; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zlebcik, Radek; Zohrabyan, Hamlet

    2016-01-01

    A precision measurement of jet cross sections in neutral current deep-inelastic scattering for photon virtualities $5.5order in the strong coupling, in approximate next-to-next-to-leading order and in full next-to-next-to-leading order. Using...

  8. Measurement of integrated and differential cross sections for isolated photon pairs in pp collisions at sqrt{

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xingguo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A measurement of the production cross section for two isolated photons in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √ s = 8 TeV is presented. The results are based on an integrated luminosity of 20.24 fb−1 recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The measurement considers photons with pseudorapidities satisfying |η γ | 40 GeV and Eγ T,2 > 30 GeV for the highest and second highest Eγ T photon produced in the interaction. The background due to hadronic jets and electrons is subtracted using data-driven techniques. The fiducial cross sections are corrected for detector effects and measured differentially as a function of six kinematic observables. The data are compared to fixed-order QCD calculations at 16 next-to-leading order (NLO) and next-to-next-to-leading-order (NNLO) accuracy as well as NLO computations including resummation of initial-state gluon radiation at next-to-next-to-leading-logarithm or matched to a parton shower.

  9. Evolution of Things

    CERN Document Server

    Eiben, A E; Schut, M; Kernbach, S

    2011-01-01

    Evolution is one of the major omnipresent powers in the universe that has been studied for about two centuries. Recent scientific and technical developments make it possible to make the transition from passively understanding to actively mastering evolution. As of today, the only area where human experimenters can design and manipulate evolutionary processes in full is that of Evolutionary Computing, where evolutionary processes are carried out in a digital space, inside computers, in simulation. We argue that in the near future it will be possible to move evolutionary computing outside such imaginary spaces and make it physically embodied. In other words, we envision the "Evolution of Things", rather than just the evolution of code, leading to a new field of Embodied Artificial Evolution (EAE). The main objective of the present paper is to offer an umbrella term and vision in order to aid the development of this high potential research area. To this end, we introduce the notion of EAE, discuss a few examples...

  10. Order aggressiveness and order book dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Anthony D.; Hautsch, Nikolaus

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we study the determinants of order aggressiveness and traders’ order submission strategy in an open limit order book market. Applying an order classification scheme, we model the most aggressive market orders, limit orders as well as cancellations on both sides of the market...... employing a six-dimensional autoregressive conditional intensity model. Using order book data from the Australian Stock Exchange, we find that market depth, the queued volume, the bid-ask spread, recent volatility, as well as recent changes in both the order flow and the price play an important role...... in explaining the determinants of order aggressiveness. Overall, our empirical results broadly confirm theoretical predictions on limit order book trading. However, we also find evidence for behavior that can be attributed to particular liquidity and volatility effects...

  11. Measurement of fiducial and total cross section for Higgs boson production in the four-lepton decay channel in pp collisions at √{ s} = 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herde, Hannah; Atlas Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Fully characterizing the Higgs boson provides a key portal to stringently examine the Standard Model and search for tantalizing hints of new physics. We will present the measurement of the cross section for Higgs boson production in the four lepton (electron or muon) decay channel in a fiducial region within the detector acceptance, defined in terms of lepton traverse momenta and pseudo-rapidity. The extrapolation to the total cross section, covering the full phase-space, is also presented. The measurements are performed using 2015-2016 pp collision data at √{ s} = 13 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector. We will also present the measurements of the fiducial cross section as a function of the final state as well as a confrontation of the cross section for same flavor and opposite flavor final states. The inclusive fiducial cross section is compared with the Next-to-Next-to-Next to Leading Order theoretical calculation for the gluon-gluon fusion production mode, and Next-to-Next-to Leading Order calculations for production via vector boson fusion and associated production modes in the fiducial phase-space.

  12. Factorization and N3LLp+NNLO predictions for the Higgs cross section with a jet veto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher, Thomas; Neubert, Matthias; Rothen, Lorena

    2013-10-01

    We have recently derived a factorization formula for the Higgs-boson production cross section in the presence of a jet veto, which allows for a systematic resummation of large Sudakov logarithms of the form , along with the large virtual corrections known to affect also the total cross section. Here we determine the ingredients entering this formula at two-loop accuracy. Specifically, we compute the dependence on the jet-radius parameter R, which is encoded in the two-loop coefficient of the collinear anomaly, by means of a direct, fully analytic calculation in the framework of soft-collinear effective theory. We confirm the result obtained by Banfi et al. from a related calculation in QCD, and demonstrate that factorization-breaking, soft-collinear mixing effects do not arise at leading power in , even for . In addition, we extract the two-loop collinear beam functions numerically. We present detailed numerical predictions for the jet-veto cross section with partial next-to-next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy, matched to the next-to-next-to-leading order cross section in fixed-order perturbation theory. The only missing ingredients at this level of accuracy are the three-loop anomaly coefficient and the four-loop cusp anomalous dimension, whose numerical effects we estimate to be small.

  13. Nuclear matter saturation with chiral three-nucleon interactions fitted to light nuclei properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logoteta, Domenico [INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Largo Bruno Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bombaci, Ignazio, E-mail: ignazio.bombaci@unipi.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Pisa, Largo Bruno Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Largo Bruno Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); European Gravitational Observatory, Via E. Amaldi, I-56021 S. Stefano a Macerata, Cascina (Italy); Kievsky, Alejandro [INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Largo Bruno Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2016-07-10

    The energy per particle of symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter is calculated using the many-body Brueckner–Hartree–Fock approach and employing the Chiral Next-to-next-to-next-to leading order (N3LO) nucleon–nucleon (NN) potential, supplemented with various parametrizations of the Chiral Next-to-next-to leading order (N2LO) three-nucleon interaction. Such combination is able to reproduce several observables of the physics of light nuclei for suitable choices of the parameters entering in the three-nucleon interaction. We find that some of these parametrizations provide a satisfactory saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter and values of the symmetry energy and its slope parameter L in very good agreement with those extracted from various nuclear experimental data. Thus, our results represent a significant step toward a unified description of few- and many-body nuclear systems starting from two- and three-nucleon interactions based on the symmetries of QCD.

  14. High precision predictions for exclusive $VH$ production at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ye

    2014-01-01

    We present a resummation-improved prediction for $VH$ + 0 jets production at the Large Hadron Collider. We focus on highly-boosted final states in the presence of jet veto to suppress the $t{\\bar t}$ background. In this case, conventional fixed-order calculations are plagued by the existence of large Sudakov logarithms $\\alpha_s^n \\log^m (p_T^{veto}/Q)$ for $Q\\sim m_V + m_H$ which lead to unreliable predictions as well as large theoretical uncertainties, and thus limit the accuracy when comparing experimental measurements to the Standard Model. In this work, we show that the resummation of Sudakov logarithms beyond the next-to-next-to-leading-log accuracy, combined with the next-to-next-to-leading order calculation, reduces the scale uncertainty and stabilizes the perturbative expansion in the region where the vector bosons carry large transverse momentum. Our result improves the precision with which Higgs properties can be determined from LHC measurements using boosted Higgs techniques.

  15. Virtual amplitudes and threshold behaviour of hadronic top-quark pair-production cross sections

    CERN Document Server

    Baernreuther, P; Fiedler, P

    2013-01-01

    We present the two-loop virtual amplitudes for the production of a top-quark pair in gluon fusion. The evaluation method is based on a numerical solution of differential equations for master integrals in function of the quark velocity and scattering angle starting from a boundary at high-energy. The results are given for the renormalized infrared finite remainders on a large grid and have recently been used in the calculation of the total cross sections at the next-to-next-to-leading order. For convenience, we also give the known results for the quark annihilation case on the same grid. Outside of the kinematical range covered by the grid, we provide threshold and high-energy expansions. From expansions of the two-loop virtual amplitudes, we determine the threshold behavior of the total cross sections at next-to-next-to-leading order for the quark annihilation and gluon fusion channels including previously unknown constant terms. In our analysis of the quark annihilation channel, we uncover the presence of a ...

  16. Nuclear matter saturation with chiral three-nucleon interactions fitted to light nuclei properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logoteta, Domenico; Bombaci, Ignazio; Kievsky, Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    The energy per particle of symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter is calculated using the many-body Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approach and employing the Chiral Next-to-next-to-next-to leading order (N3LO) nucleon-nucleon (NN) potential, supplemented with various parametrizations of the Chiral Next-to-next-to leading order (N2LO) three-nucleon interaction. Such combination is able to reproduce several observables of the physics of light nuclei for suitable choices of the parameters entering in the three-nucleon interaction. We find that some of these parametrizations provide a satisfactory saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter and values of the symmetry energy and its slope parameter L in very good agreement with those extracted from various nuclear experimental data. Thus, our results represent a significant step toward a unified description of few- and many-body nuclear systems starting from two- and three-nucleon interactions based on the symmetries of QCD.

  17. Local chiral potentials with Δ-intermediate states and the structure of light nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piarulli, Maria

    2017-01-01

    We present a fully local nucleon-nucleon potential in chiral effective field theory (χEFT) retaining pions, nucleons and Δ-isobars as explicit degrees of freedom, and use it in hypersperical-harmonics and quantum Monte Carlo calculations of ground and excited states of 3H, 3He, 4He, 6He, and 6Li nuclei. The calculation of the potential is carried out by including one- and two-pion-exchange contributions up to next-to-next-to-leading order (N2LO) and contact interactions up to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N3LO). The low-energy constants multiplying these contact interactions are fitted to the 2013 Granada database in two different ranges of laboratory energies, either 0-125 MeV or 0-200 MeV, and to the deuteron binding energy and nn singlet scattering length. Fits to these data are performed for three models characterized by long- and short-range cutoffs, RL and RS respectively, ranging from (RL ,RS) =(1 . 2 , 0 . 8) fm down to (0 . 8 , 0 . 6) fm. The long-range (short-range) cutoff regularizes the one- and two-pion exchange (contact) part of the potential.

  18. The 3-, 4-, and 5-flavor NNLO parton distributions functions from deep-inelastic-scattering data and at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekhin, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino (Russian Federation); Bluemlein, J.; Klein, S.; Moch, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    We determine the parton distribution functions (PDFs) in a next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) QCD-analysis of the inclusive neutral-current deep-inelastic-scattering (DIS) world data combined with the neutrino-nucleon DIS di-muon data and the fixed-target Drell-Yan data. The PDF-evolution is performed in the N{sub f} = 3 fixed-flavor scheme and supplementary sets of PDFs in the 4- and 5-flavor schemes are derived from the results in the 3-flavor scheme using matching conditions. The charm-quark DIS contribution is calculated in a general-mass variable-flavor-number (GMVFN) scheme interpolating between the zero mass 4-flavor scheme at asymptotically large values of momentum transfer Q{sup 2} and the 3-flavor scheme prescription of Buza-Matiounine-Smith-van Neerven (BMSN) at the value of Q{sup 2} = m{sub c}{sup 2}. The results in the GMVFN scheme are compared with those of the fixed-flavor scheme and other prescriptions used in global fits of PDFs. The strong coupling constant is measured at an accuracy of {approx} 1.5%. We obtain at NNLO {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z}{sup 2})=0.1135{+-}0.0014 in the fixed-flavor scheme and {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z}{sup 2})=0.1129{+-}0.0014 applying the BMSN-prescription. The implications for important standard candle and hard scattering processes at hadron colliders are illustrated. Predictions for cross sections of W{sup {+-}}- and Z-boson, the top-quark pair- and Higgs-boson production at the Tevatron and the LHC based on the 5-flavor PDFs of the present analysis are provided. (orig.)

  19. Galaxy Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteucci, F.

    We review both the observational and theoretical constraints on the evolution of the abundances of heavy elements in gas and stars in galaxies of different morphological type. The main aim of this work is to document the progress made in our understanding of the physical processes regulating the chemical evolution of galaxies during the last sixteen years since the appearance, in this same journal (volume 5, page 287), of the well know review of Beatrice Tinsley, to whom I dedicate this paper. Finally, this article is addressed particularly to readers who do not actively work on galactic chemical evolution and who might use it as a cook book where the main ingredients are discussed and useful recipes can be found.

  20. Asymptotics of high order noise corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Sondergaard, N; Pálla, G; Voros, A; Sondergaard, Niels; Vattay, Gabor; Palla, Gergely; Voros, Andre

    1999-01-01

    We consider an evolution operator for a discrete Langevin equation with a strongly hyperbolic classical dynamics and noise with finite moments. Using a perturbative expansion of the evolution operator we calculate high order corrections to its trace in the case of a quartic map and Gaussian noise. The leading contributions come from the period one orbits of the map. The asymptotic behaviour is investigated and is found to be independent up to a multiplicative constant of the distribution of noise.

  1. Variable Order and Distributed Order Fractional Operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2002-01-01

    Many physical processes appear to exhibit fractional order behavior that may vary with time or space. The continuum of order in the fractional calculus allows the order of the fractional operator to be considered as a variable. This paper develops the concept of variable and distributed order fractional operators. Definitions based on the Riemann-Liouville definitions are introduced and behavior of the operators is studied. Several time domain definitions that assign different arguments to the order q in the Riemann-Liouville definition are introduced. For each of these definitions various characteristics are determined. These include: time invariance of the operator, operator initialization, physical realization, linearity, operational transforms. and memory characteristics of the defining kernels. A measure (m2) for memory retentiveness of the order history is introduced. A generalized linear argument for the order q allows the concept of "tailored" variable order fractional operators whose a, memory may be chosen for a particular application. Memory retentiveness (m2) and order dynamic behavior are investigated and applications are shown. The concept of distributed order operators where the order of the time based operator depends on an additional independent (spatial) variable is also forwarded. Several definitions and their Laplace transforms are developed, analysis methods with these operators are demonstrated, and examples shown. Finally operators of multivariable and distributed order are defined in their various applications are outlined.

  2. Animal evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus

    This book provides a comprehensive analysis of evolution in the animal kingdom. It reviews the classical, morphological information from structure and embryology, as well as the new data gained from studies using immune stainings of nerves and muscles and blastomere markings, which makes...

  3. Representing Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedin, Gry

    2012-01-01

    . This article discusses Willumsen's etching in the context of evolutionary theory, arguing that Willumsen is a rare example of an artist who not only let the theory of evolution fuel his artistic imagination, but also concerned himself with a core issue of the theory, namely to what extent it could be applied...

  4. Precision physics with pile-up insensitive observables

    CERN Document Server

    Frye, Christopher; Schwartz, Matthew D; Yan, Kai

    2016-01-01

    To deepen the search for beyond the Standard Model physics, the Large Hadron Collider is pushing to higher and higher luminosity. At high luminosity, precision physics becomes increasingly difficult due to contamination from additional proton collisions per bunch crossing called pile-up. In recent years, many methods have been developed to cull this excess mostly low-energy radiation away from important signal regions, but it has been unclear if these methods were amenable to systematically-improvable theoretical understanding. In this paper, it is shown that one such method, soft drop jet grooming, has excellent theoretical properties: it is ultra-local, depending on only radiation within a jet, and it is free of non-global logarithms. Calculations of the soft drop jet mass and related observables are presented at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy matched to next-to-next-to-leading fixed-order in perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics. Once measured at the Large Hadron Collider, precision comparisons...

  5. arXiv Top-quark pair production cross sections at NNLO+NNLL in pPb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 8.16 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    d'Enterria, David

    Total and fiducial top pair ($t\\bar{t}$) production cross sections in proton-lead (pPb) collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 8.16 TeV are computed at next-to-next-to-leading-order (NNLO) accuracy including next-to-next-to-leading-log (NNLL) gluon resummation, using the CT14 and CT10 proton parton distribution functions (PDF), and the EPPS16 and EPS09 nuclear PDF parametrizations for the lead ion. The total cross sections amount to $\\sigma(pPb\\to t\\bar{t}+X) = 59.0 \\pm 5.3$(CT14+EPPS16)$\\,^{+1.6}_{-2.1}$(scale) nb, and $57.5 \\pm \\,^{+4.3}_{-3.3}$(CT10+EPS09)$\\,^{+1.5}_{-2.0}$(scale) nb, with small modifications with respect to the result computed using the free proton PDF alone. The normalized ratio of pPb to pp cross sections (nuclear modification factor) is $R_{pPb} = 1.04 \\,^{\\pm 0.07(EPPS16)}_{\\pm0.03(EPS09)}$. In the lepton+jets decay mode, $t\\bar{t} \\to b\\bar{b} W(\\ell\

  6. Combination of measurements of the top-quark pair production cross section from the Tevatron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurisano, A.; Avila, C.; Azfar, F.; Badaud, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bartos, P.; Bassler, U.; Bauce, M.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Bedeschi, F.; Begalli, M.; Behari, S.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brigliadori, L.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brucken, E.; Bu, X. B.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Chokheli, D.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Clutter, J.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corbo, M.; Corcoran, M.; Cordelli, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; Davies, G.; de Barbaro, P.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; D'Errico, M.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dittmann, J. R.; Dominguez, A.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Edmunds, D.; Elagin, A.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Farrington, S.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Fiedler, F.; Field, R.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Fuess, S.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Ginther, G.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Golovanov, G.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hahn, S. R.; Haley, J.; Han, J. Y.; Han, L.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Harder, K.; Hare, M.; Harel, A.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, C.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinrich, J.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herndon, M.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hocker, A.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ito, A. S.; Ivanov, A.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Jindariani, S.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jonsson, P.; Joo, K. K.; Joshi, J.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, A. W.; Junk, T. R.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Kiselevich, I.; Knoepfel, K.; Kohli, J. M.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurata, M.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lammers, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Limosani, A.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipeles, E.; Lipton, R.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lungu, G.; Lyon, A. L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Mansour, J.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Mesropian, C.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miao, T.; Miconi, F.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Mulhearn, M.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nagy, E.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Nunnemann, T.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Orduna, J.; Ortolan, L.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pagliarone, C.; Pal, A.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parker, W.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pondrom, L.; Popov, A. V.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ranjan, N.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Ristori, L.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Rominsky, M.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sajot, G.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santi, L.; Santos, A. S.; Sato, K.; Savage, G.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwarz, T.; Schwienhorst, R.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Sekaric, J.; Semenov, A.; Severini, H.; Sforza, F.; Shabalina, E.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simak, V.; Simonenko, A.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Song, H.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sorin, V.; Soustruznik, K.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stark, J.; Stentz, D.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Titov, M.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vernieri, C.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vidal, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wallny, R.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Wang, S. M.; Warchol, J.; Waters, D.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wobisch, M.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wood, D. R.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, S.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, J. M.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    We combine six measurements of the inclusive top-quark pair (tt ¯) production cross section (σtt ¯) from data collected with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron with proton-antiproton collisions at √s =1.96 TeV. The data correspond to integrated luminosities of up to 8.8 fb-1. We obtain a value of σtt ¯=7.60±0.41 pb for a top-quark mass of mt=172.5 GeV. The contributions to the uncertainty are 0.20 pb from statistical sources, 0.29 pb from systematic sources, and 0.21 pb from the uncertainty on the integrated luminosity. The result is in good agreement with the standard model expectation of 7.35-0.33+0.28 pb at next-to-next-to-leading order and next-to-next-to leading logarithms in perturbative QCD.

  7. Protein domain organisation: adding order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kummerfeld Sarah K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Domains are the building blocks of proteins. During evolution, they have been duplicated, fused and recombined, to produce proteins with novel structures and functions. Structural and genome-scale studies have shown that pairs or groups of domains observed together in a protein are almost always found in only one N to C terminal order and are the result of a single recombination event that has been propagated by duplication of the multi-domain unit. Previous studies of domain organisation have used graph theory to represent the co-occurrence of domains within proteins. We build on this approach by adding directionality to the graphs and connecting nodes based on their relative order in the protein. Most of the time, the linear order of domains is conserved. However, using the directed graph representation we have identified non-linear features of domain organization that are over-represented in genomes. Recognising these patterns and unravelling how they have arisen may allow us to understand the functional relationships between domains and understand how the protein repertoire has evolved. Results We identify groups of domains that are not linearly conserved, but instead have been shuffled during evolution so that they occur in multiple different orders. We consider 192 genomes across all three kingdoms of life and use domain and protein annotation to understand their functional significance. To identify these features and assess their statistical significance, we represent the linear order of domains in proteins as a directed graph and apply graph theoretical methods. We describe two higher-order patterns of domain organisation: clusters and bi-directionally associated domain pairs and explore their functional importance and phylogenetic conservation. Conclusion Taking into account the order of domains, we have derived a novel picture of global protein organization. We found that all genomes have a higher than expected

  8. Teaching genetics prior to teaching evolution improves evolution understanding but not acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Rebecca; Hejmadi, Momna; Hurst, Laurence D

    2017-05-01

    What is the best way to teach evolution? As microevolution may be configured as a branch of genetics, it being a short conceptual leap from understanding the concepts of mutation and alleles (i.e., genetics) to allele frequency change (i.e., evolution), we hypothesised that learning genetics prior to evolution might improve student understanding of evolution. In the UK, genetics and evolution are typically taught to 14- to 16-y-old secondary school students as separate topics with few links, in no particular order and sometimes with a large time span between. Here, then, we report the results of a large trial into teaching order of evolution and genetics. We modified extant questionnaires to ascertain students' understanding of evolution and genetics along with acceptance of evolution. Students were assessed prior to teaching, immediately post teaching and again after several months. Teachers were not instructed what to teach, just to teach in a given order. Regardless of order, teaching increased understanding and acceptance, with robust signs of longer-term retention. Importantly, teaching genetics before teaching evolution has a significant (p evolution understanding by 7% in questionnaire scores beyond the increase seen for those taught in the inverse order. For lower ability students, an improvement in evolution understanding was seen only if genetics was taught first. Teaching genetics first additionally had positive effects on genetics understanding, by increasing knowledge. These results suggest a simple, minimally disruptive, zero-cost intervention to improve evolution understanding: teach genetics first. This same alteration does not, however, result in a significantly increased acceptance of evolution, which reflects a weak correlation between knowledge and acceptance of evolution. Qualitative focus group data highlights the role of authority figures in determination of acceptance.

  9. Teaching genetics prior to teaching evolution improves evolution understanding but not acceptance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Rebecca; Hejmadi, Momna

    2017-01-01

    What is the best way to teach evolution? As microevolution may be configured as a branch of genetics, it being a short conceptual leap from understanding the concepts of mutation and alleles (i.e., genetics) to allele frequency change (i.e., evolution), we hypothesised that learning genetics prior to evolution might improve student understanding of evolution. In the UK, genetics and evolution are typically taught to 14- to 16-y-old secondary school students as separate topics with few links, in no particular order and sometimes with a large time span between. Here, then, we report the results of a large trial into teaching order of evolution and genetics. We modified extant questionnaires to ascertain students’ understanding of evolution and genetics along with acceptance of evolution. Students were assessed prior to teaching, immediately post teaching and again after several months. Teachers were not instructed what to teach, just to teach in a given order. Regardless of order, teaching increased understanding and acceptance, with robust signs of longer-term retention. Importantly, teaching genetics before teaching evolution has a significant (p evolution understanding by 7% in questionnaire scores beyond the increase seen for those taught in the inverse order. For lower ability students, an improvement in evolution understanding was seen only if genetics was taught first. Teaching genetics first additionally had positive effects on genetics understanding, by increasing knowledge. These results suggest a simple, minimally disruptive, zero-cost intervention to improve evolution understanding: teach genetics first. This same alteration does not, however, result in a significantly increased acceptance of evolution, which reflects a weak correlation between knowledge and acceptance of evolution. Qualitative focus group data highlights the role of authority figures in determination of acceptance. PMID:28542179

  10. Synchrotron radiation of higher order soliton

    CERN Document Server

    Driben, Rodislav; Efimov, Anatoly

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate radiation mechanism exhibited by higher order soliton. In a course of its evolution higher order soliton emits polychromatic radiation resulting in appearance of multipeak frequency comb like spectral band. The shape and spectral position of this band can be effectively controlled by the relative strength of the third order dispersion. An analytical description is completely corroborated by numerical simulations. An analogy between this radiation and the radiation of moving charges is presented. For longer pulses the described effect persists also under the action of higher order perturbations such as Raman and self-steepening.

  11. Order-theoretical connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Richmond

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Order-theoretically connected posets are introduced and applied to create the notion of T-connectivity in ordered topological spaces. As special cases T-connectivity contains classical connectivity, order-connectivity, and link-connectivity.

  12. Balitsky-JIMWLK evolution equation at NLO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirilli Giovanni Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wilson line operators are infinite gauge factors ordered along the straight lines of the fast moving particles. Scattering amplitudes of proton-Nucleus or Nucleus-Nucleus collisions at high-energy are written in terms of matrix elements of these operators and the energy dependence of such amplitudes is obtained by the evolution equation with respect to the rapidity parameter: the Balitsky-JIMWLK evolution equation. A brief description of the derivation of the Balitsky-JIMWLK evolution equation at leading order and nextto-leading order will be presented.

  13. Representing Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedin, Gry

    2012-01-01

    A scandal shook Danish art when Jens Ferdinand Willumsen exhibited his etching Fertility in 1891. A heavily pregnant woman—Willumsen's wife, Juliette—and a short text about a new language of art flank a grain, which sprouts in a way that looks less like a plant than some sort of diagram....... This article discusses Willumsen's etching in the context of evolutionary theory, arguing that Willumsen is a rare example of an artist who not only let the theory of evolution fuel his artistic imagination, but also concerned himself with a core issue of the theory, namely to what extent it could be applied...

  14. CHEMICAL EVOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvin, Melvin

    1965-06-01

    How did life come to be on the surface of the earth? Darwin himself recognized that his basic idea of evolution by variation and natural selection must be a continuous process extending backward in time through that period in which the first living things arose and into the period of 'Chemical Evolution' which preceded it. We are approaching the examination of these events by two routes. One is to seek for evidence in the ancient rocks of the earth which were laid down prior to that time in which organisms capable of leaving their skeletons in the rocks to be fossilized were in existence. This period is sometime prior to approximately 600 million years ago. The earth is believed to have taken its present form approximately 4700 million years ago. We have found in rocks whose age is about 1000 million years certain organic molecules which are closely related to the green pigment of plants, chlorophyll. This seems to establish that green plants were already fluorishing prior to that time. We have now found in rocks of still greater age, namely, 2500 million years, the same kinds of molecules mentioned above which can be attributed to the presence of living organisms. If these molecules are as old as the rocks, we have thus shortened the time available for the generation of the complex biosynthetic sequences which give rise to these specific hydrocarbons (polyisoprenoids) to less than 2000 million years.

  15. Order Theoretical Semantic Recommendation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joslyn, Cliff A.; Hogan, Emilie A.; Paulson, Patrick R.; Peterson, Elena S.; Stephan, Eric G.; Thomas, Dennis G.

    2013-07-23

    Mathematical concepts of order and ordering relations play multiple roles in semantic technologies. Discrete totally ordered data characterize both input streams and top-k rank-ordered recommendations and query output, while temporal attributes establish numerical total orders, either over time points or in the more complex case of startend temporal intervals. But also of note are the fully partially ordered data, including both lattices and non-lattices, which actually dominate the semantic strcuture of ontological systems. Scalar semantic similarities over partially-ordered semantic data are traditionally used to return rank-ordered recommendations, but these require complementation with true metrics available over partially ordered sets. In this paper we report on our work in the foundations of partial order measurement in ontologies, with application to top-k semantic recommendation in workflows.

  16. Thought Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadrikov V.D.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The thought evolution is studied by historical reconstruction method that is based on the propositions of the theory of culturalhistorical determination of the psyche development, and the data of the morphological analysis and child development, and the conception of the psyche neuroontogenesis. The grounds for advisability of protothinking are presented. The protothinking is understood as the use of objective thought in cases of awareness absence. It is shown that protothinking is a form of transition from animal thinking to human speech. The particular attention is paid to the process of the word producing and thought generation in that process. The conditions of word producing as cooccurring acoustic pattern served for though expression are discussed. It is emphasized that a word is produced by a particular person. The historical development of the language and the specificity of this development are pointed out

  17. Minimal Orderings Revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyton, B.W.

    1999-07-01

    When minimum orderings proved too difficult to deal with, Rose, Tarjan, and Leuker instead studied minimal orderings and how to compute them (Algorithmic aspects of vertex elimination on graphs, SIAM J. Comput., 5:266-283, 1976). This paper introduces an algorithm that is capable of computing much better minimal orderings much more efficiently than the algorithm in Rose et al. The new insight is a way to use certain structures and concepts from modern sparse Cholesky solvers to re-express one of the basic results in Rose et al. The new algorithm begins with any initial ordering and then refines it until a minimal ordering is obtained. it is simple to obtain high-quality low-cost minimal orderings by using fill-reducing heuristic orderings as initial orderings for the algorithm. We examine several such initial orderings in some detail.

  18. Urban Evolution: the Role of Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    The structure, function, and services of urban ecosystems evolve over time scales from seconds to centuries as Earth's population grows, infrastructure ages, and sociopolitical values alter them. In order to systematically study changes over time, the concept of "urban evolution...

  19. Infrared Evolution Equations: Method and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Ermolaev, B. I.; Greco, M; Troyan, S. I.

    2007-01-01

    It is a brief review on composing and solving Infrared Evolution Equations. They can be used in order to calculate amplitudes of high-energy reactions in different kinematic regions in the double-logarithmic approximation.

  20. Ordered Cauchy spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Kent

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the notion of “ordered Cauchy space” which is given a simple internal characterization in Section 2. It gives a discription of the category of ordered Cauchy spaces which have ordered completions, and a construction of the “fine completion functor” on this category. Sections 4 through 6 deals with certain classes of ordered Cauchy spaces which have ordered completions; examples are given which show that the fine completion does not preserve such properties as uniformizability, regularity, or total boundedness. From these results, it is evident that a further study of ordered Cauchy completions is needed.

  1. Om religion og evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertz, Armin W.

    2011-01-01

    for kulturens kausale virkning på den menneskelige kognition og ikke mindst den hominine evolution. Ud fra, hvad vi ved om den menneskelige evolution, ses det, at den hominine evolution har en dybde, som sjældent medtænkes i teorier og hypoteser om den menneskelige evolution. Den menneskelige evolution er...

  2. Synchronization of chaotic systems with different order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Femat, Ricardo; Solís-Perales, Gualberto

    2002-03-01

    The chaotic synchronization of third-order systems and second-order driven oscillator is studied in this paper. Such a problem is related to synchronization of strictly different chaotic systems. We show that dynamical evolution of second-order driven oscillators can be synchronized with the canonical projection of a third-order chaotic system. In this sense, it is said that synchronization is achieved in reduced order. Duffing equation is chosen as slave system whereas Chua oscillator is defined as master system. The synchronization scheme has nonlinear feedback structure. The reduced-order synchronization is attained in a practical sense, i.e., the difference e=x(3)-x(1)(') is close to zero for all time t> or =t(0)> or =0, where t(0) denotes the time of the control activation.

  3. Reduct and Attribute Order

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-Qing Han; Jue Wang

    2004-01-01

    Based on the principle of discernibility matrix,a kind of reduction algorithm with attribute order has been developed and its solution has been proved to be complete for reduct and unique for a given attribute order.Being called the reduct problem,this algorithm can be regarded as a mapping R = Reduct(S)from the attribute order space θ to the reduct space R for an information system ,where U is the universe and C and D are two sets of condition and decision attributes respectively.This paper focuses on the reverse problem of reduct problem S = Order(R),i.e.,for a given reduct R of an information system,we determine the solution of S = Order(R)in the space θ.First,we need to prove that there is at least one attribute order S such that S = Order(R).Then,some decision rules are proposed,which can be used directly to decide whether the pair of attribute orders has the same reduct.The main method is based on the fact that an attribute order can be transformed into another one by moving the attribute for limited times.Thus,the decision of the pair of attribute orders can be altered to the decision of the sequence of neighboring pairs of attribute orders.Therefore,the basic theorem of neighboring pair of attribute orders is first proved,then,the decision theorem of attribute order is proved accordingly by the second attribute.

  4. First-order inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolb, E.W. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA) Chicago Univ., IL (USA). Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1990-09-01

    In the original proposal, inflation occurred in the process of a strongly first-order phase transition. This model was soon demonstrated to be fatally flawed. Subsequent models for inflation involved phase transitions that were second-order, or perhaps weakly first-order; some even involved no phase transition at all. Recently the possibility of inflation during a strongly first-order phase transition has been revived. In this talk I will discuss some models for first-order inflation, and emphasize unique signatures that result in inflation is realized in a first-order transition. Before discussing first-order inflation, I will briefly review some of the history of inflation to demonstrate how first-order inflation differs from other models. 58 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Adiabatic theorems for generators of contracting evolutions

    CERN Document Server

    Avron, J E; Graf, G M; Grech, P

    2011-01-01

    We develop an adiabatic theory for generators of contracting evolution on Banach spaces. This provides a uniform framework for a host of adiabatic theorems ranging from unitary quantum evolutions through quantum evolutions of open systems generated by Lindbladians all the way to classically driven stochastic systems. In all these cases the adiabatic evolution approximates, to lowest order, the natural notion of parallel transport in the manifold of instantaneous stationary states. The dynamics in the manifold of instantaneous stationary states and transversal to it have distinct characteristics: The former is irreversible and the latter is transient in a sense that we explain. Both the gapped and gapless cases are considered. Some applications are discussed.

  6. Enhancer evolution across 20 mammalian species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villar, Diego; Berthelot, Camille; Aldridge, Sarah;

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian radiation has corresponded with rapid changes in noncoding regions of the genome, but we lack a comprehensive understanding of regulatory evolution in mammals. Here, we track the evolution of promoters and enhancers active in liver across 20 mammalian species from six diverse orders...... by profiling genomic enrichment of H3K27 acetylation and H3K4 trimethylation. We report that rapid evolution of enhancers is a universal feature of mammalian genomes. Most of the recently evolved enhancers arise from ancestral DNA exaptation, rather than lineage-specific expansions of repeat elements....... These results provide important insight into the functional genetics underpinning mammalian regulatory evolution....

  7. Some Applications of Hard Thermal Loop Perturbation Theory in Quark Gluon Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Haque, Najmul

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is mainly devoted to the study of thermodynamics for quantum Chromodynamics. In this thesis I apply hard-thermal-loop perturbation theory, which is a gauge-invariant reorganization of the conventional perturbative expansion for quantum gauge theories to study the thermodynamics of QCD in leading-order, next-to-leading-order and next-to-next-to-leading order at finite temperature and finite chemical potential. I also discuss about various order diagonal and off-diagonale quark number susceptibilities in leading order as well as beyond leading order. For all the observables, I compare our results with available lattice QCD data and we find good agreement. Along-with the computation of thermodynamic quantities of hot and dense matter, I also discuss about low mass dilepton rate from hot and dense medium using both perturbative and non-perturbative models and compare them with those from lattice gauge theory and in-medium hadron gas.

  8. Groupware requirements evolution patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pumareja, Dulce Trinidad

    2013-01-01

    Requirements evolution is a generally known problem in software development. Requirements are known to change all throughout a system's lifecycle. Nevertheless, requirements evolution is a poorly understood phenomenon. Most studies on requirements evolution focus on changes to written specifications

  9. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    OpenAIRE

    TEMPLETON, Alan R

    2010-01-01

    It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important ...

  10. Higgs boson gluon-fusion production in QCD at three loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiou, Charalampos; Duhr, Claude; Dulat, Falko; Herzog, Franz; Mistlberger, Bernhard

    2015-05-29

    We present the cross section for the production of a Higgs boson at hadron colliders at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N^{3}LO) in perturbative QCD. The calculation is based on a method to perform a series expansion of the partonic cross section around the threshold limit to an arbitrary order. We perform this expansion to sufficiently high order to obtain the value of the hadronic cross at N^{3}LO in the large top-mass limit. For renormalization and factorization scales equal to half the Higgs boson mass, the N^{3}LO corrections are of the order of +2.2%. The total scale variation at N^{3}LO is 3%, reducing the uncertainty due to missing higher order QCD corrections by a factor of 3.

  11. Nudging Evolution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine N. Farrell

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This Special Feature, "Nudging Evolution? Critical Exploration of the Potential and Limitations of the Concept of Institutional Fit for the Study and Adaptive Management of Social-Ecological Systems," aims to contribute toward the development of social theory and social research methods for the study of social-ecological system dynamics. Our objective is to help strengthen the academic discourse concerning if, and if so, how, to what extent, and in what concrete ways the concept of institutional "fit" might play a role in helping to develop better understanding of the social components of interlinkages between the socioeconomic-cultural and ecological dynamics of social-ecological systems. Two clearly discernible patterns provide a map of this Special Feature: (1 One pattern is the authors' positions regarding the place and role of normativity within their studies and assessment of institutional fit. Some place this at the center of their studies, exploring phenomena endogenous to the process of defining what constitutes institutional fit, whereas others take the formation of norms as a phenomenon exogenous to their study. (2 Another pattern is the type of studies presented: critiques and elaborations of the theory, methods for judging qualities of fit, and/or applied case studies using the concept. As a body of work, these contributions highlight that self-understanding of social-ecological place, whether explicit or implicit, constitutes an important part of the study object, i.e., the role of institutions in social-ecological systems, and that this is, at the same time, a crucial point of reference for the scholar wishing to evaluate what constitutes institutional fit and how it might be brought into being.

  12. Fractional-order devices

    CERN Document Server

    Biswas, Karabi; Caponetto, Riccardo; Mendes Lopes, António; Tenreiro Machado, José António

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on two specific areas related to fractional order systems – the realization of physical devices characterized by non-integer order impedance, usually called fractional-order elements (FOEs); and the characterization of vegetable tissues via electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) – and provides readers with new tools for designing new types of integrated circuits. The majority of the book addresses FOEs. The interest in these topics is related to the need to produce “analogue” electronic devices characterized by non-integer order impedance, and to the characterization of natural phenomena, which are systems with memory or aftereffects and for which the fractional-order calculus tool is the ideal choice for analysis. FOEs represent the building blocks for designing and realizing analogue integrated electronic circuits, which the authors believe hold the potential for a wealth of mass-market applications. The freedom to choose either an integer- or non-integer-order analogue integrator...

  13. Adding linear orders

    CERN Document Server

    Shelah, Saharon

    2011-01-01

    We address the following question: Can we expand an NIP theory by adding a linear order such that the expansion is still NIP? Easily, if acl(A)=A for all A, then this is true. Otherwise, we give counterexamples. More precisely, there is a totally categorical theory for which every expansion by a linear order has IP. There is also an \\omega-stable NDOP theory for which every expansion by a linear order interprets bounded arithmetic.

  14. Order in Chaos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bertel Teilfeldt; Olsen, Asmus Leth

    2014-01-01

    Ballot order effects are well documented in established democracies, but less so in fragile post-conflict settings. We test for the presence of ballot order effects in the 2010 parliamentary election in Afghanistan. Turning out for the 2010 election was a potentially life-threatening endeavor...... for the Afghan voter. The election provides a first look at ballot order effects in a high stakes, post-conflict setting. In this setting limited cognitive skills and information are more likely explanations of potential ballot order effects than mechanisms of lacking of effort or ambivalence of choice...

  15. Order, Disorder and Confinement

    CERN Document Server

    D'Elia, M; Pica, C

    2006-01-01

    Studying the order of the chiral transition for $N_f=2$ is of fundamental importance to understand the mechanism of color confinement. We present results of a numerical investigation on the order of the transition by use of a novel strategy in finite size scaling analysis. The specific heat and a number of susceptibilities are compared with the possible critical behaviours. A second order transition in the O(4) and O(2) universality classes are excluded. Substantial evidence emerges for a first order transition. Results are in agreement with those found by studying the scaling properties of a disorder parameter related to the dual superconductivity mechanism of color confinement.

  16. Modified Order Crossover (OX Operator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms. Monica Sehrawat,

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work Traveling salesperson problem is taken as Domain. TSP has long been known to be NP-complete and is a standard example of such problems. Genetic Algorithm (GA is an approximate algorithmthat doesn’t always aim to find the shortest tour but to find a reasonably short tour quickly, which is a search procedure inspired by the mechanisms of biological evolution. In genetic algorithms, crossovers are used as a main search operator for TSP. Briefly speaking: the role of crossovers is to generate offspring that are better tours by preserving partial tours from the parents. There were a lot attempts to discover an appropriate crossover operator. This paper presents the strategy which used to find the nearly optimized solution to these type of problems. It is the order crossover operator (OX which was proposed by Davis, which constructs an offspring by choosing a subsequence of one parent and preserving the relative order of cities of the other parent.

  17. Measurement of the cross section for prompt isolated diphoton production using the full CDF run II data sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; De Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Eusebi, R; Farrington, S; Fernández Ramos, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martínez, M; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Ranjan, N; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Riddick, T; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Sorin, V; Song, H; Stancari, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2013-03-08

    This Letter reports a measurement of the cross section for producing pairs of central prompt isolated photons in proton-antiproton collisions at a total energy sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV using data corresponding to 9.5 fb(-1) integrated luminosity collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The measured differential cross section is compared to three calculations derived from the theory of strong interactions. These include a prediction based on a leading order matrix element calculation merged with a parton shower model, a next-to-leading order calculation, and a next-to-next-to-leading order calculation. The first and last calculations reproduce most aspects of the data, thus showing the importance of higher-order contributions for understanding the theory of strong interaction and improving measurements of the Higgs boson and searches for new phenomena in diphoton final states.

  18. Measurement of the cross section for prompt isolated diphoton production using the full CDF Run II data sample

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K.R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H.S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y.C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Ciocci, M.A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M.E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M..; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C.A.; Cox, D.J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d'Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J.R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Fernandez Ramos, J.P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J.C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A.T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R.C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S.R.; Han, J.Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R.F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R.E.; Husemann, U.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E.J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K.K.; Jun, S.Y.; Junk, T.R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P.E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D.H.; Kim, H.S.; Kim, J.E.; Kim, M.J.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, S.H.; Kim, Y.K.; Kim, Y.J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D.J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A.V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A.T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H.S.; Lee, J.S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J.D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martinez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M.E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C.S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S.Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S.H.; Oh, Y.D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T.J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernandez, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J.L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W.K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E.E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S.Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P.F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J.R.; Snider, F.D.; Sorin, V.; Song, H.; Stancari, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P.K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vazquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizan, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S.M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W.C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A.B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H.H.; Wilson, J.S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B.L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Y.C.; Yao, W.M.; Yeh, G.P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G.B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A.M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-01-01

    This Letter reports a measurement of the cross section for producing pairs of central prompt isolated photons in proton-antiproton collisions at a total energy of 1.96 TeV using data corresponding to 9.5/fb integrated luminosity collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The measured differential cross section is compared to three calculations derived from the theory of strong interactions. These include a prediction based on a leading order matrix element calculation merged with parton shower, a next-to-leading order, and a next-to-next-to-leading order calculation. The first and last calculations reproduce most aspects of the data, thus showing the importance of higher-order contributions for understanding the theory of strong interaction and improving measurements of the Higgs boson and searches for new phenomena in diphoton final states.

  19. Measurement of the Cross Section for Prompt Isolated Diphoton Production Using the Full CDF Run II Data Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; De Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d'Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Sorin, V.; Song, H.; Stancari, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-03-01

    This Letter reports a measurement of the cross section for producing pairs of central prompt isolated photons in proton-antiproton collisions at a total energy s=1.96TeV using data corresponding to 9.5fb-1 integrated luminosity collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The measured differential cross section is compared to three calculations derived from the theory of strong interactions. These include a prediction based on a leading order matrix element calculation merged with a parton shower model, a next-to-leading order calculation, and a next-to-next-to-leading order calculation. The first and last calculations reproduce most aspects of the data, thus showing the importance of higher-order contributions for understanding the theory of strong interaction and improving measurements of the Higgs boson and searches for new phenomena in diphoton final states.

  20. Triton Electric Form Factor at Low-Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Sadeghi, H

    2009-01-01

    Making use of the Effective Field Theory(EFT) expansion recently developed by the authors, we compute the charge form factor of triton up to next-to-next-to-leading order (N$^2$LO). The three-nucleon forces(3NF) is required for renormalization of the three-nucleon system and it effects are predicted for process and is qualitatively supported by available experimental data. We also show that, by including higher order corrections, the calculated charge form factor and charge radius of $^3$H are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data and the realistic Argonne $v_{18}$ two-nucleon and Urbana IX potential models calculations. This method makes possible a high precision few-body calculations in nuclear physics. Our result converges order by order in low energy expansion and also cut-off independent.

  1. Generalized threshold resummation for semi-inclusive e+e- annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Presti, N A Lo; Almasy, A A

    2012-01-01

    Recently methods have been developed to extend the resummation of large-x double logarithms in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) to terms not addressed by the soft-gluon exponentiation. Here we briefly outline our approach based on fixed-order results, the general large-x structure in dimensional regularization and the all-order factorization of mass singularities, which is directly applicable also to semi-inclusive e+e- annihilation (SIA). We then present some main results for the corresponding timelike splitting functions and transverse and longitudinal fragmentation functions. The close relation between DIS and SIA facilitates the determination of additional third-order results for the latter function which is fully known only at the next-to-leading order. Therefore all above quantities can be resummed at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy.

  2. From Randomness to Order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Berger

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available I review some selected situations in which order builds up from randomness, or a losing trend turns into winning. Except for Section 4 (which is mine, all cases are well documented and the price paid to achieve order is apparent.

  3. Order of blood draw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornes, Michael; van Dongen-Lases, Edmée; Grankvist, Kjell

    2017-01-01

    does occur if order of draw is not followed during blood collection and when performing venipuncture under less than ideal circumstances, thus putting patient safety at risk. Moreover, given that order of draw is not difficult to follow and knowing that ideal phlebotomy conditions and protocols...

  4. Narcissism and birth order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyring, W E; Sobelman, S

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to clarify the relationship between birth-order position and the development of narcissism, while refining research and theory. The relationship between birth-order status and narcissism was examined with a sample of 79 undergraduate students (55 women and 24 men). These subjects were placed in one of the four following birth-order categories of firstborn, second-born, last-born, and only children. These categories were chosen given their significance in Adlerian theory. Each subject completed the Narcissistic Personality Inventory and a demographic inventory. Based on psychodynamic theory, it was hypothesized that firstborn children were expected to score highest, but statistical significance was not found for an association between narcissism and birth order. Further research is urged to investigate personality theory as it relates to parenting style and birth order.

  5. Evolution prediction from tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominy, Jason M.; Venuti, Lorenzo Campos; Shabani, Alireza; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2017-03-01

    Quantum process tomography provides a means of measuring the evolution operator for a system at a fixed measurement time t. The problem of using that tomographic snapshot to predict the evolution operator at other times is generally ill-posed since there are, in general, infinitely many distinct and compatible solutions. We describe the prediction, in some "maximal ignorance" sense, of the evolution of a quantum system based on knowledge only of the evolution operator for finitely many times 0evolution at times away from the measurement times. Even if the original evolution is unitary, the predicted evolution is described by a non-unitary, completely positive map.

  6. Feynman formulae for evolution semigroups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya. A. Butko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper systematically describes an approach to solution of initial and initial-boundary value problems for evolution equations based on the representation of the corresponding evolution semigroups with the help of Feynman formulae. The article discusses some of the methods of constructing Feynman formulae for different evolution semigroups, presents specific examples of solutions of evolution equations. In particular, Feynman formula is obtained for evolution semigroups generated by multiplicative perturbations of generators of some initial semigroups. In this case semigroups on a Banach space of continuous functions defined on an arbitrary metric space are considered; Feynman formulae are constructed with the help of operator families, which are Chernoff equivalent to the initial unperturbed semigroups. The present result generalizes the author's paper \\Feynman formula for semigroups with multiplicative perturbed generators" and some of the results of the joint with O.G. Smolyanov and R.L. Schilling paper \\Lagrangian and Hamiltonian Feynman formulae for some Feller processes and their perturbations". The approach to the construction of Feynman formulae for semigroups with multiplicative and additive perturbed generators is illustrated with examples of the Cauchy problem for the Schrodinger equation, the approximation of transition probabilities of some Markov processes.Further, a wider class of additive and multiplicative perturbations of a particular generator | the Laplace operator | is considered in the paper. And Feynman formula for the solution of the Cauchy problem for a second order parabolic equation with unbounded variable coefficients is proved. In addition, the article describes a method for constructing Feynman formulae for solutions of the Cauchy | Dirichlet problem for parabolic differential equations. The method is also illustrated by a second order parabolic equation with variable coefficients. These results generalize some

  7. Evolution of molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevenster, M.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of interstellar molecular hydrogen was studied, with a special interest for the formation and evolution of molecular clouds and star formation within them, by a two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulation performed on a rectangular grid of physical sizes on the order of 100 pc. It is filled with an initial density of approx. 1 cm(exp -3), except for one cell (approx. 1 pc(exp 2)) at the center of the grid where an accretion core of 1-10(exp 3) solar masses is placed. The grid is co-moving with the gridcenter that is on a circular orbit around the Galactic center and that also is the guiding center of epicyclic approximation of orbits of the matter surrounding it. The initial radial velocity is zero; to account for differential rotation the initial tangential velocity (i.e. the movement around the galactic center) is proportional to the radial distance to the grid center. The rate is comparable to the rotation rate at the Local Standard of Rest. The influence of galactic rotation is noticed by spiral or elliptical forms, but on much longer time scales than self gravitation and cooling processes. Density and temperature are kept constant at the boundaries and no inflow is allowed along the tangential boundaries.

  8. Evolution Of Cosmic Strings

    CERN Document Server

    Vanchurin, V

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of finite loops and infinite strings as a part of a complete cosmic string network. We give dynamical arguments showing that the structures on infinite strings should obey a scaling law. We perform a simulation of the network which uses functional forms for the string position and thus is exact to the limits of computer arithmetic. The effective box size of our simulation is at least two orders of magnitude larger than what was previously reached. Our results confirm that the wiggles on the strings obey a scaling law described by universal power spectrum. The average distance between long strings also scales accurately with the time. Production functions of string loops do not show scaling. With low intercommutation probability p the true scaling régime is not reached until very late cosmic times, which makes it difficult to simulate such evolutions. Via the expansion of the box technique, we were able to reach scaling with a wide range of p. The physical correlation ...

  9. Field Independent Cosmic Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayem Sk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown earlier that Noether symmetry does not admit a form of corresponding to an action in which is coupled to scalar-tensor theory of gravity or even for pure theory of gravity taking anisotropic model into account. Here, we prove that theory of gravity does not admit Noether symmetry even if it is coupled to tachyonic field and considering a gauge in addition. To handle such a theory, a general conserved current has been constructed under a condition which decouples higher-order curvature part from the field part. This condition, in principle, solves for the scale-factor independently. Thus, cosmological evolution remains independent of the form of the chosen field, whether it is a scalar or a tachyon.

  10. The regular state in higher order gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotsakis, Spiros; Kadry, Seifedine; Trachilis, Dimitrios

    2016-08-01

    We consider the higher-order gravity theory derived from the quadratic Lagrangian R + 𝜖R2 in vacuum as a first-order (ADM-type) system with constraints, and build time developments of solutions of an initial value formulation of the theory. We show that all such solutions, if analytic, contain the right number of free functions to qualify as general solutions of the theory. We further show that any regular analytic solution which satisfies the constraints and the evolution equations can be given in the form of an asymptotic formal power series expansion.

  11. Higher Order Spreading Models

    CERN Document Server

    Argyros, S A; Tyros, K

    2012-01-01

    We introduce the higher order spreading models associated to a Banach space $X$. Their definition is based on $\\ff$-sequences $(x_s)_{s\\in\\ff}$ with $\\ff$ a regular thin family and the plegma families. We show that the higher order spreading models of a Banach space $X$ form an increasing transfinite hierarchy $(\\mathcal{SM}_\\xi(X))_{\\xi<\\omega_1}$. Each $\\mathcal{SM}_\\xi (X)$ contains all spreading models generated by $\\ff$-sequences $(x_s)_{s\\in\\ff}$ with order of $\\ff$ equal to $\\xi$. We also provide a study of the fundamental properties of the hierarchy.

  12. Geodesic order types

    OpenAIRE

    Aichholzer, Oswin; Korman Cozzetti, Matías; Pilz, Alexander; Vogtenhuber, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    The geodesic between two points a and b in the interior of a simple polygon P is the shortest polygonal path inside P that connects a to b. It is thus the natural generalization of straight line segments on unconstrained point sets to polygonal environments. In this paper we use this extension to generalize the concept of the order type of a set of points in the Euclidean plane to geodesic order types. In particular, we show that, for any set S of points and an ordered subset of at least four...

  13. Shuffling with ordered cards

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, Steve

    2010-01-01

    We consider a problem of shuffling a deck of cards with ordered labels. Namely we split the deck of N=k^tq cards (where t>=1 is maximal) into k equally sized stacks and then take the top card off of each stack and sort them by the order of their labels and add them to the shuffled stack. We show how to find stacks of cards invariant and periodic under the shuffling. We also show when gcd(q,k)=1 the possible periods of this shuffling are all divisors of order_k(N-q).

  14. Measurement of the Z boson differential cross section in transverse momentum and rapidity in proton–proton collisions at 8 TeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Khachatryan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a measurement of the Z boson differential cross section in rapidity and transverse momentum using a data sample of pp collision events at a centre-of-mass energy s=8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb−1. The Z boson is identified via its decay to a pair of muons. The measurement provides a precision test of quantum chromodynamics over a large region of phase space. In addition, due to the small experimental uncertainties in the measurement the data has the potential to constrain the gluon parton distribution function in the kinematic regime important for Higgs boson production via gluon fusion. The results agree with the next-to-next-to-leading-order predictions computed with the fewz program. The results are also compared to the commonly used leading-order MadGraph and next-to-leading-order powheg generators.

  15. Nuclear effective field theory on the lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Krebs, H; Epelbaum, E; Lee, D; ner, Ulf-G Mei\\ss

    2008-01-01

    In the low-energy region far below the chiral symmetry breaking scale (which is of the order of 1 GeV) chiral perturbation theory provides a model-independent approach for quantitative description of nuclear processes. In the two- and more-nucleon sector perturbation theory is applicable only at the level of an effective potential which serves as input in the corresponding dynamical equation. To deal with the resulting many-body problem we put chiral effective field theory (EFT) on the lattice. Here we present the results of our lattice EFT study up to next-to-next-to-leading order in the chiral expansion. Accurate description of two-nucleon phase-shifts and ground state energy ratio of dilute neutron matter up to corrections of higher orders shows that lattice EFT is a promising tool for a quantitative description of low-energy few- and many-body systems.

  16. Signatures of the chiral two-pion exchange electromagnetic currents in the 2H and 3He photodisintegration reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Rozpedzik, D; Kolling, S; Epelbaum, E; Skibinski, R; Witala, H; Krebs, H

    2011-01-01

    The recently derived long-range two-pion exchange (TPE) contributions to the nuclear current operator which appear at next-to-leading order (NLO) of the chiral expansion are used to describe electromagnetic processes. We study their role in the photodisintegration of 2H and 3He and compare our predictions with experimental data. The bound and scattering states are calculated using five different parametrizations of the chiral next-to-next-to-leading order (N2LO) nucleon-nucleon (NN) potential which allows us to estimate the theoretical uncertainty at a given order in the chiral expansion. For some observables the results are very close to the predictions based on the AV18 NN potential and the current operator (partly) consistent with this force. In the most cases, the addition of long-range TPE currents improved the description of the experimental data.

  17. Subtraction of power counting breaking terms in chiral perturbation theory: spinless matter fields

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Meng-Lin; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2016-01-01

    When matter fields are included in chiral perturbation theory, the nonvanishing mass in the chiral limit introduces a new energy scale so that the loop diagrams including such matter field propagators spoil the usual power counting. However, the power counting breaking terms can be absorbed into counterterms in the chiral Lagrangian. In this paper, we systematically derive these terms to leading one-loop order (next-to-next-to leading order in the chiral expansion) at once by calculating the generating functional using the path integral. They are then absorbed by counterterms in the next-to-leading order Lagrangian. The method can be extended to calculating power counting breaking terms for other matter fields.

  18. Measurement of the Z boson differential cross section in transverse momentum and rapidity in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; CMS Collaboration; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dobur, Didar; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Léonard, Alexandre; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Zenoni, Florian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Molina, Jorge; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Zghiche, Amina; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Davignon, Olivier; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Brochet, Sébastien; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Xiao, Hong; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Bontenackels, Michael; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behr, Joerg; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Roland, Benoit; Ron, Elias; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Vargas Trevino, Andrea Del Rocio; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Junkes, Alexandra; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Nowatschin, Dominik; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Pöhlsen, Thomas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Frensch, Felix; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Nürnberg, Andreas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Tziaferi, Eirini; Aslanoglou, Xenofon; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Makovec, Alajos; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Modak, Atanu; Mukherjee, Swagata; Roy, Debarati; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Sharma, Seema; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Ferretti, Roberta; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Gulmini, Michele; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Magnani, Alice; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Moon, Chang-Seong; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Vernieri, Caterina; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Soffi, Livia; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Casasso, Stefano; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Dellacasa, Giulio; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Umer, Tomo; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Park, Hyangkyu; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Ryu, Min Sang; Kim, Jae Yool; Moon, Dong Ho; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kyong Sei; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Reucroft, Steve; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Ekmedzic, Marko; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Graziano, Alberto; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Bondu, Olivier; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Colafranceschi, Stefano; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dorney, Brian; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Eugster, Jürg; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Marrouche, Jad; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Plagge, Michael; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Wollny, Heiner; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meister, Daniel; Mohr, Niklas; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrozzi, Luca; Peruzzi, Marco; Quittnat, Milena; Rebane, Liis; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Amsler, Claude; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Taroni, Silvia; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Ferro, Cristina; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Petrakou, Eleni; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wilken, Rachel; Asavapibhop, Burin; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Gamsizkan, Halil; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Sekmen, Sezen; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Taylan; Cankocak, Kerem; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Burton, Darren; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mathias, Bryn; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Kasmi, Azeddine; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Scarborough, Tara; Wu, Zhenbin; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Lawson, Philip; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Christopher, Grant; Cutts, David; Demiragli, Zeynep; Dhingra, Nitish; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Heintz, Ulrich; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Sagir, Sinan; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Swanson, Joshua; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Rakness, Gregory; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wimpenny, Stephen; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Barge, Derek; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Danielson, Thomas; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Pierini, Maurizio; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Krohn, Michael; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Skinnari, Louise; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitbeck, Andrew; Whitmore, Juliana; Yang, Fan; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Yelton, John; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Zakaria, Mohammed; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sen, Sercan; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Gray, Julia; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Majumder, Devdatta; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Sekaric, Jadranka; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bierwagen, Katharina; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Klute, Markus; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zanetti, Marco; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Gude, Alexander; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Rusack, Roger; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Meier, Frank; Ratnikov, Fedor; Snow, Gregory R; Zvada, Marian; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Chan, Kwok Ming; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Winer, Brian L; Wolfe, Homer; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Brownson, Eric; Malik, Sudhir; Mendez, Hector; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; Gutay, Laszlo; Hu, Zhen; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Kress, Matthew; Leonardo, Nuno; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Primavera, Federica; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Zablocki, Jakub; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Korjenevski, Sergey; Petrillo, Gianluca; Verzetti, Mauro; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Kunori, Shuichi; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wolfe, Evan; Wood, John; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Friis, Evan; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Levine, Aaron; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ross, Ian; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Vuosalo, Carl; Woods, Nathaniel

    2015-01-01

    We present a measurement of the Z boson differential cross section in rapidity and transverse momentum using a data sample of pp collision events at a centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb$^{-1}$. The Z boson is identified via its decay to a pair of muons. The measurement provides a precision test of quantum chromodynamics over a large region of phase space. In addition, due to the small experimental uncertainties in the measurement the data has the potential to constrain the gluon parton distribution function in the kinematic regime important for Higgs boson production via gluon fusion. The results agree with the next-to-next-to-leading-order predictions computed with the FEWZ program. The results are also compared to the commonly used leading-order MADGRAPH and next-to-leading-order POWHEG generators.

  19. Genus dependence of the number of (non-)orientable surface triangulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Benedikt; Mecke, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Topological triangulations of orientable and nonorientable surfaces with arbitrary genus have important applications in quantum geometry, graph theory and statistical physics. However, until now, only the asymptotics for 2-spheres have been known analytically, and exact counts of triangulations are only available for both small genera and triangulations. We apply the Wang-Landau algorithm to calculate the number N (m ,h ) of triangulations for several orders of magnitude in system size m and type h (equals genus in orientable triangulations). We verify that the limit of the entropy density of triangulations is independent of genus and orientability and are able to determine the next-to-leading-order and the next-to-next-to-leading-order terms. We conjecture for the number of surface triangulations the asymptotic behavior N (m ,h )→(170.4 ±15.1 )hm-2 (h -1 )/5(256/27) m /2, which might guide a mathematician's proof for the exact asymptotics.

  20. Higgs production in gluon fusion beyond NNLO

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, Richard D; Forte, Stefano; Marzani, Simone; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    We construct an approximate expression for the cross section for Higgs production in gluon fusion at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N3LO) in alpha_s with finite top mass. We argue that an accurate approximationcan be constructed by exploiting the analiticity of the Mellin space cross section, and the information on its singularity structure coming from large N (soft gluon, Sudakov) and small N (high energy, BFKL) all order resummation. We support our argument with an explicit comparison of the approximate and the exact expressions up to the highest (NNLO) order at which the latter are available. We find that the approximate N3LO result amounts to a correction of 17% to the NNLO QCD cross section for production of a 125 GeV Higgs at the LHC (8 TeV), larger than previously estimated, and it significantly reduces the scale dependence of the NNLO result.

  1. Mixed electroweak-QCD corrections to e+e-→H Z at Higgs factories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qing-Feng; Feng, Feng; Jia, Yu; Sang, Wen-Long

    2017-09-01

    The prospective Higgs factories, exemplified by ILC, FCC-ee and CEPC, plan to conduct precision Higgs measurements at the e+e- center-of-mass energy around 250 GeV. The cross sections for the dominant Higgs production channel, the Higgsstrahlung process, can be measured to a (sub)percent accuracy. Merely incorporating the well-known next-to-leading-order (NLO) electroweak corrections appears to be far from sufficient to match the unprecedented experimental precision. In this work, we make an important advancement toward this direction by investigating the mixed electroweak-QCD corrections to e+e-→H Z at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) for both unpolarized and polarized Z bosons. The corrections turn out to reach the 1% level of the Born order results, and thereby must be incorporated in future confrontations with the data.

  2. Application of FIRE for the calculation of photon matrix elements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Norihisa Watanabe

    2009-10-01

    The next-to-next-to-leading order (the order $ _{s}^{2}$ ) corrections to the first moment of the polarized virtual photon structure function $g_{1}^{} (x, Q^{2}, P^{2})$ are studied in perturbative QCD for the kinematical region $^{2} \\ll P^{2} Q^{2}$, where $−Q^{2} (−P^{2})$ is the mass square of the probe (target) photon and is the QCD scale parameter. In order to evaluate the two-loop Feynman diagrams for the photon matrix element of the gluon operator, I apply the recently developed algorithm FIRE which reduces a complicated sum of scalar Feynman integrals to a linear combination of a few master integrals. The details of the calculation are presented.

  3. NLO+NLL limits on $W'$ and $Z'$ gauge boson masses

    CERN Document Server

    Ježo, Tomáš; Lamprea, David R; Lyonnet, Florian; Schienbein, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    QCD resummation predictions for the production of new charged ($W'$) and neutral ($Z'$) heavy gauge bosons decaying leptonically are presented. These results are obtained with our resummation code at next-to-leading order and next-to-leading logarithmic (NLO+NLL) accuracy. Our predictions are compared to PYTHIA at leading order (LO) supplemented with parton showers (PS) and FEWZ at NLO and next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) for the $p_T$-differential and total cross sections in the Sequential Standard Model (SSM) and general SU(2)$\\times$SU(2)$\\times$U(1) models. We show that the importance of resummation for total cross sections increases with the gauge boson mass. Finally, the latest ATLAS and CMS results are reinterpreted to derive new limits at NLO+NLL on $W'$ and $Z'$ boson masses in general extensions of the Standard Model.

  4. Timelike single-logarithm-resummed splitting functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albino, S.; Bolzoni, P.; Kniehl, B.A. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Kotikov, A.V. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Joint Inst. of Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation). Bogoliubov Lab. of Theoretical Physics

    2011-08-15

    We calculate the single logarithmic contributions to the quark singlet and gluon matrix of timelike splitting functions at all orders in the modified minimal-subtraction (MS) scheme. We fix two of the degrees of freedom of this matrix from the analogous results in the massive-gluon regularization scheme by using the relation between that scheme and the MS scheme. We determine this scheme transformation from the double logarithmic contributions to the timelike splitting functions and the coefficient functions of inclusive particle production in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation now available in both schemes. The remaining two degrees of freedom are fixed by reasonable physical assumptions. The results agree with the fixed-order results at next-to-next-to-leading order in the literature. (orig.)

  5. Improved estimates of the pion-photon transition form factor in the $(\\mathbf{1\\leq Q^2\\leq5})$~GeV$^\\mathbf{2}$ range and their theoretical uncertainties

    CERN Document Server

    Mikhailov, S V; Stefanis, N G

    2016-01-01

    We consider the pion-photon transition form factor at low to intermediate spacelike momenta within the theoretical framework of light-cone sum rules. We derive predictions which take into account all currently known contributions stemming from QCD perturbation theory up to the next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) and by including all twist terms up to order six. In order to enable a more detailed comparison with forthcoming high-precision data, we also estimate the main systematic theoretical uncertainties, stemming from various sources, and discuss their influence on the calculations --- in particular the dominant one related to the still uncalculated part of the NNLO contribution. The analysis addresses, in broad terms, also the role of the twist-two pion distribution amplitude derived with different approaches.

  6. Measurement of normalized differential t-tbar cross sections in the dilepton channel from pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 13 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirunyan, Albert M; et al.

    2017-08-25

    Normalized differential cross sections for top quark pair production are measured in the dilepton (e-e, mu-mu, and mu-e) decay channels in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The measurements are performed with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.1 inverse-femtobarns using the CMS detector at the LHC. The cross sections are measured differentially as a function of the kinematic properties of the leptons, jets from bottom quark hadronization, top quarks, and top quark pairs at the particle and parton levels. The results are compared to several Monte Carlo generators that implement calculations up to next-to-leading order in perturbative quantum chromodynamics interfaced with parton showering, and also to fixed-order theoretical calculations of top quark pair production up to next-to-next-to-leading order.

  7. Measurement of normalized differential $\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} }$ cross sections in the dilepton channel from pp collisions at $ \\sqrt{s} = $ 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Sirunyan, Albert M; CMS Collaboration; Adam, Wolfgang; Ambrogi, Federico; Asilar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Grossmann, Johannes; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; König, Axel; Krammer, Natascha; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Madlener, Thomas; Mikulec, Ivan; Pree, Elias; Rabady, Dinyar; Rad, Navid; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Spanring, Markus; Spitzbart, Daniel; Strauss, Josef; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wittmann, Johannes; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Zarucki, Mateusz; Chekhovsky, Vladimir; Mossolov, Vladimir; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Lauwers, Jasper; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; De Bruyn, Isabelle; De Clercq, Jarne; Deroover, Kevin; Flouris, Giannis; Lowette, Steven; Moortgat, Seth; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Skovpen, Kirill; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Parijs, Isis; Brun, Hugues; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Luetic, Jelena; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Randle-conde, Aidan; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Vannerom, David; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Cimmino, Anna; Cornelis, Tom; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Gul, Muhammad; Khvastunov, Illia; Poyraz, Deniz; Roskas, Christos; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Tytgat, Michael; Verbeke, Willem; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Adrien; De Visscher, Simon; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Francois, Brieuc; Giammanco, Andrea; Jafari, Abideh; Komm, Matthias; Krintiras, Georgios; Lemaitre, Vincent; Magitteri, Alessio; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Wertz, Sébastien; Beliy, Nikita; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Melo De Almeida, Miqueias; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, Felipe; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Misheva, Milena; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Shopova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Gao, Xuyang; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Chen, Ye; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Liu, Zhenan; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Yazgan, Efe; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhao, Jingzhou; Ban, Yong; Chen, Geng; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; González Hernández, Carlos Felipe; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Courbon, Benoit; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Sculac, Toni; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Ferencek, Dinko; Kadija, Kreso; Mesic, Benjamin; Susa, Tatjana; Ather, Mohsan Waseem; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Mohammed, Yasser; Salama, Elsayed; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Kadastik, Mario; Perrini, Lucia; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Jarvinen, Terhi; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Ghosh, Saranya; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Kucher, Inna; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Negro, Giulia; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Titov, Maksym; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Charlot, Claude; Davignon, Olivier; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Jo, Mihee; Lisniak, Stanislav; Lobanov, Artur; Martin Blanco, Javier; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Stahl Leiton, Andre Govinda; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Zghiche, Amina; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Jansová, Markéta; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Finco, Linda; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grenier, Gérald; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Popov, Andrey; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Viret, Sébastien; Khvedelidze, Arsen; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Feld, Lutz; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Preuten, Marius; Schomakers, Christian; Schulz, Johannes; Verlage, Tobias; Albert, Andreas; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hamer, Matthias; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Flügge, Günter; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Müller, Thomas; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Arndt, Till; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Beernaert, Kelly; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin; Borras, Kerstin; Botta, Valeria; Campbell, Alan; Connor, Patrick; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Eren, Engin; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Grados Luyando, Juan Manuel; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gunnellini, Paolo; Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Kasemann, Matthias; Keaveney, James; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Lelek, Aleksandra; Lenz, Teresa; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Ntomari, Eleni; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Savitskyi, Mykola; Saxena, Pooja; Shevchenko, Rostyslav; Spannagel, Simon; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Walsh, Roberval; Wen, Yiwen; Wichmann, Katarzyna; Wissing, Christoph; Zenaiev, Oleksandr; Bein, Samuel; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Dreyer, Torben; Garutti, Erika; Gonzalez, Daniel; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Kurz, Simon; Lapsien, Tobias; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Niedziela, Marek; Nowatschin, Dominik; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Sonneveld, Jory; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Stöver, Marc; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baur, Sebastian; Butz, Erik; Caspart, René; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Freund, Benedikt; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Haitz, Dominik; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Kassel, Florian; Kudella, Simon; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Schröder, Matthias; Shvetsov, Ivan; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Triantis, Frixos A; Csanad, Mate; Filipovic, Nicolas; Pasztor, Gabriella; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Makovec, Alajos; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Choudhury, Somnath; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Bahinipati, Seema; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Nayak, Aruna; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Chawla, Ridhi; Dhingra, Nitish; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Kumari, Priyanka; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Shah, Aashaq; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Chauhan, Sushil; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Keshri, Sumit; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhardwaj, Rishika; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Dey, Sourav; Dutt, Suneel; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Thakur, Shalini; Behera, Prafulla Kumar; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Dugad, Shashikant; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhattacharya, Soham; Chatterjee, Suman; Das, Pallabi; Guchait, Monoranjan; Jain, Sandhya; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Sarkar, Tanmay; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Hegde, Vinay; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Pandey, Shubham; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Chenarani, Shirin; Eskandari Tadavani, Esmaeel; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Errico, Filippo; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Albergo, Sebastiano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Russo, Lorenzo; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Strom, Derek; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Brivio, Francesco; Ciriolo, Vincenzo; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malberti, Martina; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pauwels, Kristof; Pedrini, Daniele; Pigazzini, Simone; Ragazzi, Stefano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Fienga, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Khan, Wajid Ali; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, Alexandra; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Passaseo, Marina; Pegoraro, Matteo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Rossin, Roberto; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Braghieri, Alessandro; Fallavollita, Francesco; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Ressegotti, Martina; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Leonardi, Roberto; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Mariani, Valentina; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiga, Daniele; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Borrello, Laura; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fedi, Giacomo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Cipriani, Marco; Daci, Nadir; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marzocchi, Badder; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bartosik, Nazar; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Cenna, Francesca; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Monteno, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Shchelina, Ksenia; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Traczyk, Piotr; Belforte, Stefano; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Zanetti, Anna; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Jeongeun; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Oh, Young Do; Sekmen, Sezen; Son, Dong-Chul; Yang, Yu Chul; Lee, Ari; Kim, Hyunchul; Moon, Dong Ho; Oh, Geonhee; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Tae Jeong; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Ha, Seungkyu; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Youngkwon; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Almond, John; Kim, Junho; Kim, Jae Sung; Lee, Haneol; Lee, Kyeongpil; Nam, Kyungwook; Oh, Sung Bin; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Seo, Seon-hee; Yang, Unki; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Yu, Geum Bong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Choi, Young-Il; Hwang, Chanwook; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Saddique, Asif; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Pyskir, Andrzej; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Calpas, Betty; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Voytishin, Nikolay; Zarubin, Anatoli; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stepennov, Anton; Toms, Maria; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Aushev, Tagir; Bylinkin, Alexander; Danilov, Mikhail; Parygin, Pavel; Tarkovskii, Evgenii; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Terkulov, Adel; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Korneeva, Natalia; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Savrin, Viktor; Volkov, Petr; Blinov, Vladimir; Skovpen, Yuri; Shtol, Dmitry; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Elumakhov, Dmitry; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Dordevic, Milos; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Barrio Luna, Mar; Cerrada, Marcos; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Álvarez Fernández, Adrian; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Erice, Carlos; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; González Fernández, Juan Rodrigo; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Sanchez Cruz, Sergio; Suárez Andrés, Ignacio; Vischia, Pietro; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chazin Quero, Barbara; Curras, Esteban; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bianco, Michele; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Botta, Cristina; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cepeda, Maria; Cerminara, Gianluca; Chapon, Emilien; Chen, Yi; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Roeck, Albert; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dorney, Brian; Du Pree, Tristan; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Everaerts, Pieter; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Glege, Frank; Gulhan, Doga; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Karacheban, Olena; Kieseler, Jan; Kirschenmann, Henning; Knünz, Valentin; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kortelainen, Matti J; Krammer, Manfred; Lange, Clemens; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Meijers, Frans; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Milenovic, Predrag; Moortgat, Filip; Mulders, Martijn; Neugebauer, Hannes; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuel; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Racz, Attila; Reis, Thomas; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Selvaggi, Michele; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Steggemann, Jan; Stoye, Markus; Tosi, Mia; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veckalns, Viesturs; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Verweij, Marta; Wardle, Nicholas; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Rohe, Tilman; Wiederkehr, Stephan Albert; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Berger, Pirmin; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Klijnsma, Thomas; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marionneau, Matthieu; Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, Gaël; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Rossini, Marco; Schönenberger, Myriam; Shchutska, Lesya; Starodumov, Andrei; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Vesterbacka Olsson, Minna Leonora; Wallny, Rainer; Zagozdzinska, Agnieszka; Zhu, De Hua; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Caminada, Lea; Canelli, Maria Florencia; De Cosa, Annapaola; Donato, Silvio; Galloni, Camilla; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Rauco, Giorgia; Robmann, Peter; Salerno, Daniel; Seitz, Claudia; Zucchetta, Alberto; Candelise, Vieri; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Chang, Paoti; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Fiori, Francesco; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Paganis, Efstathios; Psallidas, Andreas; Tsai, Jui-fa; Asavapibhop, Burin; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Adiguzel, Aytul; Boran, Fatma; Cerci, Salim; Damarseckin, Serdal; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kara, Ozgun; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Kiminsu, Ugur; Oglakci, Mehmet; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Topakli, Huseyin; Turkcapar, Semra; Zorbakir, Ibrahim Soner; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Bilin, Bugra; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Tekten, Sevgi; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Nazlim Agaras, Merve; Atay, Serhat; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Burns, Douglas; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Breeze, Shane; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Di Maria, Riccardo; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Futyan, David; Haddad, Yacine; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; James, Thomas; Lane, Rebecca; Laner, Christian; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Matsushita, Takashi; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Scott, Edward; Seez, Christopher; Shtipliyski, Antoni; Summers, Sioni; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Winterbottom, Daniel; Wright, Jack; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Bartek, Rachel; Dominguez, Aaron; Buccilli, Andrew; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; West, Christopher; Arcaro, Daniel; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Gastler, Daniel; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Benelli, Gabriele; Cutts, David; Garabedian, Alex; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Hogan, Julie Managan; Kwok, Ka Hei Martin; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Pazzini, Jacopo; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Syarif, Rizki; Yu, David; Band, Reyer; Brainerd, Christopher; Burns, Dustin; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Flores, Chad; Funk, Garrett; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mclean, Christine; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Shalhout, Shalhout; Shi, Mengyao; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tos, Kyle; Tripathi, Mani; Wang, Zhangqier; Bachtis, Michail; Bravo, Cameron; Cousins, Robert; Dasgupta, Abhigyan; Florent, Alice; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Mccoll, Nickolas; Saltzberg, David; Schnaible, Christian; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Bouvier, Elvire; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Ghiasi Shirazi, Seyyed Mohammad Amin; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Si, Weinan; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; Derdzinski, Mark; Gerosa, Raffaele; Hashemi, Bobak; Holzner, André; Klein, Daniel; Kole, Gouranga; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Masciovecchio, Mario; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Wood, John; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Amin, Nick; Bhandari, Rohan; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Heller, Ryan; Incandela, Joe; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Ovcharova, Ana; Qu, Huilin; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Bendavid, Joshua; Bornheim, Adolf; Lawhorn, Jay Mathew; Newman, Harvey B; Nguyen, Thong; Pena, Cristian; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhang, Zhicai; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Mudholkar, Tanmay; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Weinberg, Marc; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Mulholland, Troy; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Mcdermott, Kevin; Mirman, Nathan; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Tan, Shao Min; Tao, Zhengcheng; Thom, Julia; Tucker, Jordan; Wittich, Peter; Zientek, Margaret; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Apollinari, Giorgio; Apresyan, Artur; Apyan, Aram; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Canepa, Anadi; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cremonesi, Matteo; Duarte, Javier; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Freeman, Jim; Gecse, Zoltan; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Lammel, Stephan; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Magini, Nicolo; Marraffino, John Michael; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Ristori, Luciano; Schneider, Basil; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Stoynev, Stoyan; Strait, James; Strobbe, Nadja; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Wang, Michael; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kotov, Khristian; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Rank, Douglas; Sperka, David; Terentyev, Nikolay; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Joshi, Yagya Raj; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Kolberg, Ted; Perry, Thomas; Prosper, Harrison; Santra, Arka; Yohay, Rachel; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Cavanaugh, Richard; Chen, Xuan; Evdokimov, Olga; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hangal, Dhanush Anil; Hofman, David Jonathan; Jung, Kurt; Kamin, Jason; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Tonjes, Marguerite; Trauger, Hallie; Varelas, Nikos; Wang, Hui; Wu, Zhenbin; Zhang, Jingyu; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Blumenfeld, Barry; Cocoros, Alice; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; You, Can; Al-bataineh, Ayman; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Boren, Samuel; Bowen, James; Castle, James; Khalil, Sadia; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Majumder, Devdatta; Mcbrayer, William; Murray, Michael; Royon, Christophe; Sanders, Stephen; Schmitz, Erich; Stringer, Robert; Tapia Takaki, Daniel; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferraioli, Charles; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Kellogg, Richard G; Kunkle, Joshua; Mignerey, Alice; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonwar, Suresh C; Abercrombie, Daniel; Allen, Brandon; Azzolini, Virginia; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bi, Ran; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Demiragli, Zeynep; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hsu, Dylan; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Maier, Benedikt; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Tatar, Kaya; Velicanu, Dragos; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Benvenuti, Alberto; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Evans, Andrew; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Claes, Daniel R; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Kravchenko, Ilya; Monroy, Jose; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Stieger, Benjamin; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Nguyen, Duong; Parker, Ashley; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Charaf, Otman; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Hurtado Anampa, Kenyi; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Loukas, Nikitas; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Alimena, Juliette; Antonelli, Louis; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Francis, Brian; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Ji, Weifeng; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Benaglia, Andrea; Cooperstein, Stephane; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Lange, David; Luo, Jingyu; Marlow, Daniel; Mei, Kelvin; Ojalvo, Isabel; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Stickland, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Tully, Christopher; Malik, Sudhir; Norberg, Scarlet; Barker, Anthony; Barnes, Virgil E; Folgueras, Santiago; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Andreas Werner; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Sun, Jian; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Cheng, Tongguang; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Duh, Yi-ting; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Lo, Kin Ho; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Ciesielski, Robert; Goulianos, Konstantin; Mesropian, Christina; Agapitos, Antonis; Chou, John Paul; Gershtein, Yuri; Gómez Espinosa, Tirso Alejandro; Halkiadakis, Eva; Heindl, Maximilian; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Kyriacou, Savvas; Lath, Amitabh; Montalvo, Roy; Nash, Kevin; Osherson, Marc; Saka, Halil; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Foerster, Mark; Heideman, Joseph; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; Thapa, Krishna; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Kamon, Teruki; Mueller, Ryan; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Perniè, Luca; Rathjens, Denis; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Damgov, Jordan; De Guio, Federico; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Gurpinar, Emine; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Peltola, Timo; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Wang, Zhixing; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Sheldon, Paul; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Barria, Patrizia; Cox, Bradley; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Sun, Xin; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Xia, Fan; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Sturdy, Jared; Zaleski, Shawn; Buchanan, James; Caillol, Cécile; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Hussain, Usama; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ruggles, Tyler; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2017-01-01

    Normalized differential cross sections for top quark pair production are measured in the dilepton ($\\mathrm{ e }^{+}\\mathrm{ e }^{-}$, $\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$, and $\\mu^{\\mp}\\mathrm{ e }^{\\pm}$) decay channels in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The measurements are performed with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.1 fb$^{-1}$ using the CMS detector at the LHC. The cross sections are measured differentially as a function of the kinematic properties of the leptons, jets from bottom quark hadronization, top quarks, and top quark pairs at the particle and parton levels. The results are compared to several Monte Carlo generators that implement calculations up to next-to-leading order in perturbative quantum chromodynamics interfaced with parton showering, and also to fixed-order theoretical calculations of top quark pair production up to next-to-next-to-leading order.

  8. Time-reversal-invariance-violating nucleon-nucleon potential in the 1/N_c expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Samart, Daris; Schindler, Matthias R; Phillips, Daniel R

    2016-01-01

    We apply the large-$N_c$ expansion to the time-reversal-invariance-violating (TV) nucleon-nucleon potential. The operator structures contributing to next-to-next-to-leading order in the large-$N_c$ counting are constructed. For the TV and parity-violating case we find a single operator structure at leading order. The TV but parity-conserving potential contains two leading-order terms, which however are suppressed by 1/$N_c$ compared to the parity-violating potential. Comparison with phenomenological potentials, including the chiral EFT potential in the TV parity-violating case, leads to large-$N_c$ scaling relations for TV meson-nucleon and nucleon-nucleon couplings.

  9. Neutron matter from chiral two- and three-nucleon calculations up to N$^3$LO

    CERN Document Server

    Drischler, C; Hebeler, K; Schwenk, A

    2016-01-01

    Neutron matter is an ideal laboratory for nuclear interactions derived from chiral effective field theory since all contributions are predicted up to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N$^3$LO) in the chiral expansion. By making use of recent advances in the partial-wave decomposition of three- nucleon (3N) forces, we include for the first time N$^3$LO 3N interactions in many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) up to third order and in self-consistent Green's function theory (SCGF). Using these two complementary many-body frameworks we provide improved predictions for the equation of state of neutron matter at zero temperature and also analyze systematically the many-body convergence for different chiral EFT interactions. Furthermore, we present an extension of the normal-ordering framework to finite temperatures. These developments open the way to improved calculations of neutron-rich matter including estimates of theoretical uncertainties for astrophysical applications.

  10. Mathematics of aperiodic order

    CERN Document Server

    Lenz, Daniel; Savinien, Jean

    2015-01-01

    What is order that is not based on simple repetition, that is, periodicity? How must atoms be arranged in a material so that it diffracts like a quasicrystal? How can we describe aperiodically ordered systems mathematically? Originally triggered by the – later Nobel prize-winning – discovery of quasicrystals, the investigation of aperiodic order has since become a well-established and rapidly evolving field of mathematical research with close ties to a surprising variety of branches of mathematics and physics. This book offers an overview of the state of the art in the field of aperiodic order, presented in carefully selected authoritative surveys. It is intended for non-experts with a general background in mathematics, theoretical physics or computer science, and offers a highly accessible source of first-hand information for all those interested in this rich and exciting field. Topics covered include the mathematical theory of diffraction, the dynamical systems of tilings or Delone sets, their cohomolog...

  11. Ordering ambiguity versus representation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza de Dutra, A [Abdus Salam ICTP, Strada Costiera 11, 34014 Trieste (Italy); UNESP-Campus de Guaratingueta-DFQ , Av. Dr. Ariberto Pereira da Cunha, 333, C.P. 205, 12516-410 Guaratingueta SP (Brazil)

    2006-01-06

    In this work we show that the ordering ambiguity on quantization depends on the representation choice. This property is then used to solve unambiguously some particular systems. Finally, we speculate on the consequences for more involved cases.

  12. Ordered groups and topology

    CERN Document Server

    Clay, Adam

    2016-01-01

    This book deals with the connections between topology and ordered groups. It begins with a self-contained introduction to orderable groups and from there explores the interactions between orderability and objects in low-dimensional topology, such as knot theory, braid groups, and 3-manifolds, as well as groups of homeomorphisms and other topological structures. The book also addresses recent applications of orderability in the studies of codimension-one foliations and Heegaard-Floer homology. The use of topological methods in proving algebraic results is another feature of the book. The book was written to serve both as a textbook for graduate students, containing many exercises, and as a reference for researchers in topology, algebra, and dynamical systems. A basic background in group theory and topology is the only prerequisite for the reader.

  13. Second order Standard Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny Espin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is known, though not commonly, that one can describe fermions using a second order in derivatives Lagrangian instead of the first order Dirac one. In this description the propagator is scalar, and the complexity is shifted to the vertex, which contains a derivative operator. In this paper we rewrite the Lagrangian of the fermionic sector of the Standard Model in such second order form. The new Lagrangian is extremely compact, and is obtained from the usual first order Lagrangian by integrating out all primed (or dotted 2-component spinors. It thus contains just half of the 2-component spinors that appear in the usual Lagrangian, which suggests a new perspective on unification. We sketch a natural in this framework SU(2×SU(4⊂SO(9 unified theory.

  14. The Evolution of Communication Systems

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    One can study communications by using Shannon's (1948) mathematical theory of communication. In social communications, however, the channels are not "fixed", but themselves subject to change. Communication systems change by communicating information to related communication systems; co-variation among systems if repeated over time, can lead to co-evolution. Conditions for stabilization of higher-order systems are specifiable: segmentation, stratification, differentiation, reflection, and self...

  15. Third Order Trace Formula

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arup Chattopadhyay; Kalyan B Sinha

    2013-11-01

    In J. Funct. Anal. 257 (2009) 1092–1132, Dykema and Skripka showed the existence of higher order spectral shift functions when the unperturbed self-adjoint operator is bounded and the perturbation is Hilbert–Schmidt. In this article, we give a different proof for the existence of spectral shift function for the third order when the unperturbed operator is self-adjoint (bounded or unbounded, but bounded below).

  16. CNEM: Cluster Based Network Evolution Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarwat Nizamani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a network evolution model, which is based on the clustering approach. The proposed approach depicts the network evolution, which demonstrates the network formation from individual nodes to fully evolved network. An agglomerative hierarchical clustering method is applied for the evolution of network. In the paper, we present three case studies which show the evolution of the networks from the scratch. These case studies include: terrorist network of 9/11 incidents, terrorist network of WMD (Weapons Mass Destruction plot against France and a network of tweets discussing a topic. The network of 9/11 is also used for evaluation, using other social network analysis methods which show that the clusters created using the proposed model of network evolution are of good quality, thus the proposed method can be used by law enforcement agencies in order to further investigate the criminal networks

  17. Birth Order and Psychopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Risal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Ordinal position the child holds within the sibling ranking of a family is related to intellectual functioning, personality, behavior, and development of psychopathology. Aim: To study the association between birth order and development of psychopathology in patients attending psychiatry services in a teaching hospital. Settings and Design: Hospital-based cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: Retrospective file review of three groups of patients was carried out. Patient-related variables like age of onset, birth order, family type, and family history of mental illness were compared with psychiatry diagnosis (ICD-10 generated. Statistical Analysis: SPSS 13; descriptive statistics and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA were used. Results: Mean age of onset of mental illness among the adult general psychiatry patients (group I, n = 527 was found to be 33.01 ± 15.073, while it was 11.68 ± 4.764 among the child cases (group II, n = 47 and 26.74 ± 7.529 among substance abuse cases (group III, n = 110. Among group I patients, commonest diagnosis was depression followed by anxiety and somatoform disorders irrespective of birth order. Dissociative disorders were most prevalent in the first born child (36.7% among group II patients. Among group III patients, alcohol dependence was maximum diagnosis in all birth orders. Conclusions: Depression and alcohol dependence was the commonest diagnosis in adult group irrespective of birth order.

  18. ORDERED WEIGHTED DISTANCE MEASURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zeshui XU; Jian CHEN

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop an ordered weighted distance (OWD) measure, which is thegeneralization of some widely used distance measures, including the normalized Hamming distance, the normalized Euclidean distance, the normalized geometric distance, the max distance, the median distance and the min distance, etc. Moreover, the ordered weighted averaging operator, the generalized ordered weighted aggregation operator, the ordered weighted geometric operator, the averaging operator, the geometric mean operator, the ordered weighted square root operator, the square root operator, the max operator, the median operator and the min operator axe also the special cases of the OWD measure. Some methods depending on the input arguments are given to determine the weights associated with the OWD measure. The prominent characteristic of the OWD measure is that it can relieve (or intensify) the influence of unduly large or unduly small deviations on the aggregation results by assigning them low (or high) weights. This desirable characteristic makes the OWD measure very suitable to be used in many actual fields, including group decision making, medical diagnosis, data mining, and pattern recognition, etc. Finally, based on the OWD measure, we develop a group decision making approach, and illustrate it with a numerical example.

  19. Learning to Order Things

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, W W; Singer, Y; 10.1613/jair.587

    2011-01-01

    There are many applications in which it is desirable to order rather than classify instances. Here we consider the problem of learning how to order instances given feedback in the form of preference judgments, i.e., statements to the effect that one instance should be ranked ahead of another. We outline a two-stage approach in which one first learns by conventional means a binary preference function indicating whether it is advisable to rank one instance before another. Here we consider an on-line algorithm for learning preference functions that is based on Freund and Schapire's 'Hedge' algorithm. In the second stage, new instances are ordered so as to maximize agreement with the learned preference function. We show that the problem of finding the ordering that agrees best with a learned preference function is NP-complete. Nevertheless, we describe simple greedy algorithms that are guaranteed to find a good approximation. Finally, we show how metasearch can be formulated as an ordering problem, and present ex...

  20. Arguments from Developmental Order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckle-Schobel, Richard

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I investigate a special type of argument regarding the role of development in theorizing about psychological processes and cognitive capacities. Among the issues that developmental psychologists study, discovering the ontogenetic trajectory of mechanisms or capacities underpinning our cognitive functions ranks highly. The order in which functions are developed or capacities are acquired is a matter of debate between competing psychological theories, and also philosophical conceptions of the mind - getting the role and the significance of the different steps in this order right could be seen as an important virtue of such theories. Thus, a special kind of strategy in arguments between competing philosophical or psychological theories is using developmental order in arguing for or against a given psychological claim. In this article, I will introduce an analysis of arguments from developmental order, which come in two general types: arguments emphasizing the importance of the early cognitive processes and arguments emphasizing the late cognitive processes. I will discuss their role in one of the central tools for evaluating scientific theories, namely in making inferences to the best explanation. I will argue that appeal to developmental order is, by itself, an insufficient criterion for theory choice and has to be part of an argument based on other core explanatory or empirical virtues. I will end by proposing a more concerted study of philosophical issues concerning (cognitive) development, and I will present some topics that also pertain to a full-fledged 'philosophy of development.'

  1. Gluon TMDs in quarkonium production

    CERN Document Server

    Signori, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    I report on our investigations into the impact of (un)polarized transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMD PDFs or TMDs) for gluons at hadron colliders, especially at A Fixed Target Experiment at the LHC (AFTER@LHC). In the context of high energy proton-proton collisions, we look at final states with low mass (e.g. $\\eta_b$) in order to investigate the nonperturbative part of TMD PDFs. We study the factorization theorem for the $q_T$ spectrum of $\\eta_b$ produced in proton-proton collisions relying on the effective field theory approach, defining the tools to perform phenomenological investigations at next-to-next-to-leading log (NNLL) and next-to-leading order (NLO) accuracy in the perturbation theory. We provide predictions for the unpolarized cross section and comment on the possibility of extracting nonperturbative information about the gluon content of the proton once data at low transverse momentum are available.

  2. Gluon TMDs in Quarkonium Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signori, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    I report on our investigations into the impact of (un)polarized transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMD PDFs or TMDs) for gluons at hadron colliders, especially at A Fixed Target Experiment at the LHC (AFTER@LHC). In the context of high energy proton-proton collisions, we look at final states with low mass (e.g. η _b) in order to investigate the nonperturbative part of TMD PDFs. We study the factorization theorem for the q_T spectrum of η _b produced in proton-proton collisions relying on the effective field theory approach, defining the tools to perform phenomenological investigations at next-to-next-to-leading log and next-to-leading order accuracy in the perturbation theory. We provide predictions for the unpolarized cross section and comment on the possibility of extracting nonperturbative information about the gluon content of the proton once data at low transverse momentum are available.

  3. Color Singlet Production at NNLO in MCFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boughezal, Radja [Argonne; Campbell, John M. [Fermilab; Ellis, R. Keith [Durham U., IPPP; Focke, Christfried [Northwestern U.; Giele, Walter [Fermilab; Liu, Xiaohui [Maryland U.; Petriello, Frank [Northwestern U.; Williams, Ciaran [SUNY, Buffalo

    2016-05-25

    We present the implementation of several color-singlet final-state processes at Next-to-Next-to Leading Order (NNLO) accuracy in QCD to the publicly available parton-level Monte Carlo program MCFM. Specifically we discuss the processes $pp\\rightarrow H$, $pp\\rightarrow Z$, $pp\\rightarrow W$, $pp\\rightarrow HZ$, $pp\\rightarrow HW$ and $pp\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$. Decays of the unstable bosons are fully included, resulting in a flexible fully differential Monte Carlo code. The NNLO corrections have been calculated using the non-local $N$-jettiness subtraction approach. Special attention is given to the numerical aspects of running MCFM for these processes at this order. We pay particular attention to the systematic uncertainties due to the power corrections induced by the $N$-jettiness regularization scheme and the evaluation time needed to run the hybrid openMP/MPI version of MCFM at NNLO on multi-processor systems.

  4. Chiral three-nucleon force at N^4LO II: Intermediate-range contributions

    CERN Document Server

    Krebs, Hermann; Epelbaum, Evgeny

    2013-01-01

    We derive the subleading contributions to the two-pion-one-pion exchange and ring three-nucleon force topologies emerging at next-to-next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order in chiral effective field theory. The resulting expressions do not involve any unknown parameters. To study convergence of the chiral expansion we work out the most general operator structure of a local isospin-invariant three-nucleon force. Using the resulting operator basis with 22 independent structures, we compare the strength of the corresponding potentials in configuration space for individual topologies at various orders in the chiral expansion. As expected, the subleading contributions from the two-pion-one-pion-exchange and ring diagrams are large which can be understood in terms of intermediate excitation of the Delta(1232) isobar.

  5. Lattice Effective Field Theory for Medium-Mass Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Lähde, Timo A; Krebs, Hermann; Lee, Dean; Meißner, Ulf-G; Rupak, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    We extend Nuclear Lattice Effective Field Theory (NLEFT) to the regime of medium-mass nuclei, and describe a method which allows us to greatly decrease the uncertainties due to extrapolation at large Euclidean time. We present results for the ground states of alpha nuclei from $^4$He to $^{28}$Si, calculated up to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in the EFT expansion. We discuss systematic errors associated with the momentum-cutoff scale and the truncation of the EFT expansion. While the long-term objectives of NLEFT are a decrease in the lattice spacing and the inclusion of higher-order contributions, we show that the missing physics at NNLO can be approximated by an effective four-nucleon interaction.

  6. Delta-excitations and the three-nucleon force

    CERN Document Server

    Epelbaum, E; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2007-01-01

    We study the three-nucleon force in chiral effective field theory with explicit Delta-resonance degrees of freedom. We show that up to next-to-next-to-leading order, the only contribution to the isospin symmetric three-nucleon force involving the spin-3/2 degrees of freedom is given by the two-pion-exchange diagram with an intermediate delta, frequently called the Fujita-Miyazawa force. We also analyze the leading isospin-breaking corrections due to the delta. For that, we give the first analysis of the delta quartet mass splittings in chiral effective field theory. The charge-symmetry breaking three-nucleon force due to an intermediate delta excitation is small, of the order of a few keV.

  7. Matching pion-nucleon Roy-Steiner equations to chiral perturbation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hoferichter, Martin; Kubis, Bastian; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-01-01

    We match the results for the subthreshold parameters of pion-nucleon scattering obtained from a solution of Roy-Steiner equations to chiral perturbation theory up to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order, to extract the pertinent low-energy constants including a comprehensive analysis of systematic uncertainties and correlations. We study the convergence of the chiral series by investigating the chiral expansion of threshold parameters up to the same order and discuss the role of the \\Delta(1232) resonance in this context. Results for the low-energy constants are also presented in the counting scheme usually applied in chiral nuclear effective field theory, where they serve as crucial input to determine the long-range part of the nucleon-nucleon potential as well as three-nucleon forces.

  8. $\\pi K$ Scattering in Three Flavour ChPT

    CERN Document Server

    Bijnens, Johan; Talavera, Pere

    2004-01-01

    We present the scattering lengths for the $\\pi K$ processes in the three flavour Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT) framework at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO). The calculation has been performed analytically but we only include analytical results for the dependence on the low-energy constants (LECs) at NNLO due to the size of the expressions. These results, together with resonance estimates of the NNLO LECs are used to obtain constraints on the Zweig rule suppressed LECs at NLO, $L_4^r$ and $L_6^r$. Contrary to expectations from NLO order calculations we find them to be compatible with zero. We do a preliminary study of combining the results from $\\pi\\pi$ scattering, $\\pi K$ scattering and the scalar form-factors and find only a marginal compatibility with all experimental/dispersive input data.

  9. W-boson plus jet differential distributions at NNLO in QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Boughezal, Radja; Petriello, Frank

    2016-01-01

    We present a detailed phenomenological study of W-boson production in association with a jet through next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in perturbative QCD. Fiducial cross sections and differential distributions for both 8 TeV and 13 TeV LHC collisions are presented, as are results for both the inclusive one-jet bin and the exclusive one-jet bin. Two different event selection criteria are considered: a general selection with standard cuts used in experimental analyses, and a boosted selection that focuses on high transverse momentum jets. We discuss the higher-order corrections in detail and identify for which observables and phase space regions the QCD perturbative expansion is under good theoretical control, and where additional work is needed. For most distributions and phase space regions the QCD perturbative expansion exhibits good convergence after the inclusion of the NNLO corrections.

  10. Measurement of $d\\sigma/dy$ of Drell-Yan $e^+e^-$ pairs in the $Z$ Mass Region from $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, Jahred A.; /Chicago U., EFI; Gonzalez, Barbara Alvarez; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, Silvia; /Padua U., CISAS; Amidei, Dante E.; /Michigan U. /INFN, Padua; Anastassov, Anton Iankov; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, Alberto; /Frascati; Antos, Jaroslav; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, Giorgio; /Fermilab; Appel, Jeffrey A.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, Artur; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2010-03-01

    We report on a CDF measurement of the total cross section and rapidity distribution, d{sigma}/dy, for q{bar q} {yields} {gamma}{sup *}/Z {yields} e{sup +} e {sup -} events in the Z boson mass region (66 < M {sub ee} < 116 GeV/c {sub 2}) produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with 2.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The measured cross section of 257 {+-} 16pb and d{sigma}/dy distribution are compared with Next-to-Leading-Order (NLO) and Next-to-Next-to-Leading-Order (NNLO) QCD theory predictions with CTEQ and MRST/MSTW parton distribution functions (PDFs). There is good agreement between the experimental total cross section and d{sigma}/dy measurements with theoretical calcualtion with the most recent NNLO PDFs.

  11. Potential NRQCD for unequal masses and the Bc spectrum at NNNLO

    CERN Document Server

    Peset, Clara; Stahlhofen, Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    We determine the $1/m$ and $1/m^2$ spin-independent heavy quarkonium potentials in the unequal mass case with $\\mathcal O(\\alpha^3)$ and $\\mathcal O(\\alpha^2)$ accuracy, respectively. We discuss in detail different methods to calculate the potentials, and show the equivalence among them. In particular we obtain, for the first time, the manifestly gauge invariant $1/m$ and $1/m^2$ potentials in terms of Wilson loops with next-to-leading order (NLO) precision. As an application of our results we derive the theoretical expression for the $B_c$ spectrum in the weak-coupling limit through next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N$^3$LO).

  12. Chiral lagrangian approach to exchange vector currents in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Park, T S; Rho, M; Park, Tae Sun; Min, Dong Pil; Rho, Mannque

    1995-01-01

    Exchange vector currents are calculated up to one-loop order (corresponding to next-to-next-to-leading order) in chiral perturbation theory. As an illustration of the power of the approach, we apply the formalism to the classic nuclear process n+p\\rightarrow d +\\gamma at thermal energy. The exchange current correction comes out to be (4.5 \\pm 0.3) \\% in amplitude giving a predicted cross section \\sigma= (334\\pm 3)\\ {\\mbox mb} in excellent agreement with the experimental value (334.2\\pm 0.5)\\ {\\mbox mb}. Together with the axial charge transitions computed previously, this result provides a strong support for the power of chiral Lagrangians in nuclear physics. As a by-product of our results, we suggest an open problem in the application of chiral Lagrangian approach to nuclear processes that has to do with giving a physical meaning to the short-range correlations that play an important role in nuclei.

  13. Nonlocal energy density functionals for pairing and beyond-mean-field calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Bennaceur, K; Dobaczewski, J; Dobaczewski, P; Kortelainen, M; Raimondi, F

    2016-01-01

    We propose to use two-body regularized finite-range pseudopotential to generate nuclear energy density functional (EDF) in both particle-hole and particle-particle channels, which makes it free from self-interaction and self-pairing, and also free from singularities when used beyond mean field. We derive a sequence of pseudopotentials regularized up to next-to-leading order (NLO) and next-to-next-to-leading order (N2LO), which fairly well describe infinite-nuclear-matter properties and finite open-shell paired and/or deformed nuclei. Since pure two-body pseudopotentials cannot generate sufficiently large effective mass, the obtained solutions constitute a preliminary step towards future implementations, which will include, e.g., EDF terms generated by three-body pseudopotentials.

  14. HERA Inclusive Neutral and Charged Current Cross Sections and a New PDF Fit, HERAPDF 2.0

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2015-01-01

    In this talk, I present the brand new results from the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations on the combination of all previously published inclusive deep inelastic cross sections at HERA for neutral and charged current $e^\\pm p$ scattering for zero beam polarisation and the corresponding parton distributions functions, HERAPDF 2.0, at up to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO). The results also include a new precise determination at next-to-leading order (NLO) of the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_s(M^2_Z)=0.1184\\pm 0.0016$ (excluding scale uncertainties) based on a simultaneous fit to the combined inclusive cross section data and jet production data.

  15. Measurement of d sigma/dy of Drell-Yan e+ e- pairs in the Z Mass Region from p anti-p Collisions at s88(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /Padua U. /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-08-01

    We report on a CDF measurement of the total cross section and rapidity distribution, d{sigma}/dy, for q{bar q} {yields} {gamma}*/Z {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} events in the Z boson mass region (66 < M{sub ee} < 116 GeV/c{sup 2}) produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with 2.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The measured cross section of 256 {+-} 16 pb and d{sigma}/dy distribution are compared with Next-to-Leading-Order and Next-to-Next-to-Leading-Order QCD theory predictions with CTEQ and MRST parton distribution functions (PDFs). There is good agreement between data and theory except at large rapidity for which further tuning of PDF models may be needed.

  16. NNLO corrections to the polarized Drell-Yan coefficient function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravindran, V. [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhusii, Allahabad, 211019 (India); Smith, J. [C.N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics, State University of New York at Stony Brook, New York 11794-3840 (United States); Neerven, W.L. van [Instituut-Lorentz, Universiteit Leiden, PO Box 9506, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2004-10-01

    We present the full next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) corrections to the coefficient function for the polarized cross section d{delta}{sigma}/dQ of the Drell-Yan process. We study the effect of these corrections on the process p+p->l+l-+'X' at an C.M. energy S=200GeV. All QCD partonic subprocesses have been included provided the lepton pair is created by a virtual photon, which is a valid approximation for a lepton pair invariant mass Q50GeV. For this reaction the dominant subprocess is given by q+q-bar ->{gamma}*+'X' and its higher order corrections so that it provides us with an excellent tool to measure the polarized sea-quark densities.

  17. piK Scattering in Three Flavour ChPT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijnens, Johan; Dhonte, Pierre; Talavera, Pere

    2004-05-01

    We present the scattering lengths for the piK processes in the three flavour Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT) framework at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO). The calculation has been performed analytically but we only include analytical results for the dependence on the low-energy constants (LECs) at NNLO due to the size of the expressions. These results, together with resonance estimates of the NNLO LECs are used to obtain constraints on the Zweig rule suppressed LECs at NLO, L4r and L6r. Contrary to expectations from NLO order calculations we find them to be compatible with zero. We do a preliminary study of combining the results from pipi scattering, piK scattering and the scalar form-factors and find only a marginal compatibility with all experimental/dispersive input data.

  18. Pion and Kaon Electromagnetic Form Factors

    CERN Document Server

    Bijnens, J; Bijnens, Johan; Talavera, Pere

    2002-01-01

    We study the electromagnetic form factor of the pion and kaons at low-energies with the use of Chiral Perturbation Theory. The analysis is performed within the three flavour framework and at next-to-next-to-leading order. We explain carefully all the relevant consistency checks on the expressions, present full analytical results for the pion form factor and describe all the assumptions in the analysis. From the phenomenological point of view we make use of our expression and the available data to obtain the charge radius of the pion obtaining $_V^\\pi=(0.452+-0.013) fm^2$, as well as the low-energy constant $L_9^r(m_\\rho)= (5.93+-0.43)10^{-3}$. We also obtain experimental values for 3 combinations of order $p^6$ constants.

  19. Exploring the LHC Landscape with Dileptons

    CERN Document Server

    Bourilkov, Dimitri

    2016-01-01

    The dilepton decay channels provide clean signatures and are an ideal hunting ground for high mass resonant, like Z', or non-resonant, like contact interactions or extra dimensions, searches at the LHC. The production of high invariant mass opposite sign lepton pairs in proton-proton collisions in the Standard Model is dominated by the Drell-Yan process. In addition to this photon or Z exchange mediated mechanism, photons radiated by the incoming protons can collide and produce lepton pairs. In this paper detailed calculations of the Drell-Yan process at next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD and next-to-leading order in the electroweak corrections, augmented with the photon-induced effects, are presented in the typical acceptance of a multi-purpose LHC detector at center of mass energy 13 TeV. Estimates of the expected backgrounds for new physics searches are provided for dilepton invariant masses up to the LHC kinematic limit.

  20. NNLO contributions to jet photoproduction and determination of \\alpha_s

    CERN Document Server

    Klasen, M; Michael, M

    2013-01-01

    We present the first calculation of inclusive jet photoproduction with next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) contributions, obtained from a unified threshold resummation formalism. The leading coefficients for direct photoproduction are computed analytically. Together with the coefficients pertinent to parton-parton scattering, they are shown to agree with those appearing in our full next-to-leading order calculations. For hadron-hadron scattering, numerical agreement is found with a previous calculation of jet production at the Tevatron. We show that the direct and resolved NNLO contributions considerably improve the description of final ZEUS data on jet photoproduction and that the error on the determination of the strong coupling constant is significantly reduced.

  1. NNLO contributions to jet photoproduction and determination of {alpha}{sub s}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasen, Michael; Michael, Markus [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik 1; Kramer, Gustav [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2013-10-15

    We present the first calculation of inclusive jet photoproduction with next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) contributions, obtained from a unified threshold resummation formalism. The leading coefficients for direct photoproduction are computed analytically. Together with the coefficients pertinent to parton-parton scattering, they are shown to agree with those appearing in our full next-to-leading order calculations. For hadron-hadron scattering, numerical agreement is found with a previous calculation of jet production at the Tevatron. We show that the direct and resolved NNLO contributions considerably improve the description of final ZEUS data on jet photoproduction and that the error on the determination of the strong coupling constant is significantly reduced.

  2. Description of light nuclei in pionless effective field theory using the stochastic variational method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lensky, Vadim; Birse, Michael C.; Walet, Niels R.

    2016-09-01

    We construct a coordinate-space potential based on pionless effective field theory (EFT) with a Gaussian regulator. Charge-symmetry breaking is included through the Coulomb potential and through two- and three-body contact interactions. Starting with the effective field theory potential, we apply the stochastic variational method to determine the ground states of nuclei with mass number A ≤4 . At next-to-next-to-leading order, two out of three independent three-body parameters can be fitted to the three-body binding energies. To fix the remaining one, we look for a simultaneous description of the binding energy of 4He and the charge radii of 3He and 4He. We show that at the order considered we can find an acceptable solution, within the uncertainty of the expansion. We find that the EFT expansion shows good agreement with empirical data within the estimated uncertainty, even for a system as dense as 4He.

  3. Description of light nuclei in pionless effective field theory using the stochastic variational method

    CERN Document Server

    Lensky, Vadim; Walet, Niels R

    2016-01-01

    We construct a coordinate-space potential based on pionless effective field theory with a Gaussian regulator. Charge-symmetry breaking is included through the Coulomb potential and through two- and three-body contact interactions. Starting with the effective field theory potential, we apply the stochastic variational method to determine the ground states of nuclei with mass number $A\\leq 4$. At next-to-next-to-leading order, two out of three independent three-body parameters can be fitted to the three-body binding energies. To fix the remaining one, we look for a simultaneous description of the binding energy of $^4$He and the charge radii of $^3$He and $^4$He. We show that at the order considered we can find an acceptable solution, within the uncertainty of the expansion. We find that the EFT expansion shows good convergence, even for a system as dense as $^4$He.

  4. The global electroweak fit at NNLO and constraints on new physics

    CERN Document Server

    Baak, Max; Haller, Johannes; Hoecker, Andreas; Kogler, Roman; Mönig, K; Peiffer, Thomas; Schott, Matthias; Stelzer, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    We present an update of the global electroweak fit using electroweak next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) calculations for all precision observables that enter the fit. The availability of NNLO corrections allows for the first time the inclusion of realistic estimates of theoretical uncertainties due to missing higher order calculations. The knowledge of the mass of the Higgs boson improves the precision of the predictions in the global electroweak fit considerably and the global fits are used as powerful tools to assess the validity of the Standard Model and to constrain scenarios for new physics. We present updated constraints in a model with modified Higgs couplings to bosons and fermions, and two Higgs doublet models. We show that in many cases the Higgs signal strength measurements give complementary information to constraints obtained from electroweak precison observables. Future measurements at the LHC and an expected electron-positron collider promise to improve the experimental precision of key obser...

  5. Determination of {alpha}{sub S} using OPAL hadronic event shapes at {radical}(s)= 91-209{proportional_to}GeV and resummed NNLO calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbiendi, G.; Braibant, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Ciocca, C.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, M.; Fabbri, F.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Mader, W.; Mes, H.; Renkel, P. [Univ. di Bologna (Italy); INFN, Bologna (Italy); Ainsley, C.; Batley, R.J.; Carter, J.R.; Hill, J.C.; Tasevsky, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J. [Cavendish Lab., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Aakesson, P.F.; Barberio, E.; Burckhart, H.J.; Roeck, A. de; Wolf, E.A. de; Ferrari, P.; Frey, A.; Gruwe, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkings, R.; Heuer, R.D.; McKenna, J.; Neal, H.A.; Pilcher, J.E.; Plane, D.E.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Sachs, K.; Schaile, A.D.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schumacher, M.; Sherwood, P.; Stroehmer, R.; Torrence, E.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K. [European Organisation for Nuclear Research, CERN, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Alexander, G.; Bella, G.; Etzion, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Trigger, I. [Tel Aviv Univ., Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv (Israel); Anagnostou, G.; Bell, P.J.; Charlton, D.G.; Hawkes, C.M.; Jovanovic, P.; Nanjo, H.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Wermes, N. [Univ. of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Anderson, K.J.; Gupta, A.; Meijers, F.; O' Neale, S.W.; Pasztor, G.; Sobie, R.; Tarem, S. [Univ. of Chicago, Enrico Fermi Inst. and Dept. of Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Asai, S.; Ishii, K.; Kanzaki, J.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Komamiya, S.; Martin, A.J.; Meyer, N.; Miller, D.J.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Oh, A.; Runge, K.; Thomson, M.A.; Tsur, E.; Wolf, G. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Kobe Univ. (Japan); Axen, D.; Loebinger, F.K.; Mashimo, T. [Univ. of British Columbia, Dept. of Physics, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Bailey, I.; Karlen, D.; Keeler, R.K.; Maettig, P.; Rembser, C.; Skuja, A. [Univ. of Victoria (Canada); Barillari, T.; Bethke, S.; Kluth, S.; Oreglia, M.J.; Pooth, O.; Schaile, O. [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany)] [and others

    2011-09-15

    Hadronic event shape distributions from e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation measured by the OPAL experiment at centre-of-mass energies between 91 GeV and 209 GeV are used to determine the strong coupling {alpha}{sub S}. The results are based on QCD predictions complete to the next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO), and on NNLO calculations matched to the resummed next-to-leading-log-approximation terms (NNLO + NLLA). The combined NNLO result from all variables and centre-of-mass energies is while the combined NNLO + NLLA result is The completeness of the NNLO and NNLO + NLLA results with respect to missing higher order contributions, studied by varying the renormalization scale, is improved compared to previous results based on NLO or NLO + NLLA predictions only. The observed energy dependence of {alpha}{sub S} agrees with the QCD prediction of asymptotic freedom and excludes the absence of running. (orig.)

  6. Topics in Effective Field Theory for Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Walker-Loud, A

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we extend and apply effective field theory techniques to systematically understand a subset of lattice artifacts which pollute the lattice correlation functions for a few processes of physical interest. Where possible, we compare to existing lattice QCD calculations. In particular, we extend the heavy baryon Lagrangian to the next order in partially quenched chiral perturbation theory and use it to compute the masses of the lightest spin-1/2 and spin-3/2 baryons to next-to-next-to leading order. We then construct the twisted mass chiral Lagrangian for baryons and apply it to compute the lattice spacing corrections to the baryon masses simulated with twisted mass lattice QCD. We extend computations of the nucleon electromagnetic structure to account for finite volume effects, as these observables are particularly sensitive to the finite extent of the lattice. We resolve subtle peculiarities for lattice QCD simulations of polarizabilities and we show that using background field techniques, one can...

  7. Mass-corrections to double-Higgs production & TopoID

    CERN Document Server

    Grigo, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    We consider power corrections due to a finite top quark mass M_t to the production of a Higgs boson pair within the Standard Model at next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD. Previous calculations for this process and at this precision were done in the limit of an inifinitely heavy top quark. Our results for the inclusive production cross section at NLO include terms up to O(1/M_t^12). We present the Mathematica package TopoID which for arbitrary processes aims to perform the necessary steps from Feynman diagrams to unrenormalized results expressed in terms of master integrals. We employ it for advancing in this process towards next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) where further automatization is needed.

  8. Matching Pion-Nucleon Roy-Steiner Equations to Chiral Perturbation Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoferichter, Martin; Ruiz de Elvira, Jacobo; Kubis, Bastian; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2015-11-01

    We match the results for the subthreshold parameters of pion-nucleon scattering obtained from a solution of Roy-Steiner equations to chiral perturbation theory up to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order, to extract the pertinent low-energy constants including a comprehensive analysis of systematic uncertainties and correlations. We study the convergence of the chiral series by investigating the chiral expansion of threshold parameters up to the same order and discuss the role of the Δ (1232 ) resonance in this context. Results for the low-energy constants are also presented in the counting scheme usually applied in chiral nuclear effective field theory, where they serve as crucial input to determine the long-range part of the nucleon-nucleon potential as well as three-nucleon forces.

  9. Perturbative QCD description of jet data from LHC Run-I and Tevatron Run-II

    CERN Document Server

    Carrazza, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    We present a systematic comparison of jet predictions at the LHC and the Tevatron, with accuracy up to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO). The exact computation at NNLO is completed for the gluons-only channel, so we compare the exact predictions for this channel with an approximate prediction based on threshold resummation, in order to determine the regions where this approximation is reliable at NNLO. The kinematic regions used in this study are identical to the experimental setup used by recently published jet data from the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC, and CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron. We study the effect of choosing different renormalisation and factorisation scales for the NNLO exact prediction and as an exercise assess their impact on a PDF fit including these corrections. Finally we provide numerical values of the NNLO k-factors relevant for the LHC and Tevatron experiments.

  10. Nuclear forces from EFT: Recent developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meißner U.-G.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear forces are considered based on chiral perturbation theory with and without explicit ∆-isobar degrees of freedom. We discuss the subleading corrections to chiral three-nucleon forces in the ∆-less formalism which contain no additional free parameters. In the formalism with explicit ∆-isobar we present the complete next-to-next-to-leading order analysis of isospin-conserving and next-to-leading order analysis of isospinviolating nuclear forces. The perturbative expansion of nuclear forces in the ∆-full case is shown to have much better convergence compared with the ∆-less theory where the ∆-resonance is integrated out and is encoded in certain low-energy constants.

  11. The proton–deuteron scattering length in pionless EFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    König Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a fully perturbative calculation of the quartet-channel proton–deuteron scattering length (4ap–d up to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO in pionless effective field theory. In particular, we use a framework that consistently extracts the Coulomb-modified effective range function for a screened Coulomb potential in momentum space. We find a natural convergence pattern as we go to higher orders in the EFT expansion. Our NNLO result of (10.9 ± 0.4 fm agrees with older experimental determinations but deviates from more recent calculations, which find values around 14 fm. To resolve this discrepancy, we discuss the scheme dependence of Coulomb subtractions in a three-body system.

  12. Higgs boson decay into b-quarks at NNLO accuracy

    CERN Document Server

    Del Duca, Vittorio; Somogyi, Gabor; Tramontano, Francesco; Trocsanyi, Zoltan

    2015-01-01

    We compute the fully differential decay rate of the Standard Model Higgs boson into b-quarks at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) accuracy in alpha_S. We employ a general subtraction scheme developed for the calculation of higher order perturbative corrections to QCD jet cross sections, which is based on the universal infrared factorization properties of QCD squared matrix elements. We show that the subtractions render the various contributions to the NNLO correction finite. In particular, we demonstrate analytically that the sum of integrated subtraction terms correctly reproduces the infrared poles of the two-loop double virtual contribution to this process. We present illustrative differential distributions obtained by implementing the method in a parton level Monte Carlo program. The basic ingredients of our subtraction scheme, used here for the first time to compute a physical observable, are universal and can be employed for the computation of more involved processes.

  13. W -boson plus jet differential distributions at NNLO in QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughezal, Radja; Liu, Xiaohui; Petriello, Frank

    2016-12-01

    We present a detailed phenomenological study of W -boson production in association with a jet through next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in perturbative QCD. Fiducial cross sections and differential distributions for both 8 TeV and 13 TeV LHC collisions are presented, as are results for both the inclusive one-jet bin and the exclusive one-jet bin. Two different event selection criteria are considered: a general selection with standard cuts used in experimental analyses, and a boosted selection that focuses on high transverse momentum jets. We discuss the higher-order corrections in detail and identify for which observables and phase space regions the QCD perturbative expansion is under good theoretical control, and where additional work is needed. For most distributions and phase space regions the QCD perturbative expansion exhibits good convergence after the inclusion of the NNLO corrections.

  14. 'Good Order and Police'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of police ordinances and police authorities in the early modern period has traditionally been seen as a way to discipline society in order to increase the power of the absolutist state. However, recent investigations of early modern policing in German and French regions show...... that ‘good order and police’ was in demand by the subjects and also adapted to local needs. Inspired by this research this article investigates the enforcement of police ordinances in the market towns of Aalborg and Sæby and the country district of Børglum-Jerslev. The results show that policing remained...... focused on local needs even after the creation of a royal police office in 1682. Policing mainly concerned the welfare and privileges of burghers in market towns until the introduction of a country police in 1791, when agrarian reforms began to erode the patriarchal order in the countryside. As a new way...

  15. The interval ordering problem

    CERN Document Server

    Dürr, Christoph; Spieksma, Frits C R; Nobibon, Fabrice Talla; Woeginger, Gerhard J

    2011-01-01

    For a given set of intervals on the real line, we consider the problem of ordering the intervals with the goal of minimizing an objective function that depends on the exposed interval pieces (that is, the pieces that are not covered by earlier intervals in the ordering). This problem is motivated by an application in molecular biology that concerns the determination of the structure of the backbone of a protein. We present polynomial-time algorithms for several natural special cases of the problem that cover the situation where the interval boundaries are agreeably ordered and the situation where the interval set is laminar. Also the bottleneck variant of the problem is shown to be solvable in polynomial time. Finally we prove that the general problem is NP-hard, and that the existence of a constant-factor-approximation algorithm is unlikely.

  16. Hume without Spontaneous Order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Salter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The question whether it is possible to be both a Humean and a contractarian arises from the interpretation of Hume as a theorist of spontaneous order, a theory that is usually taken to be incompatible with contractarianism. I argue that this interpretation is unconvincing and anachronistic. The real reason why it is problematic to view Hume as a contractarian is not because he is proponent of spontaneous order, but because he is a virtue-ethicist. I argue that Hume adopted and elaborated on the natural law account of the origins of property as conventional, but provided a different and separate account of the obligation to respect property rights.

  17. Nuclear order in copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Annila, A.J.; Clausen, K.N.; Lindgård, P-A.

    1990-01-01

    A new ordering vector k=(2π/a)(0, 2/3, 2/3) for fcc antiferromagnets has been found by neutron-diffraction experiments at nanokelvin temperatures in the nuclear-spin system of a 65Cu single crystal. The corresponding reflection together with the previously observed (100) Bragg peak show the prese......A new ordering vector k=(2π/a)(0, 2/3, 2/3) for fcc antiferromagnets has been found by neutron-diffraction experiments at nanokelvin temperatures in the nuclear-spin system of a 65Cu single crystal. The corresponding reflection together with the previously observed (100) Bragg peak show...

  18. Singularly perturbed Cauchy problem for abstract linear differential equations of second order in Hilbert spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Perjan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We study the behavior of solutions to perturbed second order abstract evolution equations in Hilbert spaces, when the small parameter, multiplying the second order time derivative, converges to zero.

  19. Transformation and diversification in early mammal evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhe-Xi

    2007-12-13

    Evolution of the earliest mammals shows successive episodes of diversification. Lineage-splitting in Mesozoic mammals is coupled with many independent evolutionary experiments and ecological specializations. Classic scenarios of mammalian morphological evolution tend to posit an orderly acquisition of key evolutionary innovations leading to adaptive diversification, but newly discovered fossils show that evolution of such key characters as the middle ear and the tribosphenic teeth is far more labile among Mesozoic mammals. Successive diversifications of Mesozoic mammal groups multiplied the opportunities for many dead-end lineages to iteratively evolve developmental homoplasies and convergent ecological specializations, parallel to those in modern mammal groups.

  20. Second-Order Fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Espin, Johnny

    2015-01-01

    It has been proposed several times in the past that one can obtain an equivalent, but in many aspects simpler description of fermions by first reformulating their first-order (Dirac) Lagrangian in terms of two-component spinors, and then integrating out the spinors of one chirality ($e.g.$ primed or dotted). The resulting new Lagrangian is second-order in derivatives, and contains two-component spinors of only one chirality. The new second-order formulation simplifies the fermion Feynman rules of the theory considerably, $e.g.$ the propagator becomes a multiple of an identity matrix in the field space. The aim of this thesis is to work out the details of this formulation for theories such as Quantum Electrodynamics, and the Standard Model of elementary particles. After having developed the tools necessary to establish the second-order formalism as an equivalent approach to spinor field theories, we proceed with some important consistency checks that the new formulation is required to pass, namely the presence...

  1. Order Management - Today's focus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Ari

    1996-01-01

    -production, purchases, and financing.Often, no one single function or department is responsible for the handling and completion of the individual customer orders, and the information systems in use are frequently not too well-functioning. Finally, too much time is used for handling acticities that do not add value...

  2. The Birth Order Puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajonc, R. B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the controversy of the relationship between birth order and intellectual performance through a detailed evaluation of the confluence model which assumes that the rate of intellectual growth is a function of the intellectual environment within the family and associated with the special circumstances of last children. (CM)

  3. Court-ordered caesareans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, Elizabeth; Lomri, Sara

    2014-11-01

    Court-ordered caesarean sections are in the news after a number of recent legal decisions authorising surgery for women who lack mental capacity to consent. The decisions have not always been based on good evidence and they raise serious concerns about the protection of the rights of mentally ill women. The authors explain the legal process and question the wisdom of recent judgements.

  4. Education and World Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Phillip W.

    2007-01-01

    The impact on educational analysis of mainstream international relations (IR) theories is yet to realize its full potential. The problem of education in relation to the construction of world order is considered in relation to core developments in IR theory since the Second World War. In particular, the global architecture of education is seen as a…

  5. The Ordered Apology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijck, Gijs

    2017-01-01

    Psychological research has demonstrated that an apology can contribute to the well-being of the receiver of the apology. However, the legal community has only cautiously embraced the idea of claiming and ordering apologies in a legal procedure. The conventional wisdom is that apologies that are clai

  6. The Evolution of Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, G. Ledyard

    1973-01-01

    Describes the basic logic behind the modern view of evolution theory. Despite gaps in fossil records, evidence is indicative of the origin of life from nonliving molecules and evolution of higher forms of life from simpler forms. (PS)

  7. Cannabis: evolution and ethnobotany

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clarke, Robert Connell; Merlin, Mark David

    2013-01-01

    "Cannabis: Evolution and Ethnobotany is a comprehensive, interdisciplinary exploration of the natural origins and early evolution of this famous plant, highlighting its historic role in the development of human societies...

  8. Mistakes and Molecular Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevors, J. T.

    1998-01-01

    Examines the role mistakes play in the molecular evolution of bacteria. Discusses the interacting physical, chemical, and biological factors that cause changes in DNA and play a role in prokaryotic evolution. (DDR)

  9. SIM Configuration Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, Kim M.

    2000-01-01

    The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) is a space-based 10 m baseline Michelson interferometer. Planned for launch in 2005 aboard a Delta III launch vehicle, or equivalent, its primary objective is to measure the positions of stars and other celestial objects with an unprecedented accuracy of 4 micro arc seconds. With such an instrument, tremendous advancement can be expected in our understanding of stellar and galactic dynamics. Using triangulation from opposite sides of the orbit around the sun (i.e. by using parallax) one can measure the distance to any observable object in our galaxy. By directly measuring the orbital wobble of nearby stars, the mass and orbit of planets can be determined over a wide range of parameters. The distribution of velocity within nearby galaxies will be measurable. Observations of these and other objects will improve the calibration of distance estimators by more than an order of magnitude. This will permit a much better determination of the Hubble Constant as well as improving our overall understanding of the evolution of the universe. SIM has undergone several transformations, especially over the past year and a half since the start of Phase A. During this phase of a project, it is desirable to perform system-level trade studies, so the substantial evolution of the design that has occurred is quite appropriate. Part of the trade-off process has addressed two major underlying architectures: SIM Classic; and Son of SIM. The difference between these two architectures is related to the overall arrangement of the optical elements and the associated metrology system. Several different configurations have been developed for each architecture. Each configuration is the result of design choices that are influenced by many competing considerations. Some of the more important aspects will be discussed. The Space Interferometry Mission has some extremely challenging goals: millikelvin thermal stability, nanometer stabilization of optics

  10. How Darwinian is cultural evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claidière, Nicolas; Scott-Phillips, Thomas C.; Sperber, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Darwin-inspired population thinking suggests approaching culture as a population of items of different types, whose relative frequencies may change over time. Three nested subtypes of populational models can be distinguished: evolutionary, selectional and replicative. Substantial progress has been made in the study of cultural evolution by modelling it within the selectional frame. This progress has involved idealizing away from phenomena that may be critical to an adequate understanding of culture and cultural evolution, particularly the constructive aspect of the mechanisms of cultural transmission. Taking these aspects into account, we describe cultural evolution in terms of cultural attraction, which is populational and evolutionary, but only selectional under certain circumstances. As such, in order to model cultural evolution, we must not simply adjust existing replicative or selectional models but we should rather generalize them, so that, just as replicator-based selection is one form that Darwinian selection can take, selection itself is one of several different forms that attraction can take. We present an elementary formalization of the idea of cultural attraction. PMID:24686939

  11. Chemical Evolution of M31

    CERN Document Server

    Matteucci, F

    2014-01-01

    We review chemical evolution models developed for M31 as well as the abundance determinations available for this galaxy. Then we present a recent chemical evolution model for M31 including radial gas flows and galactic fountains along the disk, as well as a model for the bulge. Our models are predicting the evolution of the abundances of several chemical species such as H, He, C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ca and Fe. From comparison between model predictions and observations we can derive some constraints on the evolution of the disk and the bulge of M31. We reach the conclusions that Andromeda must have evolved faster than the Milky Way and inside-out, and that its bulge formed much faster than the disk on a timescale $\\leq$ 0.5 Gyr. Finally, we present a study where we apply the model developed for the disk of M31 in order to study the probability of finding galactic habitable zones in this galaxy.

  12. Hamiltonian dynamics of breathers with third-order dispersion

    OpenAIRE

    Mookherjea, Shayan; Yariv, Amnon

    2001-01-01

    We present a nonperturbative analysis of certain dynamical aspects of breathers (dispersion-managed solitons) including the effects of third-order dispersion. The analysis highlights the similarities to and differences from the well-known analogous procedures for second-order dispersion. We discuss in detail the phase-space evolution of breathers in dispersion-managed systems in the presence of third-order dispersion.

  13. Evolution variable dependence of jet substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Sakaki, Yasuhito

    2015-01-01

    Studies on jet substructure have evolved significantly in recent years. Jet substructure is essentially determined by QCD radiations and non-perturbative effects. Predictions of jet substructure are usually different among Monte Carlo event generators, and are governed by the parton shower algorithm implemented. For leading logarithmic parton shower, even though one of the core variables is the evolution variable, its choice is not unique. We examine evolution variable dependence of the jet substructure by developing a parton shower generator that interpolates between different evolution variables using a parameter $\\alpha$. Jet shape variables and associated jet rates for quark and gluon jets are used to demonstrate the $\\alpha$-dependence of the jet substructure. We find angular ordered shower predicts wider jets, while relative transverse momentum ($p_{\\bot}$) ordered shower predicts narrower jets. This is qualitatively in agreement with the missing phase space of $p_{\\bot}$ ordered showers. Such differenc...

  14. Evolution & Diversity in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Lorentz C.

    1988-01-01

    Summarizes recent findings that help in understanding how evolution has brought about the diversity of plant life that presently exists. Discusses basic concepts of evolution, diversity and classification, the three-line hypothesis of plant evolution, the origin of fungi, and the geologic time table. Included are 31 references. (CW)

  15. Galaxy Formation and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamine, Kentaro; Reddy, Naveen; Daddi, Emanuele; Sargent, Mark T.

    2016-07-01

    In this chapter, we discuss the current status of observational and computational studies on galaxy formation and evolution. In particular, a joint analysis of star-formation rates (SFRs), stellar masses, and metallicities of galaxies throughout cosmic time can shed light on the processes by which galaxies build up their stellar mass and enrich the environment with heavy elements. Comparison of such observations and the results of numerical simulations can give us insights on the physical importance of various feedback effects by supernovae and active galactic nuclei. In Sect. 1, we first discuss the primary methods used to deduce the SFRs, stellar masses, and (primarily) gas-phase metallicities in high-redshift galaxies. Then, we show how these quantities are related to each other and evolve with time. In Sect. 2, we further examine the distribution of SFRs in galaxies following the `Main Sequence' paradigm. We show how the so-called `starbursts' display higher specific SFRs and SF efficiencies by an order of magnitude. We use this to devise a simple description of the evolution of the star-forming galaxy population since z ˜3 that can successfully reproduce some of the observed statistics in the infrared (IR) wavelength. We also discuss the properties of molecular gas. In Sect. 3, we highlight some of the recent studies of high-redshift galaxy formation using cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. We discuss the physical properties of simulated galaxies such as luminosity function and escape fraction of ionizing photons, which are important statistics for reionization of the Universe. In particular the escape fraction of ionizing photons has large uncertainties, and studying gamma-ray bursts (which is the main topic of this conference) can also set observational constraints on this uncertain physical parameter as well as cosmic star formation rate density.

  16. Hierarchical partial order ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Lars

    2008-09-01

    Assessing the potential impact on environmental and human health from the production and use of chemicals or from polluted sites involves a multi-criteria evaluation scheme. A priori several parameters are to address, e.g., production tonnage, specific release scenarios, geographical and site-specific factors in addition to various substance dependent parameters. Further socio-economic factors may be taken into consideration. The number of parameters to be included may well appear to be prohibitive for developing a sensible model. The study introduces hierarchical partial order ranking (HPOR) that remedies this problem. By HPOR the original parameters are initially grouped based on their mutual connection and a set of meta-descriptors is derived representing the ranking corresponding to the single groups of descriptors, respectively. A second partial order ranking is carried out based on the meta-descriptors, the final ranking being disclosed though average ranks. An illustrative example on the prioritization of polluted sites is given.

  17. Gender Orders Unbound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    During the last thirty years, the modernisation of gender relations has been dynamic and comprehensive, shaped by the conflicting forces of globalisation as well as women's movements around the world. As the patterns of segregation and discrimination of the classical industrial gender order erode...... issues are the chances and the barriers for equality and new forms of gender reciprocity and solidarity.......During the last thirty years, the modernisation of gender relations has been dynamic and comprehensive, shaped by the conflicting forces of globalisation as well as women's movements around the world. As the patterns of segregation and discrimination of the classical industrial gender order erode......, new complexities and contentions in gender relations emerge at various sites such as politics, work and families. The main aim of the book is to trace formal as well as informal gender contracts as they emerge in everyday life and also in new norms and regulations set by state and enterprises. Core...

  18. Normal Order: Combinatorial Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Solomon, A I; Blasiak, P; Horzela, A; Penson, K A; Solomon, Allan I.; Duchamp, Gerard; Blasiak, Pawel; Horzela, Andrzej; Penson, Karol A.

    2004-01-01

    A conventional context for supersymmetric problems arises when we consider systems containing both boson and fermion operators. In this note we consider the normal ordering problem for a string of such operators. In the general case, upon which we touch briefly, this problem leads to combinatorial numbers, the so-called Rook numbers. Since we assume that the two species, bosons and fermions, commute, we subsequently restrict ourselves to consideration of a single species, single-mode boson monomials. This problem leads to elegant generalisations of well-known combinatorial numbers, specifically Bell and Stirling numbers. We explicitly give the generating functions for some classes of these numbers. In this note we concentrate on the combinatorial graph approach, showing how some important classical results of graph theory lead to transparent representations of the combinatorial numbers associated with the boson normal ordering problem.

  19. Ordered cones and approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Keimel, Klaus

    1992-01-01

    This book presents a unified approach to Korovkin-type approximation theorems. It includes classical material on the approximation of real-valuedfunctions as well as recent and new results on set-valued functions and stochastic processes, and on weighted approximation. The results are notonly of qualitative nature, but include quantitative bounds on the order of approximation. The book is addressed to researchers in functional analysis and approximation theory as well as to those that want to applythese methods in other fields. It is largely self- contained, but the readershould have a solid background in abstract functional analysis. The unified approach is based on a new notion of locally convex ordered cones that are not embeddable in vector spaces but allow Hahn-Banach type separation and extension theorems. This concept seems to be of independent interest.

  20. Mrs. Asuman's emergency order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The Family Planning Management Development Project presents a case scenario for family planning manager training and group discussion. The manager of a family planning clinic, Mrs. Asuman, notes that the demand for condoms has increased about 3-fold in the last 3 months. The Ministry of Health's condom promotional radio campaign, which began 2 months ago, is probably responsible for the increase. Clinic staff did not know about the campaign when they made their last order 2 months ago. The supplies of condoms are lower than the minimum level and the next routine ordering time is in another month. The supervising nurse comments that other clinics have the same problem, presumably due to the radio campaign. She inspects the storeroom, cartons of contraceptives and their expiration dates, and puts monthly tallies from the stock cards for each type of contraceptive on the Contraceptive Data Analysis Charts. This activity confirms the increase in demand for condoms. If the demand rate increases at the current rate, the clinic will be out of condoms in 2 weeks, the same amount of time it takes for an emergency order to arrive. Using the Max/Min System, and based on the demand in August, the supervising nurse and Mrs. Asuman calculate the average monthly consumption of condoms, which translates into a 4.1 months' supply. This should meet client demand until the next order arrives in February. Mrs. Asuman needs to closely monitor the number of condoms distributed for the next few months until demand stabilizes to determine whether the high demand for condoms continues at the high rate. The project presents questions on this case for group discussion. It also provides a case worksheet for this case study so family planning managers undergoing training can learn the Max/Min system. It includes sample worksheets of the Contraceptive Data Analysis Chart and an answer sheet.