WorldWideScience

Sample records for news article wounded

  1. Tweeting News Articles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Toledo Bastos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article we investigate the impact of social media readership to the editorial profile of newspapers. We analyze tweets containing links to news articles from eight of the largest national newspapers in the United States, United Kingdom, Spain, Brazil, and Germany. The data collection follows the first two weeks of October 2012 and includes 2,842,699 tweets with links to news articles. Twitter-shortened links were resolved using a three-pass routine and assigned to 1 of the 21 newspaper sections. We found the concentration of links to news articles posted by top users to be lower than reported in the literature and the strategy of relaying headlines on Twitter via automatic news aggregators (feeds to be inefficient. The results of this investigation show which sections of a newspaper are the most and least read by readers in different parts of the world, with German readers placing greater emphasis on Politics and Economy; Brazilians on Sports and Arts; Spaniards on Local and National news; Britons and Americans on Opinion and World news. We also found that German and Spanish readers are more likely to read multiple national newspapers, while British readers more often resort to foreign sources of news. The results confirm that feedback to news items from a large user base is pivotal for the replication of content and that newspapers and news items can be clustered according to the editorial profile and principles of newsworthiness inherited from legacy media. The results of this investigation shed light onto the networked architecture of journalism that increasingly depends on readership agency.

  2. Measuring the Interestingness of News Articles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pon, R K; Cardenas, A F; Buttler, D J

    2007-09-24

    An explosive growth of online news has taken place. Users are inundated with thousands of news articles, only some of which are interesting. A system to filter out uninteresting articles would aid users that need to read and analyze many articles daily, such as financial analysts and government officials. The most obvious approach for reducing the amount of information overload is to learn keywords of interest for a user (Carreira et al., 2004). Although filtering articles based on keywords removes many irrelevant articles, there are still many uninteresting articles that are highly relevant to keyword searches. A relevant article may not be interesting for various reasons, such as the article's age or if it discusses an event that the user has already read about in other articles. Although it has been shown that collaborative filtering can aid in personalized recommendation systems (Wang et al., 2006), a large number of users is needed. In a limited user environment, such as a small group of analysts monitoring news events, collaborative filtering would be ineffective. The definition of what makes an article interesting--or its 'interestingness'--varies from user to user and is continually evolving, calling for adaptable user personalization. Furthermore, due to the nature of news, most articles are uninteresting since many are similar or report events outside the scope of an individual's concerns. There has been much work in news recommendation systems, but none have yet addressed the question of what makes an article interesting.

  3. Teaching the Scientific Method Using Current News Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Laura K.; Mahan, Carolyn G.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a short (less than 50 minutes) activity using news articles from sources such as "Science Daily" to teach students the steps of the scientific method and the difference between primary and secondary literature sources. The flexibility in choosing news articles to examine allowed us to tailor the activity to the specific interests of…

  4. BreakingNews: Article Annotation by Image and Text Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramisa, Arnau; Yan, Fei; Moreno-Noguer, Francesc; Mikolajczyk, Krystian

    2018-05-01

    Building upon recent Deep Neural Network architectures, current approaches lying in the intersection of Computer Vision and Natural Language Processing have achieved unprecedented breakthroughs in tasks like automatic captioning or image retrieval. Most of these learning methods, though, rely on large training sets of images associated with human annotations that specifically describe the visual content. In this paper we propose to go a step further and explore the more complex cases where textual descriptions are loosely related to the images. We focus on the particular domain of news articles in which the textual content often expresses connotative and ambiguous relations that are only suggested but not directly inferred from images. We introduce an adaptive CNN architecture that shares most of the structure for multiple tasks including source detection, article illustration and geolocation of articles. Deep Canonical Correlation Analysis is deployed for article illustration, and a new loss function based on Great Circle Distance is proposed for geolocation. Furthermore, we present BreakingNews, a novel dataset with approximately 100K news articles including images, text and captions, and enriched with heterogeneous meta-data (such as GPS coordinates and user comments). We show this dataset to be appropriate to explore all aforementioned problems, for which we provide a baseline performance using various Deep Learning architectures, and different representations of the textual and visual features. We report very promising results and bring to light several limitations of current state-of-the-art in this kind of domain, which we hope will help spur progress in the field.

  5. Augmented trading : From news articles to stock price predictions using semantics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bunningen, A.H.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis tries to answer the question how to predict the reaction of the stock market to news articles using the latest suitable developments in Natural Language Processing. This is done using text classiffication where a new article is matched to a category of articles which have a certain

  6. A Demonstrative Analysis of News Articles Using Fairclough’s Critical Discourse Analysis Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Randy Y. Briones

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to demonstrate Norman Fairclough’s Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA framework by conducting internal and external level analyses on two online news articles that report on the Moro Islamic Liberation Front’s (MILF submission of its findings on the “Mamasapano Incident” that happened in the Philippines in 2015. In performing analyses using this framework, the social context and background for these texts, as well as the relationship between the internal discourse features and the external social practices and structures in which the texts were produced are thoroughly examined. As a result, it can be noted that from the texts’ internal discourse features, the news articles portray ideological and social distinctions among social actors such as the Philippine Senate, the SAF troopers, the MILF, the MILF fighters, and the civilians. Moreover, from the viewpoint of the texts as being external social practices, the texts maintain institutional identities as news reports, but they also reveal some evaluative stance as exemplified by the adjectival phrases that the writers employed. Having both the internal and external features examined, it can be said that the way these texts were written seems to portray power relations that exist between the Philippine government and the MILF. Key words: Critical Discourse Analysis, discourse analysis, news articles, social practices, social structures, power relations

  7. Large-scale Comparative Sentiment Analysis of News Articles

    OpenAIRE

    Wanner, Franz; Rohrdantz, Christian; Mansmann, Florian; Stoffel, Andreas; Oelke, Daniela; Krstajic, Milos; Keim, Daniel; Luo, Dongning; Yang, Jing; Atkinson, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Online media offers great possibilities to retrieve more news items than ever. In contrast to these technical developments, human capabilities to read all these news items have not increased likewise. To bridge this gap, this poster presents a visual analytics tool for conducting semi-automatic sentiment analysis of large news feeds. The tool retrieves and analyzes the news of two categories (Terrorist Attack and Natural Disasters) and news which belong to both categories of the Europe Media ...

  8. News in wound healing and management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottrup, Finn; Jørgensen, Bo; Karlsmark, Tonny

    2009-01-01

    -TNFalpha) and Lactobacillus plantarum cultures have also been successfully used in hard to heal, atypical wounds. Knowledge on influencing factors as smoking and biofilm on the healing process has also been improved. Smoking results in delayed healing and increased risk of postoperative infection, whereas the role of biofilm...... is still at an exploratory level. Organizing models for optimal wound management are constantly being developed and refined. SUMMARY: Recent knowledge on the importance of new dressing materials containing active substances, new treatments for atypical wounds, influencing factors on the healing process...

  9. Wound healing in animal models: review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Jaffary

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing and reduction of its recovery time is one of the most important issues in medicine. Wound is defined as disruption of anatomy and function of normal skin. This injury could be the result of physical elements such as  surgical incision, hit or pressure cut of the skin and gunshot wound. Chemical or caustic burn is another category of wound causes that can be induced by acid or base contact irritation. Healing is a process of cellular and extracellular matrix interactions that occur in the damaged tissue. Wound healing consists of several stages including hemostasis, inflammatory phase, proliferative phase and new tissue formation which reconstructs by new collagen formation. Wounds are divided into acute and chronic types based on their healing time. Acute wounds have sudden onset and in normal individuals usually have healing process of less than 4 weeks without any residual side effects. In contrast, chronic wounds have gradual onset. Their inflammatory phase is prolonged and the healing process is stopped due to some background factors like diabetes, ischemia or local pressure. If the healing process lasts more than 4 weeks it will be classified as chronic wound. Despite major advances in the treatment of wounds, still finding effective modalities for healing wounds in the shortest possible time with the fewest side effects is a current challenge. In this review different phases of wound healing and clinical types of wound such as venous leg ulcer, diabetic foot ulcer and pressure ulcer are discussed. Also acute wound models (i.e burn wounds or incisional wound and chronic wound models (such as venous leg ulcers, diabetic foot ulcer, pressure ulcers or bedsore in laboratory animals are presented. This summary can be considered as a preliminary step to facilitate designing of more targeted and applied research in this area.

  10. Conjunct Use in Business News Stories and Academic Journal Articles: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Phillip R.

    1989-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of the use of conjuncts in two genres of written English, business news stories and academic journal articles, revealed a much higher frequency of conjunct use in the journal articles. A brief discussion focuses on the pedagogical implications of this study, and suggestions for further research are presented. (26…

  11. "It is merely a paper tiger." Battle for increased tobacco advertising regulation in Indonesia: content analysis of news articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuti, Putu Ayu Swandewi; Freeman, Becky

    2017-09-01

    At the end of 2012, the Indonesian government enacted tobacco control regulation (PP 109/2012) that included stricter tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship (TAPS) controls. The PP did not ban all forms of TAPS and generated a great deal of media interest from both supporters and detractors. This study aims to analyse stakeholder arguments regarding the adoption and implementation of the regulation as presented through news media converge. Content analysis of 213 news articles reporting on TAPS and the PP that were available from the Factiva database and the Google News search engine. Indonesia, 24 December 2012-29 February 2016. Arguments presented in the news article about the adoption and implementation of the PP were coded into 10 supportive and 9 opposed categories. The news actors presenting the arguments were also recorded. Kappa statistic were calculated for intercoder reliability. Of the 213 relevant news articles, 202 included stakeholder arguments, with a total of 436 arguments coded across the articles. More than two-thirds, 69% (301) of arguments were in support of the regulation, and of those, 32.6% (98) agreed that the implementation should be enhanced. Of 135 opposed arguments, the three most common were the potential decrease in government revenue at 26.7% (36), disadvantage to the tobacco industry at 18.5% (25) and concern for tobacco farmers and workers welfare at 11.1% (15). The majority of the in support arguments were made by national government, tobacco control advocates and journalists, while the tobacco industry made most opposing arguments. Analysing the arguments and news actors provides a mapping of support and opposition to an essential tobacco control policy instrument. Advocates, especially in a fragmented and expansive geographic area like Indonesia, can use these findings to enhance local tobacco control efforts. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights

  12. Bio-energy in China: Content analysis of news articles on Chinese professional internet platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Mei; Tahvanainen, Liisa; Ahponen, Pirkkoliisa; Pelkonen, Paavo

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to discuss how information about the development and use of bio-energy is forwarded and disseminated to general public via the Internet in China. Furthermore, this study also explores in what manner the information of renewable energy policies is presented. A research method used in this study is an application of content analysis. Altogether 19 energy-related web platforms were found by searching keywords, such as 'energy net' or 'renewable energy net' or 'bio-energy net' on (www.Google.cn). A thorough analysis was conducted by focusing on one of them: (www.china5e.com). The news articles on (www.china5e.com) were examined according to whether the use of bio-energy was articulated positively or negatively in the contents of articles. It was also considered whether the articles were imported from abroad. The results of this study indicated that in China there is a tendency on the Internet to disseminate primarily the positive information about bio-energy with a great emphasis on its benefits. In addition, the study shows that when analyzing the content of the news articles, biogas and liquid bio-fuels will be the main bio-energy development trends in China in the near future.

  13. Bio-energy in China: Content analysis of news articles on Chinese professional internet platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu Mei [Faculty of Forest Sciences, University of Joensuu, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu (Finland); Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University, College of Forestry (China)], E-mail: qu@cc.joensuu.fi; Tahvanainen, Liisa [Faculty of Forest Sciences, University of Joensuu, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu (Finland); Ahponen, Pirkkoliisa [Faculty of Social Sciences and Regional Studies, University of Joensuu, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu (Finland); Pelkonen, Paavo [Faculty of Forest Sciences, University of Joensuu, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu (Finland)

    2009-06-15

    The aim of this study is to discuss how information about the development and use of bio-energy is forwarded and disseminated to general public via the Internet in China. Furthermore, this study also explores in what manner the information of renewable energy policies is presented. A research method used in this study is an application of content analysis. Altogether 19 energy-related web platforms were found by searching keywords, such as 'energy net' or 'renewable energy net' or 'bio-energy net' on (www.Google.cn). A thorough analysis was conducted by focusing on one of them: (www.china5e.com). The news articles on (www.china5e.com) were examined according to whether the use of bio-energy was articulated positively or negatively in the contents of articles. It was also considered whether the articles were imported from abroad. The results of this study indicated that in China there is a tendency on the Internet to disseminate primarily the positive information about bio-energy with a great emphasis on its benefits. In addition, the study shows that when analyzing the content of the news articles, biogas and liquid bio-fuels will be the main bio-energy development trends in China in the near future.

  14. Bio-energy in China. Content analysis of news articles on Chinese professional internet platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Mei [Faculty of Forest Sciences, University of Joensuu, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu (Finland); Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University, College of Forestry (China); Tahvanainen, Liisa; Pelkonen, Paavo [Faculty of Forest Sciences, University of Joensuu, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu (Finland); Ahponen, Pirkkoliisa [Faculty of Social Sciences and Regional Studies, University of Joensuu, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu (Finland)

    2009-06-15

    The aim of this study is to discuss how information about the development and use of bio-energy is forwarded and disseminated to general public via the Internet in China. Furthermore, this study also explores in what manner the information of renewable energy policies is presented. A research method used in this study is an application of content analysis. Altogether 19 energy-related web platforms were found by searching keywords, such as 'energy net' or 'renewable energy net' or 'bio-energy net' on www.Google.cn. A thorough analysis was conducted by focusing on one of them: www.china5e.com. The news articles on www.china5e.com were examined according to whether the use of bio-energy was articulated positively or negatively in the contents of articles. It was also considered whether the articles were imported from abroad. The results of this study indicated that in China there is a tendency on the Internet to disseminate primarily the positive information about bio-energy with a great emphasis on its benefits. In addition, the study shows that when analyzing the content of the news articles, biogas and liquid bio-fuels will be the main bio-energy development trends in China in the near future. (author)

  15. The U.S. Online News Coverage of Mammography Based on a Google News Search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young Lin, Leng Leng; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B

    2017-12-01

    To characterize online news coverage relating to mammography, including articles' stance toward screening mammography. Google News was used to search U.S. news sites over a 9-year period (2006-2015) based on the search terms "mammography" and "mammogram." The top 100 search results were recorded. Identified articles were manually reviewed. The top 100 news articles were from the following sources: local news outlet (50%), national news outlet (24%), nonimaging medical source (13%), entertainment or culture news outlet (6%), business news outlet (4%), peer-reviewed journal (1%), and radiology news outlet (1%). Most common major themes were the screening mammography controversy (29%), description of a new breast imaging technology (23%), dense breasts (11%), and promotion of a public screening initiative (11%). For the most recent year, article stance toward screening mammography was 59%, favorable; 16%, unfavorable; and 25%, neutral. After 2010, there was an abrupt shift in articles' stances from neutral to both favorable and unfavorable. A wide range of online news sources addressed a range of issues related to mammography. National, rather than local, news sites were more likely to focus on the screening controversy and more likely to take an unfavorable view. The controversial United States Preventive Services Task Force guidelines may have influenced articles to take a stance on screening mammography. As such online news may impact public perception of the topic and thus potentially impact guideline adherence, radiologists are encouraged to maintain awareness of this online coverage and to support the online dissemination of reliable and accurate information. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. “It is merely a paper tiger.” Battle for increased tobacco advertising regulation in Indonesia: content analysis of news articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuti, Putu Ayu Swandewi; Freeman, Becky

    2017-01-01

    Objective At the end of 2012, the Indonesian government enacted tobacco control regulation (PP 109/2012) that included stricter tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship (TAPS) controls. The PP did not ban all forms of TAPS and generated a great deal of media interest from both supporters and detractors. This study aims to analyse stakeholder arguments regarding the adoption and implementation of the regulation as presented through news media converge. Design Content analysis of 213 news articles reporting on TAPS and the PP that were available from the Factiva database and the Google News search engine. Setting Indonesia, 24 December 2012–29 February 2016. Methods Arguments presented in the news article about the adoption and implementation of the PP were coded into 10 supportive and 9 opposed categories. The news actors presenting the arguments were also recorded. Kappa statistic were calculated for intercoder reliability. Results Of the 213 relevant news articles, 202 included stakeholder arguments, with a total of 436 arguments coded across the articles. More than two-thirds, 69% (301) of arguments were in support of the regulation, and of those, 32.6% (98) agreed that the implementation should be enhanced. Of 135 opposed arguments, the three most common were the potential decrease in government revenue at 26.7% (36), disadvantage to the tobacco industry at 18.5% (25) and concern for tobacco farmers and workers welfare at 11.1% (15). The majority of the in support arguments were made by national government, tobacco control advocates and journalists, while the tobacco industry made most opposing arguments. Conclusions Analysing the arguments and news actors provides a mapping of support and opposition to an essential tobacco control policy instrument. Advocates, especially in a fragmented and expansive geographic area like Indonesia, can use these findings to enhance local tobacco control efforts. PMID:28864704

  17. Understanding Public Perceptions of the HPV Vaccination Based on Online Comments to Canadian News Articles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Feinberg

    Full Text Available Given the variation in human papillomavirus (HPV vaccine coverage across Canada, and debate regarding delivery of HPV vaccines in Catholic schools, we studied online comments on Canadian news websites to understand public perceptions of HPV and HPV vaccine.We searched English- and French-language Canadian news websites for 2012 articles that contained the terms "HPV" or "human papillomavirus." Articles about HPV vaccinations that contained at least one comment were included. Two researchers independently coded comments, analyzing them for emerging themes.We identified 3073 comments from 1198 individuals in response to 71 news articles; 630 (52.6% individuals expressed positive sentiments about HPV vaccination (2.5 comments/individual, 404 (33.7% were negative (3.0 comments/individual, 34 (2.8% were mixed (1.5 comments/individual and 130 (10.8% were neutral (1.6 comments/individual. Vaccine-supportive commenters believed the vaccine is safe and effective. Common themes in negative comments included concerns regarding HPV vaccine safety and efficacy, distrust of pharmaceutical companies and government, and belief that school-age children are too young for HPV vaccine. Many comments focused on whether the Catholic Church has the right to inform health policy for students, and discussion often evolved into debates regarding HPV and sexual behaviour. We noted that many individuals doubted the credibility of vaccine safety information.The majority of commenters do not appear to be against HPV vaccination, but public health messaging that focuses on both the vaccine's safety profile, and its use as a means to prevent cancer rather than sexually transmitted HPV infection may facilitate its acceptance.

  18. Politinė eufemizacija publicistinių straipsnių antraštėse | Political euphemization in the news article headlines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Smetonienė

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the analysis of realizations of euphemization in political discourse. Its focus is on news article headlines. The language data under study have been collected from the Internet news websites published in 2013–2014. The aim of the paper is twofold: to give an overview of recent cases of euphemization in news headlines, and to define functions, purpose and means of euphemization. The most frequently euphemized topics this year have been found to be war, military actions in different countries, politics and economics. The analysis of the news article headlines has showed that one of the main purposes of euphemization of social problems and political issues is to veil and cover up the real names of such phenomena as military actions, massacre, preparation for war, rising prices, unsuitable behavior of various officials, conflicts between leading politicians, bad economic conditions. The sub-topics of euphemization are concerned with the criticism of the behaviour of government leaders, leading politicians who are claimed to have violated ethics, who are arrogant, corrupt and dishonest. The semantics of euphemisms is best reflected describing them according to the means of euphemization, which are generalization, conceptual metaphorization, choice of international terms, periphrasis, pronominalization and litotes. Political euphemisms are part and parcel of the world of diplomacy, international and internal policy; politically correct language is crucial in today’s mass media communication. It seeks to avoid conflict and antagonism, reduce panic and anxiety, and to disguise unpleasant news.

  19. Incorporating popularity in a personalized news recommender system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal Jonnalagedda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Online news reading has become a widely popular way to read news articles from news sources around the globe. With the enormous amount of news articles available, users are easily overwhelmed by information of little interest to them. News recommender systems help users manage this flood by recommending articles based on user interests rather than presenting articles in order of their occurrence. We present our research on developing personalized news recommendation system with the help of a popular micro-blogging service, “Twitter.” News articles are ranked based on the popularity of the article identified from Twitter’s public timeline. In addition, users construct profiles based on their interests and news articles are also ranked based on their match to the user profile. By integrating these two approaches, we present a hybrid news recommendation model that recommends interesting news articles to the user based on their popularity as well as their relevance to the user profile.

  20. Sensing the News: User Experiences when Reading Locative News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjetil Vaage Øie

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on user experiences on reading location-aware news on the mobile platform and aims to explore what experiences this kind of locative journalism generates and how such experiences change the users’ social interaction with news. We produced a specially designed mobile application and tailored news stories specific to this project called LocaNews in order to explore participants’ relation to the content in this journalistic format. The result is generated through a field study and a questionnaire of 32 people to find out how they experience the news presented in this format. The user participants’ responses are analyzed based on their news experiences, contextualizing places and their social interaction with the news within this form of journalism. Results showed that the local, semi-local and non-local user approaches the locative news in a different manner, but that the average user found this kind of news more interesting and more informative than ordinary news. The participants also have a problem identifying this as journalism, rather than an information service.

  1. News media old and new

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Kim Christian

    2014-01-01

    This article presents and discusses three different approaches to the exploration of the cross-media challenges facing news audiences, as they seek access to, navigate in and make sense of the multitude of news sources across print, broadcasting, online and mobile media platforms. From a modernized...... uses and gratifications perspective, based on the notion of “worthwhileness” as the determinant of people's everyday selections from the “supermarket of news”, the article first reports from a longitudinal survey study in Denmark in which the author's foundational mapping of cross-media news...... consumption in pre-mobile 2008 is compared with replicating mappings carried out in 2011 and 2012, in a collaborative project between academics and news publishers. The analytical interest here focuses on the fluctuations between traditional news media and the surging digital news outlets of the internet...

  2. Young people’s news orientations and uses of traditional and new media for news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Cauwenberge, A.; d'Haenens, L.; Beentjes, H.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on Flemish college students’ news orientations and their uses of traditional and new media for news within a public service media environment. We used five homogeneous focus groups that covered variation in news media use. The analysis of the focus groups revealed major

  3. The Role of Mobile Technology in Tourism: Patents, Articles, News, and Mobile Tour App Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongwook Kim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to identify the status and role of mobile technology in achieving sustainable and smart tourism, and to suggest future research and strategy directions for academia and managers in practice. This research utilized multiple sources, such as patents, academic articles, and news, and selected methodologies optimized for the purpose of each study. Study 1 used Netminer, a social network analysis program, to analyze the relationships between patent’s International Patent Classification (IPC codes. Study 2 used the T-LAB program for content analysis to analyze the texts of patents, journal articles, and news. Study 3 used the Leximancer program, which utilizes relative frequency to analyze mobile app consumer reviews. In study 1, we identified various forms of data related technologies and mobile technologies for smart city systems and maps. In study 2, we found the environment, sustainability, business, and market themes to be related to mobile technology. In study 3, we explored consumers’ attitudes and preferences for mobile travel app using their reviews. Advances in mobile technology are expected to create innovative experiences for consumers, foster a sustainable competitive advantage for tourism destinations and tourism-related suppliers, and create sustainable competencies for smart tourism.

  4. The shifting cross-media news landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Kim Christian; Steeg Larsen, Bent

    2010-01-01

    and lifestyles. Theoretically the study is anchored in Habermas’s notion of the public sphere, and its recent reconceptualizations in theories of ‘cultural citizenship’, 'civic agency' and 'public connection'. The project operationalizes these theories through the concept of users' perceived “worthwhileness......The article offers new insights for democracy and for news producers by mapping the use and users of today’s cross-media news landscape, as the everyday consumption of news across the range of available news media and formats is shifting as a result of transformations of technology, culture......” of news media, a user-anchored concept which incorporates the different functionalities of the situational cross-media use of news by citizen/consumers in everyday life. Empirically the article presents the findings of a large-scale survey that traces the imminent challenges facing players in the news...

  5. Networks in the news media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro, Peter

    more formal types of social networks, but also complement or even substitute social networking elsewhere, and as such this particular type of social network offers people both inside and outside the news room new potentials - and problems. This article describe the basic vision of networks in the news......When news reporters connect people in a single news story or in a series of coherent news stories they essentially construct networks in the news media. Networks through which social actors are aligned symbolically in written, visible or audible form. These socio-symbolic networks not only copy...

  6. Predicting the volume of comments on online news stories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsagkias, M.; Weerkamp, W.; de Rijke, M.; Cheung, D.; Song, I.-Y.; Chu, W.; Hu, X.; Lin, J.; Li, J.; Peng, Z.

    2009-01-01

    On-line news agents provide commenting facilities for readers to express their views with regard to news stories. The number of user supplied comments on a news article may be indicative of its importance or impact. We report on exploratory work that predicts the comment volume of news articles

  7. Tissue transglutaminase in normal and abnormal wound healing: review article

    OpenAIRE

    Verderio, EAM; Johnson, T; Griffin, M

    2004-01-01

    A complex series of events involving inflammation, cell migration and proliferation, ECM stabilisation and remodelling, neovascularisation and apoptosis are crucial to the tissue response to injury. Wound healing involves the dynamic interactions of multiple cells types with components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and growth factors. Impaired wound healing as a consequence of aging, injury or disease may lead to serious disabilities and poor quality of life. Abnormal wound healing may al...

  8. Political News and Political Consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schertges, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    This article deals with mass media in modern democratic societies, using the example of Israeli news reports in German television (TV) news. Central to this interest are processes of mediating politics: political socialisation and education; that is to say, empowering citizens via TV news to participate in democratic processes. The article…

  9. News coverage of climate change in Nature News and ScienceNOW during 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian Hvidtfelt; Kjærgaard, Rikke Schmidt

    2011-01-01

    of appreciating climate change, its severe consequences, and its anthropogenic causes. During that year the two journals’ online news services Nature News and ScienceNOW framed climate change to fit particular agendas resulting in markedly different narratives. This article demonstrates that Nature News reported...... more critically on political decisions, scientific results, and social matters of climate change compared to ScienceNOW. Operating under different institutional constraints ScienceNOW generally took a more cautious line. The evidence drawn from both textual and visual analyses shows that news sections...

  10. Cascading Corruption News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Mads

    2018-01-01

    Through a content analysis of 8,800 news items and six months of front pages in three Brazilian newspapers, all dealing with corruption and political transgression, this article documents the remarkable skew of media attention to corruption scandals. The bias is examined as an information...... phenomenon, arising from systemic and commercial factors of Brazil’s news media: An information cascade of news on corruption formed, destabilizing the governing coalition and legitimizing the impeachment process of Dilma Rousseff. As this process gained momentum, questions of accountability were disregarded...

  11. Cascading Corruption News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Mads

    2018-01-01

    Through a content analysis of 8,800 news items and six months of front pages in three Brazilian newspapers, all dealing with corruption and political transgression, this article documents the remarkable skew of media attention to corruption scandals. The bias is examined as an information...... phenomenon, arising from systemic and commercial factors of Brazil’s news media: An information cascade of news on corruption formed, destabilizing the governing coalition and legitimizing the impeachment process of Dilma Rousseff. As this process gained momentum, questions of accountability were disregarded...... by the media, with harmful effects on democracy....

  12. Interpretation of Results of Studies Evaluating an Intervention Highlighted in Google Health News: A Cross-Sectional Study of News.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romana Haneef

    Full Text Available Mass media through the Internet is a powerful means of disseminating medical research. We aimed to determine whether and how the interpretation of research results is misrepresented by the use of "spin" in the health section of Google News. Spin was defined as specific way of reporting, from whatever motive (intentional or unintentional, to emphasize that the beneficial effect of the intervention is greater than that shown by the results.We conducted a cross-sectional study of news highlighted in the health section of US, UK and Canada editions of Google News between July 2013 and January 2014. We searched for news items for 3 days a week (i.e., Monday, Wednesday, and Friday during 6 months and selected a sample of 130 news items reporting a scientific article evaluating the effect of an intervention on human health.In total, 78% of the news did not provide a full reference or electronic link to the scientific article. We found at least one spin in 114 (88% news items and 18 different types of spin in news. These spin were mainly related to misleading reporting (59% such as not reporting adverse events that were reported in the scientific article (25%, misleading interpretation (69% such as claiming a causal effect despite non-randomized study design (49% and overgeneralization/misleading extrapolation (41% of the results such as extrapolating a beneficial effect from an animal study to humans (21%. We also identified some new types of spin such as highlighting a single patient experience for the success of a new treatment instead of focusing on the group results.Interpretation of research results was frequently misrepresented in the health section of Google News. However, we do not know whether these spin were from the scientific articles themselves or added in the news.

  13. Personalized News Recommendation: A Review and an Experimental Investigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Li; Ding-Ding Wang; Shun-Zhi Zhu; Tao Li

    2011-01-01

    Online news articles,as a new format of press releases,have sprung up on the Internet.With its convenience and recency,more and more people prefer to read news online instead of reading the paper-format press releases.However,a gigantic amount of news events might be released at a rate of hundreds,even thousands per hour.A challenging problem is how to efficiently select specific news articles from a large corpus of newly-published press releases to recommend to individual readers,where the selected news items should match the reader's reading preference as much as possible.This issue refers to personalized news recommendation.Recently,personalized news recommendation has become a promising research direction as the Internet provides fast access to real-time information from multiple sources around the world.Existing personalized news recommendation systems strive to adapt their services to individual users by virtue of both user and news content information.A variety of techniques have been proposed to tackle personalized news recommendation,including content-based,collaborative filtering systems and hybrid versions of these two.In this paper,we provide a comprehensive investigation of existing personalized news recommenders.We discuss several essential issues underlying the problem of personalized news recommendation,and explore possible solutions for performance improvement.Further,we provide an empirical study on a collection of news articles obtained from various news websites,and evaluate the effect of different factors for personalized news recommendation.We hope our discussion and exploration would provide insights for researchers who are interested in personalized news recommendation.

  14. Linking online news and social media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsagkias, M.; de Rijke, M.; Weerkamp, W.

    2011-01-01

    Much of what is discussed in social media is inspired by events in the news and, vice versa, social media provide us with a handle on the impact of news events. We address the following linking task: given a news article, find social media utterances that implicitly reference it. We follow a

  15. News Media Framing of Negative Campaigning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus Tue

    2014-01-01

    that news coverage of negative campaigning does apply the strategic game frame to a significantly larger degree than articles covering positive campaigning. This finding has significant implications for campaigning politicians and for scholars studying campaign and media effects.......News media coverage of election campaigns is often characterized by use of the strategic game frame and a focus on politicians’ use of negative campaigning. However, the exact relationship between these two characteristics of news coverage is largely unexplored. This article theorizes that consumer...... demand and norms of journalistic independence might induce the news media outlets to cover negative campaigning with a strategic game frame. A comprehensive content analysis based on several newspaper types, several election campaigns, and several different measurements of media framing confirms...

  16. Decoding the codes: A content analysis of the news coverage of genetic cloning by three online news sites and three national daily newspapers, 1996 through 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Jon E.

    This study compared news coverage of genetic cloning research in three online news sites (CNN.com, ABC.com, and MSNBC.com) and three national daily newspapers (The New York Times, The Washington Post, and USA Today). The study involved the analysis of 230 online and print news articles concerning genetic cloning published from 1996 through 1998. Articles were examined with respect to formats, sources, focus, tone, and assessments about the impact of cloning research. Findings indicated that while print news formats remained relatively constant for the duration of this study, online news formats changed significantly with respect to the kinds of media used to represent the news, the layouts used to represent cloning news, and the emphasis placed on audio-visual content. Online stories were as much as 20 to 70% shorter than print stories. More than 50% of the articles appearing online were composed by outside sources (wire services, guest columnists, etc.). By comparison, nearly 90% of the articles published by print newspapers were written "in-house" by science reporters. Online news sites cited fewer sources and cited a smaller variety of sources than the newspapers examined here. In both news outlets, however, the sources most frequently cited were those with vested interests in furthering cloning research. Both online and print news coverage of cloning tends to focus principally on the technical procedures and on the future benefits of cloning. More than 60% of the articles focused on the techniques and technologies of cloning. Less than 25% of the articles focused on social, ethical, or legal issues associated with cloning. Similarly, articles from all six sources (75%) tended to be both positive and future-oriented. Less than 5% of the total articles examined here had a strongly negative or critical tone. Moreover, both online and print news sources increasingly conveyed a strong sense of acceptance about the possibility of human cloning. Data from this study

  17. Navigating cross-media news use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swart, Joëlle; Peters, Chris; Broersma, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    distinctive cross-media repertoires, and what makes these compositions meaningful. This article analyzes the value of different platforms, genres and practices in everyday life by mapping patterns of cross-media news use. Combining Q methodology with think-aloud protocols and day-in-the-life-interviews, five...... distinct news media repertoires are identified: 1) regionally-oriented 2) background-oriented 3) digital 4) laid-back and 5) nationally-oriented news use. Our findings indicate that users do not always use what they prefer, nor do they prefer what they use. Moreover, the boundaries they draw between news......The current news media landscape is characterized by an abundance of digital outlets and increased opportunities for users to navigate news themselves. Yet, it is still unclear how people negotiate this fluctuating environment to decide which news media to select or ignore, how they assemble...

  18. Indonesian News Harvester and Recommender System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Wibowo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available To provide convenience for the user that frequently read the news, a system to gather, classify, and provide news from several news websites in one place was needed. This system utilized a recommender system to provide only relevant news to the user. This research proposed a system architecture that used vector space model, and Rocchio relevance feedback to provide specific news recommendation to user’s feedback. The results are that the proposed system architecture can achieve the goal by using five levels of feedback from the user. However, the time needed to gather news is increasing exponentially in line with the number of terms gathered from articles.

  19. Media coverage of medical journals: do the best articles make the news?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Senthil; Borkar, Durga S; Prasad, Vinay

    2014-01-01

    News coverage of medical research is followed closely by many Americans and affects the practice of medicine and influence of scientific research. Prior work has examined the quality of media coverage, but no investigation has characterized the choice of stories covered in a controlled manner. We examined whether the media systematically covers stories of weaker study design. We compared study characteristics of 75 clinically-oriented journal articles that received coverage in the top five newspapers by circulation against 75 clinically-oriented journal articles that appeared in the top five medical journals by impact factor over a similar timespan. Subgroup analysis was performed to determine whether differences between investigations from both sources varied by study type (randomized controlled trial [RCT] or observational study). Investigations receiving coverage from newspapers were less likely to be RCTs (17% vs. 35%, p = 0.016) and more likely to be observational studies (75% vs. 47%, pstudied (median: 1034 vs. 1901, p = 0.14) or length of follow-up (median: 1.80 vs. 1.00 years, p = 0.22). In subgroup analysis, observational studies from the media used smaller sample sizes (median: 1984 vs. 21136, p = 0.029) and were more likely to be cross-sectional (71% vs. 31%, pstudies and less likely to cover RCTs than high impact journals. Additionally, when the media does cover observational studies, they select articles of inferior quality. Newspapers preferentially cover medical research with weaker methodology.

  20. Estimation of Cross-Lingual News Similarities Using Text-Mining Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhouhao Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, two estimation algorithms for extracting cross-lingual news pairs based on machine learning from financial news articles have been proposed. Every second, innumerable text data, including all kinds news, reports, messages, reviews, comments, and tweets are generated on the Internet, and these are written not only in English but also in other languages such as Chinese, Japanese, French, etc. By taking advantage of multi-lingual text resources provided by Thomson Reuters News, we developed two estimation algorithms for extracting cross-lingual news pairs from multilingual text resources. In our first method, we propose a novel structure that uses the word information and the machine learning method effectively in this task. Simultaneously, we developed a bidirectional Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM based method to calculate cross-lingual semantic text similarity for long text and short text, respectively. Thus, when an important news article is published, users can read similar news articles that are written in their native language using our method.

  1. The shifting temporalities of online news

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Henrik; Brügger, Niels

    2018-01-01

    websites (as well as other characteristics of online archives), the construction of the empirical base stands in a complex relation to the analytical framework applied. As much as the article is a historical analysis of the temporality of online news, it, thus, also offers a range of methodological......As much as news websites news can be characterised by speed and immediacy, they are also recognisable online periodicals, which accumulate preceding news items. This is, as with the constitution of time in general, linked to relations between change and continuity. This article aims to understand...... consequently employs a framework for webpage analysis that primarily focuses on the syntactical level where temporalities emerge as relations between textual elements that change at very different intervals. This framework is applied to examples from the different stages of The Guardian’s webpage from 1996...

  2. Repositioning news and public connection in everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swart, Joëlle; Peters, Chris; Broersma, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    News has traditionally served as a common ground, enabling people to connect to others and engage with the public issues they encounter in everyday life. This article revisits these theoretical debates about mediated public connection within the context of a digitalized news media landscape. While...... of public connection into four dimensions that emphasize people’s lived experiences: inclusiveness, engagement, relevance, and constructiveness. Situating these in an everyday life framework, this article advances a user-based perspective that considers the role of news for people in digital societies...

  3. Terra News: sensationalism and fait-divers on the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Golembiewski

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an analysis of the news program Jornal do Terra (Terra News shown on the Terra website. The study involved two aspects: forms of news presentations on TV, based on studies by Pedro Maciel, and criteria of news value, based on Mário Erbolatto’s view. In addition, we used Luis Arthur Ferraretto’s studies of the news formats used specifically on the radio. The objective of this work was to verify what kind of news is transmitted by the news program Terra News, and to compare it with the traditional news program we watch on TV. The study confirmed that Terra News utilizes conventional formats of news presentation and makes a selection of sensationalist news about fait-divers.

  4. TERRA NEWS: Sensationalism and Fait-divers on the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Golembiewski

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an analysis of the news program Jornal do Terra (Terra News shown on the Terra website. The study involved two aspects: forms of news presentations on TV, based on studies by Pedro Maciel, and criteria of news value, based on Mário Erbolatto’s view. In addition, we used Luis Arthur Ferraretto’s studies of the news formats used specifically on the radio. The objective of this work was to verify what kind of news is transmitted by the news program Terra News, and to compare it with the traditional news program we watch on TV. The study confirmed that Terra News utilizes conventional formats of news presentation and makes a selection of sensationalist news about fait-divers.

  5. Emotional Mining: Tagging Emoticons to Online News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasinathan, Vinothini; Mustapha, Aida; Zhi Yong, Lee; Aida Zamnah, Z. A.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents an emotion mining system, which assigns emoticons to newspaper articles into a pre-defined emotion category based on the underlying emotion in the news. Next, the system makes recommendation to the reader by tagging the news headline with the respective emoticons. Users are then able to decide whether to read the news based on the emoticons provided. The system also provides a filter for the users to choose the category of news to read following the emoticons.

  6. Predicting User Views in Online News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hardt, Daniel; Rambow, Owen

    2017-01-01

    We analyze user viewing behavior on anonline news site. We collect data from64,000 news articles, and use text featuresto predict frequency of user views.We compare predictiveness of the headlineand “teaser” (viewed before clicking) andthe body (viewed after clicking). Both arepredictive of click...

  7. Diabetic foot wounds: the value of negative pressure wound therapy with instillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Paola, Luca

    2013-12-01

    Chronic wounds such as diabetic foot wounds are a tremendous burden to the health care system and often require a multidisciplinary approach to prevent amputations. Advanced technologies such as negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) and bioengineered tissues have been successfully used in the treatment of these types of complex wounds. However, the introduction of NPWT with instillation (NPWTi) has provided an alternative treatment for treating complex and difficult-to-heal wounds. This article provides an overview of NPWT and the new NPWTi system and describes preliminary experience using NPWTi on patients with complicated infected diabetic foot wounds after surgical debridement and in a multidisciplinary setting. © 2013 The Author. International Wound Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.

  8. Advertising and news management in media organisations aspect of advertisers' influence on news content

    OpenAIRE

    Jastramskis, Deimantas

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the article is to analyze display of financial and organizational aspects of advertisers’ influence on news’ content. Main points of analysis are: advertising influence on concentration of media organizations, convergence of advertising and journalism in the strategies of media marketing, relation between advertising and news content in Lithuanian media system, problems of links between political advertising and presentation of politicians in the news .

  9. Determining Citizens’ Opinions About Stories in the News Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Wandhöfer

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe a method whereby a governmental policy maker can discover citizens’ reaction to news stories. This is particularly relevant in the political world, where governments’ policy statements are reported by the news media and discussed by citizens. The work here addresses two main questions: whereabouts are citizens discussing a news story, and what are they saying? Our strategy to answer the first question is to find news articles pertaining to the policy statements, then perform internet searches for references to the news articles’ headlines and URLs. We have created a software tool that schedules repeating Google searches for the news articles and collects the results in a database, enabling the user to aggregate and analyse them to produce ranked tables of sites that reference the news articles. Using data mining techniques we can analyse data so that resultant ranking reflects an overall aggregate score, taking into account multiple datasets, and this shows the most relevant places on the internet where the story is discussed. To answer the second question, we introduce the WeGov toolbox as a tool for analysing citizens’ comments and behaviour pertaining to news stories.  We first use the tool for identifying social network discussions, using different strategies for Facebook and Twitter. We apply different analysis components to analyse the data to distil the essence of the social network users’ comments, to determine influential users and identify important comments.

  10. Public Opinions Toward Diseases: Infodemiological Study on News Media Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming; ElTayeby, Omar; Zolnoori, Maryam; Yao, Lixia

    2018-05-08

    Society always has limited resources to expend on health care, or anything else. What are the unmet medical needs? How do we allocate limited resources to maximize the health and welfare of the people? These challenging questions might be re-examined systematically within an infodemiological frame on a much larger scale, leveraging the latest advancement in information technology and data science. We expanded our previous work by investigating news media data to reveal the coverage of different diseases and medical conditions, together with their sentiments and topics in news articles over three decades. We were motivated to do so since news media plays a significant role in politics and affects the public policy making. We analyzed over 3.5 million archive news articles from Reuters media during the periods of 1996/1997, 2008 and 2016, using summary statistics, sentiment analysis, and topic modeling. Summary statistics illustrated the coverage of various diseases and medical conditions during the last 3 decades. Sentiment analysis and topic modeling helped us automatically detect the sentiments of news articles (ie, positive versus negative) and topics (ie, a series of keywords) associated with each disease over time. The percentages of news articles mentioning diseases and medical conditions were 0.44%, 0.57% and 0.81% in the three time periods, suggesting that news media or the public has gradually increased its interests in medicine since 1996. Certain diseases such as other malignant neoplasm (34%), other infectious diseases (20%), and influenza (11%) represented the most covered diseases. Two hundred and twenty-six diseases and medical conditions (97.8%) were found to have neutral or negative sentiments in the news articles. Using topic modeling, we identified meaningful topics on these diseases and medical conditions. For instance, the smoking theme appeared in the news articles on other malignant neoplasm only during 1996/1997. The topic phrases HIV and

  11. Breaking the news or fueling the epidemic? Temporal association between news media report volume and opioid-related mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Nabarun; Mandl, Kenneth D; Brownstein, John S

    2009-11-18

    Historical studies of news media have suggested an association between reporting and increased drug abuse. Period effects for substance use have been documented for different classes of legal and illicit substances, with the suspicion that media publicity may have played major roles in their emergence. Previous analyses have drawn primarily from qualitative evidence; the temporal relationship between media reporting volume and adverse health consequences has not been quantified nationally. We set out to explore whether we could find a quantitative relationship between media reports about prescription opioid abuse and overdose mortality associated with these drugs. We assessed whether increases in news media reports occurred before or after increases in overdose deaths. Our ecological study compared a monthly time series of unintentional poisoning deaths involving short-acting prescription opioid substances, from 1999 to 2005 using multiple cause-of-death data published by the National Center for Health Statistics, to monthly counts of English-language news articles mentioning generic and branded names of prescription opioids obtained from Google News Archives from 1999 to 2005. We estimated the association between media volume and mortality rates by time-lagged regression analyses. There were 24,272 articles and 30,916 deaths involving prescription opioids during the seven-year study period. Nationally, the number of articles mentioning prescription opioids increased dramatically starting in early 2001, following prominent coverage about the nonmedical use of OxyContin. We found a significant association between news reports and deaths, with media reporting preceding fatal opioid poisonings by two to six months and explaining 88% (pnews reporting may enhance the popularity of psychoactive substances. Albeit ecological in nature, our finding suggests the need for further evaluation of the influence of news media on health. Reporting on prescription opioids conforms

  12. Breaking the news or fueling the epidemic? Temporal association between news media report volume and opioid-related mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabarun Dasgupta

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Historical studies of news media have suggested an association between reporting and increased drug abuse. Period effects for substance use have been documented for different classes of legal and illicit substances, with the suspicion that media publicity may have played major roles in their emergence. Previous analyses have drawn primarily from qualitative evidence; the temporal relationship between media reporting volume and adverse health consequences has not been quantified nationally. We set out to explore whether we could find a quantitative relationship between media reports about prescription opioid abuse and overdose mortality associated with these drugs. We assessed whether increases in news media reports occurred before or after increases in overdose deaths.Our ecological study compared a monthly time series of unintentional poisoning deaths involving short-acting prescription opioid substances, from 1999 to 2005 using multiple cause-of-death data published by the National Center for Health Statistics, to monthly counts of English-language news articles mentioning generic and branded names of prescription opioids obtained from Google News Archives from 1999 to 2005. We estimated the association between media volume and mortality rates by time-lagged regression analyses. There were 24,272 articles and 30,916 deaths involving prescription opioids during the seven-year study period. Nationally, the number of articles mentioning prescription opioids increased dramatically starting in early 2001, following prominent coverage about the nonmedical use of OxyContin. We found a significant association between news reports and deaths, with media reporting preceding fatal opioid poisonings by two to six months and explaining 88% (p<0.0001, df 78 of the variation in mortality.While availability, structural, and individual predispositions are key factors influencing substance use, news reporting may enhance the popularity of psychoactive

  13. News and corporate reputation: Empirical findings from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, M.M.; Kleinnijenhuis, J.

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the influence of business news on corporate reputation. A panel survey was used to measure the reputations of six companies and two professional sectors. Media coverage was analyzed by focusing on the tone of two different types of news. News about the successes of the

  14. Qualification of contemporary French TV news

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie LELEU-MERVIEL

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The News is one of the main programs on TV. In this regard, many investigations are concerned with TV News tackling the problem of the specificity of the audiovisual media. So, descriptive methods were designed to investigate conception and writing processes. Today, the emerging forms (non-stop news TV channels, no comment images TV, revitalize the information processing at television.Carrying on with the analyses of (Compte & Mouchon, 1990, this paper develops a method to examine the news productions in a relevant way. To do so, this article advocates the use of MCR, Méthode générale de Conceptualisation Relativisée based upon knowledge weaving theory (Mugur-Schächter, 2006. This study analysed a few TV news programs by using MCR tools. The method was applied to a corpus of news programs which were broadcasted the same day by two French channels. The study revealed the specificities of the present TV innovations.

  15. From everyday communicative figurations to rigorous audience news repertoires: A mixed method approach to cross-media news consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Kobbernagel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last couple of decades there has been an unprecedented explosion of news media platforms and formats, as a succession of digital and social media have joined the ranks of legacy media. We live in a ‘hybrid media system’ (Chadwick, 2013, in which people build their cross-media news repertoires from the ensemble of old and new media available. This article presents an innovative mixed-method approach with considerable explanatory power to the exploration of patterns of news media consumption. This approach tailors Q-methodology in the direction of a qualitative study of news consumption, in which a card sorting exercise serves to translate the participants’ news media preferences into a form that enables the researcher to undertake a rigorous factor-analytical construction of their news consumption repertoires. This interpretive, factor-analytical procedure, which results in the building of six audience news repertoires in Denmark, also preserves the qualitative thickness of the participants’ verbal accounts of the communicative figurations of their day-in-the-life with the news media.

  16. Quantifying the role of online news in linking conservation research to Facebook and Twitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papworth, S K; Nghiem, T P L; Chimalakonda, D; Posa, M R C; Wijedasa, L S; Bickford, D; Carrasco, L R

    2015-06-01

    Conservation science needs to engage the general public to ensure successful conservation interventions. Although online technologies such as Twitter and Facebook offer new opportunities to accelerate communication between conservation scientists and the online public, factors influencing the spread of conservation news in online media are not well understood. We explored transmission of conservation research through online news articles with generalized linear mixed-effects models and an information theoretic approach. In particular, we assessed differences in the frequency conservation research is featured on online news sites and the impact of online conservation news content and delivery on Facebook likes and shares and Twitter tweets. Five percent of articles in conservation journals are reported in online news, and the probability of reporting depended on the journal. There was weak evidence that articles on climate change and mammals were more likely to be featured. Online news articles about charismatic mammals with illustrations were more likely to be shared or liked on Facebook and Twitter, but the effect of news sites was much larger. These results suggest journals have the greatest impact on which conservation research is featured and that news site has the greatest impact on how popular an online article will be on Facebook and Twitter. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  17. Molecular pathology of wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Toshikazu; Ishida, Yuko

    2010-12-15

    Skin-wound healing is an orchestrated biological phenomena consisting of three sequential phases, inflammation, proliferation, and maturation. Many biological substances are involved in the process of wound repair, and this short and simplified overview of wound healing can be adopted to determine wound vitality or wound age in forensic medicine. With the development of genetically engineered animals, essential molecules for skin-wound healing have been identified. Especially, cytokines, and growth factors are useful candidates and markers for the determination of wound vitality or age. Moreover, bone marrow-derived progenitor cells would give significant information to wound age determination. In this review article, some interesting observations are presented, possibly contributing to the future practice of forensic pathologists. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. The Early 1730s Shipworm Disaster in Dutch News Media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, Joop W.

    This article investigates the interaction between society, government and news media during the 1730s shipworm disaster in the Netherlands. It focuses on the quality of the information news media provided and the effects the governmental use of news media while addressing the population had in

  19. Factors Affecting Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, S.; DiPietro, L.A.

    2010-01-01

    Wound healing, as a normal biological process in the human body, is achieved through four precisely and highly programmed phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. For a wound to heal successfully, all four phases must occur in the proper sequence and time frame. Many factors can interfere with one or more phases of this process, thus causing improper or impaired wound healing. This article reviews the recent literature on the most significant factors that affect cutaneous wound healing and the potential cellular and/or molecular mechanisms involved. The factors discussed include oxygenation, infection, age and sex hormones, stress, diabetes, obesity, medications, alcoholism, smoking, and nutrition. A better understanding of the influence of these factors on repair may lead to therapeutics that improve wound healing and resolve impaired wounds. PMID:20139336

  20. Factors Affecting Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, S.; DiPietro, L.A.

    2010-01-01

    Wound healing, as a normal biological process in the human body, is achieved through four precisely and highly programmed phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. For a wound to heal successfully, all four phases must occur in the proper sequence and time frame. Many factors can interfere with one or more phases of this process, thus causing improper or impaired wound healing. This article reviews the recent literature on the most significant factors that affect cutane...

  1. An Effective News Recommendation Method for Microblog User

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanrong Gu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recommending news stories to users, based on their preferences, has long been a favourite domain for recommender systems research. Traditional systems strive to satisfy their user by tracing users' reading history and choosing the proper candidate news articles to recommend. However, most of news websites hardly require any user to register before reading news. Besides, the latent relations between news and microblog, the popularity of particular news, and the news organization are not addressed or solved efficiently in previous approaches. In order to solve these issues, we propose an effective personalized news recommendation method based on microblog user profile building and sub class popularity prediction, in which we propose a news organization method using hybrid classification and clustering, implement a sub class popularity prediction method, and construct user profile according to our actual situation. We had designed several experiments compared to the state-of-the-art approaches on a real world dataset, and the experimental results demonstrate that our system significantly improves the accuracy and diversity in mass text data.

  2. An effective news recommendation method for microblog user.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wanrong; Dong, Shoubin; Zeng, Zhizhao; He, Jinchao

    2014-01-01

    Recommending news stories to users, based on their preferences, has long been a favourite domain for recommender systems research. Traditional systems strive to satisfy their user by tracing users' reading history and choosing the proper candidate news articles to recommend. However, most of news websites hardly require any user to register before reading news. Besides, the latent relations between news and microblog, the popularity of particular news, and the news organization are not addressed or solved efficiently in previous approaches. In order to solve these issues, we propose an effective personalized news recommendation method based on microblog user profile building and sub class popularity prediction, in which we propose a news organization method using hybrid classification and clustering, implement a sub class popularity prediction method, and construct user profile according to our actual situation. We had designed several experiments compared to the state-of-the-art approaches on a real world dataset, and the experimental results demonstrate that our system significantly improves the accuracy and diversity in mass text data.

  3. An Effective News Recommendation Method for Microblog User

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wanrong; Dong, Shoubin; Zeng, Zhizhao; He, Jinchao

    2014-01-01

    Recommending news stories to users, based on their preferences, has long been a favourite domain for recommender systems research. Traditional systems strive to satisfy their user by tracing users' reading history and choosing the proper candidate news articles to recommend. However, most of news websites hardly require any user to register before reading news. Besides, the latent relations between news and microblog, the popularity of particular news, and the news organization are not addressed or solved efficiently in previous approaches. In order to solve these issues, we propose an effective personalized news recommendation method based on microblog user profile building and sub class popularity prediction, in which we propose a news organization method using hybrid classification and clustering, implement a sub class popularity prediction method, and construct user profile according to our actual situation. We had designed several experiments compared to the state-of-the-art approaches on a real world dataset, and the experimental results demonstrate that our system significantly improves the accuracy and diversity in mass text data. PMID:24983011

  4. The Wound CARE Instrument: the process for developing standards for wound management education and programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsted, Heather L; Woodbury, M Gail; Stevenson, Kimberly

    2012-06-01

    This article describes the collaborative process undertaken by the Canadian Association for Enterostomal Therapy and the Canadian Association of Wound Care in an effort to improve the quality of wound prevention and management education and programming. The end result of this process is the Wound CARE Instrument which promotes an interprofessional, collaborative appraisal process to support the development, adoption or adaption of wound management educational events and programs. © 2011 The Authors. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.

  5. The News Delivery Sequence: Bad News and Good News in Conversational Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Douglas W.

    1997-01-01

    Explores the conditional nature of good and bad news while focusing on three topics: (1) the status of information as news according the participants in a conversation; (2) the valence of this information with regard to its perception as good or bad; and (3) the effect of news on individuals. Notes that good news is privileged over bad news in…

  6. The effects of colour and valence on news evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, Kai; Grümmer, Melanie; Kießler, Antje; Neuß, Celina; Schröter, Franziska

    2017-12-01

    Research across different fields of psychology has reported effects of colour cues on a variety of cognitive processes. Especially, the colour red has been shown to have striking influences. In the context of media reception, however, colour effects have been widely neglected so far. This study made a first step in this direction by investigating the effects of the colour red (compared with blue and grey) on the way news articles are evaluated. Two types of news were framed by a coloured border while the valence of the news content additionally varied. Based on 369 participants who read and evaluated the news articles online, we observed effects for colour cues and news valence in the absence of an interaction effect, indicating that the colour red induced approach motivation. However, only the contrast between red and grey reached statistical significance, indicating that chromatic and achromatic colours may differ in their perceived visual saliency. Overall, these results provide an important complement to previous studies and have practical implications for media researchers and producers. © 2015 International Union of Psychological Science.

  7. Chitosan preparations for wounds and burns: antimicrobial and wound-healing effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Tianhong; Tanaka, Masamitsu; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    Since its discovery approximately 200 years ago, chitosan, as a cationic natural polymer, has been widely used as a topical dressing in wound management owing to its hemostatic, stimulation of healing, antimicrobial, nontoxic, biocompatible and biodegradable properties. This article covers the antimicrobial and wound-healing effects of chitosan, as well as its derivatives and complexes, and its use as a vehicle to deliver biopharmaceuticals, antimicrobials and growth factors into tissue. Studies covering applications of chitosan in wounds and burns can be classified into in vitro, animal and clinical studies. Chitosan preparations are classified into native chitosan, chitosan formulations, complexes and derivatives with other substances. Chitosan can be used to prevent or treat wound and burn infections not only because of its intrinsic antimicrobial properties, but also by virtue of its ability to deliver extrinsic antimicrobial agents to wounds and burns. It can also be used as a slow-release drug-delivery vehicle for growth factors to improve wound healing. The large number of publications in this area suggests that chitosan will continue to be an important agent in the management of wounds and burns. PMID:21810057

  8. Content Analysis of US News Stories About E-Cigarettes in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackowski, Olivia A; Giovenco, Daniel P; Singh, Binu; Lewis, M Jane; Steinberg, Michael B; Delnevo, Cristine D

    2017-08-03

    Coverage of e-cigarettes in the news media may shape public perceptions about them but little is known about such news content. This content analysis characterized discussion of e-cigarettes in leading print and online US news sources in 2015. We searched Access World News and Factiva databases for e-cigarette-related news articles appearing in the top 30 circulating newspapers, 4 newswires, and 4 online news sources in the United States in 2015 (n = 295). Coders identified the presence of various e-cigarette topics (e.g. regulation), and benefit and risk statements. Nearly half of articles (45.1%) focused primarily on e-cigarette policy/regulatory issues, although e-cigarette prevalence (21.0%) and health effects (21.7%) were common main topics. Concerns about youth were frequently mentioned, including the rise in youth e-cigarette use (45.4%), gateway to smoking potential (33.9%) and appeal of flavors (22.4%). Youth e-cigarette prevalence was more frequently mentioned than adult prevalence in articles discussing FDA regulation (61% vs. 13.5%, respectively). News articles more frequently discussed potential e-cigarette risks or concerns (80%) than benefits (45.4%), such as smoking harm-reduction. Quoted physicians, researchers, and government representatives were more likely to refer to e-cigarette risks than benefits. In 2015, rising rates of e-cigarette use among youth and policy strategies to address e-cigarettes dominated US e-cigarette news stories, leading up to their FDA regulation in 2016. Statements about e-cigarettes' potential risks were frequently attributed to trusted sources such as physicians, and outnumbered claims about their harm-reduction benefits. Such coverage may impact e-cigarette risk perceptions, use intentions and policy support. In the year leading up to the FDA's Deeming Rule, concerns about youth use or potential use were frequently discussed in e-cigarette news. News articles more frequently discussed potential e-cigarette risks

  9. Bad news: The influence of news coverage and Google searches on Gardasil adverse event reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faasse, Kate; Porsius, Jarry T; Faasse, Jonathan; Martin, Leslie R

    2017-12-14

    Human papilloma virus vaccines are a safe and effective tool for reducing HPV infections that can cause cervical cancer. However, uptake of these vaccines has been suboptimal, with many people holding negative beliefs and misconceptions. Such beliefs have been linked with the experience of unpleasant side effects following medical treatment, and media coverage may heighten such concerns. The present study sought to assess the influence of news coverage (number of news articles per month) on adverse event reporting in response to Gardasil vaccination in New Zealand over a 7.5-year period, and whether the influence of news coverage was mediated by internet search activity (Google search volumes). Multiple linear regression analyses and simple mediation analyses were used, controlling for year and number of vaccinations delivered. News coverage in the previous month, and Google search volumes in the same month, were significant predictors of adverse event reporting, after accounting for vaccination rates and year. Concurrent Google search volumes partially mediated the effect of prior news coverage. The results suggest that some of the adverse events reported were not related to the vaccination itself, but to news coverage and internet search volumes, which may have contributed to public concerns about potentially unpleasant or harmful outcomes. These findings have implications for the importance of psychological and social factors in adverse event reporting, and the role of the news media in disseminating health information. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Chitosan: A potential biopolymer for wound management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bano, Ijaz; Arshad, Muhammad; Yasin, Tariq; Ghauri, Muhammad Afzal; Younus, Muhammad

    2017-09-01

    It has been seen that slow healing and non-healing wounds conditions are treatable but still challenging to humans. Wound dressing usually seeks for biocompatible and biodegradable recipe. Natural polysaccharides like chitosan have been examined for its antimicrobial and healing properties on the basis of its variation in molecular weight and degree of deacetylation. Chitosan adopts some vital characteristics for treatment of various kinds of wounds which include its bonding nature, antifungal, bactericidal and permeability to oxygen. Chitosan therefore has been modified into various forms for the treatment of wounds and burns. The purpose of this review article is to understand the exploitation of chitosan and its derivatives as wound dressings. This article will also provide a concise insight on the properties of chitosan necessary for skin healing and regeneration, particularly highlighting the emerging role of chitosan films as next generation skin substitutes for the treatment of full thickness wounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Tuning In: Using the News for a Content-Based ESL Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moglen, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Vast amounts of daily news content are widely available and easily accessible, and they can be converted into materials for intermediate and advanced ESL classes. This article will describe the why and how for integrating news media sources into a multiskills ESL classroom. Through the news, students are immediately engaged with the material…

  12. The 2013 general elections in Malaysia: An analysis of online news portals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azahar Kasim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This research analyzed the coverage of online news portals during the election campaign in Malaysia's 13th General Election on 5th May 2013. There were two types of news portals chosen for this research: 1 the mainstream online news portals, namely The Star Online, Berita Harian Online, Bernama Online and Utusan Online; and 2 the alternative news portals consisting of political parties' publications: the Harakah Daily, Roketkini and Keadilan Daily; and the independent news portals of The Malaysian Insider and Malaysiakini. This study was conducted starting from the nomination day on the 20th April 2013 until the polling day on the 5th May 2013. Results obtained were based on the frequencies of articles covering the ruling Barisan Nasional (BN party and the opposition Pakatan Rakyat (PR party. Each article was coded and labeled as positive, negative, or neutral coverage for each political party. The Content Analysis method was applied where the researchers chose and analyzed each election article and placed it in one of five categories; +BN (positive report, −BN (negative report, +PR (positive report, −PR (negative report and N (Neutral. The results showed that the four mainstream online news portals favored the BN with their coverage. However, the parties' online news portals clearly owned by PR alliance parties had completely opposite, bias toward their owners. The two independent news portals seemed to give more balanced coverage to both sides.

  13. News and Syria: Creating key media moments in the conflict

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Simons

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mass media play a critical role through the production of news in influencing how citizens have their perceptions and opinions shaped. This article intends to delve into the role of news production in creating knowledge and shaping public perception and opinion within the Syrian case and demonstrates that news is not an accidental occurrence, neither in terms of subject or timing. Articles on specific issues, such as the reaction to the chemical weapons attack of August 2013 and the allegations of “industrial killings” by the Syrian government, appearing in the mass media, are subjected to analysis based on the theoretical notions outlined in the paper. These two cases hint that the timing and nature of these specific news events are not as “random” and coincidental as would seem at first glance.

  14. Breaking bad news: issues relating to nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, Clare

    2014-07-15

    The breaking of bad news was traditionally regarded to be the time when a doctor and nurse sat down with a patient and family members to provide information about, for example, a life-limiting diagnosis or a poor prognosis. However, breaking bad news is now generally accepted as a process, not a one-off event, and is considered to refer to any bad, sad or difficult information that alters patients' perceptions of their present and future. Nurses have an important role in the process of providing information and helping patients prepare for, receive, understand and cope with the bad news they have been given. This article aims to help nurses understand the process of breaking bad news and discuss the challenges and difficulties that nurses can face when they are involved with patients who have been given bad news. It also provides guidance with regard to preparing for breaking bad news, giving difficult information, responding to possible reactions, and supporting patients and their relatives after they have received bad news.

  15. A content analysis of smokeless tobacco coverage in U.S. newspapers and news wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackowski, Olivia A; Lewis, M Jane; Delnevo, Cristine D; Ling, Pamela M

    2013-07-01

    Research attention on smokeless tobacco (SLT) has focused on SLT use, health risks, harm-reduction potential, and risk perceptions, but few studies have examined mediated communications about SLT. This study aims to contribute to the literature by providing the first description of SLT coverage in the news, an important communication channel given its ability to educate and shape public opinion about tobacco issues. A content analysis was conducted on SLT-related news and opinion articles between 2006 and 2010 from top circulating national and state newspapers and select news wires. Articles were coded for the main SLT topic, SLT risk references, and slant of opinion articles. SLT was discussed in news/feature articles (n = 677) in terms of business (28%), new products, product regulation and harm reduction (19%), prevention/cessation (11.4%), taxation (10.2%), profiles/trends in use (9%), bans (8.1%), and tobacco industry promotional activities (4.9%). Health risk references (i.e., addictiveness, carcinogenicity, and specific health effects including oral cancer) were found in 40% of articles, though frequency differed by article topic. Although the majority of opinion articles (n = 176) conveyed an anti-SLT slant (64%), 25.6% were pro-SLT. SLT topics of both national and local importance are covered in the news. Public health professionals can participate in SLT coverage by sending in press releases about new study findings, events, or resources and by submitting opinion pieces to share views or respond to previous coverage. Research on SLT news should continue given its potential to shape the public's SLT knowledge and opinions.

  16. Fear and Loathing in the News: A Qualitative Analysis of Canadian Print News Coverage of Youthful Offending in the Twentieth Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucher, Chantal

    2009-01-01

    This article reports research findings on the representations of youth crime and of young lawbreakers in Canadian print media. The examination of a subset of the sample of news items shows that several themes emerge in the historical discussion of youthful offending in the news. Firstly, the prevailing portrayal of youth crime is that it is to be…

  17. Related Fact Checks: a tool for combating fake news

    OpenAIRE

    Guha, Sreya

    2017-01-01

    The emergence of "Fake News" and misinformation via online news and social media has spurred an interest in computational tools to combat this phenomenon. In this paper we present a new "Related Fact Checks" service, which can help a reader critically evaluate an article and make a judgment on its veracity by bringing up fact checks that are relevant to the article. We describe the core technical problems that need to be solved in building a "Related Fact Checks" service, and present results ...

  18. From everyday communicative figurations to rigorous audience news repertoires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobbernagel, Christian; Schrøder, Kim Christian

    2016-01-01

    In the last couple of decades there has been an unprecedented explosion of news media platforms and formats, as a succession of digital and social media have joined the ranks of legacy media. We live in a ‘hybrid media system’ (Chadwick, 2013), in which people build their cross-media news...... repertoires from the ensemble of old and new media available. This article presents an innovative mixed-method approach with considerable explanatory power to the exploration of patterns of news media consumption. This approach tailors Q-methodology in the direction of a qualitative study of news consumption......, in which a card sorting exercise serves to translate the participants’ news media preferences into a form that enables the researcher to undertake a rigorous factor-analytical construction of their news consumption repertoires. This interpretive, factor-analytical procedure, which results in the building...

  19. Attachment-Focused Psychotherapy and the Wounded Self.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Eric B

    2016-07-01

    The concept of the "wounded self" (Wolfe, 2005) offers an integrative theoretical framework for self-wounds and their developmental origins. Alladin (2013, 2014, 2016) integrated hypnotherapy into this model to comprehensively address the unconscious protective mechanisms and maladaptive conscious cognitive strategies of the wounded self. The purpose of this article is to propose how an attachment-focused psychotherapy could be utilized in working with the wounded self. With its emphasis on developmental maturation through the frame of the attachment relationship, attachment theory is well-positioned to offer conceptual and treatment insights in treating the wounded self. E. B. Spiegel's (2016) attunement, representation, and mentalization approach to attachment-focused psychotherapy described how hypnosis can be utilized across attachment processes of attunement, representation, and mentalization toward structural maturation and developmental repair of patients with histories of complex relational trauma. In this article, the attunement, representation, and mentalization attachment approach and associated interventions are further explicated in the treatment of self-wounds in the borderline and narcissistic spectrums of personality organization. These principles of conceptualization and treatment interventions are then applied in a case example.

  20. Exploring the concept of a team approach to wound care: Managing wounds as a team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Zena; Butcher, Gillian; Corbett, Lisa Q; McGuiness, William; Snyder, Robert J; van Acker, Kristien

    2014-05-01

    Background - The growing prevalence and incidence of nonhealing acute and chronic wounds is a worrying concern. A major challenge is the lack of united services aimed at addressing the complex needs of individuals with wounds. However, the WHO argues that interprofessional collaboration in education and practice is key to providing the best patient care, enhancing clinical and health-related outcomes and strengthening the health system. It is based on this background that the team approach to wound care project was conceptualised. The project was jointly initiated and realised by the Association for the Advancement of Wound Care (AAWC-USA), the Australian Wound Management Association (AWMA) and the European Wound Management Association (EWMA). Aim - The aim of this project was to develop a universal model for the adoption of a team approach to wound care. Objective The overarching objective of this project was to provide recommendations for implementing a team approach to wound care within all clinical settings and through this to develop a model for advocating the team approach toward decision makers in national government levels. Method An integrative literature review was conducted. Using this knowledge, the authors arrived at a consensus on the most appropriate model to adopt and realise a team approach to wound care. Results - Eighty four articles met the inclusion criteria. Following data extraction, it was evident that none of the articles provided a definition for the terms multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary or transdisciplinary in the context of wound care. Given this lack of clarity within the wound care literature, the authors have here developed a Universal Model for the Team Approach to Wound Care to fill this gap in our current understanding. Conclusion - We advocate that the patient should be at the heart of all decision-making, as working with the Universal Model for the Team Approach to Wound Care begins with the needs of the patient. To

  1. Women in Television News: Analysis of Primetime News on HTV, RTL and Nova TV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svjetlana Knežević

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article assesses the particularly low level of women represented on national primetime television newscasts in Croatia. In doing so, it presents the results of a content analysis covering a random,stratified sample of HTV, Nova TV, and RTL primetime news broadcasts over the years 2009 and 2010. According to these results, women are significantly underrepresented as main characters, experts, or even persons relevant to news stories concerning issues or problems. In particular, the results are most apparent on the primetime newscast Dnevnik, broadcasted daily on Croatia’s main public television station. Ideally, this news broadcast should rank among the best in terms of gender equality, given the principles of equality stipulated throughout Croatian law (and especially where it concerns programming legislation. Concerning the analyzed content, when women serve as the main characters in a news story, their emotional response to an issue appears to be almost obligatory. Further, women are often portrayed as victims, or as a figure to galvanize a rather black and white response, i.e. they are to be praised or blamed. Adding to this gender discrepancy, statistics show that more women than men have earned BA and MA degrees, which not only highlights the unbalanced representation of women on television news, but also distorts the actual level of female participation in society, particularly where it regards sociopolitical fields.

  2. Wound-Related Allergic/Irritant Contact Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Afsaneh; Sibbald, R Gary; Ladizinski, Barry; Saraiya, Ami; Lee, Kachiu C; Skotnicki-Grant, Sandy; Maibach, Howard

    2016-06-01

    To provide information from a literature review about the prevention, recognition, and treatment for contact dermatitis. This continuing education activity is intended for physicians and nurses with an interest in skin and wound care. After participating in this educational activity, the participant should be better able to:1. Identify signs and symptoms of and diagnostic measures for contact dermatitis.2. Identify causes and risks for contact dermatitis.3. Select appropriate treatment for contact dermatitis and its prevention. Contact dermatitis to wound care products is a common, often neglected problem. A review was conducted to identify articles relevant to contact dermatitis.A PubMed English-language literature review was conducted for appropriate articles published between January 2000 and December 2015.Contact dermatitis is both irritant (80% of cases) or allergic (20% of cases). Frequent use of potential contact allergens and impaired barrier function of the skin can lead to rising sensitization in patients with chronic wounds. Common known allergens to avoid in wound care patients include fragrances, colophony, lanolin, and topical antibiotics.Clinicians should be cognizant of the allergens in wound care products and the potential for sensitization. All medical devices, including wound dressings, adhesives, and bandages, should be labeled with their complete ingredients, and manufacturers should be encouraged to remove common allergens from wound care products, including topical creams, ointments, and dressings.

  3. Editorial Tag Endogeneity for News Websites

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno Ribeiro; Ricardo Morla; Amílcar Correia

    2013-01-01

    Editors and journalists at some news websites label their articles with structure and content-related editorial tags. Each article can have more than one tag and each tag can be used in more than one article. A network of tags can be defined whose edges are all possible pairs of tags in each article. Because editorial tags relate to structure and content rather than individual articles, the analysis of a network of editorial tags could assist editorial decisions to prioritize types of content...

  4. Breaking Bad News: An Evidence-Based Review of Communication Models for Oncology Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumb, Meridith; Keefe, Joanna; Miller, Lindsay; Overcash, Janine

    2017-10-01

    A diagnosis of cancer is a stressful, difficult, and life-altering event. Breaking bad news is distressing to patients and families and is often uncomfortable for the nurse delivering it. Evidence-based communication models have been developed and adapted for use in clinical practice to assist nurses with breaking bad news.

. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview on breaking bad news and to review the utility of the SPIKES and PEWTER evidence-based communication models for oncology nurses.
. Perceptions of breaking bad news from the nurse and patient perspectives, as well as barriers and consequences to effective communication, will be presented. Clinical examples of possible situations of breaking bad news will demonstrate how to use the SPIKES and PEWTER models of communication when disclosing bad news to patients and their families.
. By using the evidence-based communication strategies depicted in this article, oncology nurses can support the delivery of bad news and maintain communication with their patients and their patients' families in an effective and productive manner.

  5. "I Have Good News and Bad News:" The Effects of Power Imbalances and Physical Distance on News-givers' Use of Blended News Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Legg, Angela M.

    2013-01-01

    People dislike giving bad news, and one strategy they use to ease the process is to pair bad news with some good news, a phenomenon called blended news delivery. Often, blended news arrives from people in power positions such as physicians, managers, or teachers. But followers also find themselves needing to give bad news to those in higher power positions. Similarly, people can choose how they deliver bad news, such as in person or over email. The current study brings much needed empirical a...

  6. A Content Analysis of Smokeless Tobacco Coverage in U.S. Newspapers and News Wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Research attention on smokeless tobacco (SLT) has focused on SLT use, health risks, harm-reduction potential, and risk perceptions, but few studies have examined mediated communications about SLT. This study aims to contribute to the literature by providing the first description of SLT coverage in the news, an important communication channel given its ability to educate and shape public opinion about tobacco issues. Methods: A content analysis was conducted on SLT-related news and opinion articles between 2006 and 2010 from top circulating national and state newspapers and select news wires. Articles were coded for the main SLT topic, SLT risk references, and slant of opinion articles. Results: SLT was discussed in news/feature articles (n = 677) in terms of business (28%), new products, product regulation and harm reduction (19%), prevention/cessation (11.4%), taxation (10.2%), profiles/trends in use (9%), bans (8.1%), and tobacco industry promotional activities (4.9%). Health risk references (i.e., addictiveness, carcinogenicity, and specific health effects including oral cancer) were found in 40% of articles, though frequency differed by article topic. Although the majority of opinion articles (n = 176) conveyed an anti-SLT slant (64%), 25.6% were pro-SLT. Conclusions: SLT topics of both national and local importance are covered in the news. Public health professionals can participate in SLT coverage by sending in press releases about new study findings, events, or resources and by submitting opinion pieces to share views or respond to previous coverage. Research on SLT news should continue given its potential to shape the public’s SLT knowledge and opinions. PMID:23288875

  7. Identifying Partisan Slant in News Articles and Twitter during Political Crises

    OpenAIRE

    Karamshuk, Dmytro; Lokot, Tetyana; Pryymak, Oleksandr; Sastry, Nishanth

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we are interested in understanding the interrelationships between mainstream and social media in forming public opinion during mass crises, specifically in regards to how events are framed in the mainstream news and on social networks and to how the language used in those frames may allow to infer political slant and partisanship. We study the lingual choices for political agenda setting in mainstream and social media by analyzing a dataset of more than 40M tweets and more than...

  8. Comparing "insider" and "outsider" news coverage of the 2014 Ebola outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Brittany; Radice, Martha; Lauzier, Sophie

    2017-11-09

    Information provided by news media during an infectious disease outbreak can affect the actions taken to safeguard public health. There has been little evaluation of how the content of news published during an outbreak varies by location of the news outlet. This study analyzes coverage of the 2014 Ebola outbreak by one news outlet operating within a country affected by the outbreak and one country not directly affected. A qualitative content analysis was conducted of articles published in two national news outlets, The Globe and Mail (Canada) and the Vanguard (Nigeria), between January 1 and December 31, 2014. Articles available through LexisNexis Academic were sorted by date and sampled using a stratified sampling method (The Globe and Mail n = 100; Vanguard n = 105). A coding scheme was developed and modified to incorporate emerging themes until saturation was achieved. There were substantial differences in outbreak coverage in terms of the topic and content of the articles, as well as the sources consulted. The Globe and Mail framed the outbreak in terms of national security and national interests, as well as presenting it as an international humanitarian crisis. In contrast, the Vanguard framed the outbreak almost exclusively in terms of public health. Our findings highlight how different geographic contexts can shape reporting on the same event. Further research is required to investigate how the political, social or economic situations of a country shape its news media, potentially influencing actions taken to control disease outbreaks.

  9. New techniques for wound management: A systematic review of their role in the management of chronic wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Bekara

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Debridement is a crucial component of wound management. Recent technologies such as hydrosurgery (Versajet, ultrasound therapy (the MIST therapy device, or plasma-mediated bipolar radio-frequency ablation therapy (Coblation seem to represent interesting alternatives for wound debridement. The purpose of this systematic review was to describe, evaluate, and compare these three recently developed methods for the management of chronic wounds. In January 2016, an electronic database search was conducted of MEDLINE, PubMed Central, and Embase for articles concerning these three innovative methods for the management of chronic wounds. A total of 389 references were identified by our search strategy, and 15 articles were included. We extracted data regarding the number and age of patients, indications, operating time, number of procedures, costs, wound healing time, decrease in exudation, perioperative blood loss, bacterial load, and the occurrence of complications. The 15 articles included studies that involved 563 patients who underwent hydrosurgery (7 studies, ultrasound therapy (6 studies, or Coblation (2 studies. Six randomized controlled trials were included that compared the use of a scalpel or curette to hydrosurgery (2 studies or ultrasound therapy (6 studies. Hydrosurgery, in addition to being a very precise and selective tool, allows significantly faster debridement. Ultrasound therapy provides a significant reduction of exudation, and improves the wound healing time. No comparative study dedicated to Coblation was identified. Despite the obvious clinical interest of the topic, our review of the current literature revealed a lack of prospective randomized studies comparing these devices with each other or with standard techniques, particularly for Coblation and hydrosurgery.

  10. Debridement and wound bed preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falabella, Anna F

    2006-01-01

    Debridement can play a vital role in wound bed preparation and the removal of barriers that impair wound healing. In accordance with the TIME principles, debridement can help remove nonviable tissue, control inflammation or infection, decrease excess moisture, and stimulate a nonadvancing wound edge. There are many types of debridement, each with a set of advantages and disadvantages that must be clearly understood by the healthcare team. Failure to use the correct debridement method for a given type of wound may lead to further delays in healing, increase patient suffering, and unnecessarily increase the cost of care. This review article discusses the various methods of debridement, describes currently available debriding agents, evaluates the clinical data regarding their efficacy and safety, and describes strategies for the management of problematic nonhealing wounds.

  11. No news is good news?

    CERN Multimedia

    Peter Schmid

    I'm retired and living back home in Austria. But I am still excited about ATLAS and I try to follow the progress of the project as closely as I can. The ATLAS e-news are an excellent source of information. Appearing now every month they provide a broad, solid view of what is going on. But I'm greedy; I'd love to be "on-line". When the first End-Cap Toroid moved from hall 180 to the pit I was frustrated. I knew that it was happening but I could only get first pictures and reports a few days later. In the meantime the ECT was lowered into the cavern; no information on this available nowhere up to the this issue of the e-news. Here is my dream: an "ATLAS news ticker", i.e. a web page with the news appearing on the day they happen; just one line of information, possibly with a reference to a picture, a person or a report. My idea isn't new. On the ATLAS web-site for the public we have a window "latest news". But I was disappointed when, until a week ago, the latest news dated from December 2006 !!! Can't we do...

  12. news-please

    OpenAIRE

    Hamborg, Felix; Meuschke, Norman; Breitinger, Corinna; Gipp, Bela

    2017-01-01

    The amount of news published and read online has increased tremendously in recent years, making news data an interesting resource for many research disciplines, such as the social sciences and linguistics. However, large scale collection of news data is cumbersome due to a lack of generic tools for crawling and extracting such data. We present news-please, a generic, multilanguage, open-source crawler and extractor for news that works out-of-thebox for a large variety of news websites. ...

  13. Tracking Multiple Topics for Finding Interesting Articles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pon, R K; Cardenas, A F; Buttler, D J; Critchlow, T J

    2008-01-03

    We introduce multiple topic tracking (MTT) for iScore to better recommend news articles for users with multiple interests and to address changes in user interests over time. As an extension of the basic Rocchio algorithm, traditional topic detection and tracking, and single-pass clustering, MTT maintains multiple interest profiles to identify interesting articles for a specific user given user-feedback. Focusing on only interesting topics enables iScore to discard useless profiles to address changes in user interests and to achieve a balance between resource consumption and classification accuracy. iScore is able to achieve higher quality results than traditional methods such as the Rocchio algorithm. We identify several operating parameters that work well for MTT. Using the same parameters, we show that MTT alone yields high quality results for recommending interesting articles from several corpora. The inclusion of MTT improves iScore's performance by 25% in recommending news articles from the Yahoo! News RSS feeds and the TREC11 adaptive filter article collection. And through a small user study, we show that iScore can still perform well when only provided with little user feedback.

  14. ‘It’s Something Posh People Do’: Digital Distinction in Young People’s Cross-Media News Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannie Møller Hartley

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I analyse digital distinction mechanisms in young people’s cross media engagement with news. Using a combination of open online diaries and qualitative interviews with young Danes aged 15 to 18 who differ in social background and education, and with Bourdieu’s field theory as an analytical framework, the article investigates how cultural capital (CC operates in specific tastes and distastes for news genres, platforms and providers. The article argues that distinction mechanism not only works on the level of news providers and news genres but also on the level of engagement practices—the ways in which people enact and describe their own news engagement practices. Among those rich in CC, physical, analogue objects in the form of newspapers and physical conversations about news are seen as ‘better’ that digital ones, resulting in a feeling of guilt when they mostly engage with news on social media. Secondly, young people with lower CC discard legacy news, which they see as elitist and irrelevant. Thirdly, those rich in CC are media and news genre savvy in the sense that it makes them able to critically evaluate the news they engage with across platforms and sites.

  15. "Rape Culture" language and the news media: contested versus non-contested cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April COBOS

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The American news media has recently reported on several rape and sexual assault cases in various cultural settings, sparking public conversations about rape culture in different cultural contexts. The article is focused as a Critical Discourse Analysis that compares the language use in news articles from The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal over a six months period in order to more clearly understand the way the news media uses language in regards to gender and sexual assault and creates a spectrum of valid versus contested reports of sexual assault in different cultural settings.

  16. Causal interpretation of correlational studies - Analysis of medical news on the website of the official journal for German physicians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Buhse

    Full Text Available Media frequently draws inappropriate causal statements from observational studies. We analyzed the reporting of study results in the Medical News section of the German medical journal Deutsches Ärzteblatt (DÄ.Study design: Retrospective quantitative content analysis of randomly selected news reports and related original journal articles and press releases. A medical news report was selected if headlines comprised at least two linked variables. Two raters independently categorized the headline and text of each news report, conclusions of the abstract and full text of the related journal article, and the press release. The assessment instrument comprised five categories from 'neutral' to 'unconditionally causal'. Outcome measures: degree of matching between 1 news headlines and conclusions of the journal article, 2 headlines and text of news reports, 3 text and conclusions, and 4 headlines and press releases. We analyzed whether news headlines rated as unconditionally causal based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs.One-thousand eighty-seven medical news reports were published between April 2015 and May 2016. The final random sample comprised 176 news reports and 100 related press releases. Degree of matching: 1 45% (79/176 for news headlines and journal article conclusions, 2 55% (97/176 for headlines and text, 3 53% (93/176 for text and conclusions, and 4 41% (41/100 for headlines and press releases. Exaggerations were found in 45% (80/176 of the headlines compared to the conclusions of the related journal article. Sixty-five of 137 unconditionally causal statements of the news headlines were phrased more weakly in the subsequent news text body. Only 52 of 137 headlines (38% categorized as unconditionally causal reported RCTs.Reporting of medical news in the DÄ medical journal is misleading. Most headlines that imply causal associations were not based on RCTs. Medical journalists should follow standards of reporting scientific study results.

  17. Causal interpretation of correlational studies - Analysis of medical news on the website of the official journal for German physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhse, Susanne; Rahn, Anne Christin; Bock, Merle; Mühlhauser, Ingrid

    2018-01-01

    Media frequently draws inappropriate causal statements from observational studies. We analyzed the reporting of study results in the Medical News section of the German medical journal Deutsches Ärzteblatt (DÄ). Study design: Retrospective quantitative content analysis of randomly selected news reports and related original journal articles and press releases. A medical news report was selected if headlines comprised at least two linked variables. Two raters independently categorized the headline and text of each news report, conclusions of the abstract and full text of the related journal article, and the press release. The assessment instrument comprised five categories from 'neutral' to 'unconditionally causal'. Outcome measures: degree of matching between 1) news headlines and conclusions of the journal article, 2) headlines and text of news reports, 3) text and conclusions, and 4) headlines and press releases. We analyzed whether news headlines rated as unconditionally causal based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs). One-thousand eighty-seven medical news reports were published between April 2015 and May 2016. The final random sample comprised 176 news reports and 100 related press releases. Degree of matching: 1) 45% (79/176) for news headlines and journal article conclusions, 2) 55% (97/176) for headlines and text, 3) 53% (93/176) for text and conclusions, and 4) 41% (41/100) for headlines and press releases. Exaggerations were found in 45% (80/176) of the headlines compared to the conclusions of the related journal article. Sixty-five of 137 unconditionally causal statements of the news headlines were phrased more weakly in the subsequent news text body. Only 52 of 137 headlines (38%) categorized as unconditionally causal reported RCTs. Reporting of medical news in the DÄ medical journal is misleading. Most headlines that imply causal associations were not based on RCTs. Medical journalists should follow standards of reporting scientific study results.

  18. They Came, They Liked, They Commented: Social Influence on Facebook News Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Stephan; Brückner, Caroline; Krämer, Nicole C

    2015-08-01

    Due to the increasing importance of social networking sites as sources of information, news media organizations have set up Facebook channels in which they publish news stories or links to articles. This research investigated how journalistic texts are perceived in this new context and how reactions of other users change the influence of the main articles. In an online experiment (N=197), a Facebook posting of a reputable news site and the corresponding article were shown. The type of user comments and the number of likes were systematically varied. Negative comments diminished the persuasive influence of the article, while there were no strengthening effects of positive comments. When readers perceived the topic as personally relevant, comments including relevant arguments were more influential than comments with subjective opinions, which can be explained by higher levels of elaboration. However, against expectations of bandwagon perceptions, a high number of likes did not lead to conformity effects, which suggests that exemplifying comments are more influential than statistical user representations. Results are discussed with regard to effects of news media content and the mechanisms of social influence in Web 2.0.

  19. News values on social media: News organizations’ Facebook use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rawi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the news selection practices followed by news organizations through investigating the news posted on social networking sites and, in particular, the Facebook pages of four foreign Arabic language TV stations: The Iranian Al-Alam TV, Russia Today, Deutsche Welle, and BBC. A total of 15,589 news stories are analyzed in order to examine the prominence of references to countries and political actors. The study reveals that social significance and proximity as well as the news organizations’ ideological agenda are the most important elements that dictate the news selection process. PMID:29278253

  20. News values on social media: News organizations' Facebook use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rawi, Ahmed

    2017-08-01

    This study examines the news selection practices followed by news organizations through investigating the news posted on social networking sites and, in particular, the Facebook pages of four foreign Arabic language TV stations: The Iranian Al-Alam TV, Russia Today, Deutsche Welle, and BBC. A total of 15,589 news stories are analyzed in order to examine the prominence of references to countries and political actors. The study reveals that social significance and proximity as well as the news organizations' ideological agenda are the most important elements that dictate the news selection process.

  1. Breaking bad news in prenatal medicine: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Rita; George, Astrid; Spitz, Elisabeth; Vieux, Rachel

    2017-02-01

    The diagnosis of a fetal anomaly in perinatal medicine forces expectant parents and healthcare providers to face the difficult process of breaking bad news. This exploratory literature review was aimed at providing a medical and psychological view of the psychological experience in expectant parents and physicians in the context of prenatal diagnosis of a fetal anomaly. An exploratory search of PubMed and PsycINFO/PsycARTICLES databases performed by an interdisciplinary team composed of a physician and psychologists. Search terms were: prenatal diagnosis AND bad news; prenatal diagnosis AND psychological consequences; prenatal diagnosis AND psychological sequelae; prenatal diagnosis AND fetal abnormality. The processing of selected articles followed a standardised five-step procedure. A total of 860 articles were screened of which 32 were retained for analysis. Four main themes emerged from the explanatory content analysis: (1) parents' subjective experience; (2) physicians' subjective experience; (3) encounters between expectant parents and professionals; and (4) ethical challenges in breaking bad news in prenatal medicine. Expectant parents go through a complex and multidimensional experience when the diagnosis of a fetal anomaly is disclosed. Simultaneously, physicians consider breaking bad news as a very stressful event and are poorly prepared in this regard. A better knowledge of factors underlying psychological adjustment of the parental dyad and on the subjective experience of physicians delivering these diagnoses could enable better adaptation for both patients and professionals.

  2. ‘Let’s Get Them Involved’ . . . to Some Extent: Analyzing Online News Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne M. Almgren

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of social media applications, such as blogs, Facebook, and Twitter, has offered new participatory opportunities for everyday media users. This article contributes to research by looking into one specific aspect of the increasingly more participatory media ecology—the news comment feature. Drawing on a quantitative content analysis of 1,100 news pieces, as well as spaces for user comments, the article reveals both how this emerging public space is shaped by the media company and, later, appropriated by their participating users. Our analysis reveals, for instance, that the online newspaper prefers to allow users to comment on lightweight news such as sports and entertainment. The users, however, prefer to post comments on news covering changes in proximity space, politics, and health care, while also clearly ignoring the most available news pieces (sport and entertainment. In the concluding section, the discrepancy in preferences is discussed.

  3. Girls, Guys and Games: How News Media Perpetuate Stereotypes of Male and Female Gamers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Maclean

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the sheer popularity of gaming, stereotypes of gamers are persistent and often ill-informed. The average age of an Australian gamer, for example, is 33 and nearly half of gamers are female. Yet, few mainstream and gaming news articles seem to acknowledge this diversity. Because news media and public perception are intertwined, such misrepresentation may affect the way gamers are perceived by the public and, in turn, how gamers negotiate their identities. This paper, through a primarily qualitative analysis of 75 online news articles, explores many examples of simplistic and distorted portrayals of gamers that characterise news coverage. In particular, it examines three gendered tropes—‘not real’ female gamers, women as the victims and oppressors of gamers, and toxic male gamers—that news media use to frame the narratives that misrepresent gaming in social life. Ultimately, this article argues that two prevailing themes underlie many news stories about gaming: the perpetuation of male technocratic privilege and moral panic. Both of these phenomena have relevance to the #GamerGate controversy of 2014, which news media portrayed as a ‘culture war’ between these inaccurate notions of male and female gamers. Thus, this indicates that the media blame game and alienation of gaming culture, as a multibillion-dollar international industry of increasing social importance, must be acknowledged and addressed.

  4. Cinema and the communication of bad news

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Isabel GÓMEZ CORDOBA; Haroldo ESTRADA

    2016-01-01

    Breaking Bad News requires medical professionals possess a range of skills to ensure that the patient has the information required for decision?making, this process occurs without further damage and even has a therapeutic effect, and another, that the doctor is not exposed to legal risk or stress associated with the inability to cope with the feelings of the patient, their families or themselves. This article discusses the aspects of communication of bad news in the field of doctor?patient re...

  5. Recent advances in topical wound care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata Sarabahi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are a wide variety of dressing techniques and materials available for management of both acute wounds and chronic non-healing wounds. The primary objective in both the cases is to achieve a healed closed wound. However, in a chronic wound the dressing may be required for preparing the wound bed for further operative procedures such as skin grafting. An ideal dressing material should not only accelerate wound healing but also reduce loss of protein, electrolytes and fluid from the wound, and help to minimize pain and infection. The present dictum is to promote the concept of moist wound healing. This is in sharp contrast to the earlier practice of exposure method of wound management wherein the wound was allowed to dry. It can be quite a challenge for any physician to choose an appropriate dressing material when faced with a wound. Since wound care is undergoing a constant change and new products are being introduced into the market frequently, one needs to keep abreast of their effect on wound healing. This article emphasizes on the importance of assessment of the wound bed, the amount of drainage, depth of damage, presence of infection and location of wound. These characteristics will help any clinician decide on which product to use and where,in order to get optimal wound healing. However, there are no ′magical dressings′. Dressings are one important aspect that promotes wound healing apart from treating the underlying cause and other supportive measures like nutrition and systemic antibiotics need to be given equal attention.

  6. A short guide to giving bad news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jeffrey T

    2008-01-01

    Approaching an individual or a family with bad news, but without an appropriate plan to present the information in a structured manner, is almost a guarantee of greater emotional pain and disruption for the recipients of the news. Crisis interveners must develop a strategic plan for the announcement of bad news. That plan should entail a lead-up phase, a transmission phase, and a followup phase. The lead-up phase encompasses the gathering of accurate, verifiable information and the clear identification of the targets of the information. The transmission phase includes immediate preparation for the presentation of the information, the actual announcement, and the presentation of additional details as questions arise. The follow-up phase includes a range of supportive interventions to assist people in the immediate crisis reaction. It also includes a system of referrals for people who might benefit from additional professional care. This article provides practical guidelines for providing bad news to the loved ones of injured, ill, or deceased people.

  7. Second Annual Meeting of the International Society of Pediatric Wound Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keswani, Sundeep G

    2015-10-01

    The overarching goals of the International Society of Pediatric Wound Care (ISPeW) are to (1) set global standards for the assessment and treatment of pediatric wounds of varying etiologies; (2) provide a forum for international interprofessional collaboration among healthcare professionals, researchers, educators, and industry leaders dedicated to the care of pediatric wounds; (3) promote and support clinical research focused on the prevention, assessment, and treatment of pediatric wounds; (4) collaborate with wound care organizations worldwide on pediatric wound care issues; and (5) provide evidence-based pediatric wound care education to healthcare professionals, parents, and lay caregivers. This edition of Advances in Wound Care includes some of the work that was presented at the 2014 ISPeW meeting in Rome. The first article by Dr. Romanelli, is an in-depth description of the progression of skin physiology throughout its maturational stages and clinical implication. A cutting edge article by Dr. Timothy King then follows, with regard to scar prevention in postnatal tissues. This is followed by a comprehensive look at debridement techniques in pediatric trauma by Dr. Ankush Gosain. Next, is a cautionary article by Dr. Luca Spazzapan that examines the prevalence of diabetic foot ulcers in children and the potential for an epidemic. The last article in this series is from the keynote speaker, Dr. Amit Geffen, who eloquently examines the use of biomaterials to offload and prevent pediatric pressure ulcers.

  8. A multi-centre clinical evaluation of reactive oxygen topical wound gel in 114 wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryden, M; Dickinson, A; Brooks, J; Hudgell, L; Saeed, K; Cutting, K F

    2016-03-01

    This article reports the outcomes of the use of Surgihoney RO (SHRO), topical wound dressing in a multi-centre, international setting. The aims were to explore the clinical effects of SHRO, including a reduction in bacterial load and biofilm and improvement in healing in a variety of challenging non-healing and clinically infected wounds. This was a non-comparative evaluation, where both acute and chronic wounds with established delayed healing were treated with the dressing. Clinicians prospectively recorded wound improvement or deterioration, level of wound exudate, presence of pain, and presence of slough and necrosis. Analysis of this data provided information on clinical performance of the dressing. Semi-quantitative culture to assess bacterial bioburden was performed where possible. We recruited 104 patients, mean age 61 years old, with 114 wounds. The mean duration of wounds before treatment was 3.7 months and the mean duration of treatment was 25.7 days. During treatment 24 wounds (21%) healed and the remaining 90 (79%) wounds improved following application of the dressing. No deterioration in any wound was observed. A reduction in patient pain, level of wound exudate and in devitalised tissue were consistently reported. These positive improvements in wound progress were reflected in the wound cultures that showed a reduction in bacterial load in 39 out of the 40 swabs taken. There were two adverse events recorded: a stinging sensation following application of the dressing was experienced by 2 patients, and 2 elderly patients died of causes unrelated to the dressing or to the chronic wound. These patients' wounds and their response to SHRO have been included in the analysis. SHRO was well tolerated and shows great promise as an effective potent topical antimicrobial in the healing of challenging wounds. Matthew Dryden has become a shareholder in Matoke Holdings, the manufacturer of Surgihoney RO, since the completion of this study. Keith Cutting is a

  9. Negative pressure wound therapy for the treatment of infected wounds with exposed knee joint after patellar fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Yang; Niikura, Takahiro; Miwa, Masahiko; Sakai, Yoshitada; Oe, Keisuke; Fukazawa, Takahiro; Kawakami, Yohei; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2011-06-14

    Treatment of soft tissue defects with exposed bones and joints, resulting from trauma, infection, and surgical complications, represents a major challenge. The introduction of negative pressure wound therapy has changed many wound management practices. Negative pressure wound therapy has recently been used in the orthopedic field for management of traumatic or open wounds with exposed bone, nerve, tendon, and orthopedic implants. This article describes a case of a patient with a large soft tissue defect and exposed knee joint, in which negative pressure wound therapy markedly improved wound healing. A 50-year-old man presented with an ulceration of his left knee with exposed joint, caused by severe wound infections after open reduction and internal fixation of a patellar fracture. After 20 days of negative pressure wound therapy, a granulated wound bed covered the exposed bones and joint.To our knowledge, this is the first report of negative pressure wound therapy used in a patient with a large soft tissue defect with exposed knee joint. Despite the chronic wound secondary to infection, healing was achieved through the use of the negative pressure wound therapy, thus promoting granulation tissue formation and closing the joint. We suggest negative pressure wound therapy as an alternative option for patients with lower limb wounds containing exposed bones and joints when free flap transfer is contraindicated. Our result added to the growing evidence that negative pressure wound therapy is a useful adjunctive treatment for open wounds around the knee joint. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Defense Intelligence Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Management Office Management and Infrastructure Security Science and Technology Pre-Employment Forms Intelligence Community Wounded Warrior Internship Program News Articles Videos Contact DIA DIA in the News observed the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in an event Jan. 26, at the DIA headquarters. Story DIA

  11. International News Flows in the Post-Cold War World: Mapping the News and the News Producers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreberny-Mohammadi, Annabelle

    1995-01-01

    Reviews the global political environment, major global news providers, and technologies of global news production. Argues for a multinational comparative mapping of international news representation in the 1990s. Outlines a major international venture to update and elaborate the 1979 UNESCO/IAMCR study of foreign news in the media of 29 countries,…

  12. Marine environment news. Vol. 2, no. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-09-01

    This issue of the Newsletter carries articles on Tracers to reveal Global Role of Southern Oceans in Climate Change, a Technical Cooperation project on contamination in Mediterranean Sea and an article Marine Environment Laboratory (MEL) and Harmful Algal Blooms: nuclear methods serving seafood toxicity management. News items on training, personnel and intercomparison exercise are also covered

  13. Framing beyond words : Applying cluster and sentiment analysis to news coverage of the nuclear power issue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burscher, B.; Vliegenthart, R.; de Vreese, C.H.

    2016-01-01

    Methods to automatically analyze media content are advancing significantly. Among others, it has become increasingly popular to analyze the framing of news articles by means of statistical procedures. In this article, we investigate the conceptual validity of news frames that are inferred by a

  14. The Spin Doctors of news sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Antonio Schmitz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines in a historical context, with reference to concrete cases, the phenomenon of spin doctors. What is it? How does it act? What is its purpose? Where does it operate? And what are its consequences? These questions are raised in order to help identify the actions and strategies benefitting news sources, as well as the impact on journalism: the accommodation of journalists, the reduction or elimination of investigative journalism, the transference of the news to digital social networks, and the expansion of media sources. The article draws on a survey conducted with 163 news sources and journalists, on the premise that spin doctors are professional communicators, who are able to forge public opinion using processes, procedures, journalist’s co-optation, and knowledge of journalism and public relations, in order to be successful in the media, or directly with the target audience.

  15. THE SPIN DOCTORS OF NEWS SOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Antonio Schmitz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines in a historical context, with reference to concrete cases, the phenomenon of spin doctors. What is it? How does it act? What is its purpose? Where does it operate? And what are its consequences? These questions are raised in order to help identify the actions and strategies benefitting news sources, as well as the impact on journalism: the accommodation of journalists, the reduction or elimination of investigative journalism, the transference of the news to digital social networks, and the expansion of media sources. The article draws on a survey conducted with 163 news sources and journalists, on the premise that spin doctors are professional communicators, who are able to forge public opinion using processes, procedures, journalist’s co-optation, and knowledge of journalism and public relations, in order to be successful in the media, or directly with the target audience.

  16. Research News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research News Share this page Facebook Twitter Email Research News Research News Quarterly Updates Research Call Archive ... Clinical Trials in MS Learn More Become a Research Champion An MS Research Revolution Support MS Research ...

  17. A guide to wound managment in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Wayne A

    2005-11-01

    Wound management in palliative patients is often a very challenging area of care. There are many unique issues that can combine to produce complicated wound management scenarios, including the types of wounds and wound symptoms most commonly affecting palliative care patients, as well as the presence of concurrent disease and associated treatment. Problems exist with the availability of suitable dressings and balancing life expectancy with the goals of wound care. A significant, and possibly under-recognized, issue is the emotional and social distress experienced by these patients, which can be directly attributed to their wound. These problems must all be recognized and addressed in order to manage wounds effectively in this patient population. This article aims to explore these issues and offer advice on the management of wound-related symptoms, with the ultimate goal of improving patients' quality of life.

  18. Breaking bad news revisited: the push for negotiated disclosure and changing practice implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arber, Anne; Gallagher, Ann

    2003-04-01

    This article revisits the ethical, legal, professional and emotional issues involved with disclosing bad news. The authors examine the push for disclosure that has come from a number of quarters in the UK, including ethical and legal challenges, in particular the Bristol Royal Inquiry Report, professional codes of conduct, health policy and the expectations of the public. The contribution of nurses to breaking bad news is not widely discussed in the literature. With the development of new nursing roles and evidence-based practice it is timely to consider the role of nurses in this process. The article highlights some limitations with current guidelines for breaking bad news, in particular, that these guidelines tend to be constructed from a professional standpoint and lack patient-centred evidence. The issue of emotional labour and how it relates to giving bad news is discussed with respect to professional staff and patients. The article concludes by raising some practice implications, including: the importance of context and continuity; the significance of information and support; the desirable qualities of the professional; and issues to consider in determining patient preferences.

  19. Beyond Knowledge Gaps: Examining Socioeconomic Differences in Response to Cancer News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederdeppe, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    This article tested a model, informed by the knowledge gap hypothesis, to predict information seeking about cancer immediately following news about the diagnosis or death from cancer of a national celebrity. I identified five celebrity news events and examined their impact using data from the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey. News…

  20. News Coverage of Child Sexual Abuse and Prevention, 2007-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Pamela; Cheyne, Andrew; Dorfman, Lori

    2012-01-01

    News media coverage of child sexual abuse can help policymakers and the public understand what must be done to prevent future abuse, but coverage tends to focus on extreme cases. This article presents an analysis of newspaper coverage from 2007 to 2009 to describe how the daily news presents and frames day-to-day stories about child sexual abuse.…

  1. The Digital Distribution of Public Health News Surrounding the Human Papillomavirus Vaccination: A Longitudinal Infodemiology Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, L Meghan; Tang, Tang; Ji, Kai; Ulrich-Schad, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    New media changes the dissemination of public health information and misinformation. During a guest appearance on the Today Show, US Representative Michele Bachmann claimed that human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines could cause "mental retardation". The purpose of this study is to explore how new media influences the type of public health information users access, as well as the impact to these platforms after a major controversy. Specifically, this study aims to examine the similarities and differences in the dissemination of news articles related to the HPV vaccination between Google News and Twitter, as well as how the content of news changed after Michele Bachmann's controversial comment. This study used a purposive sampling to draw the first 100 news articles that appeared on Google News and the first 100 articles that appeared on Twitter from August 1-October 31, 2011. Article tone, source, topics, concerns, references, publication date, and interactive features were coded. The intercoder reliability had a total agreement of .90. Results indicate that 44.0% of the articles (88/200) about the HPV vaccination had a positive tone, 32.5% (65/200) maintained a neutral tone, while 23.5% (47/200) presented a negative tone. Protection against diseases 82.0% (164/200), vaccine eligibility for females 75.5% (151/200), and side effects 59.0% (118/200) were the top three topics covered by these articles. Google News and Twitter articles significantly differed in article tone, source, topics, concerns covered, types of sources referenced in the article, and uses of interactive features. Most notably, topic focus changed from public health information towards political conversation after Bachmann's comment. Before the comment, the HPV vaccine news talked more often about vaccine dosing (Ppolitics (P=.01) and talked more about HPV vaccine eligibility for males (P=.01). This longitudinal infodemiology study suggests that new media influences public health communication

  2. Good News in Bad News: How Negativity Enhances Economic Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Svensson, H.M.; Albæk, E.; van Dalen, A.; de Vreese, C.

    2017-01-01

    Negativity is a news ideology, and its negative effects on attitude formation are widely documented. Contrary to this view, the present study demonstrates that negative economic news can in fact be good news. Based on a two-wave national panel survey and a media content analysis, we show that individual exposure to negative economic news enhances internal economic efficacy, a sense of competence in and understanding of the economy. This is good news as internal economic efficacy may facilitat...

  3. News from the future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinecke Hansen, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a corpus linguistic analysis of the development in future-oriented political journalism in four Danish newspapers in the period 1997–2013 (N = 2954 full articles = 1,553,038 word tokens). Keyword analysis and concordance analysis are applied within a framework of grammatical......-semantic theory of tense and modal verbs and semantic-pragmatic theory of time meaning, modality and speech acts. The results suggest, unexpectedly, that the newspapers – and news reports in particular – seem to have become less future-oriented in the period. At the same time, however, the articles...

  4. A mediation model for the translation of radio news texts in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Broadcast journalists in South Africa are media workers, editors and translators simultaneously producing news for bilingual or multilingual audiences. News texts are translated from English into one or more of the other official languages, depending on the target audience of the broadcaster. This article aims to indicate how ...

  5. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    78 Feature Article. What is Free Software? V Vinay · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 79-84 Classroom. Exchange and Sign-change: The Pauli Exclusion Principle · Rahul Siddharthan · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 85-87 Research News.

  6. Antimicrobials and Non-Healing Wounds. Evidence, controversies and suggestions-key messages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottrup, Finn; Apelqvist, Jan; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This article constitutes an extraction of key messages originally presented in the Document: Antimicrobials and Non-Healing Wounds. Evidence, controversies and suggestions written by the European Wound Management Association (EWMA), and originally published by the Journal of Wound Care in 2013. All...

  7. Types of Journalistic News Selection or Media Tracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SILVIA BRANEA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to answer to the following question: How do the TV news and the online media platforms reflect reality from Romania and from outside of Romania? The subjective response to this question will be given based on an audiovisual and online monitoring conducted in the week 2-8 May 2011. The main core of our analysis consists of data obtained through monitoring of programs at four local Romanian TV stations (TVR 2, B1TV, Realitatea TV and Antena 3 for one week at the beginning of May, 2011. We also used information provided by two news websites: hotnews.ro and realitatea.ro.The research starts from two assumptions: 1. The news presented by all four TV networks will focus on events in the proximity, on the one hand and on human interest, on the other hand. 2. Online news websites will be more interested in political and social news, both in the region and in more distant areas. From the methodological point of view, the analysis of documents (the audiovisual tracks and the online ones is based on the communicational approach and on hermeneutic analysis.

  8. TYPES OF JOURNALISTIC NEWS SELECTION OR MEDIA TRACKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SILVIA BRANEA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to answer to the following question: How do the TV news and the online media platforms reflect reality from Romania and from outside of Romania? The subjective response to this question will be given based on an audiovisual and online monitoring conducted in the week 2−8 May 2011. The main core of our analysis consists of data obtained through monitoring of programs at four local Romanian TV stations (TVR 2, B1TV, Realitatea TV and Antena 3 for one week at the beginning of May, 2011. We also used information provided by two news websites: hotnews.ro and realitatea.ro. The research starts from two assumptions: 1. The news presented by all four TV networks will focus on events in the proximity, on the one hand and on human interest, on the other hand. 2. Online news websites will be more interested in political and social news, both in the region and in more distant areas. From the methodological point of view, the analysis of documents (the audiovisual tracks and the online ones is based on the communicational approach and on hermeneutic analysis

  9. BBC VERSUS EURO NEWS: DISCOURSE AND IDEOLOGY IN NEWS TRANSLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseini, F.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to compare discursive strategies employed by two international news agencies including Euro News and BBC. Van Dijk’s (2004 model of CDA was adopted. Thirty pieces of news about internal affairs of Iran together with their Persian translations were downloaded from the corresponding website, i.e. 30 pieces of English news and their corresponding Persian translations from the Euro News website and 30 pieces of English news with their corresponding translations from the BBC website. The frequency of lexical items was observed to not differ significantly. Two sets of translations were compared to their source texts based on four discursive strategies of hyperbole, polarization, vagueness and euphemism. An independent-samples t-test was conducted to compare the frequency of strategies applied by the two news agencies. Results revealed no significant difference between the two agencies except for the discursive strategy of vagueness.

  10. The good news about giving bad news to patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Neil J; Urban, Susan Y; Collier, Virginia U; Weiner, Joan; Polite, Ronald G; Davis, Elizabeth B; Boyer, E Gil

    2002-12-01

    There are few data available on how physicians inform patients about bad news. We surveyed internists about how they convey this information. We surveyed internists about their activities in giving bad news to patients. One set of questions was about activities for the emotional support of the patient (11 items), and the other was about activities for creating a supportive environment for delivering bad news (9 items). The impact of demographic factors on the performance of emotionally supportive items, environmentally supportive items, and on the number of minutes reportedly spent delivering news was analyzed by analysis of variance and multiple regression analysis. More than half of the internists reported that they always or frequently performed 10 of the 11 emotionally supportive items and 6 of the 9 environmentally supportive items while giving bad news to patients. The average time reportedly spent in giving bad news was 27 minutes. Although training in giving bad news had a significant impact on the number of emotionally supportive items reported (P woman, unmarried, and having a history of major illness were also associated with reporting a greater number of emotionally supportive activities. Internists report that they inform patients of bad news appropriately. Some deficiencies exist, specifically in discussing prognosis and referral of patients to support groups. Physician educational efforts should include discussion of prognosis with patients as well as the availability of support groups.

  11. Acute and Impaired Wound Healing: Pathophysiology and Current Methods for Drug Delivery, Part 1: Normal and Chronic Wounds: Biology, Causes, and Approaches to Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Herman, Ira M.

    2012-01-01

    This is the first installment of 2 articles that discuss the biology and pathophysiology of wound healing, review the role that growth factors play in this process, and describe current ways of growth factor delivery into the wound bed. Part 1 discusses the latest advances in clinicians’ understanding of the control points that regulate wound healing. Importantly, biological similarities and differences between acute and chronic wounds are considered, including the signaling pathways that initiate cellular and tissue responses after injury, which may be impeded during chronic wound healing. PMID:22713781

  12. Good, Bad or Absent: Discourses of Parents with Disabilities in Australian News Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Vikki; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth

    2015-01-01

    Background: News media frames public perceptions. As such, news media becomes a useful source of analysis to understand the presence (or otherwise) of people with disabilities, particularly intellectual disabilities, within parenting discourses in Australia. Method: Using Critical Discourse Analysis, this article examines major Australian…

  13. Puncture Wounds: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Skin problems. In: American Medical Association Handbook of First Aid and Emergency Care. New York, N.Y.: Random House; 2009. Jan. 12, 2018 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-puncture-wounds/basics/ART-20056665 . Mayo ...

  14. Collaborative Practice Model: Improving the Delivery of Bad News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Pamela N; Slusser, Kim; Allen, Deborah

    2018-02-01

    Ideal bad news delivery requires skilled communication and team support. The literature has primarily focused on patient preferences, impact on care decisions, healthcare roles, and communication styles, without addressing systematic implementation. This article describes how an interdisciplinary team, led by advanced practice nurses, developed and implemented a collaborative practice model to deliver bad news on a unit that had struggled with inconsistencies. Using evidence-based practices, the authors explored current processes, role perceptions and expectations, and perceived barriers to developing the model, which is now the standard of care and an example of interprofessional team collaboration across the healthcare system. This model for delivering bad news can be easily adapted to meet the needs of other clinical units.
.

  15. Use of the terms "schizophrenia" and "schizophrenic" in the South Korean news media: a content analysis of newspapers and news programs in the last 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun-Hyun; Choi, Young-Min; Kim, Bongseog; Lee, Dong-Woo; Gim, Min-Sook

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we explored the meaning attributed to the words "jungshinbunyeolbyung" (schizophrenia) and "jungshinbunyeol" (schizophrenic) in South Korean newspapers and news programs in the last 10 years. We screened the websites of three national newspapers and the broadcasts of three nationwide television news programs from January 1, 2001, to December 31, 2010. We classified a total of 490 articles and 257 news segments by category and quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed them. The articles and news segments were assigned to one of the following categories based on their use of the term "schizophrenia": 1) negative, 2) neutral or positive, 3) incidental, and 4) metaphorical. The negative viewpoint accounted for 349 incidences (46.7%), while the neutral and positive viewpoints included 225 incidences (30.1%). Incidental uses accounted for 95 incidences (12.7%), and metaphorical uses accounted for 78 incidences (10.4%). The majority of the negative uses focused on violence or dangers posed by patients (137 mentions, 37.8%), while the metaphorical uses mainly focused on the idea of splitting (51 mentions, or 65%). This study showed that the South Korean news media do not provide balanced information about schizophrenia to the public. This study also showed that no significant move has been made toward a more positive use of the term since a previous study was conducted on the subject. Although the term schizophrenia has given way to "attunement disorder," it will be difficult to establish the new term as the standard if the South Korean media continue to use the term "schizophrenic symptom." Even though the term has been changed, guidelines are necessary to encourage the mass media to provide balanced articles and reduce prejudice.

  16. Britishness and Community Cohesion in Muslim News Online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassen ZRIBA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The issues of British national identity and social cohesion have become pressing concerns within the multicultural fabric of contemporary British society. The increasing number of immigrants and their offspring, along with the maintenance of their cultural roots, seem to represent a serious defiance to social cohesion and the alleged “purity” of Britishness. A number of race related reports were produced by the official authorities to churn out the necessary steps to be followed by the British (immigrants and host community in order to keep social stability and community cohesion. Thus, the politics of community cohesion came to the fore as the neologism of contemporary British political discourse. Such new discourse of governance has been digested and processed differently by different mass media. It has been decoded, for instance, preferably by mainstream news agencies like BBC News Online. However, arguably, it is read appositionally or at best negotiatedly by ethnicity-related news agencies such as Muslim News Online. In this article, attempt has been made to adopt media discourse analysis tools to decipher the ways Muslim News Online decoded and then encoded the hegemonic official discourses of Britishness and community cohesion. A critical and interpretative approach is used to accomplish such study. The corpus of this study is primarily extracted from the website of the Muslim News Online.

  17. Negative pressure therapy for the treatment of complex wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RENAN VICTOR KÜMPEL SCHMIDT LIMA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of negative pressure therapy (NPT in the treatment of complex wounds, with emphasis on its mechanisms of action and main therapeutic indications. We searched the Pubmed / Medline database for articles published from 1997 to 2016, and selected the most relevant ones. The mechanisms of action of NPT involveboth physical effects, such as increased perfusion, control of edema and exudate, reduction of wound dimensions and bacterial clearance, and biological ones, such as the stimulation of granulation tissue formation, microdeformations and reduction of Inflammatory response. The main indications of NPT are complex wounds, such as pressure ulcers, traumatic wounds, operative wound dehiscences, burns, necrotizing wounds, venous ulcers, diabetic wounds, skin grafts, open abdomen, prevention of complications in closed incisions and in the association with instillation of solutions in infected wounds.

  18. Posts to online news message boards and public discourse surrounding DUI enforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Susan M; Wesolowski, Kathryn

    2009-12-01

    This study analyzes posts to online news message boards covering driving under the influence (DUI) enforcement efforts to determine their usefulness for informing traffic safety program planning and public relations efforts aimed at mainstream drinking drivers. A series of Google searches were conducted using keywords designed to capture news stories regarding impaired driving enforcement efforts. For each search, the first 100 Web pages returned were reviewed and articles were included in analysis if they were from an independent news source and contained user comments. Coders captured data on 28 fields for each post, including tone in relation to enforcement, tone of interpersonal communication with other posters, and expressed feelings regarding drinking and driving. Fifty-six news articles covering DUI enforcement efforts met study criteria, with 615 posts. The majority of posts (57%) were neutral on DUI enforcement; 24 percent (148) took a negative tone and 19 percent (115) positive. Posts that discussed checkpoints were 2.6 times more likely to take a negative tone toward enforcement than those that did not. Twenty-one percent of anti-enforcement posts challenged the idea that driving after drinking was necessarily dangerous. Of the 321 posts involving direct communication between posters, 67 percent involved disagreement with another post. Profanity or belittling comments appeared in 10 percent of posts. Public responses to DUI enforcement news articles provide insight into the beliefs and thought processes of those who oppose enforcement efforts or view drinking and driving as no big deal. Primary objections to enforcement focused on civil and personal rights issues, skepticism regarding law enforcement's motives and objectivity, and the belief that drinking driving is not a "real" crime. Online news message boards could be useful in informing campaigns and helping program planners frame media events and press releases to best appeal to the most at

  19. Media ownership and news framing: an analysis of HIV/AIDS coverage by Ugandan press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiwanuka-Tondo, James; Albada, Kelly F; Payton, Fay Cobb

    2012-12-01

    Applying framing theory, the present research analyzes trends in Ugandan news coverage and the prominent issue frames for HIV/AIDS-related stories. In order to determine the influence of other factors, such as media ownership and journalist origin, nearly 800 articles, from 2000 to 2004, were gathered from the major private newspaper and government-owned newspaper in Uganda. After systematic sampling, 365 articles constitute the sample. The results indicate that print news coverage of HIV and AIDS followed a non-linear trajectory, declining from 2000-2002 and then increasing from 2003-2004. Curative medicine emerged as the most prominent issue frame. Higher-risk behaviour was the least prominent issue frame overall. The 'solutions' issue frame nearly doubled in prominence from 2000-2004, while the HIV-prevention frame decreased from 2000-2002 and then rebounded from 2003-2004. Concerning HIV-related topics, the private newspaper included more features, printed lengthier articles, incorporated a greater variety of news frames, and published more articles by foreign journalists than the government-owned newspaper. The private newspaper employed the 'HIV-prevention,' 'action,' and 'victims' frames more often than the government-owned newspaper. Journalists at the government-owned newspaper adopted a 'solutions' frame more often than their private-press counterparts. Though foreign journalists were more likely than local journalists to employ the HIV-prevention frame, additional tests revealed that the news organisation for which the journalists worked contributed to issue framing to a greater extent than did either a local or foreign reporting origin. Local (Ugandan) journalists working for the two news organisations differed in their tendencies to apply the HIV-prevention, action, victims, and tragedy frames in news stories on HIV and AIDS, with journalists at the private newspaper using these frames more often than did journalists at the government-owned newspaper.

  20. News media coverage of trans fat: health risks and policy responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarlenski, Marian; Barry, Colleen L

    2013-01-01

    Prior research indicates that the news media play a critical role in transmitting information to the public about the most pressing public health problems, and framing attributions about who in society is responsible for solving these problems. In this article, we use content analysis methods to study the agenda-setting and framing functions of the news media in shaping perceptions about the health risks posed by trans fat in the U.S. diet. A census of news stories focusing on trans fat was collected from the two largest circulation U.S. newspapers and three major television networks from 1998 to 2008 (N = 156). The content of news coverage was analyzed using a 23-item instrument. Findings indicated that the news media served an important agenda-setting role in educating the public about the presence of trans fat in the U.S. diet and describing the health risks these foods pose. In addition, results indicate that news media coverage framed attributions of responsibility for solving the problem of trans fat in the food supply. News stories noting the heart disease risks of trans fat were significantly more likely to mention governmental responses aimed at curbing consumption than news coverage that did not note these health risks.

  1. Effect of aging on wound healing: current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Joyce

    2007-01-01

    The population is aging, and advanced age is commonly identified as a risk factor for delayed wound healing. Therefore, it is important for WOC nurses to be knowledgeable about how aging affects the wound healing and repair process, and strategies they can use to promote healing in the elderly population. Impaired wound healing in the aged is due partly to comorbidities common among the elderly, but evidence also suggests that inherent differences in cellular structure and function may impair tissue repair and regeneration as well. This article will address the effect of aging on wound healing, with a particular focus on processes of cellular senescence and related factors hypothesized to result in slowed or impaired wound healing in the elderly.

  2. News media consumption among immigrants in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Connie Carøe

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, especially with the advent of Digital Broadcasting Technology, transnational media has become central in the consumption of news by immigrant populations. This has received some attention as a factor associated with lack of integration into their new societies. The present article...

  3. The Effects of Bad News and Good News on a Newspaper's Image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Jack B.; Miller, M. Mark

    1984-01-01

    Concludes that whether a newspaper carries mostly good news or mostly bad news affects the image of the paper, with bad news having negative effects and good news having positive effects on readers' perceptions of the newspaper. (FL)

  4. Investigating people’s news diets: how online news users use offline news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trilling, D.; Schoenbach, K.

    2015-01-01

    The question how offline media use is related to online media use has been heavily debated in the last decades. If they are functionally equivalent, then advantages like low costs, rapid publication cycles, and easy access to online news could lead to them displacing offline news. Data from a

  5. Identifying and exploring physical and psychological morbidity and patient and family caregiver resilience following acute wound development and/or wound blistering post orthopaedic surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ousey, Karen; Edward, Karen-Leigh; Lui, Steve

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this article was to identify the literature that examined and explored physical and psychological morbidity and patient and family caregiver resilience following acute wound development and/or wound blistering post orthopaedic surgery. A systematic review of the literature using the databases MEDLINE, CINAHL and EMBASE was undertaken. The papers were examined using title and abstract for relevance to the primary and secondary outcomes. The primary outcome of interest was family caregiver resilience following acute wound development and/or wound blistering post orthopaedic surgery. The search yielded 275 records after removing any duplicates; eight studies were considered eligible and were reviewed as full text. Following full review, none of the studies was included in this article. To conclude, there were no papers that investigated or examined the concept of resilience in relation to the management of acute post-surgical orthopaedic wounds. Four of the papers identified, following the review process, did discuss quality of life outcomes and how these may be improved following wound development; most papers focused on the management of chronic wounds. It is apparent from the review that there is no evidence currently available that explores patient and family caregiver resilience following acute wound development and/or wound blistering post orthopaedic surgery. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The impact of Australian ETS news on wholesale spot electricity prices. An exploratory analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevallier, Julien

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the impact of news concerning the development of emissions trading in Australia (such as the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme (CPRS)) on wholesale electricity spot prices, by using a database of 117 news announcements from December 1, 1998 to July 1, 2009. As power producers constitute the bulk of the participants of the proposed Australian emissions trading scheme, regulatory changes (about allocation, banking, coverage, targets) are indeed likely to affect the five interconnected electricity markets in New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Victoria, and Tasmania. We assess these effects with an ARMA(1,1)-GARCH(1,1) model, where daily electricity spot prices are regressed against exogenous variables in the mean and variance equations. This article constitutes the first empirical analysis of Australian ETS news effects on electricity wholesale spot prices. Our results show two asymmetric types of news effects, depending on their information content. (author)

  7. The impact of Australian ETS news on wholesale spot electricity prices. An exploratory analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevallier, Julien [Universite Paris Dauphine, Place du Marechal de Lattre de Tassigny, 75775 Paris Cedex 16 (France)

    2010-08-15

    This article investigates the impact of news concerning the development of emissions trading in Australia (such as the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme (CPRS)) on wholesale electricity spot prices, by using a database of 117 news announcements from December 1, 1998 to July 1, 2009. As power producers constitute the bulk of the participants of the proposed Australian emissions trading scheme, regulatory changes (about allocation, banking, coverage, targets) are indeed likely to affect the five interconnected electricity markets in New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Victoria, and Tasmania. We assess these effects with an ARMA(1,1)-GARCH(1,1) model, where daily electricity spot prices are regressed against exogenous variables in the mean and variance equations. This article constitutes the first empirical analysis of Australian ETS news effects on electricity wholesale spot prices. Our results show two asymmetric types of news effects, depending on their information content. (author)

  8. The impact of Australian ETS news on wholesale spot electricity prices: An exploratory analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevallier, Julien, E-mail: julien.chevallier@dauphine.f [Universite Paris Dauphine, Place du Marechal de Lattre de Tassigny, 75775 Paris Cedex 16 (France)

    2010-08-15

    This article investigates the impact of news concerning the development of emissions trading in Australia (such as the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme (CPRS)) on wholesale electricity spot prices, by using a database of 117 news announcements from December 1, 1998 to July 1, 2009. As power producers constitute the bulk of the participants of the proposed Australian emissions trading scheme, regulatory changes (about allocation, banking, coverage, targets) are indeed likely to affect the five interconnected electricity markets in New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Victoria, and Tasmania. We assess these effects with an ARMA(1,1)-GARCH(1,1) model, where daily electricity spot prices are regressed against exogenous variables in the mean and variance equations. This article constitutes the first empirical analysis of Australian ETS news effects on electricity wholesale spot prices. Our results show two asymmetric types of news effects, depending on their information content.

  9. Implementation of news module for news client based on ApiCloud

    OpenAIRE

    Fu Xin; Liang Yu; Cao Sanxing; Gu Hongbo

    2017-01-01

    With the development of new media technology, news client has become the main battlefield of news browsing. Based on the ApiCloud hybrid development platform, this paper uses HTML, JavaScript and other technologies to develop the mobile client news module, and uses WAMP integrated development environment to build a news publishing system on the server side.

  10. Reporting risk, producing prejudice: how news reporting on obesity shapes attitudes about health risk, policy, and prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saguy, Abigail C; Frederick, David; Gruys, Kjerstin

    2014-06-01

    News reporting on research studies may influence attitudes about health risk, support for public health policies, or attitudes towards people labeled as unhealthy or at risk for disease. Across five experiments (N = 2123) we examined how different news framings of obesity research influence these attitudes. We exposed participants to either a control condition, a news report on a study portraying obesity as a public health crisis, a news report on a study suggesting that obesity may not be as much of a problem as previously thought, or an article discussing weight-based discrimination. Compared to controls, exposure to the public health crisis article did not increase perception of obesity-related health risks but did significantly increase the expression of antifat prejudice in four out of seven comparisons. Across studies, compared to controls, participants who read an article about weight-based discrimination were less likely to agree that overweight constitutes a public health crisis or to support various obesity policies. Effects of exposure to an article questioning the health risks associated with overweight and obesity were mixed. These findings suggest that news reports on the "obesity epidemic" - and, by extension, on public health crises commonly blamed on personal behavior - may unintentionally activate prejudice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Handing Over the ATLAS eNews Scientific Editor Task

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Jenni

    2006-01-01

    The ATLAS eNews are now established since many years as a lively source of stories about the construction of our detector as well as the preparations for the physics running to come. The human touch in telling these stories is important, and to stimulate and motivate the article writers to include also this side of our work is one of the tasks for the Scientific Editor of the eNews. Joleen ('Jo') Pater has been the enthusiastic and competent 'skipper' for the last two years keeping the eNews on track. The whole Collaboration owes her a great and very hearty thank-you! Pauline Gagnon has kindly accepted to take up the challenge for the next couple of years. She will have the privilege to be the editor when we will see the first collisions with ATLAS! I wish her all the best for this new task. Outgoing and incoming editors of the ATLAS E-news: Jo Pater (left) and Pauline Gagnon (right)

  12. How is research evidence used to support claims made in advertisements for wound care products?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumville, Jo C; Petherick, Emily S; O'Meara, Susan; Raynor, Pauline; Cullum, Nicky

    2009-05-01

    To investigate the amount, type and accuracy of citations use in support of product related claims from advertisements of wound care products. Although articles submitted to most medical journals are subjected to peer review, such scrutiny is often not required for the content of advertisements. A contents survey of advertisements from two wound care journals (Journal of Wound Care and Ostomy Wound Management) from 2002-2003 and the British Medical Journal, 2002-2003. Data collected from advertisements included identification of product related claims made and any corresponding citations. Where journal articles were cited to support claims, the articles were obtained. Where data on file were cited, this material was requested. In each case the accuracy of claims in relation to the content of the supporting citation was assessed. The use of citations to support product related claims was infrequent in advertisements from wound care journals, where 35% of advertisements containing a product related claim also contained at least one citation, compared with 63% of advertisements from the British Medical Journal. Of citations that were supplied, journal articles were less common in the wound journals (40% vs. 73% in the British Medical Journal) and data on file more common (38% vs. 6% in the British Medical Journal). Where journal articles were obtained, 56% of claims in the wound care journals advertisements were not supported by the cited article, compared with 12% of claims in the British Medical Journal. The wound journals advertised predominantly medical devices. The use and accuracy of referencing in advertisements from wound care journals was poor. Nurses have increasing responsibilities for the prescribing of both drugs and devices, which must be accompanied by the ability to interpret marketing materials and research evidence critically. Nurse educators must ensure that nurse education generally and nurse prescriber training particularly, builds skills of

  13. Voices and Power in the Tv News Broadcast: The Workings of the Reported Speech in Rede Globo´S National News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dóris de Arruda Carneiro da Cunha

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This article presents some reflections on the voices and power of journalism on TV, based on a study of a news report in Jornal Nacional, via Rede Globo, an evening Brazilian TV news program. The central question is the power of the editor and the journalists in the construction of the news, constituted mostly by the use of reported speech. In the analyzed newscast, the ways the heterodiscourse are inserted are little diversified and apparently neutral: the citing discourse of the editor and the one of the presenter calls the journalist who introduces other voices – fragments of interviews, official statements and testimonies, in the form of direct or indirect citation. The strategy is not to use linguistic forms that explicitly state their points of view. However, the selected voices serve to illustrate and highlight the veiled views of the company and its professionals, acting as an authoritative argument. This way, TV Globo exercises its power by manipulating a large audience, unaware of this strategy, who believes that the news broadcast on Jornal Nacional is neutral and truthful.

  14. ENET News July 2003 - Information on energy research - German issue; ENET News, Juli 2003, Nr. 55 deutsch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellstein, J.

    2003-07-01

    The July 2003 issue of ENET News, a magazine on energy research in Switzerland published three times a year, presents several articles on and around the topic of geothermal energy. Further articles cover the topics of decentralised power supply, environment-friendly small hydropower, adsorption refrigeration for African clinics, optimisation of wood-fired boilers, biofuels and noise abatement issues concerning heat pump applications. Also, a fuel-cell based mobile power pack and an electric scooter are described. Further articles take a look at nuclear fusion and the development of a gas-motor based combined heat and power system.

  15. ENET News July 2003 - Information on energy research - French issue; ENET News, Juillet 2003, No 55 francais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellstein, J.

    2003-07-01

    The July 2003 issue of ENET News, a magazine on energy research in Switzerland published three times a year, presents several articles on and around the topic of geothermal energy. Further articles cover the topics of decentralised power supply, environment-friendly small hydropower, adsorption refrigeration for African clinics, optimisation of wood-fired boilers, biofuels and noise abatement issues concerning heat pump applications. Also, a fuel-cell based mobile power pack and an electric scooter are described. Further articles take a look at nuclear fusion and the development of a gas-motor based combined heat and power system.

  16. Transition theory and its relevance to patients with chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil, J A; Barrell, L M

    1998-01-01

    A wound, in the broadest sense, is a disruption of normal anatomic structure and function. Acute wounds progress through a timely and orderly sequence of repair that leads to the restoration of functional integrity. In chronic wounds, this timely and orderly sequence goes awry. As a result, people with chronic wounds often face not only physiological difficulties but emotional ones as well. The study of body image and its damage as a result of a chronic wound fits well with Selder's transition theory. This article describes interviews with seven patients with chronic wounds. The themes that emerged from those interviews were compared with Selder's theory to describe patients' experience with chronic wounds as a transition process that can be identified and better understood by healthcare providers.

  17. Implementation of news module for news client based on ApiCloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Xin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of new media technology, news client has become the main battlefield of news browsing. Based on the ApiCloud hybrid development platform, this paper uses HTML, JavaScript and other technologies to develop the mobile client news module, and uses WAMP integrated development environment to build a news publishing system on the server side.

  18. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pp 768-778 General Article. Dissymmetry and Asymmetry - A Hopeless Conflict in Chemical Literature · Chandan Saha Suchandra Chakraborty · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 779-790 Classroom. Analysing Spherical Aberration in Concave Mirrors · Ranjit Konkar · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 791-796 Research News.

  19. News clippings for introductory astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrowsky, Matthew

    1999-09-01

    Most students entering our introductory astronomy course for nonscience majors arrive not merely lacking scientific facts-they also have misconceptions about the nature of science, and many have a handicapping ``science anxiety'' (in addition to math anxiety). So I have added a ``current science'' requirement to our introductory course. Each student must compile a file of five astronomy news articles taken from readily available sources.

  20. The Future of Data-Driven Wound Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Jon S; Saxena, Mayur; Nagamine, Tasha; Howell, Raelina S; Criscitelli, Theresa; Gorenstein, Scott; M Gillette, Brian

    2018-04-01

    Care for patients with chronic wounds can be complex, and the chances of poor outcomes are high if wound care is not optimized through evidence-based protocols. Tracking and managing every variable and comorbidity in patients with wounds is difficult despite the increasing use of wound-specific electronic medical records. Harnessing the power of big data analytics to help nurses and physicians provide optimized care based on the care provided to millions of patients can result in better outcomes. Numerous applications of machine learning toward workflow improvements, inpatient monitoring, outpatient communication, and hospital operations can improve overall efficiency and efficacy of care delivery in and out of the hospital, while reducing adverse events and complications. This article provides an overview of the application of big data analytics and machine learning in health care, highlights important recent advances, and discusses how these technologies may revolutionize advanced wound care. © AORN, Inc, 2018.

  1. Pushed news: when the news comes to the cellphone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Fidalgo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Combining two findings of recent surveys on the Internet which state that 1 “the Internet will soon surpass all other media as a main source for national and international news” and 2 “the mobile device will be the primary connection tool to the Internet in 2020” leads us to the conclusion that smartphones will soon be the primary source for news access. But if so, how will news come to the Internetconnected cellphones? In accordance with the distinction, already drawn in 1997, between push and pull technologies as two different forms of how content is delivered to the end users, cellphones are characterized as push devices (passive reception, in opposition to computers, classified as pull devices (active reception. The news items that fit cellphones are pushed news. And they will be pushed as SMS, e-mails, tweets and through news aggregators.

  2. PUSHED NEWS: When the news comes to the cellphone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Fidalgo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Combining two findings of recent surveys on the Internet whichstate that 1 “the Internet will soon surpass all other media as a main source for national and international news” and 2 “the mobile device will be the primary connection tool to the Internet in 2020” leads us to the conclusion that smartphones will soon be the primary source for news access. But if so, how will news come to the Internetconnected cellphones? In accordance with the distinction, already drawn in 1997, between push and pull technologies as two different forms of how content is delivered to the end users, cellphones are characterized as push devices (passive reception, in opposition to computers, classified as pull devices (active reception. The news items that fit cellphones are pushed news. And they will be pushed as SMS, e-mails, tweets and through news aggregators.

  3. Good News in Bad News: How Negativity Enhances Economic Efficacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svensson, H.M.; Albæk, E.; van Dalen, A.; de Vreese, C.

    2017-01-01

    Negativity is a news ideology, and its negative effects on attitude formation are widely documented. Contrary to this view, the present study demonstrates that negative economic news can in fact be good news. Based on a two-wave national panel survey and a media content analysis, we show that

  4. Platelet Rich Plasma: New Insights for Cutaneous Wound Healing Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Chicharro-Alcántara

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The overall increase of chronic degenerative diseases associated with ageing makes wound care a tremendous socioeconomic burden. Thus, there is a growing need to develop novel wound healing therapies to improve cutaneous wound healing. The use of regenerative therapies is becoming increasingly popular due to the low-invasive procedures needed to apply them. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP is gaining interest due to its potential to stimulate and accelerate the wound healing process. The cytokines and growth factors forming PRP play a crucial role in the healing process. This article reviews the emerging field of skin wound regenerative therapies with particular emphasis on PRP and the role of growth factors in the wound healing process.

  5. Platelet Rich Plasma: New Insights for Cutaneous Wound Healing Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicharro-Alcántara, Deborah; Damiá-Giménez, Elena; Carrillo-Poveda, José M.; Peláez-Gorrea, Pau

    2018-01-01

    The overall increase of chronic degenerative diseases associated with ageing makes wound care a tremendous socioeconomic burden. Thus, there is a growing need to develop novel wound healing therapies to improve cutaneous wound healing. The use of regenerative therapies is becoming increasingly popular due to the low-invasive procedures needed to apply them. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is gaining interest due to its potential to stimulate and accelerate the wound healing process. The cytokines and growth factors forming PRP play a crucial role in the healing process. This article reviews the emerging field of skin wound regenerative therapies with particular emphasis on PRP and the role of growth factors in the wound healing process. PMID:29346333

  6. Healthy depictions? Depicting adoption and adoption news events on broadcast news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Susan L; Chatterjee, Karishma; Karel, Amanda I

    2009-01-01

    Given that the public uses the media to learn about adoption as a family form, this study analyzes U.S. television news coverage of adoption between 2001 and 2005 (N = 309 stories), to identify the types of news events covered about adoption. A majority of news stories covered fraud, crime, legal disputes, and negative international adoption cases. Adoptees as defective or unhealthy were depicted more in negative news event stories, birth parents appeared less overall, and adoptive parents were most likely to have healthy depictions in positively oriented adoption experience, big family, and reunion stories. Although three quarters of the stories used primary adoption participants as news sources, one-third of the negative event stories did not contain healthy depictions of adoption participants. The authors discuss ways journalists and researchers might improve adoption news coverage.

  7. News framing and public opinion: A mediation analysis of framing effects on political attitudes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lecheler, S.K.; de Vreese, C.H.

    2012-01-01

    There is no satisfactory account of the psychological processes that mediate a news framing effect. Based on an experimental study (N = 1,537), this article presents a mediation analysis of a news framing effect on opinion, testing for two important mediation processes: belief importance and belief

  8. High Tempo Knowledge Collaboration in Wikipedia's Coverage of Breaking News Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Brian C.

    2012-01-01

    When major news breaks in our hyper-connected society, we increasingly turn to an encyclopedia for the latest information. Wikipedia's coverage of breaking news events attracts unique levels of attention; the articles with the most page views, edits, and contributors in any given month since 2003 are related to current events. Extant…

  9. Diverse politics, diverse news coverage? A longitudinal study of diversity in Dutch political news during two decades of election campaigns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoof, A.M.J.; Jacobi, C.; Ruigrok, N.; van Atteveldt, W.H.

    2014-01-01

    Although diverse political news has been recognized as a requirement for a well-functioning democracy, longitudinal research into this topic is sparse. In this article, we analyse the development of diversity in election coverage in the Netherlands between 1994 and 2012. We distinguish between

  10. Great Escapes from the Past. Memory and Identity in European Transnational Television News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Widholm

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last couple of decades, Europe has undergone fundamental political transformations that have challenged old stereotypes about the ‘essence’ of the European identity. This article analyses televisual narratives of the 2004 enlargement of the European Union, turning the analytical spotlight on two of Europe’s largest news broadcasters: BBC World and Euronews. The article focuses on how Europe is remembered in the news, but also how references to the past are used to explain what Europe is today and what it might look like in the future.

  11. Automatic caption generation for news images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yansong; Lapata, Mirella

    2013-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the task of automatically generating captions for images, which is important for many image-related applications. Examples include video and image retrieval as well as the development of tools that aid visually impaired individuals to access pictorial information. Our approach leverages the vast resource of pictures available on the web and the fact that many of them are captioned and colocated with thematically related documents. Our model learns to create captions from a database of news articles, the pictures embedded in them, and their captions, and consists of two stages. Content selection identifies what the image and accompanying article are about, whereas surface realization determines how to verbalize the chosen content. We approximate content selection with a probabilistic image annotation model that suggests keywords for an image. The model postulates that images and their textual descriptions are generated by a shared set of latent variables (topics) and is trained on a weakly labeled dataset (which treats the captions and associated news articles as image labels). Inspired by recent work in summarization, we propose extractive and abstractive surface realization models. Experimental results show that it is viable to generate captions that are pertinent to the specific content of an image and its associated article, while permitting creativity in the description. Indeed, the output of our abstractive model compares favorably to handwritten captions and is often superior to extractive methods.

  12. Fundamentals of pain management in wound care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulling, Sarah

    Under-treated pain can result in a number of potentially serious sequelae (Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists, 2006), including delayed mobilization and recovery, cardiac complications, thromboses, pulmonary complications, delayed healing, psychosocial problems and chronic pain syndromes. This article considers pain management in the context of painful wounds. An international comparative survey on wound pain (European Wound Management Association, 2002) found that practitioners in the wound care community tend to focus on healing processes rather than the patient's total pain experience involving an accurate pain assessment and selection of an appropriate pain management strategy. Procedural pain with dressing removal and cleansing caused the greatest concerns. An overview of simple, evidence-based drug and non-drug techniques is offered as potential strategies to help minimize the experience of pain.

  13. Routinizing Breaking News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartley, Jannie Møller

    2011-01-01

    This chapter revisits seminal theoretical categorizations of news proposed three decades earlier by US sociologist Gaye Tuchman. By exploring the definition of ”breaking news” in the contemporary online newsrooms of three Danish news organisations, the author offers us a long overdue re-theorizat......-theorization of journalistic practice in the online context and helpfully explores well-evidenced limitations to online news production, such as the relationship between original reporting and the use of ”shovelware.”......This chapter revisits seminal theoretical categorizations of news proposed three decades earlier by US sociologist Gaye Tuchman. By exploring the definition of ”breaking news” in the contemporary online newsrooms of three Danish news organisations, the author offers us a long overdue re...

  14. Supplemental surveillance: a review of 2015 and 2016 agricultural injury data from news reports on AgInjuryNews.org.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichelt, Bryan; Gorucu, Serap

    2018-01-31

    Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting industry is the most hazardous occupational sector in the USA. Even with this level of occupational risk, several national and state-level occupational injury surveillance programmes have been eliminated, leaving regional efforts to analyse multiple sources and compile data on agricultural injuries and fatalities. No up-to-date centralised national database for agricultural injuries/fatalities in the USA currently exists. Using the public data on AgInjuryNews.org, this study considered a wide range of variables to examine fatalities and injuries of the industry in 2015 and 2016. The results reported in this paper sought to explore and understand common data elements of US news reports. As of 5 April 2017, more than 3000 articles across 36 years were contained in the dataset. We selected 2 years to review, 2015 and 2016, which represented the most complete years to date; 2015 was the first year in which systematic collection was initiated by the AgInjuryNews.org team. Data were coded based on the Occupational Injury and Illness Classification System source and event/exposure types. A total of 1345 victims were involved in 1044 incidents. Leading sources of injuries were vehicles and machinery, and the most common event/exposure type was transportation. This study demonstrated that data from AgInjuryNew.org is consistent with previous literature, and it can supply up-to-date data as an open-source surveillance supplement, disseminated for health and safety stakeholders. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Effects and mechanisms of a microcurrent dressing on skin wound healing: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chao; Hu, Zong-Qian; Peng, Rui-Yun

    2014-01-01

    The variety of wound types has resulted in a wide range of wound dressings, with new products frequently being introduced to target different aspects of the wound healing process. The ideal wound dressing should achieve rapid healing at a reasonable cost, with minimal inconvenience to the patient. Microcurrent dressing, a novel wound dressing with inherent electric activity, can generate low-level microcurrents at the device-wound contact surface in the presence of moisture and can provide an advanced wound healing solution for managing wounds. This article offers a review of the effects and mechanisms of the microcurrent dressing on the healing of skin wounds.

  16. Biofantasies: genetics and medicine in the print news media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, A

    2001-04-01

    The contemporary news media is an important site for exploring the diverse and complex cultural images of genetics and its medical possibilities, and of the mechanisms by which these images are (re) produced and sustained. This article investigates how the print news media 'frames' stories on genetics and medicine. It is based on a discourse analysis of articles appearing in three Australian newspapers in the late 1990s. Gene stories were found to be prominent in each of the newspapers, and to emphasise the medical benefits of genetic research. Stories frequently cite and quote scientists, who explain the nature and significance of the research and/or its implications for treatment or prevention. Many stories focus on new genetic discoveries, and portray genetic researchers as involved in a quest to unlock nature's secrets. Stories of hope, and depictions of geneticists as warriors or heroes, appear regularly. The positive vision of genetics is supported by the use of particular metaphors, accompanying illustrative material, 'human interest' stories, and reference to credible sources. There is rarely mention of the influence of non-genetic factors and 'multifactorial' interactions on disorders, or questioning of the goals, direction, methods, or value of genetic research. Scientists made extensive use of the media in their efforts to maintain a positive image of research in the face of public concerns about scientists 'going too far', following the announcement of the cloning of Dolly. Boundaries were drawn between 'therapeutic cloning'--implicitly defined as 'good', useful, and legitimate--and 'reproductive cloning'--seen as 'bad', dangerous, and illegitimate. By framing news stories as they do, the print news media are likely to exert a powerful influence on public responses to health problems. With new genetic technologies becoming more integrated in preventive medicine and public health, it is important to investigate how news stories help shape the agenda for

  17. Mining Concept Maps from News Stories for Measuring Civic Scientific Literacy in Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yuen-Hsien; Chang, Chun-Yen; Rundgren, Shu-Nu Chang; Rundgren, Carl-Johan

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by a long-term goal in education for measuring Taiwanese civic scientific literacy in media (SLiM), this work reports the detailed techniques to efficiently mine a concept map from 2 years of Chinese news articles (901,446 in total) for SLiM instrument development. From the Chinese news stories, key terms (important words or phrases),…

  18. The Dynamic Cross-Correlations between Mass Media News, New Media News, and Stock Returns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuochao Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the dynamic cross-correlations between mass media news, new media news, and stock returns for the SSE 50 Index in Chinese stock market by employing the MF-DCCA method. The empirical results show that (1 there exist power-law cross-correlations between two types of news as well as between news and its corresponding SSE 50 Index return; (2 the cross-correlations between mass media news and SSE 50 Index returns show larger multifractality and more complicated structures; (3 mass media news and new media news have both complementary and competitive relationships; (4 with the rolling window analysis, we further find that there is a general increasing trend for the cross-correlations between the two types of news as well as the cross-correlations between news and returns and this trend becomes more persistent over time.

  19. Fake news propagate differently from real news even at early stages of spreading

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Zilong; Zhao, Jichang; Sano, Yukie; Levy, Orr; Takayasu, Hideki; Takayasu, Misako; Li, Daqing; Havlin, Shlomo

    2018-01-01

    Social media can be a double-edged sword for modern communications, either a convenient channel exchanging ideas or an unexpected conduit circulating fake news through a large population. Existing studies of fake news focus on efforts on theoretical modelling of propagation or identification methods based on black-box machine learning, neglecting the possibility of identifying fake news using only structural features of propagation of fake news compared to those of real news and in particular...

  20. News Media Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    radio news departments will operate on many technological platforms at the same time ( Papper , 2006, p.3). News radio stations will likely broadcast...Retrieved March 25, 2007, from http://firstlook.nytimes.com/index.php?cat=4 Papper , Bob. RTNDF’s 2006 Future of the News Survey, 25 Mar. 2006. 10 Mar

  1. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Embryonic Stem Cells and their Genetic Modification - The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2007 · Mitradas M Panicker · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 181-190 General Article. Is There a Pattern? ... pp 195-197 Research News. DNA's New Avatar as Nanoscale Construction Material · Yamuna Krishnan · More Details ...

  2. Measuring News Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksl, Adam; Ashley, Seth; Craft, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    News media literacy refers to the knowledge and motivations needed to identify and engage with journalism. This study measured levels of news media literacy among 500 teenagers using a new scale measure based on Potter's model of media literacy and adapted to news media specifically. The adapted model posits that news media literate individuals…

  3. BRAZILIAN NEWS PORTALS CHARACTERISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloiza G. Herckovitz

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A content analysis of four Brazilian news media portals found that economic news dominated the top headlines with little attention paid to education, the environment and welfare. Other trends included a focus on local events and national news sources, reliance on few sources, mostly official ones, and a low percentage of news that fitted the concept of newsworthiness (a combination of both social significance and deviance concepts. Other findings of a study of 432 top news stories published by UOL, Estadão, iG and Terra during a 15-day period between February and March 2008 indicate that the top portions of the portals’ front pages carry news that lacks story depth, editorial branding, and multimedia applications. The results suggest that online news portals are in their infancy although Brazil has the largest online population of Latin America. This study hopes to shed light on the gatekeeping process in Brazilian news portals. Brazilian media portals have yet to become a significant editorial force able to provide knowledge about social issues and public affairs in a socially responsible fashione.

  4. Age-related aspects of cutaneous wound healing: a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgonc, Roswitha; Gruber, Johann

    2013-01-01

    As the aging population in developed countries is growing in both numbers and percentage, the medical, social, and economic burdens posed by nonhealing wounds are increasing. Hence, it is all the more important to understand the mechanisms underlying age-related impairments in wound healing. The purpose of this article is to give a concise overview of (1) normal wound healing, (2) alterations in aging skin that have an impact on wound repair, (3) alterations in the repair process of aged skin, and (4) general factors associated with old age that might impair wound healing, with a focus on the literature of the last 10 years. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Sustainable Supply Chain Based on News Articles and Sustainability Reports: Text Mining with Leximancer and DICTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongwook Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to explore sustainable supply chain management (SSCM trends, and firms’ strategic positioning and execution with regard to sustainability in the textile and apparel industry based on news articles and sustainability reports. Further analysis of the rhetoric in Chief executive officer (CEO letters within sustainability reports is used to determine firms’ resoluteness, positive entailments, sharing of values, perception of reality, and sustainability strategy and execution feasibility. Computer-based content analysis is used for this research: Leximancer is applied for text analysis, while dictionary-based text mining program DICTION and SPSS are used for rhetorical analysis. Overall, contents similar to the literature on environmental, social, and economic aspects of the triple bottom line (TBL are observed, however, topics such as regulation, green incentives, and international standards are not readily observed. Furthmore, ethical issues, sustainable production, quality, and customer roles are emphasized in texts analyzed. The CEO letter analysis indicates that listed firms show relatively low realism and high commonality, while North American firms exhibit relatively high commonality, and Europe firms show relatively high realism. The results will serve as a baseline for providing academia guidelines in SSCM research, and provide an opportunity for businesses to complement their sustainability strategies and executions.

  6. Asymmetric News Effects on Volatility: Good vs. Bad News in Good vs. Bad Times

    OpenAIRE

    Laakkonen, Helinä; Lanne, Markku

    2008-01-01

    We study the impact of positive and negative macroeconomic US and European news announcements in different phases of the business cycle on the highfrequency volatility of the EUR/USD exchange rate. The results suggest that in general bad news increases volatility more than good news. The news effects also depend on the state of the economy: bad news increases volatility more in good times than in bad times, while there is no difference between the volatility effects of good news in bad and go...

  7. Soviet Cybernetics: Recent News Items, Number Thirteen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Wade B.

    An issue of "Soviet Cybernetics: Recent News Items" consists of English translations of the leading recent Soviet contributions to the study of cybernetics. Articles deal with cybernetics in the 21st Century; the Soviet State Committee on Science and Technology; economic reforms in Rudnev's ministry; an interview with Rudnev; Dnepr-2; Dnepr-2…

  8. The "U.S. News" Rankings Roll On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Eric

    2007-01-01

    As usual, "U.S. News & World Report's" annual college rankings offered a heavy dose of deja vu when they arrived last August. In this article, the author discusses the response rate to the magazine's controversial reputational survey. The overall response rate plunged to its lowest level ever, a possible sign that organized criticism of the…

  9. News Media Coverage of Corporate Tax Avoidance and Corporate Tax Reporting

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Soojin

    2015-01-01

    Drawing upon media agenda-setting theory and previous studies in organizational impression management, this paper empirically investigates the influence of tax avoidance news on corporate tax reporting. This study is based on the pronounced discontinuity in the amount of news articles related to tax avoidance in the United Kingdom over two periods (2010-2011 and 2012-2013). A difference-in-differences design is employed in order to enable a comparison of the media effects on those firms that ...

  10. On Specifying Media Representation of Reality in the Genre of News Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Aleksandrovna Mel'nikova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights genre peculiarities of the news story that represents social event in media discourse as the mixture of invariant genre features and text realization variations. The author points to the entanglement of narration about the event constituents with the response commentaries and refers it to discursive circumstances in verbal presentation of a socially relevant event in the breaking news story format. The statement is verified with the interpretational analysis of news stories with the tag «Natural Disaster». It is proved that the narrative part is to ensure invariability of exactness and conciseness as the genre features of the text that describes an event or happening. To implement the tasks of making the plausibility of the information and increasing the interest to the news story the following types of response commentaries are incorporated into the text: the current commentary (witnesses' opinion or citations on impression, the pre-commentary (indication to connection between the main event and the prior ones, the post-commentary (information for the reader about possible consequences of the happening. Such mixture of ways that depict main and related events helps to solve one pragmatic goal of media discourse – having changed the perspective of event representation a journalist could not only attract the attention to the breaking news about natural disasters, but get a reader's respond to it. Being initiated by a journalist response commentaries help to enrich the details indirectly and raise the reader's awareness that he hasn't asked for. The article also contains generalization about stylistic implementation of the pre- and post-commentaries in the news breaking story.

  11. Effects of "Good News" and "Bad News" on Newscast Image and Community Image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galician, Mary-Lou; Vestre, Norris D.

    1987-01-01

    Investigates whether the relative amount of bad, neutral, and good news on television has corresponding effects on viewers' image of the community depicted and of the carrying newscast. Concludes that bad news creates a bad image for the community but that good news does not produce a more favorable image than neutral news. (MM)

  12. ON THE ANATOMY OF MEDIATIZED NEWS BROADCASTING: METAMORPHOSES AND MULTIPLE NARRATIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demétrio de Azeredo Soster

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses mediatization in news journalism, which is characterized by the institution, in current times, of a new “place” for the media. From this standpoint, they are no longer regarded as mere media, but as structuring elements of a new communicational bios. In the course of society’s transition from the media towards a mediatized society, news production practices become complex and process practices, as well as narrative and content distribution forms emerge, that are distinct from those seen until then. Television news broadcast emerges, therefore, in a new format, made up of the cluster of diverse media that refer to such programs, demanding new identification and recognition protocols. These changes will be examined as they relate to the news telecasts TV Folha, of TV Cultura, based on four movements resulting from the mediatization process in journalism: self-referentiality, co-referentiality, decentralization and dialogy.

  13. On the anatomy of mediatized news broadcasting: metamorphoses and multiple narratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Piccinin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses mediatization in news journalism, which is characterized by the institution, in current times, of a new “place” for the media. From this standpoint, they are no longer regarded as mere media, but as structuring elements of a new communicational bios. In the course of society’s transition from the media towards a mediatized society, news production practices become complex and process practices, as well as narrative and content distribution forms emerge, that are distinct from those seen until then. Television news broadcast emerges, therefore, in a new format, made up of the cluster of diverse media that refer to such programs, demanding new identification and recognition protocols. These changes will be examined as they relate to the news telecasts TV Folha, of TV Cultura, based on four movements resulting from the mediatization process in journalism: self-referentiality, co-referentiality, decentralization and dialogy.

  14. Improving wound and pressure area care in a nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprakes, Kate; Tyrer, Julie

    Wound and pressure ulcer prevention are key quality indicators of nursing care. This article describes a collaborative project between a community skin care service and a nursing home. The aim of the project was to establish whether the implementation of a wound and pressure ulcer management competency framework within a nursing home would improve patient outcomes and reduce the severity and number of wounds and pressure ulcers. Following the project's implementation, there was a reduction in the number of wounds and pressure ulcers, hospital admissions and district nursing visits. Nursing home staff also reported an increase in their knowledge and skills.

  15. Political Expertise and Affect: Effects on News Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Mei-Ling; Price, Vincent

    1993-01-01

    Investigates interactions between political expertise and affect in shaping cognitive strategies people employ in forming reactions to newspaper stories. Finds that, in processing the news articles, political experts produced a greater number of thoughts and a larger share of arguments than did novices. Observes no predicted main effects of…

  16. Examining the Nexus of Science Communication and Science Education: A Content Analysis of Genetics News Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Nicole A.

    2015-01-01

    Access to science information via communications in the media is rapidly becoming a central means for the public to gain knowledge about scientific advancements. However, little is known about what content knowledge is essential for understanding issues presented in news media. Very few empirical studies attempt to bridge science communication and…

  17. Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Wound Healing: A Clinical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunalp Uzun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to review clinical studies on the use of adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of chronic wounds. A search on PubMed was performed on April 30th, 2014 to identify the relevant clinical studies. We reviewed 13 articles that reported the use adipose derived stem cells in the treatment of different types of wounds. Adipose derived stem cells have the potential to be used in the treatment of chronic wounds. However, standard methods for isolation, storage and application of these cells are needed. New materials to transfer these stem cells to injured tissues should be investigated. [Dis Mol Med 2014; 2(4.000: 57-64

  18. News of the Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Lifer, Evan; Olson, Renee; Margolis, Rick; Glick, Andrea; Milliot, Jim

    1999-01-01

    Includes the following reports: "'LJ' (Library Journal) News Report: Libraries Success at Funding Books and Bytes"; "'SLJ' (School Library Journal) News Report: We're in the Money!"; and "'PW' (Publishers Weekly) News Reports". (AEF)

  19. Topical oxygenation therapy in wound care: are patients getting enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Sharon

    2017-08-10

    Wound management is a major burden on today's healthcare provider, both clinically with regard to available resources and financially. Most importantly, it has a significant impact on the patient's quality of life and experience. Within the field of wound care these pressures, alongside an ageing population, multiple comorbidities, disease processes and negative lifestyle choices, increase incidences of reduced skin integrity and challenging wounds. In an attempt to meet these challenges alternative, innovative therapies are being explored to support the wound healing process. Wound care experts are now exploring the scientific, biological aspects of wound healing at a cellular level. They are taking wound care back to basics with the identification of elements that, if introduced as an 'adjunct' or as a stand-alone device alongside gold-standard regimens, can positively impact the static or problematic wounds that pose the most challenges to clinicians on a daily basis. This article explores the phenomenon of oxygen, its place in tissue formation and the effect of depletion on the wound healing process and highlights ways in which patients may receive benefit from non-invasive intervention to improve wound care outcomes.

  20. Collection and Analysis of Open Source News for Information Awareness and Early Warning in Nuclear Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cojazzi, Giacomo G.M.; Van Der Goot, Erik; Verile, Marco; Wolfart, Erik; Rutan Fowler, Marcy; Feldman, Yana; Hammond, William; Schweighardt, John; Ferguson, Mattew

    2013-01-01

    Acquisition and analysis of open source information plays an increasingly important role in the IAEA’s move towards safeguards implementation based on all safeguards relevant information known about a State. The growing volume of open source information requires the development of technology and tools capable of effectively collecting relevant information, filtering out “noise”, organizing valuable information in a clear and accessible manner, and assessing its relevance. In this context, the IAEA’s Division of Information Management (SGIM) and the EC’s Joint Research Centre (JRC) are currently implementing a joint project to advance the effectiveness and efficiency of the IAEA’s workflow for open source information collection and analysis. The objective is to provide tools to support SGIM in the production of the SGIM Open Source Highlights, which is a daily news brief consisting of the most pertinent news stories relevant to safeguards and non-proliferation. The process involves the review and selection of hundreds of articles from a wide array of specifically selected sources. The joint activity exploits the JRC’s Europe Media Monitor (EMM) and NewsDesk applications: EMM automatically collects and analyses news articles from a pre-defined list of web sites, and NewsDesk allows an analyst to manually select the most relevant articles from the EMM stream for further processing. The paper discusses the IAEA’s workflow for the production of SGIM Open Source Highlights and describes the capabilities of EMM and NewsDesk. It then provides an overview of the joint activities since the project started in 2011, which were focused i) on setting up a separate EMM installation dedicated to the nuclear safeguards and security domain (Nuclear Security Media Monitor, NSMM) and ii) on evaluating the NSMM/NewsDesk for meeting the IAEA’s needs. Finally, it presents the current use NSMM/NewsDesk at the IAEA and proposes options for further integration with the

  1. Arousing news characteristics in Dutch television news 1990-2004: an exploration of competitive strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks Vettehen, P.; Beentjes, J.; Nuijten, K.; Peeters, A.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the processes by which competition in the television news market might promote the presence of arousing characteristics in television news. A total of 3,024 news stories from six Dutch television news programs over the period 1990 to 2004 were investigated through content

  2. Arousing news characteristics in Dutch television news 1990-2004: An exploration of competitive strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks Vettehen, P.G.J.; Beentjes, J.W.J.; Nuijten, C.M.; Peeters, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the processes by which competition in the television news market might promote the presence of arousing characteristics in television news. A total of 3,024 news stories from six Dutch television news programs over the period 1990 to 2004 were investigated through content

  3. Mobile news - a review and model of journalism in an age of mobile media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westlund, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    The technological convergence of mobile “phones” and multimedia has been taking place since the 1990s, but it was not until the commercial birth of touchscreen-enabled mobile devices, offered with flat-rate subscriptions for mobile internet, that widespread production and use of news....... This article explores the production of mobile news, by discussing and synthesising the findings of the contemporary literature found in the nexus of journalism and mobile media. It posits a model of journalism focusing on the roles of humans and technology in activities characterised by customising......-related content and services began to flourish. Accessing mobile news has gained traction in the everyday life of the public. In parallel, legacy news media have in recent years developed news provision, by repurposing or customising journalistic content published for mobile sites and/or applications...

  4. Thrilling News Revisited: The Role of Suspense for the Enjoyment of News Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, Kai; Zimmermann, Daniel; Wilbers, Anne-Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    Previous research on news perception has been dominated by a cognitively oriented perspective on reception processes, whereas emotions have been widely neglected. Consequently, it has remained open which features of a news story might elicit affective responses and hence modulate news perception, shifting the focus to the emotional potential of the narrative. According to the affective-disposition theory, the experience of suspense is the striving force of immersion in fictional dramas. Thereby, a positive affective disposition toward the protagonist of a story and a high likelihood of a bad ending should increase suspense that, in turn, should positively influence reading appreciation and lingering interest in the story. We investigated whether suspense and its determinants also play such a key role in the context of news stories. Study 1 ( n = 263) successfully replicated results of an earlier study, whereas Studies 2 ( n = 255) and 3 ( n = 599) challenged the generalizability of some effects related to manipulated characteristics of a news story. In contrast, correlational relationships between perceived news characteristics and news evaluation were relatively stable. In particular, participants' liking of the protagonist and the perceived likelihood of a good ending were positively associated with suspense, reading appreciation, and lingering interest. This result indicates a preference for happy endings and contradicts the notion that likely negative outcomes are beneficial for suspense and the enjoyment of news stories, as postulated by the affective-disposition theory in the context of fictional dramas. Moreover, experienced suspense reliably mediated the correlations between, on the one hand, participants' liking of the protagonist and the perceived likelihood of a good ending and, on the other hand, reading appreciation and lingering interest. The news story's personal relevance was less influential than expected. Further, we observed a large absence of

  5. Patients' experiences of negative pressure wound therapy for the treatment of wounds: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, D; Stephens, D; Andrews, A

    2013-01-01

    To review the research on patients' experiences of undergoing negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). A literature search was carried out using the following databases: Academic Search Complete, CINAHL, PsychINFO, MEDLINE, PubMed and PsyARTICLES. The search covered the period from 2001 to 2012, using the key words: ['negative pressure wound therapy' OR 'vacuum-assisted closure' OR 'topical negative therapy'] AND ['patients' experiences' OR 'psychological' OR 'stress' OR 'anxiety' OR 'wellbeing' OR 'pain' OR 'quality of life' OR 'physical']. Twenty-five relevant articles were included. NPWT is generally considered to be successful in reducing wound depth and facilitating healing. However, studies have highlighted a number of issues that need to be considered. For example, the type of dressing used during treatment can have a significant effect on patients' experience of pain. Furthermore, the NPWT system can cause patients to feel anxious due to both the patient and the health professional being unfamiliar with this form of treatment. It can also restrict patients' daily care and wider social life, which may result in a negative self-image and low self-esteem. Despite this, some studies have reported positive improvements to patients' quality of life. Additionally, since NPWT can lead to faster healing, any detrimental impact upon patients' wellbeing may be short-term and less prolonged than that of other treatments. Compared with other treatments, there is evidence to show that NPWT can lead to faster wound healing, and a reduced frequency of dressing changes and other treatments. However, there are a number of challenges with the use of NPWT, which need to be explored further so that improvements can be made. Specifically, certain aspects of NPWT may impact negatively on patients' wellbeing, albeit short-term. Therefore, research needs to explore patients' experience of NPWT throughout the treatment process and to consider how this can be improved to minimise any

  6. News trends and web search query of HIV/AIDS in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Alice P. Y.; Lin, Qianying

    2017-01-01

    Background The HIV epidemic in Hong Kong has worsened in recent years, with major contributions from high-risk subgroup of men who have sex with men (MSM). Internet use is prevalent among the majority of the local population, where they sought health information online. This study examines the impacts of HIV/AIDS and MSM news coverage on web search query in Hong Kong. Methods Relevant news coverage about HIV/AIDS and MSM from January 1st, 2004 to December 31st, 2014 was obtained from the WiseNews databse. News trends were created by computing the number of relevant articles by type, topic, place of origin and sub-populations. We then obtained relevant search volumes from Google and analysed causality between news trends and Google Trends using Granger Causality test and orthogonal impulse function. Results We found that editorial news has an impact on “HIV” Google searches on HIV, with the search term popularity peaking at an average of two weeks after the news are published. Similarly, editorial news has an impact on the frequency of “AIDS” searches two weeks after. MSM-related news trends have a more fluctuating impact on “MSM” Google searches, although the time lag varies anywhere from one week later to ten weeks later. Conclusions This infodemiological study shows that there is a positive impact of news trends on the online search behavior of HIV/AIDS or MSM-related issues for up to ten weeks after. Health promotional professionals could make use of this brief time window to tailor the timing of HIV awareness campaigns and public health interventions to maximise its reach and effectiveness. PMID:28922376

  7. How Television News Programs Use Video News Releases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Mark D.; White, Candace

    2001-01-01

    Examines actual use in television news broadcasts of video news releases (VNRs). Finds that all sizes of markets were likely to use VNRs. Finds that the most common use was as a voice-over story in an early evening newscast, and that VNRs associated with children and their safety or health got the greatest number of uses. (SR)

  8. An analysis of news media coverage of complementary and alternative medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Billie Bonevski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To examine the accuracy and adequacy of lay media news stories about complementary and alternative medicines and therapies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A descriptive analysis of news stories about complementary and alternative medicine (CAM in the Australian media using a national medical news monitoring website, mediadoctor.org.au. Each story was rated against 10 criteria by two individuals. Consensus scores of 222 news articles reporting therapeutic claims about complementary medicines posted on mediadoctor.org.au between 1 January 2004 and 1 September 2007 were calculated. The overall rating score for 222 CAM articles was 50% (95% CI 47% to 53%. There was a statistically significant (F = 3.68, p = 0.006 difference in cumulative mean scores according to type of therapy: biologically based practices (54%, 95% CI 50% to 58%; manipulative body based practices (46%, 95% CI 39% to 54%, whole medical systems (45%, 95% CI 32% to 58%, mind body medicine (41%, 95% CI 31% to 50% and energy medicine (33%, 95% CI 11% to 55%. There was a statistically significant difference in cumulative mean scores (F = 3.72, p = 0.0001 according to the clinical outcome of interest with stories about cancer treatments (62%, 95% CI 54% to 70% scoring highest and stories about treatments for children's behavioural and mental health concerns scoring lowest (31%, 95% CI 19% to 43%. Significant differences were also found in scores between media outlets. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: There is substantial variability in news reporting practices about CAM. Overall, although they may be improving, the scores remain generally low. It appears that much of the information the public receives about CAM is inaccurate or incomplete.

  9. The Impact of Smokeless Tobacco Risk Information on Smokers' Risk Perceptions and Use Intentions: A News Media Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackowski, Olivia A; Manderski, Michelle T Bover; Lewis, M Jane; Delnevo, Cristine D

    2017-12-13

    Little research exists on the impact of risk information comparing smokeless tobacco (SLT) use, particularly snus, to cigarette smoking. This study explored this topic using a communication channel where smokers may be exposed to such information-the news media. We randomly assigned 1008 current smokers to read one of three constructed news stories or to a control group (no article). The "favorable" story framed snus as a "safer" smoking alternative while the "cautious" story described snus risks. The "mixed" version described potential risks and harm-reduction benefits. Participants completed a post-article survey with snus risk and harm perception and use intention measures. Article condition was significantly associated with perceived harm of daily snus use relative to smoking (1 = a lot less harmful - 5 = a lot more harmful; p news messages about SLT and snus relative to cigarettes may impact smokers' SLT harm perceptions and use intentions. Tobacco control professionals and FDA officials should consider the potential impact of the news media when communicating about tobacco risks.

  10. Hypoperfusion and Wound Healing: Another Dimension of Wound Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smollock, Wendy; Montenegro, Paul; Czenis, Amy; He, Yuan

    2018-02-01

    To examine the correlation between mean arterial pressure (MAP) and wound healing indices and describe an analytical process that can be used accurately and prospectively when evaluating all types of skin ulcerations. A correlational study in a long-term-care facility.Participants (N = 230) were adults residing in a long-term-care facility with an average age of 77.8 years (range, 35-105). Assessment through both an index of wound healing and wound surface area. Signs of wound healing included a reduction of surface area and surface necrosis and increased granulation or epithelialization. Aggregate analyses for all wound locations revealed a positive correlation between the MAP and index of wound healing (r = 0.86, n = 501, P wound healing was noted for all wound locations in this data set when MAP values were 80 mm Hg or less (r = 0.95, n = 141, P wounds and MAP of less than 80 mm Hg yielded a very strong positive correlation. The data indicated that as perfusion decreased, wounds within the sample population declined (r = 0.93, n = 102, P wound healing or worsened wounds. A predictability of wounds stalling or declining related to the MAP was observed, regardless of topical treatment or standard-of-care interventions. Therefore, the data also suggest that remediating states of low perfusion should take precedence in making treatment decisions.

  11. Quality of health news disseminated in the print media in developing countries: a case study in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashorkhani, Mahnaz; Gholami, Jaleh; Maleki, Katayoun; Nedjat, Sima; Mortazavi, Jalaledin; Majdzadeh, Reza

    2012-08-09

    Mass media play an important role in keeping people up-to-date with the latest health news. This study aims at investigating the quality of health news disseminated in the print media, its course of production and factors affecting its quality. In the quantitative section of the study, 410 health-related news items, published during a six-month span in the Iranian public press, underwent content analysis. In the qualitative section, focus group discussions were held with journalists, editors-in-chief and news gatekeepers. The quantitative phase showed that 18% of the news articles were not fit for dissemination in public. The qualitative phase illustrated that multiple factors at various levels affect the quality of news, namely poor knowledge, inadequate motivations and context-related barriers. The quality of health news reporting is not desirable. Educational interventions need to be carried out to raise awareness among researchers and journalists. Also, certain steps should be taken to increase motivations and strengthen infrastructures, including designing guidelines and monitoring news.

  12. Wound care centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressure ulcer - wound care center; Decubitus ulcer - wound care center; Diabetic ulcer - wound care center; Surgical wound - wound ... Common types of non-healing wounds include: Pressure sores Surgical ... flow, or swollen legs Certain wounds may not heal well due to: ...

  13. NERSC News

    Science.gov (United States)

    NERSC Powering Scientific Discovery Since 1974 Login Site Map | My NERSC search... Go Home About Scheduled Outages Login Node Status My NERSC Now Computing Highlights Timeline News & Publications News Coming to NERSC Login Page May 21, 2018 NERSC rolls out a redesigned login page on June 11. Read More Â

  14. Thrilling news revisited: The role of suspense for the enjoyment of news stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Kaspar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous research on news perception has been dominated by a cognitively oriented perspective on reception processes, whereas emotions have been widely neglected. Consequently, it has remained open which features of a news story might elicit affective responses and hence modulate news perception, shifting the focus to the emotional potential of the narrative. According to the affective-disposition theory, the experience of suspense is the striving force of immersion in fictional dramas. Thereby, a positive affective disposition toward the protagonist of a story and a high likelihood of a bad ending should increase suspense that, in turn, should positively influence reading appreciation and lingering interest in the story. We investigated whether suspense and its determinants also play such a key role in the context of news stories. Study 1 (n = 263 successfully replicated results of an earlier study, whereas Studies 2 (n = 255 and 3 (n = 599 challenged the generalizability of some effects related to manipulated characteristics of a news story. In contrast, correlational relationships between perceived news characteristics were relatively stable. In particular, a higher liking of the protagonist and a higher perceived likelihood of a good versus bad ending were positively associated with suspense, reading appreciation, and lingering interest. This result indicates a preference for happy endings and it contradicts the notion that likely negative outcomes are beneficial for suspense and the enjoyment of news stories, as postulated by the affective-disposition theory in the context of fictional dramas. Moreover, experienced suspense reliably mediated the correlations between, on the one hand, participants’ liking of the protagonist and the perceived likelihood of a good ending and, on the other hand, reading appreciation and lingering interest. The news story’s personal relevance was less influential than expected. Further, we observed a large

  15. Communicating Ebola through social media and electronic news media outlets: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Househ, Mowafa

    2016-09-01

    Social media and electronic news media activity are an important source of information for the general public. Yet, there is a dearth of research exploring the use of Twitter and electronic news outlets during significant worldly events such as the recent Ebola Virus scare. The purpose of this article is to investigate the use of Twitter and electronic news media outlets in communicating Ebola Virus information. A cross-sectional survey of Twitter data and Google News Trend data from 30 September till 29 October, 2014 was conducted. Between 30 September and 29 October, there were approximately 26 million tweets (25,925,152) that contained the word Ebola. The highest number of correlated activity for Twitter and electronic news outlets occurred on 16 October 2014. Other important peaks in Twitter data occurred on 1 October, 6 October, 8 October, and 12 October, 2014. The main influencers of the Twitter feeds were news media outlets. The study reveals a relationship between electronic news media publishing and Twitter activity around significant events such as Ebola. Healthcare organizations should take advantage of the relationship between electronic news media and trending events on social media sites such as Twitter and should work on developing social media campaigns in co-operation with leading electronic news media outlets (e.g. CNN, Yahoo, Reuters) that can have an influence on social media activity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. News/Press Releases

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — A press release, news release, media release, press statement is written communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing programs...

  17. Who Makes The News?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørndrup, Hanne; Bentsen, Martine

    As newsroom staff around the world went about their day on 25 March 2015, hundreds of volunteers located in over 100 countries gathered to monitor their news media as part of the Fifth Global Media Monitoring Project (GMMP). The Global Media Monitoring Project (GMMP) is the world’s longest......-running and most extensive research on gender in the news media. It began in 1995 when volunteers in 71 countries around the world monitored women’s presence in their national radio, television and print news. The research revealed that only 17% of news subjects – the people who are interviewed or whom the news...... is about – were women. It found that gender parity was ‘a distant prospect in any region of the world. News [was] more often being presented by women but it [was] still rarely about women. Denmark participates in GMMP for the second time and both times we can recognize the global inequality in the Danish...

  18. Behavioral genetics in Polish print news media between 2000 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domaradzki, Jan

    2016-12-23

    The aim of this paper is to describe how Polish print news media frame relations between genetics and human behaviors and what images of behavioral genetics dominate in press discourse. A content and frame analysis of 72 print news articles about behavioral genetics published between 2000 and 2014 in four major Polish weekly magazines: "Polityka", "Wprost", "Newsweek" and "Przekrój" was conducted. Twenty one different behaviors were mentioned in the sample and six major analytic frames were identified: essentialist, materialistic, deterministic, probabilistic, optimistic and pessimistic. The most common was the tendency to describe human behaviors in terms of genetic essentialism, reductionism and determinism, as almost one half of the articles was focused solely on genetic determinants of human behaviors and lacked any reference to polygenetic and/or environmental conditioning. Although most of the articles were balanced in tone, benefits were stressed more often than potential risks. Stories that confirmed existence of genetic determinants of human behavior were favored over those that did not. One third of the articles stressed the social or ethical consequences of the development of behavioral genetics. The complex and abstract character of genetic knowledge results in a simplistic portrayal of behavioral genetics in the press, which may lead to a misunderstood interpretation of the complicated interplay between behavior, genetics and environment by the public. Consequently, print news media contribute to geneticization of behaviors. It is important to improve the quality of science reporting on behavioral genetics and to educate researchers how to communicate with the media more effectively.

  19. Cascading corruption news: explaining the bias of media attention to Brazil’s political scandals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mads Damgaard

    Full Text Available Abstract Through a content analysis of 8,800 news items and six months of front pages of three Brazilian newspapers, all dealing with corruption and political transgression, the present article documents the remarkable bias of media coverage toward corruption scandals. Said bias is examined as an informational phenomenon, arising from key systemic and commercial factors of Brazil’s news media: an information cascade of news on corruption formed, destabilizing the governing coalition and legitimizing the impeachment process of Dilma Rousseff. As this process gained momentum, questions of accountability were disregarded by the media, with harmful effects for democracy.

  20. An mHealth App for Decision-Making Support in Wound Dressing Selection (WounDS): Protocol for a User-Centered Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Scott; McSwiggan, Jane; Parker, Joanne; Halas, Gayle A; Friesen, Marcia

    2018-04-24

    Primary care health professionals, especially family physicians, see a variety of wounds, and yet-despite the frequency of providing wound care-many family physicians do not feel confident in wound care management. This is partly due to a lack of formal wound education in Family Medicine programs. While there are numerous electronic wound care resources available in the UK and North America, none were identified that address the specific need in supporting clinical decision-making in wound dressing selection. At the same time, healthcare providers are increasingly using technology in personal and professional contexts, and a logical extension is to use technology for knowledge translation strategies. This work developed a prototype mobile health software application named WounDS, designed to support clinical decision-making in selecting wound dressings. This article presents the development and evaluation plan for the WounDS app. WounDS has been developed on the iOS platform. The primary specification included ease of use, in that one of the primary influences in user adoption would be the ability to receive a wound dressing recommendation in under 30 seconds and under 5 taps on the screen. The WounDS app guides users through a series of binary decisions for assessing the wound and provides a wound dressing recommendation. The selection algorithm is based in best practices using the Wound Bed Preparation Paradigm. Current work is underway to examine the implementation needs for WounDS to be most effectively utilized and to pilot test its feasibility and use in clinical care. Data will be collected through user trials, focus groups, and user metadata will be collected within the app. Optimizing these preconditions will enable a subsequent phase of study to determine effects on clinical decision-making and clinical outcomes. WounDS is designed for knowledge translation, use of technology in clinical decision-making, and continuity of care. The benefits of WounDS

  1. Burn wound: Pathophysiology and its management by herbal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhirender Kaushik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In human body, wound healing is a normal biological phenomenon. Burns may be acute or chronic depending upon the source and its time of exposure. Burn wounds may be superficial, partial or full thickness wounds. When skin comes in contact with higher temperature, protein denaturation takes place due to which the plasma membrane integrity is lost. When skin is burned, a number of inflammatory mediators and releasing agents such as histamine, nitric oxide, oxygen free radicals, eicosanoid products, tumor necrosis factors, and interleukins etc., are released at the site. For wound healing mechanism, the keratinocytes has to move from uninjured site to the burned area. For deeper burns this process takes a long time. By some unknown mechanisms, burn wounds may convert from one form to another form. So burn wound depth must be accurately measured before starting the treatment to prevent the complications. Burns can be induced in experimental animals by using different models. Many treatments such as herbal drugs, topical agents, gene therapy, volume therapy, and rehabilitation can be employed. This review article mainly deals with the theoretical and practical aspects of burn wound healing. Some burn wound healing plants with their chemical constituents, plant part used, uses and animal models are described here.

  2. NEWS ARTICLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    CENTCOM: Search CENTCOM CENTCOM Home ABOUT US COMMAND NARRATIVE LEADERSHIP COMPONENT COMMANDS HISTORY , security forces May 14, 2018 Syrian Democratic Forces fire in self-defense May 11, 2018 Military Strikes against Daesh terrorists in Iraq and Syria May 04, 2018 Syrian Democratic Forces announce drive to reclaim

  3. Application of Three - dimensional Wound Analyzer in the Small Wound Area Measurement during the Process of Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jiajun; Li, Haihang; Jin, Jian; Liu, Tong; Ma, Bing; Liu, Gongcheng; Zhu, Shihui

    2018-02-20

    The objective of this study was to determinate the reliability of 3-dimensional wound analyzer (3-DWMD) in the wound area measurement for animal small area in the process of wound healing. Seven Sprague-Dawley rats were used to establish the skin defect model. And the wound area and time consumption were measured on days 0, 5, 10, 15 using 3-DWMD, investigators, and planimetry method. The measurement results using 3-DWMD and investigators were analyzed comparative with that using planimetry method separately. A total 46 wounds, including 32 irregular wounds and regular 14 wounds, were measured. No matter calculating the irregular wounds or the regular wounds, there was no significant difference between 3-DWMD group and planimetry group in measuring wound area (P > 0.05). However, a statistically significant difference was found in time-consuming for measuring wound area between 3-DWMD group and planimetry group (P area, and its measurement results were consistent with planimetry method. Therefore, such measuring equipment has clinical reference value for measuring precision area of the wound in the process of wound healing.

  4. The molecular biology in wound healing & non-healing wound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Chun

    2017-08-01

    The development of molecular biology and other new biotechnologies helps us to recognize the wound healing and non-healing wound of skin in the past 30 years. This review mainly focuses on the molecular biology of many cytokines (including growth factors) and other molecular factors such as extracellular matrix (ECM) on wound healing. The molecular biology in cell movement such as epidermal cells in wound healing was also discussed. Moreover many common chronic wounds such as pressure ulcers, leg ulcers, diabetic foot wounds, venous stasis ulcers, etc. usually deteriorate into non-healing wounds. Therefore the molecular biology such as advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and other molecular factors in diabetes non-healing wounds were also reviewed. Copyright © 2017 Daping Hospital and the Research Institute of Surgery of the Third Military Medical University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Do audiences receive diverse ideas from news media? Exposure to a variety of news media and personal characteristics as determinants of diversity as received

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wurff, R.

    2011-01-01

    Media policies in Europe traditionally promote a diverse media supply. This article investigates for the first time under what conditions audience members actually receive diversity. It focuses on the reception of diverse ideas on European integration from mainstream news media in Ireland and the

  6. Acute and Impaired Wound Healing: Pathophysiology and Current Methods for Drug Delivery, Part 2: Role of Growth Factors in Normal and Pathological Wound Healing: Therapeutic Potential and Methods of Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Herman, Ira M.

    2012-01-01

    This is the second of 2 articles that discuss the biology and pathophysiology of wound healing, reviewing the role that growth factors play in this process and describing the current methods for growth factor delivery into the wound bed. PMID:22820962

  7. Aging influences wound healing in patients with chronic lower extremity wounds treated in a specialized Wound Care Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicke, Corinna; Bachinger, Andreas; Coerper, Stephan; Beckert, Stefan; Witte, Maria B; Königsrainer, Alfred

    2009-01-01

    With the dramatic increase in the aging population, the study and care of wounds in the elderly have become priority topics for both researchers and clinicians. The effects of aging on wound healing in humans have remained controversial. The study was a 5-year epidemiological evaluation of standardized data collected regularly during patients' visits at a specialized Wound Care Center with the aim to determine the key factors influencing the healing of chronic lower extremity wounds. In this analysis of 1,158 chronic wounds, the frequency of wound closure was statistically significantly lower in older patients compared with younger patients. The share of closed wounds decreased by nearly 25% in the elderly patients (>or=70 years). The relationship between the patient's age and the proportion of wound closure was nonlinear. The effect of aging on the frequency of wound closure of chronic wounds became clinically apparent after age 60. The chronicity of the wounds was illustrated by their recurrent nature, their long duration, the presence of multiple wounds, and the frequency of concurrent infection. Comorbidity was documented by the coprevalence of up to three underlying diseases related to impaired wound healing. The present study clearly showed that aging affects chronic wound healing negatively.

  8. ACCURACY AND RELIABILITY AS CRITERIA OF INFORMATIVENESS IN THE NEWS STORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melnikova Ekaterina Aleksandrovna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article clarifies the meaning of the terms accuracy and reliability of the news story, offers a researcher's approach to obtaining objective data that helps to verify linguistic means of accuracy and reliability presence in the informative structure of the text. The accuracy of the news story is defined as a high relevance degree of event reflection through language representation of its constituents; the reliability is viewed as news story originality that is proved by introducing citations and sources of information considered being trustworthy into the text content. Having based the research on an event nominative density identification method, the author composed nominative charts of 115 news story texts, collected at web-sites of BBC and CNN media corporations; distinguished qualitative and quantitative markers of accuracy and reliability in the news story text; confirmed that the accuracy of the news story is achieved with terminological clearness in nominating event constituents in the text, thematic bind between words, presence of onyms that help deeply identify characteristics of the referent event. The reliability of the text is discovered in eyewitness accounts, quotations, and references to the sources being considered as trustworthy. Accurate revision of associations between accuracy and reliability and informing strategies in digital news nets allowed the author to set two variants of information delivery, that differ in their communicative and pragmatic functions: developing (that informs about major and minor details of an event and truncated (which gives some details thus raising the interest to the event and urging a reader to open a full story.

  9. NetWorking News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritsch, Jonas; Iversen, Ole Sejer; Dindler, Christian

    For many years cooperative design was primarily concerned with the development of IT supported systems for professional users. However, the cooperative design approach can embrace other social practices such as children’s everyday life. At a methodological level there is no difference in designing...... the Networking News workshop, offers an opportunity to make first hand studies of children’s IT supported social activities in an informal classroom setting....... with adults or children. However there is a need for new methods to support communication and collaboration between designers and children. This article proposes a new method for understandings children’s appropriation of new technology in an interactive workshop setting. The method, which we call...

  10. A test of rivaling approaches to explain news effects: A multi-wave panel study of agenda setting, social and economic conditions, the tone of the news, and horse race news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinnijenhuis, J.; van Hoof, A.M.J.; Oegema, D.; de Ridder, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Different "paradigmatic" approaches to explain news effects on voting may supplement each other, because their starting points are based on different news types in political campaign news: news on issue positions of parties, news on real-world developments, news on support or criticism for parties,

  11. Methods of reconstruction of perineal wounds after abdominoperineal resection. Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Gordeev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of wound closure after abdominoperineal resection to treat oncological diseases remains unsolved. Formation of a primary suture in the perineal wound can lead to multiple postoperative complications: seroma, abscess, wound disruption with subsequent perineal hernia. Chemoradiation therapy as a standard for locally advanced rectal or anal cancer doesn’t improve results of treatment of perineal wounds and increases duration of their healing. Currently, surgeons have several reconstructive and plastic techniques to improve both direct and long-term functional treatment results. In the article, the most common methods of allo- and autotransplantation are considered, benefits and deficiencies of various techniques are evaluated and analyzed.  

  12. Low Cost Inkjet Printed Smart Bandage for Wireless Monitoring of Chronic Wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Farooqui, Muhammad Fahad; Shamim, Atif

    2016-01-01

    Chronic wounds affect millions of patients around the world and their treatment is challenging as the early signs indicating their development are subtle. In addition, a type of chronic wound, known as pressure ulcer, develops in patients with limited mobility. Infection and frequent bleeding are indicators of chronic wound development. In this article, we present an unprecedented low cost continuous wireless monitoring system, realized through inkjet printing on a standard bandage, which can...

  13. Good Friends, Bad News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kai; Arvidsson, Adam; Nielsen, Finn Årup

    . In this paper we explore the apparent paradox in a quantitative analysis of information diffusion on Twitter. Twitter is interesting in this context as it has been shown to present both the characteristics social and news media. The basic measure of virality in Twitter is the probability of retweet. Twitter...... is different from email in that retweeting does not depend on pre-existing social relations, but often occur among strangers, thus in this respect Twitter may be more similar to traditional news media. We therefore hypothesize that negative news content is more likely to be retweeted, while for non-news tweets...

  14. Exploiting Tri-Relationship for Fake News Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Shu, Kai; Wang, Suhang; Liu, Huan

    2017-01-01

    Social media for news consumption is becoming popular nowadays. The low cost, easy access and rapid information dissemination of social media bring benefits for people to seek out news timely. However, it also causes the widespread of fake news, i.e., low-quality news pieces that are intentionally fabricated. The fake news brings about several negative effects on individual consumers, news ecosystem, and even society trust. Previous fake news detection methods mainly focus on news contents fo...

  15. Compounding with sucralfate for the treatment of external wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Tom; Williams, Lavonn A

    2009-01-01

    Sucralfate was originally marketed for the prevention and accelerated healing of duodenal ulcers. Physicians also have used sucralfate in the treatment of ulcers and erosions in the mouth, esophagus, and stomach, although its effectiveness in these areas has never been clearly proven. This article discusses the use and effectiveness of sucralfate in the treatment of external wounds. The author provides case reports as support for sucralfate's success in treating wounds and provides formulations for the unconventional use of this drug. The author has found sucralfate to be relatively inexpensive and inert when compared to other ingredients, and has found sucralfate to be very versatile and capable of healing almost any wound.

  16. Three-dimensional wound measurements for monitoring wound healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard Jørgensen, Line; Møller Jeppesen, Sune; Halekoh, Ulrich

    Telemedicine is increasingly used for monitoring wound healing. Three-dimensional (3D) measurement methods enable clinicians to assess wound healing with respect to all dimensions. However, the currently available methods are inaccurate, costly or complicated to use. To address these issues, a 3D......-WAM camera was developed. This camera is able to measure wound size (2D area, 3D area, perimeter and volume) and to assess wound characteristics....

  17. There is no news like bad news: women are more remembering and stress reactive after reading real negative news than men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Marie-France; Morin-Major, Julie-Katia; Schramek, Tania E; Beaupré, Annick; Perna, Andrea; Juster, Robert-Paul; Lupien, Sonia J

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of specialized television channels offering 24-hour coverage, Internet and smart phones, the possibility to be constantly in contact with the media has increased dramatically in the last decades. Despite this higher access to knowledge, the impact media exposure has on healthy individuals remains poorly studied. Given that most information conveyed in the media is negative and that upon perception of threat, the brain activates the stress system, which leads to cortisol secretion, we decided to determine how healthy individuals react to media information. Accordingly, we investigated whether reading real negative news (1) is physiologically stressful, (2) modulates one's propensity to be stress reactive to a subsequent stressor and (3) modulates remembrance for these news. Sixty participants (30 women, 30 men) were randomly assigned to either twenty-four real neutral news excerpts or to twenty-four real negative excerpts for 10 minutes. They were then all exposed to a well-validated psychosocial stressor, the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), which consists of an anticipation phase of 10 minutes and a test phase of 10 minutes. A total of eight salivary cortisol samples were collected, at 10-minutes intervals, throughout the experimental procedure. One day later, a free recall of the news was performed. Results showed that although reading negative news did not lead to change in cortisol levels (p>0.05), it led to a significant increase in cortisol to a subsequent stressor in women only (pnegative news condition experienced better memory for these news excerpts compared to men (pmedia exposure could increase stress reactivity and memory for negative news in women.

  18. Tailor-Made News: Meeting the demands of news users on mobile and social media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot Kormelink, T.; Costera Meijer, I.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the technological possibilities for portable, personalized, and participatory news use, the public has not turned en masse from passive receivers who consume news on the producers' terms, into active users who tailor news to fit their personal preferences and practices. Unmistakably, some

  19. Schizophrenia in the News: The Role of News Frames in Shaping Online Reader Dialogue about Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwarjanski, Anna Rae; Parrott, Scott

    2018-08-01

    A quantitative content analysis examined the portrayal of schizophrenia in eight of the most read online news publications in the United States. The analysis documented the prevalence of stigma frames, which communicate stereotypes concerning schizophrenia, and stigma-challenge frames, which contradict stereotypes, in 558 articles related to schizophrenia. The study also examined the relationship between media framing and reader commentary, including the likelihood of readers posting stigmatizing comments, stigma-challenging comments, and comments in which they disclosed personal experience with mental illness. Stigma frames were prevalent in the sample, suggesting the news media continue associating schizophrenia with violent and criminal behavior. Stigma frames stood greater chance of being accompanied by stigmatizing comments from readers when compared to stigma-challenging frames. Conversely, stigma-challenging frames stood greater chance of being accompanied by stigma-challenging comments from readers. Readers were more likely to disclose personal experience with mental illness when they encountered a stigma-challenging frame. Recommendations are made for journalists and health communicators.

  20. In the Know and in the News: How Science and the Media Communicate About Stem Cells, Autism and Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Kimberly; Di Pietro, Nina; Illes, Judy

    2016-02-01

    Stem cell research has generated considerable attention for its potential to remediate many disorders of the central nervous system including neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and cerebral palsy (CP) that place a high burden on individual children, families and society. Here we characterized messaging about the use of stem cells for ASD and CP in news media articles and concurrent dissemination of discoveries through conventional science discourse. We searched LexisNexis and Canadian Newsstand for news articles from the US, UK, Canada and Australia in the period between 2000 and 2014, and PubMed for peer reviewed articles for the same 10 years. Using in-depth content analysis methods, we found less cautionary messaging about stem cells for ASD and CP in the resulting sample of 73 media articles than in the sample of 87 science papers, and a privileging of benefits over risk. News media also present stem cells as ready for clinical application to treat these neurodevelopmental disorders, even while the science literature calls for further research. Investigative news reports that explicitly quote researchers, however, provide the most accurate information to actual science news. The hope, hype, and promise of stem cell interventions for neurodevelopmental disorders, combined with the extreme vulnerability of these children and their families, creates a perfect storm in which journalists and stem cell scientists must commit to a continued, if not even more robust, partnership to promote balanced and accurate messaging.

  1. News Authorship and News Sources: Impacts on Environmental Coverage in The Nigerian Press

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogadimma C. Emenyeonu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the impacts of news authorship and news sources on environmental coverage in the Nigerian press to shed light on the roles they play in news construction. The study finds that journalists in conjunction with policy makers are the catalyst for environmental information, whereas citizens who are pivotal in creating relevant public opinion on environmental issues are left behind. The study reveals that investigative reporting lacks in environmental coverage because most coverage are events driven which explains why environmental news is reported as straight news and as such journalists rely heavily on official sources rather than subsidiary sources. The study opines that for proper environmental coverage, journalists must choose sources from both main and subsidiary actors and revert to proactive, investigative and interpretive reporting so as to make environmental stories relatable to the intended audiences.

  2. Antarctic news clips - 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-07-01

    The newspaper and magazine stories selected for this book present only a sampling of one year's (July 1991 to July 1992) news coverage of Antarctica. The only requirement for inclusion in this publication is that the article's subject matter pertains or refers to Antarctica in some way - whether it is focused on the science done there, or on the people who play such a large part in the work accomplished, or on the issues related to it. No attempt has been made to correlate the number of articles, or their length, with the importance of the subjects treated. Clippings are provided to the Foundation by a service that searches for items containing the phrase 'National Science Foundation'. Identical versions of many stories, especially those written and distributed by wire services such as the Associated Press and United Press International, and by syndicated columnists, are published in numerous papers across the United States. Other articles are submitted from a variety of sources, including interested readers across the United States and in New Zealand.

  3. High Quality Topic Extraction from Business News Explains Abnormal Financial Market Volatility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisano, Ryohei; Sornette, Didier; Mizuno, Takayuki; Ohnishi, Takaaki; Watanabe, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the mutual relationships between information flows and social activity in society today is one of the cornerstones of the social sciences. In financial economics, the key issue in this regard is understanding and quantifying how news of all possible types (geopolitical, environmental, social, financial, economic, etc.) affects trading and the pricing of firms in organized stock markets. In this article, we seek to address this issue by performing an analysis of more than 24 million news records provided by Thompson Reuters and of their relationship with trading activity for 206 major stocks in the S&P US stock index. We show that the whole landscape of news that affects stock price movements can be automatically summarized via simple regularized regressions between trading activity and news information pieces decomposed, with the help of simple topic modeling techniques, into their “thematic” features. Using these methods, we are able to estimate and quantify the impacts of news on trading. We introduce network-based visualization techniques to represent the whole landscape of news information associated with a basket of stocks. The examination of the words that are representative of the topic distributions confirms that our method is able to extract the significant pieces of information influencing the stock market. Our results show that one of the most puzzling stylized facts in financial economies, namely that at certain times trading volumes appear to be “abnormally large,” can be partially explained by the flow of news. In this sense, our results prove that there is no “excess trading,” when restricting to times when news is genuinely novel and provides relevant financial information. PMID:23762258

  4. High quality topic extraction from business news explains abnormal financial market volatility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryohei Hisano

    Full Text Available Understanding the mutual relationships between information flows and social activity in society today is one of the cornerstones of the social sciences. In financial economics, the key issue in this regard is understanding and quantifying how news of all possible types (geopolitical, environmental, social, financial, economic, etc. affects trading and the pricing of firms in organized stock markets. In this article, we seek to address this issue by performing an analysis of more than 24 million news records provided by Thompson Reuters and of their relationship with trading activity for 206 major stocks in the S&P US stock index. We show that the whole landscape of news that affects stock price movements can be automatically summarized via simple regularized regressions between trading activity and news information pieces decomposed, with the help of simple topic modeling techniques, into their "thematic" features. Using these methods, we are able to estimate and quantify the impacts of news on trading. We introduce network-based visualization techniques to represent the whole landscape of news information associated with a basket of stocks. The examination of the words that are representative of the topic distributions confirms that our method is able to extract the significant pieces of information influencing the stock market. Our results show that one of the most puzzling stylized facts in financial economies, namely that at certain times trading volumes appear to be "abnormally large," can be partially explained by the flow of news. In this sense, our results prove that there is no "excess trading," when restricting to times when news is genuinely novel and provides relevant financial information.

  5. The news Engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ralf

    for ideas etc. Reporters have limitedpossibilities for making own stories and less time for research - each live reportercovers 5-7 stories during a day. People : In a survey, most reporters replied that the new workflow was afundamental change of their work and had major impact on their identity......The News Engine How a new experiment in newsrooms can change process, product and people.   By Ralf Andersson   In fall 2012, the news department of the Danish Broadcasting Corporation,decided to implement a new workflow called ”The News Engine” - in order to workfaster, more freely, flexible...... and with fewer resources. This was done to raisethe productivity. The fundamental principle was that all stories should fit all platforms(content sharing) - and that no one did their own story anymore. DR News introduced 8-10 mobile live teams who are responsible for doinginterviews, record pictures and sound...

  6. There is no news like bad news: women are more remembering and stress reactive after reading real negative news than men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-France Marin

    Full Text Available With the advent of specialized television channels offering 24-hour coverage, Internet and smart phones, the possibility to be constantly in contact with the media has increased dramatically in the last decades. Despite this higher access to knowledge, the impact media exposure has on healthy individuals remains poorly studied. Given that most information conveyed in the media is negative and that upon perception of threat, the brain activates the stress system, which leads to cortisol secretion, we decided to determine how healthy individuals react to media information. Accordingly, we investigated whether reading real negative news (1 is physiologically stressful, (2 modulates one's propensity to be stress reactive to a subsequent stressor and (3 modulates remembrance for these news. Sixty participants (30 women, 30 men were randomly assigned to either twenty-four real neutral news excerpts or to twenty-four real negative excerpts for 10 minutes. They were then all exposed to a well-validated psychosocial stressor, the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST, which consists of an anticipation phase of 10 minutes and a test phase of 10 minutes. A total of eight salivary cortisol samples were collected, at 10-minutes intervals, throughout the experimental procedure. One day later, a free recall of the news was performed. Results showed that although reading negative news did not lead to change in cortisol levels (p>0.05, it led to a significant increase in cortisol to a subsequent stressor in women only (p<0.001. Also, women in the negative news condition experienced better memory for these news excerpts compared to men (p<0.01. These results suggest a potential mechanism by which media exposure could increase stress reactivity and memory for negative news in women.

  7. Googling the news

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørmen, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Search engines provide a window into the changing association between websites and keywords across cultures and countries and over time. As such, they offer journalism and news researchers an opportunity to study how search engines, in this case Google, mediate news events and stories online...

  8. Development of a wound healing index for patients with chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Susan D; Fife, Caroline E; Smout, Randall J; Barrett, Ryan S; Thomson, Brett

    2013-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials in wound care generalize poorly because they exclude patients with significant comorbid conditions. Research using real-world wound care patients is hindered by lack of validated methods to stratify patients according to severity of underlying illnesses. We developed a comprehensive stratification system for patients with wounds that predicts healing likelihood. Complete medical record data on 50,967 wounds from the United States Wound Registry were assigned a clear outcome (healed, amputated, etc.). Factors known to be associated with healing were evaluated using logistic regression models. Significant variables (p healing for each wound type. Some variables predicted significantly in nearly all models: wound size, wound age, number of wounds, evidence of bioburden, tissue type exposed (Wagner grade or stage), being nonambulatory, and requiring hospitalization during the course of care. Variables significant in some models included renal failure, renal transplant, malnutrition, autoimmune disease, and cardiovascular disease. All models validated well when applied to the holdout sample. The "Wound Healing Index" can validly predict likelihood of wound healing among real-world patients and can facilitate comparative effectiveness research to identify patients needing advanced therapeutics. © 2013 by the Wound Healing Society.

  9. Feminism in the News: Representations of the Women's Movement Since the 1960s

    OpenAIRE

    Mendes, Kaitlynn

    2011-01-01

    Feminism in the News is a detailed exploration of how the women's movement, its members, and their goals were represented in eight British and American newspapers between 1968 and 2008 – a period covering the height of the Second Wave, and a more contemporary Third Wave. Examining over 1100 news articles, the book analyses the nuanced ways feminism has historically been supported, marginalized and debated in the mainstream press.Mendes asks questions such as: How have feminists and the women'...

  10. Mast Cells Regulate Wound Healing in Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellechea, Ana; Leal, Ermelindo C; Kafanas, Antonios; Auster, Michael E; Kuchibhotla, Sarada; Ostrovsky, Yana; Tecilazich, Francesco; Baltzis, Dimitrios; Zheng, Yongjun; Carvalho, Eugénia; Zabolotny, Janice M; Weng, Zuyi; Petra, Anastasia; Patel, Arti; Panagiotidou, Smaro; Pradhan-Nabzdyk, Leena; Theoharides, Theoharis C; Veves, Aristidis

    2016-07-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a severe complication of diabetes that lacks effective treatment. Mast cells (MCs) contribute to wound healing, but their role in diabetes skin complications is poorly understood. Here we show that the number of degranulated MCs is increased in unwounded forearm and foot skin of patients with diabetes and in unwounded dorsal skin of diabetic mice (P diabetic mice. Pretreatment with the MC degranulation inhibitor disodium cromoglycate rescues diabetes-associated wound-healing impairment in mice and shifts macrophages to the regenerative M2 phenotype (P diabetic mice deficient in MCs have delayed wound healing compared with their wild-type (WT) controls, implying that some MC mediator is needed for proper healing. MCs are a major source of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in mouse skin, but the level of VEGF is reduced in diabetic mouse skin, and its release from human MCs is reduced in hyperglycemic conditions. Topical treatment with the MC trigger substance P does not affect wound healing in MC-deficient mice, but improves it in WT mice. In conclusion, the presence of nondegranulated MCs in unwounded skin is required for proper wound healing, and therapies inhibiting MC degranulation could improve wound healing in diabetes. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  11. Science fiction/science fact: medical genetics in news stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Alan; Anderson, Alison; Allan, Stuart

    2005-12-01

    News media coverage of biotechnology issues offers a rich source of fictional portrayals, with stories drawing strongly on popular imagery and metaphors in descriptions of the powers and dangers of biotechnology. This article examines how science fiction metaphors, imagery and motifs surface in British newspaper (broadsheet and tabloid) coverage of medical genetic issues, focusing on press reporting of two recent highly publicised news media events; namely, the Hashmi and Whitaker families' plights to use stem cells from a 'perfectly matched sibling' for the treatment of their diseased children. It is concerned in particular with the extent to which journalists' use of certain literary devices encourages preferred formulations of medical genetics, and thereby potentially shapes public deliberation about scientific developments and their consequences for society. Understanding how science fiction sustains science fact, and vice versa, and how the former is portrayed in news media, it is argued, would thus seem to be crucial in the effort to understand why people respond so strongly to biotechnologies, and what they imagine their consequences to be.

  12. [The treatment of wounds during World War I].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbatani, Sergio; Fiorino, Sirio

    2017-06-01

    The First World War was a huge tragedy for mankind, but, paradoxically, it represented a source of significant progress in a broad series of human activities, including medicine, since it forced physicians to improve their knowledge in the treatment of a large number of wounded soldiers. The use of heavy artillery and machine guns, as well as chemical warfare, caused very serious and life-threatening lesions and wounds. The most frequent causes of death were not mainly related to gunshot wounds, but rather to fractures, tetanus and septic complications of infectious diseases. In the first part of this article, we describe the surgical procedures and medical therapies carried out by Italian physicians during the First World War, with the aim of treating wounded soldiers in this pre-antibiotic era. Antibacterial solutions, such as those of Dakin-Carrel and sodium hypochlorite and boric acid, the tincture of iodine as well as the surgical and dressing approaches and techniques used to remove pus from wounds, such as ignipuncture and thermocautery or lamellar drainage are reported in detail. In the second part of the paper, the organization of the Italian military hospitals network, the systems and tools useful to transport wounded soldiers both in the front lines and in the rear is amply discussed. In addition, the number of soldiers enrolling, and those dying, wounded or missing during the Great War on the Italian front is estimated.

  13. Outsourcing the news? An empirical assessment of the role of sources and news agencies in the contemporary news landscape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boumans, J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Journalists are increasingly accused of uncritically recycling subsidized material in the form of press releases and news agency copy. This practice has been labeled churnalism and is believed to compromise journalism’s autonomy and threaten news quality. While the context - rampant competition,

  14. Automatic Detection of Fake News

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Rosas, Verónica; Kleinberg, Bennett; Lefevre, Alexandra; Mihalcea, Rada

    2017-01-01

    The proliferation of misleading information in everyday access media outlets such as social media feeds, news blogs, and online newspapers have made it challenging to identify trustworthy news sources, thus increasing the need for computational tools able to provide insights into the reliability of online content. In this paper, we focus on the automatic identification of fake content in online news. Our contribution is twofold. First, we introduce two novel datasets for the task of fake news...

  15. The Stock Market's Reaction to Unemployment News: Why Bad News is Usually Good for Stocks

    OpenAIRE

    John H. Boyd; Ravi Jagannathan; Jian Hu

    2001-01-01

    We find that on average an announcement of rising unemployment is 'good news' for stocks during economic expansions and 'bad news' during economic contractions. Thus stock prices usually increase on news of rising unemployment, since the economy is usually in an expansion phase. We provide an explanation for this phenomenon. Unemployment news bundles two primitive types of information relevant for valuing stocks: information about future interest rates and future corporate earnings and divide...

  16. When Sound Bites Become the News: a Case Study on Manufacturing News in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tena Perišin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Media environment is rapidly changing and facing a widespread crisis in journalism. It is followed by the decline of audience trust and increasing market pressures. The main goal is to win the audience’s attention, very often by creating drama and producing ‘conflict’. The news is not based on something that really happened and that is relevant, but it is more often manufactured or artificially produced. In this case study we explore the curious life cycle of a sound bite from a passing remark by the then Croatian Prime Minister Zoran Milanović’s to the headlines, discussions and extensive reports which developed over the course of several days. This example shows how news could be manufactured and content blurred when it is built around a fragment without providing the context, in this case a political quote. For several days, politicians, experts, war veterans, but also ordinary citizens were involved in the manufactured news story without making a reference to the context. Consequently, the democratic debate was avoided. Drawing on a discussion of news fragmentation as isolation from context, we show that in this case, news values (what news is are increasingly blurred, preventing the news from becoming the source of information and discussion of the country’s key issues.

  17. Collagenase Santyl ointment: a selective agent for wound debridement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; Carson, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Enzymatic debridement is a frequently used technique for removal of necrotic tissue from wounds. Proteases with specificity to break down the collagenous materials in necrotic tissues can achieve selective debridement, digesting denatured collagen in eschar while sparing nonnecrotic tissues. This article provides information about the selectivity of a collagenase-based debriding agent, including evidence of its safe and efficacious uses. Recent research has been conducted, investigating the chemical and biological properties of collagenase ointment, including healing in animal models, digestion power on different collagen types, cell migration activity from collagen degradation products, and compatibility with various wound dressings and metal ions. Evidence presented demonstrates that collagenase ointment is an effective, selective, and safe wound debriding agent.

  18. Clinical process in an integrative psychotherapy for self-wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Barry E

    2013-09-01

    In this article, I will briefly describe the clinical process of an integrative psychotherapy for the healing of self-wounds, including its intended interventions and the variability of their application and outcome. Four specific strategies will be considered, including (a) the role of empathy throughout the course of therapy; (b) exposure therapy as a paradigmatic treatment for the treatment of feared thoughts, behavior, and emotions; (c) focusing and other experiential interventions for eliciting self-wounds; and (d) modification and healing of self-wounds with an individualized array of psychodynamic, experiential, and cognitive-behavioral strategies. In addition, we will briefly consider the impact of transference and countertransference on the trajectory of therapy. 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  19. Exploring Digital News Publishing Business Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindskow, Kasper

    News publishers in the industrialized world are experiencing a fundamental challenge to their business models because of the changing modes of consumption, competition, and production of their offerings that are associated with the emergence of the networked information society. The erosion...... of the traditional business models poses an existential threat to news publishing and has given rise to a continuing struggle among news publishers to design digital business models that will be sustainable in the future. This dissertation argues that a central and underresearched aspect of digital news publishing...... business models concerns the production networks that support the co-production of digital news offerings. To fill this knowledge gap, this dissertation explores the strategic design of the digital news publishing production networks that are associated with HTML-based news offerings on the open Web...

  20. 7 CFR 28.904 - Market news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Market news. 28.904 Section 28.904 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Cotton Classification and Market News Service for Producers Classification and Market News Services § 28.904 Market news. The Director shall cause to be distributed to producers of...

  1. Diverse artikelen in Gay Amsterdam News

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekma, G.

    2002-01-01

    Vernedering, in: Gay Amsterdam News 125 (jan 2002), pp. 20-21; Webseks, zaad, zweetseks, in: Gay Amsterdam News 126 (feb 2002), pp. 30-31; Wurgseks, in: Gay Amsterdam News 127 (mrt 2002), pp. 30-31; Wijnandus Johannes Sengers (1927-2002), in: Gay Amsterdam News 133 (sept 2002), pp. 49.

  2. Beyond the Eurosceptic/Europhile Divide: Towards a New Classification of EU News Coverage in the UK Press

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Price

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Newspapers are typically categorised as being either Eurosceptic or Europhile. However, this classification is insufficient and misleading when applied to news reporting in the UK press. The term Euroscepticism has been usefully deconstructed into more nuanced and complex categories by researchers studying political parties and public opinion. A similar approach is now needed to better represent the complexities of EU news coverage. The current Eurosceptic/Europhile classification needs to be developed for two main reasons. First, it is misleading in that it fails to accurately map the landscape of EU news reporting across the press. Second, it is too simplistic in that it ignores important variations in EU news production – in particular, differences between tabloid and quality titles, and between Brussels based and national based journalists. This article will discuss these issues by drawing on new, empirical research into EU news production. It will conclude by proposing a new means of classifying EU news coverage in the UK press.

  3. Papua in Media: A Discourse Critical Analysis of Economic News in Three National Indonesian Newspapers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mungky Diana Sari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available For so many years, peace in Papua has become a high critical thing in Indonesian politics. In order to find the solution, the paradigm has been shifted from security to welfare or economic approach. Article explored the impact of religion affiliation toward news making and news frame, especially in economic news published by mass media. This research was developed to explore the framing formed by three media outlets which each of them affiliated with certain religion. This research focused on the analysis of economic articles published by three media outlets; Sinar Harapan, Republika, and Kompas daily. The method of framing analysis was based on Robert N. Entman theory, while the critical discourse analysis method was based on Norman Fairclough theory. Political economics theories such as Vincent Mosco, Robert E. Babe, and D.W. Smythe to analyze the influence of religion affiliation in news production were also used. Meanwhile, some political communication theories such as Brian McNair, Dann Nimmo, Noam Chomsky and Denis McQuail were also used to know how media stands in Papua conflict. From the research, it is discovered that the religion affiliation has a big impact on news media and its content, and also the frame that is built. Not only political-economic matters, but "the-sense-of-belonging" of the owner through particular religion gives impact to media policy. The content and frame are finally influencing political communication in Indonesia in Papua conflict particularly. 

  4. Fake News

    OpenAIRE

    Grunewald, Andreas; Kräkel, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade, social media and the Internet have amplified the possibility to spread false information, a.k.a. fake news, which has become a serious threat to the credibility of politicians, organizations, and other decision makers. This paper proposes a framework for investigating the incentives to strategically spread fake news under different institutional configurations and payoff structures. In particular, we show under what conditions institutions that foster transparency in the m...

  5. The New News Media: Democratic implications of undergraduate education and news consumption over social and traditional media

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Communication students at Simon Fraser University were surveyed and interviewed to deduce perceptions and behaviour of news consumption over social and traditional media. Both social media and traditional media are used to consume news with traditional media acting as the primary news source and as more accessible and reliable than social media. News stories considered important or having various perspectives were verified the most, especially world news. Extent of accessibility of sources an...

  6. Implicit hype? Representations of platelet rich plasma in the news media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachul, Christen; Rasko, John E J; Caulfield, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) has gained popularity in recent years for treating sports-related injuries and the news media frequently reports on elite athletes' and celebrities' use of PRP. We conducted a content analysis of newspaper coverage of PRP in Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, United Kingdom, and the United States. Findings show that news media coverage of PRP appears most frequently in sports-related stories, and in relation to elite athletes use of PRP. PRP injections are largely portrayed as a routine treatment for sports-related injuries and newspaper articles rarely discuss the limitations or efficacy of PRP. We argue that while news media coverage of PRP exhibits very few common hallmarks of hype, its portrayal as a routine treatment used by elite athletes and celebrities creates an implicit hype. This implicit hype can contribute to public misunderstandings of the efficacy of PRP.

  7. Managing painful chronic wounds: the Wound Pain Management Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, Patricia; Fogh, Karsten; Glynn, Chris

    2007-01-01

    of the pain experience: location, duration, intensity, quality, onset and impact on activities of daily living. Holistic management must be based on a safe and effective mix of psychosocial approaches together with local and systemic pain management. It is no longer acceptable to ignore or inadequately...... to the wound should be handled as one of the main priorities in chronic wound management together with addressing the cause. Management of pain in chronic wounds depends on proper assessment, reporting and documenting patient experiences of pain. Assessment should be based on six critical dimensions...... document persistent wound pain and not to develop a treatment and monitoring strategy to improve the lives of persons with chronic wounds. Unless wound pain is optimally managed, patient suffering and costs to health care systems will increase. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Apr...

  8. The Usefulness of a News Media Literacy Measure in Evaluating a News Literacy Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksl, Adam; Craft, Stephanie; Ashley, Seth; Miller, Dean

    2017-01-01

    A survey of college students showed those who had taken a news literacy course had significantly higher levels of news media literacy, greater knowledge of current events, and higher motivation to consume news, compared with students who had not taken the course. The effect of taking the course did not diminish over time. Results validate the News…

  9. Dual therapeutic functions of F-5 fragment in burn wounds: preventing wound progression and promoting wound healing in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Bhatia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Burn injuries are a leading cause of morbidity including prolonged hospitalization, disfigurement, and disability. Currently there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved burn therapeutics. A clinical distinction of burn injuries from other acute wounds is the event of the so-called secondary burn wound progression within the first week of the injury, in which a burn expands horizontally and vertically from its initial boundary to a larger area. Therefore, an effective therapeutics for burns should show dual abilities to prevent the burn wound progression and thereafter promote burn wound healing. Herein we report that topically applied F-5 fragment of heat shock protein-90α is a dual functional agent to promote burn wound healing in pigs. First, F-5 prevents burn wound progression by protecting the surrounding cells from undergoing heat-induced caspase 3 activation and apoptosis with increased Akt activation. Accordingly, F-5–treated burn and excision wounds show a marked decline in inflammation. Thereafter, F-5 accelerates burn wound healing by stimulating the keratinocyte migration-led reepithelialization, leading to wound closure. This study addresses a topical agent that is capable of preventing burn wound progression and accelerating burn wound healing.

  10. Dual therapeutic functions of F-5 fragment in burn wounds: preventing wound progression and promoting wound healing in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Ayesha; O'Brien, Kathryn; Chen, Mei; Wong, Alex; Garner, Warren; Woodley, David T; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Burn injuries are a leading cause of morbidity including prolonged hospitalization, disfigurement, and disability. Currently there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved burn therapeutics. A clinical distinction of burn injuries from other acute wounds is the event of the so-called secondary burn wound progression within the first week of the injury, in which a burn expands horizontally and vertically from its initial boundary to a larger area. Therefore, an effective therapeutics for burns should show dual abilities to prevent the burn wound progression and thereafter promote burn wound healing. Herein we report that topically applied F-5 fragment of heat shock protein-90α is a dual functional agent to promote burn wound healing in pigs. First, F-5 prevents burn wound progression by protecting the surrounding cells from undergoing heat-induced caspase 3 activation and apoptosis with increased Akt activation. Accordingly, F-5-treated burn and excision wounds show a marked decline in inflammation. Thereafter, F-5 accelerates burn wound healing by stimulating the keratinocyte migration-led reepithelialization, leading to wound closure. This study addresses a topical agent that is capable of preventing burn wound progression and accelerating burn wound healing.

  11. Navigating Cross-Media News Use : Media repertoires and the value of news in everyday life.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, Joelle; Peters, Chris; Broersma, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    The current news media landscape is characterized by an abundance of digital outlets and increased opportunities for users to navigate news themselves. Yet, it is still unclear how people negotiate this fluctuating environment to decide which news media to select or ignore, how they assemble

  12. News Sources, Gender and Majority-Minority in Danish TV News Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiig, Christina

    In this paper, I am going to identify some central methodological challenges in relation to a project on TV-news and news sources in a perspective of intersectionality and to sketch a research design. In what follows, I will present some methodological issues and research designs of previous...

  13. Media ownership and news framing: an analysis of HIV/AIDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Applying framing theory, the present research analyzes trends in Ugandan news coverage and the prominent issue frames for HIV/AIDS-related stories. In order to determine the influence of other factors, such as media ownership and journalist origin, nearly 800 articles, from 2000 to 2004, were gathered from the major ...

  14. Power structure in Chilean news media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahamonde, Jorge; Bollen, Johan; Elejalde, Erick; Ferres, Leo; Poblete, Barbara

    2018-01-01

    Even democracies endowed with the most active free press struggle to maintain diversity of news coverage. Consolidation and market forces may cause only a few dominant players to control the news cycle. Editorial policies may be biased by corporate ownership relations, narrowing news coverage and focus. To an increasing degree this problem also applies to social media news distribution, since it is subject to the same socio-economic drivers. To study the effects of consolidation and ownership on news diversity, we model the diversity of Chilean coverage on the basis of ownership records and social media data. We create similarity networks of news outlets on the basis of their ownership and the topics they cover. We then examine the relationships between the topology of ownership networks and content similarity to characterize how ownership affects news coverage. A network analysis reveals that Chilean media is highly concentrated both in terms of ownership as well as in terms of topics covered. Our method can be used to determine which groups of outlets and ownership exert the greatest influence on news coverage.

  15. A comparison of obsidian and surgical steel scalpel wound healing in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disa, J J; Vossoughi, J; Goldberg, N H

    1993-10-01

    There are several anecdotal clinical articles claiming wound healing and scar superiority using obsidian (volcanic glass) scalpels. In order to determine if skin incisions made with obsidian were superior to those made with standard surgical steel, wound tensile strength, scar width, and histology were assessed in 40 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Each rat received two parallel 8-cm dorsal skin incisions, one with an obsidian scalpel and the other with a surgical steel scalpel (no. 15 blade). Data were analyzed by ANOVA. Tensile strength of the two wound types was not different at 7, 14, 21, and 42 days. Scar width, however, was significantly less in the obsidian wounds at 7, 10, and 14 days (p obsidian wounds contained fewer inflammatory cells and less granulation tissue at 7 days.

  16. News, truth and crime: the Westray disaster and its aftermath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMullan, J.L. [Saint Mary' s University, Halifax, NS (Canada). Department of Sociology and Criminology

    2005-07-01

    A study of the way the media portrayed the Westray Mine disaster and its aftermath over the period 1992 to 2002 is presented. The chapters titles are; power, discourse, and the production of news as truth; the explosion and its aftermath; studying the press and Westray; the press and the presentation of Westray's truth; and the politics of truth and the invisibility of corporate crime. News articles reporting the accident and outcome were sampled, coded, and evaluated by content analysis. It is concluded that the various media represented alternative truths, but did not label the corporation as criminal. This was missing from the media's reporting of the disaster.

  17. Cross-validation of the factorial structure of the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale (NEWS and its abbreviated form (NEWS-A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerin Ester

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale (NEWS and its abbreviated form (NEWS-A assess perceived environmental attributes believed to influence physical activity. A multilevel confirmatory factor analysis (MCFA conducted on a sample from Seattle, WA showed that, at the respondent level, the factor-analyzable items of the NEWS and NEWS-A measured 11 and 10 constructs of perceived neighborhood environment, respectively. At the census blockgroup (used by the US Census Bureau as a subunit of census tracts level, the MCFA yielded five factors for both NEWS and NEWS-A. The aim of this study was to cross-validate the individual- and blockgroup-level measurement models of the NEWS and NEWS-A in a geographical location and population different from those used in the original validation study. Methods A sample of 912 adults was recruited from 16 selected neighborhoods (116 census blockgroups in the Baltimore, MD region. Neighborhoods were stratified according to their socio-economic status and transport-related walkability level measured using Geographic Information Systems. Participants self-completed the NEWS. MCFA was used to cross-validate the individual- and blockgroup-level measurement models of the NEWS and NEWS-A. Results The data provided sufficient support for the factorial validity of the original individual-level measurement models, which consisted of 11 (NEWS and 10 (NEWS-A correlated factors. The original blockgroup-level measurement model of the NEWS and NEWS-A showed poor fit to the data and required substantial modifications. These included the combining of aspects of building aesthetics with safety from crime into one factor; the separation of natural aesthetics and building aesthetics into two factors; and for the NEWS-A, the separation of presence of sidewalks/walking routes from other infrastructure for walking. Conclusion This study provided support for the generalizability of the individual

  18. Frequency of Risk-Related News Media Messages in 2016 Coverage of Zika Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sell, Tara Kirk; Watson, Crystal; Meyer, Diane; Kronk, Marissa; Ravi, Sanjana; Pechta, Laura E; Lubell, Keri M; Rose, Dale A

    2018-01-03

    News media plays a large role in the information the public receives during an infectious disease outbreak, and may influence public knowledge and perceptions of risk. This study analyzed and described the content of U.S. news media coverage of Zika virus and Zika response during 2016. A random selection of 800 Zika-related news stories from 25 print and television news sources was analyzed. The study examined 24 different messages that appeared in news media articles and characterized them using theories of risk perception as messages with characteristics that could increase perception of risk (risk-elevating messages; n = 14), messages that could decrease perception of risk (risk-minimizing messages; n = 8), or messages about travel or testing guidance (n = 2). Overall, 96% of news stories in the study sample contained at least one or more risk-elevating message(s) and 61% contained risk-minimizing message(s). The frequency of many messages changed after local transmission was confirmed in Florida, and differed between sources in locations with or without local transmission in 2016. Forty percent of news stories included messages about negative potential outcomes of Zika virus infection without mentioning ways to reduce risk. Findings from this study may help inform current federal, state, and local Zika responses by offering a detailed analysis of how news media are covering the outbreak and response activities as well as identifying specific messages appearing more or less frequently than intended. Findings identifying the types of messages that require greater emphasis may also assist public health communicators in responding more effectively to future outbreaks. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  19. Chronic wound repair and healing in older adults: current status and future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Lisa; Abadir, Peter; Brem, Harold; Carter, Marissa; Conner-Kerr, Teresa; Davidson, Jeff; DiPietro, Luisa; Falanga, Vincent; Fife, Caroline; Gardner, Sue; Grice, Elizabeth; Harmon, John; Hazzard, William R; High, Kevin P; Houghton, Pamela; Jacobson, Nasreen; Kirsner, Robert S; Kovacs, Elizabeth J; Margolis, David; McFarland Horne, Frances; Reed, May J; Sullivan, Dennis H; Thom, Stephen; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Walston, Jeremy; Whitney, Jo Anne; Williams, John; Zieman, Susan; Schmader, Kenneth

    2015-03-01

    Older adults are more likely to have chronic wounds than younger people, and the effect of chronic wounds on quality of life is particularly profound in this population. Wound healing slows with age, but the basic biology underlying chronic wounds and the influence of age-associated changes on wound healing are poorly understood. Most studies have used in vitro approaches and various animal models, but observed changes translate poorly to human healing conditions. The effect of age and accompanying multimorbidity on the effectiveness of existing and emerging treatment approaches for chronic wounds is also unknown, and older adults tend to be excluded from randomized clinical trials. Poorly defined outcomes and variables; lack of standardization in data collection; and variations in the definition, measurement, and treatment of wounds also hamper clinical studies. The Association of Specialty Professors, in conjunction with the National Institute on Aging and the Wound Healing Society, held a workshop, summarized in this article, to explore the current state of knowledge and research challenges, engage investigators across disciplines, and identify research questions to guide future study of age-associated changes in chronic wound healing. © 2015 by the American Geriatrics Society and the Wound Healing Society.

  20. Recommendations for how to communicate bad news

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Villa López

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The communication, along with the control of the symptoms and the emotional support are the basic instruments that are used in the daily development of our profession. To be little capable at the time of notifying bad news can generate an added suffering unnecessary in the person who receives the new and a deterioration in the relation professional-patient.In many occasions, at the time of approaching these situations, the professional of the health usually feels anguish, fear and restlessness, this is because during is scared and restlessness this happens because during his stage of studies in the faculty the student has received a formation based on the binomial health-disease from a totally biological perspective forgetting the abilities communication.Supported in different bibliographical sources, this article tries to analyze the factors that influence when communicating the bad news and, to suggest some preventatives ideas on how giving them trying to prevent the burnout syndrome.

  1. (In)direct framing effects: the effects of news media framing on public support for Turkish membership in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vreese, C.H.; Boomgaarden, H.G.; Semetko, H.A.

    2011-01-01

    News framing can exert a strong influence on public opinion. Following a media content analysis, this article investigates the effects of news framing on support for membership of Turkey in the European Union. A first experimental study (n = 304) showed a significant difference in the level of

  2. Climate News Across Media Platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskjær, Mikkel Fugl

    2015-01-01

    In a changing media landscape marked by technological, institutional and cultural convergence, comparative and cross-media content analysis represents a valuable analytical tool in mapping the diverse channels of climate change communication. This paper presents a comparative study of climate...... quantitative and qualitative content analysis the paper documents and explores the extent and character of climate change news across different media platforms. The study aims at contributing to the on-going assessment of how news media are addressing climate change at a time when old and new media...... change news on five different media platforms: newspapers, television, radio, web-news and mobile news. It investigates the themes and actors represented in public climate change communication as well as the diverse possibilities of participating in public debates and information sharing. By combining...

  3. CERN television news

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    CERN events brought right to your desktop by the new video bulletin.   CERN now has its very own news broadcast , or rather 'webcast', with a host of special reports and even a star presenter. From today onwards, just go to the Bulletin's web page, click on the 'video news' link and sit back and enjoy the latest news about CERN, presented in images by Wendy Korda. The ten-minute newscast in both French and English, the Organization's two official languages, presents interviews, pictures of experiments and computer-generated graphics, bringing you right up to date with some of the Laboratory's latest stories. The show concludes with a selection of the best snapshots taken by the CERN Photo Lab. So every one or two months CERN's Audio-Video Service (ETT/DH) will be putting together a video news report that you can watch on your own desktop computer. Daniel Boileau, Patrick Gilbert de Vautibault and Jacques Fichet, the Service's three technicians, came up with the idea of producing this regular feat...

  4. NEWordS A News Search Engine for English Vocabulary Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejing Huang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Vocabulary is the first hurdle for English learners to over- come. Instead of simply showing a word again and again we come up with an idea to develop an English news article search engine based on users word-reciting record on Shanbay.com. It is designed for advanced English learners to find suitable reading materials. The search engine consists of Crawling Module Document Normalizing module Indexing Module Querying Module and Interface Module. We propose three sorting amp ranking algorithms for Querying Module. For the basic algorithm five crucial principles are taken into consideration. Term frequency inverse document frequency familiarity degree and article freshness degree are factors in this algorithm. Then we think of a improved algorithm for the scene in which a user read multiple articles in the searching result list. Here we adopt a iterative amp greedy method. The essential idea is to select English news articles one by one according to the query meanwhile dynamically update the unfamiliarity of the words during each iterative step. Moreover we develop an advanced algorithm to take article difficulty in to account. Interface Module is designed as a website meanwhile some data visualization technologies e.g. word cloud are applied here. Furthermore we conduct both applicability check and performance evaluation. Metrics such as searching time word-covering ratio and minimum number of articles that completely cover all the queried vocabulary are randomly sampled and profoundly analyzed. The result shows that our search engine works very well with satisfying performance.

  5. Scientific production on the applicability of phenytoin in wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Firmino

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Phenytoin is an anticonvulsant that has been used in wound healing. The objectives of this study were to describe how the scientific production presents the use ofphenytoinas a healing agent and to discuss its applicability in wounds. A literature review and hierarchy analysis of evidence-based practices was performed. Eighteen articles were analyzed that tested the intervention in wounds such as leprosy ulcers, leg ulcers, diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers, trophic ulcers, war wounds, burns, preparation of recipient graft area, radiodermatitis and post-extraction of melanocytic nevi. Systemic use ofphenytoinin the treatment of fistulas and the hypothesis of topical use in the treatment of vitiligo were found. In conclusion, topical use ofphenytoinis scientifically evidenced. However robust research is needed that supports a protocol for the use ofphenytoinas another option of a healing agent in clinical practice.

  6. Health as science and the biological body as an artifact: the case of Brazil's national TV news program Jornal Nacional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Eduardo; Ianni, Aurea Maria Zöllner; Lefevre, Fernando

    2018-04-01

    This article presents the findings of a study of the coverage of health, science and technology during 2012 by the Jornal Nacional, a national television news program in Brazil produced by the Rede Globo de Televisão. A total of 246 news stories addressing health-related topics were analyzed, half of which addressed scientific research, technological innovation and hospital care, and were shown to represent a doctor-centered discourse. The findings also show that 82% of the news stories concerning science and technology advertise products that are about to be introduced onto the market, illustrating the commercial nature of this research. The article discusses two aspects portrayed by these news stories that characterize the biological body as an artifact: the construction of a virtual and fragmented body through the diffusion of images of the inside of the body; and the importance of biotechnological issues, which leaves life processes open to molecular manipulation and alteration. The study also questions the nature-culture hybridization present in biotechnological objects.

  7. The interaction of financial news between mass media and new media: Evidence from news on Chinese stock market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongjie; Zhang, Zuochao; Liu, Lanbiao; Shen, Dehua

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate both the contemporaneous and the lead-lag relationships between the mass media news and the new media news of the financial news on the constitute stocks of the CSI 300. The empirical results show that: (1) there exists a strong correlation between these two types of news; (2) the granger causality direction from new media news to mass media news is increasingly obvious, while the reverse direction has a downward trend; (3) new media is playing a increasingly important role in the stock market and exhibits a trend to substitutes the mass media.

  8. The evidence-based principles of negative pressure wound therapy in trauma & orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Novak; Khan, Wasim S; J, Palmer

    2014-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy is a popular treatment for the management of both acute and chronic wounds. Its use in trauma and orthopedics is diverse and includes the acute traumatic setting as well as chronic troublesome wounds associated with pressure sores and diabetic foot surgery. Efforts have been made to provide an evidence base to guide its use however this has been limited by a lack of good quality evidence. The following review article explores the available evidence and describes future developments for its use in trauma and orthopaedic practice.

  9. Competing Discourses about Youth Sexual Exploitation in Canadian News Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saewyc, Elizabeth M; Miller, Bonnie B; Rivers, Robert; Matthews, Jennifer; Hilario, Carla; Hirakata, Pam

    2013-10-01

    Media holds the power to create, maintain, or break down stigmatizing attitudes, which affect policies, funding, and services. To understand how Canadian news media depicts the commercial sexual exploitation of children and youth, we examined 835 Canadian newspaper articles from 1989-2008 using a mixed methods critical discourse analysis approach, comparing representations to existing research about sexually exploited youth. Despite research evidence that equal rates of boys and girls experience exploitation, Canadian news media depicted exploited youth predominantly as heterosexual girls, and described them alternately as victims or workers in a trade, often both in the same story. News media mentioned exploiters far less often than victims, and portrayed them almost exclusively as male, most often called 'customers' or 'consumers,' and occasionally 'predators'; in contrast, research has documented the majority of sexually exploited boys report female exploiters. Few news stories over the past two decades portrayed the diversity of victims, perpetrators, and venues of exploitation reported in research. The focus on victims but not exploiters helps perpetuate stereotypes of sexual exploitation as business or a 'victimless crime,' maintains the status quo, and blurs responsibility for protecting youth under the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. Health care providers and researchers can be advocates for accuracy in media coverage about sexual exploitation; news reporters and editors should focus on exploiters more than victims, draw on existing research evidence to avoid perpetuating stereotypes, and use accurate terms, such as commercial sexual exploitation, rather than terms related to business or trade.

  10. Naturally Occurring Wound Healing Agents: An Evidence-Based Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapanagioti, E G; Assimopoulou, A N

    2016-01-01

    Nature constitutes a pool of medicines for thousands of years. Nowadays, trust in nature is increasingly growing, as many effective medicines are naturally derived. Over the last decades, the potential of plants as wound healing agents is being investigated. Wounds and ulcers affect the patients' life quality and often lead to amputations. Approximately 43,000,000 patients suffer from diabetic foot ulcers worldwide. Annually, $25 billion are expended for the treatment of chronic wounds, with the number growing due to aging population and increased incidents of diabetes and obesity. Therefore a timely, orderly and effective wound management and treatment is crucial. This paper aims to systematically review natural products, mainly plants, with scientifically well documented wound healing activity, focusing on articles based on animal and clinical studies performed worldwide and approved medicinal products. Moreover, a brief description of the wound healing mechanism is presented, to provide a better understanding. Although a plethora of natural products are in vitro and in vivo evaluated for wound healing activity, only a few go through clinical trials and even fewer launch the market as approved medicines. Most of them rely on traditional medicine, indicating that ethnopharmacology is a successful strategy for drug development. Since only 6% of plants have been systematically investigated pharmacologically, more intensified efforts and emerging advancements are needed to exploit the potentials of nature for the development of novel medicines. This paper aims to provide a reliable database and matrix for thorough further investigation towards the discovery of wound healing agents.

  11. Market News Price Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Real-time price data collected by the Boston Market News Reporter. The NOAA Fisheries' "Fishery Market News" began operations in New York City on February 14, 1938....

  12. Fake News: A Technological Approach to Proving the Origins of Content, Using Blockchains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckle, Steve; White, Martin

    2017-12-01

    In this article, we introduce a prototype of an innovative technology for proving the origins of captured digital media. In an era of fake news, when someone shows us a video or picture of some event, how can we trust its authenticity? It seems that the public no longer believe that traditional media is a reliable reference of fact, perhaps due, in part, to the onset of many diverse sources of conflicting information, via social media. Indeed, the issue of "fake" reached a crescendo during the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election, when the winner, Donald Trump, claimed that The New York Times was trying to discredit him by pushing disinformation. Current research into overcoming the problem of fake news does not focus on establishing the ownership of media resources used in such stories-the blockchain-based application introduced in this article is technology that is capable of indicating the authenticity of digital media. Put simply, using the trust mechanisms of blockchain technology, the tool can show, beyond doubt, the provenance of any source of digital media, including images used out of context in attempts to mislead. Although the application is an early prototype and its capability to find fake resources is somewhat limited, we outline future improvements that would overcome such limitations. Furthermore, we believe that our application (and its use of blockchain technology and standardized metadata) introduces a novel approach to overcoming falsities in news reporting and the provenance of media resources used therein. However, while our application has the potential to be able to verify the originality of media resources, we believe that technology is only capable of providing a partial solution to fake news. That is because it is incapable of proving the authenticity of a news story as a whole. We believe that takes human skills.

  13. A synthesis of the literature on breaking bad news or truth telling: potential for research in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martis, Lawrence; Westhues, Anne

    2013-01-01

    The high incidence of fatal diseases, inequitable access to health care, and socioeconomic disparities in India generate plentiful clinical bad news including diagnosis of a life-limiting disease, poor prognosis, treatment failure, and impending death. These contexts compel health care professionals to become the messengers of bad news to patients and their families. In global literature on breaking bad news, there is very little about such complex clinical interactions occurring in India or guiding health care providers to do it well. The purpose of this article is to identify the issues for future research that would contribute to the volume, comprehensiveness, and quality of empirical literature on breaking bad news in clinical settings across India. Towards this end, we have synthesized the studies done across the globe on breaking bad news, under four themes: (a) deciding the amount of bad news to deliver; (b) attending to cultural and ethical issues; (c) managing psychological distress; and (d) producing competent messengers of bad news. We believe that robust research is inevitable to build an indigenous knowledge base, enhance communicative competence among health care professionals, and thereby to improve the quality of clinical interactions in India.

  14. A synthesis of the literature on breaking bad news or truth telling: Potential for research in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Martis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The high incidence of fatal diseases, inequitable access to health care, and socioeconomic disparities in India generate plentiful clinical bad news including diagnosis of a life-limiting disease, poor prognosis, treatment failure, and impending death. These contexts compel health care professionals to become the messengers of bad news to patients and their families. In global literature on breaking bad news, there is very little about such complex clinical interactions occurring in India or guiding health care providers to do it well. The purpose of this article is to identify the issues for future research that would contribute to the volume, comprehensiveness, and quality of empirical literature on breaking bad news in clinical settings across India. Towards this end, we have synthesized the studies done across the globe on breaking bad news, under four themes: (a deciding the amount of bad news to deliver; (b attending to cultural and ethical issues; (c managing psychological distress; and (d producing competent messengers of bad news. We believe that robust research is inevitable to build an indigenous knowledge base, enhance communicative competence among health care professionals, and thereby to improve the quality of clinical interactions in India.

  15. The Changing Landscape of Science News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordon, James

    2011-03-01

    Social media are revolutionizing the ways that people communicate and the ways they get their news. Traditional news outlets are in decline, and no subject area is declining faster than science news. Every day there are fewer professional science journalists working in traditional media. On the other hand, ever greater numbers of scientists, science enthusiasts, and online journalists are turning to blogs, podcasts, eBooks, twitter feeds, and social media sites like Facebook and Tumbler to spread news about science. I will present an overview of the state of science journalism and speculate on the likely directions it seems to be heading. I will also offer some general guidelines to help scientists understand what makes a good science news story, as well as suggesting ways that they can get their work in the news.

  16. Summer Food Service Program. Nourishing News. Volume 3, Issue 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idaho State Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The primary goal of the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) is to provide nutritious meals to children in low-income areas when school is not in session. This issue of "Nourishing News" focuses on SFSPs. The articles contained in this issue are: (1) Is Your Summer Food Program Financially Fit? (Jean Zaske); (2) Keeping the…

  17. Abnormal pigmentation within cutaneous scars: A complication of wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Chadwick

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormally pigmented scars are an undesirable consequence of cutaneous wound healing and are a complication every single individual worldwide is at risk of. They present a challenge for clinicians, as there are currently no definitive treatment options available, and render scars much more noticeable making them highly distressing for patients. Despite extensive research into both wound healing and the pigment cell, there remains a scarcity of knowledge surrounding the repigmentation of cutaneous scars. Pigment production is complex and under the control of many extrinsic and intrinsic factors and patterns of scar repigmentation are unpredictable. This article gives an overview of human skin pigmentation, repigmentation following wounding and current treatment options.

  18. News with an attitude: assessing the mechanisms underlying the effects of opinionated news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boukes, M.; Boomgaarden, H.G.; Moorman, M.; de Vreese, C.H.

    2014-01-01

    Opinionated news targets communities of likeminded viewers, relies on dramaturgical storytelling techniques, and shares characteristics with political satire. Accordingly, opinionated news should be understood as a specific form of political entertainment. We have investigated the mechanisms

  19. Chronic Wound Repair and Healing in Older Adults: Current Status and Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Lisa; Abadir, Peter; Brem, Harold; Carter, Marissa; Conner-Kerr, Teresa; Davidson, Jeff; DiPietro, Luisa; Falanga, Vincent; Fife, Caroline; Gardner, Sue; Grice, Elizabeth; Harmon, John; Hazzard, William R.; High, Kevin P.; Houghton, Pamela; Jacobson, Nasreen; Kirsner, Robert S.; Kovacs, Elizabeth J.; Margolis, David; Horne, Frances McFarland; Reed, May J.; Sullivan, Dennis H.; Thom, Stephen; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Walston, Jeremy; Whitney, Jo Anne; Williams, John; Zieman, Susan; Schmader, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Older adults are more likely to have chronic wounds than younger people, and the effect of chronic wounds on quality of life is particularly profound in this population. Wound healing slows with age, but the basic biology underlying chronic wounds and the influence of age-associated changes on wound healing are poorly understood. Most studies have used in vitro approaches and various animal models, but observed changes translate poorly to human healing conditions. The effect of age and accompanying multimorbidity on the effectiveness of existing and emerging treatment approaches for chronic wounds is also unknown, and older adults tend to be excluded from randomized clinical trials. Poorly defined outcomes and variables; lack of standardization in data collection; and variations in the definition, measurement, and treatment of wounds also hamper clinical studies. The Association of Specialty Professors, in conjunction with the National Institute on Aging and the Wound Healing Society, held a workshop, summarized in this article, to explore the current state of knowledge and research challenges, engage investigators across disciplines, and identify research questions to guide future study of age-associated changes in chronic wound healing. PMID:25753048

  20. Displaying fairness while delivering bad news: Testing the effectiveness of organizational bad news training in the layoff context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Manuela; König, Cornelius J; Koppermann, Christopher; Schilling, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Although giving bad news at work is a stressful experience, managers are often underprepared for this challenging task. As a solution, we introduce organizational bad news training that integrates (a) principles of delivering bad news from the context of health care (i.e., bad news delivery component), and (b) principles of organizational justice theory (i.e., fairness component). We argue that both the formal and fair delivery of bad news at work can be enhanced with the help of training to mitigate distress both for the messenger and the recipient. We tested the effectiveness of training for the delivery of a layoff as a typical bad news event at work. In 2 studies, we compared the performance of a training group (receiving both components of training) with that of a control group (Study 1, Study 2) and a basics group (receiving the bad news delivery component only; Study 2) during a simulated dismissal notification meeting. In general, the results supported our hypotheses: Training improved the formal delivery of bad news and predicted indicators of procedural fairness during the conversation in both studies. In Study 2, we also considered layoff victims' negativity after the layoff and found that training significantly reduced negative responses. This relationship was fully mediated by layoff victims' fairness perceptions. Despite preparation, however, giving bad news remained a challenging task in both studies. In summary, we recommend that organizations provide managers with organizational bad news training in order to promote professional and fair bad news conversations at work. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Gender perspectives on access to public debate: reflecting on the evening news contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Cabecinhas

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present article aims to analyze the reception of media content within a gender perspective. The women’s full exercise of citizenship and access to public debate depends greatly on the way media presents them to the world. This study considers that balanced representation of men and women in the news is an important criterion to take into account in order to produce quality journalism. Considering the various television news programs, the evening news is definitely one of the most important and, yet, one of the less studied. Daily broadcast on a prime time schedule, it is considered to be an important source of information through which citizens acknowledge themain events of the news agenda and, also, their social roles and responsibilities. Therefore, several focus groups have been organized with the purpose of debating news contents and understanding how gender meanings are negotiated by audiences. The analysis of these debates displayed important gender perspectives among focus groups participants. Its outputs allowed a better understanding of how audiences interpret gender meanings in the media and emphasized the need to develop alternative proposals of journalistic practices capable of promoting a critical, balanced and diversified gender perspective within the audiences.

  2. Breaking bad news in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantis, Apostolos; Exiara, Triada

    2015-01-01

    In a regional hospital, many patients are newly diagnosed with cancer. Breaking the bad news in these patients and their relatives is a tough task. Many doctors are not experienced in talking to patients about death or death-related diseases. In recent years, there have been great efforts to change the current situation. The aim of this study was to investigate the experience and education of medical personnel in breaking bad news in a secondary hospital. 59 doctors from General Hospital of Komotini, Greece were included in the study. All the doctors were in clinical specialties that treated cancer patients. A brief questionnaire was developed based on current guidelines such as Baile/SPIKES framework and the ABCDE mnemonic. Residents are involved in delivering bad news less frequently than specialists. Only 21 doctors (35.59%) had specific training on breaking bad news. 20 doctors (33.90%) were aware of the available techniques and protocols on breaking bad news. 47 doctors (79.66%) had a consistent plan for breaking bad news. 57 (96.61%) delivered bad news in a quiet place, 53 (89.83%) ensured no interruptions and enough time, 53 (89.83%) used simple words and 54 (91.53%) checked for understanding and did not rush through the news. 46 doctors (77.97%) allowed relatives to determine patient's knowledge about the disease. There were low rates of specific training in breaking bad news. However, the selected location, the physician's speech and their plan were according to current guidelines.

  3. The Cognitive Information Effect of Televised News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lăzăroiu, George; Pera, Aurel; Ştefănescu-Mihăilă, Ramona O; Bratu, Sofia; Mircică, Nela

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize the key findings which prove that the biased perceptions of viewers may provide an inaccurate image of the informational validity of televised news. The news may generate distorted recollections of what occurred in particular reported events if displayed routines influence viewers not to pay attention to the essential features of a narrative. Elaborating on Fiske and Hartley (2010), Zelizer (2010), and Gunter (2015), we indicate that the character of the news setting has altered and individuals' news consumption routines have changed in adapting to media advancements. The news may be undergone at various psychological stages by news publics. Televised news may transmit information undeviatingly to publics that may (not) be committed successfully to memory. Our paper shows that individuals' skills to handle information that is displayed in a linguistic configuration are influenced by their abilities in the utilization of certain symbol systems that are employed to represent notions and meanings. Televised news may shape what individuals grasp, influence their perceptions, convictions, and views regarding prevailing events and matters, and transmit knowledge and interpretation. If news stories can be jotted down in a linguistic style that sidesteps making needless processing demands and captivate news users by facilitating them to make connections with former knowledge, they may be more worthy of note and more edifying. We conclude that news narratives present a cognitive demanding task to individuals, displaying novel information regarding evolving events in a multifarious format. Broadcast news exhibits intricate contents, displaying configurations that employ excessively the cognitive abilities for information processing of viewers.

  4. Implicating municipalities in addressing household food insecurity in Canada: A pan-Canadian analysis of news print media coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Patricia A; Gaucher, Megan; Power, Elaine M; Little, Margaret H

    2016-06-27

    Household food insecurity (HFI) affects approximately 13% of Canadian households and is especially prevalent among low-income households. Actions to address HFI have been occurring primarily at the local level, despite calls for greater income supports from senior governments to reduce poverty. News media may be reinforcing this trend, by emphasizing food-based solutions to HFI and the municipal level as the site where action needs to take place. The objective of this study was to examine the level and framing of print news media coverage of HFI action in Canada. Using a quantitative newspaper content analysis approach, we analyzed 547 articles gathered from 2 national and 16 local/regional English-language newspapers published between January 2007 and December 2012. News coverage increased over time, and over half was produced from Ontario (33%) and British Columbia (22%) combined. Of the 374 articles that profiled a specific action, community gardens/urban agriculture was most commonly profiled (17%), followed by food banks/meal programs (13%); 70% of articles implicated governments to take action on HFI, and of these, 43% implicated municipal governments. Article tone was notably more negative when senior governments were profiled and more neutral and positive when municipal governments were profiled. News media reporting of this issue in Canada may be placing pressure on municipalities to engage in food-based actions to address HFI. A more systematic approach to HFI action in Canada will require more balanced media reporting that acknowledges the limitations of food-based solutions to the income-based problem of HFI.

  5. Assessing News Contagion in Finance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Cerchiello

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of news in the financial context has gained a prominent interest in the last years. This is because of the possible predictive power of such content especially in terms of associated sentiment/mood. In this paper, we focus on a specific aspect of financial news analysis: how the covered topics modify according to space and time dimensions. To this purpose, we employ a modified version of topic model LDA, the so-called Structural Topic Model (STM, that takes into account covariates as well. Our aim is to study the possible evolution of topics extracted from two well known news archive—Reuters and Bloomberg—and to investigate a causal effect in the diffusion of the news by means of a Granger causality test. Our results show that both the temporal dynamics and the spatial differentiation matter in the news contagion.

  6. Do the contents of foreign news on television match viewers’ interests? A 12-nation study of topics and countries of interest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, F.; De Swert, K.; Cohen, A.A.

    2017-01-01

    This article draws upon content analytic and survey data from a 12-nation comparative study to examine the question of content-interest correspondence (CIC) regarding foreign news on television, that is, to what extent do the contents of foreign news aired on television match the interests that

  7. Women's Hidden Agency in the News Coverage of the Tibetian Riots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvimarja Vuontela

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This mixed methods case study on the international newspaper coverage of women in the  Tibetan  riots  in  March  2008  analyses  to  what extent  women  are  represented according to prevailing gender stereotypes in conflict news. The study largely confirms news media’s gender bias, in that news media hides women’s agency. Women are either not included in the studied 62 articles from International Herald Tribune, China Daily, and  the  Tibet  Post  International, or represented according  to  prevailing  gender stereotypes, namely as passive feminine objects. Interestingly, Chi-square testing  reveals  that  the Tibet Post International, an online newspaper  run  by  Tibetan  exiles,  deviated from  the  general  tendency  by  representing remarkably frequent images of active Tibetan women. Around one-third (32 percent of the Tibet Post  International’s articles  included press  photos featuring women and the clear  majority  (88  percent  of  these  images represented  them  as  active.  However,  the qualitative  part  of  the study  tells  that  text  associated  with  the  newspaper’s  images  of active Tibetan women reduced these women’s perceived agency. When introducing text into  the  interpretation  of  these  images,  the  women in  many  cases  were  turned  into potential victims. This points out that text-image interaction is an often overlooked, yet integral part of assigning meaning in conflict news.

  8. Representations of disability in the Canadian news media: a decade of change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devotta, Kimberly; Wilton, Robert; Yiannakoulias, Niko

    2013-01-01

    To assess stability and change in representations of disability and persons with disability in the Canadian news media between 1998 and 2008. The study replicated research conducted in 1998 that assessed the representation of disability in the Canadian news media. Following the earlier study, three newspapers were selected (Globe and Mail, Toronto Star and Toronto Sun) and all articles from a three-month period in 1998 and 2008 were assessed for disability content. In total, 362 articles were found in the two time periods. These were coded for structure and content using a schema developed in the earlier research. Between 1998 and 2008, there was a significant increase in the proportion of stories using "person first" language, and a significant increase in the proportion of "progressively" themed articles (e.g. dealing with barriers to participation, or disability awareness and inclusion). At the same time, there were significant differences between newspapers, with the Toronto Sun (a tabloid) maintaining a strong focus on "traditional" themes (e.g. special education, charitable provision). The differences in news media representations between 1998 and 2008 suggest a positive change in the way people with disabilities are represented, with greater attention to the complexity of their identity and their multiple social roles. The participation of persons with disabilities in society continues to be limited by negative attitudes. Media reporting has a significant influence on public attitudes toward disability. In a content analysis of three Canadian newspapers, this study found several significant changes in the language and content of disability-related articles. Together, these changes provide some evidence of more favorable media representations of disability. Further research in rehabilitation is needed to understand how such changes may both reflect and facilitate ongoing efforts to enhance people with disabilties' participation in social life.

  9. Press problem related to nuclear energy news reporting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Mitsuo

    2008-01-01

    Since the event of Niigataken Chuetsu-oki Earthquake in 2007 and the subsequent press reports on damage of nuclear power station after it, a stance of media is being questioned. In order to clear this problem, basic organizational structure of the press related to nuclear energy news was analyzed. Local news department, social news department, science news department and economical news department involve in nuclear energy news the accordance with their own situations and concerns. This structure makes problem of nuclear energy news reporting complicated. Changing this system is required but very difficult. It is concluded that the press problem around nuclear energy news is strange. (author)

  10. Research and Practice of the News Map Compilation Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T.; Liu, W.; Ma, W.

    2018-04-01

    Based on the needs of the news media on the map, this paper researches on the news map compilation service, conducts demand research on the service of compiling news maps, designs and compiles the public authority base map suitable for media publication, and constructs the news base map material library. It studies the compilation of domestic and international news maps with timeliness and strong pertinence and cross-regional characteristics, constructs the hot news thematic gallery and news map customization services, conducts research on types of news maps, establish closer liaison and cooperation methods with news media, and guides news media to use correct maps. Through the practice of the news map compilation service, this paper lists two cases of news map preparation services used by different media, compares and analyses cases, summarizes the research situation of news map compilation service, and at the same time puts forward outstanding problems and development suggestions in the service of news map compilation service.

  11. RESEARCH AND PRACTICE OF THE NEWS MAP COMPILATION SERVICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Zhao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on the needs of the news media on the map, this paper researches on the news map compilation service, conducts demand research on the service of compiling news maps, designs and compiles the public authority base map suitable for media publication, and constructs the news base map material library. It studies the compilation of domestic and international news maps with timeliness and strong pertinence and cross-regional characteristics, constructs the hot news thematic gallery and news map customization services, conducts research on types of news maps, establish closer liaison and cooperation methods with news media, and guides news media to use correct maps. Through the practice of the news map compilation service, this paper lists two cases of news map preparation services used by different media, compares and analyses cases, summarizes the research situation of news map compilation service, and at the same time puts forward outstanding problems and development suggestions in the service of news map compilation service.

  12. Going Down the Hole: Beaconsfield, Celebrities and the Changing News Culture in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Bainbridge

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available For fourteen days, all of Australia and much of the world was focused on the rescue of two miners trapped underground in Beaconsfield, Tasmania. This article looks at the period from Todd Russell and Brant Webb’s rescue up to and including Channel Nine’s screening of an exclusive interview with the men on 21 May 2006. It analyses the ways in which Beaconsfield was reported—and the exclusive interview with the miners pursued—as a way of exploring notions of celebrity, infotainment, chequebook journalism and the changing shape of news culture in Australia. For these reasons, the events at Beaconsfield should not be dismissed as just another news story, but rather, should be regarded as indicative of the ways in which news is increasingly being reported, packaged and folded back into larger entertainment structures.

  13. A Blind Angle? News Sources, Gender and Ethnicity in Danish TV News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiig, Christina

    The paper will present and discuss a framework for grasping some of the democratic consequences of biased TV news programs. In line with Jürgen Habermas, one can ask what consequences it has for a democratic public sphere that the national TV news landscape is biased in term of source diversity (...

  14. Breaking News as Radicalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartley, Jannie Møller

    The aim of the paper is to make explicit how the different categories are applied in the online newsroom and thus how new categories can be seen as positioning strategies in the form of radicalisations of already existing categories. Thus field theory provides us with tools to analyse how online...... journalists are using the categorisations to create hierarchies within the journalistic field in order to position themselves as specialists in what Tuchman has called developing news, aiming and striving for what today is know as breaking news and the “exclusive scoop,” as the trademark of online journalism...... in a media environment where immediacy rules (Domingo 2008a). Following this research the primary focus of this paper is the category breaking news and Tuchmans developing news, but as they are all connected the analysis will also draw upon the other categories in Tuchmans typology. The theoretical framework...

  15. A Clinicoepidemiological Profile of Chronic Wounds in Wound Healing Department in Shanghai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaofang; Ni, Pengwen; Wu, Minjie; Huang, Yao; Ye, Junna; Xie, Ting

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the study was to update the clinical database of chronic wounds in order to derive an evidence based understanding of the condition and hence to guide future clinical management in China. A total of 241 patients from January 1, 2011 to April 30, 2016 with chronic wounds of more than 2 weeks' duration were studied in wound healing department in Shanghai. Results revealed that among all the patients the mean age was 52.5 ± 20.2 years (range 2-92 years). The mean initial area of wounds was 30.3 ± 63.0 cm 2 (range 0.25-468 cm 2 ). The mean duration of wounds was 68.5 ± 175.2 months (range 0.5-840 months). The previously reported causes of chronic wounds were traumatic or surgical wounds (n = 82, 34.0%), followed by pressure ulcers (n = 59, 24.5%). To study the effects of age, patients were divided into 2 groups: less than 60 years (wounds etiology between the 2 age groups was analyzed, and there was significant statistical difference ( P wounds, chi-square test was used. There were significant differences in the factor of wound infection. ( P = .035, 95% CI = 0.031-0.038) Regarding therapies, 72.6% (n = 175) of the patients were treated with negative pressure wound therapy. Among all the patients, 29.9% (n = 72) of them were completely healed when discharged while 62.7% (n = 150) of them improved. The mean treatment cost was 12055.4 ± 9206.3 Chinese Yuan (range 891-63626 Chinese Yuan). In conclusion, traumatic or surgical wounds have recently become the leading cause of chronic wounds in Shanghai, China. Etiology of the 2 age groups was different. Infection could significantly influence the wound outcome.

  16. Physicochemical properties of radiation-sterilized honey alginate wound dressing for exudating wounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asa, Anie Day DC.; De Guzman, Zenaida M.; Baldos, Davison T.; Asaad, Celia O.

    2013-01-01

    Honey is a well-known natural cure in promoting healing of wounds. Alginate, on the other hand, is a polysaccharide with pharmaceutical applications such as wound dressing and control release drugs. Calcium-alginate wound dressings have a gel-forming capability. in that, upon ion exchange between calcium ions in the dressing, and sodium ions in wound fluid, the dressing transforms into a gel. Cross-linked alginate gels can absorb would fluid, and also maintain a moist environment to the wound area. Combined with anti-microbial properties of honey and absorption and gelling properties of alginate, a honey alginate wound dressing is developed and irradiated for sterility. Its physicochemical properties are then analyzed. The honey-alginate wound dressing has lower pH (4.40±0.02) than alginate alone dressings (5.40±0.04) which is more favorable for wound healing. The dressing also has low moisture content (10.25±1.11%). Analysis of moisture vapour transmission rate shows a general increase with time for 48 hours. The wound dressing also has an absorbency of 19.00±1.80 g/100 cm 2 with a gel fraction of 18.44±0.63%. The rate of absorption analysis, meanwhile, shows a very rapid absorption rate upon exposure to wound fluid. After some time, a decrease in rate is observed which is accounted to the release of honey to the wound environment. For tensile strength, irradiation causes an effect in tensile strength in machine direction but is insignificant for cross machine direction. Physicochemical properties of the radiation-sterilized honey alginate wound dressing e.g. acidic pH, absorbency, moisture vapor permeability and absorption rate ascertain its characteristic as a good wound dressing for exudating wounds. Its low moisture content, meanwhile, allows for longer shelf-life of the developed product. (author)

  17. The Cognitive Information Effect of Televised News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Lăzăroiu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review is to summarize the key findings which prove that the biased perceptions of viewers may provide an inaccurate image of the informational validity of televised news. The news may generate distorted recollections of what occurred in particular reported events if displayed routines influence viewers not to pay attention to the essential features of a narrative. Elaborating on Fiske and Hartley (2010, Zelizer (2010, and Gunter (2015, we indicate that the character of the news setting has altered and individuals’ news consumption routines have changed in adapting to media advancements. The news may be undergone at various psychological stages by news publics. Televised news may transmit information undeviatingly to publics that may (not be committed successfully to memory. Our paper shows that individuals’ skills to handle information that is displayed in a linguistic configuration are influenced by their abilities in the utilization of certain symbol systems that are employed to represent notions and meanings. Televised news may shape what individuals grasp, influence their perceptions, convictions, and views regarding prevailing events and matters, and transmit knowledge and interpretation. If news stories can be jotted down in a linguistic style that sidesteps making needless processing demands and captivate news users by facilitating them to make connections with former knowledge, they may be more worthy of note and more edifying. We conclude that news narratives present a cognitive demanding task to individuals, displaying novel information regarding evolving events in a multifarious format. Broadcast news exhibits intricate contents, displaying configurations that employ excessively the cognitive abilities for information processing of viewers.

  18. Marine environment news. Vol. 3, no. 1, May 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    This issue presents a guest article on selective biomagnification of metals and radionuclides in marine food chains. Major news items include that MEL joins the international study in South Pacific, inter-agency collaboration in the study of marine pollution, IAEA-UNESCO coordinate studies on submarine ground water discharge and collaborative research on nuclear and isotopic studies of the El Nino phenomenon launched in 2004

  19. Marine environment news. Vol. 3, no. 1, May 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-06-01

    This issue presents a guest article on selective biomagnification of metals and radionuclides in marine food chains. Major news items include that MEL joins the international study in South Pacific, inter-agency collaboration in the study of marine pollution, IAEA-UNESCO coordinate studies on submarine ground water discharge and collaborative research on nuclear and isotopic studies of the El Nino phenomenon launched in 2004.

  20. Social Responsibility in Stem Cell Research - Is the News All Bad?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjaminy, Shelly; Lo, Cody; Illes, Judy

    2016-06-01

    Transparent public discourse about translational stem cell research promotes informed hope about scientific progress and the sustainable development of biotechnologies. Using an a priori coding scheme, we surveyed articles from leading news media about stem cell interventions for neurodegenerative diseases (1991-2014) from United States (n = 83), Canada (n = 29), and United Kingdom (n = 65). While, this analysis of translational contexts in the news demonstrates a lingering tendency to celebrate the benefits of research with little context of its caveats even for chronic neurologic diseases, in a departure from many previous studies, the data also reveal conscientious reporting about stem cell tourism and timeframe estimates for the development of relevant therapeutics.

  1. Breaking bad news in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostolos Konstantis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In a regional hospital, many patients are newly diagnosed with cancer. Breaking the bad news in these patients and their relatives is a tough task. Many doctors are not experienced in talking to patients about death or death-related diseases. In recent years, there have been great efforts to change the current situation. The aim of this study was to investigate the experience and education of medical personnel in breaking bad news in a secondary hospital. Materials and Methods: 59 doctors from General Hospital of Komotini, Greece were included in the study. All the doctors were in clinical specialties that treated cancer patients. A brief questionnaire was developed based on current guidelines such as Baile/SPIKES framework and the ABCDE mnemonic. Results: Residents are involved in delivering bad news less frequently than specialists. Only 21 doctors (35.59% had specific training on breaking bad news. 20 doctors (33.90% were aware of the available techniques and protocols on breaking bad news. 47 doctors (79.66% had a consistent plan for breaking bad news. 57 (96.61% delivered bad news in a quiet place, 53 (89.83% ensured no interruptions and enough time, 53 (89.83% used simple words and 54 (91.53% checked for understanding and did not rush through the news. 46 doctors (77.97% allowed relatives to determine patient′s knowledge about the disease. Conclusions: There were low rates of specific training in breaking bad news. However, the selected location, the physician′s speech and their plan were according to current guidelines.

  2. Low Cost Inkjet Printed Smart Bandage for Wireless Monitoring of Chronic Wounds

    KAUST Repository

    Farooqui, Muhammad Fahad

    2016-06-29

    Chronic wounds affect millions of patients around the world and their treatment is challenging as the early signs indicating their development are subtle. In addition, a type of chronic wound, known as pressure ulcer, develops in patients with limited mobility. Infection and frequent bleeding are indicators of chronic wound development. In this article, we present an unprecedented low cost continuous wireless monitoring system, realized through inkjet printing on a standard bandage, which can send early warnings for the parameters like irregular bleeding, variations in pH levels and external pressure at wound site. In addition to the early warnings, this smart bandage concept can provide long term wound progression data to the health care providers. The smart bandage comprises a disposable part which has the inkjet printed sensors and a reusable part constituting the wireless electronics. This work is an important step towards futuristic wearable sensors for remote health care applications.

  3. Low Cost Inkjet Printed Smart Bandage for Wireless Monitoring of Chronic Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqui, Muhammad Fahad; Shamim, Atif

    2016-06-29

    Chronic wounds affect millions of patients around the world and their treatment is challenging as the early signs indicating their development are subtle. In addition, a type of chronic wound, known as pressure ulcer, develops in patients with limited mobility. Infection and frequent bleeding are indicators of chronic wound development. In this article, we present an unprecedented low cost continuous wireless monitoring system, realized through inkjet printing on a standard bandage, which can send early warnings for the parameters like irregular bleeding, variations in pH levels and external pressure at wound site. In addition to the early warnings, this smart bandage concept can provide long term wound progression data to the health care providers. The smart bandage comprises a disposable part which has the inkjet printed sensors and a reusable part constituting the wireless electronics. This work is an important step towards futuristic wearable sensors for remote health care applications.

  4. Low Cost Inkjet Printed Smart Bandage for Wireless Monitoring of Chronic Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqui, Muhammad Fahad; Shamim, Atif

    2016-06-01

    Chronic wounds affect millions of patients around the world and their treatment is challenging as the early signs indicating their development are subtle. In addition, a type of chronic wound, known as pressure ulcer, develops in patients with limited mobility. Infection and frequent bleeding are indicators of chronic wound development. In this article, we present an unprecedented low cost continuous wireless monitoring system, realized through inkjet printing on a standard bandage, which can send early warnings for the parameters like irregular bleeding, variations in pH levels and external pressure at wound site. In addition to the early warnings, this smart bandage concept can provide long term wound progression data to the health care providers. The smart bandage comprises a disposable part which has the inkjet printed sensors and a reusable part constituting the wireless electronics. This work is an important step towards futuristic wearable sensors for remote health care applications.

  5. Low Cost Inkjet Printed Smart Bandage for Wireless Monitoring of Chronic Wounds

    KAUST Repository

    Farooqui, Muhammad Fahad; Shamim, Atif

    2016-01-01

    Chronic wounds affect millions of patients around the world and their treatment is challenging as the early signs indicating their development are subtle. In addition, a type of chronic wound, known as pressure ulcer, develops in patients with limited mobility. Infection and frequent bleeding are indicators of chronic wound development. In this article, we present an unprecedented low cost continuous wireless monitoring system, realized through inkjet printing on a standard bandage, which can send early warnings for the parameters like irregular bleeding, variations in pH levels and external pressure at wound site. In addition to the early warnings, this smart bandage concept can provide long term wound progression data to the health care providers. The smart bandage comprises a disposable part which has the inkjet printed sensors and a reusable part constituting the wireless electronics. This work is an important step towards futuristic wearable sensors for remote health care applications.

  6. Image acquisition and planimetry systems to develop wounding techniques in 3D wound model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiefer Ann-Kathrin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing represents a complex biological repair process. Established 2D monolayers and wounding techniques investigate cell migration, but do not represent coordinated multi-cellular systems. We aim to use wound surface area measurements obtained from image acquisition and planimetry systems to establish our wounding technique and in vitro organotypic tissue. These systems will be used in our future wound healing treatment studies to assess the rate of wound closure in response to wound healing treatment with light therapy (photobiomodulation. The image acquisition and planimetry systems were developed, calibrated, and verified to measure wound surface area in vitro. The system consists of a recording system (Sony DSC HX60, 20.4 M Pixel, 1/2.3″ CMOS sensor and calibrated with 1mm scale paper. Macro photography with an optical zoom magnification of 2:1 achieves sufficient resolution to evaluate the 3mm wound size and healing growth. The camera system was leveled with an aluminum construction to ensure constant distance and orientation of the images. The JPG-format images were processed with a planimetry system in MATLAB. Edge detection enables definition of the wounded area. Wound area can be calculated with surface integrals. To separate the wounded area from the background, the image was filtered in several steps. Agar models, injured through several test persons with different levels of experience, were used as pilot data to test the planimetry software. These image acquisition and planimetry systems support the development of our wound healing research. The reproducibility of our wounding technique can be assessed by the variability in initial wound surface area. Also, wound healing treatment effects can be assessed by the change in rate of wound closure. These techniques represent the foundations of our wound model, wounding technique, and analysis systems in our ongoing studies in wound healing and therapy.

  7. Extracting the Discussion Structure in Comments on News-Articles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuth, A.; Marx, M.; de Rijke, M.

    2007-01-01

    Several on-line daily newspapers offer readers the opportunity to directly comment on articles. In the Netherlands this feature is used quite often and the quality (grammatically and content-wise) is surprisingly high. We develop techniques to collect, store, enrichand analyze these comments. After

  8. Delivering bad news in emergency care medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Douglas W

    2017-01-01

    Forecasting is a strategy for delivering bad news and is compared to two other strategies, stalling and being blunt. Forecasting provides some warning that bad news is forthcoming without keeping the recipient in a state of indefinite suspense (stalling) or conveying the news abruptly (being blunt). Forecasting appears to be more effective than stalling or being blunt in helping a recipient to "realize" the bad news because it involves the deliverer and recipient in a particular social relation. The deliverer of bad news initiates the telling by giving an advance indication of the bad news to come; this allows the recipient to calculate the news in advance of its final presentation, when the deliverer confirms what the recipient has been led to anticipate. Thus, realization of bad news emerges from intimate collaboration, whereas stalling and being blunt require recipients to apprehend the news in a social vacuum. Exacerbating disruption to recipients' everyday world, stalling and being blunt increase the probability of misapprehension (denying, blaming, taking the situation as a joke, etc.) and thereby inhibit rather than facilitate realization. Particular attention is paid to the "perspective display sequence", a particular forecasting strategy that enables both confirming the recipient's perspective and using that perspective to affirm the clinical news. An example from acute or emergency medicine is examined at the close of the paper.

  9. "We remain very much the second sex": the constructions of prostate cancer in popular news magazines, 2000-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miele, Rachelle; Clarke, Juanne

    2014-01-01

    Informed by social constructionism, biomedicalization, and a feminist framework, a discourse analysis was performed on 31 popular news articles published in North America between 2000 and 2010. The magazines construct prostate cancer in a gendered manner. Its construction is rooted in themes that are related to discussions of biology, prostate cancer as a heterosexual problem, the responsibilization of health and masculinity. Through these constructions, the popular news articles reinforce dominant ideals and performances of hegemonic masculinity and male sexuality, traditional femininity, and heteronormativity. While reinforcing such ideals, the prevention, treatment, and knowledge of prostate cancer is constructed as the responsibility of individual men. This study reveals that the articles favor discussions of heteronormativity and hegemonic masculinity over racism, rendering health inequalities silent.

  10. Teaching wound care to family medicine residents on a wound care service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Little SH

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Sahoko H Little,1,2 Sunil S Menawat,1,3 Michael Worzniak,1 Michael D Fetters2 1Oakwood Annapolis Family Medicine Residency, Wayne, Michigan, USA; 2University of Michigan, Department of Family Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA; 3Ghent Family Medicine Residency, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia, USA Abstract: Primary care physicians often care for patients with chronic wounds, and they can best serve patients if they have knowledge and proficient skills in chronic wound care, including sharp debridement. The Oakwood Annapolis Family Medicine Residency in Michigan, USA developed a Wound Care Service, incorporating wound care training during the surgical rotation. Effectiveness of the wound care training was evaluated through pre- and posttesting of residents, to assess changes in knowledge and comfort in treating chronic wounds. The results demonstrate significant improvement in residents’ knowledge and comfort in wound care. This innovation demonstrates the feasibility of educating residents in chronic wound care through hands-on experience. Keywords: wound care education, primary care, residency education, surgery rotation, curriculum development

  11. Treatment of secondary burn wound progression in contact burns-a systematic review of experimental approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmauss, Daniel; Rezaeian, Farid; Finck, Tom; Machens, Hans-Guenther; Wettstein, Reto; Harder, Yves

    2015-01-01

    After a burn injury, superficial partial-thickness burn wounds may progress to deep partial-thickness or full-thickness burn wounds, if kept untreated. This phenomenon is called secondary burn wound progression or conversion. Burn wound depth is an important determinant of patient morbidity and mortality. Therefore, reduction or even the prevention of secondary burn wound progression is one goal of the acute care of burned patients. The objective of this study was to review preclinical approaches evaluating therapies to reduce burn wound progression. A systematic review of experimental approaches in animals that aim at reducing or preventing secondary burn wound progression was performed in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines. The selected references consist of all the peer-reviewed studies performed in vivo in animals and review articles published in English, German, Italian, Spanish, or French language relevant to the topic of secondary burn wound progression. We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar including all the articles published from the beginning of notations to the present. The search was conducted between May 3, 2012 and December 26, 2013. We included 29 experimental studies in this review, investigating agents that maintain or increase local perfusion conditions, as well as agents that exhibit an anti-coagulatory, an anti-inflammatory, or an anti-apoptotic property. Warm water, simvastatin, EPO, or cerium nitrate may represent particularly promising approaches for the translation into clinical use in the near future. This review demonstrates promising experimental approaches that might reduce secondary burn wound progression. Nevertheless, a translation into clinical application needs to confirm the results compiled in experimental animal studies.

  12. Visualizing news: obstacles, challenges, and solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Piet Bakker; Gerard Smit; Yael de Haan; Laura Buijs

    2013-01-01

    Depicting news graphically is considered an apt way to deal with challenges of modern journalism: to disclose big data, and present news attractively, visually, and fast to grasp. This study delves into reported obstacles and challenges for the production of news visualizations. It focuses on the

  13. Biofilms in wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, R A; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Alhede, M

    2014-01-01

    Following confirmation of the presence of biofilms in chronic wounds, the term biofilm became a buzzword within the wound healing community. For more than a century pathogens have been successfully isolated and identified from wound specimens using techniques that were devised in the nineteenth...... extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Cells within such aggregations (or biofilms) display varying physiological and metabolic properties that are distinct from those of planktonic cells, and which contribute to their persistence. There are many factors that influence healing in wounds and the discovery...... of biofilms in chronic wounds has provided new insight into the reasons why. Increased tolerance of biofilms to antimicrobial agents explains the limited efficacy of antimicrobial agents in chronic wounds and illustrates the need to develop new management strategies. This review aims to explain the nature...

  14. A prospective randomized evaluation of negative-pressure wound dressings for diabetic foot wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eginton, Mark T; Brown, Kellie R; Seabrook, Gary R; Towne, Jonathan B; Cambria, Robert A

    2003-11-01

    Optimal treatment for large diabetic foot wounds is ill defined. The purpose of this study was to compare the rate of wound healing with the Vacuum Assisted Closure device trade mark (VAC) to conventional moist dressings in the treatment of large diabetic foot wounds. Diabetics with significant soft tissue defects of the foot were considered for enrollment. Patients were randomized to receive either moist gauze dressings or VAC treatments for 2 weeks, after which they were treated with the alternative dressing for an additional 2 weeks. Wounds were photographed weekly and wound dimensions calculated in a blinded fashion with spatial analysis software. Percent change in wound dimensions were calculated and compared for each weekly assessment and over 2 weeks of therapy with each dressing type. Ten patients were enrolled in the trial, but two were lost to follow-up and two were withdrawn. Complete data were available for analysis on seven wounds in six patients. Average length, width, and depth of the wounds at initiation of the trial was 7.7, 3.5, and 3.1 cm, respectively. Only the wound depth was significantly decreased over the weeks of the trial to 1.2 cm ( p VAC dressings decreased the wound volume and depth significantly more than moist gauze dressings (59% vs. 0% and 49% vs. 8%, respectively). VAC dressings were associated with a decrease in all wound dimensions while wound length and width increased with moist dressings. In summary, over the first several weeks of therapy, VAC dressings decreased wound depth and volume more effectively than moist gauze dressings. Negative-pressure wound treatment may accelerate closure of large foot wounds in the diabetic patient.

  15. Breaking News: Utilizing Video Simulations to Improve Educational Leaders' Public Speaking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Jennifer; Adams, April; Curry, George

    2011-01-01

    This article examines specific uses of video simulations in one educational leadership preparation program to advance future school and district leaders' skills related to public speaking and participation in televised news interviews. One faculty member and two advanced educational leadership candidates share their perspectives of several…

  16. A content-based news video retrieval system: NVRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huayong; He, Tingting

    2009-10-01

    This paper focus on TV news programs and design a content-based news video browsing and retrieval system, NVRS, which is convenient for users to fast browsing and retrieving news video by different categories such as political, finance, amusement, etc. Combining audiovisual features and caption text information, the system automatically segments a complete news program into separate news stories. NVRS supports keyword-based news story retrieval, category-based news story browsing and generates key-frame-based video abstract for each story. Experiments show that the method of story segmentation is effective and the retrieval is also efficient.

  17. The Influence of News Framing on Support for Charter School Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, Abe

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the influence of media framing on attitudes toward charter school reform. Participants in an Internet-based experiment were presented, at random, with one of three manipulated news articles framing charter school reform as (a) supportive of values such as freedom, choice, and innovation; (b) conflicting with values such as…

  18. Spread the News: How the Crisis Affected the Impact of News on the European Sovereign Bond Markets

    OpenAIRE

    Beetsma, Roel; de Jong, Frank; Giuliodori, Massimo; Widijanto, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We investigate how "news" affected domestic interest spreads vis-à-vis Germany and how it propagated to other countries during the recent crisis period, thereby distinguishing between the so-called GIIPS countries and other European countries. We make original use of the Eurointelligence newsflash to construct news variables based on the amount of news that is released on a country on a given date. We find that more news on average raises the domestic interest spread of GIIPS countries since ...

  19. Innate defense regulator peptide 1018 in wound healing and wound infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Steinstraesser

    Full Text Available Innate defense regulators (IDRs are synthetic immunomodulatory versions of natural host defense peptides (HDP. IDRs mediate protection against bacterial challenge in the absence of direct antimicrobial activity, representing a novel approach to anti-infective and anti-inflammatory therapy. Previously, we reported that IDR-1018 selectively induced chemokine responses and suppressed pro-inflammatory responses. As there has been an increasing appreciation for the ability of HDPs to modulate complex immune processes, including wound healing, we characterized the wound healing activities of IDR-1018 in vitro. Further, we investigated the efficacy of IDR-1018 in diabetic and non-diabetic wound healing models. In all experiments, IDR-1018 was compared to the human HDP LL-37 and HDP-derived wound healing peptide HB-107. IDR-1018 was significantly less cytotoxic in vitro as compared to either LL-37 or HB-107. Furthermore, administration of IDR-1018 resulted in a dose-dependent increase in fibroblast cellular respiration. In vivo, IDR-1018 demonstrated significantly accelerated wound healing in S. aureus infected porcine and non-diabetic but not in diabetic murine wounds. However, no significant differences in bacterial colonization were observed. Our investigation demonstrates that in addition to previously reported immunomodulatory activities IDR-1018 promotes wound healing independent of direct antibacterial activity. Interestingly, these effects were not observed in diabetic wounds. It is anticipated that the wound healing activities of IDR-1018 can be attributed to modulation of host immune pathways that are suppressed in diabetic wounds and provide further evidence of the multiple immunomodulatory activities of IDR-1018.

  20. Audiovisual infotainment in European news: a comparative content analysis of Dutch, Spanish and Irish television news programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alencar, A.; Kruikemeier, S.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates to what extent audiovisual infotainment features can be found in the narrative structure of television news in three European countries news. Content analysis included a sample of 639 news reports (or reporter packages) aired in the first three weeks of September 2013, in six

  1. News reported on 30 November 1993 by the Middle East News Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-01-10

    The document reproduces a letter dated 27 December 1993 from the Alternate Resident Representative of Iraq to the IAEA including in an annex the news reported on 30 November 1993 by the Middle East News Agency concerning the detection of nuclear radiations in Iraqi military equipment left behind by the Iraqi army during the war for Kuwait liberation.

  2. News reported on 30 November 1993 by the Middle East News Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The document reproduces a letter dated 27 December 1993 from the Alternate Resident Representative of Iraq to the IAEA including in an annex the news reported on 30 November 1993 by the Middle East News Agency concerning the detection of nuclear radiations in Iraqi military equipment left behind by the Iraqi army during the war for Kuwait liberation

  3. News media coverage of a women's health contraversy: how newspapers and TV outlets covered a recent debate over screening mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Whitney Randolph; Mebane, Felicia; Viswanath, K; Solomon, Janice

    2005-01-01

    Over the past decade, there have been several highly visible debates about mammography that have captured professional, public and media attention. This paper looks at newspaper and television news coverage of a controversial research letter in The Lancet by Gøtzsche and Olsen (2001) that concluded that screening mammography did not prevent deaths from breast cancer. The news pieces examined for this project were published between October 2001 and March 2002 in one of eight U.S. newspapers or aired on one of six national or cable news networks. The six-month period was divided into one-week segments; the numbers of articles published or stories aired in each week were graphed to examine patterns. Each newspaper article and television transcript was then reviewed to identify its main content area and the amount of coverage for each major event was quantified. The highest number of newspaper articles appeared to result from several events during the end of January through the beginning of February. These events included the publication of another meta-analysis of mammography that disputed the original letter's conclusion and a full-page New York Times advertisement paid for by major medical organizations stating their continued support for mammography. The greatest amount of television news coverage was devoted to the announcement of the official federal guidelines by the Secretary of Health and Human Services in late February. We conclude by discussing how the flow of news coverage of medical controversies can potentially impact the actions and reactions of the public, the medical community and health policy makers.

  4. Modern and Convensional Wound Dressing to Interleukin 1 and Interleukin 6 in Diabetic wound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werna Nontji

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Holistic wound care is one of the ways to prevent gangrene and amputation, modern wound dressing is more effective than convensional with increasing transforming growth factor and cytokine, especially interleukin. This study aims to identify the effectiveness of Modern and Convensional Wound Dressing to Interleukin 1 (IL-1 and Interleukin 6 (IL-6 in Diabetic wound. Method:A Quasi eksperimental pre-post with control group design was used. The intervention given was modern wound dressing and Control group by convensional wound dressing, This study was conducted in Makassar with 32 samples (16 in intervention group and 16 in control group. Result: The result of Pooled T- test showed that p = 0.00 (p < 0.05, it means that there was signifi cant correlation between modern wound dressing to IL-6 and IL-1 than Convensional wound dressing. Discussion: Process of wound healing was produced growth factor and cytokine (IL-1 and IL-6, it will stimulated by wound dressing, modern wound dressing (Calcium alginat can absorb wound drainage, non oklusive, non adhesif, and autolytic debridement. Keywords: Modern wound dressing, Interleukin 1 (IL-1, Interleukin 6 (IL-6

  5. How long do news framing effects last? A systematic review of longitudinal studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lecheler, S.; de Vreese, C.H.

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of experimental studies investigate the duration of news framing effects. This article presents a systematic review of the theoretical premises, experimental designs, and individual-level moderators in these studies. Our results suggest that most studies report effects that persist

  6. Creative Cycling of News Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Gynnild, PhD.

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The theory of creative cycling emerged from my PhD study of news professionals in Norway. The study was carried out according to classic grounded theory principles (Glaser and Strauss 1967, Glaser 1978, 1998, 2001, 2005, and the area of interest was the performance of news journalism in the multimedia age. The theory runs counter to widespread tendencies of industrial age thinking in news media. It emphasizes news professionals’ search for meaning in their daily work, and suggests that their main concern is self-fulfillment through original contribution. The dilemma and resolution, creative cycling, is a basic social process continuously going within inner and outer framings. It consists of three interrelated dimensions: productive processing, breaks and shifts and inspirational looping.

  7. Cinema and the communication of bad news

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel GÓMEZ CORDOBA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Breaking Bad News requires medical professionals possess a range of skills to ensure that the patient has the information required for decision?making, this process occurs without further damage and even has a therapeutic effect, and another, that the doctor is not exposed to legal risk or stress associated with the inability to cope with the feelings of the patient, their families or themselves. This article discusses the aspects of communication of bad news in the field of doctor?patient relationship will be presented. The SPIKES model and discussion of movie segments related to the subject was employed as a thread, such as Doctor, 50/50, The Barbarian Invasions, Wings of Life, Stepmom, Letters to God, Wit, The butterfly blue, The power of friendship, Life without me, Make me laugh, Knockin ‘on Heaven’s Door, My Life, A crazy Loose in Brooklyn, As suicide and not die in the attempt, A lesson of life, and The sacrifice of a mother, as a pedagogical strategy in medical training.

  8. New format for ATLAS e-news

    CERN Multimedia

    Pauline Gagnon

    ATLAS e-news got a new look! As of November 30, 2007, we have a new format for ATLAS e-news. Please go to: http://atlas-service-enews.web.cern.ch/atlas-service-enews/index.html . ATLAS e-news will now be published on a weekly basis. If you are not an ATLAS colaboration member but still want to know how the ATLAS experiment is doing, we will soon have a version of ATLAS e-news intended for the general public. Information will be sent out in due time.

  9. Dividend growth, cash flow, and discount rate news

    OpenAIRE

    Garrett, Ian; Priestley, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This is the authors’ accepted and refereed manuscript to the article. Publishers web site http://journals.cambridge.org/ Using a new variable based on a model of dividend smoothing, we find that dividend growth is highly predictable and that cash flow news contributes importantly to return variability. Cash flow betas derived from this predictability are central to explaining the size effect in the cross section of returns. However, they do not explain the value effect; this is explained b...

  10. [Errors in wound management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipović, Marinko; Novinscak, Tomislav

    2014-10-01

    Chronic ulcers have adverse effects on the patient quality of life and productivity, thus posing financial burden upon the healthcare system. Chronic wound healing is a complex process resulting from the interaction of the patient general health status, wound related factors, medical personnel skill and competence, and therapy related products. In clinical practice, considerable improvement has been made in the treatment of chronic wounds, which is evident in the reduced rate of the severe forms of chronic wounds in outpatient clinics. However, in spite of all the modern approaches, efforts invested by medical personnel and agents available for wound care, numerous problems are still encountered in daily practice. Most frequently, the problems arise from inappropriate education, of young personnel in particular, absence of multidisciplinary approach, and inadequate communication among the personnel directly involved in wound treatment. To perceive them more clearly, the potential problems or complications in the management of chronic wounds can be classified into the following groups: problems mostly related to the use of wound coverage and other etiology related specificities of wound treatment; problems related to incompatibility of the agents used in wound treatment; and problems arising from failure to ensure aseptic and antiseptic performance conditions.

  11. Semantic Analysis of FBI News Reports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nizamani, Sarwat; Memon, Nasrullah

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present our work on semantic analysis of FBI News reports. In the paper we have considered the News which are of the immense significance for the analyst who want to analyze the News of specific area. With this definite analysis we are able to extract critical events or concepts...

  12. "Gay Guys are Shit-Lovers" and "Lesbians are Obsessed With Fingers": The (Mis)Representation of LGBTIQ People in Thai News Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fongkaew, Kangwan; Khruataeng, Anoporn; Unsathit, Sumon; Khamphiirathasana, Matawii; Jongwisan, Nisarat; Arlunaek, Oranong; Byrne, Jensen

    2017-10-26

    This article presents an analysis of news reports containing information or opinions about lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, and queer (LGBTIQ) people taken from six Thai media outlets over a period of one year. The aim was to explore how LGBTIQ people are portrayed in news media narratives. LGBTIQ identities were found to be vastly underrepresented and, when represented, were often represented inaccurately, stereotypically, harmfully, or without a clear understanding of the diversity of sexual orientations, gender identities, and gender expressions. (Hetero-)sexist narratives, negative portrayals, harmful stereotypes, and discriminatory speech were also widely found, fueling a climate of stigmatization and discrimination of LGBTIQ people in Thai society. This article suggests that key stakeholders in Thai news media should be sensitized on the human rights of LGBTIQ people and on basic professional ethics in journalism.

  13. Product Differentiation in Local Television News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwater, Tony

    A study was conducted to investigate the extent to which local television stations exhibited diversity in newscast content within three midwest broadcast markets. A second objective was to describe the nature of the news content characteristic of local news stories that were broadcast by only one station within a market (or unique news stories). A…

  14. Profiling wound healing with wound effluent: Raman spectroscopic indicators of infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Nicole J.; Elster, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    The care of modern traumatic war wounds remains a significant challenge for clinicians. Many of the extremity wounds inflicted during Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom are colonized or infected with multi-drug resistant organisms, particularly Acinetobacter baumannii. Biofilm formation and resistance to current treatments can significantly confound the wound healing process. Accurate strain identification and targeted drug administration for the treatment of wound bioburden has become a priority for combat casualty care. In this study, we use vibrational spectroscopy to examine wound exudates for bacterial load. Inherent chemical differences in different bacterial species and strains make possible the high specificity of vibrational spectroscopy.

  15. UK news media representations of smoking, smoking policies and tobacco bans in prisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Amy; Sweeting, Helen; Hunt, Kate

    2018-02-19

    Prisoner smoking rates remain high, resulting in secondhand smoke exposures for prison staff and non-smoker prisoners. Several jurisdictions have introduced prison smoking bans with little evidence of resulting disorder. Successful implementation of such bans requires staff support. As news media representations of health and other issues shape public views and as prison smoking bans are being introduced in the UK, we conducted content analysis of UK news media to explore representations of smoking in prisons and smoke-free prisons. We searched 64 national and local newspapers and 5 broadcast media published over 17 months during 2015-2016, and conducted thematic analysis of relevant coverage in 106 articles/broadcasts. Coverage was relatively infrequent and lacked in-depth engagement with the issues. It tended to reinforce a negative view of prisoners, avoid explicit concern for prisoner or prison staff health and largely ignore the health gains of smoke-free policies. Most coverage failed to discuss appropriate responses or support for cessation in the prison context, or factors associated with high prisoner smoking rates. Half the articles/broadcasts included coverage suggesting smoke-free prisons might lead to unrest or instability. Negative news media representations of prisoners and prison smoking bans may impact key stakeholders' views (eg, prison staff, policy-makers) on the introduction of smoke-free prison policies. Policy-makers' communications when engaging in discussion around smoke-free prison policies should draw on the generally smooth transitions to smoke-free prisons to date, and on evidence on health benefits of smoke-free environments and smoking cessation. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. News and Features Updates from USA.gov

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — Stay on top of important government news and information with the USA.gov Updates: News and Features RSS feed. We'll update this feed when we add news and featured...

  17. JOURNALISM IN POST-TRUTH ERA: fact-checking as a tool to fight against the fake news

    OpenAIRE

    Spinelli, Egle Müller; Santos, Jéssica de Almeida

    2018-01-01

    This article intends to report how the work of the agencies of fact-checking can help informative companies in the fight against false news, with their data-checking methodologies in order to encourage the transparency of the journalistic process. A literature review addresses the impacts of post-truth and the spread of fake news in society - where objective facts are less influential in public opinion than personal emotions and beliefs. As a result, it is concluded that serious fact-finding ...

  18. Framing CSR fit: How corporate social responsibility activities are covered by news media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lunenberg, Katharina; Gosselt, Jordi Franciscus; de Jong, Menno D.T.

    2016-01-01

    This research provides a basis for understanding how the contents of media coverage about CSR activities relates to the fit between these CSR activities and the organizations’ core activities. In two steps, 513 news articles about organizations’ CSR activities were analyzed. First, an expert review

  19. RHYTHM STRUCTURE IN NEWS READING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís Mas Manchón

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Rhythm is central to news reading in radio and television programs. This paper proposes a three level structure for rhythm in news discourse. It gives a comprehensive definition of rhythm and types of rhythm. Firstly, the Base Rhythm Structure consists of semantic and pragmatic rhythmic accents, coincident with very specific words. Secondly, these accents are grouped together according to type, frequency and order, thereby configuring three types of “rhythmic units” (the Internal Rhythm Structure: starting, main and end units. A last structure level presents four discursive factors that are very important in integrating the overall time structure of news announcing (the Melodic Rhythm Structure. This integral structure for news announcing rhythm should be further tested in acoustic-experimental studies under the criterion of information transmission efficacy.

  20. Communicating bad news: an integrative review of the nursing literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Cassiana Mendes Bertoncello; Menezes, Daniele Vieira de; Borgato, Maria Helena; Luiz, Marcos Roberto

    2017-01-01

    describe how the process of breaking bad news is established and identify how nurses approach the task of giving bad news. integrative review of the literature for articles in Portuguese and English published between 1993-2014, in the databases: Bireme, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, CINAHL and Embase. Nine articles were included using the selection flow chart. A digital form was completed for each article according to the Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research checklist and the level of scientific evidence was determined. Of the 99 articles in identified, nine were included after applying the selection flowchart. breaking bad news is frequent in the area of oncology and palliative care, with a strong cultural influence on the autonomy of nurses in this process. the approach and skills of the nurse during this task influences the patient's reaction to the message. The theme is scarce in the literature and merits further investigation. Descrever como se estabelece o processo de comunicação de más notícias e identificar como o enfermeiro pratica a comunicação de más notícias. Revisão integrativa da literatura com artigos em português e inglês referente ao período 1993-2014 nas bases de dados Bireme, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, CINAHL e Embase. Elegeram-se nove artigos pelo fluxograma de seleção. Para cada artigo foi preenchida uma ficha eletrônica, elaborado um checklist do Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research e verificado o nível de evidência científica. Foram identificados 99 artigos e incluídos nove pelo fluxograma de seleção. Transmitir más notícias é frequente nas áreas de oncologia e cuidados paliativos, com forte influência cultural na autonomia do enfermeiro nesse processo. O modo e a habilidade do enfermeiro durante a ação influenciarão a reação do paciente acerca da mensagem. O tema é escasso na literatura, necessitando ser explorado.

  1. Violence and suffering in television news: toward a broader conception of harmful television content for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walma van der Molen, Juliette H

    2004-06-01

    Traditionally, the public and professional debate about the inappropriateness of media violence for children focuses mainly on the negative effects of violence in entertainment programming. However, since the terrorist attacks on September 11th and the recent coverage of the war in Iraq, the suitability of real-life news violence for children may be doubted more than ever. To draw attention to the potential harmful effects of violence presented in news programs, it is argued in the present article that health care professionals should advocate a broader conception of media violence than thus far has been used. On the basis of recent research, potential effects of violent news content, such as fear, aggression, and desensitization, are discussed and recommendations are provided on how to abate these outcomes.

  2. Science News of the Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science News, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Highlights important 1983 news stories reported in Science News. Stories are categorized under: anthropology/paleontology; behavior; biology; chemistry; earth sciences; energy; environment; medicine; physics; science and society; space sciences and astronomy; and technology and computers. (JN)

  3. Comparing local TV news with national TV news in cancer coverage: an exploratory content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chul-Joo; Long, Marilee; Slater, Michael D; Song, Wen

    2014-12-01

    The authors compared local TV news with national TV news in terms of cancer coverage using a nationally representative sample of local nightly TV and national network TV (i.e., ABC, CBS, NBC, and CNN) cancer news stories that aired during 2002 and 2003. Compared with national TV news, local TV cancer stories were (a) much shorter in length, (b) less likely to report on cancer prevention (i.e., preventive behaviors and screening tests), and (c) less likely to reference national organizations (i.e., National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society, National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Food and Drug Administration) that have made clear recommendations about ways to prevent cancer. The implications of these findings for health communication research and cancer education were discussed.

  4. Department of National Security Affairs News Archive for period of June 7, 2016 to September 9, 2016

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This document captures NSA's "archived" news content for this period: 2016-06-07 to 2016-09-06. National Security Affairs (NSA) News Includes these articles: NSA Faculty Contribute to Diplomacy Efforts; Visiting Scholar Discusses Russia and Putin with NSA Students; Dr. Covell Meyskens Featured in NY Times; NSA Professor Huntley Shares Knowledge with DLI FAOs; NSA Prof Afshon Ostovar Published in Foreign Affairs; NSA Prof Jasper Speaks on ISIS as Adaptive Hybrid Threat; NSA Department Welc...

  5. Saliva and wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Henk S; Ligtenberg, Antoon J M; Veerman, Enno C I

    2014-01-01

    Oral wounds heal faster and with less scar formation than skin wounds. One of the key factors involved is saliva, which promotes wound healing in several ways. Saliva creates a humid environment, thus improving the survival and functioning of inflammatory cells that are crucial for wound healing. In addition, saliva contains several proteins which play a role in the different stages of wound healing. Saliva contains substantial amounts of tissue factor, which dramatically accelerates blood clotting. Subsequently, epidermal growth factor in saliva promotes the proliferation of epithelial cells. Secretory leucocyte protease inhibitor inhibits the tissue-degrading activity of enzymes like elastase and trypsin. Absence of this protease inhibitor delays oral wound healing. Salivary histatins in vitro promote wound closure by enhancing cell spreading and cell migration, but do not stimulate cell proliferation. A synthetic cyclic variant of histatin exhibits a 1,000-fold higher activity than linear histatin, which makes this cyclic variant a promising agent for the development of a new wound healing medication. Conclusively, recognition of the many roles salivary proteins play in wound healing makes saliva a promising source for the development of new drugs involved in tissue regeneration.

  6. Telemedicine for wound management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi K Chittoria

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The escalating physiological, psychological, social and financial burdens of wounds and wound care on patients, families and society demand the immediate attention of the health care sector. Many forces are affecting the changes in health care provision for patients with chronic wounds, including managed care, the limited number of wound care therapists, an increasingly ageing and disabled population, regulatory and malpractice issues, and compromised care. The physician is also faced with a number of difficult issues when caring for chronic wound patients because their conditions are time consuming and high risk, represent an unprofitable part of care practice and raise issues of liability. Telemedicine enhances communication with the surgical wound care specialist. Digital image for skin lesions is a safe, accurate and cost-effective referral pathway. The two basic modes of telemedicine applications, store and forward (asynchronous transfer and real-time transmission (synchronous transfer, e.g. video conference, are utilized in the wound care setting. Telemedicine technology in the hands of an experienced physician can streamline management of a problem wound. Although there is always an element of anxiety related to technical change, the evolution of wound care telemedicine technology has demonstrated a predictable maturation process.

  7. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Accelerates Human Endothelial Progenitor Cell-Stimulated Cutaneous Wound Healing and Angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae Wook; Kwon, Yang Woo; Park, Gyu Tae; Do, Eun Kyoung; Yoon, Jung Won; Kim, Seung-Chul; Ko, Hyun-Chang; Kim, Moon-Bum; Kim, Jae Ho

    2018-05-26

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a powerful vasodilating peptide secreted by cardiac muscle cells, and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been reported to stimulate cutaneous wound healing by mediating angiogenesis. To determine whether ANP can promote the EPC-mediated repair of injured tissues, we examined the effects of ANP on the angiogenic properties of EPCs and on cutaneous wound healing. In vitro, ANP treatment enhanced the migration, proliferation, and endothelial tube-forming abilities of EPCs. Furthermore, small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of natriuretic peptide receptor-1, which is a receptor for ANP, abrogated ANP-induced migration, tube formation, and proliferation of EPCs. In a murine cutaneous wound model, administration of either ANP or EPCs had no significant effect on cutaneous wound healing or angiogenesis in vivo, whereas the co-administration of ANP and EPCs synergistically potentiated wound healing and angiogenesis. In addition, ANP promoted the survival and incorporation of transplanted EPCs into newly formed blood vessels in wounds. These results suggest ANP accelerates EPC-mediated cutaneous wound healing by promoting the angiogenic properties and survival of transplanted EPCs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 by the Wound Healing Society.

  8. Television news coverage of obesity in China, 1982-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhe; Xu, Rui Qing; Zhao, Kun; Li, Ke Ji

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how obesity was covered in television news in China, including the trends over time and the characteristics of obesity-related news. The frame analysis was adopted to assess the content of obesity-related news broadcasted in China Central Television (CCTV) from 1982 to 2009. To investigate the characteristics of the news, the obesity-related news was divided into subgroups according to populations concerned, as well as the period in which the news was broadcasted. The differences between subgroups were examined. A total of 1 599 pieces of news reported obesity, in which 1 278 pieces (79.92%) aired in "wealthy" period (2006-2009). More news was concerned with adults (1 134, 70.92%). "Individual behavior" dominated most of the cause frames (389, 24.33%), solution frames (522, 32.65%), and responsibility frames (860, 53.78%). There was more news mentioning individual factors in news aired in "wealthy" period and news concerning children. The coverage of social-structure causes was higher in news concerning children, while the coverage of social-structure solutions was higher in news concerning children and news aired in "wealthy" period. Although the coverage of obesity was modest, it showed an incremental trend as the economy grew. Obesity was mostly depicted as an individual problem in terms of responsibility, causes and solutions. Copyright © 2012 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Is the internet about to take over? How using online news is related to offline news consumption patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trilling, D.; Schönbach, K.

    2011-01-01

    In the ongoing debate on the role of the Internet in public discourse, it is often assumed that online news fundamentally changes mass communication. But is there a relationship between online news use and a differentiation in overall news consumption patterns? The results of a large-scale survey

  10. Predicting the Strength of Online News Frames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrvoje Jakopović

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Framing theory is one of the most significant approaches to understanding media and their potential impact on publics. Leaving aside that fact, the author finds that publicity effects seem to be dispersed and difficult to catch for public relations. This article employs a specific research design, which could be applied to public relations practice, namely with a view to observing correlations between specific media frames and individual frames. The approach is based on the typology of news frames. The author attributes negative, positive and neutral determinants to the types of frames in his empirical research. Online news regarding three transport organizations and the accompanying user comments (identified as negative, positive and neutral are analysed by means of the method of content and sentiment analysis. The author recognizes user comments and reviews as individual frames that take part in the creation of online image. Furthermore, he identifies the types of media frames as well as individual frames manifested as image, and undertakes correlation research in order to establish their prediction potential. The results expose the most frequently used types of media frames concerning the transport domain. The media are keen to report through the attribution of responsibility frame, and after that, through the economic frame and the conflict frame, but, on the other hand, they tend to neglect the human interest frame and the morality frame. The results show that specific types of news frames enable better prediction of user reactions. The economic frame and the human interest frame therefore represent the most predictable types of frame.

  11. Cultural Knowledge in News Comprehension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathieu, David

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the main lines of the design and the findings of a reception study on news comprehension. This empirical study is a comparison of the comprehension processes of Danes and French Canadians over a set of news texts from both countries. Comprehension is explored from a cultural...... perspective, through the lens of cognition and pragmatics, revealing the role played by cultural knowledge in comprehension and the underlying relationship between a text and its intended audience. It is argued that recipients ‘problematise’ the news texts, a process by which the texts answer questions...

  12. Data Exchanges in Mobile News Apps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammer, Aske; Wallberg, Filip

    This paper maps the flows of data to and from third-party actors when users access content in mobile news apps. This way, it analyzes the strategic networks of collaboration and data exchange that news organizations engage in in the digital economy, expanding the traditional two-sided model...... of media economics (centered around sales to audiences and advertisers) to also account for what happens “behind the curtain”. Research already shows that the trade with data constitutes a central component of web-based business models (Evens & Van Damme, 2016; Gerlitz & Helmond, 2013; Lindskow, 2016......), but no systematic scrutiny of the same phenomenon exists with regards to mobile news use even though the use of mobile platforms for news accessing increases these years (Newman, Levy, & Nielsen, 2015). This study measures all calls made by the news apps upon accessing content, mapping which third-party actors get...

  13. Children's Recall of the News: TV News Stories Compared with Three Print Versions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Molen, Juliette H. Walma; van der Voort, Tom H. A.

    1998-01-01

    A sample of 144 fourth and sixth graders was presented with five children's news stories, in television form or in one of three print versions. Results indicated that children who watched news on television remembered the stories better than children who read one of the three print versions, regardless of their level of reading proficiency.…

  14. Threat and efficacy in Malaysia’s cancer news coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collin Jerome

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The news media plays important roles not only in creating and disseminating health messages, but also in influencing people’s perceptions of health and their health behaviours. However, much more needs to be known about the creation process, particularly how health messages are created with the goal of raising awareness and knowledge, and changing people’s attitudes and behaviours. This paper presents a study aimed at examining cancer risk messages in Malaysia’s leading newspapers. Methods: Our search identified count the total 73 articles related to cancer which were published in three leading Malaysian English dailies in 2012 – September 2017. Of these, 10 were selected for a content analysis using the Extended Parallel Process (EPPM Model. The analysis focused on the presence and the levels of two important components required for designing effective health risk message: threat (severity and susceptibility and efficacy (responses efficacy and self-efficacy. The language used in the news articles was also analysed to see whether it helped enhance the threat-efficacy levels which are crucial for increasing message acceptance and yielding behaviour change. Results: Present study shows that the varying presence of threat and efficacy in the articles as evidenced by messages that focused on threat alone with no efficacy and messages that highlighted both threat and efficacy. Results also show contrasting levels of threat and efficacy as evidenced by messages that possessed high levels of threat and efficacy and messages that revealed a high level of threat and a low level of efficacy. Furthermore, the contents were composed differently in terms of language use: some articles used neutral language while others used vivid and descriptive language in addressing the topic and target audience. These have implication on message acceptance and behaviour change where high levels of threat and efficacy, and the ways in which vivid

  15. Rapid hemostatic and mild polyurethane-urea foam wound dressing for promoting wound healing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiangyu; Niu, Yuqing [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Nanshan District Key lab for Biopolymers and Safety Evaluation, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Polymer Science and Technology, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Guangdong Research Center for Interfacial Engineering of Functional Materials, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Chen, Kevin C. [Multidisciplinary Research Center, Shantou University, Shantou, Guangdong 515063 (China); Chen, Shiguo, E-mail: csg@szu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Nanshan District Key lab for Biopolymers and Safety Evaluation, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Polymer Science and Technology, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Guangdong Research Center for Interfacial Engineering of Functional Materials, Shenzhen 518060 (China)

    2017-02-01

    A novel rapid hemostatic and mild polyurethane-urea foam (PUUF) wound dressing was prepared by the particle leaching method and vacuum freeze-drying method using 4, 4-Methylenebis(cyclohexyl isocyanate), 4,4-diaminodicyclohexylmethane and poly (ethylene glycol) as raw materials. And X-ray diffraction (XRD), tensile test, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TG) were used to its crystallinity, stress and strain behavior, and thermal properties, respectively. Platelet adhesion, fibrinogen adhesion and blood clotting were performed to evaluate its hemostatic effect. And H&E staining and Masson Trichrome staining were used to its wound healing efficacy. The results revealed the pore size of PUUF is 50–130 μm, and its porosity is 71.01%. Porous PUUF exhibited good water uptake that was benefit to adsorb abundant wound exudates to build a regional moist environment beneficial for wound healing. The PUUF wound dressing exhibit better blood coagulation effect than commercial polyurethane dressing (CaduMedi). Though both PUUF and CaduMedi facilitated wound healing generating full re-epithelialization within 13 days, PUUF was milder and lead to more slight inflammatory response than CaduMedi. In addition, PUUF wound dressing exhibited lower cytotoxicity than CaduMedi against NIH3T3 cells. Overall, porous PUUF represents a novel mild wound dressing with excellent water uptake, hemostatic effect and low toxicity, and it can promote wound healing and enhance re-epithelialization. - Highlights: • Rapid hemostatic and mild PUUF wound dressing was fabricated. • Low-toxic PUUF exhibited good water uptake that could build a regional moist environment beneficial for wound healing. • PUUF could promote wound healing and enhance re-epithelialization.

  16. Wound healing and all-cause mortality in 958 wound patients treated in home care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarchi, Kian; Martinussen, Torben; Jemec, Gregor B. E.

    2015-01-01

    to investigate wound healing and all-cause mortality associated with different types of skin wounds. Consecutive skin wound patients who received wound care by home-care nurses from January 2010 to December 2011 in a district in Eastern Denmark were included in this study. Patients were followed until wound...... healing, death, or the end of follow-up on December 2012. In total, 958 consecutive patients received wound care by home-care nurses, corresponding to a 1-year prevalence of 1.2% of the total population in the district. During the study, wound healing was achieved in 511 (53.3%), whereas 90 (9.4%) died...

  17. GOOD NEWS, BAD NEWS AND GARCH EFFECTS IN STOCK RETURN DATA

    OpenAIRE

    Craig A. Depken II

    2001-01-01

    It is shown that the volume of trade can be decomposed into proportional proxies for stochastic flows of good news and bad news into the market. Positive (good) information flows are assumed to increase the price of a financial vehicle while negative (bad) information flows decrease the price. For the majority of a sample of ten split-stocks it is shown that the proposed decomposition explains more GARCH than volume itself. Using the proposed decomposition, the variance of returns for younger...

  18. Psoriasis and wound healing outcomes: A retrospective cohort study examining wound complications and antibiotic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Paulina M; Parsi, Kory K; Schupp, Clayton W; Armstrong, April W

    2017-11-15

    Little is known about wound healing in psoriasis. We performed a cohort study examining differences in wound healing complications between patients with and without psoriasis. Psoriasis patients with traumatic wounds were matched 1:3 to non-psoriasis patients with traumatic wounds based on age, gender, and body mass index (BMI). We examined theincidence of wound complications including infection, necrosis, and hematoma as well as incident antibiotic use within three months following diagnosis of a traumatic wound. The study included 164 patients with traumatic wounds, comprised of 41 patients with psoriasis matched to 123 patients without psoriasis. No statistically significant differences were detected in the incidence of overall wound complications between wound patients with psoriasis and wound patients without psoriasis (14.6% versus. 13.0%, HR 1.18, CI 0.39-3.56). After adjustment for diabetes, peripheral vascular disease, and smoking, no statistically significant differences were detected in the incidence of overall wound complications between patients with and without psoriasis (HR 1.11, CI 0.34-3.58). Specifically, the adjusted rates of antibiotic use were not significantly different between those with and without psoriasis (HR 0.65, CI 0.29-1.46). The incidence of wound complications following traumatic wounds of the skin was found to be similar between patients with and without psoriasis.

  19. Engagement with News Content in Online Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeldorf-Hirsch, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Reports indicate that as the Internet is displacing traditional news sources, younger users continue to be disconnected from the news. Fortunately, the Internet provides new ways of sharing and discussing news stories with others through social networking sites such as Facebook, which may be important for engaging users in the news they read…

  20. Do People Prefer to Pass Along Good or Bad News? Valence and Relevance of News as Predictors of Transmission Propensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath

    1996-11-01

    Anecdotal evidence seems to indicate that exaggeratedly bad news may propagate in the marketplace of ideas. Three studies investigate whether people prefer to pass along pieces of bad news or good news that are equated for "surprisingness." People typically prefer to pass along central rather than extreme information (i.e., news that is less surprising rather than more surprising). However, when confronted with extreme information, the results support a preference for congruence, that is, people prefer to pass along news that is congruent with the emotional valence of the domain in question. This means that in emotionally negative domains, contrary to some theoretical predictions, people are willing to pass along bad news even when it is exaggeratedly bad. At the same time, however, people transmit exaggeratedly good news in emotionally positive domains. The general discussion indicates how these results may inform research on word of mouth for consumer products and social relations in organizations.

  1. Analysis of print news media framing of ketamine treatment in the United States and Canada from 2000 to 2015.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melvyn W B Zhang

    Full Text Available There are multifaceted views on the use of ketamine, a potentially addictive substance, to treat mental health problems. The past 15 years have seen growing media coverage of ketamine for medical and other purposes. This study examined the print news media coverage of medical and other uses of ketamine in North America to determine orientations and trends over time.Print newspaper coverage of ketamine from 2000 to 2015 was reviewed, resulting in 43 print news articles from 28 North American newspapers. A 55-item structured coding instrument was applied to assess news reports of ketamine. Items captured negative and positive aspects, therapeutic use of ketamine, and adverse side effects. Chi-squares tested for changes in trends over time.In the 15-year reviewed period, the three most frequent themes related to ketamine were: abuse (68.2%, legal status (34.1%, and clinical use in anesthesia (31.8%. There was significant change in trends during two periods (2000-2007 and 2008-2015. In 2008-2015, print news media articles were significantly more likely to encourage clinical use of ketamine to treat depression (p = 0.002, to treat treatment resistant depression (p = 0.043, and to claim that ketamine is more effective than conventional antidepressants (p = 0.043.Our review found consistent positive changes in the portrayals of ketamine by the print news media as a therapeutic antidepressant that mirror the recent scientific publications. These changes in news media reporting might influence the popularity of ketamine use to treat clinical depression. Guidance is required for journalists on objective reporting of medical research findings, including limitations of current research evidence and potential risks of ketamine.

  2. Analysis of print news media framing of ketamine treatment in the United States and Canada from 2000 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Melvyn W B; Hong, Ying X; Husain, Syeda F; Harris, Keith M; Ho, Roger C M

    2017-01-01

    There are multifaceted views on the use of ketamine, a potentially addictive substance, to treat mental health problems. The past 15 years have seen growing media coverage of ketamine for medical and other purposes. This study examined the print news media coverage of medical and other uses of ketamine in North America to determine orientations and trends over time. Print newspaper coverage of ketamine from 2000 to 2015 was reviewed, resulting in 43 print news articles from 28 North American newspapers. A 55-item structured coding instrument was applied to assess news reports of ketamine. Items captured negative and positive aspects, therapeutic use of ketamine, and adverse side effects. Chi-squares tested for changes in trends over time. In the 15-year reviewed period, the three most frequent themes related to ketamine were: abuse (68.2%), legal status (34.1%), and clinical use in anesthesia (31.8%). There was significant change in trends during two periods (2000-2007 and 2008-2015). In 2008-2015, print news media articles were significantly more likely to encourage clinical use of ketamine to treat depression (p = 0.002), to treat treatment resistant depression (p = 0.043), and to claim that ketamine is more effective than conventional antidepressants (p = 0.043). Our review found consistent positive changes in the portrayals of ketamine by the print news media as a therapeutic antidepressant that mirror the recent scientific publications. These changes in news media reporting might influence the popularity of ketamine use to treat clinical depression. Guidance is required for journalists on objective reporting of medical research findings, including limitations of current research evidence and potential risks of ketamine.

  3. Balanced or biased? Interest groups and legislative lobbying in the European news media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Bruycker, I.; Beyers, J.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the coverage of legislative lobbying in European news media. The starting point thereby is that lobbying in the crowded European Union (EU)-level interest community is not only a struggle for direct access to policymakers, but that in order to realize policy goals many interest

  4. How to Write News for Broadcast and Print Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dary, David

    This book is a primer on the techniques of news writing and the application of those principles to print and broadcast journalism. Chapters include: "The News Media," which presents a brief history of journalism and the foundations on which it is based; "What Is News?"; "Gathering News," which discusses news beats, reporters' qualifications, and…

  5. Principles of Multimedia News Systems for Business Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan I. ANDONE

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past few years considerable demand for business oriented multimedia information systems has developed. A multimedia information system is one that can create, import, integrate, store, retrieve, edit, and delete two or more types of media materials in digital form, such as audio, image, full-motion video, and text information. Multimedia information systems play a central role in many business activities. They represent a very special class complex computing systems. This paper surveys a special type of multimedia information systems: multimedia news systems. Multimedia news systems deal with architectures to manage complex multimedia news databases, online presentation and distribution services or the integration of several existing services to meta-services using intelligent news retrieval engines. The leading presentation platform in multimedia news presentation is news networks providing television services and Internet content distribution. The primary focus is on advanced multimedia news systems infrastructure, document standards, application architecture and principles for multimedia news on the Web that suggest long-term trends in this increasingly important area.

  6. Masculinity discourse on media text: A critical review about news about violence on online news portals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Susilo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Media as a medium plays a significant role in strengthening gender concept in society. Female’s sexualities are viewed as an object of judgement for the media. For the sake of men readers’ satisfaction, media justifies itself in its attempts to exploit women sexuality. Masculine’s way of thinking has been perpetuated in reports about women. Masculine men are considered empowering female’s bodies. Violence acts are considered as the form of masculine domination over feminine beings. This research aims to dismantle how media construct their texts on masculine discourses on online news portals. Online news portals are required to be swift in uploading news and using their acquired resources; thus, they perpetuate this masculine discourse. Critical discourse analysis of Van Dick was employed to unravel masculine discourse structures on media texts at the largest news portals in Indonesia, Alexa.com; and Tribunnews.com; which belong to a corporate media, Kompas Gramedia. The findings of this research state that online news portals and their acquired resources strengthen violence labelling as a part of masculine domination over feminine beings.

  7. Naval Medical R and D News. Volume 8, Issue 12, December 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    scars that may manifest as depression or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Military leaders and medical personnel were quick to realize that...shock, which can be life threatening. (cont.) Full Article NAMRU-2 Scientists Highlight Ongoing Dengue Research in Cambodia at ASTMH...Full Article Beyond the Battlefield: Using Research to Improve Wounded Warrior Care and Quality of Life (Cover) ASTMH - NMRC and WRAIR Work

  8. Perceptions of Advertising Influence on Broadcast News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Hubert W.; Barnes, Beth E.

    2001-01-01

    Finds that while students (studying broadcast journalism or advertising) and practitioners (station news directors and agency media directors) were in agreement on the majority of opinion statements discussing advertising's influence on broadcast news content, except students were less bothered by advertising's influence on news content than were…

  9. News Resources on the World Wide Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notess, Greg R.

    1996-01-01

    Describes up-to-date news sources that are presently available on the Internet and World Wide Web. Highlights include electronic newspapers; AP (Associated Press) sources and Reuters; sports news; stock market information; New York Times; multimedia capabilities, including CNN Interactive; and local and regional news. (LRW)

  10. Hot news recommendation system from heterogeneous websites based on bayesian model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhengyou; Xu, Shengwu; Liu, Ningzhong; Zhao, Zhengkang

    2014-01-01

    The most current news recommendations are suitable for news which comes from a single news website, not for news from different heterogeneous news websites. Previous researches about news recommender systems based on different strategies have been proposed to provide news personalization services for online news readers. However, little research work has been reported on utilizing hundreds of heterogeneous news websites to provide top hot news services for group customers (e.g., government staffs). In this paper, we propose a hot news recommendation model based on Bayesian model, which is from hundreds of different news websites. In the model, we determine whether the news is hot news by calculating the joint probability of the news. We evaluate and compare our proposed recommendation model with the results of human experts on the real data sets. Experimental results demonstrate the reliability and effectiveness of our method. We also implement this model in hot news recommendation system of Hangzhou city government in year 2013, which achieves very good results.

  11. Giving bad news: a qualitative research exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aein, Fereshteh; Delaram, Masoumeh

    2014-06-01

    The manner in which healthcare professionals deliver bad news affects the way it is received, interpreted, understood, and dealt with. Despite the fact that clinicians are responsible for breaking bad news, it has been shown that they lack skills necessary to perform this task. The purpose of this study was to explore Iranian mothers' experiences to receive bad news about their children cancer and to summarize suggestions for improving delivering bad news by healthcare providers. A qualitative approach using content analysis was adopted. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 mothers from two pediatric hospitals in Iran. Five major categories emerged from the data analysis, including dumping information, shock and upset, emotional work, burden of delivering bad news to the family members, and a room for multidisciplinary approach. Effective communication of healthcare team with mothers is required during breaking bad news. Using multidisciplinary approaches to prevent harmful reactions and providing appropriate support are recommended.

  12. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS EXEMPTION OF CERTAIN RADIO AND TELEVISION STATION EMPLOYEES... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He...

  13. Daily Market News Sentiment and Stock Prices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Allen (David); M.J. McAleer (Michael); A.K. Singh (Abhay)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIn recent years there has been a tremendous growth in the influx of news related to traded assets in international financial markets. This financial news is now available via print media but also through real-time online sources such as internet news and social media sources. The

  14. U.S. News Media Coverage of Pharmaceutical Pollution in the Aquatic Environment: A Content Analysis of the Problems and Solutions Presented by Actors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Benjamin; Zimny-Schmitt, Daniel; Rudd, Murray A

    2017-08-01

    Pharmaceutical pollution in the aquatic environment is an issue of concern that has attracted attention by the news media. Understanding the factors that contribute to media framing of pharmaceutical pollution may lead to a better understanding of the management and governance of this issue, including why these pollutants are generally unregulated at this time. This study conducted a content analysis of 405 newspaper articles (81 had substantive information on the topic) from 2007 to 2014, using the search terms "water" and "pharmaceuticals" in the Chicago Tribune, Denver Post, Los Angeles Times, New York Daily News, New York Times, USA Today, Wall Street Journal, and Washington Post. We sought to analyze the factors that contributed to the news media presentation of pharmaceutical pollution in the United States, including the presentation of the risks/safety and solutions by various actors. We found that the primary issues in the news media were uncertainty regarding public health and harm to the environment. The primary solutions recommended within the news media were implementing additional water treatment technologies, taking unused pharmaceuticals to predetermined sites for disposal (take-back programs), and trash disposal of unused pharmaceuticals. Water utilities and scientists presented improved water treatment technology, government actors presented take-back programs, and pharmaceutical representatives, while sparsely involved in the news media, presented trash disposal as their primary solutions. To advance the understanding of the management of pharmaceutical pollution, this article offers further insight into the debate and potential solutions within the news media presentation of this complex scientific topic.

  15. U.S. News Media Coverage of Pharmaceutical Pollution in the Aquatic Environment: A Content Analysis of the Problems and Solutions Presented by Actors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Benjamin; Zimny-Schmitt, Daniel; Rudd, Murray A.

    2017-08-01

    Pharmaceutical pollution in the aquatic environment is an issue of concern that has attracted attention by the news media. Understanding the factors that contribute to media framing of pharmaceutical pollution may lead to a better understanding of the management and governance of this issue, including why these pollutants are generally unregulated at this time. This study conducted a content analysis of 405 newspaper articles (81 had substantive information on the topic) from 2007 to 2014, using the search terms "water" and "pharmaceuticals" in the Chicago Tribune, Denver Post, Los Angeles Times, New York Daily News, New York Times, USA Today, Wall Street Journal, and Washington Post. We sought to analyze the factors that contributed to the news media presentation of pharmaceutical pollution in the United States, including the presentation of the risks/safety and solutions by various actors. We found that the primary issues in the news media were uncertainty regarding public health and harm to the environment. The primary solutions recommended within the news media were implementing additional water treatment technologies, taking unused pharmaceuticals to predetermined sites for disposal (take-back programs), and trash disposal of unused pharmaceuticals. Water utilities and scientists presented improved water treatment technology, government actors presented take-back programs, and pharmaceutical representatives, while sparsely involved in the news media, presented trash disposal as their primary solutions. To advance the understanding of the management of pharmaceutical pollution, this article offers further insight into the debate and potential solutions within the news media presentation of this complex scientific topic.

  16. Effects of low-level laser therapy on wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana do Socorro da Silva Dias Andrade

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To gather and clarify the actual effects of low-level laser therapy on wound healing and its most effective ways of application in human and veterinary medicine.METHODS: We searched original articles published in journals between the years 2000 and 2011, in Spanish, English, French and Portuguese languages, belonging to the following databases: Lilacs, Medline, PubMed and Bireme; Tey should contain the methodological description of the experimental design and parameters used.RESULTS: doses ranging from 3 to 6 J/cm2 appear to be more effective and doses 10 above J/cm2 are associated with deleterious effects. The wavelengths ranging from 632.8 to 1000 nm remain as those that provide more satisfactory results in the wound healing process.CONCLUSION: Low-level laser can be safely applied to accelerate the resolution of cutaneous wounds, although this fact is closely related to the election of parameters such as dose, time of exposure and wavelength.

  17. Is macroeconomic announcement news priced?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Goeij, Peter; Hu, Jiehui; Werker, Bas

    2016-01-01

    We test whether news contained in macroeconomic announcements (MEAs) is priced in the cross-section of stock returns. When including news on a set of widely followed individual macroeconomic fundamentals in the cross-section of stock returns, estimates of their prices of risk are consistent with the

  18. School Violence and the News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and teens have many sources of information about school shootings or other tragic events. They might see or hear news stories or graphic images on TV, radio, or online, over and over. ... of a news story about school violence can make some kids feel that might ...

  19. 16 CFR 1012.6 - The news media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... media attempts to influence any Agency employee on a substantial interest matter. ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false The news media. 1012.6 Section 1012.6... PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.6 The news media. The Agency recognizes that the news media occupy a...

  20. Breaking Bad News in Counseling: Applying the PEWTER Model in the School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe-Cooperman, Kathleen; Brady-Amoon, Peggy

    2013-01-01

    Breaking bad news is a stressful experience for counselors and clients. In this article, the PEWTER (Prepare, Evaluate, Warning, Telling, Emotional Response, Regrouping) model (Nardi & Keefe-Cooperman, 2006) is used as a guide to facilitate the process of a difficult conversation and promote client growth in a school setting. In this…

  1. Hot News Recommendation System from Heterogeneous Websites Based on Bayesian Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengyou Xia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The most current news recommendations are suitable for news which comes from a single news website, not for news from different heterogeneous news websites. Previous researches about news recommender systems based on different strategies have been proposed to provide news personalization services for online news readers. However, little research work has been reported on utilizing hundreds of heterogeneous news websites to provide top hot news services for group customers (e.g., government staffs. In this paper, we propose a hot news recommendation model based on Bayesian model, which is from hundreds of different news websites. In the model, we determine whether the news is hot news by calculating the joint probability of the news. We evaluate and compare our proposed recommendation model with the results of human experts on the real data sets. Experimental results demonstrate the reliability and effectiveness of our method. We also implement this model in hot news recommendation system of Hangzhou city government in year 2013, which achieves very good results.

  2. Comparison of conventional gauze therapy with vacuum assisted closure wound therapy in acute traumatic wounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, S.H.; Jalil, M.; Butt, Q.; Malik, Z.U

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the Vacuum Assisted Closure (Vac) wound therapy with Conventional Gauze Therapy (CGT) in management of acute traumatic wounds on the basis of time taken to achieve a vital red wound ready for definitive surgical closure. Study Design: Randomized control trial. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Surgery Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi from Mar 2009 to Sep 2009. Patients and Methods: This study included 82 patients of acute traumatic wounds. Patients were randomly allotted to group A, in which wound was treated with new method of vacuum assisted closure (VAC) wound therapy and to group B, in which wound was managed by conventional gauze therapy (CGT). Outcomes were measured by the presence of vital red wound ready to be closed by surgical intervention. Patients with concomitant systemic pathology were not included in study. Results: Comparison between the two groups revealed mean time for wound healing 13 days in group A and 16.9 days in group B with significant difference (p value =0.029). Conclusion: Vacuum assisted closure wound therapy is an effective method in reducing time of wound healing for definitive surgical closure. (author)

  3. THE REMR Bulletin: News from the Repair, Evaluation, Maintenance, and Rehabilitation Research Program. Volume 15, Number 1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Neil, Edward

    1998-01-01

    .... Contribution of articles, news, reviews, notices, and other pertinent types of information are solicited from all sources and will be considered for publication so long as they are relevant to REMR activities...

  4. Insights into the key roles of epigenetics in matrix macromolecules-associated wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piperigkou, Zoi; Götte, Martin; Theocharis, Achilleas D; Karamanos, Nikos K

    2017-10-24

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic network of macromolecules, playing a regulatory role in cell functions, tissue regeneration and remodeling. Wound healing is a tissue repair process necessary for the maintenance of the functionality of tissues and organs. This highly orchestrated process is divided into four temporally overlapping phases, including hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation and tissue remodeling. The dynamic interplay between ECM and resident cells exerts its critical role in many aspects of wound healing, including cell proliferation, migration, differentiation, survival, matrix degradation and biosynthesis. Several epigenetic regulatory factors, such as the endogenous non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs), are the drivers of the wound healing response. microRNAs have pivotal roles in regulating ECM composition during wound healing and dermal regeneration. Their expression is associated with the distinct phases of wound healing and they serve as target biomarkers and targets for systematic regulation of wound repair. In this article we critically present the importance of epigenetics with particular emphasis on miRNAs regulating ECM components (i.e. glycoproteins, proteoglycans and matrix proteases) that are key players in wound healing. The clinical relevance of miRNA targeting as well as the delivery strategies designed for clinical applications are also presented and discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Comprehension of Critical News Items as Expressed by College Students and Adults in Business, Industry, and Religion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Effie Kaye; Scott, Elois M.

    College students were compared to adults for their reading comprehension of news items on two critical issues of national concern. The subjects were 109 adults and 97 college students who read ten short magazine articles on the Iran-United States hostage crisis and the U.S. energy problem. After reading the articles, the subjects' comprehension…

  6. Wound Disruption Following Colorectal Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Hanna, Mark H; Carmichael, Joseph C; Mills, Steven; Pigazzi, Alessio; Nguyen, Ninh T; Stamos, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Postoperative wound disruption is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We sought to identify the risk factors and outcomes of wound disruption following colorectal resection. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database was used to examine the clinical data of patients who underwent colorectal resection from 2005 to 2013. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors of wound disruption. We sampled a total of 164,297 patients who underwent colorectal resection. Of these, 2073 (1.3 %) had wound disruption. Patients with wound disruption had significantly higher mortality (5.1 vs. 1.9 %, AOR: 1.46, P = 0.01). The highest risk of wound disruption was seen in patients with wound infection (4.8 vs. 0.9 %, AOR: 4.11, P disruption such as chronic steroid use (AOR: 1.71, P disruption compared to open surgery (AOR: 0.61, P disruption occurs in 1.3 % of colorectal resections, and it correlates with mortality of patients. Wound infection is the strongest predictor of wound disruption. Chronic steroid use, obesity, severe COPD, prolonged operation, non-elective admission, and serum albumin level are strongly associated with wound disruption. Utilization of the laparoscopic approach may decrease the risk of wound disruption when possible.

  7. Getting Out the Good News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciancia, David

    1995-01-01

    A majority of American schools are meeting the challenge of educating children. A New York State district gets out the good news by producing school newsletters and videos, by constant and close contact with the local news media, and by forming ties with local real estate agents. (MLF)

  8. CSIR eNews: Laser technology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info CSIR e-NewsLaserT1_2009.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 1889 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name CSIR e-NewsLaserT1_2009.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Laser...

  9. Predicting complex acute wound healing in patients from a wound expertise centre registry: a prognostic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubbink, Dirk T; Lindeboom, Robert; Eskes, Anne M; Brull, Huub; Legemate, Dink A; Vermeulen, Hester

    2015-10-01

    It is important for caregivers and patients to know which wounds are at risk of prolonged wound healing to enable timely communication and treatment. Available prognostic models predict wound healing in chronic ulcers, but not in acute wounds, that is, originating after trauma or surgery. We developed a model to detect which factors can predict (prolonged) healing of complex acute wounds in patients treated in a large wound expertise centre (WEC). Using Cox and linear regression analyses, we determined which patient- and wound-related characteristics best predict time to complete wound healing and derived a prediction formula to estimate how long this may take. We selected 563 patients with acute wounds, documented in the WEC registry between 2007 and 2012. Wounds had existed for a median of 19 days (range 6-46 days). The majority of these were located on the leg (52%). Five significant independent predictors of prolonged wound healing were identified: wound location on the trunk [hazard ratio (HR) 0·565, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·405-0·788; P = 0·001], wound infection (HR 0·728, 95% CI 0·534-0·991; P = 0·044), wound size (HR 0·993, 95% CI 0·988-0·997; P = 0·001), wound duration (HR 0·998, 95% CI 0·996-0·999; P = 0·005) and patient's age (HR 1·009, 95% CI 1·001-1·018; P = 0·020), but not diabetes. Awareness of the five factors predicting the healing of complex acute wounds, particularly wound infection and location on the trunk, may help caregivers to predict wound healing time and to detect, refer and focus on patients who need additional attention. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Possible Courses for News and Public Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Richard C.

    1978-01-01

    Live programming, regular daily news programs, and documentary series, which are suggested as solutions to the limited scope of news and public affairs air time, would enable PBS to increase its coverage of news and public affairs. Some suggestions are also made for restructuring the functions of stations within the system to facilitate this…

  11. Experience with wound VAC and delayed primary closure of contaminated soft tissue injuries in Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leininger, Brian E; Rasmussen, Todd E; Smith, David L; Jenkins, Donald H; Coppola, Christopher

    2006-11-01

    Wartime missile injuries are frequently high-energy wounds that devitalize and contaminate tissue, with high risk for infection and wound complications. Debridement, irrigation, and closure by secondary intention are fundamental principles for the management of these injuries. However, closure by secondary intention was impractical in Iraqi patients. Therefore, wounds were closed definitively before discharge in all Iraqi patients treated for such injures at our hospital. A novel wound management protocol was developed to facilitate this practice, and patient outcomes were tracked. This article describes that protocol and discusses the outcomes in a series of 88 wounds managed with it. High-energy injuries were treated with rapid aggressive debridement and pulsatile lavage, then covered with negative pressure (vacuum-assisted closure [VAC]) dressings. Patients underwent serial operative irrigation and debridement until wounds appeared clean to gross inspection, at which time they were closed primarily. Patient treatment and outcome data were recorded in a prospectively updated database. Treatment and outcomes data from September 2004 through May 2005 were analyzed retrospectively. There were 88 high-energy soft tissue wounds identified in 77 patients. Surprisingly, for this cohort of patients the wound infection rate was 0% and the overall wound complication rate was 0%. This series of 88 cases is the first report of the use of a negative pressure dressing (wound VAC) as part of the definitive management of high-energy soft tissue wounds in a deployed wartime environment. Our experience with these patients suggests that conventional wound management doctrine may be improved with the wound VAC, resulting in earlier more reliable primary closure of wartime injuries.

  12. Amateur Sources Breaking the News, Meta Sources Authorizing the News of Gaddafi's Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Mette; Kristensen, Nete Nørgaard

    2013-01-01

    access to information from war zones, but are instead brought in to comment on, validate and grant legitimacy to amateur sources as a form of explicit source criticism that we would like to term metasourcing. This new pattern of information gathering and sourcing within war reporting manifests itself......This article takes its point of departure in the thesis that today’s global, digitalized and conver- gent media environment has promoted new patterns of information gathering and dissemina- tion within journalism, and war journalism in particular, which involve changing forms and various degrees...... of interplay between elite and non-elite sources as well as media professionals and amateur sources. On account of their proximity to unfolding events, amateur sources often break the news by means of raw and fragmented bits of visual and verbal information. Elite sources rarely possess the same exclusive...

  13. Online news: between private enterprise and public subsidy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjarvard, Stig; Kammer, Aske

    2015-01-01

    The Nordic countries’ media systems are exemplary of the democratic corporatist model, and newspapers have occupied a very prominent position in the political public sphere supported by wide circulation and a political will to subsidize the press and still keep an arm’s length distance. During past...... decades, these features have come under pressure due to – among other things – the spread of digital media. In this article, we explore two current structural economic challenges to legacy newspaper organizations in Denmark. The first challenge regards the implementation of subscription on news websites...

  14. 'BREAKS' Protocol for Breaking Bad News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Vijayakumar; Bista, Bibek; Koshy, Cheriyan

    2010-05-01

    Information that drastically alters the life world of the patient is termed as bad news. Conveying bad news is a skilled communication, and not at all easy. The amount of truth to be disclosed is subjective. A properly structured and well-orchestrated communication has a positive therapeutic effect. This is a process of negotiation between patient and physician, but physicians often find it difficult due to many reasons. They feel incompetent and are afraid of unleashing a negative reaction from the patient or their relatives. The physician is reminded of his or her own vulnerability to terminal illness, and find themselves powerless over emotional distress. Lack of sufficient training in breaking bad news is a handicap to most physicians and health care workers. Adherence to the principles of client-centered counseling is helpful in attaining this skill. Fundamental insight of the patient is exploited and the bad news is delivered in a structured manner, because the patient is the one who knows what is hurting him most and he is the one who knows how to move forward. Six-step SPIKES protocol is widely used for breaking bad news. In this paper, we put forward another six-step protocol, the BREAKS protocol as a systematic and easy communication strategy for breaking bad news. Development of competence in dealing with difficult situations has positive therapeutic outcome and is a professionally satisfying one.

  15. The News Media as a Political Institution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsten, Mark; Allern, Sigurd

    2011-01-01

    : what new roles, if any, are news organizations and journalists playing in the political system? What are the characteristics of these new roles, and how do news organizations use their newfound political power? We address these questions in the context of an institutional approach to the news coupled...... with Hallin and Mancini's analysis of media systems....

  16. Making the News: Jobs in TV Journalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csorny, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    What do TV news workers do each day? For many of them, contributing to daily news broadcasts has changed greatly over the years. This evolution will likely continue for years to come. And more changes to news production are expected, according to Tom Weir, an associate professor at the University of South Carolina's School of Journalism and Mass…

  17. Mural painting apprentice: news concerning the presence of Gaspar Becerra in the estufa of The Alhambra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Martínez Jiménez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the first news about the presence of Gaspar Becerra in Granada, prior to his move to Italy. In this way the author verifies that Becerra already knew Italian mural painting in Spain.

  18. Fake news portrayals of stem cells and stem cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Alessandro R; Murdoch, Blake; Caulfield, Timothy

    2017-10-01

    This study examines how stem cells and stem cell research are portrayed on websites deemed to be purveyors of distorted and dubious information. Content analysis was conducted on 224 articles from 2015 to 2016, compiled by searching with the keywords 'stem cell(s)' on a list of websites flagged for containing either 'fake' or 'junk science' news. Articles contained various exaggerated positive and negative claims about stem cells and stem cell science, health and science related conspiracy theories, and statements promoting fear and mistrust of conventional medicine. Findings demonstrate the existence of organized misinformation networks, which may lead the public away from accurate information and facilitate a polarization of public discourse.

  19. The News Media Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-06-05

    into “infotainment,” with an emphasis on trivia and news of the lives of celebrities. As a result, the American public is, as media critic Mark...presented by multiple outlets is often recycled . For example, a reader of Newsweek may see a similar, if not identical, story in its sibling...teleprompter. News and entertainment have morphed into “infotainment,” with an emphasis on trivia and the lives of celebrities. Unfortunately

  20. Studying Fake News via Network Analysis: Detection and Mitigation

    OpenAIRE

    Shu, Kai; Bernard, H. Russell; Liu, Huan

    2018-01-01

    Social media for news consumption is becoming increasingly popular due to its easy access, fast dissemination, and low cost. However, social media also enable the wide propagation of "fake news", i.e., news with intentionally false information. Fake news on social media poses significant negative societal effects, and also presents unique challenges. To tackle the challenges, many existing works exploit various features, from a network perspective, to detect and mitigate fake news. In essence...

  1. Hypertext in online news stories: More control, more appreciation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagerwerf, L.; Verheij, D.

    2014-01-01

    News websites struggle tailoring news stories to divergent needs of online news users. We examined a way to bridge these needs by representing sources in hypertext. News items were designed to be short and concise, with hyperlinks citing sources. Readers could either ignore hyperlinks or explore

  2. CERN Video News on line

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The latest CERN video news is on line. In this issue : an interview with the Director General and reports on the new home for the DELPHI barrel and the CERN firemen's spectacular training programme. There's also a vintage video news clip from 1954. See: www.cern.ch/video or Bulletin web page

  3. Popular Science Articles for Chemistry Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketevan Kupatadze

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The presented paper reviews popular science articles (these articles are published in online magazine “The Teacher” as one of the methods of chemistry teaching. It describes which didactic principles they are in line with and how this type of articles can be used in order to kindle the interest of pupils, students and generally, the readers of other specialties, in chemistry.  The articles review the main topics of inorganic/organic chemistry, biochemistry and ecological chemistry in a simple and entertaining manner. A part of the articles is about "household" chemistry. Chemical topics are related to poetry, literature, history of chemistry or simply, to fun news. The paper delineates the structure of popular science articles and the features of engaging students. It also reviews the teachers' and students' interview results about the usage of popular science articles in chemistry teaching process. The aforementioned pedagogical study revealed that the popular science articles contain useful information not only for the students of other specialties, but also for future biologists and ecologists (having chemistry as a mandatory subject at their universities. The articles are effectively used by teachers on chemistry lessons to kindle students' interest in this subject. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v9i3.960 

  4. Location-aware News Recommendation System with Using Fuzzy Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Nejati

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available with release of a huge amount of news on the Internet and the trend of users to Web-based news services.it is necessary to have a recommendation system. To grab attentions to news, news services use a number of criteria that called news values and user location is an important factor for it. In this paper, LONEF is proposed as a tow stage recommendation system. In first stage news are ranked by user’s locations and in second stage news are recommended by location Preferences, recency, Trustworthiness, groups priorities and popularity. To reduce ambiguity these properties is used tow Mamdani fuzzy interference and case-based decision systems. In Mamdani fuzzy interference system, it is tried to increase the system speed by optimizing selection of rules and membership functions and because of ambiguous feedback implementation, a decision making system is used to enable better simulation of user’s activities. Performance of our proposed approach is demonstrated in the experiments on different news groups.

  5. The spread of true and false news online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosoughi, Soroush; Roy, Deb; Aral, Sinan

    2018-03-09

    We investigated the differential diffusion of all of the verified true and false news stories distributed on Twitter from 2006 to 2017. The data comprise ~126,000 stories tweeted by ~3 million people more than 4.5 million times. We classified news as true or false using information from six independent fact-checking organizations that exhibited 95 to 98% agreement on the classifications. Falsehood diffused significantly farther, faster, deeper, and more broadly than the truth in all categories of information, and the effects were more pronounced for false political news than for false news about terrorism, natural disasters, science, urban legends, or financial information. We found that false news was more novel than true news, which suggests that people were more likely to share novel information. Whereas false stories inspired fear, disgust, and surprise in replies, true stories inspired anticipation, sadness, joy, and trust. Contrary to conventional wisdom, robots accelerated the spread of true and false news at the same rate, implying that false news spreads more than the truth because humans, not robots, are more likely to spread it. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  6. Measuring the Interestingness of Articles in a Limited User Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pon, Raymond K. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Search engines, such as Google, assign scores to news articles based on their relevancy to a query. However, not all relevant articles for the query may be interesting to a user. For example, if the article is old or yields little new information, the article would be uninteresting. Relevancy scores do not take into account what makes an article interesting, which varies from user to user. Although methods such as collaborative filtering have been shown to be effective in recommendation systems, in a limited user environment, there are not enough users that would make collaborative filtering effective. A general framework, called iScore, is presented for defining and measuring the 'interestingness' of articles, incorporating user-feedback. iScore addresses various aspects of what makes an article interesting, such as topic relevancy, uniqueness, freshness, source reputation, and writing style. It employs various methods to measure these features and uses a classifier operating on these features to recommend articles. The basic iScore configuration is shown to improve recommendation results by as much as 20%. In addition to the basic iScore features, additional features are presented to address the deficiencies of existing feature extractors, such as one that tracks multiple topics, called MTT, and a version of the Rocchio algorithm that learns its parameters online as it processes documents, called eRocchio. The inclusion of both MTT and eRocchio into iScore is shown to improve iScore recommendation results by as much as 3.1% and 5.6%, respectively. Additionally, in TREC11 Adaptive Filter Task, eRocchio is shown to be 10% better than the best filter in the last run of the task. In addition to these two major topic relevancy measures, other features are also introduced that employ language models, phrases, clustering, and changes in topics to improve recommendation results. These additional features are shown to improve recommendation results by iScore by

  7. Recombinant human erythropoietin improves angiogenesis and wound healing in experimental burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Mariarosaria; Altavilla, Domenica; Bitto, Alessandra; Minutoli, Letteria; Calò, Margherita; Lo Cascio, Patrizia; Polito, Francesca; Giugliano, Giovanni; Squadrito, Giovanni; Mioni, Chiara; Giuliani, Daniela; Venuti, Francesco S; Squadrito, Francesco

    2006-04-01

    Erythropoietin interacts with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and stimulates endothelial cell mitosis and motility; thus it may be of importance in the complex phenomenon of wound healing. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) on experimental burn wounds. Randomized experiment. Research laboratory. C57BL/6 male mice weighing 25-30 g. Mice were immersed in 80 degrees C water for 10 secs to achieve a deep-dermal second degree burn. Animals were randomized to receive either rHuEPO (400 units/kg/day for 14 days in 100 microL subcutaneously) or its vehicle alone (100 microl/day distilled water for 14 days subcutaneously). On day 14 the animals were killed. Burn areas were used for histologic examination, evaluation of neoangiogenesis by immunohistochemistry, and expression (Western blot) of the specific endothelial marker CD31 as well as quantification of microvessel density, measurement of VEGF wound content (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), expression (Western blot) of endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthases, and determination of wound nitric oxide (NO) products. rHuEPO increased burn wound reepithelialization and reduced the time to final wound closure. These effects were completely abated by a passive immunization with specific antibodies against erythropoietin. rHuEPO improved healing of burn wound through increased epithelial proliferation, maturation of the extracellular matrix, and angiogenesis. The hematopoietic factor augmented neoangiogenesis as suggested by the marked increase in microvessel density and by the robust expression of the specific endothelial marker CD31. Furthermore, rHuEPO enhanced the wound content of VEGF caused a marked expression of endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthases and increased wound content of nitric oxide products. Our study suggests that rHuEPO may be an effective therapeutic approach to improve clinical outcomes after thermal injury.

  8. When good news is bad news: explicating the moderated mediation dynamic behind the reversed mobilization effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuck, A.R.T.; de Vreese, C.H.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the mobilizing potential of positive news framing on opponents of a referendum proposal. On the basis of an experiment (N = 470), using bootstrapping as a method to assess conditional indirect effects, mediation analysis showed that positive news framing—endorsing a

  9. Detecting Terrorism Incidence Type from News Summary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nizamani, Sarwat; Memon, Nasrullah

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the experiments to detect terrorism incidence type from news summary data. We have applied classification techniques on news summary data to analyze the incidence and detect the type of incidence. A number of experiments are conducted using various classification algorithms...... and results show that a simple decision tree classifier can learn incidence type with satisfactory results from news data....

  10. What Turns Events into News?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukachinsky, Riva

    2013-01-01

    "The New York Times" is known for its slogan ''All the News That's Fit to Print.'' But how do gatekeepers decide which events meet this criterion? Although some individuals might believe that the news constitutes an undistorted reflection of the social reality, students in communication courses have the…

  11. Recent advances on biomedical applications of scaffolds in wound healing and dermal tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani Del Bakhshayesh, Azizeh; Annabi, Nasim; Khalilov, Rovshan; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl; Samiei, Mohammad; Alizadeh, Effat; Alizadeh-Ghodsi, Mohammadreza; Davaran, Soodabeh; Montaseri, Azadeh

    2018-06-01

    The tissue engineering field has developed in response to the shortcomings related to the replacement of the tissues lost to disease or trauma: donor tissue rejection, chronic inflammation and donor tissue shortages. The driving force behind the tissue engineering is to avoid the mentioned issues by creating the biological substitutes capable of replacing the damaged tissue. This is done by combining the scaffolds, cells and signals in order to create the living, physiological, three-dimensional tissues. A wide variety of skin substitutes are used in the treatment of full-thickness injuries. Substitutes made from skin can harbour the latent viruses, and artificial skin grafts can heal with the extensive scarring, failing to regenerate structures such as glands, nerves and hair follicles. New and practical skin scaffold materials remain to be developed. The current article describes the important information about wound healing scaffolds. The scaffold types which were used in these fields were classified according to the accepted guideline of the biological medicine. Moreover, the present article gave the brief overview on the fundamentals of the tissue engineering, biodegradable polymer properties and their application in skin wound healing. Also, the present review discusses the type of the tissue engineered skin substitutes and modern wound dressings which promote the wound healing.

  12. Generation, life course and news media use in Sweden 1986–2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westlund, Oscar; Weibull, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    It has been posited that different generations are largely influenced by the characteristics of the media landscape they inherit and grow into in their formative years. However, we also know from empirical studies that individual media use changes over the life course. At present no empirical study...... the empiric analyses into distinct media system contexts. The findings evidence the generational hypothesis on formative socialization, especially with regards to the dutifuls and the baby boomers. Nevertheless, age and life cycle are also identified as critically important factors. The findings show...... has analysed and compared the use of several news media among different generations in relation to both life cycle factors and media development over significant periods of time. Hence, this article explores the topic through its cross-generational comparison of transforming news media usage...

  13. Misinformation with fake news

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. BOTEI

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The last presidential elections in the United States of America (2016 have brought to the international public opinion’ s attention the phenomenon of “fake news”. Though it isn’t a new phenomenon, the spread of fake information for manipulating and misinforming the masses has existed in all historical periods. This time the phenomenon was noticed because of the number of fake news and, especially because of their impact, starting the discussion whether the victory of Donald Trump happened because of fake news and raising the question whether this phenomenon is a danger to democracy. An important reaction came also from the part of technology companies, of tech giants, Google and Facebook especially, which want the implementation of the phenomenon. Misinformation with public speech under the form of fake news brings to discussion the responsibility in the online space, but also the protection of people against this phenomenon.

  14. Predicting complex acute wound healing in patients from a wound expertise centre registry: a prognostic study

    OpenAIRE

    Ubbink, Dirk T; Lindeboom, Robert; Eskes, Anne M; Brull, Huub; Legemate, Dink A; Vermeulen, Hester

    2015-01-01

    It is important for caregivers and patients to know which wounds are at risk of prolonged wound healing to enable timely communication and treatment. Available prognostic models predict wound healing in chronic ulcers, but not in acute wounds, that is, originating after trauma or surgery. We developed a model to detect which factors can predict (prolonged) healing of complex acute wounds in patients treated in a large wound expertise centre (WEC). Using Cox and linear regression analyses, we ...

  15. Skin Wound Healing: An Update on the Current Knowledge and Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorg, Heiko; Tilkorn, Daniel J; Hager, Stephan; Hauser, Jörg; Mirastschijski, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    The integrity of healthy skin plays a crucial role in maintaining physiological homeostasis of the human body. The skin is the largest organ system of the body. As such, it plays pivotal roles in the protection against mechanical forces and infections, fluid imbalance, and thermal dysregulation. At the same time, it allows for flexibility to enable joint function in some areas of the body and more rigid fixation to hinder shifting of the palm or foot sole. Many instances lead to inadequate wound healing which necessitates medical intervention. Chronic conditions such as diabetes mellitus or peripheral vascular disease can lead to impaired wound healing. Acute trauma such as degloving or large-scale thermal injuries are followed by a loss of skin organ function rendering the organism vulnerable to infections, thermal dysregulation, and fluid loss. For this update article, we have reviewed the actual literature on skin wound healing purposes focusing on the main phases of wound healing, i.e., inflammation, proliferation, epithelialization, angiogenesis, remodeling, and scarring. The reader will get briefed on new insights and up-to-date concepts in skin wound healing. The macrophage as a key player in the inflammatory phase will be highlighted. During the epithelialization process, we will present the different concepts of how the wound will get closed, e.g., leapfrogging, lamellipodial crawling, shuffling, and the stem cell niche. The neovascularization represents an essential component in wound healing due to its fundamental impact from the very beginning after skin injury until the end of the wound remodeling. Here, the distinct pattern of the neovascularization process and the special new functions of the pericyte will be underscored. At the end, this update will present 3 topics of high interest in skin wound healing issues, dealing with scarring, tissue engineering, and plasma application. Although wound healing mechanisms and specific cell functions in wound

  16. “The Image Speaks for Itself” – or does it?: Instant News Icons, Impromptu Publics, and the 2015 European “Refugee Crisis”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Mette

    2016-01-01

    and are declared to be “icons”. They stand out from the image abundance, grasp the attention of a broad, transnational public, and stir emotional reactions and heated debates. Usually, these iconic images are related to major news events and represent an ongoing conflict or crisis in society in a simple, univocal...... manner. They quickly turn into standard frames of reference in news and popular culture, seem to require no particular explanation, and are often proclaimed to “speak for themselves”. This article proposes the term “instant news icon” to define and gain a fuller understanding of the role performed...

  17. Polymeric hydrogels for burn wound care: Advanced skin wound dressings and regenerative templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaghiele, Marta; Demitri, Christian; Sannino, Alessandro; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Wound closure represents a primary goal in the treatment of very deep and/or large wounds, for which the mortality rate is particularly high. However, the spontaneous healing of adult skin eventually results in the formation of epithelialized scar and scar contracture (repair), which might distort the tissues and cause lifelong deformities and disabilities. This clinical evidence suggests that wound closure attained by means of skin regeneration, instead of repair, should be the true goal of burn wound management. The traditional concept of temporary wound dressings, able to stimulate skin healing by repair, is thus being increasingly replaced by the idea of temporary scaffolds, or regenerative templates, able to promote healing by regeneration. As wound dressings, polymeric hydrogels provide an ideal moisture environment for healing while protecting the wound, with the additional advantage of being comfortable to the patient, due to their cooling effect and non-adhesiveness to the wound tissue. More importantly, recent advances in regenerative medicine demonstrate that bioactive hydrogels can be properly designed to induce at least partial skin regeneration in vivo. The aim of this review is to provide a concise insight on the key properties of hydrogels for skin healing and regeneration, particularly highlighting the emerging role of hydrogels as next generation skin substitutes for the treatment of full-thickness burns.

  18. Polymeric hydrogels for burn wound care: Advanced skin wound dressings and regenerative templates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Madaghiele

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Wound closure represents a primary goal in the treatment of very deep and/or large wounds, for which the mortality rate is particularly high. However, the spontaneous healing of adult skin eventually results in the formation of epithelialized scar and scar contracture (repair, which might distort the tissues and cause lifelong deformities and disabilities. This clinical evidence suggests that wound closure attained by means of skin regeneration, instead of repair, should be the true goal of burn wound management. The traditional concept of temporary wound dressings, able to stimulate skin healing by repair, is thus being increasingly replaced by the idea of temporary scaffolds, or regenerative templates, able to promote healing by regeneration. As wound dressings, polymeric hydrogels provide an ideal moisture environment for healing while protecting the wound, with the additional advantage of being comfortable to the patient, due to their cooling effect and non-adhesiveness to the wound tissue. More importantly, recent advances in regenerative medicine demonstrate that bioactive hydrogels can be properly designed to induce at least partial skin regeneration in vivo. The aim of this review is to provide a concise insight on the key properties of hydrogels for skin healing and regeneration, particularly highlighting the emerging role of hydrogels as next generation skin substitutes for the treatment of full-thickness burns.

  19. News exposure predicts anti-Muslim prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, John H; Sibley, Chris G; Osborne, Danny; Bulbulia, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    News coverage of Islamic extremism is reigniting debates about the media's role in promoting prejudice toward Muslims. Psychological theories of media-induced prejudice date to the 1950's, and find support from controlled experiments. However, national-scale studies of media effects on Muslim prejudice are lacking. Orthogonal research investigating media-induced prejudice toward immigrants has failed to establish any link. Moreover, it has been found that people interpret the news in ways that confirm pre-existing attitudes, suggesting that media induced Muslim prejudice in liberal democracies is unlikely. Here, we test the association between news exposure and anti-Muslim prejudice in a diverse national sample from one of the world's most tolerant societies, where media effects are least likely to hold (N = 16,584, New Zealand). In support of media-induced Islamophobia, results show that greater news exposure is associated with both increased anger and reduced warmth toward Muslims. Additionally, the relationship between media exposure and anti-Muslim prejudice does not reliably vary with political ideology, supporting claims that it is widespread representations of Muslims in the news, rather than partisan media biases, that drives anti-Muslim prejudice.

  20. Qualitative content analysis of online news media coverage of weight loss surgery and related reader comments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, N M; Champion, C C; Spence, J C

    2012-10-01

    The media has the ability to affect public opinion and policy direction. Prevalence of morbid obesity in Canada is increasing; as is the only effective long-term treatment, weight loss surgery (WLS). Limited research has explored media re/presentations of WLS. The purpose of this study was to examine national online news coverage (and reader comments) of WLS using content analysis. We sought to understand the dominant messages being conveyed within the news texts and reader comments, specifically whose voice was represented, who was the intended audience and what was the overall tone. Articles and comments were retrieved from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation news web site and analysed using line-by-line techniques. Articles were predominantly 'positive/supportive' (63%) in tone and frequently presented the voices and opinions of 'experts' conveying a biomedical perspective. Comments were overwhelmingly 'negative' (56%) and often derogatory including such language as 'piggy' and 'fatty'. Comments were almost exclusively anonymous (99%) and were frequently directed at other commenters (33%) and 'fat' people (6%). The potentially problematic nature of media framing and reader comments, particularly as they could relate to weight-based stigmatization and discrimination is discussed. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical Obesity © 2012 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  1. [Wound information management system: a standardized scheme for acquisition, storage and management of wound information].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hu; Su, Rong-jia; Wu, Min-jie; Zhang, Yi; Qiu, Xiang-jun; Feng, Jian-gang; Xie, Ting; Lu, Shu-liang

    2012-06-01

    To form a wound information management scheme with objectivity, standardization, and convenience by means of wound information management system. A wound information management system was set up with the acquisition terminal, the defined wound description, the data bank, and related softwares. The efficacy of this system was evaluated in clinical practice. The acquisition terminal was composed of the third generation mobile phone and the software. It was feasible to get access to the wound information, including description, image, and therapeutic plan from the data bank by mobile phone. During 4 months, a collection of a total of 232 wound treatment information was entered, and accordingly standardized data of 38 patients were formed automatically. This system can provide standardized wound information management by standardized techniques of acquisition, transmission, and storage of wound information. It can be used widely in hospitals, especially primary medical institutions. Data resource of the system makes it possible for epidemiological study with large sample size in future.

  2. Nuclear Malaysia in The News 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear was a term that always misunderstands by public as a terrifying term. The nuclear activities around Malaysia was disseminated in newspaper and Malaysian Nuclear Agency as a responsible agency for nuclear for peace were collecting that news and compiled them to make the public aware the benefits of nuclear energy to develop our country. All the news about nuclear were collected using various type of newspaper published in Malaysia such as Utusan Malaysia, Berita Harian, Daily Express, News Straits Time, The Star, Borneo Post and others. This news was compiled according to their main topics such as energy, nuclear in agriculture, education and others. Each year one edition of this report will publish and disseminate it to the other libraries, government agencies, school and others to make the public aware the existence of nuclear activities around their countries.

  3. Nuclear Malaysia in the news 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear was a term that always misunderstands by public as a terrifying term. The nuclear activities around Malaysia was disseminated in newspaper and Malaysian Nuclear Agency as a responsible agency for nuclear for peace were collecting that news and compiled them to make the public aware the benefits of nuclear energy to develop our country. All the news about nuclear were collected using various type of newspaper published in Malaysia such as Utusan Malaysia, Berita Harian, Daily Express, News Straits Time, The Star, Borneo Post and others. This news was compiled according to their main topics such as energy, nuclear in agriculture, education and others. Each year one edition of this report will publish and disseminate it to the other libraries, government agencies, school and others to make the public aware the existence of nuclear activities around their countries.

  4. Nuclear Malaysia in the news 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear was a term that always misunderstands by public as a terrifying term. The nuclear activities around Malaysia was disseminated in newspaper and Malaysian Nuclear Agency as a responsible agency for nuclear for peace were collecting that news and compiled them to make the public aware the benefits of nuclear energy to develop our country. All the news about nuclear were collected using various type of newspaper published in Malaysia such as Utusan Malaysia, Berita Harian, Daily Express, News Straits Time, The Star, Borneo Post and others. This news was compiled according to their main topics such as energy, nuclear in agriculture, education and others. Each year one edition of this report will publish and disseminate it to the other libraries, government agencies, school and others to make the public aware the existence of nuclear activities around their countries.

  5. Improved wound care product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention pertains to use of sodium diacetate (NaHAc 2) as an antimicrobial agent against bacteria growing in biofilms. The aspects of the invention include a wound care product comprising sodium diacetate, a kit comprising a wound care product,and a methodof treating an infected wound....

  6. The historical context of business ethics: implications for choices and challenges in wound care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, S M

    1999-08-01

    Wound care clinicians are regularly asked to make decisions of an ethical nature within their work settings. Business and business practices are influenced by a number of factors, such as history, culture, and individual choices. This article describes business practices and ultimately business ethics from an historical context, the meaning of business culture within the dominant culture, and the debate over business ethics as it relates to choices and challenges for wound care clinicians.

  7. How wounds heal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How puncture wounds heal; How burns heal; How pressure sores heal; How lacerations heal ... bleed. For example, burns, some puncture wounds, and pressure sores do not bleed. Once the scab forms, your ...

  8. “It’s Only a Pastime, Really”: Young People’s Experiences of Social Media as a Source of News about Public Affairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malin Sveningsson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Western democracies have seen a decreased participation in activities traditionally associated with political participation. One aspect of participating politically is to keep up-to-date with what happens in society, for example, by following the news. Here, youth have been found to be less active than older generations. The decline in young people’s consumption of news media does not necessarily mean that they are disinterested in news or politics; they may get their information from other sources, for example, social media. Using a qualitative multi-method approach, this article investigates how young people who are interested in civic and political issues, and who regularly access news from various sources, experience and understand, specifically, Facebook and Twitter as sources of news about public affairs. The participants appreciated the immediateness of social media news, and felt that it could provide insights into new perspectives and make news stories feel more relevant. However, it was also experienced as one-sided, fragmented, and subjective, giving a biased, or even false, image of what happens in society. The consumption of news was strongly related to the idea of being a “good” citizen. However, since the participants did not regard social media news as “real news,” their image of themselves as citizens suffered. If young people in general resemble our participants in this respect, research that asks about their news consumption runs a risk of getting answers that underestimate it, thus reinforcing the idea that young people are less interested and informed about public affairs than is actually the case.

  9. A Cross Cultural Analysis of Textual and Interpersonal Metadiscourse Markers: The Case of Economic Articles in English and Persian Newspapers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshrabadi, Abbas Mehrabi; Biria, Reza; Zavari, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    This study was an attempt to investigate the functional role of textual and interpersonal metadiscourse markers in English and Persian Economic news reports. To this end, 10 news articles, 5 in each language, were randomly selected from the Economic sections of the leading newspapers published in 2013-2014 in Iran and the United States. Based on…

  10. Filament wound structure and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dritt, W.S.; Gerth, H.L.; Knight, C.E. Jr.; Pardue, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    A filament wound spherical structure is described comprising a plurality of filament band sets disposed about the surface of a mandrel with each band of each set formed of a continuous filament circumferentially wound about the mandrel a selected number of circuits and with each circuit of filament being wound parallel to and contiguous with an immediate previously wound circuit. Each filament band in each band set is wound at the same helix angle from the axis of revolution of the mandrel and all of the bands of each set are uniformly distributed about the mandrel circumference. The pole-to-equator wall thickness taper associated with each band set, as several contiguous band sets are wound about the mandrel starting at the poles, is accumulative as the band sets are nested to provide a complete filament wound sphere of essentially uniform thickness

  11. Fake News Detection on Social Media: A Data Mining Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Shu, Kai; Sliva, Amy; Wang, Suhang; Tang, Jiliang; Liu, Huan

    2017-01-01

    Social media for news consumption is a double-edged sword. On the one hand, its low cost, easy access, and rapid dissemination of information lead people to seek out and consume news from social media. On the other hand, it enables the wide spread of "fake news", i.e., low quality news with intentionally false information. The extensive spread of fake news has the potential for extremely negative impacts on individuals and society. Therefore, fake news detection on social media has recently b...

  12. Wound care clinical pathway: a conceptual model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, J E; Cuzzell, J

    1996-08-01

    A clinical pathway is a written sequence of clinical processes or events that guides a patient with a defined problem toward an expected outcome. Clinical pathways are tools to assist with the cost-effective management of clinical outcomes related to specific problems or disease processes. The primary obstacles to developing clinical pathways for wound care are the chronic natures of some wounds and the many variables that can delay healing. The pathway introduced in this article was modeled upon the three phases of tissue repair: inflammatory, proliferative, and maturation. This physiology-based model allows clinicians to identify and monitor outcomes based on observable and measurable clinical parameters. The pathway design, which also includes educational and behavioral outcomes, allows the clinician to individualize the expected timeframe for outcome achievement based on individual patient criteria and expert judgement. Integral to the pathway are the "4P's" which help standardize the clinical processes by wound type: Protocols, Policies, Procedures, and Patient education tools. Four categories into which variances are categorized based on the cause of the deviation from the norm are patient, process/system, practitioner, and planning/discharge. Additional research is warranted to support the value of this clinical pathway in the clinical arena.

  13. Consequences of age on ischemic wound healing in rats: altered antioxidant activity and delayed wound closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moor, Andrea N; Tummel, Evan; Prather, Jamie L; Jung, Michelle; Lopez, Jonathan J; Connors, Sarah; Gould, Lisa J

    2014-04-01

    Advertisements targeted at the elderly population suggest that antioxidant therapy will reduce free radicals and promote wound healing, yet few scientific studies substantiate these claims. To better understand the potential utility of supplemental antioxidant therapy for wound healing, we tested the hypothesis that age and tissue ischemia alter the balance of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. Using a bipedicled skin flap model, ischemic and non-ischemic wounds were created on young and aged rats. Wound closure and the balance of the critical antioxidants superoxide dismutase and glutathione in the wound bed were determined. Ischemia delayed wound closure significantly more in aged rats. Lower superoxide dismutase 2 and glutathione in non-ischemic wounds of aged rats indicate a basal deficit due to age alone. Ischemic wounds from aged rats had lower superoxide dismutase 2 protein and activity initially, coupled with decreased ratios of reduced/oxidized glutathione and lower glutathione peroxidase activity. De novo glutathione synthesis, to restore redox balance in aged ischemic wounds, was initiated as evidenced by increased glutamate cysteine ligase. Results demonstrate deficiencies in two antioxidant pathways in aged rats that become exaggerated in ischemic tissue, culminating in profoundly impaired wound healing and prolonged inflammation.

  14. News Analytics for Financial Decision Support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Milea (Viorel)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThis PhD thesis contributes to the newly emerged, growing body of scientific work on the use of News Analytics in Finance. Regarded as the next significant development in Automated Trading, News Analytics extends trading algorithms to incorporate information extracted from textual

  15. Are news media substitutes? Gratifications, contents, and uses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wurff, R.

    2011-01-01

    Internet is generally expected to have one of two effects on traditional news media: It displaces them, or it forces them into distinct market niches. A shared assumption underlying both expectations is that news media displacement, or substitution, is a function of the degree to which news media

  16. Nuclear Malaysia in the news 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear was a term that always misunderstood by public as a terrifying term. Nuclear activities around Malaysia were disseminated in newspaper and Malaysian Nuclear Agency as a responsible agency were collecting that news and compiled them. The purpose for this compilation were to make the public aware the benefits of nuclear energy and all the activities regarding nuclear surround them. All the news about nuclear technology were collected using various type of newspaper published in Malaysia such as Utusan Malaysia, Berita Harian, Daily Express, News Straits Time, The Star, Borneo Post and others. This news was compiled according to their main topics such as energy, nuclear in agriculture, education and others. Each year one edition of this report will publish and disseminate it to the other libraries, government agencies, school and others to make the public aware the existence of nuclear activities around their countries.

  17. Nuclear Malaysia in the news 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear was a term that always misunderstood by public as a terrifying term. Nuclear activities around Malaysia were disseminated in newspaper and Malaysian Nuclear Agency as a responsible agency were collecting that news and compiled them. The purpose for this compilation were to make the public aware the benefits of nuclear energy and all the activities regarding nuclear surround them. All the news about nuclear technology were collected using various type of newspaper published in Malaysia such as Utusan Malaysia, Berita Harian, Daily Express, News Straits Time, The Star, Borneo Post and others. This news was compiled according to their main topics such as energy, nuclear in agriculture, education and others. Each year one edition of this report will publish and disseminate it to the other libraries, government agencies, school and others to make the public aware the existence of nuclear activities around their countries.

  18. Nuclear Malaysia in the news 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear was a term that always misunderstood by public as a terrifying term. Nuclear activities around Malaysia were disseminated in newspaper and Malaysian Nuclear Agency as a responsible agency were collecting that news and compiled them. The purpose for this compilation were to make the public aware the benefits of nuclear energy and all the activities regarding nuclear surround them. All the news about nuclear technology were collected using various type of newspaper published in Malaysia such as Utusan Malaysia, Berita Harian, Daily Express, News Straits Time, The Star, Borneo Post and others. This news was compiled according to their main topics such as energy, nuclear in agriculture, education and others. Each year one edition of this report will publish and disseminate it to the other libraries, government agencies, school and others to make the public aware the existence of nuclear activities around their countries.

  19. Nuclear Malaysia in the news 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear was a term that always misunderstood by public as a terrifying term. Nuclear activities around Malaysia were disseminated in newspaper and Malaysian Nuclear Agency as a responsible agency were collecting that news and compiled them. The purpose for this compilation were to make the public aware the benefits of nuclear energy and all the activities regarding nuclear surround them. All the news about nuclear technology were collected using various type of newspaper published in Malaysia such as Utusan Malaysia, Berita Harian, Daily Express, News Straits Time, The Star, Borneo Post and others. This news was compiled according to their main topics such as energy, nuclear in agriculture, education and others. Each year one edition of this report will publish and disseminate it to the other libraries, government agencies, school and others to make the public aware the existence of nuclear activities around their countries.

  20. Engaging and Disengaging with Political News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørmen, Jacob; Linaa Jensen, Jakob

    (most notably by Prior, 2007; Stromback, Djerf-Pierre, & Shehata, 2012) that this development also can lead to an increase in the number of people who utilize this enhanced media choice to skip news altogether. One area that merits special attention in this context is political news. Critical engagement......, 1992) and 'performance of identity' (Madianou, 2009) that take place throughout people's everyday life. To further understand these processes it is important to attend to how users engage – or disengage – with political news. To do this we present a typology of news users based on an exploratory...... and conversing face-to-face) that users engage in for political discussion, and compare these across demographics as well as relevant media use patterns. The findings from the survey will be supplemented by results from a series of qualitative interviews that shed light on the motivations users have for engaging...

  1. US News Media Portrayal of Islam and Muslims: A Corpus-Assisted Critical Discourse Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaie, Mahmoud; Malmir, Bahareh

    2017-01-01

    This article exploits the synergy of critical discourse studies and Corpus Linguistics to study the pervasive representation of Islam and Muslims in an approximate 670,000-word corpus of US news media stories published between 2001 and 2015. Following collocation and concordance analysis of the most frequent topics or categories which revolve…

  2. The effects of psychological interventions on wound healing: A systematic review of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Hayley; Norton, Sam; Jarrett, Paul; Broadbent, Elizabeth

    2017-11-01

    Psychological stress has been shown to delay wound healing. Several trials have investigated whether psychological interventions can improve wound healing, but to date, this evidence base has not been systematically synthesized. The objective was to conduct a systematic review of randomized controlled trials in humans investigating whether psychological interventions can enhance wound healing. A systematic review was performed using PsychINFO, CINAHL, Web of Science, and MEDLINE. The searches included all papers published in English up until September 2016. The reference lists of relevant papers were screened manually to identify further review articles or relevant studies. Nineteen studies met inclusion criteria and were included in the review. Fifteen of nineteen studies were of high methodological quality. Six studies were conducted with acute experimentally created wounds, five studies with surgical patients, two studies with burn wounds, two studies with fracture wounds, and four studies were conducted with ulcer wounds. Post-intervention standardized mean differences (SMD) between groups across all intervention types ranged from 0.13 to 3.21, favouring improved healing, particularly for surgical patients and for relaxation interventions. However, there was some evidence for publication bias suggesting negative studies may not have been reported. Due to the heterogeneity of wound types, population types, and intervention types, it is difficult to pool effect sizes across studies. Current evidence suggests that psychological interventions may aid wound healing. Although promising, more research is needed to assess the efficacy of each intervention on different wound types. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Psychological stress negatively affects wound healing. A number of studies have investigated whether psychological interventions can improve healing. However, no systematic reviews have been conducted. What does this study add

  3. Wound repair and anti-inflammatory potential of Lonicera japonica in excision wound-induced rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Cheng; Liou, Shorong-Shii; Tzeng, Thing-Fong; Lee, Shiow-Ling; Liu, I-Min

    2012-11-23

    Lonicera japonica Thunb. (Caprifoliaceae), a widely used traditional Chinese medicinal plant, is used to treat some infectious diseases and it may have uses as a healthy food and applications in cosmetics and as an ornamental groundcover. The ethanol extract of the flowering aerial parts of L. japonica (LJEE) was investigated for its healing efficiency in a rat excision wound model. Excision wounds were inflicted upon three groups of eight rats each. Healing was assessed by the rate of wound contraction in skin wound sites in rats treated with simple ointment base, 10% (w/w) LJEE ointment, or the reference standard drug, 0.2% (w/w) nitrofurazone ointment. The effects of LJEE on the contents of hydroxyproline and hexosamine during healing were estimated. The antimicrobial activity of LJEE against microorganisms was also assessed. The in vivo anti-inflammatory activity of LJEE was investigated to understand the mechanism of wound healing. LJEE exhibited significant antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Candida albicans, and Candida tropicalis. The ointment formulation prepared with 10% (w/w) LJEE exhibited potent wound healing capacity as evidenced by the wound contraction in the excision wound model. The contents of hydroxyproline and hexosamine also correlated with the observed healing pattern. These findings were supported by the histopathological characteristics of healed wound sections, as greater tissue regeneration, more fibroblasts, and angiogenesis were observed in the 10% (w/w) LJEE ointment-treated group. The results also indicated that LJEE possesses potent anti-inflammatory activity, as it enhanced the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines that suppress proinflammatory cytokine production. The results suggest that the antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities of LJEE act synergistically to accelerate wound repair.

  4. Trends in news coverage about skin cancer prevention, 1993-2006: increasingly mixed messages for the public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Maree; Wakefield, Melanie; Dixon, Helen

    2008-10-01

    To provide a comprehensive overview of trends in news coverage about sun protection issues in an Australian setting over a 14-year period. A content analysis was performed on all relevant articles (N=547) published in two major daily newspapers, The Age and the Herald Sun, from 1993 to 2006. Articles were coded for article type, prominence, theme, spokesperson, topic slant and opinion slant. The most frequent themes were the health effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure (24% of articles), education/prevention (14%) and product issues (12%). Themes that became more dominant over time were vitamin D issues, solaria issues and fake tans. Sixty per cent of articles included a pro-sun protection spokesperson and 12% an anti-sun protection spokesperson, with the profile of anti-sun protection spokespeople increasing over time. Half the articles reported on topics positive for sun protection, whereas 18% reported on negative topics; however, this difference narrowed considerably from 2001 onwards. In opinionated articles, the opinions expressed by authors were mainly positive (57%) rather than negative (7%) for sun protection. The findings suggest that the mix of sun protection issues covered and views of sun protection have changed over time, resulting in greater coverage of controversies and issues not necessarily positive for sun protection objectives. These findings imply that evaluation of paid skin cancer prevention public education campaigns may need to take account of the changing news media environment in which they take place.

  5. Combat Wound Initiative program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojadinovic, Alexander; Elster, Eric; Potter, Benjamin K; Davis, Thomas A; Tadaki, Doug K; Brown, Trevor S; Ahlers, Stephen; Attinger, Christopher E; Andersen, Romney C; Burris, David; Centeno, Jose; Champion, Hunter; Crumbley, David R; Denobile, John; Duga, Michael; Dunne, James R; Eberhardt, John; Ennis, William J; Forsberg, Jonathan A; Hawksworth, Jason; Helling, Thomas S; Lazarus, Gerald S; Milner, Stephen M; Mullick, Florabel G; Owner, Christopher R; Pasquina, Paul F; Patel, Chirag R; Peoples, George E; Nissan, Aviram; Ring, Michael; Sandberg, Glenn D; Schaden, Wolfgang; Schultz, Gregory S; Scofield, Tom; Shawen, Scott B; Sheppard, Forest R; Stannard, James P; Weina, Peter J; Zenilman, Jonathan M

    2010-07-01

    The Combat Wound Initiative (CWI) program is a collaborative, multidisciplinary, and interservice public-private partnership that provides personalized, state-of-the-art, and complex wound care via targeted clinical and translational research. The CWI uses a bench-to-bedside approach to translational research, including the rapid development of a human extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) study in complex wounds after establishing the potential efficacy, biologic mechanisms, and safety of this treatment modality in a murine model. Additional clinical trials include the prospective use of clinical data, serum and wound biomarkers, and wound gene expression profiles to predict wound healing/failure and additional clinical patient outcomes following combat-related trauma. These clinical research data are analyzed using machine-based learning algorithms to develop predictive treatment models to guide clinical decision-making. Future CWI directions include additional clinical trials and study centers and the refinement and deployment of our genetically driven, personalized medicine initiative to provide patient-specific care across multiple medical disciplines, with an emphasis on combat casualty care.

  6. Wound Healing in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Lisa J; Fulton, Ana Tuya

    2016-02-01

    Impaired wound healing in the elderly represents a major clinical problem that is growing as our population ages. Wound healing is affected by age and by co-morbid conditions, particularly diabetes and obesity. This is particularly important in Rhode Island as the state has a very high percentage of vulnerable older adults. A multi- disciplinary approach that incorporates the skills of a comprehensive wound center with specialized nursing, geriatric medicine and palliative care will facilitate rapid wound healing, reduce costs and improve outcomes for our older adults that suffer from 'problem wounds'.

  7. Fake News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Linda

    2017-01-01

    In a politically and digitally polarized environment, identifying and evaluating fake news is more difficult than ever before. Librarians who have been teaching information and media literacy skills for decades understand the role we can and must play in this environment.

  8. Apitherapeutics and phage-loaded nanofibers as wound dressings with enhanced wound healing and antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarhan, Wessam A; Azzazy, Hassan Me

    2017-09-01

    Develop green wound dressings which exhibit enhanced wound-healing ability and potent antibacterial effects. Honey, polyvinyl alcohol, chitosan nanofibers were electrospun and loaded with bee venom, propolis and/or bacteriophage against the multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and examined for their antibacterial, wound-healing ability and cytotoxicity. Among different formulations of nanofibers, honey, polyvinyl alcohol, chitosan-bee venom/bacteriophage exhibited the most potent antibacterial activity against all tested bacterial strains (Gram-positive and -negative strains) and achieved nearly complete killing of multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa. In vivo testing revealed enhanced wound-healing results and cytotoxicity testing proved improved biocompatibility. The developed biocompatible nanofibers represent competitive wound-healing dressings with potent antibacterial and wound-healing activity.

  9. The management of perineal wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh k Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of perineal wounds can be very frustrating as these invariably get contaminated from the ano-genital tracts. Moreover, the apparent skin defect may be associated with a significant three dimensional dead space in the pelvic region. Such wounds are likely to become chronic and recalcitrant if appropriate wound management is not instituted in a timely manner. These wounds usually result after tumor excision, following trauma or as a result of infective pathologies like hideradenitis suppurativa or following thermal burns. Many options are available for management of perineal wounds and these have been discussed with illustrative case examples. A review of literature has been done for listing commonly instituted options for management of the wounds in perineum.

  10. The Softening of Journalistic Political Communication: A Comprehensive Framework Model of Sensationalism, Soft News, Infotainment, and Tabloidization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, L.; Glogger, I.; Boukes, M.

    Despite the scholarly popularity of important developments of political communication, concepts like soft news or infotainment lack conceptual clarity. This article tackles that problem and introduces a multilevel framework model of softening of journalistic political communication, which shows that

  11. News analytics for financial decision support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milea, D.V.

    2013-01-01

    This PhD thesis contributes to the newly emerged, growing body of scientific work on the use of News Analytics in Finance. Regarded as the next significant development in Automated Trading, News Analytics extends trading algorithms to incorporate information extracted from textual messages, by

  12. Negative pressure wound therapy via vacuum-assisted closure following partial foot amputation: what is the role of wound chronicity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, David G; Lavery, Lawrence A; Boulton, Andrew J M

    2007-03-01

    Randomised clinical trials (RCTs) to evaluate diabetic foot wound therapies have systematically eliminated large acute wounds from evaluation, focusing only on smaller chronic wounds. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the proportion and rate of wound healing in acute and chronic wounds after partial foot amputation in individuals with diabetes treated with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) delivered by the vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) device or with standard wound therapy (SWT). This study constitutes a secondary analysis of patients enrolled in a 16-week RCT of NPWT: 162 open foot amputation wounds (mean wound size = 20.7 cm(2)) were included. Acute wounds were defined as the wounds less than 30 days after amputation, whereas chronic wounds as the wounds greater than 30 days. Inclusion criteria consisted of individuals older than 18 years, presence of a diabetic foot amputation wound up to the transmetatarsal level and adequate perfusion. Wound size and healing were confirmed by independent, blinded wound evaluators. Analyses were done on an intent-to-treat basis. There was a significantly higher proportion of acute wounds (SWT = 59; NPWT = 63) than chronic wounds (SWT = 26; NPWT = 14), evaluated in this clinical trial (P = 0.001). There was no significant difference in the proportion of acute and chronic wounds achieving complete wound closure in either treatment group. Despite this finding, the Kaplan-Meier curves demonstrated statistically significantly faster healing in the NPWT group in both acute (P = 0.030) and chronic wounds (P = 0.033). Among the patients treated with NPWT via the VAC, there was not a significant difference in healing as a function of chronicity. In both the acute and the chronic wound groups, results for patients treated with NPWT were superior to those for the patients treated with SWT. These results appear to indicate that wound duration should not deter the clinician from using this modality to treat complex wounds.

  13. The use of negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of infected wounds. Case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel de Alcântara Jones

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results and benefits obtained from the topical use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT in patients with infected wounds. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of 20 patients (17 males and three females, mean age 42 years with infected wounds treated using NPWT. The infected wounds were caused by trauma. The treatment system used was VAC.(r (Vacuum Assisted Closure, KCI, San Antonio, United States applied to the wound in continuous mode from 100 to 125 mmHg. The parameters related to the wounds (location, number of VAC changes, the size of the defects in the soft parts, and the evolution of the state of the wound, length of hospital stay, length of intravenous antibiotic therapy, and complications related to the use of this therapy were evaluated. RESULTS: The mean length of the hospital stay, use of NPWT, and antibacterial therapy were 41 days, 22.5 days, and 20 days respectively. The use of the VAC led to a mean reduction of 29% in the wound area (95.65-68.1 cm2; p < 0.05. Only one patient did not show any improvement in the final appearance of the wound with complete eradication of the infection. No complication directly caused by NPWT was observed. CONCLUSION: NPWT stimulates infection-free scar tissue formation in a short time, and is a quick and comfortable alternative to conventional infected wounds treatment methods.

  14. Local television news reporting of kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffery, Jonathan B; Jacobson, Lynn M; Goldstein, Kenneth M; Pribble, James M

    2006-12-01

    Local television is the primary news source for the majority of Americans. This study aims to describe how local news reports on kidney disease. Using our searchable database of health-related late local news segments from 2002, we identified stories with the key words kidney, hypertension, blood pressure, or diabetes. This database is a representative sample of the late local news on 122 stations in the 50 largest US media markets, comprising 60% of the population. The content of each identified story was reviewed to determine whether it mentioned: (1) chronic kidney disease (CKD), (2) screening for kidney disease, or (3) kidney disease as a potential complication (for blood pressure- or diabetes-related stories). Only 2 of 1,799 database news stories (0.11%) included "kidney" as a summary key word; neither referred to CKD, screening, or complications of other diseases. Of 19 stories about hypertension or blood pressure (1.06% of all stories) and the 14 stories about diabetes (0.78% of all stories), none mentioned these criteria. Despite efforts to increase public awareness of and screening for CKD, local television news (the most important news source for a majority of Americans) did little to help achieve these goals. Further work will be needed to confirm whether this paucity of coverage varies over time and determine why so little attention is given to CKD. Educating physicians and public relations personnel who advocate for kidney disease about journalists' needs may be an important step to help advance public awareness of CKD.

  15. Is the future of meat palatable? Perceptions of in vitro meat as evidenced by online news comments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laestadius, Linnea I; Caldwell, Mark A

    2015-09-01

    To understand current public perceptions of in vitro meat (IVM) in light of its potential to be a more environmentally sustainable alternative to conventional meat. A qualitative content analysis of the comments made on online news articles highlighting the development of IVM and the world's first IVM hamburger in August 2013. News article comment sections across seven US-based online news sources (The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, Cable News Network and National Public Radio). Four hundred and sixty-two commenters who made eight hundred and fourteen publicly available online comments addressing IVM. Key themes in commenter perceptions of IVM included environmental and public health benefits, but also negative themes such as IVM's status as an unnatural and unappealing food. Overall, the tone of comments was more negative than positive. Findings suggest that while the environmental and public health motivations for developing and in turn consuming IVM resonate with some segments of the population, others find that reasoning both uncompelling and problematic. Concerns about IVM as an unnatural and risky product also appear to be a significant barrier to public acceptance of IVM. Supporters of IVM may wish to begin to develop a regulatory strategy for IVM to build public trust and explore messaging strategies that cast IVM as a new technology with benefits to individuals rather than primarily a solution to global challenges. Those in the public health nutrition field can make an important contribution to the emerging public discussion about IVM.

  16. The Role of Iron in the Skin & Cutaneous Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine Anne Wright

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this review article we discuss current knowledge about iron in the skin and the cutaneous wound healing process. Iron plays a key role in both oxidative stress and photo-induced skin damage. The main causes of oxidative stress in the skin include reactive oxygen species (ROS generated in the skin by ultraviolet (UVA 320-400 nm portion of the ultraviolet spectrum and biologically available iron. We also discuss the relationships between iron deficiency, anaemia and cutaneous wound healing. Studies looking at this fall into two distinct groups. Early studies investigated the effect of anaemia on wound healing using a variety of experimental methodology to establish anaemia or iron deficiency and focused on wound-strength rather than effect on macroscopic healing or re-epithelialisation. More recent animal studies have investigated novel treatments aimed at correcting the effects of systemic iron deficiency and localised iron overload. Iron overload is associated with local cutaneous iron deposition, which has numerous deleterious effects in chronic venous disease and hereditary haemochromatosis. Iron plays a key role in chronic ulceration and conditions such as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA and Lupus Erythematosus are associated with both anaemia of chronic disease and dysregulation of local cutaneous iron haemostasis. Iron is a potential therapeutic target in the skin by application of topical iron chelators and novel pharmacological agents, and in delayed cutaneous wound healing by treatment of iron deficiency or underlying systemic inflammation.

  17. 17 CFR 242.505 - Exclusion for news media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exclusion for news media. 242...-Analyst Certification § 242.505 Exclusion for news media. No provision of this Regulation AC shall apply to any person who: (a) Is the publisher of any bona fide newspaper, news magazine or business or...

  18. A Functional Conceptualization of Understanding Science in the News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Megan M.

    The idea that the public should have the capacity for understanding science in the news has been embraced by scientists, educators, and policymakers alike. An oft-cited goal of contemporary science education, in fact, is to enhance students' understanding of science in the news. But what exactly does it mean to understand science in the news? Surprisingly few have asked this question, or considered the significance of its answer. This dissertation steps away from issues of science teaching and learning to examine the nature of understanding science in the news itself. My work consolidates past scholarship from the multiple fields concerned with the relationship between science and society to produce a theoretical model of understanding science in the news as a complex, multidimensional process that involves an understanding of science as well as journalism. This thesis begins by exploring the relationship between the understanding implicit in understanding science in the news and understanding science. Many assume these two ways of knowing are one in the same. To rebut this assumption, I examine the types of knowledge necessary for understanding science and understanding science in the news. I then use the literature devoted to scientific literacy to show how past research has imagined the knowledge necessary to understand science in the news. Next, I argue that one of the principle difficulties with these conceptualizations is that they define science in the news in essentially the same terms as science. They also, I suggest, oversimplify how and why public interacts with science in the news. This dissertation concludes with a proposal for one way we might think about understanding science in the news on its own terms rather than those of understanding science. This dissertation attempts to connect two fields of research that rarely intersect, despite their multiple common interests: science education and mass communication. It considers the notion of

  19. Subprime Loans and Fake News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella

    2017-01-01

    Could the market fundamentalism that ruled the pre-crisis financial markets of the 2000s hold lessons for how we should approach the unregulated information and news market in the digital age?......Could the market fundamentalism that ruled the pre-crisis financial markets of the 2000s hold lessons for how we should approach the unregulated information and news market in the digital age?...

  20. Lower limb revascularisation preceding surgical wound coverage - an interdisciplinary algorithm for chronic wound closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aust, M C; Spies, M; Guggenheim, M; Gohritz, A; Kall, S; Rosenthal, H; Pichlmaier, M; Oehlert, G; Vogt, P M

    2008-08-01

    Chronic wounds may occur or persist due to arterial insufficiency. Despite the high prevalence of arterial occlusive disease, a search of the literature has yielded a paucity of data on the benefit of interventions to recanalise lower extremity arteries prior to surgical closure of chronic wounds. To investigate the correlation of simple clinical examinations and apparative diagnostics for the detection of arterial occlusive disease of the lower extremity in patients with chronic wounds, and to evaluate the benefit of vascular procedures to optimise wound perfusion before surgical closure. During a 6-year period, 150 patients with chronic lower extremity wounds (no healing for more than 30 days) were included into this prospective study. All patients underwent palpation of foot pulses, Doppler sonography and measurement of occlusive pressures. Positive clinical findings were re-evaluated by angiography. All patients with peripheral extremity vessel occlusions underwent vascular interventions (percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with stenting, open thrombectomy or vascular bypass surgery) prior to surgical wound closure. In all 34 patients (21%) with missing foot pulses, suspicious Doppler signals or pathological occlusive pressure measurements, the clinical diagnosis of arterial occlusion was confirmed by angiography. An arterial pathology had previously been diagnosed in merely two of those patients. Nineteen patients underwent percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and 21 stents were implanted; in 10 cases, open thrombectomy or vascular bypasses were performed. In all 34 patients, sufficient peripheral recanalisation and improved wound perfusion were successfully achieved. For definitive wound closure, microsurgical tissue transplantation was performed in 15 patients. Angiography was performed prior to surgery. In 11 patients, regional or local flaps were used. Six patients received split skin grafting only; two wounds healed conservatively following vascular

  1. Wound Healing Effects of Rose Placenta in a Mouse Model of Full-Thickness Wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Woo Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundRosa damascena, a type of herb, has been used for wound healing in Eastern folk medicine. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of rose placenta from R. damascena in a full-thickness wound model in mice.MethodsSixty six-week-old C57BL/6N mice were used. Full-thickness wounds were made with an 8-mm diameter punch. Two wounds were made on each side of the back, and wounds were assigned randomly to the control and experimental groups. Rose placenta (250 µg was injected in the experimental group, and normal saline was injected in the control group. Wound sizes were measured with digital photography, and specimens were harvested. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to assess the expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1, and CD31. Vessel density was measured. Quantitative analysis using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for EGF was performed. All evaluations were performed on postoperative days 0, 2, 4, 7, and 10. Statistical analyses were performed using the paired t-test.Results On days 4, 7, and 10, the wounds treated with rose placenta were significantly smaller. On day 2, VEGF and EGF expression increased in the experimental group. On days 7 and 10, TGF-β1 expression decreased in the experimental group. On day 10, vessel density increased in the experimental group. The increase in EGF on day 2 was confirmed with ELISA.ConclusionsRose placenta was found to be associated with improved wound healing in a mouse full-thickness wound model via increased EGF release. Rose placenta may potentially be a novel drug candidate for enhancing wound healing.

  2. Validation of a laser-assisted wound measurement device in a wound healing model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantine, Ryan S; Bills, Jessica D; Lavery, Lawrence A; Davis, Kathryn E

    2016-10-01

    In the treatment and monitoring of a diabetic or chronic wound, accurate and repeatable measurement of the wound provides indispensable data for the patient's medical record. This study aims to measure the accuracy of the laser-assisted wound measurement (LAWM) device against traditional methods in the measurement of area, depth and volume. We measured four 'healing' wounds in a Play-Doh(®) -based model over five subsequent states of wound healing progression in which the model was irregularly filled in to replicate the healing process. We evaluated the LAWM device against traditional methods including digital photograph assessment with National Institutes of Health ImageJ software, measurements of depth with a ruler and weight-to-volume assessment with dental paste. Statistical analyses included analysis of variance (ANOVA) and paired t-tests. We demonstrate that there are significantly different and nearly statistically significant differences between traditional ruler depth measurement and LAWM device measurement, but there are no statistically significant differences in area measurement. Volume measurements were found to be significantly different in two of the wounds. Rate of percentage change was analysed for volume and depth in the wound healing model, and the LAWM device was not significantly different than the traditional measurement technique. While occasionally inaccurate in its absolute measurement, the LAWM device is a useful tool in the clinician's arsenal as it reliably measures rate of percentage change in depth and volume and offers a potentially aseptic alternative to traditional measurement techniques. © 2014 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2014 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Predicting complex acute wound healing in patients from a wound expertise centre registry: a prognostic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ubbink, Dirk T.; Lindeboom, Robert; Eskes, Anne M.; Brull, Huub; Legemate, Dink A.; Vermeulen, Hester

    2015-01-01

    It is important for caregivers and patients to know which wounds are at risk of prolonged wound healing to enable timely communication and treatment. Available prognostic models predict wound healing in chronic ulcers, but not in acute wounds, that is, originating after trauma or surgery. We

  4. Predicting complex acute wound healing in patients from a wound expertise centre registry : a prognostic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ubbink, Dirk T; Lindeboom, Robert; Eskes, Anne M; Brull, Huub; Legemate, Dink A; Vermeulen, Hester

    2015-01-01

    It is important for caregivers and patients to know which wounds are at risk of prolonged wound healing to enable timely communication and treatment. Available prognostic models predict wound healing in chronic ulcers, but not in acute wounds, that is, originating after trauma or surgery. We

  5. Public health news frames in North Carolina newspaper coverage of the 100% Tobacco-Free Schools campaign? Sometimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Suzanne DePalma; Sutton, Sonya F; Mebane, Felicia E

    2006-01-01

    News organizations are an important and influential part of the social environment. They identify certain issues by the extent and nature of their coverage. To help explain what public health policy messages may have influenced school policy decisions, this content analysis provides an examination of newspaper coverage of North Carolinas 100% tobacco-free schools campaign. Researchers searched LexisNexis for articles published in North Carolina newspapers between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2004 that included variations of "North Carolina tobacco-free schools." Researchers then conducted a descriptive analysis of 138 stories from nine North Carolina newspapers (approximately 4% of all the states newspapers) and used page placement and story type to examine the level of importance placed on the issue. Finally, frames for and against tobacco-free school policies were tracked, along with the presence of key messages presented by 100% TFS advocates. The volume of news coverage changed throughout the study period, with peaks and valleys closely associated with external "trigger" events. In addition, a majority of the newspaper articles did not include key public health messages. The results suggest an opportunity for public health experts and officials to work more effectively with local journalists to increase the use (and impact) of public health messages in news coverage of tobacco policies affecting youth.

  6. The Effect of the Online News on Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eda DİŞLİ BAYRAKTAR

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the technological developments, people are able to quickly reach the information and the news about destinations where they have planned to go on their holidays. Online news websites are important and reliable tools which deliver up-to-date information about a destination to broad masses. It is indisputable that the media is a significant influence on public awareness, tourist purchase decision, destination image and tourist behavior. A tourist who chooses a holiday destination decides among countless destinations according to the information he receives from various sources. Therefore, in this study, the news in the two foreign online news sites are interpreted according to the touristic arrival statistics from the Ministry of Culture and Tourism. The two countries to be included in the study, Germany and England, were selected among the countries that sent the most tourists to Turkey. In these countries, news web sites with the highest number of daily visitors were determined and the news related to Turkey in the 7 years period between 2010 and 2016 were analyzed by content analysis.

  7. Sinonasal Epithelial Wound Resealing in an In Vitro Model: Inhibition of Wound Closure with IL-4 Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sarah K.; Den Beste, Kyle A.; Hoddeson, Elizabeth K.; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2013-01-01

    Background Prolonged healing and persistent inflammation following surgery for rhinosinusitis impacts patient satisfaction and healthcare resources. Cytokines interleukin (IL)-4, 5, and 13 are important mediators in Th2 inflammatory rhinosinusitis. Decreased wound healing has been demonstrated with Th2 cytokine exposure, but this has not been extensively studied in sinonasal epithelium. We hypothesized that in vitro exposure of primary sinonasal epithelial cell cultures to Th2 inflammatory cytokine IL-4 and IL-13 would impair wound resealing and decrease expression of annexin A2 at the wound edge. Methods Following 24-hour exposure to IL-4, 5, or 13 versus controls, sterile linear mechanical wounds were created in primary sinonasal epithelial cultures (n = 12 wounds per condition). Wounds were followed for 36 hours or until complete closure and residual wound areas were calculated by image analysis. Group differences in annexin A2 were assessed by immunofluorescence labeling, confocal microscopy, and Western blots. Results Significant wound closure differences were identified across cytokine exposure groups (pprotein levels were decreased in IL-4 treated wounds when compared to control wounds (p<0.01). Conclusions Th2 cytokine IL-4 decreases sinonasal epithelial wound closure in vitro. Annexin A2 is also diminished with IL-4 exposure. This supports the hypothesis that IL-4 exposure impairs sinonasal epithelial wound healing and may contribute to prolonged healing in Th2 inflammatory rhinosinusitis. PMID:23468432

  8. Clinical challenges of chronic wounds: searching for an optimal animal model to recapitulate their complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Nunan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The efficient healing of a skin wound is something that most of us take for granted but is essential for surviving day-to-day knocks and cuts, and is absolutely relied on clinically whenever a patient receives surgical intervention. However, the management of a chronic wound – defined as a barrier defect that has not healed in 3 months – has become a major therapeutic challenge throughout the Western world, and it is a problem that will only escalate with the increasing incidence of conditions that impede wound healing, such as diabetes, obesity and vascular disorders. Despite being clinically and molecularly heterogeneous, all chronic wounds are generally assigned to one of three major clinical categories: leg ulcers, diabetic foot ulcers or pressure ulcers. Although we have gleaned much knowledge about the fundamental cellular and molecular mechanisms that underpin healthy, acute wound healing from various animal models, we have learned much less about chronic wound repair pathology from these models. This might largely be because the animal models being used in this field of research have failed to recapitulate the clinical features of chronic wounds. In this Clinical Puzzle article, we discuss the clinical complexity of chronic wounds and describe the best currently available models for investigating chronic wound pathology. We also assess how such models could be optimised to become more useful tools for uncovering pathological mechanisms and potential therapeutic treatments.

  9. In vivo performance of chitosan/soy-based membranes as wound-dressing devices for acute skin wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Tírcia C; Höring, Bernhard; Reise, Kathrin; Marques, Alexandra P; Silva, Simone S; Oliveira, Joaquim M; Mano, João F; Castro, António G; Reis, Rui L; van Griensven, Martijn

    2013-04-01

    Wound management represents a major clinical challenge on what concerns healing enhancement and pain control. The selection of an appropriate dressing plays an important role in both recovery and esthetic appearance of the regenerated tissue. Despite the wide range of available dressings, the progress in the wound care market relies on the increasing interest in using natural-based biomedical products. Herein, a rat wound-dressing model of partial-thickness skin wounds was used to study newly developed chitosan/soy (cht/soy)-based membranes as wound-dressing materials. Healing and repair of nondressed, cht/soy membrane-dressed, and Epigard(®)-dressed wounds were followed macroscopically and histologically for 1 and 2 weeks. cht/soy membranes performed better than the controls, promoting a faster wound repair. Re-epithelialization, observed 1 week after wounding, was followed by cornification of the outermost epidermal layer at the second week of dressing, indicating repair of the wounded tissue. The use of this rodent model, although in impaired healing conditions, may enclose some drawbacks regarding the inevitable wound contraction. Moreover, being the main purpose the evaluation of cht/soy-based membranes' performance in the absence of growth factors, the choice of a clinically relevant positive control was limited to a polymeric mesh, without any growth factor influencing skin healing/repair, Epigard. These new cht/soy membranes possess the desired features regarding healing/repair stimulation, ease of handling, and final esthetic appearance-thus, valuable properties for wound dressings.

  10. Television News Uses: A Cross-National Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Mark R.

    1978-01-01

    Reports that a classification of television news uses and gratifications based on research in Leeds, England, did not adequately encompass the functions of television news for a United States audience. (GW)

  11. articles32.htm | sep25 | currsci | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; currsci; sep25; articles32.htm. 404! error. The page your are looking for can not be found! Please check the link or use the navigation bar at the top. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year meeting of the Academy will be ...

  12. articles16.htm | jul10 | currsci | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; currsci; jul10; articles16.htm. 404! error. The page your are looking for can not be found! Please check the link or use the navigation bar at the top. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year meeting of the Academy will be held ...

  13. Top News Events of 1973 Ranked for Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdin, Joel L.

    This document presents a listing of those news events for 1973 that are thought by the author to have the most immediate or potential significance for educators. It is noted that the selections were made primarily from the "Washington Post,""Washington Star-News,""New York Times," and weekly news magazines. The events, ranked in order of present…

  14. For Video Games, Bad News Is Good News: News Reporting of Violent Video Game Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copenhaver, Allen; Mitrofan, Oana; Ferguson, Christopher J

    2017-12-01

    News coverage of video game violence studies has been critiqued for focusing mainly on studies supporting negative effects and failing to report studies that did not find evidence for such effects. These concerns were tested in a sample of 68 published studies using child and adolescent samples. Contrary to our hypotheses, study effect size was not a predictor of either newspaper coverage or publication in journals with a high-impact factor. However, a relationship between poorer study quality and newspaper coverage approached significance. High-impact journals were not found to publish studies with higher quality. Poorer quality studies, which tended to highlight negative findings, also received more citations in scholarly sources. Our findings suggest that negative effects of violent video games exposure in children and adolescents, rather than large effect size or high methodological quality, increase the likelihood of a study being cited in other academic publications and subsequently receiving news media coverage.

  15. [The results of delivering surgical care to the wounded and sick in military medical establishments and impending tasks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briusov, P G; Efimenko, N A

    1997-07-01

    In article results of activity of the military surgeons on rendering of the surgical care to wounded and sick in 1996 are analyzed. During combat actions in Chechnya despite of severe forms of wounds and significant increase of combined battle traumas lethality among heavy wounded was reduced in 2 times. At common lethality rate in 1.3%, in hospitals from wounds 1.5% of wounded died, from traumas--0.7%, burns--2.9%, frostbitten--0.5%. As to peace time surgery, the analysis of main parameters of surgical work in military medical establishments, structure of diseases of servicemen, surgical activity, average terms of treatment, lethality after operations, defects in rendering of the surgical care is given. In conclusions the authors say about problems, that the military surgeons have today.

  16. Aloe vera and Vitis vinifera improve wound healing in an in vivo rat burn wound model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li-Xin; Wang, Peng; Wang, Yu-Ting; Huang, Yong; Jiang, Lei; Wang, Xue-Ming

    2016-02-01

    Aloe vera and Vitis vinifera have been traditionally used as wound healing agents. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of aloe emodin and resveratrol in the burn wound healing procedure. Burn wounds are common in developed and developing countries, however, in developing countries, the incidence of severe complications is higher and financial resources are limited. The results of the present study demonstrated that neither aloe emodin or resveratrol were cytotoxic to THP-1 macrophages at concentrations of 1, 100 and 500 ng/ml. A significant increase in wound-healing activity was observed in mice treated with the aloe emodin and resveratrol, compared with those which received control treatments. The levels of IL-1β in the exudates of the burn wound area of the treated mice increased in a time-dependent manner over 7 days following burn wound injury. At 10 days post-injury, steady and progressive wound healing was observed in the control animals. The present study confirmed that increased wound healing occurs following treatment with aloe emodin,, compared with resveratrol, providing support for the use of Aloe vera plants to improve burn wound healing.

  17. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Maxillofacial Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J. Mellott

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Negative pressure wound therapy has greatly advanced the field of wound healing for nearly two decades, by providing a robust surgical adjunct technique for accelerating wound closure in acute and chronic wounds. However, the application of negative pressure wound therapy in maxillofacial applications has been relatively under utilized as a result of the physical articulations and contours of the head and neck that make it challenging to obtain an airtight seal for different negative pressure wound therapy systems. Adapting negative pressure wound therapies for maxillofacial applications could yield significant enhancement of wound closure in maxillofacial applications. The current review summarizes the basic science underlying negative pressure wound therapy, as well as specific maxillofacial procedures that could benefit from negative pressure wound therapy.

  18. Traditional Therapies for Skin Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Rúben F; Bártolo, Paulo J

    2016-05-01

    Significance: The regeneration of healthy and functional skin remains a huge challenge due to its multilayer structure and the presence of different cell types within the extracellular matrix in an organized way. Despite recent advances in wound care products, traditional therapies based on natural origin compounds, such as plant extracts, honey, and larvae, are interesting alternatives. These therapies offer new possibilities for the treatment of skin diseases, enhancing the access to the healthcare, and allowing overcoming some limitations associated to the modern products and therapies, such as the high costs, the long manufacturing times, and the increase in the bacterial resistance. This article gives a general overview about the recent advances in traditional therapies for skin wound healing, focusing on the therapeutic activity, action mechanisms, and clinical trials of the most commonly used natural compounds. New insights in the combination of traditional products with modern treatments and future challenges in the field are also highlighted. Recent Advances: Natural compounds have been used in skin wound care for many years due to their therapeutic activities, including anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and cell-stimulating properties. The clinical efficacy of these compounds has been investigated through in vitro and in vivo trials using both animal models and humans. Besides the important progress regarding the development of novel extraction methods, purification procedures, quality control assessment, and treatment protocols, the exact mechanisms of action, side effects, and safety of these compounds need further research. Critical Issues: The repair of skin lesions is one of the most complex biological processes in humans, occurring throughout an orchestrated cascade of overlapping biochemical and cellular events. To stimulate the regeneration process and prevent the wound to fail the healing, traditional therapies and natural products have been used

  19. Scalp Wound Closure with K wires: An alternative easier method to scalp wound closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, S; Ajik, S

    2012-12-01

    Scalp defects and lacerations present a reconstructive challenge to plastic surgeons. Many methods have been described from the use of skin grafting to rotation flaps. Here we present a method of closure of a contaminated scalp wound with the use of Kirschner wires. In our case, closure of scalp laceration was made possible with the use of 1.4 Kirschner wires and cable tie/ zip tie fasteners. The duration to closure of wound was 10 days. In reconstructing the scalp defect, this method was found to adhere to principles of scalp reconstruction. There were no post operative complications found from the procedure. On initial application on the edge of the wound, tension applied caused the K wires to cut through the wound edge. On replacement of K wires 1cm away from wound edge the procedure was not plagued by any further complication. In conclusion we find scalp closure with Kirschner wires are a simple and effective method for scalp wound closure.

  20. Agenda-setting effects of sun-related news coverage on public attitudes and beliefs about tanning and skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Helen; Warne, Charles; Scully, Maree; Dobbinson, Suzanne; Wakefield, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    The topics and framing of news stories relevant to skin cancer prevention have shifted over time. This study examined agenda-setting effects of such news stories on public attitudes and beliefs about tanning and skin cancer. Content analysis data on 516 articles published in two major daily newspapers in Melbourne, Australia, from 1994 to 2007 were combined with circulation data to generate indices of potential news exposure. Associations between these indices and cross-sectional telephone survey data from the same period on 6,244 adults' tanning attitudes and perceived susceptibility to skin cancer were examined using logistic regression models, accounting for the temporal precedence of news content. Pro-sun protection stories on attitudes and behavior were associated with older adults not thinking a tan looks healthy. Pro-sun protection stories on solaria were associated with less preference for a deep tan among young adults who like to suntan. Stories on vitamin D that were unsupportive of or ambiguous about sun protection were associated with a number of pro-tan attitudes among younger adults. Results indicate news coverage during 1994-2007 served an important agenda-setting role in explaining the public's attitudes and beliefs about tanning and skin cancer. Vitamin D stories appeared most influential, particularly among young adults.