WorldWideScience

Sample records for next-generation nuclear technology

  1. Control technology for nuclear power system of next generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report is the summary of the results obtained by the investigation activities for two years carried out by the expert committee on investigation of control technology for nuclear power system of next generation. The course of investigation is outlined, and as the results, as advanced control technologies, adaptive control. H sub (infinite) control, fuzzy control and the application of autonomous distributed system and genetic algorithm to control; as operation support technology, the operation and monitoring system for nuclear power plants and safety support system; as interface technology which is the basic technology of them, virtual reality, multimedia and so on; further, various problems due to human factors, computer technology, artificial intelligence and others were taken up, and the grasp of the present status and the future subjects was carried out, including the information in international conferences. The items of the investigation are roughly divided into measurement and control technologies, interface technology and operation support, human factors, computer technology and artificial intelligence, and the trend in foreign countries, and the results of investigation for respective items are reported. (K.I.)

  2. Development of technology for next generation reactor - Research of evaluation technology for nuclear power plant -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Kyun; Chang, Moon Heuy; Hwang, Yung Dong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1993-09-01

    For development of next generation reactor, a project for evaluation technology for nuclear power plant is performed. Evaluation technology is essential to next generation reactor for reactor safety and system analysis. For design concept, detailed evaluation technologies are studied as follows: evaluation of safety margin, evaluation of safety facilities, evaluation of measurement and control technology; man-machine interface. Especially for thermal efficiency, thermal properties and chemical composition of inconel 690 tube, instead of inconel 600 tube, are measured for steam generator. (Author).

  3. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Technology Development Roadmaps: The Technical Path Forward

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Collins

    2009-01-01

    This document presents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Systems, Subsystems, and Components, establishes a baseline for the current technology readiness status, and provides a path forward to achieve increasing levels of technical maturity.

  4. Design Features and Technology Uncertainties for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John M. Ryskamp; Phil Hildebrandt; Osamu Baba; Ron Ballinger; Robert Brodsky; Hans-Wolfgang Chi; Dennis Crutchfield; Herb Estrada; Jeane-Claude Garnier; Gerald Gordon; Richard Hobbins; Dan Keuter; Marilyn Kray; Philippe Martin; Steve Melancon; Christian Simon; Henry Stone; Robert Varrin; Werner von Lensa

    2004-06-01

    This report presents the conclusions, observations, and recommendations of the Independent Technology Review Group (ITRG) regarding design features and important technology uncertainties associated with very-high-temperature nuclear system concepts for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The ITRG performed its reviews during the period November 2003 through April 2004.

  5. U.S. FUEL CYCLE TECHNOLOGIES R&D PROGRAM FOR NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR MATERIALS MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. MILLER

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cycle Technologies R&D program under the Office of Nuclear Energy is working to advance technologies to enhance both the existing and future fuel cycles. One thrust area is in developing enabling technologies for next generation nuclear materials management under the Materials Protection, Accounting and Control Technologies (MPACT Campaign where advanced instrumentation, analysis and assessment methods, and security approaches are being developed under a framework of Safeguards and Security by Design. An overview of the MPACT campaign's activities and recent accomplishments is presented along with future plans.

  6. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. David A. Petti

    2009-01-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a demonstration of the technical, licensing, operational, and commercial viability of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology for the production of process heat, electricity, and hydrogen. This nuclear- based technology can provide high-temperature process heat (up to 950°C) that can be used as a substitute for the burning of fossil fuels for a wide range of commercial applications (see Figure 1). The substitution of the HTGR for burning fossil fuels conserves these hydrocarbon resources for other uses, reduces uncertainty in the cost and supply of natural gas and oil, and eliminates the emissions of greenhouse gases attendant with the burning of these fuels. The HTGR is a passively safe nuclear reactor concept with an easily understood safety basis that permits substantially reduced emergency planning requirements and improved siting flexibility compared to other nuclear technologies.

  7. ENDF/B-VII.0: Next Generation Evaluated Nuclear Data Library for Nuclear Science and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chadwick, M B; Oblozinsky, P; Herman, M; Greene, N M; McKnight, R D; Smith, D L; Young, P G; MacFarlane, R E; Hale, G M; Haight, R C; Frankle, S; Kahler, A C; Kawano, T; Little, R C; Madland, D G; Moller, P; Mosteller, R; Page, P; Talou, P; Trellue, H; White, M; Wilson, W B; Arcilla, R; Dunford, C L; Mughabghab, S F; Pritychenko, B; Rochman, D; Sonzogni, A A; Lubitz, C; Trumbull, T H; Weinman, J; Brown, D; Cullen, D E; Heinrichs, D; McNabb, D; Derrien, H; Dunn, M; Larson, N M; Leal, L C; Carlson, A D; Block, R C; Briggs, B; Cheng, E; Huria, H; Kozier, K; Courcelle, A; Pronyaev, V; der Marck, S

    2006-10-02

    We describe the next generation general purpose Evaluated Nuclear Data File, ENDF/B-VII.0, of recommended nuclear data for advanced nuclear science and technology applications. The library, released by the U.S. Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) in December 2006, contains data primarily for reactions with incident neutrons, protons, and photons on almost 400 isotopes. The new evaluations are based on both experimental data and nuclear reaction theory predictions. The principal advances over the previous ENDF/B-VI library are the following: (1) New cross sections for U, Pu, Th, Np and Am actinide isotopes, with improved performance in integral validation criticality and neutron transmission benchmark tests; (2) More precise standard cross sections for neutron reactions on H, {sup 6}Li, {sup 10}B, Au and for {sup 235,238}U fission, developed by a collaboration with the IAEA and the OECD/NEA Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC); (3) Improved thermal neutron scattering; (4) An extensive set of neutron cross sections on fission products developed through a WPEC collaboration; (5) A large suite of photonuclear reactions; (6) Extension of many neutron- and proton-induced reactions up to an energy of 150 MeV; (7) Many new light nucleus neutron and proton reactions; (8) Post-fission beta-delayed photon decay spectra; (9) New radioactive decay data; and (10) New methods developed to provide uncertainties and covariances, together with covariance evaluations for some sample cases. The paper provides an overview of this library, consisting of 14 sublibraries in the same, ENDF-6 format, as the earlier ENDF/B-VI library. We describe each of the 14 sublibraries, focusing on neutron reactions. Extensive validation, using radiation transport codes to simulate measured critical assemblies, show major improvements: (a) The long-standing underprediction of low enriched U thermal assemblies is removed; (b) The {sup 238}U, {sup 208}Pb, and {sup 9}Be reflector

  8. ENDF/B-VII.0: Next Generation Evaluated Nuclear Data Library for Nuclear Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, M. B.; Obložinský, P.; Herman, M.; Greene, N. M.; McKnight, R. D.; Smith, D. L.; Young, P. G.; MacFarlane, R. E.; Hale, G. M.; Frankle, S. C.; Kahler, A. C.; Kawano, T.; Little, R. C.; Madland, D. G.; Moller, P.; Mosteller, R. D.; Page, P. R.; Talou, P.; Trellue, H.; White, M. C.; Wilson, W. B.; Arcilla, R.; Dunford, C. L.; Mughabghab, S. F.; Pritychenko, B.; Rochman, D.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Lubitz, C. R.; Trumbull, T. H.; Weinman, J. P.; Brown, D. A.; Cullen, D. E.; Heinrichs, D. P.; McNabb, D. P.; Derrien, H.; Dunn, M. E.; Larson, N. M.; Leal, L. C.; Carlson, A. D.; Block, R. C.; Briggs, J. B.; Cheng, E. T.; Huria, H. C.; Zerkle, M. L.; Kozier, K. S.; Courcelle, A.; Pronyaev, V.; van der Marck, S. C.

    2006-12-01

    We describe the next generation general purpose Evaluated Nuclear Data File, ENDF/B-VII.0, of recommended nuclear data for advanced nuclear science and technology applications. The library, released by the U.S. Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) in December 2006, contains data primarily for reactions with incident neutrons, protons, and photons on almost 400 isotopes, based on experimental data and theory predictions. The principal advances over the previous ENDF/B-VI library are the following: (1) New cross sections for U, Pu, Th, Np and Am actinide isotopes, with improved performance in integral validation criticality and neutron transmission benchmark tests; (2) More precise standard cross sections for neutron reactions on H, 6Li, 10B, Au and for 235,238U fission, developed by a collaboration with the IAEA and the OECD/NEA Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC); (3) Improved thermal neutron scattering; (4) An extensive set of neutron cross sections on fission products developed through a WPEC collaboration; (5) A large suite of photonuclear reactions; (6) Extension of many neutron- and proton-induced evaluations up to 150 MeV; (7) Many new light nucleus neutron and proton reactions; (8) Post-fission beta-delayed photon decay spectra; (9) New radioactive decay data; (10) New methods for uncertainties and covariances, together with covariance evaluations for some sample cases; and (11) New actinide fission energy deposition. The paper provides an overview of this library, consisting of 14 sublibraries in the same ENDF-6 format as the earlier ENDF/B-VI library. We describe each of the 14 sublibraries, focusing on neutron reactions. Extensive validation, using radiation transport codes to simulate measured critical assemblies, show major improvements: (a) The long-standing underprediction of low enriched uranium thermal assemblies is removed; (b) The 238U and 208Pb reflector biases in fast systems are largely removed; (c) ENDF/B-VI.8 good

  9. ENDF/B-VII.0: Next Generation Evaluated Nuclear Data Library for Nuclear Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, M.B.; Oblozinsky, P.; Herman, M.

    2006-01-01

    We describe the next generation general purpose Evaluated Nuclear Data File, ENDF/B-VII.0, of recommended nuclear data for advanced nuclear science and technology applications. The library, released by the U.S. Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) in December 2006, contains data primarily for reactions with incident neutrons, protons, and photons on almost 400 isotopes, based on experimental data and theory predictions. The principal advances over the previous ENDF/B-VI library are the following: (1) New cross sections for U, Pu, Th, Np and Am actinide isotopes, with improved performance in integral validation criticality and neutron transmission benchmark tests; (2) More precise standard cross sections for neutron reactions on H, 6 Li, 10 B, Au and for 235,238 U fission, developed by a collaboration with the IAEA and the OECD/NEA Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC); (3) Improved thermal neutron scattering; (4) An extensive set of neutron cross sections on fission products developed through a WPEC collaboration; (5) A large suite of photonuclear reactions; (6) Extension of many neutron- and proton-induced evaluations up to 150 MeV; (7) Many new light nucleus neutron and proton reactions; (8) Post-fission beta-delayed photon decay spectra; (9) New radioactive decay data; (10) New methods for uncertainties and covariances, together with covariance evaluations for some sample cases; and (11) New actinide fission energy deposition. The paper provides an overview of this library, consisting of 14 sublibraries in the same ENDF-6 format as the earlier ENDF/B-VI library. We describe each of the 14 sublibraries, focusing on neutron reactions. Extensive validation, using radiation transport codes to simulate measured critical assemblies, show major improvements: (a) The long-standing underprediction of low enriched uranium thermal assemblies is removed; (b) The 238 U and 208 Pb reflector biases in fast systems are largely removed; (c) ENDF/B-VI.8 good

  10. Research and Development Technology Development Roadmaps for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ian McKirdy

    2011-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for process heat, hydrogen and electricity production. The reactor will be graphite moderated with helium as the primary coolant and may be either prismatic or pebble-bed. Although, final design features have not yet been determined. Research and Development (R&D) activities are proceeding on those known plant systems to mature the technology, codify the materials for specific applications, and demonstrate the component and system viability in NGNP relevant and integrated environments. Collectively these R&D activities serve to reduce the project risk and enhance the probability of on-budget, on-schedule completion and NRC licensing. As the design progresses, in more detail, toward final design and approval for construction, selected components, which have not been used in a similar application, in a relevant environment nor integrated with other components and systems, must be tested to demonstrate viability at reduced scales and simulations prior to full scale operation. This report and its R&D TDRMs present the path forward and its significance in assuring technical readiness to perform the desired function by: Choreographing the integration between design and R&D activities; and proving selected design components in relevant applications.

  11. Proceedings of the first MIT international conference on the next generation of nuclear power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The overall goal of advanced nuclear reactor development is to provide technological options which will be broadly acceptable to the different interested communities - electric utilities, environmental protection interests and electricity consumers. These constituencies will differ greatly in their priorities and understandings of what is feasible. However they all will collectively determine the definition of what constitutes an acceptable technology. The purpose of the Conference reported here was to aid the process reaching a greater consensus concerning acceptable technologies. The Conference was structured to permit all of those involved to gain a common understanding of the performance attributes which can reasonably be expected from the next generation of nuclear power plants, and to assist the process of communication among the various interest groups - ranging from reactor manufacturers and electric utilities to groups which have been strongly critical of nuclear power. This Conference is the first of an indefinite series of Conferences to be sponsored by the Program. The purpose of having a series of Conferences is to permit them to serve as a vehicle for sustained discussion among the communities which will determine whether future nuclear power plants are acceptable as national strategic options. The hope in organizing these Conferences is to improve the technologies which will eventually emerge, as a consequence of early effective communication among those concerned with the results. In order to do this, however, it is necessary for the people involved in such communication to have opportunities for sustained exposure to the ideas of others whom they would not otherwise have met. To do this it is necessary that these various communities interact repeatedly. The Conference series is intended to assist in that process. The Conference consisted of six focused topical sessions and two panel discussions. In each topical session keynote and respondent papers

  12. The bungling giant : Atomic Energy Canada Limited and next-generation nuclear technology, 1980-1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, I.J.

    2003-01-01

    From 1980-1994 Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL), the Crown Corporation responsible for the development of nuclear technology in Canada, ventured into the market for small-scale, decentralized power systems with the Slowpoke Energy System (SES), a 10MW nuclear reactor for space heating in urban and remote areas. The SES was designed to be 'passively' or 'inherently' safe, such that even the most catastrophic failure of the system would not result in a serious accident (e.g. a meltdown or an explosion). This Canadian initiative, a beneficiary of the National Energy Program, was the first and by far the most successful attempt at a passively safe, decentralized nuclear power system anywhere in the world. Part one uses archival documentation and interviews with project leaders to reconstruct the history of the SES. The standard explanations for the failure of the project, cheap oil, public resistance to the technology, and lack of commercial expertise, are rejected. Part two presents an alternative explanation for the failure of AECL to commercialize the SES. In short, technological momentum towards large-scale nuclear designs led to structural restrictions for the SES project. These restrictions manifested themselves internally to the company (e.g., marginalization of the SES) and externally to the company (e.g., licensing). In part three, the historical lessons of the SES are used to refine one of the central tenets of Popper's political philosophy, 'piecemeal social engineering.' Popper's presentation of the idea is lacking in detail; the analysis of the SES provides some empirical grounding for the concept. I argue that the institutions surrounding traditional nuclear power represent a form utopian social engineering, leading to consequences such as the suspension of civil liberties to guarantee security of the technology. The SES project was an example of a move from the utopian social engineering of large-scale centralized nuclear technology to the piecemeal

  13. Next generation DNA led technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Jyothsna, G; Kashyap, Amita

    2016-01-01

    This brief highlights advances in DNA technologies and their wider applications. DNA is the source of life and has been studied since a generation, but very little is known as yet. Several sophisticated technologies of the current era have laid their foundations on the principle of DNA based mechanisms. DNA based technologies are bringing a new revolution of Advanced Science and Technology. Forensic Investigation, Medical Diagnosis, Paternity Disputes, Individual Identity, Health insurance, Motor Insurance have incorporated the DNA testing and profiling technologies for settling the issues.

  14. Next generation advanced nuclear reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turgut, M. H.

    2009-01-01

    Growing energy demand by technological developments and the increase of the world population and gradually diminishing energy resources made nuclear power an indispensable option. The renewable energy sources like solar, wind and geothermal may be suited to meet some local needs. Environment friendly nuclear energy which is a suitable solution to large scale demands tends to develop highly economical, advanced next generation reactors by incorporating technological developments and years of operating experience. The enhancement of safety and reliability, facilitation of maintainability, impeccable compatibility with the environment are the goals of the new generation reactors. The protection of the investment and property is considered as well as the protection of the environment and mankind. They became economically attractive compared to fossil-fired units by the use of standard designs, replacing some active systems by passive, reducing construction time and increasing the operation lifetime. The evolutionary designs were introduced at first by ameliorating the conventional plants, than revolutionary systems which are denoted as generation IV were verged to meet future needs. The investigations on the advanced, proliferation resistant fuel cycle technologies were initiated to minimize the radioactive waste burden by using new generation fast reactors and ADS transmuters.

  15. Nuclear Knowledge to the Next Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazour, Thomas; Kossilov, Andrei

    2004-01-01

    The safe, reliable, and cost-effective operation of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) requires that personnel possess and maintain the requisite knowledge, skills, and attitudes to do their jobs properly. Such knowledge includes not only the technical competencies required by the nature of the technology and particular engineering designs, but also the softer competencies associated with effective management, communication and teamwork. Recent studies have shown that there has been a loss of corporate knowledge and memory. Both explicit knowledge and tacit knowledge must be passed on to the next generation of workers in the industry to ensure a quality workforce. New and different techniques may be required to ensure timely and effective knowledge retention and transfer. The IAEA prepared a report on this subject. The main conclusions from the report regarding strategies for managing the aging workforce are included. Also included are main conclusions from the report regarding the capture an d preservation of mission critical knowledge, and the effective transfer of this knowledge to the next generation of NPP personnel. The nuclear industry due to its need for well-documented procedures, specifications, design basis, safety analyses, etc., has a greater fraction of its mission critical knowledge as explicit knowledge than do many other industries. This facilitates the task of knowledge transfer. For older plants in particular, there may be a need for additional efforts to transfer tacit knowledge to explicit knowledge to support major strategic initiatives such as plant license extensions/renewals, periodic safety reviews, major plant upgrades, and plant specific control room simulator development. The challenge in disseminating explicit knowledge is to make employees aware that it is available and provide easy access in formats and forms that are usable. Tacit knowledge is more difficult to identify and disseminate. The challenge is to identify what can be converted to

  16. The next generation of ultraviolet light technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    According to this article, the next generation of ultraviolet (UV) light technologies into the environmental spotlight. Researchers have long recognized the potential of UV light, nestled between the longer radiation wavelengths of the visible spectrum and the shorter ones in the x-ray region, to effect chemical change. Environmentally, UV light made its debut as a water purification tool. As the technology improved, researchers incorporated UV light in wastewater treatment systems and, later, in remediation techniques

  17. Microstructural Characterization of Next Generation Nuclear Graphites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karthik Chinnathambi; Joshua Kane; Darryl P. Butt; William E. Windes; Rick Ubic

    2012-04-01

    This article reports the microstructural characteristics of various petroleum and pitch based nuclear graphites (IG-110, NBG-18, and PCEA) that are of interest to the next generation nuclear plant program. Bright-field transmission electron microscopy imaging was used to identify and understand the different features constituting the microstructure of nuclear graphite such as the filler particles, microcracks, binder phase, rosette-shaped quinoline insoluble (QI) particles, chaotic structures, and turbostratic graphite phase. The dimensions of microcracks were found to vary from a few nanometers to tens of microns. Furthermore, the microcracks were found to be filled with amorphous carbon of unknown origin. The pitch coke based graphite (NBG-18) was found to contain higher concentration of binder phase constituting QI particles as well as chaotic structures. The turbostratic graphite, present in all of the grades, was identified through their elliptical diffraction patterns. The difference in the microstructure has been analyzed in view of their processing conditions.

  18. NNSA Program Develops the Next Generation of Nuclear Security Experts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brim, Cornelia P.; Disney, Maren V.

    2015-09-02

    NNSA is fostering the next generation of nuclear security experts is through its successful NNSA Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP). NGFP offers its Fellows an exceptional career development opportunity through hands-on experience supporting NNSA mission areas across policy and technology disciplines. The one-year assignments give tomorrow’s leaders in global nuclear security and nonproliferation unparalleled exposure through assignments to Program Offices across NNSA.

  19. Next Generation Nuclear Plant GAP Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, Sydney J [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Corwin, William R [ORNL; Fisher, Stephen Eugene [ORNL; Forsberg, Charles W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL; Moses, David Lewis [ORNL

    2008-12-01

    As a follow-up to the phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) studies conducted recently by NRC on next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) safety, a study was conducted to identify the significant 'gaps' between what is needed and what is already available to adequately assess NGNP safety characteristics. The PIRT studies focused on identifying important phenomena affecting NGNP plant behavior, while the gap study gives more attention to off-normal behavior, uncertainties, and event probabilities under both normal operation and postulated accident conditions. Hence, this process also involved incorporating more detailed evaluations of accident sequences and risk assessments. This study considers thermal-fluid and neutronic behavior under both normal and postulated accident conditions, fission product transport (FPT), high-temperature metals, and graphite behavior and their effects on safety. In addition, safety issues related to coupling process heat (hydrogen production) systems to the reactor are addressed, given the limited design information currently available. Recommendations for further study, including analytical methods development and experimental needs, are presented as appropriate in each of these areas.

  20. Candu technology: the next generation now

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopwood, J.M.; Duffey, R.B.; Torgerson, D.F.

    2001-01-01

    We describe the development philosophy, direction and concepts that are being utilized by AECL to refine the CANDU reactor to meet the needs of current and future competitive energy markets. The technology development path for CANDU reactors is based on the optimization of the pressure tube concept. Because of the inherent modularity and flexibility of this basis for the core design, it is possible to provide a seamless and continuous evolution of the reactor design and performance. There is no need for a drastic shift in concept, in technology or in fuel. By continual refinement of the flow and materials conditions in the channels, the basic reactor can be thermally and operationally efficient, highly competitive and economic, and highly flexible in application. Thus, the design can build on the successful construction and operating experience of the existing plants, and no step changes in development direction are needed. This approach minimizes investor, operator and development risk but still provides technological, safety and performance advances. In today's world energy markets, major drivers for the technology development are: (a) reduced capital cost; (b) improved operation; (c) enhanced safety; and (d) fuel cycle flexibility. The drivers provide specific numerical targets. Meeting these drivers ensures that the concept meets and exceeds the customer economic, performance, safety and resource use goals and requirements, including the suitable national and international standards. This logical development of the CANDU concept leads naturally to the 'Next Generation' of CANDU reactors. The major features under development include an optimized lattice for SEU (slightly enriched uranium) fuel, light water cooling coupled with heavy water moderation, advanced fuel channels and CANFLEX fuel, optimization of plant performance, enhanced thermal and BOP (balance of plant) efficiency, and the adoption of layout and construction technology adapted from successful on

  1. Proceedings of the 2. MIT international conference on the next generation of nuclear power technology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    The goal of the conference was to try to attract a variety of points of view from well-informed people to debate issues concerning nuclear power. Hopefully from that process a better understanding of what one should be doing will emerge. In organizing the conference lessons learned from the previous one were applied. A continuous effort was made to see to it that the arguments for the alternatives to nuclear power were given abundant time for presentation. This is ultimately because nuclear power is going to have to compete with all of the energy technologies. Thus, in discussing energy strategy all of the alternatives must be considered in a reasonable fashion. The structure the conference used has seven sessions. The first six led up to the final session which was concerned with what the future nuclear power strategy should be. Each session focused upon a question concerning the future. None of these questions has a unique correct answer. Rather, topics are addressed where reasonable people can disagree. In order to state some of the important arguments for each session`s question, the combination of a keynote paper followed by a respondent was used. The respondent`s paper is not necessarily included to be a rebuttal to the keynote; but rather, it was recognized that two people will look at a complex question with different shadings. Through those two papers the intention was to get out the most important arguments affecting the question for the session. The purpose of the papers was to set the stage for about an hour of discussion. The real product of this conference was that discussion.

  2. Present state of new technologies of nuclear power generation, and technological development of fast-breeder reactor and next-generation light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyagi, Toshihiro; Ando, Masato

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces the present state of development of FBR in Japan and international cooperation, the development of HP-ABWR and HP-APWR as the next-generation light water reactors, and SMR development in the United States. As for FBR, the following situations are described: (1) history of development in Japan in the past, (2) history of change due to the readjustment of development plan caused by the accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, in which shift to FaCT phase 2 was suspended, and the approach to the establishment of safety standards for sodium-cooled FBR and its international standardization was adopted, and (3) future challenges. As for the Japan - France fast-breeder reactor development cooperation, the conclusion of the Japan - France inter-government agency agreement, and Japan's cooperation plan and system are described. Next, as for HP-ABWR and HP-APWR, the development goal and concept of each plant, and the element technologies required for the success are described. On the other hand, the small reactor development in the United States started with the aim of the securement of domestic technology base, contribution to reduction in carbon dioxide emissions, and its export to new entry countries for nuclear energy. This project aimed the practical use of SMR, and started 'financial support program for small reactors' to allocate about 452 million dollars to maximum two units of SMRs in the next five years. This project is outlined. (A.O.)

  3. Reducing Risk for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John M. Beck II; Harold J. Heydt; Emmanuel O. Opare; Kyle B. Oswald

    2010-07-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, managed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is directed by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, to research, develop, design, construct, and operate a prototype forth generation nuclear reactor to meet the needs of the 21st Century. As with all large projects developing and deploying new technologies, the NGNP has numerous risks that need to be identified, tracked, mitigated, and reduced in order for successful project completion. A Risk Management Plan (RMP) was created to outline the process the INL is using to manage the risks and reduction strategies for the NGNP Project. Integral to the RMP is the development and use of a Risk Management System (RMS). The RMS is a tool that supports management and monitoring of the project risks. The RMS does not only contain a risk register, but other functionality that allows decision makers, engineering staff, and technology researchers to review and monitor the risks as the project matures.

  4. Nuclear power - strategic planning for the next generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, K.H.

    1989-01-01

    Regardless of the real or perceived causes of the nuclear power industry's current difficulties, a number of recent trends-increasing electricity demand, foreign oil dependency, and attention paid to acid rain and the greenhouse effect-taken together, point of the most favorable atmosphere in recent history for nuclear power. Already, serious public discussion of its advantages have begun anew. Thus, the time is ripe to consider the developmental structure of nuclear power's next generation. Although much uncertainty still surrounds the nuclear industry, valuable lessons have been learned, and the evolution of the industry from this point cannot be left to chance. The purpose of this paper is to discuss a framework for nuclear power strategic planning activities. The strategic planning objectives outlined in this paper span issues that affect virtually every aspect of the nuclear power industry. Piecemeal responses to the vagaries of random stimuli will not be adequate. A proactive, integrated, industry-wide initiative-an Institute of Nuclear Power Planning, actively supported by the members of the industry-should be undertaken immediately to fill the strategic planning role. In so doing, the industry will not only be acting in its own best interest but will also be helping the nation realize the real and important benefits of its nuclear power technology

  5. Reaching the next generation of nuclear engineers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djokic, Denia; Fratoni, Massimiliano

    2008-01-01

    The University of California, Berkeley (UCB) American Nuclear Society (ANS) Student Section hosted two outreach events for young students between the ages of seven and twelve. The students were part of a private after-school club called Adventures Through Open Minds Science TM club for kids (A.T.O.M.S. club for kids) heated by Leslie Buchalter. Buchalter is an expert in early education and teaches children fundamental scientific concepts by using 'kid language' and associating usually difficult ideas with something even the very young children can understand. The greatest challenge for us UCB student organizers was to follow this manner of teaching and to construct activities that would always keep the attention of the children. We put together an array of fundamental concept demonstrations based on this philosophy. For example, the concept of half-life was taught by repeatedly tossing M and M's onto a surface and removing the upside down M and M's, and the concept of a nuclear chain reaction was introduced using a mousetrap-and-ping-pong-ball contraption. The main lessons learned were that the children most successfully absorbed ideas by engaging the students activity in the concept demonstrations, by using concepts and vocabulary already familiar to them which encouraged them to answer questions about familiar topics, and by creating a playful game out of every learning opportunity. (author)

  6. Ceramics composites for next generation nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouchon, Manuel A.; Rebac, Tomislav; Chen, Jiachao; Dai, Yong; Hoffelner, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Silicon carbide and carbon based composite materials are promising candidates for structural components of future nuclear systems. From non nuclear applications, both, the silicon carbide and the carbon matrix are well known for their excellent high temperature behavior and in case of the carbide, for the chemical inertness. The usage of these materials in their composite variant is inevitable, as the additionally introduced ductility is absolutely necessary in safety relevant components. Possible applications are structural components in high temperature reactors and claddings of advanced reactor systems, such as gas cooled fast reactors, including subcritical ones. The basic mechanical behavior of many of these composite materials is well known, however, little data is available about the degradation in mechanical performance after irradiation. The present paper investigates the mechanical behavior of four different composite materials before and after proton and neutron irradiation. The testing method is a three point bend experiment on non-notched sample bars. Four kinds of materials were tested. Two chemically vapor infiltrated CVI composites with silicon carbide matrices, one with a 2D silicon carbide fiber structure, and the other one with carbon fibers woven in a 2D structure. The two others were liquid silicon infiltrated LSI, both with carbon fibers, but one with a random and the other one with a 2D woven structure. The CVI samples with carbon fibers showed the highest mechanical strength after irradiation. The CVI material with silicon carbide fibers degraded most, but starting from a very high strength before irradiation. Both LSI materials showed a quite constant performance, before and after irradiation. (author)

  7. Nuclear material accounting: The next generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kern, E.A.; McRae, L.P.; O'Callaghan, P.B.; Yearsley, D.

    1992-07-01

    The Westinghouse Hanford company (Westinghouse Hanford) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) have undertaken a joint effort to develop a new generation material accounting system. The system will incorporate the latest advances in microcomputer hardware, software, and network technology. This system, the Local Area Network Material Accounting System (LANMAS), offers greater performance and functionality at a reduced overall cost. It also offers the possibility of establishing a standard among DOE and NRC facilities for material accounting. This report provides a discussion of this system

  8. Next-generation wireless technologies 4G and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Chilamkurti, Naveen; Chaouchi, Hakima

    2013-01-01

    This comprehensive text/reference examines the various challenges to secure, efficient and cost-effective next-generation wireless networking. Topics and features: presents the latest advances, standards and technical challenges in a broad range of emerging wireless technologies; discusses cooperative and mesh networks, delay tolerant networks, and other next-generation networks such as LTE; examines real-world applications of vehicular communications, broadband wireless technologies, RFID technology, and energy-efficient wireless communications; introduces developments towards the 'Internet o

  9. ADEPT2 - Next Generation Process Management Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dadam, P.; Rinderle, S.B.; Reichert, M.U.; Jurisch, M.; Acker, H.; Göser, K.; Kreher, U; Lauer, M.

    If current process management systems shall be applied to a broad spectrum of applications, they will have to be significantly improved with respect to their technological capabilities. In particular, in dynamic environments it must be possible to quickly implement and deploy new processes, to

  10. Technology Innovations from NASA's Next Generation Launch Technology Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Stephen A.; Morris, Charles E. K., Jr.; Tyson, Richard W.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Next Generation Launch Technology Program has been on the cutting edge of technology, improving the safety, affordability, and reliability of future space-launch-transportation systems. The array of projects focused on propulsion, airframe, and other vehicle systems. Achievements range from building miniature fuel/oxygen sensors to hot-firings of major rocket-engine systems as well as extreme thermo-mechanical testing of large-scale structures. Results to date have significantly advanced technology readiness for future space-launch systems using either airbreathing or rocket propulsion.

  11. Developing the next generation of nuclear workers at OPG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spekkens, P.

    2007-01-01

    This presentation is about developing the next generation of nuclear workers at Ontario Power Generation (OPG). Industry developments are creating urgent need to hire, train and retain new staff. OPG has an aggressive hiring campaign. Training organization is challenged to accommodate influx of new staff. Collaborating with colleges and universities is increasing the supply of qualified recruits with an interest in nuclear. Program for functional and leadership training have been developed. Knowledge retention is urgently required

  12. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Intermediate Heat Exchanger Acquisition Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizia, Ronald Eugene [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2008-04-01

    DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C to 950°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor, and use low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. The purpose of this report is to address the acquisition strategy for the NGNP Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX).This component will be operated in flowing, impure helium on the primary and secondary side at temperatures up to 950°C. There are major high temperature design, materials availability, and fabrication issues that need to be addressed. The prospective materials are Alloys 617, 230, 800H and X, with Alloy 617 being the leading candidate for the use at 950°C. The material delivery schedule for these materials does not pose a problem for a 2018 start up as the vendors can quote reasonable delivery times at the moment. The product forms and amount needed must be finalized as soon as possible. An

  13. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Preliminary Project Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis J. Harrell

    2006-01-01

    This draft preliminary project management plan presents the conceptual framework for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, consistent with the authorization in the Energy Policy Act of 2005. In developing this plan, the Idaho National Laboratory has considered three fundamental project planning options that are summarized in the following section. Each of these planning options is literally compliant with the Energy Policy Act of 2005, but each emphasizes different approaches to technology development risks, design, licensing and construction risks, and to the extent of commercialization support provided to the industry. The primary focus of this draft preliminary project management plan is to identify those activities important to Critical Decision-1, at which point a decision on proceeding with the NGNP Project can be made. The conceptual project framework described herein is necessary to establish the scope and priorities for the technology development activities. The framework includes: A reference NGNP prototype concept based on what is judged to be the lowest risk technology development that would achieve the needed commercial functional requirements to provide an economically competitive nuclear heat source and hydrogen production capability. A high-level schedule logic for design, construction, licensing, and acceptance testing. This schedule logic also includes an operational shakedown period that provides proof-of-principle to establish the basis for commercialization decisions by end-users. An assessment of current technology development plans to support Critical Decision-1 and overall project progress. The most important technical and programmatic uncertainties (risks) are evaluated, and potential mitigation strategies are identified so that the technology development plans may be modified as required to support ongoing project development. A rough-order-of-magnitude cost evaluation that provides an initial basis for budget planning. This

  14. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. O. Hayner; E.L. Shaber

    2004-09-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years.

  15. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Selection and Qualification Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Doug Hamelin; G. O. Hayner

    2004-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design is a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble bed thermal neutron spectrum reactor with an average reactor outlet temperature of at least 1000 C. The NGNP will use very high burn up, lowenriched uranium, TRISO-Coated fuel in a once-through fuel cycle. The design service life of the NGNP is 60 years.

  16. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: (1) Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (2) Demonstrate safe and economical nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: (1) High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior; (2) High temperature materials qualification; (3) Design methods development and validation; (4) Hydrogen production technologies; and (5) Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented

  17. Next-generation in-situ science concepts and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muirhead, Brian; Varsi, Giulio

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the concepts of a next-generation in situ science program, named Sample Acquisition, Analysis, and Preservation (SAAP), established by NASA to develop critical technologies for remote identification, acquisition, processing, analysis, and preservation of materials for the in situ science, engineering characterization, and earth return. Special attention is given to the SAAP architecture, system design, remote sensing system, sample acquisition system, and methods for sample analysis. A diagram of the SAAP preliminary system conceptual design is included.

  18. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. E. MacDonald

    2005-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Demonstrate safe and economical nuclearassisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior High temperature materials qualification Design methods development and validation Hydrogen production technologies Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented in Section 4. The DOE-funded hydrogen

  19. Next generation digital microfluidic technology: Electrophoresis of charged droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Do Jin [Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Contact charging of a conducting droplet in a dielectric medium is introduced as a novel and useful digital microfluidic technology as well as an interesting scientific phenomenon. The history of this phenomenon, starting from original observations to its interpretations and applications, is presented. The basic principle of the droplet contact charging is also presented. Several fundamental aspects of the droplet contact charging from view points of electrochemistry, surface science, electrocoalescence, and electrohydrodynamics are mentioned. Some promising results for future applications and potential features as a next generation digital microfluidic technology are discussed, especially for 3D organ printing. Finally, implications and significance of the proposed technology for chemical engineering community are discussed.

  20. Next generation LP system for maintenance in nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Naruhiko; Uehara, Takuya; Suezono, Nobuichi; Saeki, Ryoichi; Sano, Yuji

    2006-01-01

    Laser peening (LP) is a process to introduce residual compressive stress on metal surface by irradiating laser pulses underwater without any surface preparations. Toshiba has developed and applied LP system to preventive maintenance against stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in nuclear power reactors since 1999. The system is composed of laser oscillators, a beam delivery system, a laser irradiation head, remote handling equipment and a monitor/control system. In the early applications, a rigidly laser beam delivery system with many mirrors and beam guide pipes was accomplished. A flexible fiber-delivery system has been developed for accessing to the narrow place, and presently it is adopted mainly. As these beam-delivery systems require a wide installation space and difficult operation, a simple and small system is desired. In order to meet this demand, we are developing the small-sized next generation LP system that builds in the laser oscillator inside the remote handling equipment. In the next generation system new irradiating method is adopted, stress improvement speed is faster than the present system. (author)

  1. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Resilient Control System Functional Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynne M. Stevens

    2010-07-01

    Control Systems and their associated instrumentation must meet reliability, availability, maintainability, and resiliency criteria in order for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) to be economically competitive. Research, perhaps requiring several years, may be needed to develop control systems to support plant availability and resiliency. This report functionally analyzes the gaps between traditional and resilient control systems as applicable to HTGRs, which includes the Next Generation Nuclear Plant; defines resilient controls; assesses the current state of both traditional and resilient control systems; and documents the functional gaps existing between these two controls approaches as applicable to HTGRs. This report supports the development of an overall strategy for applying resilient controls to HTGRs by showing that control systems with adequate levels of resilience perform at higher levels, respond more quickly to disturbances, increase operational efficiency, and increase public protection.

  2. Structural materials for the next generation of technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Van de Voorde, Marcel Hubert

    1996-01-01

    1. Overview of advanced technologies; i.e. aerospace-aeronautics; automobile; energy technology; accelerator engineering etc. and the need for new structural materials. 2. Familiarisation with polymers, metals and alloys, structural ceramics, composites and surface engineering. The study of modern materials processing, generation of a materials data base, engineering properties includind NDE, radiation damage etc. 3. Development of new materials for the next generation of technologies; including the spin-off of materials developed for space and military purposes to industrial applications. 4. Materials selection for modern accelerator engineering. 5. Materials research in Europe, USA and Japan. Material R & D programmes sponsored by the European Union and the collaboration of CERN in EU sponsored programmes.

  3. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

    2010-12-01

    One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the “highly ranked” phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

  4. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan -- PLN-2498

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

    2010-09-01

    One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the “highly ranked” phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

  5. Next-generation technologies and data analytical approaches for epigenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensaert, Klaas; Denil, Simon; Trooskens, Geert; Van Criekinge, Wim; Thas, Olivier; De Meyer, Tim

    2014-04-01

    Epigenetics refers to the collection of heritable features that modulate the genome-environment interaction without being encoded in the actual DNA sequence. While being mitotically and sometimes even meiotically transmitted, epigenetic traits often demonstrate extensive flexibility. This allows cells to acquire diverse gene expression patterns during differentiation, but also to adapt to a changing environment. However, epigenetic alterations are not always beneficial to the organism, as they are, for example, frequently identified in human diseases such as cancer. Accurate and cost-efficient genome-scale profiling of epigenetic features is thus of major importance to pinpoint these "epimutations," for example, to monitor the epigenetic impact of environmental exposure. Over the last decade, the field of epigenetics has been revolutionized by several innovative "epigenomics" technologies exactly addressing this need. In this review, we discuss and compare widely used next-generation methods to assess DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation, noncoding RNA expression, histone modifications, and nucleosome positioning. Although recent methods are typically based on "second-generation" sequencing, we also pay attention to still commonly used array- and PCR-based methods, and look forward to the additional advantages of single-molecule sequencing. As the current bottleneck in epigenomics research is the analysis rather than generation of data, the basic difficulties and problem-solving strategies regarding data preprocessing and statistical analysis are introduced for the different technologies. Finally, we also consider the complications associated with epigenomic studies of species with yet unsequenced genomes and possible solutions. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Developing the Next Generation Shell Buckling Design Factors and Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilburger, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    NASA s Shell Buckling Knockdown Factor (SBKF) Project was established in the spring of 2007 by the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) in collaboration with the Constellation Program and Exploration Systems Mission Directorate. The SBKF project has the current goal of developing less-conservative, robust shell buckling design factors (a.k.a. knockdown factors) and design and analysis technologies for light-weight stiffened metallic launch vehicle (LV) structures. Preliminary design studies indicate that implementation of these new knockdown factors can enable significant reductions in mass and mass-growth in these vehicles and can help mitigate some of NASA s LV development and performance risks. In particular, it is expected that the results from this project will help reduce the reliance on testing, provide high-fidelity estimates of structural performance, reliability, robustness, and enable increased payload capability. The SBKF project objectives and approach used to develop and validate new design technologies are presented, and provide a glimpse into the future of design of the next generation of buckling-critical launch vehicle structures.

  7. Next-generation ionomer encapsulants for thin film technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyzewicz, Robin; Smith, C. Anthony

    2011-09-01

    The characteristic properties of newly developed ionomer-based encapsulants are highlighted along with an in-depth analysis of moisture ingress, electrical and mechanical properties. The mechanical properties of these encapsulants with their high stiffness and strength have been found to allow the use of thinner glass and a possible shift from tempered to annealed glass. Lower-cost mounting options may be explored through full-module stress/deflection measurement capability and competencies developed in world-class finite-element modeling of system parameters. The superior electrical and moisture properties may allow modules to be produced without the use of an additional edge seal. These new materials have improved melt flow properties when compared to other encapsulant families such as EVA or PVB. This allows for faster processing which reduces production cost by shortening the lamination cycle. During the lamination process the sheets show excellent dimensional stability and low shrinkage behavior; and there is no need for curing, thus energy costs are lower due to lower lamination temperature. As advancement of technology proceeds across the entire PV industry, next generation ionomer encapsulants have been developed to keep up with the pace.

  8. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.N. Wright

    2005-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Project is envisioned to demonstrate the following: (1) A full-scale prototype VHTR by about 2021; (2) High-temperature Brayton Cycle electric power production at full scale with a focus on economic performance; (3) Nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen (with about 10% of the heat) with a focus on economic performance; and (4) By test, the exceptional safety capabilities of the advanced gas-cooled reactors. Further, the NGNP program will: (1) Obtain a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) License to construct and operate the NGNP, this process will provide a basis for future performance based, risk-informed licensing; and (2) Support the development, testing, and prototyping of hydrogen infrastructures. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R and D) Program is responsible for performing R and D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. The NGNP Materials R and D Program includes the following elements: (1) Developing a specific approach, program plan and other project management

  9. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.N. Wright

    2005-09-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Project is envisioned to demonstrate the following: (1) A full-scale prototype VHTR by about 2021; (2) High-temperature Brayton Cycle electric power production at full scale with a focus on economic performance; (3) Nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen (with about 10% of the heat) with a focus on economic performance; and (4) By test, the exceptional safety capabilities of the advanced gas-cooled reactors. Further, the NGNP program will: (1) Obtain a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) License to construct and operate the NGNP, this process will provide a basis for future performance based, risk-informed licensing; and (2) Support the development, testing, and prototyping of hydrogen infrastructures. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. The NGNP Materials R&D Program includes the following elements: (1) Developing a specific approach, program plan and other project management tools for

  10. Advanced Ceramic Materials For Next-Generation Nuclear Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marra, J.

    2010-01-01

    Rising global energy demands coupled with increased environmental concerns point to one solution; they must reduce their dependence on fossil fuels that emit greenhouse gases. As the global community faces the challenge of maintaining sovereign nation security, reducing greenhouse gases, and addressing climate change nuclear power will play a significant and likely growing role. In the US, nuclear energy already provides approximately one-fifth of the electricity used to power factories, offices, homes, and schools with 104 operating nuclear power plants, located at 65 sites in 31 states. Additionally, 19 utilities have applied to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for construction and operating licenses for 26 new reactors at 17 sites. This planned growth of nuclear power is occurring worldwide and has been termed the 'nuclear renaissance.' As major industrial nations craft their energy future, there are several important factors that must be considered about nuclear energy: (1) it has been proven over the last 40 years to be safe, reliable and affordable (good for Economic Security); (2) its technology and fuel can be domestically produced or obtained from allied nations (good for Energy Security); and (3) it is nearly free of greenhouse gas emissions (good for Environmental Security). Already an important part of worldwide energy security via electricity generation, nuclear energy can also potentially play an important role in industrial processes and supporting the nation's transportation sector. Coal-to-liquid processes, the generation of hydrogen and supporting the growing potential for a greatly increased electric transportation system (i.e. cars and trains) mean that nuclear energy could see dramatic growth in the near future as we seek to meet our growing demand for energy in cleaner, more secure ways. In order to address some of the prominent issues associated with nuclear power generation (i.e., high capital costs, waste management, and

  11. Use of virtual environments to reduce the construction costs of the next generation nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whisker, V.E.; Baratta, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    The near term deployment of the next generation of reactors will only be successful if they are built on time and without the costly overruns experienced in the previous generation. One critical factor in achieving these goals is to ensure the design is optimized for constructability. In this work the authors explored the effectiveness of full-scale virtual reality simulation in the optimization of the design and construction of the next generation of nuclear reactors. The research tested the suitability of immersive virtual reality display technology in aiding engineers in evaluating potential cost reductions that can be realized by the optimization of design and installation and construction sequences. The intent of this research is to see if this type of technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups and desktop simulations. Using a fully-immersive five sided virtual reality system, known as a CAVE, the authors constructed a series of virtual mockups that represented two next generation nuclear power plants, the Westinghouse AP-1000 and the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). These virtual mockups were then tested as a design tool to help locate and correct problem areas, to optimize the construction sequence, and to assist with familiarizing trades people with the performance of maintenance activities. A series of experiments were performed to assess the usefulness of these virtual mockups in accomplishing these tasks. (authors)

  12. Next Generation Surfactants for Improved Chemical Flooding Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laura Wesson; Prapas Lohateeraparp; Jeffrey Harwell; Bor-Jier Shiau

    2012-05-31

    The principle objective of this project was to characterize and test current and next generation high performance surfactants for improved chemical flooding technology, focused on reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian-aged (Penn) sands. In order to meet this objective the characteristic curvatures (Cc) of twenty-eight anionic surfactants selected for evaluation for use in chemical flooding formulations were determined. The Cc values ranged from -6.90 to 2.55 with the majority having negative values. Crude oil samples from nine Penn sand reservoirs were analyzed for several properties pertinent to surfactant formulation for EOR application. These properties included equivalent alkane carbon numbers, total acid numbers, and viscosity. The brine samples from these same reservoirs were analyzed for several cations and for total dissolved solids. Surfactant formulations were successfully developed for eight reservoirs by the end of the project period. These formulations were comprised of a tertiary mixture of anionic surfactants. The identities of these surfactants are considered proprietary, but suffice to say the surfactants in each mixture were comprised of varying chemical structures. In addition to the successful development of surfactant formulations for EOR, there were also two successful single-well field tests conducted. There are many aspects that must be considered in the development and implementation of effective surfactant formulations. Taking into account these other aspects, there were four additional studies conducted during this project. These studies focused on the effect of the stability of surfactant formulations in the presence of polymers with an associated examination of polymer rheology, the effect of the presence of iron complexes in the brine on surfactant stability, the potential use of sacrificial agents in order to minimize the loss of surfactant to adsorption, and the effect of electrolytes on surfactant adsorption. In these last four studies

  13. Discovery of posttranscriptional regulatory RNAs using next generation sequencing technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelderman, Grant; Contreras, Lydia M

    2013-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized the way by which we engineer metabolism by radically altering the path to genome-wide inquiries. This is due to the fact that NGS approaches offer several powerful advantages over traditional methods that include the ability to fully sequence hundreds to thousands of genes in a single experiment and simultaneously detect homozygous and heterozygous deletions, alterations in gene copy number, insertions, translocations, and exome-wide substitutions that include "hot-spot mutations." This chapter describes the use of these technologies as a sequencing technique for transcriptome analysis and discovery of regulatory RNA elements in the context of three main platforms: Illumina HiSeq, 454 pyrosequencing, and SOLiD sequencing. Specifically, this chapter focuses on the use of Illumina HiSeq, since it is the most widely used platform for RNA discovery and transcriptome analysis. Regulatory RNAs have now been found in all branches of life. In bacteria, noncoding small RNAs (sRNAs) are involved in highly sophisticated regulatory circuits that include quorum sensing, carbon metabolism, stress responses, and virulence (Gorke and Vogel, Gene Dev 22:2914-2925, 2008; Gottesman, Trends Genet 21:399-404, 2005; Romby et al., Curr Opin Microbiol 9:229-236, 2006). Further characterization of the underlying regulation of gene expression remains poorly understood given that it is estimated that over 60% of all predicted genes remain hypothetical and the 5' and 3' untranslated regions are unknown for more than 90% of the genes (Siegel et al., Trends Parasitol 27:434-441, 2011). Importantly, manipulation of the posttranscriptional regulation that occurs at the level of RNA stability and export, trans-splicing, polyadenylation, protein translation, and protein stability via untranslated regions (Clayton, EMBO J 21:1881-1888, 2002; Haile and Papadopoulou, Curr Opin Microbiol 10:569-577, 2007) could be highly beneficial to metabolic

  14. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project 2009 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Demick; Jim Kinsey; Keith Perry; Dave Petti

    2010-05-01

    The mission of the NGNP Project is to broaden the environmental and economic benefits of nuclear energy technology to the United States and other economies by demonstrating its applicability to market sectors not served by light water reactors (LWRs). Those markets typically use fossil fuels to fulfill their energy needs, and high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) like the NGNP can reduce this dependence and the resulting carbon footprint.

  15. Comparison of next generation sequencing technologies for transcriptome characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soltis Douglas E

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have developed a simulation approach to help determine the optimal mixture of sequencing methods for most complete and cost effective transcriptome sequencing. We compared simulation results for traditional capillary sequencing with "Next Generation" (NG ultra high-throughput technologies. The simulation model was parameterized using mappings of 130,000 cDNA sequence reads to the Arabidopsis genome (NCBI Accession SRA008180.19. We also generated 454-GS20 sequences and de novo assemblies for the basal eudicot California poppy (Eschscholzia californica and the magnoliid avocado (Persea americana using a variety of methods for cDNA synthesis. Results The Arabidopsis reads tagged more than 15,000 genes, including new splice variants and extended UTR regions. Of the total 134,791 reads (13.8 MB, 119,518 (88.7% mapped exactly to known exons, while 1,117 (0.8% mapped to introns, 11,524 (8.6% spanned annotated intron/exon boundaries, and 3,066 (2.3% extended beyond the end of annotated UTRs. Sequence-based inference of relative gene expression levels correlated significantly with microarray data. As expected, NG sequencing of normalized libraries tagged more genes than non-normalized libraries, although non-normalized libraries yielded more full-length cDNA sequences. The Arabidopsis data were used to simulate additional rounds of NG and traditional EST sequencing, and various combinations of each. Our simulations suggest a combination of FLX and Solexa sequencing for optimal transcriptome coverage at modest cost. We have also developed ESTcalc http://fgp.huck.psu.edu/NG_Sims/ngsim.pl, an online webtool, which allows users to explore the results of this study by specifying individualized costs and sequencing characteristics. Conclusion NG sequencing technologies are a highly flexible set of platforms that can be scaled to suit different project goals. In terms of sequence coverage alone, the NG sequencing is a dramatic advance

  16. Rf probe technology for the next generation of technological plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, V.J.; Kenyon, A.J.; Thornhill, N.F.; Seeds, A.J.; Batty, I.

    2001-01-01

    We describe radio frequency (rf) analysis of technological plasmas at the 13.56 MHz fundamental drive frequency and integer narrow-band harmonics up to n = 9. In particular, we demonstrate the use of harmonic amplitude information as a process end-point diagnostic. Using very high frequency (vhf) techniques, we construct non-invasive ex situ remote-coupled probes: a diplexer, an equal-ratio-arm bridge, and a dual directional coupler used as a single directional device. These probes bolt into the plasma-tool 50 Ω transmission-line between the rf generator and matching network, and hence do not require modification of the plasma tool. The 50 Ω probe environment produces repeatable measurements of the chamber capacitance and narrow-band harmonic amplitude with an end-point detection sensitivity corresponding to a 2 dB change in the harmonic amplitude with the removal of 1 cm 2 of photoresist. The methodology and design of an instrument for the measurement of the plasma-tool frequency response, and the plasma harmonic amplitude and phase response are examined. The instrument allows the monitoring of the plasma phase delay, plasma-tool short- and long-term ageing, and process end-point prediction. (author)

  17. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Technology Development Roadmaps: The Technical Path Forward for 750–800°C Reactor Outlet Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Collins

    2009-08-01

    This document presents the NGNP Critical PASSCs and defines their technical maturation path through Technology Development Roadmaps (TDRMs) and their associated Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs). As the critical PASSCs advance through increasing levels of technical maturity, project risk is reduced and the likelihood of within-budget and on-schedule completion is enhanced. The current supplier-generated TRLs and TDRMs for a 750–800°C reactor outlet temperature (ROT) specific to each supplier are collected in Appendix A.

  18. Draft design requirements for instrumentation and control systems in next generation nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, In Soo

    1995-01-01

    The basic requirements of I and C system development for the next generation nuclear power plants in Korea has been reviewed with respect to the conventional I and C systems. The typical characteristics of the advanced I and C systems for next generation are extensive application of the digital technologies in order to enhance safety and reliability of the integrated I and C systems. The advanced I and C systems are also applied to advanced man-machine interface technology to improve human factor problems in nuclear power plants. The I and C system design requirement in EPRI's utility requirements document have been evaluated. For the development of the Korean I and C design requirements, the various types of design for I and C systems have been reviewed and incorporated. The draft Korean I and C design requirements are: (1) Improvement of plant availability and reliability, (2) Improvement of the maintainability, (3) Software quality improvement and hardware qualification, (4) Improvement of the operator support functions. On the licensing concerns, the common mode failure design criteria and the software verification and validation methodology are under discussion. (orig.) (5 refs.)

  19. Future of nuclear power in Japan - Development of next Generation LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Eiji; Yamamoto, T.; Kurosaki, K.; Ohga, Y.; Tsuzuki, K.; Kasai, S.; Tanaka, T.

    2010-09-15

    Japan's energy policies have been to decrease the oil portion and dependence on the Middle East for energy security, as well as satisfy environmental requirement. The report of 2008 targeted reducing GHG emission by 60-80% before 2050, and highlighted ''Cool Earth-Innovative Energy Technology Program'' featuring 21 innovative technologies. In this context nuclear power is expected as a core power source. In April 2008, ''Next Generation Light Water Power Reactor Development Program'' was launched with the IAE as the core organization in alliance with Japan's major vendors and in collaboration with METI and power utilities for the future of nuclear power.

  20. Factors affecting the next generation of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remick, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    For both financial, environmental and health reasons, and because of external and internal factors affecting this nation's energy supply, nuclear power will likely play a part in supplying this nation's energy in the coming decades. I believe this to be true for some other parts of the world as well. Even some severe critics of the nuclear power industry and the NRC might agree with me on this point. Increasing concern with the environmental consequences of the burning of fossil fuels has led some former opponents of the use of nuclear power to balance anew the risks and benefits of nuclear power and to modify to some degree their former opposition. A related concern with the adequacy of the energy supply is leading others to modify their positions. According to analyses done by the U.S. Department of Energy, after 1994 the United States will no longer be able to assure all its citizens a reliable supply of electricity. Already, many areas of the country are in need of additional electric capacity. In both Sweden and Switzerland, similar concerns have led to the adoption by many of more compromising positions. Some critics of nuclear power may in the end still reject it as an alternative, but, with the increased pressures on the environment and on our energy supply, nuclear power is an alternative which cannot be rejected without the most serious consideration. This should be, I believe, a point of consensus among us. In sum, there is a future for nuclear power in the sense that there is a use for it

  1. Next generation sequencing technologies: tool to study avian virus diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapgate, S S; Barbuddhe, S B; Kumanan, K

    2015-03-01

    Increased globalisation, climatic changes and wildlife-livestock interface led to emergence of novel viral pathogens or zoonoses that have become serious concern to avian, animal and human health. High biodiversity and bird migration facilitate spread of the pathogen and provide reservoirs for emerging infectious diseases. Current classical diagnostic methods designed to be virus-specific or aim to be limited to group of viral agents, hinder identifying of novel viruses or viral variants. Recently developed approaches of next-generation sequencing (NGS) provide culture-independent methods that are useful for understanding viral diversity and discovery of novel virus, thereby enabling a better diagnosis and disease control. This review discusses the different possible steps of a NGS study utilizing sequence-independent amplification, high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics approaches to identify novel avian viruses and their diversity. NGS lead to the identification of a wide range of new viruses such as picobirnavirus, picornavirus, orthoreovirus and avian gamma coronavirus associated with fulminating disease in guinea fowl and is also used in describing viral diversity among avian species. The review also briefly discusses areas of viral-host interaction and disease associated causalities with newly identified avian viruses.

  2. Dependable Hydrogen and Industrial Heat Generation from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson; Vincent C. Maio; Piyush Sabharwall

    2009-03-01

    The Department of Energy is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the US with abundant, clean and secure energy. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory, will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications. Substituting HTGR power for traditional fossil fuel resources reduces the cost and supply vulnerability of natural gas and oil, and reduces or eliminates greenhouse gas emissions. As authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, industry leaders are developing designs for the construction of a commercial prototype producing up to 600 MWt of power by 2021. This paper describes a variety of critical applications that are appropriate for the HTGR with an emphasis placed on applications requiring a clean and reliable source of hydrogen. An overview of the NGNP project status and its significant technology development efforts are also presented.

  3. Human Reliability for the Next Generation of Nuclear Experts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coates, Cameron W [ORNL; Eisele, Gerhard R [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    As the nuclear renaissance progresses and today s nuclear and radiological experts retire, a new generation of experts will ultimately be recruited, trained, and replace the old guard. Selecting individuals who have the attitudes and values appropriate to work in the nuclear industry and who have the best qualifications for the position will be a key to the success of this renaissance. In a world with deep divisions on political and social issues; how a State, agency, or company assures that those hired can be trusted with the access to, and responsibilities for, nuclear and/or radiological materials is an important consideration. Human interactions invariably rely on the offering of assurance and the receipt of trust. A fundamental element in any human relationship is knowing when to trust and when to doubt. When are assurances to be believed or questioned? Human reliability programs (HRP) are used to assure a person s truthfulness and loyalty to the State. An HRP program has a number of elements and may not fit all cultures in the same form. An HRP can vary in scope from simple background checks of readily available data to full field investigations and testing. This presentation discusses possible elements for an HRP from regulation to implementation and the issues related to each element. The effects of an HRP on potential recruits will be discussed.

  4. Detailed requirements for a next generation nuclear data structure.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-07-05

    This document attempts to compile the requirements for the top-levels of a hierarchical arrangement of nuclear data such as found in the ENDF format. This set of requirements will be used to guide the development of a new data structure to replace the legacy ENDF format.

  5. Requirements for a next generation nuclear data format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archier, Pascal; Jouanne, Cedric; Peneliau, Yannick; Saint-Jean, Cyrille de; Trama, Jean-Christophe; Becky, Bret; Cullen, D.E. Red; Mattoony, Caleb; McNabb, Dennis; Brownyz, David; Herman, Michal; Johnson, Timothy; Sonzogni, Alejandro; Cabellos, Oscar; Capote Noy, Roberto; Forrest, Robin; Trkov, Andrej; Zerkiny, Viktor; Go, Chiba; Conliny, Jeremy Lloyd; Kahler, A.H. Skip; Talouy, Patrick; Whitey, Morgan C.; Cornock, Mark; Coste-Delclaux, Mireille; Malvagi, Fausto; Dunn, Michael; Leal, Luiz; Pigni, Marco; Wiarda, Dorothea; Dupont, Emmeric; Fischer, Ulrich; Tokio, Fukahori; Makoto, Ishikawa; Osamu, Iwamoto; Chikara, Konno; Teruhiko, Kugo; Kenji, Nishihara; Tatsuhiko, Sato; Kenya, Suyama; Kenji, Yokoyama; Haeck, Wim; Hawari, Ayman; Holmes, Jessie; Jacqmin, Robert; Noguere, Gilles; Kodeli, Ivo; Koningy, Arjan; Lee, Morgan; Sublet, Jean-Christophe; Lubitz, Cecil; Romano, Paul; Millsy, Robert; Roubtsovy, Danila; Scopatz, Anthony; Sinitsa, Valentin; Soppera, Nicolas; Vogty, Romona

    2015-01-01

    This document attempts to compile the requirements for the top-levels of a hierarchical arrangement of nuclear data such as is found in the ENDF format. This set of requirements will be used to guide the development of a new set of formats to replace the legacy ENDF format. (authors)

  6. Next-generation online MC and A technologies for reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.E.; Schwantes, J.M.; Ressler, J.J.; Douglas, M.; Anderson, K.A.; Fraga, C.G.; Durst, C.; Orton, C.; Christensen, R.

    2007-01-01

    As power-production nuclear fuel cycles propagate across the globe, a new generation of measurement technologies is needed to support safeguards monitoring of fuel reprocessing facilities. This paper describes the simulation and analysis of two potential technologies for meeting the challenges of 1) direct measurement of fissile isotopic content in irradiated fuel to detect partial defects, and 2) near-real-time monitoring of process chemistry to detect protracted diversion scenarios. Lead slowing-down spectroscopy is the core of the spent fuel assay technology and multi-isotope indicators via high-resolution gamma ray spectroscopy are the foundation of the process chemistry verification approach. The safeguards context and methods for each technology are described and the results of preliminary performance studies are presented. The quantitative results for both studies are promising but more comprehensive analysis and empirical validation is needed to adequately assess their potential value as next generation online materials control and accountability measures. (authors)

  7. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Defense-in-Depth Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward G. Wallace; Karl N. Fleming; Edward M. Burns

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to (1) document the definition of defense-in-depth and the pproach that will be used to assure that its principles are satisfied for the NGNP project and (2) identify the specific questions proposed for preapplication discussions with the NRC. Defense-in-depth is a safety philosophy in which multiple lines of defense and conservative design and evaluation methods are applied to assure the safety of the public. The philosophy is also intended to deliver a design that is tolerant to uncertainties in knowledge of plant behavior, component reliability or operator performance that might compromise safety. This paper includes a review of the regulatory foundation for defense-in-depth, a definition of defense-in-depth that is appropriate for advanced reactor designs based on High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology, and an explanation of how this safety philosophy is achieved in the NGNP.

  8. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Defense-in-Depth Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, Edward G.; Fleming, Karl N.; Burns, Edward M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to (1) document the definition of defense-in-depth and the pproach that will be used to assure that its principles are satisfied for the NGNP project and (2) identify the specific questions proposed for preapplication discussions with the NRC. Defense-in-depth is a safety philosophy in which multiple lines of defense and conservative design and evaluation methods are applied to assure the safety of the public. The philosophy is also intended to deliver a design that is tolerant to uncertainties in knowledge of plant behavior, component reliability or operator performance that might compromise safety. This paper includes a review of the regulatory foundation for defense-in-depth, a definition of defense-in-depth that is appropriate for advanced reactor designs based on High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology, and an explanation of how this safety philosophy is achieved in the NGNP.

  9. Perspectives on next-generation technology for environmental sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara J. Benson; Barbara J. Bond; Michael P. Hamilton; Russell K. Monson; Richard. Han

    2009-01-01

    Sensor networks promise to transform and expand environmental science. However, many technological difficulties must be overcome to achieve this potential. Partnerships of ecologists with computer scientists and engineers are critical in meeting these challenges. Technological issues include promoting innovation in new sensor design, incorporating power optimization...

  10. More than Moore technologies for next generation computer design

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of key technologies being used to address challenges raised by continued device scaling and the extending gap between memory and central processing unit performance.  Authors discuss in detail what are known commonly as “More than Moore” (MtM), technologies, which add value to devices by incorporating functionalities that do not necessarily scale according to “Moore's Law”.  Coverage focuses on three key technologies needed for efficient power management and cost per performance: novel memories, 3D integration and photonic on-chip interconnect.

  11. Digital Waveform Technology and the Next Generation of Mass Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Nathan M.; Gotlib, Zachary P.; Opačić, Bojana; Huntley, Adam P.; Moon, Ashley M.; Donahoe, Katherine E. G.; Brabeck, Gregory F.; Reilly, Peter T. A.

    2018-02-01

    Ion traps and guides are integral parts of current commercial mass spectrometers. They are currently operated with sinusoidal waveform technology that has been developed over many years. Recently, digital waveform technology has begun to emerge and promises to supplant its older cousin because it presents new capabilities that result from the ability to instantaneously switch the frequency and duty cycle of the waveforms. This manuscript examines these capabilities and reveals their uses and effects on instrumentation.

  12. Next generation 100Gb/s ethernet technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Gee-kung; Chowdhury, Arshad; Yu, Jianjun; Jia, Zhensheng; Younce, Richard

    2007-11-01

    We have designed and experimentally demonstrated optical networking technologies for generating, transmitting and switching 100Gbit/s packet signals in optical networks. The performance of 100Gb/s packet transmission over cascaded ROADM nodes with WSSs and over label switched metro networks are discussed.

  13. Advanced relay technologies in next generation wireless communications

    CERN Document Server

    Krikidis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    This book details the use of the cooperative networks/relaying approach in new and emerging telecommunications technologies such as full-duplex radio, massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO), network coding and spatial modulation, and new application areas including visible light communications (VLC), wireless power transfer, and 5G.

  14. Technology for the Next-Generation-Mobile User Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delagi, Greg

    The current mobile-handset market is a vital and growing one, being driven by technology advances, including increased bandwidth and processing performance, as well as reduced power consumption and improved screen technologies. The 3G/4G handsets of today are multimedia internet devices with increased screen size, HD video and gaming, interactive touch screens, HD camera and camcorders, as well as incredible social, entertainment, and productivity applications. While mobile-technology advancements to date have made us more social in many ways, new advancements over the next decade will bring us to the next level, allowing mobile users to experience new types of "virtual" social interactions with all the senses. The mobile handsets of the future will be smart autonomous-lifestyle devices with a multitude of incorporated sensors, applications and display options, all designed to make your life easier and more productive! With future display media, including 3D imaging, virtual interaction and conferencing will be possible, making every call feel like you are in the same room, providing an experience far beyond today's video conferencing technology. 3D touch-screen with integrated image-projection technologies will work in conjunction with gesturing to bring a new era of intuitive mobile device applications, interaction, and information sharing. Looking to the future, there are many challenges to be faced in delivering a smart mobile companion device that will meet the user demands. One demand will be for the availability of new and compelling services, and features on the "mobile companion". These mobile companions will be more than just Internet devices, and will function as on-the-go workstations, allowing users to function as if they were sitting in front of their computer in the office or at home. The massive amounts of data that will be transmitted through, to and from these mobile companions will require immense improvements in system performance, including

  15. Next generation sequencing (NGS)technologies and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuyisich, Momchilo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-11

    NGS technology overview: (1) NGS library preparation - Nucleic acids extraction, Sample quality control, RNA conversion to cDNA, Addition of sequencing adapters, Quality control of library; (2) Sequencing - Clonal amplification of library fragments, (except PacBio), Sequencing by synthesis, Data output (reads and quality); and (3) Data analysis - Read mapping, Genome assembly, Gene expression, Operon structure, sRNA discovery, and Epigenetic analyses.

  16. Status of Mirror Technology for the Next Generation Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, D. N.

    2000-10-01

    The NGST primary mirror is anticipated to be a segmented deployable optic with segment size being in the range of 1-3m depending on the details of the architecture. Over the past 4 years the NGST program has initiated and implemented an aggressive lightweight cryogenic mirror technology program. The program was designed to challenge and excite the optical community in reaching a new standard in production of lightweight optics. The goal was to develop optics at segment, it was felt that a 1.2-2.0m optic would be of sufficient size to understand the mirror material and fabrication processes which drive the cost and schedule of mirror production. The ultimate goals of the technology program are both to demonstrate mirrors meeting the NGST performance requirements, and to establish cost and schedule credibility for producing and implementing the mirrors for the NGST flight system. Establishing cost and schedule credibility is essential to NGST which is a cost capped mission, with past program experience demonstrating that the optics will be a large portion of the total cost of the program. The first two years of the program were dedicated to understanding the various applicable materials, funding those materials to various levels of maturity and implementing the first large mirror procurement, the NGST Mirror System Demonstrator (NMSD), in order to establish a benchmark for the state-of-the-art in lightweight optics and to establish credibility that the goals of NGST could be achieved. The past two years of the program has seen major steps in the development of several mirror materials, which not only might have NGST applicability but could also support other programs for other customers. Additionally, a second large mirror procurement, the Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator (AMSD), has been implemented providing a focal point to complete the mirror technology development and lead ultimately to the production of mirrors that will fly on NEXUS (NGST flight

  17. CRISPR-Based Typing and Next-Generation Tracking Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrangou, Rodolphe; Dudley, Edward G

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria occur ubiquitously in nature and are broadly relevant throughout the food supply chain, with diverse and variable tolerance levels depending on their origin, biological role, and impact on the quality and safety of the product as well as on the health of the consumer. With increasing knowledge of and accessibility to the microbial composition of our environments, food supply, and host-associated microbiota, our understanding of and appreciation for the ratio of beneficial to undesirable bacteria are rapidly evolving. Therefore, there is a need for tools and technologies that allow definite, accurate, and high-resolution identification and typing of various groups of bacteria that include beneficial microbes such as starter cultures and probiotics, innocuous commensals, and undesirable pathogens and spoilage organisms. During the transition from the current molecular biology-based PFGE (pulsed-field gel electrophoresis) gold standard to the increasingly accessible omics-level whole-genome sequencing (WGS) N-gen standard, high-resolution technologies such as CRISPR-based genotyping constitute practical and powerful alternatives that provide valuable insights into genome microevolution and evolutionary trajectories. Indeed, several studies have shown potential for CRISPR-based typing of industrial starter cultures, health-promoting probiotic strains, animal commensal species, and problematic pathogens. Emerging CRISPR-based typing methods open new avenues for high-resolution typing of a broad range of bacteria and constitute a practical means for rapid tracking of a diversity of food-associated microbes.

  18. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Structures, Systems, and Components Safety Classification White Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pete Jordan

    2010-09-01

    This white paper outlines the relevant regulatory policy and guidance for a risk-informed approach for establishing the safety classification of Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs) for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant and sets forth certain facts for review and discussion in order facilitate an effective submittal leading to an NGNP Combined Operating License application under 10 CFR 52.

  19. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

    2010-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production, with an outlet gas temperature in the range of 750°C, and a design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. This technology development plan details the additional research and development (R&D) required to design and license the NGNP RPV, assuming that A 508/A 533 is the material of construction. The majority of additional information that is required is related to long-term aging behavior at NGNP vessel temperatures, which are somewhat above those commonly encountered in the existing database from LWR experience. Additional data are also required for the anticipated NGNP environment. An assessment of required R&D for a Grade 91 vessel has been retained from the first revision of the R&D plan in Appendix B in somewhat less detail. Considerably more development is required for this steel compared to A 508/A 533 including additional irradiation testing for expected NGNP operating temperatures, high-temperature mechanical properties, and extensive studies of long-term microstructural stability.

  20. Nuclear Safeguards Infrastructure Required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Mark Schanfein; Philip Casey Durst

    2012-07-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is a Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) to be constructed near Idaho Falls, Idaho The NGNP is intrinsically safer than current reactors and is planned for startup ca. 2021 Safety is more prominent in the minds of the Public and Governing Officials following the nuclear reactor meltdown accidents in Fukushima, Japan The authors propose that the NGNP should be designed with International (IAEA) Safeguards in mind to support export to Non-Nuclear-Weapons States There are two variants of the NGNP design; one using integral Prismatic-shaped fuel assemblies in a fixed core; and one using recirculating fuel balls (or Pebbles) The following presents the infrastructure required to safeguard the NGNP This infrastructure is required to safeguard the Prismatic and Pebble-fueled NGNP (and other HTGR/VHTR) The infrastructure is based on current Safeguards Requirements and Practices implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for similar reactors The authors of this presentation have worked for decades in the area of International Nuclear Safeguards and are recognized experts in this field Presentation for INMM conference in July 2012.

  1. Next-generation sequencing technology for genetics and genomics of sorghum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Hong; Mocoeur, Anne Raymonde Joelle; Jing, Hai-Chun

    2014-01-01

    The invention and application of Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies have revolutionized the study of genetics and genomics. Much research which would not even be considered are nowdays being excuted in many laboratories as routine. In this chapter, we introduce the currently available...

  2. On fire risk/methodology for the next generation of reactors and nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, K.C.; Alesso, H.P.; Altenbach, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    Methodologies for including fire in probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) have been evolving during the last ten years. Many of these studies show that fire risk constitutes a significant percentage of external events, as well as the total core damage frequency. This paper summarizes the methodologies used in the fire risk analysis of the next generation of reactors and existing DOE nuclear facilities. Methodologies used in other industries, as well as existing nuclear power plants, are also discussed. Results of fire risk studies for various nuclear plants and facilities are shown and compared

  3. Composite Materials under Extreme Radiation and Temperature Environments of the Next Generation Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simos, N.

    2011-05-01

    In the nuclear energy renaissance, driven by fission reactor concepts utilizing very high temperatures and fast neutron spectra, materials with enhanced performance that exceeds are expected to play a central role. With the operating temperatures of the Generation III reactors bringing the classical reactor materials close to their performance limits there is an urgent need to develop and qualify new alloys and composites. Efforts have been focused on the intricate relations and the high demands placed on materials at the anticipated extreme states within the next generation fusion and fission reactors which combine high radiation fluxes, elevated temperatures and aggressive environments. While nuclear reactors have been in operation for several decades, the structural materials associated with the next generation options need to endure much higher temperatures (1200 C), higher neutron doses (tens of displacements per atom, dpa), and extremely corrosive environments, which are beyond the experience on materials accumulated to-date. The most important consideration is the performance and reliability of structural materials for both in-core and out-of-core functions. While there exists a great body of nuclear materials research and operating experience/performance from fission reactors where epithermal and thermal neutrons interact with materials and alter their physio-mechanical properties, a process that is well understood by now, there are no operating or even experimental facilities that will facilitate the extreme conditions of flux and temperature anticipated and thus provide insights into the behaviour of these well understood materials. Materials, however, still need to be developed and their interaction and damage potential or lifetime to be quantified for the next generation nuclear energy. Based on material development advances, composites, and in particular ceramic composites, seem to inherently possess properties suitable for key functions within the

  4. Composite Materials under Extreme Radiation and Temperature Environments of the Next Generation Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simos, N.

    2011-01-01

    In the nuclear energy renaissance, driven by fission reactor concepts utilizing very high temperatures and fast neutron spectra, materials with enhanced performance that exceeds are expected to play a central role. With the operating temperatures of the Generation III reactors bringing the classical reactor materials close to their performance limits there is an urgent need to develop and qualify new alloys and composites. Efforts have been focused on the intricate relations and the high demands placed on materials at the anticipated extreme states within the next generation fusion and fission reactors which combine high radiation fluxes, elevated temperatures and aggressive environments. While nuclear reactors have been in operation for several decades, the structural materials associated with the next generation options need to endure much higher temperatures (1200 C), higher neutron doses (tens of displacements per atom, dpa), and extremely corrosive environments, which are beyond the experience on materials accumulated to-date. The most important consideration is the performance and reliability of structural materials for both in-core and out-of-core functions. While there exists a great body of nuclear materials research and operating experience/performance from fission reactors where epithermal and thermal neutrons interact with materials and alter their physio-mechanical properties, a process that is well understood by now, there are no operating or even experimental facilities that will facilitate the extreme conditions of flux and temperature anticipated and thus provide insights into the behaviour of these well understood materials. Materials, however, still need to be developed and their interaction and damage potential or lifetime to be quantified for the next generation nuclear energy. Based on material development advances, composites, and in particular ceramic composites, seem to inherently possess properties suitable for key functions within the

  5. Advances in clinical next-generation sequencing: target enrichment and sequencing technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Leomar Y; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Kanagal-Shamanna, Rashmi; Singh, Rajesh R

    2016-01-01

    The huge parallel sequencing capabilities of next generation sequencing technologies have made them the tools of choice to characterize genomic aberrations for research and diagnostic purposes. For clinical applications, screening the whole genome or exome is challenging owing to the large genomic area to be sequenced, associated costs, complexity of data, and lack of known clinical significance of all genes. Consequently, routine screening involves limited markers with established clinical relevance. This process, referred to as targeted genome sequencing, requires selective enrichment of the genomic areas comprising these markers via one of several primer or probe-based enrichment strategies, followed by sequencing of the enriched genomic areas. Here, the authors review current target enrichment approaches and next generation sequencing platforms, focusing on the underlying principles, capabilities, and limitations of each technology along with validation and implementation for clinical testing.

  6. NERI Final Project Report: On-Line Intelligent Self-Diagnostic Monitoring System for Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, Leonard J.; Jarrell, Donald B.; Koehler, Theresa M.; Meador, Richard J.; Sisk, Daniel R.; Hatley, Darrel D.; Watkins, Kenneth S.; Chai, Jangbom; Kim, Wooshik

    2003-06-20

    This project provides a proof-of-principle technology demonstration for SDMS, where a distributed suite of sensors is integrated with active components and passive structures of types expected to be encountered in next generation nuclear power reactor and plant systems. The project employs state-of-the-art operational sensors, advanced stressor-based instrumentation, distributed computing, RF data network modules and signal processing to improve the monitoring and assessment of the power reactor system and gives data that is used to provide prognostics capabilities.

  7. Aerosciences, Aero-Propulsion and Flight Mechanics Technology Development for NASA's Next Generation Launch Technology Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockrell, Charles E., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) program, Vehicle Systems Research and Technology (VSR&T) project is pursuing technology advancements in aerothermodynamics, aeropropulsion and flight mechanics to enable development of future reusable launch vehicle (RLV) systems. The current design trade space includes rocket-propelled, hypersonic airbreathing and hybrid systems in two-stage and single-stage configurations. Aerothermodynamics technologies include experimental and computational databases to evaluate stage separation of two-stage vehicles as well as computational and trajectory simulation tools for this problem. Additionally, advancements in high-fidelity computational tools and measurement techniques are being pursued along with the study of flow physics phenomena, such as boundary-layer transition. Aero-propulsion technology development includes scramjet flowpath development and integration, with a current emphasis on hypervelocity (Mach 10 and above) operation, as well as the study of aero-propulsive interactions and the impact on overall vehicle performance. Flight mechanics technology development is focused on advanced guidance, navigation and control (GN&C) algorithms and adaptive flight control systems for both rocket-propelled and airbreathing vehicles.

  8. R and D areas for next generation desalination and water purification technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raha, A.; Rao, I.S.; Srivastava, V.K.; Tewari, P.K.

    2007-01-01

    By 2020, desalination and water purification technologies are expected to contribute significantly to ensure a safe, sustainable, affordable and adequate water supply. The cost of producing water from the current generation desalination technologies has declined over time at a rate of only approximately 4% per year. So we need to accelerate our research and development (R and D) activities with a near and long term objective for evolution of current generation desalination technology and to create revolutionary next generation advanced desalination and water purification technologies which will offer a promise of step reduction in cost of producing water. There are five broad technological areas-thermal technologies, membrane technologies, alternate technologies, concentrate management technologies, reuse and recycle technologies that encompass the spectrum of desalination technology. In this paper high priority research areas in all the above technologies areas are discussed to make decision about research direction that will help to mitigate our nation's future water supply challenges. (author)

  9. Physics and Technology for the Next Generation of Radioactive Ion Beam Facilities: EURISOL

    CERN Document Server

    Kadi, Y; Catherall, R; Giles, T; Stora, T; Wenander, F K

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of artificial radioactivity in 1935, nuclear scientists have developed tools to study nuclei far from stability. A major breakthrough came in the eighties when the first high energy radioactive beams were produced at Berkeley, leading to the discovery of neutron halos. The field of nuclear structure received a new impetus, and the major accelerator facilities worldwide rivalled in ingenuity to produce more intense, purer and higher resolution rare isotope beams, leading to our much improved knowledge and understanding of the general evolution of nuclear properties throughout the nuclear chart. However, today, further progress is hampered by the weak beam intensities of current installations which correlate with the difficulty to reach the confines of nuclear binding where new phenomena are predicted, and where the r-process path for nuclear synthesis is expected to be located. The advancement of Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) science calls for the development of so-called next-generation facil...

  10. CHARACTERISTICS OF NEXT-GENERATION SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL (SNF) TRANSPORT AND STORAGE CASKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haire, M.J.; Forsberg, C.W.; Matveev, V.Z.; Shapovalov, V.I.

    2004-10-03

    The design of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) casks used in the present SNF disposition systems has evolved from early concepts about the nuclear fuel cycle. The reality today is much different from that envisioned by early nuclear scientists. Most SNF is placed in pool storage, awaiting reprocessing (as in Russia) or disposal at a geologic SNF repository (as in the United States). Very little transport of SNF occurs. This paper examines the requirements for SNF casks from today's perspective and attempts to answer this question: What type of SNF cask would be produced if we were to start over and design SNF casks based on today's requirements? The characteristics for a next-generation SNF cask system are examined and are found to be essentially the same in Russia and the United States. It appears that the new depleted uranium dioxide (DUO2)-steel cermet material will enable these requirements to be met. Depleted uranium (DU) is uranium in which a portion of the 235U isotope has been removed during a uranium enrichment process. The DUO2-steel cermet material is described. The United States and Russia are cooperating toward the development of a next-generation, dual-purpose, storage and transport SNF system.

  11. Design of a fault diagnosis system for next generation nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, K.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Wood, R.T.

    2004-01-01

    A new design approach for fault diagnosis is developed for next generation nuclear power plants. In the nuclear reactor design phase, data reconciliation is used as an efficient tool to determine the measurement requirements to achieve the specified goal of fault diagnosis. In the reactor operation phase, the plant measurements are collected to estimate uncertain model parameters so that a high fidelity model can be obtained for fault diagnosis. The proposed algorithm of fault detection and isolation is able to combine the strength of first principle model based fault diagnosis and the historical data based fault diagnosis. Principal component analysis on the reconciled data is used to develop a statistical model for fault detection. The updating of the principal component model based on the most recent reconciled data is a locally linearized model around the current plant measurements, so that it is applicable to any generic nonlinear systems. The sensor fault diagnosis and process fault diagnosis are decoupled through considering the process fault diagnosis as a parameter estimation problem. The developed approach has been applied to the IRIS helical coil steam generator system to monitor the operational performance of individual steam generators. This approach is general enough to design fault diagnosis systems for the next generation nuclear power plants. (authors)

  12. Preliminary materials selection issues for the next generation nuclear plant reactor pressure vessel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Majumdar, S.; Shankar, P. S.; Shah, V. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-03-21

    In the coming decades, the United States and the entire world will need energy supplies to meet the growing demands due to population increase and increase in consumption due to global industrialization. One of the reactor system concepts, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), with helium as the coolant, has been identified as uniquely suited for producing hydrogen without consumption of fossil fuels or the emission of greenhouse gases [Generation IV 2002]. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected this system for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, to demonstrate emissions-free nuclear-assisted electricity and hydrogen production within the next 15 years. The NGNP reference concepts are helium-cooled, graphite-moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactors with a design goal outlet helium temperature of {approx}1000 C [MacDonald et al. 2004]. The reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. The use of molten salt coolant, especially for the transfer of heat to hydrogen production, is also being considered. The NGNP is expected to produce both electricity and hydrogen. The process heat for hydrogen production will be transferred to the hydrogen plant through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). The basic technology for the NGNP has been established in the former high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) and demonstration plants (DRAGON, Peach Bottom, AVR, Fort St. Vrain, and THTR). In addition, the technologies for the NGNP are being advanced in the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) project, and the South African state utility ESKOM-sponsored project to develop the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). Furthermore, the Japanese HTTR and Chinese HTR-10 test reactors are demonstrating the feasibility of some of the planned components and materials. The proposed high operating temperatures in the VHTR place significant constraints on the choice of material selected for the reactor pressure vessel for

  13. Cycle layout studies of S-CO2 cycle for the next generation nuclear system application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Yoonhan; Bae, Seong Jun; Kim, Minseok; Cho, Seong Kuk; Baik, Seungjoon; Lee, Jeong Ik; Cha, Jae Eun

    2014-01-01

    According to the second law of thermodynamics, the next generation nuclear reactor system efficiency can potentially be increased with higher operating temperature. Fig.1 shows several power conversion system efficiencies and heat sources with respect to the system top operating temperature. As shown in Fig.1, the steam Rankine and gas Brayton cycles have been considered as the major power conversion systems more than several decades. In the next generation reactor operating temperature region (450 - 900 .deg. C), the steam Rankine and gas Brayton cycles have limits due to material problems and low efficiency, respectively. Among the future power conversion systems, S-CO 2 cycle is receiving interests due to several benefits including high efficiency under the mild turbine inlet temperature range (450-650 .deg. C), compact turbomachinery and simple layout compared to the steam Rankine cycle. S-CO 2 cycle can show relatively high efficiency under the mild turbine inlet temperature range (450-600 .deg. C) compared to other power conversion systems. The recompression cycle shows the best efficiency among other layouts and it is suitable for the application to advanced nuclear reactor systems. As S-CO 2 cycle performance can vary depending on the layout configuration, further studies on the layouts are required to design a better performing cycle

  14. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Steam Generator and Intermediate Heat Exchanger Materials Research and Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. K. Wright

    2010-09-01

    DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Today’s high-temperature alloys and associated ASME Codes for reactor applications are approved up to 760°C. However, some primary system components, such as the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP will require use of materials that can withstand higher temperatures. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge. Examples include materials for the core barrel and core internals, such as the control rod sleeves. The requirements of the materials for the IHX are among the most demanding. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. A number of solid solution strengthened nickel based alloys have been considered for

  15. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Intermediate Heat Exchanger Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2804)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. K. Wright

    2008-04-01

    DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Today’s high-temperature alloys and associated ASME Codes for reactor applications are approved up to 760°C. However, some primary system components, such as the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP will require use of materials that can withstand higher temperatures. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge. Examples include materials for the core barrel and core internals, such as the control rod sleeves. The requirements of the materials for the IHX are among the most demanding. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. A number of solid solution strengthened nickel based alloys have been considered for

  16. Building upon Historical Competencies: Next-generation Clean-up Technologies for World-Wide Application - 13368

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guevara, K.C. [DOE Savannah River Operations Office, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States); Fellinger, A.P.; Aylward, R.S.; Griffin, J.C.; Hyatt, J.E.; Bush, S.R. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Department of Energy's Savannah River Site has a 60-year history of successfully operating nuclear facilities and cleaning up the nuclear legacy of the Cold War era through the processing of radioactive and otherwise hazardous wastes, remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater, management of nuclear materials, and deactivation and decommissioning of excess facilities. SRS recently unveiled its Enterprise.SRS (E.SRS) strategic vision to identify and facilitate application of the historical competencies of the site to current and future national and global challenges. E.SRS initiatives such as the initiative to Develop and Demonstrate Next generation Clean-up Technologies seek timely and mutually beneficial engagements with entities around the country and the world. One such ongoing engagement is with government and industry in Japan in the recovery from the devastation of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. (authors)

  17. Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI): On-Line Intelligent Self-Diagnostic Monitoring for Next Generation Nuclear Plants - Phase I Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, L.G.; Doctor, S.R.; Gilbert, R.W.; Jarrell, D.B.; Greitzer, F.L.; Meador, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    OAK-B135 This OSTI ID belongs to an IWO and is being released out of the system. The Program Manager Rebecca Richardson has confirmed that all reports have been received. The objective of this project is to design and demonstrate the operation of the real-time intelligent self-diagnostic and prognostic system for next generation nuclear power plant systems. This new self-diagnostic technology is titled, ''On-Line Intelligent Self-Diagnostic Monitoring System'' (SDMS). This project provides a proof-of-principle technology demonstration for SDMS on a pilot plant scale service water system, where a distributed array of sensors is integrated with active components and passive structures typical of next generation nuclear power reactor and plant systems. This project employs state-of-the-art sensors, instrumentation, and computer processing to improve the monitoring and assessment of the power reactor system and to provide diagnostic and automated prognostics capabilities

  18. Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI): On-Line Intelligent Self-Diagnostic Monitoring for Next Generation Nuclear Plants - Phase I Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. J. Bond; S. R. Doctor; R. W. Gilbert; D. B. Jarrell; F. L. Greitzer; R. J. Meador

    2000-09-01

    OAK-B135 This OSTI ID belongs to an IWO and is being released out of the system. The Program Manager Rebecca Richardson has confirmed that all reports have been received. The objective of this project is to design and demonstrate the operation of the real-time intelligent self-diagnostic and prognostic system for next generation nuclear power plant systems. This new self-diagnostic technology is titled, ''On-Line Intelligent Self-Diagnostic Monitoring System'' (SDMS). This project provides a proof-of-principle technology demonstration for SDMS on a pilot plant scale service water system, where a distributed array of sensors is integrated with active components and passive structures typical of next generation nuclear power reactor and plant systems. This project employs state-of-the-art sensors, instrumentation, and computer processing to improve the monitoring and assessment of the power reactor system and to provide diagnostic and automated prognostics capabilities.

  19. The Smart Programmable CRISPR Technology: A Next Generation Genome Editing Tool for Investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Teoh, Seong Lin; Das, Srijit

    2017-01-01

    The present era is fast experiencing rapid innovation in the genome-editing technology. CRISPR Cas9-mediated targeted genetic manipulation is an easy, cost-effective and scalable method. As a result, it can be used for a broad range of targeted genome engineering. The main objective of the present review is to highlight the structural signature, classification, its mechanism and application from basic science to medicine and future challenges for this genome editing tool kit. The present review provides a brief description of the recent development of CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technology. We discuss the paradigms shift for this next generation genome editing technology, CRISPR. The CRISPR structural significance, classification and its different applications are also being discussed. We portray the future challenges for this extraordinary genome in vivo editing tool. We also highlight the role of CRISPR genome editing in curing many diseases. Scientists and researchers are constantly looking one genome editing tool that is competent, simple and low-cost assembly of nucleases. It can target any particular site without any off-target mutations in the genome. The CRISPR-Cas9 has all of the above characteristics. The genome engineering technology may be a strong and inspiring technology meant for the next generation of drug development. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. The virtuous technology cycle concept and its application in next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluess-Li, Ying; Bongiovanni, Sandrine; Oakeley, Edward J; Johnson, Keith J; Staedtler, Frank

    2012-09-01

    External access to scientific technology plays an increasingly important part in pharmaceutical R&D. One advantage of accessing technology externally is the avoidance of costs associated with purchase and the reduced time required for developing new methods; in addition, access to external scientific expertise can be beneficial. However, few conceptual frameworks exist for achieving an optimal mix of internal and external technology access. In this review, we describe the virtuous technology cycle (VTC) concept and exemplify its application to next-generation sequencing (NGS). Based on selected examples, we show that the VTC concept can greatly enhance the number of technologies accessed and thus significantly increase flexibility and efficiency in drug discovery. We also discuss the challenges of externally accessing NGS technologies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Innovative open air brayton combined cycle systems for the next generation nuclear power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohuri, Bahman

    The purpose of this research was to model and analyze a nuclear heated multi-turbine power conversion system operating with atmospheric air as the working fluid. The air is heated by a molten salt, or liquid metal, to gas heat exchanger reaching a peak temperature of 660 0C. The effects of adding a recuperator or a bottoming steam cycle have been addressed. The calculated results are intended to identify paths for future work on the next generation nuclear power plant (GEN-IV). This document describes the proposed system in sufficient detail to communicate a good understanding of the overall system, its components, and intended uses. The architecture is described at the conceptual level, and does not replace a detailed design document. The main part of the study focused on a Brayton --- Rankine Combined Cycle system and a Recuperated Brayton Cycle since they offer the highest overall efficiencies. Open Air Brayton power cycles also require low cooling water flows relative to other power cycles. Although the Recuperated Brayton Cycle achieves an overall efficiency slightly less that the Brayton --- Rankine Combined Cycle, it is completely free of a circulating water system and can be used in a desert climate. Detailed results of modeling a combined cycle Brayton-Rankine power conversion system are presented. The Rankine bottoming cycle appears to offer a slight efficiency advantage over the recuperated Brayton cycle. Both offer very significant advantages over current generation Light Water Reactor steam cycles. The combined cycle was optimized as a unit and lower pressure Rankine systems seem to be more efficient. The combined cycle requires a lot less circulating water than current power plants. The open-air Brayton systems appear to be worth investigating, if the higher temperatures predicted for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant do materialize.

  2. New Temperature References and Sensors for the Next Generation of Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadli, M.; Deuze, T.; Failleau, G.; Mokdad, S.-A.; Podesta, M. de; Edwards, G.; Elliott, C.-J.; Pearce, J.-V.; Sutton, G.; Del Campo, D.; Garcia-Izquierdo, C.; Fourrez, S.; Laurie, M.

    2013-06-01

    In preparation for the new challenges posed by the higher temperature environments which are likely to be encountered in the next generation of nuclear power plants, to maintain the safety and to ensure the long-term reliability of such plants, it is crucial that new temperature sensors and methods for in-situ measurement are investigated and developed. This is the general objective of the first work package of the joint research project, ENG08 MetroFission, funded in the framework of the European metrology research program. This paper will review the results obtained in developing and testing new temperature sensors and references during the course of the project. The possible continuation of these activities in the future is discussed. (authors)

  3. Thermal hydrodynamic modeling and simulation of hot-gas duct for next-generation nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Injun [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sungdeok; Kim, Chansoo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Bai, Cheolho; Hong, Sungyull [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Jaesool, E-mail: jshim@ynu.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Thermal hydrodynamic nonlinear model is presented to examine a hot gas duct (HGD) used in a fourth-generation nuclear power reactor. • Experiments and simulation were compared to validate the nonlinear porous model. • Natural convection and radiation are considered to study the effect on the surface temperature of the HGD. • Local Nusselt number is obtained for the optimum design of a possible next-generation HGD. - Abstract: A very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is a fourth-generation nuclear power reactor that requires an intermediate loop that consists of a hot-gas duct (HGD), an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX), and a process heat exchanger for massive hydrogen production. In this study, a mathematical model and simulation were developed for the HGD in a small-scale nitrogen gas loop that was designed and manufactured by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. These were used to investigate the effect of various important factors on the surface of the HGD. In the modeling, a porous model was considered for a Kaowool insulator inside the HGD. The natural convection and radiation are included in the model. For validation, the modeled external surface temperatures are compared with experimental results obtained while changing the inlet temperatures of the nitrogen working fluid. The simulation results show very good agreement with the experiments. The external surface temperatures of the HGD are obtained with respect to the porosity of insulator, emissivity of radiation, and pressure of the working fluid. The local Nusselt number is also obtained for the optimum design of a possible next-generation HGD.

  4. The Coming Nuclear Renaissance for Next Generation Safeguards Specialists--Maximizing Potential and Minimizing the Risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eipeldauer, Mary D [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    This document is intended to provide an overview of the workshop entitled 'The Coming Nuclear Renaissance for the Next Generation Safeguards Experts-Maximizing Benefits While Minimizing Proliferation Risks', conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in partnership with the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This document presents workshop objectives; lists the numerous participant universities and individuals, the nuclear nonproliferation lecture topics covered, and the facilities tours taken as part of the workshop; and discusses the university partnership sessions and proposed areas for collaboration between the universities and ORNL for 2009. Appendix A contains the agenda for the workshop; Appendix B lists the workshop attendees and presenters with contact information; Appendix C contains graphics of the evaluation form results and survey areas; and Appendix D summarizes the responses to the workshop evaluation form. The workshop was an opportunity for ORNL, Y-12, and SRNL staff with more than 30 years combined experience in nuclear nonproliferation to provide a comprehensive overview of their expertise for the university professors and their students. The overall goal of the workshop was to emphasize nonproliferation aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle and to identify specific areas where the universities and experts from operations and national laboratories could collaborate.

  5. Compaction Scale Up and Optimization of Cylindrical Fuel Compacts for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey J. Einerson; Jeffrey A. Phillips; Eric L. Shaber; Scott E. Niedzialek; W. Clay Richardson; Scott G. Nagley

    2012-10-01

    Multiple process approaches have been used historically to manufacture cylindrical nuclear fuel compacts. Scale-up of fuel compacting was required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project to achieve an economically viable automated production process capable of providing a minimum of 10 compacts/minute with high production yields. In addition, the scale-up effort was required to achieve matrix density equivalent to baseline historical production processes, and allow compacting at fuel packing fractions up to 46% by volume. The scale-up approach of jet milling, fluid-bed overcoating, and hot-press compacting adopted in the U.S. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development Program involves significant paradigm shifts to capitalize on distinct advantages in simplicity, yield, and elimination of mixed waste. A series of designed experiments have been completed to optimize compaction conditions of time, temperature, and forming pressure using natural uranium oxycarbide (NUCO) fuel. Results from these experiments are included. The scale-up effort is nearing completion with the process installed and operational using nuclear fuel materials. The process is being certified for manufacture of qualification test fuel compacts for the AGR-5/6/7 experiment at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

  6. Site Selection and Characterization Status Report for Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holbrook, Mark

    2007-01-01

    In the near future, the US Department of Energy (DOE) will need to make important decisions regarding design and construction of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). One part of making these decisions is considering the potential environmental impacts that this facility may have, if constructed here at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 provides DOE decision makers with a process to systematically consider potential environmental consequences of agency decisions. In addition, the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Title VI, Subtitel C, Section 644) states that the 'Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) shall have licensing and regulatory authority for any reactor authorized under this subtitle.' This stipulates that the NRC will license the NGNP for operation. The NRC NEPA Regulations (10 CFR Part 51) require tha thte NRC prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for a permit to construct a nuclear power plant. The applicant is required to submit an Environmental report (ER) to aid the NRC in complying with NEPA.

  7. Developing next-generation telehealth tools and technologies: patients, systems, and data perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Michael J; Filart, Rosemarie; Burgess, Lawrence P; Lee, Insup; Poropatich, Ronald K

    2010-01-01

    The major goals of telemedicine today are to develop next-generation telehealth tools and technologies to enhance healthcare delivery to medically underserved populations using telecommunication technology, to increase access to medical specialty services while decreasing healthcare costs, and to provide training of healthcare providers, clinical trainees, and students in health-related fields. Key drivers for these tools and technologies are the need and interest to collaborate among telehealth stakeholders, including patients, patient communities, research funders, researchers, healthcare services providers, professional societies, industry, healthcare management/economists, and healthcare policy makers. In the development, marketing, adoption, and implementation of these tools and technologies, communication, training, cultural sensitivity, and end-user customization are critical pieces to the process. Next-generation tools and technologies are vehicles toward personalized medicine, extending the telemedicine model to include cell phones and Internet-based telecommunications tools for remote and home health management with video assessment, remote bedside monitoring, and patient-specific care tools with event logs, patient electronic profile, and physician note-writing capability. Telehealth is ultimately a system of systems in scale and complexity. To cover the full spectrum of dynamic and evolving needs of end-users, we must appreciate system complexity as telehealth moves toward increasing functionality, integration, interoperability, outreach, and quality of service. Toward that end, our group addressed three overarching questions: (1) What are the high-impact topics? (2) What are the barriers to progress? and (3) What roles can the National Institutes of Health and its various institutes and centers play in fostering the future development of telehealth?

  8. DNA fingerprinting, DNA barcoding, and next generation sequencing technology in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucher, Nikolaus J; Hennell, James R; Carles, Maria C

    2012-01-01

    DNA fingerprinting of plants has become an invaluable tool in forensic, scientific, and industrial laboratories all over the world. PCR has become part of virtually every variation of the plethora of approaches used for DNA fingerprinting today. DNA sequencing is increasingly used either in combination with or as a replacement for traditional DNA fingerprinting techniques. A prime example is the use of short, standardized regions of the genome as taxon barcodes for biological identification of plants. Rapid advances in "next generation sequencing" (NGS) technology are driving down the cost of sequencing and bringing large-scale sequencing projects into the reach of individual investigators. We present an overview of recent publications that demonstrate the use of "NGS" technology for DNA fingerprinting and DNA barcoding applications.

  9. [Application of next-generation semiconductor sequencing technologies in genetic diagnosis of inherited cardiomyopathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Hong; Xia, Xue-shan

    2015-07-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathy is the most common hereditary cardiac disease. It also causes a significant proportion of sudden cardiac deaths in young adults and athletes. So far, approximately one hundred genes have been reported to be involved in cardiomyopathies through different mechanisms. Therefore, the identification of the genetic basis and disease mechanisms of cardiomyopathies are important for establishing a clinical diagnosis and genetic testing. Next-generation semiconductor sequencing (NGSS) technology platform is a high-throughput sequencer capable of analyzing clinically derived genomes with high productivity, sensitivity and specificity. It was launched in 2010 by Life Technologies of USA, and it is based on a high density semiconductor chip, which was covered with tens of thousands of wells. NGSS has been successfully used in candidate gene mutation screening to identify hereditary disease. In this review, we summarize these genetic variations, challenge and application of NGSS in inherited cardiomyopathy, and its value in disease diagnosis, prevention and treatment.

  10. The next generation of CANDU technologies: profiling the potential for hydrogen fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopwood, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    This report discusses the Next-generation CANDU Power Reactor technologies currently under development at AECL. The innovations introduced into proven CANDU technologies include a compact reactor core design, which reduces the size by a factor of one third for the same power output; improved thermal efficiency through higher-pressure steam turbines; reduced use of heavy water (one quarter of the heavy water required for existing plants), thus reducing the cost and eliminating many material handling concerns; use of slightly enriched uranium to extend fuel life to three times that of existing natural uranium fuel and additions to CANDU's inherent passive safety. With these advanced features, the capital cost of constructing the plant can be reduced by up to 40 per cent compared to existing designs. The clean, affordable CANDU-generated electricity can be used to produce hydrogen for fuel cells for the transportation sector, thereby reducing emissions from the transportation sector

  11. Next Generation Astronomical Data Processing using Big Data Technologies from the Apache Software Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattmann, Chris

    2014-04-01

    In this era of exascale instruments for astronomy we must naturally develop next generation capabilities for the unprecedented data volume and velocity that will arrive due to the veracity of these ground-based sensor and observatories. Integrating scientific algorithms stewarded by scientific groups unobtrusively and rapidly; intelligently selecting data movement technologies; making use of cloud computing for storage and processing; and automatically extracting text and metadata and science from any type of file are all needed capabilities in this exciting time. Our group at NASA JPL has promoted the use of open source data management technologies available from the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) in pursuit of constructing next generation data management and processing systems for astronomical instruments including the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) in Socorro, NM and the Atacama Large Milimetre/Sub Milimetre Array (ALMA); as well as for the KAT-7 project led by SKA South Africa as a precursor to the full MeerKAT telescope. In addition we are funded currently by the National Science Foundation in the US to work with MIT Haystack Observatory and the University of Cambridge in the UK to construct a Radio Array of Portable Interferometric Devices (RAPID) that will undoubtedly draw from the rich technology advances underway. NASA JPL is investing in a strategic initiative for Big Data that is pulling in these capabilities and technologies for astronomical instruments and also for Earth science remote sensing. In this talk I will describe the above collaborative efforts underway and point to solutions in open source from the Apache Software Foundation that can be deployed and used today and that are already bringing our teams and projects benefits. I will describe how others can take advantage of our experience and point towards future application and contribution of these tools.

  12. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan, Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.E. Mizia; W.E. Windes; W.R. Corwin; T.D. Burchell; C.E. Duty; Y. Katoh; J.W. Klett; T.E. McGreevy; R.K. Nanstad; W. Ren; P.L. Rittenhouse; L.L. Snead; R.W. Swindeman; D.F. Wlson

    2007-09-01

    DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 950°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Some of the general and administrative aspects of the R&D Plan include: • Expand American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Codes and American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standards in support of the NGNP Materials R&D Program. • Define and develop inspection needs and the procedures for those inspections. • Support selected university materials related R&D activities that would be of direct benefit to the NGNP Project. • Support international materials related collaboration activities through the DOE sponsored Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Materials and Components (M&C) Project Management Board (PMB). • Support document review activities through the Materials Review Committee (MRC) or other suitable forum.

  13. The nuclear power industry's ageing workforce: Transfer of knowledge to the next generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-06-01

    This report is intended primarily for senior and middle level managers in nuclear power plant operating organizations. It is intended to provide them practical information they can use to improve the transfer of knowledge from the current generation of NPP operating organization personnel to the next generation in an effective manner. The information provided in this report is based upon the experience of Member State operating organizations as well as other related industries. In September 2000, the IAEA held a technical meeting on the topic of an ageing workforce and declining educational infrastructures. The proceedings of this meeting were distributed on CD-ROM as Working Material. Several recent IAEA meetings including a senior level meeting held in June 2002 in Vienna and a technical session of the IAEA General Conference in September 2002 addressed methods of knowledge transfer. This is the first IAEA report published on this specific topic. In 2000, the IAEA Technical Working Group on the Training and Qualification of NPP Personnel (TWG-T and Q) suggested that the IAEA should develop a publication on the definition of core competencies to be maintained by an NPP operating organization. The TWG-T and Q suggested that this TECDOC should provide additional detail beyond that specified in the recently revised Safety Guide NS-G-2.8, Recruitment, Qualification and Training of Personnel for Nuclear Power Plants. This task was included in the approved programme for 2002-2003. In March 2001, IAEA-TECDOC-1204, A Systematic Approach to Human Performance Improvement: Training Solutions was published. This TECDOC provides a comprehensive list of core competencies. These competencies provide the additional detail beyond that specified in Safety Guide NS-G-2.8 that the TWG-T and Q had suggested. The aspect of core competencies that is not addressed in IAEA-TECDOC-1204 is how to effectively transfer these competencies to the generation that replaces the workforce that

  14. The Application of Next Generation Sequencing Technology on Noninvasive Prenatal Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Hui

    a sensitivity and specificity of over 99%, which can provide accurate and reliable results and thus avoid most of invasive process compared to standard prenatal test. Moreover,we also designed probes for genes related to Monogenetic disorders and conducted target region sequencing for parents, proband......There are nearly 7000 rare diseases that have been reported in the world. Although most of them occur with a frequency of less than one in 2000, in total about 6% of the population suffers from rare diseases. These rare diseases are often caused by changes in genes, which is currently lack...... of effective treatment. The rapid development of next generation sequencing technology boosts the discovery of new causative gene for these rare diseases, as well as the genetic diagnosis in clinic practice. Carrier screening, prenatal diagnosis and newborn screening are wildly used in the world to prevent...

  15. Next Generation Hydro Software

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donchyts, G.; Baart, F.; Van Dam, A.; De Goede, E.; Icke, J.; Putten, H.

    2014-01-01

    An overview paper, describes motivation and main deliverables of the Next Generation Hydro Software (NGHS) project. Important technological innovations include development of the new computational core Delft3D Flexible Mesh, as well as the open modelling environment Delta Shell.

  16. Evaluation of Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP) Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) Operating Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. A. Harvego

    2006-04-01

    This report summarizes results of a preliminary evaluation to determine the operating conditions for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) that will transfer heat from the reactor primary system to the demonstration hydrogen production plant(s). The Department of Energy is currently investigating two primary options for the production of hydrogen using a high temperature reactor as the power source. These options are the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) and Sulfur-Iodine (SI) thermochemical hydrogen production processes. However, since the SI process relies entirely on process heat from the reactor, while the HTE process relies primarily on electrical energy with only a small amount of process heat required, the design of the IHX is dictated by the SI process heat requirements. Therefore, the IHX operating conditions were defined assuming 50 MWt is available for the production of hydrogen using the SI process. Three configurations for the intermediate loop were evaluated, including configurations for both direct and indirect power conversion systems. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to perform sensitivity studies to determine the influence of reactor outlet temperatures, intermediate loop working fluids (helium and molten salt), intermediate loop pressures, and intermediate loop piping lengths on NGNP performance and IHX operating conditions. The evaluation of NGNP performance included assessments of overall electric power conversion efficiency and estimated hydrogen production efficiency. Based on these evaluations, recommended IHX operating conditions are defined.

  17. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 1: Main Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, Sydney J [ORNL

    2008-03-01

    A phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) process was conducted for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) design. This design (in the conceptual stage) is a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) that generates both electricity and process heat for hydrogen production. Expert panels identified safety-relevant phenomena, ranked their importance, and assessed the knowledge levels in the areas of accidents and thermal fluids, fission-product transport and dose, high-temperature materials, graphite, and process heat for hydrogen production. This main report summarizes and documents the process and scope of the reviews, noting the major activities and conclusions. The identified phenomena, analyses, rationales, and associated ratings of the phenomena, plus a summary of each panel's findings, are presented. Individual panel reports for these areas are provided as attached volumes to this main report and provide considerably more detail about each panel's deliberations as well as a more complete listing of the phenomena that were evaluated.

  18. Efforts of development on the next generation nuclear reactor in the Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    At present, the Mitsubishi Heavy Industry, Ltd. (MHI) enters to development on APWR+ for a large-scale reactor, AP1000 and pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR) for middle- and small-scale one, and innovative one, under cooperation of power industries, manufacturers and institutes in and out of Japan. On APWR+, MHI occupies the most advanced position of conventional large-scale route, intends to carry out further upgrading of large capacity on a base of already developed 1500 MWe class APWR, and aims at further upgrading of economical efficiency. On the other reactor, as it becomes possible to perform value addition specific to the small-scale reactor with smaller output, it is planned to overcome its scale demerit by introducing more innovative techniques. And, on AP1000, it is intended to remove dynamic safety system by introducing a static one, to upgrade simplification of apparatus and reliability of safety system and to reduce its human factors. In addition, here was described on the next generation nuclear reactors under development. (G.K.)

  19. Near-term and next-generation nuclear power plant concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiga, Shigenori; Handa, Norihiko; Heki, Hideaki

    2002-01-01

    Near-term and next-generation nuclear reactors will be required to have high economic competitiveness in the deregulated electricity market, flexibility with respect to electricity demand and investment, and good public acceptability. For near-term reactors in the 2010s, Toshiba is developing an improved advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) based on the present ABWR with newly rationalized systems and components; a construction period of 36 months, one year shorter than the current period; and a power lineup ranging from 800 MWe to 1,600 MWe. For future reactors in the 2020s and beyond, Toshiba is developing the ABWR-II for large-scale, centralized power sources; a supercritical water-cooled power reactor with high thermal efficiency for medium-scale power sources; a modular reactor with siting flexibility for small-scale power sources; and a small, fast neutron reactor with inherent safety for independent power sources. From the viewpoint of efficient uranium resource utilization, a low-moderation BWR core with a high conversion factor is also being developed. (author)

  20. Planning and Programming of Education and Training Courses on the Radiation Fusion Technologies for Next Generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Nam, Y. M.; Choi, P. H.

    2009-06-01

    In order to program education and training courses on the radiation technologies and to have the WNU RT School to be held in Korea, this project was carried out. It was also done to make a strategy for running the programmed courses, and to build and knit a global network among radiation specialists such as international advisory board, domestic advisory board and steering committee. A plan for the WNU RT School in Korea was made under this project. Curricula in all subjects related to radiation technology and the lecture materials were prepared, which are essential for education and training courses on radiation technologies for next generations. Lecturers were selected among global CEOs and professionals in radiation industries and university professors and radiation specialists. In addition, a global network among radiation specialists such as international advisory board, domestic advisory board and steering committee was built and organized. As a model for the international education and training courses in RT field as well as the other fields, it can be used for making fundamentals of technology exports and promoting Korea's national image in science and technology

  1. Analysis of plant microbe interactions in the era of next generation sequencing technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia eKnief

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing (NGS technologies have impressively accelerated research in biological science during the last years by enabling the production of large volumes of sequence data to a drastically lower price per base, compared to traditional sequencing methods. The recent and ongoing developments in the field allow addressing research questions in plant-microbe biology that were not conceivable just a few years ago. The present review provides an overview of NGS technologies and their usefulness for the analysis of microorganisms that live in association with plants. Possible limitations of the different sequencing systems, in particular sources of errors and bias, are critically discussed and methods are disclosed that help to overcome these shortcomings. A focus will be on the application of NGS methods in metagenomic studies, including the analysis of microbial communities by amplicon sequencing, which can be considered as a targeted metagenomic approach. Different applications of NGS technologies are exemplified by selected research articles that address the biology of the pant associated microbiota to demonstrate the worth of the new methods.

  2. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Bratton, Rob [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Marsden, Barry [University of Manchester, UK; Srinivasan, Makuteswara [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Penfield, Scott [Technology Insights; Mitchell, Mark [PBMR (Pty) Ltd.; Windes, Will [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2008-03-01

    Here we report the outcome of the application of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) process to the issue of nuclear-grade graphite for the moderator and structural components of a next generation nuclear plant (NGNP), considering both routine (normal operation) and postulated accident conditions for the NGNP. The NGNP is assumed to be a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), either a gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GTMHR) version [a prismatic-core modular reactor (PMR)] or a pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) version [a pebble bed reactor (PBR)] design, with either a direct- or indirect-cycle gas turbine (Brayton cycle) system for electric power production, and an indirect-cycle component for hydrogen production. NGNP design options with a high-pressure steam generator (Rankine cycle) in the primary loop are not considered in this PIRT. This graphite PIRT was conducted in parallel with four other NRC PIRT activities, taking advantage of the relationships and overlaps in subject matter. The graphite PIRT panel identified numerous phenomena, five of which were ranked high importance-low knowledge. A further nine were ranked with high importance and medium knowledge rank. Two phenomena were ranked with medium importance and low knowledge, and a further 14 were ranked medium importance and medium knowledge rank. The last 12 phenomena were ranked with low importance and high knowledge rank (or similar combinations suggesting they have low priority). The ranking/scoring rationale for the reported graphite phenomena is discussed. Much has been learned about the behavior of graphite in reactor environments in the 60-plus years since the first graphite rectors went into service. The extensive list of references in the Bibliography is plainly testament to this fact. Our current knowledge base is well developed. Although data are lacking for the specific grades being considered for Generation IV (Gen IV

  3. Next Generation Life Support Project: Development of Advanced Technologies for Human Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Next Generation Life Support (NGLS) is one of several technology development projects sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Game Changing Development Program. NGLS is developing life support technologies (including water recovery, and space suit life support technologies) needed for humans to live and work productively in space. NGLS has three project tasks: Variable Oxygen Regulator (VOR), Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) swing bed, and Alternative Water Processing. The selected technologies within each of these areas are focused on increasing affordability, reliability, and vehicle self sufficiency while decreasing mass and enabling long duration exploration. The RCA and VOR tasks are directed at key technology needs for the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) for an Exploration Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), with focus on prototyping and integrated testing. The focus of the Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) swing-bed ventilation task is to provide integrated carbon dioxide removal and humidity control that can be regenerated in real time during an EVA. The Variable Oxygen Regulator technology will significantly increase the number of pressure settings available to the space suit. Current spacesuit pressure regulators are limited to only two settings while the adjustability of the advanced regulator will be nearly continuous. The Alternative Water Processor efforts will result in the development of a system capable of recycling wastewater from sources expected in future exploration missions, including hygiene and laundry water, based on natural biological processes and membrane-based post treatment. The technologies will support a capability-driven architecture for extending human presence beyond low Earth orbit to potential destinations such as the Moon, near Earth asteroids and Mars.

  4. Experimental and computational studies of thermal mixing in next generation nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landfried, Douglas Tyler

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is a proposed next generation nuclear power plant. The VHTR utilizes helium as a coolant in the primary loop of the reactor. Helium traveling through the reactor mixes below the reactor in a region known as the lower plenum. In this region there exists large temperature and velocity gradients due to non-uniform heat generation in the reactor core. Due to these large gradients, concern should be given to reducing thermal striping in the lower plenum. Thermal striping is the phenomena by which temperature fluctuations in the fluid and transferred to and attenuated by surrounding structures. Thermal striping is a known cause of long term material failure. To better understand and predict thermal striping in the lower plenum two separate bodies of work have been conducted. First, an experimental facility capable of predictably recreating some aspects of flow in the lower plenum is designed according to scaling analysis of the VHTR. Namely the facility reproduces jets issuing into a crossflow past a tube bundle. Secondly, extensive studies investigate the mixing of a non-isothermal parallel round triple-jet at two jet-to-jet spacings was conducted. Experimental results were validation with an open source computational fluid dynamics package, OpenFOAMRTM. Additional care is given to understanding the implementation of the realizable k-a and Launder Gibson RSM turbulence Models in OpenFOAMRTM. In order to measure velocity and temperature in the triple-jet experiment a detailed investigation of temperature compensated hotwire anemometry is carried out with special concern being given to quantify the error with the measurements. Finally qualitative comparisons of trends in the experimental results and the computational results is conducted. A new and unexpected physical behavior was observed in the center jet as it appeared to spread unexpectedly for close spacings (S/Djet = 1.41).

  5. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Research and Development Technical Program Plan -- PLN-2498

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

    2008-09-01

    One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the “highly ranked” phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

  6. Read length and repeat resolution: exploring prokaryote genomes using next-generation sequencing technologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt J Cahill

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are a growing number of next-generation sequencing technologies. At present, the most cost-effective options also produce the shortest reads. However, even for prokaryotes, there is uncertainty concerning the utility of these technologies for the de novo assembly of complete genomes. This reflects an expectation that short reads will be unable to resolve small, but presumably abundant, repeats. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a simple model of repeat assembly, we develop and test a technique that, for any read length, can estimate the occurrence of unresolvable repeats in a genome, and thus predict the number of gaps that would need to be closed to produce a complete sequence. We apply this technique to 818 prokaryote genome sequences. This provides a quantitative assessment of the relative performance of various lengths. Notably, unpaired reads of only 150nt can reconstruct approximately 50% of the analysed genomes with fewer than 96 repeat-induced gaps. Nonetheless, there is considerable variation amongst prokaryotes. Some genomes can be assembled to near contiguity using very short reads while others require much longer reads. CONCLUSIONS: Given the diversity of prokaryote genomes, a sequencing strategy should be tailored to the organism under study. Our results will provide researchers with a practical resource to guide the selection of the appropriate read length.

  7. Read length and repeat resolution: Exploring prokaryote genomes using next-generation sequencing technologies

    KAUST Repository

    Cahill, Matt J.

    2010-07-12

    Background: There are a growing number of next-generation sequencing technologies. At present, the most cost-effective options also produce the shortest reads. However, even for prokaryotes, there is uncertainty concerning the utility of these technologies for the de novo assembly of complete genomes. This reflects an expectation that short reads will be unable to resolve small, but presumably abundant, repeats. Methodology/Principal Findings: Using a simple model of repeat assembly, we develop and test a technique that, for any read length, can estimate the occurrence of unresolvable repeats in a genome, and thus predict the number of gaps that would need to be closed to produce a complete sequence. We apply this technique to 818 prokaryote genome sequences. This provides a quantitative assessment of the relative performance of various lengths. Notably, unpaired reads of only 150nt can reconstruct approximately 50% of the analysed genomes with fewer than 96 repeat-induced gaps. Nonetheless, there is considerable variation amongst prokaryotes. Some genomes can be assembled to near contiguity using very short reads while others require much longer reads. Conclusions: Given the diversity of prokaryote genomes, a sequencing strategy should be tailored to the organism under study. Our results will provide researchers with a practical resource to guide the selection of the appropriate read length. 2010 Cahill et al.

  8. Uses of Next-Generation Sequencing Technologies for the Diagnosis of Primary Immunodeficiencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Seleman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs are genetic disorders impairing host immunity, leading to life-threatening infections, autoimmunity, and/or malignancies. Genomic technologies have been critical for expediting the discovery of novel genetic defects underlying PIDs, expanding our knowledge of the complex clinical phenotypes associated with PIDs, and in shifting paradigms of PID pathogenesis. Once considered Mendelian, monogenic, and completely penetrant disorders, genomic studies have redefined PIDs as a heterogeneous group of diseases found in the global population that may arise through multigenic defects, non-germline transmission, and with variable penetrance. This review examines the uses of next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS in the diagnosis of PIDs. While whole genome sequencing identifies variants throughout the genome, whole exome sequencing sequences only the protein-coding regions within a genome, and targeted gene panels sequence only a specific cohort of genes. The advantages and limitations of each sequencing approach are compared. The complexities of variant interpretation and variant validation remain the major challenge in wide-spread implementation of these technologies. Lastly, the roles of NGS in newborn screening and precision therapeutics for individuals with PID are also addressed.

  9. A practical comparison of de novo genome assembly software tools for next-generation sequencing technologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyu Zhang

    Full Text Available The advent of next-generation sequencing technologies is accompanied with the development of many whole-genome sequence assembly methods and software, especially for de novo fragment assembly. Due to the poor knowledge about the applicability and performance of these software tools, choosing a befitting assembler becomes a tough task. Here, we provide the information of adaptivity for each program, then above all, compare the performance of eight distinct tools against eight groups of simulated datasets from Solexa sequencing platform. Considering the computational time, maximum random access memory (RAM occupancy, assembly accuracy and integrity, our study indicate that string-based assemblers, overlap-layout-consensus (OLC assemblers are well-suited for very short reads and longer reads of small genomes respectively. For large datasets of more than hundred millions of short reads, De Bruijn graph-based assemblers would be more appropriate. In terms of software implementation, string-based assemblers are superior to graph-based ones, of which SOAPdenovo is complex for the creation of configuration file. Our comparison study will assist researchers in selecting a well-suited assembler and offer essential information for the improvement of existing assemblers or the developing of novel assemblers.

  10. Metagenomics study of endophytic bacteria in Aloe vera using next-generation technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushafau Adewale Akinsanya

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing (NGS enables rapid analysis of the composition and diversity of microbial communities in several habitats. We applied the high throughput techniques of NGS to the metagenomics study of endophytic bacteria in Aloe vera plant, by assessing its PCR amplicon of 16S rDNA sequences (V3–V4 regions with the Illumina metagenomics technique used to generate a total of 5,199,102 reads from the samples. The analyses revealed Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteriodetes as the predominant genera. The roots have the largest composition with 23% not present in other tissues. The stems have more of the genus—Pseudomonas and the unclassified Pseudomonadaceae. The α-diversity analysis indicated the richness and inverse Simpson diversity index of the bacterial endophyte communities for the leaf, root and stem tissues to be 2.221, 6.603 and 1.491 respectively. In a similar study on culturable endophytic bacteria in the same A. vera plants (unpublished work, the dominance of Pseudomonas and Bacillus genera was similar, with equal proportion of four species each in root, stem and leaf tissues. It is evident that NGS technology captured effectively the metagenomics of microbiota in plant tissues and this can improve our understanding of the microbial–plant host interactions.

  11. Miniaturization Technologies for Efficient Single-Cell Library Preparation for Next-Generation Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Castilla, Sergio; To, Cuong; Vaezeslami, Soheila; Morey, Robert; Srinivasan, Srimeenakshi; Dumdie, Jennifer N; Cook-Andersen, Heidi; Jenkins, Joby; Laurent, Louise C

    2016-08-01

    As the cost of next-generation sequencing has decreased, library preparation costs have become a more significant proportion of the total cost, especially for high-throughput applications such as single-cell RNA profiling. Here, we have applied novel technologies to scale down reaction volumes for library preparation. Our system consisted of in vitro differentiated human embryonic stem cells representing two stages of pancreatic differentiation, for which we prepared multiple biological and technical replicates. We used the Fluidigm (San Francisco, CA) C1 single-cell Autoprep System for single-cell complementary DNA (cDNA) generation and an enzyme-based tagmentation system (Nextera XT; Illumina, San Diego, CA) with a nanoliter liquid handler (mosquito HTS; TTP Labtech, Royston, UK) for library preparation, reducing the reaction volume down to 2 µL and using as little as 20 pg of input cDNA. The resulting sequencing data were bioinformatically analyzed and correlated among the different library reaction volumes. Our results showed that decreasing the reaction volume did not interfere with the quality or the reproducibility of the sequencing data, and the transcriptional data from the scaled-down libraries allowed us to distinguish between single cells. Thus, we have developed a process to enable efficient and cost-effective high-throughput single-cell transcriptome sequencing. © 2016 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  12. Developing the User Experience for a Next Generation Nuclear Fuel Cycle Simulator (NGFCS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Paul H. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Schneider, Erich [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Pascucci, Valerio [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Livnat, Yarden [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hiromoto, Robert [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Scopatz, Anthony [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Brossard, Dominique [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Scheufele, Dietram [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2017-07-30

    This project made substantial progress on its original aim for providing a modern user experience for nuclear fuel cycle analysis while also creating a robust and functional next- generation fuel cycle simulator. The Cyclus kernel experienced a dramatic clari cation of its interfaces and data model, becoming a full- edged agent-based framework, with strong support for third party developers of novel archetypes. The most important contribution of this project to the the development of Cyclus was the introduction of tools to facilitate archetype development. These include automated code generation of routine archetype components, metadata annotations to provide re ection and rich description of each data member's purpose, and mechanisms for input validation and output of complex data. A comprehensive social science investigation of decision makers' interests in nuclear fuel cycles, and speci cally their interests in nuclear fuel cycle simulators (NFCSs) as tools for understanding nuclear fuel cycle options, was conducted. This included document review and analysis, stakeholder interviews, and a survey of decision makers. This information was used to study the role of visualization formats and features in communicating information about nuclear fuel cycles. A exible and user-friendly tool was developed for building Cyclus analysis models, featuring a drag-and-drop interface and automatic input form generation for novel archetypes. Cycic allows users to design fuel cycles from arbitrary collections of facilities for the rst time, with mechanisms that contribute to consistency within that fuel cycle. Interacting with some of the metadata capabilities introduced in the above-mentioned tools to support archetype development, Cycic also automates the generation of user input forms for novel archetypes with little to no special knowledge required by the archetype developers. Translation of the fundamental metrics of Cyclus into more interesting quantities is

  13. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant - Insights Gained from the INEEL Point Design Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip E. MacDonald; A. M. Baxter; P. D. Bayless; J. M. Bolin; H. D. Gougar; R. L. Moore; A. M. Ougouag; M. B. Richards; R. L. Sant; J. W. Sterbentz; W. K. Terry

    2004-08-01

    This paper provides the results of an assessment of two possible versions of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), a prismatic fuel type helium gas-cooled reactor and a pebble-bed fuel helium gas reactor. Insights gained regarding the strengths and weaknesses of the two designs are also discussed. Both designs will meet the three basic requirements that have been set for the NGNP: a coolant outlet temperature of 1000 C, passive safety, and a total power output consistent with that expected for commercial high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. Two major modifications of the current Gas Turbine- Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) design were needed to obtain a prismatic block design with a 1000 C outlet temperature: reducing the bypass flow and better controlling the inlet coolant flow distribution to the core. The total power that could be obtained for different core heights without exceeding a peak transient fuel temperature of 1600 °C during a high or low-pressure conduction cooldown event was calculated. With a coolant inlet temperature of 490 °C and 10% nominal core bypass flow, it is estimated that the peak power for a 10-block high core is 686 MWt, for a 12-block high core is 786 MWt, and for a 14-block core is about 889 MWt. The core neutronics calculations showed that the NGNP will exhibit strongly negative Doppler and isothermal temperature coefficients of reactivity over the burnup cycle. In the event of rapid loss of the helium gas, there is negligible core reactivity change. However, water or steam ingress into the core coolant channels can produce a relatively large reactivity effect. Two versions of an annular pebble-bed NGNP have also been developed, a 300 and a 600 MWt module. From this work we learned how to design passively safe pebble bed reactors that produce more than 600 MWt. We also found a way to improve both the fuel utilization and safety by modifying the pebble design (by adjusting the fuel zone radius in the pebble to optimize the fuel

  14. Fuelling innovation: Countries look to the next generation of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera, Judith

    2004-01-01

    The past few years have seen several multinational initiatives looking at the prospects for the medium and long-term development of nuclear energy. These include: the US-led Generation IV International Forum (GIF), the IAEA's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO), and the European Michelangelo network for competitiveness and sustainability of nuclear energy in the EU (Micanet). There have also been two major studies - a joint investigation by the IAEA together with the OECD's International Energy Agency (IEA) and Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), Innovative Nuclear Reactor Development; Opportunities for International Co-operation; and an interdisciplinary study by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on The Future of Nuclear Energy. All these cover much of the same ground, looking at innovative nuclear systems including reactors and fuel cycles. But, while they were prompted by the same set of underlying imperatives, they also differ to some extent, not least in the importance they attach to the nuclear fuel cycle. GIF and INPRO are two initiatives where enhanced international cooperation could emerge

  15. NASA Fluid Lensing & MiDAR: Next-Generation Remote Sensing Technologies for Aquatic Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirayath, Ved

    2018-01-01

    We present two recent instrument technology developments at NASA, Fluid Lensing and MiDAR, and their application to remote sensing of Earth's aquatic systems. Fluid Lensing is the first remote sensing technology capable of imaging through ocean waves in 3D at sub-cm resolutions. MiDAR is a next-generation active hyperspectral remote sensing and optical communications instrument capable of active fluid lensing. Fluid Lensing has been used to provide 3D multispectral imagery of shallow marine systems from unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs, or drones), including coral reefs in American Samoa and stromatolite reefs in Hamelin Pool, Western Australia. MiDAR is being deployed on aircraft and underwater remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) to enable a new method for remote sensing of living and nonliving structures in extreme environments. MiDAR images targets with high-intensity narrowband structured optical radiation to measure an objectâ€"TM"s non-linear spectral reflectance, image through fluid interfaces such as ocean waves with active fluid lensing, and simultaneously transmit high-bandwidth data. As an active instrument, MiDAR is capable of remotely sensing reflectance at the centimeter (cm) spatial scale with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) multiple orders of magnitude higher than passive airborne and spaceborne remote sensing systems with significantly reduced integration time. This allows for rapid video-frame-rate hyperspectral sensing into the far ultraviolet and VNIR wavelengths. Previously, MiDAR was developed into a TRL 2 laboratory instrument capable of imaging in thirty-two narrowband channels across the VNIR spectrum (400-950nm). Recently, MiDAR UV was raised to TRL4 and expanded to include five ultraviolet bands from 280-400nm, permitting UV remote sensing capabilities in UV A, B, and C bands and enabling mineral identification and stimulated fluorescence measurements of organic proteins and compounds, such as green fluorescent proteins in terrestrial and

  16. Next generation mobile broadcasting

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez-Barquero, David

    2013-01-01

    Next Generation Mobile Broadcasting provides an overview of the past, present, and future of mobile multimedia broadcasting. The first part of the book-Mobile Broadcasting Worldwide-summarizes next-generation mobile broadcasting technologies currently available. This part covers the evolutions of the Japanese mobile broadcasting standard ISDB-T One-Seg, ISDB-Tmm and ISDB-TSB; the evolution of the South Korean T-DMB mobile broadcasting technology AT-DMB; the American mobile broadcasting standard ATSC-M/H; the Chinese broadcasting technologies DTMB and CMMB; second-generation digital terrestrial

  17. Developing nuclear DNA phylogenetic markers in the angiosperm genus Leucadendron (Proteaceae): a next-generation sequencing transcriptomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonnabel, Jeanne; Olivieri, Isabelle; Mignot, Agnès; Rebelo, Anthony; Justy, Fabienne; Santoni, Sylvain; Caroli, Stéfanie; Sauné, Laure; Bouchez, Olivier; Douzery, Emmanuel J P

    2014-01-01

    Despite the recent advances in generating molecular data, reconstructing species-level phylogenies for non-models groups remains a challenge. The use of a number of independent genes is required to resolve phylogenetic relationships, especially for groups displaying low polymorphism. In such cases, low-copy nuclear exons and non-coding regions, such as 3' untranslated regions (3'-UTRs) or introns, constitute a potentially interesting source of nuclear DNA variation. Here, we present a methodology meant to identify new nuclear orthologous markers using both public-nucleotide databases and transcriptomic data generated for the group of interest by using next generation sequencing technology. To identify PCR primers for a non-model group, the genus Leucadendron (Proteaceae), we adopted a framework aimed at minimizing the probability of paralogy and maximizing polymorphism. We anchored when possible the right-hand primer into the 3'-UTR and the left-hand primer into the coding region. Seven new nuclear markers emerged from this search strategy, three of those included 3'-UTRs. We further compared the phylogenetic potential between our new markers and the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region (ITS). The sequenced 3'-UTRs yielded higher polymorphism rates than the ITS region did. We did not find strong incongruences with the phylogenetic signal contained in the ITS region and the seven new designed markers but they strongly improved the phylogeny of the genus Leucadendron. Overall, this methodology is efficient in isolating orthologous loci and is valid for any non-model group given the availability of transcriptomic data. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Modeling a Helical-coil Steam Generator in RELAP5-3D for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nathan V. Hoffer; Piyush Sabharwall; Nolan A. Anderson

    2011-01-01

    Options for the primary heat transport loop heat exchangers for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant are currently being evaluated. A helical-coil steam generator is one heat exchanger design under consideration. Safety is an integral part of the helical-coil steam generator evaluation. Transient analysis plays a key role in evaluation of the steam generators safety. Using RELAP5-3D to model the helical-coil steam generator, a loss of pressure in the primary side of the steam generator is simulated. This report details the development of the steam generator model, the loss of pressure transient, and the response of the steam generator primary and secondary systems to the loss of primary pressure. Back ground on High Temperature Gas-cooled reactors, steam generators, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant is provided to increase the readers understanding of the material presented.

  19. Beyond activity tracking: next-generation wearable and implantable sensor technologies (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Patrick

    2017-05-01

    Current-generation wearable devices have had success continuously measuring the activity and heart rate of subjects during exercise and daily life activities, resulting in interesting new data sets that can, though machine learning algorithms, predict a small subset of health conditions. However, this information is only very peripherally related to most health conditions, and thus offers limited utility to a wide range of the population. In this presentation, I will discuss emerging sensor technologies capable of measuring new and interesting parameters that can potentially offer much more meaningful and actionable data sets. Specifically, I will present recent work on wearable chemical sensors that can, for the first time, continuously monitor a suite of parameters like glucose, alcohol, lactate, and electrolytes, all while wirelessly delivering these results to a smart phone in real time. Demonstration platforms featuring patch, temporary tattoo, and mouthguard form factors will be described, in addition to the corresponding electronics necessary to perform sensor conditioning and wireless readout. Beyond chemical sensors, I will also discuss integration strategies with more conventional electrophysiological and physical parameters like ECG and strain gauges for cardiac and respiration rate monitoring, respectively. Finally, I will conclude the talk by introducing a new form of wireless communications in body-area networks that utilize the body itself as a channel for magnetic energy. Since the power consumption of conventional RF circuits often dominates the power of wearable devices, this new magnetic human body communication technique is specifically architected to dramatically reduce the path loss compared to conventional RF and capacitive human body communication techniques, thereby enabling ultra-low-power body area networks for next-generation wearable devices.

  20. Education and public relations in nuclear power toward the next generation in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I, Han-Joo; Seo, Doo-Han.

    1989-01-01

    The report outlines the education in nuclear engineering in colleges and universities in Korea, experiments and training in nuclear reactor operation, research project for education in peaceful utilization of nuclear power, and public relations activities and special plans intended for the new generation in the nation. Programs covering the education of students in nuclear engineering in colleges and universities in Korea, and public relations toward some selected groups and brackets have been conducted successfully, producing good results. On the other hand, some improvements in educational activities, including the revision of textbooks, are required in such a field of education of pupils in primary, middle and high schools. Specially-designed introductory courses and advanced courses in the peaceful utilization of nuclear power should be established to ensure that students in scientific or technological fields other than nuclear engineering will gain deeper understanding of the issue. For this, the preparation of textbooks are currently under way. It is hoped that public relations activities will be expanded on a more continuous and consistent basis, instead of the current intermittent basis, by making good use of the mass media to distribute information among the general public. (Nogami. K.)

  1. Education and public relations in nuclear power toward the next generation in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I, Han-Joo; Seo, Doo-Han.

    1989-02-01

    The report outlines the education in nuclear engineering in colleges and universities in Korea, experiments and training in nuclear reactor operation, research project for education in peaceful utilization of nuclear power, and public relations activities and special plans intended for the new generation in the nation. Programs covering the education of students in nuclear engineering in colleges and universities in Korea, and public relations toward some selected groups and brackets have been conducted successfully, producing good results. On the other hand, some improvements in educational activities, including the revision of textbooks, are required in such a field of education of pupils in primary, middle and high schools. Specially-designed introductory courses and advanced courses in the peaceful utilization of nuclear power should be established to ensure that students in scientific or technological fields other than nuclear engineering will gain deeper understanding of the issue. For this, the preparation of textbooks are currently under way. It is hoped that public relations activities will be expanded on a more continuous and consistent basis, instead of the current intermittent basis, by making good use of the mass media to distribute information among the general public. (Nogami. K.).

  2. Analysis of chemotherapy response programs in ovarian cancers by the next-generation sequencing technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lihua; Lu, Wei; Kulkarni, Bhushan; Pejovic, Tanja; Yan, Xiaowei; Chiang, Jung-Hsien; Hood, Leroy; Odunsi, Kunle; Lin, Biaoyang

    2010-05-01

    To understand the chemotherapy response program in ovarian cancer cells at deep transcript sequencing levels. Two next-generation sequencing technologies--MPSS (massively parallel signature sequencing) and SBS (sequencing by synthesis)--were used to sequence the transcripts of IGROV1 and IGROV1-CP cells, and to sequence the transcripts of a highly chemotherapy responsive and a highly chemotherapy resistant ovarian cancer tissue. We identified 3422 signatures (2957 genes) that are significantly different between IGROV1 and IGROV1-CP cells (P<0.001). Gene Ontology (GO) term GO:0001837 (epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition) and GO:0034330 (cell junction assembly and maintenance) are enriched in genes that are over expressed in IGROV1-CP cells while apoptosis-related GO terms are enriched in genes over expressed in IGROV1 cells. We identified 1187 tags (corresponding to 1040 genes) that are differentially expressed between the chemotherapy responsive and the persistently chemotherapy resistant ovarian cancer tissues. GO term GO:0050673 (epithelial cell proliferation) and GO:0050678 (regulation of epithelial cell proliferation) are enriched in the genes over expressed in the chemotherapy resistant tissue while the GO:0007229 (integrin-mediated signaling pathway) is enriched in the genes over expressed in the chemotherapy sensitive tissue. An integrative analysis identified 111 common differentially expressed genes including two bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP4 and BMP7), six solute carrier proteins (SLC10A3, SLC16A3, SLC25A1, SLC35B3, SLC7A5 and SLC7A7), transcription factor POU5F1 (POU class 5 homeobox 1), and KLK10 (kallikrein-related peptidase 10). A network analysis revealed a subnetwork with three genes BMP7, NR2F2 and AP2B1 that were consistently over expressed in the chemoresistant tissue or cells compared to the chemosensitive tissue or cells. Our database offers the first comprehensive view of the digital transcriptomes of ovarian cancer cell lines and tissues

  3. Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Allele Determination Using Next-Generation Sequencing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bercelin Maniangou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The impact of natural killer (NK cell alloreactivity on hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT outcome is still debated due to the complexity of graft parameters, HLA class I environment, the nature of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR/KIR ligand genetic combinations studied, and KIR+ NK cell repertoire size. KIR genes are known to be polymorphic in terms of gene content, copy number variation, and number of alleles. These allelic polymorphisms may impact both the phenotype and function of KIR+ NK cells. We, therefore, speculate that polymorphisms may alter donor KIR+ NK cell phenotype/function thus modulating post-HSCT KIR+ NK cell alloreactivity. To investigate KIR allele polymorphisms of all KIR genes, we developed a next-generation sequencing (NGS technology on a MiSeq platform. To ensure the reliability and specificity of our method, genomic DNA from well-characterized cell lines were used; high-resolution KIR typing results obtained were then compared to those previously reported. Two different bioinformatic pipelines were used allowing the attribution of sequencing reads to specific KIR genes and the assignment of KIR alleles for each KIR gene. Our results demonstrated successful long-range KIR gene amplifications of all reference samples using intergenic KIR primers. The alignment of reads to the human genome reference (hg19 using BiRD pipeline or visualization of data using Profiler software demonstrated that all KIR genes were completely sequenced with a sufficient read depth (mean 317× for all loci and a high percentage of mapping (mean 93% for all loci. Comparison of high-resolution KIR typing obtained to those published data using exome capture resulted in a reported concordance rate of 95% for centromeric and telomeric KIR genes. Overall, our results suggest that NGS can be used to investigate the broad KIR allelic polymorphism. Hence, these data improve our knowledge, not only on KIR+ NK cell alloreactivity in

  4. Commercializing the next generation: the AP600 advanced simplified nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruschi, H.J.

    1994-01-01

    Today, government and industry are working together on advanced nuclear power plant designs that take advantage of valuable lessons learned from the experience to date and promise to reconcile the demands of economic expansion with the laws of environmental protection. In the U.S., the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) initiated a design certification program in 1989 to develop and commercialize advanced light water reactors (ALWRs) for the next round of power plant construction. Advanced, simplified technology is one approach under development to end the industry's search for a simpler, more forgiving, and less costly reactor. As part of this program, Westinghouse is developing the AP600, a new standard 600 MWe advanced, simplified plant. The design strikes a balance between the use of proven technology and new approaches. The result is a greatly streamlined plant that can meet safety regulations and reliability requirements, be economically competitive, and promote broader public confidence in nuclear energy. 1 fig

  5. Development of fuel cladding material for the next-generation nuclear power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaharada, Yoshiyuki; Kano, Fumihisa; Kitano, Koji; Okonogi, Kazunari; Higuchi, Shinichi

    2009-01-01

    The capability for the fuel cladding made of silicon carbide (SiC) fiber-bonded ceramic composite, which consists of a close-packed structure of silicon carbide fiber, was studied. The microstructure was composed of the close-packed structure of the fiber with the interfacial carbon layer. For the thermomechanical properties, SiC composite indicated higher thermal conductivity than zirconium alloy and a relatively high tensile strength. Moreover, fracture toughness of SiC composite was higher than that of other monolithic ceramics owing to fiber layer debonding. The observed characteristics were favorable for SiC composite to be a candidate material applicable to the next-generation reactor. (author)

  6. The energy mix for the next generation: with or without nuclear?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agnes, M.; Tounkara, N.

    2001-01-01

    This paper has been prepared as a contribution to the ongoing debate on nuclear energy and sustainable development. Some of the supporters of sustainable energy systems do not see nuclear power as part of the future: an UNDP (United Nations Development Program) document 'Energy after Rio' suggests a role for nuclear power in a sustainable energy future in very doubtful terms; the Swedish Parliament's February 1997 law launching the phase out of nuclear power is entitled 'Government Bill on a Sustainable Energy Supply'; many environmental organizations underlined the incompatibility of nuclear power and sustainable energy systems; the European Parliament recently excluded nuclear power from the energy sources that can fit into flexibility mechanisms because of its unsustainability. The supporters of nuclear power see climate change concerns as a way to revitalize interest in nuclear power. They call for a significant role of nuclear power in sustainable energy systems mainly because it does not emit any CO 2 . Member countries of International Energy Agency (IEA) recognize the potential contribution of nuclear power to a sustainable energy mix. The Nuclear Energy Agency of OECD recognizes the potential role of nuclear power in sustainable development. In the framework of the United Nations Convention on Climate Change, the nuclear industry as a Non Governmental Organization (NGO) involved in the climate negotiations, emphasizes the role of nuclear power in reducing the greenhouse gas effect. In this debate, radioactive waste is the main argument against the sustainability of nuclear power whilst the fact that nuclear power does not produce emissions of airborne pollutants or CO 2 is used to argue that it can be a great contributor to sustainable energy systems. Our purpose is to go further in the debate: sustainability is not only about climate change and the role of nuclear power in achieving a 'sustainable development' goes further than the reduction of greenhouse

  7. Development of microsatellite markers for Suriana maritima (Surianaceae) using next-generation sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W S; Zhao, G; Jian, S G; Wang, Z F

    2015-10-30

    Our objective was to develop microsatellite markers for use in assessing genetic variation in the small shrub or tree species Suriana maritima (Surianaceae). In China, this species is found only as a few fragmented populations and individuals on the Paracel Islands. Using next-generation genome sequencing methodology, we developed 17 novel microsatellite markers for S. maritima. Fifty-four individuals from six populations of S. maritima were examined for polymorphisms; only one allele was detected for each of the markers. Microsatellite loci developed indicate a complete absence of genetic diversity for S. maritima on the Paracel Islands in China. These markers will be useful for examining genetic variation among S. maritima populations in other areas of the world.

  8. Educating the next generation of nuclear safeguards and security experts at TAMU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, William S.; Boyle, David; Chirayath, Sunil; Ford, David G.; Gariazzo, Claudio A.; Marianno, Craig; Ragusa, Kelley; Solodov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The Nuclear Security Science and Policy Institute (NSSPI) has established a Nuclear Nonproliferation specialization for the Master of Science degree within the Nuclear Engineering Department at Texas A and M University (TAMU). Since 2004, twenty-eight students have received MS degrees in this area and over 200 (technical and policy) students have taken classes offered by NSSPI at TAMU. The model for educating safeguards and security experts is being changed at TAMU. Beyond conventional classroom lectures, NSSPI has developed alternative educational models based on practical experience, asynchronous learning portals, and virtual courses in both nuclear safeguards and nuclear security. Due to the experimental and practical past experiences of NSSPI staff and faculty, a heavy hands-on component has been implemented for TAMU nuclear engineering graduate students: hands-on education at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, visiting nuclear installations in other countries to discuss applied safeguards, and summer internships at several national laboratories. In an effort to disseminate basic nuclear education for professionals and students around the globe, NSSPI has developed a publically-available online resource that offers self-paced, independent course modules in basic safeguards and security education: the Nuclear Safeguards Education Portal. Another venture utilized by NSSPI is using a virtual TAMU campus to hold classes for students at a distance. NSSPI is building upon a successful academic program by embracing new educational means. This paper describes the current efforts NSSPI and TAMU have undertaken in strengthening the nuclear nonproliferation, safeguards and security human resource capacity domestically and internationally and the lessons learned from these efforts. (author)

  9. Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite Creep Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, S. Blaine

    2009-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six gas reactor graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy's lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world's premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These graphite irradiations are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain seven separate stacks of graphite specimens. Six of the specimen stacks will have half of their graphite specimens under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six stacks will be organized into pairs with a different compressive load being applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks. The seventh stack will not have a compressive load on the graphite specimens during irradiation. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be the capability of sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or

  10. Airspace Systems Program: Next Generation Air Transportation System Concepts and Technology Development FY2010 Project Plan Version 3.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopardekar, Parimal H.

    2010-01-01

    This document describes the FY2010 plan for the management and execution of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) Concepts and Technology Development (CTD) Project. The document was developed in response to guidance from the Airspace Systems Program (ASP), as approved by the Associate Administrator of the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), and from guidelines in the Airspace Systems Program Plan. Congress established the multi-agency Joint Planning and Development Office (JPDO) in 2003 to develop a vision for the 2025 Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) and to define the research required to enable it. NASA is one of seven agency partners contributing to the effort. Accordingly, NASA's ARMD realigned the Airspace Systems Program in 2007 to "directly address the fundamental research needs of the Next Generation Air Transportation System...in partnership with the member agencies of the JPDO." The Program subsequently established two new projects to meet this objective: the NextGen-Airspace Project and the NextGen-Airportal Project. Together, the projects will also focus NASA s technical expertise and world-class facilities to address the question of where, when, how and the extent to which automation can be applied to moving aircraft safely and efficiently through the NAS and technologies that address optimal allocation of ground and air technologies necessary for NextGen. Additionally, the roles and responsibilities of humans and automation influence in the NAS will be addressed by both projects. Foundational concept and technology research and development begun under the NextGen-Airspace and NextGen-Airportal projects will continue. There will be no change in NASA Research Announcement (NRA) strategy, nor will there be any change to NASA interfaces with the JPDO, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Research Transition Teams (RTTs), or other stakeholders

  11. Development of a low bias method for characterizing viral populations using next generation sequencing technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M Willerth

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available With an estimated 38 million people worldwide currently infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, and an additional 4.1 million people becoming infected each year, it is important to understand how this virus mutates and develops resistance in order to design successful therapies.We report a novel experimental method for amplifying full-length HIV genomes without the use of sequence-specific primers for high throughput DNA sequencing, followed by assembly of full length viral genome sequences from the resulting large dataset. Illumina was chosen for sequencing due to its ability to provide greater coverage of the HIV genome compared to prior methods, allowing for more comprehensive characterization of the heterogeneity present in the HIV samples analyzed. Our novel amplification method in combination with Illumina sequencing was used to analyze two HIV populations: a homogenous HIV population based on the canonical NL4-3 strain and a heterogeneous viral population obtained from a HIV patient's infected T cells. In addition, the resulting sequence was analyzed using a new computational approach to obtain a consensus sequence and several metrics of diversity.This study demonstrates how a lower bias amplification method in combination with next generation DNA sequencing provides in-depth, complete coverage of the HIV genome, enabling a stronger characterization of the quasispecies present in a clinically relevant HIV population as well as future study of how HIV mutates in response to a selective pressure.

  12. NASA Fluid Lensing & MiDAR - Next-Generation Remote Sensing Technologies for Aquatic Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirayath, Ved

    2018-01-01

    Piti's Tepungan Bay and Tumon Bay, two of five marine preserves in Guam, have not been mapped to a level of detail sufficient to support proposed management strategies. This project addresses this gap by providing high resolution maps to promote sustainable, responsible use of the area while protecting natural resources. Dr. Chirayath, a research scientist at the NASA Ames Laboratory, developed a theoretical model and algorithm called 'Fluid Lensing'. Fluid lensing removes optical distortions caused by moving water, improving the clarity of the images taken of the corals below the surface. We will also be using MiDAR, a next-generation remote sensing instrument that provides real-time multispectral video using an array of LED emitters coupled with NASA's FluidCam Imaging System, which may assist Guam's coral reef response team in understanding the severity and magnitude of coral bleaching events. This project will produce a 3D orthorectified model of the shallow water coral reef ecosystems in Tumon Bay and Piti marine preserves. These 3D models may be printed, creating a tactile diorama and increasing understanding of coral reefs among various audiences, including key decision makers. More importantly, the final data products can enable accurate and quantitative health assessment capabilities for coral reef ecosystems.

  13. Reducing regulatory and economic uncertainty in the next generation of U.S. nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simard, R.L.; Bell, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plants have accounted for 40% of all new electricity supplied in the last 25 years. Nuclear energy and coal fired plants together account for approximately three quarters of the current electricity supply.In addition to assuring reliability and diversity of energy supply, U.S. nuclear plants proved their value in another critical area of the national energy policy-managing environmental impacts.Since 1973, the use of nuclear energy in lieu of fossil fuels has prevented the emission of more than 2 billion tons of carbon in the form of carbon dioxide, 80 million tons of sulfur dioxide and 35 million tons of nitrogen oxides. Now looking ahead to the next 25 years, the challenge is to maintain reliability of energy supply, while meeting increasingly urgent needs to minimize environmental impacts from the electricity sector. Fossil fired power plants face increasing regulatory requirements and constraints on emissions.The response to the challenges of the future must include aggressive development of renewable energy sources and increased reliance on nuclear energy-the only non-emitting sources of electricity available for deployment in the near term.(DM)

  14. Requirements for a top level hierarchy for a next generation nuclear data format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.A.; Koning, A.; Roubtsov, Y.D.; Mills, R.; Mattoon, C.M.; Beck, B.; Vogt, R.

    2014-01-01

    This document attempts to compile the requirements for the top-levels of a hierarchical arrangement of nuclear data such as is found in the ENDF format. This set of requirements will be used to guide the development of a new set of formats to replace the legacy ENDF format. (authors)

  15. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Evaluation of Siting a HTGR Co-generation Plant on an Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demick, L.E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes an evaluation by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project of siting a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant on an existing nuclear plant site that is located in an area of significant industrial activity. This is a co-generation application in which the HTGR Plant will be supplying steam and electricity to one or more of the nearby industrial plants.

  16. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Evaluation of Siting a HTGR Co-generation Plant on an Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.E. Demick

    2011-10-01

    This paper summarizes an evaluation by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project of siting a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant on an existing nuclear plant site that is located in an area of significant industrial activity. This is a co-generation application in which the HTGR Plant will be supplying steam and electricity to one or more of the nearby industrial plants.

  17. The first FDA marketing authorizations of next-generation sequencing technology and tests: challenges, solutions and impact for future assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijwaard, Karen; Dickey, Jennifer S; Kelm, Kellie; Težak, Živana

    2015-01-01

    The rapid emergence and clinical translation of novel high-throughput sequencing technologies created a need to clarify the regulatory pathway for the evaluation and authorization of these unique technologies. Recently, the US FDA authorized for marketing four next generation sequencing (NGS)-based diagnostic devices which consisted of two heritable disease-specific assays, library preparation reagents and a NGS platform that are intended for human germline targeted sequencing from whole blood. These first authorizations can serve as a case study in how different types of NGS-based technology are reviewed by the FDA. In this manuscript we describe challenges associated with the evaluation of these novel technologies and provide an overview of what was reviewed. Besides making validated NGS-based devices available for in vitro diagnostic use, these first authorizations create a regulatory path for similar future instruments and assays.

  18. Some ideas for next-generation controlled nuclear materials accountability techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brough, W.; Parrish, C.

    1994-08-01

    Current DOE regulations for Controlled Nuclear Materials (CNM) management have particular accounting problems that have become more evident as computer systems have been designed and programmed to automate the materials accounting functions. Some valuable detailed accounting information is lost with current accounting procedures and some aspects of the procedures are more complicated than need be. In February, 1988, the authors first recommended that the basic concepts of CNM accountability be reviewed, with particular emphasis on developing an Isotopic accountability system as opposed to the present Material-type accountability system. A parallel effort to review the materials measurement program would also be desirable

  19. Characterization of microflora in Latin-style cheeses by next-generation sequencing technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lusk Tina S

    2012-11-01

    have been influenced by the enrichment process. This study is the first to define Latin-style cheese microflora using Next-Generation Sequencing. These valuable preliminary data will direct selective tailoring of agar formulations to improve culture-based detection of pathogens in Latin-style cheese.

  20. Use of Commercial I and C in the Next Generation of Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G. L.

    2006-01-01

    The powerpoint presentation highlighted the following points: we should position ourselves to take better advantage of commercial equipment; the industry is taking certification for safety application seriously; we need ways to take advantage of these certifications rather than starting from zero; there will be gaps; and bridging these gaps will bring commercial technology to our market more quickly

  1. Fast flux fluid fuel reactor: A concept for the next generation of nuclear power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmiotti, G.; Feldman, E.E.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear energy has not become the preferred method of electrical energy production largely because of economic, safety, and proliferation concerns and challenges posed by nuclear waste disposal. Economies is the most important factor. To reduce the capital costs, the authors propose a compact configuration with a very high power density and correspondingly reduced reactor component sizes. Enhanced efficiency made possible by higher operating temperatures will also improve the economics of the design, and design simplicity will keep capital, operational, and maintenance costs down. The most direct solution to the nuclear waste problem is to eliminate waste production or, at least, minimize its amount and long-term radiotoxicity. This can be achieved by very high burnups, ideally 100%, and by the eventual transmutation of the long-lived fission products in situ. Very high burnups also improve the economics by optimal exploitation of the fuel. Safety concerns can be addressed by an inherently safe reactor design. Because of the intrinsic nature of nuclear materials, there probably is no definitive answer to proliferation concerns for systems that generate neutrons; however, it is important to minimize proliferation risks. The thorium cycle is a promising option because (a) plutonium is produced only in very small quantities, (b) the presence of 232 U makes handling the fuel very difficult and therefore proliferation resistant, and (c) 233 U is a fissile isotope that is less suitable than 239 Pu for making weapons and can be diluted with other uranium isotopes. An additional benefit of the thorium cycle is that it increases nuclear fuel resources by one order of magnitude. A fast flux fluid fuel reactor is a concept that can satisfy all the foregoing requirements. The fluid fuel systems have a very simple structure. Because integrity of the fuel is not an issue, these systems can operate at very high temperatures, can have high power densities, and can achieve very

  2. Novel Concepts for Damage-Resistant Alloys in Next Generation Nuclear Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen M. Bruemmer; Peter L. Andersen; Gary Was

    2002-12-27

    The discovery of a damage-resistant alloy based on Hf solute additions to a low-carbon 316SS is the highlight of the Phase II research. This damage resistance is supported by characterization of radiation-induced microstructures and microchemistries along with measurements of environmental cracking. The addition of Hf to a low-carbon 316SS reduced the detrimental impact of radiation by changing the distribution of Hf. Pt additions reduced the impact of radiation on grain boundary segregation but did not alter its effect on microstructural damage development or cracking. Because cracking susceptibility is associated with several material characteristics, separate effect experiments exploring strength effects using non-irradiated stainless steels were conducted. These crack growth tests suggest that irradiation strength by itself can promote environmental cracking. The second concept for developing damage resistant alloys is the use of metastable precipitates to stabilize the microstructure during irradiation. Three alloys have been tailored for evaluation of precipitate stability influences on damage evolution. The first alloy is a Ni-base alloy (alloy 718) that has been characterized at low neutron irradiation doses but has not been characterized at high irradiation doses. The other two alloys are Fe-base alloys (PH 17-7 and PH 17-4) that have similar precipitate structures as alloy 718 but is more practical in nuclear structures because of the lower Ni content and hence lesser transmutation to He.

  3. Next-generation sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rieneck, Klaus; Bak, Mads; Jønson, Lars

    2013-01-01

    the feasibility of predicting the fetal KEL1 phenotype using next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: The KEL1/2 single-nucleotide polymorphism was polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified with one adjoining base, and the PCR product was sequenced using a genome analyzer (GAIIx......, Illumina); several millions of PCR sequences were analyzed. RESULTS: The results demonstrated the feasibility of diagnosing the fetal KEL1 or KEL2 blood group from cell-free DNA purified from maternal plasma. CONCLUSION: This method requires only one primer pair, and the large amount of sequence...

  4. Need for Strengthening Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Safeguards Education to Prepare the Next Generation of Experts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssens, W.A.M.; Peerani, P.; ); Gariazzo, C.; Ward, S.; Crete, J.-M.; Braunegger-Guelich, A.

    2015-01-01

    Although nuclear non-proliferation and safeguards are a continuous concern of the international community and discussed frequently at international fora and conferences, the academic world is not really on board with these topics. What we mean by this is that nuclear non-proliferation and safeguards is only very seldom part of a university curriculum. In the few cases where it does appear in the curriculum, whether in a nuclear engineering course or a political sciences master programme, it is typically covered only partially. Nuclear non-proliferation and safeguards are multidisciplinary and embrace, inter alia, historical, legal, technical, and political aspects. This is perhaps the reason why it is challenging for a single professor or university to develop and implement a comprehensive academic course or programme in this area. Professional organizations in this field, like the European Safeguards Research and Development Association (ESARDA) and the Institute for Nuclear Materials Management (INMM), have made first steps to address this issue by implementing specific educational activities. However, much more needs to be done. Therefore, ESARDA, INMM and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are in the process of joining efforts to identify key elements and priorities to support universities in establishing appropriate and effective academic programmes in this area. This paper will share best practices, achievements and lessons learned by ESARDA, INMM and the IAEA in providing education and training to develop and maintain the expertise of nuclear non-proliferation and safeguards professionals. In addition, it will suggest potential ways on how to assist universities to get prepared for building-up the next generation of experts able to meet any future challenges in the area of non-proliferation and safeguards. (author)

  5. Meeting the economic objectives for the next generation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerstenhaber, E.; Mahlab, M. A.

    1997-01-01

    The Westinghouse AP600 reactor is a 600 MW size, Advanced Light Water Reactor with passive designed safety systems. In its twin configuration, the AP600 delivers 1200 MW of power and is competitive with 1200 MW plant of evolutionary design with active safety system. Cost reduction occur with the AP600 compared to conventional technology because of passive safety systems that eliminates costly active safety equipment and piping. In addition, the second unit of a twin AP600 is constructed for 80% of the cost of the first unit because of cost savings from share facilities, multiple purchaser and learning curve effect. The AP600 with its modular construction is able to be constructed in five years compared to six years for a 1200 MW size plant. The twin AP600 brings one 600 MW unit on line one year early resulting in significant reduction in interest during construction and producing early cash flow for the project. Additionally the first unit generates cash flow during its first year of operation, reducing its equivalent investment compared to the larger unit. In total the twin AP600 more than makes up a theoretical 28% economy of scale advantage in unit capital cost for the large plant. Historical analysis is presented in the paper for electricity generation cost of Westinghouse U.S. 2-loop plants have operated for over twenty years each and are characterized by low operating cost and high availability and capacity factors. This experience of the low operating costs and high performance factors is anticipated for the AP600, and was modeled to derive life cycle electricity generation cost. (author)

  6. Cleaning of SCALPEL next-generation lithography masks using PLASMAX, a revolutionary dry cleaning technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festa, John J.; Novembre, Anthony E.; Bennett, Darryl A.; Kasica, Richard J.; Bailey, Brad; Blakey, Myrtle I.

    1999-12-01

    Due to mechanical and exposure considerations, NGL mask technology lacks the ability to use a pellicle to prevent mask contamination. The PLASMAX (Plasma Mechanical Activation and Extraction of Particle Contamination) process represents a technology, which acts as the functional replacement of a pellicle for the NGL mask. This dry environmentally benign cleaning technology can be directly integrated into the exposure system and serves as an in-situ creative mask cleaning process. Unlike other, more conventional cleaning methods, PLASMAX lifts surface particles from the mask, then suspends, traps and channels these particles down the vacuum port, thus preventing particle redeposition on the mask surface. Originally demonstrated on wafers, this plasma/mechanical cleaning technology has demonstrated its ability to remove particles from the surface of NGL masks such as SCALPEL (Scattering with Angular Limitation in Projection Electron Beam Lithography) masks. PLASMAX uses the combined action of a gentle plasma with simultaneous vibration to clean the mask. Unlike all other methods of mask cleaning, PLASMAX uses no water or hazardous acids, thus reducing the cost of each cleaning step and eliminating the environmental impact of today's aqueous cleaning technologies. Initial work with SCALPEL masks showed them to be highly stable and robust in the PLASMAX environment while yielding cleaning efficiencies of 90% removal of polyester particles 0.8 micron and larger. The PlASMAX technology was proven to be effective in removing particles from the patterned front side and strutted backside of the mask. This paper focuses on the ongoing development of PLASMAX to enhance the cleaning efficiency of SCALPEL masks down to 0.25-micron particles. In addition, the cleaning efficiency of various particle materials will be studied. Sandia National Laboratories is providing software model simulations of the PLASMAX technology to assist in the development effort.

  7. Illuminating Solar Decathlon Homes: Exploring Next Generation Lighting Technology - Light Emitting Diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, Kelly L.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

    2008-05-22

    This report was prepared by PNNL for the US Department of Energy Building Technologies Program, Solid-State Lighting Program. The report will be provided to teams of university students who are building houses for the 2009 Solar Decathlon, a home design competition sponsored in part by DOE, to encourage teams to build totally solar powered homes. One aspect of the competition is lighting. This report provides the teams with information about LED lighting that can help them determine how they incorporate LED lighting into their homes. The report provides an overview of LED technology, a status of where LED technology is today, questions and answers about lighting quality, efficiency, lifetime etc.; numerous examples of LED products; and several weblinks for further research.

  8. Performance Evaluation of Speech Recognition Systems as a Next-Generation Pilot-Vehicle Interface Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Shelton, Kevin J.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Bailey, Randall E.

    2016-01-01

    During the flight trials known as Gulfstream-V Synthetic Vision Systems Integrated Technology Evaluation (GV-SITE), a Speech Recognition System (SRS) was used by the evaluation pilots. The SRS system was intended to be an intuitive interface for display control (rather than knobs, buttons, etc.). This paper describes the performance of the current "state of the art" Speech Recognition System (SRS). The commercially available technology was evaluated as an application for possible inclusion in commercial aircraft flight decks as a crew-to-vehicle interface. Specifically, the technology is to be used as an interface from aircrew to the onboard displays, controls, and flight management tasks. A flight test of a SRS as well as a laboratory test was conducted.

  9. Biomolecule Sequencer: Next-Generation DNA Sequencing Technology for In-Flight Environmental Monitoring, Research, and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David J.; Burton, Aaron; Castro-Wallace, Sarah; John, Kristen; Stahl, Sarah E.; Dworkin, Jason Peter; Lupisella, Mark L.

    2016-01-01

    On the International Space Station (ISS), technologies capable of rapid microbial identification and disease diagnostics are not currently available. NASA still relies upon sample return for comprehensive, molecular-based sample characterization. Next-generation DNA sequencing is a powerful approach for identifying microorganisms in air, water, and surfaces onboard spacecraft. The Biomolecule Sequencer payload, manifested to SpaceX-9 and scheduled on the Increment 4748 research plan (June 2016), will assess the functionality of a commercially-available next-generation DNA sequencer in the microgravity environment of ISS. The MinION device from Oxford Nanopore Technologies (Oxford, UK) measures picoamp changes in electrical current dependent on nucleotide sequences of the DNA strand migrating through nanopores in the system. The hardware is exceptionally small (9.5 x 3.2 x 1.6 cm), lightweight (120 grams), and powered only by a USB connection. For the ISS technology demonstration, the Biomolecule Sequencer will be powered by a Microsoft Surface Pro3. Ground-prepared samples containing lambda bacteriophage, Escherichia coli, and mouse genomic DNA, will be launched and stored frozen on the ISS until experiment initiation. Immediately prior to sequencing, a crew member will collect and thaw frozen DNA samples, connect the sequencer to the Surface Pro3, inject thawed samples into a MinION flow cell, and initiate sequencing. At the completion of the sequencing run, data will be downlinked for ground analysis. Identical, synchronous ground controls will be used for data comparisons to determine sequencer functionality, run-time sequence, current dynamics, and overall accuracy. We will present our latest results from the ISS flight experiment the first time DNA has ever been sequenced in space and discuss the many potential applications of the Biomolecule Sequencer for environmental monitoring, medical diagnostics, higher fidelity and more adaptable Space Biology Human

  10. Next-generation cellulosic ethanol technologies and their contribution to a sustainable Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zyl, W. H.; Chimphango, A. F. A.; den Haan, R.; Görgens, J. F.; Chirwa, P. W. C.

    2011-01-01

    The world is currently heavily dependent on oil, especially in the transport sector. However, rising oil prices, concern about environmental impact and supply instability are among the factors that have led to greater interest in renewable fuel and green chemistry alternatives. Lignocellulose is the only foreseeable renewable feedstock for sustainable production of transport fuels. The main technological impediment to more widespread utilization of lignocellulose for production of fuels and chemicals in the past has been the lack of low-cost technologies to overcome the recalcitrance of its structure. Both biological and thermochemical second-generation conversion technologies are currently coming online for the commercial production of cellulosic ethanol concomitantly with heat and electricity production. The latest advances in biological conversion of lignocellulosics to ethanol with a focus on consolidated bioprocessing are highlighted. Furthermore, integration of cellulosic ethanol production into existing bio-based industries also using thermochemical processes to optimize energy balances is discussed. Biofuels have played a pivotal yet suboptimal role in supplementing Africa's energy requirements in the past. Capitalizing on sub-Saharan Africa's total biomass potential and using second-generation technologies merit a fresh look at the potential role of bioethanol production towards developing a sustainable Africa while addressing food security, human needs and local wealth creation. PMID:22482027

  11. Dutch Micro Systems Technology for the Next Generation of Small Satellites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gill, E.; Monna, G.L.E.; Scherpen, J.M.A.; Verhoeven, C.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Advanced microelectronics and Micro Systems Technology (MST) enable an increased functional performance of small satellites with decreased demands on mass, size and power. The research and development cluster MISAT stimulates the design and development of advanced small satellite platforms based on

  12. Next-Generation Technologies for Production and Distribution of FWU Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Uwe L.

    1998-01-01

    Examines the potential for learning offered by computer technology and describes work of the German Institut fur Film und Bild in Wissenschaft und Unterricht (FWU), including database systems for audiovisual centers, electronic communication, digitization of media, and modularized media for interactive education and training. (LRW)

  13. Next-generation cellulosic ethanol technologies and their contribution to a sustainable Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zyl, W H; Chimphango, A F A; den Haan, R; Görgens, J F; Chirwa, P W C

    2011-04-06

    The world is currently heavily dependent on oil, especially in the transport sector. However, rising oil prices, concern about environmental impact and supply instability are among the factors that have led to greater interest in renewable fuel and green chemistry alternatives. Lignocellulose is the only foreseeable renewable feedstock for sustainable production of transport fuels. The main technological impediment to more widespread utilization of lignocellulose for production of fuels and chemicals in the past has been the lack of low-cost technologies to overcome the recalcitrance of its structure. Both biological and thermochemical second-generation conversion technologies are currently coming online for the commercial production of cellulosic ethanol concomitantly with heat and electricity production. The latest advances in biological conversion of lignocellulosics to ethanol with a focus on consolidated bioprocessing are highlighted. Furthermore, integration of cellulosic ethanol production into existing bio-based industries also using thermochemical processes to optimize energy balances is discussed. Biofuels have played a pivotal yet suboptimal role in supplementing Africa's energy requirements in the past. Capitalizing on sub-Saharan Africa's total biomass potential and using second-generation technologies merit a fresh look at the potential role of bioethanol production towards developing a sustainable Africa while addressing food security, human needs and local wealth creation.

  14. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant/Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, S. Blaine

    2009-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy's lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world's premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006, and the second experiment (AGR-2) is currently in the design phase. The design of test trains, as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation will be discussed. In

  15. Internet of Things and big data technologies for next generation healthcare

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Nilanjan; Ashour, Amira

    2017-01-01

    This comprehensive book focuses on better big-data security for healthcare organizations. Following an extensive introduction to the Internet of Things (IoT) in healthcare including challenging topics and scenarios, it offers an in-depth analysis of medical body area networks with the 5th generation of IoT communication technology along with its nanotechnology. It also describes a novel strategic framework and computationally intelligent model to measure possible security vulnerabilities in the context of e-health. Moreover, the book addresses healthcare systems that handle large volumes of data driven by patients’ records and health/personal information, including big-data-based knowledge management systems to support clinical decisions. Several of the issues faced in storing/processing big data are presented along with the available tools, technologies and algorithms to deal with those problems as well as a case study in healthcare analytics. Addressing trust, privacy, and security issues as well as the I...

  16. On-Orbit Measurement of Next Generation Space Solar Cell Technology on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolford, David S.; Myers, Matthew G.; Prokop, Norman F.; Krasowski, Michael J.; Parker, David S.; Cassidy, Justin C.; Davies, William E.; Vorreiter, Janelle O.; Piszczor, Michael F.; McNatt, Jeremiah S.

    2015-01-01

    Measurement is essential for the evaluation of new photovoltaic (PV) technology for space solar cells. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is in the process of measuring several solar cells in a supplemental experiment on NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Robotic Refueling Mission's (RRM) Task Board 4 (TB4). Four industry and government partners have provided advanced PV devices for measurement and orbital environment testing. The experiment will be on-orbit for approximately 18 months. It is completely self-contained and will provide its own power and internal data storage. Several new cell technologies including four- junction (4J) Inverted Metamorphic Multijunction (IMM) cells will be evaluated and the results compared to ground-based measurements.

  17. The next generation CdTe technology- Substrate foil based solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferekides, Chris [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2017-03-22

    The main objective of this project was the development of one of the most promising Photovoltaic (PV) materials CdTe into a versatile, cost effective, and high throughput technology, by demonstrating substrate devices on foil substrates using high throughput fabrication conditions. The typical CdTe cell is of the superstrate configuration where the solar cell is fabricated on a glass superstrate by the sequential deposition of a TCO, n-type heterojunction partner, p-CdTe absorber, and back contact. Large glass modules are heavy and present significant challenges during manufacturing (uniform heating, etc.). If a substrate CdTe cell could be developed (the main goal of this project) a roll-to-toll high throughput technology could be developed.

  18. Leading research on next generation metal production technology; Jisedai kinzoku shigen seisan gijutsu no sendo kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The energy saving environment-friendly technology for low- grade difficult-to-process ores was researched focusing attention on the hydro-metallurgical process of non-ferrous metals. This research aims at development of both effective leaching system of metals, and separation/crystallization system recognizing the property difference between metal ions in solution. The leaching system allows the inexpensive molecular level control of electron transfer, mass transfer of metal ions and stabilization of leached metal ions in a solid/liquid interface. The system thus allows selective leaching of metals from various resources such as difficult- to-leach sulfide minerals to prepare concentrated solutions. The separation system can obtain high-purity solutions including each metal ion by advanced separation/concentration technology from the solutions. The crystallization technology (including electrolysis) is developed for preparing target metal materials by molecular level control of nucleation, particle growth, thin film formation and bulky metal formation processes. Overall energy consumption is reduced to 1/3 of that of the pyro-metallurgical method, aiming at zero emission. 15 refs., 14 figs., 11 tabs.

  19. Demonstration of Next-Generation PEM CHP Systems for Global Markets Using PBI Membrane Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, John [Plug Power Inc., Latham, NY (United States); Fritz Intwala, Katrina [Plug Power Inc., Latham, NY (United States)

    2009-08-01

    Plug Power and BASF have conducted eight years of development work prior to this project, demonstrating the potential of PBI membranes to exceed many DOE technical targets. This project consisted of; 1.The development of a worldwide system architecture; 2.Stack and balance of plant module development; 3.Development of an improved, lower cost MEA electrode; 4.Receipt of an improved MEA from the EU consortium; 5.Integration of modules into a system; and 6.Delivery of system to EU consortium for additional integration of technologies and testing.

  20. Modeling and processing for next-generation big-data technologies with applications and case studies

    CERN Document Server

    Barolli, Leonard; Barolli, Admir; Papajorgji, Petraq

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the latest advances in Big Data technologies and provides the readers with a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art in Big Data processing, analysis, analytics, and other related topics. It presents new models, algorithms, software solutions and methodologies, covering the full data cycle, from data gathering to their visualization and interaction, and includes a set of case studies and best practices. New research issues, challenges and opportunities shaping the future agenda in the field of Big Data are also identified and presented throughout the book, which is intended for researchers, scholars, advanced students, software developers and practitioners working at the forefront in their field.

  1. Next Generation Waste Tracking: Linking Legacy Systems with Modern Networking Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, Randy M.; Resseguie, David R.; Shankar, Mallikarjun; Gorman, Bryan L.; Smith, Cyrus M.; Hill, David E.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes results from a preliminary analysis to satisfy the Department of Energy (DOE) objective to ensure the safe, secure, efficient packaging and transportation of materials both hazardous and non hazardous (1, 2). The DOE Office of Environmental Management (OEM) through Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has embarked on a project to further this objective. OEM and ORNL have agreed to develop, demonstrate and make available modern day cost effective technologies for characterization, identification, tracking, monitoring and disposal of radioactive waste when transported by, or between, motor, air, rail, and water modes. During the past 8 years ORNL has investigated and deployed Web 2.0 compliant sensors into the transportation segment of the supply chain. ORNL has recently demonstrated operational experience with DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) and others in national test beds and applications within this domain of the supply chain. Furthermore, in addition to DOE, these hazardous materials supply chain partners included Federal and State enforcement agencies, international ports, and commercial sector shipping operations in a hazardous/radioactive materials tracking and monitoring program called IntelligentFreight. IntelligentFreight is an ORNL initiative encompassing 5 years of research effort associated with the supply chain. The ongoing ORNL SmartFreight programs include RadSTraM (3), GRadSTraM, Trusted Corridors, SensorPedia (4), SensorNet, Southeastern Transportation Corridor Pilot (SETCP) and Trade Data Exchange (5). The integration of multiple technologies aimed at safer more secure conveyance has been investigated with the core research question being focused on testing distinctly different distributed supply chain information sharing systems. ORNL with support from ORO have demonstrated capabilities when transporting Environmental Management (EM) waste materials for disposal over an onsite haul road. ORNL has unified the operations

  2. Telebation: next-generation telemedicine in remote airway management using current wireless technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosier, Jarrod; Joseph, Bellal; Sakles, John C

    2013-02-01

    Since the first remote intubation with telemedicine guidance, wireless technology has advanced to enable more portable methods of telemedicine involvement in remote airway management. Three voice over Internet protocol (VoIP) services were evaluated for quality of image transmitted, data lag, and audio quality with remotely observed and assisted intubations in an academic emergency department. The VoIP clients evaluated were Apple (Cupertino, CA) FaceTime(®), Skype™ (a division of Microsoft, Luxembourg City, Luxembourg), and Tango(®) (TangoMe, Palo Alto, CA). Each client was tested over a Wi-Fi network as well as cellular third generation (3G) (Skype and Tango). All three VoIP clients provided acceptable image and audio quality. There is a significant data lag in image transmission and quality when VoIP clients are used over cellular broadband (3G) compared with Wi-Fi. Portable remote telemedicine guidance is possible with newer technology devices such as a smartphone or tablet, as well as VoIP clients used over Wi-Fi or cellular broadband.

  3. Next Generation Metallic Iron Nodule Technology in Electric Arc Steelmaking - Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald R. Fosnacht; Iwao Iwasaki; Richard F. Kiesel; David J. Englund; David W. Hendrickson; Rodney L. Bleifuss

    2010-12-22

    The current trend in the steel industry is a gradual decline in conventional steelmaking from taconite pellets in blast furnaces, and an increasing number of alternative processes using metallic scrap iron, pig iron and metallized iron ore products. Currently, iron ores from Minnesota and Michigan are pelletized and shipped to the lower Great Lakes ports as blast furnace feed. The existing transportation system and infrastructure is geared to handling these bulk materials. In order to expand the opportunities for the existing iron ore mines beyond their blast furnace customer base, a new material is needed to satisfy the needs of the emerging steel industry while utilizing the existing infrastructure and materials handling. A recent commercial installation employing Kobe Steel’s ITmk3 process, was installed in Northeastern Minnesota. The basic process uses a moving hearth furnace to directly reduce iron oxides to metallic iron from a mixture of iron ore, coals and additives. The resulting products can be shipped using the existing infrastructure for use in various steelmaking processes. The technology reportedly saves energy by 30% over the current integrated steelmaking process and reduces emissions by more than 40%. A similar large-scale pilot plant campaign is also currently in progress using JFE Steel’s Hi-QIP process in Japan. The objective of this proposal is to build upon and improve the technology demonstrated by Kobe Steel and JFE, by further reducing cost, improving quality and creating added incentive for commercial development. This project expands previous research conducted at the University of Minnesota Duluth’s Natural Resources Research Institute and that reported by Kobe and JFE Steel. Three major issues have been identified and are addressed in this project for producing high-quality nodular reduced iron (NRI) at low cost: (1) reduce the processing temperature, (2) control the furnace gas atmosphere over the NRI, and (3) effectively use sub

  4. Special Session 3 The Virtual Observatory in action: new science, new technology, and next generation facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Nicholas A.; Lawrence, Andrew; Williams, Roy

    2007-08-01

    The vision of the Virtual Observatory (VO) is to make access to astronomical databases as seamless and transparent as browsing the World Wide Web is today. It will federate the data flows from current and future facilities and large scale surveys, and the computational resources and new tools necessary to fully exploit them. This requires both technological developments and an international commitment to standardisation and working culture. Increasingly, it will alter the way that astronomers do science, and the way that future facilities and projects plan for their data management, and the scientific exploitation of their data. It will make an impact on a wide variety of astronomical topics, but especially those using very large databases, and those needing a multiwavelength approach, or more generally the use of multiple archives.

  5. Development of next generation consumable technologies for chemical mechanical planarization of copper/low K devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keleher, Jason J.

    Chemical Mechanical Planarization (CMP) has become the key planarization technology for the fabrication of ultra large-scale integration (ULSI) silicon devices that contain sub-quarter micron metal and dielectric lines. The rapid integration of copper as the interconnect material into IC production has placed a high demand on Cu CMP slurry development. Key issues in CMP today include reduction of surface defectivity and enhancement of planarization efficiency. More specifically, the polished surface should be free of defects such as scratches, pits, corrosion spots, trench copper loss, and residue particles. This dissertation will explore the use of Abrasive Free and Novel Abrasive systems as a plausible solution for the planarization Cu/low K devices. For copper/low K CMP, one of the most promising strategies to accomplishing these goals is an Abrasive-Free Process (AFP). By eliminating abrasive particles from the process, either free or fixed to the pad, it has been anticipated and realized that defects such as severe scratching, particle contamination and slurry instability via particle aggregation or settling will be significantly reduced. In addition, with proper formulation, an abrasive free process can also yield an excellent over polishing window and desired step function of pressure for material removal rate. Coupled with a supramolecular design, some of the characteristic advantages seen in abrasive containing systems, such as step height reduction efficiency, can be realized without the side effects often introduced from solid particles. The second portion of this dissertation deals with the use of novel hydrophobic particles such as diamond and boron nitride. Hydrophobic particles have received much less attention because of issues related to the stability when placed in an aqueous media as well as the inability of the particles to interact with the abraded material. In general the ability of the hydrophobic particle to interact with the oxidized or

  6. Next generation CANDU plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedges, K.R.; Yu, S.K.W.

    1998-01-01

    Future CANDU designs will continue to meet the emerging design and performance requirements expected by the operating utilities. The next generation CANDU products will integrate new technologies into both the product features as well as into the engineering and construction work processes associated with delivering the products. The timely incorporation of advanced design features is the approach adopted for the development of the next generation of CANDU. AECL's current products consist of 700MW Class CANDU 6 and 900 MW Class CANDU 9. Evolutionary improvements are continuing with our CANDU products to enhance their adaptability to meet customers ever increasing need for higher output. Our key product drivers are for improved safety, environmental protection and improved cost effectiveness. Towards these goals we have made excellent progress in Research and Development and our investments are continuing in areas such as fuel channels and passive safety. Our long term focus is utilizing the fuel cycle flexibility of CANDU reactors as part of the long term energy mix

  7. Hacking Hackathons: Preparing the next generation for the multidisciplinary world of healthcare technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyndon, Mataroria P; Cassidy, Michael P; Celi, Leo Anthony; Hendrik, Luk; Kim, Yoon Jeon; Gomez, Nicholas; Baum, Nathaniel; Bulgarelli, Lucas; Paik, Kenneth E; Dagan, Alon

    2018-04-01

    Machine learning in healthcare, and innovative healthcare technology in general, require complex interactions within multidisciplinary teams. Healthcare hackathons are being increasingly used as a model for cross-disciplinary collaboration and learning. The aim of this study is to explore high school student learning experiences during a healthcare hackathon. By optimizing their learning experiences, we hope to prepare a future workforce that can bridge technical and health fields and work seamlessly across disciplines. A qualitative exploratory study utilizing focus group interviews was conducted. Eight high school students from the hackathon were invited to participate in this study through convenience sampling Participating students (n = 8) were allocated into three focus groups. Semi structured interviews were completed, and transcripts evaluated using inductive thematic analysis. Through the structured analysis of focus group transcripts three major themes emerged from the data: (1) Collaboration, (2) Transferable knowledge and skills, and (3) Expectations about hackathons. These themes highlight strengths and potential barriers when bringing this multidisciplinary approach to high school students and the healthcare community. This study found that students were empowered by the interdisciplinary experience during a hackathon and felt that the knowledge and skills gained could be applied in real world settings. However, addressing student expectations of hackathons prior to the event is an area for improvement. These findings have implications for future hackathons and can spur further research into using the hackathon model as an educational experience for learners of all ages. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Modeling a Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger with RELAP5-3D for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The main purpose of this report is to design a printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant and carry out Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) simulation using RELAP5-3D. Helium was chosen as the coolant in the primary and secondary sides of the heat exchanger. The design of PCHE is critical for the LOCA simulations. For purposes of simplicity, a straight channel configuration was assumed. A parallel intermediate heat exchanger configuration was assumed for the RELAP5 model design. The RELAP5 modeling also required the semicircular channels in the heat exchanger to be mapped to rectangular channels. The initial RELAP5 run outputs steady state conditions which were then compared to the heat exchanger performance theory to ensure accurate design is being simulated. An exponential loss of pressure transient was simulated. This LOCA describes a loss of coolant pressure in the primary side over a 20 second time period. The results for the simulation indicate that heat is initially transferred from the primary loop to the secondary loop, but after the loss of pressure occurs, heat transfers from the secondary loop to the primary loop.

  9. The next generation CANDU 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopwood, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    AECL's product line of CANDU 6 and CANDU 9 nuclear power plants are adapted to respond to changing market conditions, experience feedback and technological development by a continuous improvement process of design evolution. The CANDU 6 Nuclear Power Plant design is a successful family of nuclear units, with the first four units entering service in 1983, and the most recent entering service this year. A further four CANDU 6 units are under construction. Starting in 1996, a focused forward-looking development program is under way at AECL to incorporate a series of individual improvements and integrate them into the CANDU 6, leading to the evolutionary development of the next-generation enhanced CANDU 6. The CANDU 6 improvements program includes all aspects of an NPP project, including engineering tools improvements, design for improved constructability, scheduling for faster, more streamlined commissioning, and improved operating performance. This enhanced CANDU 6 product will combine the benefits of design provenness (drawing on the more than 70 reactor-years experience of the seven operating CANDU 6 units), with the advantages of an evolutionary next-generation design. Features of the enhanced CANDU 6 design include: Advanced Human Machine Interface - built around the Advanced CANDU Control Centre; Advanced fuel design - using the newly demonstrated CANFLEX fuel bundle; Improved Efficiency based on improved utilization of waste heat; Streamlined System Design - including simplifications to improve performance and safety system reliability; Advanced Engineering Tools, -- featuring linked electronic databases from 3D CADDS, equipment specification and material management; Advanced Construction Techniques - based on open top equipment installation and the use of small skid mounted modules; Options defined for Passive Heat Sink capability and low-enrichment core optimization. (author)

  10. Validation of next generation sequencing technologies in comparison to current diagnostic gold standards for BRAF, EGFR and KRAS mutational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCourt, Clare M; McArt, Darragh G; Mills, Ken; Catherwood, Mark A; Maxwell, Perry; Waugh, David J; Hamilton, Peter; O'Sullivan, Joe M; Salto-Tellez, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) has the potential of becoming an important tool in clinical diagnosis and therapeutic decision-making in oncology owing to its enhanced sensitivity in DNA mutation detection, fast-turnaround of samples in comparison to current gold standard methods and the potential to sequence a large number of cancer-driving genes at the one time. We aim to test the diagnostic accuracy of current NGS technology in the analysis of mutations that represent current standard-of-care, and its reliability to generate concomitant information on other key genes in human oncogenesis. Thirteen clinical samples (8 lung adenocarcinomas, 3 colon carcinomas and 2 malignant melanomas) already genotyped for EGFR, KRAS and BRAF mutations by current standard-of-care methods (Sanger Sequencing and q-PCR), were analysed for detection of mutations in the same three genes using two NGS platforms and an additional 43 genes with one of these platforms. The results were analysed using closed platform-specific proprietary bioinformatics software as well as open third party applications. Our results indicate that the existing format of the NGS technology performed well in detecting the clinically relevant mutations stated above but may not be reliable for a broader unsupervised analysis of the wider genome in its current design. Our study represents a diagnostically lead validation of the major strengths and weaknesses of this technology before consideration for diagnostic use.

  11. Next generation breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabaschi, Delfina; Tondelli, Alessandro; Desiderio, Francesca; Volante, Andrea; Vaccino, Patrizia; Valè, Giampiero; Cattivelli, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    The genomic revolution of the past decade has greatly improved our understanding of the genetic make-up of living organisms. The sequencing of crop genomes has completely changed our vision and interpretation of genome organization and evolution. Re-sequencing allows the identification of an unlimited number of markers as well as the analysis of germplasm allelic diversity based on allele mining approaches. High throughput marker technologies coupled with advanced phenotyping platforms provide new opportunities for discovering marker-trait associations which can sustain genomic-assisted breeding. The availability of genome sequencing information is enabling genome editing (site-specific mutagenesis), to obtain gene sequences desired by breeders. This review illustrates how next generation sequencing-derived information can be used to tailor genomic tools for different breeders' needs to revolutionize crop improvement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Converging blockchain and next-generation artificial intelligence technologies to decentralize and accelerate biomedical research and healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamoshina, Polina; Ojomoko, Lucy; Yanovich, Yury; Ostrovski, Alex; Botezatu, Alex; Prikhodko, Pavel; Izumchenko, Eugene; Aliper, Alexander; Romantsov, Konstantin; Zhebrak, Alexander; Ogu, Iraneus Obioma; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2018-01-19

    The increased availability of data and recent advancements in artificial intelligence present the unprecedented opportunities in healthcare and major challenges for the patients, developers, providers and regulators. The novel deep learning and transfer learning techniques are turning any data about the person into medical data transforming simple facial pictures and videos into powerful sources of data for predictive analytics. Presently, the patients do not have control over the access privileges to their medical records and remain unaware of the true value of the data they have. In this paper, we provide an overview of the next-generation artificial intelligence and blockchain technologies and present innovative solutions that may be used to accelerate the biomedical research and enable patients with new tools to control and profit from their personal data as well with the incentives to undergo constant health monitoring. We introduce new concepts to appraise and evaluate personal records, including the combination-, time- and relationship-value of the data. We also present a roadmap for a blockchain-enabled decentralized personal health data ecosystem to enable novel approaches for drug discovery, biomarker development, and preventative healthcare. A secure and transparent distributed personal data marketplace utilizing blockchain and deep learning technologies may be able to resolve the challenges faced by the regulators and return the control over personal data including medical records back to the individuals.

  13. Converging blockchain and next-generation artificial intelligence technologies to decentralize and accelerate biomedical research and healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamoshina, Polina; Ojomoko, Lucy; Yanovich, Yury; Ostrovski, Alex; Botezatu, Alex; Prikhodko, Pavel; Izumchenko, Eugene; Aliper, Alexander; Romantsov, Konstantin; Zhebrak, Alexander; Ogu, Iraneus Obioma; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2018-01-01

    The increased availability of data and recent advancements in artificial intelligence present the unprecedented opportunities in healthcare and major challenges for the patients, developers, providers and regulators. The novel deep learning and transfer learning techniques are turning any data about the person into medical data transforming simple facial pictures and videos into powerful sources of data for predictive analytics. Presently, the patients do not have control over the access privileges to their medical records and remain unaware of the true value of the data they have. In this paper, we provide an overview of the next-generation artificial intelligence and blockchain technologies and present innovative solutions that may be used to accelerate the biomedical research and enable patients with new tools to control and profit from their personal data as well with the incentives to undergo constant health monitoring. We introduce new concepts to appraise and evaluate personal records, including the combination-, time- and relationship-value of the data. We also present a roadmap for a blockchain-enabled decentralized personal health data ecosystem to enable novel approaches for drug discovery, biomarker development, and preventative healthcare. A secure and transparent distributed personal data marketplace utilizing blockchain and deep learning technologies may be able to resolve the challenges faced by the regulators and return the control over personal data including medical records back to the individuals. PMID:29464026

  14. Advances in the analysis of complex food matrices: Species identification in surimi-based products using Next Generation Sequencing technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, Carmen G.

    2017-01-01

    The Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies represent a turning point in the food inspection field, particularly for species identification in matrices composed of a blend of two or more species. In this study NGS technologies were applied by testing the usefulness of the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM) in seafood traceability. Sixteen commercial surimi samples produced both in EU and non-EU countries were analysed. Libraries were prepared using a universal primer pair able to amplify a short 16SrRNA fragment from a wide range of fish and cephalopod species. The mislabelling rate of the samples was also evaluated. Overall, DNA from 13 families, 19 genera and 16 species of fish, and from 3 families, 3 genera and 3 species of cephalopods was found with the analysis. Samples produced in non-EU countries exhibited a higher variability in their composition. 37.5% of the surimi products were found to be mislabelled. Among them, 25% voluntary declared a species different from those identified and 25% (all produced in non-EU countries) did not report the presence of molluscs on the label, posing a potential health threat for allergic consumers. The use of vulnerable species was also proved. Although the protocol should be further optimized, PGM platform proved to be a useful tool for the analysis of complex, highly processed products. PMID:28968423

  15. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 2: Accident and Thermal Fluids Analysis PIRTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, Sydney J [ORNL; Corradini, M. [University of Wisconsin; Fisher, Stephen Eugene [ORNL; Gauntt, R. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Geffraye, G. [CEA, France; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Hassan, Y. [Texas A& M University; Moses, David Lewis [ORNL; Renier, John-Paul [ORNL; Schultz, R. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Wei, T. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

    2008-03-01

    An accident, thermal fluids, and reactor physics phenomena identification and ranking process was conducted by a panel of experts on the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) design (consideration given to both pebble-bed and prismatic gas-cooled reactor configurations). Safety-relevant phenomena, importance, and knowledge base were assessed for the following event classes: (1) normal operation (including some reactor physics aspects), (2) general loss of forced circulation (G-LOFC), (3) pressurized loss-of-forced circulation (P-LOFC), (4) depressurized loss-of-forced circulation (D-LOFC), (5) air ingress (following D-LOFC), (6) reactivity transients - including anticipated transients without scram (ATWS), (7) processes coupled via intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) (IHX failure with molten salt), and (8) steam/water ingress. The panel's judgment of the importance ranking of a given phenomenon (or process) was based on the effect it had on one or more figures of merit or evaluation criteria. These included public and worker dose, fuel failure, and primary (and other safety) system integrity. The major phenomena of concern that were identified and categorized as high importance combined with medium to low knowledge follow: (1) core coolant bypass flows (normal operation), (2) power/flux profiles (normal operation), (3) outlet plenum flows (normal operation), (4) reactivity-temperature feedback coefficients for high-plutonium-content cores (normal operation and accidents), (5) fission product release related to the transport of silver (normal operation), (6)emissivity aspects for the vessel and reactor cavity cooling system (G-LOFC), (7) reactor vessel cavity air circulation and heat transfer (G-LOFC), and (8)convection/radiation heating of upper vessel area (P-LOFC).

  16. Next-generation LWRs development toward realization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsumata, Hiroki; Kasai, S.; Ohga, Y.; Kurosaki, T.

    2010-01-01

    This special article introduced the round-table talk of 'next-generation LWRs development toward realization' at the issue of an intermediate evaluation report about technology development of next-generation LWRs in 2010. 'Recent trends around nuclear energy and next-generation LWRs development' and 'summary of the report' were also included. After a 2-year feasibility study on development of next-generation LWRs, the vision of this development has been established as follows; the new designs of HP-BWR and HP-PWR, based on ABWR and APWR, are to lead to a large reduction in construction and generation costs and a 30% reduction of spent fuel quantity with improved safety, 30-month construction and a design life of 80 years with 24-month operating cycle. In 2008 the project was established within the Institute of Applied Energy to pursue this vision, involving three manufacturers. Over eight years, the project is to develop designs of BWR and PWR with 1700-1800 MWe. Basic designs are to be finished by 2015, with significant deployment as new alternative reactors in Japan or internationally by 2030. (T. Tanaka)

  17. A high-throughput method to detect RNA profiling by integration of RT-MLPA with next generation sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Yang, Xue; Chen, Haofeng; Wang, Xuewei; Wang, Xiangyu; Fang, Yi; Jia, Zhenyu; Gao, Jidong

    2017-07-11

    RNA in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues provides large amount of information indicating disease stages, histological tumor types and grades, as well as clinical outcomes. However, Detection of RNA expression levels in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded samples is extremely difficult due to poor RNA quality. Here we developed a high-throughput method, Reverse Transcription-Multiple Ligation-dependent Probe Sequencing (RT-MLPSeq), to determine expression levels of multiple transcripts in FFPE samples. By combining Reverse Transcription-Multiple Ligation-dependent Amplification method and next generation sequencing technology, RT-MLPSeq overcomes the limit of probe length in multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay and thus could detect expression levels of transcripts without quantitative limitations. We proved that different RT-MLPSeq probes targeting on the same transcripts have highly consistent results and the starting RNA/cDNA input could be as little as 1 ng. RT-MLPSeq also presented consistent relative RNA levels of selected 13 genes with reverse transcription quantitative PCR. Finally, we demonstrated the application of the new RT-MLPSeq method by measuring the mRNA expression levels of 21 genes which can be used for accurate calculation of the breast cancer recurrence score - an index that has been widely used for managing breast cancer patients.

  18. A Review on the Applications of Next Generation Sequencing Technologies as Applied to Food-Related Microbiome Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Cao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The development of next generation sequencing (NGS techniques has enabled researchers to study and understand the world of microorganisms from broader and deeper perspectives. The contemporary advances in DNA sequencing technologies have not only enabled finer characterization of bacterial genomes but also provided deeper taxonomic identification of complex microbiomes which in its genomic essence is the combined genetic material of the microorganisms inhabiting an environment, whether the environment be a particular body econiche (e.g., human intestinal contents or a food manufacturing facility econiche (e.g., floor drain. To date, 16S rDNA sequencing, metagenomics and metatranscriptomics are the three basic sequencing strategies used in the taxonomic identification and characterization of food-related microbiomes. These sequencing strategies have used different NGS platforms for DNA and RNA sequence identification. Traditionally, 16S rDNA sequencing has played a key role in understanding the taxonomic composition of a food-related microbiome. Recently, metagenomic approaches have resulted in improved understanding of a microbiome by providing a species-level/strain-level characterization. Further, metatranscriptomic approaches have contributed to the functional characterization of the complex interactions between different microbial communities within a single microbiome. Many studies have highlighted the use of NGS techniques in investigating the microbiome of fermented foods. However, the utilization of NGS techniques in studying the microbiome of non-fermented foods are limited. This review provides a brief overview of the advances in DNA sequencing chemistries as the technology progressed from first, next and third generations and highlights how NGS provided a deeper understanding of food-related microbiomes with special focus on non-fermented foods.

  19. Next generation information systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limback, Nathan P.; Medina, Melanie A.; Silva, Michelle E.

    2010-01-01

    The Information Systems Analysis and Development (ISAD) Team of the Safeguards Systems Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been developing web based information and knowledge management systems for sixteen years. Our vision is to rapidly and cost effectively provide knowledge management solutions in the form of interactive information systems that help customers organize, archive, post and retrieve nonproliferation and safeguards knowledge and information vital to their success. The team has developed several comprehensive information systems that assist users in the betterment and growth of their organizations and programs. Through our information systems, users are able to streamline operations, increase productivity, and share and access information from diverse geographic locations. The ISAD team is also producing interactive visual models. Interactive visual models provide many benefits to customers beyond the scope of traditional full-scale modeling. We have the ability to simulate a vision that a customer may propose, without the time constraints of traditional engineering modeling tools. Our interactive visual models can be used to access specialized training areas, controlled areas, and highly radioactive areas, as well as review site-specific training for complex facilities, and asset management. Like the information systems that the ISAD team develops, these models can be shared and accessed from any location with access to the internet. The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on the capabilities of information systems and interactive visual models as well as consider the possibility of combining the two capabilities to provide the next generation of infonnation systems. The collection, processing, and integration of data in new ways can contribute to the security of the nation by providing indicators and information for timely action to decrease the traditional and new nuclear threats. Modeling and simulation tied to comprehensive

  20. Combining Next-Generation Sequencing and Microarray Technology into a Transcriptomics Approach for the Non-Model Organism Chironomus riparius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinković, Marino; de Leeuw, Wim C.; de Jong, Mark; Kraak, Michiel H. S.; Admiraal, Wim; Breit, Timo M.; Jonker, Martijs J.

    2012-01-01

    Whole-transcriptome gene-expression analyses are commonly performed in species that have a sequenced genome and for which microarrays are commercially available. To do such analyses in species with no or limited genome data, i.e. non-model organisms, necessary transcriptomics resources, i.e. an annotated transcriptome and a validated gene-expression microarray, must first be developed. The aim of the present study was to establish an advanced approach for developing transcriptomics resources for non-model organisms by combining next-generation sequencing (NGS) and microarray technology. We applied our approach to the non-biting midge Chironomus riparius, an ecologically relevant species that is widely used in sediment ecotoxicity testing. We sampled extensively covering all C. riparius developmental stages as well as toxicant exposed larvae and obtained from a normalized cDNA library 1.5 M NGS reads totalling 501 Mbp. Using the NGS data we developed transcriptomics resources in several steps. First, we designed 844 k probes directly on the NGS reads, as well as 76 k probes targeting expressed sequence tags of related species. These probes were tested for their affinity to C. riparius DNA and mRNA, by performing two biological experiments with a 1 M probe-selection microarray that contained the entire probe-library. Subsequently, the 1.5 M NGS reads were assembled into 23,709 isotigs and 135,082 singletons, which were associated to ∼55 k, respectively, ∼61 k gene ontology terms and which corresponded together to 22,593 unique protein accessions. An algorithm was developed that took the assembly and the probe affinities to DNA and mRNA into account, what resulted in 59 k highly-reliable probes that targeted uniquely 95% of the isotigs and 18% of the singletons. Concluding, our approach allowed the development of high-quality transcriptomics resources for C. riparius, and is applicable to any non-model organism. It is expected, that these resources will advance

  1. Next Generation Wind Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheraghi, S. Hossein [Western New England Univ., Springfield, MA (United States); Madden, Frank [FloDesign Wind Turbine Corp., Waltham, MA (United States)

    2012-09-01

    The goal of this collaborative effort between Western New England University's College of Engineering and FloDesign Wind Turbine (FDWT) Corporation to wok on a novel areodynamic concept that could potentially lead to the next generation of wind turbines. Analytical studies and early scale model tests of FDWT's Mixer/Ejector Wind Turbine (MEWT) concept, which exploits jet-age advanced fluid dynamics, indicate that the concept has the potential to significantly reduce the cost of electricity over conventional Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines while reducing land usage. This project involved the design, fabrication, and wind tunnel testing of components of MEWT to provide the research and engineering data necessary to validate the design iterations and optimize system performance. Based on these tests, a scale model prototype called Briza was designed, fabricated, installed and tested on a portable tower to investigate and improve the design system in real world conditions. The results of these scale prototype efforts were very promising and have contributed significantly to FDWT's ongoing development of a product scale wind turbine for deployment in multiple locations around the U.S. This research was mutually beneficial to Western New England University, FDWT, and the DOE by utilizing over 30 student interns and a number of faculty in all efforts. It brought real-world wind turbine experience into the classroom to further enhance the Green Engineering Program at WNEU. It also provided on-the-job training to many students, improving their future employment opportunities, while also providing valuable information to further advance FDWT's mixer-ejector wind turbine technology, creating opportunities for future project innovation and job creation.

  2. Next generation of accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1979-01-01

    Existing high-energy accelerators are reviewed, along with those under construction or being designed. Finally, some of the physics issues which go into setting machine parameters, and some of the features of the design of next generation electron and proton machines are discussed

  3. Next Generation Inverter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Zilai [General Motors LLC, Detroit, MI (United States); Gough, Charles [General Motors LLC, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-04-22

    The goal of this Cooperative Agreement was the development of a Next Generation Inverter for General Motors’ electrified vehicles, including battery electric vehicles, range extended electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and hybrid electric vehicles. The inverter is a critical electronics component that converts battery power (DC) to and from the electric power for the motor (AC).

  4. NEXT GENERATION TURBINE PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William H. Day

    2002-05-03

    The Next Generation Turbine (NGT) Program's technological development focused on a study of the feasibility of turbine systems greater than 30 MW that offer improvement over the 1999 state-of-the-art systems. This program targeted goals of 50 percent turndown ratios, 15 percent reduction in generation cost/kW hour, improved service life, reduced emissions, 400 starts/year with 10 minutes to full load, and multiple fuel usage. Improvement in reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM), while reducing operations, maintenance, and capital costs by 15 percent, was pursued. This program builds on the extensive low emissions stationary gas turbine work being carried out by Pratt & Whitney (P&W) for P&W Power Systems (PWPS), which is a company under the auspices of the United Technologies Corporation (UTC). This study was part of the overall Department of Energy (DOE) NGT Program that extends out to the year 2008. A follow-on plan for further full-scale component hardware testing is conceptualized for years 2002 through 2008 to insure a smooth and efficient transition to the marketplace for advanced turbine design and cycle technology. This program teamed the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), P&W, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), kraftWork Systems Inc., a subcontractor on-site at UTRC, and Multiphase Power and Processing Technologies (MPPT), an off-site subcontractor. Under the auspices of the NGT Program, a series of analyses were performed to identify the NGT engine system's ability to serve multiple uses. The majority were in conjunction with a coal-fired plant, or used coal as the system fuel. Identified also was the ability of the NGT system to serve as the basis of an advanced performance cycle: the humid air turbine (HAT) cycle. The HAT cycle is also used with coal gasification in an integrated cycle HAT (IGHAT). The NGT systems identified were: (1) Feedwater heating retrofit to an existing coal-fired steam plant, which

  5. Safeguards and security by design support for the next generation nuclear plant project - Progress in safeguards by design (SBD) by the United States National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjornard, T.; Casey Durst, P.

    2013-01-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project was authorized by the United States Energy Policy Act of 2005 with the principal objective of designing, licensing, and building a Generation IV nuclear plant capable of producing both high-temperature process heat and electricity. The two candidate NGNP reactor concepts are pebble- and prismatic-fueled high-temperature gas reactors that will be licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The conceptual design phase of the project was completed in December 2010. This paper summarizes support provided to the NGNP project to facilitate consideration of international safeguards during the design phase, or safeguards by design (SBD). Additional support was provided for domestic safeguards (material control and accounting) and physical protection, or safeguards and security by design (2SBD). The main focus of this paper is on SBD and international safeguards. Included is an overview of the international safeguards guidance contained in guidance reports for SBD. These reports contain guidance and suggestions intended to be useful to the industry design teams, but they do not contain ready-made solutions. Early and frequent interaction of design stakeholders with the International Atomic Energy Agency and the NRC are essential to a successful endeavor. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (author)

  6. STEAMakers- a global initiative to connect STEM career professionals with the public to inspire the next generation and nurture a creative approach to science, technology, maths & engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Niamh; Sorkhabi, Elburz; Gasquez, Oriol; Yajima, Saho

    2016-04-01

    STEAMakers is a global initiative founded by Niamh Shaw, Elburz Sorkhabi, Oriol Gasquez & Saho Yajima, four alumni of The International Space University's Space Studies Programme 2015 who each shared a vision to inspire the next generation to embrace science, technology, engineering & maths (STEM) in new ways, by embedding the Arts within STEM, putting the 'A' in STEAM. STEAMakers invited STEM professionals around the world to join their community, providing training and a suite of STEAM events, specially designed to encourage students to perceive science, technology, engineering & maths as a set of tools with which to create, design, troubleshoot, innovate, and imagine. The ultimate goal of STEAMakers is to grow this community and create a global culture of non-linear learning among the next generation, to nurture within them a new multidisciplinary mindset and incubate new forms of innovation and thought leadership required for the future through the power of inspiration and creativity.

  7. The next generation safeguards initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobey, William

    2008-01-01

    NGSI or the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative is designed to revitalize the U.S. safeguards technical base, as well as invest in human resources, and to mobilize our primary asset - the U.S. National Laboratories - as well as industry and academia to restore capabilities. While NGSI is a U.S. effort it is intended to serve as a catalyst for a much broader commitment to international safeguards in partnership with the IAEA and other countries. Initiatives over the last years include such as the Proliferation Security Initiative, UN Security Council Resolution 1540, the Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism, and initiatives of the G-8 and NSG to discourage the spread of enrichment and reprocessing. NGSI augments this agenda by providing a means to strengthen the technical and political underpinnings of IAEA safeguards. Priorities and envisioned activities under NGSI are the following. (1) Cooperation with IAEA and others to promote universal adoption of safeguards agreements and the Additional Protocol including greater information sharing between member states and the IAEA, investigation of weaponization and procurement activities, and options to strengthen the state-level approach to safeguards. (2) NGSI anticipates the deployment of new types of reactors and fuel cycle facilities, as well as the need to use limited safeguards resources effectively and efficiently, especially in plants that pose the largest burden specifically complex, bulk-handling facilities. (3) NGSI will encourage a generational improvement in current safeguards technologies including improvement of precision and speed of nuclear measurements, performance of real-time process monitoring and surveillance in unattended mode, enabling in-field, pre-screening and analysis of nuclear and environmental samples, and collection, integration, analysis and archiving safeguards-relevant information from all available sources.(4) NGSI will address human capital management. Training and

  8. PARTNERSHIP FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF NEXT GENERATION SIMULATION TOOLS TO EVALUATE CEMENTITIOUS BARRIERS AND MATERIALS USED IN NUCLEAR APPLICATION - 8388

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, C; Richard Dimenna, R

    2008-01-01

    are typically the primary control to prevent the release of radionuclides from nuclear facilities into the environment. In the absence of an adequate predictive tool, assessments cannot fully incorporate the effectiveness of the concrete barriers, and the inventory of radionuclides (especially the long-lived radionuclides) that may be safely disposed of in shallow land disposal and the predicted service life of operating nuclear facilities. This project is 5 year effort focused on reducing uncertainties associated with current methodologies for assessing cementitious barrier performance and increasing the consistency and transparency of the assessment process. The results of this project will enable improved risk-informed, performance-based decision making, and supports several of the strategic initiatives in the DOE-EM Engineering and Technology Roadmap

  9. A genome-wide analysis of lentivector integration sites using targeted sequence capture and next generation sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustek, Duran; Sirma, Sema; Gumus, Ergun; Arikan, Muzaffer; Cakiris, Aris; Abaci, Neslihan; Mathew, Jaicy; Emrence, Zeliha; Azakli, Hulya; Cosan, Fulya; Cakar, Atilla; Parlak, Mahmut; Kursun, Olcay

    2012-10-01

    One application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) is the targeted resequencing of interested genes which has not been used in viral integration site analysis of gene therapy applications. Here, we combined targeted sequence capture array and next generation sequencing to address the whole genome profiling of viral integration sites. Human 293T and K562 cells were transduced with a HIV-1 derived vector. A custom made DNA probe sets targeted pLVTHM vector used to capture lentiviral vector/human genome junctions. The captured DNA was sequenced using GS FLX platform. Seven thousand four hundred and eighty four human genome sequences flanking the long terminal repeats (LTR) of pLVTHM fragment sequences matched with an identity of at least 98% and minimum 50 bp criteria in both cells. In total, 203 unique integration sites were identified. The integrations in both cell lines were totally distant from the CpG islands and from the transcription start sites and preferentially located in introns. A comparison between the two cell lines showed that the lentiviral-transduced DNA does not have the same preferred regions in the two different cell lines. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Application of next-generation sequencing technology for comprehensive aneuploidy screening of blastocysts in clinical preimplantation genetic screening cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Francesco; Bono, Sara; Biricik, Anil; Nuccitelli, Andrea; Cotroneo, Ettore; Cottone, Giuliano; Kokocinski, Felix; Michel, Claude-Edouard; Minasi, Maria Giulia; Greco, Ermanno

    2014-12-01

    Can next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques be used reliably for comprehensive aneuploidy screening of human embryos from patients undergoing IVF treatments, with the purpose of identifying and selecting chromosomally normal embryos for transfer? Extensive application of NGS in clinical preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) cycles demonstrates that this methodology is reliable, allowing identification and transfer of euploid embryos resulting in ongoing pregnancies. The effectiveness of PGS is dependent upon the biology of the early embryo and the limitations of the technology. Fluorescence in situ hybridization, used to test for a few chromosomes, has largely been superseded by microarray techniques that test all 24 chromosomes. Array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) has been demonstrated to be an accurate PGS method and has become the de facto gold standard, but new techniques, such as NGS, continue to emerge. The study consisted of a prospective trial involving a double blind parallel evaluation, with both NGS and array-CGH techniques, of 192 blastocysts obtained from 55 consecutive clinical PGS cycles undertaken during the period of September to October 2013. Consistency of NGS-based aneuploidy detection was assessed by matching the results obtained with array-CGH-based diagnoses. Primary outcome measure was accuracy of the chromosomal analysis; secondary outcome measures were clinical outcomes. Fifty-five patients (median age 39.3 years, range 32-46) undergoing PGS were enrolled in the study. All embryos were cultured to blastocyst stage; trophectoderm biopsy was performed on Day 5 of development or Day 6/7 for slower growing embryos. The method involved whole genome amplification followed by both NGS and array-CGH. The MiSeq control software, real-time analysis and reporter performed on-board primary and secondary bioinformatics analysis. Copy number variation analysis was accomplished with BlueFuse Multi software. A total of 192

  11. Next generation sensors and systems

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Written by experts in their area of research, this book has outlined the current status of the fundamentals and analytical concepts, modelling and design issues, technical details and practical applications of different types of sensors and discussed about the trends of next generation of sensors and systems happening in the area of Sensing technology. This book will be useful as a reference book for engineers and scientist especially the post-graduate students find will this book as reference book for their research on wearable sensors, devices and technologies.  .

  12. Next Generation Social Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lene Tolstrup; Skouby, Knud Erik

    2008-01-01

    When it comes to discussing the future of electronic communication, social networking is the buzzword. The Internet has become a platform where new social networks emerge and the Internet it itself support the more traditional computer supported communication. The way users build and verifies...... different online networks for communities of people who share interests or individuals who presents themselves through user produced content is what makes up the social networking of today. The purpose of this paper is to discuss perceived user requirements to the next generation social networks. The paper...

  13. Hacking the next generation

    CERN Document Server

    Dhanjani, Nitesh; Hardin, Brett

    2009-01-01

    With the advent of rich Internet applications, the explosion of social media, and the increased use of powerful cloud computing infrastructures, a new generation of attackers has added cunning new techniques to its arsenal. For anyone involved in defending an application or a network of systems, Hacking: The Next Generation is one of the few books to identify a variety of emerging attack vectors. You'll not only find valuable information on new hacks that attempt to exploit technical flaws, you'll also learn how attackers take advantage of individuals via social networking sites, and abuse

  14. Next generation toroidal devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Shoichi

    1998-10-01

    A general survey of the possible approach for the next generation toroidal devices was made. Either surprisingly or obviously (depending on one's view), the technical constraints along with the scientific considerations lead to a fairly limited set of systems for the most favorable approach for the next generation devices. Specifically if the magnetic field strength of 5 T or above is to be created by superconducting coils, it imposes minimum in the aspect ratio for the tokamak which is slightly higher than contemplated now for ITER design. The similar technical constraints make the minimum linear size of a stellarator large. Scientifically, it is indicated that a tokamak of 1.5 times in the linear dimension should be able to produce economically, especially if a hybrid reactor is allowed. For the next stellarator, it is strongly suggested that some kind of helical axis is necessary both for the (almost) absolute confinement of high energy particles and high stability and equilibrium beta limits. The author still favors a heliac most. Although it may not have been clearly stated in the main text, the stability afforded by the shearless layer may be exploited fully in a stellarator. (author)

  15. Dynalight Next Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Bo Nørregaard; Ottosen, Carl-Otto; Dam-Hansen, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    The project aims to develop the next generation of energy cost-efficient artificial lighting control that enables greenhouse growers to adapt their use of artificial lighting dynamically to fluctuations in the price of electricity. This is a necessity as fluctuations in the price of electricity can...... be so large that it directly affects the production costs. The project results show that the newly developed lighting control software, DynaLight NG, allows greenhouse growers to adapt their use of artificial lighting to market variations in electricity prices without negative impacts on plant quality...... or production time. The electricity savings that DynaLight NG can achieve depends on the installed lamp type. When used together with conventional SON-T lamps DynaLight NG can achieve an electricity savings of 25% compared to traditional artificial lighting control. The project results also show that shifting...

  16. Next generation vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedmann, Eva M

    2011-07-01

    In February this year, about 100 delegates gathered for three days in Vienna (Austria) for the Next Generation Vaccines conference. The meeting held in the Vienna Hilton Hotel from 23rd-25th February 2011 had a strong focus on biotech and industry. The conference organizer Jacob Fleming managed to put together a versatile program ranging from the future generation of vaccines to manufacturing, vaccine distribution and delivery, to regulatory and public health issues. Carefully selected top industry experts presented first-hand experience and shared solutions for overcoming the latest challenges in the field of vaccinology. The program also included several case study presentations on novel vaccine candidates in different stages of development. An interactive pre-conference workshop as well as interactive panel discussions during the meeting allowed all delegates to gain new knowledge and become involved in lively discussions on timely, interesting and sometimes controversial topics related to vaccines.

  17. FY 2000 report on the results of the development of the next generation chemical process technology; 2000 nendo jisedai kagaku process gijutsu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    The R and D were conducted on the next generation chemical process by which no energy losses are produced and the amount of the waste is made extremely small by the new catalytic reaction, the reaction using next generation separation/reaction membrane, etc., and the FY 2000 results were summed up. As to the development of the selective oxidation technology of saturated hydrocarbon, the basic knowledge/information were obtained on the following: construction of the catalytic principle toward the highly selective catalytic partial oxidation, elucidation of the reaction mechanism in alkane oxidation and design of the high functional catalyst, functional design in butane oxidation, characterization of the alkane oxidation catalyst and the application to the catalytic development, synthesis of the alkane selective oxidation catalyst, etc. Relating to the development of the process technology using the new reaction mechanism, a target value of equilibrium conversion of 10% or more was achieved using membrane reactor in the dehydrogenation of ethyl benzene. Further, as to the high performance selective membrane and low temperature active catalyst that are indispensable to the element technology, the continuous study was made, and at the same time themes in this study were arranged. (NEDO)

  18. The International conference on fast reactors and related fuel cycles: next generation nuclear systems for sustainable development. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    The materials of the International Conference on Fast Reactors and Related Fuel Cycles (June 26-29, 2017, Yekaterinburg) are presented. The forum was organized by the IAEA with the assistance of Rosatom State Corporation. The theme of the conference: “The New Generation of Nuclear Systems for Sustainable Development”. About 700 specialists from more than 30 countries took part in the conference. The state and prospects for the development of the direction of fast reactors in countries dealing with this topic were discussed. A wide range of scientific issues covered the concepts of prospective reactors, reactor cores, fuel and fuel cycles, operation and decommissioning, safety, licensing, structural materials, industrial implementation [ru

  19. Optical Subsystems for Next Generation Access Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazaro, J.A; Polo, V.; Schrenk, B.

    2011-01-01

    Recent optical technologies are providing higher flexibility to next generation access networks: on the one hand, providing progressive FTTx and specifically FTTH deployment, progressively shortening the copper access network; on the other hand, also opening fixed-mobile convergence solutions...... in next generation PON architectures. It is provided an overview of the optical subsystems developed for the implementation of the proposed NG-Access Networks....

  20. Fiscal 1998 research report. Application technology of next-generation high-density energy beams; 1998 nendo chosa hokokusho. Jisedai komitsudo energy beam riyo gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Survey was made on application technologies of next- generation high-density energy beams. For real application of laser power, application to not exciting source of YAG crystal but machining directly is highly efficient. For generation of semiconductor laser high-power coherent beam, phase synchronization and summing are large technological walls. Short pulse, high intensity and high repeatability are also important. Since ultra-short pulse laser ends before heat transfer to the periphery, it is suitable for precise machining, in particular, ultra-fine machining. To use beam sources as tool for production process, development of transmission, focusing and control technologies, and optical fiber and device is indispensable. Applicable fields are as follows: machining (more than pico seconds), surface modification (modification and functionalization of tribo- materials and biocompatible materials), complex machining, fabrication of quantum functional structured materials (thin film, ultra-fine particle), agriculture, ultra-precise measurement, non-destructive measurement, and coherent chemistry in chemical and environment fields. (NEDO)

  1. Next-Generation Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caie, Peter D; Harrison, David J

    2016-01-01

    The field of pathology is rapidly transforming from a semiquantitative and empirical science toward a big data discipline. Large data sets from across multiple omics fields may now be extracted from a patient's tissue sample. Tissue is, however, complex, heterogeneous, and prone to artifact. A reductionist view of tissue and disease progression, which does not take this complexity into account, may lead to single biomarkers failing in clinical trials. The integration of standardized multi-omics big data and the retention of valuable information on spatial heterogeneity are imperative to model complex disease mechanisms. Mathematical modeling through systems pathology approaches is the ideal medium to distill the significant information from these large, multi-parametric, and hierarchical data sets. Systems pathology may also predict the dynamical response of disease progression or response to therapy regimens from a static tissue sample. Next-generation pathology will incorporate big data with systems medicine in order to personalize clinical practice for both prognostic and predictive patient care.

  2. Next Generation Science Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, J.

    2016-02-01

    I will provide an overview of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and demonstrate how scientists and educators can use these standards to strengthen and enhance their collaborations. The NGSS are rich in content and practice and provide all students with an internationally-benchmarked science education. Using these state-led standards to guide outreach efforts can help develop and sustain effective and mutually beneficial teacher-researcher partnerships. Aligning outreach with the three dimensions of the standards can help make research relevant for target audiences by intentionally addressing the science practices, cross-cutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas of the K-12 science curriculum that drives instruction and assessment. Collaborations between researchers and educators that are based on this science framework are more sustainable because they address the needs of both scientists and educators. Educators are better able to utilize science content that aligns with their curriculum. Scientists who learn about the NGSS can better understand the frameworks under which educators work, which can lead to more extensive and focused outreach with teachers as partners. Based on this model, the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) develops its education materials in conjunction with scientists and educators to produce accurate, standards-aligned activities and curriculum-based interactions with researchers. I will highlight examples of IODP's current, successful teacher-researcher collaborations that are intentionally aligned with the NGSS.

  3. NASA/DARPA advanced communications technology satellite project for evaluation of telemedicine outreach using next-generation communications satellite technology: Mayo Foundation participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, B K; Mitchell, M P; Bengali, A R; Khandheria, B K

    1999-08-01

    To describe the development of telemedicine capabilities-application of remote consultation and diagnostic techniques-and to evaluate the feasibility and practicality of such clinical outreach to rural and underserved communities with limited telecommunications infrastructures. In 1992, Mayo Foundation (Rochester, Minn, Jacksonville, Fla, and Scottsdale, Ariz), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency collaborated to create a complex network of fiberoptic landlines, video recording systems, satellite terminals, and specially developed data translators linking Mayo sites with other locations in the continental United States on an on-demand basis. The purpose was to transmit data via the asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) digital communications protocol over the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite. The links were intended to provide a conduit for transmission of data for patient-specific consultations between physicians, evaluation of medical imagery, and medical education for clinical staffs at remote sites. Low-data-rate (LDR) experiments went live late in 1993. Mayo Clinic Rochester successfully provided medical consultation and services to 2 small regional medical facilities. High-data-rate (HDR) experiments included studies of remote digital echocardiography, store-and-forward telemedicine, cardiac catheterization, and teleconsultation for congenital heart disease. These studies combined landline data transmission with use of the satellite. The complexity of the routing paths and network components, immaturity of available software, and inexperience with existing telecommunications caused significant study delays. These experiments demonstrated that next-generation satellite technology can provide batch and real-time imagery for telemedicine. The first-generation of the ATM and satellite network technology used in these experiments created several technical problems and inconveniences that should

  4. Next Generation Summer School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugenia, Marcu

    2013-04-01

    On 21.06.2010 the "Next Generation" Summer School has opened the doors for its first students. They were introduced in the astronomy world by astronomical observations, astronomy and radio-astronomy lectures, laboratory projects meant to initiate them into modern radio astronomy and radio communications. The didactic programme was structure as fallowing: 1) Astronomical elements from the visible spectrum (lectures + practical projects) 2) Radio astronomy elements (lectures + practical projects) 3) Radio communication base (didactic- recreative games) The students and professors accommodation was at the Agroturistic Pension "Popasul Iancului" situated at 800m from the Marisel Observatory. First day (summer solstice day) began with a practical activity: determination of the meridian by measurements of the shadow (the direction of one vertical alignment, when it has the smallest length). The experiment is very instructive and interesting because combines notions of physics, spatial geometry and basic astronomy elements. Next day the activities took place in four stages: the students processed the experimental data obtained on first day (on sheets of millimetre paper they represented the length of the shadow alignments according the time), each team realised its own sun quadrant, point were given considering the design and functionality of these quadrant, the four teams had to mimic important constellations on carton boards with phosphorescent sticky stars and the students, accompanied by the professors took a hiking trip to the surroundings, marking the interest point coordinates, using a GPS to establish the geographical coronations and at the end of the day the students realised a small map of central Marisel area based on the GPS data. On the third day, the students were introduced to basic notions of radio astronomy, the principal categories of artificial Earth satellites: low orbit satellites (LEO), Medium orbit satellites (MEO) and geostationary satellites (GEO

  5. CO2 CAPTURE PROJECT - AN INTEGRATED, COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FOR NEXT GENERATION CO2 SEPARATION, CAPTURE AND GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Helen Kerr

    2003-08-01

    The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) is a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, Eni, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (1) European Union (DG Res & DG Tren), (2) Norway (Klimatek) and (3) the U.S.A. (Department of Energy). The project objective is to develop new technologies, which could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies are to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. The project budget is approximately $24 million over 3 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: (1) Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. (2) Capture Technology, Post Combustion: technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. (3) Capture Technology, Oxyfuel: where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with high CO{sub 2} for storage. (4) Capture Technology, Pre -Combustion: in which, natural gas and petroleum coke are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. (5) Common Economic Model/Technology Screening: analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. (6) New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. (7) Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV): providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. (8) Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Technology development work dominated the past six months of the project. Numerous studies are making

  6. Historic Developments, Current Technologies and Potential of Nanotechnology to Develop Next Generation Solar Cells with Improved Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisith Raval

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Sun is the continuous source of renewable energy, from where we can get abundant of solar energy. Concept of conversionof solar energy into heat was used back in 200 B.C. since then, the solar cells have been developed which can convert solar energy into theelectrical energy and these systems have been produced commercially. The technologies to enhance the power conversion efficiency (PCEhave been continuously improved. Different technologies used for developing solar cells can be categorized either on the basis of materialused or techniques of technology development which is further termed as ‘first generation’ (e.g. crystalline silicon, ‘second generation’(thin films of Amorphous silicon, Copper indium gallium selenide, Cadmium telluride, ‘Third generation’ (Concentrated, Organic and Dyesensitize solar cell. These technologies give PCE up to 25% depending on the technology and the materials used. Nanotechnology enablesthe use of nanomaterial whose size is below 100 nm with extraordinary properties which has the capability to enhance the PCE to greaterextent. Various nanomaterials like Quantum Dots, Quantum well, carbon nanotubes, Nanowire and graphene have been used to makeefficient and economical solar cells, which not only provide high conversion efficiency economically but also are easy to produce. Today,by using nanotechnology, conversion efficiency up to 44.7 % has been achieved by Fraunhofer Institute at Germany. In this review article,we have reviewed the literature including various patents and publications, summarized the history of solar cell development, developmentof different technologies and rationale of their development highlighting the advantages and challenges involved in their development forcommercial purpose. We have also included the recent developments in solar cell research where different nanomaterials have beendesigned and used successfully to prove their superiority over conventional systems.

  7. Potential of robots as next-generation technology for clinical assessment of neurological disorders and upper-limb therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Stephen H; Dukelow, Sean P

    2011-01-01

    Robotic technologies have profoundly affected the identification of fundamental properties of brain function. This success is attributable to robots being able to control the position of or forces applied to limbs, and their inherent ability to easily, objectively, and reliably quantify sensorimotor behavior. Our general hypothesis is that these same attributes make robotic technologies ideal for clinically assessing sensory, motor, and cognitive impairments in stroke and other neurological disorders. Further, they provide opportunities for novel therapeutic strategies. The present opinionated review describes how robotic technologies combined with virtual/augmented reality systems can support a broad range of behavioral tasks to objectively quantify brain function. This information could potentially be used to provide more accurate diagnostic and prognostic information than is available from current clinical assessment techniques. The review also highlights the potential benefits of robots to provide upper-limb therapy. Although the capital cost of these technologies is substantial, it pales in comparison with the potential cost reductions to the overall healthcare system that improved assessment and therapeutic interventions offer.

  8. Final Technical Report: The Incubation of Next-Generation Radar Technologies to Lower the Cost of Wind Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, John [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Hirth, Brian [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Guynes, Jerry [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States)

    2017-03-15

    The National Wind Institute (NWI) at Texas Tech University (TTU) has had an impressive and well documented 46-year history of wind related research activities (http://www.depts.ttu.edu/nwi/). In 2011 with funding from the United States Department of Energy (DOE), an NWI team applied radar technologies and techniques to document the complex flows occurring across a wind plant. The resulting efforts yielded measurements that exceeded the capabilities of commercial lidar technologies with respect to maximum range, range resolution and scan speed. The NWI team was also the first to apply dual-Doppler synthesis and objective analysis techniques to resolve the full horizontal wind field (i.e. not just the line-of-sight wind speeds) to successfully define turbine inflow and wake flows across large segments of wind plants. While these successes advanced wind energy interests, the existing research radar platforms were designed to serve a diversity of meteorological applications, not specifically wind energy. Because of this broader focus and the design choices made during their development, the existing radars experienced technical limitations that inhibited their commercial viability and wide spread adoption. This DOE project enabled the development of a new radar prototype specifically designed for the purpose of documenting wind farm complex flows. Relative to other “off the shelf” radar technologies, the specialized transmitter and receiver chains were specifically designed to enhance data availability in non-precipitating atmospheres. The new radar prototype was integrated at TTU using components from various suppliers across the world, and installed at the Reese Technology Center in May 2016. Following installation, functionality and performance testing were completed, and subsequent comparative analysis indicated that the new prototype greatly enhances data availability by a factor of 3.5-50 in almost all atmospheric conditions. The new prototype also provided

  9. Designing Next Generation Telecom Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henten, Anders; Samarajiva, Rohan

    – ICT convergence regulation and multisector utility regulation. Whatever structure of next generation telecom regulation is adopted, all countries will need to pay much greater attention to the need for increased coordination of policy directions and regulatory activities both across the industries......Continuously expanding applications of information and communication technologies (ICT) are transforming local, national, regional and international economies into network economies, the foundation for information societies. They are being built upon expanded and upgraded national telecom networks...... to creating an environment to foster a massive expansion in the coverage and capabilities of the information infrastructure networks, with national telecom regulators as the key implementers of the policies of reform. The first phase of reform has focused on industry specific telecom policy and regulation...

  10. Advanced nuclear energy analysis technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Murata, Kenneth K.; Romero, Vicente Josce; Young, Michael Francis; Rochau, Gary Eugene

    2004-01-01

    A two-year effort focused on applying ASCI technology developed for the analysis of weapons systems to the state-of-the-art accident analysis of a nuclear reactor system was proposed. The Sandia SIERRA parallel computing platform for ASCI codes includes high-fidelity thermal, fluids, and structural codes whose coupling through SIERRA can be specifically tailored to the particular problem at hand to analyze complex multiphysics problems. Presently, however, the suite lacks several physics modules unique to the analysis of nuclear reactors. The NRC MELCOR code, not presently part of SIERRA, was developed to analyze severe accidents in present-technology reactor systems. We attempted to: (1) evaluate the SIERRA code suite for its current applicability to the analysis of next generation nuclear reactors, and the feasibility of implementing MELCOR models into the SIERRA suite, (2) examine the possibility of augmenting ASCI codes or alternatives by coupling to the MELCOR code, or portions thereof, to address physics particular to nuclear reactor issues, especially those facing next generation reactor designs, and (3) apply the coupled code set to a demonstration problem involving a nuclear reactor system. We were successful in completing the first two in sufficient detail to determine that an extensive demonstration problem was not feasible at this time. In the future, completion of this research would demonstrate the feasibility of performing high fidelity and rapid analyses of safety and design issues needed to support the development of next generation power reactor systems

  11. Potential of the FLASH FEL technology for the construction of a kW-scale light source for the next generation lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneidmiller, E.A.; Vogel, V.F.; Weise, H.; Yurkov, M.V.

    2011-08-15

    The driving engine of the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) is an L-band superconducting accelerator. It is designed to operate in burst mode with 800 microsecond pulse duration at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The maximum accelerated beam current during the macropulse is 9 mA. Our analysis shows that the FLASH technology has great potential since it is possible to construct a FLASH like free electron laser operating at the wavelength of 13.5 and 6.8 nanometer with an average power up to 2.6 kW. Such a source meets the physical requirements for the light source for the next generation lithography. (orig.)

  12. The Next Generation Photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, Dennis Thomas; /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2005-09-12

    This dissertation will elucidate the design, construction, theory, and operation of the Next Generation Photoinjector (NGP). This photoinjector is comprised of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell symmetrized S-band photocathode radio frequency (rf) electron gun and a single emittance-compensation solenoidal magnet. This photoinjector is a prototype for the Linear Coherent Light Source X-ray Free Electron Laser operating in the 1.5 {angstrom} range. Simulations indicate that this photoinjector is capable of producing a 1nC electron bunch with transverse normalized emittance less than 1 {pi} mm mrad were the cathode is illuminated with a 10 psec longitudinal flat top pulse. Using a Gaussian longitudinal laser profile with a full width half maximum (FWHM) of 10 psec, simulation indicates that the NGP is capable of producing a normalized rms emittance of 2.50 {pi} mm mrad at 1 nC. Using the removable cathode plate we have studied the quantum efficiency (QE) of both copper and magnesium photo-cathodes. The Cu QE was found to be 4.5 x 10{sup -5} with a 25% variation in the QE across the emitting surface of the cathode, while supporting a field gradient of 125 MV/m. At low charge, the transverse normalized rms emittance, {epsilon}{sub n,rms}, produced by the NGP is {epsilon}{sub n,rms} = 1.2 {pi} mm mrad for Q{sub T} = 0.3 nC. The 95% electron beam bunch length was measured to 10.9 psec. The emittance due to the finite magnetic field at the cathode has been studied. The scaling of this magnetic emittance term as a function of cathode magnetic field was found to be 0.01 {pi} mm mrad per Gauss. The 1.6 cell rf gun has been designed to reduce the dipole field asymmetry of the longitudinal accelerating field. Low level rf measurements show that this has in fact been accomplished, with an order of magnitude decrease in the dipole field. High power beam studies also show that the dipole field has been decreased. An upper limit of the intrinsic non-reducible thermal emittance of a

  13. Fiscal 1999 survey report. Survey and research concerning development of next-generation chemical process technologies; 1999 nendo jisedai kagaku process gijutsu kaihatsu ni kansuru chosa kenkyu hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    To further enhance resource/energy conservation and environmental impact reduction, it is necessary to develop innovative chemical reaction process technologies. It is for this reason that 'development of next-generation chemical reaction process technologies' is being carried out under the New Sunshine Program. The survey and research, for the fulfilment of the above goal, aim to select important technologies and put in a easy-to-study order the problems contained in associated technologies for picking out tasks for future studies for the purpose of suggesting some subjects to be taken up for future development. In addition, studies are made about how a comprehensive technology assessment system should be. In this fiscal year, propositions are compiled for research and development projects on five subjects. Studies of subjects other than these five will also continue to eventually build concrete propositions on them. The said five subjects involve 1) the development and application of nonaqueous biotechnologies, 2) biotechnology-aided polymeric material creation processes, 3) construction of high-efficiency energy conservation processes using innovative grain handling technologies in the high-temperature reaction field, 4) manufacture of high-performance polymeric materials for batteries and development of battery fabrication processes, and 5) the development of an energy conservation process maximally utilizing environmentally-friendly polyolefin. (NEDO)

  14. FY1998 report on the surveys and studies on developing next generation chemical process technologies; 1998 nendo jisedai kagaku process gijutsu kaihatsu ni kansuru chosa kenkyu hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    For further resource and energy conservation and environmental load reduction, development is necessary on innovative chemical reaction technologies. This paper describes surveys on next generation chemical processes. As non-halogen processes subject to development of new catalysts, new processes were investigated and searching experiments and discussions were given on isocyanate, propylene oxide, and phenol. Technological progress in the C1 chemistry was investigated. Problems in hydrocarbon compound oxidation, hydroxylation, and decomposition by utilizing microorganisms were put into order as application of environmentally friendly technologies. Marine biotechnical possibilities were surveyed. The surveys were given on new processes utilizing the phase transfer catalyst forming a third phase, manufacture of biodegradable plastics, and a novel reaction system combined with self-separation process using molecular assembly. Possibilities were searched on designing a truly simple production system of highly energy saving type. Such fundamental common technologies as structure analysis, property control and reaction engineering were investigated for methods to manufacture functional micro-powder chemical materials. Development was discussed on a system for technology assessment over whole product life cycle to structure a technology assessment basis. (NEDO)

  15. Next Generation Respiratory Viral Vaccine System: Advanced and Emerging Bioengineered Human Lung Epithelia Model (HLEM) Organoid Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; Schneider, Sandra L.; MacIntosh, Victor; Gibbons, Thomas F.

    2010-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections, including pneumonia and influenza, are the S t" leading cause of United States and worldwide deaths. Newly emerging pathogens signaled the need for an advanced generation of vaccine technology.. Human bronchial-tracheal epithelial tissue was bioengineered to detect, identify, host and study the pathogenesis of acute respiratory viral disease. The 3-dimensional (3D) human lung epithelio-mesechymal tissue-like assemblies (HLEM TLAs) share characteristics with human respiratory epithelium: tight junctions, desmosomes, microvilli, functional markers villin, keratins and production of tissue mucin. Respiratory Syntial Virus (RSV) studies demonstrate viral growth kinetics and membrane bound glycoproteins up to day 20 post infection in the human lung-orgainoid infected cell system. Peak replication of RSV occurred on day 10 at 7 log10 particles forming units per ml/day. HLEM is an advanced virus vaccine model and biosentinel system for emergent viral infectious diseases to support DoD global surveillance and military readiness.

  16. Achievement report for fiscal 1998. Development of next-generation chemical process technologies; 1998 nendo jisedai kagaku process gijutsu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Researches are conducted on the development of a technology of catalytic cracking of naphtha, technology relative to selective oxidation reaction of saturated hydrocarbons, process technology utilizing solid-phase reaction field, and a process technology utilizing novel reaction mechanism. Also, a survey is conducted on chemical processes of the next generation. Concerning the catalytic cracking of naphtha, reaction systems are roughly divided into two groups by whether or not they proceed in the presence of oxygen. As for rare earth oxide catalyst systems and zeolitic catalyst systems, their performance is confirmed and their reaction mechanisms are estimated. Concerning the selective oxidation reaction of hydrocarbons, studies are made to enhance the performance of catalytic systems that have been selected in researches conducted in the past. Concerning the process of solid phase reaction field utilization, the project is summarized and a concept is constructed of 'solid phase catalyst.' Concerning novel reaction mechanism utilizing process technologies, development is discussed of a novel process using membrane reactor, a highly functional hydrogen permeable membrane, a low-temperature dehydrogenation catalyst, etc., and a dehydrogenation membrane reactor is experimentally built. (NEDO)

  17. Game Changing Development Program - Next Generation Life Support Project: Oxygen Recovery From Carbon Dioxide Using Ion Exchange Membrane Electrolysis Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kenneth A.; Jiao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes the Phase I research and development work performed during the March 13, 2015 to July 13, 2016 period. The proposal for this work was submitted in response to NASA Research Announcement NNH14ZOA001N, "Space Technology Research, Development, Demonstration, and Infusion 2014 (SpaceTech-REDDI-2014)," Appendix 14GCD-C2 "Game Changing Development Program, Advanced Oxygen Recovery for Spacecraft Life Support Systems Appendix" The Task Agreement for this Phase I work is Document Control Number: GCDP-02-TA-15015. The objective of the Phase I project was to demonstrate in laboratories two Engineering Development Units (EDU) that perform critical functions of the low temperature carbon dioxide electrolysis and the catalytic conversion of carbon monoxide into carbon and carbon dioxide. The low temperature carbon dioxide electrolysis EDU was built by the University of Delaware with Dr. Feng Jiao as the principal investigator in charge of this EDU development (under NASA Contract NNC15CA04C). The carbon monoxide catalytic conversion EDU was built by the NASA Glenn Research Center with Kenneth Burke as the principal investigator and overall project leader for the development of both EDUs. Both EDUs were successfully developed and demonstrated the critical functions for each process. The carbon dioxide electrolysis EDU was delivered to the NASA Johnson Space Center and the carbon monoxide catalytic conversion EDU was delivered to the NASA Marshall Spaceflight Center.

  18. Next-generation biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigues da Fonseca, Rute Andreia; Albrechtsen, Anders; Themudo, Goncalo Espregueira Cruz

    2016-01-01

    we present an overview of the current sequencing technologies and the methods used in typical high-throughput data analysis pipelines. Subsequently, we contextualize high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies within their applications in non-model organism biology. We include tips regarding managing...

  19. The SURA Coastal Ocean Observing and Prediction (SCOOP) Program: Adapting Web 2.0 technologies to power next generation science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogden, P.; Partners, S.

    2008-12-01

    The Web 2.0 has helped globalize the economy and change social interactions, but the full impact on coastal sciences has yet to be realized. The SCOOP program (www.OpenIOOS.org/about/sura.html), an initiative of the Coastal Research Committee of the Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA), has been using Web 2.0 technologies to create infrastructure for a multi-disciplinary Distributed Coastal Laboratory (DCL). In the spirit of the Web 2.0, SCOOP strives to provide an open-access virtual facility where "virtual visiting" scientists can log in, perform experiments (e.g., evaluate new wetting/drying algorithms in several different inundation models), potentially contribute to the assembly of resources (e.g., leave their algorithms for others), and then move on. The SCOOP prototype has focused on storm surge and waves (the initial science focus), and integrates a real-time data network to evaluate the predictions. The multi-purpose SCOOP components support a sensor-web initiative (www.OOSTethys.org) that is co-led by SURA. SCOOP also includes portals with real-time visualization, workflow configuration and decision-tool prototypes (www.OpenIOOS.org), powered by distributed computing resources from multiple universities across the nation (www.sura.org/SURAgrid). Based on our experience, we propose three key ingredients for initiatives to have the biggest impact on coastal science: (1) standards, (2) working prototypes and (3) communities of interest. We strongly endorse the Open Geospatial Consortium - a geospatial analog of the World Wide Web consortium - and other international consensus-standards bodies that engage government, private sector and academic involvement. But these standards are often highly complex, which can be an impediment to their use. We have overcome such hurdles with the second key ingredient: a focused working prototype. The prototype should include guides and resources that make it easy for others to apply, test, and revise the

  20. Cataloging of the Northern Sky from the POSS-II using a Next-Generation Software Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djorgovski, S. G.; Weir, N.; Fayyad, U.

    Digitization of the Second Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS-II) is now in progress at STScI. The resulting data set, the Palomar-STScI Digital Sky Survey (DPOSS), will consist of about 3 TB of pixel data. In order to extract useful information from this data set quickly, uniformly, and efficiently, we have developed a software system to catalog, calibrate, classify, maintain, and analyse the scans, called Sky Image Cataloging and Analysis Tool (SKICAT). It is a suite of programs designed to facilitate the maintenance and analysis of astronomical surveys comprised of multiple, overlapping images and/or catalogs. The system serves three principal functions: catalog construction (including object classification), catalog management, and catalog analysis. It provides a powerful, integrated environment for the manipulation and scientific investigation of catalogs from virtually any source. The system is a testbed for practical astronomical applications of AI technology, including machine learning, expert systems, etc., used for astronomical catalog generation and analysis. The system also provides tools to merge these catalogs into a large, complex database which may be easily queried, modified, and upgraded (e.g., as more or better calibration data are added). For example, we make a considerable use of the GID3* decision tree induction software. The resulting Palomar Northern Sky Catalog (PNSC) is expected to contain galaxies, and stars, in 3 colors ( ), down to the limiting magnitude , with the star-galaxy classification accurate to 90 -- 95 percent down to . The catalog will be continuously upgraded as more calibration data become available. It will be made available to the community via computer networks and/or suitable media, probably in installments, as soon as scientific validation and quality checks are completed. Analysis software (parts of SKICAT) will also be freely available. A vast variety of scientific projects will be possible with this data base

  1. Super ODS steels R and D for fuel cladding on next generation nuclear systems. 8) Ion irradiation effects at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Hirotatsu; Kasada, Ryuta; Kimura, Akihiko; Inoue, Masaki; Okuda, Takanari; Abe, Fujio; Ohnuki, Somei; Fujisawa, Toshiharu

    2009-01-01

    The Super ODS steels, having excellent high-temperature strength and highly corrosion resistant, are considered to increase the energy efficiency by higher temperature operation and extend the lifetime of next generation nuclear systems. High-temperature strength of the ODS steels strongly depends on the dispersion of oxide particles, therefore, the irradiation effect on the dispersed oxides is critical in the material development. In the present research, ion irradiation experiments were employed to investigate microstructural stability under the irradiation environment at elevated temperatures. Ion irradiation experiments were performed with 6.4 MeV Fe ions irradiated at 650degC up to a nominal displacement damage of 60 dpa. Microstructural investigation was carried out using TEM and EDX. No significant change of grains and grain boundaries was observed by TEM investigation after the ion irradiation. Main oxide particles in the 16Cr-4Al-0.1Ti (SOC-1) ODS steel were (Y, Al) complex oxides. (Y, Ti) complex oxides were in 16Cr-0.1Ti (SOC-5) and 15.5Cr-2W-0.1Ti (SOCP-3). (Y, Zr) complex oxides were in 15.5Cr-4Al-0.6Zr (SOCP-1). No significant modification of these complex oxides was detected after the ion irradiation up to 60 dpa at 650degC. The stable complex oxides are considered to keep highly microstructural stability of the Super ODS steels under the irradiation environments. (author)

  2. Super ODS steels R and D for fuel cladding of next generation nuclear systems. 7) Corrosion behavior and mechanism in LBE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, H.; Fujisawa, T.; Kimura, A.; Inoue, Masaki; Ukai, S.; Ohnuki, S.; Okuda, T.; Abe, F.

    2009-01-01

    Corrosion of structural materials is one of the serious problems when lead-bismuth eutectic alloy (LBE) is used as a coolant material in next generation nuclear systems. In this study, dissolution experiments of synthetic Fe-Cr-Al alloys and developed super ODS steel candidates into LBE under several partial pressures of oxygen were conducted. Dissolution behaviors of major components in such steels into LBE were investigated. Interfacial behavior between LBE and steels was also observed. In addition, partial potential diagrams of the Fe-Cr-Al-O system at several conditions were established as basic data. From the potential diagrams, the partial pressure range of oxygen was estimated for the stable protective oxide layer formation at the interface. At lower oxygen partial pressure than the pressure that is enough for the formation of the stable oxide layer, a rough oxide layer was formed at the interface in all samples, and the alloy elements dissolved into LBE through it. On the other hand, at the oxygen partial pressure to form stable oxide layer, a dense and very thin oxide layer was formed especially on the higher aluminum content steel, preventing the alloy dissolution into LBE. From the results, aluminum and chromium content in steel were very important for preventing the corrosion by LBE. (author)

  3. Development of low-cost technology for the next generation of high efficiency solar cells composed of earth abundant elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrawal, Rakesh [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2014-09-28

    The development of renewable, affordable, and environmentally conscious means of generating energy on a global scale represents a grand challenge of our time. Due to the “permanence” of radiation from the sun, solar energy promises to remain a viable and sustainable power source far into the future. Established single-junction photovoltaic technologies achieve high power conversion efficiencies (pce) near 20% but require complicated manufacturing processes that prohibit the marriage of large-scale throughput (e.g. on the GW scale), profitability, and quality control. Our approach to this problem begins with the synthesis of nanocrystals of semiconductor materials comprising earth abundant elements and characterized by material and optoelectronic properties ideal for photovoltaic applications, namely Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe). Once synthesized, such nanocrystals are formulated into an ink, coated onto substrates, and processed into completed solar cells in such a way that enables scale-up to high throughput, roll-to-roll manufacturing processes. This project aimed to address the major limitation to CZTSSe solar cell pce’s – the low open-circuit voltage (Voc) reported throughout literature for devices comprised of this material. Throughout the project significant advancements have been made in fundamental understanding of the CZTSSe material and device limitations associated with this material system. Additionally, notable improvements have been made to our nanocrystal based processing technique to alleviate performance limitations due to the identified device limitations. Notably, (1) significant improvements have been made in reducing intra- and inter-nanoparticle heterogeneity, (2) improvements in device performance have been realized with novel cation substitution in Ge-alloyed CZTGeSSe absorbers, (3) systematic analysis of absorber sintering has been conducted to optimize the selenization process for large grain CZTSSe absorbers, (4) novel electrical

  4. FY 1999 report on the results of the technology development of next-generation chemical process; 1999 nendo jisedai kagaku process gijutsu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    The R and D were conducted on the naphtha catalytic cracking, selective oxidation reaction of saturated hydrocarbon, new reaction mechanism utilization process, etc., as next-generation chemical process technology in FY 1999, and the results were summarized. As to the technology of naphtha catalytic cracking, developed was La203/p/ZMS-5 zeolite catalyst which is high in cracking activity and high in light-olefin selectivity. By the FS, it was confirmed that this is more excellent in case of the fixed bed reactor than in the present process. Concerning the technology of selective oxidation reaction of saturated hydrocarbon, the basic information/knowledge were obtained about the construction of catalytic principle toward the high selective catalytic partial oxidation, elucidation of a reaction mechanism in alkane oxidation and design of high functional catalysts, elucidation of a mechanism in butan oxidation, synthesis of alkane selective oxidation catalysts, etc. In relation to the technology of new reaction mechanism utilization process, the following were carried out: study of ethyl benzene dehydrogenation using the membrane reactor trially fabricated in the previous fiscal year, development of high efficiency hydrogen penetration membranes and low temperature high activity catalysts, study of the new process by membrane reactor. (NEDO)

  5. Exploring Two-Dimensional Transport Phenomena in Metal Oxide Heterointerfaces for Next-Generation, High-Performance, Thin-Film Transistor Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labram, John G; Lin, Yen-Hung; Anthopoulos, Thomas D

    2015-11-04

    In the last decade, metal oxides have emerged as a fascinating class of electronic material, exhibiting a wide range of unique and technologically relevant characteristics. For example, thin-film transistors formed from amorphous or polycrystalline metal oxide semiconductors offer the promise of low-cost, large-area, and flexible electronics, exhibiting performances comparable to or in excess of incumbent silicon-based technologies. Atomically flat interfaces between otherwise insulating or semiconducting complex oxides, are also found to be highly conducting, displaying 2-dimensional (2D) charge transport properties, strong correlations, and even superconductivity. Field-effect devices employing such carefully engineered interfaces are hoped to one day compete with traditional group IV or III-V semiconductors for use in the next-generation of high-performance electronics. In this Concept article we provide an overview of the different metal oxide transistor technologies and potential future research directions. In particular, we look at the recent reports of multilayer oxide thin-film transistors and the possibility of 2D electron transport in these disordered/polycrystalline systems and discuss the potential of the technology for applications in large-area electronics. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. A Review of LOX/Kerosene Combustion Instability in American and Russian Combustion Devices in Application to Next-Generation Launch Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocker, Marvin; Nesman, Tomas E.; Hulka, James R.; Dougherty, N. Sam

    2003-01-01

    The Next-Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) project was introduced with its objectives. To meet the objectives, NASA has directed aerospace industry to perform advances and risk reduction of relevant technologies, including propulsion. Originally, the propulsion industry focused on producing both LOWLH2 and LOWkerosene flight engine technology demonstrators. These flight engine technology demonstrators were briefly reviewed. NASA recently redirected this focus to Lowkerosene only. Discussion of LOWkerosene combustion devices was and is prefaced by grave concerns about combustion instability. These concerns have prompted a review of LOWkerosene combustion instability in American and Russian combustion devices. In the review of the Russian propulsion industry's experience in eliminating LOWkerosene combustion instabilities, the history of principal Russian rocket scientists and their role in the development of LOXkerosene combustion devices is presented. The innovative methods implemented by the Russians of eliminations combustion instabilities in LOXkerosene combustion devices were reviewed. The successful elimination of these combustion instabilities has resulted in two generations of Russian-produced, high-performance LOWkerosene combustion devices.

  7. Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

    1995-09-01

    cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at

  8. Next generation storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesser, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    With diminishing requirements for plutonium, a substantial quantity of this material requires special handling and ultimately, long-term storage. To meet this objective, we at Los Alamos, have been involved in the design of a storage facility with the goal of providing storage capabilities for this and other nuclear materials. This paper presents preliminary basic design data, not for the structure and physical plant, but for the container and arrays which might be configured within the facility, with strong emphasis on criticality safety features

  9. Next Generation Microbiology Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, C. M.; Oubre, C. M.; Elliott, T. F.; Castro, V. A.; Pierson, D. L.

    2012-01-01

    As humans continue to explore deep into space, microorganisms will travel with them. The primary means to mitigate the risk of infectious disease are a combination of prudent spacecraft design and rigorous operational controls. The effectiveness of these methods are evaluated by microbiological monitoring of spacecraft, food, water, and the crew that is performed preflight, in-flight, and post-flight. Current NASA requirements associated with microbiological monitoring are based on culture-based methodology where microorganisms are grown on a semi-solid growth medium and enumerated. Subsequent identification of the organisms requires specialized labor and large equipment, which historically has been performed on Earth. Requirements that rely strictly on culture-based units limit the use of non-culture based monitoring technology. Specifically, the culture-based "measurement criteria" are Colony Forming Units (CFU, representing the growth of one microorganism at a single location on the agar medium) per a given volume, area, or sample size. As the CFU unit by definition is culture-based, these requirements limit alternative technologies for spaceflight applications. As spaceflight missions such as those to Mars extend further into space, culture-based technology will become difficult to implement due to the (a) limited shelf life of the culture media, (b) mass/volume necessary to carry these consumables, and (c) problems associated with the production of biohazardous material in the habitable volume of the spacecraft. In addition, an extensive amount of new knowledge has been obtained during the Space Shuttle, NASA-Mir, and International Space Station Programs, which gave direction for new or modified microbial control requirements for vehicle design and mission operations. The goal of this task is to develop and recommend a new set of requirements for vehicle design and mission operations, including microbiological monitoring, based upon "lessons learned" and new

  10. Educating the next generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, D.; Feltin, C.

    2004-01-01

    The INSTN, a higher education establishment, has an original place in the French and European education system. Placed within the CEA, the French nuclear research organization, it is under the supervision of the Ministries in charge of industry and of education. Originally, it was created to train engineers, technicians and researchers needed for the energy development of France, as neither universities, nor Schools of engineers had developed the necessary skills. Half a century later, the INSTN set up academic curricula organized by itself or in cooperation with Universities and High schools of engineers as well as a broad range of professional and continuous training courses, using the skills available within the CEA, other research organizations, industrial companies (EDF, Areva...) or public authorities. Moreover, on behalf of the CEA, the INSTN acts as a doctoral college, ensuring the selection, management and training of PhD students and post-doctorants. At the international level, the INSTN provides training courses aimed at foreign professionals in cooperation with the IAEA. It is also strongly involved in the education and training aspects of FP6 European projects, especially EURATOM projects, and in the Erasmus program. (author)

  11. Next-generation Digital Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodchild, Michael F; Guo, Huadong; Annoni, Alessandro; Bian, Ling; de Bie, Kees; Campbell, Frederick; Craglia, Max; Ehlers, Manfred; van Genderen, John; Jackson, Davina; Lewis, Anthony J; Pesaresi, Martino; Remetey-Fülöpp, Gábor; Simpson, Richard; Skidmore, Andrew; Wang, Changlin; Woodgate, Peter

    2012-07-10

    A speech of then-Vice President Al Gore in 1998 created a vision for a Digital Earth, and played a role in stimulating the development of a first generation of virtual globes, typified by Google Earth, that achieved many but not all the elements of this vision. The technical achievements of Google Earth, and the functionality of this first generation of virtual globes, are reviewed against the Gore vision. Meanwhile, developments in technology continue, the era of "big data" has arrived, the general public is more and more engaged with technology through citizen science and crowd-sourcing, and advances have been made in our scientific understanding of the Earth system. However, although Google Earth stimulated progress in communicating the results of science, there continue to be substantial barriers in the public's access to science. All these factors prompt a reexamination of the initial vision of Digital Earth, and a discussion of the major elements that should be part of a next generation.

  12. Next Generation Solar Collectors for CSP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molnar, Attila [3M Company, St. Paul, MN (United States); Charles, Ruth [3M Company, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    2014-07-31

    The intent of “Next Generation Solar Collectors for CSP” program was to develop key technology elements for collectors in Phase 1 (Budget Period 1), design these elements in Phase 2 (Budget Period 2) and to deploy and test the final collector in Phase 3 (Budget Period 3). 3M and DOE mutually agreed to terminate the program at the end of Budget Period 1, primarily due to timeline issues. However, significant advancements were achieved in developing a next generation reflective material and panel that has the potential to significantly improve the efficiency of CSP systems.

  13. Characterization of specific spoilage organisms (SSOs) in vacuum-packed ham by culture-plating techniques and MiSeq next-generation sequencing technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowska-Cyplik, Agnieszka; Myszka, Kamila; Czarny, Jakub; Ratajczak, Katarzyna; Kowalski, Ryszard; Biegańska-Marecik, Róża; Staninska-Pięta, Justyna; Nowak, Jacek; Cyplik, Paweł

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge regarding microaerophilic and anaerobic specific spoilage organisms (SSOs) is crucial for an appropriate evaluation of vacuum-packed ham. The objective of this study was to characterize the SSO community in vacuum-packed ham by a culture-dependent technique and MiSeq next-generation sequencing (NGS) platform. The relation between changes among the SSO group in the ham and changes in sensory characteristics of the product was also assessed. In the study, conventional microbiological analyses were employed in order to establish the participation of several groups of microorganisms in the deterioration of vacuum-packed ham. The diversity of the SSO group in the product was further assessed with the use of MiSeq NGS technology. The bacteria identified in sliced cooked ham belonged mostly to four phyla, namely Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. A temperature of 4 °C favoured the development of mesophilic and psychrophilic/psychrotrophic flora, mainly Lactobacillaceae, Enterobacteriaceae and Micrococcaceae families. A high ratio of Brochothrix thermosphacta species and new, cold-tolerant Clostridium spp. was also observed. The growth of these microorganisms facilitated changes in the pH value and organoleptic characteristics of the product. This study confirms that the combination of culturing and MiSeq NGS technology improves the microbial evaluation of food. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Next Generation Microshutter Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop the next generation MicroShutter Array (MSA) as a multi-object field selector for missions anticipated in the next two decades. For many...

  15. Next Generation Target Control System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1995-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the allegations concerning the Next Generation Target Control System Program and to determine whether the Program is the most cost effective solution to meet the target...

  16. Next Generation Drivetrain Development and Test Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Jonathan; Erdman, Bill; Blodgett, Doug; Halse, Chris; Grider, Dave

    2015-11-03

    This presentation was given at the Wind Energy IQ conference in Bremen, Germany, November 30 through December 2, 2105. It focused on the next-generation drivetrain architecture and drivetrain technology development and testing (including gearbox and inverter software and medium-voltage inverter modules.

  17. Next-generation sequencing in veterinary medicine: how can the massive amount of information arising from high-throughput technologies improve diagnosis, control, and management of infectious diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Borm, Steven; Belák, Sándor; Freimanis, Graham; Fusaro, Alice; Granberg, Fredrik; Höper, Dirk; King, Donald P; Monne, Isabella; Orton, Richard; Rosseel, Toon

    2015-01-01

    The development of high-throughput molecular technologies and associated bioinformatics has dramatically changed the capacities of scientists to produce, handle, and analyze large amounts of genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic data. A clear example of this step-change is represented by the amount of DNA sequence data that can be now produced using next-generation sequencing (NGS) platforms. Similarly, recent improvements in protein and peptide separation efficiencies and highly accurate mass spectrometry have promoted the identification and quantification of proteins in a given sample. These advancements in biotechnology have increasingly been applied to the study of animal infectious diseases and are beginning to revolutionize the way that biological and evolutionary processes can be studied at the molecular level. Studies have demonstrated the value of NGS technologies for molecular characterization, ranging from metagenomic characterization of unknown pathogens or microbial communities to molecular epidemiology and evolution of viral quasispecies. Moreover, high-throughput technologies now allow detailed studies of host-pathogen interactions at the level of their genomes (genomics), transcriptomes (transcriptomics), or proteomes (proteomics). Ultimately, the interaction between pathogen and host biological networks can be questioned by analytically integrating these levels (integrative OMICS and systems biology). The application of high-throughput biotechnology platforms in these fields and their typical low-cost per information content has revolutionized the resolution with which these processes can now be studied. The aim of this chapter is to provide a current and prospective view on the opportunities and challenges associated with the application of massive parallel sequencing technologies to veterinary medicine, with particular focus on applications that have a potential impact on disease control and management.

  18. First study on gene expression of cement proteins and potential adhesion-related genes of a membranous-based barnacle as revealed from Next-Generation Sequencing technology

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Hsiu Chin

    2013-12-12

    This is the first study applying Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology to survey the kinds, expression location, and pattern of adhesion-related genes in a membranous-based barnacle. A total of 77,528,326 and 59,244,468 raw sequence reads of total RNA were generated from the prosoma and the basis of Tetraclita japonica formosana, respectively. In addition, 55,441 and 67,774 genes were further assembled and analyzed. The combined sequence data from both body parts generates a total of 79,833 genes of which 47.7% were shared. Homologues of barnacle cement proteins - CP-19K, -52K, and -100K - were found and all were dominantly expressed at the basis where the cement gland complex is located. This is the main area where transcripts of cement proteins and other potential adhesion-related genes were detected. The absence of another common barnacle cement protein, CP-20K, in the adult transcriptome suggested a possible life-stage restricted gene function and/or a different mechanism in adhesion between membranous-based and calcareous-based barnacles. © 2013 © 2013 Taylor & Francis.

  19. NEXT GENERATION TURBINE SYSTEM STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank Macri

    2002-02-28

    Rolls-Royce has completed a preliminary design and marketing study under a Department of Energy (DOE) cost shared contract (DE-AC26-00NT40852) to analyze the feasibility of developing a clean, high efficiency, and flexible Next Generation Turbine (NGT) system to meet the power generation market needs of the year 2007 and beyond. Rolls-Royce evaluated the full range of its most advanced commercial aerospace and aeroderivative engines alongside the special technologies necessary to achieve the aggressive efficiency, performance, emissions, economic, and flexibility targets desired by the DOE. Heavy emphasis was placed on evaluating the technical risks and the economic viability of various concept and technology options available. This was necessary to ensure the resulting advanced NGT system would provide extensive public benefits and significant customer benefits without introducing unacceptable levels of technical and operational risk that would impair the market acceptance of the resulting product. Two advanced cycle configurations were identified as offering significant advantages over current combined cycle products available in the market. In addition, balance of plant (BOP) technologies, as well as capabilities to improve the reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) of industrial gas turbine engines, have been identified. A customer focused survey and economic analysis of a proposed Rolls-Royce NGT product configuration was also accomplished as a part of this research study. The proposed Rolls-Royce NGT solution could offer customers clean, flexible power generation systems with very high efficiencies, similar to combined cycle plants, but at a much lower specific cost, similar to those of simple cycle plants.

  20. Next Generation Reactors in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Yongshick; Choi, Youngsang; Park, Keecheol

    1990-01-01

    In Korea, nuclear power will be continuously needed to meet the trend of steady increase in electricity demand. But in relation to the further development of nuclear energy, there are still many uncertainties to be solved such as power demand forecast, site availability, thermal energy utilization and technology enhancement for economic and safety. To cope with those uncertainties effectively and to proceed the nuclear projects uninterruptedly, KEPCO decided to initiate two research project. i. e., one is 'the outlook and developmental strategy of nuclear energy for the early 21st century in the R. O. K' and the other is 'the feasibility study on the advanced reactors in Korea. Prospects of nuclear energy in Korea was overviewed and recommendations from the industry were introduced. It is strong opinion of Korea nuclear industry that nuclear policy should be changed from the support policy to the target management policy. In the point of reactor strategy, the life of light water reactor technology might be longer than expected before in Korea and it is emphasized that good maintenance of light water reactor technology and smooth transition program to the advanced technologies should be carefully considered. There are differences in the opinions between preferences to the evolutionary and/or passive, inherently safe reactors but, in the long-term point of view, it is judged to be desirable to have alternatives

  1. Technical presentation: Next Generation Oscilloscopes

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

      Rohde & Schwarz "Next Generation Oscilloscopes" - Introduction and Presentation Agenda: Wednesday 23 March  -  09:30 to 11:30 (open end) Bldg. 13-2-005 Language: English 09.30 Presentation "Next Generation Oscilloscopes" from Rohde & Schwarz RTO / RTM in theory and practice Gerard Walker 10.15 Technical design details from R&D Dr. Markus Freidhof 10.45 Scope and Probe Roadmap (confidential) Guido Schulze 11.00 Open Discussion Feedback, first impression, wishes, needs and requirements from CERN All 11.30 Expert Talks, Hands on All Mr. Dr. Markus Freidhof, Head of R&D Oscilloscopes, Rohde & Schwarz, Germany; Mr. Guido Schulze, ...

  2. Birth of Industry 5.0: Making Sense of Big Data with Artificial Intelligence, "The Internet of Things" and Next-Generation Technology Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Vural; Hekim, Nezih

    2018-01-01

    emphasis on both acceleration and deceleration of innovation if diminishing returns become apparent; and (3) next generation social science and humanities (SSH) research for global governance of emerging technologies: "Post-ELSI Technology Evaluation Research" (PETER). Importantly, PETER considers the technology opportunity costs, ethics, ethics-of-ethics, framings (epistemology), independence, and reflexivity of SSH research in technology policymaking. Industry 5.0 is poised to harness extreme automation and Big Data with safety, innovative technology policy, and responsible implementation science, enabled by 3D symmetry in innovation ecosystem design.

  3. Next generation environment for collaborative research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collados, D.; Denis, G.; Galvez, P.; Newman, H.

    2001-01-01

    Collaborative environments supporting point to point and multipoint video-conferencing, document and application sharing across both local and wide area networks, video on demand (broadcast and playback) and interactive text facilities will be a crucial element for the development of the next generation of HEP experiments by geographically dispersed collaborations. The 'Virtual Room Video conferencing System' (VRVS) has been developed since 1995, in order to provide a low cost, bandwidth-efficient, extensible means for video conferencing and remote collaboration over networks within the High Energy and Nuclear Physics communities. The VRVS provides worldwide videoconferencing service and collaborative environment to the research and education communities. VRVS uses the Internet2 and ESnet high-performance networks infrastructure to deploy its Web-based system, which now includes more than 5790 registered hosts running VRVS software in more than 50 different countries. VRVS hosts an average of 100-multipoint videoconference and collaborative sessions worldwide every month. There are around 35 reflectors that manage the traffic flow, at HENP labs and universities in the US and Europe. So far, there are 7 Virtual Rooms for World Wide Conferences (involving more than one continent), and 4 Virtual Rooms each for intra-continental conferences in the US, Europe and Asia. VRVS continues to expand and implement new digital video technologies, including H.323 ITU standard integration, MPEG-2 videoconferencing integration, shared environments, and Quality of Service

  4. Genetic richness and diversity in Cryptosporidium hominis and C. parvum reveals major knowledge gaps and a need for the application of "next generation" technologies--research review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jex, Aaron R; Gasser, Robin B

    2010-01-01

    Cryptosporidium species (apicomplexan protists) are a major cause of diarrhoeal disease (= cryptosporidiosis) in humans worldwide. The impact of cryptosporidiosis is also compounded by the spread of HIV/AIDS and a lack of cost-effective anti-cryptosporidial chemotherapeutics or vaccines. Mitigation of the impact of cryptosporidiosis in humans needs to focus on prevention and control strategies, built on a sound understanding of the epidemiology of Cryptosporidium species. Refined epidemiological studies rely on the use of molecular tools employing informative genetic markers. Currently, the 60-kDa glycoprotein gene (gp60) is the most suitable and widely used genetic marker for Cryptosporidium species infecting humans. Here, we undertake an analysis of all publicly-available gp60 sequence data and associated literature for C. hominis and C. parvum, and yield useful insights into the richness, diversity and distribution of genetic variants, and link these variants to human cryptosporidiosis. This global analysis reveals that, despite high genetic richness in Cryptosporidium isolates from humans, there is a surprisingly low diversity. It also highlights limited knowledge about the genetics of cryptosporidiosis in developing nations and in many animals that might act as infection sources. Clearly, there is a major need for more comprehensive studies of Cryptosporidium infecting humans and other animals in Africa and Asia. As molecular technologies improve and become affordable, future studies should utilize "next generation" sequencing and bioinformatic platforms to conduct comparative 'genome sequence surveys' to test the validity of current genetic classifications based on gp60 data. Complemented by in vitro and in vivo investigations, these biotechnological advances will also assist significantly in the search for new intervention strategies against human cryptosporidiosis.

  5. The Next Generation Science Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS Lead States 2013) were released almost two years ago. Work tied to the NGSS, their adoption, and implementation continues to move forward around the country. Stephen L. Pruitt, senior vice president, science, at Achieve, an independent, nonpartisan, nonprofit education reform organization that was a lead…

  6. Next generation natriuretic peptide measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunter, Ingrid; Goetze, Jens P

    2012-01-01

    in the molecular heterogeneity could in itself contain valuable information of clinical status, and the time seems right for industry and dedicated researchers in the field to get together and discuss the next generation natriuretic peptide measurement. In such an environment, new strategies can be developed...

  7. Nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    This report examines nuclear technology in Canada, with emphasis on Quebec, as a means of revitilizing industry. The historical, present day, and future states of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited are examined. Future research programs are discussed in greatest detail. These range from disposal of porcine wastes to new applications for electricity to nuclear medical techniques (to cite only a few examples). The executive summary is written in English. (23 fig., 16 tab.)

  8. Next Generation of Photovoltaics New Concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Vega, Antonio; López, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    This book presents new concepts for a next generation of PV. Among these concepts are: Multijunction solar cells, multiple excitation solar cells (or how to take benefit of high energy photons for the creation of more than one electron hole-pair), intermediate band solar cells (or how to take advantage of below band-gap energy photons) and related technologies (for quantum dots, nitrides, thin films), advanced light management approaches (plasmonics). Written by world-class experts in next generation photovoltaics this book is an essential reference guide accessible to both beginners and experts working with solar cell technology. The book deeply analyzes the current state-of-the-art of the new photovoltaic approaches and outlines the implementation paths of these advanced devices. Topics addressed range from the fundamentals to the description of state-of-the-art of the new types of solar cells.

  9. Next-Generation Sequencing in Intellectual Disability

    OpenAIRE

    Carvill, Gemma L.; Mefford, Heather C.

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have revolutionized gene discovery in patients with intellectual disability (ID) and led to an unprecedented expansion in the number of genes implicated in this disorder. We discuss the strategies that have been used to identify these novel genes for both syndromic and nonsyndromic ID and highlight the phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity that underpin this condition. Finally, we discuss the future of defining the genetic etiology of ID, including the r...

  10. Next Generation Safeguards Initiative: 2010 and Beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitney, J.M.; LaMontagne, S.; Sunshine, A.; Lockwood, D.; Peranteau, D.; Dupuy, G.

    2010-01-01

    Strengthening the international safeguards system is a key element of the U.S. non-proliferation policy agenda as evidenced by President Obama's call for more 'resources and authority to strengthen international inspections' in his April 2009 Prague speech. Through programs such as the recently-launched Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) and the long standing U.S. Program of Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards, the United States is working to implement this vision. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration launched NGSI in 2008 to develop the policies, concepts, technologies, expertise, and international safeguards infrastructure necessary to strengthen and sustain the international safeguards system as it evolves to meet new challenges. Following a successful 2009, NGSI has made significant progress toward these goals in 2010. NGSI has recently completed a number of policy studies on advanced safeguards concepts and sponsored several workshops, including a second international meeting on Harmonization of International Safeguards Infrastructure Development in Vienna. The program is also continuing multi-year projects to investigate advanced non-destructive assay techniques, enhance recruitment and training efforts, and strengthen international cooperation on safeguards. In December 2010, NGSI will host the Third Annual International Meeting on International Safeguards in Washington, DC, which will draw together key stakeholders from government, the nuclear industry, and the IAEA to further develop and promote a common understanding of Safeguards by Design principles and goals, and to identify opportunities for practical application of the concept. This paper presents a review of NGSI program activities in 2010 and previews plans for upcoming activities. (author)

  11. Next Generation Microchannel Heat Exchangers

    CERN Document Server

    Ohadi, Michael; Dessiatoun, Serguei; Cetegen, Edvin

    2013-01-01

    In Next Generation Microchannel Heat Exchangers, the authors’ focus on the new generation highly efficient heat exchangers and presentation of novel data and technical expertise not available in the open literature.  Next generation micro channels offer record high heat transfer coefficients with pressure drops much less than conventional micro channel heat exchangers. These inherent features promise fast penetration into many mew markets, including high heat flux cooling of electronics, waste heat recovery and energy efficiency enhancement applications, alternative energy systems, as well as applications in mass exchangers and chemical reactor systems. The combination of up to the minute research findings and technical know-how make this book very timely as the search for high performance heat and mass exchangers that can cut costs in materials consumption intensifies.

  12. Towards Next Generation BI Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varga, Jovan; Romero, Oscar; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2014-01-01

    Next generation Business Intelligence (BI) systems require integration of heterogeneous data sources and a strong user-centric orientation. Both needs entail machine-processable metadata to enable automation and allow end users to gain access to relevant data for their decision making processes....... Although evidently needed, there is no clear picture about the necessary metadata artifacts, especially considering user support requirements. Therefore, we propose a comprehensive metadata framework to support the user assistance activities and their automation in the context of next generation BI systems....... This framework is based on the findings of a survey of current user-centric approaches mainly focusing on query recommendation assistance. Finally, we discuss the benefits of the framework and present the plans for future work....

  13. Next Generation Biopharmaceuticals: Product Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathaes, Roman; Mahler, Hanns-Christian

    2018-04-11

    Therapeutic proteins show a rapid market growth. The relatively young biotech industry already represents 20 % of the total global pharma market. The biotech industry environment has traditionally been fast-pasted and intellectually stimulated. Nowadays the top ten best selling drugs are dominated by monoclonal antibodies (mABs).Despite mABs being the biggest medical breakthrough in the last 25 years, technical innovation does not stand still.The goal remains to preserve the benefits of a conventional mAB (serum half-life and specificity) whilst further improving efficacy and safety and to open new and better avenues for treating patients, e.g., improving the potency of molecules, target binding, tissue penetration, tailored pharmacokinetics, and reduced adverse effects or immunogenicity.The next generation of biopharmaceuticals can pose specific chemistry, manufacturing, and control (CMC) challenges. In contrast to conventional proteins, next-generation biopharmaceuticals often require lyophilization of the final drug product to ensure storage stability over shelf-life time. In addition, next-generation biopharmaceuticals require analytical methods that cover different ways of possible degradation patterns and pathways, and product development is a long way from being straight forward. The element of "prior knowledge" does not exist equally for most novel formats compared to antibodies, and thus the assessment of critical quality attributes (CQAs) and the definition of CQA assessment criteria and specifications is difficult, especially in early-stage development.

  14. Next Generation Energy. A study; Next Generation Energy. Studie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichert, Frank; Kitvarametha, Saman; Lehmann, Jochen; Ruhoff, Tim

    2010-07-01

    Under the short title 'Next Generation Energy', this publication discusses the complex problem of energy supply for the future. The authors attempt to identify the key issues that must be tackled, the business opportunities arising out of these issues, their practical feasibility and social impact. One of the findings of the study is the fact that consumers today are ready to buy electric-powered cars but there are not enough commercially available electric vehicles. The study is an attempt to tackle and advance this important and logistically complex issue. (orig.)

  15. Next generation surveillance system (NGSS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aparo, Massimo

    2006-01-01

    Development of 'functional requirements' for transparency systems may offer a near-term mode of regional cooperation. New requirements under development at the IAEA may provide a foundation for this potential activity. The Next Generation Surveillance System (NGSS) will become the new IAEA remote monitoring system Under new requirements the NGSS would attempt to use more commercial components to reduce cost, increase radiation survivability and further increase reliability. The NGSS must be available in two years due to rapidly approaching obsolescence in the existing DCM family. (author)

  16. Next-Generation Tools For Next-Generation Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, S. G.

    2017-04-01

    The next generation of large-scale galaxy surveys, across the electromagnetic spectrum, loom on the horizon as explosively game-changing datasets, in terms of our understanding of cosmology and structure formation. We are on the brink of a torrent of data that is set to both confirm and constrain current theories to an unprecedented level, and potentially overturn many of our conceptions. One of the great challenges of this forthcoming deluge is to extract maximal scientific content from the vast array of raw data. This challenge requires not only well-understood and robust physical models, but a commensurate network of software implementations with which to efficiently apply them. The halo model, a semi-analytic treatment of cosmological spatial statistics down to nonlinear scales, provides an excellent mathematical framework for exploring the nature of dark matter. This thesis presents a next-generation toolkit based on the halo model formalism, intended to fulfil the requirements of next-generation surveys. Our toolkit comprises three tools: (i) hmf, a comprehensive and flexible calculator for halo mass functions (HMFs) within extended Press-Schechter theory, (ii) the MRP distribution for extremely efficient analytic characterisation of HMFs, and (iii) halomod, an extension of hmf which provides support for the full range of halo model components. In addition to the development and technical presentation of these tools, we apply each to the task of physical modelling. With hmf, we determine the precision of our knowledge of the HMF, due to uncertainty in our knowledge of the cosmological parameters, over the past decade of cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. We place rule-of-thumb uncertainties on the predicted HMF for the Planck cosmology, and find that current limits on the precision are driven by modeling uncertainties rather than those from cosmological parameters. With the MRP, we create and test a method for robustly fitting the HMF to observed

  17. Strategy for robust detection of insertions, deletions, and point mutations in CEBPA, a GC-rich content gene, using 454 next-generation deep-sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Vera; Schnittger, Susanne; Schindela, Sonja; Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Eder, Christiane; Dugas, Martin; Kern, Wolfgang; Haferlach, Torsten; Haferlach, Claudia; Kohlmann, Alexander

    2011-03-01

    CEBPA mutations are of prognostic relevance in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and are currently detected using a combination of denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC), gene scan/fragment length analysis, and direct Sanger sequencing. Next-generation deep pyrosequencing, principally, allows for the highly sensitive detection of molecular mutations. However, standard 454 chemistry laboratory procedures lack efficient amplification of guanine-cytosine (GC)-rich amplicons during the emulsion PCR (emPCR) steps allowing direct massively parallel clonal amplification of PCR products. To solve this problem, we investigated six distinct emPCR conditions. The coding sequence of CEBPA was subdivided into four overlapping amplicons: GC content for amplicon 1, 74%; amplicon 2, 76%; amplicon 3, 77%; and amplicon 4, 69%. A new emPCR condition, improving the standard titanium assay, presents a robust solution to sequence amplicons with a GC content of up to 77%. Moreover, this assay was subsequently tested on a larger independent cohort of 23 AML patients. For each patient, a median of 737 reads was generated (coverage range, 397-fold to 1194-fold) and therefore allowed a robust detection of insertions, deletions, and point mutations. In conclusion, next-generation amplicon sequencing enables the highly sensitive detection of molecular mutations and is a feasible assay for routine assessment of GC-rich content amplicons. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Next Generation Life Support (NGLS): Rapid Cycle Amine Swing Bed

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) swingbed has been identified as a technology with high potential to meet the stringent requirements for the next generation spacesuit's...

  19. Next generation of energy production systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouault, J.; Garnier, J.C.; Carre, F.

    2003-01-01

    This document gathers the slides that have been presented at the Gedepeon conference. Gedepeon is a research group involving scientists from Cea (French atomic energy commission), CNRS (national center of scientific research), EDF (electricity of France) and Framatome that is devoted to the study of new energy sources and particularly to the study of the future generations of nuclear systems. The contributions have been classed into 9 topics: 1) gas cooled reactors, 2) molten salt reactors (MSBR), 3) the recycling of plutonium and americium, 4) reprocessing of molten salt reactor fuels, 5) behavior of graphite under radiation, 6) metallic materials for molten salt reactors, 7) refractory fuels of gas cooled reactors, 8) the nuclear cycle for the next generations of nuclear systems, and 9) organization of research programs on the new energy sources

  20. Next generation distributed computing for cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pankaj; Owzar, Kouros

    2014-01-01

    Advances in next generation sequencing (NGS) and mass spectrometry (MS) technologies have provided many new opportunities and angles for extending the scope of translational cancer research while creating tremendous challenges in data management and analysis. The resulting informatics challenge is invariably not amenable to the use of traditional computing models. Recent advances in scalable computing and associated infrastructure, particularly distributed computing for Big Data, can provide solutions for addressing these challenges. In this review, the next generation of distributed computing technologies that can address these informatics problems is described from the perspective of three key components of a computational platform, namely computing, data storage and management, and networking. A broad overview of scalable computing is provided to set the context for a detailed description of Hadoop, a technology that is being rapidly adopted for large-scale distributed computing. A proof-of-concept Hadoop cluster, set up for performance benchmarking of NGS read alignment, is described as an example of how to work with Hadoop. Finally, Hadoop is compared with a number of other current technologies for distributed computing.

  1. Rhamnolipids--next generation surfactants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Markus Michael; Kügler, Johannes H; Henkel, Marius; Gerlitzki, Melanie; Hörmann, Barbara; Pöhnlein, Martin; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2012-12-31

    The demand for bio-based processes and materials in the petrochemical industry has significantly increased during the last decade because of the expected running out of petroleum. This trend can be ascribed to three main causes: (1) the increased use of renewable resources for chemical synthesis of already established product classes, (2) the replacement of chemical synthesis of already established product classes by new biotechnological processes based on renewable resources, and (3) the biotechnological production of new molecules with new features or better performances than already established comparable chemically synthesized products. All three approaches are currently being pursued for surfactant production. Biosurfactants are a very promising and interesting substance class because they are based on renewable resources, sustainable, and biologically degradable. Alkyl polyglycosides are chemically synthesized biosurfactants established on the surfactant market. The first microbiological biosurfactants on the market were sophorolipids. Of all currently known biosurfactants, rhamnolipids have the highest potential for becoming the next generation of biosurfactants introduced on the market. Although the metabolic pathways and genetic regulation of biosynthesis are known qualitatively, the quantitative understanding relevant for bioreactor cultivation is still missing. Additionally, high product titers have been exclusively described with vegetable oil as sole carbon source in combination with Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Competitive productivity is still out of reach for heterologous hosts or non-pathogenic natural producer strains. Thus, on the one hand there is a need to gain a deeper understanding of the regulation of rhamnolipid production on process and cellular level during bioreactor cultivations. On the other hand, there is a need for metabolizable renewable substrates, which do not compete with food and feed. A sustainable bioeconomy approach should

  2. Building next-generation converged networks theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Pathan, Al-Sakib Khan

    2013-01-01

    Supplying a comprehensive introduction to next-generation networks, Building Next-Generation Converged Networks: Theory and Practice strikes a balance between how and why things work and how to make them work. It compiles recent advancements along with basic issues from the wide range of fields related to next generation networks. Containing the contributions of 56 industry experts and researchers from 16 different countries, the book presents relevant theoretical frameworks and the latest research. It investigates new technologies such as IPv6 over Low Power Wireless Personal Area Network (6L

  3. Next Generation Safeguards Initiative: Human Capital Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, M.; Irola, G.; Glynn, K.

    2015-01-01

    Since 2008, the Human Capital Development (HCD) subprogramme of the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) has supported the recruitment, education, training, and retention of the next generation of international safeguards professionals to meet the needs of both the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the United States. Specifically, HCD's efforts respond to data indicating that 82% of safeguards experts at U.S. Laboratories will have left the workforce within 15 years. This paper provides an update on the status of the subprogramme since its last presentation at the IAEA Safeguards Symposium in 2010. It highlights strengthened, integrated efforts in the areas of graduate and post-doctoral fellowships, young and midcareer professional support, short safeguards courses, and university engagement. It also discusses lessons learned from the U.S. experience in safeguards education and training as well as the importance of long-range strategies to develop a cohesive, effective, and efficient human capital development approach. (author)

  4. Examination of concept of next generation computer. Progress report 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, Kenji; Hasegawa, Yukihiro; Hirayama, Toshio

    2000-12-01

    The Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering has conducted R and D works on the technology of parallel processing and has started the examination of the next generation computer in 1999. This report describes the behavior analyses of quantum calculation codes. It also describes the consideration for the analyses and examination results for the method to reduce cash misses. Furthermore, it describes a performance simulator that is being developed to quantitatively examine the concept of the next generation computer. (author)

  5. NIRS report of investigations for the development of the next generation PET apparatus. FY 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-01

    The present status of studies conducted by representative technology fields for the development of the next generation PET apparatus, and the summary of opinions given by investigators of nuclear medicine are reported. The former involves chapters of: Summary of representative technologies for the development of the next generation PET apparatus; Count rate analysis of PET apparatuses for the whole body and small animals by PET simulator; Scintillator; DOI (depth of interaction) detector-evaluation of the detector with 256-ch fluorescence polarization-photomultiplier tubes (FP-PMT) trial apparatus etc; Examination of multi-slice DOI-MR compatible detector for PET; Development of application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for processing the front-end signals; Detector simulation; Circuit for processing PET detector signals; Signal processing-coincidence circuit; Data collection system; Signal processing technology for the next generation PET; Reconstruction of statistical PET image using DOI signals; Monte Carlo simulation and Unique directions-PET for infants and for the whole body autonomic nervous systems and mental activity; and Actual design and evaluation of image reconstruction by statistical means. Opinions are: Progress of clinical PET apparatus; Desirable PET drugs and apparatuses; From clinical practice for the development of the next generation PET apparatus; >From clinical psychiatric studies for the development; From application of drug development and basic researches; From brain PET practice; From clinical PET practice; and The role of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in PET development. Also involved is the publication list. (N.I.)

  6. Translational Health: The Next Generation of Medicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mural, Richard J

    2006-01-01

    The "Translational Health - the Next Generation of Medicine" conference brought together scientists and medical professionals from across the country and Europe to present and discuss their research...

  7. Nuclear fuel manufacture and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power accounts for approximately 17% of the world's total electrical energy production. Over 30 countries operate in excess of 430 nuclear power plants with a combined generating capacity of more than 340 000 MWe. BNFL is a leading force in the international nuclear industry, supplying products and services across the complete fuel cycle business spectrum. These services and products include fuel and intermediate products manufacture, reprocessing, transport, waste management and decommissioning. This paper describes the processes involved in taking uranium ore as a raw material through to the production of advanced fuels and focuses on the manufacture and technology for both uranium oxide (UO 2 ) and mixed oxide (MOX) fuels. As a light water reactor (LWR) fuel fabricator, BNFL is able to manufacture MOX or UO 2 fuel utilizing recycled uranium. This paper discusses the technology involved in the use of plutonium or uranium oxide recovered from reprocessing and other advanced fuel technical issues. Improved production methods and the application of advanced engineering permits the next generation of fuel fabrication plants to capitalize on advances in technology. The long-term research and development (R and D) commitments by BNFL are outlined in this paper, indicating the levels of investment needed in R and D to accommodate a high technology company in an international market. (author)

  8. Statistical analysis of next generation sequencing data

    CERN Document Server

    Nettleton, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) is the latest high throughput technology to revolutionize genomic research. NGS generates massive genomic datasets that play a key role in the big data phenomenon that surrounds us today. To extract signals from high-dimensional NGS data and make valid statistical inferences and predictions, novel data analytic and statistical techniques are needed. This book contains 20 chapters written by prominent statisticians working with NGS data. The topics range from basic preprocessing and analysis with NGS data to more complex genomic applications such as copy number variation and isoform expression detection. Research statisticians who want to learn about this growing and exciting area will find this book useful. In addition, many chapters from this book could be included in graduate-level classes in statistical bioinformatics for training future biostatisticians who will be expected to deal with genomic data in basic biomedical research, genomic clinical trials and personalized med...

  9. FY 2000 study report on the study on technological development of the chemical processes of the next generation; 2000 nendo jisedai kagaku process gijutsu kaihatsu ni kansuru chosa kenkyu hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    The technological development of the innovative chemical reaction processes is studied, in order to accomplish further energy saving, and reduction of resource consumption and environmental loads. Described herein are the FY 2000 study results. The program for systematization of the next-generation chemical processes systematically pigeonholes the undergoing projects and subjects to be studied, based on the principles of simplification, and sets the study fields of organic bulk chemicals, organic fine chemicals, highpolymer materials and inorganic materials. The program for investigation on next-generation chemical processes reviews creation and technological use of tailor-made biocatalysts, polymer materials which utilize wood resources, tailor-made reaction process engineering for handling fine particles in high-temperature reaction fields, production and processing of materials for high-performance polymer batteries, and extreme energy saving process for polyolefins, and proposes the revisions. The newly proposed study themes include novel C1 catalytic processes toward minimal wastes, and high utilization of biotechnology for novel processes to create materials. (NEDO)

  10. Nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    This book has sixteen peer-reviewed papers divided into four sections that reflect changes in the nuclear power industry occurring since 1981, including escalating capital requirements and a growing worldwide dependence on nuclear power for electricity production. The four sections of this book are: Overview of National Programs; Surveillance and Other Radiation Embrittlement Studies; Pressure Vessel Integrity and Regulatory Considerations; and Mechanisms of Irradiation Embrittlement

  11. Feasibility study of an optical resonator for applications in neutral-beam injection systems for the next generation of nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorucci, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    This work is part of a larger project called SIPHORE (Single gap Photo-neutralizer energy Recovery injector), which aims to enhance the overall efficiency of one of the mechanisms through which the plasma is heated, in a nuclear fusion reactor, i.e. the Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) system. An important component of a NBI system is the neutralizer of high energetic ion beams. SIPHORE proposes to substitute the gas cell neutralizer, used in the current NBI systems, with a photo-neutralizer exploiting the photo-detachment process within Fabry Perot cavities. This mechanism should allow a relevant NBI global efficiency of η≥ 60%, significantly higher than the one currently possible (η≤25% for ITER). The present work concerns the feasibility study of an optical cavity with suitable properties for applications in NBI systems. Within this context, the issue of the determination of an appropriated optical cavity design has been firstly considered and the theoretical and experimental analysis of a particular optical resonator has been carried on. The problems associated with the high levels of intracavity optical power (∼3 MW) required for an adequate photo-neutralization rate have then been faced. In this respect, we addressed both the problem of the thermal effects on the cavity mirrors due to their absorption of intra-cavity optical power (∼1 W) and the one associated to the necessity of a high powerful input laser beam (∼1 kW) to feed the optical resonator. (author)

  12. Next Generation CALICE Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    OpenAIRE

    Grondin, Denis; Jeans, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents mechanical R&D for the CALICE Silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter. After the physics ECAL prototype, tested in 2006 (DESY-CERN), 2007 (CERN), 2008 (FNAL) and before the design of different 'modules 0' (barrel and endcap) for a final detector, a technological ECAL prototype, called the EUDET module, is under design in order to have a close to full scale technological solution which could be used for the final detector, taking into account future industrialisation o...

  13. Next Generation CALICE Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    OpenAIRE

    Grondin, Denis; Jeans, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents mechanical R&D for the CALICE Silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter. After the physics ECAL prototype, tested in 2006 (DESY-CERN), 2007 (CERN), 2008 (FNAL) and before the design of different "modules 0" (barrel and endcap) for a final detector, a technological ECAL prototype, called the EUDET module, is under design in order to have a close to full scale technological solution which could be used for the final detector, taking into account future industrialisation o...

  14. CO2 CAPTURE PROJECT-AN INTEGRATED, COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FOR NEXT GENERATION CO2 SEPARATION, CAPTURE AND GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helen Kerr

    2004-04-01

    The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) is a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, Eni, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (European Union (DG Res & DG Tren), Norway (Klimatek) and the U.S.A. (Department of Energy)). The project objective is to develop new technologies, which could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies are to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. The project budget is approximately $24 million over 3 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: (1) Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. (2) Capture Technology, Post Combustion--technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. (3) Capture Technology, Oxyfuel--where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with wet high concentrations of CO{sub 2} for storage. (4) Capture Technology, Pre-Combustion--in which, natural gas and petroleum coke are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. (5) Common Economic Model/Technology Screening--analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. (6) New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. (7) Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV)--providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. (8) Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Technology development work dominated the past six months of the project. Numerous studies

  15. CO2 Capture Project-An Integrated, Collaborative Technology Development Project for Next Generation CO2 Separation, Capture and Geologic Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helen Kerr; Linda M. Curran

    2005-04-15

    The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) was a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, ENI, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (European Union [DG RES & DG TREN], the Norwegian Research Council [Klimatek Program] and the U.S. Department of Energy [NETL]). The project objective was to develop new technologies that could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies were to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. Certain promising technology areas were increased in scope and the studies extended through 2004. The project budget was approximately $26.4 million over 4 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. Capture Technology, Post Combustion: technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. Capture Technology, Oxyfuel: where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with high CO{sub 2} for storage. Capture Technology, Pre-Combustion: in which, natural gas and petroleum cokes are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. Common Economic Model/Technology Screening: analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV): providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Pre

  16. Science and Math Lesson Plans to Meet the Ohio Revised Science Standards and the Next Generation of Standards for Today; Technology (Excel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Lunsford

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pre-service teachers (K-12 developed and taught lesson plans that met the state and national science and technology standards by integrating Excel and PowerPoint into their lesson. A sample of 74 pre-service teachers in our science education program were required to integrate technology (Excel as they developed science and math lesson plans with graphing as a requirement. These students took pre-test and post-test (n=74 to determine their understanding of Excel in relation to the need of current technology for todays' science classroom. The test results showed that students obtained content gains in Excel graphing in all the inquiry-based lab experiments. They also gained experience in developing math skills, inquiry-based science lesson plans, and communication and presentation skills.

  17. Next Generation Information Systems Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    networks. Furthermore, we present visualization of the collected data for the purpose of exploratory analysis. It helps identify large-scale trends ...W. McKnight, “Wireless Internet Access: 3G vs. WiFi?” Cambridge: Center for eBusiness , Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2002. Available at

  18. Active optics for next generation space telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costes, V.; Perret, L.; Laubier, D.; Delvit, J. M.; Imbert, C.; Cadiergues, L.; Faure, C.

    2017-09-01

    High resolution observation systems need bigger and bigger telescopes. The design of such telescopes is a key issue for the whole satellite. In order to improve the imaging resolution with minimum impact on the satellite, a big effort must be made to improve the telescope compactness. Compactness is also important for the agility of the satellite and for the size and cost of the launcher. This paper shows how compact a high resolution telescope can be. A diffraction limited telescope can be less than ten times shorter than its focal length. But the compactness impacts drastically the opto-mechanical sensitivity and the optical performances. Typically, a gain of a factor of 2 leads to a mechanical tolerance budget 6 times more difficult. The need to implement active optics for positioning requirements raises very quickly. Moreover, the capability to compensate shape defaults of the primary mirror is the way to simplify the mirror manufacture, to mitigate the development risks and to minimize the cost. The larger the primary mirror is, the more interesting it is to implement active optics for shape compensations. CNES is preparing next generation of earth observation satellite in the frame of OTOS (Observation de la Terre Optique Super-Résolue; High resolution earth observing optical system). OTOS is a technology program. In particular, optical technological developments and breadboards dedicated to active optics are on-going. The aim is to achieve TRL 5 to TRL6 for these new technologies and to validate the global performances of such an active telescope.

  19. CRISPR and piRNAs: Fundamental Mechanisms and Key Applications of the Next Generation of Molecular Technologies in the Field of Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    " Exploration into the roles of genes, the proteins that they encode, and the functions that they carry out within the cell is a founding pillar in the field of toxicology. Recent breakthroughs in clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) technology...

  20. Next generation sequencing reveals the hidden diversity of zooplankton assemblages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope K Lindeque

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Zooplankton play an important role in our oceans, in biogeochemical cycling and providing a food source for commercially important fish larvae. However, difficulties in correctly identifying zooplankton hinder our understanding of their roles in marine ecosystem functioning, and can prevent detection of long term changes in their community structure. The advent of massively parallel next generation sequencing technology allows DNA sequence data to be recovered directly from whole community samples. Here we assess the ability of such sequencing to quantify richness and diversity of a mixed zooplankton assemblage from a productive time series site in the Western English Channel. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Plankton net hauls (200 µm were taken at the Western Channel Observatory station L4 in September 2010 and January 2011. These samples were analysed by microscopy and metagenetic analysis of the 18S nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene using the 454 pyrosequencing platform. Following quality control a total of 419,041 sequences were obtained for all samples. The sequences clustered into 205 operational taxonomic units using a 97% similarity cut-off. Allocation of taxonomy by comparison with the National Centre for Biotechnology Information database identified 135 OTUs to species level, 11 to genus level and 1 to order, <2.5% of sequences were classified as unknowns. By comparison a skilled microscopic analyst was able to routinely enumerate only 58 taxonomic groups. CONCLUSIONS: Metagenetics reveals a previously hidden taxonomic richness, especially for Copepoda and hard-to-identify meroplankton such as Bivalvia, Gastropoda and Polychaeta. It also reveals rare species and parasites. We conclude that Next Generation Sequencing of 18S amplicons is a powerful tool for elucidating the true diversity and species richness of zooplankton communities. While this approach allows for broad diversity assessments of plankton it may

  1. The states of the art of the nondestructive assay of spent nuclear fuel assemblies. A critical review of the Spent Fuel NDA Project of the U.S. Department of Energy's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolind, Alan Michael; Seya, Michio

    2015-12-01

    The state of the art of the nondestructive assay of spent nuclear fuel assemblies is represented by the results of the Spent Fuel Nondestructive Assay Project of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S. Department of Energy / National Nuclear Security Administration. This report surveys the fourteen advanced nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques that were examined by the NGSI. For each technique, it explains how the technique operates, the NGSI's design of an instrument that uses the technique, how the data are analyzed, and the technique's chief limitations. After this survey of the NDA techniques, the report then discusses and critiques the current paradigm of the practice of NDA of spent fuel assemblies. It shows how the current main problem in the NDA of spent fuel assemblies—namely, an unacceptably large uncertainty in the assay results—is caused primarily by using too few independent NDA measurements. Because the physics of the NDA of spent fuel assemblies is three dimensional, at least three independent NDA measurements are required. Thus, NDA results should be able to be improved dramatically by combining the fourteen advanced NDA techniques plus other existing NDA techniques into appropriate combinations of three techniques. This report evaluates the NGSI's proposed NDA combinations according to these principles. (author)

  2. Zephyr - the next generation prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giebel, G.; Landberg, L.; Nielsen, Torben Skov

    2001-01-01

    Technical University. This paper will describe a new project funded by the Danish Ministry of Energy where the largest Danish utilities (Elkraft, Elsam, Eltra and SEAS) are participating. Two advantages can be achieved by combining the effort: The software architecture will be state-of-the-art, using...... the Java2TM platform and Enterprise Java Beans technology, and it will ensure that the best forecasts are given on all prediction horizons from the short range (0-9 hours) to the long range (36-48 hours). This is because the IMM approach uses online data and advanced statistical methods, which...

  3. Next Generation Reliable Transport Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jiang

    the wavelength and fiber assignment problem is proposed and implemented for avionic optical transport networks. Simulation results give out resource consumptions and prove the efficiency of the proposed mechanisms. Finally, a Home Environment Service Knowledge Management system is proposed. Through ontology...... technologies, a knowledge base is constructed to represent the whole information of a home environment. By applying the reasoner tool, the proposed system manages to keep the consistency in a home environment and helps all software configure and update procedures across multiple vendors....

  4. Next-generation transcriptome assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Zhong

    2011-09-01

    Transcriptomics studies often rely on partial reference transcriptomes that fail to capture the full catalog of transcripts and their variations. Recent advances in sequencing technologies and assembly algorithms have facilitated the reconstruction of the entire transcriptome by deep RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), even without a reference genome. However, transcriptome assembly from billions of RNA-seq reads, which are often very short, poses a significant informatics challenge. This Review summarizes the recent developments in transcriptome assembly approaches - reference-based, de novo and combined strategies-along with some perspectives on transcriptome assembly in the near future.

  5. Next Generation Power and Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-02

    reduction in harmonic distortion from ~9% to ə%, and an increase in efficiency from 94% to 98%, i.e., a 2X reduction in thermal losses.  Develop a...Distribution A: Cleared for Public Release Intelligent Ship/Power Dense Technologies: Solid State Power Substation : Power Conversion Module Enabling... Substation (SSPS) Program • DARPA, ONR, PEO-Carriers, ESO • Phase III in progress (6/2007- 6/2010) • Team: GE, Cree, Powerex, LANL, IAP, GD-EB Goal • Compact

  6. NEXT GENERATION MELTER OPTIONEERING STUDY - INTERIM REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GRAY MF; CALMUS RB; RAMSEY G; LOMAX J; ALLEN H

    2010-10-19

    The next generation melter (NOM) development program includes a down selection process to aid in determining the recommended vitrification technology to implement into the WTP at the first melter change-out which is scheduled for 2025. This optioneering study presents a structured value engineering process to establish and assess evaluation criteria that will be incorporated into the down selection process. This process establishes an evaluation framework that will be used progressively throughout the NGM program, and as such this interim report will be updated on a regular basis. The workshop objectives were achieved. In particular: (1) Consensus was reached with stakeholders and technology providers represented at the workshop regarding the need for a decision making process and the application of the D{sub 2}0 process to NGM option evaluation. (2) A framework was established for applying the decision making process to technology development and evaluation between 2010 and 2013. (3) The criteria for the initial evaluation in 2011 were refined and agreed with stakeholders and technology providers. (4) The technology providers have the guidance required to produce data/information to support the next phase of the evaluation process. In some cases it may be necessary to reflect the data/information requirements and overall approach to the evaluation of technology options against specific criteria within updated Statements of Work for 2010-2011. Access to the WTP engineering data has been identified as being very important for option development and evaluation due to the interface issues for the NGM and surrounding plant. WRPS efforts are ongoing to establish precisely data that is required and how to resolve this Issue. It is intended to apply a similarly structured decision making process to the development and evaluation of LAW NGM options.

  7. Benchmarking the expected stack manufacturing cost of next generation, intermediate-temperature protonic ceramic fuel cells with solid oxide fuel cell technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Alexis; Ricote, Sandrine; Braun, Robert J.

    2017-11-01

    Recent progress in the performance of intermediate temperature (500-600 °C) protonic ceramic fuel cells (PCFCs) has demonstrated both fuel flexibility and increasing power density that approach commercial application requirements. These developments may eventually position the technology as a viable alternative to solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs). The PCFCs investigated in this work are based on a BaZr0.8Y0.2O3-δ (BZY20) thin electrolyte supported by BZY20/Ni porous anodes, and a triple conducting cathode material comprised of BaCo0.4Fe0.4Zr0.1Y0.1O3-δ (BCFZY0.1). These cells are prepared using a low-cost solid-state reactive sintering (SSRS) process, and are capable of power densities of 0.156 W cm-2 at 500 °C operating directly from methane fuel. We develop a manufacturing cost model to estimate the Nth generation production costs of PCFC stack technology using high volume manufacturing processes and compare them to the state-of-the-art in SOFC technology. The low-cost cell manufacturing enabled by the SSRS technique compensates for the lower PCFC power density and the trade-off between operating temperature and efficiency enables the use of lower-cost stainless steel materials. PCFC stack production cost estimates are found to be as much as 27-37% lower at 550 °C than SOFCs operating at 800 °C.

  8. (U) Ristra Next Generation Code Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hungerford, Aimee L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Daniel, David John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-22

    LANL’s Weapons Physics management (ADX) and ASC program office have defined a strategy for exascale-class application codes that follows two supportive, and mutually risk-mitigating paths: evolution for established codes (with a strong pedigree within the user community) based upon existing programming paradigms (MPI+X); and Ristra (formerly known as NGC), a high-risk/high-reward push for a next-generation multi-physics, multi-scale simulation toolkit based on emerging advanced programming systems (with an initial focus on data-flow task-based models exemplified by Legion [5]). Development along these paths is supported by the ATDM, IC, and CSSE elements of the ASC program, with the resulting codes forming a common ecosystem, and with algorithm and code exchange between them anticipated. Furthermore, solution of some of the more challenging problems of the future will require a federation of codes working together, using established-pedigree codes in partnership with new capabilities as they come on line. The role of Ristra as the high-risk/high-reward path for LANL’s codes is fully consistent with its role in the Advanced Technology Development and Mitigation (ATDM) sub-program of ASC (see Appendix C), in particular its emphasis on evolving ASC capabilities through novel programming models and data management technologies.

  9. Trends in IT Innovation to Build a Next Generation Bioinformatics Solution to Manage and Analyse Biological Big Data Produced by NGS Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre G. de Brevern

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sequencing the human genome began in 1994, and 10 years of work were necessary in order to provide a nearly complete sequence. Nowadays, NGS technologies allow sequencing of a whole human genome in a few days. This deluge of data challenges scientists in many ways, as they are faced with data management issues and analysis and visualization drawbacks due to the limitations of current bioinformatics tools. In this paper, we describe how the NGS Big Data revolution changes the way of managing and analysing data. We present how biologists are confronted with abundance of methods, tools, and data formats. To overcome these problems, focus on Big Data Information Technology innovations from web and business intelligence. We underline the interest of NoSQL databases, which are much more efficient than relational databases. Since Big Data leads to the loss of interactivity with data during analysis due to high processing time, we describe solutions from the Business Intelligence that allow one to regain interactivity whatever the volume of data is. We illustrate this point with a focus on the Amadea platform. Finally, we discuss visualization challenges posed by Big Data and present the latest innovations with JavaScript graphic libraries.

  10. Trends in IT Innovation to Build a Next Generation Bioinformatics Solution to Manage and Analyse Biological Big Data Produced by NGS Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brevern, Alexandre G; Meyniel, Jean-Philippe; Fairhead, Cécile; Neuvéglise, Cécile; Malpertuy, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing the human genome began in 1994, and 10 years of work were necessary in order to provide a nearly complete sequence. Nowadays, NGS technologies allow sequencing of a whole human genome in a few days. This deluge of data challenges scientists in many ways, as they are faced with data management issues and analysis and visualization drawbacks due to the limitations of current bioinformatics tools. In this paper, we describe how the NGS Big Data revolution changes the way of managing and analysing data. We present how biologists are confronted with abundance of methods, tools, and data formats. To overcome these problems, focus on Big Data Information Technology innovations from web and business intelligence. We underline the interest of NoSQL databases, which are much more efficient than relational databases. Since Big Data leads to the loss of interactivity with data during analysis due to high processing time, we describe solutions from the Business Intelligence that allow one to regain interactivity whatever the volume of data is. We illustrate this point with a focus on the Amadea platform. Finally, we discuss visualization challenges posed by Big Data and present the latest innovations with JavaScript graphic libraries.

  11. Next generation CANDU heat transport system parameter assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hau, K.F.; Love, J.W.; Vadera, M.; Vecchiarelli, J.

    2001-01-01

    AECL has initiated an innovative program to develop the next generation of technologies for CANDU reactors, and to apply them to a highly cost-effective new family of next generation power plants. Four major design changes were considered in the present conceptual design of the Heat Transport System (HTS) for the Next Generation (NG) CANDU. These include: light water replacement of heavy water as coolant, a compact core design resulting from a fuel channel lattice pitch reduction, use of Slightly Enriched Uranium (SEU) CANFLEX fuel bundles, and higher HTS and Turbine Generator (TG) operating pressures and temperatures. In designing the HTS, the goal is to reduce the capital cost while meeting the design and safety requirements with robust safety margins. This paper describes the studies to optimize key HTS parameters, including the assessment methodology and the basis of proposed design conditions for the NG CANDU HTS. (author)

  12. Next generation spin torque memories

    CERN Document Server

    Kaushik, Brajesh Kumar; Kulkarni, Anant Aravind; Prajapati, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    This book offers detailed insights into spin transfer torque (STT) based devices, circuits and memories. Starting with the basic concepts and device physics, it then addresses advanced STT applications and discusses the outlook for this cutting-edge technology. It also describes the architectures, performance parameters, fabrication, and the prospects of STT based devices. Further, moving from the device to the system perspective it presents a non-volatile computing architecture composed of STT based magneto-resistive and all-spin logic devices and demonstrates that efficient STT based magneto-resistive and all-spin logic devices can turn the dream of instant on/off non-volatile computing into reality.

  13. Galaxy LIMS for next-generation sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtalbers, J.; Rossler, J.; Sorn, P.; Graaf, J. de; Boisguerin, V.; Castle, J.; Sahin, U.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY: We have developed a laboratory information management system (LIMS) for a next-generation sequencing (NGS) laboratory within the existing Galaxy platform. The system provides lab technicians standard and customizable sample information forms, barcoded submission forms, tracking of input

  14. NOAA NEXt-Generation RADar (NEXRAD) Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of Level III weather radar products collected from Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) stations located in the contiguous United States, Alaska,...

  15. Next-generation sequencing for investigating the diversity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pathogenic bacteria in water. Recent technological advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) offer better prospects for detection of pathogenic microorganisms and investigating their diversity [11]. NGS can quickly generate huge amounts of DNA reads, and the technique is affordable [12]. In this study, the pathogens ...

  16. Next-generation sequencing approaches to understanding the oral microbiome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaura, E.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, the focus in dental research has been on studying a small fraction of the oral microbiome—so-called opportunistic pathogens. With the advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, researchers now have the tools that allow for profiling of the microbiomes and metagenomes at

  17. Estimating individual admixture proportions from next generation sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skotte, Line; Korneliussen, Thorfinn Sand; Albrechtsen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Inference of population structure and individual ancestry is important both for population genetics and for association studies. With next generation sequencing technologies it is possible to obtain genetic data for all accessible genetic variations in the genome. Existing methods for admixture...

  18. Next Generation BioPhotonics Workstation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    We are developing a Next Generation BioPhotonics Workstation to be applied in research on regulated microbial cell growth including their underlying physiological mechanisms, in vivo characterization of cell constituents and manufacturing of nanostructures and meta-materials.......We are developing a Next Generation BioPhotonics Workstation to be applied in research on regulated microbial cell growth including their underlying physiological mechanisms, in vivo characterization of cell constituents and manufacturing of nanostructures and meta-materials....

  19. A Next Generation BioPhotonics Workstation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin; Tauro, Sandeep

    2011-01-01

    We are developing a Next Generation BioPhotonics Workstation to be applied in research on regulated microbial cell growth including their underlying physiological mechanisms, in vivo characterization of cell constituents and manufacturing of nanostructures and meta-materials.......We are developing a Next Generation BioPhotonics Workstation to be applied in research on regulated microbial cell growth including their underlying physiological mechanisms, in vivo characterization of cell constituents and manufacturing of nanostructures and meta-materials....

  20. Modelling with stakeholders - Next generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voinov, Alexey; Kolagani, Nagesh; McCall, Michael K; Glynn, Pierre D.; Kragt, Marit E; Ostermann, Frank O; Pierce, Suzanne A; Ramu, Palaniappan

    2016-01-01

    This paper updates and builds on ‘Modelling with Stakeholders’ Voinov and Bousquet, 2010 which demonstrated the importance of, and demand for, stakeholder participation in resource and environmental modelling. This position paper returns to the concepts of that publication and reviews the progress made since 2010. A new development is the wide introduction and acceptance of social media and web applications, which dramatically changes the context and scale of stakeholder interactions and participation. Technology advances make it easier to incorporate information in interactive formats via visualization and games to augment participatory experiences. Citizens as stakeholders are increasingly demanding to be engaged in planning decisions that affect them and their communities, at scales from local to global. How people interact with and access models and data is rapidly evolving. In turn, this requires changes in how models are built, packaged, and disseminated: citizens are less in awe of experts and external authorities, and they are increasingly aware of their own capabilities to provide inputs to planning processes, including models. The continued acceleration of environmental degradation and natural resource depletion accompanies these societal changes, even as there is a growing acceptance of the need to transition to alternative, possibly very different, life styles. Substantive transitions cannot occur without significant changes in human behaviour and perceptions. The important and diverse roles that models can play in guiding human behaviour, and in disseminating and increasing societal knowledge, are a feature of stakeholder processes today.

  1. Preparation of next generation set of group cross sections. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Kunio

    2002-03-01

    This fiscal year, based on the examination result about the evaluation energy range of heavy element unresolved resonance cross sections, the upper energy limit of the energy range, where ultra-fine group cross sections are produced, was raised to 50 keV, and an improvement of the group cross section processing system was promoted. At the same time, reflecting the result of studies carried out till now, a function producing delayed neutron data was added to the general-purpose group cross section processing system , thus the preparation of general purpose group cross section processing system has been completed. On the other hand, the energy structure, data constitution and data contents of next generation group cross section set were determined, and the specification of a 151 groups next generation group cross section set was defined. Based on the above specification, a concrete library format of the next generation cross section set has been determined. After having carried out the above-described work, using the general-purpose group cross section processing system , which was complete in this study, with use of the JENDL-3. 2 evaluated nuclear data, the 151 groups next generation group cross section of 92 nuclides and the ultra fine group resonance cross section library for 29 nuclides have been prepared. Utilizing the 151 groups next generation group cross section set and the ultra-fine group resonance cross-section library, a bench mark test calculation of fast reactors has been performed by using an advanced lattice calculation code. It was confirmed, by comparing the calculation result with a calculation result of continuous energy Monte Carlo code, that the 151 groups next generation cross section set has sufficient accuracy. (author)

  2. Conception of Next Generation Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Šarić

    2004-11-01

    tool for the realization ofadditional se1vices and for enabling the control in NGN. Theproblem of JP routers for NGN has also been mentioned, aswell as the importance of the new core generation of optical networks.The conceptual framework of NGN is based today onIP/ATM transport technology, which is at this level of developmentgenerally accepted as the optimal transp011 solution. The problem of addressing caused by the insufficient address spaceof Ipv4 has been stressed and the solution of that problem hasbeen anticipated with the introduction of lpv6 technology,which, due to its complexity and high costs, would be graduallyintroduced by a dual approach into the system.The differentiating elements of NGN in relation to the existingnetworks have been specially pointed out. The modulm;that is, plane nature of the NGN conception in relation to thevertical and hierarchical conception of PSTN has beenstressed, as well as the pdvileges that this open conception offerswhen choosing the equipment of the highest quality by differentmanufacturers. Both existing, voice (TDM and data(NGN (ATM/IP, networks will act parallel in the next yearsuntil new solutions to NGN will have been introduced.

  3. Changes in root bacterial communities associated to two different development stages of canola (Brassica napus L. var oleifera) evaluated through next-generation sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, Samanta B; Youn, Jung-Won; Farina, Roberto; Jaenicke, Sebastian; Jünemann, Sebastian; Szczepanowski, Rafael; Beneduzi, Anelise; Vargas, Luciano K; Goesmann, Alexander; Wendisch, Volker F; Passaglia, Luciane M P

    2013-04-01

    Crop production may benefit from plant growth-promoting bacteria. The knowledge on bacterial communities is indispensable in agricultural systems that intend to apply beneficial bacteria to improve plant health and production of crops such as canola. In this work, the diversity of root bacterial communities associated to two different developmental phases of canola (Brassica napus L.) plants was assessed through the application of new generation sequencing technology. Total bacterial DNA was extracted from root samples from two different growth states of canola (rosette and flowering). It could be shown how bacterial communities inside the roots changed with the growing stage of the canola plants. There were differences in the abundance of the genera, family, and even the phyla identified for each sample. While in both root samples Proteobacteria was the most common phylum, at the rosette stage, the most common bacteria belonged to the family Pseudomonadaceae and the genus Pseudomonas, and in the flowering stage, the Xanthomonadaceae family and the genus Xanthomonas dominated the community. This implies in a switch in the predominant bacteria in the different developmental stages of the plant, suggesting that the plant itself interferes with the associated microbial community.

  4. Design of a High Density SNP Genotyping Assay in the Pig Using SNPs Identified and Characterized by Next Generation Sequencing Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramos, Antonio M; Crooijmans, Richard P M A; Nabeel, Nabeel A

    2009-01-01

    generation sequencing technologies and use these SNPs, as well as others from different public sources, to design a high-density SNP genotyping assay. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 19 reduced representation libraries derived from four swine breeds (Duroc, Landrace, Large White, Pietrain......) and a Wild Boar population and three restriction enzymes (AluI, HaeIII and MspI) were sequenced using Illumina's Genome Analyzer (GA). The SNP discovery effort resulted in the de novo identification of over 372K SNPs. More than 549K SNPs were used to design the Illumina Porcine 60K+SNP iSelect Beadchip, now...... commercially available as the PorcineSNP60. A total of 64,232 SNPs were included on the Beadchip. Results from genotyping the 158 individuals used for sequencing showed a high overall SNP call rate (97.5%). Of the 62,621 loci that could be reliably scored, 58,994 were polymorphic yielding a SNP conversion...

  5. Exploring early micronutrient deficiencies in rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss by next-generation sequencing technology--from black box to functional genomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pål A Olsvik

    Full Text Available This work studies final nutritional status and transcriptional responses of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum 1792 (28 g after a 10 week feeding experiment designed to elucidate the effect of adding a vitamin and mineral premix on growth, health, and nutritional endpoints. Juvenile fish were fed a either a diet supplemented with a vitamin and mineral premix (Diet S or the same diet without premix supplementation (Diet U. The analyzed micronutrient composition of diets differed accordingly. Pooled livers from 15 fish from each dietary group were used to create suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH cDNA libraries that were sequenced with 454 FLX GS Titanium Technology. In total 552 812 reads were sequenced from the two cDNA libraries. Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA was then used to characterize the hepatic transcriptome of the two dietary groups of rainbow trout. In the present communication we discuss how selected micronutrients may affect the transcriptome at suboptimal status by directly impacting the cellular metabolism, functions, and structures, and by introducing respective compensatory mechanisms. Processes related to lipid metabolism, peptide hydrolysis, oxygen transportation, and growth development were mostly affected. Considering the transcriptomics data relative to changes in nutritional status from the feeding study and the background phenotypic outcome of growth performance and gill histopathology, the outcome of the transcriptional profiling are suggested to be mainly related to suboptimal pantothenic acid and vitamin C nutrition.

  6. Generation of expressed sequence tags for discovery of genes responsible for floral traits of Chrysanthemum morifolium by next-generation sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Katsutomo; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Nashima, Kenji; Kishimoto, Kyutaro; Katayose, Yuichi; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Ohmiya, Akemi

    2017-09-04

    Chrysanthemum morifolium is one of the most economically valuable ornamental plants worldwide. Chrysanthemum is an allohexaploid plant with a large genome that is commercially propagated by vegetative reproduction. New cultivars with different floral traits, such as color, morphology, and scent, have been generated mainly by classical cross-breeding and mutation breeding. However, only limited genetic resources and their genome information are available for the generation of new floral traits. To obtain useful information about molecular bases for floral traits of chrysanthemums, we read expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of chrysanthemums by high-throughput sequencing using the 454 pyrosequencing technology. We constructed normalized cDNA libraries, consisting of full-length, 3'-UTR, and 5'-UTR cDNAs derived from various tissues of chrysanthemums. These libraries produced a total number of 3,772,677 high-quality reads, which were assembled into 213,204 contigs. By comparing the data obtained with those of full genome-sequenced species, we confirmed that our chrysanthemum contig set contained the majority of all expressed genes, which was sufficient for further molecular analysis in chrysanthemums. We confirmed that our chrysanthemum EST set (contigs) contained a number of contigs that encoded transcription factors and enzymes involved in pigment and aroma compound metabolism that was comparable to that of other species. This information can serve as an informative resource for identifying genes involved in various biological processes in chrysanthemums. Moreover, the findings of our study will contribute to a better understanding of the floral characteristics of chrysanthemums including the myriad cultivars at the molecular level.

  7. Cernavoda NPP simulator - next generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatar, F.; Ionescu, T.; Dascalu, M.

    2003-01-01

    Demand for extending the amount of training and scope for Cernavoda Unit 1 as well as the new trend in the simulator owners world, led to a change in the Romanian philosophy of simulator specification. Up to now the training was conducted on a Full Scope simulator, a 1:1 replica of Cernavoda Unit 1 reference plant. The present task is to define the simulation facilities and structure capable to meet the requirements for training, qualification and licensing of personnel for both Cernavoda Unit 1 and Unit 2. Obviously, the Cernavoda Unit 2 belongs to the same technological family but has rather different control room layout. Since this target requires a new simulator the costs would be rather high in accordance to the degree of automation of Cernavoda NPP. Therefore, depending on training requirements and financing, the Cernavoda Unit 1 simulator modernization, which also provides an alternative to full scope control room simulator, may be a viable option. Therefore the solution that with discuss for Cernavoda training extension is the migration of Cernavoda Unit 1 simulator to state-of-the-art. Consequently, the Cernavoda Unit 1 simulator modernization task will be organized as project including the following major items: 1. Rehost existing U1 simulation software from VAX 4500 to: - Best commercial multi-processor server for simulation server (HP, O/S Linux); - Best commercial single processor PC for I/O communications (HP, O/S Linux); 2. Replace DCC with enhanced emulated version: Best commercial individual PC for DCC emulation (HP, O/S Windows); Support for actual keyboards; Replacement of RAMTEK System and CONRAC Monitors with X terminals or PC's; 3. Conversion of AutoCAD-based panel graphic pages to RAVE-based; 4. Install the required software tools for developing enhanced simulation modules; 5. Replace the simulation modules with advanced modules; 6. Replace the present Windows Instructor Facilities with ISIS; 7. Development of a selection of MCR-U1 virtual

  8. Novel Technologies for Next Generation Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-25

    such as parasitic leakage paths in unselected cells and series resistance of the interconnections. These drawbacks hinder the realization of 43 high...4.4 (b)); only leakage current (through parasitic paths) flow. If the cell is in the Set state, a much larger forward diode current flows through...A birds -eye view shows the 4 µm × 4 µm cells prior to HF vapor release. The cross-sectional view shows the sacrificial oxide layer thickness (12.7

  9. Next Generation Public Safety and Emergency Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Camilla; Tadayoni, Reza; Skouby, Knud Erik

    2014-01-01

    The paper researches the existing European standards for Public Safety and Emergency (PSE) services (also called Public Protection Disaster Relief “PPDR”), and identifies based on user studies in Denmark conflicts between the current deployments of the standards and the user requirements. The aim...

  10. Autonomous energy management system in next generation homes

    OpenAIRE

    Charro Laiño, Raúl

    2012-01-01

    [ANGLÈS] The energy management system in next generation home has been developed in web semantic technology. This technology is used in smart homes. And for the monitoring of the power level and consumption of appliances, groups and rooms. Inside the autonomous energy system. The semantic web will give us the necessary interrelated to use autonomous. For good management of energy consumption, we must create communication methods to interact with the user. We can refer to the possibilities off...

  11. The next generation of power reactors - safety characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modro, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The next generation of commercial nuclear power reactors is characterized by a new approach to achieving reliability of their safety systems. In contrast to current generation reactors, these designs apply passive safety features that rely on gravity-driven transfer processes or stored energy, such as gas-pressurized accumulators or electric batteries. This paper discusses the passive safety system of the AP600 and Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) designs

  12. Design of the next generation target at Lujan center, LANSCE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferres, Laurent [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-27

    This is a presentation given at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) on the design of the next generation target at Lujan center, LANSCE. The motivation for this design is to enable new nuclear physics experiments (defense program applications (DANCE)) that are currently limited by neutron intensity or energy resolution available at LANSCE. The target is being redesigned so that the Flight Paths in the upper tier provide a higher intensity in the epithermal and medium energy ranges.

  13. Next-generation healthcare: a strategic appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Terrence

    2009-01-01

    Successful next-generation healthcare must deliver timely access and quality for an aging population, while simultaneously promoting disease prevention and managing costs. The key factors for sustained success are a culture with aligned goals and values; coordinated team care that especially engages with physicians and patients; practical information that is collected and communicated reliably; and education in the theory and methods of collaboration, measurement and leadership. Currently, optimal population health is challenged by a high prevalence of chronic disease, with large gaps between best and usual care, a scarcity of health human resources - particularly with the skills, attitudes and training for coordinated team care - and the absence of flexible, reliable clinical measurement systems. However, to make things better, institutional models and supporting technologies are available. In the short term, a first step is to enhance the awareness of the practical opportunities to improve, including the expansion of proven community-based disease management programs that communicate knowledge, competencies and clinical measurements among professional and patient partners, leading to reduced care gaps and improved clinical and economic outcomes. Longer-term success requires two additional steps. One is formal inter-professional training to provide, on an ongoing basis, the polyvalent human resource skills and foster the culture of working with others to improve the care of whole populations. The other is the adoption of reliable information systems, including electronic health records, to allow useful and timely measurement and effective communication of clinical information in real-world settings. A better health future can commence immediately, within existing resources, and be sustained with feasible innovations in provider and patient education and information systems. The future is now.

  14. Next-Generation Sequencing: From Understanding Biology to Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Meder

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Within just a few years, the new methods for high-throughput next-generation sequencing have generated completely novel insights into the heritability and pathophysiology of human disease. In this review, we wish to highlight the benefits of the current state-of-the-art sequencing technologies for genetic and epigenetic research. We illustrate how these technologies help to constantly improve our understanding of genetic mechanisms in biological systems and summarize the progress made so far. This can be exemplified by the case of heritable heart muscle diseases, so-called cardiomyopathies. Here, next-generation sequencing is able to identify novel disease genes, and first clinical applications demonstrate the successful translation of this technology into personalized patient care.

  15. Intelligent control and automation technology for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Hui; Huh, Young Hwan; Lee, Jang Soo; Kim, Ko Ryeo; Cha, Kyoung Ho; Lee, Jae Cheol; Dong, In Sook

    1993-01-01

    This project intends to establish the basic technology of intelligent control and automation to be applied to the next generation nuclear plant. For that, the research status of those technologies is surveyed for various application areas at first. The characteristics and availability of those techniques such as neural network, fuzzy rule based control and reasoning, multimedia, real-time software and qualitative modelling are studied through a series of simulations and experiments. By integrating each technologies studied above, we developed a hierarchical, intelligent control system for an autonomous mobile robot as a test bed. The system is composed of several modules of software and hardware subsystems, which are implemented by use of the intelligent techniques. Through the analysis of the results and experiences, we investigated the feasibility of application of the basic technology to the next generation plant. (Author)

  16. Optimizing the next generation optical access networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amaya Fernández, Ferney Orlando; Soto, Ana Cardenas; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2009-01-01

    Several issues in the design and optimization of the next generation optical access network (NG-OAN) are presented. The noise, the distortion and the fiber optic nonlinearities are considered to optimize the video distribution link in a passive optical network (PON). A discussion of the effect...

  17. Achieving universal access to next generation networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falch, Morten; Henten, Anders

    The paper examines investment dimensions of next generation networks in a universal service perspective in a European context. The question is how new network infrastructures for getting access to communication, information and entertainment services in the present and future information society...

  18. IPv6: The Next Generation Internet Protocol

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GENERAL I ARTICLE. IPv6: The Next Generation Internet Protocol. 1. IPv4 and its Shortcomings. Harsha Srinath is currently pursuing his MS degree in Computer. Science at the Center for. Advanced Computer. Studies (CACS) in. University of Louisiana at. Lafayette, USA. His research interests include networking with an.

  19. IPv6: The Next Generation Internet Protocol

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 3. IPv6: The Next Generation Internet Protocol - IPv4 and its Shortcomings. Harsha Srinath. General Article Volume 8 Issue 3 March 2003 pp 33-41. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  20. IPv6: The Next Generation Internet Protocol

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 4. IPv6: The Next Generation Internet Protocol - New Features in IPv6. Harsha Srinath. General Article Volume 8 Issue 4 April 2003 pp 8-16. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  1. Implementing the Next Generation Science Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penuel, William R.; Harris, Christopher J.; DeBarger, Angela Haydel

    2015-01-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards embody a new vision for science education grounded in the idea that science is both a body of knowledge and a set of linked practices for developing knowledge. The authors describe strategies that they suggest school and district leaders consider when designing strategies to support NGSS implementation.

  2. Educating the next generation of nature entrepreneurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judith C. Jobse; Loes Witteveen; Judith Santegoets; Daan van der Linde

    2015-01-01

    With this paper, it is illustrated that a focus on entrepreneurship training in the nature and wilderness sector is relevant for diverse organisations and situations. The first curricula on nature entrepreneurship are currently being developed. In this paper the authors describe a project that focusses on educating the next generation of nature entrepreneurs, reflect...

  3. Data Analysis and Next Generation Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pon, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    For the last decade, much of the work of California school administrators has been shaped by the accountability of the No Child Left Behind Act. Now as they stand at the precipice of Common Core Standards and next generation assessments, it is important to reflect on the proficiency educators have attained in using data to improve instruction and…

  4. Next-generation mid-infrared sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, D.; Bank, S.; Lee, M. L.; Wasserman, D.

    2017-12-01

    to provide a survey of the current state of the art for mid-IR sources, but instead looks primarily to provide a picture of potential next-generation optical and optoelectronic materials systems for mid-IR light generation.

  5. NASA's Next Generation Space Geodesy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkowitz, S. M.; Desai, S. D.; Gross, R. S.; Hillard, L. M.; Lemoine, F. G.; Long, J. L.; Ma, C.; McGarry, J. F.; Murphy, D.; Noll, C. E.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Requirements for the ITRF have increased dramatically since the 1980s. The most stringent requirement comes from critical sea level monitoring programs: a global accuracy of 1.0 mm, and 0.1mm/yr stability, a factor of 10 to 20 beyond current capability. Other requirements for the ITRF coming from ice mass change, ground motion, and mass transport studies are similar. Current and future satellite missions will have ever-increasing measurement capability and will lead to increasingly sophisticated models of these and other changes in the Earth system. Ground space geodesy networks with enhanced measurement capability will be essential to meeting the ITRF requirements and properly interpreting the satellite data. These networks must be globally distributed and built for longevity, to provide the robust data necessary to generate improved models for proper interpretation of the observed geophysical signals. NASA has embarked on a Space Geodesy Program with a long-range goal to build, deploy and operate a next generation NASA Space Geodetic Network (SGN). The plan is to build integrated, multi-technique next-generation space geodetic observing systems as the core contribution to a global network designed to produce the higher quality data required to maintain the Terrestrial Reference Frame and provide information essential for fully realizing the measurement potential of the current and coming generation of Earth Observing spacecraft. Phase 1 of this project has been funded to (1) Establish and demonstrate a next-generation prototype integrated Space Geodetic Station at Goddard's Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory (GGAO), including next-generation SLR and VLBI systems along with modern GNSS and DORIS; (2) Complete ongoing Network Design Studies that describe the appropriate number and distribution of next-generation Space Geodetic Stations for an improved global network; (3) Upgrade analysis capability to handle the next-generation data; (4) Implement a modern

  6. Achievement report on research and development of the industrial basic technologies of the next generation in fiscal 1981. Research and development of composite materials; 1981 nendo jisedai sangyo kiban gijutsu itaku kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Fukugo zairyo no kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1982-03-01

    Described herein are the results of the FY 1981 research and development for composite materials, established by the R and D system for the basic technologies of the next generation. The R and D project for resin-based composite materials involves basic researches on the matrix resins, and surface modification of the reinforcing fibers. The investigations and basic tests are conducted for monolithic molding, other types of molding, and cutting and boring by, e.g., laser beams and water jet. The other related efforts include researches on analysis theories for optimization of strength and rigidity of the composite structures, and development of the optimization programs. For the R and D project for the metal-based composite materials, the efforts are directed to understanding wettability and reactivity of the reinforcing fibers with metals, and development of the techniques for producing various types of preforms and compositing methods. The basic researches are conducted for hot pressing/rolling molding, extrusion/withdrawal, powder molding and melt molding of the composite materials with aluminum alloys as the matrices. The other R and D items include investigations on methods for evaluating qualities for the steps form the stock preparation to production of the final products. (NEDO)

  7. Selection of Digital Subscriber Lines Ready for Next Generation Access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Jares

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, in the EU a lot of project concerning broadband access to the Internet for end users is being developed. The aim of those projects is to support the creation of access communication networks that can meet defined performance criteria for providing the broadband services. Such networks are in general called Next Generation Access. One of the first tasks is to identify appropriate transmission technologies that could meet the required performance criteria. For each transmission technology, it is necessary to carry out a detailed performance analysis of the transmission depending on certain transmission conditions. To perform a detailed analysis means to carry out modelling of transmission’s specific conditions for each technology. This article, specifically, discusses hybrid optical networks, which in conjunction with digital subscriber lines are one of the possible solutions for Next Generation Access. In the access network topology that combines copper and optical cables, it is necessary to optimize the mutual ratio of both infrastructure’s length. Therefore, the article also describes this issue that refers to a certain technology for the Next Generation Access. Specific performance criteria of transmission for access network in the Czech Republic are considered and the optimized location of the external node digital line access multiplexer is discussed.

  8. Alternative metro architectures for delivering next-generation data services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Anand

    2002-08-01

    Data services are a primary target for increasing carrier revenues. As carriers prepare to capture this opportunity, they must determine how to cost-effectively deliver the more flexible and scalable bandwidth customers are requesting. Ethernet has emerged as a key technology for delivering these next-generation services; it is easy-to-use, widely understood and offers lower cost to both carriers and end customers. With more bandwidth available in the carrier core, the next challenge is the Metropolitan Area Network (MAN), where data services have been constrained by technologies optimized for voice services. This paper describes an Ethernet-over-SDH/SONET migration scenario that enables a portfolio of metro data services, such as Internet access and Virtual Private Lines, which can be delivered. It illustrates how optimizing SONET/SDH networks for next-generation data services will prove to be more cost-effective, scalable, manageable and resilient.

  9. Nuclear Technology applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cibils Machado, W. E- mail: wrcibils@adinet.com.uy

    2002-01-01

    The present work tries on the applications of the nuclear technology in the life daily, such as agriculture and feeding, human health, industry, non destructive essays, isotopic hydrology, and the nuclear power stations for electricity production and radioisotopes production

  10. Assessing the Genetics Content in the Next Generation Science Standards

    OpenAIRE

    Lontok, Katherine S.; Zhang, Hubert; Dougherty, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Science standards have a long history in the United States and currently form the backbone of efforts to improve primary and secondary education in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). Although there has been much political controversy over the influence of standards on teacher autonomy and student performance, little light has been shed on how well standards cover science content. We assessed the coverage of genetics content in the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) using...

  11. Traffic Management for Next Generation Transport Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Hao

    Video services are believed to be prevalent in the next generation transport networks. The popularity of these bandwidth-intensive services, such as Internet Protocol Television (IPTV), online gaming, and Videoon- Demand (VoD), are currently driving the network service providers to upgrade...... their network capacities. However, in order to provide more advanced video services than simply porting the traditional television services to the network, the service provider needs to do more than just augment the network capacity. Advanced traffic management capability is one of the relevant abilities...... required by the next generation transport network to provide Quality-of-Service (QoS) guaranteed video services. Augmenting network capacity and upgrading network nodes indicate long deployment period, replacement of equipment and thus significant cost to the network service providers. This challenge may...

  12. Next generation biofuel engineering in prokaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronenberg, Luisa S.; Marcheschi, Ryan J.; Liao, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation biofuels must be compatible with current transportation infrastructure and be derived from environmentally sustainable resources that do not compete with food crops. Many bacterial species have unique properties advantageous to the production of such next-generation fuels. However, no single species possesses all characteristics necessary to make high quantities of fuels from plant waste or CO2. Species containing a subset of the desired characteristics are used as starting points for engineering organisms with all desired attributes. Metabolic engineering of model organisms has yielded high titer production of advanced fuels, including alcohols, isoprenoids and fatty acid derivatives. Technical developments now allow engineering of native fuel producers, as well as lignocellulolytic and autotrophic bacteria, for the production of biofuels. Continued research on multiple fronts is required to engineer organisms for truly sustainable and economical biofuel production. PMID:23623045

  13. Fetal Kidney Anomalies: Next Generation Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Maria; Sunde, Lone; Nielsen, Marlene Louise

    Aim and Introduction Identification of abnormal kidneys in the fetus may lead to termination of the pregnancy and raises questions about the underlying cause and recurrence risk in future pregnancies. In this study, we investigate the effectiveness of targeted next generation sequencing in fetuse...... no mutations were identified, have been selected for exome sequencing in order to uncover novel genes associated to fetal kidney anomalies.......Aim and Introduction Identification of abnormal kidneys in the fetus may lead to termination of the pregnancy and raises questions about the underlying cause and recurrence risk in future pregnancies. In this study, we investigate the effectiveness of targeted next generation sequencing in fetuses...... postmortem examination. The approximately 110 genes included in the targeted panel were chosen on the basis of their potential involvement in embryonic kidney development, cystic kidney disease, or the renin-angiotensin system. DNA was extracted from fetal tissue samples or cultured chorion villus cells...

  14. What can next generation sequencing do for you? Next generation sequencing as a valuable tool in plant research

    OpenAIRE

    Bräutigam, Andrea; Gowik, Udo

    2010-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have opened fascinating opportunities for the analysis of plants with and without a sequenced genome on a genomic scale. During the last few years, NGS methods have become widely available and cost effective. They can be applied to a wide variety of biological questions, from the sequencing of complete eukaryotic genomes and transcriptomes, to the genome-scale analysis of DNA-protein interactions. In this review, we focus on the use of NGS for pla...

  15. NASA's Next Generation Space Geodesy Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, S. D.; Gross, R. S.; Hilliard, L.; Lemoine, F. G.; Long, J. L.; Ma, C.; McGarry, J. F.; Merkowitz, S. M.; Murphy, D.; Noll, C. E.; hide

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Space Geodesy Project (SGP) is developing a prototype core site for a next generation Space Geodetic Network (SGN). Each of the sites in this planned network co-locate current state-of-the-art stations from all four space geodetic observing systems, GNSS, SLR, VLBI, and DORIS, with the goal of achieving modern requirements for the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). In particular, the driving ITRF requirements for this network are 1.0 mm in accuracy and 0.1 mm/yr in stability, a factor of 10-20 beyond current capabilities. Development of the prototype core site, located at NASA's Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory at the Goddard Space Flight Center, started in 2011 and will be completed by the end of 2013. In January 2012, two operational GNSS stations, GODS and GOON, were established at the prototype site within 100 m of each other. Both stations are being proposed for inclusion into the IGS network. In addition, work is underway for the inclusion of next generation SLR and VLBI stations along with a modern DORIS station. An automated survey system is being developed to measure inter-technique vectorties, and network design studies are being performed to define the appropriate number and distribution of these next generation space geodetic core sites that are required to achieve the driving ITRF requirements. We present the status of this prototype next generation space geodetic core site, results from the analysis of data from the established geodetic stations, and results from the ongoing network design studies.

  16. Manufacturing Laboratory for Next Generation Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-16

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The specific aims of this project were: 1) to plan a manufacturing laboratory to educate next generation engineers. 2) to...compressor disc is an example of 5-axis machining. It is a prototype turbo-charger compressor disc machined from aluminum stock . The complex blade... keyboard press "Delete." Bradley University College of Engineering Omax 2626 XP Operating Instructions 11 P r o g r a m Page

  17. Technology Roadmaps: Nuclear Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This nuclear energy roadmap has been prepared jointly by the IEA and the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). Unlike most other low-carbon energy sources, nuclear energy is a mature technology that has been in use for more than 50 years. The latest designs for nuclear power plants build on this experience to offer enhanced safety and performance, and are ready for wider deployment over the next few years. Several countries are reactivating dormant nuclear programmes, while others are considering nuclear for the first time. China in particular is already embarking on a rapid nuclear expansion. In the longer term, there is great potential for new developments in nuclear energy technology to enhance nuclear's role in a sustainable energy future.

  18. Next-Generation Sequencing for Binary Protein-Protein Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard eSuter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The yeast two-hybrid (Y2H system exploits host cell genetics in order to display binary protein-protein interactions (PPIs via defined and selectable phenotypes. Numerous improvements have been made to this method, adapting the screening principle for diverse applications, including drug discovery and the scale-up for proteome wide interaction screens in human and other organisms. Here we discuss a systematic workflow and analysis scheme for screening data generated by Y2H and related assays that includes high-throughput selection procedures, readout of comprehensive results via next-generation sequencing (NGS, and the interpretation of interaction data via quantitative statistics. The novel assays and tools will serve the broader scientific community to harness the power of NGS technology to address PPI networks in health and disease. We discuss examples of how this next-generation platform can be applied to address specific questions in diverse fields of biology and medicine.

  19. Emerging Definition of Next-Generation of Aeronautical Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Aviation continues to experience rapid growth. In regions such as the United States and Europe air traffic congestion is constraining operations, leading to major new efforts to develop methodologies and infrastructures to enable continued aviation growth through transformational air traffic management systems. Such a transformation requires better communications linking airborne and ground-based elements. Technologies for next-generation communications, the required capacities, frequency spectrum of operation, network interconnectivity, and global interoperability are now receiving increased attention. A number of major planning and development efforts have taken place or are in process now to define the transformed airspace of the future. These activities include government and industry led efforts in the United States and Europe, and by international organizations. This paper will review the features, approaches, and activities of several representative planning and development efforts, and identify the emerging global consensus on requirements of next generation aeronautical communications systems for air traffic control.

  20. Next-Generation Sequencing for Binary Protein-Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Bernhard; Zhang, Xinmin; Pesce, C Gustavo; Mendelsohn, Andrew R; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma P; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system exploits host cell genetics in order to display binary protein-protein interactions (PPIs) via defined and selectable phenotypes. Numerous improvements have been made to this method, adapting the screening principle for diverse applications, including drug discovery and the scale-up for proteome wide interaction screens in human and other organisms. Here we discuss a systematic workflow and analysis scheme for screening data generated by Y2H and related assays that includes high-throughput selection procedures, readout of comprehensive results via next-generation sequencing (NGS), and the interpretation of interaction data via quantitative statistics. The novel assays and tools will serve the broader scientific community to harness the power of NGS technology to address PPI networks in health and disease. We discuss examples of how this next-generation platform can be applied to address specific questions in diverse fields of biology and medicine.

  1. Nuclear energy technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buden, David

    1992-01-01

    An overview of space nuclear energy technologies is presented. The development and characteristics of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG's) and space nuclear power reactors are discussed. In addition, the policy and issues related to public safety and the use of nuclear power sources in space are addressed.

  2. Electric vehicle charge patterns and the electricity generation mix and competitiveness of next generation vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuta, Taisuke; Murata, Akinobu; Endo, Eiichi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The energy system of whole of Japan is analyzed in this study. • An advanced model based on MARKAL is used for the energy system analysis. • The impact of charge patterns of EVs on electricity generation mix is evaluated. • Technology competitiveness of the next generation vehicles is also evaluated. - Abstract: The nuclear accident of 2011 brought about a reconsideration of the future electricity generation mix of power systems in Japan. A debate on whether to phase out nuclear power plants and replace them with renewable energy sources is taking place. Demand-side management becomes increasingly important in future Japanese power systems with a large-scale integration of renewable energy sources. This paper considers the charge control of electric vehicles (EVs) through demand-side management. There have been many studies of the control or operation methods of EVs known as vehicle-to-grid (V2G), and it is important to evaluate both their short-term and long-term operation. In this study, we employ energy system to evaluate the impact of the charge patterns of EVs on both the electricity generation mix and the technology competitiveness of the next generation vehicles. An advanced energy system model based on Market Allocation (MARKAL) is used to consider power system control in detail

  3. Next generation sequencing in sporadic retinoblastoma patients reveals somatic mosaicism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitrano, Sara; Marozza, Annabella; Somma, Serena; Imperatore, Valentina; Hadjistilianou, Theodora; De Francesco, Sonia; Toti, Paolo; Galimberti, Daniela; Meloni, Ilaria; Cetta, Francesco; Piu, Pietro; Di Marco, Chiara; Dosa, Laura; Lo Rizzo, Caterina; Carignani, Giulia; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Mari, Francesca; Renieri, Alessandra; Ariani, Francesca

    2015-11-01

    In about 50% of sporadic cases of retinoblastoma, no constitutive RB1 mutations are detected by conventional methods. However, recent research suggests that, at least in some of these cases, there is somatic mosaicism with respect to RB1 normal and mutant alleles. The increased availability of next generation sequencing improves our ability to detect the exact percentage of patients with mosaicism. Using this technology, we re-tested a series of 40 patients with sporadic retinoblastoma: 10 of them had been previously classified as constitutional heterozygotes, whereas in 30 no RB1 mutations had been found in lymphocytes. In 3 of these 30 patients, we have now identified low-level mosaic variants, varying in frequency between 8 and 24%. In 7 out of the 10 cases previously classified as heterozygous from testing blood cells, we were able to test additional tissues (ocular tissues, urine and/or oral mucosa): in three of them, next generation sequencing has revealed mosaicism. Present results thus confirm that a significant fraction (6/40; 15%) of sporadic retinoblastoma cases are due to postzygotic events and that deep sequencing is an efficient method to unambiguously distinguish mosaics. Re-testing of retinoblastoma patients through next generation sequencing can thus provide new information that may have important implications with respect to genetic counseling and family care.

  4. Nuclear technology in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, M.

    1993-01-01

    This book deals with the Nuclear Energy in Peru. It consists of ten chapters. In the first chapter is presented a rapid overview on nuclear science history. The second chapter describes the nuclear proliferation and the nuclear competition in South America. The nuclear organization in Peru, the Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy, and the main centers are described in the third chapter. The following chapters deals with peruvian advances in nuclear medicine, agriculture and food, nuclear application to industry, hydrology, earth sciences and environmental considerations. In the last chapter, the perspectives for nuclear science and technology in Peru are described from the inter institutional cooperation point of view. This book also includes appendix and bibliography. (author)

  5. Next Generation NASA Initiative for Space Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkowitz, S. M.; Desai, S.; Gross, R. S.; Hilliard, L.; Lemoine, F. G.; Long, J. L.; Ma, C.; McGarry J. F.; Murphy, D.; Noll, C. E.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Space geodesy measurement requirements have become more and more stringent as our understanding of the physical processes and our modeling techniques have improved. In addition, current and future spacecraft will have ever-increasing measurement capability and will lead to increasingly sophisticated models of changes in the Earth system. Ground-based space geodesy networks with enhanced measurement capability will be essential to meeting these oncoming requirements and properly interpreting the sate1!ite data. These networks must be globally distributed and built for longevity, to provide the robust data necessary to generate improved models for proper interpretation ofthe observed geophysical signals. These requirements have been articulated by the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS). The NASA Space Geodesy Project (SGP) is developing a prototype core site as the basis for a next generation Space Geodetic Network (SGN) that would be NASA's contribution to a global network designed to produce the higher quality data required to maintain the Terrestrial Reference Frame and provide information essential for fully realizing the measurement potential of the current and coming generation of Earth Observing spacecraft. Each of the sites in the SGN would include co-located, state of-the-art systems from all four space geodetic observing techniques (GNSS, SLR, VLBI, and DORIS). The prototype core site is being developed at NASA's Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory at Goddard Space Flight Center. The project commenced in 2011 and is scheduled for completion in late 2013. In January 2012, two multiconstellation GNSS receivers, GODS and GODN, were established at the prototype site as part of the local geodetic network. Development and testing are also underway on the next generation SLR and VLBI systems along with a modern DORIS station. An automated survey system is being developed to measure inter-technique vector ties, and network design studies are being

  6. Thermonuclear ignition in the next generation tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johner, J.

    1989-04-01

    The extrapolation of experimental rules describing energy confinement and magnetohydrodynamic - stability limits, in known tokamaks, allow to show that stable thermonuclear ignition equilibria should exist in this configuration, if the product aB t x of the dimensions by a magnetic-field power is large enough. Quantitative application of this result to several next-generation tokamak projects show that those kinds of equilibria could exist in such devices, which would also have enough additional heating power to promote an effective accessible ignition

  7. Synchronization System for Next Generation Light Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavriyev, Anton [MagiQ Technologies, Inc., Somerville, MA (United States)

    2014-03-27

    An alternative synchronization technique – one that would allow explicit control of the pulse train including its repetition rate and delay is clearly desired. We propose such a scheme. Our method is based on optical interferometry and permits synchronization of the pulse trains generated by two independent mode-locked lasers. As the next generation x-ray sources will be driven by a clock signal derived from a mode-locked optical source, our technique will provide a way to synchronize x-ray probe with the optical pump pulses.

  8. Next Generation Flight Displays Using HTML5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The Human Integrated Vehicles and Environments (HIVE) lab at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is focused on bringing together inter-disciplinary talent to design and integrate innovative human interface technologies for next generation manned spacecraft. As part of this objective, my summer internship project centered on an ongoing investigation in to building flight displays using the HTML5 standard. Specifically, the goals of my project were to build and demo "flight-like" crew and wearable displays as well as create a webserver for live systems being developed by the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program. In parallel to my project, a LabVIEW application, called a display server, was created by the HIVE that uses an XTCE (XML (Extensible Markup Language) Telemetry and Command Exchange) parser and CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data System) space packet decoder to translate telemetry items sent by the CFS (Core Flight Software) over User Datagram Protocol (UDP). It was the webserver's job to receive these UDP messages and send them to the displays. To accomplish this functionality, I utilized Node.js and the accompanying Express framework. On the display side, I was responsible for creating the power system (AMPS) displays. I did this by using HTML5, CSS and JavaScript to create web pages that could update and change dynamically based on the data they received from the webserver. At this point, I have not started on the commanding, being able to send back to the CFS, portion of the displays but hope to have this functionality working by the completion of my internship. I also created a way to test the webserver's functionality without the display server by making a JavaScript application that read in a comma-separate values (CSV) file and converted it to XML which was then sent over UDP. One of the major requirements of my project was to build everything using as little preexisting code as possible, which I accomplished by only using a handful of Java

  9. Passive Core Cooling Systems for Next Generation NPPs: Characteristics and State of the Art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, Andrey; Soshkina, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    Among nuclear power generation plants, light water reactors are mainly used at present, and are anticipated to be predominant in the future. To improve the light water reactors the development of the LWRs for the next generation is carried out at various organizations. For example, in the USA the Westinghouse AP-1000 is based on proven technology but with an emphasis on passive safety features. The reactor passive core cooling systems include the core makeup tanks system, passive residual heat removal heat exchanger and in-containment refuelling water storage tank. In Russia has been developed the so-called NPP-2006 project of a VVER-1200 nuclear power plant with a V-392M reactor unit. To provide the safety, protection passive systems which do not depend upon human errors are widely used in this project. Among these are hydro-tanks of the second stage and passive heat removal system. In the presented paper an overview of passive core cooling systems for next generation NPPs is given. (authors)

  10. Passive Core Cooling Systems for Next Generation NPPs: Characteristics and State of the Art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morozov, Andrey; Soshkina, Alexandra [Institute for Physics and Power Engineering by A.I. Leypunsky, 1 Bondarenko sq. Obninsk, 249033 (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01

    Among nuclear power generation plants, light water reactors are mainly used at present, and are anticipated to be predominant in the future. To improve the light water reactors the development of the LWRs for the next generation is carried out at various organizations. For example, in the USA the Westinghouse AP-1000 is based on proven technology but with an emphasis on passive safety features. The reactor passive core cooling systems include the core makeup tanks system, passive residual heat removal heat exchanger and in-containment refuelling water storage tank. In Russia has been developed the so-called NPP-2006 project of a VVER-1200 nuclear power plant with a V-392M reactor unit. To provide the safety, protection passive systems which do not depend upon human errors are widely used in this project. Among these are hydro-tanks of the second stage and passive heat removal system. In the presented paper an overview of passive core cooling systems for next generation NPPs is given. (authors)

  11. Nuclear technology and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Mamoru

    1997-01-01

    After the confrontation of East and West, and the problem of North and South, we are now facing the era of Globalization in the presence of twenty-first century. Tracing the history of civilization, human being has progressed along with the accumulation of experience, and the development of science and technology. Science and technology bloomed in modern ages, especially, energy technology showed the giant leap in this century. Nuclear science and technology has been developed for peaceful purposes, and for the benefit of humanity. As a result, today, its progress led nuclear science and technology to have the great applicability to the development of the society. Toward the twenty-first century and Globalization, the science and technology developed in nuclear field is hoped to play a great contribution in various area of the society. (author)

  12. Chemistry and nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Wet, W.J.

    1977-01-01

    The underlying principles of nuclear sciece and technology as based on the two basic phenomena, namely, radioactivity and nuclear reactions, with their relatively large associated energy changes, are outlined. The most important contributions by chemists in the overall historical development are mentioned and the strong position chemistry has attained in these fields is indicated. It is concluded that chemistry as well as many other scientific discplines (apart from general benefits) have largely benefitted from these nuclear developments [af

  13. Fiscal Year 2014 Annual Report on BNLs Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Human Capital Development Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepper, Susan E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-10-10

    Brookhaven National Laboratory’s (BNL’s) Nonproliferation and National Security Department contributes to the National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Nonproliferation and International Security Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) through university engagement, safeguards internships, safeguards courses, professional development, recruitment, and other activities aimed at ensuring the next generation of international safeguards professionals is adequately prepared to support the U.S. safeguards mission. This report is a summary of BNL s work under the NGSI program in Fiscal Year 2014.

  14. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Next Generation Safeguards Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, Bernadette Lugue [ORNL; Eipeldauer, Mary D [ORNL; Whitaker, J Michael [ORNL

    2011-12-01

    In 2007, the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NA-24) completed a comprehensive review of the current and potential future challenges facing the international safeguards system. The review examined trends and events impacting the mission of international safeguards and the implications of expanding and evolving mission requirements on the legal authorities and institutions that serve as the foundation of the international safeguards system, as well as the technological, financial, and human resources required for effective safeguards implementation. The review's findings and recommendations were summarized in the report, 'International Safeguards: Challenges and Opportunities for the 21st Century (October 2007)'. One of the report's key recommendations was for DOE/NNSA to launch a major new program to revitalize the international safeguards technology and human resource base. In 2007, at the International Atomic Energy Agency's General Conference, then Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman announced the newly created Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI). NGSI consists of five program elements: (1) Policy development and outreach; (2) Concepts and approaches; (3) Technology and analytical methodologies; (4) Human resource development; and (5) Infrastructure development. The ensuing report addresses the 'Human Resource Development (HRD)' component of NGSI. The goal of the HRD as defined in the NNSA Program Plan (November 2008) is 'to revitalize and expand the international safeguards human capital base by attracting and training a new generation of talent.' One of the major objectives listed in the HRD goal includes education and training, outreach to universities, professional societies, postdoctoral appointments, and summer internships at national laboratories. ORNL is a participant in the NGSI program, together

  15. A Healthcare-Delivery System for the Next Generation

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    On May 2-3, 2006, Purdue University, BlueCross BlueShield Association, and WellPoint, Inc. hosted 24 CEO-level healthcare executives representing a diverse cross section of the healthcare supply chain to design the U.S. healthcare-delivery system for the next generation. Participants were challenged to envision the ideal system for the future, without regard to the constraints of today’s technologies, infrastructure, or financial systems. The Regenstrief Center for Healthcare Engineering at P...

  16. Convergence of wireless, wireline, and photonics next generation networks

    CERN Document Server

    Iniewski, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    Filled with illustrations and practical examples from industry, this book provides a brief but comprehensive introduction to the next-generation wireless networks that will soon replace more traditional wired technologies. Written by a mixture of top industrial experts and key academic professors, it is the only book available that covers both wireless networks (such as wireless local area and personal area networks) and optical networks (such as long-haul and metropolitan networks) in one volume. It gives engineers and engineering students the necessary knowledge to meet challenges of next-ge

  17. NEXT-GENERATION GENE SEQUENCING AND ITS APPLICATIONS IN ONCOHEMATOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Barkhatov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The review bears on basic principles and technologies of next-generation sequencing (NGS, as well as its applications for detection of gene mutations in leukemic cells. We discuss some novel data concerning NGS approach to studies of genetic heterogeneity in myeloproliferative disorders, detection of high-risk genes, including drug resistance mutations, epigenomic changes associated with leukemias, as well as molecular aspects of clonal evolution. A special section concerns basic problems with bioinformatics and adequate analysis of large digital databases obtained with NGS approach. Optimal choice of appropriate software is of utmost importance for adequate retrieval and interpretation of the NGS data.

  18. Analysis of next-generation sequencing data using Galaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenberg, Daniel; Hillman-Jackson, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The extraordinary throughput of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology is outpacing our ability to analyze and interpret the data. This chapter will focus on practical informatics methods, strategies, and software tools for transforming NGS data into usable information through the use of a web-based platform, Galaxy. The Galaxy interface is explored through several different types of example analyses. Instructions for running one's own Galaxy server on local hardware or on cloud computing resources are provided. Installing new tools into a personal Galaxy instance is also demonstrated.

  19. Social Intelligence: Next Generation Business Intelligence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troy Hiltbrand

    2010-09-01

    In order for Business Intelligence to truly move beyond where it is today, a shift in approach must occur. Currently, much of what is accomplished in the realm of Business Intelligence relies on reports and dashboards to summarize and deliver information to end users. As we move into the future, we need to get beyond these reports and dashboards to a point where we break out the individual metrics that are embedded in these reports and interact with these components independently. Breaking these pieces of information out of the confines of reports and dashboards will allow them to be dynamically assembled for delivery in the way that makes most sense to each consumer. With this change in ideology, Business Intelligence will move from the concept of collections of objects, or reports and dashboards, to individual objects, or information components. The Next Generation Business Intelligence suite will translate concepts popularized in Facebook, Flickr, and Digg into enterprise worthy communication vehicles.

  20. The Next Generation of Planetary Atmospheric Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houben, Howard

    2005-01-01

    Entry probes provide useful insights into the structures of planetary atmospheres, but give only one-dimensional pictures of complex four-dimensional systems that vary on all temporal and spatial scales. This makes the interpretation of the results quite challenging, especially as regards atmospheric dynamics. Here is a planetary meteorologist's vision of what the next generation of atmospheric entry probe missions should be: Dedicated sounding instruments get most of the required data from orbit. Relatively simple and inexpensive entry probes are released from the orbiter, with low entry velocities, to establish ground truth, to clarify the vertical structure, and for adaptive observations to enhance the dataset in preparation for sensitive operations. The data are assimilated onboard in real time. The products, being immediately available, are of immense benefit for scientific and operational purposes (aerobraking, aerocapture, accurate payload delivery via glider, ballooning missions, weather forecasts, etc.).

  1. Astro Data Science: The Next Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentzel, Chris

    2018-01-01

    Astronomers have been at the forefront of data-driven discovery since before the days of Kepler. Using data in the scientific inquiry into the workings of the the universe is the lifeblood of the field. This said, data science is considered a new thing, and researchers from every discipline are rushing to learn data science techniques, train themselves on data science tools, and even leaving academia to become data scientists. It is undeniable that our ability to harness new computational and statistical methods to make sense of today’s unprecedented size, complexity, and fast streaming data is helping scientists make new discoveries. The question now is how to ensure that researchers can employ these tools and use them appropriately. This talk will cover the state of data science as it relates to scientific research and the role astronomers play in its development, use, and training the next generation of astro-data scientists.

  2. Terahertz planar antennas for next generation communication

    CERN Document Server

    Jha, Kumud Ranjan

    2014-01-01

    This book describes various methods to enhance the directivity of  planar antennas, enabling the next generation of high frequency, wireless communication.  The authors discuss various applications to the terahertz regime of the electromagnetic spectrum, with an emphasis on gain enhancement mechanisms.  The numerical models of these antennas are presented and the analytical results are supported, using commercial simulators. The multilayer substrate microstrip transmission line at terahertz frequency is also explored and a method to obtain the various parameters of this interconnect at high frequency is described.  This book will be a valuable resource for anyone needing to explore the terahertz band gap for future wireless communication, in an effort to solve the bandwidth (spectrum scarcity) problem. • Enables development of terahertz communication systems in a license-free band of the electromagnetic spectrum; • Describes methods to design a multi-layered substrate transmission line to reduce var...

  3. Integrated control of next generation power system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2010-02-28

    The multi-agent system (MAS) approach has been applied with promising results for enhancing an electric power distribution circuit, such as the Circuit of the Future as developed by Southern California Edison. These next generation power system results include better ability to reconfigure the circuit as well as the increased capability to improve the protection and enhance the reliability of the circuit. There were four main tasks in this project. The specific results for each of these four tasks and their related topics are presented in main sections of this report. Also, there were seven deliverables for this project. The main conclusions for these deliverables are summarized in the identified subtask section of this report. The specific details for each of these deliverables are included in the “Project Deliverables” section at the end of this Final Report.

  4. The Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goad Michael

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS is a new ground-based sky survey designed to find transiting Neptunes and super-Earths. By covering at least sixteen times the sky area of Kepler, we will find small planets around stars that are sufficiently bright for radial velocity confirmation, mass determination and atmospheric characterisation. The NGTS instrument will consist of an array of twelve independently pointed 20 cm telescopes fitted with red-sensitive CCD cameras. It will be constructed at the ESO Paranal Observatory, thereby benefiting from the very best photometric conditions as well as follow up synergy with the VLT and E-ELT. Our design has been verified through the operation of two prototype instruments, demonstrating white noise characteristics to sub-mmag photometric precision. Detailed simulations show that about thirty bright super-Earths and up to two hundred Neptunes could be discovered. Our science operations are due to begin in 2014.

  5. CANDU nuclear reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakaria, B. K.

    1994-01-01

    AECL has over 40 years of experience in the nuclear field. Over the past 20 years, this unique Canadian nuclear technology has made a worldwide presence, In addition to 22 CANDU reactors in Canada, there are also two in India, one in Pakistan, one in Argentina, four in Korea and five in Romania. CANDU advancements are based on evolutionary plant improvements. They consist of system performance improvements, design technology improvements and research and development in support of advanced nuclear power. Given the good performance of CANOU plants, it is important that this CANDU operating experience be incorporated into new and repeat designs

  6. Latest nuclear emulsion technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokujo, Hiroki; Kawahara, Hiroaki; Komatani, Ryosuke; Morishita, Misaki; Nakano, Toshiyuki; Otsuka, Naoto; Yoshimoto, Masahiro

    2017-06-01

    Nuclear emulsion is a extremely high-resolution 3D tracking detector. Since the discovery of the pion by C.F. Powell et al. in 1946, experiments with nuclear emulsions have contributed to the development of particle physics. (e.g. the OPERA collaboration reported the discovery of νμ * ντ oscillations in appearance mode in 2015) The technology of nuclear emulsion still keeps making progress. Since 2010, we have introduced a system of nuclear emulsion gel production to our laboratory in Nagoya University, and have started self-development of the new gel, instead of from the photographic film companies. Moreover, a faster automated emulsion scanning system is developed. Its scanning speed reaches 4000 cm2/h, and the load for analyzing becomes more and more lighter. In this presentation, we report the status of nuclear emulsion technologies for cosmic ray experiments.

  7. Latest nuclear emulsion technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokujo Hiroki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear emulsion is a extremely high-resolution 3D tracking detector. Since the discovery of the pion by C.F. Powell et al. in 1946, experiments with nuclear emulsions have contributed to the development of particle physics. (e.g. the OPERA collaboration reported the discovery of νμ * ντ oscillations in appearance mode in 2015 The technology of nuclear emulsion still keeps making progress. Since 2010, we have introduced a system of nuclear emulsion gel production to our laboratory in Nagoya University, and have started self-development of the new gel, instead of from the photographic film companies. Moreover, a faster automated emulsion scanning system is developed. Its scanning speed reaches 4000 cm2/h, and the load for analyzing becomes more and more lighter. In this presentation, we report the status of nuclear emulsion technologies for cosmic ray experiments.

  8. Global Adjoint Tomography: Next-Generation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozdag, Ebru; Lefebvre, Matthieu; Lei, Wenjie; Orsvuran, Ridvan; Peter, Daniel; Ruan, Youyi; Smith, James; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Tromp, Jeroen

    2017-04-01

    The first-generation global adjoint tomography model GLAD-M15 (Bozdag et al. 2016) is the result of 15 conjugate-gradient iterations based on GPU-accelerated spectral-element simulations of 3D wave propagation and Fréchet kernels. For simplicity, GLAD-M15 was constructed as an elastic model with transverse isotropy confined to the upper mantle. However, Earth's mantle and crust show significant evidence of anisotropy as a result of its composition and deformation. There may be different sources of seismic anisotropy affecting both body and surface waves. As a first attempt, we initially tackle with surface-wave anisotropy and proceed iterations using the same 253 earthquake data set used in GLAD-M15 with an emphasize on upper-mantle. Furthermore, we explore new misfits, such as double-difference measurements (Yuan et al. 2016), to better deal with the possible artifacts of the uneven distribution of seismic stations globally and minimize source uncertainties in structural inversions. We will present our observations with the initial results of azimuthally anisotropic inversions and also discuss the next generation global models with various parametrizations. Meanwhile our goal is to use all available seismic data in imaging. This however requires a solid framework to perform iterative adjoint tomography workflows with big data on supercomputers. We will talk about developments in adjoint tomography workflow from the need of defining new seismic and computational data formats (e.g., ASDF by Krischer et al. 2016, ADIOS by Liu et al. 2011) to developing new pre- and post-processing tools together with experimenting workflow management tools, such as Pegasus (Deelman et al. 2015). All our simulations are performed on Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Cray XK7 "Titan" system. Our ultimate aim is to get ready to harness ORNL's next-generation supercomputer "Summit", an IBM with Power-9 CPUs and NVIDIA Volta GPU accelerators, to be ready by 2018 which will enable us to

  9. Nuclear Reactors and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

  10. Beyond Human Capital Development: Balanced Safeguards Workforce Metrics and the Next Generation Safeguards Workforce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Since its establishment in 2008, the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) has achieved a number of objectives under its five pillars: concepts and approaches, policy development and outreach, international nuclear safeguards engagement, technology development, and human capital development (HCD). As a result of these efforts, safeguards has become much more visible as a critical U.S. national security interest across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. However, limited budgets have since created challenges in a number of areas. Arguably, one of the more serious challenges involves NGSI's ability to integrate entry-level staff into safeguards projects. Laissez fair management of this issue across the complex can lead to wasteful project implementation and endanger NGSI's long-term sustainability. The authors provide a quantitative analysis of this problem, focusing on the demographics of the current safeguards workforce and compounding pressures to operate cost-effectively, transfer knowledge to the next generation of safeguards professionals, and sustain NGSI safeguards investments.

  11. NREL-Prime Next-Generation Drivetrain Dynamometer Test Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Jonathan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Erdman, Bill [Cinch, Inc., Moraga, CA (United States); Blodgett, Douglas [DNV KEMA Renewables, Burlington, VT (United States); Halse, Christopher [Romax Technology, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Advances in wind turbine drivetrain technologies are necessary to improve reliability and reduce the cost of energy for land-based and offshore wind turbines. The NREL-Prime Next-Generation Drivetrain team developed a geared, medium-speed drivetrain that is lighter, more reliable and more efficient than existing designs. One of the objectives of Phase II of the project was to complete the detailed design, fabrication, and dynamometer testing of a 750 kilowatt (kW) drivetrain that includes the key gearbox innovations designed by Romax Technology and power converter innovations designed by DNV Kema Renewables. The purpose of this document is to summarize these tests completed in NREL's National Wind Technology Center 2.5 megawatt (MW) dynamometer.

  12. Application of Next-generation Sequencing in Clinical Molecular Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Seifi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Next-generation sequencing (NGS is the catch all terms that used to explain several different modern sequencing technologies which let us to sequence nucleic acids much more rapidly and cheaply than the formerly used Sanger sequencing, and as such have revolutionized the study of molecular biology and genomics with excellent resolution and accuracy. Over the past years, many academic companies and institutions have continued technological advances to expand NGS applications from research to the clinic. In this review, the performance and technical features of current NGS platforms were described. Furthermore, advances in the applying of NGS technologies towards the progress of clinical molecular diagnostics were emphasized. General advantages and disadvantages of each sequencing system are summarized and compared to guide the selection of NGS platforms for specific research aims.

  13. Nuclear technology and society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Tatsujiro; Tanaka, Yutaka; Taniguchi, Taketoshi; Oyama, Kosuke

    1999-01-01

    This special issue of Journal of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan deals with the relation between nuclear technology and society, and is composed of four papers: (1) Nuclear energy and international politics - sociotechnics around plutonium utilization; (2) Risk recognition and benefit recognition of nuclear facilities and social acceptance; (3) Environmental risk management and radioactive waste problem; and, (4) Public administration around the relation between nuclear energy and society. (1) describes the historical development of nuclear energy since its birth, focusing on how the leading countries tried to control nuclear proliferation. Peaceful utilization of nuclear energy is closely connected with the Non-proliferation problem. (1) also discusses the relation of plutonium utilization of Japan with international society. (2) discusses how nuclear facilities can be accepted by society, analyzing the background of risk recognition, in particular, of psychological character of mass society. (3) introduces an new approach (risk-based or risk-informed regulation) of environmental risk management for radioactive waste disposal problem, focusing on HLW (high-level waste). (4) explains the approach from public administration to nuclear energy and general energy policy and introduces PPA (participatory policy analysis) as a means for policy making. (M.M.)

  14. Tedizolid Phosphate: a Next-Generation Oxazolidinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybak, Jeffrey M; Roberts, Karrine

    2015-02-24

    Treatment of multidrug-resistant Gram-positive infections continues to challenge clinicians as the emergence of new resistance mechanisms outpaces introduction of novel antimicrobial agents. Tedizolid phosphate is a next-generation oxazolidinone with activity against both methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp. Tedizolid has consistently shown potency advantages over linezolid against Gram-positive microorganisms including those with reduced susceptibility to linezolid. Of particular significance, minimum inhibitory concentrations of tedizolid appear to be largely unaffected by the chloramphenicol-florfenicol resistance (cfr) gene, which has been implicated in a number of published linezolid-resistant organism outbreaks. Tedizolid phosphate also has been found to have a favorable pharmacokinetic profile allowing for once-daily dosing in both oral and intravenous forms. Potency and pharmacokinetic advantages have allowed for lower total daily doses of tedizolid, compared to linezolid, being needed for clinical efficacy in the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). The decreased total drug exposure produced may in part be responsible for a decrease in the observed adverse effects including thrombocytopenia. Tedizolid phosphate is currently indicated for the treatment of ABSSSI and under investigation for the treatment of nosocomial pneumonia. Although much of the role of tedizolid remains to be defined by expanding clinical experience, tedizolid is likely a welcomed addition to the mere handful of agents available for the treatment of multidrug-resistant Gram-positive infections.

  15. Next Generation Sequencing of Tubal Intraepithelial Carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Andrew S.; Stall, Jennifer N.; Hovelson, Daniel H.; Cani, Andi K.; Liu, Chia-Jen; Tomlins, Scott A.; Cho, Kathleen R.

    2016-01-01

    Importance High-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) is the most prevalent and lethal form of ovarian cancer. HGSCs frequently arise in the distal fallopian tubes rather than the ovary, developing from small precursor lesions called serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (TICs or more specifically STICs). While STICs have been reported to harbor TP53 mutations, detailed molecular characterizations of these lesions are lacking. Observations We performed targeted next generation sequencing (NGS) on formalin-fixed, paraffin- embedded tissue from four women, two with HGSC and two with uterine endometrioid carcinoma (UEC) who were diagnosed with synchronous STICs. We detected concordant mutations in both HGSCs with synchronous STICs, including TP53 mutations as well as assumed germline BRCA1/2 alterations, confirming a clonal relationship between these lesions. NGS confirmed the presence of a STIC clonally unrelated to one case of UEC. NGS of the other tubal lesion diagnosed as a STIC unexpectedly supported the lesion as a micrometastasis from the associated UEC. Conclusions and Relevance We demonstrate that targeted NGS can identify genetic lesions in minute lesions such as TICs, and confirm TP53 mutations as early driving events for HGSC. NGS also demonstrated unexpected relationships between presumed STICs and synchronous carcinomas, suggesting potential diagnostic and translational research applications. PMID:26181193

  16. Reaching the Next Generation of Marine Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, J.

    2009-04-01

    The next generation of marine scientists are today at primary school, secondary school or at college. To encourage them in their career, and to introduce those who are as yet undecided to the wonders of marine science, the Irish Marine Institute has devised a series of three overlapping outreach programmes to reach children at all three levels. Beginning at primary school, the "Explorers" programme offers a range of resources to teachers to enable them to teach marine-related examples as part of the science or geography modules of the SESE curriculum. These include teacher training, expert visits to schools, the installation and stocking of aquaria, field trips and downloadable lesson plans. For older pupils, the "Follow the Fleet" programme is a web-based education asset that allows users to track individual merchant ships and research vessels across the world, to interact with senior crew members of ships and to learn about their cargoes, the ports they visit and the sea conditions along the way. Finally, the "Integrated Marine Exploration Programme (IMEP)" takes secondary school pupils and university students to sea aboard the Marine Institute's research vessels to give them a taste of life as a marine scientist or to educate them in the practical day-to-day sampling and data processing tasks that make up a marine scientist's job.

  17. Implementing Elementary School Next Generation Science Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Katheryn B.

    Implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards requires developing elementary teacher content and pedagogical content knowledge of science and engineering concepts. Teacher preparation for this undertaking appears inadequate with little known about how in-service Mid-Atlantic urban elementary science teachers approach this task. The purpose of this basic qualitative interview study was to explore the research questions related to perceived learning needs of 8 elementary science teachers and 5 of their administrators serving as instructional leaders. Strategies needed for professional growth to support learning and barriers that hamper it at both building and district levels were included. These questions were considered through the lens of Schon's reflective learning and Weick's sensemaking theories. Analysis with provisional and open coding strategies identified informal and formal supports and barriers to teachers' learning. Results indicated that informal supports, primarily internet usage, emerged as most valuable to the teachers' learning. Formal structures, including professional learning communities and grade level meetings, arose as both supportive and restrictive at the building and district levels. Existing formal supports emerged as the least useful because of the dominance of other priorities competing for time and resources. Addressing weaknesses within formal supports through more effective planning in professional development can promote positive change. Improvement to professional development approaches using the internet and increased hands on activities can be integrated into formal supports. Explicit attention to these strategies can strengthen teacher effectiveness bringing positive social change.

  18. Next generation sequencing in neuromuscular diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efthymiou, S; Manole, A; Houlden, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Neuromuscular diseases are clinically and genetically heterogeneous and probably contains the greatest proportion of causative Mendelian defects than any other group of conditions. These disorders affect muscle and/or nerves with neonatal, childhood or adulthood onset, with significant disability and early mortality. Along with heterogeneity, unidentified and often very large genes, require complementary and comprehensive methods in routine molecular diagnosis. Inevitably this leads to increased diagnostic delays and challenges in the interpretation of genetic variants. Recent findings The application of next-generation sequencing, as a research and diagnostic strategy has made significant progress into solving many of these problems. The analysis of these data is by no means simple and the clinical input is essential to interpret results. Summary In this review, we describe using examples the recent advances in the genetic diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders, in research and clinical practice and the latest developments that are underway in NGS. We also discuss the latest collaborative initiatives such as the Genomics England genome sequencing project that combine rare disease clinical phenotyping with genomics, with the aim of defining the vast majority of rare disease genes in patients as well as modifying risks and pharmacogenomics factors. PMID:27588584

  19. Tailoring next-generation biofuels and their combustion in next-generation engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladden, John Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wu, Weihua [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Taatjes, Craig A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Scheer, Adam Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Turner, Kevin M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yu, Eizadora T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); O' Bryan, Greg [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Powell, Amy Jo [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gao, Connie W. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Increasing energy costs, the dependence on foreign oil supplies, and environmental concerns have emphasized the need to produce sustainable renewable fuels and chemicals. The strategy for producing next-generation biofuels must include efficient processes for biomass conversion to liquid fuels and the fuels must be compatible with current and future engines. Unfortunately, biofuel development generally takes place without any consideration of combustion characteristics, and combustion scientists typically measure biofuels properties without any feedback to the production design. We seek to optimize the fuel/engine system by bringing combustion performance, specifically for advanced next-generation engines, into the development of novel biosynthetic fuel pathways. Here we report an innovative coupling of combustion chemistry, from fundamentals to engine measurements, to the optimization of fuel production using metabolic engineering. We have established the necessary connections among the fundamental chemistry, engine science, and synthetic biology for fuel production, building a powerful framework for co-development of engines and biofuels.

  20. Advanced Safeguards Technology Road-map for the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.C.; Tobin, S.; Smith, L.E.; Ehinger, M.; Dougan, A.; Cipiti, B.; Bakel, A.; Bean, R.

    2008-01-01

    Strengthening the nonproliferation regime, including advanced safeguards, is a cornerstone of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). To meet these challenges, the Safeguards Campaign was formed, whose mission is to provide research and technology development for the foundation of next generation safeguards systems for implementation in U.S. GNEP facilities. The Safeguards Campaign works closely with the Nuclear Nonproliferation and International Security department (NA-24) of NNSA (National Nuclear Safety Administration) to ensure that technology developed for domestic safeguards applications are optimum with respect to international safeguards use. A major milestone of the program this year has been the development of the advanced safeguards technology road-map. This paper will broadly describe the road-map, which provides a path to next generation safeguards systems including advanced instrumentation; process monitoring; data integration, protection, and analysis; and system level evaluation and knowledge extraction for real time applications. (authors)

  1. Biomimetic Artificial Basilar Membranes for Next-Generation Cochlear Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jongmoon; Jang, Jeong Hun; Choi, Hongsoo

    2017-11-01

    Patients with sensorineural hearing loss can recover their hearing using a cochlear implant (CI). However, there is a need to develop next-generation CIs to overcome the limitations of conventional CIs caused by extracorporeal devices. Recently, artificial basilar membranes (ABMs) are actively studied for next-generation CIs. The ABM is an acoustic transducer that mimics the mechanical frequency selectivity of the BM and acoustic-to-electrical energy conversion of hair cells. This paper presents recent progress in biomimetic ABMs. First, the characteristics of frequency selectivity of the ABMs by the trapezoidal membrane and beam array are addressed. Second, to reflect the latest research of energy conversion technologies, ABMs using various piezoelectric materials and triboelectric-based ABMs are discussed. Third, in vivo evaluations of the ABMs in animal models are discussed according to the target position for implantation. Finally, future perspectives of ABM studies for the development of practical hearing devices are discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Engineered CRISPR Systems for Next Generation Gene Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Michael; Moghadam, Farzaneh; Ebrahimkhani, Mo R; Kiani, Samira

    2017-09-15

    An ideal in vivo gene therapy platform provides safe, reprogrammable, and precise strategies which modulate cell and tissue gene regulatory networks with a high temporal and spatial resolution. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), a bacterial adoptive immune system, and its CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9), have gained attention for the ability to target and modify DNA sequences on demand with unprecedented flexibility and precision. The precision and programmability of Cas9 is derived from its complexation with a guide-RNA (gRNA) that is complementary to a desired genomic sequence. CRISPR systems open-up widespread applications including genetic disease modeling, functional screens, and synthetic gene regulation. The plausibility of in vivo genetic engineering using CRISPR has garnered significant traction as a next generation in vivo therapeutic. However, there are hurdles that need to be addressed before CRISPR-based strategies are fully implemented. Some key issues center on the controllability of the CRISPR platform, including minimizing genomic-off target effects and maximizing in vivo gene editing efficiency, in vivo cellular delivery, and spatial-temporal regulation. The modifiable components of CRISPR systems: Cas9 protein, gRNA, delivery platform, and the form of CRISPR system delivered (DNA, RNA, or ribonucleoprotein) have recently been engineered independently to design a better genome engineering toolbox. This review focuses on evaluating CRISPR potential as a next generation in vivo gene therapy platform and discusses bioengineering advancements that can address challenges associated with clinical translation of this emerging technology.

  3. Leading research report for fiscal 1998 on the super-survey (Next-generation underground exploration technology); 1998 nendo super survey (jisedai chika tansa gijutsu) no chosa kenkyu sendo chosa kenkyu hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Researches are conducted on innovative mineral resources exploration technologies which use seismic waves or scattered electromagnetic waves to grasp the 3-dimensional structure in the ground. In fiscal 1998, a concrete research and development program is formulated, under which the seismic method and electromagnetic method will deal with an approximately 1km{sup 2}-large area of metalliferous deposit seated approximately 500m deep. In addition, researches are conducted overseas on the trend of related technologies. At an NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) workshop held at the Society of Exploration Geophysicist, U.S., application of the NMR method to water is suggested. At a European Geophysical Society of environmental research and civil engineering event, useful knowledge is acquired about a 4-dimensional sounding (monitoring) technique in which a time axis is added to the 3-dimensional sounding technique and a high-resolution high-efficiency sounding system for probing shallow layers. During visits at Australian institutes concerned with the electromagnetic sounding technology, the trend of probing technologies especially those using the superconducting quantum interface device (SQUID) is gasped. (NEDO)

  4. Nuclear technology in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This pamphlet provides a summary of the research being carried out by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The design and development of the CANDU type reactor are highlighted and the contribution of nuclear technology to medicine, agriculture and the Canadian economy is briefly discussed

  5. The Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, Peter J.; West, Richard G.; Goad, Michael R.; Jenkins, James S.; Pollacco, Don L.; Queloz, Didier; Rauer, Heike; Udry, Stéphane; Watson, Christopher A.; Chazelas, Bruno; Eigmüller, Philipp; Lambert, Gregory; Genolet, Ludovic; McCormac, James; Walker, Simon; Armstrong, David J.; Bayliss, Daniel; Bento, Joao; Bouchy, François; Burleigh, Matthew R.; Cabrera, Juan; Casewell, Sarah L.; Chaushev, Alexander; Chote, Paul; Csizmadia, Szilárd; Erikson, Anders; Faedi, Francesca; Foxell, Emma; Gänsicke, Boris T.; Gillen, Edward; Grange, Andrew; Günther, Maximilian N.; Hodgkin, Simon T.; Jackman, James; Jordán, Andrés; Louden, Tom; Metrailler, Lionel; Moyano, Maximiliano; Nielsen, Louise D.; Osborn, Hugh P.; Poppenhaeger, Katja; Raddi, Roberto; Raynard, Liam; Smith, Alexis M. S.; Soto, Maritza; Titz-Weider, Ruth

    2018-04-01

    We describe the Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS), which is a ground-based project searching for transiting exoplanets orbiting bright stars. NGTS builds on the legacy of previous surveys, most notably WASP, and is designed to achieve higher photometric precision and hence find smaller planets than have previously been detected from the ground. It also operates in red light, maximizing sensitivity to late K and early M dwarf stars. The survey specifications call for photometric precision of 0.1 per cent in red light over an instantaneous field of view of 100 deg2, enabling the detection of Neptune-sized exoplanets around Sun-like stars and super-Earths around M dwarfs. The survey is carried out with a purpose-built facility at Cerro Paranal, Chile, which is the premier site of the European Southern Observatory (ESO). An array of twelve 20 cm f/2.8 telescopes fitted with back-illuminated deep-depletion CCD cameras is used to survey fields intensively at intermediate Galactic latitudes. The instrument is also ideally suited to ground-based photometric follow-up of exoplanet candidates from space telescopes such as TESS, Gaia and PLATO. We present observations that combine precise autoguiding and the superb observing conditions at Paranal to provide routine photometric precision of 0.1 per cent in 1 h for stars with I-band magnitudes brighter than 13. We describe the instrument and data analysis methods as well as the status of the survey, which achieved first light in 2015 and began full-survey operations in 2016. NGTS data will be made publicly available through the ESO archive.

  6. Nuclear technology and societal needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-11-01

    This volume aims to review the present status of development of nuclear technologies and their applications in the country and also to make projections for future requirements. This will also cover state-of-the-art technologies in these areas. The following topics are covered in detail: nuclear technologies for water desalination, water resources development and management using nuclear technology, industrial applications of isotopes and radiation technology, radiation technology in health care, nuclear technology for food preservation, agricultural applications of nuclear technology. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  7. Applications of nanotechnology, next generation sequencing and microarrays in biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elingaramil, Sauli; Li, Xiaolong; He, Nongyue

    2013-07-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies, microarrays and advances in bio nanotechnology have had an enormous impact on research within a short time frame. This impact appears certain to increase further as many biomedical institutions are now acquiring these prevailing new technologies. Beyond conventional sampling of genome content, wide-ranging applications are rapidly evolving for next-generation sequencing, microarrays and nanotechnology. To date, these technologies have been applied in a variety of contexts, including whole-genome sequencing, targeted re sequencing and discovery of transcription factor binding sites, noncoding RNA expression profiling and molecular diagnostics. This paper thus discusses current applications of nanotechnology, next-generation sequencing technologies and microarrays in biomedical research and highlights the transforming potential these technologies offer.

  8. Nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daud Mohamad; Abd Khalik Wood; Azali Muhammad; Idris Besar; Jaafar Abdullah; Mohd Tadza Abdul Rahman; Muhammad Lebai Juri; Noriah Mod Ali; Samsurdin Ahamad; Syed Abdul Malik Syed Zain; Zaharudin Ahmad

    2005-01-01

    The Nuclear Science and Technology contains valuable information on many aspects of nuclear sciences and technology particularly, its application in various socio-economic sectors, presented in 26 chapters. In general, the book addresses 5 main subjects, covering the following: 1] Introduction; contains basic information on ionising radiation and radioactivity including the what of ionising radiation is all about, interaction with matter and sources of radiation. 2] Detection and measurements; describes detection system and methods capable of detecting specific type of radiation and exposure rate. The QA/QC aspects are also given due consideration in this segment. 3] Safety and health. Outlines the effects of radiation on man, proper working procedures and the organisational radiation protection programme required in accordance to the Atomic Energy Licensing Act 1984 (Act 304) and its subsidiaries. 4] Techniques and applications; as the nucleus of the book, focussing on the various applications and some success stories; power production (for electricity) and other utilizations from both sealed and unsealed sources used in industry, medical and non-medical sectors for the benefit of mankind. 5] Prospects; provides information on the current situation and status of nuclear technology, and prominent organisations responsible in the development of the technology. The direction and future outlook of the technology are also presented to gauge the position and possible contribution that the nuclear technology can play a significant role for the socio-economic progress and nation, well being. Each, chapter in this book is developed around three pillars - basic principle, equipment and system, techniques and operational aspects - as a backbone of the chapter, to ease the understanding of the readers, step by step. Those dealing, with ionising radiation related matters, be it a researcher, a scientist, a laboratory worker or even a member of the public would find this book

  9. Why nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Wilson J.; Ishiguro, Yuji; Urbina, Ligia M. Soto

    1996-01-01

    The importance of nuclear energy in the global society implies the nacional need to give priority and maintain an effective technology policy for nuclear science. In this work, it is considered three points that, although do not represent all the problems in the nuclear sector, were chosen because of their importance and need of change that require: evaluation of the Brazilian scientific policy, which is directed towards the publication in international periodicals, yielding more benefits to the developed countries; evaluation of the few and small investment in laboratories and research institutes, which are the natural producers of technology for the industry and service sectors; evaluation of the lack of concrete of concrete objectives in the universities and research institutes, whose policies are elaborated with-out the due consideration of the collective benefits. It is necessary a national plan for the nuclear are that makes investments in technology development, investments in the laboratories and research institutes, and that makes these universities and research institutes accountable for the success or failure to accomplish the proposed objectives. (author)

  10. International nuclear technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartwright, P.; Rocchio, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    Light water reactors (LWRs), originally developed in the United States, became the nuclear workhorses for utilities in Europe and Japan largely because the U.S. industry was willing and able to transfer its nuclear know-how abroad. In this international effort, the industry had the encouragement and support of the U.S. governement. In the case of the boiling water reactor (BWR) the program for technology transfer was developed in response to overseas customer demands for support in building local designs and manufacturing capabilities. The principal vehicles have been technology exchange agreements through which complete engineering and manufacturing information is furnished covering BWR systems and fuel. Agreements are held with companies in Germany, Japan, Italy, and Sweden. In recent years, a comprehensive program of joint technology development with overseas manufacturers has begun. The rapidly escalating cost of nuclear research and development make it desirable to minimize duplication of effort. These joint programs provide a mechanism for two or more parties jointly to plan a development program, assign work tasks among themselves, and exchange test results. Despite a slower-than-hoped-for start, nuclear power today is playing a significant role in the economic growth of some developing countries, and can continue to do so. Roughly half of the 23 free world nations that have adopted LWRs are developing countries

  11. Potential application of LIBS to NNSA next generation safeguards initiative (NGSI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barefield Ii, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clegg, Samuel M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Veirs, Douglas K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Browne, Mike [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lopez, Leon [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Ron [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Le, Loan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lamontagne, Stephen A [DOE/NNSA/NA241; Veal, Kevin [NN/ADTR

    2009-01-01

    In a climate in which states and nations have been and perhaps currently are involved in the prol iferation of nuclear materials and technologies, advanced methodologies and improvements in current measurement techniques are needed to combat new threats and increased levels of sophistication. The Department of Energy through the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has undertaken a broad review of International Safeguards. The conclusion from that review was that a comprehensive initiative to revitalize international safeguards technology and the human resource base was urgently needed to keep pace with demands and increasingly sophisticated emerging safeguards challenges. To address these challenges, NNSA launched the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) to develop policies, concepts, technologies, expertise, and infrastructure necessary to sustain the international safeguards system as its mission evolves for the next 25 years. NGSI is designed to revitalize and strengthen the U.S. safeguards technical base, recognizing that without a robust program the United States of America will not be in a position to exercise leadership or provide the necessary support to the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency). International safeguards as administrated by the IAEA are the primary vehicle for verifying compliance with the peaceful use and nonproliferation of nuclear materials and technologies. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy or LIBS has the potential to support the goals of NGSI as follows: by providing (1) automated analysis in complex nuclear processing or reprocessing facilities in real-time or near real-time without sample preparation or removal, (2) isotopic and important elemental ratio (Cm/Pu, Cm/U, ... etc) analysis, and (3) centralized remote control, process monitoring, and analysis of nuclear materials in nuclear facilities at multiple locations within the facility. Potential application of LIBS to international safeguards as

  12. Raytheon's next generation compact inline cryocooler architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, B. R.; Bellis, L.; Ellis, M. J.; Conrad, T.

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1970s, Raytheon has developed, built, tested and integrated high performance cryocoolers. Our versatile designs for single and multi-stage cryocoolers provide reliable operation for temperatures from 10 to 200 Kelvin with power levels ranging from 50 W to nearly 600 W. These advanced cryocoolers incorporate clearance seals, flexure suspensions, hermetic housings and dynamic balancing to provide long service life and reliable operation in all relevant environments. Today, sensors face a multitude of cryocooler integration challenges such as exported disturbance, efficiency, scalability, maturity, and cost. As a result, cryocooler selection is application dependent, oftentimes requiring extensive trade studies to determine the most suitable architecture. To optimally meet the needs of next generation passive IR sensors, the Compact Inline Raytheon Stirling 1-Stage (CI-RS1), Compact Inline Raytheon Single Stage Pulse Tube (CI-RP1) and Compact Inline Raytheon Hybrid Stirling/Pulse Tube 2-Stage (CI-RSP2) cryocoolers are being developed to satisfy this suite of requirements. This lightweight, compact, efficient, low vibration cryocooler combines proven 1-stage (RS1 or RP1) and 2-stage (RSP2) cold-head architectures with an inventive set of warm-end mechanisms into a single cooler module, allowing the moving mechanisms for the compressor and the Stirling displacer to be consolidated onto a common axis and in a common working volume. The CI cryocooler is a significant departure from the current Stirling cryocoolers in which the compressor mechanisms are remote from the Stirling displacer mechanism. Placing all of the mechanisms in a single volume and on a single axis provides benefits in terms of package size (30% reduction), mass (30% reduction), thermodynamic efficiency (>20% improvement) and exported vibration performance (≤25 mN peak in all three orthogonal axes at frequencies from 1 to 500 Hz). The main benefit of axial symmetry is that proven balancing

  13. Nuclear Technology Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, J.E. (ed.)

    1990-10-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April--September 1988. These programs involve R D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions, the thermophysical properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. Another effort is concerned with examining the feasibility of substituting low-enriched for high-enriched uranium in the production of fission-product {sup 99}Mo. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation's high-level waste repositories.

  14. Nuclear technology programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1989--March 1990. These programs involve R ampersand D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions, the thermophysical properties of metal fuel and blanket materials of the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. Another effort is concerned water waste stream generated in production of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation's high-level waste repositories

  15. Next Generation GPS Ground Control Segment (OCX) Navigation Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertiger, Willy; Bar-Sever, Yoaz; Harvey, Nate; Miller, Kevin; Romans, Larry; Weiss, Jan; Doyle, Larry; Solorzano, Tara; Petzinger, John; Stell, Al

    2010-01-01

    In February 2010, a Raytheon-led team was selected by The Air Force to develop, implement, and operate the next generation GPS ground control segment (OCX). To meet and exceed the demanding OCX navigation performance requirements, the Raytheon team partnered with ITT (Navigation lead) and JPL to adapt major elements of JPL's navigation technology, proven in the operations of the Global Differential GPS (GDGPS) System. Key design goals for the navigation subsystem include accurate ephemeris and clock accuracy (user range error), ease of model upgrades, and a smooth and safe transition from the legacy system to OCX.We will describe key elements of the innovative architecture of the OCX navigation subsystem,and demonstrate the anticipated performance of the system through high fidelity simulations withactual GPS measurements.

  16. Rapid Conditioning for the Next Generation Melting System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rue, David M. [Gas Technology Institute, Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2015-06-17

    This report describes work on Rapid Conditioning for the Next Generation Melting System under US Department of Energy Contract DE-FC36-06GO16010. The project lead was the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). Partners included Owens Corning and Johns Manville. Cost share for this project was provided by NYSERDA (the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority), Owens Corning, Johns Manville, Owens Illinois, and the US natural gas industry through GTI’s SMP and UTD programs. The overreaching focus of this project was to study and develop rapid refining approaches for segmented glass manufacturing processes using high-intensity melters such as the submerged combustion melter. The objectives of this project were to 1) test and evaluate the most promising approaches to rapidly condition the homogeneous glass produced from the submerged combustion melter, and 2) to design a pilot-scale NGMS system for fiberglass recycle.

  17. Understanding Cancer Genome and Its Evolution by Next Generation Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Yong

    knowledge we previously know. There is very limited knowledge of East Asia lung cancer genome except enrichment of EGFR mutations and lack of KRAS mutations. We carried out integrated genomic, transcriptomic and methylomic analysis of 335 primary Chinese lung adenocarcinomas (LUAD) and 35 corresponding......Cancer will cause 13 million deaths by the year of 2030, ranking the second leading cause of death worldwide. Previous studies indicate that most of the cancers originate from cells that acquired somatic mutations and evolved as Darwin Theory. Ten biological insights of cancer have been summarized...... recently. Cutting-age technologies like next generation sequencing (NGS) enable exploring cancer genome and evolution much more efficiently. However, integrated cancer genome sequencing studies showed great inter-/intra-tumoral heterogeneity (ITH) and complex evolution patterns beyond the cancer biological...

  18. Neurogenetics: advancing the "next-generation" of brain research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoghbi, Huda Y; Warren, Stephen T

    2010-10-21

    There can be little doubt that genetics has transformed our understanding of mechanisms mediating brain disorders. The last two decades have brought tremendous progress in terms of accurate molecular diagnoses and knowledge of the genes and pathways that are involved in a large number of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Likewise, new methods and analytical approaches, including genome array studies and "next-generation" sequencing technologies, are bringing us deeper insights into the subtle complexities of the genetic architecture that determines our risks for these disorders. As we now seek to translate these discoveries back to clinical applications, a major challenge for the field will be in bridging the gap between genes and biology. In this Overview of Neuron's special review issue on neurogenetics, we reflect on progress made over the last two decades and highlight the challenges as well as the exciting opportunities for the future. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Next Generation Agricultural System Data, Models and Knowledge Products: Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antle, John M.; Jones, James W.; Rosenzweig, Cynthia E.

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural system models have become important tools to provide predictive and assessment capability to a growing array of decision-makers in the private and public sectors. Despite ongoing research and model improvements, many of the agricultural models today are direct descendants of research investments initially made 30-40 years ago, and many of the major advances in data, information and communication technology (ICT) of the past decade have not been fully exploited. The purpose of this Special Issue of Agricultural Systems is to lay the foundation for the next generation of agricultural systems data, models and knowledge products. The Special Issue is based on a 'NextGen' study led by the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) with support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

  20. Power Electronics for the Next Generation Wind Turbine System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke

    The wind power generation has been steadily growing both for the total installed capacity and for the individual turbine size. Due to much more significant impacts to the power grid, the power electronics, which can change the behavior of wind turbines from an unregulated power source to an active...... generation unit, are becoming crucial in the wind turbine system. The objective of this project is to study the power electronics technology used for the next generation wind turbines. Some emerging challenges as well as potentials like the cost of energy and reliability are going to be addressed. First...... several potential converter topologies and power semiconductor devices for the future wind power application are presented in respect to the advantages/drawbacks. And then the criteria for evaluating the wind power converter are generally discussed, where the importance of thermal stress in the power...

  1. Safety criteria for the next generation of European reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez Bautista, M.T.

    1995-01-01

    For the next generation of reactors, European companies operating in the electricity sector have drawn up a document called European Utilities Requirement (EUR), which sets out the requirements to be met by the designers of future reactors. The main objective of these new requirements is to increase the safety in existing reactors, making good use of operating experience available and the technological developments of the last decade. This paper offers an in-depth analysis of the most significant characteristics, describing how the EUR requirements have been prepared and how they are being implemented by the designers. Areas covered are: - Combining deterministic and probabilistic criteria - Automation of control systems - Design extension for severe accidents - Containment design - Emergency plans - Autonomy versus manual operation

  2. Advanced LIGO: the next generation of gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harry, Gregory M

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are next generation instruments which will replace the existing initial LIGO detectors. They are currently being constructed and installed. Advanced LIGO strain sensitivity is designed to be about a factor 10 better than initial LIGO over a broad band and usable to 10 Hz, in contrast to 40 Hz for initial LIGO. This is expected to allow for detections and significant astrophysics in most categories of gravitational waves. To achieve this sensitivity, all hardware subsystems are being replaced with improvements. Designs and expected performance are presented for the seismic isolation, suspensions, optics and laser subsystems. Possible enhancements to Advanced LIGO, either to resolve problems that may arise and/or to allow for improved performance, are now being researched. Some of these enhancements are discussed along with some potential technology being considered for detectors beyond Advanced LIGO.

  3. The Next Generation ARC Middleware and ATLAS Computing Model

    CERN Document Server

    Filipcic, A; The ATLAS collaboration; Smirnova, O; Konstantinov, A; Karpenko, D

    2012-01-01

    The distributed NDGF Tier-1 and associated Nordugrid clusters are well integrated into the ATLAS computing model but follow a slightly different paradigm than other ATLAS resources. The current strategy does not divide the sites as in the commonly used hierarchical model, but rather treats them as a single storage endpoint and a pool of distributed computing nodes. The next generation ARC middleware with its several new technologies provides new possibilities in development of the ATLAS computing model, such as pilot jobs with pre-cached input files, automatic job migration between the sites, integration of remote sites without connected storage elements, and automatic brokering for jobs with non-standard resource requirements. ARC's data transfer model provides an automatic way for the computing sites to participate in ATLAS' global task management system without requiring centralised brokering or data transfer services. The powerful API combined with Python and Java bindings can easily be used to build new ...

  4. Deep learning—Accelerating Next Generation Performance Analysis Systems?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Brock

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Deep neural network architectures show superior performance in recognition and prediction tasks of the image, speech and natural language domains. The success of such multi-layered networks encourages their implementation in further application scenarios as the retrieval of relevant motion information for performance enhancement in sports. However, to date deep learning is only seldom applied to activity recognition problems of the human motion domain. Therefore, its use for sports data analysis might remain abstract to many practitioners. This paper provides a survey on recent works in the field of high-performance motion data and examines relevant technologies for subsequent deployment in real training systems. In particular, it discusses aspects of data acquisition, processing and network modeling. Analysis suggests the advantage of deep neural networks under difficult and noisy data conditions. However, further research is necessary to confirm the benefit of deep learning for next generation performance analysis systems.

  5. Nuclear technology review 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-08-01

    The viability and credibility of a wide range of nuclear-based technologies require ready access to high-quality atomic, molecular and nuclear data. The demands of new nuclear technologies continue to determine the direction(s) of future data development, including the requirements for data that address innovative fuel cycles, accelerator-driven systems, nuclear incineration, fusion devices, diagnostic and therapeutic medical treatment by radiation, optimization of medical isotope production, non-destructive materials testing, radiation analytical techniques, minerals exploration and land-mine detection. Some recent data development projects with diverse applications are a search engine for Atomic and Molecular data to permit simultaneous data retrieval from a number of different sources for both numerical and bibliographic databases to aid designers. For over 50 years, research reactors have made valuable contributions to the development of nuclear power, basic science, materials development, radioisotope production for medicine and industry, and education and training. They remain core experimental instruments. As of June 2004, 672 research reactors are recorded in the IAEA's Research Reactor Data Base (RRDB), of which 274 are operational in 56 countries (85 in 39 developing countries), 214 are shut down, 168 have been decommissioned and 16 are planned or under construction. Nuclear power supplied 16% of global electricity generation in 2002, and as of 31 December 2003 there were 439 NPPs operating worldwide. Their global energy availability factor has risen steadily from 74.2% in 1991 to approximately 84% in 2003. In 2003 two new NPPs were connected to the grid, a 665 MW(e) pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) in China and a 960 MW(e) pressurized water reactor (PWR) in the Republic of Korea. In addition Canada restarted two units that had been shutdown. Construction started on one new NPP in India. Four 50 MW(e) units in the UK were retired, as were one 640 MW

  6. A Framework for the Next Generation of Risk Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krewski, Daniel; Andersen, Melvin E.; Paoli, Gregory M.; Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Al-Zoughool, Mustafa; Croteau, Maxine C.; Burgoon, Lyle D.; Cote, Ila

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: In 2011, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency initiated the NexGen project to develop a new paradigm for the next generation of risk science. Methods: The NexGen framework was built on three cornerstones: the availability of new data on toxicity pathways made possible by fundamental advances in basic biology and toxicological science, the incorporation of a population health perspective that recognizes that most adverse health outcomes involve multiple determinants, and a renewed focus on new risk assessment methodologies designed to better inform risk management decision making. Results: The NexGen framework has three phases. Phase I (objectives) focuses on problem formulation and scoping, taking into account the risk context and the range of available risk management decision-making options. Phase II (risk assessment) seeks to identify critical toxicity pathway perturbations using new toxicity testing tools and technologies, and to better characterize risks and uncertainties using advanced risk assessment methodologies. Phase III (risk management) involves the development of evidence-based population health risk management strategies of a regulatory, economic, advisory, community-based, or technological nature, using sound principles of risk management decision making. Conclusions: Analysis of a series of case study prototypes indicated that many aspects of the NexGen framework are already beginning to be adopted in practice. Citation: Krewski D, Westphal M, Andersen ME, Paoli GM, Chiu WA, Al-Zoughool M, Croteau MC, Burgoon LD, Cote I. 2014. A framework for the next generation of risk science. Environ Health Perspect 122:796–805; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307260 PMID:24727499

  7. The impact of next-generation sequencing on genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Chiodini, Rod; Badr, Ahmed; Zhang, Genfa

    2011-03-20

    This article reviews basic concepts, general applications, and the potential impact of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies on genomics, with particular reference to currently available and possible future platforms and bioinformatics. NGS technologies have demonstrated the capacity to sequence DNA at unprecedented speed, thereby enabling previously unimaginable scientific achievements and novel biological applications. But, the massive data produced by NGS also presents a significant challenge for data storage, analyses, and management solutions. Advanced bioinformatic tools are essential for the successful application of NGS technology. As evidenced throughout this review, NGS technologies will have a striking impact on genomic research and the entire biological field. With its ability to tackle the unsolved challenges unconquered by previous genomic technologies, NGS is likely to unravel the complexity of the human genome in terms of genetic variations, some of which may be confined to susceptible loci for some common human conditions. The impact of NGS technologies on genomics will be far reaching and likely change the field for years to come. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Nuclear technology options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvatores, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Different strategies and motivations in different countries have led to diverse options. In Europe the SNETP (Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform) has the objective of developing R&D supporting GEN-II (present) and GEN-III nuclear systems under development; allowing sustainability and minimisation of waste burden, promoting advanced Gen-IV Fast Reactors; and accounting for a Nuclear Cogeneration Industrial Initiative. A remarkable initiative in the USA has been the promotion of small modular reactors (SMRs) – at less than 300 MWe in capacity, much smaller than typical reactors – which can be an ideal choice for (remote) areas which cannot support a larger reactor. Compact scalable design offers a host of potential safety, construction and economic benefits. More “upbeat” strategies are expected in other areas of the world where significant increase in nuclear energy demand is predicted in the next decades. If this growth materialises, future fuel cycles characteristics, feasibility and acceptability will be crucial. This paper will discuss different scenarios for future fuel cycles, resources optimisation and/or waste minimization, the range from full fast reactor deployment to phase-out, management of spent nuclear fuel and the significant potential benefits of advanced cycles. The next 45 years will be dominated by deployment of standard large or medium size plants operating for 60 years. Available resources do allow it. However, fuel cycle will be a growing and most challenging issue and early assessments will be needed for public acceptance and policy decisions.

  9. Nuclear technology review 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-08-01

    The unifying theme of the Nuclear Technology Review 2002 (NTR-2002) is the importance of innovation. Innovation makes it possible to step beyond incremental evolutionary improvements constrained by diminishing returns. For crop production and public health, for example, the sterile insect technique created a whole new path for future improvements, distinctly different from applying ever larger amounts of pesticides. Nuclear techniques offer a new and safer approach to removing the world's estimated 60,000,000 abandoned land mines. New precision techniques create the potential for ever less intrusive and more effective radiation treatments for cancer. For nuclear power continuing innovation will be a key factor in closing the projection gap between long term global energy scenarios in which nuclear power expands substantially and near term scenarios with only modest expansion or even decline. While the NTR-2002 presents a worldwide review of the state-of-the-art of nuclear science and technology, and not an annual report on IAEA activities, it notes areas where the Agency has a particularly important role to play. Part I of the NTR-2002 'Fundamentals of Nuclear Development', reviews developments in the field of nuclear, atomic and molecular data. Research reactors remain essential to progress in nuclear science and technology. Part I reviews advances in radioisotope production, the use of accelerators and neutron activation analysis relevant to applications ranging from medicine particularly the light against cancer to industry. Part I also reviews developments in nuclear instrumentation and nuclear fusion, particularly in connection with the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. Part II begins with a summary of nuclear power production in 2001. At the end of 2001 there were 438 nuclear power plants (NPPs) in operation, corresponding to a total capacity of 353 GW(e), more than 10000 reactor-years of cumulative operating experience and about 16% of global

  10. Educating the Next Generation of Lunar Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner, A. J.; Shipp, S. S.; Allen, J. S.; Kring, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    The Center for Lunar Science and Exploration (CLSE), a collaboration between the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI) and NASA’s Johnson Space Center (JSC), is one of seven member teams of the NASA Lunar Science Institute (NLSI). In addition to research and exploration activities, the CLSE team is deeply invested in education and outreach. In support of NASA’s and NLSI’s objective to train the next generation of scientists, CLSE’s High School Lunar Research Project is a conduit through which high school students can actively participate in lunar science and learn about pathways into scientific careers. The High School Lunar Research Project engages teams of high school students in authentic lunar research that envelopes them in the process of science and supports the science goals of the CLSE. Most high school students’ lack of scientific research experience leaves them without an understanding of science as a process. Because of this, each team is paired with a lunar scientist mentor responsible for guiding students through the process of conducting a scientific investigation. Before beginning their research, students undertake “Moon 101,” designed to familiarize them with lunar geology and exploration. Students read articles covering various lunar geology topics and analyze images from past and current lunar missions to become familiar with available lunar data sets. At the end of “Moon 101”, students present a characterization of the geology and chronology of features surrounding the Apollo 11 landing site. To begin their research, teams choose a research subject from a pool of topics compiled by the CLSE staff. After choosing a topic, student teams ask their own research questions, within the context of the larger question, and design their own research approach to direct their investigation. At the conclusion of their research, teams present their results and, after receiving feedback, create and present a conference style poster to a panel of

  11. Next-generation probabilistic seismicity forecasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiemer, S.

    2014-07-01

    novel automated method to investigate the significance of spatial b-value variations. The method incorporates an objective data-driven partitioning scheme, which is based on penalized likelihood estimates. These well-defined criteria avoid the difficult choice of commonly applied spatial mapping parameters, such as grid spacing or size of mapping radii. We construct a seismicity forecast that includes spatial b-value variations and demonstrate our model’s skill and reliability when applied to data from California. All proposed probabilistic seismicity forecasts were subjected to evaluation methods using state of the art algorithms provided by the 'Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability' infrastructure. First, we evaluated the statistical agreement between the forecasted and observed rates of target events in terms of number, space and magnitude. Secondly, we assessed the performance of one forecast relative to another. We find that the forecasts presented in this thesis are reliable and show significant skills with respect to established classical forecasts. These next-generation probabilistic seismicity forecasts can thus provide hazard information that are potentially useful in reducing earthquake losses and enhancing community preparedness and resilience. (author)

  12. Next-generation probabilistic seismicity forecasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiemer, S.

    2014-01-01

    novel automated method to investigate the significance of spatial b-value variations. The method incorporates an objective data-driven partitioning scheme, which is based on penalized likelihood estimates. These well-defined criteria avoid the difficult choice of commonly applied spatial mapping parameters, such as grid spacing or size of mapping radii. We construct a seismicity forecast that includes spatial b-value variations and demonstrate our model’s skill and reliability when applied to data from California. All proposed probabilistic seismicity forecasts were subjected to evaluation methods using state of the art algorithms provided by the 'Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability' infrastructure. First, we evaluated the statistical agreement between the forecasted and observed rates of target events in terms of number, space and magnitude. Secondly, we assessed the performance of one forecast relative to another. We find that the forecasts presented in this thesis are reliable and show significant skills with respect to established classical forecasts. These next-generation probabilistic seismicity forecasts can thus provide hazard information that are potentially useful in reducing earthquake losses and enhancing community preparedness and resilience. (author)

  13. Next-generation coal utilization technology development study. Environmentally-friendly coal combustion technology; topping cycles; Sekitan riyo jisedai gijutsu kaihatsu chosa. Kankyo chowagata sekitan nensho gijutsu bun`ya (topping nensho gijutsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    As a realistic measure to reduce environmental pollutants emitted from coal-fueled boilers, a developmental study was conducted of high-efficient combustion systems. In fiscal 1994, four types of topping cycles which are different in system structure and gasifier type were selected, and topping cycles assuming a 300MW-class power plant were trially designed. Further, an evaluation of adaptability of these systems was made, and an selection of the optimum system for the early development was made among the systems. As a result, the evaluation was obtained that `a system using air blown gasifier` is most suitable for conducting the next-stage research. In the element test on the topping combustion technology, collection was made of data of desulfurization activity, desulfurization oxidation mechanism and alkali metal behavior at the laboratory level, data of temperatures and gas concentration distribution in coal gasification, data of simulation of the gasifier reaction, and the other data. 262 figs., 66 tabs.

  14. Reactor core and passive safety systems descriptions of a next generation pressure tube reactor - mechanical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yetisir, M.; Gaudet, M.; Rhodes, D.; Hamilton, H.; Pencer, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Canada has been developing a channel-type supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor concept, often called the Canadian SCWR. The objective of this reactor concept is to meet the technology goals of the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) for the next generation nuclear reactor development, which include enhanced safety features (inherent safe operation and deploying passive safety features), improved resource utilization, sustainable fuel cycle, and greater proliferation resistance than Generation III nuclear reactors. The Canadian SCWR core concept consists of a high-pressure inlet plenum, a separate low-pressure heavy water moderator contained in a calandria vessel, and 336 pressure tubes surrounded by the moderator. The reactor uses supercritical water as a coolant, and a direct steam power cycle to generate electricity. The reactor concept incorporates advanced safety features such as passive core cooling, long-term decay heat rejection to the environment and fuel melt prevention via passive moderator cooling. These features significantly reduce core damage frequency relative to existing nuclear reactors. This paper presents a description of the design concepts for the Canadian SCWR core, reactor building layout and the plant layout. Passive safety concepts are also described that address containment and core cooling following a loss-of coolant accident, as well as long term reactor heat removal at station blackout conditions. (author)

  15. Using Evidence to Create Next Generation High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Planning, Evaluation and Policy Development, US Department of Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Next Generation High Schools are schools that redesign the high school experience to make it more engaging and worthwhile for high school students. In order to create such Next Generation High Schools, schools, districts, and States should utilize evidence-based strategies to transform high schools in ways that engage students and help prepare…

  16. Nuclear technology review 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-08-01

    Cadarache, France.The IAEA's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) grew to 24 members, with the addition in 2005 of Ukraine and the United States of America. Current INPRO activities include completion of a user manual on the INPRO methodology, application of the methodology to assessing innovative nuclear energy systems (INSs) in national and multinational studies, analyses of the role and structure of INSs in meeting energy demands in a sustainable manner, and selection of the most suitable areas for collaborative development. Developments in accelerator based techniques, production of radioisotopes and some novel uses of nanotechnology are also reported. Nuclear technologies continue to play key and often unique roles in food production and safety, in human and animal health, in water resource management and in the environment. Mutation breeding of crops, for example, has led to the use of previously unusable land in many countries for rice production. In human health, the use of stable isotopes is becoming an accepted tool for the development of nutrition programmes. Nuclear medicine is benefiting from technological advances in computing. Sustainable water management and desalination remain high on the international agenda. New developments in isotopic analysis of hydrological samples hold promise for increasing the use of isotopes in water resources management. Advances in sampling and analytical techniques have assisted in better understanding of the environment. Developments in all these areas are also reported

  17. Next-Generation Sequencing and Genome Editing in Plant Virology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Hadidi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS has been applied to plant virology since 2009. NGS provides highly efficient, rapid, low cost DNA or RNA high-throughput sequencing of the genomes of plant viruses and viroids and of the specific small RNAs generated during the infection process. These small RNAs, which cover frequently the whole genome of the infectious agent, are 21-24 nt long and are known as vsRNAs for viruses and vd-sRNAs for viroids. NGS has been used in a number of studies in plant virology including, but not limited to, discovery of novel viruses and viroids as well as detection and identification of those pathogens already known, analysis of genome diversity and evolution, and study of pathogen epidemiology. The genome engineering editing method, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-Cas9 system has been successfully used recently to engineer resistance to DNA geminiviruses (family, Geminiviridae by targeting different viral genome sequences in infected Nicotiana benthamiana or Arabidopsis plants. The DNA viruses targeted include tomato yellow leaf curl virus and merremia mosaic virus (begomovirus; beet curly top virus and beet severe curly top virus (curtovirus; and bean yellow dwarf virus (mastrevirus. The technique has also been used against the RNA viruses zucchini yellow mosaic virus, papaya ringspot virus and turnip mosaic virus (potyvirus and cucumber vein yellowing virus (ipomovirus, family, Potyviridae by targeting the translation initiation genes eIF4E in cucumber or Arabidopsis plants. From these recent advances of major importance, it is expected that NGS and CRISPR-Cas technologies will play a significant role in the very near future in advancing the field of plant virology and connecting it with other related fields of biology.Keywords: Next-generation sequencing, NGS, plant virology, plant viruses, viroids, resistance to plant viruses by CRISPR-Cas9

  18. Nuclear Technology Review 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-08-01

    The year 2006 saw increasing activities in the field of nuclear power. Significant plans for expansion were announced in some countries and plans for introducing nuclear power in some others. The year began with announcements by both the Russian Federation and the United States of America of international fuel cycle proposals in anticipation of a substantial expansion of nuclear power worldwide. In January, Russian President Vladimir Putin outlined a proposal to create 'a system of international centres providing nuclear fuel cycle services, including enrichment, on a non-discriminatory basis and under the control of the IAEA'. In February, the USA proposed a Global Nuclear Energy Partnership to develop advanced recycling technologies that would not separate pure plutonium; international collaboration in supplying fuel for States which agree not to pursue enrichment and reprocessing; advanced reactors to consume recycled spent fuel while providing energy; and safe and secure small reactors suited to the needs of developing countries. New medium-term projections by the IAEA and the International Energy Agency present a picture with opportunities for substantial nuclear expansion, but still with notable uncertainty. A number of countries have announced plans for significant expansion: China, India, Japan, Pakistan, the Russian Federation and the Republic of Korea. Announcements of planned license applications by US companies and consortia mentioned approximately 25 new reactors. Two site preparation applications were submitted in Canada. A major energy review by the United Kingdom concluded that new nuclear power stations would make a significant contribution to meeting the UK's energy policy goals. Utilities from Estonia, Lithuania and Latvia launched a joint feasibility study of a new nuclear power plant to serve all three countries, and Belarus, Egypt, Indonesia, Nigeria and Turkey made announcements of steps they are taking toward their first nuclear power plants

  19. Space technology needs nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leidinger, B.J.G.

    1993-01-01

    Space technology needs nuclear power to solve its future problems. Manned space flight to Mars is hardly feasible without nuclear propulsion, and orbital nuclear power lants will be necessary to supply power to large satellites or large space stations. Nuclear power also needs space technology. A nuclear power plant sited on the moon is not going to upset anybody, because of the high natural background radiation level existing there, and could contribute to terrestrial power supply. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Next-Generation 9-1-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The nations current 9-1-1 system is designed around outdated telephone technology : and cannot handle the text, data, images, and video that are common in personal : communications and critical to future safety and mobility advances. In addition, ...

  1. NEXT GENERATION GAS TURBINE (NGGT) SYSTEMS STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2001-12-05

    Building upon the 1999 AD Little Study, an expanded market analysis was performed by GE Power Systems in 2001 to quantify the potential demand for an NGGT product. This analysis concluded that improvements to the US energy situation might be best served in the near/mid term (2002-2009) by a ''Technology-Focused'' program rather than a specific ''Product-Focused'' program. Within this new program focus, GEPS performed a parametric screening study of options in the three broad candidate categories of gas turbines: aero-derivative, heavy duty, and a potential hybrid combining components of the other two categories. GEPS's goal was to determine the best candidate systems that could achieve the DOE PRDA expectations and GEPS's internal design criteria in the period specified for initial product introduction, circa 2005. Performance feasibility studies were conducted on candidate systems selected in the screening task, and critical technology areas were identified where further development would be required to meet the program goals. DOE PRDA operating parameters were found to be achievable by 2005 through evolutionary technology. As a result, the study was re-directed toward technology enhancements for interim product introductions and advanced/revolutionary technology for potential NGGT product configurations. Candidate technologies were identified, both evolutionary and revolutionary, with a potential for possible development products via growth step improvements. Benefits were analyzed from two perspectives: (1) What would be the attributes of the top candidate system assuming the relevant technologies were developed and available for an NGGT market opportunity in 2009/2010; and (2) What would be the expected level of public benefit, assuming relevant technologies were incorporated into existing new and current field products as they became available. Candidate systems incorporating these technologies were assessed as

  2. Next-Generation Shipboard DC Power System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Zheming; Sulligoi, Giorgio; Cuzner, Rob

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, more and more evidence suggests that the global energy system is on the verge of a drastic revolution. The evolutionary development in power electronic technologies, the emerging high-performance energy storage devices, as well as the ever increasing penetration of renewable energy......, aerospace/aircraft power systems, as well as maritime power systems....... sources (RES) are commonly recognized as the major driven force of the revolution, the outburst of customer electronics and new kinds of household electronics is also powering this change. In this context, dc power distribution technologies have made a comeback and keep gaining a commendable increase...

  3. Next-Generation X-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Nicholas E.

    2011-01-01

    The future timing capabilities in X-ray astronomy will be reviewed. This will include reviewing the missions in implementation: Astro-H, GEMS, SRG, and ASTROSAT; those under study: currently ATHENA and LOFT; and new technologies that may enable future missions e.g. Lobster eye optics. These missions and technologies will bring exciting new capabilities across the entire time spectrum from micro-seconds to years that e.g. will allow us to probe close to the event horizon of black holes and constrain the equation of state of neutron stars.

  4. Nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Program on Nuclear Science and Technology comprehends Nuclear and Condensed Matter Physics, Neutron Activation Analysis, Radiation Metrology, Radioprotection and Radioactive Waste Management. These activities are developed at the Research Reactor Center, the Radiation Metrology Center and the Radioactive Waste Management Laboratory. The Radioprotection activities are developed at all radioactive and nuclear facilities of IPEN-CNEN/SP. The Research Reactor Center at IPEN-CNEN/SP is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the Research Reactor IEA-R1 and has a three-fold mission: promoting basic and applied research in nuclear and neutron related sciences, providing educational opportunities for students in these fields and providing services and applications resulting from the reactor utilization. Specific research programs include nuclear structure study from beta and gamma decay of radioactive nuclei and nuclear reactions, nuclear and neutron metrology, neutron diffraction and neutron multiple-diffraction study for crystalline and magnetic structure determination, perturbed -angular correlation (PAC) using radioactive nuclear probes to study the nuclear hyperfine interactions in solids and instrumental neutron activation analysis, with comparative or ko standardization applied to the fields of health, agriculture, environment, archaeology, reference material production, geology and industry. The research in the areas of applied physics includes neutron radiography, scientific computation and nuclear instrumentation. During the last several years a special effort was made to refurbish the old components and systems of the reactor, particularly those related with the reactor safety improvement, in order to upgrade the reactor power. The primary objective was to modernize the IEA-R1 reactor for safe and sustainable operation to produce primary radioisotopes, such as 99 Mo and 131 I, among several others, used in nuclear medicine, by operating the reactor

  5. Nuclear science and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    The Program on Nuclear Science and Technology comprehends Nuclear and Condensed Matter Physics, Neutron Activation Analysis, Radiation Metrology, Radioprotection and Radioactive Waste Management. These activities are developed at the Research Reactor Center, the Radiation Metrology Center and the Radioactive Waste Management Laboratory. The Radioprotection activities are developed at all radioactive and nuclear facilities of IPEN-CNEN/SP. The Research Reactor Center at IPEN-CNEN/SP is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the Research Reactor IEA-R1 and has a three-fold mission: promoting basic and applied research in nuclear and neutron related sciences, providing educational opportunities for students in these fields and providing services and applications resulting from the reactor utilization. Specific research programs include nuclear structure study from beta and gamma decay of radioactive nuclei and nuclear reactions, nuclear and neutron metrology, neutron diffraction and neutron multiple-diffraction study for crystalline and magnetic structure determination, perturbed -angular correlation (PAC) using radioactive nuclear probes to study the nuclear hyperfine interactions in solids and instrumental neutron activation analysis, with comparative or ko standardization applied to the fields of health, agriculture, environment, archaeology, reference material production, geology and industry. The research in the areas of applied physics includes neutron radiography, scientific computation and nuclear instrumentation. During the last several years a special effort was made to refurbish the old components and systems of the reactor, particularly those related with the reactor safety improvement, in order to upgrade the reactor power. The primary objective was to modernize the IEA-R1 reactor for safe and sustainable operation to produce primary radioisotopes, such as {sup 99}Mo and {sup 131}I, among several others, used in nuclear medicine, by operating

  6. Nuclear Technology Review 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-08-01

    , on a non-discriminatory basis and under the control of the IAEA. Nineteen countries signed a statement of principles of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership, which aims at accelerating development and deployment of advanced fuel cycle technologies to foster development, improve the environment, and reduce the risk of nuclear proliferation. The NRC approved the release of most of the Big Rock Point nuclear power plant site and most of the Yankee Rowe nuclear power plant site for unrestricted public use. Thus, ten power plants around the world have been completely decommissioned with their sites released for unconditional use. Seventeen plants have been partially dismantled and safely enclosed. Thirty-two are being dismantled prior to eventual site release, and thirty-four reactors are undergoing minimum dismantling prior to long term enclosure. In September, the IAEA launched a new Network of Centres of Excellence for Decommissioning to improve the flow of knowledge and experience among those engaged in decommissioning and to encourage organizations in developed Member States to contribute to the activities of Member States requiring decommissioning assistance. Nuclear and isotopic techniques continue to make substantive contributions in agriculture, human health, the marine and terrestrial environments as well as in water resource management. In food and agriculture, plant mutation breeding is supporting the development of new varieties of crops that bring enhanced yields while also providing significant environmental benefits through reduced requirements for fertilizers and increased resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. The genetic enhancement of biomass crops is useful in responding to increasing demands for biofuels. In addition to the continuing use of irradiation for sanitary purposes, the use of irradiation for phytosanitary applications, especially those applications related to quarantine measures, is increasing.

  7. Educating the Next Generation of Makers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepker, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    The field of manufacturing typically conjures images of dimly lit dirty and dangerous factories crowded with workers, the kind seen in photos of New York City's garment district in the early 1900s and in some developing countries today. Because of advances in technology, however, the field of manufacturing--what is made, how it is made, where and…

  8. The next generation of targeted mutation discovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harakalova, M.

    2013-01-01

    Sequencing technologies (NGS) now allows efficient analysis of the complete protein-coding regions of genomes (exomes) for multiple samples in a single sequencing run. In Chapter 2, we present our results with a genomic DNA pooling strategy for rare variant discovery on a NGS platform. The high

  9. Probing next Generation Portuguese Academic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friacas, Carlos; Massano, Emanuel; Domingues, Monica; Veiga, Pedro

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to provide several viewpoints about monitoring aspects related to recent deployments of a new technology (IPv6). Design/methodology/approach: Several views and domains were used, with a common point: the Portuguese research and education network (RCTS). Findings: A significant amount of work is yet to be…

  10. The Double Bind: The next Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcom, Lindsey E.; Malcom, Shirley M.

    2011-01-01

    In this foreword, Shirley Malcom and Lindsey Malcom speak to the history and current status of women of color in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. As the author of the seminal report "The Double Bind: The Price of Being a Minority Woman in Science", Shirley Malcom is uniquely poised to give us an insightful…

  11. IPv6: The Next Generation Internet Protocol

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    fund its research. The ARPA (Advanced Research Projects. Agency) played a lead role in the development of the internet technology. ARPA, with experience gained from its own net- work called ... Their work caught the attention of many researchers and a board .... This limits the lifetime of the datagram and aids the cong-.

  12. Reconciling proteomics with next generation sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Low, Teck Yew; Heck, Albert Jr

    2015-01-01

    Both genomics and proteomics technologies have matured in the last decade to a level where they are able to deliver system-wide data on the qualitative and quantitative abundance of their respective molecular entities, that is DNA/RNA and proteins. A next logical step is the collective use of these

  13. Rucio, the next-generation Data Management system in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Serfon, C; The ATLAS collaboration; Beermann, T; Garonne, V; Goossens, L; Lassnig, M; Nairz, A; Vigne, R

    2014-01-01

    Rucio is the next-generation of Distributed Data Management (DDM) system benefiting from recent advances in cloud and "Big Data" computing to address HEP experiments scaling requirements. Rucio is an evolution of the ATLAS DDM system Don Quijote 2 (DQ2), which has demonstrated very large scale data management capabilities with more than 160 petabytes spread worldwide across 130 sites, and accesses from 1,000 active users. However, DQ2 is reaching its limits in terms of scalability, requiring a large number of support staff to operate and being hard to extend with new technologies. Rucio addresses these issues by relying on new technologies to ensure system scalability, cover new user requirements and employ new automation framework to reduce operational overheads. In this talk, we will present the history of the DDM project and the experience of data management operation in ATLAS computing. Thus, We will show the key concepts of Rucio, including its data organization. The Rucio design, and the technology it e...

  14. Rucio, the next-generation Data Management system in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Serfon, C; Beermann, T; Garonne, V; Goossens, L; Lassnig, M; Nairz, A; Vigne, R

    2016-01-01

    Rucio is the next-generation of Distributed Data Management (DDM) system benefiting from recent advances in cloud and "Big Data" computing to address HEP experiments scaling requirements. Rucio is an evolution of the ATLAS DDM system Don Quijote 2 (DQ2), which has demonstrated very large scale data management capabilities with more than 160 petabytes spread worldwide across 130 sites, and accesses from 1,000 active users. However, DQ2 is reaching its limits in terms of scalability, requiring a large number of support staff to operate and being hard to extend with new technologies. Rucio addresses these issues by relying on new technologies to ensure system scalability, cover new user requirements and employ new automation framework to reduce operational overheads. This paper shows the key concepts of Rucio, details the Rucio design, and the technology it employs, the tests that were conducted to validate it and finally describes the migration steps that were conducted to move from DQ2 to Rucio.

  15. Rucio, the next-generation Data Management system in ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serfon, C.; Barisits, M.; Beermann, T.; Garonne, V.; Goossens, L.; Lassnig, M.; Nairz, A.; Vigne, R.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    Rucio is the next-generation of Distributed Data Management (DDM) system benefiting from recent advances in cloud and ;Big Data; computing to address HEP experiments scaling requirements. Rucio is an evolution of the ATLAS DDM system Don Quixote 2 (DQ2), which has demonstrated very large scale data management capabilities with more than 160 petabytes spread worldwide across 130 sites, and accesses from 1,000 active users. However, DQ2 is reaching its limits in terms of scalability, requiring a large number of support staff to operate and being hard to extend with new technologies. Rucio addresses these issues by relying on new technologies to ensure system scalability, cover new user requirements and employ new automation framework to reduce operational overheads. This paper shows the key concepts of Rucio, details the Rucio design, and the technology it employs, the tests that were conducted to validate it and finally describes the migration steps that were conducted to move from DQ2 to Rucio.

  16. The Next Generation ATLAS Production System

    CERN Document Server

    Borodin, Mikhail; The ATLAS collaboration; Golubkov, Dmitry; Klimentov, Alexei; Maeno, Tadashi; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Vaniachine, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at LHC data processing and simulation grows continuously, as more data and more use cases emerge. For data processing the ATLAS experiment adopted the data transformation approach, where software applications transform the input data into outputs. In the ATLAS production system, each data transformation is represented by a task, a collection of many jobs, dynamically submitted by the ATLAS workload management system (PanDA/JEDI) and executed on the Grid, clouds and supercomputers. Patterns in ATLAS data transformation workflows composed of many tasks provided a scalable production system framework for template definitions of the many-tasks workflows. User interface and system logic of these workflows are being implemented in the Database Engine for Tasks (DEFT). Such development required using modern computing technologies and approaches. We report technical details of this development: database implementation, server logic and Web user interface technologies.

  17. Automated speech understanding: the next generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picone, J.; Ebel, W. J.; Deshmukh, N.

    1995-04-01

    Modern speech understanding systems merge interdisciplinary technologies from Signal Processing, Pattern Recognition, Natural Language, and Linguistics into a unified statistical framework. These systems, which have applications in a wide range of signal processing problems, represent a revolution in Digital Signal Processing (DSP). Once a field dominated by vector-oriented processors and linear algebra-based mathematics, the current generation of DSP-based systems rely on sophisticated statistical models implemented using a complex software paradigm. Such systems are now capable of understanding continuous speech input for vocabularies of several thousand words in operational environments. The current generation of deployed systems, based on small vocabularies of isolated words, will soon be replaced by a new technology offering natural language access to vast information resources such as the Internet, and provide completely automated voice interfaces for mundane tasks such as travel planning and directory assistance.

  18. Creating the next generation control system software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    A new 1980's style support package for future accelerator control systems is proposed. It provides a way to create accelerator applications software without traditional programming. Visual Interactive Applications (VIA) is designed to meet the needs of expanded accelerator complexes in a more cost effective way than past experience with procedural languages by using technology from the personal computer and artificial intelligence communities. 4 refs

  19. Next Generation Simulation Training for Pararescue Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-13

    design, and analysis as well as the build out of its information technology systems and training infrastructure at its Design and Development Center...sessions conducted immediately after training. • Written feedback – Obtained through a web-based survey tool (SurveyMonkey) Data Analysis : Analysis of the...brevity, being detailed in a classical Strengths, Weatknesses, Opportunities, Threats ( SWOT ) structure. STRENGTHS: Identified strengths of the simulation

  20. Free Space Optics for Next Generation Cellular Backhaul

    KAUST Repository

    Zedini, Emna

    2016-11-01

    The exponential increase in the number of mobile users, coupled with the strong demand for high-speed data services results in a significant growth in the required cellular backhaul capacity. Optimizing the cost efficiency while increasing the capacity is becoming a key challenge to the cellular backhaul. It refers to connections between base stations and mobile switching nodes over a variety of transport technologies such as copper, optical fibers, and radio links. These traditional transmission technologies are either expensive, or cannot provide high data rates. This work is focused on the opportunities of free-space-optical (FSO) technology in next generation cellular back- haul. FSO is a cost effective and wide bandwidth solution as compared with the traditional radio-frequency (RF) transmission. Moreover, due to its ease of deployment, license-free operation, high transmission security, and insensitivity to interference, FSO links are becoming an attractive solution for next generation cellular networks. However, the widespread deployment of FSO links is hampered by the atmospheric turbulence-induced fading, weather conditions, and pointing errors. Increasing the reliability of FSO systems, while still exploiting their high data rate communications, is a key requirement in the deployment of an FSO-based backhaul. Therefore, the aim of this work is to provide different approaches to address these technical challenges. In this context, investigation of hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ) protocols from an information-theoretic perspective is undertaken. Moreover, performance analysis of asymmetric RF/FSO dual-hop systems is studied. In such system models, multiple RF users can be multiplexed and sent over the FSO link. More specifically, the end-to-end performance metrics are presented in closed-form. This also has increased the interest to study the performance of dual-hop mixed FSO/RF systems, where the FSO link is used as a multicast channel that serves

  1. Final Report, Next-Generation Mega-Voltage Cargo-Imaging System for Cargo Container Inspection, March 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dr. James Clayton, Ph.D., Varian Medical Systems-Security and Inspection Products; Dr. Emma Regentova, Ph.D, University of Nevada Las Vegas; Dr. Evangelos Yfantis, Ph.D., University of Nevada, Las Vegas

    2007-01-01

    The UNLV Research Foundation, as the primary award recipient, teamed with Varian Medical Systems-Security and Inspection Products and the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) for the purpose of conducting research and engineering related to a ''next-generation'' mega-voltage imaging (MVCI) system for inspection of cargo in large containers. The procurement and build-out of hardware for the MVCI project has been completed. The K-9 linear accelerator and an optimized X-ray detection system capable of efficiently detecting X-rays emitted from the accelerator after they have passed through the device is under test. The Office of Science financial assistance award has made possible the development of a system utilizing a technology which will have a profound positive impact on the security of U.S. seaports. The proposed project will ultimately result in critical research and development advances for the ''next-generation'' Linatron X-ray accelerator technology, thereby providing a safe, reliable and efficient fixed and mobile cargo inspection system, which will very significantly increase the fraction of cargo containers undergoing reliable inspection as the enter U.S. ports. Both NNSA/NA-22 and the Department of Homeland Security's Domestic Nuclear Detection Office are collaborating with UNLV and its team to make this technology available as soon as possible

  2. Development of the Korean next generation reactor arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Soon Chul; Park, Koo Woun

    1996-01-01

    The Korean Next Generation Reactor(KNGR) is being developed as an evolutionary plant under the sponsorship of Korean government and KEPCO to meet the electricity requirements in the early part of the 21st century. The KNGR design is based on our successful experience of Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plants design such as YGN 3 is 4 and UCN 3 and 4. The type of reactor, its generating capacity, and the plant design concept were determined based on the feasibility study during conducted Phase 1 of the KNGR. This led to the establishment of the overall requirements for plant arrangement and their incorporation into the preliminary design. The principle behind these requirements is to incorporate the Severe Accident Features, the Advanced Design Features(ADF), the Passive Design Features(PDF) as well as the conventional requirements applied to the existing plants. Utility requirements derived from constructional and operational experiences have also been incorporated into the basic design of the KNGR. The KNGR arrangement is primarily affected by a double cylindrical concrete containment building and the increased capacity(1,350 MWe) of the Nuclear Steam Supply System which requires the larger containment size than the existing Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant design. Additional aspects which could impact on the overall plant arrangement have been evaluated based on the criteria of separation, enhancement of safety, operability, maintainability, construct ability, and ALARA, and incorporated into the design as a result of the development process. Details of the preliminary arrangement including the requirements established for KNGR are discussed in the paper

  3. Nuclear medicine technology study guide

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Dee

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear Medicine Technology Study Guide presents a comprehensive review of nuclear medicine principles and concepts necessary for technologists to pass board examinations. The practice questions and content follow the guidelines of the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB) and American Registry of Radiological Technologists (ARRT), allowing test takers to maximize their success in passing the examinations. The book is organized by sections of increasing difficulty, with over 600 multiple-choice questions covering all areas of nuclear medicine, including radiation safety; radi

  4. Infrared Spectroscopic Imaging: The Next Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopic imaging seemingly matured as a technology in the mid-2000s, with commercially successful instrumentation and reports in numerous applications. Recent developments, however, have transformed our understanding of the recorded data, provided capability for new instrumentation, and greatly enhanced the ability to extract more useful information in less time. These developments are summarized here in three broad areas— data recording, interpretation of recorded data, and information extraction—and their critical review is employed to project emerging trends. Overall, the convergence of selected components from hardware, theory, algorithms, and applications is one trend. Instead of similar, general-purpose instrumentation, another trend is likely to be diverse and application-targeted designs of instrumentation driven by emerging component technologies. The recent renaissance in both fundamental science and instrumentation will likely spur investigations at the confluence of conventional spectroscopic analyses and optical physics for improved data interpretation. While chemometrics has dominated data processing, a trend will likely lie in the development of signal processing algorithms to optimally extract spectral and spatial information prior to conventional chemometric analyses. Finally, the sum of these recent advances is likely to provide unprecedented capability in measurement and scientific insight, which will present new opportunities for the applied spectroscopist. PMID:23031693

  5. Next generation sequencing in breast cancer: first take home messages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmedt, Christine; Voet, Thierry; Sotiriou, Christos; Campbell, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the review We are currently on the threshold of a revolution in breast cancer research thanks to the emergence of novel technologies based on next generation sequencing (NGS). In this review, we will describe the different sequencing technologies and platforms, and summarize the main findings from the latest sequencing papers in breast cancer. Recent findings First, the sequencing of a few hundreds of breast tumors has revealed new cancer genes. Although these were not frequently mutated, mutated genes from different patients could be grouped into the deregulation of similar pathways. Second, NGS allowed further exploration of intratumor heterogeneity and revealed that although subclonal mutations were present in all tumors, there was always a dominant clone which comprised at least 50% of the tumor cells. Finally, tumor-specific DNA rearrangements could be detected in the patient’s plasma, suggesting that NGS could be used to personalize the monitoring of the disease. Summary The application of NGS to breast cancer has been associated with tremendous advances and promises for increasing the understanding of the disease. However, there still remain many unanswered questions, such as for example the role of structural changes of tumor genomes in cancer progression and treatment response/resistance. PMID:23014189

  6. Consideration of key design requirements for Korean next generation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, S. K.; Oh, H. S.; Jung, S. H.; Kim, I. S.; Kim, D. S.

    1999-01-01

    Some key design requirements being applied for the Korean Next Generation Reactor(KNGR) development, which is in progress to complete a standard design improved in safety and performance, are investigated in this study. Careful consideration is given to the requirements by reviewing the selection background, utility and licensing requirements, and by investigating the licensing process of the similar reactor, System80+, through reviewing the draft and final safety evaluation reports issued by the U.S. NRC. Among the requirements for the KNGR development, thermal power which is approximately 40% uprated from the existing Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant, newly adopted pilot operated safety relief valves(POSRVs) replacing the conventional pressurizer safety valves and motor driven valves of the safety depressurization system are investigated as well as some performance targets of the KNGR, i.e., operator action time, station blackout coping time, and steam generator capacity. Summary of the current KNGR design status is also presented and, finally, direction for the future design optimization is suggested

  7. A roadmap for nuclear energy technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofu, Tanju

    2018-01-01

    The prospects for the future use of nuclear energy worldwide can best be understood within the context of global population growth, urbanization, rising energy need and associated pollution concerns. As the world continues to urbanize, sustainable development challenges are expected to be concentrated in cities of the lower-middle-income countries where the pace of urbanization is fastest. As these countries continue their trajectory of economic development, their energy need will also outpace their population growth adding to the increased demand for electricity. OECD IEA's energy system deployment pathway foresees doubling of the current global nuclear capacity by 2050 to reduce the impact of rapid urbanization. The pending "retirement cliff" of the existing U.S. nuclear fleet, representing over 60 percent of the nation's emission-free electricity, also poses a large economic and environmental challenge. To meet the challenge, the U.S. DOE has developed the vision and strategy for development and deployment of advanced reactors. As part of that vision, the U.S. government pursues programs that aim to expand the use of nuclear power by supporting sustainability of the existing nuclear fleet, deploying new water-cooled large and small modular reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the energy security and climate change goals, conducting R&D for advanced reactor technologies with alternative coolants, and developing sustainable nuclear fuel cycle strategies. Since the current path relying heavily on water-cooled reactors and "once-through" fuel cycle is not sustainable, next generation nuclear energy systems under consideration aim for significant advances over existing and evolutionary water-cooled reactors. Among the spectrum of advanced reactor options, closed-fuel-cycle systems using reactors with fast-neutron spectrum to meet the sustainability goals offer the most attractive alternatives. However, unless the new public-private partnership models emerge

  8. Highly Flexible, Fire Resistant HybridSil Foams for Next Generation Fireproofing, Insulation, and Energy Absorption NASA Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this Phase I STTR program is to adapt NanoSonic's HybridSil™ nanocomposite technology for the creation of next generation highly flexible, fire...

  9. Next Generation Avionics System for Satellite Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, M.; Schmidt, G.; Hahn, M.

    This paper describes the new modular avionics system developed at Astrium GmbH in Munich in the frame of Gammabus, a DLR-funded development for constellation programs. Modularity, reusability and time to market are major goals of the development. The system consists of the on-board computer core modules, namely processor module, telemetry/telecommand/reconfiguration/safeguard-memory module and power converter module, an onboard software computing environment as well as a development and verification environment including a real-time testbed and ground station interface (SCOS) to support mission simulation tests. The new concept is taking advantage of improvements in microelectronics and software technology to improve performance while reducing costs.

  10. TALE nucleases and next generation GM crops.

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2011-04-01

    Site-specific and adaptable DNA binding domains are essential modules to develop genome engineering technologies for crop improvement. Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) proteins are used to provide a highly specific and adaptable DNA binding modules. TALE chimeric nucleases (TALENs) were used to generate site-specific double strand breaks (DSBs) in vitro and in yeast, Caenorhabditis elegans, mammalian and plant cells. The genomic DSBs can be generated at predefined and user-selected loci and repaired by either the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homology dependent repair (HDR). Thus, TALENs can be used to achieve site-specific gene addition, stacking, deletion or inactivation. TALE-based genome engineering tools should be powerful to develop new agricultural biotechnology approaches for crop improvement. Here, we discuss the recent research and the potential applications of TALENs to accelerate the generation of genomic variants through targeted mutagenesis and to produce a non-transgenic GM crops with the desired phenotype.

  11. Next generation WLCG File Transfer Service (FTS)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    LHC experiments at CERN and worldwide utilize WLCG resources and middleware components to perform distributed computing tasks. One of the most important tasks is reliable file replication. It is a complex problem, suffering from transfer failures, disconnections, transfer duplication, server and network overload, differences in storage systems, etc. To address these problems, EMI and gLite have provided the independent File Transfer Service (FTS) and Grid File Access Library (GFAL) tools. Their development started almost a decade ago, in the meantime, requirements in data management have changed - the old architecture of FTS and GFAL cannot keep support easily these changes. Technology has also been progressing: FTS and GFAL do not fit into the new paradigms (cloud, messaging, for example). To be able to serve the next stage of LHC data collecting (from 2013), we need a new generation of  these tools: FTS 3 and GFAL 2. We envision a service requiring minimal configuration, which can dynamically adapt to the...

  12. Japan's robotics research for the next generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umetani, Y.; Yonemoto, K.

    1983-10-01

    The results of a survey of Japanese research institutes concerning the direction of Japanese robotics development over the next twenty years are presented. Attention is given to an assessment of the goals of robotics R & D in the public and private sectors based on the total research budgets of R & D institutes, the number of research laboratories studying robotics, and the various classifications of the topics of study. The study topics include work, control, measurement and recognition functions. A time table is presented which lists the specific applications of robotic research, the year of their expected actualization, and the degree of importance assigned by the respondents. Some of the more important applications are: robots able to work in hostile environments; robots for unmanned mining operations; and the rationalization of such tasks as afforestation, felling and transport activities in steep forested land through the use of advanced locomotive technology.

  13. NIH Abroad: Inspiring the Next Generation of Global Health Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section NIH Abroad: Inspiring the Next Generation of Global Health Researchers ... interaction has always been important to me, but working with these patients in Zambia lit a fire ...

  14. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic considerations for the next generation protein therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dhaval K

    2015-10-01

    Increasingly sophisticated protein engineering efforts have been undertaken lately to generate protein therapeutics with desired properties. This has resulted in the discovery of the next generation of protein therapeutics, which include: engineered antibodies, immunoconjugates, bi/multi-specific proteins, antibody mimetic novel scaffolds, and engineered ligands/receptors. These novel protein therapeutics possess unique physicochemical properties and act via a unique mechanism-of-action, which collectively makes their pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) different than other established biological molecules. Consequently, in order to support the discovery and development of these next generation molecules, it becomes important to understand the determinants controlling their PK/PD. This review discusses the determinants that a PK/PD scientist should consider during the design and development of next generation protein therapeutics. In addition, the role of systems PK/PD models in enabling rational development of the next generation protein therapeutics is emphasized.

  15. NOAA Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD) Level 3 Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of Level 3 weather radar products collected from Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) stations located in the contiguous United States, Alaska,...

  16. NOAA Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD) Level 2 Base Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of Level II weather radar data collected from Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) stations located in the contiguous United States, Alaska, Hawaii,...

  17. Next-generation sequencing in NSCLC and melanoma patients : A cost and budget impact analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Amerongen, Rosa A.; Retèl, Valesca P.; Coupé, Veerle M.H.; Nederlof, Petra M.; Vogel, Maartje J.; Van Harten, Wim H.

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has reached the molecular diagnostic laboratories. Although the NGS technology aims to improve the effectiveness of therapies by selecting the most promising therapy, concerns are that NGS testing is expensive and that the 'benefits' are not yet in relation to these

  18. New long-range speed record with next-generation internet

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Scientists at CERN and the California Institute of Technology have set a new Internet2 land speed record using the next-generation Internet protocol IPv6. The team sustained a single stream Transfer Control Protocol (TCP) rate of 983 megabits per second for more than one hour between CERN and Chicago, a distance of more than 7,000 kilometres" (1 page).

  19. Quantitative miRNA expression analysis: comparing microarrays with next-generation sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willenbrock, Hanni; Salomon, Jesper; Søkilde, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    Recently, next-generation sequencing has been introduced as a promising, new platform for assessing the copy number of transcripts, while the existing microarray technology is considered less reliable for absolute, quantitative expression measurements. Nonetheless, so far, results from the two te...

  20. Values Underpinning STEM Education in the USA: An Analysis of the Next Generation Science Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeg, Darren G.; Bencze, John Lawrence

    2017-01-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) were designed to address poor science and math performance in United States schools by inculcating globally competitive science, technology, engineering, and mathematics literacies relevant to participation in future society. Considering the complex network of influences involved in the development of…

  1. Uncovering of Classical Swine Fever Virus adaptive response to vaccination by Next Generation Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahnøe, Ulrik; Orton, Richard; Höper, Dirk

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) has rapidly become the preferred technology in nucleotide sequencing, and can be applied to unravel molecular adaptation of RNA viruses such as Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV). However, the detection of low frequency variants within viral populations by NGS...

  2. Bringing Next-Generation Sequencing into the Classroom through a Comparison of Molecular Biology Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, Bethany; Zimmer, Erin; Pyatt, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Although the development of next-generation (NextGen) sequencing technologies has revolutionized genomic research and medicine, the incorporation of these topics into the classroom is challenging, given an implied high degree of technical complexity. We developed an easy-to-implement, interactive classroom activity investigating the similarities…

  3. The next generation of command post computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Ross D.; Lieb, Aaron J.; Samuel, Jason M.; Burger, Mitchell A.

    2015-05-01

    The future of command post computing demands an innovative new solution to address a variety of challenging operational needs. The Command Post of the Future is the Army's primary command and control decision support system, providing situational awareness and collaborative tools for tactical decision making, planning, and execution management from Corps to Company level. However, as the U.S. Army moves towards a lightweight, fully networked battalion, disconnected operations, thin client architecture and mobile computing become increasingly essential. The Command Post of the Future is not designed to support these challenges in the coming decade. Therefore, research into a hybrid blend of technologies is in progress to address these issues. This research focuses on a new command and control system utilizing the rich collaboration framework afforded by Command Post of the Future coupled with a new user interface consisting of a variety of innovative workspace designs. This new system is called Tactical Applications. This paper details a brief history of command post computing, presents the challenges facing the modern Army, and explores the concepts under consideration for Tactical Applications that meet these challenges in a variety of innovative ways.

  4. Towards next generation 3D cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mohit

    2017-03-01

    We are in the midst of a 3D revolution. Robots enabled by 3D cameras are beginning to autonomously drive cars, perform surgeries, and manage factories. However, when deployed in the real-world, these cameras face several challenges that prevent them from measuring 3D shape reliably. These challenges include large lighting variations (bright sunlight to dark night), presence of scattering media (fog, body tissue), and optically complex materials (metal, plastic). Due to these factors, 3D imaging is often the bottleneck in widespread adoption of several key robotics technologies. I will talk about our work on developing 3D cameras based on time-of-flight and active triangulation that addresses these long-standing problems. This includes designing `all-weather' cameras that can perform high-speed 3D scanning in harsh outdoor environments, as well as cameras that recover shape of objects with challenging material properties. These cameras are, for the first time, capable of measuring detailed (<100 microns resolution) scans in extremely demanding scenarios with low-cost components. Several of these cameras are making a practical impact in industrial automation, being adopted in robotic inspection and assembly systems.

  5. Development of an Advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics Technology for the Next-Generation Nuclear Reactor System Analysis and Safety Margin Characterization Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Hong [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Nourgaliev, Robert [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-04-06

    This report describes the research activities we have conducted at NCSU for our NEUP project. The work toward achieving the objectives of the project is reported. The significant achievements and accomplishments are presented. A number of numerical experiments are conducted to demonstrate that the goal of the proposed work has been successfully achieved. Issues, recommendations, and future work are discussed.

  6. Status of core nuclear design technology for future fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Hyung Kook; Jung, Hyung Guk; Noh, Jae Man; Kim, Yeong Il; Kim, Taek Kyum; Gil, Choong Sup; Kim, Jung Do; Kim, Young Jin; Sohn, Dong Seong

    1997-01-01

    The effective utilization of nuclear resource is more important factor to be considered in the design of next generation PWR in addition to the epochal consideration on economics and safety. Assuming that MOX fuel can be considered as one of the future fuel corresponding to the above request, the establishment of basic technology for the MOX core design has been performed : : the specification of the technical problem through the preliminary core design and nuclear characteristic analysis of MOX, the development and verification of the neutron library for lattice code, and the acquisition of data to be used for verification of lattice and core analysis codes. The following further studies will be done in future: detailed verification of library E63LIB/A, development of the spectral history effect treatment module, extension of decay chain, development of new homogenization for the MOX fuel assembly. (author). 6 refs., 7 tabs., 2 figs

  7. Research and development of the industrial basic technologies of the next generation, 'composite materials (fine ceramics)'. Evaluation of the first phase research and development; Jisedai sangyo kiban gijutsu kenkyu kaihatsu 'fine ceramics'. Daiikki kenkyu kaihatsu hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1984-03-30

    The results of the first phase research and development project for developing fine ceramics as the basic technologies of the next generation are evaluated. The R and D themes are selected to develop fine ceramics of high strength, corrosion resistance, precision and wear resistance, noting their excellent characteristics. Development of the basic techniques for these materials is of high significance, and highly rated. The efforts in the first-phase R and D project are aimed at development of silicon nitride and silicon carbide for synthesis of the stock materials; explosive forming/treating the stock powders; forming, sintering and processing/joining; evaluation of the characteristics; non-destructive testing methods; designs; and evaluation of the parts, among others, as the elementary techniques for production, evaluation and application of the fine ceramic materials. The technical targets of improving functions have been achieved, or bright prospects have been obtained therefor in development of the techniques for synthesis of the stock materials, forming/sintering and processing/joining. The silica reduction for stock synthesis, basic techniques for molding/sintering, and rheological considerations for the molding/sintering techniques represent the techniques of the next generation, because they break through the limitations of the conventional techniques. (NEDO)

  8. Indian Nuclear Society annual conference-1994 on advanced technologies related to nuclear power: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    The focal theme of the conference is advanced technologies related to nuclear power. Over the past three decades civilian nuclear power plants around the world have accumulated about 6000 reactor years of experience and have performed quite well. Overall safety record has been satisfactory. However, nuclear community is trying to compete with its own record by trying to enhance the safety characteristics of the best operating plant. A safety culture has been established in the nuclear establishments, which is providing impetus to advances in all aspects of nuclear technology all over the world. India has ongoing programmes for the development of advanced reactors and related advanced technologies. Evolution of pressurised heavy water reactors in India, developments made in the design of advanced heavy water reactor and the fast reactor programme, are some of the topics covered in addition to highlighting worldwide developments for the next generation of light water reactors. India is one of the few countries in the world where expertise about complete fuel cycle is available. Developments in the back end of the fuel cycle, use of thorium and plutonium and other related issues are also discussed. Technology control regimes being advocated and adopted by developed nations make it imperative for us to indigenise every equipment and component that goes into a power plant. In view of this, some aspects of manufacturing technologies, inspection techniques and maintenance problems are also covered. Relevant papers are processed separately for INIS. (M.K.V.)

  9. Progress on Concepts for Next-Generation Drop Tower Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könemann, Thorben; Eigenbrod, Christian; Von Kampen, Peter; Laemmerzahl, Claus; Kaczmarczik, Ulrich

    2016-07-01

    The Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM) founded by Prof. Dr.-Ing. Hans J. Rath in 1985 is part of the Department of Production Engineering at the University of Bremen, Germany. ZARM is mainly concentrated on fundamental investigations of gravitational and space-related phenomenas under conditions of weightlessness as well as questions and developments related to technologies for space. At ZARM about 100 scientists, engineers, and administrative staff as well as many students from different departments are employed. Today, ZARM is still one of the largest and most important research center for space sciences and technologies in Europe. With a height of 146 m the Bremen Drop Tower is the predominant facility of ZARM and also the only drop tower of its class in Europe. ZARM's ground-based laboratory offers the opportunity for daily short-term experiments under conditions of high-quality weightlessness at a level of 10-6 g (microgravity), which is one of the best achievable for ground-based flight opportunities. Scientists may choose up to three times a day between a single drop experiment with 4.74 s in simple free fall and an experiment in ZARM's worldwide unique catapult system with 9.3 s in weightlessness. Since the start of operation of the facility in 1990, over 7500 drops or catapult launches of more than 160 different experiment types from various scientific fields like fundamental physics, combustion, fluid dynamics, planetary formation / astrophysics, biology and materials sciences have been accomplished so far. In addition, more and more technology tests have been conducted under microgravity conditions at the Bremen Drop Tower in order to effectively prepare appropriate space missions in advance. In this paper we report on the progress on concepts for next-generation drop tower systems based on the GraviTower idea utilizing a guided electro-magnetic linear drive. Alternative concepts motivated by the scientific demand for higher

  10. AgMIP: Next Generation Models and Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, C.

    2014-12-01

    Next steps in developing next-generation crop models fall into several categories: significant improvements in simulation of important crop processes and responses to stress; extension from simplified crop models to complex cropping systems models; and scaling up from site-based models to landscape, national, continental, and global scales. Crop processes that require major leaps in understanding and simulation in order to narrow uncertainties around how crops will respond to changing atmospheric conditions include genetics; carbon, temperature, water, and nitrogen; ozone; and nutrition. The field of crop modeling has been built on a single crop-by-crop approach. It is now time to create a new paradigm, moving from 'crop' to 'cropping system.' A first step is to set up the simulation technology so that modelers can rapidly incorporate multiple crops within fields, and multiple crops over time. Then the response of these more complex cropping systems can be tested under different sustainable intensification management strategies utilizing the updated simulation environments. Model improvements for diseases, pests, and weeds include developing process-based models for important diseases, frameworks for coupling air-borne diseases to crop models, gathering significantly more data on crop impacts, and enabling the evaluation of pest management strategies. Most smallholder farming in the world involves integrated crop-livestock systems that cannot be represented by crop modeling alone. Thus, next-generation cropping system models need to include key linkages to livestock. Livestock linkages to be incorporated include growth and productivity models for grasslands and rangelands as well as the usual annual crops. There are several approaches for scaling up, including use of gridded models and development of simpler quasi-empirical models for landscape-scale analysis. On the assessment side, AgMIP is leading a community process for coordinated contributions to IPCC AR6

  11. Next generation of global land cover characterization, mapping, and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, C.; Pengra, B.; Long, J.; Loveland, T. R.

    2013-12-01

    Land cover change is increasingly affecting the biophysics, biogeochemistry, and biogeography of the Earth's surface and the atmosphere, with far-reaching consequences to human well-being. However, our scientific understanding of the distribution and dynamics of land cover and land cover change (LCLCC) is limited. Previous global land cover assessments performed using coarse spatial resolution (300 m-1 km) satellite data did not provide enough thematic detail or change information for global change studies and for resource management. High resolution (˜30 m) land cover characterization and monitoring is needed that permits detection of land change at the scale of most human activity and offers the increased flexibility of environmental model parameterization needed for global change studies. However, there are a number of challenges to overcome before producing such data sets including unavailability of consistent global coverage of satellite data, sheer volume of data, unavailability of timely and accurate training and validation data, difficulties in preparing image mosaics, and high performance computing requirements. Integration of remote sensing and information technology is needed for process automation and high-performance computing needs. Recent developments in these areas have created an opportunity for operational high resolution land cover mapping, and monitoring of the world. Here, we report and discuss these advancements and opportunities in producing the next generations of global land cover characterization, mapping, and monitoring at 30-m spatial resolution primarily in the context of United States, Group on Earth Observations Global 30 m land cover initiative (UGLC).

  12. Precise Thermometry for Next Generation LHC Superconducting Magnet Prototypes

    CERN Document Server

    Datskov, V; Bottura, L; Perez, J C; Borgnolutti, F; Jenninger, B; Ryan, P

    2013-01-01

    The next generation of LHC superconducting magnets is very challenging and must operate in harsh conditions: high radiation doses in a range between 10 and 50 MGy, high voltage environment of 1 to 5 kV during the quench, dynamic high magnetic field up to 12 T, dynamic temperature range 1.8 K to 300 K in 0.6 sec. For magnet performance and long term reliability it is important to study dynamic thermal effects, such as the heat flux through the magnet structure, or measuring hot spot in conductors during a magnet quench with high sampling rates above 200 Hz. Available on the market cryogenic temperature sensors comparison is given. An analytical model for special electrically insulating thermal anchor (Kapton pad) with high voltage insulation is described. A set of instrumentation is proposed for fast monitoring of thermal processes during normal operation, quenches and failure situations. This paper presents the technology applicable for mounting temperature sensors on high voltage superconducting (SC) cables....

  13. Coupled Qubits for Next Generation Quantum Annealing: Novel Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samach, Gabriel; Weber, Steven; Hover, David; Rosenberg, Danna; Yoder, Jonilyn; Kim, David; Oliver, William D.; Kerman, Andrew J.

    While the first generation of quantum annealers based on Josephson junction technology have been successfully engineered to represent arrays of spins in the quantum transverse-field Ising model, no circuit architecture to date has succeeded in emulating the more complicated non-stoquastic Hamiltonians of interest for next generation quantum annealing. Here, we present our recent results for tunable ZZ- and XX-coupling between high coherence superconducting flux qubits. We discuss the larger architectures these coupled two-qubit building blocks will enable, as well as comment on the limitations of such architectures. This research was funded by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) and by the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research & Engineering under Air Force Contract No. FA8721-05-C-0002. The views and conclusions contained herein are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies or endorsements, either expressed or implied, of ODNI, IARPA, or the US Government.

  14. Assessing the Genetics Content in the Next Generation Science Standards.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine S Lontok

    Full Text Available Science standards have a long history in the United States and currently form the backbone of efforts to improve primary and secondary education in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM. Although there has been much political controversy over the influence of standards on teacher autonomy and student performance, little light has been shed on how well standards cover science content. We assessed the coverage of genetics content in the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS using a consensus list of American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG core concepts. We also compared the NGSS against state science standards. Our goals were to assess the potential of the new standards to support genetic literacy and to determine if they improve the coverage of genetics concepts relative to state standards. We found that expert reviewers cannot identify ASHG core concepts within the new standards with high reliability, suggesting that the scope of content addressed by the standards may be inconsistently interpreted. Given results that indicate that the disciplinary core ideas (DCIs included in the NGSS documents produced by Achieve, Inc. clarify the content covered by the standards statements themselves, we recommend that the NGSS standards statements always be viewed alongside their supporting disciplinary core ideas. In addition, gaps exist in the coverage of essential genetics concepts, most worryingly concepts dealing with patterns of inheritance, both Mendelian and complex. Finally, state standards vary widely in their coverage of genetics concepts when compared with the NGSS. On average, however, the NGSS support genetic literacy better than extant state standards.

  15. Molecular Characterization of Transgenic Events Using Next Generation Sequencing Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammadov, Jafar; Ye, Liang; Soe, Khaing; Richey, Kimberly; Cruse, James; Zhuang, Meibao; Gao, Zhifang; Evans, Clive; Rounsley, Steve; Kumpatla, Siva P.

    2016-01-01

    Demand for the commercial use of genetically modified (GM) crops has been increasing in light of the projected growth of world population to nine billion by 2050. A prerequisite of paramount importance for regulatory submissions is the rigorous safety assessment of GM crops. One of the components of safety assessment is molecular characterization at DNA level which helps to determine the copy number, integrity and stability of a transgene; characterize the integration site within a host genome; and confirm the absence of vector DNA. Historically, molecular characterization has been carried out using Southern blot analysis coupled with Sanger sequencing. While this is a robust approach to characterize the transgenic crops, it is both time- and resource-consuming. The emergence of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies has provided highly sensitive and cost- and labor-effective alternative for molecular characterization compared to traditional Southern blot analysis. Herein, we have demonstrated the successful application of both whole genome sequencing and target capture sequencing approaches for the characterization of single and stacked transgenic events and compared the results and inferences with traditional method with respect to key criteria required for regulatory submissions. PMID:26908260

  16. Assessing the Genetics Content in the Next Generation Science Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lontok, Katherine S; Zhang, Hubert; Dougherty, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Science standards have a long history in the United States and currently form the backbone of efforts to improve primary and secondary education in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). Although there has been much political controversy over the influence of standards on teacher autonomy and student performance, little light has been shed on how well standards cover science content. We assessed the coverage of genetics content in the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) using a consensus list of American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) core concepts. We also compared the NGSS against state science standards. Our goals were to assess the potential of the new standards to support genetic literacy and to determine if they improve the coverage of genetics concepts relative to state standards. We found that expert reviewers cannot identify ASHG core concepts within the new standards with high reliability, suggesting that the scope of content addressed by the standards may be inconsistently interpreted. Given results that indicate that the disciplinary core ideas (DCIs) included in the NGSS documents produced by Achieve, Inc. clarify the content covered by the standards statements themselves, we recommend that the NGSS standards statements always be viewed alongside their supporting disciplinary core ideas. In addition, gaps exist in the coverage of essential genetics concepts, most worryingly concepts dealing with patterns of inheritance, both Mendelian and complex. Finally, state standards vary widely in their coverage of genetics concepts when compared with the NGSS. On average, however, the NGSS support genetic literacy better than extant state standards.

  17. Next generation tools for genomic data generation, distribution, and visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nix David A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the rapidly falling cost and availability of high throughput sequencing and microarray technologies, the bottleneck for effectively using genomic analysis in the laboratory and clinic is shifting to one of effectively managing, analyzing, and sharing genomic data. Results Here we present three open-source, platform independent, software tools for generating, analyzing, distributing, and visualizing genomic data. These include a next generation sequencing/microarray LIMS and analysis project center (GNomEx; an application for annotating and programmatically distributing genomic data using the community vetted DAS/2 data exchange protocol (GenoPub; and a standalone Java Swing application (GWrap that makes cutting edge command line analysis tools available to those who prefer graphical user interfaces. Both GNomEx and GenoPub use the rich client Flex/Flash web browser interface to interact with Java classes and a relational database on a remote server. Both employ a public-private user-group security model enabling controlled distribution of patient and unpublished data alongside public resources. As such, they function as genomic data repositories that can be accessed manually or programmatically through DAS/2-enabled client applications such as the Integrated Genome Browser. Conclusions These tools have gained wide use in our core facilities, research laboratories and clinics and are freely available for non-profit use. See http://sourceforge.net/projects/gnomex/, http://sourceforge.net/projects/genoviz/, and http://sourceforge.net/projects/useq.

  18. Next generation tools for genomic data generation, distribution, and visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nix, David A; Di Sera, Tonya L; Dalley, Brian K; Milash, Brett A; Cundick, Robert M; Quinn, Kevin S; Courdy, Samir J

    2010-09-09

    With the rapidly falling cost and availability of high throughput sequencing and microarray technologies, the bottleneck for effectively using genomic analysis in the laboratory and clinic is shifting to one of effectively managing, analyzing, and sharing genomic data. Here we present three open-source, platform independent, software tools for generating, analyzing, distributing, and visualizing genomic data. These include a next generation sequencing/microarray LIMS and analysis project center (GNomEx); an application for annotating and programmatically distributing genomic data using the community vetted DAS/2 data exchange protocol (GenoPub); and a standalone Java Swing application (GWrap) that makes cutting edge command line analysis tools available to those who prefer graphical user interfaces. Both GNomEx and GenoPub use the rich client Flex/Flash web browser interface to interact with Java classes and a relational database on a remote server. Both employ a public-private user-group security model enabling controlled distribution of patient and unpublished data alongside public resources. As such, they function as genomic data repositories that can be accessed manually or programmatically through DAS/2-enabled client applications such as the Integrated Genome Browser. These tools have gained wide use in our core facilities, research laboratories and clinics and are freely available for non-profit use. See http://sourceforge.net/projects/gnomex/, http://sourceforge.net/projects/genoviz/, and http://sourceforge.net/projects/useq.

  19. Prospects for Next-Generation Storage Ring Light Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borland, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Storage ring light sources are among the most productive large-scale scientific user facilities in existence, owing to a combination of broad tunability, mature technology, high capacity, remarkable reliability, and high performance. The most commonly-used performance measure is the photon beam brightness, which is proportional to the flux per unit volume in six-dimensional phase space. The brightness is generally maximized by minimizing the transverse phase space area, or emittance, of the electron beam that generates the photons. Since the 1990's, most storage ring light sources have used a variant of the Chasman-Green, or double-bend-achromat (DBA), lattice, which produces transverse emittances of several nanometers. Presently, several light sources are under construction based on more challenging multi-bend-achromat (MBA) concepts, which promise an order of magnitude reduction in the emittance. Somewhat larger reductions are contemplated for upgrades of the largest facilities. This talk briefly surveys the relevant concepts in light source design, then explains both the mechanism and challenge of achieving next-generation emittances. Other factors, such as improved radiation-emitting devices, are also described. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  20. Comparison of DNA Quantification Methods for Next Generation Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Jérôme D; Ludlow, Andrew T; LaRanger, Ryan; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2016-04-06

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) is a powerful tool that depends on loading a precise amount of DNA onto a flowcell. NGS strategies have expanded our ability to investigate genomic phenomena by referencing mutations in cancer and diseases through large-scale genotyping, developing methods to map rare chromatin interactions (4C; 5C and Hi-C) and identifying chromatin features associated with regulatory elements (ChIP-seq, Bis-Seq, ChiA-PET). While many methods are available for DNA library quantification, there is no unambiguous gold standard. Most techniques use PCR to amplify DNA libraries to obtain sufficient quantities for optical density measurement. However, increased PCR cycles can distort the library's heterogeneity and prevent the detection of rare variants. In this analysis, we compared new digital PCR technologies (droplet digital PCR; ddPCR, ddPCR-Tail) with standard methods for the titration of NGS libraries. DdPCR-Tail is comparable to qPCR and fluorometry (QuBit) and allows sensitive quantification by analysis of barcode repartition after sequencing of multiplexed samples. This study provides a direct comparison between quantification methods throughout a complete sequencing experiment and provides the impetus to use ddPCR-based quantification for improvement of NGS quality.