WorldWideScience

Sample records for newspapers helpful how-to

  1. How newspapers began to blog

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Kleis

    2012-01-01

    of technologists (project managers, computer programers, information architects, etc.) that are increasingly integral to how legacy media organizations operate in a new and ever more convergent media environment under circumstances of great economic uncertainty, and discuss the wider implications for how we......In this article, I examine how ‘old’ media organizations develop ‘new’ media technologies by analyzing processes of technological innovation in two Danish newspaper companies that integrated blogs into their websites in very different ways in 2007. Drawing on concepts from science and technology...... studies and sociology and building on previous research on blogging by news media organizations, I analyze how the three different communities involved in the development process – journalists and managers, but also the often-overlooked community of technologists – articulated different versions of what...

  2. Online newspapers as newspapers online - extending the concept of 'newspaper'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkenberg, Vidar

    2007-01-01

    Online newspapers may be easy to identify, but are difficult to define. This paper discusses how to define the online newspaper and proposes a definition that includes online newspapers with or without printed editions. The definition is based on the functions of a newspaper rather than on who th...

  3. How Newspaper Advertising Sales Managers Spend Their Time: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Jerry C.; Saathoff, Roger C.

    A pilot study examined how newspaper advertising sales managers in five southwestern states spend their time during a typical work day. Of the 360 questionnaires mailed, 176 responses were received. The largest number of responses (93) came from retail sales managers of newspapers in markets with less than 50,000 population. The questionnaire…

  4. How do changes in media consumption affect newspaper revenue? : Suggestions on earning more revenue, with a special attention to the Nordic region

    OpenAIRE

    Shahbazi, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is concentrated on the changes in consumer’s newspaper consumption and its impact on newspaper’s revenue in order to find out how printed news can earn more money. This thesis has a special attention on the Nordic region newspaper industry. The aim of this thesis is to explain how changes occurred in news consumption habits of users has impacted on newspaper firms’ revenue in order to find new strategies for newspaper firms for earning more money to remain survived. The research q...

  5. Getting Behind the Newspaper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebraska State Dept. of Education, Lincoln.

    A number of learning center activities designed to help elementary school students learn to read a newspaper intelligently are presented in this guide. Specific activities deal with newspaper vocabulary, using an index, identifying the five "W's" in a news article, editorials, characteristics of various kinds of newspaper cartoons (advertising,…

  6. How One Award-Winning Newspaper Reports the Big Story Responsibly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferentinos, Nick

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the school newspaper of Westlake High School in Austin, Texas, which regularly features "hard" news stories and how, as a result, the students have learned the responsibility and honesty involved in ethical journalism. (SRT)

  7. How Different Newspapers Cover Xingjian Conflicts from Human Right Perspective? A Frame Analysis of 10 Newspapers from Taiwan, Hong Kong, Mainland China, Britain and Unites States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Hwa Chang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Drastic increase of riots has been noted in Xingjian, the far-western Chinese region, in recent years, resulting in international media concerns about its ethnic conflicts, terrorism and human rights abuses. How different newspapers covered those conflict events from the human rights perspective? The paper aims to analyze different news frames of 10 newspapers: 4 major Taiwan newspapers, 2 China’s major newspapers, 2 Hong Kong newspapers, New York Times of US and The Guardian in Britain. Adopting a content analysis of 7 major Xingjian riots coverage during 2013/06 to 2013/12, the research finds out that there are 2 major frames, one is the China official frame, which shows less news sources with one-sided pro-regime position, accusing the protesters, concerning less human rights abuses. While the “critical frame” demonstrates more news sources from different positions, accusing both the regime and the protesters, and covering more human rights abuses.

  8. Oral cancer: exploring the stories in United Kingdom newspaper articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, C M; Johnson, I G; Morgan, M Z

    2016-09-09

    Objective Reports suggest that patients with oral cancer delay seeking help because they are unaware of the symptoms. The majority of adults (95%) engage with news reports and 40% read newspapers. Newspaper oral cancer stories may influence awareness and health-seeking behaviour. The aim of this study was to explore how oral cancer is portrayed in UK newspaper print media.Design Qualitative content analysis of articles from ten newspapers with the widest UK print circulation. All articles using the terms 'mouth cancer' and 'oral cancer' over a three year period were retrieved. Duplicates, non-cancer and non-human articles were excluded.Results 239 articles were analysed. Common topics included 'recent research', 'survivor stories', 'health information' and 'celebrity linkage'. Articles were often emotive, featuring smoking, alcohol, sex and celebrity. Articles lacked a proper evidence base and often failed to provide accurate information about signs and symptoms, information about prevention and signposting to treatment.Conclusions Opportunities to save lives are being missed. Further work to improve social responsibility in the media and develop guidance to enhance the quality of information, health reporting and signposting to help are indicated.

  9. How Managerial Ownership Affects Profit Maximization in Newspaper Firms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busterna, John C.

    1989-01-01

    Explores whether different levels of a manager's ownership of a newspaper affects the manager's profit maximizing attitudes and behavior. Finds that owner-managers tend to place less emphasis on profits than non-owner-controlled newspapers, contrary to economic theory and empirical evidence from other industries. (RS)

  10. Newspapers and Parties: How Advertising Revenues Created an Independent Press

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Petrova

    2009-01-01

    Does economic development promote media freedom? Do higher advertising revenues tend to make media outlets independent of political groups?in?uence? Using data on the 19th century American newspapers, I show that in places with higher advertising revenues, newspapers were more likely to be independent from political parties. Similar results hold when local advertising rates are instrumented by regulations on outdoor advertising and newspaper distribution. I also show that newly created newspa...

  11. June, 2015 Influence of Newspapers in the Development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigates influence of newspaper towards the development of students' reading culture in ... for making decision, creating knowledge and fuelling .... promotion campaign that will help to ..... purchase newspaper that will interest.

  12. Evaluating Lexical Cohesion in Nigerian Newspaper Genres: Focus on the Editorials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubairu Malah

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Applied linguists paying scholarly attention to newspaper genres have often argued that findings emerging from such studies would be of pedagogical significance because most of the newspaper genres share certain conventional features with school genres. Similarly, this study explored lexical cohesion in newspaper editorials, and it is understood that the findings could help learners in handling persuasive writings. The study sought to identify the dominant sources of lexical cohesion in the editorials, and also to examine how lexical cohesion is utilized to achieve coherence in the editorials. Drawing on Systemic Functional Linguistics (SFL, the study applied Eggins’ (2004 model of lexical cohesion and analyzed 30 editorial texts of 20, 354 words drawn from three major Nigerian newspapers: The Guardian, The Nation, and Vanguard. The analysis revealed 2, 685 ties across 849 sentences. The data demonstrated that the major types of lexical cohesion in the editorials include: repetition (49.5%, expectancy relations (15. 8%, class/sub-class (11%, and synonymy (10.8%. It was further revealed that lexical cohesion devices, which formed into chains (586 and isolated ties (837, were utilized in building coherence in the editorial texts. It was finally shown how findings of the study could be beneficial in ESP, EAP, and EGP learning, especially in persuasive writings.

  13. Investigating water resources of the desert: How isotopes can help

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonfiantini, R.

    1992-01-01

    Newspapers and magazines from time to time write about the enormous reserves of water stored underground in the Sahara, whose rational exploitation would allow the agricultural development of the desert. Although the practical implementation of such projects is rather problematic, it is true that groundwater is relatively abundant under most of the Sahara (as well as in other deserts in the world), but it is seldom easily accessible. What do we really know about these resources of groundwater and how they have accumulated in areas where rainfall is so scarce. What do we know of the hydrological history of the desert. These problems are important for the correct evaluation and use of the groundwater in the desert. Isotope techniques help in their solution, and are described in this document. 6 figs

  14. Investigating water resources of the desert: how isotopes can help

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonfiantini, R.

    1981-01-01

    Newspapers and magazines from time to time write about the enormous reserves of water stored underground in the Sahara, whose rational exploitation would allow the agricultural development of the desert. Although the practical implementation of such projects is rather problematic, it is true that groundwater is relatively abundant under most of the Sahara (as well as in other deserts in the world), but it is seldom easily accessible. What do we really know about these resources of groundwater and how they have accumulated in areas where rainfall is so scarce. What do we know of the hydrological history of the desert. These problems are important for the correct evaluation and use of the groundwater in the desert. Isotope techniques help in their solution, and are described in this document

  15. How Do National Newspapers Report on Sex and Relationship Education in England?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simey, Piers; Wellings, Kaye

    2008-01-01

    Issues relating to the sexual behaviour and sexual health of young people consistently capture newspaper headlines in the UK. The present paper provides a qualitative analysis of national newspaper articles reporting on sex and relationship education (SRE) within the context of teenage pregnancy. Overall, conservative newspapers were generally…

  16. Newspaper Construction of a Moral Farmer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisner, Ann

    2003-01-01

    This study examines how six national newspapers balanced supporting agriculture (a morally good occupation) with supporting environmentalism (nature as a moral value), in an area in which agricultural and environmental interests conflict--farm use of pesticides. The study showed that, contrary to expectations, newspapers supported social change…

  17. Homelessness coverage, social reality, and media ownership: Comparing a national newspaper with two regional newspapers in Canada

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Mao (Yuping); M.S. Richter (Solina); K. Kovacs Burns (Kathy); J. Chaw-Kant (Jean)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe media plays an important role in the discourse of homelessness. The purpose of this study was to compare how two Alberta newspapers (Calgary Herald and Edmonton Journal) and one national newspaper(the Globe and Mail) covered homeless issues in terms of population, main themes,

  18. Articulated System to Analyse Digital Media (ASADM: a proposal about what and how to study online newspapers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís Codina

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Throughout this article, we are presenting a proposal to conduct digital media studies as one of the first deliverables of an ongoing research project. This proposal, which we are calling “Articulated System to Analyse Digital Media” (ASADM: consists of a set of concepts presented through specific terminology, and of a group of articulated elements allowing to determine what we call the what (parameters and how (indicators of any future study regarding online newspapers or digital media. Thus, we obtain an operative analysis protocol as a deliverable. In between, we characterize the typical context of the sort of studies that constitute the context for our proposal.

  19. Frame And Blame An Analysis Of How Local Newspaper Framed The Conflict Between Confentional And Technological Application-Based Transportation In Medan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deka Harwinta Zianur

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The title of the research was Frame and Blame An Analysis of How Local Newspapers Framed the Conflict Between Conventional and Technological Application-Based Transportation Service in Medan. Waspada Daily Newspaper as local newspapers more frequently put a human face on the issue while national papers more frequently framed it a moral wrong. The objective of the research was to find out how the newspaper constructs the news about this conflict and how it explains the conflict as part of its social responsibility in its news product. The research used qualitative method with paradigm constructivism which considers the subject Waspada Daily News as the central factor in the communicative activity and social relationsand as the function of control toward social facts which occur in society the conflict between motor pedicab drivers and go-jek riders. Framing analysis is a descriptive textual analysis of media used to find out how news is understood and framed by media. The research used Gamson and Modegliani framing model analysis based on constructivism approach in order to find out the representation of media. The theory of Berger and Luckman Reality Construction was used to explain social reality constructed through the process of externalization objectivity and internalization. The result of the research showed that 1 Waspada Daily Newspaper prioritized the conflict because the conflict was the effect of the lack of income of motor pedicab driver and also because there was no regulation on the transportationoperation of Go-Jek online 2 Waspada Daily News exposed the conflict in the front page in four days consecutively which indicated that there were attention and seriousness of moral evaluations.

  20. Who? Me? Sponsor the School Newspaper? First Steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Beverly

    Given the assignment of school newspaper adviser, an English teacher should consider the desired content and focus of the newspaper. Policy, philosophy, and procedure can be developed by the adviser with the help of the staff. To motivate student participation in the production of the paper, the editors and entire staff need to develop a sense of…

  1. 15 CFR 730.8 - How to proceed and where to get help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false How to proceed and where to get help... INFORMATION § 730.8 How to proceed and where to get help. (a) How the EAR are organized. The Export... effective enforcement. (c) Where to get help. Throughout the EAR you will find information on offices you...

  2. How did policy actors use mass media to influence the Scottish alcohol minimum unit pricing debate? Comparative analysis of newspapers, evidence submissions and interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Shona

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To explore how policy actors attempted to deliberately frame public debate around alcohol minimum unit pricing (MUP) in the UK by comparing and contrasting their constructions of the policy in public (newspapers), semi-public (evidence submissions) and private (interviews). Methods: Content analysis was conducted on articles published in ten national newspapers between 1 January 2005 and 30 June 2012. Newsprint data were contrasted with alcohol policy documents, evidence submissions to the Scottish Parliament's Health and Sport Committee and 36 confidential interviews with policy stakeholders (academics, advocates, industry representatives, politicians and civil servants). Findings: A range of policy actors exerted influence both directly (through Parliamentary institutions and political representatives) and indirectly through the mass media. Policy actors were acutely aware of mass media's importance in shaping public opinion and used it tactically to influence policy. They often framed messages in subtly different ways, depending on target audiences. In general, newspapers presented the policy debate in a “balanced” way, but this arguably over-represented hostile perspective and suggested greater disagreement around the evidence base than is the case. Conclusions: The roles of policy actors vary between public and policy spheres, and how messages are communicated in policy debates depends on perceived strategic advantage. PMID:26045639

  3. How big data analytics affect decision-making : A study of the newspaper industry

    OpenAIRE

    Björkman, Filip; Franco, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Big data analytics is a topic that is surrounded by a lot of enthusiasm and hype among both researchers and practitioners and is quickly being applied in different industries. The purpose of the thesis is to investigate the emerging technology of big data analytics and how it affects decision-making. In order to investigate this, we conducted empirical research in the newspaper industry, which is an industry that is going through a crisis with decreasing revenues, old business models collapsi...

  4. The evolution of a media image: newspaper attention to the Flemish far right 1987-2004

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schafraad, P.; d'Haenens, L.; Scheepers, P.; Wester, F.

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates changes in attention to the far right in Flemish newspapers. Not only the volume of attention will be analysed but especially how newspapers pay attention to the far right, focusing on the portrayal of far-right actors (substantial attention), and on favourable and

  5. The Business Values of American Newspapers: The Nineteenth-Century Watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nord, David Paul

    The rejection of the "Great Forces" and "Great Man" theories of newspaper history allows a middle-range view that seeks to discover the uniqueness of the newspaper business and to explain how that uniqueness shaped the business values of the editors and proprietors. An examination of three Chicago, Illinois, newspapers--the…

  6. The American Newspaper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Will

    This book presents a series of fifteen articles, written in 1911 by the journalist Will Irwin, that discuss the origins, purposes, and principles of newspaper journalism. The articles first appeared in "Collier's" magazine and have been reprinted to give journalism students a better understanding of how twentieth-century newspapers…

  7. Constructing identities in the media: newspaper coverage analysis of a major UK Clostridium difficile outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Emma; Johnston, Bridget; Corlett, Joanne; Kearney, Nora

    2014-07-01

    To examine how a major Clostridium difficile outbreak in the UK was represented in the media. Clostridium difficile is a serious health care-associated infection with significant global prevalence. As major outbreaks have continued to occur worldwide over the last few decades, it has also resulted in increasing media coverage. Newspaper journalists are, however, frequently criticized for sensationalized and inaccurate reporting and alarming the public. Despite such criticisms, nothing is known about how the media frame Clostridium difficile related coverage. Qualitative interpretive descriptive study. An interpretive analysis of newspaper articles from the national press that reported about the outbreak from the first day of coverage over 3 weeks (12 June-3 July 2008). Twenty-eight newspaper articles were included in the study from tabloids, broadsheets, a regional and a Sunday newspaper. Monster and war metaphors were frequently adopted to portray the severity of Clostridium difficile and the impact it can have on patient safety. In addition, the positioning of the affected patients, their families, healthcare professionals and the Government produced representations of victims, villains and heroes. This subsequently evoked notions of vulnerability, blame and conflict. The media are and will remain critical convectors of public information and, as such, are hugely influential in risk perceptions and responses. Rather than simply dismissing media coverage, further understanding around how such stories in specific contexts are constructed and represented is needed so that it can help inform future communication and management strategies. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Newspaper media reporting of motor vehicle crashes in Singapore: an opportunity lost for injury prevention education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Kenneth W J; Vasu, Alicia

    2010-06-01

    Newspaper media advocacy can help steer public attention away from motor vehicle crash (MVC) injuries as a personal problem to that of a social and public health issue. If used properly, newspaper media is potentially a powerful mass educator on MVC prevention. However, there is often a conflict of interest in which newspapers, in an attempt to boost readership and revenue, may over-emphasize and sensationalize the human-interest aspect of an MVC story. The aim of this study is to examine newspaper articles of MVCs in Singapore to assess how our newspaper media coverage portray MVCs and identify factors that mitigate injury and educate the public on injury prevention measures. Details of the MVC were extracted from 12 months of newspaper coverage in Singapore. Two independent coders were used to establish inter-rater reliability. From 1 January to 31 December 2007, 201 articles about MVCs were published. About 74.1% of articles assigned blame to a particular road user, negligence on either road user was implied in 56.7% of articles, and road safety messages were mentioned in 8% of the articles. The mainstream communication tone used was positive for law enforcement (71.1%) and neutral towards injury prevention or road safety messages (89.1%). Newspaper media reporting of MVCs in Singapore generally does not include injury prevention messages or highlight injury-mitigating measures. This is a lost opportunity for public education. Collaboration between public health practitioners and newspaper media is required to address this issue.

  9. How Readers and Advertisers Benefit from Local Newspaper Competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Shu-Ling Chen; Everett, Stephen E.

    1989-01-01

    Explores relations among three competitive schemes with respect to newspapers' price structures, including advertising rates and prices to consumers. Finds that readers get some benefit from greater competition, but that advertisers do not. (MM)

  10. Category dynamics and cluster spanning during the emergence of the Lebanese newspaper industry (1851-1879).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozahem, Najib A

    2018-03-01

    Recently, researchers have started to pay more attention to a usually ignored topic: audience perceptions. Legitimacy, for example, is no longer modeled as the number of organizations in a population. It is now thought to be dependent on how audience members perceive these organizations. This paper will study how the newspaper industry in Lebanon emerged. The paper studies the period 1851-1879, building on the theoretic formulation of Hannan et al. (2007). The concept of cluster formation will also be introduced in order to help answer the question of whether unified identity projection is a necessary condition for successful legitimation and emergence. So far, research has produced diverging results as to the necessary conditions for successful legitimation. Cluster Analysis is used to show that in the case of the Lebanese newspaper industry, successful emergence was attained without the need to project a unified identity. In fact, the analysis clearly shows that there were two separate groups of clusters that had emerged by the end of the period. The nature of these two clusters will be investigated by looking at the category spanning activities of the newspapers that were members of the clusters.

  11. What is happening with our printed newspapers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jevtović Zoran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The changes that have occurred in the first decade of this century have dramatically shook the media, especially printed newspapers. Based on the comparative studies on media system in wealthy, developing countries and southern European countries, we came to conclusion that the internet is not the main cause of the newspaper industry collapse, at the time of the increased use of the internet and the decline of newspaper circulation. Internet is and will always be the important factor, but this is the crisis that has hit the media the most, especially the advertising the newspapers depended on. Although internet did not kill printed newspapers, some sites destroyed profitable category of advertising in newspapers, which evolved along with them. In such circumstances, printed newspapers, if tailored to measure the audience, can still play an important role in society. Journalism remains the basis of the media, as the largest source of information, and newspapers content, in new circumstances, is not used for news, but for reflection and background. All this indicates that we now have the domination of mixed media use, the coexistence of old and new, because wherever they are, new media always complement the old media, rather than change them. Most of the news that is shared on-line is manufactured in traditional media organizations, and newspapers and television produce more news and reach larger audience than any other media organization. That is how the new time has imposed the new modified business model that combines print and digital edition, sales and advertising and is based on loyal audience.

  12. An Analysis of Reader-Interest and Readership of the Advertising Content of a Small Daily Newspaper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Ernest F.; And Others

    The study reported in this paper was designed to determine how consumers perceive the newspaper and how they use it; specifically, how well read is newspaper advertising and how do readers of a small daily newspaper feel about advertising content. A team of trained, paid interviewers collected data in two waves, one week apart, from a random…

  13. Facts about Newspapers '86: A Statistical Summary of the Newspaper Business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Newspaper Publishers Association, Washington, DC.

    Attesting to the continuing economic strength and institutional vitality of the newspaper business in 1985, this booklet presents a statistical summary of the industry in the United States and Canada. The statistics cover a wide range of topics, including (1) number of daily newspapers, (2) daily newspaper circulation, (3) daily newspapers by…

  14. Local newspaper movie contests and the creation of the first movie fans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Leonora Whitehead

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the advent of local newspaper movie contests in the 1910s and how these contests helped to create active movie fans. Such contests increased the popularity of the new medium of film by engaging local audiences in the process of filmmaking, including fans as scriptwriters and even stars. They helped to transform film into a dominant cultural practice by creating local spaces for film patrons to become part of the national pastime of going to the show. They did so by appealing directly to female spectators, who both legitimized going to the movies and created dynamic film fan communities.

  15. Book advertisements in Osijek’s 19th century newspapers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Krtalić

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the promotion of books through advertising in the newspapers published in Osijek in the second half of the 19th century. From late 18th century and in the course of the 19th century’s intense developments in the publishing of newspapers and journals, advertising in this medium was one of the ways to promote books. Booksellers and publishers advertised books in newspaper ads, relying on the fact that newspapers had become a common and omnipresent medium for disseminating information. Book advertisements were evidence of the position of books in relation to other aspects of culture and society, of the approach to their promotion and, finally, of the importance of book promotion. In order to investigate how and how much book ads were present, and how Croatian books were promoted and reached the readership, the paper analyses daily and monthly publications, such as Esseker allgemeine illustrierte Zeitung from 1869, Die Drau from 1968 to 1877, and Branislav from 1878. Among the eleven different papers published in the second half of the 19th century in Osijek, these were selected for their content, as they were the first illustrated newspapers (Esseker allgemeine illustrierte Zeitung. The investigation focused on the influence of the newly emerged illustrated press and on the influence of the newspapers published in Croatian language (Branislav, as a possible tool for spreading and promotion of Croatian books. Another focus was on the influence of continued publication and on the growth of a steady readership (Die Drau. The papers were analysed with the aim to locate book advertisements which were then subjected to content analysis. Also provided is a brief overview of the book production and publication in Croatia and in Osijek at the time, and an overview of the emergence of newspapers in Osijek with a brief account of the titles selected for study in order to gain an insight into the context in which book ads appeared. It

  16. Desktop Technology for Newspapers: Use of the Computer Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Howard Alan

    This work considers desktop publishing technology as a way used to paginate newspapers electronically, tracing the technology's development from the beginning of desktop publishing in the mid-1980s to the 1990s. The work emphasizes how desktop publishing technology is and can be used by weekly newspapers. It reports on a Pennsylvania weekly…

  17. Media business transformation based on information technology : A pilot study of three Swedish newspapers

    OpenAIRE

    Sadat Alavioon, Samin

    2017-01-01

    The newspaper industry has been transformed after the emergence of information technology. According to the transformation of media businesses by technology advancement this study realizes the importance of opportunities and threats brought by new information technology in the newspaper industry. Therefore, to develop an understanding of how the newspaper industry can transform due to technology advancement three research questions were answered; RQ 1. How can information technologies transfo...

  18. Facts about Newspapers '85: A Statistical Summary of the Newspaper Business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Newspaper Publishers Association, Washington, DC.

    A statistical summary of the newspaper industry for 1984 and previous years is presented in this brochure. Focusing primarily on the United States newspaper industry, the brochure also contains some information on Canadian newspapers. The brochure presents statistics in the following categories: (1) number of daily newspapers, (2) daily newspaper…

  19. Media response to colon cancer campaigns in Switzerland 2005-2007: regional newspapers are the most reliable among the printed media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borisch Bettina

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health campaigns are frequently covered by printed media, but coverage is not homogeneous across different types of newspapers. Switzerland as a multilinguistic country with many newspapers offers a good field for study. A better understanding of how printed media report on national campaigns against colon cancer in the three main linguistic regions may help to improve future public health interventions. Therefore, we analyzed articles published between 2005 and 2007 during the campaigns "Darmkrebs-nie?" and "Self-Care" in the German, French and Italian regions of Switzerland. Findings Some 65% of articles reporting on colon cancer were in German, 23% and 12% were in French and Italian respectively. During the campaign, topics linked to colon cancer were increasingly covered by the media. Regional newspapers (66% reported significantly more about colon cancer and produced the most detailed articles. Both gain- and loss-framed messages have been used by journalists, whereas the campaigns used merely gain-framed messages. Latin (French and Italian newspapers mixed gain- and loss-framed messages in the same articles, while German articles mainly used a single frame throughout. Conclusions Swiss-German papers reported more about the topic and the reporting was quantitatively and qualitatively more prominent in regional papers. The press followed the campaigns closely only during the period of campaigning, with high coverage. We propose to consider the regional press as an important vehicle of health information. Moreover, slight differences in framing can be observed between German and Latin articles.

  20. Filtering the “News” : Uncovering Morphine's Multiple Meanings on Delpher’s Dutch Newspapers and the Need to Distinguish More Article Types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walma, L.W.B.

    2015-01-01

    The current categorization of digitized newspaper archives prevents optimal use of the range of newspaper article types. Drawing examples from close reading research into the reputation of morphine in Dutch newspapers from 1880-1914, this article discusses how further specifying the article types

  1. How Managing Editors View and Deal with Newspaper Ethical Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Douglas

    1987-01-01

    Claims there is awareness and concern about journalism ethics among daily newspaper managing editors. Asserts that although ethical issues are being addressed to some degree, greater efforts could be made to see that reporters and editors are apprised of codes of ethics. (MM)

  2. Twitter as a news source : How Dutch and British newspapers used tweets in their news coverage, 2007–2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broersma, M.J.; Graham, T.S.

    2013-01-01

    Twitter has become a convenient, cheap and effective beat for journalists in search of news and information. Reporters today increasingly aggregate information online and embed it in journalism discourse. In this paper, we analyse how tweets have increasingly been included as quotes in newspaper

  3. Yesterday's dinner, tomorrow's weather, today's news? US newspaper coverage of food system contributions to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Roni A; Chan, Iris L; Smith, Katherine Clegg

    2009-07-01

    There is strong evidence that what we eat and how it is produced affects climate change. The present paper examines coverage of food system contributions to climate change in top US newspapers. Using a sample of sixteen leading US newspapers from September 2005 to January 2008, two coders identified 'food and climate change' and 'climate change' articles based on specified criteria. Analyses examined variation across time and newspaper, the level of content relevant to food systems' contributions to climate change, and how such content was framed. There were 4582 'climate change' articles in these newspapers during this period. Of these, 2.4% mentioned food or agriculture contributions, with 0.4% coded as substantially focused on the issue and 0.5% mentioning food animal contributions. The level of content on food contributions to climate change increased across time. Articles initially addressed the issue primarily in individual terms, expanding to address business and government responsibility more in later articles. US newspaper coverage of food systems' effects on climate change during the study period increased, but still did not reflect the increasingly solid evidence of the importance of these effects. Increased coverage may lead to responses by individuals, industry and government. Based on co-benefits with nutritional public health messages and climate change's food security threats, the public health nutrition community has an important role to play in elaborating and disseminating information about food and climate change for the US media.

  4. How to Help a Person with a Serious Burn Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How To Help A Person With A Serious Burn Injury Wellness For Parents Professionals Caregivers Printable Version ... volunteer to help out! Kathy Edwards is a burn survivor and professor in the Department of Communication ...

  5. Category dynamics and cluster spanning during the emergence of the Lebanese newspaper industry (1851–1879

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najib A. Mozahem

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, researchers have started to pay more attention to a usually ignored topic: audience perceptions. Legitimacy, for example, is no longer modeled as the number of organizations in a population. It is now thought to be dependent on how audience members perceive these organizations. This paper will study how the newspaper industry in Lebanon emerged. The paper studies the period 1851–1879, building on the theoretic formulation of Hannan et al. (2007. The concept of cluster formation will also be introduced in order to help answer the question of whether unified identity projection is a necessary condition for successful legitimation and emergence. So far, research has produced diverging results as to the necessary conditions for successful legitimation. Cluster Analysis is used to show that in the case of the Lebanese newspaper industry, successful emergence was attained without the need to project a unified identity. In fact, the analysis clearly shows that there were two separate groups of clusters that had emerged by the end of the period. The nature of these two clusters will be investigated by looking at the category spanning activities of the newspapers that were members of the clusters. Keywords: TBC, Business, Industry, Information science

  6. Discontinuities in business model innovation of the Danish newspaper industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anna B.

    Within this study, I have analysed emerging business models in the newspaper industry at large, including the role ongoing technological developments play (from paper-based towards digital platforms), and the key activities, which the newspapers undertake in redefining their core business model....... More specifically, I discuss how changes introduced during the on-going development of new content delivery channels have affected the traditional business model based on one delivery channel, i.e. printed newspaper....

  7. Making a small country count: nanotechnology in Danish newspapers from 1996 to 2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Rikke Schmidt

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the results of a content study of how nanotechnology has been framed in Danish national newspapers by taking a random sample of 250 articles published between 1996 and 2006 from a population of 1,062 articles. The articles were analyzed for "dominant frame" and "dominant tone......" with respect to risks and benefits of nanotechnology. The findings demonstrate a remarkable positive tone in the articles with a ratio of ten to one in favor of "benefits outweigh risks" versus "risks outweigh benefits." Using data from this content study the author analyzes patterns of newspaper attention...

  8. Sales Forecasting System for Newspaper Distribution Companies in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gencay İncesu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE st1\\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} Newspapers are like goods with a shelf life of one day and they have to be distributed daily basis to the sales points. A problem that most newspaper companies encounter daily is how to predict the right number of newspapers to print and distribute among distinct sales points. The aim is to predict newspaper demand as accurately as possible to meet customer need with minimum number of returns, missed sales and oversupply. This makes it necessary to develop a short-term forecasting system. The data taken from one of the largest distribution companies in Turkey is time dependent. Therefore, time series analysis is used to forecast newspaper circulation. In this paper, the newspaper sales system is examined for Turkey. Various types of forecasting techniques which are applicable to newspaper circulation planning are compared and a nonlinear approach for returns is applied.

  9. Facts about Newspapers '87: A Statistical Summary of the Newspaper Business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Newspaper Publishers Association, Washington, DC.

    Attesting to the continuing economic strength and institutional vitality of the newspaper business in 1987, this booklet presents a statistical summary of the industry in the United States and Canada. The statistics cover a wide range of topics, including (1) number of daily newspapers; (2) daily newspaper circulation; (3) single copy sales price;…

  10. How To Run a Successful Community Newspaper and Bring It into the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Jay

    1999-01-01

    Provides advice and guidelines for running a successful community newspaper. Sixteen criteria of a good local paper include reporting on all civic activities, keeping tabs on where tax dollars go, getting out to listen to community members, encouraging community dialogue, celebrating achievements, explaining the meaning of local happenings,…

  11. Public discourse on mental health and psychiatry: Representations in Swedish newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsson, Robert

    2018-05-01

    Mass media plays a central role in shaping public discourse on health and illness. In order to examine media representations of mental health and expert knowledge in this field, two major Swedish daily newspapers from the year 2009 were qualitatively analysed. Drawing on the theory of social representations, the analysis focused on how issues concerning mental health and different perspectives are represented. The results show how the concept of mental illness is used in different and often taken-for-granted ways and how the distinction between normal and pathological is a central underlying question. Laypersons' perspectives are supplemented by views of professionals in the newspapers, where signs of confidence and dependence on expert knowledge are juxtaposed with critique and expressions of distrust. The newspaper discourse thus has salient argumentative features and the way that conflicts are made explicit and issues concerning authoritative knowledge are addressed indicates ambivalence towards the authoritative role of expert knowledge concerning mental health. In this way, the newspapers provide a complex epistemic context for everyday sense-making that can be assumed to have implications for relations between laypersons and professionals in the field of mental health.

  12. Representation of Tinnitus in the US Newspaper Media and in Facebook Pages: Cross-Sectional Analysis of Secondary Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchaiah, Vinaya; Ratinaud, Pierre; Andersson, Gerhard

    2018-05-08

    When people with health conditions begin to manage their health issues, one important issue that emerges is the question as to what exactly do they do with the information that they have obtained through various sources (eg, news media, social media, health professionals, friends, and family). The information they gather helps form their opinions and, to some degree, influences their attitudes toward managing their condition. This study aimed to understand how tinnitus is represented in the US newspaper media and in Facebook pages (ie, social media) using text pattern analysis. This was a cross-sectional study based upon secondary analyses of publicly available data. The 2 datasets (ie, text corpuses) analyzed in this study were generated from US newspaper media during 1980-2017 (downloaded from the database US Major Dailies by ProQuest) and Facebook pages during 2010-2016. The text corpuses were analyzed using the Iramuteq software using cluster analysis and chi-square tests. The newspaper dataset had 432 articles. The cluster analysis resulted in 5 clusters, which were named as follows: (1) brain stimulation (26.2%), (2) symptoms (13.5%), (3) coping (19.8%), (4) social support (24.2%), and (5) treatment innovation (16.4%). A time series analysis of clusters indicated a change in the pattern of information presented in newspaper media during 1980-2017 (eg, more emphasis on cluster 5, focusing on treatment inventions). The Facebook dataset had 1569 texts. The cluster analysis resulted in 7 clusters, which were named as: (1) diagnosis (21.9%), (2) cause (4.1%), (3) research and development (13.6%), (4) social support (18.8%), (5) challenges (11.1%), (6) symptoms (21.4%), and (7) coping (9.2%). A time series analysis of clusters indicated no change in information presented in Facebook pages on tinnitus during 2011-2016. The study highlights the specific aspects about tinnitus that the US newspaper media and Facebook pages focus on, as well as how these aspects change

  13. Representation of Tinnitus in the US Newspaper Media and in Facebook Pages: Cross-Sectional Analysis of Secondary Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratinaud, Pierre; Andersson, Gerhard

    2018-01-01

    Background When people with health conditions begin to manage their health issues, one important issue that emerges is the question as to what exactly do they do with the information that they have obtained through various sources (eg, news media, social media, health professionals, friends, and family). The information they gather helps form their opinions and, to some degree, influences their attitudes toward managing their condition. Objective This study aimed to understand how tinnitus is represented in the US newspaper media and in Facebook pages (ie, social media) using text pattern analysis. Methods This was a cross-sectional study based upon secondary analyses of publicly available data. The 2 datasets (ie, text corpuses) analyzed in this study were generated from US newspaper media during 1980-2017 (downloaded from the database US Major Dailies by ProQuest) and Facebook pages during 2010-2016. The text corpuses were analyzed using the Iramuteq software using cluster analysis and chi-square tests. Results The newspaper dataset had 432 articles. The cluster analysis resulted in 5 clusters, which were named as follows: (1) brain stimulation (26.2%), (2) symptoms (13.5%), (3) coping (19.8%), (4) social support (24.2%), and (5) treatment innovation (16.4%). A time series analysis of clusters indicated a change in the pattern of information presented in newspaper media during 1980-2017 (eg, more emphasis on cluster 5, focusing on treatment inventions). The Facebook dataset had 1569 texts. The cluster analysis resulted in 7 clusters, which were named as: (1) diagnosis (21.9%), (2) cause (4.1%), (3) research and development (13.6%), (4) social support (18.8%), (5) challenges (11.1%), (6) symptoms (21.4%), and (7) coping (9.2%). A time series analysis of clusters indicated no change in information presented in Facebook pages on tinnitus during 2011-2016. Conclusions The study highlights the specific aspects about tinnitus that the US newspaper media and Facebook

  14. Analyzing the presentation and the stigma of schizophrenia in French newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampropoulos, Dimitrios; Wolman, Angelika; Apostolidis, Thémis

    2017-12-01

    It has been suggested that the stigmatizing presentation of people with schizophrenia by newspapers is an example of structural stigma. In this study, we explore how French newspapers contribute to the stigma of people with schizophrenia. All the articles of eight major newspapers (four national and four regional) that include the term schizophr* and that were published in 2015 were therefore analyzed using a coding scheme that we developed inductively. This analysis showed that among the identified themes, 40.4% of the articles used the term schizophrenia metaphorically and 28.3% referred to dangerousness. The first concerned mostly national newspapers, while the second were mostly published by regional newspapers. A more selective analysis was also carried out on these major themes in order to investigate how the "us" against "them" distinction is created and how negative stereotypes are associated with this distinction. In the case of the metaphorical use of the term, schizophrenia was presented as a "split personality" disorder and the label used in order to devalue the political opposition. Schizophrenia was presented either as a deterministic cause of dangerousness or as a potential cause of crime. In either case, the question of control was clearly present in these articles. These results are discussed in terms of the "us" against "them" distinction as a double process of stigmatization of people with schizophrenia and of reinforcement of one's own identity and security.

  15. Newspapers and Magazines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chandra, Ambarish; Kaiser, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    the research on advertising in print media, particularly the question of whether readers value print advertising as a good or a bad thing. We summarize the research on antitrust-related issues in newspaper markets, including mergers, joint operating agreements, and vertical price restrictions. We then review......We review the Economics literature on newspapers and magazines. Our emphasis is on the newspaper industry, especially in the United States, given that this has been the focus of existing research. We first discuss the structure of print media markets, describing the rise in the number of daily...... newspapers during the early twentieth century and then the steady decline since the 1940s. We discuss print media in the context of two-sided markets, noting that empirical papers on the newspaper industry were some of the earliest studies to use the techniques of two-sided market estimation. We then review...

  16. Newspaper coverage of mental illness in England 2008-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornicroft, Amalia; Goulden, Robert; Shefer, Guy; Rhydderch, Danielle; Rose, Diana; Williams, Paul; Thornicroft, Graham; Henderson, Claire

    2013-04-01

    Better newspaper coverage of mental health-related issues is a target for the Time to Change (TTC) anti-stigma programme in England, whose population impact may be influenced by how far concurrent media coverage perpetuates stigma and discrimination. To compare English newspaper coverage of mental health-related topics each year of the TTC social marketing campaign (2009-2011) with baseline coverage in 2008. Content analysis was performed on articles in 27 local and national newspapers on two randomly chosen days each month. There was a significant increase in the proportion of anti-stigmatising articles between 2008 and 2011. There was no concomitant proportional decrease in stigmatising articles, and the contribution of mixed or neutral elements decreased. These findings provide promising results on improvements in press reporting of mental illness during the TTC programme in 2009-2011, and a basis for guidance to newspaper journalists and editors on reporting mental illness.

  17. Reading the Newspaper as a Social Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, Avner; Schmidt, Sander

    2006-01-01

    In today's culture, some of the most commonly shared experiences involve the mass media. The media--film, television, radio, newspapers, magazines, music, advertising, and software industries--have become primary avenues through which most come to know about the world, both near and far. They help frame the world, elevating certain issues, and the…

  18. The impact of newspaper advertising on a regional antenatal health campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, J M

    1984-01-01

    In 1981 the West Midlands Health services undertook a publicity campaign aimed at helping women to understand more about keeping healthy during pregnancy and encouraging them to seek early ante-natal care. A series of full page advertisements on ante-natal care were placed in local newspapers in the Region. Set out here are the findings of two studies of the impact of the publicity campaign. The first shows how far people's knowledge of what to do during pregnancy was altered by the publicity, and the second shows what people thought of the advertisements themselves and the further information sent to them on request.

  19. From print to web to e-paper: the challenge of designing the e-newspaper

    OpenAIRE

    C. Ihlström; M.Å. kesson; S. Nodqvist

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents future scenarios of use and design of the e-newspaper, i.e. the newspaper on epaper. These scenarios are based on experiences from prototyping e-newspaper interfaces and from a survey with newspaper designers and management. The findings show e.g. that the design from the printed edition and the functionality of the online newspaper were considered preferable attributes for the e-newspaper, and that mobility, interactivity, adjustment for special target groups and personal...

  20. ASK: The Advertising Survival Kit; A Guide to Advertising in High School Newspapers and Yearbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lain, Laurence B.

    The primary purpose of this booklet is to offer suggestions which will help alleviate some of the burdens involved in producing a school's publications, so that journalistic endeavors will not be damaged by economic difficulties. The first section discusses newspaper advertising and examines such topics as selling advertisements, sales approaches,…

  1. News media coverage of a women's health contraversy: how newspapers and TV outlets covered a recent debate over screening mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Whitney Randolph; Mebane, Felicia; Viswanath, K; Solomon, Janice

    2005-01-01

    Over the past decade, there have been several highly visible debates about mammography that have captured professional, public and media attention. This paper looks at newspaper and television news coverage of a controversial research letter in The Lancet by Gøtzsche and Olsen (2001) that concluded that screening mammography did not prevent deaths from breast cancer. The news pieces examined for this project were published between October 2001 and March 2002 in one of eight U.S. newspapers or aired on one of six national or cable news networks. The six-month period was divided into one-week segments; the numbers of articles published or stories aired in each week were graphed to examine patterns. Each newspaper article and television transcript was then reviewed to identify its main content area and the amount of coverage for each major event was quantified. The highest number of newspaper articles appeared to result from several events during the end of January through the beginning of February. These events included the publication of another meta-analysis of mammography that disputed the original letter's conclusion and a full-page New York Times advertisement paid for by major medical organizations stating their continued support for mammography. The greatest amount of television news coverage was devoted to the announcement of the official federal guidelines by the Secretary of Health and Human Services in late February. We conclude by discussing how the flow of news coverage of medical controversies can potentially impact the actions and reactions of the public, the medical community and health policy makers.

  2. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 247 - Funded Newspapers and Magazines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... Funded publications shall not carry commercial advertising. As a service, the Funded newspaper may carry... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Funded Newspapers and Magazines A Appendix A to... (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NEWSPAPERS, MAGAZINES AND CIVILIAN ENTERPRISE PUBLICATIONS Pt...

  3. Daily Press Headers as a Reinforcement to Brand Identity in Spanish Sport Newspapers both Print and Online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén PUEBLA MARTÍNEZ

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Press headers are to daily newspapers the same as brands are to products. Because a newspaper is an object itself which also participates in a double designing process: from information and from product design; and in both cases this serves the same purpose, that the reader feels attracted and comes back for more every day. On that trip, which takes place either to the newsstand or to the computer, to become visible and unique is of paramount importance and the header is the element that best identifies not only the publication but also the tone of the language that the reader expects to find in it. This study intends to dive into the Spanish sport daily press headers, both print and digital, to establish how newspapers achieve their pretended brand identity.

  4. Newspaper: What's in It for Me? Your Complete Guide to Newspaper Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattman, Ray, Ed.; And Others

    Intended to inform young people about the wealth of career opportunities in the newspaper business, this magazine-style booklet, profusely illustrated with color photographs and graphics, discusses 10 career areas (advertising, art and design, business, circulation, human resources, marketing/promotion, news/editorial, news graphics and…

  5. Students Losing Interest? How to Help them Adapt to Changes in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, Gay

    1999-01-01

    Discusses how reform affects students and how teachers can help them adapt to change. After explaining the principles of change and how they affect students, the paper examines the stages of change (comfortable dependence, anxiety, and comfortable independence); discusses students and the process of change; explains the supports that students need…

  6. Introducing Newspapers in Developmental Reading Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karstadt, Roberta; Rey, Victoria M.

    2009-01-01

    Newspapers are an effective educational and motivational tool in developmental reading classes. However, many students are unfamiliar with newspapers and read them infrequently. In order to foster newspaper reading and familiarize the college freshmen enrolled in their developmental reading classes with newspapers, the writers of this article…

  7. How Newspaper-Article-Events, Other Stock Market Indices, and the Foreign Currency Rate Affect the Philippine Stock Market

    OpenAIRE

    Percival S. Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Eugene Fama in his “Efficient Market Hypothesis” introduced the term newspaper-article-event. The aim of this paper is to find out if newspaper-article-events which are presented and discussed in newspaper articles and which could collage to create an atmosphere of investment, together with the indices of other stock markets (treated as other events) and the performance of the Philippine Peso against the US Dollar (considered as another event) could affect the closing Philippine Stock Market ...

  8. Newspaper Uses of Satellite Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, David

    Replacing slower mail service, satellite transmission now gives the newspaper industry a practical and almost spontaneous method for sending all kinds of information to any newspaper across the country. Unlike other communication industries, newspapers did not begin to make widespread use of satellite technology until 1979, when government…

  9. Continuous business model innovation in the Danish newspaper industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anna B.; Günzel, Franziska

    Business model innovation is undoubtedly of strategic importance in innovation management. However, little is known on how in fact how companies experiment and innovate with regards to their business models. To shed more light on this issue, we have conducted a qualitative study of the newspaper...... industry in Denmark. Business model innovation became imperative for the traditional newspaper publishers after many years of the declining readership and revenues. We collected rich primary and secondary data from various sources during 2010-2012. Our analysis suggests that changing business models in its...... various parts does not guarantee a successful business model change and may even harm the existing well-functioning business model. To innovate a business model successfully, managers need to secure the business logic flow and its feedback loops....

  10. Are Graphic Designers Killing Newspapers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin G. Barnhurst, Ph.D.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Newspapers are doomed to die, according to recent preductions, and be replaced by brave new technological news. Even news executives argue that they're no longer in the newspaper business; they're in the information business. This analogy saps journalism of the central passion that made newspapers: ink and paper. The fate of journalism then falls into the hands of information specialists and designers, the confectioners needed to make dry information. Rather than news, these professionals value other things. Typographers respect books and make newspapers look more book-like. Illustrators aspire to make art posters of news. Designers of "infographics" admire Minard and page designers emulate Mondrian. The consequences are visible: newspapers that look beautiful but can't hold as much news about ordinary people. Without room for a more diverse public, newspapers will die. Paper and ink are the key to the ritual of news reading. Paper news contributes to the collective memory in ways digital forms cannot, at least not yet.* El periódico

  11. An Analysis of Newspaper Texts with a View to Studying the "First" Old People’s Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubica Milosavljević

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Newspaper texts published in the period between the end of World War II and the late 1950s in the Belgrade dailies Borba and Politika have been analyzed for the purpose of studying the process of how old age, as a social issue, has repeatedly "appeared" and "disappeared" from the public eye. These texts illustrate one of the fundamental tenets of constructionism that leads to reality perceived as, and provide insight into the reasons that this social problem, which dates back to the emergence of a burgeois civil society in 19th century Serbia, was perceived in the period studied as just constructed. In this way, it is possible to explain how before becomes after, and why newspapers refer to an old people’s home built no earlier than 1959 as the "first" home of its kind in Belgrade.

  12. Down to the Wire: How Six Newspapers Reported Public Opinion Polls during the 1988 Presidential Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Luther W.; And Others

    A study analyzed the quality of reporting of public opinion polls in six selected newspapers during the final 65 days of the 1988 presidential campaign. The eight disclosure standards used were based upon the latest version of the American Association for Public Opinion Research (AAPOR) code of Professional Ethics and Practices. The newspapers…

  13. Newspaper on e-paper with WiFi transfer: The newspaper of the future

    OpenAIRE

    Aune, Håkon Rørvik

    2008-01-01

    An e-newspaper is the result of newspaper content adapted to electronic paper. Electronic paper is a display technology which has many favourable attributes. It is a passive display technology which means that it can have the appearence of paper due to its high contrast, it is readable like paper due to only changing its pixels when the image changes and also uses very little power making it suitable for mobile uses. Making an e-newspaper service has many challenges, the areas focused on in ...

  14. How To Increase Advertising Revenue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Carmen

    1995-01-01

    Describes advertising sales strategies to help faculty advisers of community college newspapers increase revenues. Argues that sales representatives should know their product well and maintain demographic information on the paper's readership. Includes strategies for organizing advertising staff, searching for potential clients, and taking charge…

  15. The Rise of Web Supremacy in Newspaper Coverage of Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergård, Gunver Lystbæk

    discloses how original writing is increasingly being replaced by copy-paste-journalism as novel online resources distribute intelligible science press material. This trend is visible in all journalistic fields but more explicit in the source-driven science journalism. The online abundant availability...... of science news material has also shifted the balance in distribution. Coverage in broadsheet print newspapers is decreasing whereas online and tabloid newspapers are steadily embracing science news. This transfer causes new target groups who have not been previously reachable to be included in science......Alert!) have become an increasing origin of science news on print and online, especially in tabloid newspapers. It is concluded that the availability of lucid science material online has made up for the cutback in science coverage on print and exposed science to social groups predominantly reading Internet...

  16. How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? KidsHealth / For Teens / How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? What's in ... them? If so, what should you do? It can be hard to understand why a friend might ...

  17. The Portrayal of Occupational Therapy and Occupational Science in Canadian Newspapers: A Content Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsing-Yee (Emily Chai

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The primary goal of occupational therapy is to enable people to participate in the activities of everyday life. The demand for occupational therapists in Canada is expected to grow sharply at an annual growth rate of 3.2%, compared to 0.7% for all occupations. At the same time, it is believed by occupational therapists in Canada that the Canadian public does not understand the role of occupational therapy. Occupational science is an emerging basic science field that supports the practice of occupational therapy. Given that newspapers are one source the public uses to obtain information and that newspapers are seen to shape public opinions, the purpose of this study is to investigate how “occupational therapy” is covered in Canadian newspapers from the term’s first appearance in 1917 until 2016 and how “occupational science” is covered from the term’s first appearance in 1989 to 2016. We interrogated the findings through the lens of three non-newspaper sources—two academic journals: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy (CJOT and Journal of Occupational Science (JOS; and one Canadian magazine: Occupational Therapy Now (OTN. We found that medical terms were prevalent in the newspaper articles covering occupational therapy similar to the presence of medical terms in the CJOT and OTN. However, the newspapers missed contemporary shifts in occupational therapy as evident in the CJOT, OTN and JOS—such as the increased engagement with enablement, occupational justice and other occupational concepts. The newspapers also failed to portray the societal issues that occupational therapy engages with on behalf of and with their clients, and the newspapers did not cover many of the client groups of occupational therapy. Occupational science was only mentioned in n = 26 articles of the nearly 300 Canadian newspapers covered with no concrete content linked to occupational science. The scope of occupational therapy presented in Canadian

  18. Refusing intergroup help from the morally superior: How one group's moral superiority leads to another group's reluctance to seek their help. : How one group's moral superiority leads to another group's reluctance to seek their help

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Täuber, Susanne; van Zomeren, Martijn

    We examine how group members paradoxically refuse intergroup help where they might need it most: in the moral status domain. Based on the Sacred Value Protection Model (Tetlock, 2002), we predicted and found that group members felt stronger group-based anger and a stronger motivation to reaffirm

  19. Sources and Coverage of Medical News on Front Pages of US Newspapers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, William Y. Y.; Lane, Trevor; Jones, Alison

    2009-01-01

    Background Medical news that appears on newspaper front pages is intended to reach a wide audience, but how this type of medical news is prepared and distributed has not been systematically researched. We thus quantified the level of visibility achieved by front-page medical stories in the United States and analyzed their news sources. Methodology Using the online resource Newseum, we investigated front-page newspaper coverage of four prominent medical stories, and a high-profile non-medical news story as a control, reported in the US in 2007. Two characteristics were quantified by two raters: which newspaper titles carried each target front-page story (interrater agreement, >96%; kappa, >0.92) and the news sources of each target story (interrater agreement, >94%; kappa, >0.91). National rankings of the top 200 US newspapers by audited circulation were used to quantify the extent of coverage as the proportion of the total circulation of ranked newspapers in Newseum. Findings In total, 1630 front pages were searched. Each medical story appeared on the front pages of 85 to 117 (67.5%–78.7%) ranked newspaper titles that had a cumulative daily circulation of 23.1 to 33.4 million, or 61.8% to 88.4% of all newspapers. In contrast, the non-medical story achieved front-page coverage in 152 (99.3%) newspaper titles with a total circulation of 41.0 million, or 99.8% of all newspapers. Front-page medical stories varied in their sources, but the Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, New York Times and the Associated Press together supplied 61.7% of the total coverage of target front-page medical stories. Conclusion Front-page coverage of medical news from different sources is more accurately revealed by analysis of circulation counts rather than of newspaper titles. Journals wishing to widen knowledge of research news and organizations with important health announcements should target at least the four dominant media organizations identified in this study. PMID:19724643

  20. Newspaper vs. online advertising: Is there a niche for newspapers in modern advertising markets?

    OpenAIRE

    Lindstädt, Nadine; Budzinski, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Newspapers have experienced declining circulation figures and declining advertising revenues for several years. In particular, declining advertising figures put a threat on newspapers – this is especially severe in the US where 73% of their revenues are generated through advertising. On the advertising side many companies have expanded their advertising expenditure towards online. Consequently, there are concerns about online advertising substituting newspaper advertising – in the same way as...

  1. Communication perspectives on social networking and citizen journalism challenges to traditional newspapers

    OpenAIRE

    Katz, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Communication perspectives are presented on the challenges posed to traditional newspapers by social media and citizen journalism, with special reference to the United States. This is an important topic given the critical role investigative reporting, long the domain of newspapers, plays in fostering democratic practices. New Media and social networking technology are evaluated in terms of their impact on the newspaper enterprise. Alternative scenarios for future developments are examined as ...

  2. Newspaper Editing: English, Journalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Johanna

    A course designed to groom editors for the newspaper is presented. Editing copy, copyreading and proofreading, principles of headlining, responsibility of the press, libel and slander laws, and problems of censorship are covered. Course objectives include the following: (1) The student will recognize and correct all newspaper items that do not…

  3. Newspaper Advertising and the First Amendment: The Commercial Speech Doctrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Joseph H., III

    The purpose of this paper is to help identify newspaper advertisements which fall under the protection of the First Amendment. Although the Supreme Court declared in 1942 that advertisements which propose a purely commercial transaction were not protected by the First Amendment, in 1976 it decided that commercial expression, like other forms of…

  4. Smoke and Mirrors: U.K. Newspaper Representations of Intimate Partner Domestic Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Michele; Ramon, Shula

    2017-01-01

    News media are in a position to project certain perspectives on domestic violence while marginalizing others, which has implications for public understanding and policy development. This study applies discourse analysis to articles on domestic violence in two U.K. national daily newspapers published in 2001-2002 and 2011-2012 to evaluate evidence of change over a 10-year time span. The research examines how discourses of domestic violence are constructed through newspaper representations of victims, predominantly women, and perpetrators, predominantly men. Although one of the newspapers adopts a respectful position toward women, the textual and visual techniques adopted by the other reveal a tendency for blaming the victim and sexualizing violence related to perceptions of "deserving" or "undeserving" women victims. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. "More Closeted Than Gayness Itself": The Depiction of Same-Sex Couple Violence in Newspaper Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Michelle L; Webber, Gretchen R

    2017-10-01

    Same-sex intimate partner violence (IPV) lacks mainstream news media coverage. News media report on those stories that are most prominent, and these stories are often shaped and presented within a White, heterosexual, upper-class, male framework. This framework largely ignores or misrepresents those that do not fit these characteristics, resulting in a gap in research and coverage of same-sex IPV. This article explores whether U.S. newspapers cover same-sex IPV, how often, and how same-sex couple violence is portrayed in newspapers when covered. Twenty-five newspaper articles published from 2005 to 2015, 10 years prior to the U.S. Supreme Court decision that legalized same-sex marriage, were located and analyzed. Findings indicate sparse newspaper coverage of IPV in same-sex couples. Ten articles highlight the lack of coverage and knowledge related to same-sex couple IPV. Eighteen articles address same-sex IPV as a social issue and highlight resource concerns, police involvement, and heteronormativity and heterosexism. Sixteen articles depict specific instances of IPV in same-sex couples. The overall lack of coverage and how same-sex IPV is covered remains problematic and limited. More mainstream and accurate coverage is needed to effectively address this social issue. Limitations and directions for future research are also discussed.

  6. Newspaper preservation at Botswana's legal repositories

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    thabakgolom

    ABSTRACT. For centuries, newspapers have been a resource for both scholars and researchers. There is no form of publication that captures day-to-day life of a community and its citizens better than the local newspaper. As a primary source for local history and other information, all newspapers (e.g. metropolitan dailies ...

  7. Obesity framing in Botswana online newspapers: Its implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This discourse draws on agenda-setting and framing theories to understand how obesity issues are defined and presented in Botswana newspapers. Obesity is a salient public health issue whose framing involves various individuals and organizations such as physicians, dieticians, exercise scientists, policy makers, ...

  8. Sales forecasting newspaper with ARIMA: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permatasari, Carina Intan; Sutopo, Wahyudi; Hisjam, Muh.

    2018-02-01

    People are beginning to switch to using digital media for their daily activities, including changes in newspaper reading patterns to electronic news. In uncertainty trend, the customers of printed newspaper also have switched to electronic news. It has some negative effects on the printed newspaper demand, where there is often an inaccuracy of supply with demand which means that many newspapers are returned. The aim of this paper is to predict printed newspaper demand as accurately as possible to minimize the number of returns, to keep off the missed sales and to restrain the oversupply. The autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models were adopted to predict the right number of newspapers for a real case study of a newspaper company in Surakarta. The model parameters were found using maximum likelihood method. Then, the software Eviews 9 were utilized to forecasting any particular variables in the newspaper industry. This paper finally presents the appropriate of modeling and sales forecasting newspaper based on the output of the ARIMA models. In particular, it can be recommended to use ARIMA (1, 1, 0) model in predicting the number of newspapers. ARIMA (1, 1, 0) model was chosen from three different models that it provides the smallest value of the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE).

  9. School and Community in Shock as Newspaper Tries to Honor Three Who Die in Car Wreck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwiebel, Kathleen

    1999-01-01

    Describes how the staffs of the yearbook, newspaper, online Web page, and literary magazine (at the Pottsville Area High School in Pennsylvania) worked together on a special insert to cover the deaths of three students in an auto accident. Appends an exercise on deciding coverage of automobile accidents. (RS)

  10. One side of the story: Examining newspaper coverage of workplace injury and fatality in Ontario, 2007-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawley, Tim; Dixon, Shane

    2015-01-01

    News coverage in popular media can shape public perspectives on occupational issues. Few studies exist concerning how occupational injury and fatality are represented in the news. This study examined how injuries, fatalities and worker characteristics were represented in newspapers compared with official government statistics. It also examined what individuals or organizations were most often included by reporters to provide interpretations of injuries and fatalities. Quantitative content analysis was used to examine 304 newspaper articles from between 2007 and 2012 representing the nine most populous cities in the province of Ontario, Canada. Government data came from reports compiled by the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB) of Ontario. Compared to workers' compensation board records, physical characteristics of injuries and fatalities were skewed toward the acute traumatic. Women were dramatically underrepresented in newspaper articles. Age distributions were represented. Goods-producing, transportation and resource extraction occupations were overrepresented while services were underrepresented. Worker voices were largely absent in newspaper accounts compared with law enforcement, the State and management. How workplace injury and fatality are framed, and who contributes to these frames, serves to shape public interpretations of occupational injury and fatality and how occupational health and safety issues might be addressed in the future.

  11. Using National Newspapers in the College Classroom: Resources To Improve Teaching and Learning. The First-Year Experience & Students in Transition. Monograph Series, No. 28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Steven R., Ed.; Barefoot, Betsy O., Ed.

    Thirty-eight brief articles first make the case for using newspapers in the college classroom and then offer examples of how newspapers should be used in the following subject areas: business (advertising, business writing, management); English (composition, research writing, women's studies); first-year seminar (honors seminar, reading, study…

  12. "It's not healthy and it's decidedly not masculine": a media analysis of UK newspaper representations of eating disorders in males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Alice; Sweeting, Helen; Walker, Laura; Patterson, Chris; Räisänen, Ulla; Hunt, Kate

    2015-05-29

    Recent qualitative research found young men reporting that an expectation that eating disorders (EDs) mainly affect young women led them, and others, to only recognise their symptoms when their ED had become entrenched. This raises questions about how these stereotypes persist. We therefore explored how EDs in males were represented in articles published in UK newspapers over a 10-year period (7.12.2002-7.12.2012), specifically attending to whether newsprint media represent EDs in males as 'gender appropriate', 'gender anomalous' or 'gender neutral'. A qualitative thematic analysis of UK newspaper articles. We searched two databases, Newsbank and LexisNexis, for newspaper articles including ED and male terms in the lead/first paragraph. Following de-duplication, 420 articles were scrutinised; 138 met inclusion criteria for detailed textual analysis and were imported into NVivo10. The number of articles peaked in 2008 when a UK politician announced that he had experienced bulimia nervosa. Analysis of how the articles portrayed male ED-related characterisations and experiences revealed that they conveyed ambiguous messages about EDs in males. Despite apparently aiming to dispel stereotypes that only young women experience EDs and to address stigma surrounding EDs in males, many aspects of the articles, including repetition of phrases such as 'a young woman's illness', serve to reinforce messages that EDs are inherently 'female' and so 'anomalous' for men. Newspaper articles represent men with EDs as atypical of men, as a result of having an ED (and any feminising or demasculinising characteristics associated with this), and as atypical of people with EDs, who are still usually portrayed as teenage girls. Such media representations frame a cultural paradigm in which there is an expectation that men may feel shame about or strive to conceal EDs, potentially contributing to men with EDs delaying help-seeking, gaining late access to treatments and reducing chances of

  13. Chains versus Independents: Newspaper and Market Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, F. Dennis

    A study examined the marketing differences between large chain newspapers and small chain and independent newspapers by analyzing differences in characteristics of the newspapers, patterns of circulation, economic and social conditions of the market, and competition from other print media. The 200 newspapers studied--113 large chain and 87 small…

  14. The cultural-historical value of and problems with digitized advertisements : Historical newspapers and the portable radio, 1950- 1969

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, J.

    2015-01-01

    This article demonstrates how a digital newspaper archive such as Delpher offers new possibilities to do justice to the value of newspaper advertisements when conducting historical research. A case study into the way advertisements tried to cater to youngsters in portable radio advertisements

  15. Representations of OxyContin in North American newspapers and medical journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Emma; Asbridge, Mark; Haydt, Susan

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are public concerns regarding OxyContin (Purdue Pharma, Canada) and charges within the pain medicine community that media coverage of the drug has been biased. OBJECTIVE: To analyze and compare representations of OxyContin in medical journals and North American newspapers in an attempt to shed light on how each contributes to the ‘social problem’ associated with OxyContin. METHODS: Using searches of newspaper and medical literature databases, two samples were drawn: 924 stories published between 1995 and 2005 in 27 North American newspapers, and 197 articles published between 1995 and 2007 in 33 medical journals in the fields of addiction/substance abuse, pain/anesthesiology and general/internal medicine. The foci, themes, perspectives represented and evaluations of OxyContin presented in these texts were analyzed statistically. RESULTS: Newspaper coverage of OxyContin emphasized negative evaluations of the drug, focusing on abuse, addiction, crime and death rather than the use of OxyContin for the legitimate treatment of pain. Newspaper stories most often conveyed the perspectives of law enforcement and courts, and much less often represented the perspectives of physicians. However, analysis of physician perspectives represented in newspaper stories and in medical journals revealed a high degree of inconsistency, especially across the fields of pain medicine and addiction medicine. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of negative representations of OxyContin is often blamed on biased media coverage and an ignorant public. However, the proliferation of inconsistent messages regarding the drug from physicians plays a role in the drug’s persistent status as a social problem. PMID:22059195

  16. NEWSPAPERS: TEENAGERS AND THEIR NEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansor T. TENKU MAZUWANA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Newspaper is by far the most comprehensive printed medium among teenagers. The way newspaper represent the information will be able to generate more inputs to teenagers after they read various issues discussed. The objectives of this study are to identify the types of news which are chosen by teenagers; and to investigate the factors which are associated with the teenagers’ acceptance to the newspaper. A total of 387 teenagers, aged between 16 and 17 years old, who were students from 10 national secondary schools in the Federal Territory, Kuala Lumpur were selected to be the respondents of this study. Results shows that entertainment news seem to be the teenagers’ preferred choice. At the same times, the findings indicates that the contents of the newspapers have fulfilled the needs of the teenagers. However, the correlation test shows that the relationship between cognitive are moderate, weak for the affective, personal and escapism and there is no relationship between social needs and acceptance. As a conclusion, entertainment news has become the main choice of news among the teenagers. Meanwhile, the factor which is strongly associated with the teenagers’ acceptance is cognitive. It is hoped that the results of this study will be able to assist the newspaper institutions to publish contents relating to education and knowledge, which are connected to entertainment so that the newspapers could be one of the leading learning references, besides the school textbooks and printed references in order to fulfill various needs of the teenagers.

  17. O Captain, My Captain! U.S Newspaper Framing of the Death of Captain America

    OpenAIRE

    Serge, Evan John

    2009-01-01

    This thesis explores how U.S. newspapers framed the death of Captain America. Specifically, the presence of various frames and their classifications was determined via a content analysis of 139 newspaper articles. Additionally, this thesis explores relationships between frame substance and other frame classifications. Generic/recurring frames were more prevalent than issue-specific/recurring frames. Frames tended to be episodic more often than thematic. Frames were also most likely to be...

  18. Newspaper Advertising Impact in Non-Metropolitan Markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Jerry R.

    A telephone survey of 1,487 adults in 91 nonmetropolitan areas of Tennessee was conducted to determine the nonmetropolitan newspaper audience, the exposure and effectiveness of nonmetro newspaper advertising, and the complementary relationship of advertising media, particularly newspapers and television, in nonmetropolitan markets. The results…

  19. Environmental Indicators in the Newspaper Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Enroth

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Environmental indicators promote the eco-efficient development of companies, as demonstrated in earlier study. This study builds on a previously developed model and inventory tools for industryspecific environmental indicators for the graphic arts industry. This study is based on case studies from 14 newspaper companies with experience of the use of these industry-specific environmental indicators in actual production.This paper presents data on industry-specific environmental indicators for the newspaper industry. The data describes the average situation and the range of values for the indicators in 14 environmentally aware newspaper companies in Sweden in 2001. The data is also grouped so as to illustrate average values for various classes:Newspaper companies with printing facilities.Newspaper companies with no printing facilities.Newspaper printing companies.In addition, a preliminary comparison has been carried out using equivalent data for the commercial printing industry.The indicators calculated for each specific company, together with average values for these indicators, have been used to identify areas for action for the various companies and to formulate action plans. The aim of this is to promote more eco-efficient activities. The study also summarizes measures already implemented at the various companies.The use of indicators within these companies has been linked with the current and predicted future eed to communicate environmental issues. Financial and social aspects have been considered to a limited extent in the study in order to put forward the concept of sustainable development in the newspaper industry in Sweden.

  20. “It's not healthy and it's decidedly not masculine”: a media analysis of UK newspaper representations of eating disorders in males

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Alice; Sweeting, Helen; Walker, Laura; Patterson, Chris; Räisänen, Ulla; Hunt, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Recent qualitative research found young men reporting that an expectation that eating disorders (EDs) mainly affect young women led them, and others, to only recognise their symptoms when their ED had become entrenched. This raises questions about how these stereotypes persist. We therefore explored how EDs in males were represented in articles published in UK newspapers over a 10-year period (7.12.2002–7.12.2012), specifically attending to whether newsprint media represent EDs in males as ‘gender appropriate’, ‘gender anomalous’ or ‘gender neutral’. Design A qualitative thematic analysis of UK newspaper articles. Methods We searched two databases, Newsbank and LexisNexis, for newspaper articles including ED and male terms in the lead/first paragraph. Following de-duplication, 420 articles were scrutinised; 138 met inclusion criteria for detailed textual analysis and were imported into NVivo10. Findings The number of articles peaked in 2008 when a UK politician announced that he had experienced bulimia nervosa. Analysis of how the articles portrayed male ED-related characterisations and experiences revealed that they conveyed ambiguous messages about EDs in males. Despite apparently aiming to dispel stereotypes that only young women experience EDs and to address stigma surrounding EDs in males, many aspects of the articles, including repetition of phrases such as ‘a young woman's illness’, serve to reinforce messages that EDs are inherently ‘female’ and so ‘anomalous’ for men. Conclusions Newspaper articles represent men with EDs as atypical of men, as a result of having an ED (and any feminising or demasculinising characteristics associated with this), and as atypical of people with EDs, who are still usually portrayed as teenage girls. Such media representations frame a cultural paradigm in which there is an expectation that men may feel shame about or strive to conceal EDs, potentially contributing to men with EDs delaying

  1. Joint Newspaper Operating Agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Marie

    The number of competing daily newspapers in American cities has dwindled until only about 50 cities boast two papers. Of the newspapers in those cities, 23 now maintain separate editorial operations but have joint printing, advertising, and circulation departments. The concept of joint operation is 50 years old, dating from the Depression years…

  2. Homelessness Coverage in Major Canadian Newspapers, 1987 – 2007

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.S. Richter (Solina); K. Kovacs Burns (Kathy); Y. Mao (Yuping); J. Chaw-Kant (Jean); M. Calder (Moira); S. Mogale (Shirley); L. Goin (Lyla); K. Schnell (Kerry)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis article describes how the Canadian printed news media depicted the homeless and their situations between 1987 and 2007. Our study used a descriptive, cross-sectional design and a content analysis was conducted on selected newspaper articles on homelessness issues. The main themes

  3. Daily news and daily bread: Precarious employment in the newspaper distribution sector in Durban, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chibuikem C. Nnaeme

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The outsourcing of newspaper distribution seems to be one of the sources of precarious employment for newspaper distribution contractors and their employees. Research Purpose: In an attempt to contribute to the debate on outsourcing, this paper explored the effects of outsourcing newspaper distribution on the labour market experiences of newspaper distribution contractors and their employees in Durban. Motivation for the study: The labour market experiences of workers in precarious employment, especially those in the lower echelon of newspaper distribution, are rarely known. Research Design, approach and method: The study is a qualitative research which sought to explore the experiences of newspaper distributors in Durban. In identifying the respondents non-probability sampling was used to identify information-rich respondents for interview sections. Also, the research used participant observation to deepen data from interviews. Main Findings: The research finds that the respondents were exposed to precarious employment conditions irrespective of whether they were contracted or not, seemingly because of outsourcing of newspaper distribution in Durban. Practical/Managerial Implications: The practical implication suggests that Basic Employment Act is not guiding how the respondents are being treated. Contribution/Value-Add: The paper specifically highlights the exploitation of newspaper distributors on the streets, as they are denied any form of employment benefits or employment security despite executing their job within severe working conditions.

  4. How to help the patient motivate himself?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, A

    2012-03-01

    In order to help a patient with a chronic disease motivate himself, caregivers spontaneously make use of reason with a view to having the patient share the caregivers' point of view, in other words, to some extent, transforming the care recipient into a caregiver. However, it is not unusual for a caregiver suffering from the disease in which he specializes not to treat himself in compliance with the rules he recommends to his patients. Man is a trinity with three instances of the self. In addition to the "rational self" that tends towards the universal, there is also an "animal self" subject to powerful, frequently imperious, primary needs which may be compared to impulsions, compulsions and addictions. Lastly, there is an "identity self", an irreducible singularity, governed by the law of optimizing pleasure or, in any event, avoiding moral distress. The patient has to learn to navigate between objectives oriented by reason, more or less imperious urges and the striving for well-being and avoidance of moral distress. These various instances of the "self" have a distinct relationship with the norm and with time. Psychologists recognize two types of motivation: intrinsic motivation, an activity implemented for itself, and extrinsic motivation, an activity practiced for its secondary beneficial effects. Clearly, caring for oneself derives from an extrinsic motivation. This motivation may be very powerful but is frequently of limited duration. Helping a patient suffering from a chronic disease motivate himself over time thus consists in helping the patient take on board an extrinsic motivation in order for the treatment to become a routine or a source of satisfaction or even pleasure. The physician has to promote the acquisition of self-care skills and a feeling of success in the patient. The physician is also to help the patient negotiate the optimum compromise between his "rational self" and his "identity self" by acting as the advocate of the two parties, while not

  5. Moral Choices in Contemporary Society: Newspaper Articles for the Sixth Course by Newspaper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieff, Philip; And Others

    Sixteen articles written for publication in newspapers discuss moral issues in contemporary society. The articles form the basis of a college-level course by newspaper which also includes a book of primary source readings, study guide, and source book. The course can be taken independently by individuals or in a structured class setting. The…

  6. Portrayal of the human resource crisis and accountability in healthcare: a qualitative analysis of ugandan newspapers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Wojczewski

    Full Text Available Uganda is one of the 57 countries with a critical shortage of health workers. The aim of this study was to determine how the human resources and health service crisis was covered in Ugandan newspapers and, in particular, how the newspapers attributed accountability for problems in the health services.We collected all articles related to health workers and health services for the calendar year 2012 in the two largest national newspapers in Uganda (collection on daily basis and in one local newspaper (collection on weekly basis. These articles were analysed qualitatively regarding the main themes covered and attribution of accountability.The two more urban national newspapers published 229 articles on human resources and health services in Uganda (on average over two articles per week, whereas the local more rural newspaper published only a single article on this issue in the 12 month period. The majority of articles described problems in the health service without discussing accountability. The question of accountability is raised in only 46% of articles (106 articles. The responsibility of the government was discussed in 50 articles (21%, and negligence, corruption and misbehaviour by individual health workers was reported in 56 articles (25%. In the articles about corruption (n=35, 60% (21 articles mention corruption by health workers and 40% (14 articles mention corruption by government officials. Six articles defended the situation of health workers in Uganda.The coverage of accountability in the Ugandan newspapers surveyed is insufficient to generate informed debate on what political actions need to be taken to improve the crisis in health care and services. There exists not only an "inverse care law" but also an "inverse information law": those sections of society with the greatest health needs and problems in accessing quality health care receive the least information about health services.

  7. Portrayal of the human resource crisis and accountability in healthcare: a qualitative analysis of ugandan newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojczewski, Silvia; Willcox, Merlin; Mubangizi, Vincent; Hoffmann, Kathryn; Peersman, Wim; Niederkrotenthaler, Thomas; Natukunda, Silvia; Maling, Samuel; Maier, Manfred; Mant, David; Kutalek, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Uganda is one of the 57 countries with a critical shortage of health workers. The aim of this study was to determine how the human resources and health service crisis was covered in Ugandan newspapers and, in particular, how the newspapers attributed accountability for problems in the health services. We collected all articles related to health workers and health services for the calendar year 2012 in the two largest national newspapers in Uganda (collection on daily basis) and in one local newspaper (collection on weekly basis). These articles were analysed qualitatively regarding the main themes covered and attribution of accountability. The two more urban national newspapers published 229 articles on human resources and health services in Uganda (on average over two articles per week), whereas the local more rural newspaper published only a single article on this issue in the 12 month period. The majority of articles described problems in the health service without discussing accountability. The question of accountability is raised in only 46% of articles (106 articles). The responsibility of the government was discussed in 50 articles (21%), and negligence, corruption and misbehaviour by individual health workers was reported in 56 articles (25%). In the articles about corruption (n=35), 60% (21 articles) mention corruption by health workers and 40% (14 articles) mention corruption by government officials. Six articles defended the situation of health workers in Uganda. The coverage of accountability in the Ugandan newspapers surveyed is insufficient to generate informed debate on what political actions need to be taken to improve the crisis in health care and services. There exists not only an "inverse care law" but also an "inverse information law": those sections of society with the greatest health needs and problems in accessing quality health care receive the least information about health services.

  8. Portrayal of the Human Resource Crisis and Accountability in Healthcare: A Qualitative Analysis of Ugandan Newspapers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojczewski, Silvia; Willcox, Merlin; Mubangizi, Vincent; Hoffmann, Kathryn; Peersman, Wim; Niederkrotenthaler, Thomas; Natukunda, Silvia; Maling, Samuel; Maier, Manfred; Mant, David; Kutalek, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Background Uganda is one of the 57 countries with a critical shortage of health workers. The aim of this study was to determine how the human resources and health service crisis was covered in Ugandan newspapers and, in particular, how the newspapers attributed accountability for problems in the health services. Methods We collected all articles related to health workers and health services for the calendar year 2012 in the two largest national newspapers in Uganda (collection on daily basis) and in one local newspaper (collection on weekly basis). These articles were analysed qualitatively regarding the main themes covered and attribution of accountability. Results The two more urban national newspapers published 229 articles on human resources and health services in Uganda (on average over two articles per week), whereas the local more rural newspaper published only a single article on this issue in the 12 month period. The majority of articles described problems in the health service without discussing accountability. The question of accountability is raised in only 46% of articles (106 articles). The responsibility of the government was discussed in 50 articles (21%), and negligence, corruption and misbehaviour by individual health workers was reported in 56 articles (25%). In the articles about corruption (n=35), 60% (21 articles) mention corruption by health workers and 40% (14 articles) mention corruption by government officials. Six articles defended the situation of health workers in Uganda. Conclusions The coverage of accountability in the Ugandan newspapers surveyed is insufficient to generate informed debate on what political actions need to be taken to improve the crisis in health care and services. There exists not only an “inverse care law” but also an “inverse information law”: those sections of society with the greatest health needs and problems in accessing quality health care receive the least information about health services. PMID

  9. Chinese newspaper coverage of (unproven) stem cell therapies and their providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbogu, Ubaka; Du, Li; Rachul, Christen; Bélanger, Lisa; Caulfield, Timothy

    2013-04-01

    China is a primary destination for stem cell tourism, the phenomenon whereby patients travel abroad to receive unproven stem cell-based treatments that have not been approved in their home countries. Yet, much remains unknown about the state of the stem cell treatment industry in China and about how the Chinese view treatments and providers. Given the media's crucial role in science/health communication and in framing public dialogue, this study sought to examine Chinese newspaper portrayal and perceptions of stem cell treatments and their providers. Based on a content analysis of over 300 newspaper articles, the study revealed that while Chinese newspaper reporting is generally neutral in tone, it is also inaccurate, overly positive, heavily influenced by "interested" treatment providers and focused on the therapeutic uses of stem cells to address the health needs of the local population. The study findings suggest a need to counterbalance providers' influence on media reporting through strategies that encourage media uptake of accurate information about stem cell research and treatments.

  10. Exciting on Facebook or competent in the newspaper? : Media effects on consumers’ perceptions of brands in the fashion category

    OpenAIRE

    Anselmsson, Johan; Tunca, Burak

    2017-01-01

    Media investments are continuously shifting from traditional media like newspapers to digital alternatives like websites and social media. This study investigated if and how media choice between the two rival channels can influence consumers’ perceptions of a novel brand. 504 Swedish retail fashion customers participated in an experiment to evaluate the identical advertisement placed either in a national newspaper or on Facebook. The results revealed that advertising in a newspaper can have a...

  11. Media reporting of neuroscience depends on timing, topic and newspaper type.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nienke M van Atteveldt

    Full Text Available The rapid developments in neuroscientific techniques raise high expectations among the general public and therefore warrant close monitoring of the translation to the media and daily-life applications. The need of empirical research into neuroscience communication is emphasized by its susceptibility to evoke misconceptions and polarized beliefs. As the mass media are the main sources of information about (neuro-science for a majority of the general public, the objective of the current research is to quantify how critically and accurately newspapers report on neuroscience as a function of the timing of publication (within or outside of periods of heightened media attention to neuroscience, termed "news waves", the topic of the research (e.g. development, health, law and the newspaper type (quality, popular, free newspapers. The results show that articles published during neuroscience news waves were less neutral and more optimistic, but not different in accuracy. Furthermore, the overall tone and accuracy of articles depended on the topic; for example, articles on development often had an optimistic tone whereas articles on law were often skeptical or balanced, and articles on health care had highest accuracy. Average accuracy was rather low, but articles in quality newspapers were relatively more accurate than in popular and free newspapers. Our results provide specific recommendations for researchers and science communicators, to improve the translation of neuroscience findings through the media: 1 Caution is warranted during periods of heightened attention (news waves, as reporting tends to be more optimistic; 2 Caution is also warranted not to follow topic-related biases in optimism (e.g., development or skepticism (e.g., law; 3 Researchers should keep in mind that overall accuracy of reporting is low, and especially articles in popular and free newspapers provide a minimal amount of details. This indicates that researchers themselves may

  12. Media Reporting of Neuroscience Depends on Timing, Topic and Newspaper Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Atteveldt, Nienke M.; van Aalderen-Smeets, Sandra I.; Jacobi, Carina; Ruigrok, Nel

    2014-01-01

    The rapid developments in neuroscientific techniques raise high expectations among the general public and therefore warrant close monitoring of the translation to the media and daily-life applications. The need of empirical research into neuroscience communication is emphasized by its susceptibility to evoke misconceptions and polarized beliefs. As the mass media are the main sources of information about (neuro-)science for a majority of the general public, the objective of the current research is to quantify how critically and accurately newspapers report on neuroscience as a function of the timing of publication (within or outside of periods of heightened media attention to neuroscience, termed “news waves”), the topic of the research (e.g. development, health, law) and the newspaper type (quality, popular, free newspapers). The results show that articles published during neuroscience news waves were less neutral and more optimistic, but not different in accuracy. Furthermore, the overall tone and accuracy of articles depended on the topic; for example, articles on development often had an optimistic tone whereas articles on law were often skeptical or balanced, and articles on health care had highest accuracy. Average accuracy was rather low, but articles in quality newspapers were relatively more accurate than in popular and free newspapers. Our results provide specific recommendations for researchers and science communicators, to improve the translation of neuroscience findings through the media: 1) Caution is warranted during periods of heightened attention (news waves), as reporting tends to be more optimistic; 2) Caution is also warranted not to follow topic-related biases in optimism (e.g., development) or skepticism (e.g., law); 3) Researchers should keep in mind that overall accuracy of reporting is low, and especially articles in popular and free newspapers provide a minimal amount of details. This indicates that researchers themselves may need to

  13. Assessing the quality of media reporting of suicide news in India against World Health Organization guidelines: A content analysis study of nine major newspapers in Tamil Nadu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Gregory; Vijayakumar, Lakshmi; Niederkrotenthaler, Thomas; Jayaseelan, Mala; Kannan, Ramya; Pirkis, Jane; Jorm, Anthony F

    2018-05-01

    Suicide rates in India are among the highest in the world, resulting in an estimated 250,000 suicide deaths annually. How the media communicates with the Indian public on the topic of suicide has thus far gone without sufficient scrutiny. The objective of our study was to assess the quality of newspaper reporting of suicide-related news in India against World Health Organization suicide reporting guidelines. We used content analysis to assess the quality of suicide reporting against World Health Organization guidelines in nine of the most highly read daily newspapers in the southern state of Tamil Nadu between June and December 2016. Five of the nine newspapers under review were in the top 20 most circulated daily newspapers in the country. A total of 1681 suicide articles were retrieved. The mean number of suicide articles per day per newspaper was 0.9%, and 54.5% of articles were 10 sentences or less. The vast majority (95.9%) of articles primarily focused on reporting specific suicide incidents. Harmful reporting practices were very common (e.g. a detailed suicide method was reported in 43.3% of articles), while helpful reporting practices were rare (e.g. just 2.5% gave contact details for a suicide support service). We observed that a daily diet of short and explicit suicide-related news was served up to readers of newspapers. Attempts should be made to understand the perspectives of media professionals in relation to suicide reporting, and to devise strategies to boost the positive contribution that media can make to suicide prevention.

  14. A Market Segmentation Approach to the Study of the Daily Newspaper Audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Ernest F.; Grotta, Gerald L.

    To determine whether differing attitudes toward, and the utilization of, the daily newspaper are related to the variable of age, 481 persons responded to a questionnaire designed to measure their attitudes and opinions about mass media in general and their evaluations of newspaper content in particular. The findings revealed the following…

  15. Cultural and lifestyle journalism in online and print newspapers from a reader/userperspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    From, Unni

    newspapers often engage people to participate in producing content creating new ways of being an active audience. Departing from quantitative and qualitative audience studies of the use and reception of culture and lifestyle journalism in the Danish press (completed in Autumn 2008 and Spring 2009......), this paper empirically demonstrates, on the one hand, how audiences, in a Danish context, use their daily print and online newspapers in a range of ways and, on the other hand, how they negotiate the mix of modes of address across sections and within articles. Theoretically the analyses draw on socio...... and information - may interrelate. Precisely this mix, it will be argued, represents a more general change as to the role and identity of journalism - from both a content and reception perspective....

  16. How Computer Games Help Children Learn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, David Williamson

    2008-01-01

    This book looks at how particular video and computer games--such as "Digital Zoo", "The Pandora Project", "SodaConstructor", and more--can help teach children and students to think like doctors, lawyers, engineers, urban planners, journalists, and other professionals. In the process, new "smart games" will give them the knowledge and skills they…

  17. Collusion and the Political Differentiation of Newspapers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filistrucchi, L.; Antonielli, M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: We analyse a newspaper market where two editors first choose the political position of their newspaper, then set cover prices and advertising tariffs. We build on the work of Gabszewicz, Laussel and Sonnac (2001, 2002), whose model of competition among newspaper publishers we take as the

  18. The Role of Perceived Substitution and Individual Culture in the Adoption of Electronic Newspapers in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pogrebnyakov, Nicolai; Buchmann, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Introduction:This paper explores the factors behind the adoption of electronic newspapers. Adoption is hypothesized to be driven by attributes of the electronic newspaper artefact (expressed by perceived substitution) and individual cultural characteristics of potential adopters. Perceived substi...... technology over another may lead to adoption, as well as to studies that investigate the role of individual cultural characteristics in the adoption of information and communication technologies....... was used to test hypotheses. Results: The results indicate that perceived substitution explains the adoption of electronic newspapers well, while most cultural factors did not show a significant effect on adoption. Conclusion: These results add to research on how perceived substitutive functionality of one...

  19. SUPPLEMENARY COMMUNICATIVE UNITS IN NEWSPAPER ARTICLES OF DIFFERENT GENRES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Yurievna Viktorova

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The article studies the role of supplementary communicative units functioning as discourse markers in analytical articles and opinion columns of modern Russian and English newspapers. The dependence of quantitative and qualitative characteristics of different supplementary communicative units on the type of the article and on the language is discussed. The article proves that the use of supplementary units in opinion columns in Russian and in English has more common features than in analytical articles. The highest frequency of occurrence of these units is registered in Russian analytical articles, the lowest – in English articles. In Russian newspapers analytical articles and columns demonstrate more similar characteristics than in English materials. Supplementary communicative units with organizing functions occur more frequently in Russian articles, in English articles and columns they are equally rare. Regulative supplementary units are used equally often in all analyzed newspaper texts. There is a conclusion that regulative supplementary units tend to be more universal in their use in the two languages, while organizing units show greater dependence on the language. The presented analysis of the supplementary communicative units’ use can become one of the ways to take an inventory of persuasive language means in media discourse. These units produce a productive influence on the readers, help them interpret the text adequately; enhance their attention and mental activity.

  20. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 247 - DoD Command Newspaper and Magazine Review System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false DoD Command Newspaper and Magazine Review System... OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NEWSPAPERS, MAGAZINES AND CIVILIAN ENTERPRISE PUBLICATIONS Pt. 247, App. E Appendix E to Part 247—DoD Command Newspaper and Magazine Review...

  1. Amount of newspaper coverage of high school athletics for boys and girls on sports page and newspaper circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Paul M; Whisenant, Warren A

    2002-02-01

    This study analyzed the amount of coverage for high school athletics in 43 newspapers with small circulation by devoting 40% of their interscholastic athletics coverage to girls in athletics, printed significantly more articles about girls' athletics than did the newspapers with medium (33%) or large (32%) circulation. Therefore, the smaller the newspaper circulation, the more equitable the coverage of athletics for girls and boys. This finding was consistent with some prior work but not all.

  2. A Semiotics of Cartoons in Two Nigerian Newspapers: The Punch ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper explores the semiotics of cartoons using selected samples from The punch and The Guardian, newspapers based in Nigeria. It seeks to bridge the gap between semiotics and the act of cartooning. It also attempts to show the relationship between the cartoons and the semiotic resources employed. It analyses how ...

  3. Innovation at UNICEF: How to Help Balance an Asymmetric World

    KAUST Repository

    Fabian, Christopher

    2017-01-10

    Using science, technology, and venture investment to help balance an asymmetric world How do we find solutions to the greatest challenges facing humanity? UNICEF\\'s Office of Innovation (www.unicefstories.org) helps the world\\'s leading children\\'s organization use new methods and approaches to identify, invest in, and scale open source technologies that benefit children, and the world. This talk will share our approach to developing solutions to billion-person problems - a hybrid between the world of Silicon Valley venture capital and the world of global development, policy, and governmental change. Chris will discuss using data, science, and failure to drive investment and development decisions, as well as issues in developing good companies that also want to do good. Examples from Uganda, Estonia, China, Nigeria, and more show that new portfolios of (sometimes surprisingly simple) technologies can create global collaborations around issues important to us all.

  4. Radioactivity in newspapers and information business papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobashi, Asaya

    1997-01-01

    The radioactivities of the naturally occurring radionuclides ( 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 228 Th and 40 K) and a fallout nuclide ( 137 Cs) in newspapers issued during 1990s in Japan and information business papers were determined by gamma-ray spectrometry to obtain information on radioactivity level of papers and the sources of radionuclides contained in papers. The concentrations of the naturally occurring radionuclides in the newspapers were low, whereas the 228 Ra and 228 Th contents of an information business paper were as high as 30 Bq kg -1 . Perhaps the thorium series nuclides contained in this information business paper was present in the kaolinite filler used in the paper. 137 Cs was detected in all the newspapers, while the radionuclide was not detected in the information business papers. The 137 Cs concentration in the newspaper ranged from 0.1 to 0.2 Bq kg -1 . Mechanical pulp was the main constituent of the newspapers, and 137 Cs in the newspapers was maybe brought with the mechanical pulp which kept a part of fallout 137 Cs contained in the material wood. The data obtained in this work may be useful to estimate radioactivity released from incinerators to the environment by burning waste paper. (author)

  5. The Newspaper in the Elementary School: A Research Report to ANPA Foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Charles

    The purpose of the study reported was to determine the effects of the use of daily newspapers by elementary school students on their general and newspaper reading skills. Five social studies teachers taught 50 50 minute lessons over a period of 10 weeks to homogeneously grouped pupils in grades 4-7, using three local dailies as the instructional…

  6. Content analysis of agricultural training advertisements in Nigerian newspapers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Oloruntoba

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is obvious that the use of newspapers is one of the ways through which literate farmers could access agriculture-related information and are acquainted with innovations in agriculture. This study investigated the content of agricultural training advertisements in three Nigerian newspapers: The Guardian, Nigerian Tribune and Daily Times. Using multistage sampling techniques, 240 editions of these newspapers containing 609 advertisements for five years (2001–2005 were selected. In terms of agricultural subsectoral coverage, 30.3% were on veterinary services while forestry services recorded the least advertisement (4.0 %. The Nigerian Tribune newspaper has the highest coverage of agricultural training advertisements 40.7% compared to the 34.7% and 12.2% for Daily Times and Guardian newspapers, respectively. The result also showed that majority of agricultural training advertisements (81.10% were placed on the non-prominent pages of the selected newspapers. Chi-Square analysis of association between the categories of agricultural training advertisements in the focal newspapers showed that there is significant relationship in the rate at which the sampled newspapers advertise different category of agricultural training advertisements in the newspapers (p<0.05. Chi square analysis also indicated that there is significant association between the placements of agricultural training advertisements and type of newspapers (p<0.05. This implies that advertisement placement on prominent pages of newspapers is determined by the policy of print media organization which also varies with cost of advertisement. It is therefore recommended that agricultural news items should be given more prominence as a panacea for increased information source to new entrants, especially the literate farmers to encourage farming.

  7. Military Personnel: Performance Measures Needed to Determine How Well DOD’s Credentialing Program Helps Servicemembers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    MILITARY PERSONNEL Performance Measures Needed to Determine How Well DOD’s Credentialing Program Helps Servicemembers...Measures Needed to Determine How Well DOD’s Credentialing Program Helps Servicemembers What GAO Found The Department of Defense (DOD) has taken steps to...establish the statutorily required credentialing program, but it has not developed performance measures to gauge the program’s effectiveness

  8. UV tanning advertisements in national high school newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofgreen, Seth J; Domozych, Renee; Doctor, Monica; Reimer, Christine; Self, Alyssa; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2017-04-15

    Many young adults have utilized indoor ultraviolet(UV) tanning, putting them at higher risk for development of skin cancers. Prior to the increased regulations on indoor tanning for minors, indoor tanning businesses marketed to teens through modalities such as advertisements in high school newspapers. The purpose of this study was to quantify tanning advertisements in high school newspapers published across the United States between August 2014 and July 2015. Online versions of the newspaper issues were available on issuu.com. Tanning advertisements appeared in 3 of 23 high school newspapers with advertisements of any kind(13%). Among all newspapers with advertisements, 10% were indoor tanning advertisements. One newspaper in Colorado contained advertisements of any kind and had 0 tanning advertisements. A prior study of Colorado high schools showed 11 of 23 schools (48%) to contain tanning advertisements. This suggests that there may be a decrease in indoor UV tanning advertisements owing to increased tanning regulation by state legislatures, national attention to UV tanning, or a general decrease in high school tanning advertisements.

  9. Circulation Price Elasticity in the Daily Newspaper Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotta, Gerald L.; Taylor, Michael Lee

    Pricing of subscriptions and single copies has historically been arbitrary. Evidence indicates that the newspaper industry has tended to overestimate the elasticity of demand for newspaper circulation. This study analyzed price changes, circulation changes, and population changes for all daily newspapers in the United States between 1970 and 1975.…

  10. Teaching Primary Science: How Research Helps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlen, Wynne

    2010-01-01

    The very first edition of "Primary Science Review" included an article entitled "Teaching primary science--how research can help" (Harlen, 1986), which announced that a section of the journal would be for reports of research and particularly for teachers reporting their classroom research. The intervening 24 years have seen…

  11. Linguistic Legitimation of Political Events in Newspaper Discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwah Kareem Ali

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the discursive structures employed in legitimizing the event of U.S. forces withdrawal from Iraq and identifies them in relation to linguistic features. It attempts to describe the relation between language use and legitimation discursive structures in depicting political events. The paper focuses on the political event of U.S. forces’ withdrawal from Iraq in the English newspaper issued in Iraq. The study shows the way in which journalists express their values and attitudes concerning this critical event. Consequently, this requires a critical discourse analysis (henceforth, CDA to analyse news articles in the Iraqi English newspaper: The Kurdish Globe (henceforth, KG newspaper. Accordingly, the study presents a qualitative content analysis of newspaper articles to identify the legitimation discursive structures and their linguistic features. It is found that the main discursive structures of legitimation employed in the KG newspaper are: authorization, rationalization, and moral evaluation. Besides, there were five verb processes used to represent this legitimation, including material, verbal, relational, mental, and existential. Keywords: Critical discourse analysis, legitimation discursive structures, linguistic features, newspaper discourse, systemic functional linguistics

  12. Two ways of constructing the reader`s subject position: a discursive analysis of the newspaper language of the newspapers Diário Catarinense and Hora de Santa Catarina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Braga

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We analyze, based on French Discourse Analysis, how the newspapers Diário Catarinense and Hora de Santa Catarina produce different reader`s subject positions. This research is justified by the fact that both newspapers are products of the same media company. The starting point was the hypothesis that there would be in the market two types of readers, thus the two products do not compete with each other, but they would complement each other in the coverage of a reading area. Reading here is treated as a process of production of sense effects. The work is based on Orlandi`s thinking about the conception of reading, as well as in the distinction between real and virtual reader. We do also present the clues included in the statements which inferences are essential to apprehend the said and the unsaid which, by means of a comparative analysis, was used to understand the production of different reader’s subject position. The analysis points out that the newspapers DC and Hora present similar characteristics in regard to the process of transmitting information, howevereach newspaper interrelates with its target public in a different way through the use of language and in the manner of production of news. It leads to the construction of different positions of these readers in relation to the information which is transmitted, because, making use of uttering strategies, these newspapers ideologically mark the readers of DC as being more lettered than the ones of Hora.

  13. Emotional tone of ontario newspaper articles on the health effects of industrial wind turbines before and after policy change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deignan, Benjamin; Hoffman-Goetz, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    Newspapers are often a primary source of health information for the public about emerging technologies. Information in newspapers can amplify or attenuate readers' perceptions of health risk depending on how it is presented. Five geographically distinct wind energy installations in Ontario, Canada were identified, and newspapers published in their surrounding communities were systematically searched for articles on health effects from industrial wind turbines from May 2007 to April 2011. The authors retrieved 421 articles from 13 community, 2 provincial, and 2 national newspapers. To measure the emotional tone of the articles, the authors used a list of negative and positive words, informed from previous studies as well as from a random sample of newspaper articles included in this study. The majority of newspaper articles (64.6%, n = 272) emphasized negative rather than positive/neutral tone, with community newspapers publishing a higher proportion of negative articles than provincial or national newspapers, χ(2)(2) = 15.1, p < .001. Articles were more likely to be negative when published 2 years after compared with 2 years before provincial legislation to reduce dependence on fossil fuels (the Green Energy Act), χ(2)(3) = 9.7, p < .05. Repeated public exposure to negative newspaper content may heighten readers' health risk perceptions about wind energy.

  14. ’The Mission is to Keep this Industry Intact’: Digital Transition in the Japanese Newspaper Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Villi, Mikko Olavi; Hayashi, Kaori

    2017-01-01

    The focus of this paper is the digital transition in major Japanese newspapers that sell millions of copies per day. By digital transition we refer to the shift to publishing content on digital platforms – in this case the shift from print to online and mobile media. Japan is globally one of the most important newspaper markets with the world’s largest daily newspapers circulation-wise. The research focusing on the digital transition in Japanese newspapers and the implications of this shift h...

  15. Newspaper preservation at Botswana's legal repositories

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    thabakgolom

    Journal of the South African Society of Archivists, Vol. ... The informational value of the newspapers as ... research on newspaper preservation in Africa ..... semantic differential e.g. average, good or bad ..... African Primary Health Care and.

  16. An Examination of the Perceptions of Newspaper Advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, F. Dennis

    1980-01-01

    Analyzes newspaper readers' evaluations of specific categories of newspaper content, including four advertising categories. Shows that reader demand for advertising was lower than for news, although most readers desired the same amount or more advertising in their newspaper. (RL)

  17. Exploring the agenda-setting potential of homeland online newspapers on perceptions of elections issues among diasporic Nigerians in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Lambe Kayode Mustapha; Saodah Wok

    2015-01-01

    The increasing transnational migration of people and availability of homeland newspapers on the web have stimulated interest in the understanding of the use and effects of homeland media on a nation’s foreign residents. This study explores the relationship between the agenda covered in three Nigerian online newspapers (N=260) and how they were perceived by Nigerian students in Malaysia (N=350) during the 2011 Nigerian presidential election. Specifically, the issues in online newspapers and th...

  18. Implementing Self-Directed Work Teams at a College Newspaper

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pillis, Emmeline; Parsons, Blake

    2013-01-01

    The problem: Motivating and retaining staff had become an ongoing problem at the student newspaper. Student staffers would quit abruptly when overwhelmed or dissatisfied, leaving the newspaper with critical positions vacant. This affected the performance of the newspaper. Method: The newspaper was organized into self directed work teams (SDWTs).…

  19. 27 CFR 6.92 - Newspaper cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS âTIED-HOUSEâ Exceptions § 6.92 Newspaper cuts. Newspaper cuts, mats, or engraved blocks for use in retailers' advertisements may be given or sold by an industry member to a retailer selling the industry member's products. [T.D. ATF-364, 60 FR 20423, Apr. 26, 1995] ...

  20. subordination across ghanaian and british newspaper editorials

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    What functional motivation underlies the distribution of dependent clause patterns in newspaper .... The mode is as relevant to our understanding of newspaper editorials as the ..... Emotive nouns: nouns which express emotion. Attested nouns ...

  1. The design of the covers of Zero Hora newspaper from 1990 to 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Gruszynski

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the reformulations of the graphic presentation undergone by the Zero Hora (ZH newspaper from 1990 to 2010, focusing on its covers. It analyzes how this publication revamped its design in this period, in order to discuss how such changes could be related to technological changes pertaining to the circulation of editions in other media as well. It questions relationships between visual elements and principles of journalistic editing, considering the history of the vehicle. The significant change in the layouts perceived in the years taken into consideration seems to be associated with the growing amount of information available in the graphic space that is permeated by the intense usage of graphic resources and images that often undermine the hierarchy of what is being reported.

  2. THE DESIGN OF THE COVERS OF ZERO HORA NEWSPAPER FROM 1990 TO 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Gruszynski

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the reformulations of the graphic presentation undergone by the Zero Hora (ZH newspaper from 1990 to 2010, focusing on its covers. It analyzes how this publication revamped its design in this period, in order to discuss how such changes could be related to technological changes pertaining to the circulation of editions in other media as well. It questions relationships between visual elements and principles of journalistic editing, considering the history of the vehicle. The significant change in the layouts perceived in the years taken into consideration seems to be associated with the growing amount of information available in the graphic space that is permeated by the intense usage of graphic resources and images that often undermine the hierarchy of what is being reported.

  3. Characteristics of genetics-related news content in Black weekly newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caburnay, C A; Babb, P; Kaphingst, K A; Roberts, J; Rath, S

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS/OBJECTIVES: The media are an important source of health information, especially for those with less access to regular health care. Black news outlets such as Black newspapers are a source of health information for African Americans. This study characterized media coverage of genetics-related information in Black weekly newspapers and general audience newspapers from the same communities. All health stories in a sample of 24 Black weekly newspapers and 12 general audience newspapers from January 2004 to December 2007 were reviewed for genetics-related stories. These stories were further coded for both journalistic and public health variables. Of all health-related stories identified, only 2% (n = 357) were considered genetics related. Genetics-related stories in Black newspapers - compared to those in general audience newspapers - were larger, more locally and racially relevant, and more likely to contain recommendations or action steps to improve health or reduce disease risks and to mention the importance of knowing one's family history. Stories in general audience newspapers were more likely to discuss causes of disease, mention genetic testing or therapy, and suggest a high/moderate degree of genetic determinism. Black newspapers are a viable communication channel to disseminate findings and implications of human genome research to African American audiences.

  4. Thermal conductivity of newspaper sandwiched aerated lightweight concrete panel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Soon-Ching; Low, Kaw-Sai [Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Jalan Genting Kelang, Setapak, 53300 Kuala Lumpur, Wilayah Persekutuan (Malaysia)

    2010-12-15

    Investigation on the thermal conductivity of newspaper sandwiched aerated lightweight concrete (ALC) panels is the main purpose of this study. Various densities of ALC panels ranging from 1700, 1400 and 1100 kg/m{sup 3} with three different aerial intensities of newspaper sandwiched were produced. Investigation was limited to the effect of aerial intensity of newspaper sandwiched and the effect of density of ALC on thermal conductivity. It is found that the thermal conductivity of newspaper sandwiched ALC panels reduced remarkably compared to control ALC panels. The reduction was recorded at 18.0%, 21.8% and 20.7% correspond to densities of 1700, 1400 and 1100 kg/m{sup 3} with just a mere 0.05 g/cm{sup 2} aerial intensity of newspaper sandwiched. Newspaper sandwiched has a significant impact on the performance of thermal conductivity of ALC panels based on regression analysis. (author)

  5. Public health news frames in North Carolina newspaper coverage of the 100% Tobacco-Free Schools campaign? Sometimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Suzanne DePalma; Sutton, Sonya F; Mebane, Felicia E

    2006-01-01

    News organizations are an important and influential part of the social environment. They identify certain issues by the extent and nature of their coverage. To help explain what public health policy messages may have influenced school policy decisions, this content analysis provides an examination of newspaper coverage of North Carolinas 100% tobacco-free schools campaign. Researchers searched LexisNexis for articles published in North Carolina newspapers between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2004 that included variations of "North Carolina tobacco-free schools." Researchers then conducted a descriptive analysis of 138 stories from nine North Carolina newspapers (approximately 4% of all the states newspapers) and used page placement and story type to examine the level of importance placed on the issue. Finally, frames for and against tobacco-free school policies were tracked, along with the presence of key messages presented by 100% TFS advocates. The volume of news coverage changed throughout the study period, with peaks and valleys closely associated with external "trigger" events. In addition, a majority of the newspaper articles did not include key public health messages. The results suggest an opportunity for public health experts and officials to work more effectively with local journalists to increase the use (and impact) of public health messages in news coverage of tobacco policies affecting youth.

  6. Communicating Environmental Risks: Local Newspaper Coverage of Shellfish Bacterial Contamination in Maine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianne Suldovsky

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Coastal resources play a vital role in Maine’s cultural and economic wellbeing, contributing an estimated 168 billion dollars to the Maine economy. There are numerous risks to the sustainability of Maine’s shellfishing industry and working waterfront, including pathogenic bacterial pollution. In this study, we ask a broad fundamental question central to science and environmental journalism: how do newspapers cover localized environmental risks and what are the implications of those approaches? Utilizing the northeastern US state of Maine’s shellfishing industry as an exemplar environmental issue, this study examines how Maine’s two most read newspapers, the Bangor Daily News and the Portland Press Herald, report on bacterial contamination and shellfish. This study examines the themes that are present in the newspaper articles published about shellfish between 2003 and 2014 and analyses the types of sources journalists used within their coverage of these issues. Overall, we identified seven key themes: economic concerns, environmental impacts, political and regulatory issues, issues of public health and safety, reference to cultural values, technical and infrastructural issues, and aesthetic concerns. The most commonly cited individuals in the articles were government officials and scientists. The least cited groups were clammers and shellfishermen, general citizens, advocacy groups, and worm diggers. Implications for local coverage of environmental risks in Maine, science communication, and sustainability science are discussed.

  7. Reporter Turnover on Texas Daily Newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Marquita

    1978-01-01

    A survey of Texas daily newspapers yielded a picture of newspaper reporters as relatively young men who do not stay in one place very long, suggesting that the stereotype of the itinerant reporter may have its basis in fact. (GW)

  8. Khuzestan dust phenomenon: a content analysis of most widely circulated newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojadam, Mehdi; Matlabi, Mohammad; Haji, Alireza; Cheraghi, Maria; Bitaraf, Saeid; Khafaie, Morteza Abdullatif

    2018-06-01

    Dust is an atmospheric phenomenon that causes adverse environmental effects. It is deemed to have harmful effects on health, economics, and climate. This study aimed to analyze the content published on the phenomenon of dust in the widely circulated newspapers in Iran. We investigated the content of all national and provincial newspapers that were published between July and August 2014. Data on the materials related to the dust phenomenon in the newspapers were categorized and coded. From a total of 510 newspaper issues, 143 articles were devoted to the dust phenomenon which 74.1% of them were published in provincial newspapers. Among the national newspapers, Hamshahri newspaper with 16 headlines and from the provincial newspapers; Karoon with 23 headlines published the highest number of articles on dust phenomenon. 45.5% of content on dust were printed on the first page of the newspapers. The most common approach to the type of content published in these newspapers was an interview. Moreover, we noticed that 28.7% of the content published in the newspapers was related to the health issue. The media plays an important role in the transmission of health information. Weaknesses in addressing the causes of dust occurrence and also in providing solutions for the dust control and prevention were noticeable in the content published in the newspaper. It seems necessary to take practical measures to disseminate relevant information to dust and also address the needs of the target audience community influenced by the dust phenomenon properly.

  9. How Does Physical Activity Help Build Healthy Bones?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print How does physical activity help build healthy bones? Bones are living tissue. Weight-bearing physical activity causes new bone tissue to form, and this ...

  10. Preservation of Newspapers: Theoretical Approaches and Practical Achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenay, Damir; Krtalic, Maja

    2010-01-01

    The preservation of newspapers is the main topic of this paper. A theoretical overview of newspaper preservation is given, with an emphasis on the importance of a systematic and comprehensive approach. Efficient newspaper preservation implies understanding the meaning of preservation in general, as well as understanding specific approaches,…

  11. Newspaper coverage of biobanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubaka Ogbogu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Biobanks are an important research resource that provides researchers with biological samples, tools and data, but have also been associated with a range of ethical, legal and policy issues and concerns. Although there have been studies examining the views of different stakeholders, such as donors, researchers and the general public, the media portrayal of biobanks has been absent from this body of research. This study therefore examines how biobanking has been represented in major print newspapers from Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States to identify the issues and concerns surrounding biobanks that have featured most prominently in the print media discourse.Methods. Using Factiva, articles published in major broadsheet newspapers in Canada, the US, the UK, and Australia were identified using specified search terms. The final sample size consisted of 163 articles.Results. Majority of articles mentioned or discussed the benefits of biobanking, with medical research being the most prevalent benefit mentioned. Fewer articles discussed risks associated with biobanking. Researchers were the group of people most quoted in the articles, followed by biobank employees. Biobanking was portrayed as mostly neutral or positive, with few articles portraying biobanking in a negative manner.Conclusion. Reporting on biobanks in the print media heavily favours discussions of related benefits over risks. Members of the scientific research community appear to be a primary source of this positive tone. Under-reporting of risks and a downtrend in reporting on legal and regulatory issues suggests that the print media views such matters as less newsworthy than perceived benefits of biobanking.

  12. How to Build Good Learning Habits for your College Studies

    OpenAIRE

    O'Rawe, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Students often struggle with making the transition to a higher education learning environment. This newspaper article offers some guiding principles for students and parents ,and helps them understand the differences and challenges they may experience in their first year of college.

  13. An Analysis of Euphemisms Found in the Political Issues News of the Jakarta Post Online Newspaper

    OpenAIRE

    AVRIANTI, NUKE ELOK

    2014-01-01

    Keyword : Euphemisms, Type of Euphemisms, Motives of using Euphemisms The political issues which become the highlighted issues in media Indonesia in recent days is the reason of the writer in conducting this study. The writer wants to examine how the euphemistic expression is used in the newspaper when they publish their article. The writer analyzed the political issues news written in The Jakarta Post online newspaper since the development of technology is running very fast so the ...

  14. Latin American Newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Mary A.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews the historical development of the press in Latin America from the sixteenth century to the present. Discusses the various pressures that Latin American newspapers are subject to, including political censorship, economic restrictions, and cultural conflicts. (AEA)

  15. Framing Islam-related issues during GE13: An analysis of Malaysian mainstream newspapers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aini Maznina A.Manaf

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The two major political coalitions in Malaysia are Barisan Nasional  (BN and Pakatan Rakyat (PR, which are dominated by the Malay-Muslim majority. During the 13th national election, to gain public votes, the government used mainstream newspapers to frame Islam-related issues. This research focuses on the characterisation and information reported about Islam and Muslims during the 13th General Election. Using content analysis, we examine the coverage of such issues by the mainstream newspapers: Berita Harian, Utusan Malaysia, New Straits Times, and The Star. This analysis aims to provide a holistic review of the scope of the coverage during the period with a focus on how the Malaysian government framed Islam-related issues through the print media in order to gain the Malay votes. A total of 178 news articles were analysed, from which we found that 15 dominant issues were reported in the newspapers during that period. Among the most frequently reported Islam-related issues were hudud (prescribed punishments, Islamic state, and kalimah Allah (the word “Allah”, which were predominantly covered by the Malay newspapers. In addition, the data indicated that most of the news were inclined towards supporting the ruling coalition, i.e., Barisan Nasional.

  16. LEXICO-STYLISTIC CHOICES AND MEDIA IDEOLOGY IN NEWSPAPER REPORTS ON NIGER DELTA CONFLICTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuka Fred Ononye

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Media reports on Niger Delta (Henceforth, ND conflicts have reflected a relationship between lexico-stylistic choices and media ideologies. The existing media studies on the discourse have predominantly utilised pragmatic, stylistic and discourse analytical tools in presenting and labelling discourse participants and/or their ideologies, but neglected how media ideologies can be revealed through lexico-stylistic choices made in the reports. This paper therefore examines the lexico-stylistic choices in the reports in order to establish their link to specific ideological goals of the newspapers in relaying the conflict news. Forty reports on ND conflicts, published between 2003 and 2007, sampled from two ND-based (The Tide and Pioneer and two national (The Punch and THISDAY, labelled newspapers, were subjected to stylistic and critical analyses, with insights from structural (relational semantics and aspects of stylistics discourse. Two broad lexical stylistic choices are identified, including paradigmatic (61.8%—indexed by synonymous, antonymous, hyponymous, colloquial, and register items, and coinages and syntagmatic (38.2%—marked by collocations, metaphors, pleonasms, and lexical fields features. The features are utilised for three ideological ends; namely, picking out and framing participants as perpetrators of the violence in the discourse, evaluating specific entities and their roles in the conflicts, and reducing the impact of the activities of the news actors. Although there are overlaps, the evaluative ideology is largely associated with the national newspaper, the impact reduction ideology with the ND-based newspapers, while the framist ideology is observed in the two sets of newspapers. With these findings the study has added the lexical stylistics angle to the existing scholarship on ND conflict news discourse. Thus, the newspaper reports on ND conflicts are motivated by their ideological goals to change the reader’s outlook on

  17. Variations by Audience Social Class in Newspaper Content Relating to Development for Newspapers in New Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Kurt

    Based on the assumption that newspapers mirror the conceptions of economic development among major groups in society and that analysis of their content may aid in the clarification of group viewpoints, two dimensions along which groups might differ with respect to their conceptions of economic development issues were postulated: the need for…

  18. "Read All about It," and Teach Kids Using School Newspapers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, Raven

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an adaptation from Communicator, 29 (January 2006), 5-6, in which the author discusses the value of a newspaper as well as the benefits of having a student-run newspaper at a school and highlights the use of school newspapers as a teaching tool. A school newspaper is an excellent way for students to practice their writing and…

  19. Caregiving and, Decision-Making For Seniors: How You Can Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Decision-Making For Seniors: How You Can Help Past Issues / Summer 2009 Table of Contents For ... and online resources ( www.nia.nih.gov ) to help older adults, their loved ones, and caregivers manage ...

  20. Reporting on cyclist crashes in Australian newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boufous, Soufiane; Aboss, Ahmad; Montgomery, Victoria

    2016-10-01

    To assess information on cyclist crashes reported in Australian newspapers. The Factiva news archive was searched for articles on cyclist crashes published in major Australian newspapers between 2010 and 2013. Information on the circumstances of cyclist crashes were extracted and coded. A total of 160 cyclist crashes were covered by 198 newspaper articles, with 44% of crashes resulting in cyclist fatalities. Crashes reported by more than one newspaper were more likely to involve public figures or protracted court cases. Individual characteristics of cyclists as well as the location of the crash were reported for more than 80% of crashes. The road user at fault was reported for more than half of crashes. In contrast, information on helmet use, alcohol and cycling lanes was mentioned for only about 10% of crashes. Fewer than one in five articles mentioned prevention strategies including education campaigns, legislative and infrastructure changes. Australian newspapers tend to focus on the most dramatic and more 'newsworthy' aspects of cyclist crashes. Cycling advocates need to work with journalists to improve the quality of this coverage. Better communication between cycling advocates and journalists is likely to have a positive impact on the safety and the uptake of cycling in the community. © 2016 Public Health Association of Australia.

  1. Helping patients make better decisions: how to apply behavioral economics in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney MR

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Maureen Reni Courtney,1 Christy Spivey,2 Kathy M Daniel1 1College of Nursing, 2College of Business, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX, USA  Abstract: Clinicians are committed to effectively educating patients and helping them to make sound decisions concerning their own health care. However, how do clinicians determine what is effective education? How do they present information clearly and in a manner that patients understand and can use to make informed decisions? Behavioral economics (BE is a subfield of economics that can assist clinicians to better understand how individuals actually make decisions. BE research can help guide interactions with patients so that information is presented and discussed in a more deliberate and impactful way. We can be more effective providers of care when we understand the factors that influence how our patients make decisions, factors of which we may have been largely unaware. BE research that focuses on health care and medical decision making is becoming more widely known, and what has been reported suggests that BE interventions can be effective in the medical realm. The purpose of this article is to provide clinicians with an overview of BE decision science and derived practice strategies to promote more effective behavior change in patients.Keywords: nursing, message framing, defaults, incentives, social norms, commitment devices, health care

  2. Enhancing Newspaper's Value as Local Advertising Medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Bruce W.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Finds that, to enhance the value of a newspaper's advertising, newspaper executives seek to broaden the scope of their operations by adding new subscribers and advertisers, while marketers tend to prefer narrowing the focus of operations, serving the existing customer base or concentrating exclusively on select market segments. (SR)

  3. Double Image Design in Newspaper Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Barišić

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the high circulation production of daily newspapers, a double image, double information is set under the rules of Infraredesign theory (Pap et al, 2010. The management of visible and near infrared is posted with process colors for color setting configured for conventional newspaper print. The place of imprint that has delimited information in vs (Visible Spectrum and nir (Near InfraRed is called “a print with an infrared effect,” or conditionally “a print with infrared colors.” Daily newspapers, as massive carriers of information made by printing technique, are receiving a new form of presentation: printed image with a built-in invisible image.

  4. Preparatory Journalism: The College Newspaper as a Pedagogical Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockino, David

    2018-01-01

    This study utilizes a national survey of college newspaper advisers to assess the internal workings of the college newspaper and its value as a pedagogical tool. It finds significant differences between the degree of audience and marketing coupling occurring within college and U.S. daily newspapers as well as differences in student autonomy among…

  5. Modeling Newspaper Advertising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Joseph; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents a mathematical model for simulating a newspaper financial system. Includes the effects of advertising and circulation for predicting advertising linage as a function of population, income, and advertising rate. (RL)

  6. How to breathe when you are short of breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you: Watch TV Use your computer Read a newspaper How to do Pursed lip Breathing The steps ... of Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. Also ...

  7. Trends in US newspaper and television coverage of tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, David E; Pederson, Linda L; Mowery, Paul; Bailey, Sarah; Sevilimedu, Varadan; London, Joel; Babb, Stephen; Pechacek, Terry

    2015-01-01

    The news media plays an important role in agenda setting and framing of stories about tobacco control. The purpose of this study was to examine newspaper, newswire and television coverage of tobacco issues in the USA over a 7-year period. Analyses of 2004-2010 news media surveillance system data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Office on Smoking and Health, based on content analysis and quantitative methods. Information on extent of news coverage, and types of tobacco-related themes, were examined from articles in 10 newspapers and 2 major newswires, as well as transcripts from 6 national television networks. The overall extent of newspaper, newswire and television stories about tobacco, and level of coverage by specific media outlets, varied over time, especially for newspapers. Nevertheless, there was an average of 3 newspaper stories, 4 newswire stories, and 1 television tobacco-related story each day. Television stories were more likely to contain cessation/addiction or health effects/statistics themes and less likely to contain secondhand smoke or policy/regulation themes than newspaper/newswire stories. There was more variation in the choice of tobacco theme among individual newspapers/newswires than television media outlets. News coverage of tobacco in the USA was relatively constant from 2004 to 2010. Audiences were more likely to be exposed to different tobacco themes in newspapers/newswires than on television. Tracking information about tobacco news stories can be used by advocates, programs and others for planning and evaluation, and by researchers for hypothesis generation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. How to implement the Science Fair Self-Help Development Program in schools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menicucci, D.

    1994-01-01

    This manual is intended to act as a working guide for setting up a Science Fair Volunteer Support Committee at your school. The Science Fair Volunteer Support Committee, or SFVSC, is the key component of the Science Fair Self-Help program, which was developed by Sandia National Laboratories and is designed to support a school`s science activities. The SFVSC is a team of parents and community volunteers who work in concert with a school`s teaching staff to assist and manage all areas of a school Science and Engineering Fair. The main advantage of creating such a committee is that it frees the science teachers from the organizational aspects of the fair and lets them concentrate on their job of teaching science. This manual is based on information gained through a Self-Help Development pilot program that was developed by Sandia National Laboratories during the 1991--92 school year at three Albuquerque, NM, middle schools. The manual describes the techniques that were successful in the pilot program and discusses how these techniques might be implemented in other schools. This manual also discusses problems that may be encountered, including suggestions for how they might be resolved.

  9. Polarizing news? Representations of threat and efficacy in leading US newspapers' coverage of climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Lauren; Hart, P Sol; Milosevic, Tijana

    2017-05-01

    This study examines non-editorial news coverage in leading US newspapers as a source of ideological differences on climate change. A quantitative content analysis compared how the threat of climate change and efficacy for actions to address it were represented in climate change coverage across The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, and USA Today between 2006 and 2011. Results show that The Wall Street Journal was least likely to discuss the impacts of and threat posed by climate change and most likely to include negative efficacy information and use conflict and negative economic framing when discussing actions to address climate change. The inclusion of positive efficacy information was similar across newspapers. Also, across all newspapers, climate impacts and actions to address climate change were more likely to be discussed separately than together in the same article. Implications for public engagement and ideological polarization are discussed.

  10. The changing face of newspaper representations of the mentally ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Neil A; Fatoye, Francis; Wibberley, Christopher

    2013-06-01

    Negative stereotypes presented in the media may contribute to the stigma associated with mental illness. People's attitudes towards the mentally ill are initially influenced and subsequently maintained in part by the frequent media presentation of negative stereotypes of mental illness. This could result in social rejection of individuals with mental illnesses. To explore how four main U.K. national newspapers reported on mental health/mental illness stories over a 10-year period. This study utilised content analysis to identify words, themes and trends of representation related to the mentally ill in articles from the four newspapers. The findings indicated that there was an increase in the number of articles related to mental health/illness over the time of the study. The rate of increase was far greater than that for the increase in the total number of articles carried in the press over this time period. It was also identified that pejorative terms were used, in a number of the articles, to describe the mentally ill person. Many of the newspaper reports highlighted the need for protection of the general public from the mentally ill, and that the mentally ill were in some way different to the general public. In particular, both the words "violence" and "drugs" were linked to mental health/mental illness in these articles.

  11. Facilitating Peer Discourse to Support Third Graders' Comprehension of the News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Michelle; Massad, Michael, Sr.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored how one third-grade teacher facilitated daily peer-led discussions around articles from a local newspaper. Two students were assigned to select and summarize an article, then lead a whole-class discussion with the teacher's help. The teacher differentially scaffolded engagement with newspaper articles, adaptively responding to…

  12. How to help teachers' voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatweber, Margarete

    2008-01-01

    It has been shown that teachers are at high risk of developing occupational dysphonia, and it has been widely accepted that the vocal characteristics of a speaker play an important role in determining the reactions of listeners. The functions of breathing, breathing movement, breathing tonus, voice vibrations and articulation tonus are transmitted to the listener. So we may conclude that listening to the teacher's voice at school influences children's behavior and the perception of spoken language. This paper presents the concept of Schlaffhorst-Andersen including exercises to help teachers improve their voice, breathing, movement and their posture. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. The Student Newspaper; Report of the Special Commission on the Student Press to the President of the University of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Council on Education, Washington, DC.

    The Commission on the Student Press was appointed by the President of the University of California to assess the nature, role and quality of student newspapers at the University of California's campuses and ascertain their degree of effectiveness in meeting student needs. The Commission also considered such issues as (1) how should the student…

  14. From journal to headline: the accuracy of climate science news in Danish high quality newspapers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergård, Gunver Lystbæk

    2011-01-01

    analysis to examine the accuracy of Danish high quality newspapers in quoting scientific publications from 1997 to 2009. Out of 88 articles, 46 contained inaccuracies though the majority was found to be insignificant and random. The study concludes that Danish broadsheet newspapers are ‘moderately...

  15. Introducing the e-newspaper - Audience Preferences and Demands

    OpenAIRE

    C.Ihlström Eriksson; M.Å. kesson

    2007-01-01

    This paper adds to the overall understanding of new media adoption in general and the promotion of the e-newspaper in particular by empirically studying the preferences and demands of the potential users. The e-newspaper is a newspaper published on e-paper technology. The findings in this paper is based on the results from two studies, i.e. an online questionnaire with 3626 respondents and an evaluation in real life settings with 10 families over a two week period. Our initial hypothesis was ...

  16. Media content analysis of the Fukushima accident in two Belgian newspapers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perko, T.; Turcanu, C.; Geenen, D.; Mamane, N.; Van Rooy, L.

    2011-01-01

    In case of a nuclear accident, the media play a major role in communicating with the public. It is therefore crucial to know what messages are the media delivering in a nuclear emergency and how do they frame the event. Analysing the media reporting on the Fukushima nuclear accident can benefit nuclear emergency management in two major aspects. On the one hand, such analysis shows how to deliver risk messages effectively through the media and on the other hand, it brings insights into the information that has to be communicated by the emergency managers to the mass media. The media analysis of the nuclear accident in Fukushima reported here was done by means of discourse and content analysis. The coding method followed explicit rules of coding and enabled large quantities of data to be categorized. The newspapers included in the analysis were the Belgian newspapers Le Soir (French language) and De Standaard (Dutch language). The media news were obtained from press clippings by Media data base at University Antwerp - MEDIARGUS for the period between 11th of March to 11th of May, 2011.

  17. Newspaper Review Show in the Broadcast Media Space in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Nyarko

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ghana’s public sphere has witnessed a growing media presence which has enhanced the relay of information to the citizenry. By this, society is given a full spectrum of alternatives to access media. Amid this atmosphere is a platform labeled the “Newspaper Review Show” which appears to have generated some sort of contention since its inception among newspaper publishers on one hand and broadcast stations on the other. Using an exploratory qualitative approach, this study has shown that review of newspaper content is pervasive in the landscape and the selective style of review of major agenda has affected readership, revenue of newspaper outlets, and reading culture, among others. However, the article also contended that falling readership is attributed to some factors other than only review of newspaper content.

  18. Supply chain risk management of newspaper industry: A quantitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartika, Viny; Hisjam, Muh.; Sutopo, Wahyudi

    2018-02-01

    The newspaper industry has several distinctive features that make it stands out from other industries. The strict delivery deadline and zero inventory led to a very short time frame for production and distribution. On the other hand, there is pressure from the newsroom to encourage the start of production as slowly as possible in order to enter the news, while there is pressure from production and distribution to start production as early as possible. Supply chain risk management is needed in determining the best strategy for dealing with possible risks in the newspaper industry. In a case study of a newspaper in Surakarta, quantitative approaches are made to the newspaper supply chain risk management by calculating the expected cost of risk based on the magnitude of the impact and the probability of a risk event. From the calculation results obtained that the five risks with the highest value are newspaper delays to the end customer, broken plate, miss print, down machine, and delayed delivery of newspaper content. Then analyzed appropriate mitigation strategies to cope with such risk events.

  19. Diabetes: How and RDN Can Help with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that your daily cup (or three!) provides some health benefits. How an RDN Can Help with Diabetes Maintaining ... Keep Your Picnic Safe Food Safety Tips for Outdoor Dining Keep Your Picnic Safe Dads and Breast- ...

  20. Risk in Daily Newspaper Coverage of Red Tide Blooms in Southwest Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zongchao; Garrison, Bruce; Ullmann, Steven G.; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Fleming, Lora E.; Hoagland, Porter

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated newspaper coverage of Florida red tide blooms in four metropolitan areas of Southwest Florida during a 25-year period, 1987-2012. We focused on how journalists framed red tide stories with respect to environmental risk, health risk, and economic risk. We determined risk to be a key factor in this news coverage, being an…

  1. Newspaper and internet display advertising: Co-existence or substitution?

    OpenAIRE

    Lindstädt, Nadine; Budzinski, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Newspapers have been experiencing declining circulation figures and diminishing advertising revenues for several years – both effects might pose a threat to the continuing existence of (print) newspapers. In an earlier paper, Lindstädt & Budzinski (2011) argued from a theoretical viewpoint that industry-specific patterns exist that determine substitution or complementation effects between internet and newspaper advertising. It was argued that retail advertising, in particular, may offer a nic...

  2. The Use of Newspaper Articles as a Tool to Develop Critical Thinking in Science Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveras, Begoña; Márquez, Conxita; Sanmartí, Neus

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this research is to identify the difficulties experienced by secondary school students (aged 15-16) with the critical reading of newspaper articles with scientific content. Two newspaper critical reading activities in relation to the study of various scientific contents were designed and carried out in two schools (61 students in total), one with a student population from a medium to high social and economic bracket and the other with students from a medium to low social and economic bracket. These activities were designed taking into account the phases of the reading process: before, during and after reading. In order to analyse the difficulties 'Elements of science critical reading' were identified on the basis of the 'Elements of reasoning' of Paul and Elder and the categories proposed by Bartz C.R.I.T.I.C. questionnaire and a scale was drawn up. The results show that the activities designed were useful in helping students to read critically. We also rated very positively the instrument created to assess the students' answers: the scale based on the performance indicators of Paul and Elder. This instrument enabled us to detect the aspects of critical thinking where students have the most difficulties: identifying the writer's purpose and looking for evidence in a text. It was also shown that the stance taken in the articles also had an influence on the results.

  3. Online and print newspapers in Europe in 2003. Evolving towards complementarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wurff, R.; Lauf, E.; Balčytienė, A.; Fortunati, L.; Holmberg, S.L.; Paulussen, S.; Salaverría, R.

    2008-01-01

    This article assesses online newspapers in Europe from a media evolutionary perspective, ten years after the introduction of the World Wide Web. Comparing print and online front pages of 51 newspapers in 14 countries in 2003, we argue that online newspapers complement print newspapers in modest

  4. Everything but "Censorship": How U.S. Newspapers Have Framed Student Free Speech and Press, 1969-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, Megan E.

    2010-01-01

    Legal scholars rarely focus on student First Amendment rights, and general public understanding of the extent of these rights is vague at best. While media scholars have focused much attention on newspaper coverage of more mainstream issues, no notable attention has been given to examining the way news media cover student First Amendment rights.…

  5. News media representations of electronic cigarettes: an analysis of newspaper coverage in the UK and Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooke, Catriona; Amos, Amanda

    2014-11-01

    Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems (ENDS) have recently been attracting interest for their potential as a less harmful alternative to smoking, their rising popularity and the regulatory issues they raise. The news media can play an important role in shaping public perceptions of new technologies. It is, therefore, important to understand the ways the news media present ENDS. This paper examines how ENDS are represented in the UK and in the Scottish press. Twelve national UK and Scottish newspapers and the three most popular online news sources were searched between 2007 and 2012. A thematic analysis was conducted to explore how the meanings, uses and users of ENDS are presented, and whether and how this has changed. Newspaper coverage of ENDS increased substantially over this period. Five key themes emerged from the analysis: getting around smokefree legislation; risk and uncertainty; healthier choice; celebrity use; price. Drawing on the diffusion of innovations theory, we suggest that newspaper constructions of ENDS provide readers with important information about what ENDS are for, how they work, and their relative advantages. These themes, and dominance of more positive meanings, raise a number of issues for tobacco control, including concerns around celebrity use and promotion; the impact of increasing ENDS use on social norms around smoking; their potential to undermine smokefree legislation; and their promotion as effective cessation aids. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Problems and possibilities of digital newspaper and periodical archives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Smits

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital newspaper archives are the most widely used resource for digital humanities research. The basic functionality of these archives – the ability to perform keyword searches across multiple titles – is unlikely to change. This means that researchers can safely develop a digital methodology without having to fear that new technology will make their efforts obsolete. On the basis of this observation, this article discusses three methodological problems of the digital newspaper archive. First, it provides unequal access to both different scholars and historical periods. Second, it tends to ignore the historical form of media landscapes. Third, the digital mediation of newspapers and periodicals results in a problematic loss of context. This article proposes that the solution to these problems lies in the assertion of agency over the digital newspaper archive and in the debates surrounding them by researchers. They should see digital newspaper archive as any other paper archive: with its own possibilities and limitations, which can be adjusted by the researcher.  

  7. How Configuration Management Helps Projects Innovate and Communicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioletti, Louis A.; Guidry, Carla F.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the concept of Configuration Management (CM) and compares it to the standard view of Project management (PM). It presents two PM models: (1) Kepner-Tregoe,, and the Deming models, describes why projects fail, and presents methods of how CM helps projects innovate and communicate.

  8. Assessment of Newspaper Advocacy for Rural Development and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of Newspaper Advocacy for Rural Development and Environmental Education in Nigeria. ... Journal of Agricultural Extension ... It analyzed five leading national newspapers for a period of twelve months to ascertain their level of coverage and reportage of environmental and rural development information and ...

  9. Newspaper Ideabook: Creative Advertising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasler, Wayne

    1977-01-01

    Offers suggestions to high school newspaper staffs for designing effective advertisements for local businesses and then selling them to the businesses. Notes that carefully planned advertisements can increase the appeal and value of a publication. (GW)

  10. Collusion and the Political Differentiation of Newspapers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonielli, M.; Filistrucchi, L.

    2011-01-01

    We analyse a newspaper market where two editors compete for advertising as well as for readership. They first choose the political position of their newspaper, then set cover prices and advertising tariffs. We build on the work of Gabszewicz, Laussel and Sonnac (2001, 2002), whose model we take as

  11. How Potassium Can Help Control High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aneurysm More How Potassium Can Help Control High Blood Pressure Updated:Jan 29,2018 Understanding the heart-healthy ... This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  12. The Way of Representation of Ideology in Local and International Newspapers about Iran’s Nuclear Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gity Taki

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ideology is a meaningful structure that involves in production, reproduction and changing unequal power relations. By means of meaning, ideology connects to discourse and language which is the device of meaning production. Ideologies are generated and transformed in actual discursive events. Press headlines are also discursive events. Based on critical discourse analysis and by using Van Leeuwen's theoretical framework (1996 and socio-semantic features of the framework like exclusion, inclusion, appraisement, association and differentiation, this study will try to analyze the way of representation of ideologies about Iran's nuclear program in a selection of national and international newspapers’ headlines during 2011-2012. By determining and comparing the frequency of the socio-semantic features during 2011- 2012, this question will be answered that how ideology is represented in national and international newspapers about Iran's nuclear program by using socio-semantic features during 2011- 2012, and whether the way of representation and the amount of these features are the same in both groups? To do this 242 headlines of two national newspapers, Keyhan and Iran, and two foreign newspapers, The Washington post and The Guardian were selected. Then the headlines were analyzed by using an analytical–descriptive method. The findings showed that both local and international newspapers use the same kind of features to reflect the news, but the amount of the features, especially in using of exclusion, and the way they are used, is different according to the newspaper's policy. In fact by utilizing specific features, the newspapers actually show the ideology they advocate. Actually having different ideologies have led to use the features in different ways.

  13. Advanced Newspaper Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Michael

    1980-01-01

    Describes various methods for using the newspaper for reading and listening comprehension. Headlines are cut out and arranged on a sheet of paper and the students must expand on these headlines. Articles can be read and discussed. Certain words in a horoscope can be blacked out for the student to fill in. (PJM)

  14. Alcohol and tobacco advertising in black and general audience newspapers: targeting with message cues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Elisia L; Caburnay, Charlene A; Rodgers, Shelly

    2011-07-01

    This study content analyzed 928 tobacco- and alcohol-related advertisements from a 3-year national sample of Black (n = 24) and general audience (n = 11) newspapers from 24 U.S. cities. The authors compared the frequency of tobacco and alcohol product and control advertising in Black versus general audience newspapers, as well as the presence of 5 message cues: model ethnicity, presence of health official, referral to resources, personal behavior mobilization, and localization. Results within health issues show that Black newspapers had more alcohol product advertising than did general audience newspapers. In contrast, Black newspapers had less alcohol and tobacco control advertising than general audience newspapers. Black newspapers' tobacco/alcohol product advertisements had more African American models than did general audience newspapers' tobacco/alcohol advertising, whereas general audience newspapers' tobacco control advertisements were significantly more likely to feature public health officials than ads in Black newspapers. Fewer message cues such as personal behavior mobilization, referral to resources, and localization were present in Black versus general audience newspapers. Results suggest that Black newspapers may have greater dependency than do general audience newspapers on these risk-related advertisements that target African American consumers. Given the current advertising environment, public health initiatives are needed to counter unhealthy alcohol product advertising messages that target vulnerable populations.

  15. Exploring the agenda-setting potential of homeland online newspapers on perceptions of elections issues among diasporic Nigerians in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lambe Kayode Mustapha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The increasing transnational migration of people and availability of homeland newspapers on the web have stimulated interest in the understanding of the use and effects of homeland media on a nation’s foreign residents. This study explores the relationship between the agenda covered in three Nigerian online newspapers (N=260 and how they were perceived by Nigerian students in Malaysia (N=350 during the 2011 Nigerian presidential election. Specifically, the issues in online newspapers and their location (homepage and index and length were compared with the issues perceived as being important by Nigerian students in Malaysia. Comparing content analysis data with survey responses, the findings revealed a modest but plausible support for the agenda-setting potential of the online newspapers. In view of the established correspondence between issues that are salient in the news and issues perceived by the readers, the study establishes the importance of homeland online media to political cognitions and actions among diasporic Nigerians. It also suggests the need to explore other cues in the online newspapers capable of raising the salience of issues in the perceptions of the Nigerian diaspora.

  16. Vegaphobia: derogatory discourses of veganism and the reproduction of speciesism in UK national newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Matthew; Morgan, Karen

    2011-03-01

    This paper critically examines discourses of veganism in UK national newspapers in 2007. In setting parameters for what can and cannot easily be discussed, dominant discourses also help frame understanding. Discourses relating to veganism are therefore presented as contravening commonsense, because they fall outside readily understood meat-eating discourses. Newspapers tend to discredit veganism through ridicule, or as being difficult or impossible to maintain in practice. Vegans are variously stereotyped as ascetics, faddists, sentimentalists, or in some cases, hostile extremists. The overall effect is of a derogatory portrayal of vegans and veganism that we interpret as 'vegaphobia'. We interpret derogatory discourses of veganism in UK national newspapers as evidence of the cultural reproduction of speciesism, through which veganism is dissociated from its connection with debates concerning nonhuman animals' rights or liberation. This is problematic in three, interrelated, respects. First, it empirically misrepresents the experience of veganism, and thereby marginalizes vegans. Second, it perpetuates a moral injury to omnivorous readers who are not presented with the opportunity to understand veganism and the challenge to speciesism that it contains. Third, and most seriously, it obscures and thereby reproduces exploitative and violent relations between human and nonhuman animals. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2011.

  17. Evaluating and Recommending Greek Newspapers' Websites Using Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanellopoulos, Dimitris; Kotsiantis, Sotiris

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to evaluate Greek newspaper websites using clustering and a number of criteria obtained from the Alexa search engine. Furthermore, a recommendation approach is proposed for matching Greek online newspapers with the profiles of potential readers. The paper presents the implementation and validation of a recommender…

  18. Cultural Influences on Toddlers' Prosocial Behavior: How Maternal Task Assignment Relates to Helping Others

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köster, Moritz; Cavalcante, Lilia; Vera Cruz de Carvalho, Rafael; Dôgo Resende, Briseida; Kärtner, Joscha

    2016-01-01

    This cross-cultural study investigates how maternal task assignment relates to toddlers' requested behavior and helping between 18 and 30 months. One hundred seven mother-child dyads were assessed in three different cultural contexts (rural Brazil, urban Germany, and urban Brazil). Brazilian mothers showed assertive scaffolding (serious and…

  19. Poor replication validity of biomedical association studies reported by newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas-Mallet, Estelle; Smith, Andy; Boraud, Thomas; Gonon, François

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the replication validity of biomedical association studies covered by newspapers. We used a database of 4723 primary studies included in 306 meta-analysis articles. These studies associated a risk factor with a disease in three biomedical domains, psychiatry, neurology and four somatic diseases. They were classified into a lifestyle category (e.g. smoking) and a non-lifestyle category (e.g. genetic risk). Using the database Dow Jones Factiva, we investigated the newspaper coverage of each study. Their replication validity was assessed using a comparison with their corresponding meta-analyses. Among the 5029 articles of our database, 156 primary studies (of which 63 were lifestyle studies) and 5 meta-analysis articles were reported in 1561 newspaper articles. The percentage of covered studies and the number of newspaper articles per study strongly increased with the impact factor of the journal that published each scientific study. Newspapers almost equally covered initial (5/39 12.8%) and subsequent (58/600 9.7%) lifestyle studies. In contrast, initial non-lifestyle studies were covered more often (48/366 13.1%) than subsequent ones (45/3718 1.2%). Newspapers never covered initial studies reporting null findings and rarely reported subsequent null observations. Only 48.7% of the 156 studies reported by newspapers were confirmed by the corresponding meta-analyses. Initial non-lifestyle studies were less often confirmed (16/48) than subsequent ones (29/45) and than lifestyle studies (31/63). Psychiatric studies covered by newspapers were less often confirmed (10/38) than the neurological (26/41) or somatic (40/77) ones. This is correlated to an even larger coverage of initial studies in psychiatry. Whereas 234 newspaper articles covered the 35 initial studies that were later disconfirmed, only four press articles covered a subsequent null finding and mentioned the refutation of an initial claim. Journalists preferentially cover initial findings

  20. Poor replication validity of biomedical association studies reported by newspapers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estelle Dumas-Mallet

    Full Text Available To investigate the replication validity of biomedical association studies covered by newspapers.We used a database of 4723 primary studies included in 306 meta-analysis articles. These studies associated a risk factor with a disease in three biomedical domains, psychiatry, neurology and four somatic diseases. They were classified into a lifestyle category (e.g. smoking and a non-lifestyle category (e.g. genetic risk. Using the database Dow Jones Factiva, we investigated the newspaper coverage of each study. Their replication validity was assessed using a comparison with their corresponding meta-analyses.Among the 5029 articles of our database, 156 primary studies (of which 63 were lifestyle studies and 5 meta-analysis articles were reported in 1561 newspaper articles. The percentage of covered studies and the number of newspaper articles per study strongly increased with the impact factor of the journal that published each scientific study. Newspapers almost equally covered initial (5/39 12.8% and subsequent (58/600 9.7% lifestyle studies. In contrast, initial non-lifestyle studies were covered more often (48/366 13.1% than subsequent ones (45/3718 1.2%. Newspapers never covered initial studies reporting null findings and rarely reported subsequent null observations. Only 48.7% of the 156 studies reported by newspapers were confirmed by the corresponding meta-analyses. Initial non-lifestyle studies were less often confirmed (16/48 than subsequent ones (29/45 and than lifestyle studies (31/63. Psychiatric studies covered by newspapers were less often confirmed (10/38 than the neurological (26/41 or somatic (40/77 ones. This is correlated to an even larger coverage of initial studies in psychiatry. Whereas 234 newspaper articles covered the 35 initial studies that were later disconfirmed, only four press articles covered a subsequent null finding and mentioned the refutation of an initial claim.Journalists preferentially cover initial findings

  1. Poor replication validity of biomedical association studies reported by newspapers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andy; Boraud, Thomas; Gonon, François

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the replication validity of biomedical association studies covered by newspapers. Methods We used a database of 4723 primary studies included in 306 meta-analysis articles. These studies associated a risk factor with a disease in three biomedical domains, psychiatry, neurology and four somatic diseases. They were classified into a lifestyle category (e.g. smoking) and a non-lifestyle category (e.g. genetic risk). Using the database Dow Jones Factiva, we investigated the newspaper coverage of each study. Their replication validity was assessed using a comparison with their corresponding meta-analyses. Results Among the 5029 articles of our database, 156 primary studies (of which 63 were lifestyle studies) and 5 meta-analysis articles were reported in 1561 newspaper articles. The percentage of covered studies and the number of newspaper articles per study strongly increased with the impact factor of the journal that published each scientific study. Newspapers almost equally covered initial (5/39 12.8%) and subsequent (58/600 9.7%) lifestyle studies. In contrast, initial non-lifestyle studies were covered more often (48/366 13.1%) than subsequent ones (45/3718 1.2%). Newspapers never covered initial studies reporting null findings and rarely reported subsequent null observations. Only 48.7% of the 156 studies reported by newspapers were confirmed by the corresponding meta-analyses. Initial non-lifestyle studies were less often confirmed (16/48) than subsequent ones (29/45) and than lifestyle studies (31/63). Psychiatric studies covered by newspapers were less often confirmed (10/38) than the neurological (26/41) or somatic (40/77) ones. This is correlated to an even larger coverage of initial studies in psychiatry. Whereas 234 newspaper articles covered the 35 initial studies that were later disconfirmed, only four press articles covered a subsequent null finding and mentioned the refutation of an initial claim. Conclusion Journalists

  2. Newspaper Suppression During the Mexican War, 1846-1848.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Tom

    A number of scholars have found that wartime conditions often bring about conflict between the press and the military. This study documents the various incidents between the United States Army and various Mexican and United States newspaper editors that led to at least ten cases of newspaper suppression, the occasional use of prior censorship, and…

  3. Chinese newspaper coverage of genetically modified organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Li

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Debates persist around the world over the development and use of genetically modified organisms (GMO. News media has been shown to both reflect and influence public perceptions of health and science related debates, as well as policy development. To better understand the news coverage of GMOs in China, we analyzed the content of articles in two Chinese newspapers that relate to the development and promotion of genetically modified technologies and GMOs. Methods Searching in the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Core Newspaper Database (CNKI-CND, we collected 77 articles, including news reports, comments and notes, published between January 2002 and August 2011 in two of the major Chinese newspapers: People’s Daily and Guangming Daily. We examined articles for perspectives that were discussed and/or mentioned regarding GMOs, the risks and benefits of GMOs, and the tone of news articles. Results The newspaper articles reported on 29 different kinds of GMOs. Compared with the possible risks, the benefits of GMOs were much more frequently discussed in the articles. 48.1% of articles were largely supportive of the GM technology research and development programs and the adoption of GM cottons, while 51.9% of articles were neutral on the subject of GMOs. Risks associated with GMOs were mentioned in the newspaper articles, but none of the articles expressed negative tones in regards to GMOs. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the Chinese print media is largely supportive of GMOs. It also indicates that the print media describes the Chinese government as actively pursuing national GMO research and development programs and the promotion of GM cotton usage. So far, discussion of the risks associated with GMOs is minimal in the news reports. The media, scientists, and the government should work together to ensure that science communication is accurate and balanced.

  4. Chinese newspaper coverage of genetically modified organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Debates persist around the world over the development and use of genetically modified organisms (GMO). News media has been shown to both reflect and influence public perceptions of health and science related debates, as well as policy development. To better understand the news coverage of GMOs in China, we analyzed the content of articles in two Chinese newspapers that relate to the development and promotion of genetically modified technologies and GMOs. Methods Searching in the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Core Newspaper Database (CNKI-CND), we collected 77 articles, including news reports, comments and notes, published between January 2002 and August 2011 in two of the major Chinese newspapers: People’s Daily and Guangming Daily. We examined articles for perspectives that were discussed and/or mentioned regarding GMOs, the risks and benefits of GMOs, and the tone of news articles. Results The newspaper articles reported on 29 different kinds of GMOs. Compared with the possible risks, the benefits of GMOs were much more frequently discussed in the articles. 48.1% of articles were largely supportive of the GM technology research and development programs and the adoption of GM cottons, while 51.9% of articles were neutral on the subject of GMOs. Risks associated with GMOs were mentioned in the newspaper articles, but none of the articles expressed negative tones in regards to GMOs. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the Chinese print media is largely supportive of GMOs. It also indicates that the print media describes the Chinese government as actively pursuing national GMO research and development programs and the promotion of GM cotton usage. So far, discussion of the risks associated with GMOs is minimal in the news reports. The media, scientists, and the government should work together to ensure that science communication is accurate and balanced. PMID:22551150

  5. Chinese newspaper coverage of genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Li; Rachul, Christen

    2012-06-08

    Debates persist around the world over the development and use of genetically modified organisms (GMO). News media has been shown to both reflect and influence public perceptions of health and science related debates, as well as policy development. To better understand the news coverage of GMOs in China, we analyzed the content of articles in two Chinese newspapers that relate to the development and promotion of genetically modified technologies and GMOs. Searching in the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Core Newspaper Database (CNKI-CND), we collected 77 articles, including news reports, comments and notes, published between January 2002 and August 2011 in two of the major Chinese newspapers: People's Daily and Guangming Daily. We examined articles for perspectives that were discussed and/or mentioned regarding GMOs, the risks and benefits of GMOs, and the tone of news articles. The newspaper articles reported on 29 different kinds of GMOs. Compared with the possible risks, the benefits of GMOs were much more frequently discussed in the articles. 48.1% of articles were largely supportive of the GM technology research and development programs and the adoption of GM cottons, while 51.9% of articles were neutral on the subject of GMOs. Risks associated with GMOs were mentioned in the newspaper articles, but none of the articles expressed negative tones in regards to GMOs. This study demonstrates that the Chinese print media is largely supportive of GMOs. It also indicates that the print media describes the Chinese government as actively pursuing national GMO research and development programs and the promotion of GM cotton usage. So far, discussion of the risks associated with GMOs is minimal in the news reports. The media, scientists, and the government should work together to ensure that science communication is accurate and balanced.

  6. COVERING RACE AND RELIGION: THE MOORTHY AND NYONYA TAHIR CASES IN FOUR MALAYSIAN NEWSPAPERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngu Teck Hua

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Reporting on issues like race and religion in a multi-racial and multi-religious society is not an easy media responsibility. In a country like Malaysia where racial and religious sensitivities abound, the media have to constantly tread on precarious ground, balancing between what to write and how to write it. Much of the concern over the reporting of sensitive issues stems from the belief that a wrong move may have dire consequences, as seen in the recent controversy and furore over the Prophet Muhammad caricature published in the Danish newspaper, Jyllands-Posten.This study analyses two recent racial/religious issues – M. Moorthy and Nyonya Tahir cases – as reported in the New Straits Times (NST, Utusan Malaysia (UM, Malaysia Nanban (MN and Sin Chew Daily (SCD. The former case caused a stir when there was a tussle between Moorthy’s Indian/Hindu family and the Federal Territory Islamic Affairs Council which argued that Moorthy had converted to Islam when he was alive without the family’s knowledge. The latter was a case of a Malay/Muslim woman who, while alive, had denounced Islam and lived as a Chinese practising Buddhism.This study analyses how the two race and religion-related controversial issues were treated in the various language newspapers in Malaysia. A preliminary finding showed that, true to the communal nature of the Malaysian press, there was an apparent slant in how the ethnic press covered these two issues. For instance, in terms of prominence given to the stories, SCD, while downplaying the Moorthy story, dedicated more space to the Nyonya Tahir case. Similarly, MN highlighted the Moorthy story and downplayed the Nyonya Tahir case. The different newspapers were also seen to ''favour'' the subject they covered according to the ethnicity.

  7. How the causes, consequences and solutions for problem gambling are reported in Australian newspapers: a qualitative content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Helen E; Thomas, Samantha L; Robinson, Priscilla; Daube, Mike

    2014-12-01

    To inform public health approaches to problem gambling by examining how the news media covers problem gambling, with a particular focus on the causes, consequences and solutions to problem gambling, and the 'actors' and sources who influence media coverage. A qualitative content analysis guided by framing theory analysed coverage of problem gambling in Australian newspapers in the period 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2012. Solutions to problem gambling were more frequently discussed than causes and consequences. A focus on the responsibility of individuals was preferred to reporting that focused on broader social, ecological, and industry determinants of problem gambling. Reporting was highly politicised, with politicians frequently quoted and political issues frequently discussed. In contrast, the community sector, health professionals and problem gamblers were rarely quoted. This analysis has revealed the need for a more proactive, coordinated approach to the media by both public health researchers and health groups. The establishment of a gambling-specific coalition to push for evidence-based reform is recommended. © 2014 Public Health Association of Australia.

  8. Bioethics and the newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, M

    1999-04-01

    Many bioethics questions are resistant to journalistic exploration on account of their inherently philosophical dimensions. Such dimensions are ill-suited to what we may term the internal goods (in MacIntyre's sense) of the newspapers and mass media generally, which constrain newspaper coverage to an abbreviated form of narrative that, whilst not in itself objectionable, is nonetheless inimical to the conduct of philosophical reflection. The internal goods of academic bioethics, by contrast, include attention to philosophical questions inherent in bioethical issues and value-enquiry. The danger for bioethics is that its agenda for reflective enquiry will, if dictated by this abbreviated narrative, be distorted in terms of both range and priorities, to the inevitable neglect of questions having a philosophical dimension to them. This danger can be avoided by a constructive partnership between the media and academic bioethics. The success of this partnership relies on four suggested provisos, for the meeting of which both journalists and academics bear responsibility.

  9. The Cross-Elasticity of Demand for National Newspaper Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busterna, John C.

    1987-01-01

    Measures the extent to which other media compete with newspapers in the market for national advertising, using coefficients of the cross-elasticity of demand between newspapers and eight other media. Concluded that no other media reside in the same product market for national advertising. (MM)

  10. Framing Autism: A Content Analysis of Five Major News Frames in U.S.-Based Newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendorf Muhamad, Jessica; Yang, Fan

    2017-03-01

    The portrayal of child autism-related news stories has become a serious issue in the United States, yet few studies address this from media framing perspective. To fill this gap in the literature, this study examined the applicability of a media framing scale (Semetko & Valkenburg, 2000) for the deductive examination of autism-related news stories in U.S.-based newspapers. Under the theoretical framework of framing theory, a content analysis of news stories (N = 413) was conducted to investigate the presence of the five news frames using an established questionnaire. Differentiating between local and national news outlets, the following five news frames were measured: (a) attribution of responsibility, (b) human interest, (c) conflict, (d) morality, and (e) economic consequences. Findings revealed that news stories about autism most frequently fell within the human interest frame. Furthermore, the study shed light on how local and national newspapers might differ in framing autism-related news pieces and in their placement of the autism-related story within the newspaper (e.g., front page section, community section).

  11. In the Public Eye: Swedish School Inspection and Local Newspapers: Exploring the Audit-Media Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronnberg, Linda; Lindgren, Joakim; Segerholm, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the dual dependencies apparent at the intersection of the media society and the audit society by empirically exploring and discussing the relationship between Swedish local newspaper coverage and school inspection activities. The research questions pertain to the Inspectorate's media strategy, how inspection is represented…

  12. 'Appeals to nature' in marriage equality debates: A content analysis of newspaper and social media discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Cliodhna

    2017-09-01

    In May 2015, Ireland held a referendum to legalize same-sex marriage, which passed with 62% of the vote. This study explores the role played by 'appeals to nature' in the referendum debate. Little research has investigated how biological attributions are spontaneously generated in real-world discourse regarding sexual rights. Through content analysis of newspaper and Twitter discussion of the referendum, this study aims to (1) establish the frequency of appeals to nature and their distribution across the various 'sides' of the debate and (2) analyse the forms these natural claims took and the rhetorical functions they fulfilled. Appeals to nature occurred in a minority of media discussion of the referendum (13.6% of newspaper articles and .3% of tweets). They were more prominent in material produced by anti-marriage equality commentators. Biological attributions predominantly occurred in relation to parenthood, traditional marriage, gender, and homosexuality. The article analyses the rhetorical dynamics of these natural claims and considers the implications for marriage equality research and activism. The analysis suggests appeals to nature allow anti-marriage equality discourse adapt to a cultural context that proscribes outright disapproval of same-sex relationships. However, it also queries whether previous research has overemphasized the significance of biological attributions in discourse about groups' rights. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  13. "I dumped my husband for a Turkish toyboy": romance tourism and intersectionality in British tabloid newspapers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamid-Turksoy, N.; van Zoonen, L.; Kuipers, G.M.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we analyse how British tabloid newspapers represent relationships between mature British women and the younger Turkish toyboy lovers they meet (and sometimes look for) on their holiday; a practice that is often considered as the female counterpart to male sex tourism, albeit

  14. "No Thank You, We'd Rather Not": The Rights and Policies of Daily Newspapers Relating to Refusals to Accept Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utt, Sandra H.; Pasternack, Steve

    A study investigated the types of advertisements newspapers refuse as well as the attitudes of advertising managers about guidelines and laws concerning advertising refusal. Newspapers were selected from the "1985 Editor and Publisher Yearbook" using a systematic probability sampling method, and questionnaires were mailed to advertising…

  15. Readership of Oriwu Sun community newspaper in Ikorodu, Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Community newspapers are designed to fill the information gap created by the urban-centric nature of conventional media houses. This aim cannot be achieved without reading the disseminated messages by the target population. This study assessed the readership of Oriwu Sun community newspaper in Ikorodu area of ...

  16. Analysis of the Science and Technology Narrative within Organ Donation and Transplantation Coverage in Canadian Newspapers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Cheung

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Organ failure is one cause of death. Advancements in scientific research and technological development made organ transplantation possible and continue to find better ways to substitute failed organs with other organs of biological origin or artificial organs. Media, including newspapers, are one source of information for the public. The purpose of this study was to examine to what extent and how science and technology research and development are covered in the organ transplantation and organ donation (ODOT coverage of n = 300 Canadian newspapers, including the two Canadian newspapers with national reach (The Globe and Mail, National Post. The study generated qualitative and quantitative data addressing the following issues: (1 which scientific and technological developments are mentioned in the ODOT coverage; and (2 what issues are mentioned in the coverage of scientific and technological advancements linked to ODOT. We found little to no coverage of many technological and scientific advancements evident in academic and grey literature covering ODOT, and we found little engagement with social and ethical issues already raised about these advancements in the literature. The only area we found to be covered to a broader extent was xenotransplantation, although the coverage stopped after 2002. We argue that the newspaper coverage of ODOT under reports scientific and technological advancements related to ODOT and the issues these advancements might raise.

  17. Framing crime: moral panic in Argentine newspapers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia ARUGUETE

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carolina Píparo was shot a few minutes after withdrawing cash from a bank branch. This case outraged the public opinion because she was eight months pregnant at the moment of the assault. She had to undergo a caesarean section and her baby only survived one week. Through an exploratory and inductive research we will analyze how the Argentine newspapers presented the case. We aim at elaborating a content analysis code book that can be validated in future similar researches on the subject. We apply the Framing theory in order to detect the frames used in the news coverage and to observe if they are compatible with the idea of «moral panic» proposed by Stanley Cohen.

  18. The Cross-Roads to Digital: Newspaper Models and the Change to an Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth COSGROVE

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The slow growth in online marketing revenue for newspapers and the industry’s development of online models has not been enough to stop the industry’s pending demise. This problem has arisen from the increased access to free and more recent content on the internet, supplying the consumers with their demand for news. Due to the abundant information available on the internet, consumers are used to having the information they want almost instantly. Newspapers are only one of many suppliers for this demand. The industry’s focus centres on whether they can they keep up with the rapid pace of demand for information and maintain a profitable organization. This paper first analyzes the current research trends, and the different industry business models. The paper then identifies the key attributes of the industry business models. The paper finally validates that the identified attributes can be used to predict the potential success of the newly introduced business models in the industry.

  19. Newspaper Coverage of the Harvard Medicare Project: Regional Distinctions/Discreet Disregard?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, J. Gregory

    A study examined American newspaper coverage of the Harvard Medicare Project proposal of 1986, a major health policy proposal calling for comprehensive reforms in the national health program. Using Burrelle's news clipping service which includes every daily newspaper (over 1500) in the United States, all 75 newspaper articles on the project from…

  20. Students' Attitudes to Information in the Press: Critical Reading of a Newspaper Article With Scientific Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveras, B.; Márquez, C.; Sanmartí, N.

    2014-08-01

    This research analyses what happens when a critical reading activity based on a press article dealing with an energy-related problem is implemented with two groups of students of 13-14 years old and 16-17 years old in the same school (a total of 117 students). Specifically, the research analyses the students' profiles from the standpoint of their attitudes to the information given in the news story and the use they make of it when writing an argumentative text. It also analyses the difficulties the students have when it comes to applying their knowledge about energy in a real-life context. Lastly, some strategies are suggested for helping students to critically analyse the scientific content of a newspaper article. Three reader profiles were identified (the credulous reader, the ideological reader and the critical reader). No significant differences were found in reading profiles in terms of age or scientific knowledge. The findings show that the activity helped to link science learning in school with facts relating to an actual context, particularly in the case of students with more science knowledge.

  1. Nostalgic constructions of nurse education in British national newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, Karen

    2014-11-01

    To explore nostalgic constructions of nurse education in British National newspapers. British newspaper discourse relating to the increased academic level of nurse education in the UK is negative, evoking comparisons between negative constructions of nurse education in the present and an idealized nostalgic view of the past. Discussion paper. This study used a critical discourse analysis approach to analyse 11 British Newspaper articles, which exemplify nostalgic constructions of nurse education. This was a purposive sample from a database search (LexisNexis) of British national newspaper articles relating to the increasing academic level of nurse education in the period from 1999-2012. A dominant nostalgic discourse constructs a 'golden era' of nurse education, which idealizes the past, making the present flawed in comparison. Nostalgic constructions create group identities creating contrasting 'caring' nurses educated in the idealized past with those educated now, who are perceived as too educated to care. An inherent characteristic of the nostalgic discourse is the notion that the solution to current problems with nurse education is a return to an idealized version of the past. Another less common newspaper discourse views nostalgia as a problematic construct. Nostalgic discourse with a focus on the past potentially acts as a barrier to creating an effective nurse education system for the 21(st) Century. This focus on an idealized past also has potential consequences in terms of public opinion and legitimization of government policy, which might otherwise be viewed as retrograde. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Online newspapers as an effective tool to generate interest in reading for students of Youth and Adult Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Luis Notari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the main challenges to improve the quality of Brazilian education is to promote reading and an understanding of what is read. This situation is more complex in Youth and Adult Education, which has focused on students who exhibited academic failure in mainstream classes or had not engaged in reading and writing for many years. In addition to adolescents, adults and elderly individuals have the same interests when they are in school; however, the identification of a way to engage these different audiences is a challenge. Thus, we propose reading newspapers online to generate an interest in reading, as well as determining how to select updated texts that are able to draw the attention of students. The findings indicated 100% of the students were satisfied with the activity. Nevertheless, when the times of reading performed in the Educational Computer Laboratory and classroom were compared, the evaluation that employed computer tools was far superior to the classroom. We conclude that although online newspaper reading is quite simple and easy to perform, it is an important tool capable of stimulating and developing the taste and habit of reading and is effective for different audiences.

  3. Student Voices: How Has Performing Shakespeare Helped You Appreciate His Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almansouri, Orubba; Balian, Aram S.; Sawdy, Jessica

    2009-01-01

    In this article, three students share how performing in Shakespearean plays have helped them appreciate his work. Orubba Almansouri describes how acting out the play "Romeo and Juliet" allowed him to understand the whole story better. While rehearsing and performing "A Midsummer Night's Dream," Aram S. Balian became a true Shakespeare fan,…

  4. Trends in newspaper coverage of mental illness in Canada: 2005-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Rob; Berry, Sarah

    2013-02-01

    Much research suggests that the general public relies on the popular media as a primary source of information about mental illness. We assessed the broad content of articles relating to mental illness in major Canadian newspapers over a 6-year period. We also sought to assess if such content has changed over time. We conducted a retrospective analysis of Canadian newspaper coverage from 2005 to 2010. Research assistants used a standardized guide to code 11 263 newspaper articles that mention the terms mental health, mental illness, schizophrenia, or schizophrenic. Once the articles were coded, descriptive statistics were produced for overarching themes and time trend analyses from 2005 to 2010. Danger, violence, and criminality were direct themes in 40% of newspaper articles. Treatment for a mental illness was discussed in only 19% of newspaper articles, and in only 18% was recovery or rehabilitation a significant theme. Eighty-three per cent of articles coded lacked a quotation from someone with a mental illness. We did not observe any significant changes over time from 2005 to 2010 in any domain measured. There is scope for more balanced, accurate, and informative coverage of mental health issues in Canada. Newspaper articles infrequently reflect the common realities of mental illness phenomenology, course, and outcome. Currently, clinicians may direct patients and family members to other resources for more comprehensive and accurate information about mental illness.

  5. WE-H-201-01: The Opportunities and Benefits of Helping LMICs: How Helping Them Can Help You

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollard, J.

    2016-01-01

    The desperate need for radiotherapy in low and mid-income countries (LMICs) has been well documented. Roughly 60 % of the worldwide incidence of cancer occurs in these resource-limited settings and the international community alongside governmental and non-profit agencies have begun publishing reports and seeking help from qualified volunteers. However, the focus of several reports has been on how dire the situation is and the magnitude of the problem, leaving most to feel overwhelmed and unsure as to how to help and why to get involved. This session will help to explain the specific ways that Medical Physicists can uniquely assist in this grand effort to help bring radiotherapy to grossly-underserved areas. Not only can these experts fulfill an important purpose, they also can benefit professionally, academically, emotionally and socially from the endeavor. By assisting others worldwide with their skillset, Medical Physicists can end up helping themselves. Learning Objectives: Understand the need for radiotherapy in LMICs. Understand which agencies are seeking Medical Physicists for help in LMICs. Understand the potential research funding mechanisms are available to establish academic collaborations with LMIC researchers/physicians. Understand the potential social and emotional benefits for both the physicist and the LMIC partners when collaborations are made. Understand the potential for collaboration with other high-income scientists that can develop as the physicist partners with other large institutions to assist LMICs. Wil Ngwa - A recent United Nations Study reports that in developing countries more people have access to cell phones than toilets. In Africa, only 63% of the population has access to piped water, yet, 93% of Africans have cell phone service. Today, these cell phones, Skype, WhatsApp and other information and communication technologies (ICTs) connect us in unprecedented ways and are increasingly recognized as powerful, indispensable to global

  6. WE-H-201-01: The Opportunities and Benefits of Helping LMICs: How Helping Them Can Help You

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollard, J. [MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The desperate need for radiotherapy in low and mid-income countries (LMICs) has been well documented. Roughly 60 % of the worldwide incidence of cancer occurs in these resource-limited settings and the international community alongside governmental and non-profit agencies have begun publishing reports and seeking help from qualified volunteers. However, the focus of several reports has been on how dire the situation is and the magnitude of the problem, leaving most to feel overwhelmed and unsure as to how to help and why to get involved. This session will help to explain the specific ways that Medical Physicists can uniquely assist in this grand effort to help bring radiotherapy to grossly-underserved areas. Not only can these experts fulfill an important purpose, they also can benefit professionally, academically, emotionally and socially from the endeavor. By assisting others worldwide with their skillset, Medical Physicists can end up helping themselves. Learning Objectives: Understand the need for radiotherapy in LMICs. Understand which agencies are seeking Medical Physicists for help in LMICs. Understand the potential research funding mechanisms are available to establish academic collaborations with LMIC researchers/physicians. Understand the potential social and emotional benefits for both the physicist and the LMIC partners when collaborations are made. Understand the potential for collaboration with other high-income scientists that can develop as the physicist partners with other large institutions to assist LMICs. Wil Ngwa - A recent United Nations Study reports that in developing countries more people have access to cell phones than toilets. In Africa, only 63% of the population has access to piped water, yet, 93% of Africans have cell phone service. Today, these cell phones, Skype, WhatsApp and other information and communication technologies (ICTs) connect us in unprecedented ways and are increasingly recognized as powerful, indispensable to global

  7. ON THE (DISCONTINUITY OF THE CASES IN THE NEWSPAPERS: THE COVERAGE OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AGAINST CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elton Antunes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the presences and absences that journalistic stories put into play to address violence against children and adolescents committed by people with whom they have ties of kinship or trust and coexistence. The analysis focuses on texts (letters from readers, articles, editorials, news and reports published in 2008 and 2009, in three daily newspapers in the Brazilian state of Minas Gerais: Estado de Minas, O Tempo and Super Notícia. Based on Content Analysis, we have systematized reports, pointing out the types of violence that appear more frequently as well as the locations in which these events unfold and the actors identified as responsible for the violent gesture. We also discuss how the analyzed newspapers confirm the existence of "preferential victims" and how certain events receive more attention than others.

  8. On the (discontinuity of the cases in the newspapers: the coverage of domestic violence against children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elton Antunes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the presences and absences that journalistic stories put into play to address violence against children and adolescents committed by people with whom they have ties of kinship or trust and coexistence. The analysis focuses on texts (letters from readers, articles, editorials, news and reports published in 2008 and 2009, in three daily newspapers in the Brazilian state of Minas Gerais: Estado de Minas, O Tempo and Super Notícia. Based on Content Analysis, we have systematized reports, pointing out the types of violence that appear more frequently as well as the locations in which these events unfold and the actors identified as responsible for the violent gesture. We also discuss how the analyzed newspapers confirm the existence of "preferential victims" and how certain events receive more attention than others.

  9. Cultural Models Shaping Stalking From a Content Analysis of Italian Newspapers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Caputo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The increasing spread of stalking in recent years has captured the community’s and media’s interest and highlighted complex legal, clinical and cultural issues. This phenomenon, far from being an individual problem, can be considered as a product of a growing culture that seems to reveal the crisis of current rules of social coexistence. This work aims at detecting the cultural repertoires that organise the stalking discourse, from an analysis of Italian newspaper articles, within a socio-constructivist paradigm. Emotional text analysis was conducted on a corpus of headlines and subheadings derived from 496 articles. These articles were published in major national newspapers and helped to identify four cultural repertoires (clusters that characterise the social representation of stalking: gender violence and women’s social independence (Cluster 1, psychological violence and control as illusion of intimacy (Cluster 2, anomic violence and intolerant individualism (Cluster 3, domestic violence and women’s marital obligation (Cluster 4. These repertoires are conceived along three latent dimensions which respectively refer to the cultural functions of stalking (Factor 1, representations of the victim (Factor 2, and gender inequalities (Factor 3. The paper offers a key to a social contextualisation of stalking in Italy, in order to re-think work practices within institutional agencies that deal with this phenomenon.

  10. Computer assisted analysis of research-based teaching method in English newspaper reading teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Zheng

    2017-06-01

    In recent years, the teaching of English newspaper reading has been developing rapidly. However, the teaching effect of the existing course is not ideal. The paper tries to apply the research-based teaching model to English newspaper reading teaching, investigates the current situation in higher vocational colleges, and analyzes the problems. It designs a teaching model of English newspaper reading and carries out the empirical research conducted by computers. The results show that the teaching mode can use knowledge and ability to stimulate learners interest and comprehensively improve their ability to read newspapers.

  11. The Grapevine : Measuring the Influence of Dutch Newspapers in Delpher

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bos, M.J.A.; Giffard, H.

    2015-01-01

    A measure of which newspapers are the most influential is an important foundation for any large-scale study of newspapers. A reliable measure of significance would allow studies to more strongly weigh articles in more influential papers. In this article, we use digital methods to create a partial

  12. Supply chain risk management in newspaper company: House of risk approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnasari, Sintya; Hisjam, Muhammad; Sutopo, Wahyudi

    2018-02-01

    In the supply chain (SC) of newspapers, the printing company is the main entity that has several processes, i.e. procure raw materials, print plate and newspapers, and also distribute newspaper to consumers. The existing risks in the newspaper printing company are quite high. A wide range of disturbances or risks needs to be identified to map out the characteristics of the risk sources that will impact on the performance of the supply chain. Therefore, the printing companies need to manage their supply chain risk of the five major SC processes (such as plan, source, deliver, make, and return). In a case study of a newspaper company in Surakarta, the company have not implemented a risk management process that affects the company. This study is aimed to map the risks in the printing company and formulate risk mitigation alternatives to mitigate the risks. The house of risk (HOR) method was chosen to select a set of proactive actions deemed cost-effective in managing SC Risks in the newspaper company. The model consisting of two stages, the first stage (HOR1) was done by identifying risk, risk causing agents and then measured the severity and occurrences to calculate the Aggregate Risk Priority (ARP) value. The second stage (HOR2) is intended to formulate and prioritize the action of mitigation that the company should pursue to reduce the probability of risk agents to occur. The result shows that the innovative model of HOR in Newspaper Company was presented. There are 24 risk events, 20 causing agents and two priority risks in HOR1. The HOR 2 was proposed 9 ranks of mitigation strategy for priority risk agents, from the easiest to the hardest strategy for the company to implement it.

  13. 20 CFR 404.1030 - Delivery and distribution or sale of newspapers, shopping news, and magazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Employment, Wages, Self-Employment... and similar kinds of advertising material), your work is not covered while you are under age 18. Related work such as assembling newspapers is also excluded. (b) If you are any age. No matter how old you...

  14. Weight-based Teasing and Bullying in Children: How Parents Can Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weight-based Teasing and Bullying in Children: How Parents Can Help Page Content Children with obesity have to deal with many challenges beyond pressures to lose weight. They may also be teased ...

  15. How can we help students appreciate physics education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jia-Ling; Zaki, Eman; Schmidt, Jason; Woolston, Don

    2004-03-01

    Helping students appreciate physics education is a formidable task, considering that many students struggle to pass introductory physics courses. Numerous efforts have been made for this undertaking because it is an important step leading to successful learning. In an out-of-classroom academic program, the Supplemental Instruction (SI) Program, we have used the approach, INSPIRE (inquiry, network, skillfulness, perseverance, intuition, reasoning, and effort), to help more students value their experiences in these courses. The method basically includes key elements outlined by experts in physics education [1]. Student responses have been encouraging. Having undergraduates as facilitators in the program is advantageous in promoting principles of physics education. Their training emphasizes tenacity, resourcefulness, understanding, support, and teamwork, i.e. TRUST. We present the organization and focus of the SI Program, and discuss how these improve learning atmosphere and facilitate learning. [1] Edward F. Redish et al, Am J. Phys. 66(3), March 1998.

  16. The Future of the Retail Advertising: Implications for the Finnish Newspaper Industry

    OpenAIRE

    FLINK, SOILE-MARI

    2011-01-01

    Starting point for this research was the future changes Internet will cause to Finnish newspaper economies. When evaluating the economic importance of future development to newspapers? economies, one of the most important areas is retail advertising and its shifting to online environment. So far Finnish retail advertising has been very much focused on printed newspapers and retailers? online investments have been moderate and conservative. The change is about to happen and this research answe...

  17. Visual framing of nanotechnology in newspapers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian Hvidtfelt

    discourse, very little research into to the visual communication of science in public has been carried out. Nanotechnology is an emerging scientific discipline that just recently has entered the public sphere. Surveys show that most Europeans and most Americans have very little knowledge about...... nanotechnology. Even so, there is a marked difference between Europeans who generally are cautious, it not skeptical about nanotechnology, and American who seem to have a much more positive attitude towards nanotechnology. Objective This paper surveys visual images used to communicate nanotechnology (and...... nanotechnology-related issues) in the printed press in Denmark from 1993 to 2006. Based on a representative sample of newspaper articles referring to nanotechnology, the survey categorizes and analyzes the images used. Studies have shown that to a high degree newspaper readers use images to navigate...

  18. Construct on Digital Rights Management for Historical Newspaper Archives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shien-chiang Yu

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Newspaper is one of the most important media as it contains the records that input the cultural data and social events, progress of national and international economical and political developments, the world’s circumstances of the time, so as transmitting information and sharing knowledge of particular regions or around the globe. However, the copyright is limited to cover the transformed entity to digital contents. In order to protect the rights of digitized-contents and restrict the scope of on-line grant of historical newspaper, it is necessary to clarify the concepts and practices. This study reveals the concepts of digital rights management via literature review that will work on both mentioned issues, so as to identify the fair use to assure the profit of digitized archive of historical newspaper. [Article content in Chinese

  19. The Effects of Newspaper-Television Cross-Ownership on News Homogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormley, William T., Jr.

    After discussing the need for message pluralism in a democracy, this report focuses on a three-stage research strategy conducted to study the effects of newspaper/television cross-ownership on news homogeneity. The three stages consist of: an analysis of questionnaire data obtained from 214 newspaper managing editors and television news directors;…

  20. How chemical pollution becomes a social problem. Risk communication and assessment through regional newspapers during the management of PCB pollutions of the Rhône River (France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comby, Emeline; Le Lay, Yves-François; Piégay, Hervé

    2014-06-01

    The case study of the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) pollutions of the Rhône River (France) offers the possibility of studying criteria for the construction of social problems that result from chemical pollution (2005-2010). We investigated the dynamics of competition that create and define pollution as a social problem and entail its decline. News outlets are crucial for determining how an environmental issue emerges locally or nationally; this study used newspapers to highlight the potential of new outlets as a data source to analyze discourse variability, science-policy-media connections and the hydrosphere. Media coverage was based on a content analysis and textual data analysis of 75 articles. Analytical frameworks such as the Downs Model and the Public Arena Model (Hilgartner and Bosk, 1988) that consider time and stakeholders were tested to determine how human alteration of the hydrosphere can become a social problem and to analyze different communication strategies held by stakeholders. In terms of management, we described the temporal dynamics of the social problem based on the case study and considered an explanation of the selections. We considered the organization of particular stakeholders who define the social problem from its beginning to end by focusing on their discourses, relationships, decision-making and political choices, and scientific studies. Despite some biases, newspapers are useful for retrospectively evaluating the emergence of a social problem in the public arena by describing it through discourse and then understanding the temporal patterns of information. Despite uncertainties and information flow, decisions are made and science is translated to the public. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Who thinks what about e?cigarette regulation? A content analysis of UK newspapers

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, Chris; Hilton, Shona; Weishaar, Heide

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To establish how frequently different types of stakeholders were cited in the UK media debate about e-cigarette regulation, their stances towards different forms of e-cigarette regulation, and what rationales they employed in justifying those stances.\\ud \\ud Methods: Quantitative and qualitative content analyses of 104 articles about e-cigarette regulation published in eight UK and three Scottish national newspapers between 1 January 2013 and 31 December 2014.\\ud \\ud Results: Reporting ...

  2. Means of temporal expressions in newspaper news and press report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čutura Ilijana R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses most frequent linguistic means for expressing the temporal frame in the printed news and press reports. With structuralism as a chosen theoretical framework, the approach of the research is qualitative and stylistic. Since the study belongs to the field of functional stylistics, the primary methods used in the study were functional-stylistic and linguistic-stylistic ones. As the study focuses on two newspaper genres, comparative-stylistic method was used as well. The analysis has been conducted on concrete linguistic excerpts from Serbian daily newspapers published throughout Serbia from 2008 to 2015. The aims of the paper are to show model of expressing temporal frame in contemporary Serbian newspapers. This paper provides an overview of the characteristics of model and the types of temporal expression as well as their variations in contemporal Serbian newspapers. The paper also aims to determine the differencies between printed news and press reports by the choice of temporal expressions. It is shown that there is a tendency of changing schematized structure of these informative genres and some innovation in relation to the choice of linguistic means for expessing the meaning of temporally close events. The research is a contribution to journalism stylistics, more precisely to the Serbian language newspaper stylistics, and also contributes to the study of linguistic and stylistic characteristics of non-literary texts. The study is also relevant because it describes the use of adverbs and adverbial expressions in the journalistic style.

  3. Forecasting techno-social systems: how physics and computing help to fight off global pandemics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vespignani, Alessandro

    2010-03-01

    The crucial issue when planning for adequate public health interventions to mitigate the spread and impact of epidemics is risk evaluation and forecast. This amount to the anticipation of where, when and how strong the epidemic will strike. In the last decade advances in performance in computer technology, data acquisition, statistical physics and complex networks theory allow the generation of sophisticated simulations on supercomputer infrastructures to anticipate the spreading pattern of a pandemic. For the first time we are in the position of generating real time forecast of epidemic spreading. I will review the history of the current H1N1 pandemic, the major road-blocks the community has faced in its containment and mitigation and how physics and computing provide predictive tools that help us to battle epidemics.

  4. Effectiveness of newspaper advertising for patient recruitment into a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapca, Adrian; Jennings, Claudine G; Wei, Li; Wilson, Adam; MacDonald, Thomas M; Mackenzie, Isla S

    2014-06-01

    To measure the impact of newspaper advertising across Scotland on patient interest, and subsequent recruitment into the Standard Care vs. Celecoxib Outcome Trial (SCOT), a clinical trial investigating the cardiovascular safety of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. Newspaper advertisements about the SCOT trial were placed sequentially in regional and national Scottish newspapers. The number of phone calls as a result of exposure to the advertisements and ongoing study recruitment rates were recorded before, during and after the advertising campaign. To enroll in SCOT individuals had to be registered with a participating GP practice. The total cost for the advertising campaign was £46 250 and 320 phone calls were received as a result of individuals responding to the newspaper advertisements. One hundred and seventy-two individuals were identified as possibly suitable to be included in the study. However only 36 were registered at participating GP practices, 17 completed a screening visit and 15 finally were randomized into the study. The average cost per respondent individual was £144 and the average cost per randomized patient was £3083. Analysis of recruitment rate trends showed that there was no impact of the newspaper advertising campaign on increasing recruitment into SCOT. Advertisements placed in local and national newspapers were not an effective recruitment strategy for the SCOT trial. The advertisements attracted relatively small numbers of respondents, many of whom did not meet study inclusion criteria or were not registered at a participating GP practice. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  5. Effectiveness of newspaper advertising for patient recruitment into a clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapca, Adrian; Jennings, Claudine G; Wei, Li; Wilson, Adam; MacDonald, Thomas M; Mackenzie, Isla S

    2014-01-01

    Aims To measure the impact of newspaper advertising across Scotland on patient interest, and subsequent recruitment into the Standard Care vs. Celecoxib Outcome Trial (SCOT), a clinical trial investigating the cardiovascular safety of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. Methods Newspaper advertisements about the SCOT trial were placed sequentially in regional and national Scottish newspapers. The number of phone calls as a result of exposure to the advertisements and ongoing study recruitment rates were recorded before, during and after the advertising campaign. To enroll in SCOT individuals had to be registered with a participating GP practice. Results The total cost for the advertising campaign was £46 250 and 320 phone calls were received as a result of individuals responding to the newspaper advertisements. One hundred and seventy-two individuals were identified as possibly suitable to be included in the study. However only 36 were registered at participating GP practices, 17 completed a screening visit and 15 finally were randomized into the study. The average cost per respondent individual was £144 and the average cost per randomized patient was £3083. Analysis of recruitment rate trends showed that there was no impact of the newspaper advertising campaign on increasing recruitment into SCOT. Conclusions Advertisements placed in local and national newspapers were not an effective recruitment strategy for the SCOT trial. The advertisements attracted relatively small numbers of respondents, many of whom did not meet study inclusion criteria or were not registered at a participating GP practice. PMID:24283948

  6. 32 CFR Appendix C to Part 247 - Mailing of DoD Newspapers, Magazines, CE Guides, and Installation Maps; Sales and Distribution of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mailing of DoD Newspapers, Magazines, CE Guides...) MISCELLANEOUS DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NEWSPAPERS, MAGAZINES AND CIVILIAN ENTERPRISE PUBLICATIONS Pt. 247, App. C Appendix C to Part 247—Mailing of DoD Newspapers, Magazines, CE Guides, and Installation Maps; Sales and...

  7. How can economists help to improve animal welfare?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tove; Lawrence, A.; Lund, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    To-date, the dominant approach to improving farm animal welfare has consisted of a combination of voluntary improvements undertaken by farmers and the tightening of legal requirements. However, history suggests that there is a limit to the improvements capable of being secured by this approach...... priorities as to which aspects of animal welfare should be promoted. Here, economic approaches can be used to capture and synthesise the perspectives of all the stakeholders, including the animals, in a transparent and systematic way. The second way is by helping to ensure that incentives are set up...... in the right way. Where the benefits and costs of improving animal welfare are initially distributed unevenly across stakeholders so that a socially desirable situation will not develop automatically, or be implemented, suitable economic principles may help to create incentives which correct this situation...

  8. Media Portrayal of the Nursing Homes Sector: A Longitudinal Analysis of 51 U.S. Newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Edward Alan; Livingstone, Ian; Ronneberg, Corina R

    2017-06-01

    Most Americans' low opinion of the nursing home (NH) sector could derive, in part, from the way in which it is portrayed in the media. This study furthers understanding of media portrayal of the NH sector by identifying how NHs were depicted in 51U.S. newspapers from 1999 to 2008. Keyword searches of the LexisNexis database were performed to identify 16,280 NH-related articles. Article content was analyzed, and tone, themes, prominence, and central actor were assessed. Basic frequencies and descriptive statistics were used to examine article content across regions, market type, and over time. Findings reveal considerably less NH coverage in the Western United States and a steady decline in NH coverage nationally over time. Most articles were news stories; more than one third were located on the front page of the newspaper or section. Most articles focused on NH industry and government interests, very few on residents/family and community concerns. Most articles were neutral or negative in tone; very few were positive or mixed. Common themes included quality, financing, and legal concerns. Tone, themes, and other article attributes varied across region, market type, and over time. Overall, findings reveal changes in how newspapers framed NH coverage, not only with respect to tone but also with respect to what dimensions of this complex issue have been emphasized during the time period analyzed. Variation in media coverage may contribute to differences in government and public views toward the NH sector across regions and over time. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. The Newspaper that Made Its Way to National Life. The First Years of Excelsior (1916- 1932

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arno Burkholder de la Rosa

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This work covers the history of the Mexican newspaper  Excelsior between  1916 and 1932. The author  examines the context in which  the newspaper  was born  —triumph of Constitutionalism and conflicts  between  its constituting groups—  and  the survival and  strengthening of  business  journalism,  which  was born during the Porfiriato and now had to negotiate with revolutionary leaders. Excelsior maintained  during its first stage a “moderately conservative” editorial line, which  brought about trouble with the governments of Álvaro Obregón and Plutarco Elías Calles, but which also led to a growing prestige among its readers —urban middle— and high —class in the capital and other cities. This period ended when the newspaper failed to overcome its problems with the revolutionary regimes and had to face a deep economic crisis leading to bankruptcy.

  10. Cost-effective advertising through TV and newspaper "banner" ads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombeski, William R; Taylor, Jan; Krauss, Katie; Medeiros, Clayton

    2003-01-01

    Banner ads, small strip ads in newspapers used to specifically promote an information piece, were introduced into one newspaper in the Connecticut market in 1999 by Yale-New Haven Hospital (YNHH). Based on their success, the concept was expanded to six additional newspapers in late 2000 and to TV in the summer of 2001. Between 2000-2002, even as the overall marketing/advertising budget declined 30%, switching advertising dollars from image/display ads to banner ads resulted in consumer awareness of YNHH increasing from 29% to 42%. Perception of YNHH as "the advanced medicine" hospital grew from 22% to 40% during the same period. The specific strategic and operational actions generated since the implementation of the program are detailed and the advantages and disadvantages of this banner advertising approach are discussed. Banner ads may offer an alternative approach for organizations to advertise their products and programs.

  11. Back to the Future: The Resurgence of Community in American Society, and Community Journalism in the Newspaper Industry and Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterer, Jock

    America is in the midst of the age of the emergent and enlightened community. Citizens increasingly demand from their newspapers high-quality, explanatory coverage of local issues. Newspapers large and small are responding. Community newspapers are growing, and many big city media outlets are rethinking their news coverage philosophy in terms of…

  12. How does the media portray drinking water security in Indigenous communities in Canada? An analysis of Canadian newspaper coverage from 2000-2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Lam

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drinking water insecurity and related health outcomes often disproportionately impact Indigenous communities internationally. Understanding media coverage of these water-related issues can provide insight into the ways in which public perceptions are shaped, with potential implications for decision-making and action. This study aimed to examine the extent, range, and nature of newspaper coverage of drinking water security in Canadian Indigenous communities. Methods Using ProQuest database, we systematically searched for and screened newspaper articles published from 2000 to 2015 from Canadian newspapers: Windspeaker, Toronto Star, The Globe and Mail, and National Post. We conducted descriptive quantitative analysis and thematic qualitative analysis on relevant articles to characterize framing and trends in coverage. Results A total of 1382 articles were returned in the search, of which 256 articles were identified as relevant. There was limited coverage of water challenges for Canadian Indigenous communities, especially for Métis (5% and Inuit (3% communities. Most stories focused on government responses to water-related issues, and less often covered preventative measures such as source water protection. Overall, Indigenous peoples were quoted the most often. Double-standards of water quality between Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities, along with conflict and cooperation efforts between stakeholders were emphasized in many articles. Conclusion Limited media coverage could undermine public and stakeholder interest in addressing water-related issues faced by many Canadian Indigenous communities.

  13. Not dead yet – the changing significance of newspapers worldwide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Piet Bakker

    2011-01-01

    Paper prepared for the Future of Journalism Conference, Cardiff, September 2011 Newspapers, particularly in the Western world, have seen paid circulation decline in the last decade. Online news is abundantly available, but at the same time newspapers – in print and online - often serve as sources

  14. Hotelling competition and political differentiation with more than two newspaper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behringer, S.; Filistrucchi, L.

    2015-01-01

    We analyse a market where newspaper publishers compete for advertising as well as for readership. Publishers first choose the political position of their newspaper then set cover prices and advertising tariffs. We build on the duopoly model of Gabszewicz et al. (2001, 2002) who show that advertising

  15. The cost of a "bad hire:" how search firms can help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, S J

    1991-10-01

    What's the key to competitive advantage and total quality management? O'Connor believes it's hiring top-quality people that are a "good fit" with your organization, and he tells how a search firm can help you do just that.

  16. Printed and tablet e-paper newspaper from an environmental perspective - A screening life cycle assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moberg, Asa; Johansson, Martin; Finnveden, Goeran; Jonsson, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Viable alternatives to conventional newspapers, such as electronic papers, e-papers or e-readers, are intended to have many of the qualities of paper, such as reading using reflective light, high resolution, 180 deg. viewing angle. It has been suggested that the environmental impact of e-paper can be lower than for printed and internet-based newspapers. However, in order to find the facts of the matter, a thorough life cycle perspective covering raw material acquisition, production, use and disposal should preferably be used to study the environmental performance of the different products. A screening life cycle assessment was performed to describe the potential environmental impacts of two product systems; printed on paper and tablet e-paper newspapers. Results show that the most significant phase of the life cycle for both product systems was the production of substrate or platform. Accordingly, key aspects that may affect the resulting environmental performance of newspaper product systems were for the printed newspaper number of readers per copy and number of pages per issue and for the tablet e-paper newspaper lifetime and multi-use of the device. The printed newspaper in general had a higher energy use, higher emissions of gases contributing to climate change and several other impact categories than the tablet e-paper newspaper. It was concluded that tablet e-paper has the potential to decrease the environmental impact of newspaper consumption. However, further studies regarding the environmental impact of production and waste management of electronic devices and internet use, as well as more comprehensive assessment of toxicological impacts are needed. As the data on the electronic devices becomes more comprehensive this may prove to be a major limitation of electronic newspaper systems. Developers are suggested to strive towards minimisation of toxic and rare substances in production.

  17. Mentoring and Coaching Tips: How Educators Can Help Each Other

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, Sheryn Spencer

    2013-01-01

    This book is for educators at all levels and is packed with creative, use-now tips and activities to support new and struggling teachers. Combining real-life scenarios with current research, the author demonstrates how educators can get the most out of available resources, promote a school culture devoted to helping and caring, and meet common…

  18. Percentage of vestibular dysfunction in 361 elderly citizens responding to a newspaper advertisement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Michael Smærup; Grönvall, Erik; Mørch, Marianne Metz

    Percentage of Vestibular Dysfunction in 361 Elderly Citizens Responding to a Newspaper Advertisement. Brandt M, Grönvall E, Henriksen JJ, Larsen SB, Læssøe U, Mørch MM, Damsgaard EM Introduction Elderly patients with vestibular dysfunction have an eight-fold increased risk of falling compared...... advertisement. Method To recruit elderly citizens with dizziness we advertised in a local newspaper. A telephone interview with the respondents was done by a physiotherapist (PT). If the PT concluded that the reason for the dizziness could be vestibular dysfunction the citizen was invited to further...... Department, Aarhus University Hospital. Results 361 elderly citizens responded to the advertisement. 8 patients had alcohol problems, 14 had significantly impaired vision, 42 had evidence of orthostatic hypotension, 49 didn’t want to participate, 50 had evidence of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV...

  19. Postpartum Depression: How Childbirth Educators Can Help Break the Silence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zauderer, Cheryl

    2009-01-01

    The voices of women suffering from postpartum depression are often silent. Women are reluctant to reveal to others that they are unhappy after the birth of their babies. Much has been written on possible causes, risk factors, and treatments for postpartum depression, but little has been done to investigate why women take so long to seek help. Early detection and treatment are key to a full recovery. Childbirth educators are in the position to offer anticipatory guidance on possible complications of the postpartum period, including postpartum depression. This article explores why women with postpartum depression choose to suffer in silence and suggests how childbirth educators can help new mothers find their voices. PMID:20190853

  20. Newspaper Clippings and Articles (Weather-related)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather-related newspaper articles and photos, almost exclusively from Baltimore, MD and nearby areas. Includes storm damage, rainfall reports, and weather's affect...

  1. If it bleeds, it leads: the construction of workplace injury in Canadian newspapers, 2009-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnetson, Bob; Foster, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Public perceptions of workplace injuries are shaped by media reports, but the accuracy of such reports is unknown. This study identifies differences between workers' compensation claims data and newspaper reports of workplace injuries in Canadian newspapers and media sources. This study applies quantitative content analysis to 245 Canadian English-language newspaper articles from 2009 to 2014. Workers' compensation claims data is drawn from the Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada. Newspapers dramatically overreport fatalities, injuries to men, injuries in the construction and mining/quarrying/oil industries, injuries stemming from contact with objects/equipment and fires/explosions, and acute physical injuries such as burns, fractures, intracranial injuries, and traumatic injuries. Newspaper reporters tend to rely upon government, police/firefighter, and employer accounts, rarely recounting the perspectives of workers. Newspapers overreported fatalities, injuries to men, and injuries in the construction and mining/quarrying/oil industries. This results in a misleading picture of occupational injuries in Canada.

  2. Analysis of North American Newspaper Coverage of Bionics Using the Disability Studies Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonum Panesar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Bionics are a set of technology products that are constantly evolving. Bionics are proposed as body add-ons or replacement for many body parts (ears, eyes, knees, neural prostheses, joints, muscles, kidney, liver, cartilage lungs, discs, pancreas, dental pulp, skin, hippocampus, legs and hands, and functions such as speech. Two main applications of bionic products are discussed; one being for the restoration of body abilities to a species-typical norm and the other being the addition of abilities to the body that are not species-typical. Disabled people are one main group perceived to be in need of therapeutic interventions that use various bionic products. So far, therapeutic interventions are about restoration to the species-typical norm. However, therapeutic bionic products increasingly give the wearer beyond normal body abilities (therapeutic enhancements. Many so-called non-disabled people want the same enhanced body-abilities especially through non-invasive bionic products (e.g., non-invasive brain machine interfaces, exoskeletons. The media has the ability to shape public perceptions with numerous consequences. The purpose of this study was to provide quantitative and qualitative data on how bionic technologies and its users are portrayed in North American newspapers. Data was obtained from 1977 to 2013 from the Canadian Newsstand complete database which covers over 300 English language Canadian newspapers and two Canadian newspapers, one with national focus (The Globe and Mail and one with local focus (Calgary Herald, and from 1980–2013 from one American newspaper with national reach (The New York Times. The study found (a an almost always positive portrayal of bionics; (b coverage of bionics mostly within a medical framework; (c a predominantly stereotypical and negative portrayal of individuals with disabilities; and (d a hierarchy of worthiness between different assistive devices such as a reporting bias favoring artificial legs

  3. Users Engage More with Interface than Materials at Welsh Newspapers Online Website

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Reed

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Gooding, P. (2016. Exploring the information behaviour of users of Welsh Newspapers Online through web log analysis. Journal of Documentation, 72(2, 232-246. doi:10.1108/JD-10-2014-0149 Objective – This study has two specific objectives: to learn about the behaviours of visitors to the Welsh Newspapers Online (WNO website, and to explore how the identified behaviours are different from those common to information-seeking in a physical archive. Design – Analysis of Google Analytics and web server content logs. Setting – Welsh Newspapers Online website: http://newspapers.library.wales Subjects – WNO had 19,805 unique visitors from 12 March 2013 to 30 June 2013, who made 52,767 visits to the site. Methods – Gooding accessed the WNO Google Analytics account, which provided visitor numbers, user engagement by page visit and visit duration, bounce rate, and mobile and social media usage. Using anonymized processed content logs provided by the National Library of Wales, he then explored searches undertaken by users on the website; instances where users browsed, filtered, or otherwise interacted with search results; and instances where users viewed content. Main Results – Google Analytics statistics showed users of WNO demonstrate behaviour that is “deeper and more sustained than general web browsing” (p. 237. The number of visitors who only viewed one page and then left the site (bounce rate was low, while page views and time spent on the site were higher than considered standard on general websites. Mobile users made up 11% of visits, although on average they viewed fewer pages and stayed for less time than non-mobile users. Screen size was directly correlated to the level of engagement. There were 9% of visitors referred via social media, but generally showed a low engagement rate similar to that of mobile users; the exception was users who were directed to WNO via blogging platforms. Web log analysis showed visitors most

  4. Risk in daily newspaper coverage of red tide blooms in Southwest Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zongchao; Garrison, Bruce; Ullmann, Steven G; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Fleming, Lora E; Hoagland, Porter

    This study investigated newspaper coverage of Florida red tide blooms in four metropolitan areas of Southwest Florida during a 25-year period, 1987-2012. We focused on how journalists framed red tide stories with respect to environmental risk, health risk, and economic risk. We determined risk to be a key factor in this news coverage, being an aspect of coverage of red tide itself in terms of environmental risk, tourism risk, and public health risk. The study found that red tide news coverage is most often framed as an environmental story.

  5. How do cancer patients navigate the public information environment? Understanding patterns and motivations for movement among information sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagler, Rebekah H; Romantan, Anca; Kelly, Bridget J; Stevens, Robin S; Gray, Stacy W; Hull, Shawnika J; Ramirez, A Susana; Hornik, Robert C

    2010-09-01

    Little is known about how patients move among information sources to fulfill unmet needs. We interviewed 43 breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer patients. Using a grounded theory approach, we identified patterns and motivations for movement among information sources. Overall, patients reported using one source (e.g., newspaper) followed by the use of another source (e.g., Internet), and five key motivations for such cross-source movement emerged. Patients' social networks often played a central role in this movement. Understanding how patients navigate an increasingly complex information environment may help clinicians and educators to guide patients to appropriate, high-quality sources.

  6. Newspaper Reading among College Students in Development of Their Analytical Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2009-01-01

    The study investigated the newspaper reading among college students in development of their analytical ability. Newspapers are one of the few sources of information that are comprehensive, interconnected and offered in one format. The main objective of the study was to find out the development of the analytical ability among college students by…

  7. Representations of workers with hearing loss in Canadian newspapers: a thematic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerber, Raphaelle; Jennings, Mary Beth; Shaw, Lynn; Cheesman, Margaret

    2017-04-01

    Participation in the labour force with a hearing impairment presents a number of challenges. This study describes how Canadian newspapers represent workers with hearing loss. Taking a critical framing theory approach, thematic analysis was performed through coding relevant articles, abstracting and hierarchically categorising themes. Seven English-language Canadian newspapers were searched for publications between 1995 and 2016. Twenty-six articles met our criteria: discussing paid workers with hearing loss who used English rather than sign language on the job and making reference to workers' competence. We identified a global theme, Focussing on a good worklife or focussing on a limited worklife, composed of three organising themes (1) Prominent individuals struggle, take action, and continue despite hearing loss, (2) Workers with hearing loss in the community create their best day themselves, and (3) Workers with hearing loss, as a generalised whole, are portrayed as either competent or limited. The dominant framing portrays individual workers as ingenious, determined, and successful. Negative framings were predominantly generalisations to these workers as a group. To generate more positive framings, professionals can build relationships with consumer groups and, when contacted by the media, direct journalists to interview workers with hearing loss.

  8. A User Centered Innovation Approach Identifying Key User Values for the E-Newspaper

    OpenAIRE

    Carina Ihlström Eriksson; Jesper Svensson

    2009-01-01

    We have studied the pre-adoption phase of the e-newspaper, i.e. a newspaper published with e-paper technology. The research question of this article is: In what way can a user centered innovation process contribute to identifying key values in mobile innovations? The aim of this article is threefold: firstly, to identify key values for the e-newspaper, secondly, to examine the intention to adopt a new possible innovation and thirdly, to explore user centered design processes ability to captur...

  9. Using newspaper collections in information institutions for research purposes: experiences of historians and linguists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Krtalić

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present the opinions, experiences and needs of a sample of scientists in the field of the humanities – namely historians and philologists – and their use of newspaper collections in memory institutions during scientific research. A part of the results gathered in the research, which was conducted within the Newspapers as a source of scientific information in social sciences and humanities project, and is presented here. This project examined the extent and practices in the use of newspapers as a resource of information for scientific research in the social sciences and humanities field in Croatia. The quantitative and qualitative data about the methods and level of use of newspaper material as a resource in scientific research were gathered. The results of this project implied that the newspapers are recognised and used as an admissible resource in scientific work, especially in the fields of history and philology. The fact that scientists have specific information needs and search patterns should be considered in creating innovative and effective digital newspaper collections.

  10. Joining the conversation: newspaper journalists' views on working with researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Charlotte; Lomas, Jonathan; Lavis, John N; Abelson, Julia; Shepherd, Cody A; Bird-Gayson, Twylla

    2005-09-01

    For health researchers who seek more research use in policy making to improve health and healthcare, working with the news media may represent an opportunity, given the media's pivotal role in public policy agenda-setting. Much literature on science and health journalism assumes a normative stance, focusing on improving the accuracy of news coverage. In this study, we investigated journalists' perspectives and experiences. We were particularly interested in learning how health researchers could work constructively with journalists as a means to increase research use in policy making. Qualitative methods were used to conduct and analyze interviews with experienced newspaper journalists across Canada, with children's mental health as a content example. In response, study participants emphasized journalistic processes more than the content of news coverage, whether children's mental health or other topics. Instead, they focused on what they thought researchers needed to know about journalists' roles, practices and views on working with researchers. Newspaper journalists balance business and social responsibilities according to their respective roles as editors, columnists and reporters. In practice, journalists must ensure newsworthiness, relevance to readers and access to sources in a context of daily deadlines. As generalists, journalists rely on researchers to be expert interpreters, although they find many researchers unavailable or unable to communicate with public audiences. While journalists are skeptical about such common organizational communications tools as news releases, they welcome the uncommon contributions of those researchers who cultivate relationships and invest time to synthesize and communicate research evidence on an ongoing basis. Some appealed for more researchers to join them in participating in public conversations. We conclude that there are opportunities for policy-oriented health researchers to work constructively with newspaper

  11. Why Most Biomedical Findings Echoed by Newspapers Turn Out to be False: The Case of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonon, François; Konsman, Jan-Pieter; Cohen, David; Boraud, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Context Because positive biomedical observations are more often published than those reporting no effect, initial observations are often refuted or attenuated by subsequent studies. Objective To determine whether newspapers preferentially report on initial findings and whether they also report on subsequent studies. Methods We focused on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Using Factiva and PubMed databases, we identified 47 scientific publications on ADHD published in the 1990s and soon echoed by 347 newspapers articles. We selected the ten most echoed publications and collected all their relevant subsequent studies until 2011. We checked whether findings reported in each “top 10” publication were consistent with previous and subsequent observations. We also compared the newspaper coverage of the “top 10” publications to that of their related scientific studies. Results Seven of the “top 10” publications were initial studies and the conclusions in six of them were either refuted or strongly attenuated subsequently. The seventh was not confirmed or refuted, but its main conclusion appears unlikely. Among the three “top 10” that were not initial studies, two were confirmed subsequently and the third was attenuated. The newspaper coverage of the “top 10” publications (223 articles) was much larger than that of the 67 related studies (57 articles). Moreover, only one of the latter newspaper articles reported that the corresponding “top 10” finding had been attenuated. The average impact factor of the scientific journals publishing studies echoed by newspapers (17.1 n = 56) was higher (pnewspapers preferentially echo initial ADHD findings appearing in prominent journals, they report on uncertain findings that are often refuted or attenuated by subsequent studies. If this media reporting bias generalizes to health sciences, it represents a major cause of distortion in health science communication. PMID:22984483

  12. New Statistical Probe into the Decline of Daily Newspaper Household Penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alperstein, Gerald

    From 1950 to 1970, daily newspaper household penetration (DNHP) levels dropped from 1.24 to 0.99 in the United States. This paper describes some of the variables involved in this decline and outlines a market-by-market statistical analysis of the relationship between the penetration levels of daily newspapers and other forms of mass media. From…

  13. Japanese Occupation Government Policy in Indonesia on Culture and Literature: A Case Study of Asia Raja Newspaper (1942-1945

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maman S Mahayana

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available There are three views are shown in the movement of Indonesia in responding to the arrival of Japan to Indonesia. First, they welcome and support the arrival of Japan considering the success of Japan drove the Dutch. Second, they have not determined the attitude of supporting or opposing. In this case, they still want to see how Japan would run his administration in Indonesia. Third, they oppose the presence of Japan, although not yet dared to take the fight. Those who oppose the Japanese arrivals in Indonesia consists of two groups, namely (1 of the aristocratic, ambtenaar, and government employees, and (2 the movement of the fighters who put the government of Japan as an imperialist occupation. How is the real politics of the Japanese occupation government in carrying out its colonial administration in the colonies? With the underlying research on the Asia Raja newspapers (April 29, 1942 to September 7, 1945, this paper tries to reveal the political government of Japan in the socio-cultural and literature. How is the newspapers used the Japanese occupation government to gain public support for Indonesia in the face of Greater East Asia war?

  14. Towards Understanding How to Assess Help-Seeking Behavior across Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogan, Amy; Walker, Erin; Baker, Ryan; Rodrigo, Ma. Mercedes T.; Soriano, Jose Carlo; Castro, Maynor Jimenez

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in automatically assessing help seeking, the process of referring to resources outside of oneself to accomplish a task or solve a problem. Research in the United States has shown that specific help-seeking behaviors led to better learning within intelligent tutoring systems. However, intelligent…

  15. Generating Conflict for Greater Good: Utilizing Contingency Theory to Assess Black and Mainstream Newspapers as Public Relations Vehicles to Promote Better Health among African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumpkins, Crystal Y.; Bae, Jiyang; Cameron, Glen T.

    2010-01-01

    The potential use of strategic conflict management ( Wilcox and Cameron, 2006; Cameron, Wilcox, Reber and Shin ( in press) as a health advocacy tool in US African-American and mainstream newspapers, arguing that escalation of conflict can increase effectiveness of health-related news releases. For health communicators focusing on at-risk populations with poor health outcomes, such goals would include increased awareness of health problems and solutions, along with increased motivation arising from indignation over health disparities. Content analysis of 1,197 stories in 24 Black and 12 mainstream newspapers showed that more conflict factors were present in Black vs. mainstream newspapers, suggesting a way to strategically place health messages in news releases disseminated to newspapers that motivate at-risk publics to better health. The findings suggest that conflict factors such as racial disparity data regarding health issues may enhance media advocacy. PMID:22822291

  16. Generating Conflict for Greater Good: Utilizing Contingency Theory to Assess Black and Mainstream Newspapers as Public Relations Vehicles to Promote Better Health among African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumpkins, Crystal Y; Bae, Jiyang; Cameron, Glen T

    2010-03-01

    The potential use of strategic conflict management ( Wilcox and Cameron, 2006; Cameron, Wilcox, Reber and Shin ( in press) as a health advocacy tool in US African-American and mainstream newspapers, arguing that escalation of conflict can increase effectiveness of health-related news releases. For health communicators focusing on at-risk populations with poor health outcomes, such goals would include increased awareness of health problems and solutions, along with increased motivation arising from indignation over health disparities. Content analysis of 1,197 stories in 24 Black and 12 mainstream newspapers showed that more conflict factors were present in Black vs. mainstream newspapers, suggesting a way to strategically place health messages in news releases disseminated to newspapers that motivate at-risk publics to better health. The findings suggest that conflict factors such as racial disparity data regarding health issues may enhance media advocacy.

  17. Semantic and stylistic pecularities of Slavicisms in language of modern newspapers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Жанар Кабдыляшымовна Киынова

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In article functioning of slavonicims in language of modern Kazakhstan and Russian newspapers is considered. On the basis of examples, ekstserpirovanny from modern newspapers, the informative picture about tendencies and regularities of modern word usage in mass media is given.

  18. Evolution of Rape Myths and Sexual Assaults in Newspaper Coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Wen Tsai

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an analysis of the coverage of three newspapers of rape in the daily Press in Taiwan. The idea that rape is a sexual rather than an aggressive act encourages people not to take it seriously as a crime-an attitude frequently revealed in comments by defense attorneys and newspaper. The authors’ investigated that the female victim who did not know most of her attackers will be portrayed as helpless and not responsible for her victimization. The newspapers sustained and reinforced the myths that a woman who is having consensual sex cannot be raped, and if so, she is held culpable and perceived as “asking for it.” A content analysis of newspapers’ headlines and coverage between 2002 and 2013 showed that more than 50% endorsed a rape myth.

  19. Media Hyping and the "Herceptin Access Story": An Analysis of Canadian and UK Newspaper Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelson, Julia; Collins, Patricia A

    2009-02-01

    In May 2005, preliminary trial results pronouncing the effectiveness of Herceptin (trastuzumab) for treatment of early-stage breast cancer were disseminated at a high-profile scientific meeting. Herceptin was subsequently approved for use in the public healthcare systems of Canada and the United Kingdom, although the differences between the two decision timelines were stark. The authors compared UK and Canadian newspaper coverage of the Herceptin story to assess how it may have been "hyped" in each country. They analyzed a diverse sample of newspapers and coded clippings for reporters' framing of the drug's efficacy, costs and funding approval process. Canadian news coverage preceded formal publication of the trial results, while UK coverage mirrored major national events. Reporters in both countries used predominantly individualistic perspectives and framed Herceptin's efficacy in salutary terms. Framing of costs was more neutral in Canadian than in UK newspapers. Funding approval framing focused on inequitable access in the UK and timeliness in Canada. News coverage of drug access stories varies across jurisdictions in terms of intensity and some aspects of framing. Such variations likely reflect different journalistic practices and dominant political rhetoric. Greater attention should be given to the role that news coverage of drug access plays in shaping public opinion and policy action, especially when this coverage precedes scientific debate. Copyright © 2009 Longwoods Publishing.

  20. Local Media in Global Conflict: Southeast Asian Newspapers and the Politics of Peace in Israel/Palestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakubu Ozohu-Suleiman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available It is often assumed that local media are a potential deescalating tool in global conflict. This study examines how four leading newspapers in Southeast Asia (Star of Malaysia, Philstar of the Philippines, Jakarta Post of Indonesia, and The Nation of Thailand reported the Israeli-Palestinian conflict during the year after the 2009 Gaza War. A census of 536 reports was coded for tones (to detect alignment, frames (to detect characterization of the conflict, and sources (to examine correlation with coverage tones. The results show fragmented alignment of the newspapers with Palestine and Israel. Conflict frames on offensives, fighting, threats, military strategies, demonization, death, and destruction were most prevalent. Coverage tones were significantly correlated with sources, suggesting that the potential of local media to serve as deescalating tools in global conflicts is subject to the varying political contexts in which they operate in relation to specific conflicts.

  1. The SOLEIL newspaper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    This first issue of the SOLEIL newspaper gives some news about the advances, decisions and scientific and technical choices concerning the detailed SOLEIL (Optimized Source of Intermediate Energy Light) pre-project of the LURE (Laboratory for the use of the Electromagnetic Radiation) of Orsay (France). This issue deals successively with: the answer of the project group to the research secretary of the French government, the technical choices and their consequences on experiments, the options on sources, the architecture and financing of buildings, the reference schedule and some details about the personnel involved in the project. (J.S.)

  2. Three Functions of the School Newspaper: The Truth Shop, The Persuasion Podium, The Pleasure Dome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Laurence R.

    This Quill and Scroll Study, which is illustrated with numerous tables, concerns the following subjects: The School Newspaper as a Truth Shop; The School Newspaper as a Pleasure Dome; and The School Newspaper as a Persuasion Podium. (DB)

  3. If it bleeds, it leads: the construction of workplace injury in Canadian newspapers, 2009–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnetson, Bob; Foster, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Background: Public perceptions of workplace injuries are shaped by media reports, but the accuracy of such reports is unknown. Objective: This study identifies differences between workers' compensation claims data and newspaper reports of workplace injuries in Canadian newspapers and media sources. Methods: This study applies quantitative content analysis to 245 Canadian English-language newspaper articles from 2009 to 2014. Workers' compensation claims data is drawn from the Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada. Results: Newspapers dramatically overreport fatalities, injuries to men, injuries in the construction and mining/quarrying/oil industries, injuries stemming from contact with objects/equipment and fires/explosions, and acute physical injuries such as burns, fractures, intracranial injuries, and traumatic injuries. Newspaper reporters tend to rely upon government, police/firefighter, and employer accounts, rarely recounting the perspectives of workers. Conclusion: Newspapers overreported fatalities, injuries to men, and injuries in the construction and mining/quarrying/oil industries. This results in a misleading picture of occupational injuries in Canada. PMID:26070326

  4. The Asian Newspaper's Reluctant Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lent, John A., Ed.

    This book is composed of 19 articles written by both Asian and American scholars on the history and present conditions of newspapers in 15 Asian nations: China, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Australia, Burma, Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore, the Philippines, Thailand, South Vietnam, Ceylon, India, and Pakistan. Two overviews of the Asian…

  5. The Means-End Approach to Understanding Customer Values of a On-Line Newspaper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Maranhão de Souza Leão

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Customer value is understood as one of the constructs that best explains consumer decision making. Its proposal is to understand how consumers translate product or service characteristics and consequences of use into personal self-relevant values. The means-end theory is a way of systematically thinking in this hierarchicalrepresentation. The most commonly used method to achieve means-end chains is laddering. This theory and method were used to understand customer values of an important on-line Brazilian newspaper, which is an innovative approach, since on-line laddering is uncommon. The findings indicate that values related to goals of a personal nature are the most important ones. However, other values indicate the increase of the public man pointing to an alternative vision of what is commonly thought of as the contemporary isolated and selfish human. Academic research could benefit from a broader understanding and use of the means-end theory and laddering on the Web. Future research for managerial practices is warranted in areas such as segmentation, satisfaction measuring and customer value reevaluation, in addition to copy tests.

  6. National newspaper portrayal of U.S. nursing homes: periodic treatment of topic and tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Edward Alan; Tyler, Denise A; Rozanova, Julia; Mor, Vincent

    2012-12-01

    Although observers have long highlighted the relationship of public distrust, government regulation, and media depictions of nursing-home scandals, no study has systematically analyzed the way in which nursing homes have been portrayed in the national media. This study examines how nursing homes were depicted in four leading national newspapers-the New York Times, Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, and Los Angeles Times-from 1999 to 2008. We used keyword searches of the LexisNexis database to identify 1,704 articles pertaining to nursing homes. We then analyzed the content of each article and assessed its tone, themes, prominence, and central actor. We used basic frequencies and descriptive statistics to examine the articles' content, both cross-sectionally and over time. Approximately one-third of the articles were published in 1999/2000, and a comparatively high percentage (12.4%) appeared in 2005. Most were news stories (89.8%), and about one-quarter were on the front page of the newspaper or section. Most focused on government (42.3%) or industry (39.2%) interests, with very few on residents/family (13.3%) and community (5.3%) concerns. Most were negative (45.1%) or neutral (37.0%) in tone, and very few were positive (9.6%) or mixed (8.3%). Common themes were quality (57.0%), financing (33.4%), and negligence/fraud (28.1%). Both tone and themes varied across newspapers and years. Overall, our findings highlight the longitudinal variation in the four widely read newspapers' framing of nursing-home coverage, regarding not only tone but also shifts in media attention from one aspect of this complex policy area to another. The predominantly negative media reports contribute to the poor public opinion of nursing homes and, in turn, of the people who live and work in them. These reports also place nursing homes at a competitive disadvantage and may pose challenges to health delivery reform, including care integration across settings. © 2012 Milbank Memorial Fund.

  7. The differential effects of position, ad and reader characteristics on readers' processing of newspaper ads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, E.G.; Neijens, P.C.; Heath, R.

    2013-01-01

    Building on previous research on the processing of newspaper ads, this comprehensive field study, with 26,556 newspaper readers and 290 unique advertisements, investigated the combined effects of position in the newspaper, ad characteristics and reader characteristics. The results show a

  8. The freshness of Persian Information: the case of Persian Newspapers indexed in Google, Yahoo and Bing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    maryam yaghtin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to study the freshness of Persian information, the study attempted to explore the indexing speed of Persian newspapers in Google, Yahoo and Bing. The present study was conducted using a webometric method. The population study comprised all the online newspapers published in Persian. The study sample was identified using a targeted method. It included those Persian newspapers listed on the Magiran database with their electronic versions regularly published on their respective websites. The results revealed that Google outperforms the two other search engines in terms of timely indexing the Persian newspapers. Furthermore, it generally enjoys a more consistent and stable indexing model. Yahoo and Bing are not only slower in indexing the newspapers, but also experience a comparably lower consistency level in their indexing models. Yahoo and Bing show to be comparable in their indexing speeds. In this study, the indexing status of Persian newspapers on different internet search engines was investigated for the first time. Results showed that those accessing these newspapers using internet search engines will have a higher chance of accessing their most updated versions using Google.

  9. Learning about the Nature of Science Using Newspaper Articles with Scientific Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Carmona, Antonio; Acevedo Díaz, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a study aiming at assessing the efficacy of reading newspaper articles with scientific content in order to incorporate nature of science (NOS) aspects in initial primary teacher education. To this aim, a short teaching intervention based on newspaper articles was planned and performed under regular class conditions. First,…

  10. Newspaper advertising versus direct mail marketing in a family practice: a hands-on approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godreau, C J

    1995-01-01

    This study compares newspaper advertising and direct mail marketing to attract private patients. Newsletter advertising was distributed to 92,251 homes throughout 1991 at a cost of $20,827.13. Newspaper advertising was conducted from August 28 to October 9, 1991 at a cost of $2,261.94. The newsletter attracted 101 new patients at a cost of $206.21 per patient and a mean response rate of 0.11%. No new patients were attracted through newspaper advertising.

  11. The Effects of Bad News and Good News on a Newspaper's Image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Jack B.; Miller, M. Mark

    1984-01-01

    Concludes that whether a newspaper carries mostly good news or mostly bad news affects the image of the paper, with bad news having negative effects and good news having positive effects on readers' perceptions of the newspaper. (FL)

  12. Mainstream newspapers in Malaysia: Impact of the online alternative media

    OpenAIRE

    HAN LEONG CHANG

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation examines the impact of the online alternative media on the traditional newspapers in Malaysia. The country’s newspapers are controlled by commercial and political interests but the press needs a major transformation to compete with the alternative media effectively. The study relies on various sources of information on the contemporary history of the media and in-depth interviews in Malaysia. The findings show that the alternative media have been a positive influence on pres...

  13. Gendering attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a discursive analysis of UK newspaper stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton-Salway, Mary

    2013-08-01

    Discursive psychology is used to study the gendering of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in UK national newspapers in the period of 2009-2011. The analysis examines how gendering is embedded in causal attributions and identity constructions. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is portrayed as a predominantly male phenomenon with representations of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder being gendered through extreme stories about victims, villains or heroes that depict boys and men as marginalised, exceptional or dangerous. There is also a focus on mothers as the spokespersons and caretakers for parenting and family health while fathers are rendered more invisible. This contributes to our understanding of how attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is constructed in the media using a range of gendered representations that draw on cultural stereotypes familiar in Western societies.

  14. Ethical Disputes and Credibility of Daily Newspapers-Content Analysis of Front Page Newspaper Articles in Jutarnji list and Večernji list

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunja Majstorović

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the more common assertions regarding the media is the existence of a large number of ethical disputes in front page news articles in daily newspapers. Therefore, the main goal of this studyis to establish the number of ethical disputes in articles placed on the front pages of Croatia’s two main dailies, Jutarnji list and Večernji list (sample of one month. In the course of the research three hypotheses were made with the purpose of verifying their accuracy. Using content analysis as the primary method for analysis, the ethically disputable articles were divided into the following categories: anonymous sources, biased display of events, violations of human rights, inappropriate reporting, and headlines that fail to match the text. The same articles were then classifi ed into categories according to their topics. The results of this study confi rm all three hypotheses, the fi rst of which is that there are a large number of ethical disputes in the analyzed articles. In Jutarnji list 26 articles (of 95 analyzed articles contained 30 ethical disputes and in Večernji list 23 articles (of 108 analyzed contained 29 ethical disputes. Further, this study concludes that there is a distinct similarity in the number of ethical disputes in the articles in both newspapers. The results verify the third hypothesis; the largest number of ethically disputable articles centered on topics related to domestic politics. The results of the research indicate a violation of journalism ethics which can be explained by increasing sensationalism in daily newspapers. The result of inappropriate reporting has a significant impact on the decline of credibility of newspapers as a medium.

  15. A comparative analysis of media reporting of perceived risks and benefits of genetically modified crops and foods in Kenyan and international newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRosier, Christopher; Sulemana, Iddisah; James, Harvey S; Valdivia, Corinne; Folk, William; Smith, Randall D

    2015-07-01

    We empirically examine the reporting on biotechnology in Kenyan and international newspapers between 2010 and early 2014. We identify news articles that reported on biotechnology and analyze their use of words to determine whether there is a balance in the reporting of perceived risks and benefits. We also consider how the sources used in news articles and how the publication of the Séralini study of rats fed genetically modified maize affect the balance of reporting of perceived risks and benefits. We find that in Kenyan news reporting, more articles mention perceived benefits than risks, but when risks are mentioned, new articles contain more references to risks than to benefits. We also find that sources affect the reporting of perceived risks and benefits and that the Séralini study increased the likelihood that perceived risks are reported in Kenyan news reporting, but not in international newspapers. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. How cortical neurons help us see: visual recognition in the human brain

    OpenAIRE

    Blumberg, Julie; Kreiman, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Through a series of complex transformations, the pixel-like input to the retina is converted into rich visual perceptions that constitute an integral part of visual recognition. Multiple visual problems arise due to damage or developmental abnormalities in the cortex of the brain. Here, we provide an overview of how visual information is processed along the ventral visual cortex in the human brain. We discuss how neurophysiological recordings in macaque monkeys and in humans can help us under...

  17. Influenza newspaper reports and the influenza epidemic: an observational study in Fukuoka City, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagihara, Akihito; Onozuka, Daisuke; Miyazaki, Shougo; Abe, Takeru

    2015-12-30

    We examined whether the weekly number of newspaper articles reporting on influenza was related to the incidence of influenza in a large city. Prospective, non-randomised, observational study. Registry data of influenza cases in Fukuoka City, Japan. A total of 83,613 cases of influenza cases that occurred between October 1999 and March 2007 in Fukuoka City, Japan. A linear model with autoregressive time series errors was fitted to time series data on the incidence of influenza and the accumulated number of influenza-related newspaper articles with different time lags in Fukuoka City, Japan. In order to obtain further evidence that the number of newspaper articles a week with specific time lags is related to the incidence of influenza, Granger causality was also tested. Of the 16 models including 'number of newspaper articles' with different time lags between 2 and 17 weeks (xt-2 to t-17), the β coefficients of 'number of newspaper articles' at time lags between t-5 and t-13 were significant. However, the β coefficients of 'number of newspaper articles' that are significant with respect to the Granger causality tests (p<0.05) were the weekly number of newspaper articles at time lags between t-6 and t-10 (time shift of 10 weeks, β=-0.301, p<0.01; time shift of 9 weeks, β=-0.200, p<0.01; time shift of 8 weeks, β=-0.156, p<0.01; time shift of 7 weeks, β=-0.122, p<0.05; time shift of 6 weeks, β=-0.113, p<0.05). We found that the number of newspaper articles reporting on influenza in a week was related to the incidence of influenza 6-10 weeks after media coverage in a large city in Japan. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Of saints and sinners: How collective pride and guilt affect outgroup helping.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, E.; van Dijk, W.W.; Kaynak, Ü

    2013-01-01

    We examined how appeals to collective guilt and pride can motivate people to help members of a disadvantaged outgroup. Results from two experiments supported the prediction that appeals to collective pride are more effective than appeals to collective guilt in prompting high identifying group

  19. Electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS) in the media - a qualitative content analysis of Norwegian newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huiberts, Ashild; Hjørnevik, Mari; Mykletun, Arnstein; Skogen, Jens C

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS) is a condition characterized by experiencing symptoms after perceived exposure to weak electromagnetic fields (EMFs). There is substantial debate concerning the aetiology of EHS, but experimental data indicate no association between EHS and actual presence of EMFs. Newspapers play a key role in shaping peoples' understanding of health-related issues. The aim of this study was to describe the content of newspaper articles concerning aetiology and treatment of EHS. Qualitative content analysis of newspaper articles. Norwegian newspaper articles were identified using a comprehensive electronic media archive. Norwegian newspaper articles published between 1 February 2006 and 11 August 2010. Statements coded according to source of information, whether it was pro or con scientific evidence on EHS aetiology, and type of intervention presented as treatment option for EHS. Of the statements concerning EHS aetiology (n = 196), 35% (n = 69) were categorized as pro evidence, 65% (n = 127) as con evidence. Of the statements about EHS interventions assessed, 78% (n = 99) were categorized as 'radiance reduction', 4% (n = 5) as 'complementary medicine', and 18% (n = 23) as 'other'. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and psychotropic drugs were never presented as possible treatment options for EHS. The newspaper media discourse of EHS aetiology and recommended treatment interventions is much in conflict with the current evidence in the field. The majority of statements concerning aetiology convey that EHS is related to the presence of weak EMFs, and radiance reduction as the most frequently conveyed measure to reduce EHS-related symptoms.

  20. The articles on atomic bomb of the newspaper in the past 15 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubuki, Satoru; Hayakawa, Norihiko; Matsuura, Masaaki; Hatano, Hiroko

    1990-01-01

    A-bomb hazards are given publicity by journalism every year from the end of the 1960s, especially in July and August, in Japan. This is generally termed 'the publication of A-bomb articles'. This paper outlines 'the publication of A-bomb articles' and introduces the actual conditions of A-bomb hazard problems. Articles were selected from three major national newspapers and two domestic newspapers (Hiroshima and Nagasaki) during the past 15 years from 1975 through 1989. Contents of the articles were divided into 20 categories and subdivided into 92 categories. According to newspaper, the Hiroshima domestic newspaper published the articles in the largest number (approximately 30% of all the articles). Overall, approximately 21% of the articles were published in August. The most common article content was A-bomb survivors' experiences, accounting for 47% before 1981 and 60% since 1982. (N.K.)

  1. Analysis of the adaptation of the editorials of five newspapers from different European countries to the online environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Gallur Santorum

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This article analyses the main features and degree of adaptation of the editorials of five newspapers from different European countries to the online environment. Methods. The study is based on the content analysis of the editorials published in the online editions of El País, The Times, Le Monde, Diario de Noticias and Corriere della Sera. Results. In the sample of online newspapers, the editorial genre maintains a privileged position in the online version and can be differentiated from the opinion pieces. In addition, this section retains its function as the institutional voice of the newspapers. Discussion. Despite the importance of the editorial, its role as shaper of public opinion in relation to current affairs is overshadowed by its role as political actor. Conclusions. The online editorial retains the traditional content and format features of the genre, and shows little adaptation to the internet platform and its possibilities to enable citizens’ participation.

  2. Media reporting of global health issues and events in New Zealand daily newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCool, Judith; Cussen, Ashleigh; Ameratunga, Shanthi

    2011-12-01

    In the context of a globalised world, reports on health that extend personal or country borders have increasing relevance. Media can promote opportunities to identify and address gaps in important global health issues. In light of the potential role of media as an advocacy tool for global health, we examined how global health issues are represented in mainstream media in New Zealand. We conducted a content analysis of media reports on global health issues in the four highest circulation newspapers in New Zealand between June 2007 and May 2009. Search terms included 'global health, 'international health' and 'world health'. Communicable disease was the most frequently reported global health issue in New Zealand newspapers, followed by environment (e.g. climate change), general health risks (unsafe pharmaceuticals) and substance use (tobacco and alcohol). Chronic disease, injury or their determinants were less frequently reported. Mainstream media favours health-related reports based on crisis, epidemic or acute conditions over chronic or non-communicable diseases or disability. Health issues facing the Asia Pacific region increasingly include chronic diseases, which would benefit from greater media coverage to increase advocacy and political awareness of global health challenges.

  3. How to help CERN to run more simulations

    CERN Multimedia

    The LHC@home team

    2016-01-01

    With LHC@home you can actively contribute to the computing capacity of the Laboratory!   You may think that CERN's large Data Centre and the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid have enough computing capacity for all the Laboratory’s users. However, given the massive amount of data coming from LHC experiments and other sources, additional computing resources are always needed, notably for simulations of physics events, or accelerator and detector upgrades. This is an area where you can help, by installing BOINC and running simulations from LHC@home on your office PC or laptop. These background simulations will not disturb your work, as BOINC can be configured to automatically stop computing when your PC is in use. As mentioned in earlier editions of the Bulletin (see here and here), contributions from LHC@home volunteers have played a major role in LHC beam simulation studies. The computing capacity they made available corresponds to about half the capacity of the CERN...

  4. Framing the Newspaper Crisis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruggemann, Michael; Humprecht, Edda; Kleis, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    as well as a qualitative analysis of policy documents and relevant media coverage. The study demonstrates that debates on the newspaper crisis are only partly influenced by (1) economic realities and (2) media policy traditions in the six countries but also reflect (3) the strategic motives of powerful...... the problem mainly by developing innovative content and business strategies. This liberal market paradigm displays one blind spot however: it does not seriously consider a scenario where the market is failing to provide sustainable journalistic quality....

  5. Nutritional-related diseases and management: newspaper ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study showed that many people are ignorant of the importance of eating a balanced diet and eating right to prevent nutritional diseases. This is why the newspapers topics or health tips on diet and nutrition had the highest percentage frequency, because of its importance the needed emphasis it requires. Therefore, it is ...

  6. Evaluation of Contribution of Local Newspapers to Lifelong Learning (Example of Bartin Province)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çuhadar, Elif; Ünal, Fatma

    2018-01-01

    In this study, while the definition of informal education, which displays the main features of lifelong learning, is made, it is also attempted to identify the contributions of the local newspapers, through which the society can reach its own unique and necessary information, to the lifelong learning of their readers. In the research, within this…

  7. Open Up Your Newspaper with Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielberger, Ronald E.

    1980-01-01

    Suggests ways the business office of a student newspaper can ease the conflicts between news and advertising space, including: raising advertising rates, selling ads only in uniform sizes, charging extra for premium space, selling special features, and selling space around a monthly calendar of special events. (TJ)

  8. The presumed reader in car advertisements published in Teresina's printed newspapers, from 1950 to 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Alves Filho

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to present how the image of the presumed reader has been built in the printed newspapers of the city of Teresina (Piaui State, Brazil, with them being the following: O Piauí, Folha da Manhã, O Dia, and Diário do Povo. In order to do so, we have researched the bibliography referent to the studies of authors such as Charles Bazerman (2011, Carolyn Miller (2009 [1984], and Amy Devitt (2004, representatives of Gender Rhetorical Studies. Besides these, we have consulted Bakhtin's assumptions for studying genre, mainly extracted from Marxism and the Philosophy of Language, and Aesthetics of Verbal Creation, as well as Brazilian authors related to the study of discursive genres, such as Fiorin (2008, Marcuschi (2008, and Faraco (2009. With the research, we could confirm that the advertisements actually build social-historic blocks capable of mirroring the values of a society, but also capable of contributing directly for determined values to be restored or forgotten.

  9. How cortical neurons help us see: visual recognition in the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberg, Julie; Kreiman, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Through a series of complex transformations, the pixel-like input to the retina is converted into rich visual perceptions that constitute an integral part of visual recognition. Multiple visual problems arise due to damage or developmental abnormalities in the cortex of the brain. Here, we provide an overview of how visual information is processed along the ventral visual cortex in the human brain. We discuss how neurophysiological recordings in macaque monkeys and in humans can help us understand the computations performed by visual cortex. PMID:20811161

  10. The British Library Newspaper Collection: Long Term Storage, Preservation and Access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Fleming

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The British Library has recently unveiled plans for improving the collection care of, and digital access to, one of the world's greatest newspaper collections. The collection, which dates from the 16th century, contains UK titles as well as 200 overseas titles and is at risk. 15% of the collection is unusable because of its deterioration, and there are pressures on space and a need to develop greater digital content for access. The solution is to place all of the physical newspapers into a new, state of the art Newspaper Storage Building at Boston Spa, the British Library's main storage and logistics site, and home to its document delivery service. The building will comprise of 160 km of high density shelf space, fully automated under special environmental conditions including low oxygen, regulated 16 degree Celsius temperature, and 52% humidity. Future access to the collection will be at the BL's main Library site at St Pancras, in a specially equipped reading room, so that researchers can integrate other collection items into their studies. However, access will be by surrogate means, initially microfilm, stored in London, and then, increasingly, digital access. By March 2009, the British Library will have digitised 3 million historic newspapers with JISC funds, and this content will be available to readers for free in reading rooms and on a paid for basis online, or via subscriptions. The Library is investigating a similar model going forward with a private sector partner who is willing to digitise and sell online out of copyright newspapers from the BL's collection for a fixed period. This will provide digital content for customers in reading rooms, free at the point of access.

  11. The effect of using waste newspaper in surface layers on physical and mechanical properties of three-layer particleboard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    vahid vaziri

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, physical and mechanical properties of particleboard made from recycled newspaper in the surface layers were investigated. Coarse and fine wood chips and recycled newspaper with dimension of 0.5 × 4 cm2 were used. The variable in this research were the ratio of recycled newspaper to wood chips (at five levels; 0:100, 15:85, 30:70, 45:55, 60:40. Urea formaldehyde resin used at 10% content on dry weight basis of the wood particles and newspaper and ammonium chloride was used as a catalyst to 2% of the dry weight of adhesive. Physical and mechanical properties of panels measured according to EN Standard. The results showed that panels containing recycled newspapers at the level of 45% had the highest bending strength and modulus of elasticity. Internal bonding and screw holding strength decreased with increasing of recycled newspaper and control sample had the highest strength. Water absorption and thickness swelling increased with increasing of recycled newspaper portion. On the basis of results of this study can be concluded that particleboard containing recycled newspapers in the surface layers up to the level of 30% can be used for general purpose boards and interior fitments (including furniture for use in dry conditions.

  12. Print, Newspapers and Audiences in Colonial Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Bodil Folke

    2011-01-01

    on the right to write freely and be heard, and traditions of freedom of speech put a brake on censorship. Furthermore, the shifting networks of financial, editorial and journalistic collaboration, and the newspapers' language choice — African vernaculars, Gujarati, Swahili and English — made intervention...

  13. Library Service to Pregnant Teens: How Can We Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Melissa

    1997-01-01

    Discusses teenage pregnancy and sexuality and suggests ways in which librarians can help provide access to appropriate and needed information. Highlights include developing policies and procedures for dealing with sexual issues, collection development, organizing information and making it accessible, and a brief teen pregnancy bibliography. (LRW)

  14. Arguing in L2: Discourse Structure and Textual Metadiscourse in Philippine Newspaper Editorials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrayo, Veronico N.; Duque, Marie Claire T.

    2011-01-01

    This study described the discourse structure and textual metadiscourse in newspaper editorials in the Philippines where English is used as a second language or L2. Specifically, it sought answers to the following questions: (1) What discourse features characterize the structure of the following parts of Philippine newspaper editorials--orientation…

  15. Tendencies of the digital newspapers in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dra. Lyudmyla Yezers´ka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes some of the tendencies of the development of the digital media in Peru. The results that are presented were obtained by means of a survey carried out to responsible people of the digital redactions of the national generalist newspapers that, when concluding the first decade of the existence of the online journalism in the country (1995-2005, had digital editions. From historical perspective, different stages of evolution and consolidation of the Peruvian daily editions in the Global Network have not had temporary clear definition. The media progressed at their own pace, depending among other factors –at the time of entry into the network, the staff assigned to the publication, and especially on the strength of the journalistic company and its policy regarding digital editing. With regard to the presence on the Internet, digital newspapers have shown a steady and numerous growth, over the first decade (1995-2005.

  16. Online devices and measuring systems for the automatic control of newspaper printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marszalec, Elzbieta A.; Heikkila, Ismo; Juhola, Helene; Lehtonen, Tapio

    1999-09-01

    The paper reviews the state-of-the-art color measuring systems used for the control of newspaper printing. The printing process requirements are specified and different off-line and on-line color quality control systems, commercially available and under development, are evaluated. Recent market trends in newspaper printing are discussed based on the survey. The study was made on information derived from: conference proceedings (TAGA, IARIGAI, SPIE and IS&T), journals (American Printer, Applied Optics), discussions with experts (GMI, QTI, HONEYWELL, TOBIAS, GretagMacbeth), IFRA Expo'98/Quality Measuring Technologies, commercial brochures, and the Internet. On the background of this review, three different measuring principles, currently, under investigation at VTT Information Technology, are described and their applicability to newspaper printing is evaluated.

  17. Language of Advertising: A Study of Nigeria's Nation Newspaper and Newswatch Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Esther

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on a critical analysis of the language of advertisement in selected newspapers and magazines; from the aspect of graphology and lexis of "The Nation Newspaper" and "Newswatch Magazine" respectively. This work is based on the framework of stylistics. Through this study, it is discovered that the language of…

  18. Influenza newspaper reports and the influenza epidemic: an observational study in Fukuoka City, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagihara, Akihito; Onozuka, Daisuke; Miyazaki, Shougo; Abe, Takeru

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We examined whether the weekly number of newspaper articles reporting on influenza was related to the incidence of influenza in a large city. Design Prospective, non-randomised, observational study. Setting Registry data of influenza cases in Fukuoka City, Japan. Participants A total of 83 613 cases of influenza cases that occurred between October 1999 and March 2007 in Fukuoka City, Japan. Main outcome measure A linear model with autoregressive time series errors was fitted to time series data on the incidence of influenza and the accumulated number of influenza-related newspaper articles with different time lags in Fukuoka City, Japan. In order to obtain further evidence that the number of newspaper articles a week with specific time lags is related to the incidence of influenza, Granger causality was also tested. Results Of the 16 models including ‘number of newspaper articles’ with different time lags between 2 and 17 weeks (xt-2 to t-17), the β coefficients of ‘number of newspaper articles’ at time lags between t-5 and t-13 were significant. However, the β coefficients of ‘number of newspaper articles’ that are significant with respect to the Granger causality tests (pnewspaper articles at time lags between t-6 and t-10 (time shift of 10 weeks, β=−0.301, pnewspaper articles reporting on influenza in a week was related to the incidence of influenza 6–10 weeks after media coverage in a large city in Japan. PMID:26719323

  19. Mass media communication of emergency issues and countermeasures in a nuclear accident: Fukushima reporting in European newspapers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallego, Eduardo; Cantone, Marie Claire; Oughton, Deborah H.; Tomkiv, Yevgeniya; Perko, Tanja; Prezelj, Iztok

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a large study of 1340 articles published by two major newspapers in six European countries (Belgium, Italy, Norway, Slovenia, Spain and Russia) in the first 2 months after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. The focus of the analysis is on the application and overall impact of protective actions, both during the emergency phase and later, how the newspapers describe those actions, which differences were apparent between countries and what recommendations can be extracted in order to improve general communication about these issues. A clear lesson is that, even under uncertainty and recognising limitations, responsible authorities need to provide transparent, clear and understandable information to the public and the mass media right from the beginning of the early phase of any nuclear emergency. Clear, concise messages should be given. Mass media could play a key role in reassuring the public if the countermeasures are clearly explained. (authors)

  20. Strategy, Innovation and Revitalizing Declining Newspaper Industries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vang, Jan; Nielsen, Anders Paarup

    2006-01-01

    the literature has not paid sufficient attention to. Such visions demand that the firms change their focus from beating existing competitors towards developing visions targeting new mass-markets. The importance and practical challenges in this process are documented by an original study of the Danish newspaper...

  1. Newspaper coverage of agricultural information in Tanzania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A.S.Sife

    Introduction. Agriculture is a key sector of economy in Tanzania. ... media to reach a wide audience, newspapers have additional advantages of being in permanent form ... advertisements, politics, entertainment, and crime events while ignoring developmental topics such as ..... Social Sciences, 3(8): 578–582. Kayode, J.

  2. Chronicles of progress : the illustrated newspapers of colonial Australia, 1853-1896

    OpenAIRE

    Dowling, Peter Andrew

    2017-01-01

    This thesis is a study of the imagery in the illustrated newspapers of colonial Australia over the period of their publication, 1853-1896. The distinguishing feature of these papers was that the illustrations were printed from engraved woodblocks. The thesis is pioneering in the sense that whilst historians have regularly used images from the papers to illustrate books on a wide variety of topics, no one has researched the illustrated newspapers as a primary source in their ...

  3. Trends in reports on climate change in 2009-2011 in the Korean press based on daily newspapers' ownership structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jihye; Hong, Yeon-pyo; Kim, Hyunsook; Hong, Youngtak; Lee, Weonyoung

    2013-03-01

    The mass media play a crucial role in risk communication regarding climate change. The aim of this study was to investigate the trend in journalistic reports on climate change in the daily newspapers of Korea. We selected 9 daily newspapers in Korea, which according to the ABC Association, represented 77% of newspaper circulation, out of a total of 44 Korean daily newspapers. The collected articles were from 2009 to 2011. All of the articles were sorted into the following 8 categories: greenhouse gas, climate change conventions, sea level rise, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change synthesis reports, expected damage and effect, use of fossil fuels, global warming, and mitigation or adaptation. A chi-squared test was done on the articles, which were counted and classified into cause, effect, and measurement of climate change according to the newspaper's majority or minority ownership structure. From the 9 selected newspapers, the number of articles on climate change by month was greatest in December 2009. Generally, the articles vague about climate change (lack of precise data, negative or skeptical tone, and improper use of terminology) were much more common than the articles presenting accurate knowledge. A statistical difference was found based on ownership structure: the majority-owned newspapers addressed the cause of climate change, while the minority-owned newspapers referred more to climate change measurement. Our investigation revealed that generally Korean daily newspapers did not deliver accurate information about climate change. The coverage of the newspapers showed significant differences according to the ownership structure.

  4. 20 CFR 655.151 - Newspaper advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Newspaper advertisements. 655.151 Section 655.151 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TEMPORARY EMPLOYMENT OF FOREIGN WORKERS IN THE UNITED STATES Labor Certification Process for Temporary Agricultural Employment in the United States (H-2A Workers)...

  5. United States Newspaper Program. List of Intended Audience Terms for 655 Genre Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin State Historical Society, Madison.

    The United States Newspaper Program (USNP) is a national, cooperative effort to locate, catalog, and preserve on microfilm newspapers published in the United States and its territories since the seventeenth century. This list of intended-audience terms was initially developed by the USNP staff at the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, but soon…

  6. #Contraoaumento as a socio-popular claim and questioning of the midiatic coverage in the newspapers Meio Norte and O Dia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Augusto de frança rocha Júnior

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes an analysis of six editions of Piaui newspapers “Meio Norte” and “O Dia”. It is about of news stories linked to the popular mobilization against the increase of the public transport fee. The corpus of the research covers the period of August 29th, 2011 until September 3rd, 2011- when the popular protest occurred in Teresina (capital of Piauí. The article’s objective is identifying the strategies of each publication and how relevant this subject is in the mentioned newspapers. Discourse Analysis was applied as one efficient methodology to this research based on concepts like “reading contract” and “interdiscourse”, and based on some authors as Charaudeau (2006, Mainguenau (2008 Marques de Melo (1985 and Verón (2004.

  7. Framing a Conflict! How Media Report on Earthquake Risks Caused by Gas Drilling: A Longitudinal Analysis Using Machine Learning Techniques of Media Reporting on Gas Drilling from 1990 to 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opperhuizen, A.E. (Alette Eva); K. Schouten (Kim); E-H. Klijn (Erik-Hans)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractUsing a new analytical tool, supervised machine learning (SML), a large number of newspaper articles is analysed to answer the question how newspapers frame the news of public risks, in this case of earthquakes caused by gas drilling in The Netherlands. SML enabled the study of 2265 news

  8. American Newspaper Editorials on the Vietnam War: An Experimental Approach to Editorial Content Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Stephen N.

    The editorials about four Vietnam War news events that appeared in five newspapers were examined for content, tone, page placement, and length to discover what trends in editorial coverage occurred. The 131 editorials that were examined appeared in the "New York Times," the "Los Angeles Times," the "Wall Street…

  9. Beliefs that manifest through newspaper items in relation to peoples’ life challenges and their potential to enhance a sustainable learning environment in school science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thapelo L. Mamiala

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper documents beliefs that manifest themselves through newspaper items and elaborates on their potential to enhance a sustainable learning environment in a school science lesson. “Learning environment” is depicted from different angles and includes virtual and real learning environments, school environments and classroom environments. Descriptive and item analyses were conducted on sixty-eight newspaper items that were identified. The nature of problems and prescriptions/solutions was categorised for each item and the paper further provides elaboration on the types of problems and recommended solutions. The results show that the “believed” structure contents in their newspaper items to catch the attention of the “believer”. Lessons on the power of belief must be learnt by school science teachers if they are to succeed in creating a sustainable learning environment with improved performance in school science.

  10. The state, use and preservation of newspapers in the serials reading room in NUK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Rapuš

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Newspapers are often placed in the category of the most imperilled materials, due to the use of a low-grade paper, their large size and relatively frequent use. Unfortunately the methods of preservation and use are extremely time consuming as well as expertly pretentious, therefore in many Slovenian collections, the preservation is utterly inappropriate. Accessibility of this kind of materials is in many cases hindered, in some even impossible. The inventory of the state of newspapers in the Serials department of NUK was performed to assess the current state of newspapers as affected by use and past preservation programs. The intent of the inventory was not only to meet the needs of our research, but also to serve as a selection tool for storage, use and retrospective reproduction. The main intent of the research was to provide a framework for the materials selection for projects of appropriate permanent storage and safe use of newspapers in NUK as well as in other Slovenian libraries.

  11. What hysteria? A systematic study of newspaper coverage of accused child molesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheit, Ross E

    2003-06-01

    There were three aims: First, to determine the extent to which those charged with child molestation receive newspaper coverage; second, to analyze the nature of that coverage; and third, to compare the universe of coverage to the nature of child molestation charges in the criminal justice system as a whole. Two databases were created. The first one identified all defendants charged with child molestation in Rhode Island in 1993. The database was updated after 5 years to include relevant information about case disposition. The second database was created by electronic searching the Providence Journal for every story that mentioned each defendant. Most defendants (56.1%) were not mentioned in the newspaper. Factors associated with a greater chance of coverage include: cases involving first-degree charges, cases with multiple counts, cases involving additional violence or multiple victims, and cases resulting in long prison sentences. The data indicate that the press exaggerates "stranger danger," while intra-familial cases are underreported. Newspaper accounts also minimize the extent to which guilty defendants avoid prison. Generalizing about the nature of child molestation cases in criminal court on the basis of newspaper coverage is inappropriate. The coverage is less extensive than often claimed, and it is skewed in ways that are typical of the mass media.

  12. newspapers' agricultural agenda setting and extension agents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p2333147

    Keywords: Newspapers', agricultural, extension agents' agenda setting. ABSTRACT ... from the priorities of political or other interest groups to the news priorities of media ... people. The questions that arise are-: what are the sources operating for ... The ADPs presently adopt the training and visit (T & V) system of extension.

  13. Could Freemium Models Work for Legacy Newspapers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anna B.

    2016-01-01

    The newspaper industry has long been looking for sustainable business models for their digital editions. One of their popular choices is the freemium business model based on free and premium content with a paywall. However, freemium has not yet lived up to the expectation of the industry and has...

  14. Do newspaper reports of suicides comply with standard suicide reporting guidelines? A study from Bangalore, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Prabha S; Doraiswamy, Padmavathy; Padmanabh, Anuroopa; Philip, Mariamma

    2014-11-01

    Several countries have prescribed standard guidelines for media professionals on suicide reporting. However, the implementation of these guidelines has been varied. Suicide rates in South Asia are one of the highest in the world, and it is known that media guidelines for suicide reporting are not followed adequately. However, there are no published reports available from this region. This study aimed at assessing newspaper reports of suicide for quality of reporting based on standard reporting guidelines and to study differences between English and vernacular (Kannada) newspapers in Bangalore, South India. A total of 341 newspaper reports of suicide from 550 newspapers (3 English and 3 Kannada) over 3 months were systematically assessed for compliance with reporting guidelines. Each report was evaluated on 2 domains and 36 parameters. Data were analyzed for frequency of inappropriate reporting and patterns compared between vernacular and English newspapers. In all, 87% of the reports were those of completed suicide. Non-compliant reporting - method of suicide was reported in 89% and 32% of reports were in prominent pages of the newspaper, 95% mentioned gender, 90% reported the name, 80% reported age and suicide location, 75% reported life events related to suicide, 70% reported occupation, 69% had headline explicity on suicide and 61% reported monocausality. Only 16% reported mental disorder related to suicide, and less than 3% included information on suicide prevention and helplines. Vernacular papers showed significantly better compliance in 16 of the 20 areas. However, protective characteristics were better reported in English newspapers. Majority of reports on suicides in newspapers from Bangalore did not comply with standard guidelines of reporting. There is a strong need to evolve local guidelines and mechanisms for ensuring responsible reporting which have important implications in prevention of suicide. © The Author(s) 2013.

  15. Social Design : How products and services can help us act in ways that benefit society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tromp, N.

    2013-01-01

    I am sitting in the train and opposite to me a couple is reading the newspaper. Every once in a while one of them looks up, checking me and the other passengers out. We are now passing through a tunnel and I can see myself reflected in the window. I see my hair could use a brushing after the rush I

  16. Help-Seeking and Help-Giving for Teen Dating Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, Arlene N.; Black, Beverly M.

    2009-01-01

    This article is based on numerous research projects conducted by the authors on adolescent dating violence. It reviews the results of those projects as they relate to how teens seek help for dating violence and how teens provide help to their friends in violent dating relationships. It concludes with helpful strategies for adults who work with…

  17. How to Help When Personal Problems Stymie Your Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Wandalyn

    1983-01-01

    A number of school districts have set up employee assistance programs (EAP) that offer help for employees having personal or family problems that affect their job performance. Guidelines for establishing an EAP are offered. (MLF)

  18. Nuclear waste information in supplements of local newspapers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryhaenen, Veijo

    1995-01-01

    Full text: The utility Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) is conducting site investigations in Finland to select a final disposal site for spent nuclear fuel. Site selection studies, including deep drillings and other field investigations, have been carried out in different parts of the country since 1987. Now there are three areas in which detailed studies are continued. The programme aims at site selection in the year 2000. Before the construction of the final disposal facility can be started around the year 2010 a precondition in the Finnish legislation is that the council of the local municipality accepts the facility. Hence, an essential task is to distribute information of the studies and of the principles of final disposal to the local decision-makers and public. Information work has an important role already now in order to make people familiar with the long-term project and to build confidence on the safety of final disposal. TVO's information programme includes several types of actions to different target groups, such as press conferences, contact group meetings, open houses, exhibitions, lectures to different groups, visits to the drilling sites and to the existing nuclear waste facilities as well as use of various written material. In January 1994 a new method was applied in the distribution of TVO's written information directly to local public. Four-page supplements were prepared to the local newspapers to inform public of the stage of the site investigations and other topical issues. After that, new supplements have been published in six months intervals. Own supplements have been made for different municipalities in which the candidate areas are situated. The form of the supplement is same as that of the newspaper. As a matter of fact, TVO's information forms a special advertising section in a single issue of a newspaper. The topics handled in the supplements are for example present status of the local bedrock studies, other topical information of TVO

  19. Paying it forward: How helping others can reduce the psychological threat of receiving help

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarez, K.; van Leeuwen, E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows that receiving help could be psychologically harmful for recipients, and passing on help to others after receiving help ("helping forward") is a good strategy to improve and restore help recipients' self-competence. Participants (N=87) received autonomy- or dependency-oriented help

  20. Where spatial capacity building and spatial decision making meet. Publically debating participatory spatial planning via a newspaper.

    OpenAIRE

    Huybrechts, Liesbeth; Martens, Sarah; Devisch, Oswald

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on the in-between results of a Participatory Design research process in spatial planning in Godsheide, a small village in the Belgian Region of Limburg. The research explores how the language of newspapers enables citizens, policy makers, property developers and local organisations to build capacities (cfr. spatial capacity building) in ‘scripting’ their reflections on, but also actions in spatial change. In the heads of our participants, there existed a duality between -...

  1. Representations of Ebola and its victims in liberal American newspapers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trčková Dita

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Combining critical discourse analysis and the cognitive theory of metaphor, the study analyses hard news on Ebola from two American newspapers of a liberal political orientation, The New York Times and The New York Daily News, to investigate metaphoric representations of the disease and portrayals of its victims. It is revealed that both newspapers heavily rely on a single conceptual metaphor of EBOLA AS WAR, with only two alternative metaphors of EBOLA AS AN ANIMATE/HUMAN BEING and EBOLA AS A NATURAL CATASTROPHE employed. All three metaphoric themes assign the role of a culprit solely to the virus, which stands in contrast to non-metaphoric discursive allocations of blame for the situation in Africa, assigning responsibility mainly to man-made factors. African victims tend to be impersonalized and portrayed as voiceless and agentless, rarely occupying the role of a “fighter” in the military metaphoric representation of the disease, which runs counter to the findings of recent studies detecting a change towards a more positive image of Africa in the media. Both newspapers fail to represent infected ordinary Africans as sovereign agents, hindering readers from reflexively identifying with them.

  2. Exercises to help prevent falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help prevent falls because it can: Make your muscles stronger and more flexible Improve your balance Increase how ... To make your calves and ankle muscles stronger: Hold on to a solid ... of a chair. Stand with your back straight and slightly bend ...

  3. Spotlight on Athletes With a Disability: Malaysian Newspaper Coverage of the 2012 London Paralympic Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Jadeera Phaik Geok; Khoo, Selina; Razman, Rizal

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed newspaper coverage of the 2012 London Paralympic Games by 8 Malaysian newspapers. Articles and photographs from 4 English-language and 4 Malay-language newspapers were examined from August 28 (1 day before the Games) to September 10, 2012 (1 day after the Games closing). Tables, graphs, letters, fact boxes, and lists of events were excluded from analysis. A total of 132 articles and 131 photographs were analyzed. Content analysis of the newspaper articles revealed that most (62.8%) of the articles contained positive reference to the athletes with a disability. There were equal numbers (39.1%) of action and static shots of athletes. More articles and photographs of Malaysian (58%) than non-Malaysian (42%) athletes with a disability were identified. Only 14.9% of the articles and photographs were related to female athletes with a disability.

  4. Newspaper reports from the Coroners Court in Ireland are used to reveal the potential complexity and need for reform in forensic toxicology and medicine services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tormey, William P

    2015-05-01

    Newspapers devote regular space to inquests in the public interest. Accuracy in determining the causes of death is important for public health. Expert opinion features prominently in press reports and is an important channel of public education. How expert are the experts and how complex are apparently simple cases? Toxicology cases involving cannabis and stroke, 'junk food' diet, unexplained sudden death, potential drug interactions, allergy during caesarean section, and ecstacy-type drugs are used to illustrate the complexities. A template for reform is suggested to reform the Coroners Laws in Ireland to recognise the complexity of forensic toxicology and medicine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  5. The Use of Twitter to Analyze Citizen Proposals: the Economic News of the National Reference Newspapers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Mar Soria Ibáñez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Twitter has become the primary means of public expression and platform on which to build a new way of doing journalism. In the Spanish case, the covers of national reference newspapers and its contents on the microblogging conversations generate traffic that is a true reflection of a social and political context marked by the economic crisis. Therefore, this study aims to reflect the degree of citizen participation in the information content on Twitter, based on the quantification of their interactions or their messages tone. The content analysis presented in this work maps the use by major Spanish newspapers of this new social media, notes the importance it attaches to citizenship expressed by sections of economy news and reveals which are the most active posts on the microblogging and therefore, the most popular.

  6. Aggregate-then-Curate: how digital learning champions help communities nurture online content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Whitworth

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Informational resources are essential for communities, rooting them in their own history, helping them learn and solve problems, giving them a voice in decision-making and so on. For digital inclusion – and inclusion in the informational and democratic processes of society more generally – it is essential that communities retain the skills, awareness and motivation to create and manage their own informational resources.This article explores a model for the creation of online content that incorporates the different ways in which the quality and relevance of information can be assured. This model, “Aggregate-then-Curate” (A/C, was developed from earlier work concerning digital inclusion in UK online centres, models of informal e-learning and ecologies of resources. A/C shows how creating online content can be viewed as a 7-step process, initiated by individuals but bringing in “digital learning champions”, other community members and formal educational institutions at different stages. A/C can be used to design training to help build the capacity to manage community informational resources in an inclusive way. The article then discusses and evaluates MOSI-ALONG, a Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC funded project founded on these ideas, which illustrates how A/C can be used to design training to help build the capacity to manage community informational resources in an inclusive way. This conclusion is supported by evaluations of the work done so far in MOSI-ALONG.

  7. Assessment of Newspaper Advocacy for Rural Development and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Madukwe

    media channels (radio, television, computer, newspaper) have revolutionalized information ... frequency and time of publication as well as circulation rate, target audience and ..... Content Analysis for the Social Sciences and Humanities, Mc.

  8. KidReporter : a method for engaging children in making a newspaper to gather user requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, M.M.; Beusmans, J.; Keyson, D.V.; Lloyd, P.A.; Bekker, M.M.; Markopoulos, P.; Tsikalkina, M.

    2002-01-01

    We describe a design method, called the KidReporter method, for gathering user requirements from children. Two school classes participated in making a newspaper about a zoo, to gather requirements for the design process of an interactive educational game. The educational game was developed to

  9. The growth in newspaper coverage of tobacco control in China, 2000-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Junling; Chapman, Simon; Sun, Shaojing; Fu, Hua; Zheng, Pinpin

    2012-03-07

    Media coverage of tobacco-related issues can potentially shape individual beliefs, attitudes and behaviors about tobacco use. This study aims to describe news coverage of tobacco control related issues in Chinese newspapers from 2000 to 2010. All 1149 articles related to tobacco control were extracted from the Database of Chinese Important Newspapers and content analyzed for the period Jan 1, 2000 to Dec 31, 2010. The changing pattern of tobacco control topic, article type, viewpoint, and article origin, and their relationship were analysed. News coverage of tobacco control related issues increased significantly (p newspapers (χ2 = 24.09, p = 0.002) and article types (χ2 = 193.35, p newspapers had more coverage of the dangers of tobacco and on enforcing bans on tobacco-advertising. News stories centered around monitoring tobacco use and smoke free activity, while editorials focused on enforcing bans on tobacco-advertising, youth access and programs and campaigns. Letters to editors focused on the dangers of smoking, raising tax, and smoking cessation. More articles (50.4%) took an anti-tobacco position (compared with 10.5% which were pro-smoking), with the amount of negative coverage growing significantly across the decade. National articles tended to lean toward anti-tobacco, however, local articles tended mix of pro-tobacco and neutral/balance positions. Editorials seemed to be more anti-tobacco oriented, but letters to the editor tended to show a mix of anti-tobacco and pro-tobacco positions. Chinese newspapers are giving increasing attention to tobacco control, but coverage remains lower than in the USA and Australia. Health workers need to give higher priority to efforts to increase news coverage beyond the present concentration around World No Tobacco Day and to develop strategies for making tobacco control issues more newsworthy to both national and local news outlets.

  10. Representations of OxyContin in North American Newspapers and Medical Journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Whelan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Following the approval of OxyContin (Purdue Pharma, Canada for medical use, the media began to report the use of OxyContin as a street drug, representing the phenomenon as a social problem. Meanwhile, the pain medicine community has criticized the inaccurate and one-sided media coverage of the OxyContin problem. The authors of this study aimed to contribute to an understanding of both sides of this controversy by analyzing the coverage of OxyContin in newspapers and medical journals. The analyses revealed inconsistent messages about the drug from physicians in the news media and in medical journals, which has likely contributed to the drug’s perception as a social problem. The authors suggest ways to address the lack of medical consensus surrounding OxyContin. The results of this study may help resolve the concerns and conflicts surrounding this drug and other opioids.

  11. Biotechnology issues in four Malaysian mainstream newspapers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-09-30

    Sep 30, 2011 ... Biotechnology has been identified as the new engine of growth for the transformation of Malaysia into a developed nation by 2020. The objective of this paper is to analyze the impact of National Policy on biotechnology on media reporting in four Malaysian newspapers. Towards this end, a content analysis.

  12. Biotechnology issues in four Malaysian mainstream newspapers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biotechnology has been identified as the new engine of growth for the transformation of Malaysia into a developed nation by 2020. The objective of this paper is to analyze the impact of National Policy on biotechnology on media reporting in four Malaysian newspapers. Towards this end, a content analysis of four Malaysian ...

  13. PRESS AND SOCIAL NETWORKING SERVICES IN THE INTERNET: APPROACHES TO THE RELATIONS OF TWO ARGENTINE ONLINE NEWSPAPERS WITH FACEBOOK AND TWITTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Raimondo Anselmino

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the incorporation of the social networks resources on Internet into digital interfaces of the two main Argentine newspapers, Clarín and La Nación, as well as the ways in which these online newspapers manage and use their official accounts on Facebook (FB and Twitter (TW. Such reflections are part of the first stage of a research project which aims to understand the relationship established, at present, between digital media and social networking, to account for the impact of the latter both the link to the press with his readership as in the press-public sphere relationship. As we have seen until now, these observed online newspapers use their official accounts on FB and TW for several purposes: to get viral spread of content; to establish a direct contact with the public; to get the audience involved and encourage their participation; to consolidate their own positions into the social networks; and to get users to control the quality of his speeches on the Internet. Besides, the incorporation of the social networks resources on these online newspapers would impact, specially, on news circulation process since a piece of news is no longer a stable unit and gets modified as the story travels through Internet social networks.

  14. Press and social networking services in the internet: approaches to the relations of two Argentine online newspapers with Facebook and Twitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Raimondo Anselmino

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the incorporation of the social networks resources on Internet into digital interfaces of the two main Argentine newspapers, Clarín and La Nación, as well as the ways in which these online newspapers manage and use their official accounts on Facebook (FB and Twitter (TW. Such reflections are part of the first stage of a research project which aims to understand the relationship established, at present, between digital media and social networking, to account for the impact of the latter both the link to the press with his readership as in the press-public sphere relationship. As we have seen until now, these observed online newspapers use their official accounts on FB and TW for several purposes: to get viral spread of content; to establish a direct contact with the public; to get the audience involved and encourage their participation; to consolidate their own positions into the social networks; and to get users to control the quality of his speeches on the Internet. Besides, the incorporation of the social networks resources on these online newspapers would impact, specially, on news circulation process since a piece of news is no longer a stable unit and gets modified as the story travels through Internet social networks.

  15. 26 CFR 31.3121(b)(14)-1 - Services in delivery or distribution of newspapers, shopping news, or magazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... newspapers, shopping news, or magazines. 31.3121(b)(14)-1 Section 31.3121(b)(14)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL... distribution of newspapers, shopping news, or magazines. (a) Services of individuals under age 18. Services... the time of, the sale of newspapers or magazines to ultimate consumers under an arrangement under...

  16. News media coverage of euthanasia: A content analysis of Dutch national newspapers

    OpenAIRE

    Rietjens, Judith; Raijmakers, Natasja; Kouwenhoven, Pauline; Seale, Clive; Thiel, Ghislaine; Trappenburg, Margo; Delden, Hans; Heide, Agnes

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The Netherlands is one of the few countries where euthanasia is legal under strict conditions. This study investigates whether Dutch newspaper articles use the term euthanasia according to the legal definition and determines what arguments for and against euthanasia they contain. Methods. We did an electronic search of seven Dutch national newspapers between January 2009 and May 2010 and conducted a content analysis. Results: Of the 284 articles containing the term eut...

  17. Price Wars in Two-Sided Markets : The Case of the UK Quality Newspapers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behringer, S.; Filistrucchi, L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the price war in the UK quality newspaper industry in the 1990s. We build a model of the newspaper market which encompasses demand for differentiated products on both, the readers and advertisers side of the market, and profi…t maximization by four competing oligopolistic

  18. Use of the word schizophrenia in Portuguese newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues-Silva, Nuno; Falcão de Almeida, Telma; Araújo, Filipa; Molodynski, Andrew; Venâncio, Ângela; Bouça, Jorge

    2017-10-01

    Stigmatizing references to schizophrenia have a negative impact on self-esteem, deter treatment seeking and diminish the effectiveness of treatment. To analyze the reporting of schizophrenia in Portuguese newspapers. We analyzed five high circulation Portuguese newspapers between 2007 and 2013. We selected all news containing the word "esquizofrenia" (schizophrenia). Several variables were collected. About 1058 news items contained the word schizophrenia. Schizophrenia was mentioned metaphorically in 40% of the cases and in the context of Crime in 22%. When used in a Criminal context, schizophrenia was mostly attributed to people who were the perpetrators of the crime (93%). When used metaphorically, schizophrenia had a negative connotation in 90% of cases. We found an increasing reporting of schizophrenia in the criminal news and serious crimes. Our results suggest the media has an active role promoting stigma, as well as passively broadcasting and thus passing on prejudices.

  19. The struggle for comprehensive education in the Netherlands : the representation of secondary school innovation in Dutch newspaper articles in the 1970s

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amsing, Hilda T. A.; Greveling, Linda; Dekker, Jeroen J. H.

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on how Dutch newspapers represented the debate in the Netherlands in the 1970s on comprehensive education and thus influenced the Dutch Middle School experiment. Wiborg's identification of key factors of success in Scandinavia was used as a point of reference. The article shows

  20. Students' Collective Knowledge Construction in the Virtual Learning Environment ""ToLigado"--Your School Interactive Newspaper"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passarelli, Brasilina

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: The ToLigado Project--Your School Interactive Newspaper is an interactive virtual learning environment conceived, developed, implemented and supported by researchers at the School of the Future Research Laboratory of the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil. Method: This virtual learning environment aims to motivate trans-disciplinary…

  1. Mobile Learning: How Smartphones Help Illiterate Farmers in Rural India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knoche, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    about agriculture, causing schemes to fail. Computer scientist Hendrik, at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, is aiming to change that. He has designed a new smart-phone interface for farmers especially so that both illiterate and literate can share ideas and vital information about...... agriculture, helping them, and 62% of the world’s food supply, to stay in business. Digital Diversity is a series of blog posts from FrontlineSMS about how mobile phones and other appropriate technologies are being used throughout the world to improve, enrich, and empower billions of lives. This article...

  2. Analysis of newspaper coverage of active aging through the lens of the 2002 World Health Organization Active Ageing Report: A Policy Framework and the 2010 Toronto Charter for Physical Activity: A Global Call for Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Boushra; Wolbring, Gregor

    2013-12-05

    As populations continue to grow older, efforts to support the process of aging well are important goals. Various synonyms are used to cover aging well, such as active aging. The World Health Organization published in 2002 the report Active Ageing: A Policy Framework that according to the call for papers, has brought active ageing to the forefront of international public health awareness. The 2010 Toronto Charter for Physical Activity: A Global Call for Action was singled out in the call for papers as a key document promoting physical activity one goal of the 2002 WHO active aging policy framework. Media are to report to the public topics of importance to them. We investigated the newspaper coverage of aging well and synonymous terms such as active aging through the lens of the 2002 WHO active aging policy framework and the 2010 Toronto Charter for Physical Activity. As sources we used the following newspapers: China Daily, The Star (Malaysia), two UK newspapers (The Guardian, The Times), a database of 300 Canadian newspapers (Canadian Newsstand) and a US newspaper (The New York Times). The study generated data answering the following four research questions: (1) how often are the 2002 WHO active aging policy framework and the 2010 Toronto Charter for Physical Activity mentioned; (2) how often is the topic of active aging and terms conveying similar content (aging well, healthy aging, natural aging and successful aging) discussed; (3) which of the issues flagged as important in the 2002 WHO active aging policy framework and the 2010 Toronto Charter for Physical Activity are covered in the newspaper coverage of active aging and synonymous terms; (4) which social groups were mentioned in the newspapers covered. The study found a total absence of mentioning of the two key documents and a low level of coverage of "active aging" and terms conveying similar content. It found further a lack of engagement with the issues raised in the two key documents and a low level of

  3. Assessment of Public Attitude Changes toward Exceptional Children as a Result of Public Newspaper Advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sterling; Ogley, Peter

    1981-01-01

    To assess whether newspaper advertising would affect attitudes toward handicapped children, a series of newspaper advertisements were run over a five-month period. It was concluded that the ads produced significant difference in attitudes of persons manifest by their response to the questionnaire. (SB)

  4. You Be the Judge: Newspaper Advertising Layout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeninger, Jimmy G.

    The learning package is designed to provide the marketing educator with a culminating activity for an instructional unit focusing on advertising layout principles and procedures. It is to be used in conjunction with 35mm slides of newspaper advertisements, which the student views and rates in comparison with the ratings of a panel of experts. A…

  5. Broadsheet English: Teaching English through Newspaper Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdemir, Ahmet Selcuk; Barin, Muzaffer; Demiroz, Hakan

    2012-01-01

    In this study it is aimed to debate whether newspaper articles can be used as speaking materials in foreign language courses as they include most actual and living language patterns by all means. A quasi-experimental study has been carried out at Vocational School of Tourism and Hotel Services of Erzincan University. Thirty-eight preparatory…

  6. Enriching Great Britain's National Landslide Database by searching newspaper archives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Faith E.; Malamud, Bruce D.; Freeborough, Katy; Demeritt, David

    2015-11-01

    Our understanding of where landslide hazard and impact will be greatest is largely based on our knowledge of past events. Here, we present a method to supplement existing records of landslides in Great Britain by searching an electronic archive of regional newspapers. In Great Britain, the British Geological Survey (BGS) is responsible for updating and maintaining records of landslide events and their impacts in the National Landslide Database (NLD). The NLD contains records of more than 16,500 landslide events in Great Britain. Data sources for the NLD include field surveys, academic articles, grey literature, news, public reports and, since 2012, social media. We aim to supplement the richness of the NLD by (i) identifying additional landslide events, (ii) acting as an additional source of confirmation of events existing in the NLD and (iii) adding more detail to existing database entries. This is done by systematically searching the Nexis UK digital archive of 568 regional newspapers published in the UK. In this paper, we construct a robust Boolean search criterion by experimenting with landslide terminology for four training periods. We then apply this search to all articles published in 2006 and 2012. This resulted in the addition of 111 records of landslide events to the NLD over the 2 years investigated (2006 and 2012). We also find that we were able to obtain information about landslide impact for 60-90% of landslide events identified from newspaper articles. Spatial and temporal patterns of additional landslides identified from newspaper articles are broadly in line with those existing in the NLD, confirming that the NLD is a representative sample of landsliding in Great Britain. This method could now be applied to more time periods and/or other hazards to add richness to databases and thus improve our ability to forecast future events based on records of past events.

  7. "USA Today": Comparative Analysis with Two National and Two Los Angeles Daily Newspapers. Research Bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Steve; And Others

    Sections of the newspaper "USA Today" were compared with corresponding sections of four major newspapers--the "New York Times," the "Wall Street Journal," the "Los Angeles Herald Examiner," and the "Los Angeles Times"--to determine what editorial components made "USA Today" different and…

  8. 'I am not a tragedy. I am full of hope': communication impairment narratives in newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O Malley-Keighran, Mary-Pat; Coleman, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Individual attitudes and more general attitudes in society can negatively influence the functioning of people with communication disorders according to the World Health Organisation's (WHO) International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) (2002). Personal narratives have been recommended as the best means to convey and understand a person's life experience and have been investigated extensively. Investigations of personal narratives of communication impairment in mass media continue to be relatively rare in the literature. Published narratives can enrich understandings of clients' experiences by elucidating available representations of lived experiences of communication impairment. To answer the following research questions: What types of personal narratives of communication impairments are currently being disseminated in Irish newspapers? How are experiences of communication impairments represented in these narratives? The study was qualitative, deploying inductive analysis and drawing on Frank's (1995) typology of illness narratives to analyse narratives that were published in two Irish national newspapers over a 12-month period. The results illustrate the under-representation of communication impairments in Irish newspapers as ten out of 51 narratives in the corpus pertained to conditions that may have associated communication impairments. None of the narratives related the lived experience of a person with communication impairment in depth. A combination of quest and chaos narrative types was identified in six out of the ten narratives. Three out of the ten narratives featured a combination of chaos and restitution narrative types. One narrative was identified as being entirely a quest narrative. Three narratives contained elements of restitution. Inductive analysis revealed six main themes in the data (two for each narrative type) with one sub-theme identified for each main theme. The six main themes are: positive stances, re

  9. Reporting diet-related health issues through newspapers: portrayal of cardiovascular disease and Type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellyer, Nicole Elizabeth; Haddock-Fraser, Janet

    2011-02-01

    This study identifies (i) the extent to which newsprint media communicate to their readers the lifestyle factors associated with the development of cardiovascular disease and Type 2 diabetes and (ii) newspaper portrayal of social determinants affecting onset of disease. A content analysis of five leading UK national newspapers and their Sunday equivalents was conducted over a 3-month period between January and March 2008. This study shows that cardiovascular disease had much higher press interest than Type 2 diabetes. 'Middle-market' and 'Quality' papers had higher levels of reporting than the 'Popular' press, but the patterns were more complex when the comprehensiveness of reporting was measured within each article. Social determinants affecting disease onset were poorly reported by newspapers, supporting similar research conducted in other countries. This research identifies that there is potential for newspapers to improve their reporting of lifestyle diseases, by including individual and social determinants of disease onset. Lower social classes who read the popular press receive the lowest frequency of reporting and could benefit most from this information. While the research identifies that newspapers are missing the potential to actively communicate and reinforce government health policy, it recognises that the commercial context of the print media may counter such behaviour.

  10. Experiences of a newspaper journalist with the official information policy of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koppelstaetter, H.

    1988-01-01

    One of the biggest problems for a newspaper journalist is to communicate highly specialist statements about technical matters to the reader in comprehensible form. This calls for total confidence in the information at the nuclear facility, i.e. the press spokesman. A number of impressions of experiences as a newspaper editor attempting to obtain information following an accident, i.e. the extent and background of Chernobyl, are outlined. (DG)

  11. MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS ON THE FRONT PAGES OF DAILY NEWSPAPERS: A comparison between newspaper journalism in two cities with different political configurations and its effect on mass democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson Urizzi Cervi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses front-page headlines concerning the 2008municipal electoral disputes in Brazilian daily newspapers. The front pages of two newspapers were analyzed: Gazeta do Povo and Jornal da Manhã. The first is distributed regionally and is published in Curitiba, the capital of Paraná state. The second has local circulation and is restricted to the interior of Paraná state. For comparative purposes, the type of visibility given to the municipal elections in each newspaper was evaluated, with the goal of identifying the importance of electoral campaigning in the news. The discussion centers on the role of the media in the dissemination of politically relevant information, taking into consideration the electoral context. While in Curitiba the incumbent mayor was re-elected in the first round with almost 80% of the votes, indicating a lack of a real electoral dispute, in Ponta Grossa the candidate for re-election won in the runoff election with a less than 4% advantage over the runner-up. The analysis questions the need to consider the social context to explain journalistic production. 

  12. Understanding of the characteristics of the local newspapers providing media coverage on the matters of nuclear energy in the regions where nuclear facilities are located. Based on analysis of the media reports and interviews with journalists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchida, Tatsuro; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Taking into consideration the influence of the media coverage, this research aims to analyze the characteristics of the local newspapers that cover diverse events relevant to nuclear energy in regional areas where nuclear facilities are located (hereinafter called the 'region'). According to the previous surveys, local residents in the region are more interested in the nuclear energy matters than those who live in urban areas. Plus, the local newspapers turn out to report more events of nuclear energy from a variety of angles. Through interviews with executives and journalists of the local newspaper companies in the regions, it is revealed that the local newspapers tend not to report news sensationally, but they would rather take a supportive stance toward the development in their regions. The interviewees hope that various activities of the nuclear industry will promote education, employment and cooperation among government, industry and academia. They also desire that the industry's activities will help to increase benefits in their regions. It appears that the interviewees' awareness reflects articles of the local newspapers. As a result of the surveys conducted for this research, it is considered that the journalists expect that their region will make particularly qualitative progress in the future. (author)

  13. Semiotic Analysis of E-Newspapers Interface Views within the Scope of Advertisements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar Dincakman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Interface of a website is a designed and composed space and it is like a paper to be filled with visual and inscriptive datas. Advertisements on newspapers can reach to readers both by physical and virtual space. As district from traditional techniques, online advertisements realize presentation functions by the fee for taking place on web pages without any paper or print cost. However, with today's revised advertising policy laws, due to enhance of advertising spaces, the main information and images are almost stuck between the advertisements on webpage of e-newspapers. On the web interfaces of e-newspapers, almost half of the page is covered with advertisements without attention of design principles. In this context, with the purpose of arranging web pages more appropriately to the design principles and transferring actual information to the readers with more simple design approach the selected newspapers’ web interfaces will be discussed with semiotics.

  14. Consumer preferences and brand equity measurement of Spanish national daily newspapers: a conjoint analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela Mallou, J; Rial Boubeta, A; Braña Tobío, T

    2001-05-01

    Brand is a product attribute that, for many types of goods or services, makes a major contribution to consumer preferences. Conjoint analysis is a useful technique for the assessment of brand values for a given consumer or group of consumers. In this paper, an application of conjoint analysis to the estimation of brand values in the Spanish daily newspaper market is reported. Four newspaper attributes were considered: brand (i.e., newspaper name), price (0.60, 1.05, or 1.50 euros), Sunday supplement (yes/no), and daily pullout (yes/no). A total of 510 regular readers of the national press, stratified by age and sex, were asked to rank 16 profiles representing an orthogonal fraction of the possible attribute-level combinations. Brand was by far the most important attribute, whereas price had negligible effect. More generally, the results confirm the utility of conjoint analysis for assessing brand equity in the newspaper market and for estimating the relative importance of the various attributes to different subgroups of consumers.

  15. Beyond Traditional Newspaper Advertisement: Leveraging Facebook-Targeted Advertisement to Recruit Long-Term Smokers for Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter-Harris, Lisa; Bartlett Ellis, Rebecca; Warrick, Adam; Rawl, Susan

    2016-06-15

    Smokers are a stigmatized population, but an important population to reach for the purpose of research. Therefore, innovative recruitment methods are needed that are both cost-effective and efficacious in recruiting this population. The aim of the present article was to evaluate the feasibility of Facebook-targeted advertisement to recruit long-term smokers eligible for lung cancer screening for a descriptive, cross-sectional survey. A social media recruitment campaign was launched using Facebook-targeted advertisement to target age and keywords related to tobacco smoking in the Facebook users profile, interests, and likes. A 3-day newspaper advertisement recruitment campaign was used as a comparison. The study that used both recruitment methods aimed to test the psychometric properties of 4 newly developed lung cancer screening health belief scales. Data were collected via cross-sectional survey methodology using an Web-based survey platform. The Facebook-targeted advertisements were viewed 56,621 times over an 18-day campaign in 2015 in the United States. The advertisement campaign yielded 1121 unique clicks to the Web-based survey platform at a cost of $1.51 per completed survey. Of those who clicked through to the study survey platform, 423 (37.7%) consented to participate; 92 (8.2%) dropped out during completion of the survey yielding a final study pool of 331 completed surveys. Recruitment by newspaper advertisement yielded a total of 30 participants in response to a 3-day advertisement campaign; recruitment efficacy resulted in 10 participants/day at $40.80 per completed survey. Participants represented current (n=182; 51%) and former smokers (n=178; 49%) with a mean age of 63.4 years (SD 6.0). Cost of the advertisement campaign was $500 total for the 18-day campaign. Recruitment by Facebook was more efficacious and cost-effective compared with newspaper advertisement. Facebook offers a new venue for recruitment into research studies that offer the potential

  16. Beyond Traditional Newspaper Advertisement: Leveraging Facebook-Targeted Advertisement to Recruit Long-Term Smokers for Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrick, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Background Smokers are a stigmatized population, but an important population to reach for the purpose of research. Therefore, innovative recruitment methods are needed that are both cost-effective and efficacious in recruiting this population. Objective The aim of the present article was to evaluate the feasibility of Facebook-targeted advertisement to recruit long-term smokers eligible for lung cancer screening for a descriptive, cross-sectional survey. Methods A social media recruitment campaign was launched using Facebook-targeted advertisement to target age and keywords related to tobacco smoking in the Facebook users profile, interests, and likes. A 3-day newspaper advertisement recruitment campaign was used as a comparison. The study that used both recruitment methods aimed to test the psychometric properties of 4 newly developed lung cancer screening health belief scales. Data were collected via cross-sectional survey methodology using an Web-based survey platform. Results The Facebook-targeted advertisements were viewed 56,621 times over an 18-day campaign in 2015 in the United States. The advertisement campaign yielded 1121 unique clicks to the Web-based survey platform at a cost of $1.51 per completed survey. Of those who clicked through to the study survey platform, 423 (37.7%) consented to participate; 92 (8.2%) dropped out during completion of the survey yielding a final study pool of 331 completed surveys. Recruitment by newspaper advertisement yielded a total of 30 participants in response to a 3-day advertisement campaign; recruitment efficacy resulted in 10 participants/day at $40.80 per completed survey. Participants represented current (n=182; 51%) and former smokers (n=178; 49%) with a mean age of 63.4 years (SD 6.0). Cost of the advertisement campaign was $500 total for the 18-day campaign. Conclusions Recruitment by Facebook was more efficacious and cost-effective compared with newspaper advertisement. Facebook offers a new venue for

  17. ‘Culture’ as a discursive resource in newspaper articles from Le Monde about secularism : Constructing ‘us’ through strategic oppositions with religion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Sommier (Mélodine)

    2018-01-01

    markdownabstractBuilding on research highlighting the complex webs of relations between secularism, culture, and religion, this study investigates how the concept of culture was utilized in discourses of laïcité from the newspaper _le Monde_. Articles (_N_ = 76) published between 2011 and 2014 were

  18. MASS MEDIA COMMUNICATION OF EMERGENCY ISSUES AND COUNTERMEASURES IN A NUCLEAR ACCIDENT: FUKUSHIMA REPORTING IN EUROPEAN NEWSPAPERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Eduardo; Cantone, Marie Claire; Oughton, Deborah H; Perko, Tanja; Prezelj, Iztok; Tomkiv, Yevgeniya

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents the results of a large study of 1340 articles published by two major newspapers in six European countries (Belgium, Italy, Norway, Slovenia, Spain and Russia) in the first 2 months after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. The focus of the analysis is on the application and overall impact of protective actions, both during the emergency phase and later, how the newspapers describe those actions, which differences were apparent between countries and what recommendations can be extracted in order to improve general communication about these issues. A clear lesson is that, even under uncertainty and recognising limitations, responsible authorities need to provide transparent, clear and understandable information to the public and the mass media right from the beginning of the early phase of any nuclear emergency. Clear, concise messages should be given. Mass media could play a key role in reassuring the public if the countermeasures are clearly explained. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Provinces News At Hamoraby Newspaper (أخبار المحافظات في صحيفة حمورابي

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatem Bidwee Obaid مدرس مساعد – حاتم بديوي عبيد الشمري

    2011-06-01

    and the reason is attributed not to acquire professional we have tried in this study give a picture of the properties of the newspapers at the time, especially the newspaper over the search so depart researcher through title search ( news provinces and how to edit them and taken out and deliver it to the editorial board so Department researcher search to four Detectives First research is the systematic study of search, and the second section was concerned with the definition of news and its components and templates, and the third section included directing the journalist told the Hammurabi and how to edit the News, The fourth section guarantees the field study is descriptive and analytical study of topics published on the newspaper in those provinces was taking models from cultural and social news, military and sports, religious and finally the researcher to a package of conclusions as well as the sources and footnotes and appendices. and God bless.

  20. Mrs. O'Leary's Cow and Other Newspaper Tales about the Chicago Fire of 1871.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedler, Fred

    Noting that, historically, newspaper editors copied the best, and sometimes erroneous, stories from other newspapers published in distant cities, this paper explores newpaper coverage of the 1871 Great Chicago Fire, and the myth that Mrs. O'Leary's cow was to blame. After suggesting that a report invented the story of the O'Leary cow kicking a…

  1. 1978 Pacemaker Newspaper Awards: What Makes a Pacemaker?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasler, Wayne

    1979-01-01

    Lists the nine high school and college newspapers, and the one newsmagazine, that won Pacemaker Awards in 1978; discusses characteristics that make each of them outstanding, and provides reproductions of a front page from each publication. (GT)

  2. Political Participation and Power Relations in Egypt: The Scope of Newspapers and Social Network Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Shehata

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The political use of media in Egypt post-2011 revolution brought about drastic transformations in political activism and power structures. In the context of communication power theory, this article investigates the effects of newspapers and social network sites on political participation and political power relations. The research employed a mixed methodology, comprised of a survey of 527 Egyptian youth and semi-structured interviews of 12 political activists and journalists. The results showed a significant relationship between reading newspapers and youth’s political participation, but not between using social network sites and political participation. In addition, newspapers and social network sites were platforms for a series of conflicts and coalitions that emerged between pro- and anti-revolution actors. Despite the importance of social network sites as key tools for informing and mobilizing the public, they eventually failed to empower new political actors, and this was because old actors, supported by newspapers and other mainstream media, managed to obstruct the new actors’ progress.

  3. Democratic discussion in newspaper reporting of the Australia-United States Free Trade Agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Robbie

    2008-10-01

    This article presents a Habermasian analysis of newspaper reporting of the debate surrounding the effect of the Australia-United States Free Trade Agreement (the FTA) on access to medicines through Australian patent law. Habermas's concept of the public sphere is utilised in determining whether discussion within the print media adequately conveyed complex legal issues to the public and facilitated democratic discussion. It was found that newspaper reporting generally failed to meet this standard.

  4. European Football Club Newspapers in Nigeria: Gratifications or ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    European Football Club Newspapers in Nigeria: Gratifications or Media Imperialism. ... The implication is that even in Nigeria; news of foreign leagues is published by Nigerian citizens to draw readers away from local league, a development which is bound to affect negatively the nations sporting culture. The conclusion is ...

  5. How does social comparison within a self-help group influence adjustment to chronic illness? A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibb, Bridget; Yardley, Lucy

    2006-09-01

    Despite the growing popularity of self-help groups for people with chronic illness, there has been surprisingly little research into how these may support adjustment to illness. This study investigated the role that social comparison, occurring within a self-help group, may play in adjustment to chronic illness. A model of adjustment based on control process theory and response shift theory was tested to determine whether social comparisons predicted adjustment after controlling for the catalyst for adjustment (disease severity) and antecedents (demographic and psychological factors). A sample of 301 people with Ménière's disease who were members of the Ménière's Society UK completed questionnaires at baseline and 10-month follow-up assessing adjustment, defined for this study as functional and goal-oriented quality of life. At baseline, they also completed measures of the predictor variables i.e. the antecedents (age, sex, living circumstances, duration of self-help group membership, self-esteem, optimism and perceived control over illness), the catalyst (severity of vertigo, tinnitus, hearing loss and fullness in the ear) and mechanisms of social comparison within the self-help group. The social comparison variables included the extent to which self-help group resources were used, and whether reading about other members' experiences induced positive or negative feelings. Cross-sectional results showed that positive social comparison was indeed associated with better adjustment after controlling for all the other baseline variables, while negative social comparison was associated with worse adjustment. However, greater levels of social comparison at baseline were associated with a deteriorating quality of life over the 10-month follow-up period. Alternative explanations for these findings are discussed.

  6. Taking care of business: self-help and sleep medicine in american corporate culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Megan

    2004-01-01

    This article argues that corporate management in the United States has expanded its scope beyond office walls and encompasses many aspects of workers' daily lives. One new element of corporate training is the micromanagement of sleep; self-help books, newspaper reports, magazine articles, and consulting firms currently advise workers and supervisors on optimizing productivity by cultivating certain sleep habits. Although consultants and self-help books make specific recommendations about sleep, most medical research is inconclusive about sleep's benefits for human performance. Using the ideas of Michel Foucault and Gilles Deleuze as a philosophical backdrop, this article examines the complex and often contradictory links between self-help, medicine, and corporate governance.

  7. How Pronounced Is Income Inequality around the World--and How Can Education Help Reduce It? Education Indicators in Focus. No. 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    OECD Publishing (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    How pronounced is income inequality around the world--and how can education help reduce it? This paper reports the following: (1) Across OECD (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries, the average income of the richest 10% of the population was about nine times that of the poorest 10% before the onset of the global economic…

  8. The Helping Horse: How Equine Assisted Learning Contributes to the Wellbeing of First Nations Youth in Treatment for Volatile Substance Misuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Cindy; Arratoon, Cheryl; Boucher, Janice; Cartier, Gail; Chalmers, Darlene; Dell, Colleen Anne; Dell, Debra; Dryka, Dominique; Duncan, Randy; Dunn, Kathryn; Hopkins, Carol; Longclaws, Loni; MacKinnon, Tamara; Sauve, Ernie; Spence, Serene; Wuttunee, Mallory

    2015-01-01

    There has been recent interest in Canada exploring the benefits of equine assisted interventions in the treatment of First Nations youth who misuse volatile substances. Using the richness of an exploratory case study involving the White Buffalo Youth Inhalant Treatment Centre and the Cartier Equine Learning Center, our community-based study examined the question of how an Equine Assisted Learning (EAL) program contributes to the wellbeing of First Nations female youth who misuse volatile substances. Both programs are grounded in a holistic bio-psycho-social-spiritual framework of healing. Our study shares how the EAL horses, facilitators and program content contributed to youths’ wellbeing in each area of the healing framework (bio-psycho-social-spiritual), with emphasis on the cultural significance of the horse and its helping role. The horse is a helper in the girls’ journeys toward improved wellbeing—the horse helps through its very nature as a highly instinctive animal, it helps the facilitators do their jobs, and it also helps put the treatment program activities into practice. In addition, the role of First Nations culture in the girls’ lives was enhanced through their encounters with the horses. The findings support the limited literature on equine assisted interventions and add important insights to the youth addictions treatment literature. Key implications to consider for EAL and volatile substance misuse policy, practice and research are identified. PMID:26793794

  9. The Effects of Bad and Good News on Newspaper Image and Community Image. A Report from the Communications Research Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins , Jack B.

    A study tested the hypotheses that the relative amount of bad news and good news in a newspaper would have corresponding effects on perceptions of the newspaper's community of origin and of the newspaper itself. Five different versions of a realistic four-page newspaper were created, in which treatment of the news stories ranged from an…

  10. Toddlers' Prosocial Behavior: From Instrumental to Empathic to Altruistic Helping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetlova, Margarita; Nichols, Sara R.; Brownell, Celia A.

    2010-01-01

    The study explored how the meaning of prosocial behavior changes over toddlerhood. Sixty-five 18- and 30-month-olds could help an adult in 3 contexts: instrumental (action based), empathic (emotion based), and altruistic (costly). Children at both ages helped readily in instrumental tasks. For 18-month-olds, empathic helping was significantly more…

  11. JAVANESE CULTURAL WORDS IN LOCAL NEWSPAPERS IN CENTRAL JAVA AS A LANGUAGE MAINTENANCE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deli Nirmala

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Javanese cultural words are the linguistic units which are very specific to Javanese culture and society. This article aims at describing what Javanese cultural words that are found in the local newspapers, what they represent, and why they are used in the local newspapers in Central Java. Non-participant observation is used to present the data for analysis, continued with page-filing and note-taking techniques. Referential, reflective-introspective, and abductive inferential methods are used to analyze the data. The result indicates that the Javanese cultural words found in the local newspapers represent festivals, rituals, Javanese ways of life, social activities, actions, feelings, thoughts, behavior, and experiences. The words become the indicators that the journalists of the local newspapers in Cental Java have positive attitudes toward Javanese words. This becomes a model for language maintenance of Javanese. This implies that the words are stored in the long-term memory, that become mental image, which are used when needed by the user for communication. The existence of the concepts residing in the mind will make the Javanese language maintenance possible, which is supported by the attitudes of the Javanese.

  12. Comparison of Welfare Discourse Representation in Taiwanese and Singaporean Newspapers: The National Pension Act and CPF LIFE as Examples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ming Chen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A discourse analysis was used in this study to examine the processes of social welfare ideology construction in Taiwanese and Singaporean newspapers. The National Pension Act and CPF LIFE were used as examples. The research conclusion is as follows: 1. Because of democratization, Taiwanese newspapers are liberal and diverse. 2. Singaporean newspapers support the government and the ruling party’s soft authoritarian policies. 3. Taiwanese newspapers pay considerable attention to universal citizenship and human rights, and contain discourses of parties from both the left and right. However, conversation is lacking between newspapers. 4. Singaporean newspapers are enthusiastic in constructing the right antiwelfarism in emphasizing the failure of Western welfare, and in accentuating the importance of self-reliance and family responsibility. The conclusion shows that differences in discourse reflect various needs of welfare ideologies and value construction. Hence, this study demonstrated the media’s role as a tool for culture hegemony and political socialization, and also the positive influence of democratization on creating diversity in media discourse.

  13. The growth in newspaper coverage of tobacco control in China, 2000-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Junling

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Media coverage of tobacco-related issues can potentially shape individual beliefs, attitudes and behaviors about tobacco use. This study aims to describe news coverage of tobacco control related issues in Chinese newspapers from 2000 to 2010. Methods All 1149 articles related to tobacco control were extracted from the Database of Chinese Important Newspapers and content analyzed for the period Jan 1, 2000 to Dec 31, 2010. The changing pattern of tobacco control topic, article type, viewpoint, and article origin, and their relationship were analysed. Results News coverage of tobacco control related issues increased significantly (p p χ2 = 24.09, p = 0.002 and article types (χ2 = 193.35, p Conclusion Chinese newspapers are giving increasing attention to tobacco control, but coverage remains lower than in the USA and Australia. Health workers need to give higher priority to efforts to increase news coverage beyond the present concentration around World No Tobacco Day and to develop strategies for making tobacco control issues more newsworthy to both national and local news outlets.

  14. The reporting of theoretical health risks by the media: Canadian newspaper reporting of potential blood transmission of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Nadya

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The media play an important role at the interface of science and policy by communicating scientific information to the public and policy makers. In issues of theoretical risk, in which there is scientific uncertainty, the media's role as disseminators of information is particularly important due to the potential to influence public perception of the severity of the risk. In this article we describe how the Canadian print media reported the theoretical risk of blood transmission of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD. Methods We searched 3 newspaper databases for articles published by 6 major Canadian daily newspapers between January 1990 and December 1999. We identified all articles relating to blood transmission of CJD. In duplicate we extracted information from the articles and entered the information into a qualitative software program. We compared the observations obtained from this content analysis with information obtained from a previous policy analysis examining the Canadian blood system's decision-making concerning the potential transfusion transmission of CJD. Results Our search identified 245 relevant articles. We observed that newspapers in one instance accelerated a policy decision, which had important resource and health implication, by communicating information on risk to the public. We also observed that newspapers primarily relied upon expert opinion (47 articles as opposed to published medical evidence (28 articles when communicating risk information. Journalists we interviewed described the challenges of balancing their responsibility to raise awareness of potential health threats with not unnecessarily arousing fear amongst the public. Conclusions Based on our findings we recommend that journalists report information from both expert opinion sources and from published studies when communicating information on risk. We also recommend researchers work more closely with journalists to assist them in identifying

  15. Negative stereotypes of the Scottish diet: A qualitative analysis of deep-fried Mars bar references in bestselling newspapers in Scotland, 2011-14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Christine

    2016-08-01

    The Scottish diet is associated in the UK media and popular discourse with unhealthy deep-fried foods. In addition to the stereotype's negative effects on perceptions of Scottish food, culture and people, there is evidence that the stereotype of the Scottish diet has negative effects on food behaviour and public health in Scotland, having been shown to encourage consumption of deep-fried foods and discourage positive dietary change. The most notorious deep-fried food associated with Scotland is the deep-fried Mars bar (DFMB), arguably invented in Stonehaven (near Aberdeen), and first reported in the Scottish and UK press in 1995. This article reports findings from an analysis of newspaper references to the DFMB in the two highest selling newspapers in Scotland, the Scottish Sun and the Daily Record, between 2011 and 2014. A keyword search ("deep fried Mars bar") using the online media database Lexis Library generated 97 unique records, and the resulting dataset was analysed thematically and discursively. Analysis showed that both newspapers clearly associated the DFMB with Scotland. Further, both newspapers portrayed the DFMB and the broader "deep-fried" Scottish diet stereotype ambivalently (mixed positive and negative associations). However, the Daily Record actively criticised the DFMB stereotype much more often than did the Scottish Sun. These findings suggest that the Scottish population encounters different messages in the press about food and nutrition from people elsewhere in the UK, and that these messages vary depending on choice of media in Scotland. Given the known negative effects of the stereotype, differences in Scottish media discourse should be considered a potential factor in persistent health inequalities affecting Scotland. Educational efforts, and opening discussion with journalists and amongst the Scottish public, may be helpful. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Helping for Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuringer, Allen; Oleson, Kathryn C.

    2010-01-01

    In "Helping for Change," Allen Neuringer and Kathryn Oleson describe another strategy that individuals can use to achieve their green goals. You might ask, "How can helping someone else help me change when I'm in the habit of not fulfilling my own promises?" The authors answer that question by explaining how the social reinforcement in a helping…

  17. User experiences with editorial control in online newspaper comment fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvlie, Anders Sundnes; Ihlebæk, Karoline Andrea; Larsson, Anders Olof

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates user experiences with editorial control in online newspaper comment fields following the public backlash against online comments after the 2011 terror attacks in Norway. We analyze data from a survey of online news consumers focusing on experiences and attitudes towards...... editorial control set against a spectrum between “interventionist” and “noninterventionist” positions. Results indicate that interventionist respondents rate the quality of online comments as poor, whereas noninterventionist respondents have most often experienced being the target of editorial control...... measures and feel that editorial control has intensified after the terror attacks. We conclude that newspapers should pay attention to the different needs of participants when devising strategies for editorial control. Media professionals should also consider changes to increase the transparency...

  18. 2 Dailies Battle for Readers and Advertisers in U. of Wisconsin Student-Newspaper War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschorn, Michael W.

    1987-01-01

    Two student newspapers at the University of Wisconsin at Madison are in fierce competition for readers and advertisers. A proposal of the Badger Herald, an 18-year-old conservative weekly, that the two merge their financial operations was rejected by the liberal Daily Cardinal and the newspaper war was on. (MLW)

  19. Advertising Intellection in Ottoman Empire Period end Sample of Tanin Newspaper between 1908 and 1909 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Hanife KOCAKAYA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Advertising that has become an indispensable element of today’s conditions has also become a frequently used tool of goods and services the companies utilized. With the advances in technology, the number of companies that commercialises their goods has been steadily increasing day by day. That fact that advertising has become such a significant sector of the industry; has provided this sector with the opportunity to contact a lot of people all at the same time. That is why; advertising is special among the marketing and the media tools. The Tanin newspaper discussed in this article began to be broadcast towards the end of the Ottoman Empire. The newspaper that began to be published in the late Ottoman and the early Turkish Republic eras came to the fore as a political organ rather than the advertisements of the publication. The number of Tanin newspaper published during the years 1908-1909 were examined in this article. The newspaper had published many advertisements and covered many brands in the issues that were published during this period,The newspaper that encountered various obstacles during its life of publication bears importance by being, established by the Committee of Union and Progress members as well

  20. Routes to diagnosis for men with prostate cancer: men's cultural beliefs about how changes to their bodies and symptoms influence help-seeking actions. A narrative review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King-Okoye, Michelle; Arber, Anne; Faithfull, Sara

    2017-10-01

    To examine the findings of existing studies in relation to men's cultural beliefs about changes to their bodies relevant to prostate cancer and how these affect interpretation of bodily changes and help-seeking actions. We undertook a narrative review of studies conducted from 2004 to 2017 in 6 databases that highlighted men's beliefs and help-seeking actions for bodily changes suggestive of prostate cancer. Eighteen (18) studies reflecting men from various ethnicities and nationalities were included. The belief that blood and painful urination were warning signs to seek medical help delayed help-seeking among men compared to men that did not experience these symptoms. The belief that urinary symptoms such as dribbling, cystitis and urinary hesitancy were transient and related to ageing, normality and infection significantly delayed symptom appraisal and help-seeking. Men also held the belief that sexual changes, such as impotence and ejaculation dysfunction were private, embarrassing and a taboo. These beliefs impeded timely help-seeking. Cultural beliefs, spirituality and the role of wives/partners were significant for men to help appraise symptoms as requiring medical attention thus sanctioning the need for help-seeking. This review underscores a critical need for further empirical research into men's beliefs about bodily changes relevant to prostate health and how these beliefs affect their interpretation of symptoms and subsequent help-seeking actions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Influence of newspapers in the development of student's reading ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of newspapers in the development of student's reading culture in two Nigerian University Libraries. ... PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... Information Impact: Journal of Information and Knowledge Management ... size of 200 and questionnaire was the major instrument used for data collection.

  2. Under the Influence: Advertisers’ Impact on the Content of Swiss Free Newspapers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Porlezza

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The study focuses on whether and to what extent advertisers influence the editorial content of free newspapers in the German part of Switzerland. The contribution analyzes, grounded on an historic approach, the most competitive period in Switzerland, 2008, when not less than five freesheets were competing for advertisers and public attention. By using Altmeppen’s (2006 organizational theory, the paper offers a theoretical frame able to describe the vanishing co-orientation between the media management and the newsroom, a trend that aggravates commercialization processes in news organizations. In a situation of economic turmoil, so the hypothesis, newsrooms are more inclined to positively adapt the valence of their coverage about their main advertisers in order to keep them in the portfolio. Using a content analysis, the author examined the editorial coverage of six among the most important advertisers of Swiss free newspapers, carrying out an aggregated statistical analysis based on logistic regression. The study revealed that free newspapers with a strong market orientation display a higher chance to publish positive facts and evaluations about advertisers with a high advertising expenditure.

  3. How do we help students as newcomers to create and develop better communities of practice for learning in a Project based learning environment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Peter

    2007-01-01

    The question for debate in this paper, is how to help students creating and developing good communities of practice for learning in a Project based learning environment? At Aalborg University it has proven very helpful for students to have both a course addressing communication, collaboration......, learning and project management (CLP) and a reflection on these issues in a written process analysis....

  4. Newspaper reporting and the emergence of charcoal burning suicide in Taiwan: A mixed methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Yeh; Tsai, Chi-Wei; Biddle, Lucy; Niederkrotenthaler, Thomas; Wu, Kevin Chien-Chang; Gunnell, David

    2016-03-15

    It has been suggested that extensive media reporting of charcoal burning suicide was a key factor in the rapid spread of this novel method in many East Asian countries. But very few empirical studies have explored the relationship between media reporting and the emergence of this new method of suicide. We investigated the changing pattern of media reporting of charcoal burning suicides in Taiwan during 1998-2002 when this method of suicide increased most rapidly, assessing whether the characteristics of media reporting were associated with the changing incidence of suicide using this method. A mixed method approach, combining quantitative and qualitative analysis of newspaper content during 1998-2002 was used. We compared differences in reporting characteristics before and after the rapid increase in charcoal burning suicide. Point-biserial and Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to quantify the associations between the media item content and changes in suicide rates. During the period when charcoal burning suicide increased rapidly, the number of reports per suicide was considerably higher than during the early stage (0.31 vs. 0.10). Detailed reporting of this new method was associated with a post-reporting increase in suicides using the method. Qualitative analysis of news items revealed that the content of reports of suicide by charcoal burning changed gradually; in the early stages of the epidemic (1999-2000) there was convergence in the terminology used to report charcoal burning deaths, later reports gave detailed descriptions of the setting in which the death occurred (2001) and finally the method was glamourized and widely publicized (2001-2002). Our analysis was restricted to newspaper reports and did not include TV or the Internet. Newspaper reporting was associated with the evolution and establishment of charcoal burning suicide. Working with media and close monitoring of changes in the incidence of suicide using a new method might help

  5. Formal Features of Headlines: notes on ten spanish speaking newspapers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Nadal Palazón

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available As a reaction to the few existing descriptions of headlines, descriptions which in some respects often fail the empirical proof of comparing them to the observable newspapers reality, it is proposed an updated set of the most distinctive formal features of headlines, according to their distribution within a large corpus of current newspapers in Spanish. The set is summarized in four constant and four variable features. The constant features —relatively homogeneous throughout the corpus (although some of its variants have certain conditions— are: expressive bimembration, ellipsis, nominal structures and historical present. On the other hand, the variable traits —which show a not so regular distribution— are: impersonal third person, verb in starting position, quoting conditional and anthroponyms abbreviated by initializations. The analysis is based on a corpus of 3 689 recent headlines published in Spanish in the printed editions of the following newspapers: El País, from Madrid (Spain; La Opinión, from Los Angeles (United States; El Universal, from Mexico City (Mexico; La Nación, from San Jose (Costa Rica; Hoy, from Santo Domingo (Dominican Republic; El Tiempo, from Bogota (Colombia; El Nacional, from Caracas (Venezuela; El Comercio, from Lima (Peru; El Mercurio, from Santiago (Chile, and Clarín, from Buenos Aires (Argentina. Where appropriate, the diatopic factor is considered, and the inaccuracy of some frequent approaches is also demonstrated.

  6. Going political – multimodal metaphor framings on a cover of the sports newspaper A Bola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Clotilde Almeida

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses a political-oriented multimodal metaphor on a cover of the sports newspaper A Bola, sequencing another study on multimodal metaphors deployed on the covers of the very same sports newspaper pertaining to the 2014 Football World Cup in Brazil (Almeida/Sousa, 2015 in the light of Forceville (2009, 2012. The fact that European politics is mapped onto football in multimodal metaphors on this sports newspaper cover draws on the interplay of conceptual metaphors, respectively in the visual mode and in the written mode. Furthermore, there is a relevant time-bound leitmotif which motivates the mapping of politics onto football in the sports newspaper A Bola, namely the upcoming football match between Portugal and Germany. In the multimodal framing of the story line under analysis. The visual mode apparently assumes preponderance, since a picture of Angela Merkel, a prominent leader of EU, is clearly overshadowed by a large picture of Cristiano Ronaldo, the captain of the Portuguese National Football team. However, the visual modality of Cristiano Ronaldo’s dominance over Angela Merkel is intertwined with the powerful metaphorical headline “Vamos expulsar a Alemanha do Euro” (“Let’s kick Germany out of the European Championship”, intended to boost the courage of the Portuguese national football team: “Go Portugal – you can win this time!”. Thus, differently from multimodal metaphors on other covers of the same newspaper, the visual modality in this case cannot be considered the dominant factor in multimodal meaning creation in this politically-oriented layout.Keywords: Multimodal Metaphors. Sports and Politics. Metaphors in Sports Newspapers.

  7. How does gender influence immigrant and refugee women's postpartum depression help-seeking experiences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, J M; Donnelly, T T

    2013-10-01

    The number of migrants arriving in Canada from non-European countries has grown significantly over the past three decades. How best to assist these escalating numbers of immigrant and refugee women to adapt to their new environment and to cope with postpartum depression (PPD) is a pressing issue for healthcare providers. Evidence has shown that immigrant and refugee women experience difficulties in accessing care and treatment for PPD. This qualitative study was conducted with 30 immigrant and refugee women using in-depth interviews to obtain information about the women's PPD experiences. The primary aim was to explore how cultural, social, political, historical and economic factors intersect with race, gender and class to influence the ways in which immigrant and refugee women seek help to manage PPD. Results reveal that immigrant and refugee women experience many complex gender-related challenges and facilitators in seeking equitable help for PPD treatment and prevention. We will demonstrate that (a) structural barriers and gender roles hinder women's ability to access necessary mental healthcare services and (b) insecure immigration status coupled with emotional and economic dependence may leave women vulnerable and disadvantaged in protecting themselves against PPD. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Practical web analytics for user experience how analytics can help you understand your users

    CERN Document Server

    Beasley, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Practical Web Analytics for User Experience teaches you how to use web analytics to help answer the complicated questions facing UX professionals. Within this book, you'll find a quantitative approach for measuring a website's effectiveness and the methods for posing and answering specific questions about how users navigate a website. The book is organized according to the concerns UX practitioners face. Chapters are devoted to traffic, clickpath, and content use analysis, measuring the effectiveness of design changes, including A/B testing, building user profiles based on search hab

  9. Understanding coping with cancer: how can qualitative research help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittem, Mahati

    2014-01-01

    Research in psycho-oncology investigates the psycho-social and emotional aspects of cancer and how this is related to health, well-being and overall patient care. Coping with cancer is a prime focus for researchers owing to its impact on patients' psychological processing and life in general. Research so far has focused mainly on quantitative study designs such as questionnaires to examine the coping strategies used by cancer patients. However, in order to gain a rich and deep understanding of the reasons, processes and types of strategies that patients use to deal with cancer, qualitative study designs are necessary. Few studies have used qualitative designs such as semi-structured interviews to explore coping with cancer. The current paper aims to review the suitability and benefits of using qualitative research designs to understand coping with cancer with the help of some key literature in psycho-oncology research.

  10. The Struggle for Comprehensive Education in the Netherlands: The Representation of Secondary School Innovation in Dutch Newspaper Articles in the 1970s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsing, Hilda T. A.; Greveling, Linda; Dekker, Jeroen J. H.

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on how Dutch newspapers represented the debate in the Netherlands in the 1970s on comprehensive education and thus influenced the Dutch Middle School experiment. Wiborg's identification of key factors of success in Scandinavia was used as a point of reference. The article shows that these key factors did not exist in the…

  11. Newspaper coverage of water issues in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlimann, Anna; Dolnicar, Sara

    2012-12-01

    The media has been found to have an impact on public debate, public opinion, and public policy agendas. Public debate, and public opinion about water conservation and water supply management projects matter because they can influence specific outcomes. For example, public opinion can potentially lead to positive behaviour, like increased water conservation, or potentially negative behaviours such as public opposition to developments such as dams or water recycling plants, which may be necessary under changing climatic conditions. It is therefore critical to understand how the media reports on water-related topics. Results from a content analysis of 1253 newspaper articles published in Australia in 2008 indicate that water-related reports are characterised by lack of inclusion of views held by various stakeholders, a low level of support of statements with scientific evidence, a low level of impartiality in the sense of reporting on opposing views and a relatively high level of hedging, meaning that the author signals that there is some uncertainly about the reported information. In sum these tendencies could theoretically culminate to work against public engagement in water issues and undermine the public's understanding of and confidence in water management measures. Proactive measures of media management are recommended. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Who thinks what about e-cigarette regulation? A content analysis of UK newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Chris; Hilton, Shona; Weishaar, Heide

    2016-07-01

    To establish how frequently different types of stakeholders were cited in the UK media debate about e-cigarette regulation, their stances towards different forms of e-cigarette regulation, and what rationales they employed in justifying those stances. Quantitative and qualitative content analyses of 104 articles about e-cigarette regulation published in eight UK and three Scottish national newspapers between 1 January 2013 and 31 December 2014. Reporting on e-cigarette regulation grew significantly (P e-cigarette regulation greatly outnumbered arguments against regulation. Regulating purchasing age, restricting marketing and regulating e-cigarettes as medicine were broadly supported, while stakeholders disagreed about prohibiting e-cigarette use in enclosed public spaces. In rationalizing their stances, supporters of regulation cited child protection and concerns about the safety of e-cigarette products, while opponents highlighted the potential of e-cigarettes in tobacco cessation and questioned the evidence base associating e-cigarette use with health harms. In the UK between 2013 and 2014, governments and tobacco control advocates frequently commented on e-cigarettes in UK-wide and Scottish national newspapers. Almost all commentators supported e-cigarette regulation, but there was disagreement about whether e-cigarette use should be allowed in enclosed public spaces. This appeared to be linked to whether commentators emphasized the harms of vapour and concerns about renormalizing smoking or emphasized the role of e-cigarettes as a smoking cessation aid. © 2016 The Authors. Addiction published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for the Study of Addiction.

  13. Whispers of the Unspeakable: New York and Montreal Newspaper Coverage of the Oscar Wilde Trials in 1895

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Robinson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Greg Robinson’s article “Whispers of the Unspeakable: New York and Montreal Newspaper Coverage of the Oscar Wilde Trials in 1895,” originally published in 2010 in the French-language journal Rue des Beaux Arts, no. 24 (2010, is here republished and—with much gratitude—translated (for the original text, please see http://www.oscholars.com/RBA/twenty-four/24.7/Articles.htm. Robinson’s transnational study focuses on how reading the specific language of newspaper reports of the Oscar Wilde case, literally from a distance, from places less emotionally attached to and nationally distinct from the scandal’s epicenter in London, England, provides insight into “the state of everyday public knowledge and discussion of (homosexuality, at least west of the Atlantic”; thus Robinson’s fascinating research, which involves numerous newspapers—from the elite New York Times to the New York Herald, from the Montreal Daily Star to the French-language papers of Quebec—concludes that the popular press, read transnationally, offers key insights into the developing attitudes toward and levels of interest in the newly forming identity of the “homosexual” across societies.

  14. How Does XML Help Libraries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Kyle

    2002-01-01

    Discusses XML, how it has transformed the way information is managed and delivered, and its impact on libraries. Topics include how XML differs from other markup languages; the document object model (DOM); style sheets; practical applications for archival materials, interlibrary loans, digital collections, and MARC data; and future possibilities.…

  15. The nuclear controversy as reflected in the daily newspapers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buire, S. van.

    1980-01-01

    The development and utilization of nuclear energy has led to conflicts of larger dimensions in our society. What has been the role of the mass communication media in this discussion. Did they fulfill their duty to inform the public, did they actively foster discussions about the facts to be considered, and did they play their part in public opinion making by publishing critical analyses. These are questions answered by this book by presenting analyses of newspaper articles on the nuclear controversy, facts and figures on the opinions and information published in the daily newspapers on the subject of nuclear energy utilization, and analyses of tendencies pro or contra nuclear energy as expressed by the various articles. By an evaluation of the history of discussions, the development and modifications of the arguments put forward and the reactions shown by the various social groups involved in the process are illustrated and commented in the light of the controversy becoming more acute. (orig./HP) [de

  16. News from the Library: newspapers anyone? Try PressDisplay!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Library

    2011-01-01

    PressDisplay is an online portal where you can browse and read online articles from more than 1,900 newspapers from 95 countries, as soon as they are published. With Pressdisplay, the time when newspapers were nicely displayed on wooden rods in libraries has passed...   Le Monde, International Herald Tribune and many more titles are displayed in their original layout including text and images, and you can print and e-mail the articles you are interested in. You even have the possibility to create rss feeds, so that the news reaches you directly.   The CERN Library has now activated a trial version of PressDisplay valid till 31 December; it is open to everyone at CERN. This trial doesn't offer the possibility to create personalised alerts based on specific search criteria. In case you need such features - or if you have any comments or questions - please contact us.

  17. Newspapers as early meteorological data sources in Andalusia (southern Spain), 1796-1830.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Montes, S.; Rodrigo, F. S.

    2010-09-01

    The growing evidence of an anthropogenically induced climatic change and the need to compare present-day climate with that of the past centuries, has boosted the search of early meteorological data from all kind of historical archives. Among the documentary data sources, early newspapers deserve special attention. Anonymous observers began to send their data to local newspapers to ensure that people were informed of them. Hardly anything is known of the conditions in which these recording were made, and press collections conserved from late 18th century to mid-19th century are fragmentary. However, it is interesting to analyze the potential of these newspapers as climatic data sources in a period prior to the existence of an official meteorological service. In this work, some examples of Andalusian cities (southern Spain) are analyzed and their utility as data sources is studied: El Mensagero (1796-1797), El Publicista (1812-1813), Diario Constitucional (1820) of Granada, Diario del Gobierno de Sevilla (1812-1813), Diario de Sevilla (1826-1831), Diario de Sevilla de Comercio, Artes y Literatura (1829-1830) of Seville, and Diario Mercantil de Cádiz (1802-1803, 1816-1830) of Cádiz. Future research is outlined.

  18. Four Essays Studying the Effects of Customization and Market Environment on the Business Success of Online Newspapers in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Santonen, Teemu

    2004-01-01

    The literature on online newspapers includes fairly few empirical investigations of the factors affecting the business success of online newspapers, even though many business models and revenue logics have been presented. Moreover, practically the whole online newspaper literature has paid relatively little attention to the suggested effect of the market environment on business success. In this dissertation we were especially interested in analyzing whether, as suggested, the better busin...

  19. [Are newspapers a reliable source of information about doping in sports?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrieu, Geneviève; Gorsse, Elisabeth; Montastruc, Jean-Louis

    2004-01-01

    To study the coverage by French newspapers of doping in sports, we performed a systematic review of articles appearing between January and March 2003 on the following French websites: L'Equipe, Le Monde, Le Figaro, Libération, La Dépêche du Midi and Agence France-Presse (AFP). We recorded a total of 58 articles about doping. Among them, 48 (83%) were collected from the AFP news. L'Equipe, a French sports newspaper, published seven articles (12%). Most of the recorded data reported results of worldwide antidoping control (71%). No information about new drugs was found. The analysis of the selected articles pointed out the following: (i) the seriousness of observations related to doping since, during this 3-month period, we noted two deaths of athletes; (ii) the risks associated with the use of dietary supplements, particularly products including amphetamine derivatives; (iii) the interest in judicial investigation as an information source about doping in sports (investigation of suspicious deaths of Italian football players); and (iv) identification of the sports involved in doping (cycling, but also athletics, football, rugby). Systematic analysis of newspaper reports can be considered as a relevant method for monitoring the pharmacovigilance and pharmacoepidemiology of doping in sports.

  20. Angelina Jolie's faulty gene: newspaper coverage of a celebrity's preventive bilateral mastectomy in Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenova, Kalina; Reshef, Amir; Caulfield, Timothy

    2014-07-01

    This study investigates the portrayal of Angelina Jolie's preventive bilateral mastectomy in the news media. Content analysis of print news was conducted to identify major frames used in press coverage, the overall tone of discussions, how journalists report broader questions about BRCA1/2 testing and hereditary breast/ovarian cancer, and whether they raise concerns about the impact of celebrities on patients' choices and public opinion. The Factiva database was used to collect publications on Jolie's preventive mastectomy in elite newspapers in Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom. The data set consisted of 103 newspaper articles published in the first month of media coverage. The results show that although the press discussed key issues surrounding predictive genetic testing and preventive options for women at high risk of hereditary breast/ovarian cancer, important medical information about the rarity of Jolie's condition was not communicated to the public. The results highlight the media's overwhelmingly positive slant toward Jolie's mastectomy, while overlooking the relative rarity of her situation, the challenges of "celebrity medicine," and how celebrities influence people's medical decisions. Future research is required to investigate whether the media hype has influenced demand and use of BRCA1/2 testing and preventive mastectomies.

  1. Media coverage of off-label promotion: a content analysis of US newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Avani D; Patel, Dipen A; Holdford, David A

    2011-09-01

    Promotion of drugs for off-label use is newsworthy, because it is an illegal but all too common strategy used by pharmaceutical companies. The print media are an important source of information about coverage of off-label promotion of drugs and devices and can influence public perceptions of the practice. Print media coverage of off-label promotion during the years 1990-2008 were described and quantified. The primary themes and general tones relating to off-label promotion articles were evaluated. General concerns associated with off-label promotion and complaints about specific brand name drugs were also identified. Content analyses of the top 6 US newspapers were conducted over the period of 1990-2008 to analyze the media coverage given to off-label promotion of drugs and devices. Headlines and full text of articles were analyzed for primary themes and tones of the coverage. Intercoder reliability tests were performed on all the study variables. One hundred and one articles were identified meeting the study inclusion criteria. Coverage varied by newspaper. The Wall Street Journal had the most coverage on the topic (45%), and USA Today and Chicago Tribune had the least coverage (5%). Overall, most of the stories sampled were deemed to have a negative tone in coverage (77%), focusing mainly on lawsuits against drug companies for promoting their drugs for off-label uses. Pfizer's Neurontin(®) (Pfizer Inc., New York, NY 10017, USA) and Johnson & Johnson's Retin-A(®) (Orthoneutrogena, Los Angeles, CA 90045, USA) received the most media attention. The news media helps shape public understanding of promotional practices of pharmaceutical companies and their potential benefits and harms. This study suggests that print media coverage is generally negative about off-label promotion, focusing on legal actions taken against drug companies and the negative consequences of such promotional practices. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Quality assessment of nutrition coverage in the media: a 6-week survey of five popular UK newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kininmonth, Alice R; Jamil, Nafeesa; Almatrouk, Nasser; Evans, Charlotte E L

    2017-12-27

    To investigate the quality of nutrition articles in popular national daily newspapers in the UK and to identify important predictors of article quality. Newspapers are a primary source of nutrition information for the public. Newspaper articles were collected on 6 days of the week (excluding Sunday) for 6 weeks in summer 2014. Predictors included food type and health outcome, size of article, whether the journalist was named and day of the week. A validated quality assessment tool was used to assess each article, with a minimum possible score of -12 and a maximum score of 17. Newspapers were checked in duplicate for relevant articles. The association of each predictor on article quality score was analysed adjusting for remaining predictors. A logistic regression model was implemented with quality score as the binary outcome, categorised as poor (score less than zero) or satisfactory (score of zero or more). Over 6 weeks, 141 nutrition articles were included across the five newspapers. The median quality score was 2 (IQR -2-6), and 44 (31%) articles were poor quality. There was no substantial variation in quality of reporting between newspapers once other factors such as anonymous publishing, health outcome, aspect of diet covered and day of the week were taken into account. Particularly low-quality scores were obtained for anonymously published articles with no named journalist, articles that focused on obesity and articles that reported on high fat and processed foods. The general public are regularly exposed to poor quality information in newspapers about what to eat to promote health, particularly articles reporting on obesity. Journalists, researchers, university press officers and scientific journals need to work together more closely to ensure clear, consistent nutrition messages are communicated to the public in an engaging way. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No

  3. How NGOs have helped shape resettlement

    OpenAIRE

    Amy Slaughter

    2017-01-01

    NGOs have a rich history of involvement in case identification and referral for resettlement, and have helped to increase numbers, improve processes and make resettlement more equitable, and accountable, for refugees.

  4. Making the Academic Transition to College

    OpenAIRE

    O'Rawe, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Students encounter many changes and challenges in making the transition to college. As well as a different vocabulary around the learning environment, students will be supported to take charge of their own learning, and encouraged to move beyond rote learning and to start thinking around the material and the subject area. This newspaper article helps students to understand how to step up to this independent learning, and presents a range of tips for success.

  5. Can an unglamorous non-event affect prices? The role of newspapers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Ferretti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Our paper offers evidence that the print media can affect stock prices by covering public information. After price-to-book value figures of Italian listed shares were first published on the major national financial newspaper, the prices of value stocks did, on average, show a positive reaction. The price reaction was limited to small caps stocks and disappeared within three weeks. Over the period of analysis, we could not find any abnormal behaviour of the returns of small and value stocks on other European markets. These findings support the view that newspapers play a role in disseminating information to small investors and grabbing their attention, even if news are continuously realeased by faster and more sophisticated media.

  6. 'It's caveman stuff, but that is to a certain extent how guys still operate': men's accounts of masculinity and help seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Rosaleen; Hunt, Kate; Hart, Graham

    2005-08-01

    It is often assumed that men are reluctant to seek medical care. However, despite growing interest in masculinity and men's health, few studies have focussed on men's experiences of consultation in relation to their constructions of masculinity. Those that have are largely based on men with diseases of the male body (testicular and prostate cancer) or those which have been stereotyped as male (coronary heart disease). This paper presents discussions and experiences of help seeking and its relation to, and implications for, the practice of masculinity amongst a diversity of men in Scotland, as articulated in focus group discussions. The discussions did indeed suggest a widespread endorsement of a 'hegemonic' view that men 'should' be reluctant to seek help, particularly amongst younger men. However, they also included instances which questioned or went against this apparent reluctance to seek help. These were themselves linked with masculinity: help seeking was more quickly embraced when it was perceived as a means to preserve or restore another, more valued, enactment of masculinity (e.g. working as a fire-fighter, or maintaining sexual performance or function). Few other studies have emphasised how men negotiate deviations from the hegemonic view of help-seeking.

  7. Assessing Unilateral Merger Effects in a Two-Sided Market : An Application to the Dutch Daily Newspaper Market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filistrucchi, L.; Klein, T.J.; Michielsen, T.O.

    2011-01-01

    We compare different methods to assess unilateral merger effects in a two-sided market by applying them to a hypothetical merger in the Dutch newspaper industry. For this, we first specify and estimate a structural model of demand for differentiated products on both the readership and the

  8. Metaphors in the Press: The Effectiveness of Working with Newspaper Tropes to Improve Foreign Language Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zashchitina, Galina

    2013-01-01

    The given article intends to focus on some approaches to teaching English as a second language at an advanced or proficient level. The paper primarily deals with the ways in which stylistic aspect of newspaper language can be put to use by university students thus becoming an integral part of their classroom discourse. The study aims at presenting…

  9. THE FRAGMENTS OF NEWSPAPER PUBLICATIONS IN THE CONTEXT OF A. M. DOSTOEVSKY’S DIARIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klavdiya V. Sizyukhina

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Th e article considers the functional and stylistic features of  the  intertextuality between the diary and newspaper genres within  A.  Dostoevsky’s diaries. Th e combination of  both genres is  based on the artistic and poetic peculiarities of the diary text. A. Dostoevsky applies to  newspaper publications within his diaries for the adding artistic dynamics to  the  text. First of all, the author refers correlates destinies of  his family members (i. e. sister Varvara Karepina and brother Fyodor Dostoevsky, the elder son Alexander with the historical circumstances of the epoch. In  the biographical episodes and represent syncretism of  the author’s inmost psychological time with the historical process. Widening the stylistic space of  the  diaries A. Dostoevsky expresses his feelings outside, changes the  poetical communication of  the text  — from intimacy to  publicity. Th e biographical newspaper publications don’t break the plot and thematic line of the diary notes, but complete their content. Secondly, A Dostoevsky includes in  the  narrative a  lot of  newspaper articles that are not directly connected with his family history. Th ey cover the epochal historical events, for example: international chronicle, phenological notes (so-called “Bulletins of nature” by D. Kaygorodov, reminiscences about famous writers, military fi gures of the past, members of the royal families, various statistics, facts and so  on. Th us, the newspaper notes (both biographical and public enlarge social and cultural context of A. Dostoevsky’s diaries. Personal history of Dostoevsky becomes particularly important for that epoch.

  10. Newspaper literacy and communication for democracy: is there a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1984) ideological model of literacy. In a pilot study, multiple readability tests were conducted on one article from each of three newspapers, Business Day, The Herald and Daily Sun. The findings of these tests, and a systemic functional grammar ...

  11. Positive thinking about the future in newspaper reports and presidential addresses predicts economic downturn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevincer, A Timur; Wagner, Greta; Kalvelage, Johanna; Oettingen, Gabriele

    2014-04-01

    Previous research has shown that positive thinking, in the form of fantasies about an idealized future, predicts low effort and poor performance. In the studies reported here, we used computerized content analysis of historical documents to investigate the relation between positive thinking about the future and economic development. During the financial crisis from 2007 to 2009, the more weekly newspaper articles in the economy page of USA Today contained positive thinking about the future, the more the Dow Jones Industrial Average declined in the subsequent week and 1 month later. In addition, between the New Deal era and the present time, the more presidential inaugural addresses contained positive thinking about the future, the more the gross domestic product and the employment rate declined in the presidents' subsequent tenures. These counterintuitive findings may help reveal the psychological processes that contribute to an economic crisis.

  12. THE IMAGE OF PISA TESTS IN TWO COLOMBIAN NEWSPAPERS REFERRALS TO SHAPE PUBLIC OPINION ON THE ASSESSMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Torres Zambrano

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The PISA tests applied by OECD in 2012 had a strong impact in Colombia because of the low scores obtained by students . The news had more coverage in the press. In order to establish how they can shape public opinion on the subject because of the manner and direction in which they were addressed, were analyzed news , editorials, opinion columns and letters from readers (total 39 information units appeared in two Colombian daily newspapers in two and a half months. Recognizing the evaluation as a social fact , the analysis focused around : quality of information sources used , breadth of perspective on the evidence by reference to the evidence and formulate action alternatives . The basic conclusions are : the sources of information to give opinion are very limited, they aren´t criticized and the focus is on the scores ; these show a very negative picture that is extended to all the country's education ; teachers are largely responsible for the failure. The opinion that the media contribute to form is negative.

  13. An Analysis of Modular Instruction of Newspaper Reading Skills to Poor Readers in Junior High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Charles

    Fifty instructional modules designed to improve newspaper reading skills were field tested in this study. During a 50-day period, modules were used by Wilkes County, Georgia teachers as they saw fit in seventh, eighth, and ninth grade classes primarily for 338 students with poor reading skills. In summary, the effectiveness of the instructional…

  14. How Essential Biodiversity Variables and remote sensing can help national biodiversity monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petteri Vihervaara

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Essential Biodiversity Variables (EBVs have been suggested to harmonize biodiversity monitoring worldwide. Their aim is to provide a small but comprehensive set of monitoring variables that would give a balanced picture of the development of biodiversity and the reaching of international and national biodiversity targets. Globally, GEO BON (Group on Earth Observations Biodiversity Observation Network has suggested 22 candidate EBVs to be monitored. In this article we regard EBVs as a conceptual tool that may help in making national scale biodiversity monitoring more robust by pointing out where to focus further development resources. We look at one country –Finland –with a relatively advanced biodiversity monitoring scheme and study how well Finland’s current biodiversity state indicators correspond with EBVs. In particular, we look at how national biodiversity monitoring could be improved by using available remote sensing (RS applications. Rapidly emerging new technologies from drones to airborne laser scanning and new satellite sensors providing imagery with very high resolution (VHR open a whole new world of opportunities for monitoring the state of biodiversity and ecosystems at low cost. In Finland, several RS applications already exist that could be expanded into national indicators. These include the monitoring of shore habitats and water quality parameters, among others. We hope that our analysis and examples help other countries with similar challenges. Along with RS opportunities, our analysis revealed also some needs to develop the EBV framework itself.

  15. Assessing unilateral merger effects in a two-sided market : An application to the Dutch daily newspaper market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filistrucchi, L.; Klein, T.J.; Michielsen, T.O.

    2012-01-01

    We compare different methods to assess unilateral merger effects in a two-sided market by applying them to a hypothetical merger in the Dutch newspaper industry. We first specify and estimate a structural model of demand for differentiated products in both the readership and the advertising sides of

  16. Tobacco advertising and press coverage of smoking and health in 10 years of Argentinean newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Sandra; Mejia, Raul; Barnoya, Joaquín; Gregorich, Steven E; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J

    2011-09-01

    To describe the extent and content of tobacco-related images, advertising and articles published in the largest Argentinean newspapers before and after a voluntary advertising ban implemented in 2001. Issues from four months of each year of the four main national newspapers were examined from 1995 to 2004. We recorded the number of tobacco images (advertisement or not), tobacco-focused articles, space used, and placement within the newspaper. Regression analyses evaluated time trends. We identified 1800 images and articles from 4828 different issues. Non-advertisement images were the most frequent (71.2%), followed by articles (20%) and advertisement images (8.8%). Advertisements only appeared in the two best selling newspapers with a majority (57%) in the Sunday magazine and 21% in the sports sections. Non-advertisement images were published in the sports and entertainment sections (55%) and showed a public figure in 88%. Of 336 articles, 39% focused on health topics and 55% emphasized the negative effects of tobacco on health. Regression models showed that prior to 2001 there were significant time-related decreases in ad images and articles and significant increases in non-ad images. The trend of each outcome changed direction beginning in 2001 and the magnitude of the change in trend was significant for ad images and non-ad images. The number of non-ad images dropped significantly in 2001 from a model-predicted value of 178 per year to 103 non-ad images and remained constant thereafter. Tobacco images exceeded information about tobacco hazards in Argentinean newspapers over this period. Advertisement increased from 2001 to 2005, following the voluntary advertisements ban. Partial advertisement bans are ineffective and a total ban is imperative.

  17. UV tanning advertisements in national high school newspapers

    OpenAIRE

    Lofgreen, Seth J; Domozych, Renee; Doctor, Monica; Reimer, Christine; Self, Alyssa; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2017-01-01

    Many young adults have utilized indoor ultraviolet(UV) tanning, putting them at higher risk fordevelopment of skin cancers. Prior to the increasedregulations on indoor tanning for minors, indoortanning businesses marketed to teens throughmodalities such as advertisements in high schoolnewspapers. The purpose of this study was toquantify tanning advertisements in high schoolnewspapers published across the United Statesbetween August 2014 and July 2015. Online versionsof the newspaper issues we...

  18. Reporting Islam in Australian Newspapers: the case of the proposed Elermore Vale mosque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin McGregor

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses the local case study of a proposed mosque development in the Newcastle suburb of Elermore Vale as an example of how Islam has been reported in the Australian media. The media reports analysed were published in Newcastle's local newspaper The Herald between February 2010, when the Newcastle Muslim Association purchased the land for the proposed development, and March 2012, when the Land and Environment Court ruled against the proposal. The discourses evident in the newspaper content reveal a clear undercurrent of racism within the local reporting against the Muslim community and, it may be argued, are representative of a larger trend of Islamophobia in the West. While the key community protest group Elermore Vale Community for Appropriate Residential and Environment Strategies (EV CARES attempted to discuss the mosque proposal by raising planning issues appropriate property development matters, anti­Muslim sentiment was clearly evident in many of the articles.Illustrations of Edward Said's (1978, 2004 concept of 'Orientalism' emerged through the reporting, where Islam, and by extension the Newcastle Muslim Association, was portrayed as being different, strange and threatening to the local community. The fact that this kind of anti­Muslim sentiment can be identified in local media products is indicative of the challenges for local media groups covering local media events, as it represents how a local matter can become contentious due to globally recognised concerns. In this instance, those concerns are the perceived threat of Muslim fundamentalism and Islam to the West. Discursive analysis of The Herald's reports demonstrates that discourses of power, religion, 'the Other', 'community' and 'the victim' are prevalently portrayed. Furthermore, these portrayals contribute to anti­Muslim attitudes communicated by key parties in the articles, who use the Islamic religion as an identifier; the marginalisation of the Muslim community

  19. Constructing (IlLegitimate Democracy: Populism and Power Concentration in Newspaper Discourse on Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Abalo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite scholarly consensus about the importance of the media for democracy, scant attention has been paid to what democracy means to journalistic discourse and how discourses on democracy are interrelated with legitimacy. The aim of this paper is to explore how (illegitimate democracy is constructed in newspaper discourse. By using critical discourse analysis, this paper examines foreign news items about Venezuela, a country that under the presidency of Hugo Chávez has challenged the hegemonic global political and economic orders. The analysis section focuses on two main findings about the Venezuelan government: the constructions of populism and power concentration, which serve to mark deviance from what is perceived as legitimate democracy. This paper argues that a liberal perception of democracy constitutes a central framework for the construction of (illegitimate democracy, which is revealed not least by news discourse’s focus on what is morally unacceptable political conduct according to liberal democratic norms. In this sense, such constructions serve to denounce potential governmental power abuses but also to legitimize the hegemonic economic and political orders.

  20. Changing Content Industry Structures: The Case of Digital Newspapers on ePaper Mobile Devices

    OpenAIRE

    L. Van Audenhove; S. Delaere; P. Ballon; M. Van Bossuyt

    2007-01-01

    The proposed paper analyses the changes in business models employed by the stakeholders in the newspaper value network, in the context of a new type of electronic reading device -the ePaper. This PDA-like device uses a new high-contrast, low-power screen technology (eInk), which holds the promise of a digital and mobile reading experience close to that of 'real' paper. The potential impact of massive digitally distributed reading content -newspapers, but also magazines, books, and all other m...

  1. Text analysis of radiation information in newspaper articles headlines and internet contents after the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanda, Reiko; Tsuji, Satsuki; Yonehara, Hidenori

    2014-01-01

    In general, the press is considered to have amplified the level of public's anxiety and perception of risk. In the present study, we analyzed newspaper article headlines and Internet contents that were released from March 11, 2011 to January 31, 2012 using text mining techniques. The aim is to reveal the particular characteristics of the information propagated regarding the Fukushima NPP Accident. The article headlines of the newspapers which had a largest circulation were chosen for analysis, and contents of Internet media were chose based on the number of times they were linked or retweeted. According to our text mining analysis, newspaper frequently reported the 'measurement, investigation and examination' of radiation/radioactive materials caused by the Fukushima Accident, and this information might be spread selectively via the social media. On the other hand, the words related to health effects of radiation exposure (i. e., cancer, hereditary effects) were rare in newspaper headlines. Instead, words like 'anxiety' and 'safe' were often used to convey the degree of health effects. Particularly in March of 2011, the concept of 'danger' was used frequently in newspaper headlines. These indirect characterizations of the situation may have contributed more or less to the misunderstanding of the health effects and to the enhanced perception of risk felt by the public. In conclusion, there were found no evidence to suggest that newspaper or Internet media users released sensational information that increased the health anxiety of reads throughout the period of analysis. (author)

  2. The Daily as a mixture of media and a new significance through the newspaper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Campos Pellanda

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Materiality (support, languages and editing gave an identity toeach type of journalism, generating formats such as: newspaper, magazine, TV journalism, radio journalism and so on. The analysis of the digital newspaper The Daily made us question to what extent this division is still relevant. The aim of this paper is to discuss The Daily as a representative of a new media experience and as a mixture of media, in what concerns materiality and languages, and also thinking about the own convergence culture.

  3. Magazine and Newspaper Prices: The Effect of Advertising Revenue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Vincent P.

    A review of the literature reveals that publishers have suggested that magazines would cost twice as much and newspapers five times as much if they were not supported by advertising revenues. However, recent research indicates that this is not true. Although statistics regarding magazine publication are easier to obtain than those regarding…

  4. Leo Szilard Lecturship Award: How can physicists help the public make better decisions about science and technology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primack, Joel

    2016-03-01

    For more than 40 years the APS has worked to improve governmental decision-making, mainly through the Congressional Science and Technology Fellowship program and through occasional studies of important science and technology issues. How productive have these been? How can the APS and other professional societies more effectively combat anti-science propaganda and help the public develop better-informed views about science and technology? How can individual scientists communicate scientific concepts in a more understandable and engaging way? How can we encourage young scientists and students to participate in creating a scientifically responsible future?

  5. 76 FR 59997 - Newspapers To Be Used by the Alaska Region for Publication of Legal Notices of Proposed Actions...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ... under 36 CFR 215, thereby allowing them to receive constructive notice of a decision or proposed action... process. DATES: Publication of legal notices in the listed newspapers begins on October 1, 2011. This list...

  6. A Study of How Letters to the Editor Published in "The Stars and Stripes" Newspaper between March 1, 1918, and November 15, 1918, Reflected the Morale of the Troops during World War I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Vicky Ann

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation is a qualitative historical study that examines the state of morale of World War I soldiers as reflected in letters to the editor published in "The Stars and Stripes" newspaper between March 1, 1918, and November 15, 1918. The narrative includes extensive use of the actual words published in the soldiers' letters in order to…

  7. Reports of Child Abuse in India from Scientific Journals and Newspapers - An Exploratory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini PR

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Child abuse is a state of emotional, physical, economic and sexual maltreatment meted out to a person below the age of eighteen and is a globally prevalent phenomenon. A total of 33,098 cases of crimes against children were reported in India during 2011 as compared to 26,694 cases during 2010, suggesting a recent increase of 24 percent. Objectives: To explore the contents of the published articles/reports on child abuse in India from scientific journals and newspapers identifying areas and gaps for further research and program development. Material and Methods: Published articles in scientific journals during the years 2007-2012 with free access and online versions of English newspapers (2007-2012 in India were searched using the search engines such as ‘PubMed’ and ‘Google’. The key words used were ‘child abuse in (on, about India. First two researchers independently reviewed the content of articles/newspaper reports and decided the categories emerging from the articles and reports. Later on, the quantification of these categories was done by identifying the number of times it was reported in the reports. Results: The nature and extent of reporting child abuse in scientific journal is different from that of newspapers. In Journals, our search provided us with 9 articles, of which prevalence studies were predominant (4 followed by case reports (3 and Knowledge, Attitude, Practice studies (2. The studies were mostly conducted in the hospital setting. We obtained 38 reports from newspapers. Child abuse was found more among girls. Among type of abuse, sexual abuse was more common (84.2%. About 52.6% of the abusers were members known to the victim. The maximum cases were reported from West India especially in Goa, followed by South region. Most reports reported legal action on accused. Little was reported on what happened to a victim, indicators of abuse and settings of the abuse. The motives and consequences of the abuses were

  8. T253. THE CORRELATION ANALYSIS BETWEEN RENAMING SCHIZOPHRENIA AND VISITING FREQUENCY OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES BY BIG DATA ANALYSIS (INTERNET SEARCHES AND NEWSPAPER ARTICLES) IN SOUTH KOREA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Yup; Hong, Kyung Sue; Joo, Yeon Ho; Koike, Shinsuke; Lee, Yu Sang; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background Korean Neuropsychiatric Association changed the Korean term for schizophrenia from ‘split-mind disorder’ to ‘attunement disorder’ in 2012, to dispel the stigma associated with name, and to promote early detection and treatment. Information on the internet affects the public awareness and attitude toward schizophrenia. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between renaming schizophrenia and the pattern of mental health services utilization by big data analysis of internet (newspaper articles and internet searches) in Korea. Methods From January 2016 to September 2017, newspaper articles on “attunement disorder” and “split-mind disorder” available on the internet were classified as related with negative images like crime and helpful or positive in dispelling the stigma. The relationship between the number of anti-stigma newspaper articles and newspaper articles of schizophrenia containing both positive and negative images was examined. In addition, using Naver, a major internet search engine in Korea, we investigated the total number of internet searches of both old and new name of schizophrenia by gender differences. Finally, the frequency of the visits of mental health services of patients with schizophrenia was measured using the Korean Healthcare Bigdata Hub (http://opendata.hira.or.kr/home.do#none) for 14 months and the correlation between the frequency of the visits and the above big data was examined. The data were analyzed using the SPSS/WIN 24.0. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to analyze correlations. Results The amounts of newspaper articles containing anti-stigma of schizophrenia were correlated with the amounts of newspaper articles containing negative images like crime of the new name (attunement disorder) of schizophrenia (r=0.528, p0.05) in next month was larger than the correlation of “split-mind disorder” searches with mental health services utilization (r = 0.082, p>0

  9. Helping You Help Me: The Role of Diagnostic (In)congruence in the Helping Process within Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Colin M.; Pillemer, Julianna; Amabile, Teresa M.

    2014-01-01

    Through an inductive, multi-method field study at a major design firm, we investigated the helping process in project work and how that process affects the success of a helping episode, as perceived by help-givers and/or -receivers. We used daily diary entries and weekly interviews from four project teams, and a separate sample of critical incident interviews, to induce process models of successful and unsuccessful helping episodes. We found that, in unsuccessful episodes, help-givers and -re...

  10. LEXICAL AND SYNTACTIC PECULIARITIES OF AN ENGLISH NEWSPAPER ARTICLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHISHKOVA DINA DMITRIEVNA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers pecularities of English journalese. The results of research on lexics, syntax, structure of newspaper articles and headlines are provided. The author uses ussues of “The Guardian” from 01.12.12 till 01.04.13 as research data.

  11. LEXICAL AND SYNTACTIC PECULIARITIES OF AN ENGLISH NEWSPAPER ARTICLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shishkova, Dina Dmitrievna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article considers pecularities of English journalese. The results of research on lexics, syntax, structure of newspaper articles and headlines are provided. The author uses ussues of “The Guardian” from 01.12.12 till 01.04.13 as research data.

  12. Influence of medical journal press releases on the quality of associated newspaper coverage: retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Lisa M; Woloshin, Steven; Andrews, Alice; Stukel, Therese A

    2012-01-27

    To determine whether the quality of press releases issued by medical journals can influence the quality of associated newspaper stories. Retrospective cohort study of medical journal press releases and associated news stories. We reviewed consecutive issues (going backwards from January 2009) of five major medical journals (Annals of Internal Medicine, BMJ, Journal of the National Cancer Institute, JAMA, and New England Journal of Medicine) to identify the first 100 original research articles with quantifiable outcomes and that had generated any newspaper coverage (unique stories ≥100 words long). We identified 759 associated newspaper stories using Lexis Nexis and Factiva searches, and 68 journal press releases using Eurekalert and journal website searches. Two independent research assistants assessed the quality of journal articles, press releases, and a stratified random sample of associated newspaper stories (n=343) by using a structured coding scheme for the presence of specific quality measures: basic study facts, quantification of the main result, harms, and limitations. Proportion of newspaper stories with specific quality measures (adjusted for whether the quality measure was present in the journal article's abstract or editor note). We recorded a median of three newspaper stories per journal article (range 1-72). Of 343 stories analysed, 71% reported on articles for which medical journals had issued press releases. 9% of stories quantified the main result with absolute risks when this information was not in the press release, 53% did so when it was in the press release (relative risk 6.0, 95% confidence interval 2.3 to 15.4), and 20% when no press release was issued (2.2, 0.83 to 6.1). 133 (39%) stories reported on research describing beneficial interventions. 24% mentioned harms (or specifically declared no harms) when harms were not mentioned in the press release, 68% when mentioned in the press release (2.8, 1.1 to 7.4), and 36% when no press release

  13. Decoding Codewords: Statistical Analysis of a Newspaper Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meacock, Susan; Meacock, Geoff

    2012-01-01

    In recent years English newspapers have started featuring a number of puzzles other than the ubiquitous crossword. Many of the puzzles are of Japanese origin such as Sudoku, Kakuro or Hidato. However, one recent one is very English and is called variously Cross-code, Alphapuzzle or some other name. In this article, it will be known as Codeword.…

  14. Representations of cycling in metropolitan newspapers - changes over time and differences between Sydney and Melbourne, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilsen Adrian

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cycling is important for health, transport, environmental and economic reasons. Newspaper reporting of cycling reflects and can influence public and policy maker attitudes towards resource allocation for cycling and cycling infrastructure, yet such coverage has not been systematically examined. Methods The Factiva electronic news archive was searched for articles referring to cycling published in four major metropolitan newspapers - two in Sydney and two in Melbourne, Australia, in the years from 1998 until 2008. After excluding articles not about cycling, there were 61 articles published in 1998, 45 in 1999, 51 in 2003, 82 in 2007 and 87 in 2008. Each article was coded for positive or negative orientation, and for framing of cyclists and cycling. Inter-rater reliability was calculated on a sample of 30 articles. Results Over the past decade there has been an increase in the reporting of cycling in the major newspapers in Sydney and Melbourne (from 106 in 1998/99 to 169 stories in 2007/08, with a significant increase in reporting of cycling in Melbourne, from 49 to 103 stories (p = 0.04. Recent reporting of cycling was generally positive (47% of articles, compared with 30% of articles which were negative and focused on benefits such as health and the environment. Three quarters of negative stories involved injury or death of a cyclist. The Sydney based The Daily Telegraph reported the most negative stories (n = 60. We found positive framing of 'cycling' was more widespread than negative, whereas framing of 'cyclists' was more negative than positive. Conclusions Quantity of reporting of cycling varies over time and by newspaper, and even between newspapers in different cities owned by the same media company. News coverage appears to reflect developments in the different cities, with increases in positive reporting of cycling in Melbourne following increases in cycling in that city. Negative cycling newspaper stories may deter

  15. A grammar of newspaper editorial language: The complex sentence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study sets out to examine what linguistic choices are made at the level of the sentence in selected English Language editorials in a particular newspaper in Ghana – the Daily Graphic. Data for the study consists of 338 selected sentences from 22 editorials of the Daily Graphic published in January 2008. We have ...

  16. Moral Choices in Contemporary Society: A Courses by Newspaper Reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieff, Philip, Ed.; Finkle, Isaac, Ed.

    This reader, which contains 135 primary source readings about morality, is one of several college-level instructional materials developed to supplement a nationwide newspaper course on moral issues in contemporary society. The authors represent a diverse group including theologians, psychologists, politicians, professional athletes, lawyers, and…

  17. Tobacco advertising and press coverage of smoking and health in 10 years of Argentinean newspapers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Sandra; Mejia, Raul; Barnoya, Joaquín; Gregorich, Steven E.; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the extent and content of tobacco-related images, advertising and articles published in the largest Argentinean newspapers before and after a voluntary advertising ban implemented in 2001. Methods Issues from four months of each year of the four main national newspapers were examined from 1995 to 2004. We recorded the number of tobacco images (advertisement or not), tobacco-focused articles, space used, and placement within the newspaper. Regression analyses evaluated time trends. Results We identified 1800 images and articles from 4828 different issues. Non-advertisement images were the most frequent (71.2%), followed by articles (20%) and advertisement images (8.8%). Advertisements only appeared in the two best selling newspapers with a majority (57%) in the Sunday magazine and 21% in the sports sections. Non-advertisement images were published in the sports and entertainment sections (55%) and showed a public figure in 88%. Of 336 articles, 39% focused on health topics and 55% emphasized the negative effects of tobacco on health. Regression models showed that prior to 2001 there were significant time-related decreases in ad images and articles and significant increases in non-ad images. The trend of each outcome changed direction beginning in 2001 and the magnitude of the change in trend was significant for ad images and non-ad images. The number of non-ad images dropped significantly in 2001 from a model-predicted value of 178 per year to 103 non-ad images and remained constant thereafter. Conclusions Tobacco images exceeded information about tobacco hazards in Argentinean newspapers over this period. Advertisement increased from 2001 to 2005, following the voluntary advertisements ban. Partial advertisement bans are ineffective and a total ban is imperative. PMID:24032052

  18. Social Design: How products and services can help us act in ways that benefit society

    OpenAIRE

    Tromp, N.

    2013-01-01

    I am sitting in the train and opposite to me a couple is reading the newspaper. Every once in a while one of them looks up, checking me and the other passengers out. We are now passing through a tunnel and I can see myself reflected in the window. I see my hair could use a brushing after the rush I was in when catching the train. I refrain from any action though, as I do not dare show any concern for my looks so blatantly in front of other people. I wish I had taken that single seat that was ...

  19. Portugal Democrático: An Exiles’ Newspaper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Travancas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to present the newspaper Portugal Democrático (Democratic Portugal through its history, its style and format. It is a periodical publication produced in São Paulo by Portuguese exiles during the dictatorship of Antônio Salazar (1926-1974. The newspaper began to circulate in 1956 and came to an end in 1975, a year after the Carnation Revolution that occurred on April 25, 1974. Fighting the Salazar dictatorship outside Portugal was the reason for the creation of the newspaper in Brazil, where it also had the collaboration of Brazilian journalists and intellectuals. This paper analyzes the newspaper Portugal Democrático both in its political aspect and in its editorial feature and concludes that the paper played a greater role than informative. It was an important part of the international opposition movement and resistance to Salazar's dictatorial regime. O objetivo deste artigo é apresentar o jornal Portugal Democrático através de sua história, de seu estilo e formato. Trata-se de uma publicação periódica produzida em São Paulo por exilados portugueses durante a ditadura de Antônio Salazar (1926-1974. O jornal começou a circular em 1956 e chegou ao fim em 1975, um ano depois da Revolução dos Cravos ocorrida em 25 de abril de 1974. Lutar contra a ditadura salazarista fora de Portugal foi o motivo da criação do jornal no Brasil, onde contou com a colaboração de jornalistas e intelectuais brasileiros. O trabalho analisa o jornal Portugal Democrático tanto em seu aspecto político quanto em sua feição editorial e conclui que o periódico teve um papel maior do que informativo. Ele foi parte importante no movimento internacional de oposição e resistência ao regime ditatorial de Salazar. El objetivo de este artículo es dar a conocer el periódico Portugal Democrático a través de su historia, de su estilo y formato. Se trata de una publicación periódica producida en São Paulo por los

  20. ENGLISH BORROWINGS IN INDONESIAN NEWSPAPERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwan Fauzi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study represents a corpus-based study of English loan words in Bahasa Indonesia used by three foremost newspapers in Indonesia (Kompas, Koran Tempo, and Media Indonesia. There are 19,494 loan tokens of 3,538 loan types extracted from 3,671 texts published online on those media during around three months ranging from 1 April to 24 June 2012. This study compares two basic typologies of borrowing—established and non-established loans. Attestations are looked into in this study proving the evidence that the borrow ability of nouns is higher than otherword categories, linguistic typology of borrowing motivates linguistic adaptation, and word categories give a significant contribution to motivate linguistic adaptation as well. Keywords: sociolinguistics, borrowing, loanwords, morphological integration, linguistic adaptation

  1. Growing pains: How risk perception and risk communication research can help to manage the challenges of global population growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Ian G J; Johnson, Johnnie E V

    2014-08-01

    In 2011, the global human population reached 7 billion and medium variant projections indicate that it will exceed 9 billion before 2045. Theoretical and empirical perspectives suggest that this growth could lead to an increase in the likelihood of adverse events (e.g., food shortages, climate change, etc.) and/or the severity of adverse events (e.g., famines, natural disasters, etc.). Several scholars have posited that the size to which the global population grows and the extent to which this growth increases the likelihood of adverse outcomes will largely be shaped by individuals' decisions (in households, organizations, governments, etc.). In light of the strong relationship between perceived risk and decision behaviors, it is surprising that there remains a dearth of empirical research that specifically examines the perceived risks of population growth and how these perceptions might influence related decisions. In an attempt to motivate this important strand of research, this article examines the major risks that may be exacerbated by global population growth and draws upon empirical work concerning the perception and communication of risk to identify potential directions for future research. The article also considers how individuals might perceive both the risks and benefits of population growth and be helped to better understand and address the related issues. The answers to these questions could help humanity better manage the emerging consequences of its continuing success in increasing infant survival and adult longevity. © 2014 Society for Risk Analysis.

  2. In search of a unique angle: on the selection and framing decisions of Flemish newspaper reporters in an era of journalistic change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesman, J.L.J.; d'Haenens, L.; Van Gorp, B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the way newspaper journalists in Flanders select and built their stories in precarious times. In recent years, the Flemish newspaper industry has known a progressive process of media concentration and growing synergies between newsrooms. Since June 2013, the Flemish newspaper

  3. Advertising and Newspaper Differentiation: On the Role of Readers’ Advertising Taste

    OpenAIRE

    Kind, Hans Jarle; Koethenbuerger, Marko; Schjelderup, Guttorm

    2007-01-01

    Newspapers have an incentive to moderate their profile in order to gain a larger readership and thus higher advertising revenue. We show that this incentive is weakened both if readers are ad-haters and if they are ad-lovers.

  4. A Clone of Your Own.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilodeau, Kirsten

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity used at the Washington Park Arboretum that helps students understand cloning through plant propagation. Students also learn how to make a pot from recycled newspapers and how to make soil that is appropriate for the plants. (DDR)

  5. Virtual Community, social network and media environment of Canary Isands regional digital newspapers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Francisco Manuel Mateos Rodríguez

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of the new communication and information technologies has favoured the creation of multiple local newspaper websites in the Canary Islands, thus making the regional press emerge as an alternative on the rise. This tendency affects significantly both traditional and new editions of the different regional and local newspapers from the Canaries and motivates a different distribution, positioning and development within the local media environment in which these media share a novel dimension of communication with a specific virtual community and social network within the World Wide Web.

  6. How automation helps steer the revenue cycle process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpas, Phil

    2013-06-01

    top-of-mind issue as we see how healthcare reform plays out. Here's what our select group of experts had to say about how automation helps to steer the revenue cycle process.

  7. Analysis of Cameroon newspaper coverage of cross border conflicts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nexus of conflict reporting: Analysis of Cameroon newspaper coverage of cross ... The conflicts taking place in the Central African Republic, Chad, Nigeria and Gabon have raised ... Consequently, it is in the interest of the public .... of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA, 2014), ... As what concerns the case of Nigeria, UNHCR.

  8. 26 CFR 31.3306(c)(15)-1 - Services in delivery or distribution of newspapers, shopping news, or magazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... newspapers, shopping news, or magazines. 31.3306(c)(15)-1 Section 31.3306(c)(15)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL..., shopping news, or magazines. (a) Services of individuals under age 18. Services performed by an employee... magazines to ultimate consumers under an arrangement under which the newspapers or magazines are to be sold...

  9. Spelling Pronunciations Help College Students Remember How to Spell Difficult Words

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocal, Turkan; Ehri, Linnea C.

    2017-01-01

    Studies have shown that children benefit from a spelling pronunciation strategy in remembering the spellings of words. The current study determined whether this strategy also helps adults learn to spell commonly misspelled words. Participants were native English speaking college students (N = 42), mean age 22.5 years (SD = 7.87). An experimental…

  10. Demands for 'off-licence' access to trastuzumab (Herceptin): content analysis of UK newspaper articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hind, Daniel; Wailoo, Allan J; Sutcliffe, Paul

    2011-03-01

    Sensationalized reporting styles and a distorted framing of health-care issues in newspapers may trigger inappropriate commissioning decisions. We evaluated UK press coverage of pre-licensing access to trastuzumab (Herceptin) for early breast cancer as a case study. Content analysis of newspaper articles published between April 2005 and May 2006 were coded by two researchers for interest groups represented, claims made and sensationalized reporting. Disagreements in coding were resolved by a third researcher. One thousand and ninety published articles were identified in the study period and a 20% sample (n = 218) was included in the content analysis. Most articles (76%, 95% CI 71-82) included claims about the clinical benefits of trastuzumab, and this was significantly higher than those expressing the uncertainty surrounding such benefits (6%, 95% CI 3-9) or those that discussed the potential harms (5%, 95% CI 2-8). Articles were significantly more likely to feature claims made by a breast cancer survivor or family member than any other interest group (P articles carried some message to the effect that trastuzumab would make the difference between life and death (47%, 95% CI 40-53). Over a quarter (28%, 95% CI 22-34) suggested that trastuzumab is a 'miracle drug' or similar. The benefits of drugs are highlighted, frequently using sensationalist language, without equal consideration of uncertainty or risks. Health-care purchasers should express decisions in opportunity cost terms; journalists should give fairer coverage to such arguments. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. 75 FR 33575 - List of Newspapers To Be Used by the Alaska Region for Publication of Legal Notices of Decisions...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-14

    ... constructive notice of a decision, to provide clear evidence of timely notice, and to achieve consistency in administering the appeals process. DATES: Publication of legal notices in the listed newspapers begins on July 1...

  12. 75 FR 32737 - Annual List of Newspapers To Be Used by the Alaska Region for Publication of Legal Notices of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-09

    ... subject to appeal under 36 CFR part 215, thereby allowing them to receive constructive notice of a... administering the appeals process. DATES: Publication of legal notices in the listed newspapers begins on July 1...

  13. Preserving local writers, genealogy, photographs, newspapers, and related materials

    CERN Document Server

    Smallwood, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Preserving Local Writers, Genealogy, Photographs, Newspapers, and Related Materials draws on the practical knowledge of archivists, preservationists, librarians, and others who share the goal of making local history accessible to future generations. Anyone who plans to start a local history project or preserve important historical materials will find plenty of tips, techniques, sample documents, project ideas, and inspiration in its pages.

  14. Bridging the Qualitative and Quantitative Divide in Comparative Migration Studies : Newspaper Data and Political Ethnography in Mixed Method Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mügge, L.M.

    2016-01-01

    Newspaper data are popular in Comparative Migration Studies as they allow diachronic and cross-national comparison and are relatively easy and inexpensive to acquire. Critics, however, warn that newspaper data are hampered by selection, description and researcher bias. This article argues that

  15. The discourses on induced abortion in Ugandan daily newspapers: a discourse analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Sofia; Eliasson, Miriam; Klingberg Allvin, Marie; Faxelid, Elisabeth; Atuyambe, Lynn; Fritzell, Sara

    2015-06-25

    Ugandan law prohibits abortion under all circumstances except where there is a risk for the woman's life. However, it has been estimated that over 250 000 illegal abortions are being performed in the country yearly. Many of these abortions are carried out under unsafe conditions, being one of the most common reasons behind the nearly 5000 maternal deaths per year in Uganda. Little research has been conducted in relation to societal views on abortion within the Ugandan society. This study aims to analyze the discourse on abortion as expressed in the two main daily Ugandan newspapers. The conceptual content of 59 articles on abortion between years 2006-2012, from the two main daily English-speaking newspapers in Uganda, was studied using principles from critical discourse analysis. A religious discourse and a human rights discourse, together with medical and legal sub discourses frame the subject of abortion in Uganda, with consequences for who is portrayed as a victim and who is to blame for abortions taking place. It shows the strong presence of the Catholic Church within the medial debate on abortion. The results also demonstrate the absence of medial statements related to abortion made by political stakeholders. The Catholic Church has a strong position within the Ugandan society and their stance on abortion tends to have great influence on the way other actors and their activities are presented within the media, as well as how stakeholders choose to convey their message, or choose not to publicly debate the issue in question at all. To decrease the number of maternal deaths, we highlight the need for a more inclusive and varied debate that problematizes the current situation, especially from a gender perspective.

  16. Sensationalization of reports of the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power plant incident. A search for top stories in Japanese newspapers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Tatsuo

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify whether reports of nuclear accidents, particularly the damage done by the 2007 Niigata-ken Chuetsu-Oki earthquake to the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power plant in Niigata, Japan, tend to be exaggerated by national media. News related to the Kashiwazaki incident was compared with that for nine other high-profile accidents in Japan, including the 1999 JCO critical accident and the 2005 JR-West Fukuchiyama Line derailment. Articles were extracted from four national newspapers in Japan, focusing on the 30 issues immediately following each accident. The numbers of articles and top stories related to the relevant accidents appearing on the front pages of the newspapers were counted. Based on these numbers, the Kashiwazaki incident was reported at a level similar to the JCO accident and Fukuchiyama line derailment in some newspapers, although these two accidents were more serious than the Kashiwazaki incident. This suggests that at least some newspapers in Japan sensationalized reports of the Kashiwazaki incident. (author)

  17. Responses to Change Helping People Make Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    (CCL), Center for Creative Leadership

    2011-01-01

    The ongoing state of many organizations is one of change. People who experience major change tend to exhibit one of four patterns of response: entrenched, overwhelmed, poser, or learner. As a leader, you need to understand the patterns of response that people express and to customize intervention strategies to help them make the transition. People can pass through a given response stage and move to one that is more effective--especially if you provide timely intervention and support. This guidebook will help you understand how people, including yourself, are responding to change and what you c

  18. Framing crime: moral panic in Argentine newspapers Encuadrando el delito: pánico moral en los periódicos Argentinos

    OpenAIRE

    Belén AMADEO; Natalia ARUGUETE

    2013-01-01

    Carolina Píparo was shot a few minutes after withdrawing cash from a bank branch. This case outraged the public opinion because she was eight months pregnant at the moment of the assault. She had to undergo a caesarean section and her baby only survived one week. Through an exploratory and inductive research we will analyze how the Argentine newspapers presented the case. We aim at elaborating a content analysis code book that can be validated in future similar researches on the subject. We a...

  19. Newspaper Advertising Trends and Teacher Supply in the Carolinas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewalt, Mark W.; Graham, Patricia L.

    This year-long research project documented critical issues of supply and demand for teachers in the Carolinas. Researchers focused on the number of public and private school education positions advertised in the four major newspapers serving South Carolina and the Charlotte metropolitan region of North Carolina. They documented advertising trends…

  20. Big Dreams, Serious Implications: How the DREAM Act can Help America Meet its Workforce Demands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, James

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how the Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act will help undocumented students by: (1) establishing a path to legal status and eventually earn legal residency through two years of higher education or military service; and (2) repealing a provision of federal law that bars states from granting in-state…

  1. What's Fit To Print: The Effect Of Ownership Concentration On Product Variety In Daily Newspaper Markets

    OpenAIRE

    George, Lisa M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of ownership concentration on product position, product variety and readership in markets for daily newspapers. US antitrust policy presumes that mergers reduce the amount and diversity of content available to consumers. However, the effects of consolidation in differentiated product markets cannot be determined solely from theory. Because multi-product firms internalize business stealing, mergers may encourage firms to reposition products, leading to more, not ...

  2. No Pending National Elections, Who Cares? What Newspaper Publications Reveal about Local Efforts Towards Millennium Development Goal 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arku, Frank S.; Arku, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) has become a catch phrase in development discourse. This study is an assessment of the MDG 3: to promote gender equality at all levels of education in Ghana. The Daily Graphic (a newspaper in Ghana) which is Ghana's prominent newspaper was reviewed from 2000 to 2011 to determine the frequency of articles…

  3. Nutrition Information In Community Newspapers: Goal Framing, Story Origins, and Topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andsager, Julie L; Chen, Li; Miles, Stephanie; Smith, Christina C; Nothwehr, Faryle

    2015-01-01

    Obesity rates are high in the rural United States. Because small communities often have few health care practitioners, nutrition news in community newspapers may be a useful source of information. This content analysis of a random sample of 164 nutrition stories from 10 community newspapers in the rural West North Central Midwest was guided by concepts from goal-framing theory. Locally generated stories comprised nearly half of the sample, suggesting that nutrition is a salient topic in many rural communities. Hedonic frames related to food enjoyment were twice as frequent as health improvement frames. Results suggest food promotion was the most common topic of nutrition stories, with guidelines for a healthy diet appearing about half as often. Stories about a healthy diet and food promotion were most often written locally. Findings are discussed with recommendations for improvement of community news coverage of nutrition.

  4. How telling stories helps patients to recover psychologically after intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Susan Lecky

    Studies have shown both the risk of post traumatic stress following intensive care unit treatment, and the helpfulness of telling trauma stories for psychological recovery. This article is based on recent doctoral research exploring the impact of unexpected life threatening events after admission to hospital. The original research used a qualitative design blending discourse, narrative and phenomenological approaches, guided by sensitivity to participants' evolving work of pulling stories together. Patients chosen from ICU discharge summaries showing a critical life threatening event after admission gave unstructured interviews soon after discharge from hospital and a year later. This article focuses on one particular finding, showing that critical illness can make it difficult for patients to construct personal stories of their experience. Limited evidence suggested overcoming those difficulties meant they had an improved sense of wellbeing a year after discharge. Stories are an essential way in which humans make sense of their experience, which is crucial both for responding appropriately and for personal wellbeing following traumatic life events. Therefore, difficulties in "storying" significant experience can have a negative impact on wellbeing. Some patients need help piecing together stories of their critical illness experience.

  5. The Influences of Sex, Race, and Prior Reading Ability on Newspaper Reading Skill Improvement in the Elementary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Charles

    This study uses the revised modules of a previous study of the effects of newspapers in elementary schools to determine the effects of the modules and newspaper use in general, as well as to determine whether the variables of sex, race, prior reading ability, and same or opposite race of teacher and student influenced results. The study was…

  6. Helping a Grieving Parent

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to stick with a TV show. Reading a newspaper may take longer than before, and retaining information ... Foundation: A Timeline Watch Our Video: Grief in Schools Copyright Information The materials on this website are ...

  7. A Contrastive Analysis of the American and Persian Newspaper Editorials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homayounzadeh, Maryam; Mehrpour, Saeed

    2013-01-01

    Based on the principles of critical discourse analysis this contrastive study sought to investigate the effect of culture on the journalistic style and the strategies used to report news in the American and Persian newspaper editorials. To this end, articles were selected from the New York Times, the Washington Post, Kayhan and Ettelaat, taking…

  8. How to explain mistakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallerstede, Stefan; Leuschel, Michael

    2009-01-01

    to improve understanding of formal models. We demonstrate how animation can help finding an explanation for a failing proof. We also demonstrate where animation or model-checking may not help and where proving may not help. For most part use of another tool pays off. Proof obligations present intentionally......Usually we teach formal methods relying for a large part on one kind of reasoning technique about a formal model. For instance, we either use formal proof or we use model-checking. It would appear that it is already hard enough to learn one technique and having to cope with two puts just another...... burden on the students. This is not our experience. Especially model-checking is easily used to complement formal proof. It only relies on an intuitive operational understanding of a formal model. In this article we show how using model-checking, animation, and formal proof together can be used...

  9. "Maybe You Could Help?" Letters to Eleanor Roosevelt, 1934-1942

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, Mary Mason

    2005-01-01

    Eleanor Roosevelt could be called a Superstar First Lady. In the era when women's suffrage was first being exercised, she was "pushing the envelope" of what the President's wife, and women in general, might be expected to do in civic life. She wrote syndicated columns for magazines and newspapers, the most famous of which was entitled "My Day," a…

  10. Newspapers in Science Education: A Study Involving Sixth Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ching-San; Wang, Yun-Fei

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the learning performance of sixth grade elementary school students using newspapers in science teaching. A quasi-experimental design with a single group was used in this study. Thirty-three sixth grade elementary school students participated in this study. The research instruments consisted of three…

  11. The Demise of Quality? Quality Newspapers and the Information Function of Libraries on the Brink of Collapse or Resurrection?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kircz, Joost; den Boef, August Hans; Nijboer, Jelke

    2008-01-01

    In The Guardian, Alan Rushbridger compared the future of newspapers to climate change. Five years ago, many climatologists were sceptical whether climate change was a real and serious issue. Today, most scientists agree that global warm ing is a fact of life. In the world of newspapers, at present,

  12. Constructing the “Arab Spring”: News Discourses in Turkish Newspapers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Dağtaş

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Originating in Tunisia and spreading rapidly to Egypt, Yemen, Bahrain, and Libya, the recent wave of popular movements that the Western media have dubbed the “Arab Spring” has been closely monitored by the whole world including in Turkey. This country is geographically close to the region and the ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP has been active in developing foreign policies in relation to the key countries involved. This paper analyzes the news discourses in the reports published between January 25th and February 25th, 2011, in six Turkish national newspapers. This is the period when upheaval reached its peak in Tahrir Square in Cairo, the most potent symbol of “Arab Spring”. The newspapers sampled fall into two categories, those supporting the AKP government (Star, Zaman, and Sabah and those not supporting the AKP government (Cumhuriyet, Hürriyet, and Taraf. To map the discursive fields employed in the news reports, this paper draws on methods from critical discourse analysis and examines news actors and their quotation patterns, lexicalization, overlexicalization and syntactic preferences.

  13. F.K. Trailin’s “Kazachy Vestnik” on the protection of old Cossacks living principles: to the typological features of the conservative Cossacks’ newspapers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abramovich Tatyana Sergeevna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available At the end of the 19th century the issue of Cossacks’ self-identification divided into two camps already exfoliated class. Liberal-minded Cossacks fought for the destruction of the “great Chinese wall” between the Don and the rest of Russia, the Cossacks, the Conservatives tried to preserve their distinctive way of life. This opposition is directly reflected in the Don journalism. On the example of F.K. Trailin’s “Kazachy Vestnik” the article describes typological features of Cossack-oriented newspapers of the period, and the relevant date for the publication of Cossack associations. It is justified the conclusion that the typological features of Cossack Conservatives newspaper were caused by combining some typological features borrowed from existing at the time of publications in the Don journalism. So, from a universal privately owned newspaper Cossack-oriented one adopted a broad program that determined the broad area of information attention, as well as many typological attributes: genre, format, frequency, design, volume. From specialized journals it was taken narrowly defined thematic focus, from national - the use of the national language - dialect, which are actively used in materials by authors Cossacks. However, a leading typology characterizing factor for the newspaper of the Cossack conservatives - publisher-Cossack-specialist - was new for the system of Don periodicals, since the creation of its organ was guided only by the principles dictated by the class origin to the Cossack class.

  14. With Coverage from Multiple Perspectives, Newspaper Represents Multiple Factions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Stacy

    1999-01-01

    Describes the coverage of the shootings at Columbine High School by the staff of "The Express," the student newspaper of Maize High School, Maize, Kansas. Notes that the school had its own so-called Trench Coat Mafia and that the feelings of this group of students were featured in one of the articles. (RS)

  15. The Flow of Foreign News into Six Arab Gulf Newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Habib, Abdulrahman Ibrahim

    In order to determine the nature of foreign news coverage in the Arab Gulf states, a study examined six newspapers in these states (one in each country) in regard to the volume, news sources, and kinds of news (both subject categories and regions covered). Data were selected from 12 issues (one from each month) in 1986 from the following…

  16. Studies on Pyrolysis Kinetic of Newspaper Wastes in a Packed Bed Reactor: Experiments, Modeling, and Product Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparna Sarkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Newspaper waste was pyrolysed in a 50 mm diameter and 640 mm long reactor placed in a packed bed pyrolyser from 573 K to 1173 K in nitrogen atmosphere to obtain char and pyro-oil. The newspaper sample was also pyrolysed in a thermogravimetric analyser (TGA under the same experimental conditions. The pyrolysis rate of newspaper was observed to decelerate above 673 K. A deactivation model has been attempted to explain this behaviour. The parameters of kinetic model of the reactions have been determined in the temperature range under study. The kinetic rate constants of volatile and char have been determined in the temperature range under study. The activation energies 25.69 KJ/mol, 27.73 KJ/mol, 20.73 KJ/mol and preexponential factors 7.69 min−1, 8.09 min−1, 0.853 min−1 of all products (solid reactant, volatile, and char have been determined, respectively. A deactivation model for pyrolysis of newspaper has been developed under the present study. The char and pyro-oil obtained at different pyrolysis temperatures have been characterized. The FT-IR analyses of pyro-oil have been done. The higher heating values of both pyro-products have been determined.

  17. Striking a Balance with Help from our Little Friends - How the Gut Microbiota Contributes to Immune Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnolds, Kathleen L; Lozupone, Catherine A

    2016-09-01

    The trillions of microbes that inhabit the human gut (the microbiota) together with the host comprise a complex ecosystem, and like any ecosystem, health relies on stability and balance. Some of the most important members of the human microbiota are those that help maintain this balance via modulation of the host immune system. Gut microbes, through both molecular factors (such as capsular components) and by-products of their metabolism (such as Short Chain Fatty Acids (SCFAs)), can influence both innate and adaptive components of the immune system, in ways that can drive both effector, and regulatory responses. Here we review how commensal microbes can specifically promote a dynamic balance of these immune responses in the mammalian gut.

  18. News media coverage of euthanasia: a content analysis of Dutch national newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietjens, Judith A C; Raijmakers, Natasja J H; Kouwenhoven, Pauline S C; Seale, Clive; van Thiel, Ghislaine J M W; Trappenburg, Margo; van Delden, Johannes J M; van der Heide, Agnes

    2013-03-06

    The Netherlands is one of the few countries where euthanasia is legal under strict conditions. This study investigates whether Dutch newspaper articles use the term 'euthanasia' according to the legal definition and determines what arguments for and against euthanasia they contain. We did an electronic search of seven Dutch national newspapers between January 2009 and May 2010 and conducted a content analysis. Of the 284 articles containing the term 'euthanasia', 24% referred to practices outside the scope of the law, mostly relating to the forgoing of life-prolonging treatments and assistance in suicide by others than physicians. Of the articles with euthanasia as the main topic, 36% described euthanasia in the context of a terminally ill patient, 24% for older persons, 16% for persons with dementia, and 9% for persons with a psychiatric disorder. The most frequent arguments for euthanasia included the importance of self-determination and the fact that euthanasia contributes to a good death. The most frequent arguments opposing euthanasia were that suffering should instead be alleviated by better care, that providing euthanasia can be disturbing, and that society should protect the vulnerable. Of the newspaper articles, 24% uses the term 'euthanasia' for practices that are outside the scope of the euthanasia law. Typically, the more unusual cases are discussed. This might lead to misunderstandings between citizens and physicians. Despite the Dutch legalisation of euthanasia, the debate about its acceptability and boundaries is ongoing and both sides of the debate are clearly represented.

  19. Bounded helping : How morality and intergroup relations shape children's reasoning about helping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sierksma, J.

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this book was to provide insight into children’s (8-13 years) cognition about helping behavior. Whereas developmental research has examined children’s prosociality in terms of dispositions and abilities, it tends to overlook the relation between recipient and helper as well as the

  20. The Metaphors on International Intervention: A Discourse Analysis of the Sri Lankan English Newspaper Editorials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeyaseelan Gnanaseelan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The metaphors used in the Sri Lankan English newspaper editorials during the peace talk time (2001-2007 commenting on the international intervention in the Sri Lankan ethnic conflict reveal community based ideological and attitudinal positions of the newspapers published in Sri Lanka. Metaphors literally contribute to our understanding of reality. The frames and scripts used for legitimization and de-legitimization of the issues related to international intervention and facilitation in the peace talk, peace process and monitoring the ceasefire bring out certain realities comfortable to certain people, groups or communities. The binary positions projected in the editorial discourse are identified. Discourse constitutes power in constructing ideational, textual and interpersonal constructs which are ideological. It can transmit and even legitimize power in society. During the peace talk time, the editorials are expected to develop constructive discourse on conflict intervention and resolution to make a positive impact on legislative changes but they display ‘ethno-nationalist’ tendencies. The study analyzes whether the media has been a part of the problem or a part of the solution. Since newspaper and editorial discourses are the constructions of journalists and editors of the elites, the biased ideologies are “hidden or subtle in expressions and often revealed in mild forms”. This study takes up selected editorials of the Sri Lankan English newspapers which appeared mainly during the Memorandum of Understanding between the Sri Lankan government and the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eezham during that period, to relate the discourse themes with rhetorical and metaphorical features.