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Sample records for news army medical

  1. Army medical imaging system: ARMIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siedband, M.P.; Kramp, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    Recent advances of stimulable phosphor screens, data cards using optical storage means, and new personal computers with image processing capability have made possible the design of economical filmless medical imaging systems. The addition of communication links means that remote interpretation of images is also possible. The Army Medical Imaging System uses stimulable phosphor screens, digital readout, a small computer, an optical digital data card device, and a DIN/PACS link. Up to 200 images can be stored in the computer hard disk for rapid recall and reading by the radiologist. The computer permits image processing, annotation, insertion of text, and control of the system. Each device contains an image storage RAM and communicates with the computer via the small computer systems interface. Data compression is used to reduce the required storage capacity and transmission times of the 1-mB images. The credit card-size optical data cards replace film and can store 12 or more images. The data cards can be read on an independent viewer. The research is supported by the U.S. Army Biomedical Research and Development Laboratory

  2. Top medical news stories 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. Here is our list of the top seven medical news stories for 2015 with special emphasis on the Southwest. 7. Wearable health devices: A wave of wearable computing devices such as Fitbit and UP wristbands have people keeping track of how much they sit, stand, walk, climb stairs and calories they consume (1. These fitness-tracking devices herald a series of devices that will detect and monitor serious diseases. However, these so-called medical-grade wearables require approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, a regulatory hurdle avoided by the fitness-tracking devices which will likely slow their introduction. 6. Caitlyn Jenner: Caitlyn Jenner became the most famous transgender woman in the world following an interview published in Vanity Fair (2. The Vanity Fair website saw 11.6 million visits curious about the former Olympic athlete. Though Jenner publicly shared her gender identity, many transgender Americans do not-12% of gender non-conforming adults said they ...

  3. US Army Medical Research and Development Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-01

    RI) US ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT. Colonel/John Jr DTIC JUL 1 5 1980; A USL &MY MEDICAL BIOENGINEERING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT...pollutants in water or soil . Pollutant by-products and breakdown products in water, air or soil will be isolated, characterized, and quantified. Where...determination of selected low-level pollutants io soil and water. Degradation products and secondary pollutants arising from munitions manufacture or pest

  4. [Andrologic disease detected during army medical visit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campodonico, Fabio; Michelazzi, Alberto; Capurro, Anna; Carmignani, Giorgio

    2003-12-01

    Aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of andrologic diseases in young men (age 18 years) recruited for conscription in a north-western Italian region. A random sample of 1993 young men was evaluated at the Army Medical Visit Center of the Military District of Genoa. The visits were performed by the same doctor. An examination of external genitalia and secondary sex characters was made and the medical history of each conscript was recorded. Investigation procedures were standardized according to the guidelines of the WHO for the diagnosis and management of the infertile male. Andrologic disorders were found in 547 subjects (27.5%) and first diagnosed in 412 (20.7%). Specific acquired or congenital disorders are discussed. Some patients with most significant diseases were referred to the Urologic Department for second level diagnostic exams. This study underlines the role of the army medical visit as a tool for andrologic screening in young males. The military health service may be a relevant institution for postpuberal control and it could be useful to prevent future sexual and fertility problems in adult males.

  5. Army Medical Department Leaders in Military Operations Other Than War

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sadlon, Gary

    2000-01-01

    .... Likewise, the Army Medical Department (AMEDD) must insure its leaders, specifically those selected to deploy world-wide, have a more diverse skill set that enables them to fully operate within the full spectrum of scenarios...

  6. Army Medical Support for Peace Operations and Humanitarian Assistance,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    or contractors. Some coalition troops may uti - lize the theater medical system in ways it was not intended. Coalition partners’ own medical assets...agencies, and the State Depart- ment often urge the Army to expand medical services and to uti - lize any excess capacity for purposes other than the...Psychologists (new 67D). Similar concerns involved comptrollers and preventive medicine officers, field medical pharmacists , and personnel managers

  7. Science fiction/science fact: medical genetics in news stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Alan; Anderson, Alison; Allan, Stuart

    2005-12-01

    News media coverage of biotechnology issues offers a rich source of fictional portrayals, with stories drawing strongly on popular imagery and metaphors in descriptions of the powers and dangers of biotechnology. This article examines how science fiction metaphors, imagery and motifs surface in British newspaper (broadsheet and tabloid) coverage of medical genetic issues, focusing on press reporting of two recent highly publicised news media events; namely, the Hashmi and Whitaker families' plights to use stem cells from a 'perfectly matched sibling' for the treatment of their diseased children. It is concerned in particular with the extent to which journalists' use of certain literary devices encourages preferred formulations of medical genetics, and thereby potentially shapes public deliberation about scientific developments and their consequences for society. Understanding how science fiction sustains science fact, and vice versa, and how the former is portrayed in news media, it is argued, would thus seem to be crucial in the effort to understand why people respond so strongly to biotechnologies, and what they imagine their consequences to be.

  8. [On the role of army physicians in the creation of Ukrainian medical terminology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radysh, Ia F; Holyk, L A

    2002-01-01

    Tha article is devoted to the analysis of the role army surgeons had in creation of Ukrainean medical terminology. In the article, medical dictionaries are briefly analyzed, of which Ukrainean army surgeons are authors or co-authors.

  9. Media hype: Patient and scientific perspectives on misleading medical news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo, Israel; Jankovic, Joseph

    2017-09-01

    In this age of digital technology, Internet, and social media we are increasingly subjected to an information and disinformation overload. This includes not only political and economic information but also medical news, which is often presented as a "new discovery", "miracle cure" or some other press hyperbole. In this viewpoint article we present patient and scientific perspectives some recent episodes of medical hype related to Parkinson's disease research, including proposed therapies such as nilotinib, marijuana, stem cells and other controversial therapies that have attracted the mainstream and social media. We conclude by emphasizing the importance of vigilance on the part of patients and physicians when interpreting these often exaggerated and/or unfounded health claims. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  10. Implementation of the Asthma Practice Guideline in the Army Medical Department: Evaluation of Process and Effects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farley, Donna O; Cretin, Shan; Vernez, Georges; Pieklik, Suzanne; Quiter, Elaine; Ashwood, J. S; Tu, Wenli

    2005-01-01

    .... The Quality Management Directorate of the Army Medical Command (MEDCOM) contracted with RAND to work as a partner in the development and testing of guideline implementation methods for ultimate application to an Army-wide guideline program...

  11. Physician Retention in the Army Medical Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-16

    Fifteen years ago, these jobs were filled by General Medical Officers ( GMO ) -- graduates of internships who spent some time “muddying their boots” in the...field while waiting a year or two for the residency position of their choice. Today, the GMO is an endangered species. In an effort to provide the best

  12. Clinical Investigation Program (Tripler Army Medical Center)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    8217 I have learned an immense amount during this last year. Clinicians have no idea of the real world of medical research, finance, and politics. We (I...91. 10 Pfanner TP, Person DA, Berenberg JL, Lockett LJ: Eosinophilia Myalgia Syndrome: A Case Report and One Year Follow-Up. American College of ...protocol as yet. This is a non therapeutic study designed to gather epidemiologic and late effects data on long term (>Syrs) survivors of Wilms’ tumor

  13. Department of the Army Supply Bulletin, Army Medical Department Supply Information, SB8-75-S7

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    .... Army Medical Materiel Agency (USAMMA), Fort Detrick, Maryland This edition focuses on the mission and functions of the SCMD and its capability to support the "Warfighter" during a full range of contingency operations While all of...

  14. News

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-01

    Italy’s Physics Olympiad creates greater interest and motivation House of Experiments: 'humour helps in the teaching of science' Science takes stage in Germany PPARC news: guide and awards Schools newspaper competition focuses on Venus Website offers practical advice SHAP workshop will sharpen up teachers' skills Students will soon use Faulkes Telescope North to see the stars Talk takes a tour of the universe ASE 2004 Welsh physicists share secrets Switch students on to physics Teachers Awards 2004 recognize quality of teaching AAPT spends winter in Miami sun Schools Physics Group meeting will take place at Rugby School

  15. News

    OpenAIRE

    News, Transfer

    2017-01-01

      NOTICIAS / NEWS (“transfer”, 2018)  1) LIBROS – CAPÍTULOS DE LIBRO  / BOOKS – BOOK CHAPTERS 1. Bandia, Paul F. (ed.). (2017). Orality and Translation.  London: Routledge.   2. Trends in Translation and Interpretin,  Institute of Translation & Interpreting 3. Schippel, Larisa & Cornelia Zwischenberger. (eds). (2017). Going East: Discovering New and Alternative Traditions in Translation Studies. Berlin: Frank & Timme. 4.  Godayol, Pilar. (2017). Tres escritoras censuradas: Simone de Beauvoir,...

  16. Medical students' reflections on emotions concerning breaking bad news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toivonen, Asta Kristiina; Lindblom-Ylänne, Sari; Louhiala, Pekka; Pyörälä, Eeva

    2017-10-01

    To gain a deeper understanding of fourth year medical students' reflections on emotions in the context of breaking bad news (BBN). During the years 2010-2012, students reflected on their emotions concerning BBN in a learning assignment at the end of the communications skills course. The students were asked to write a description of how they felt about a BBN case. The reflections were analysed using qualitative content analysis. 351 students agreed to participate in the study. We recognized ten categories in students' reflections namely empathy, insecurity, anxiety, sadness, ambivalence, guilt, hope, frustration, gratefulness and emotional detachment. Most students expressed empathy, but there was a clear tension between feeling empathy and retaining professional distance by emotional detachment. Students experience strong and perplexing emotions during their studies, especially in challenging situations. A deeper understanding of students' emotions is valuable for supporting students' professional development and coping in their work in the future. Medical students need opportunities to reflect on emotional experiences during their education to find strategies for coping with them. Emotions should be actively discussed in studies where the issues of BBN are addressed. Teachers need education in attending emotional issues constructively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Medical students' attitudes towards breaking bad news: an empirical test of the World Health Organization model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valck, C. de; Bensing, J.; Bruynooghe, R.

    2001-01-01

    The literature regarding breaking bad news distinguishes three disclosure models: non-disclosure, full-disclosure and individualized disclosure. In this study, we investigated the relations between attitudes regarding disclosure of bad news and global professional attitudes regarding medical care in

  18. The Mobile Modular Surgical Hospital: the Army Medical Department’s Future Unit of Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-17

    requirements. Paula C. Lodi in her monogram “The Army Medical Department and Full Spectrum Operations” written for the School of Advanced Military...Center, 2004), 2.1-2.10. 14Paula C. Lodi, The Army Medical Department and Full Spectrum Operations, ( Monogram , School of Advanced Military Studies...paper in the past ten years on the level III hospital. Paula C. Lodi in her monogram “The Army Medical Department and Full Spectrum Operations” written

  19. news

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Tkacheva

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available XXIV World Congress of Architecture – UIA Tokyo 2011UIA NewsTuva Architects' SuccessRecollection of "Zodchestvo 2011""Children Are not People of Tomorrow, but Are People of Today with a Different Scale of Feelings and Experience"The 30th Anniversary of the Union of Architects of RussiaXX International Review Competition for the Best Graduation Architecturaland Design Projects (YerevanParticipation of the Design Department of National Research Irkutsk State Technical UniversityParticipation of Institute of Architecture and Construction of National Research Irkutsk State Technical UniversitySeven Years and Further on!Breathe Together!VI Special Meeting of the National Association of DesignersWhat is Good for a German… or a Russian-Style SRO2012. "Katastrofa" Festival. AdvertisementSummer Workshop of Les Ateliers of Urban Planning and Development (Cergy-Pontoise, France

  20. U.S. Army Medical Department Journal (July-September 1998)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peake, James B; Goodman, Robert L; Hillhouse, Roger H; Newsome, Steve; Reed, Lester H; Hume, Jr., Carroll R. Dotson ;Roderick F; Gussenhoven, Elisabeth; Garland, Frederick N; Still, Ron; Campbell, Kyle D; Austerman, Wayne R

    1998-01-01

    .... The "MAMC Improvement Award Program" describes the Madigan Army Medical Center's incentive program to reward organizational groups within a military hospital for improving efficiency, quality of care...

  1. Use of interactive theater and role play to develop medical students' skills in breaking bad news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skye, Eric P; Wagenschutz, Heather; Steiger, Jeffrey A; Kumagai, Arno K

    2014-12-01

    Creative arts have been increasingly implemented in medical education. This study investigated the use of interactive theater and role play with professional actors in teaching breaking bad news to medical students. The objectives were to explore the contexts, approaches, experiences, and reactions in giving and receiving bad news. Second-year medical students participated in a required educational session that utilized interactive theater which helps students learn about the issues of breaking bad news to a patient with cancer. Following the interactive theater piece, professional actors provided students role play experiences in small groups with breaking bad news. Anonymous evaluation surveys were given out to all second-year medical students at the conclusion of the breaking bad news session. Surveys contained quantitative and qualitative responses. Three years of evaluations were analyzed. A total of 451 (88 %) students completed the evaluations. Comments were thematically analyzed. Ninety-four percent agreed that the theater piece prompted reflection on patient-provider communications, and 89 % agreed that it stimulated discussion on complex issues with breaking bad news. The two most common themes in student comments concerned the importance of realism in the theater piece, and the value of experiencing multiple perspectives. Use of professional actors during the role play exercises enhances the realism and pushed the students out of their own "comfort zones" in ways that may more closely approximate real life clinical situations. Interactive theater can be a potentially powerful tool to teach breaking bad news during medical school.

  2. NREL-Developed CUBE Helps Solve Army's Refueling Challenge | News | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    (such as solar panels, batteries, and generators) into usable electricity-and swiftly switches between turbine, roll-out solar panels, batteries, and small diesel generators. When the Army requested additional in it. You connect the solar panels to it. You connect the battery to it. You connect the generator

  3. Physiological and psychological effects of delivering medical news using a simulated physician-patient scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Lorenzo; Baile, Walter F; Henninger, Evelyn; Agarwal, Sandeep K; Kudelka, Andrzej P; Lenzi, Renato; Sterner, Janet; Marshall, Gailen D

    2003-10-01

    We examined the acute stress response associated with having to deliver either bad or good medical news using a simulated physician-patient scenario. Twenty-five healthy medical students were randomly assigned to a bad medical news (BN), a good medical news (GN), or a control group that read magazines during the session. Self-report measures were obtained before and after the task. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured throughout the task period. Four blood samples were obtained across the task period. The BN and GN tasks produced significant increases in self-reported distress and cardiovascular responses compared with the control group. There was also a significant increase in natural killer cell function 10 min into the task in the BN group compared with the control group. The BN task was also somewhat more stressful than the GN task, as shown by the self-report and cardiovascular data. These findings suggest that a simulated physician-patient scenario produces an acute stress response in the "physician," with the delivery of bad medical news more stressful than the delivery of good medical news.

  4. Main communication barriers in the process of delivering bad news to oncological patients - medical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska, Paulina; Jarosz, Magdalena; Kwiecińska, Agnieszka; Bętkowska-Korpała, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Delivering bad news is a major aspect of a doctor's work. The literature most often refers to patient's expectations or needs, and methods of delivering bad news, while medical perspective is often skipped. The purpose of this paper is to examine competencies (knowledge, skills and experience) in delivering bad news by medical specialists in the areas related to the causal and symptomatic treatment of oncological patients; identification of major communication problems and obstacles in this specific situation and evaluation of teaching needs for delivering bad news. The study was performed on a group of 61 medical specialists in the areas related to the causal and symptomatic treatment of oncological patients, using a self-generated questionnaire based on other studies in the literature. Topics that are considered most demanding are: delivering news on the termination of causal treatment and preparing the patient/ close ones for death. The most difficult aspect of such discussions for the respondents was associated with the emotions manifested by the patient. On the other hand, doctors were mostly distressed by the feeling of taking the patient's hope away. The study points to the need for education of doctors in the eld of techniques for delivering bad news, particularly in the area of dealing with the emotions manifested by the patient and giving them real hope. The results encourage to conduct studies on a larger group of doctors.

  5. Causal interpretation of correlational studies - Analysis of medical news on the website of the official journal for German physicians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Buhse

    Full Text Available Media frequently draws inappropriate causal statements from observational studies. We analyzed the reporting of study results in the Medical News section of the German medical journal Deutsches Ärzteblatt (DÄ.Study design: Retrospective quantitative content analysis of randomly selected news reports and related original journal articles and press releases. A medical news report was selected if headlines comprised at least two linked variables. Two raters independently categorized the headline and text of each news report, conclusions of the abstract and full text of the related journal article, and the press release. The assessment instrument comprised five categories from 'neutral' to 'unconditionally causal'. Outcome measures: degree of matching between 1 news headlines and conclusions of the journal article, 2 headlines and text of news reports, 3 text and conclusions, and 4 headlines and press releases. We analyzed whether news headlines rated as unconditionally causal based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs.One-thousand eighty-seven medical news reports were published between April 2015 and May 2016. The final random sample comprised 176 news reports and 100 related press releases. Degree of matching: 1 45% (79/176 for news headlines and journal article conclusions, 2 55% (97/176 for headlines and text, 3 53% (93/176 for text and conclusions, and 4 41% (41/100 for headlines and press releases. Exaggerations were found in 45% (80/176 of the headlines compared to the conclusions of the related journal article. Sixty-five of 137 unconditionally causal statements of the news headlines were phrased more weakly in the subsequent news text body. Only 52 of 137 headlines (38% categorized as unconditionally causal reported RCTs.Reporting of medical news in the DÄ medical journal is misleading. Most headlines that imply causal associations were not based on RCTs. Medical journalists should follow standards of reporting scientific study results.

  6. Causal interpretation of correlational studies - Analysis of medical news on the website of the official journal for German physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhse, Susanne; Rahn, Anne Christin; Bock, Merle; Mühlhauser, Ingrid

    2018-01-01

    Media frequently draws inappropriate causal statements from observational studies. We analyzed the reporting of study results in the Medical News section of the German medical journal Deutsches Ärzteblatt (DÄ). Study design: Retrospective quantitative content analysis of randomly selected news reports and related original journal articles and press releases. A medical news report was selected if headlines comprised at least two linked variables. Two raters independently categorized the headline and text of each news report, conclusions of the abstract and full text of the related journal article, and the press release. The assessment instrument comprised five categories from 'neutral' to 'unconditionally causal'. Outcome measures: degree of matching between 1) news headlines and conclusions of the journal article, 2) headlines and text of news reports, 3) text and conclusions, and 4) headlines and press releases. We analyzed whether news headlines rated as unconditionally causal based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs). One-thousand eighty-seven medical news reports were published between April 2015 and May 2016. The final random sample comprised 176 news reports and 100 related press releases. Degree of matching: 1) 45% (79/176) for news headlines and journal article conclusions, 2) 55% (97/176) for headlines and text, 3) 53% (93/176) for text and conclusions, and 4) 41% (41/100) for headlines and press releases. Exaggerations were found in 45% (80/176) of the headlines compared to the conclusions of the related journal article. Sixty-five of 137 unconditionally causal statements of the news headlines were phrased more weakly in the subsequent news text body. Only 52 of 137 headlines (38%) categorized as unconditionally causal reported RCTs. Reporting of medical news in the DÄ medical journal is misleading. Most headlines that imply causal associations were not based on RCTs. Medical journalists should follow standards of reporting scientific study results.

  7. Unwarranted Variation in the Medical Management of Injured Civilian Workers in the U.S. Army Medical Command

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rice, William A

    2005-01-01

    ... submitted from each Army medical treatment facility (MTF). Using hierarchical multiple linear regression, these variables were tested as potential predictors of the average total cost per case of an injured civilian employee in each MTF...

  8. Measuring US Army medical evacuation: Metrics for performance improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvagno, Samuel M; Mabry, Robert L; Maddry, Joseph; Kharod, Chetan U; Walrath, Benjamin D; Powell, Elizabeth; Shackelford, Stacy

    2018-01-01

    The US Army medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) community has maintained a reputation for high levels of success in transporting casualties from the point of injury to definitive care. This work served as a demonstration project to advance a model of quality assurance surveillance and medical direction for prehospital MEDEVAC providers within the Joint Trauma System. A retrospective interrupted time series analysis using prospectively collected data was performed as a process improvement project. Records were reviewed during two distinct periods: 2009 and 2014 to 2015. MEDEVAC records were matched to outcomes data available in the Department of Defense Trauma Registry. Abstracted deidentified data were reviewed for specific outcomes, procedures, and processes of care. Descriptive statistics were applied as appropriate. A total of 1,008 patients were included in this study. Nine quality assurance metrics were assessed. These metrics were: airway management, management of hypoxemia, compliance with a blood transfusion protocol, interventions for hypotensive patients, quality of battlefield analgesia, temperature measurement and interventions, proportion of traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients with hypoxemia and/or hypotension, proportion of traumatic brain injury patients with an appropriate assessment, and proportion of missing data. Overall survival in the subset of patients with outcomes data available in the Department of Defense Trauma Registry was 97.5%. The data analyzed for this study suggest overall high compliance with established tactical combat casualty care guidelines. In the present study, nearly 7% of patients had at least one documented oxygen saturation of less than 90%, and 13% of these patients had no documentation of any intervention for hypoxemia, indicating a need for training focus on airway management for hypoxemia. Advances in battlefield analgesia continued to evolve over the period when data for this study was collected. Given the inherent high

  9. Sources and Coverage of Medical News on Front Pages of US Newspapers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, William Y. Y.; Lane, Trevor; Jones, Alison

    2009-01-01

    Background Medical news that appears on newspaper front pages is intended to reach a wide audience, but how this type of medical news is prepared and distributed has not been systematically researched. We thus quantified the level of visibility achieved by front-page medical stories in the United States and analyzed their news sources. Methodology Using the online resource Newseum, we investigated front-page newspaper coverage of four prominent medical stories, and a high-profile non-medical news story as a control, reported in the US in 2007. Two characteristics were quantified by two raters: which newspaper titles carried each target front-page story (interrater agreement, >96%; kappa, >0.92) and the news sources of each target story (interrater agreement, >94%; kappa, >0.91). National rankings of the top 200 US newspapers by audited circulation were used to quantify the extent of coverage as the proportion of the total circulation of ranked newspapers in Newseum. Findings In total, 1630 front pages were searched. Each medical story appeared on the front pages of 85 to 117 (67.5%–78.7%) ranked newspaper titles that had a cumulative daily circulation of 23.1 to 33.4 million, or 61.8% to 88.4% of all newspapers. In contrast, the non-medical story achieved front-page coverage in 152 (99.3%) newspaper titles with a total circulation of 41.0 million, or 99.8% of all newspapers. Front-page medical stories varied in their sources, but the Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, New York Times and the Associated Press together supplied 61.7% of the total coverage of target front-page medical stories. Conclusion Front-page coverage of medical news from different sources is more accurately revealed by analysis of circulation counts rather than of newspaper titles. Journals wishing to widen knowledge of research news and organizations with important health announcements should target at least the four dominant media organizations identified in this study. PMID:19724643

  10. Naval Medical Research and Development News. Volume 8, Issue 5, May 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-09

    Aedes species mosquito. February 1, 2016, the World Health Organization declared congenital abnormalities related to Zika virus a Public Health...Against Zika Virus 12 More stories inside Story from the NMRC Clinical Trials Center NMR&D News is a publication of the Naval Medical Research...Against Zika Virus By Lt. Cmdr. I.W. Sutherland, U.S. Naval Medical Research Center—Asia SINGAPORE. The U.S. Naval Medical Research Center - Asia

  11. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Radiation Therapy Services at Tripler Army Medical Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Diehl, Diane S

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to examine the costs and benefits associated with continuance of "in-house" radiation therapy services to eligible beneficiaries at Tripler Army Medical Center (TAMC...

  12. U.S. Army Medical Department Journal (January-March 2000)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peake, James B; Goodman, Petra; De Lorenzo, Robert A; LaRavia, Dennis; Thomas, Timothy L; O'Hara, Charles P; Goodman, Robert L

    2000-01-01

    This issue of the AMEDD Journal contains several articles of interest. "Proceedings of the 1999 Madigan Research Day" identifies the award-winning research abstracts of this annual Madigan Army Medical Center event...

  13. Army Combat Medic Resilience: The Process of Forging Loyalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Preetha A; Russell, Dale W; Huffman, Sarah; Deuster, Patricia; Gibbons, Susanne W

    2018-03-01

    This study presents a grounded theory analysis of in-depth interviews of United States Army Combat Medics (CMs) who had served in Iraq and/or Afghanistan. The study explores how 17 CMs nominated by their peers as resilient cope with military stressors in order to identify the factors that enable them to thrive amidst harsh conditions. Four distinct categories of characteristics unique to this group emerged: (1) social bonding, (2) readiness, (3) dual loyalty as performance, and (4) leader by example. Forging loyalty underpins these characteristics and represents the main process used by resilient CMs and comprised three behavior patterns: (1) commitment to the family, (2) commitment to the military mission, and (3) commitment to their guiding religious and spiritual beliefs. Prominent behavioral tendencies of forging loyalty likely developed during childhood and re-enforced by families, friends, and other role models. Based on the findings, new training and education efforts should focus on developing positive emotional, environmental, and social resources to enhance the health and well-being of service members and their families.

  14. The impact of assessing simulated bad news consultations on medical students' stress response and communication performance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulmen, S. van; Tromp, F.; Grosfeld, F.; Cate, O. ten; Bensing, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Seventy second-year medical students volunteered to participate in a study with the aim of evaluating the impact of the assessment of simulated bad news consultations on their physiological and psychological stress and communication performance. Measurements were taken of salivary cortisol, systolic

  15. U.S. Army Medical Department Journal (April-June 2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    basic laboratory equipment and techniques acquired at the AMS, demonstrated that Puerto Rican anemia was due to the hookworm, Necator americanus.* In...Sciences, Bangkok, Thailand; US Army Medical Research Unit-Kenya, Nairobi; Naval Medical Research Center Detachment, Lima, Peru ; Naval Medical Research...2006 131 Colombia, Ecuador, El Salvador, Netherland Antilles, Antigua, Belize, Bolivia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru (air, water

  16. Crucible of fire: the Boer War and the birth of the Canadian Army Medical Corps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, I

    1995-01-01

    Although Canada's military physicians didn't come to prominence until WW I and WW II, the Canadian Army Medical Corps (CAMC), the forerunner of the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps and the current Canadian Forces Medical Service, actually had its origins in the Boer War. During that turn-of-the-century conflict, field hospitals accompanied Canadian troops to South Africa. Ian McCulloch discusses that early type of medical service and the steps that led to the creation of the CAMC. Images p1495-a p1496-a PMID:7585380

  17. [Formation and development of military-medical service of Terek Cossak Army in XIX--beginning XX c].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmadov, T Z

    2012-10-01

    The article is dedicated to one nor enough investigated question of medical supplement of irregular Cossak army in North Caucasus in XIX--beginning XX c. The role of the government and cossaks in formation and development of medical service in Terek Cossak Army is showed. Characteristic pecularities of health care of mountain population after administrative development of the district by Tsar Russia. The author underlined that despite the disadvantages, medical service of Terek Cossak Army and Terek district in described period was right developing system of medical care for irregular army and population.

  18. African-American Medical Personnel in the US Army in the First World War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marble, Sanders

    2018-02-01

    In WWI, the United States was segregated by custom and law, and the Army obeyed the laws, reducing opportunities for Black medical professionals to serve their country in uniform. This article surveys African-American medical personnel serving in the US Army in World War I. It includes physicians, dentists, veterinarians, and other commissioned officers, as well as medical enlisted men. Overall, despite segregation and associated professional limitations, determined individuals still served with distinction in a variety of roles, opening doors for future advances. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Audience responses to television news coverage of medical advances: The mediating role of audience emotions and identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyehyun

    2015-08-01

    Exemplifying a real person in news stories has become a popular journalistic technique to describe an event or issue. With the frequent appearance of medical news reports in local television in recent years, this news presentation style is widely believed to help audiences better engage in and understand complex medical information and to influence their perceptions and judgments. In terms of television news coverage of medical advances, this study investigates how audiences respond to embedded human examples (mainly patients who experience benefits from the advances) and to overall news stories, and how such responses are related to their perception of portrayed medical advances. The experimental results indicate that news stories with a human example were more likely to intensify the audience's positive emotions than those without, which in turn influenced favorable perceptions of the described medical advance. In addition, the extent to which the audience identified with a human example (in particular, sympathy) mediated the relationship between the audience's involvement in the news story and its perception of the portrayed medical advance. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Charges Assessed the Army by the Defense Logistics Agency for Deployable Medical Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1995-01-01

    .... Deployable medical systems are standardized modular field hospitals that can be prepositioned in the event of a contingency, national emergency, or war operations. In FY 1994, the Defense Personnel Support Center billed the Army $25 million for acquiring and assembling deployable medical systems.

  1. Equal Opportunity Program Management for the Army Medical Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-09

    applies to someone who has the physical, cultural, or linguistic characteristics of a national group. Personal Racism , Sexism , or Bigotry: The ...Management and Army Demographics and Statistics Departments. LTC Horrell arranged my VIP trip to the Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute (DEOMI...harassment in the organization. Organizational productivity is maximized when illegal discrimination is eradicated. One theory of why discrimination

  2. Nuclear Medical Science Officers: Army Health Physicists Serving and Defending Their Country Around the Globe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, Mark; Bosley, William; Santiago, Jodi; Hamilton, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    Tracing their distinguished history back to the Manhattan Project that developed the world's first atomic bomb, the Nuclear Medical Science Officers are the Army's experts on radiation and its health effects. Serving around the globe, these commissioned Army officers serve as military health physicists that ensure the protection of Soldiers and those they defend against all sources of radiation, military and civilian. This poster will highlight the various roles and responsibilities that Nuclear Medical Science Officers fill in defense of the Nation. Areas where these officers serve include medical health physics, deployment health physics, homeland defense, emergency response, radiation dosimetry, radiation research and training, along with support to the Army's corporate radiation safety program and international collaborations. The poster will also share some of the unique military sources of radiation such as depleted uranium, which is used as an anti-armor munition and in armor plating because of its unique metallurgic properties. )

  3. Medical News From Scientific Analysis of the Turin Shroud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bevilacqua M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper synthetizes a series of works recently published in reference to medical studies regarding both the physical conditions of the Man who was wrapped in the Turin Shroud (TS and the tortures to which this Man was subjected. An event that influenced the rapid course of the Passion and the cause of death of the TS Man was the fall under the weight of the cross. This Man shows, on the right side, shoulder lowering, flat hand and henophthalmos, revealing a violent blunt trauma, from behind, to neck, chest and shoulder, with the entire brachial plexus injury and muscular damage to the neck bottom with the head bent forward and turned to the left, on the cross, as he had a stiff neck. Most likely, falling the body forward, the chest trauma caused a heart and lung contusion with hemothorax. The wrists were easily nailed in the Destot space with ulnar artery cutting and partial tear of the ulnar nerve cause of the thumb retraction and its disappearance on the Shroud. The nail in the right foot was driven in the tarsal bones. The right foot was probably dislocated to the ankle. The lance penetrated in the sixth intercostal space. The likely cause of immediate death was a myocardial infarction with rupture, haemopericardium and heart tamponade of a subject with cardiac contusion. Tortures and other medical conditions have only accelerated the death.

  4. News media reports of patient deaths following 'medical tourism' for cosmetic surgery and bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Leigh

    2012-04-01

    Contemporary scholarship examining clinical outcomes in medical travel for cosmetic surgery identifies cases in which patients traveled abroad for medical procedures and subsequently returned home with infections and other surgical complications. Though there are peer-reviewed articles identifying patient deaths in cases where patients traveled abroad for commercial kidney transplantation or stem cell injections, no scholarly publications document deaths of patients who traveled abroad for cosmetic surgery or bariatric surgery. Drawing upon news media reports extending from 1993 to 2011, this article identifies and describes twenty-six reported cases of deaths of individuals who traveled abroad for cosmetic surgery or bariatric surgery. Over half of the reported deaths occurred in two countries. Analysis of these news reports cannot be used to make causal claims about why the patients died. In addition, cases identified in news media accounts do not provide a basis for establishing the relative risk of traveling abroad for care instead of seeking elective cosmetic surgery at domestic health care facilities. Acknowledging these limitations, the case reports suggest the possibility that contemporary peer-reviewed scholarship is underreporting patient mortality in medical travel. The paper makes a strong case for promoting normative analyses and empirical studies of medical travel. In particular, the paper argues that empirically informed ethical analysis of 'medical tourism' will benefit from rigorous studies tracking global flows of medical travelers and the clinical outcomes they experience. The paper contains practical recommendations intended to promote debate concerning how to promote patient safety and quality of care in medical travel. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. The United States Army Medical Department Journal. October - December 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    designer drugs.4 Spice is used as an alternative to marijuana because of the similarity of their “high” effects. Depending on the synthetic compound in...Poison Control Centers (bath salts data, synthetic marijuana data); http://www.aapcc.org/dnn/NewsandEvents/NewsMediaResources.aspx, accessed June 11...A review of herbal marijuana 1. alternatives (K2, spice), synthetic cathinones (bath salts), kratom, Salvia divinorum, methoxetamine, and pipera

  6. Medical students' unique experience of army leadership training: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earis, John; Garner, J; Haddock, D; Jenkins, J; Jha, V

    2017-10-01

    To assess the interactive experience of first year medical students attending the leadership and management course hosted by a British Army Reserve Field Hospital developed in partnership with Liverpool University. 244 students submitted a 1000-word structured reflective learning assignment about their reaction to, learning from and any behaviour and attitude changes as a result of, the training. The assignments were thematically analysed to identify how aspects of the training had impacted upon the students' understanding of leadership and teamwork. Their comments relating to the army were analysed to gain insight into their views and experience of the training. Students were surprised at how enjoyable and useful they found the course. Initially they expressed scepticism about what they could learn in an army-based environment. However, the training, particularly command and planning tasks, helped them appreciate and understand the different skills individuals can bring to a team environment, and the importance of everyone contributing. While some students were challenged by aspects of the course, with support and encouragement from team-mates and the army personnel, they learned they could achieve more together. Teaching leadership and management skills to medical students is a challenge which can be effectively addressed by adapting and developing army training resources. Students overcame initial scepticism about participating, and learned a lot about themselves and each other. In addition, the army developed a better understanding of the doctors of the future. The expertise of the army in delivering this training was crucial to its success as the medical school could not have provided this experience unsupported. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Review of U.S. Army Aviation Accident Reports: Prevalence of Environmental Stressors and Medical Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-18

    terminology related to an aforementioned stressor or medical condition. Table 1 presents the identified operational stressor with the keywords extracted...USAARL Report No. 2018-02 Review of U.S. Army Aviation Accident Reports: Prevalence of Environmental Stressors and Medical Conditions By Kathryn...Environmental Stressors and Medical Conditions N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Feltman, Kathryn A. Kelley, Amanda M. Curry, Ian P. Boudreaux, David A. Milam

  8. The impact of senior medical students' personal difficulties on their communication patterns in breaking bad news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meitar, Dafna; Karnieli-Miller, Orit; Eidelman, Shmuel

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate the possible influence of personal difficulties and barriers that are within the news bearer and his or her self-awareness (SA) of them, on the patterns of communication during encounters involving breaking bad news (BBN). Following an intensive BBN course in 2004, 103 senior medical students at the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, were evaluated for BBN competencies by the analysis of their written descriptions of how they visualized their manner of delivering bad news to a patient described in a challenging vignette. The students were further asked to reflect on their own difficulties and barriers that surfaced in response to reading the narrative presented in the vignette and in delivering the bad news. Using an immersion crystallization narrative analysis method, the authors analyzed the relationship between the students' BBN strategies and their self-perceived barriers and difficulties. Four types of communicators were identified and related to 45 different personal and professional barriers that the students, through self-reflection, found in themselves. These perceived barriers as well as the ability to self-reflect on them influenced their patterns of communication in their envisioned and written-down encounters, including the level of emotional connectedness, information provided, and the chosen focus-of-care paradigm (physician-centered, patient-centered, or relationship-centered). These findings empirically demonstrate that intrapersonal difficulties within the communicator and his or her level of SA about them influenced the manner and content of the communication during the encounter. This finding suggests that enhancing SA and addressing personal and professional difficulties could help physicians' capability to cope with challenging communication tasks. The authors propose a working tool (the Preparatory SPIKES) to facilitate the integration of self-reflection (by identifying personal difficulties) into day-by-day planning

  9. Hype in health reporting: "checkbook science" buys distortion of medical news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Diana

    2003-01-01

    The greatest danger to public health might be "checkbook science": research intended not to expand knowledge or to benefit humanity but to sell products. Much of the media coverage of health news stories is based on public relations efforts on behalf of the companies that sell the products, including pharmaceutical companies, diet clinics, or doctors selling new techniques. The author presents three case studies of how companies selling medical products effectively but invisibly shaped recent news coverage of medical products: fen-phen diet pills, breast implants, and hormone replacement therapy. All involve subtle strategies whereby physicians and other experts paid by corporate interests are influential because they are perceived to be objective medical experts. Articles in prestigious medical journals are sometimes ghostwritten by individuals paid by companies or are based on biased analyses or interpretations shaped by corporate interests. Nonprofit organizations that tout the benefits of specific medical products also may be part of the public relations efforts of the companies making the product. Meanwhile, important newsworthy studies are ignored by the mass media when corporate interests do not publicize or pitch the results to influential reporters and producers.

  10. Preferences and attitudes of the Saudi population toward receiving medical bad news: A primary study from Riyadh city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrukban, Mohammed O; Albadr, Badr O; Almansour, Mohammed; Sami, Waqas; Alshuil, Mussab; Aldebaib, Abulrahman; Algannam, Tamim; Alhafaf, Faisal; Almohanna, Abdulaziz; Alfifi, Tariq; Alshehri, Abdullah; Alshahrani, Muhannad

    2014-05-01

    Breaking bad news is one of the most stressful and difficult things a physician has to do. Good communication skills are required in order to ensure that bad news is delivered in a humane but effective way. This study was designed to explore the preferences and attitude of the Saudi population toward receiving bad news. Second, it was to identify the associations between preferences, attitudes, and sociodemographic characteristics. This was a cross-sectional study conducted during the month of April 2009 in Riyadh. Data were collected from 1013 adult Saudis. Stratified random sampling technique was used through a self-administered questionnaire. In this study, 474 (46.8%) were males and 539 (53.2%) were females. Almost two-third of the participants preferred to be the first to receive the bad news. A majority of the participants 695 (68.6%) preferred to be told the bad news at a private place, whereas, 441 (43.5%) preferred to be told by the head of the medical team. Moreover, almost half of the participants would like the one who breaks the bad news to remain with them to give them some more information about the disease. Significant associations were observed between participants' perception and attitude with age, marital status, gender, and education (P bad news is received. Understanding what is important in the process of breaking bad news may help in determining how best to perform this challenging task.

  11. Preferences and attitudes of the Saudi population toward receiving medical bad news: A primary study from Riyadh city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrukban, Mohammed O.; Albadr, Badr O.; Almansour, Mohammed; Sami, Waqas; Alshuil, Mussab; Aldebaib, Abulrahman; Algannam, Tamim; Alhafaf, Faisal; Almohanna, Abdulaziz; Alfifi, Tariq; Alshehri, Abdullah; Alshahrani, Muhannad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Breaking bad news is one of the most stressful and difficult things a physician has to do. Good communication skills are required in order to ensure that bad news is delivered in a humane but effective way. Objectives: This study was designed to explore the preferences and attitude of the Saudi population toward receiving bad news. Second, it was to identify the associations between preferences, attitudes, and sociodemographic characteristics. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted during the month of April 2009 in Riyadh. Data were collected from 1013 adult Saudis. Stratified random sampling technique was used through a self-administered questionnaire. Results: In this study, 474 (46.8%) were males and 539 (53.2%) were females. Almost two-third of the participants preferred to be the first to receive the bad news. A majority of the participants 695 (68.6%) preferred to be told the bad news at a private place, whereas, 441 (43.5%) preferred to be told by the head of the medical team. Moreover, almost half of the participants would like the one who breaks the bad news to remain with them to give them some more information about the disease. Significant associations were observed between participants' perception and attitude with age, marital status, gender, and education (P bad news is received. Understanding what is important in the process of breaking bad news may help in determining how best to perform this challenging task. PMID:24987276

  12. Business Case Analysis of the Walter Reed Army Medical Center Medical/Surgical Prime Vendor Generation III Service Level Electron Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Markot, Peter B

    2007-01-01

    ...) staffing and medical/surgical services offered under the Prime Vendor (PV) Generation III contract would provide the best supply chain management solution for Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC...

  13. Analysis of the experience in participation of army medical service in medical arrangement in case of radiation accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhilyaev, E.G.; Goncharov, S.F.; Vorontsov, I.V.; Legeza, V.I.; Berzin, I.A.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presented calculations of manpower and money funds for rendering aid to the injured persons in case of radiation accident. The authors offered a scheme of using medical anti-radial aids on various stages of radiation accident; immediately after the accident in case of non-predicted and controlled radiation exposure. Army Medical Service is capable of solving promptly the tasks of medical aid with the help of highly mobile specialized medical units, the use of which is stipulated in the system of the Russian Service of disaster medicine. 10 refs.; 1 tab

  14. A single-centre cohort study of National Early Warning Score (NEWS) and near patient testing in acute medical admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Tom E F; Torrance, Hew D T; Cron, Nicholas; Vaid, Nidhi; Emmanuel, Julian

    2016-11-01

    The utility of an early warning score may be improved when used with near patient testing. However, this has not yet been investigated for National Early Warning Score (NEWS). We hypothesised that the combination of NEWS and blood gas variables (lactate, glucose or base-excess) was more strongly associated with clinical outcome compared to NEWS alone. This was a prospective cohort study of adult medical admissions to a single-centre over 20days. Blood gas results and physiological observations were recorded at admission. NEWS was calculated retrospectively and combined with the biomarkers in multivariable logistic regression models. The primary outcome was a composite of mortality or critical care escalation within 2days of hospital admission. The secondary outcome was hospital length of stay. After accounting for missing data, 15 patients out of 322 (4.7%) died or were escalated to the critical care unit. The median length of stay was 4 (IQR 7) days. When combined with lactate or base excess, NEWS was associated with the primary outcome (OR 1.18, p=0.01 and OR 1.13, p=0.03). However, NEWS alone was more strongly associated with the primary outcome measure (OR 1.46, pglucose was not associated with the primary outcome. Neither NEWS nor any combination of NEWS and a biomarker were associated with hospital length of stay. Admission NEWS is more strongly associated with death or critical care unit admission within 2days of hospital admission, compared to combinations of NEWS and blood-gas derived biomarkers. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Quantitative Analysis of Contributing Factors Affecting Patient Satisfaction in Family Medicine Service Clinics at Brooke Army Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-06

    Predictors of patient satisfaction for Brooke Army Medical Center Family Medicine Service primary care clinics was performed. Data was obtained from...Factors Affecting Patient Satisfaction in Family Medicine Service Clinics at Brooke Army Medical Center Presented to MAJ Eric Schmacker, Ph.D. In...study. All patients ’ medical information was protected at all times and under no circumstances will be discussed or released to any outside agency

  16. The evolution of dependent medical care in the U.S. Army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Thomas J S

    2011-10-01

    There is great focus within the military medical community regarding the ever growing cost of medical care overall and dependent care specifically. A great deal of discussion relates to the delivery of care through a growing military-civilian partnership, where an increased amount of health care will be referred to an ever growing network of civilian providers. The U.S. military establishment now stands at an important crossroad leading into the future of dependent care. However, the special concerns, which arise from the responsibility of caring for military dependents, are not a solely recent phenomenon. Ever since the establishment of a permanent standing U.S. Army in the late 1700s, there have been families in need of medical treatment. Although changes occurred continuously, the development and evolution of policies regulating the delivery of medical care to dependants can be divided into three periods. The first is the longest and ranges from the establishment of the Army until the year 1900. The second period spans from 1900 to the post-Korean War year of 1956. The third and final period is from 1956 to 1975. Special changes and advances in each of these periods have served to shape the face of dependent care in today's Army Medical Department.

  17. The United States Army Medical Department Journal, April - June 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Amazon community at Iquitos, Stancil42 (Naval Medical Research Center Detachment, Peru ) received a grant to optimize strategies for preventing the breeding...Detachment, Lima, Peru ; Naval Medical Research Unit-2, Jakarta, Indonesia; and the Naval Medical Research Unit 3, Cairo, Egypt. These resources...the soil beneath tents and camps. In an effort to prevent sand flies breeding in rodent burrows, the Genesis Company (Wellington, Colorado) won an

  18. An Overview of Teaching Communication of Bad News in Medical School: Should a Lecture be Adequate to Address the Topic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Filipe; Ramessur, Anisha

    2016-12-30

    Delivering bad news is very common in medical daily practice. Several studies have shown a lack of effective communication skills amongst medical students, particularly concerning how to deliver bad news. The SPIKES protocol allows communicating bad news in a 6-step method. The aim of this study is to investigate the perspective of students related to this subject. A 45 minute lecture "Breaking Bad News" was given to 160 students in the fifth and sixth years of the Medicine course, using the SPIKES' protocol training. After the lecture, an online survey was given to all students, and a cross-sectional and descriptive analysis of data extracted from survey was undertaken. Fifty-four students (21% of overall) answered the online survey. Eighty three percent said that theme should have an important role in their further daily medical practice, and most of students rated the physicians' role as challenging. Sixty percent of students expressed that communicating bad news was an integral part of the medical course curriculum. Regarding the SPIKES´ protocol, 48% felt that the first step would be the easiest to put in practice, and 40% felt that the fifth step related to "Emotions" would be the most difficult. In general, the students would like to gain competencies in breaking bad news using a practical approach Conclusions: Students highly valued theoretical and practical approaches in teaching of communication of bad news. Therefore, we encourage a combination approach in pre-graduate medical education.

  19. Physicians' psychophysiological stress reaction in medical communication of bad news: A critical literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Regina Katharina; Danuser, Brigitta; Gomez, Patrick

    2017-10-01

    Stress is a common phenomenon in medical professions. Breaking bad news (BBN) is reported to be a particularly distressing activity for physicians. Traditionally, the stress experienced by physicians when BBN was assessed exclusively using self-reporting. Only recently, the field of difficult physician-patient communication has used physiological assessments to better understand physicians' stress reactions. This paper's goals are to (a) review current knowledge about the physicians' psychophysiological stress reactions in BBN situations, (b) discuss methodological aspects of these studies and (c) suggest directions for future research. The seven studies identified all used scenarios with simulated patients but were heterogeneous with regard to other methodological aspects, such as the psychophysiological parameters, time points and durations assessed, comparative settings, and operationalisation of the communication scenarios. Despite this heterogeneity, all the papers reported increases in psychological and/or physiological activation when breaking bad news in comparison to control conditions, such as history taking or breaking good news. Taken together, the studies reviewed support the hypothesis that BBN is a psychophysiologically arousing and stressful task for medical professionals. However, much remains to be done. We suggest several future directions to advance the field. These include (a) expanding and refining the conceptual framework, (b) extending assessments to include more diverse physiological parameters, (c) exploring the modulatory effects of physicians' personal characteristics (e.g. level of experience), (d) comparing simulated and real-life physician-patient encounters and (e) combining physiological assessment with a discourse analysis of physician-patient communication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A Study of Civilian Registered Nurse Recruitment at Madigan Army Medical Center, Tacoma, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    34 May, 1981, "Nurse, Where Are You?" Judy Armstrong . 5 1nitial Report and Preliminary Recommendations, National Commission on Nursing (September 1981...Interview with Ms. R. Marsh, Staffing Specialist, Force Develop- ment Division, Madigan Army Medical Center, Tacoma, WA (Dec 81) 20Philip Kotler ...Marketing Management. Boston: Allyn and Bacon, Inc., 1980. Kotler , Philip. Marketing for Nonprofit Institutions. Englewood Cliffs, N.D.: Prentice-Hall

  1. The United States Army Medical Department Journal. January-March 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    HEATSTROKE IN A MILITARY WORKING DOG January – March 2013 37 THE ARMY MEDICAL DEPARTMENT JOURNAL Respiratory alkalosis can develop as a result of...dropped to 99.1ºF within 35 minutes after presentation, and the pulse and respiratory rate normalized. The mu- cous membranes were pink, but tacky. The MWD...throughout the body, including blood cells, myocardium, skeletal muscle, soft tissues, and cells of the respiratory and nervous systems.5 Venom

  2. How the doc should (not) talk: When breaking bad news with negations influences patients' immediate responses and medical adherence intentions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgers, C.F.; Beukeboom, C.J.; Sparks, L

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We investigate the role of specific formulations in a doctor's bad news delivery. We focus on the effects of negations and message framing on patients' immediate responses to the message and the doctor, and long-term consequences including quality of life and medical adherence intentions.

  3. Media coverage of medical journals: do the best articles make the news?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Senthil; Borkar, Durga S; Prasad, Vinay

    2014-01-01

    News coverage of medical research is followed closely by many Americans and affects the practice of medicine and influence of scientific research. Prior work has examined the quality of media coverage, but no investigation has characterized the choice of stories covered in a controlled manner. We examined whether the media systematically covers stories of weaker study design. We compared study characteristics of 75 clinically-oriented journal articles that received coverage in the top five newspapers by circulation against 75 clinically-oriented journal articles that appeared in the top five medical journals by impact factor over a similar timespan. Subgroup analysis was performed to determine whether differences between investigations from both sources varied by study type (randomized controlled trial [RCT] or observational study). Investigations receiving coverage from newspapers were less likely to be RCTs (17% vs. 35%, p = 0.016) and more likely to be observational studies (75% vs. 47%, pstudied (median: 1034 vs. 1901, p = 0.14) or length of follow-up (median: 1.80 vs. 1.00 years, p = 0.22). In subgroup analysis, observational studies from the media used smaller sample sizes (median: 1984 vs. 21136, p = 0.029) and were more likely to be cross-sectional (71% vs. 31%, pstudies and less likely to cover RCTs than high impact journals. Additionally, when the media does cover observational studies, they select articles of inferior quality. Newspapers preferentially cover medical research with weaker methodology.

  4. Walter Reed Army Medical Center's Internet-based electronic health portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Kevin C; Boocks, Carl E; Sun, Zhengyi; Boal, Thomas R; Poropatich, Ronald K

    2003-12-01

    Use of the World Wide Web (WWW) and electronic media to facilitate medical care has been the subject of many reports in the popular press. However, few reports have documented the results of implementing electronic health portals for essential medical tasks, such as prescription refills and appointments. At Walter Reed Army Medical Center, "Search & Learn" medical information, Internet-based prescription refills and patient appointments were established in January 2001. A multiphase retrospective analysis was conducted to determine the use of the "Search & Learn" medical information and the relative number of prescription refills and appointments conducted via the WWW compared with conventional methods. From January 2001 to May 2002, there were 34,741 refills and 819 appointments made over the Internet compared with 2,275,112 refills and approximately 500,000 appointments made conventionally. WWW activity accounted for 1.52% of refills and 0.16% of appointments. There was a steady increase in this percentage over the time of the analysis. In April of 2002, the monthly average of online refills had risen to 4.57% and online appointments were at 0.27%. Online refills were projected to account for 10% of all prescriptions in 2 years. The "Search & Learn" medical information portion of our web site received 147,429 unique visits during this same time frame, which was an average of 326 visitors per day. WWW-based methods of conducting essential medical tasks accounted for a small but rapidly increasing percentage of total activity at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. Subsequent phases of analysis will assess demographic and geographic factors and aid in the design of future systems to increase use of the Internet-based systems.

  5. [Exhaustivity and critical tone of the news in print media reporting medical innovations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solans-Domènech, Maite; Millaret, Marta; Radó-Trilla, Núria; Caro-Mendivelso, Johanna; Carrion, Carme; Permanyer-Miralda, Gaietà; Pons, Joan M V

    2017-11-24

    To quantify how exhaustive and critical were stories reporting medical innovations published in print media and to analyze the characteristics that may be related. Content analysis of the newspapers stories related to the discovery, introduction or improvement of a medical innovation through a questionnaire with ten criteria that allows calculating an overall score of exhaustiveness. The critical view was also included. We analyzed 204 newspapers stories that on average obtained a comprehensiveness score of 4.5. Were optimistic 70% of the stories. The most valued criteria were: level of detail of the explanation of the innovation and the correct differentiation between facts and opinions. While the worst-valued criteria were: disclosure of financial conflicts of interest and the quantification of harms. The variables author, length of the story and classification of the innovation were related to both the comprehensiveness score and the critical view. The comprehensiveness score was also related to the pathology, number of sources of information and the critical tone of the story, while the critical view was also related to the newspapers diffusion and the relevance of the news. The analyzed stories presented inaccuracies, biases or an excess of optimism (either intentional or involuntary). Some aspects of the stories discussed in more detail would provide solutions to many of the identified shortcomings. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. The health of the American slave examined by means of Union Army medical statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freemon, F R

    1985-01-01

    The health status of the American slave in the 19th century remains unclear despite extensive historical research. Better knowledge of slave health would provide a clearer picture of the life of the slave, a better understanding of the 19th-century medicine, and possibly even clues to the health problems of modern blacks. This article hopes to contribute to the literature by examining another source of data. Slaves entering the Union Army joined an organization with standardized medical care that generated extensive statistical information. Review of these statistics answers questions about the health of young male blacks at the time American slavery ended.

  7. US Army Medical Bioengineering Research and Development Laboratory Annual Progress Report for FY 84. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-01

    guanidIne nitrate, is biodegraded slowly in surface waters alone and relatively rapidly if present with metabolizable carbon, in which case the compound...Operation." AORN Journal 40 (1984):330. Goethals, Gerald B. "So, You Want to be in Movies ?" Today’s OR Nurse 6 (1984):36-37. Goyal, Sagar M., S.A. Schaub...Development Laboratory MR 8-84 (May 1984). Mitchell, Wayne R. Preliminarx Results of Biodegradation Studies for Guanidine Nitrate. US Army Medical

  8. Australian news media framing of medical tourism in low- and middle-income countries: a content review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Medical tourism – travel across international borders for health care – appears to be growing globally, with patients from high-income nations increasingly visiting low- and middle-income countries to access such services. This paper analyses Australian television and newspaper news and current affairs coverage to examine how medical tourism and these destinations for the practice are represented to media audiences. Methods Electronic copies of Australian television (n = 66) and newspaper (n = 65) items from 2005–2011 about medical care overseas were coded for patterns of reporting (year, format and type) and story characteristics (geographic and medical foci in the coverage, news actors featured and appeals, credibility and risks of the practice mentioned). Results Australian media coverage of medical tourism was largely focused on Asia, featuring cosmetic surgery procedures and therapies unavailable domestically. Experts were the most frequently-appearing news actors, followed by patients. Common among the types of appeals mentioned were access to services and low cost. Factors lending credibility included personal testimony, while uncertainty and ethical dilemmas featured strongly among potential risks mentioned from medical tourism. Conclusions The Australian media coverage of medical tourism was characterised by a narrow range of medical, geographic and ethical concerns, a focus on individual Australian patients and on content presented as being personally relevant for domestic audiences. Medical tourism was portrayed as an exercise of economically-rational consumer choice, but with no attention given to its consequences for the commodification of health or broader political, medical and ethical implications. In this picture, LMICs were no longer passive recipients of aid but providers of a beneficial service to Australian patients. PMID:23384294

  9. Australian news media framing of medical tourism in low- and middle-income countries: a content review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imison, Michelle; Schweinsberg, Stephen

    2013-02-05

    Medical tourism - travel across international borders for health care - appears to be growing globally, with patients from high-income nations increasingly visiting low- and middle-income countries to access such services. This paper analyses Australian television and newspaper news and current affairs coverage to examine how medical tourism and these destinations for the practice are represented to media audiences. Electronic copies of Australian television (n = 66) and newspaper (n = 65) items from 2005-2011 about medical care overseas were coded for patterns of reporting (year, format and type) and story characteristics (geographic and medical foci in the coverage, news actors featured and appeals, credibility and risks of the practice mentioned). Australian media coverage of medical tourism was largely focused on Asia, featuring cosmetic surgery procedures and therapies unavailable domestically. Experts were the most frequently-appearing news actors, followed by patients. Common among the types of appeals mentioned were access to services and low cost. Factors lending credibility included personal testimony, while uncertainty and ethical dilemmas featured strongly among potential risks mentioned from medical tourism. The Australian media coverage of medical tourism was characterised by a narrow range of medical, geographic and ethical concerns, a focus on individual Australian patients and on content presented as being personally relevant for domestic audiences. Medical tourism was portrayed as an exercise of economically-rational consumer choice, but with no attention given to its consequences for the commodification of health or broader political, medical and ethical implications. In this picture, LMICs were no longer passive recipients of aid but providers of a beneficial service to Australian patients.

  10. PACS and its hospital-wide implementation: A case study at the Madigan Army Medical Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyung Sik; Kim, Yong Min; Smith, Donald V.; Bender, Gregory N.

    1993-01-01

    PACS represents the future of radiology in modern hospitals. Workstations and databases can be developed to substantially increase clinician's productivity, improve diagnostic accuracy, and make a large amount of knowledge and patient information available on-line to the physician. Currently, there are several hospitals in the process of implementing a total PACS system. They include Madigan Army Medical Center (Tacoma, Washington), VA Hospital in Baltimore, and Hammersmith Hospital in London (1). In order to provide the radiologist, the clinicians, and other health personnel in Korea with the general concept of PACS and its up-to-date status report, we describe the MDIS system being implemented in MAMC (Madigan Army Medical Center) which is the first hospital-wide large-scale PACS in the world. The major PACS components in MAMC have been installed since March 1992 and the full system implementation will be completed by summer 1993. The goal of the MDIS system in MAMC is to increase to more than 90% filmless by the end of 1993. In this paper, we discuss the introduction and background of PACS and its potential benefits, the current status of PACS installation in MAMC and the future plan, and the flow of image data and text information in MAMC

  11. A Study to Evaluate the Organization and the Operating Procedures of the Patient Assistance Function at Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    15 March 1979. 59Interview with Wendy L. Farace , Head Nurse, Obstetrics/Gynecology Clinic, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, 8...6 February 1979. Farace , Wendy L. Head Nurse, Obstetrica/Gynecology Clinic, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Interview, 8 January

  12. Motivational Profiles of Medical Students of Nepalese Army Institute of Health Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Lochana; Pant, Shambhu Nath

    2018-01-01

    Students enter the medical study with different types of motives. Given the importance of academic motivation for good academic achievement of the students, the present study was designed to reveal the possible relationship between academic motivation and achievement in medical students. In this cross-sectional study medical students (N=364) of Nepalese Army institute of Health Sciences were participated and classified to different subgroups using intrinsic and controlled motivation scores. Cluster membership was used as an independent variable to assess differences in study strategies and academic performance. Four clusters were obtained: High Intrinsic High Controlled, Low Intrinsic High Controlled, High Intrinsic Low Controlled, and Low Intrinsic Low Controlled. High Intrinsic High Controlled and High Intrinsic Low Controlled profile students constituted 36.1%, 22.6% of the population, respectively. No significant differences were observed as regards to deep strategy and surface strategy between high interest status motivated and high interest-motivated students. However, both of the clusters had significantly deeper, surface strategy and better academic performance than status-motivated and low-motivation clusters (p motivated and interest-motivated medical students were associated with good deep and surface study strategy and good academic performance. Low-motivation and status-motivated students were associated with the least academic performance with less interest learning behaviors. This reflected that motivation is important required component for good learning outcomes for medical students Keywords: Academic performance; controlled motivation; clusters; intrinsic motivation; motivation.

  13. When Medical News Comes from Press Releases-A Case Study of Pancreatic Cancer and Processed Meat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph W Taylor

    Full Text Available The media have a key role in communicating advances in medicine to the general public, yet the accuracy of medical journalism is an under-researched area. This project adapted an established monitoring instrument to analyse all identified news reports (n = 312 on a single medical research paper: a meta-analysis published in the British Journal of Cancer which showed a modest link between processed meat consumption and pancreatic cancer. Our most significant finding was that three sources (the journal press release, a story on the BBC News website and a story appearing on the 'NHS Choices' website appeared to account for the content of over 85% of the news stories which covered the meta analysis, with many of them being verbatim or moderately edited copies and most not citing their source. The quality of these 3 primary sources varied from excellent (NHS Choices, 10 of 11 criteria addressed to weak (journal press release, 5 of 11 criteria addressed, and this variance was reflected in the accuracy of stories derived from them. Some of the methods used in the original meta-analysis, and a proposed mechanistic explanation for the findings, were challenged in a subsequent commentary also published in the British Journal of Cancer, but this discourse was poorly reflected in the media coverage of the story.

  14. Attitudes of Polish physicians and medical students toward breaking bad news, euthanasia and morphine administration in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppert, Wojciech; Majkowicz, Mikolaj; Forycka, Maria

    2013-12-01

    Medical students and physicians should possess basic knowledge concerning medical ethics and palliative care. The aim of the study was to explore the knowledge on the end-of-life ethics and palliative care in third-year medical students and physicians during internal medicine specialty training and their attitude towards breaking bad news and euthanasia. A voluntary and anonymous questionnaire survey with the participation of 401 students and 217 physicians filled after lectures concerning ethics for medical students and after palliative medicine course for physicians during internal medicine specialty training. A total of 28 % students and 24 % physicians (p = 0.282) were ready to reveal full information to advanced cancer patients. A total of 82 % of students and 90 % of physicians (p = 0.008) would not practice euthanasia; 67 % of students and 75 % of physicians (p = 0.039) were opponents of euthanasia legalisation. A total of 70 % doctors and 23 % students indicated oral as the most preferable route of morphine administration. A total of 74 % physicians and 43 % students stated that there is no maximal dose of morphine; 64 % of doctors and 6 % of students indicated constipation as a constant adverse effect of morphine. Breaking bad news is a significant difficulty for both students and physicians. There is a small percentage of those tending to practice euthanasia and bigger accepting its legalisation with fewer physicians than students. In contrast to medical students, the majority of physicians have knowledge concerning chronic morphine use in the treatment of cancer patients.

  15. Changes in Temporary Disability Reporting Following the Implementation of the Army Medical Readiness Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, Jason E; Cody, Matthew J; Douglas, Kevin M

    2018-02-07

    In November 2014, the U.S. Army held a readiness summit to address concerns about the accuracy of medical reporting systems. At the time, soldiers on temporary disability were tracked as a medical readiness classification (MRC) 3A or 3B. MRC 3A soldiers had a medical condition with recovery expected within 30 d and MRC 3B soldiers were expected to take longer than 30 d to recover. Both groups were considered "non-available" and presumably non-deployable. Starting June 1, 2016, with the implementation of the Army Medical Readiness Transformation, soldiers on temporary disability longer than 14 d began to be reported as MRC 3s and are considered "non-deployable." The purpose of this study is to compare the number of soldiers on temporary disability previously reported as MRC 3A and 3B to the number listed as MRC 3 under the new reporting system for a light infantry brigade and to quantify the types and relative percentage of medical conditions leading to temporary disability under the new system. This cross-sectional analysis was conducted between January 1 and December 31, 2016 at Fort Carson, Colorado and included all soldiers assigned to Second Brigade, Fourth Infantry Division. We calculated the average number and proportion of soldiers on temporary disability at any one time for the period prior to implementation of the new reporting system (January 1 through May 31, 2016) and compared this to the period after implementation on June 1, 2016. The difference between the two independent proportions was calculated along with the lower and upper limits of the 95% confidence interval for the difference. Between January 1 and May 31, 2016, the average number of soldiers on temporary disability at any one time was 186, accounting for 4.3% of the authorized unit strength. After June 1, 2016, the average number increased to 244 or 5.7%. The difference in the proportion of temporary profiles was 1.4% (95% confidence interval 0.43-2.3%). From June 1 through December 31

  16. Graphical User Interface for a Remote Medical Monitoring System: U.S. Army Medic Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    screens. The majority of medics (70%) also wanted a name lis! screen that, when tapped , would go to an individual patient screen. In the name list...button has been pushed. Tapping on thaI button would prompt the user to enter the password. Tapping on the light button would illuminate the screen...a summary of current local weather conditions would be dis- played in the lower ! eft of the screen. In the lower right of this map screen is

  17. Naval Medical Research And Development News. Volume 8, Issue 4, April 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    1 Volume VIII, Issue 4 April 2016 In this issue... Use your smartphone to access our website! NMR&D News is an authorized publication of the Naval...prevention and rehabilitation, fatigue and sleep performance, and environmental physiology. “Our team at NHRC is comprised of experts in biomedical...limits of healthy warfighters ~ Evaluate new technologies for enhancing performance and reducing injuries ~ Support sleep optimization and fatigue

  18. ["Truth at the bedside"--continuing medical education and breaking bad news].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildmann, Jan; Herrmann, Eva; Klambeck, Amelie; Ortwein, Heiderose; Schwarz, Carsten; Vollmann, Jochen

    2005-01-01

    Discussions with seriously-ill patients are part of the physicians' tasks. These discussions demand good communication skills. In this paper we present the concept of a postgraduate course for physicians on ethics and breaking bad news, as well as the results of the course evaluation. Questionnaire distributed before and immediately after the course using closed-ended questions and Likert scales. 37 physicians (response rate: 84.1%) from seven specialties completed the questionnaires. Twenty-eight respondents (75.6%) had been involved in breaking bad news more than 5 times per month. Approximately half of the respondents (N = 18; 48.6%) rated the discussions on the limits of curative treatment as particularly difficult communication situations. With one exception, all physicians denied the existence of guidelines on breaking bad news in their institutions. Compared with the beginning of the course, the respondents rated their communication skills to be improved at the end of the course. Positive evaluations were obtained for practice relevance, teaching methods, and organisation of the course. The interest in this optional postgraduate course and the feedback of the participants indicate the necessity of professional training on difficult communication situations. The self-rating of improved communication skills may be interpreted as a positive effect of the course. Observational studies are required to confirm the effects of the training.

  19. A Statistical Analysis of the Relationship of Distance and Mode of Transportation on Length of Stay at Brooke Army Medical Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hagen, John

    1997-01-01

    .... Transportation Command's (TRANSCOM) aeromedical evacuation system, to determine their influence on length of hospital stay at Brooke Army Medical Center in FY 1996 in order to better understand the irnpact these patients have on utilization management...

  20. Research News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research News Share this page Facebook Twitter Email Research News Research News Quarterly Updates Research Call Archive ... Clinical Trials in MS Learn More Become a Research Champion An MS Research Revolution Support MS Research ...

  1. Army Healthcare Enterprise Management System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    ... to buy the Enterprise Management System. The Information Technology Business Center provides information technology services to Fort Sam Houston tenants which include the Army Medical Command and the Army Medical Department Center and School...

  2. The Central Simulation Committee (CSC): a model for centralization and standardization of simulation-based medical education in the U.S. Army healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deering, Shad; Sawyer, Taylor; Mikita, Jeffrey; Maurer, Douglas; Roth, Bernard J

    2012-07-01

    In this report, we describe the organizational framework, operations and current status of the Central Simulation Committee (CSC). The CSC was established in 2007 with the goals of standardizing simulation-based training in Army graduate medical education programs, assisting in redeployment training of physicians returning from war, and improving patient safety within the Army Medical Department. Presently, the CSC oversees 10 Simulation Centers, controls over 21,000 sq ft of simulation center space, and provides specialty-specific training in 14 medical specialties. In the past 2 years, CSC Simulation Centers have trained over 50,000 Army medical students, residents, physician assistants, nurses, Soldiers and DoD civilian medical personnel. We hope this report provides simulation educators within the military, and our civilian simulation colleagues, with insight into the workings of our organization and provides an example of centralized support and oversight of simulation-based medical education.

  3. Evaluation of the Low Back Pain Practice Guideline Implementation in the Army Medical Department

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farley, Donna

    2004-01-01

    ... clinical care practices across the Army health system. This report presents the final results of the evaluation that RAND conducted as part of the demonstration for the low back practice guideline, which was conducted in 1999 and 2000...

  4. Median and ulnar neuropathies in U.S. Army Medical Command Band members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Scott W; Koreerat, Nicholas R; Gordon, Lindsay B; Santillo, Douglas R; Moore, Josef H; Greathouse, David G

    2013-12-01

    Musicians have been reported as having a high prevalence of upper-extremity musculoskeletal disorders, including carpal tunnel syndrome. The purpose of this study was to determine the presence of median and ulnar neuropathies in U.S. Army Medical Command (MEDCOM) Band members at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Thirty-five MEDCOM Band members (30 males, 5 females) volunteered to participate. There were 33 right-handed musicians, and the mean length of time in the MEDCOM Band was 12.2 yrs (range, 1-30 yrs). Subjects completed a history form, were interviewed, and underwent a physical examination of the cervical spine and bilateral upper extremities. Nerve conduction studies of the bilateral median and ulnar nerves were performed. Electrophysiological variables served as the reference standard for median and ulnar neuropathy and included distal sensory latencies, distal motor latencies, amplitudes, conduction velocities, and comparison study latencies. Ten of the 35 subjects (29%) presented with abnormal electrophysiologic values suggestive of an upper extremity mononeuropathy. Nine of the subjects had abnormal median nerve electrophysiologic values at or distal to the wrist; 2 had bilateral abnormal values. One had an abnormal ulnar nerve electrophysiologic assessment at the elbow. Nine of these 10 subjects had clinical examination findings consistent with the electrophysiological findings. The prevalence of mononeuropathies in this sample of band members is similar to that found in previous research involving civilian musicians (20-36%) and far exceeds that reported in the general population. Prospective research investigating screening, examination items, and injury prevention measures in musicians appears to be warranted.

  5. [Medical service of Russian Army in the First World War 1914-1918 (to the 95th anniversary of the beginning of war)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korniushko, I G; Gladkikh, P F; Loktev, A E

    2009-08-01

    During the First World War 1914-1918 Russian Army hadn't a united medical service, military-medical affair was diluted in multiple governances. Evacuation of wounded and ill persons was an affair of Evacuation Governance of Main Governance the General Staff. Process of treatment in field and stationary medical formations was administered by sanitarium chiefs of armies and theaters of operation, bureaucrats of Russian Red Cross Society, Russian Union of Cities and Territorial Union. Supply by medical property, accounting and arrangement of medical staff was administered by Main Military-Sanitarium Governance, supply by sanitarium-household property--by Main Indent Governance, health resort affair--by Governance of Supreme chief of sanitarium and evacuation part in Empire of prince Ol'denburgskiy P.A. On the base of different sources were characterized casualty of Russian Army during the war.

  6. How stressful is doctor-patient communication? Physiological and psychological stress of medical students in simulated history taking and bad-news consultations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsman, Robert L.; Pranger, Susan; Koot, Stephanie; Fabriek, Marcel; Karemaker, John M.; Smets, Ellen M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Medical communication can be a stressful experience for both doctors and patients. In particular, inexperienced doctors facing the demanding task of a bad news consultation may experience high levels of distress. The aim of this exploratory study is to test students' differential

  7. Naval Medical R and D News, February 2017, Volume 9, Issue 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    preventive medical specialist Capt. Charles Miller, MC, USN, to Vietnam in July 1969. Much of his work would be conducted in concert the Navy...service members.... SILVER SPRING, Md. — Former Naval Medical Research Center (NMRC) Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) intern

  8. U.S. Army Medical Department Journal (January-March 2004)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-01

    the Center’s workforce emphasizes flexibility, adaptability, and a multi- disciplined approach in providing technical products to its Army...grant award to Slab DSP to develop new integrated circuit. Press release. Auckland , New Zealand: PHITEK Systems; June 4, 2002. 11. Sharp B

  9. Army Study Shows Decline In Behavioral Health Stigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Army Study Shows Decline in Behavioral Health Stigma By Rob McIlvaine Army News Service WASHINGTON, Jan. 20, 2012 - A newly released Army study on...conference yesterday. The three-year study outlines the problem of suicide in the Army and related issues of substance abuse, spouse abuse and child abuse...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2012 to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Army Study Shows Decline In Behavioral Health Stigma 5a. CONTRACT

  10. News reported on 30 November 1993 by the Middle East News Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-01-10

    The document reproduces a letter dated 27 December 1993 from the Alternate Resident Representative of Iraq to the IAEA including in an annex the news reported on 30 November 1993 by the Middle East News Agency concerning the detection of nuclear radiations in Iraqi military equipment left behind by the Iraqi army during the war for Kuwait liberation.

  11. News reported on 30 November 1993 by the Middle East News Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The document reproduces a letter dated 27 December 1993 from the Alternate Resident Representative of Iraq to the IAEA including in an annex the news reported on 30 November 1993 by the Middle East News Agency concerning the detection of nuclear radiations in Iraqi military equipment left behind by the Iraqi army during the war for Kuwait liberation

  12. Medical journals--in the news and for the wrong reasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Sanjay A

    2014-01-01

    2013 has been a landmark year, in fact, a bad year for biomedical journals. Medical journals and their editors have been respected for long, as they are the harbingers of change and of progress in scientific thought. Science expects transparency from the agents through which scientists publish their latest research findings and this expectation is usually fulfilled. Recent developments have, however, thrown into doubt the integrity of some science journals, their editors, and by extension, the entire field of biomedical and science publishing. These developments involve wide-ranging issues--the impact factor, the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE), and the birth, existence and rise of predatory journals.

  13. U.S. Army Medical Command Injury Summary, Active Duty Personnel, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Michelle Canham-Chervak 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Army...Public Health Center (Provisional), Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21010-5403 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER S.0023116-16 9. SPONSORING... softball bases (Pollack et al., 2005) • Mouthguards for football, basketball (Knapik et al., 2007) • Protective eyewear (Cass, 2012; Goldstein and Wee

  14. U.S. Army Medical Department Journal, January-March 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    events thundered onward. The term “Reconstruction Aides” was changed in 1926 to “ physiotherapy ” and “occupational therapy.”6 Only a few years later...The training of occupational therapists witnessed a similar buildup with the start of a student occupational therapy program in 1962.7 The decade...Soldiers was paramount.15 POST-VIETNAM In the year after the fall of Saigon, the Army Student Occupational Therapy program also ended due to the need

  15. Naval Medical Research and Development News. Volume 7, Issue 3, March 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-29

    involved in the efforts to combat the West African Ebola epidemic in Liberia . Pachuta expressed his gratitude to the NMRC staff for continuing to be...Sailors for their involvement in the West African Ebola epidemic in Liberia , as part of two NMRC mobile laboratory teams. (Photo taken by Mikelle D...Rear Adm. Pachuta Recognizes NMRC Ebola Team SILVER SPRING, Md., -- Naval Medical Research Center (NMRC) Commanding Officer, Capt. John W. Sanders

  16. Naval Medical Research and Development News. Volume 8, Issue 7, July 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    with the pathogen. The virus can be spread by infected people, contaminated food or water, or contact with contaminated surfaces, making...effectiveness to support approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for widespread use among other U.S. military populations and civilians. NHRC has... Malaysia aims to address some of these unanswered questions. Led by Lt. Brian L. Pike of the Naval Medical Research Center – Asia (NMRC- A) based in

  17. Naval Medical R and D News, Volume 9, Issue 12, December 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    1907, Mary Mallon was a carrier of typhoid fever. Like other enteric diseases typhoid is primarily transmitted by ingesting contaminated food or...electricity, food , water…and then we arrived to provide support, help and literally…comfort,” said Gutierrez. Gutierrez, an infectious disease clinician and...Iss. 12 4 NMRC-A Shares Importance of New Clinical Research Center in Malaysia From Naval Medical Research Center - Asia Public Affairs SINGAPORE

  18. Naval Medical R and D News. Volume 8, Issue 12, December 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    scars that may manifest as depression or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Military leaders and medical personnel were quick to realize that...shock, which can be life threatening. (cont.) Full Article NAMRU-2 Scientists Highlight Ongoing Dengue Research in Cambodia at ASTMH...Full Article Beyond the Battlefield: Using Research to Improve Wounded Warrior Care and Quality of Life (Cover) ASTMH - NMRC and WRAIR Work

  19. Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Support for the American Expeditionary Forces by the US Army Medical Corps During World War I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, James R; Baskin, Leland B

    2015-09-01

    Historical research on pathology and laboratory medicine services in World War I has been limited. In the Spanish American War, these efforts were primarily focused on tropical diseases. World War I problems that could be addressed by pathology and laboratory medicine were strikingly different because of the new field of clinical pathology. Geographic differences, changing war tactics, and trench warfare created new issues. To describe the scope of pathology and laboratory medicine services in World War I and the value these services brought to the war effort. Available primary and secondary sources related to American Expeditionary Forces' laboratory services were analyzed and contrasted with the British and German approaches. The United States entered the war in April 1917. Colonel Joseph Siler, MD, a career medical officer, was the director, and Colonel Louis B. Wilson, MD, head of pathology at the Mayo Clinic, was appointed assistant director of the US Army Medical Corps Division of Laboratories and Infectious Disease, based in Dijon, France. During the next year, they organized 300 efficient laboratories to support the American Expeditionary Forces. Autopsies were performed to better understand treatment of battlefield injuries, effects of chemical warfare agents, and the influenza pandemic; autopsies also generated teaching specimens for the US Army Medical Museum. Bacteriology services focused on communicable diseases. Laboratory testing for social diseases was very aggressive. Significant advances in blood transfusion techniques, which allowed brief blood storage, occurred during the war but were not primarily overseen by laboratory services. Both Siler and Wilson received Distinguished Service Medals. Wilson's vision for military pathology services helped transform American civilian laboratory services in the 1920s.

  20. Evaluation of two videotape instruction programmes on how to break bad news--for Cantonese-speaking medical students in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betson, C L; Fielding, R; Wong, G; Chung, S F; Nestel, D F

    1997-12-01

    To evaluate a culture-specific videotape on how to 'break bad news' and another videotape produced by a western university, and to determine if the language of presentation influenced the students' perceived abilities to execute basic skills. Third year medical students at the Faculty of Medicine, the University of Hong Kong. Longitudinal study with experimental design. Two instructional tapes on breaking bad news; one using Chinese speaking role models and one using English. In both groups, self-efficacy summed scores increased from 26.8 (95% CI = 25.9-27.7) at the pre-test to 29.0 (95% CI = 28.4-29.6). The biggest changes occurred in perceived self-efficacy regarding specific skills. However, students using the Chinese tape rated skills as more useful than those using the English tape. The videotapes were useful in teaching communication skills. Culturally relevant audiovisual materials were more effective.

  1. Evaluating the Coding and Workload Accounting Improvement Initiative of Madigan Army Medical Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bewley, Lee W; Bender, Brian J

    2007-01-01

    ... documentation, provider coding accuracy and education, and clinic electronic medical record (AHLTA) usage. The desired end state of the CWAI is improved medical documentation and coding accuracy at MAMC...

  2. Analysis of publications in Medical Journal of Chinese People’s Liberation Army during 2006 to 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-ping ZHU

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the characteristics of articles published in the Medical Journal of Chinese People’s Liberation Army(MJCPLA from year 2006 to 2010,so as to provide some beneficial references for further advance of the journal.Methods Each bibliometrics index of MJCPLA during 2006 to 2010 was analyzed with literature metrology.Results A total of 2442 articles were published in 60 issues over 5 years characterizing reasonable column setting,a high proportion,accounting for 43.5%,of fund-supported researches,with coauthor paper accounting for 95.6% and coauthor degree at 5.20.The articles were provided by authors widely distributed from 31 provinces,autonomous regions,mulicipality,and Macao Special Administrative Region,America,Ukraine,German and other overseas areas,implying the author ranks are of tremendous strength,and the readers group is of steady.Conclusion For the high quality of materials being published,the MJCPLA has a claim to one of the most important military medical information sources and an important core journal in medical field.

  3. NERSC News

    Science.gov (United States)

    NERSC Powering Scientific Discovery Since 1974 Login Site Map | My NERSC search... Go Home About Scheduled Outages Login Node Status My NERSC Now Computing Highlights Timeline News & Publications News Coming to NERSC Login Page May 21, 2018 NERSC rolls out a redesigned login page on June 11. Read More Â

  4. U.S. Army Medical Department Journal, April-June 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    IGR), against dengue vector mosquitoes. In the Peruvian Amazon community at Iquitos, Stancil42 (Naval Medical Research Center Detachment, Peru ...Research Unit- Kenya, Nairobi; Naval Medical Research Center Detachment, Lima, Peru ; Naval Medical Research Unit-2, Jakarta, Indonesia; and the Naval...These projects have revealed that sand flies often emerge from the soil beneath tents and camps. In an effort to prevent sand flies breeding in rodent

  5. Integrating Medical Supply as Part of the Army's Single Integrated Materiel Manager Concept--Why or why Not?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baxter, Shelia

    1998-01-01

    .... To achieve the goal of seamless logistics integration capabilities, one concept is to establish a Single Integrated Materiel Manager for the Army which envisions integrating all such functions...

  6. Energy Survey of Eisenhower Army Medical Center, Fort Gordon, Augusta, Georgia. Volume 2. Appendices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1996-01-01

    ...) including low cost/no cost ECO's and perform complete evaluations of each. Energy equipment replacement projects already underway, approved, or planned by the Medical Center staff will be factored into the evaluations...

  7. U.S. Army Medical Department Journal (January-March 2003)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Porr, Darrel R; Melanson, Mark A; Winstead, , Alison D; Zolman, Ryan P; Moore, Christopher J; Gbur, Jr., Lester W. Grau ;Charles J; Yarvis, Clint Schreckhise ;Jeffrey; Bordnick, Patrick; Jones, Timothy K; Austerman, Wayne R

    2003-01-01

    .... "Ground Evacuation in the Republic of Korea," by CPT Christopher J. Moore, MS, USA, outlines the medical evacuation system in South Korea and the difficulties that terrain, weather, and overcrowded highways may pose in the event of hostilities...

  8. Medical Diplomacy in the United States Army: A Concept Whose Time Has Come

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krueger, Mary V

    2008-01-01

    ... to the terrorists who wish to defeat US troops, as well as the Western way of life. Medical diplomacy is a nonlethal tool used in combination with economic and diplomatic efforts to achieve this end...

  9. "An army of reformed drunkards and clergymen": the medicalization of habitual drunkenness, 1857-1910.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavigny, Katherine A

    2014-07-01

    Historians have recognized that men with drinking problems were not simply the passive subjects of medical reform and urban social control in Gilded Age and Progressive Era America but also actively shaped the partial medicalization of habitual drunkenness. The role played by evangelical religion in constituting their agency and in the historical process of medicalization has not been adequately explored, however. A post-Civil War evangelical reform culture supported institutions that treated inebriates along voluntary, religious lines and lionized former drunkards who publicly promoted a spiritual cure for habitual drunkenness. This article documents the historical development and characteristic practices of this reform culture, the voluntarist treatment institutions associated with it, and the hostile reaction that developed among medical reformers who sought to treat intemperance as a disease called inebriety. Those physicians' attempts to promote therapeutic coercion for inebriates as medical orthodoxy and to deprive voluntarist institutions of public recognition failed, as did their efforts to characterize reformed drunkards who endorsed voluntary cures as suffering from delusions arising from their disease. Instead, evangelical traditions continued to empower reformed drunkards to publicize their own views on their malady which laid the groundwork for continued public interest in alcoholics' personal narratives in the twentieth century. Meanwhile, institutions that accommodated inebriates' voluntarist preferences proliferated after 1890, marginalizing the medical inebriety movement and its coercive therapeutics. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Fake News

    OpenAIRE

    Grunewald, Andreas; Kräkel, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade, social media and the Internet have amplified the possibility to spread false information, a.k.a. fake news, which has become a serious threat to the credibility of politicians, organizations, and other decision makers. This paper proposes a framework for investigating the incentives to strategically spread fake news under different institutional configurations and payoff structures. In particular, we show under what conditions institutions that foster transparency in the m...

  11. A Policy Analysis of U.S. Army Professional Filler System (PROFIS) Sourcing Management at the Regional Medical Command Level in Support of an Expeditionary Army at War

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-29

    many personnel had little knowledge or understanding of their wartime units and jobs and met for the very first time when they arrived at the...this handbook useful in teaching an undergraduate introduction to public policy and for executive education groups" (Bardach, 1996, Foreword,). The...FY04 Budget ($M) (includes $76.8 GWOT) D...cM F F A 47% Percent Residency wf, 9.. Ft . TX Ci 0 Programs of Army Total El P-.TX GPk * ft C.- Cb, X PROFIS

  12. Battlefield Tourniquets: Lessons Learned in Moving Current Care Toward Best Care in an Army Medical Department at War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragh, John F; Dubick, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Bleeding prevention and control by tourniquet use by out-of-hospital caregivers is a major breakthrough in military medicine of current wars. The present review documents developments in tourniquet practices since 2001 among the US military services for aid in improving doctrine, policy, and especially care in wars to come. Tourniquets are an adjunct for resuscitation in self-care and buddy aid and today are issued to all military servicepersons who deploy into a combat zone. In the US Army, virtually every Soldier is trained in first aid tourniquet use; since 2009 they are instructed early and often to use them early and often. Despite substantial knowledge gains among the services in tourniquet use and resulting improvements in casualty survival, current evidence shows persistent difficulties in achieving best care with tourniquet use for individual trauma patients. Nevertheless, contemporary tourniquet use incorporates key lessons learned over the last 14 years of war that include: (1) tourniquet use reliably stops bleeding from limb wounds and prevents mortality in prehospital settings; and (2) brief tourniquet use appears to be safe. These 2 lessons have become so evident that civilian emergency medical systems have begun using them, albeit unevenly. Collection and interpretation of data of casualties with tourniquet use have showed that such intervention has lifesaving benefit through 2 mechanisms: control of both ongoing hemorrhage and shock severity. The next generation of interventions in bleeding control involves developing the skill sets, education, and standards of tourniquet users which may improve hemorrhage control in wars to come.

  13. Medical Department, United States Army. Surgery in World War II. Neurosurgery. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1958-01-01

    116 Photomicrograph showing petechial hemorrhages in cortex ------------------- 378 117 Photomicrograph showing nerve cell changes in caudate nucleus...headache unrelieved by ordinary medication or when there were signs of increasing intracranial hypertension; and (4) diagnosis of persistent fever ...hemorrhage at various points along the track of the bullet, was almost. invariably present for some days, or even for weeks, after injury. Fever was also

  14. No news is good news?

    CERN Multimedia

    Peter Schmid

    I'm retired and living back home in Austria. But I am still excited about ATLAS and I try to follow the progress of the project as closely as I can. The ATLAS e-news are an excellent source of information. Appearing now every month they provide a broad, solid view of what is going on. But I'm greedy; I'd love to be "on-line". When the first End-Cap Toroid moved from hall 180 to the pit I was frustrated. I knew that it was happening but I could only get first pictures and reports a few days later. In the meantime the ECT was lowered into the cavern; no information on this available nowhere up to the this issue of the e-news. Here is my dream: an "ATLAS news ticker", i.e. a web page with the news appearing on the day they happen; just one line of information, possibly with a reference to a picture, a person or a report. My idea isn't new. On the ATLAS web-site for the public we have a window "latest news". But I was disappointed when, until a week ago, the latest news dated from December 2006 !!! Can't we do...

  15. A 12-month descriptive analysis of emergency intubations at Brooke Army Medical Center: a National Emergency Airway Registry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    April, Michael D; Schauer, Steven G; Brown Rd, Calvin A; Ng, Patrick C; Fernandez, Jessie; Fantegrossi, Andrea E; Maddry, Joseph K; Summers, Shane; Sessions, Daniel J; Barnwell, Robert M; Antonacci, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Emergency airway management is a critical skill for military healthcare providers. Our goal was to describe the Emergency Department (ED) intubations at Brooke Army Medical Center (BAMC) over a 12-month period. Physicians performing endotracheal intubations in the BAMC ED complete data collection forms for each intubation event as part of the National Emergency Airway Registry, including patient demographics, intubation techniques, success and failure rates, adverse events, and patient disposition. We cross-referenced these forms against the numbers of intubation events reported in the ED nursing daily reports to ensure capture of all intubations. Providers completed forms for every intubation within 6 weeks of the procedure. We analyzed data from March 28, 2016, to March 27, 2017. During the study period, providers performed 259 intubations in the BAMC ED. Reasons for intubation were related to trauma for 184 patients (71.0%) and medical conditions for 75 patients (29.0%). Overall, first-attempt success was 83.0%. Emergency medicine residents performed a majority of first attempts (95.0%). Most common devices chosen on first attempt were a video laryngoscope for 143 patients (55.2%) and a direct laryngoscope for 115 patients (44.4%). One patient underwent cricothyrotomy. The 2 most common induction agents were ketamine (59.8%; 95% CI, 55.2%-67.4%) and etomidate (19.3%; 95% CI, 14.7%-24.7%). The most common neuromuscular blocking agents were rocuronium (62.9%; 95% CI, 56.7%-68.8%) and succinylcholine (18.9%; 95% CI, 14.3%-24.2%). In the BAMC ED, emergency intubation most commonly occurred for trauma indications using video laryngoscopy with a high first-pass success.

  16. The Army’s Ground Combat Vehicle (GCV) Program: Background and Issues for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-28

    Daily, May 13, 2009. 6 Ibid. 7 John T. Bennett, “Carter: FCS Successor Effort Could Have Many Primes,” Defense News, May 18, 2009. 8 Marjorie...2014. 40 Zachary Fryer- Biggs , “U.S. Army Official Defends GCV Against Attacks,” Defense News, February 25, 2014. 41Assistant Secretary of the Army

  17. US Army Medical Materiel development activity, 1987 annual report. Progress report, 1 January-31 December 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, C.E.

    1988-05-06

    Information relating to accomplishments in military medicine in three areas is presented. The Project Management Support Division (PMSD) provides centralized administrative, financial management, contracting, and logistical support to the Project Managers and staff. The Biological Systems Project Management Division manages the development and acquisition of biological products to prevent casualties or loss of soldier effectiveness due to disease. These diseases may be naturally acquired (close contact, unsanitary conditions, contaminated environment, biting insects), or delivered deliberately (aerosols). Product Officers exploit domestic and foreign medical technology to remedy deficiencies identified by the Combat Developer and monitor research projects for their application to disease protective measures. The Pharmaceutical Systems Project Management Division centrally manages the development and the initial production of pharmaceutical products (antidotes and drugs), related drug delivery systems (autoinjectors and transdermal patches), and decontamination products. These products are fielded as preventive, protective, and therapeutic modalities for use against chemical and biological warfare threats, certain endemic diseases, and the treatment of combat casualties. The Applied Medical Systems Project Management Division is a multidisciplinary team with broad mission responsibilities to centrally manage the development and initial production of applied medical products, related diagnostic equipment, optical corrective devices for protective masks, and pesticide delivery systems.

  18. Practice on medical support in dealing with abandoned chemical weapons by Japanese army in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu LIU

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Japanese abandoned chemical weapons (JACWs are a momentous and eventful historical issue for both China and Japan. Large quantities of chemical weapons abandoned by the Japanese invaders still remain on Chinese soil after 1945 when Japanese invaders were defeated and surrendered. Up to date, JACWs have been found in 19 provinces (cities or districts of mainland China. The types of JACWs include chemical bombs, chemical aerial bombs, gas cylinders and loose packed barrels. The types of toxic agents include mustard gas, irritant agents, choking agents, systemic poisoning agents and etc. In order to eliminate JACWs to reduce injuries produced by toxic agents, Chinese government, in cooperation with Japanese government, organized a special troop to search, excavate, retrieve, and destroy JACWs. Up to date, about 50,000 pieces of poisonous chemical had retrieved and destroyed. The first operation was officially begun in Nanjing in October 2010. The main points of medical support on the operation of destroying JACWs include proper treatment of the newly discovered patients caused by JACWs, preparedness for handling the emergency medical rescue, and to actively provide routine medical support for JACWs operation field.

  19. NEWS: Institute news

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Leeds. Physics at Work Exhibition: 12-14 September, University of Cambridge The year 2000 Exhibition will be the 16th organized by Brenda Jennison. The exhibition will be held at the Cavendish Laboratory and further details can be obtained from Brenda at the University (tel: 01223 332888, fax: 01223 332894 or e-mail: bmj10@cam.ac.uk). News on GNVQ science The Institute of Physics and the Royal Society of Chemistry are currently financing the compilation of a directory of resources to assist teachers in identifying and selecting suitable materials for teaching the new GNVQ science specifications. Work on the first part of the directory will soon be completed and it is hoped to publish the material in both print and electronic forms before the end of the summer term. This first part covers resources - all evaluated by practising GNVQ teachers - supporting the teaching of the compulsory units for Advanced GNVQ Science. A small team comprising a physics teacher, a chemistry teacher and a biology teacher, all involved with GNVQ programmes and led by Dr Ken Gadd, has carried out the work. They have established a network of teachers around the country to help with the evaluation of curriculum materials. The next part of the project will be to examine the feasibility of providing a similar listing for the optional units at this level. Future development, depending on the availability of funds, will extend the project to Intermediate level programmes in science, including the Part One, once its structure has been agreed at QCA. Further information about the Directory and the next phase of development will be available in the autumn. Activities Physics on Stage The future of science, technology and the ensuing wealth creation potential for Britain will depend on the quality of science education in schools today. Yet the numbers studying physics, which underpins science and engineering, are falling. This problem is currently

  20. Army Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    that allows them to perform applied research under the Institute for Biotechnology research team 1 2 3 20 | ARMY TECHNOLOGY MAGAZINE ...DASA(R&T) Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research and Technology Download the magazine , view online or read each individual story with...Army photo by Conrad Johnson) Front and back cover designs by Joe Stephens EXECUTIVE DEPUTY TO THE COMMANDING GENERAL Army Technology Magazine is an

  1. U.S. Army Medical Bioengineering Research and Development Laboratory Annual Progress Report FY 1985. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-01

    Dental Corps, Malaysian Armed Forces; MAJ Johan van Geyzel, Malaysian Embassy, Washington, DC 7 March - BG Dato Chen Kwee Fong, Chief of Engineers... Malaysian Armed Forces; MAJ Johan van Geyzel, Malaysian Embassy, MAJ Tairobi bin Abdul Razak, Malaysian Army 2 July - BG William 0. Rodgers, Australian Army...and Diets for Culturing and Testing with Daphnia magna." Paper presented at the Ninth Symposium of Aquatic Toxicology and Environmental Fate sponsored

  2. The P-A-C-I-E-N-T-E Protocol: An instrument for breaking bad news adapted to the Brazilian medical reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Rebello Pereira

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: There are plenty of published tools for breaking bad medical news; however, none of them is culturally appropriate to our reality or published in the Brazilian literature. This study proposes a genuinely Brazilian communication tool and evaluates its acceptance among doctors and nurses. Method: This was a prospective study. The data were collected after specific training of doctors and nurses on the bad news communication techniques based on the P-A-C-I-E-N-T-E ("patient," in Portuguese Protocol. This instrument is in accordance with the Brazilian reality and was based on the SPIKES communication tool. Results: The worst task to be performed during communication is "talking about death" followed by "discussing the end of curative treatment attempts" and "diagnosis" itself. Among the respondents, 48% reported they did not receive formal training for communicating. Also, 52% of respondents do not use any systematic approach in their daily practice when communicating with patients, but 97% considered the proposed P-A-C-I-E-N-T-E Protocol as a useful and appropriate communication tool. Conclusion: The P-A-C-I-E-N-T-E Protocol proved to be suitable to the Brazilian context.

  3. people | News

    Science.gov (United States)

    of Communication Fermilab news Search Useful links Symmetry magazine Interactions Interact people , people, building, Wilson Hall, farm, planter A John Deere planter is ready for work. Josh Frieman takes the experiment for the next two years. Controlled burn at Pine Street entrance May 9, 2018 Ryan

  4. Fake News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Linda

    2017-01-01

    In a politically and digitally polarized environment, identifying and evaluating fake news is more difficult than ever before. Librarians who have been teaching information and media literacy skills for decades understand the role we can and must play in this environment.

  5. Pediatric care as part of the US Army medical mission in the global war on terrorism in Afghanistan and Iraq, December 2001 to December 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Mark W; Spinella, Philip C; Azarow, Kenneth S; Callahan, Charles W

    2008-02-01

    Our objective in this report was to describe the epidemiologic features of and workload associated with pediatric admissions to 12 US Army military hospitals deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan. The Patient Administration Systems and Biostatistics Activity database was queried for all local national patients Afghanistan and Iraq between December 2001 and December 2004. Pediatric admissions during the study period were 1012 (4.2%) of 24,227 admissions, occupying 10% of all bed-days. The median length of stay was 4 days (interquartile range: 1-8 days). The largest proportion of children were 11 to 17 years of age (332 of 757 children; 44%), although 45 (6%) of 757 children hospitalized were Afghanistan and Iraq. Military medical planners must continue to improve pediatric medical support, including personnel, equipment, and medications that are necessary to treat children injured during combat operations, as well as those for whom the existing host nation medical infrastructure is unable to provide care.

  6. Brigadier General James Stevens Simmons (1890-1954), Medical Corps, United States Army: a career in preventive medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marble, Sanders

    2012-02-01

    James Simmons began his career in the US Army as a laboratory officer and his assignments progressed into tropical medicine research. His interests and work evolved into preventive medicine (PM, as the Army termed public health), and he took both a PhD and a Doctorate in Public Health. As the Army's leading PM officer he was appointed head of PM in 1940 and guided the Army's PM effort through World War II. His responsibility ran from gas masks through healthy nutrition and occupational health to an enormous variety of diseases; by the war's end, the breadth and importance of PM was reflected in the Preventive Medicine Division, having fully one-sixth of all military personnel at the Surgeon General's Office. Simmons used his strong professional credentials to tap into civilian medicine for expertise the Army lacked and he established organizations that survive to this day. After retirement, he sought to expand the field of public health and raise another generation of public health physicians.

  7. News of the Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Lifer, Evan; Olson, Renee; Margolis, Rick; Glick, Andrea; Milliot, Jim

    1999-01-01

    Includes the following reports: "'LJ' (Library Journal) News Report: Libraries Success at Funding Books and Bytes"; "'SLJ' (School Library Journal) News Report: We're in the Money!"; and "'PW' (Publishers Weekly) News Reports". (AEF)

  8. FAKE NEWS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella; Vestergaard, Mads

    Politik og medier oversvømmes af fordrejninger, fortielser, forglemmelser og forvanskninger af sandheden. Vi invaderes af populistiske fortællinger, “alternative kendsgerninger” og “fake news”. Det er nu et faktum, at misinformation er noget man aktivt må forholde sig til som politiker, som...... for virkelige udfordringer, vi står over for. FAKE NEWS giver et første sammenhængende billede af hvordan opmærksomhedsøkonomien kan ende i det postfaktuelle demokrati: Eventyrlige fortællinger erstatter kendsgerninger som grundlag for politisk meningsdannelse, debat og lovgivning. Et monster, som de færreste...

  9. news-please

    OpenAIRE

    Hamborg, Felix; Meuschke, Norman; Breitinger, Corinna; Gipp, Bela

    2017-01-01

    The amount of news published and read online has increased tremendously in recent years, making news data an interesting resource for many research disciplines, such as the social sciences and linguistics. However, large scale collection of news data is cumbersome due to a lack of generic tools for crawling and extracting such data. We present news-please, a generic, multilanguage, open-source crawler and extractor for news that works out-of-thebox for a large variety of news websites. ...

  10. 2007 Army Modernization Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    Additional confi gurations include two NATO li ers with patients and one medical a endant. The aircra has a hoist for use in emergency...including airframes, wiring bundles and hydraulic systems on the remanufactured CH-47Fs are new. Program Status. The Army received its fi rst fully...Expansible Van and the 10T Dump Truck. Another new variant, the FMTV-Load Handling System, is expected to be fi elded in late-2007, initially to medical

  11. What's on the News? The Use of Media Texts in Exams of Clinical Biochemistry for Medical and Nutrition Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Julia Martins; Mesquita, Diego Martins; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    Health-related popular articles are easily found among media sources. With the increasing popularity of the internet, medical information--full of misconceptions--has become easily available to the lay people. The ability to recognize misconceptions may require good biomedical knowledge. In this sense, we decided to use articles from the internet…

  12. Army Hearing Program Status Report Quarter 2 Fiscal Year 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    U.S. Army Publ ic Heal th Center Army Hearing Program Status Report Q2 FY17 Clinical Public Health and Epidemiology Directorate Army... Hearing Division General Medical: 500A July 2017 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited Army Hearing Program Status Report, Q2FY17...56               INTRODUCTION The Army Hearing Program Status Report (AHPSR) is a component of the Public Health

  13. News & Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    Helge H. Wehmeier, President and Chief Executive Office of Bayer Corporation, is the recipient of the 2001 Leadership in Education Award from the Keystone Center. Wehmeier was cited for his support in spearheading ongoing education and volunteer efforts such as Bayer's Making Science Make Sense program, which, in partnership with NSF, advances science literacy through hands-on, inquiry-based science learning. You are invited to send contributions to the News & Announcements column. They should be sent to Elizabeth A. Moore, Associate Editor, by email or by mail at Journal of Chemical Education, 209 N. Brooks St., Madison, WI 53715-1116. Contributions should be concise, to the point, and appropriate for the Journal's audience. They may be edited for clarity, timeliness, appropriateness, or length.

  14. Measuring News Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksl, Adam; Ashley, Seth; Craft, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    News media literacy refers to the knowledge and motivations needed to identify and engage with journalism. This study measured levels of news media literacy among 500 teenagers using a new scale measure based on Potter's model of media literacy and adapted to news media specifically. The adapted model posits that news media literate individuals…

  15. Historical Review: The U.S. Army Medical Belt for Front Line First Aid: A Well-Considered Design That Failed the Medical Department During the First World War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wever, Peter C; Korst, Mike B J M; Otte, Maarten

    2016-10-01

    In December 1913, a board of medical officers was appointed to adapt new U.S. Army equipment to the needs of the Hospital Corps. One of the improvements concerned substitution of the satchel-like Hospital Corps pouch used to carry first aid equipment. A waist belt with 10 pockets, known as the medical belt, was devised, and supplied with a tourniquet, adhesive plaster, safety pins, iodine swabs, sublimated gauze, individual dressing packets, gauze bandages, aromatic spirit of ammonia, and common pins. In addition, an ax carrier accommodating a hand ax, a canteen hanger, and a pouch to carry diagnosis tags and instruments were attached to the medical belt. In 1916, the medical belt was incorporated in the field supply tables in the Manual for the Medical Department. The next year, on April 6, 1917, the U.S. Congress declared war on Germany in reaction to sinking of American ships by German submarines. Although the medical belt had given satisfaction in preliminary trials, it did not withstand the test of war. In practice, the medical belt proved a source of dissatisfaction both as to the methods of packing and its contents, which were considered useless in modern warfare. Subsequently, discontinuance of the medical belt was recommended. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  16. Army dreamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-14

    The birth of the Army Nursing Service took place in 1854, when Florence Nightingale, at the request of the Secretary of State for War, recruited and took to Scutari Hospital 38 women to tend the wounded of the Crimean war.

  17. Nanotechnology Laboratory Collaborates with Army to Develop Botulism Vaccine | FNLCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory (NCL) is collaborating with the Army to develop a candidate vaccine against botulism. Under a collaboration agreement between the National Cancer Institute and the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of

  18. Physics News

    CERN Multimedia

    Gianotti, F.

    In spite of the fact that real data will only come in the year 2006, this is a very busy and interesting time for Physics-related activities. A very short overview of these activities is given in this issue of the ATLAS News Letter, while the various topics will be described in more detail in the next issues. The Physics and Combined Performance groups are working in four main areas: 1) Assess the ATLAS potential for physics, with emphasis on new channels and ideas. Recent examples are Extra-dimensions, invisible Higgs decays, heavy ion physics, the expected potential of a "Super-LHC" running at a luminosity of 10^35, etc.. 2) Improve the understanding of the detector performance and optimise the reconstruction algorithms. Examples of issues in the pipeline are: can we tag charm-jet ? What can we gain in the jet energy resolution by combining the calorimeter and tracker information to reconstruct the jet energy ? 3) Follow detector changes and detector-related issues and monitor the impact on the perform...

  19. Novae news

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    As announced in the previous Bulletin, Novae has opened a new snack bar on the Flagstaff car park, just a few metres from CERN's reception area (Building 33).   Just a few metres from the CERN Reception, the new Novae snack point welcomes visitors and CERNois. Opening hours Currently: Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. From September: Monday to Friday, 7:45 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. The snack bar selection includes breakfast, starting at 2.70 CHF, cold dishes from 5 CHF, and hot dishes from 6 CHF.   Novae has also installed a 24-hour-a-day food vending machine in the CERN hostel (Building 39) and in Building 13. You can buy pasta and cooked dishes for 6.50 CHF to 8 CHF. In addition, a groceries vending machine has been installed in the main building, just across from the news kiosk. Nearly 60 different items are available around the clock. Finally, Novae has introduced a new payment system in several buildings on the Meyrin site. It accepts credit ca...

  20. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diet Complementary or Alternative Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments Online Studies News You Can Use Living With IBS ... Diet Complementary or Alternative Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments Online Studies News You Can Use Living With IBS ...

  1. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments Online Studies News You Can Use Living With IBS Relationships and IBS Pregnancy ... Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments Online Studies News You Can Use Living With IBS Relationships and IBS Pregnancy ...

  2. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Treatments IBS Diet Low FODMAP Diet Complementary or Alternative Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments Online Studies News You ... Treatments IBS Diet Low FODMAP Diet Complementary or Alternative Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments Online Studies News You ...

  3. News & Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-01

    News from Journal House National Chemistry Week (NCW) Celebrating Chemistry and Art is the theme of NCW 2001, to be held November 4-10, 2001. As you make plans for participating in the celebrations in your area, keep in mind that JCE is developing special materials on this theme, which will appear in our October issue: Classroom Activities, a comprehensive Illustrated Resource Paper, Report from Online, specially written brief articles illustrated in color, articles related to the theme, and CLIPs (Chemical Laboratory Information Profiles). Awards Announced Passer Award Passer Award recipients from the April 1 closing date are: George Bennett, Millikin University, Decatur, IL Daniel Berger, Bluffton College, Bluffton, OH Karen Dunlap, Sierra College, Rocklin, CA Myung-Hoon Kim, Georgia Perimeter College, Dunwoody, GA Cheryl Longfellow, Philadelphia University, Philadelphia, PA Jerry Maas, Oakton Community College, Des Plaines, IL Tim Royappa, University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL Visiting Scientist Award, Western Connecticut Section Diane Bunce, The Catholic University of America, has been selected as the 2001 Visiting Scientist of the Western Connecticut Section of the ACS. The award, presented annually since 1967, brings an outstanding chemical educator to visit high schools in Fairfield County, CT. In May, Bunce visited three high schools, Christian Heritage School, Fairfield High School, and Greenwich High School, where she interacted with teachers and students and presented lectures and demonstrations to several chemistry classes. She was also keynote speaker at the ACS local section's Education Night. The awardee is selected by a committee of university and high school teachers, industrial chemists, and the previous Visiting Scientist; there is an honorarium of 1500 plus expenses. Welch Award Roger D. Kornberg, a professor of structural biology at the Stanford University School of Medicine, received the 2001 Welch Award for his discovery of the nucleosome

  4. News/Press Releases

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — A press release, news release, media release, press statement is written communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing programs...

  5. Market News Price Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Real-time price data collected by the Boston Market News Reporter. The NOAA Fisheries' "Fishery Market News" began operations in New York City on February 14, 1938....

  6. News Media Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    radio news departments will operate on many technological platforms at the same time ( Papper , 2006, p.3). News radio stations will likely broadcast...Retrieved March 25, 2007, from http://firstlook.nytimes.com/index.php?cat=4 Papper , Bob. RTNDF’s 2006 Future of the News Survey, 25 Mar. 2006. 10 Mar

  7. The U.S. Online News Coverage of Mammography Based on a Google News Search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young Lin, Leng Leng; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B

    2017-12-01

    To characterize online news coverage relating to mammography, including articles' stance toward screening mammography. Google News was used to search U.S. news sites over a 9-year period (2006-2015) based on the search terms "mammography" and "mammogram." The top 100 search results were recorded. Identified articles were manually reviewed. The top 100 news articles were from the following sources: local news outlet (50%), national news outlet (24%), nonimaging medical source (13%), entertainment or culture news outlet (6%), business news outlet (4%), peer-reviewed journal (1%), and radiology news outlet (1%). Most common major themes were the screening mammography controversy (29%), description of a new breast imaging technology (23%), dense breasts (11%), and promotion of a public screening initiative (11%). For the most recent year, article stance toward screening mammography was 59%, favorable; 16%, unfavorable; and 25%, neutral. After 2010, there was an abrupt shift in articles' stances from neutral to both favorable and unfavorable. A wide range of online news sources addressed a range of issues related to mammography. National, rather than local, news sites were more likely to focus on the screening controversy and more likely to take an unfavorable view. The controversial United States Preventive Services Task Force guidelines may have influenced articles to take a stance on screening mammography. As such online news may impact public perception of the topic and thus potentially impact guideline adherence, radiologists are encouraged to maintain awareness of this online coverage and to support the online dissemination of reliable and accurate information. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cinema and the communication of bad news

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Isabel GÓMEZ CORDOBA; Haroldo ESTRADA

    2016-01-01

    Breaking Bad News requires medical professionals possess a range of skills to ensure that the patient has the information required for decision?making, this process occurs without further damage and even has a therapeutic effect, and another, that the doctor is not exposed to legal risk or stress associated with the inability to cope with the feelings of the patient, their families or themselves. This article discusses the aspects of communication of bad news in the field of doctor?patient re...

  9. Graphical User Interface (GUI) for the Warfighter Physiological Status Monitoring (WPSM) System - U.S. Army Medic Recommendations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tharion, William J; Kaushik, Sangeeta

    2006-01-01

    .... This information is sent wirelessly to a personal digital assistant (PDA) held by the medic. The primary purpose of this study was to determine what features should be included in the graphical user interface (GUI...

  10. News & Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    News from Journal House Guidelines for Submission The Journal's current Guide to Submissions can be found on pages 29-30 of this issue. They have been streamlined a bit and also include a handy check list. This information is also available on JCE Online at http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Authors/. Wanted: Demo Checkers The Tested Demonstrations column needs people who like to try out demos. Column editor Ed Vitz is looking for additional volunteers to serve as "checkers" for manuscripts that have been submitted to the Journal for possible publication as Tested Demonstrations. A checker is expected to perform two functions: to review the manuscript for accuracy and novelty, and to attempt to perform the demonstration according to the procedure supplied by the author. Checkers may suggest important improvements in demonstration procedures, and for their efforts they are cited in the byline when the manuscript is published. For instance, the demo showing the yellow cascading precipitates (lead iodide) made from potassium iodide and lead nitrate was submitted by Wobbe de Vos and checked by Kim Kostka. The (yellow) cascading precipitates are from "Using Large Glass Cylinders To Demonstrate Chemical Reactions" that appeared in the April 1999 issue of JCE. We prefer that checkers begin the review process (which may in some cases involve procuring supplies) very soon after being contacted so that their review can be completed in the timely manner that authors deserve. Checkers are usually teachers who routinely present lecture demonstrations in their classes in either high school or colleges. We try not to call on checkers more often than once a year, which is one of the reasons for this request. Another is that we lose many highly valued, experienced checkers to retirement or other endeavors. Prospective checkers may want to look at a copy of the JCE Tested Demonstration Evaluation Form. It can be found on the Web at http://www.kutztown.edu/ vitz

  11. News & Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-08-01

    News from Journal House Perspective on JCE Online Recently a reader asked us for a perspective on JCE Onlinehow the chemical education community is receiving it and how the Journal staff itself views it. We share our responses below. Subscriber Numbers How many people subscribe to JCE Online+? As of June 1, 1999, our records show that 13% of individual JCE subscriptions in the USA include JCE Online+. This percentage has increased significantly during the past year- in June 1998 it was approximately 4% and December 1998 about 7%. Almost all subscribers to JCE Online subscribe to print as well. Since JCE Online has only very recently been made available to institutional subscribers, there are no numbers to report. There has been considerable interest in online from libraries. Given that JCE Online+ is a fairly recent subscriber option and that many subscribers have a wait-and-see approach to any new option, we feel that the numbers above are quite high. The steady growth is encouraging. Online Usage How many people visit our Web site? Statistics for the period January 1, 1999, through May 31, 1999, that may be of interest include: Total Pages Served 361,115 Total Visits 138,377 Total Unique Visitors 51,744 Total Repeat Visitors 11,536 Average Visit Length 03:05 Average Requests/Visit 10.8 Average Pages/Visit 2.6 Average Daily Visits 916 Online Rationale and Expectations JCE Online is a very important part of the whole Journal, but we do not expect it to supplant print: online and print are very different media. Usage of JCE Online is growing steadily; our subscribers are realizing what we have learned: it is not possible to deliver the Journal in the print medium alone- print is no longer adequate to accomplish our mission. Examples of things not possible in print include: ·JCE Index to all 76 years of Journal issues, available all the time with responses within seconds. ·Supplementary materials that are important to only a limited number of our subscribers

  12. Army TLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-10

    Fast Deflation Device Tether marking Pennants Balloon / Tether marking LED Flashing light Loading Ramps Customized Trailer for transportation and Field...amount of xtra lift that permits the ballon to rise (if Res_Lift = 0, balloon is at equilibrium) RL = NL – Payload – Tether Payload: the weight of...Army TLS The TLS uses tethered aerodynamic blimps and precision-powered winches to loft one or more specialty-designed meteorological payloads that

  13. News & Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-02-01

    News from Journal House Journal Ambassadors, 1999 What do the people listed below have in common? A search of our records indicates that each has been a participant in our Journal Ambassador program during 1999. Guy Anderson Jim Becvar Jerry Bell Jim Birk Diane Bunce Ann Cartwright Thomas Clark Jane Crosby Maria Dean Art Ellis Donald Elswick Tommy Franklin Babu George Paul Heath Angela Hoffman Lynn Hogue J. J. Lagowski Frank Lambert Dorothy Lehmkuhl George Lelevre Scott Luaders Jane McMullen Marci Merritt Carl Minnier Richard Narske Ron Perkins Gabriel Pinto Dick Potts Herb Retcofsky Jerry Sarquis Elke Schoffers Sara Selfe Uni Susskind J. Mark Tolman John Varine Dawn Wakeley Marla White Those who are a part of this program take materials about the Journal to workshops, outreach programs, seminars, regional meetings, award nights, short courses, and other events at home and abroad, places where people who are interested in chemical education gather. Given about three weeks notice, we can outfit you with a variety of materials that will help others get tuned in to the good things that are happening in chemical education. We can send you an assortment of Journal issues, subscription forms, our Publications/Software Catalog, reprints from the Viewpoints series, copies of Classroom Activities, or JCE Gift Award Certificates, assuming that supplies are available. Of course we can arrange for the group to have temporary access to JCE Online. We can send you a brochure about the Ambassador program or answer any questions - just ask: email to jce@chem.wisc.edu; phone 1-800-991-5534 (U.S.) or 608-262-5153 (non-U.S.); fax 608-265-8094. If by chance you were a Journal Ambassador in 1999 but your name was not included, just let us know so that you can be recognized in a future column. Gift Subscription Awards As spring, the season of awards, approaches, we remind you of our handy Gift Certificates (a replica is shown on page 142). A gift of the Journal is not only affordable

  14. The United States Army Medical Department Journal, April - June 2011. Prehospital combat casualty care; The starting point of battlefield survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    from a porcine model of acute respiratory diseases secondary to pulmonary contusion. TRANSCUTANEOUS CO2 Are more accurate methods of estimating...combat medic diagnoses a tension pneumothorax from observing the patient and, if feasible, by auscultation with a stethoscope . Dyspnea, distended...Jugular veins, hypotension, and decreased unilateral breath sounds are the major findings for the diagnosis. The stethoscope was invented in 1816 by

  15. AMEDD Clinical Psychology Short Course Held in Letterman Army Medical Center, San Francisco, California on 5-9 February 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-02-02

    hypochondriasis about AIDS (62-67). The medical consequenLes of irrational fears and erroneous beliefs about HIV transmission include (a) shortages of...report emotional or somatic symptoms through cognitive or somatic complaints. The BASIC-BIS approach recommends that psychosomatic states be assessed...via somatic parameters (physical complaints/symptoms, galvanic skin response, skin temperature, heart rate, and electromyogram, etc.) and cognitive

  16. Annual Research Progress Report Fiscal Year 1990. Volume 1. Department of Clinical Investigation (Brooke Army Medical Center)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-10-01

    granulomE , Arch. Dermatol., (in press). Low, G. J. Ionizing radiation-induced pemphigus. Arch. Dermatol., (in press). McCollough, M. L. Dominant...the severity of their headache on a linear pain scale as well as a verbal scale. Patients were questioned as to whether they had received medications...occurred either by phone or in the Neurologist’s office, using the same verbal and linear scales. Progress: In all, six patients were entered into the

  17. Who Makes The News?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørndrup, Hanne; Bentsen, Martine

    As newsroom staff around the world went about their day on 25 March 2015, hundreds of volunteers located in over 100 countries gathered to monitor their news media as part of the Fifth Global Media Monitoring Project (GMMP). The Global Media Monitoring Project (GMMP) is the world’s longest......-running and most extensive research on gender in the news media. It began in 1995 when volunteers in 71 countries around the world monitored women’s presence in their national radio, television and print news. The research revealed that only 17% of news subjects – the people who are interviewed or whom the news...... is about – were women. It found that gender parity was ‘a distant prospect in any region of the world. News [was] more often being presented by women but it [was] still rarely about women. Denmark participates in GMMP for the second time and both times we can recognize the global inequality in the Danish...

  18. Breaking bad news in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantis, Apostolos; Exiara, Triada

    2015-01-01

    In a regional hospital, many patients are newly diagnosed with cancer. Breaking the bad news in these patients and their relatives is a tough task. Many doctors are not experienced in talking to patients about death or death-related diseases. In recent years, there have been great efforts to change the current situation. The aim of this study was to investigate the experience and education of medical personnel in breaking bad news in a secondary hospital. 59 doctors from General Hospital of Komotini, Greece were included in the study. All the doctors were in clinical specialties that treated cancer patients. A brief questionnaire was developed based on current guidelines such as Baile/SPIKES framework and the ABCDE mnemonic. Residents are involved in delivering bad news less frequently than specialists. Only 21 doctors (35.59%) had specific training on breaking bad news. 20 doctors (33.90%) were aware of the available techniques and protocols on breaking bad news. 47 doctors (79.66%) had a consistent plan for breaking bad news. 57 (96.61%) delivered bad news in a quiet place, 53 (89.83%) ensured no interruptions and enough time, 53 (89.83%) used simple words and 54 (91.53%) checked for understanding and did not rush through the news. 46 doctors (77.97%) allowed relatives to determine patient's knowledge about the disease. There were low rates of specific training in breaking bad news. However, the selected location, the physician's speech and their plan were according to current guidelines.

  19. Breaking bad news in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostolos Konstantis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In a regional hospital, many patients are newly diagnosed with cancer. Breaking the bad news in these patients and their relatives is a tough task. Many doctors are not experienced in talking to patients about death or death-related diseases. In recent years, there have been great efforts to change the current situation. The aim of this study was to investigate the experience and education of medical personnel in breaking bad news in a secondary hospital. Materials and Methods: 59 doctors from General Hospital of Komotini, Greece were included in the study. All the doctors were in clinical specialties that treated cancer patients. A brief questionnaire was developed based on current guidelines such as Baile/SPIKES framework and the ABCDE mnemonic. Results: Residents are involved in delivering bad news less frequently than specialists. Only 21 doctors (35.59% had specific training on breaking bad news. 20 doctors (33.90% were aware of the available techniques and protocols on breaking bad news. 47 doctors (79.66% had a consistent plan for breaking bad news. 57 (96.61% delivered bad news in a quiet place, 53 (89.83% ensured no interruptions and enough time, 53 (89.83% used simple words and 54 (91.53% checked for understanding and did not rush through the news. 46 doctors (77.97% allowed relatives to determine patient′s knowledge about the disease. Conclusions: There were low rates of specific training in breaking bad news. However, the selected location, the physician′s speech and their plan were according to current guidelines.

  20. News | Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    to give second life to EV batteries Yemen News National Lab Licensing Hydrogen Refueling Method Could Computing Center Centers, Institutes, and Programs RISCRisk and Infrastructure Science Center Other

  1. Good Friends, Bad News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kai; Arvidsson, Adam; Nielsen, Finn Årup

    . In this paper we explore the apparent paradox in a quantitative analysis of information diffusion on Twitter. Twitter is interesting in this context as it has been shown to present both the characteristics social and news media. The basic measure of virality in Twitter is the probability of retweet. Twitter...... is different from email in that retweeting does not depend on pre-existing social relations, but often occur among strangers, thus in this respect Twitter may be more similar to traditional news media. We therefore hypothesize that negative news content is more likely to be retweeted, while for non-news tweets...

  2. Pediatric Care as Part of the US Army Medical Mission in the Global War on Terrorism in Afghanistan and Iraq, December 2001 to December 2004

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burnett, Mark W; Spinella, Philip C; Azarow, Kenneth S; Callahan, Charles W

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Our objective in this report was to describe the epidemiologic features of and workload associated with pediatric admissions to 12 US Army military hospitals deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan. METHODS...

  3. The News Delivery Sequence: Bad News and Good News in Conversational Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Douglas W.

    1997-01-01

    Explores the conditional nature of good and bad news while focusing on three topics: (1) the status of information as news according the participants in a conversation; (2) the valence of this information with regard to its perception as good or bad; and (3) the effect of news on individuals. Notes that good news is privileged over bad news in…

  4. Googling the news

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørmen, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Search engines provide a window into the changing association between websites and keywords across cultures and countries and over time. As such, they offer journalism and news researchers an opportunity to study how search engines, in this case Google, mediate news events and stories online...

  5. BRAZILIAN NEWS PORTALS CHARACTERISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloiza G. Herckovitz

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A content analysis of four Brazilian news media portals found that economic news dominated the top headlines with little attention paid to education, the environment and welfare. Other trends included a focus on local events and national news sources, reliance on few sources, mostly official ones, and a low percentage of news that fitted the concept of newsworthiness (a combination of both social significance and deviance concepts. Other findings of a study of 432 top news stories published by UOL, Estadão, iG and Terra during a 15-day period between February and March 2008 indicate that the top portions of the portals’ front pages carry news that lacks story depth, editorial branding, and multimedia applications. The results suggest that online news portals are in their infancy although Brazil has the largest online population of Latin America. This study hopes to shed light on the gatekeeping process in Brazilian news portals. Brazilian media portals have yet to become a significant editorial force able to provide knowledge about social issues and public affairs in a socially responsible fashione.

  6. Routinizing Breaking News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartley, Jannie Møller

    2011-01-01

    This chapter revisits seminal theoretical categorizations of news proposed three decades earlier by US sociologist Gaye Tuchman. By exploring the definition of ”breaking news” in the contemporary online newsrooms of three Danish news organisations, the author offers us a long overdue re-theorizat......-theorization of journalistic practice in the online context and helpfully explores well-evidenced limitations to online news production, such as the relationship between original reporting and the use of ”shovelware.”......This chapter revisits seminal theoretical categorizations of news proposed three decades earlier by US sociologist Gaye Tuchman. By exploring the definition of ”breaking news” in the contemporary online newsrooms of three Danish news organisations, the author offers us a long overdue re...

  7. Administration: Army Congressional Fellowship Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    This printing publishes a new Army Regulation. This regulation presents the policies and procedures under which the Army manages the Army Congressional Fellowship Program and supplements applicable Department...

  8. News from the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2011-01-01

    This document gathers pieces of information from around the world concerning the nuclear sector. Among which were the following. Saudi-Arabia projects to build 16 nuclear reactors till 2020. In Pakistan the third reactor has entered into service, this reactor (Chashma-2, 330 MW) is a PWR-type reactor designed by CNNC (China National Nuclear Corporation). Areva Newport News LLC has postponed to a later date the construction of a plant dedicated to manufacturing big components like reactor vessels or vessel heads. Areva and Rhodia have signed an agreement for a better valorization of deposits involving uranium and rare earth elements. Bulgaria has inaugurated a new storage center for nuclear wastes. Areva has launched the construction of a plant dedicated to the production of Pb-212, an isotope used in the treatment of some cancers. A worker died of a fall on the building site of Flamanville-3. According to COMARE (Committee on Medical Aspects of Radiation in the Environment) there is no relationship between the child leukemia and the presence of nuclear power plants in U.K. Siemens has been condemned to pay 0.648 billion euros to Areva as a compensation for the breach of the shareholder pact. Rosatom has created Rosatom Overseas that will be in charge of financing, building, operating and even owning nuclear power plants on foreign soil. 'Electricite de France' has presented its trends for the next decade. (A.C.)

  9. Bad news: The influence of news coverage and Google searches on Gardasil adverse event reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faasse, Kate; Porsius, Jarry T; Faasse, Jonathan; Martin, Leslie R

    2017-12-14

    Human papilloma virus vaccines are a safe and effective tool for reducing HPV infections that can cause cervical cancer. However, uptake of these vaccines has been suboptimal, with many people holding negative beliefs and misconceptions. Such beliefs have been linked with the experience of unpleasant side effects following medical treatment, and media coverage may heighten such concerns. The present study sought to assess the influence of news coverage (number of news articles per month) on adverse event reporting in response to Gardasil vaccination in New Zealand over a 7.5-year period, and whether the influence of news coverage was mediated by internet search activity (Google search volumes). Multiple linear regression analyses and simple mediation analyses were used, controlling for year and number of vaccinations delivered. News coverage in the previous month, and Google search volumes in the same month, were significant predictors of adverse event reporting, after accounting for vaccination rates and year. Concurrent Google search volumes partially mediated the effect of prior news coverage. The results suggest that some of the adverse events reported were not related to the vaccination itself, but to news coverage and internet search volumes, which may have contributed to public concerns about potentially unpleasant or harmful outcomes. These findings have implications for the importance of psychological and social factors in adverse event reporting, and the role of the news media in disseminating health information. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Tweeting News Articles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Toledo Bastos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article we investigate the impact of social media readership to the editorial profile of newspapers. We analyze tweets containing links to news articles from eight of the largest national newspapers in the United States, United Kingdom, Spain, Brazil, and Germany. The data collection follows the first two weeks of October 2012 and includes 2,842,699 tweets with links to news articles. Twitter-shortened links were resolved using a three-pass routine and assigned to 1 of the 21 newspaper sections. We found the concentration of links to news articles posted by top users to be lower than reported in the literature and the strategy of relaying headlines on Twitter via automatic news aggregators (feeds to be inefficient. The results of this investigation show which sections of a newspaper are the most and least read by readers in different parts of the world, with German readers placing greater emphasis on Politics and Economy; Brazilians on Sports and Arts; Spaniards on Local and National news; Britons and Americans on Opinion and World news. We also found that German and Spanish readers are more likely to read multiple national newspapers, while British readers more often resort to foreign sources of news. The results confirm that feedback to news items from a large user base is pivotal for the replication of content and that newspapers and news items can be clustered according to the editorial profile and principles of newsworthiness inherited from legacy media. The results of this investigation shed light onto the networked architecture of journalism that increasingly depends on readership agency.

  11. Good News in Bad News: How Negativity Enhances Economic Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Svensson, H.M.; Albæk, E.; van Dalen, A.; de Vreese, C.

    2017-01-01

    Negativity is a news ideology, and its negative effects on attitude formation are widely documented. Contrary to this view, the present study demonstrates that negative economic news can in fact be good news. Based on a two-wave national panel survey and a media content analysis, we show that individual exposure to negative economic news enhances internal economic efficacy, a sense of competence in and understanding of the economy. This is good news as internal economic efficacy may facilitat...

  12. Cascading Corruption News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Mads

    2018-01-01

    Through a content analysis of 8,800 news items and six months of front pages in three Brazilian newspapers, all dealing with corruption and political transgression, this article documents the remarkable skew of media attention to corruption scandals. The bias is examined as an information...... phenomenon, arising from systemic and commercial factors of Brazil’s news media: An information cascade of news on corruption formed, destabilizing the governing coalition and legitimizing the impeachment process of Dilma Rousseff. As this process gained momentum, questions of accountability were disregarded...

  13. Cascading Corruption News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Mads

    2018-01-01

    Through a content analysis of 8,800 news items and six months of front pages in three Brazilian newspapers, all dealing with corruption and political transgression, this article documents the remarkable skew of media attention to corruption scandals. The bias is examined as an information...... phenomenon, arising from systemic and commercial factors of Brazil’s news media: An information cascade of news on corruption formed, destabilizing the governing coalition and legitimizing the impeachment process of Dilma Rousseff. As this process gained momentum, questions of accountability were disregarded...... by the media, with harmful effects on democracy....

  14. The news Engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ralf

    for ideas etc. Reporters have limitedpossibilities for making own stories and less time for research - each live reportercovers 5-7 stories during a day. People : In a survey, most reporters replied that the new workflow was afundamental change of their work and had major impact on their identity......The News Engine How a new experiment in newsrooms can change process, product and people.   By Ralf Andersson   In fall 2012, the news department of the Danish Broadcasting Corporation,decided to implement a new workflow called ”The News Engine” - in order to workfaster, more freely, flexible...... and with fewer resources. This was done to raisethe productivity. The fundamental principle was that all stories should fit all platforms(content sharing) - and that no one did their own story anymore. DR News introduced 8-10 mobile live teams who are responsible for doinginterviews, record pictures and sound...

  15. Zimbabwe Science News

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -disciplinary and semi-popular. The Zimbabwe Science News has ceased publication. ... An overview of solar and solar-related technologies in Zimbabwe · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL ...

  16. Breaking News as Radicalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartley, Jannie Møller

    The aim of the paper is to make explicit how the different categories are applied in the online newsroom and thus how new categories can be seen as positioning strategies in the form of radicalisations of already existing categories. Thus field theory provides us with tools to analyse how online...... journalists are using the categorisations to create hierarchies within the journalistic field in order to position themselves as specialists in what Tuchman has called developing news, aiming and striving for what today is know as breaking news and the “exclusive scoop,” as the trademark of online journalism...... in a media environment where immediacy rules (Domingo 2008a). Following this research the primary focus of this paper is the category breaking news and Tuchmans developing news, but as they are all connected the analysis will also draw upon the other categories in Tuchmans typology. The theoretical framework...

  17. The News Media Industry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bartlett, Charlie

    2003-01-01

    American news media has two fundamental roles in our democracy: that of eyewitness, giving citizens critical information, and also as the watchdog, providing another arm of "checks and balances" within our governmental system...

  18. The News Media Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-06-05

    into “infotainment,” with an emphasis on trivia and news of the lives of celebrities. As a result, the American public is, as media critic Mark...presented by multiple outlets is often recycled . For example, a reader of Newsweek may see a similar, if not identical, story in its sibling...teleprompter. News and entertainment have morphed into “infotainment,” with an emphasis on trivia and the lives of celebrities. Unfortunately

  19. 2009 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Army Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    right time, handling pre- education attitudes, and tracking performance gains and career advantages related to academics.  Developing current, relevant...Army Leadership Technical Report 2010-2 2009 CENTER FOR ARMY LEADERSHIP ANNUAL SURVEY OF ARMY LEADERSHIP (CASAL): ARMY EDUCATION ...Joshua Hatfield ICF International John P. Steele Center for Army Leadership June 2010 The Center for Army Leadership An

  20. News values on social media: News organizations’ Facebook use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rawi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the news selection practices followed by news organizations through investigating the news posted on social networking sites and, in particular, the Facebook pages of four foreign Arabic language TV stations: The Iranian Al-Alam TV, Russia Today, Deutsche Welle, and BBC. A total of 15,589 news stories are analyzed in order to examine the prominence of references to countries and political actors. The study reveals that social significance and proximity as well as the news organizations’ ideological agenda are the most important elements that dictate the news selection process. PMID:29278253

  1. News values on social media: News organizations' Facebook use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rawi, Ahmed

    2017-08-01

    This study examines the news selection practices followed by news organizations through investigating the news posted on social networking sites and, in particular, the Facebook pages of four foreign Arabic language TV stations: The Iranian Al-Alam TV, Russia Today, Deutsche Welle, and BBC. A total of 15,589 news stories are analyzed in order to examine the prominence of references to countries and political actors. The study reveals that social significance and proximity as well as the news organizations' ideological agenda are the most important elements that dictate the news selection process.

  2. Public Opinions Toward Diseases: Infodemiological Study on News Media Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming; ElTayeby, Omar; Zolnoori, Maryam; Yao, Lixia

    2018-05-08

    Society always has limited resources to expend on health care, or anything else. What are the unmet medical needs? How do we allocate limited resources to maximize the health and welfare of the people? These challenging questions might be re-examined systematically within an infodemiological frame on a much larger scale, leveraging the latest advancement in information technology and data science. We expanded our previous work by investigating news media data to reveal the coverage of different diseases and medical conditions, together with their sentiments and topics in news articles over three decades. We were motivated to do so since news media plays a significant role in politics and affects the public policy making. We analyzed over 3.5 million archive news articles from Reuters media during the periods of 1996/1997, 2008 and 2016, using summary statistics, sentiment analysis, and topic modeling. Summary statistics illustrated the coverage of various diseases and medical conditions during the last 3 decades. Sentiment analysis and topic modeling helped us automatically detect the sentiments of news articles (ie, positive versus negative) and topics (ie, a series of keywords) associated with each disease over time. The percentages of news articles mentioning diseases and medical conditions were 0.44%, 0.57% and 0.81% in the three time periods, suggesting that news media or the public has gradually increased its interests in medicine since 1996. Certain diseases such as other malignant neoplasm (34%), other infectious diseases (20%), and influenza (11%) represented the most covered diseases. Two hundred and twenty-six diseases and medical conditions (97.8%) were found to have neutral or negative sentiments in the news articles. Using topic modeling, we identified meaningful topics on these diseases and medical conditions. For instance, the smoking theme appeared in the news articles on other malignant neoplasm only during 1996/1997. The topic phrases HIV and

  3. Networks in the news media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro, Peter

    more formal types of social networks, but also complement or even substitute social networking elsewhere, and as such this particular type of social network offers people both inside and outside the news room new potentials - and problems. This article describe the basic vision of networks in the news......When news reporters connect people in a single news story or in a series of coherent news stories they essentially construct networks in the news media. Networks through which social actors are aligned symbolically in written, visible or audible form. These socio-symbolic networks not only copy...

  4. Misinformation with fake news

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. BOTEI

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The last presidential elections in the United States of America (2016 have brought to the international public opinion’ s attention the phenomenon of “fake news”. Though it isn’t a new phenomenon, the spread of fake information for manipulating and misinforming the masses has existed in all historical periods. This time the phenomenon was noticed because of the number of fake news and, especially because of their impact, starting the discussion whether the victory of Donald Trump happened because of fake news and raising the question whether this phenomenon is a danger to democracy. An important reaction came also from the part of technology companies, of tech giants, Google and Facebook especially, which want the implementation of the phenomenon. Misinformation with public speech under the form of fake news brings to discussion the responsibility in the online space, but also the protection of people against this phenomenon.

  5. Good News in Bad News: How Negativity Enhances Economic Efficacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svensson, H.M.; Albæk, E.; van Dalen, A.; de Vreese, C.

    2017-01-01

    Negativity is a news ideology, and its negative effects on attitude formation are widely documented. Contrary to this view, the present study demonstrates that negative economic news can in fact be good news. Based on a two-wave national panel survey and a media content analysis, we show that

  6. Science News of the Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science News, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Highlights important 1983 news stories reported in Science News. Stories are categorized under: anthropology/paleontology; behavior; biology; chemistry; earth sciences; energy; environment; medicine; physics; science and society; space sciences and astronomy; and technology and computers. (JN)

  7. Automatic Detection of Fake News

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Rosas, Verónica; Kleinberg, Bennett; Lefevre, Alexandra; Mihalcea, Rada

    2017-01-01

    The proliferation of misleading information in everyday access media outlets such as social media feeds, news blogs, and online newspapers have made it challenging to identify trustworthy news sources, thus increasing the need for computational tools able to provide insights into the reliability of online content. In this paper, we focus on the automatic identification of fake content in online news. Our contribution is twofold. First, we introduce two novel datasets for the task of fake news...

  8. Breaking bad news among cancer physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Ayed Alshammary

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breaking bad news to patients with cancer diagnosis is not an easy task for physicians. The diagnosis must be explicitly stated and understood, and prognosis must be well-discussed in the most gentle and comfortable manner. It is important that the disclosure is performed in a way that patients will not lose all hope and get very depressed, leading them to undergo an abrupt change of their outlook in life. Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the physicians' perceptions and perspectives of breaking bad news to cancer patients. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of all comprehensive cancer centre physicians currently working in a university teaching hospital in the Middle East was conducted from August to September 2016. Results: Sixty-eight percent responded to the survey. Eighty-four percent were comfortable with breaking bad news, and 70% had training in breaking bad news. Eighty-six percent of responders stated that patients should be told about their cancer. Almost 30% of the respondents stated that they would still disclose the diagnosis to patients even if it would be against the preference of the relatives. Nearly 61% said that they would only tell the details to the patients if asked while 67% of them disagreed that patients should be told about the diagnoses only if the relatives consent. About 51% of physicians wanted to discuss the bad news with the family members and patient together, whereas 24% stated that the patient alone should be involved in the discussion. Conclusion: Physicians face a dilemma when families do not wish the patient to know the cancer diagnosis and this highlights the necessity of taking into consideration the social circumstances in healthcare. When taking these into considerations, curriculum in the medical school must, therefore, be updated and must integrate the acquisition of skills in breaking bad news early in training.

  9. A history of US Army PAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalupa, Robyn L; Marble, W Sanders

    2017-11-01

    The US military has a long tradition of using physician assistants (PAs). The Army began using PAs in 1971 in an effort to supplement the physicians and surgeons in the medical corps. As their numbers grew, PAs gradually replaced general medical officers assigned to battalions. Later, specialty positions developed in aviation medicine, orthopedics, and emergency medicine. The need for a PA serving as an adviser in the major commands slowly developed at all levels of leadership. In 2015, the Army removed limitations on female PAs assigned to combat units. PAs lead in tactical and clinical settings, filling command roles, senior clinical positions, and administrative leadership roles.

  10. Political News and Political Consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schertges, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    This article deals with mass media in modern democratic societies, using the example of Israeli news reports in German television (TV) news. Central to this interest are processes of mediating politics: political socialisation and education; that is to say, empowering citizens via TV news to participate in democratic processes. The article…

  11. CERN television news

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    CERN events brought right to your desktop by the new video bulletin.   CERN now has its very own news broadcast , or rather 'webcast', with a host of special reports and even a star presenter. From today onwards, just go to the Bulletin's web page, click on the 'video news' link and sit back and enjoy the latest news about CERN, presented in images by Wendy Korda. The ten-minute newscast in both French and English, the Organization's two official languages, presents interviews, pictures of experiments and computer-generated graphics, bringing you right up to date with some of the Laboratory's latest stories. The show concludes with a selection of the best snapshots taken by the CERN Photo Lab. So every one or two months CERN's Audio-Video Service (ETT/DH) will be putting together a video news report that you can watch on your own desktop computer. Daniel Boileau, Patrick Gilbert de Vautibault and Jacques Fichet, the Service's three technicians, came up with the idea of producing this regular feat...

  12. Global news production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lisbeth

    Events around the world are broadcast by giant media players such as CNN, BBC and NHK amongst others. Consumers of news media receive the final message without knowing the processes that the images, the text and the sound have gone through. The media players can be considered as professional gene......), and it shows how events are "domesticated" for the target audience....

  13. Multimodal news framing effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powell, T.E.

    2017-01-01

    Visuals in news media play a vital role in framing citizens’ political preferences. Yet, compared to the written word, visual images are undervalued in political communication research. Using framing theory, this thesis redresses the balance by studying the combined, or multimodal, effects of visual

  14. Inexpensive News Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscoe, Ellen D.; Wall, Catherine

    1992-01-01

    Describes consumer or business-oriented online services that provide access to current news information and offers a less expensive alternative to standard online databases. Online clipping services are discussed, their costs are examined, and profiles of five services are compared: CompuServe, CompuServe as a gateway to IQuest, DELPHI, DIALCOM,…

  15. VULTURE NEWS 55.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-06-18

    Jun 18, 2006 ... near San Lucas, but the marksmen didn't use non-lead ammunition. Condors eat only carrion – dead carcasses – and are highly susceptible to lead poisoning if they ingest lead bullet ... came in and started eating everything,”. Petersen said. News of the ... And yet the state refuses to act.” Earlier this.

  16. COBE video news

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-01

    This videotape was produced for hand-out to both local and national broadcast media as a prelude to the launch of the Cosmic Background Explorer. The tape consists of short clips with multi-channel sound to facilitate news media editing.

  17. Antarctic news clips, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    Published stories are presented that sample a year's news coverage of Antarctica. The intent is to provide the U.S. Antarctic Program participants with a digest of current issues as presented by a variety of writers and popular publications. The subject areas covered include the following: earth science; ice studies; stratospheric ozone; astrophysics; life science; operations; education; antarctic treaty issues; and tourism

  18. BBC VERSUS EURO NEWS: DISCOURSE AND IDEOLOGY IN NEWS TRANSLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseini, F.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to compare discursive strategies employed by two international news agencies including Euro News and BBC. Van Dijk’s (2004 model of CDA was adopted. Thirty pieces of news about internal affairs of Iran together with their Persian translations were downloaded from the corresponding website, i.e. 30 pieces of English news and their corresponding Persian translations from the Euro News website and 30 pieces of English news with their corresponding translations from the BBC website. The frequency of lexical items was observed to not differ significantly. Two sets of translations were compared to their source texts based on four discursive strategies of hyperbole, polarization, vagueness and euphemism. An independent-samples t-test was conducted to compare the frequency of strategies applied by the two news agencies. Results revealed no significant difference between the two agencies except for the discursive strategy of vagueness.

  19. Discovering the Army's Core Competencies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rudesheim, Frederick

    2001-01-01

    This paper seeks to answer the question, "Has the Army correctly identified its core competencies to ensure the Army can adequately respond to the national military strategy?" FM 1, The Army (Prototype Draft...

  20. Women in the Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-06

    Army womenpower re- quirements with no apparent end in sight. No country, not even Russia or Israel, has ever made a conscious decision to include...provide a basis for decision making. iiI CHAPTER ONE AN HISTORICAL OVERVIEW Few books have been written which outline the history of military women...with a bill introducing the Women’s Army Auxillary Corps (WAAC). In order 7 that the Army could maintain control over this sensitive issue, General

  1. Army Maintenance System Transformation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gilbertson, Frank V

    2006-01-01

    .... Used in conjunction with pertinent historical data and developed with Army transformation goals in mind, General Systems thinking can provide the framework for guiding maintenance transformation...

  2. [Pediatrician's experience in announcing bad news].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosnier-Schoedel, C; Trocmé, N; Carbajal, R; Leverger, G

    2018-02-01

    Few studies are available on pediatricians' experience with announcing bad news. Announcing bad news is an important component of medical practice and is even more complex in pediatrics because parents must be associated. We had 20 hospital pediatricians complete a questionnaire containing 30 questions about their own experience announcing bad news to a child or a teenager. In spite of their experience and the time they have spent practicing medicine, there are many limitations stemming from different factors concerning children, teenagers, their families, and themselves. The difficulties encountered by pediatricians are mainly related to the timing of the announcement, the location, the choice of the words used, and the poor understanding of children and families, due to intellectual, cultural, or psychological limitations. Pediatricians question their own capacity to make such an announcement, wondering if the information has actually been well understood. They indicate that they are themselves affected. Most of them develop and implement strategies to refute the emotional instability caused by the announcement of bad news. Yet many of them feel weak, even talking about a deep sense of loneliness and guilt. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. [Breaking bad news in the emergency room: Suggestions and future challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa-Ramírez, Edgar; López-Gómez, Antonio; Jiménez-Escobar, Irma; Sánchez-Sosa, Juan José

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe educational programs that reportedly teach how to break bad news in the emergency department. We also suggest some recommendations on how to communicate bad news based on the research of evidence available in the field. The examined evidence points toward six major components with which physicians should familiarize when communicating bad news: 1) doctor-patient empathic communication, 2) establishing a proper space to give the news, 3) identifying characteristics of the person who receives the news, 4) essential aspects for communicating the news; 5) emotional support, and 6) medical and administrative aspects of the encounter. Finally, we point out several limitations in the studies in the field and future challenges identified in the communication of bad news in emergency room facilities.

  4. Sensing the News: User Experiences when Reading Locative News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjetil Vaage Øie

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on user experiences on reading location-aware news on the mobile platform and aims to explore what experiences this kind of locative journalism generates and how such experiences change the users’ social interaction with news. We produced a specially designed mobile application and tailored news stories specific to this project called LocaNews in order to explore participants’ relation to the content in this journalistic format. The result is generated through a field study and a questionnaire of 32 people to find out how they experience the news presented in this format. The user participants’ responses are analyzed based on their news experiences, contextualizing places and their social interaction with the news within this form of journalism. Results showed that the local, semi-local and non-local user approaches the locative news in a different manner, but that the average user found this kind of news more interesting and more informative than ordinary news. The participants also have a problem identifying this as journalism, rather than an information service.

  5. Interpretation of Results of Studies Evaluating an Intervention Highlighted in Google Health News: A Cross-Sectional Study of News.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romana Haneef

    Full Text Available Mass media through the Internet is a powerful means of disseminating medical research. We aimed to determine whether and how the interpretation of research results is misrepresented by the use of "spin" in the health section of Google News. Spin was defined as specific way of reporting, from whatever motive (intentional or unintentional, to emphasize that the beneficial effect of the intervention is greater than that shown by the results.We conducted a cross-sectional study of news highlighted in the health section of US, UK and Canada editions of Google News between July 2013 and January 2014. We searched for news items for 3 days a week (i.e., Monday, Wednesday, and Friday during 6 months and selected a sample of 130 news items reporting a scientific article evaluating the effect of an intervention on human health.In total, 78% of the news did not provide a full reference or electronic link to the scientific article. We found at least one spin in 114 (88% news items and 18 different types of spin in news. These spin were mainly related to misleading reporting (59% such as not reporting adverse events that were reported in the scientific article (25%, misleading interpretation (69% such as claiming a causal effect despite non-randomized study design (49% and overgeneralization/misleading extrapolation (41% of the results such as extrapolating a beneficial effect from an animal study to humans (21%. We also identified some new types of spin such as highlighting a single patient experience for the success of a new treatment instead of focusing on the group results.Interpretation of research results was frequently misrepresented in the health section of Google News. However, we do not know whether these spin were from the scientific articles themselves or added in the news.

  6. Public Affairs Training for the Army’s Officer Corps: Need or Neglect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-06

    Individual Research Project, No. AD-783-802. Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania, 1974. McKenzie, Colin . "A Look at the News Media." US Army War College Mono...SAID IN 1978 Cronkite, Walter. "On Value of Newspaper Training for TV Reporters." San Francisco Examiner and Chronicle. March 5, 1978, p. 38. Drury

  7. The Army Lawyer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    bombed RTS. Id.; see also Kydo News Int’l, Inc., Thai Journalists Protect NATO Bombing of Serb TV, ASIAN POL. NEWS, May 17, 1999, available at http...press system, namely that unilateral reporters are treated as “second class citizens” in the combat theatre . PAUL & KIM, supra note 15, at 111

  8. Contact: Releasing the news

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinotti, Roberto

    The problem of mass behavior after man's future contacts with other intelligences in the universe is not only a challenge for social scientists and political leaders all over the world, but also a cultural time bomb as well. In fact, since the impact of CETI (Contact with Extraterrestrial Intelligence) on human civilization, with its different cultures, might cause a serious socio-anthropological shock, a common and predetermined worldwide strategy is necessary in releasing the news after the contact, in order to keep possible manifestations of fear, panic and hysteria under control. An analysis of past studies in this field and of parallel historical situations as analogs suggests a definite "authority crisis" in the public as a direct consequence of an unexpected release of the news, involving a devastating "chain reaction" process (from both the psychological and sociological viewpoints) of anomie and maybe the collapse of today's society. The only way to prevent all this is to prepare the world's public opinion concerning contact before releasing the news, and to develop a long-term strategy through the combined efforts of scientists, political leaders, intelligence agencies and the mass media, in order to create the cultural conditions in which a confrontation with ETI won't affect mankind in a traumatic way. Definite roles and tasks in this multi-level model are suggested.

  9. ARMY CYBER STRUCTURE ALIGNMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-16

    content/?q=historic-cyber-unit-begins- daily-action . 14 John M. McHugh , Secretary of the Army, HQDA General Order 2014-02, Affirmation of Secretary of...support-plays-role-in-tactical-operations/75545442/. McHugh , John M., Secretary of the Army, HQDA General Order 2014-02, Affirmation of Secretary of

  10. The Effects of Bad News and Good News on a Newspaper's Image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Jack B.; Miller, M. Mark

    1984-01-01

    Concludes that whether a newspaper carries mostly good news or mostly bad news affects the image of the paper, with bad news having negative effects and good news having positive effects on readers' perceptions of the newspaper. (FL)

  11. News media old and new

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Kim Christian

    2014-01-01

    This article presents and discusses three different approaches to the exploration of the cross-media challenges facing news audiences, as they seek access to, navigate in and make sense of the multitude of news sources across print, broadcasting, online and mobile media platforms. From a modernized...... uses and gratifications perspective, based on the notion of “worthwhileness” as the determinant of people's everyday selections from the “supermarket of news”, the article first reports from a longitudinal survey study in Denmark in which the author's foundational mapping of cross-media news...... consumption in pre-mobile 2008 is compared with replicating mappings carried out in 2011 and 2012, in a collaborative project between academics and news publishers. The analytical interest here focuses on the fluctuations between traditional news media and the surging digital news outlets of the internet...

  12. Effects of Medications on Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Effects of Medications on Voice Effects of Medications on Voice Patient Health Information News ... replacement therapy post-menopause may have a variable effect. An inadequate level of thyroid replacement medication in ...

  13. Tumor Talk and Child Well-Being: Perceptions of "Good" and "Bad" News Among Parents of Children With Advanced Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feraco, Angela M; Dussel, Veronica; Orellana, Liliana; Kang, Tammy I; Geyer, J Russell; Rosenberg, Abby R; Feudtner, Chris; Wolfe, Joanne

    2017-05-01

    Little is known about how parents of children with advanced cancer classify news they receive about their child's medical condition. To develop concepts of "good news" and "bad news" in discussions of advanced childhood cancer from parent perspectives. Parents of children with advanced cancer cared for at three children's hospitals were asked to share details of conversations in the preceding three months that contained "good news" or "bad news" related to their child's medical condition. We used mixed methods to evaluate parent responses to both open-ended and fixed-response items. Of 104 enrolled parents, 86 (83%) completed the survey. Six (7%) parents reported discussing neither good nor bad news, 18 (21%) reported only bad news, 15 (17%) reported only good news, and 46 (54%) reported both good and bad news (one missing response). Seventy-six parents (88%) answered free-response items. Descriptions of both good and bad news discussions consisted predominantly of "tumor talk" or cancer control. Additional treatment options featured prominently, particularly in discussions of bad news (42%). Child well-being, an important good news theme, encompassed treatment tolerance, symptom reduction, and quality of life. A majority of parents of children with advanced cancer report discussing both good and bad news in the preceding three months. Although news related primarily to cancer control, parents also describe good news discussions related to their child's well-being. Understanding how parents of children with advanced cancer classify and describe the news they receive may enhance efforts to promote family-centered communication. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. An Analysis of Primary Care Provider Productivity in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-08

    are the Weekend Acute Care Clinic ( WACC ), After Hours Clinic (AHC), Troop Medical Clinic 10 (TMC 10), Troop Medical Clinic 12 (TMC 12), and Troop...and expense data. WACC Weekend Acute Care Clinic is staffed on a rotational basis by DFCM core assets; 0800-1700 on Saturdays & Sundays, by walk-in and

  15. Accession Medical Standards Analysis and Research Activity (AMSARA) 2014, Annual Report, and four Supplemental Applicants and Accessions Tables for: Army, Air Force, Marine, and Navy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-02

    active component accessions, between 2008 and 2013, 13% were accessed with a history of medical disqualification that was either remediated prior to...between 2008 and 2013, 15% accessed with a history of previous medical disqualification and 1% were hospitalized in the first year of service. About...include achievement, adjustment, attention-seeking, cooperation, dominance, even- temperedness, generosity, intellectual efficiency, non- delinquency

  16. How Television News Programs Use Video News Releases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Mark D.; White, Candace

    2001-01-01

    Examines actual use in television news broadcasts of video news releases (VNRs). Finds that all sizes of markets were likely to use VNRs. Finds that the most common use was as a voice-over story in an early evening newscast, and that VNRs associated with children and their safety or health got the greatest number of uses. (SR)

  17. The good news about giving bad news to patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Neil J; Urban, Susan Y; Collier, Virginia U; Weiner, Joan; Polite, Ronald G; Davis, Elizabeth B; Boyer, E Gil

    2002-12-01

    There are few data available on how physicians inform patients about bad news. We surveyed internists about how they convey this information. We surveyed internists about their activities in giving bad news to patients. One set of questions was about activities for the emotional support of the patient (11 items), and the other was about activities for creating a supportive environment for delivering bad news (9 items). The impact of demographic factors on the performance of emotionally supportive items, environmentally supportive items, and on the number of minutes reportedly spent delivering news was analyzed by analysis of variance and multiple regression analysis. More than half of the internists reported that they always or frequently performed 10 of the 11 emotionally supportive items and 6 of the 9 environmentally supportive items while giving bad news to patients. The average time reportedly spent in giving bad news was 27 minutes. Although training in giving bad news had a significant impact on the number of emotionally supportive items reported (P woman, unmarried, and having a history of major illness were also associated with reporting a greater number of emotionally supportive activities. Internists report that they inform patients of bad news appropriately. Some deficiencies exist, specifically in discussing prognosis and referral of patients to support groups. Physician educational efforts should include discussion of prognosis with patients as well as the availability of support groups.

  18. News from the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2006-01-01

    News from the world in relation with nuclear power and fuel cycle are given: Dismantling of the research reactor of the Pasteur Institute, Areva gets the contract to replace the vessel caps for the nuclear power plant of Diablo Canyon, the United Kingdom chooses the renewal of the nuclear park and an increase in the use of renewable energy sources, The united states launches a call to projects for the building of new generation nuclear power plants, in Argentina the government develops its nuclear industry, the Russian federation proposes the creation of an international center for the fuel cycle are the principal points that are developed in this issue. (N.C.)

  19. News from the future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinecke Hansen, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a corpus linguistic analysis of the development in future-oriented political journalism in four Danish newspapers in the period 1997–2013 (N = 2954 full articles = 1,553,038 word tokens). Keyword analysis and concordance analysis are applied within a framework of grammatical......-semantic theory of tense and modal verbs and semantic-pragmatic theory of time meaning, modality and speech acts. The results suggest, unexpectedly, that the newspapers – and news reports in particular – seem to have become less future-oriented in the period. At the same time, however, the articles...

  20. CERN Video News

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    From Monday you can see on the web the new edition of CERN's Video News. Thanks to a collaboration between the audiovisual teams at CERN and Fermilab, you can see a report made by the American laboratory. The clip concerns the LHC magnets that are being constructed at Fermilab. Also in the programme: the spectacular rotation of one of the ATLAS coils, the arrival at CERN of the first American magnet made at Brookhaven, the story of the discovery 20 years ago of the W and Z bosons at CERN. http://www.cern.ch/video or Bulletin web page.

  1. Nuclear waste: good news

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The author states that the problem of nuclear wastes is solved. He states that 90 per cent of radioactive wastes are now permanently managed and that technical solutions for deep geological storage and for transmutation will soon solve the problem for the remaining 10 pc. He states that geological storage will be funded (it is included in electricity price). He denounces why these facts which he consider as good news, do not prevail. He proposes several documents in appendix: a text explaining the nuclear fuel cycle in France, and an extract of a report made by the national inventory of radioactive materials and wastes

  2. Pushed news: when the news comes to the cellphone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Fidalgo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Combining two findings of recent surveys on the Internet which state that 1 “the Internet will soon surpass all other media as a main source for national and international news” and 2 “the mobile device will be the primary connection tool to the Internet in 2020” leads us to the conclusion that smartphones will soon be the primary source for news access. But if so, how will news come to the Internetconnected cellphones? In accordance with the distinction, already drawn in 1997, between push and pull technologies as two different forms of how content is delivered to the end users, cellphones are characterized as push devices (passive reception, in opposition to computers, classified as pull devices (active reception. The news items that fit cellphones are pushed news. And they will be pushed as SMS, e-mails, tweets and through news aggregators.

  3. PUSHED NEWS: When the news comes to the cellphone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Fidalgo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Combining two findings of recent surveys on the Internet whichstate that 1 “the Internet will soon surpass all other media as a main source for national and international news” and 2 “the mobile device will be the primary connection tool to the Internet in 2020” leads us to the conclusion that smartphones will soon be the primary source for news access. But if so, how will news come to the Internetconnected cellphones? In accordance with the distinction, already drawn in 1997, between push and pull technologies as two different forms of how content is delivered to the end users, cellphones are characterized as push devices (passive reception, in opposition to computers, classified as pull devices (active reception. The news items that fit cellphones are pushed news. And they will be pushed as SMS, e-mails, tweets and through news aggregators.

  4. Factors associated with patient preferences for communication of bad news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Maiko; Akechi, Tatsuo; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2017-06-01

    Communication based on patient preferences can alleviate their psychological distress and is an important part of patient-centered care for physicians who have the task of conveying bad news to cancer patients. The present study aimed to explore the demographic, medical, and psychological factors associated with patient preferences with regard to communication of bad news. Outpatients with a variety of cancers were consecutively invited to participate in our study after their follow-up medical visit. A questionnaire assessed their preferences regarding the communication of bad news, covering four factors-(1) how bad news is delivered, (2) reassurance and emotional support, (3) additional information, and (4) setting-as well as on demographic, medical, and psychosocial factors. A total of 529 outpatients with a variety of cancers completed the questionnaire. Multiple regression analyses indicated that patients who were younger, female, had greater faith in their physician, and were more highly educated placed more importance on "how bad news is delivered" than patients who were older, male, had less faith in their physician, and a lower level of education. Female patients and patients without an occupation placed more importance on "reassurance and emotional support." Younger, female, and more highly educated patients placed more importance on "additional information." Younger, female, and more highly educated patients, along with patients who weren't undergoing active treatment placed more importance on "setting." Patient preferences with regard to communication of bad news are associated with factors related to patient background. Physicians should consider these characteristics when delivering bad news and use an appropriate communication style tailored to each patient.

  5. Educating the delivery of bad news in medicine: Preceptorship versus simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Andrew P; Adkins, Eric J; Knepel, Sheri; Boulger, Creagh; Miller, Jessica; Bahner, David P

    2011-07-01

    Simulation experiences have begun to replace traditional education models of teaching the skill of bad news delivery in medical education. The tiered apprenticeship model of medical education emphasizes experiential learning. Studies have described a lack of support in bad news delivery and inadequacy of training in this important clinical skill as well as poor familial comprehension and dissatisfaction on the part of physicians in training regarding the resident delivery of bad news. Many residency training programs lacked a formalized training curriculum in the delivery of bad news. Simulation teaching experiences may address these noted clinical deficits in the delivery of bad news to patients and their families. Unique experiences can be role-played with this educational technique to simulate perceived learner deficits. A variety of scenarios can be constructed within the framework of the simulation training method to address specific cultural and religious responses to bad news in the medical setting. Even potentially explosive and violent scenarios can be role-played in order to prepare physicians for these rare and difficult situations. While simulation experiences cannot supplant the model of positive, real-life clinical teaching in the delivery of bad news, simulation of clinical scenarios with scripting, self-reflection, and peer-to-peer feedback can be powerful educational tools. Simulation training can help to develop the skills needed to effectively and empathetically deliver bad news to patients and families in medical practice.

  6. Cue-responding in a simulated bad news situation: exploring a stress hypothesis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valck, C. de; Bruynooghe, R.; Bensing, J.; Kerssens, J.J.; Hulsman, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    The stress-coping paradigm of Folkman and Lazarus (1984) was applied to investigate if the communicative reactions of the physician in a bad news transaction are related to the stressfulness of the situation. A standardized video bad news consultation was presented to 88 medical students. To examine

  7. Cue-responding in a Simulated Bad News Situation: Exploring a Stress Hypothesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Valck, C.; Bruynooghe, R.; Bensing, J. M.; Kerssens, J. J.; Hulsman, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    The stress-coping paradigm of Folkman and Lazarus (1984) was applied to investigate if the communicative reactions of the physician in a bad news transaction are related to the stressfulness of the situation. A standardized video bad news consultation was presented to 88 medical students. To examine

  8. The Evaluations of Swine Flu Magnitudes in TV News: A Comparative Analysis of Paired Influenza Pandemics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Po-Lin; Meng, Juan

    2015-01-01

    This study examined how major TV news networks covered two flu pandemics in 1976 and 2009 in terms of news frames, mortality exemplars, mortality subject attributes, vaccination, evaluation approaches, and news sources. Results showed that the first pandemic was frequently framed with the medical/scientific and political/legal issues, while the second pandemic was emphasized with the health risk issue in TV news. Both flu pandemics were regularly reported with mortality exemplars, but the focus in the first pandemic was on the flu virus threat and vaccination side effects, while the vaccination shortage was frequently revealed in the second outbreak.

  9. What the Army Needs to Know to Align Its Operational and Institutional Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    responsibilities of the Army leadership. In their roles as stakeholders in short-term acquisition, the Army leaders named here bring to bear the...required immunizations, be medically healthy, and have dental readiness classification of 1 or 2. Personal medical equipment (e.g., earplugs, eyeglasses

  10. Getting Out the Good News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciancia, David

    1995-01-01

    A majority of American schools are meeting the challenge of educating children. A New York State district gets out the good news by producing school newsletters and videos, by constant and close contact with the local news media, and by forming ties with local real estate agents. (MLF)

  11. Is macroeconomic announcement news priced?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Goeij, Peter; Hu, Jiehui; Werker, Bas

    2016-01-01

    We test whether news contained in macroeconomic announcements (MEAs) is priced in the cross-section of stock returns. When including news on a set of widely followed individual macroeconomic fundamentals in the cross-section of stock returns, estimates of their prices of risk are consistent with the

  12. What Turns Events into News?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukachinsky, Riva

    2013-01-01

    "The New York Times" is known for its slogan ''All the News That's Fit to Print.'' But how do gatekeepers decide which events meet this criterion? Although some individuals might believe that the news constitutes an undistorted reflection of the social reality, students in communication courses have the…

  13. School Violence and the News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and teens have many sources of information about school shootings or other tragic events. They might see or hear news stories or graphic images on TV, radio, or online, over and over. ... of a news story about school violence can make some kids feel that might ...

  14. CERN Video News on line

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The latest CERN video news is on line. In this issue : an interview with the Director General and reports on the new home for the DELPHI barrel and the CERN firemen's spectacular training programme. There's also a vintage video news clip from 1954. See: www.cern.ch/video or Bulletin web page

  15. Climate News Across Media Platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskjær, Mikkel Fugl

    2015-01-01

    In a changing media landscape marked by technological, institutional and cultural convergence, comparative and cross-media content analysis represents a valuable analytical tool in mapping the diverse channels of climate change communication. This paper presents a comparative study of climate...... quantitative and qualitative content analysis the paper documents and explores the extent and character of climate change news across different media platforms. The study aims at contributing to the on-going assessment of how news media are addressing climate change at a time when old and new media...... change news on five different media platforms: newspapers, television, radio, web-news and mobile news. It investigates the themes and actors represented in public climate change communication as well as the diverse possibilities of participating in public debates and information sharing. By combining...

  16. Assessing News Contagion in Finance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Cerchiello

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of news in the financial context has gained a prominent interest in the last years. This is because of the possible predictive power of such content especially in terms of associated sentiment/mood. In this paper, we focus on a specific aspect of financial news analysis: how the covered topics modify according to space and time dimensions. To this purpose, we employ a modified version of topic model LDA, the so-called Structural Topic Model (STM, that takes into account covariates as well. Our aim is to study the possible evolution of topics extracted from two well known news archive—Reuters and Bloomberg—and to investigate a causal effect in the diffusion of the news by means of a Granger causality test. Our results show that both the temporal dynamics and the spatial differentiation matter in the news contagion.

  17. Army's drinking water surveillance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneeringer, P.V.; Belkin, F.; Straffon, N.; Costick, S.A.

    1977-01-01

    In 1976 a total of 827 water sources from Army installations throughout the world were sampled and analyzed for 53 chemical constituents and physical parameters. Medically significant contaminants included radiation measurements, heavy metals, fluoride, nitrate, and pesticides. Radiological activity appeared to vary with geographic location; a majority being from water sources in the western part of the U.S. No results for tritium were found to exceed the health-reference limit. Confirmatory analyses for radium-226 identified 3 groundwater sources as exceeding the limit; one was attributed to natural activity and the other sources are currently being investigated. Of the metals considered to be medically significant, mercury, chromium, lead, cadmium, silver, barium and arsenic were found in amounts within health level limits. Nitrate levels exceeding the health limit were confirmed for 2 drinking water sources

  18. Patients' Attitude toward Breaking Bad News; a Brief Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminiahidashti, Hamed; Mousavi, Seyed Jaber; Darzi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Delivering bad news is a stressful moment for both physicians and patients. The purpose of this investigation was to explore the patients' preferences and attitudes toward being informed about the bad news. This cross-sectional study was done on patients admitted to Imam Khomeini Hospital, Sari, Iran, from September 2014 to February 2015. Patient attitude regarding breaking bad news was evaluated using a reliable and valid questionnaire. 130 patients were evaluated (61.5% male, mean age = 46.21 ± 12.1 years). 118 (90.76%) participants believed that the patient himself/herself should be informed about the disease's condition. 120 (92.30%) preferred to hear the news from a skillful physician and 105 (80.76%) believed that emergency department is not a proper place for breaking bad news. Based on the results of the present study, most participants believed that the most experienced and skillful physician should inform them completely regarding their medical condition. At the same time they declared that, it is best to hear bad news in a calm and suitable place and time rather than emergency department or hospital corridors during teaching rounds.

  19. The Army Ethic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    The Constitution and Declaration of Independence simultaneously hold two different views of human nature, an individualist and a collectivist view...Profession, defines the Army Ethic as “the evolving set of laws, values, and beliefs, deeply embedded within the core of the Army culture and...incorporate other viewpoints or respond to shifts in morality, religion, economics, and other socio- cultural factors. This thesis will use the term

  20. The Total Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    http://thediplomat.com/2015/04/chinas-growing-cyberwar-capabilities/ (accessed April 25, 2016); Nicolas Giacometti, “China’s Nuclear Modernization and...link between the operational and tactical levels of war.48 47. Michelle Tan , “US Army Generals Criticize Outdated Deployment Model: ‘We’ve Gotten...unveils-its-big-8-initiatives/81882852/ (accessed March 16, 2016). 58. Michelle Tan , “US Army Generals Criticize Outdated Deployment Model: ‘We’ve

  1. Army Leader Transitions Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The courseware allows users to tailor training materials to specific needs. Users access this at the CAL AKO website or Army eLearning https...usarmy.skillport.com/ skillportfe/login/usarmylogin.cfm. New users must register with eLearning . Then login, select “Army Custom Curricula” and scroll to...challenges of your transition. Patience, flexibility and a good understanding of influence techniques on your part will help make any needed realignment a

  2. Naval Medical R and D News

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    allowed researchers to collect high quality data while participants slept in the comfort of their own homes, allowing more natural sleep and reducing...career paths in Navy Medicine during his talks to five classes of middle school students at the Joel C. Harris Academy in San Antonio, Texas, Nov 16... school administration were welcoming. I spoke with about 150 students spread out across the five classes. Each session continued to grow in the number

  3. Investigating people’s news diets: how online news users use offline news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trilling, D.; Schoenbach, K.

    2015-01-01

    The question how offline media use is related to online media use has been heavily debated in the last decades. If they are functionally equivalent, then advantages like low costs, rapid publication cycles, and easy access to online news could lead to them displacing offline news. Data from a

  4. How to Break Bad News: Physicians’ and Nurses’ Attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali-Akbar Nejatisafa

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available "nObjective: Bad news disclosure is one of the most complex tasks of physicians. Recent evidences indicate that patients' and physicians' attitude toward breaking bad news has been changed since few years ago. The evidence of breaking bad news is different across cultures. The aim of this study is to evaluate the attitude of medical staff toward breaking bad news to provide a clinical guideline in Iran."nMethods: A descriptive study was conducted during 2008-2009 on a sample of 100 medical staff (50 physicians and 50 nurses at Cancer Institute of Imam Khomeini hospital. The subjects' demographic characteristics and their attitudes toward the manner of revealing the diagnosis were registered in a questionnaire."nResults: The majority of the physicians (86%, n=43 and nurses (74%, n=37 , mostly the older and more experienced, tended to reveal the diagnosis to patients . Only a few physicians (8%, n=4 had been trained how to disclose bad news, which discloused diagnosis more than non trained ones."nPhysicians and nurses preferred to inform the patients about the diagnosis when either the patients were alone or in the presence of their spouse respectively .Only a few physicians (14% and nurses (24% agreed to explain life expectancy to patients."nConclusion: Compared to past, physicians and nurses are more willing to share cancer diagnosis with patients. However, lack of adequate communication skills in caregivers, and their concerns about managing patients' emotional reactions reduce their tendency to disclose bad news to the patients. Therefore, training physicians and nurses to expose bad news to the patients seems to be necessary.

  5. International News Flows in the Post-Cold War World: Mapping the News and the News Producers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreberny-Mohammadi, Annabelle

    1995-01-01

    Reviews the global political environment, major global news providers, and technologies of global news production. Argues for a multinational comparative mapping of international news representation in the 1990s. Outlines a major international venture to update and elaborate the 1979 UNESCO/IAMCR study of foreign news in the media of 29 countries,…

  6. News from Afar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Peter

    in Denmark immediately following the Allied invasion of Sicily in 1943, and a second wave erupted in the summer of 1944 after the Normandy landings. In other words, knowledge of the war at large was an important aspect of life in German-controlled Europe in the 1940s, but remains somewhat understudied......News filtering through about the changing fortunes of the Axis had a direct impact on public opinion in occupied Europe during the war years, not only affecting morale but also at times triggering mass popular action. For example, a wave of protests against the German occupation broke out...... theater of war by writers of diaries in Denmark. It can be tentatively concluded that while reporting on the Pacific was relatively neutral in tone and did not, to a systematic extent, exaggerate Japanese victories, the Danish public especially paid attention to that theater of war in 1941 and 1942...

  7. NetWorking News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritsch, Jonas; Iversen, Ole Sejer; Dindler, Christian

    For many years cooperative design was primarily concerned with the development of IT supported systems for professional users. However, the cooperative design approach can embrace other social practices such as children’s everyday life. At a methodological level there is no difference in designing...... the Networking News workshop, offers an opportunity to make first hand studies of children’s IT supported social activities in an informal classroom setting....... with adults or children. However there is a need for new methods to support communication and collaboration between designers and children. This article proposes a new method for understandings children’s appropriation of new technology in an interactive workshop setting. The method, which we call...

  8. News from the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    This document gathers a series of brief news concerning nuclear industry throughout the world. Russia and Venezuela have signed an agreement for the construction of the first nuclear power plant in Venezuela. Russia and Ukraine have signed an agreement for the construction of a nuclear fuel plant in Ukraine, this plant will produce fuel assemblies for VVER reactors. The Italian authorities have stated that the come back of nuclear energy will allow Italy to comply with the Kyoto protocol. The French consortium Novarka is constructing the new sarcophagus for the Chernobyl reactor whose cost will reach 870.10 6 euros. The Socatri company has been discharged on the count of environment pollution in the accident that occurred in July 2008 on the Tricastin plant but the company was fined for not reporting in due delay the accident. (A.C.)

  9. Hazardous Waste Surveys of Two Army Installations and an Army Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    232 Nickel-63 Uranium-238 Plutonium-239 Polonium - 210 6 Army Medical Treatment Facilities: General Administration Army Regulation (AR) 40-2, 42A peren...Adhesive BN R 0x AU DOI545AO GI. 312 F 44 0,3 27)d17 N6341( 2 14,5 0 6 Adhesive 81 A XY AO D041419A0 PI 210 82140 O0 5824596 RO.34 140376139 Adhesi E ON...conform to clean air pollutant standards. 46 4 Noninfectious Solid Waste. Most wastes in this category are: (1) food waste from the military mess and

  10. Cultural Knowledge in News Comprehension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathieu, David

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the main lines of the design and the findings of a reception study on news comprehension. This empirical study is a comparison of the comprehension processes of Danes and French Canadians over a set of news texts from both countries. Comprehension is explored from a cultural...... perspective, through the lens of cognition and pragmatics, revealing the role played by cultural knowledge in comprehension and the underlying relationship between a text and its intended audience. It is argued that recipients ‘problematise’ the news texts, a process by which the texts answer questions...

  11. 7 CFR 28.904 - Market news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Market news. 28.904 Section 28.904 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Cotton Classification and Market News Service for Producers Classification and Market News Services § 28.904 Market news. The Director shall cause to be distributed to producers of...

  12. Diverse artikelen in Gay Amsterdam News

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekma, G.

    2002-01-01

    Vernedering, in: Gay Amsterdam News 125 (jan 2002), pp. 20-21; Webseks, zaad, zweetseks, in: Gay Amsterdam News 126 (feb 2002), pp. 30-31; Wurgseks, in: Gay Amsterdam News 127 (mrt 2002), pp. 30-31; Wijnandus Johannes Sengers (1927-2002), in: Gay Amsterdam News 133 (sept 2002), pp. 49.

  13. Army Business Transformation - Next Steps

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2006-01-01

    As a follow-on to the Army Science Board 2005 Summer Study on Best Practices, the Army Science Board was tasked to identify areas where alternative approaches and application of transforming practices...

  14. "I Have Good News and Bad News:" The Effects of Power Imbalances and Physical Distance on News-givers' Use of Blended News Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Legg, Angela M.

    2013-01-01

    People dislike giving bad news, and one strategy they use to ease the process is to pair bad news with some good news, a phenomenon called blended news delivery. Often, blended news arrives from people in power positions such as physicians, managers, or teachers. But followers also find themselves needing to give bad news to those in higher power positions. Similarly, people can choose how they deliver bad news, such as in person or over email. The current study brings much needed empirical a...

  15. ISD Designed Medical Specialist Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Samuel K., Jr.; Chagalis, George P.

    The Basic Medical Specialist course has one of the largest enrollments of the U.S. Army's Academy of Health Sciences; 11,000 soldiers were trained in this course in 1977 and 1978. Training encompasses both emergency first aid (for field medics) and basic nursing skills. A task force working to improve Army training developed this course, in…

  16. The Deployed Warfighter Protection Research Program: Finding New Methods to Vanquish Old Foes (The United States Army Medical Department Journal, April-June 2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    pyriproxyfen, the most powerful insect growth regulator (IGR), against dengue vector mosquitoes. In the Peruvian Amazon community at Iquitos, Stancil42 (Naval...Medical Research Center Detachment, Peru ) received a grant to optimize strategies for preventing the breeding of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in...effort to prevent sand flies breeding in rodent burrows, the Genesis Company (Wellington, Colorado) won an award for producing insecticidal baits that

  17. Creative Cycling of News Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Gynnild, PhD.

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The theory of creative cycling emerged from my PhD study of news professionals in Norway. The study was carried out according to classic grounded theory principles (Glaser and Strauss 1967, Glaser 1978, 1998, 2001, 2005, and the area of interest was the performance of news journalism in the multimedia age. The theory runs counter to widespread tendencies of industrial age thinking in news media. It emphasizes news professionals’ search for meaning in their daily work, and suggests that their main concern is self-fulfillment through original contribution. The dilemma and resolution, creative cycling, is a basic social process continuously going within inner and outer framings. It consists of three interrelated dimensions: productive processing, breaks and shifts and inspirational looping.

  18. RHYTHM STRUCTURE IN NEWS READING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís Mas Manchón

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Rhythm is central to news reading in radio and television programs. This paper proposes a three level structure for rhythm in news discourse. It gives a comprehensive definition of rhythm and types of rhythm. Firstly, the Base Rhythm Structure consists of semantic and pragmatic rhythmic accents, coincident with very specific words. Secondly, these accents are grouped together according to type, frequency and order, thereby configuring three types of “rhythmic units” (the Internal Rhythm Structure: starting, main and end units. A last structure level presents four discursive factors that are very important in integrating the overall time structure of news announcing (the Melodic Rhythm Structure. This integral structure for news announcing rhythm should be further tested in acoustic-experimental studies under the criterion of information transmission efficacy.

  19. Army Contract Writing System (ACWS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    2016 Major Automated Information System Annual Report Army Contract Writing System (ACWS) Defense Acquisition Management Information Retrieval...Information 4 Responsible Office 4 References 4 Program Description 5 Business Case 5 Program Status 6 Schedule 7 Performance...Program Information Program Name Army Contract Writing System (ACWS) DoD Component Army Responsible Office Program Manager References MAIS

  20. Subprime Loans and Fake News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella

    2017-01-01

    Could the market fundamentalism that ruled the pre-crisis financial markets of the 2000s hold lessons for how we should approach the unregulated information and news market in the digital age?......Could the market fundamentalism that ruled the pre-crisis financial markets of the 2000s hold lessons for how we should approach the unregulated information and news market in the digital age?...

  1. News, Documentary and Advocacy Journalism

    OpenAIRE

    Charles, Mathew

    2013-01-01

    This chapter examines how alternative models of journalism are emerging to counter the news values associated with the so-called mainstream media - news values, which are increasingly criticised for serving only the interests of the political and economic elite. In particular, this chapter looks at advocacy journalism, which focuses on a shift away from objectivity towards the arguably more ethical practice of attachment. The neutral and detached reporter, who remains outside of events and re...

  2. News Images - The National Guard

    Science.gov (United States)

    , 2018, at Wendell H. Ford Regional Training Center in Greenville, Kentucky. Operation Immersion is . The panel included (from left to right) Maj. Gen. Stephen G. Fogarty, the commander of U.S. Army Cyber

  3. [Proposal for a media guideline to improve medical and health journalism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Masami

    2012-01-01

    A lot of healthcare professionals experienced annoyance with biased mass media news regarding medical and health issues. In this paper, I propose "news profiling method" and "media guideline" to improve the medical and health journalism.

  4. Cinema and the communication of bad news

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel GÓMEZ CORDOBA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Breaking Bad News requires medical professionals possess a range of skills to ensure that the patient has the information required for decision?making, this process occurs without further damage and even has a therapeutic effect, and another, that the doctor is not exposed to legal risk or stress associated with the inability to cope with the feelings of the patient, their families or themselves. This article discusses the aspects of communication of bad news in the field of doctor?patient relationship will be presented. The SPIKES model and discussion of movie segments related to the subject was employed as a thread, such as Doctor, 50/50, The Barbarian Invasions, Wings of Life, Stepmom, Letters to God, Wit, The butterfly blue, The power of friendship, Life without me, Make me laugh, Knockin ‘on Heaven’s Door, My Life, A crazy Loose in Brooklyn, As suicide and not die in the attempt, A lesson of life, and The sacrifice of a mother, as a pedagogical strategy in medical training.

  5. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Complementary or Alternative Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments Online Studies News You Can Use Living With IBS Relationships and IBS Pregnancy and IBS Travel and IBS IBS Patients' Experience and Unmet Needs ...

  6. News of the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2011-01-01

    This document gathers short pieces of news from nuclear industry throughout the world. The most relevant are the following. A micro-crack has been detected in the bottom head instrumentation penetration during the ten-yearly inspection of the unit 1 of the Gravelines nuclear power station. Poland is expected before the end of 2012 to launch a bid of tender for the construction of 2 nuclear power plants of 3000 MW each. The cost of this program is estimated to near 23 billions euros. The Spanish government has allowed the 2 reactors of the Asco plant to operate 10 years more. The Russian company 'Atomstroyexport' will supply the 2 nuclear islands of the 2 new reactors at the Tianwan nuclear power plant (China). Russia is going to build the first nuclear power plant in Bangladesh. Areva has recently discovered 12300 tonnes of uranium in central Jordan. The IAEA experts recommend the Japanese Authorities to decontaminate first the inhabited areas contaminated by the Fukushima accident. It is more important to focus on the real radiation dose received by the population than on the contamination levels of the environment. (A.C.)

  7. News from Council

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    With this message I would like to share with you some highlights of this week’s Council meetings.   A major topic was the approval of CERN’s Medium Term Plan (MTP) 2017-2021, along with the budget for 2017. In approving the document, Council expressed its very strong support for the research programme the MTP outlines for the coming years.  Another important topic this week was the formal approval of the High Luminosity LHC project, HL-LHC. This comes as extremely good news not only for CERN, but also for particle physics globally. HL-LHC is the top priority of the European Strategy for Particle Physics in its 2013 update, and is part of the 2016 roadmap of the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures, ESFRI. It was also identified as a priority in the US P5 strategy process, and in Japan’s strategic vision for the field. It secures CERN’s future until 2035, and ensures that we will achieve the maximum scientific return on the investment...

  8. News from EUPHA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EUPHA 17th European Conference on Public Health

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available It is very good news for Italian participation at this year’s EUPHA meeting, which will be held in Lodz (Poland. From 25 to 28 November the joint annual conference EUPHA-ASPHER will see a peaceful “invasion” from Italy. Out of the 63 Italian abstracts submitted to the conference organisers, only 5 (7.9% were rejected. Overall, 11.6% of all of the accepted abstracts are Italian, 9.8% of the oral presentations and 13% of the poster presentations. These results pay testimony to the high quality of European public health research and practice reached in several fields and settings (academic, public health regional agencies, and local health units. Highlights from Italy include the ongoing work in the field of infectious disease control, Stefania Bruno (Catholic University will present the Roman experience of Tubercolosis surveillance in the homeless. Maria De Giusti (Sapienza University presents “Knowledge, attitudes and behaviour towards Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin infections and S. aureus nasal colonisation”; while Chiara de Waure (Catholic University will present “Rapid screening tests for MRSA carriage at hospital admission: a systematic review”.

  9. Antarctic news clips - 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-07-01

    The newspaper and magazine stories selected for this book present only a sampling of one year's (July 1991 to July 1992) news coverage of Antarctica. The only requirement for inclusion in this publication is that the article's subject matter pertains or refers to Antarctica in some way - whether it is focused on the science done there, or on the people who play such a large part in the work accomplished, or on the issues related to it. No attempt has been made to correlate the number of articles, or their length, with the importance of the subjects treated. Clippings are provided to the Foundation by a service that searches for items containing the phrase 'National Science Foundation'. Identical versions of many stories, especially those written and distributed by wire services such as the Associated Press and United Press International, and by syndicated columnists, are published in numerous papers across the United States. Other articles are submitted from a variety of sources, including interested readers across the United States and in New Zealand.

  10. New Bulletin: Latest News

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The paper version of the CERN Bulletin will be published twice a month with effect from 18 April 2005. The electronic version will be updated weekly. This year will see many changes in the Bulletin, designed to make it more economical, more compact and more attractive. From 18 April the paper version of the Bulletin will be published twice monthly, so we shall have to stop calling it the "Weekly". The purpose of this change in publication frequency is to redistribute the resources of the Publications Section of the Communications Group so that it can produce new brochures for the general public. However, so as not to compromise on topicality and communication of information, the Official News and General Information sections, the Pension Fund and training announcements and the seminar schedule will continue to be updated weekly. If you have signed up to be informed of the updates, you will continue to receive a weekly e-mail reminding you that the electronic version of the Bulletin has been updated. Offici...

  11. The Army Lawyer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    authors in the articles do not necessarily reflect the view of The Judge Advocate General or the Department of the Army. Masculine or feminine...for the hegemonic power (read ‘United States’) and its followers to determine international public enemy on a case-by-case basis. A legal

  12. Army Sustainability Report 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    the Fairfax Village Neighborhood Center’s native plant and butterfly garden. The center is the first LEED platinum military project (photo: US Army... Bush in 2007. 11 Statement of Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Strategy, Plans, and Forces, Kathleen Hicks before the Senate Environment and

  13. News of the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2012-01-01

    This document gathers pieces of news from the nuclear industry around the world. The most relevant are the following. EDF has inaugurated a logistic hub for the supply of spare parts for its 58 operating reactors. Russia has opened a new site to store spent fuels from RBMK reactors. This site is located at Zheleznogorsk near Krasnoiarsk in Siberia. The capacity of the La Hague fuel reprocessing plant is 1700 tonnes a year but the plant processes only between 800 and 1000 tones because most of its foreign contracts have come to an end and have not been renewed. In 2012 the plant is expected to process 1003 tonnes for EDF and 12 tonnes for The Netherlands. AREVA has delivered to the CNNC Chinese company 700 fuel assemblies and 800 control rod clusters. The French Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) said that there was neither health nor environmental hazards on French soil due to the Fukushima accident. The French Academy of Sciences has highlighted the least sanitary impact of nuclear power compared to other energies. The American Nuclear Safety Association has stated that the American nuclear power plants are safe and that the probability of a severe accident is very low. A new study shows an excess of cases of leukemia near nuclear power stations in France. This study rests on very few statistical cases. An opinion survey in the United Kingdom shows that the construction of nuclear power stations is considered as the best investment in infrastructures. EDF has planned to recruit in 2012 about 6000 people essentially in the nuclear sector. The Netherlands government has given its consent for the construction of the high flux reactor Pallas on the Petten site, this reactor will replace the HFR whose lifetime is over 50 years. (A.C.)

  14. Indonesian News Harvester and Recommender System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Wibowo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available To provide convenience for the user that frequently read the news, a system to gather, classify, and provide news from several news websites in one place was needed. This system utilized a recommender system to provide only relevant news to the user. This research proposed a system architecture that used vector space model, and Rocchio relevance feedback to provide specific news recommendation to user’s feedback. The results are that the proposed system architecture can achieve the goal by using five levels of feedback from the user. However, the time needed to gather news is increasing exponentially in line with the number of terms gathered from articles.

  15. Department of the Army - The Fiscal Year 2008 Military Personnel, Army Appropriation and the Antideficiency Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-22

    of the Army, U.S. Army Audit Agency, Budgeting for the Military Personnel, Army Appropriation, Report No. A-2010-0028- FFM (Jan. 6, 2010); Department...of the Army, U.S. Army Audit Agency, Military Personnel, Army FY 05 Subsistence Charges, Report No. A-2008-0037- FFM (Feb. 12, 2008); Department of

  16. News on pediatric urology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Masnata

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric urology is a pediatric speciality dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of congenital and acquired genitourinary tract diseases. It is a speciality that is rapidly changing, thanks to the technological development that has been emerging in recent years. There have been important diagnostic and therapeutic news.Congenital anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract (CAKUT include various entities of structural malformations that result from defects in their morphogenesis. Clinical research and genetic studies on the origins of CAKUT are quickly evolving, with significant growth of high-quality research.Management goals of CAKUT include prevention of febrile urinary tract infections (UTIs in newborns and toddles and renal injury, while minimizing the morbidity of treatment and follow-up. Treatment options include observation with or without continuous antibiotic prophylaxis (CAP and surgical correction. Now, randomized controlled studies show that children with normal urinary tracts or low-grade vesicoureteral reflux (VUR do not benefit from prophylaxis.All children with known mechanical or functional obstructions of the urinary tract are considered to have UTI. Functional obstruction often results from lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD of either neurogenic or non-neurogenic origin and dilating VUR.The role of bladder and bowel dysfunction (BBD in children with UTI and the long-term risk of renal scarring have shed new light on treatment strategies. Often it is BBD, rather than reflux, that causes UTI in children older than 2 years.Pediatric urology has evolved in recent years, with a greater focus on bladder and renal function, minimally invasive treatment, evidence-based interventions, and guideline adherence. Other topics in pediatric urology include urinary incontinence in children with special needs and the use of robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery (RALS in children, with advantages over conventional laparoscopic surgery

  17. Nurses' perspectives on breaking bad news to patients and their families: a qualitative content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Ehsani, Seyyedeh Roghayeh; Begjani, Jamal; Kaji, Mohammad Akbari; Dopolani, Fatemeh Nemati; Nejati, Amir; Mohammadnejad, Esmaeil

    2014-01-01

    Breaking bad news is quite often not done in an effective manner in clinical settings due to the medical staff lacking the skills necessary for speaking to patients and their families. Bad news is faced with similar reactions on the part of the news receiver in all cultures and nations. The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of Iranian nurses on breaking bad news to patients and their families. In this research, a qualitative approach was adopted. In-depth and semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 nurses who had at least one year work experience in the ward, and content analysis was performed to analyze the data. Five major categories emerged from data analysis, including effective communication with patients and their families, preparing the ground for delivering bad news, minimizing the negativity associated with the disease, passing the duty to physicians, and helping patients and their families make logical treatment decisions. The results of this study show that according to the participants, it is the physicians' duty to give bad news, but nurses play an important role in delivering bad news to patients and their companions and should therefore be trained in clinical and communicative skills to be able to give bad news in an appropriate and effective manner.

  18. The impact of delivery style on doctors' experience of stress during simulated bad news consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Joanne; Brown, Rhonda; Dunn, Stewart

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between doctors' bad news delivery style and their experience of physiological stress during simulated bad news consultations. 31 doctors participated in two simulated breaking bad news (BBN) consultations. Delivery style was categorized as either blunt, forecasting or stalling (i.e. avoidant), based on the time to deliver the bad news and qualitative analysis of the interaction content and doctor's language style. Doctors' heart rate (HR) and skin conductance (SC) were recorded in consecutive 30s epochs. Doctors experienced a significant decrease in HR (F(1,36)=44.9, p.05) or SC (F(2,48)=.66, p>.05). Doctors experience heightened stress in the pre-news delivery phase of breaking bad news interactions. Delaying the delivery of bad news exposes doctors to a longer period of increased stress.This suggests that medical students and doctors should be taught to deliver bad news without delay, to help mitigate their response to this stressful encounter. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  19. Exploiting Tri-Relationship for Fake News Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Shu, Kai; Wang, Suhang; Liu, Huan

    2017-01-01

    Social media for news consumption is becoming popular nowadays. The low cost, easy access and rapid information dissemination of social media bring benefits for people to seek out news timely. However, it also causes the widespread of fake news, i.e., low-quality news pieces that are intentionally fabricated. The fake news brings about several negative effects on individual consumers, news ecosystem, and even society trust. Previous fake news detection methods mainly focus on news contents fo...

  20. The Interaction of Production and Consumption in the News Media Social Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Gary; Kerrigan, Finola; Mehmood, Rashid; Rahman, Mustafizur

    Newspapers are operating in increasingly competitive and fragmented markets for audiences and advertising revenues, government media policy and changing audience requirements for news and the ways in which it is presented and delivered. A growing army of bloggers and amateur citizen journalists now delivers - but rarely edits - content for all media platforms, while new media technologies, combined with the changing structure of global news industries, are radically changing the ways in which newspapers and media business functions and struggles for profitability. Our research sought to answer the question of how the internet is impacting on producer/consumer value activities in the news media supply chain. To answer this question initial descriptive statistical analysis was performed on 51 newspapers. This was followed by a focus group undertaken with London-based news media organizations and bloggers. The findings showed that in spite of initial fear and rejection, the internet is now firmly embedded in news media supply chain operations. Firms are now using the internet as an operant resource and working proactively with consumers to develop various forms of relationship value. We highlight the role of consumers in the creation of news (editorial) content and consumer-driven moves toward a merged media platform of distribution (including television, online, mobile and printed forms). Regional news media organizations will probably continue to survive if they are able to supply a highly specialized and 'hyper local' community service. This will be in the form of 'hybrid' content: analysis, interpretation and investigative reporting in a print product that appears less than daily combined with constant updating and reader interaction on the web.

  1. News Consumption and Media Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Yi Xiang; Miklos Sarvary

    2007-01-01

    Bias in the market for news is well-documented. Recent research in economics explains the phenomenon by assuming that consumers want to read (watch) news that is consistent with their tastes or prior beliefs rather than the truth. The present paper builds on this idea but recognizes that (i) besides “biased” consumers, there are also “conscientious” consumers whose sole interest is in discovering the truth, and (ii) consistent with reality, media bias is constrained by the truth. These two fa...

  2. Assessing News Contagion in Finance

    OpenAIRE

    Paola Cerchiello; Giancarlo Nicola

    2018-01-01

    The analysis of news in the financial context has gained a prominent interest in the last years. This is because of the possible predictive power of such content especially in terms of associated sentiment/mood. In this paper, we focus on a specific aspect of financial news analysis: how the covered topics modify according to space and time dimensions. To this purpose, we employ a modified version of topic model LDA, the so-called Structural Topic Model (STM), that takes into account covariat...

  3. How to Spot Fake News?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çev.: Fatih Canata

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Critical thinking is a key skill in media and information literacy, and the mission of libraries is to educate and advocate its importance. Discussions about fake news has led to a new focus on media literacy more broadly, and the role of libraries and other education institutions in providing this. When Oxford Dictionaries announce post-truth is Word of the Year 2016, as librarians realise action is needed to educate and advocate for critical thinking – a crucial skill when navigating the information society, an infographic with eight simple steps have been prepared by IFLA to discover the verifiability of a given news-piece in front of you.

  4. Figuring Out Health News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... they do — like diet and exercise — have a good or bad effect on their health. For new drugs or treatments, ... they may report a dramatic or scary side effect of a medication that is really ... more can help you ask good questions about your own health when you see ...

  5. Army Programs: Army Finance and Accounting Quality Assurance Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1988-01-01

    This regulation discusses the primary responsibilities of commanders and staff officers at installation and higher levels for execution of the Army Finance and Accounting Quality Assurance (QA) Program...

  6. Arousing news characteristics in Dutch television news 1990-2004: an exploration of competitive strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks Vettehen, P.; Beentjes, J.; Nuijten, K.; Peeters, A.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the processes by which competition in the television news market might promote the presence of arousing characteristics in television news. A total of 3,024 news stories from six Dutch television news programs over the period 1990 to 2004 were investigated through content

  7. Arousing news characteristics in Dutch television news 1990-2004: An exploration of competitive strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks Vettehen, P.G.J.; Beentjes, J.W.J.; Nuijten, C.M.; Peeters, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the processes by which competition in the television news market might promote the presence of arousing characteristics in television news. A total of 3,024 news stories from six Dutch television news programs over the period 1990 to 2004 were investigated through content

  8. Implementation of news module for news client based on ApiCloud

    OpenAIRE

    Fu Xin; Liang Yu; Cao Sanxing; Gu Hongbo

    2017-01-01

    With the development of new media technology, news client has become the main battlefield of news browsing. Based on the ApiCloud hybrid development platform, this paper uses HTML, JavaScript and other technologies to develop the mobile client news module, and uses WAMP integrated development environment to build a news publishing system on the server side.

  9. Implementation of news module for news client based on ApiCloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Xin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of new media technology, news client has become the main battlefield of news browsing. Based on the ApiCloud hybrid development platform, this paper uses HTML, JavaScript and other technologies to develop the mobile client news module, and uses WAMP integrated development environment to build a news publishing system on the server side.

  10. Effects of "Good News" and "Bad News" on Newscast Image and Community Image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galician, Mary-Lou; Vestre, Norris D.

    1987-01-01

    Investigates whether the relative amount of bad, neutral, and good news on television has corresponding effects on viewers' image of the community depicted and of the carrying newscast. Concludes that bad news creates a bad image for the community but that good news does not produce a more favorable image than neutral news. (MM)

  11. Emotional Mining: Tagging Emoticons to Online News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasinathan, Vinothini; Mustapha, Aida; Zhi Yong, Lee; Aida Zamnah, Z. A.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents an emotion mining system, which assigns emoticons to newspaper articles into a pre-defined emotion category based on the underlying emotion in the news. Next, the system makes recommendation to the reader by tagging the news headline with the respective emoticons. Users are then able to decide whether to read the news based on the emoticons provided. The system also provides a filter for the users to choose the category of news to read following the emoticons.

  12. Union Directions - Army Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-06

    reflects the long-held belief in the Army that employee participation in decisions that affect their worklife is healthy and desirable. Although some...pluralistic society, checks and balances are as important for the economy as for the government. Business executives who salivate at the thought of vanishing...Unions. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley, 1976. 37. National Federation of Federal Employees. NFFE’s Guide to Quality of Worklife Programs. No. G-21

  13. Operationalizing Army Cyber

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    killed just under 3,000 people and cost the U.S. economy somewhere between three and five trillion dollars. The Japanese attacked with a state... economy , and military readiness. The challenge is to design an Army Cyber force that can support the United States Cyber Command (USCYBERCOM) national...still keeps the intelligence and signal functions separate in most units today from battalion to echelon above Corps ( EAC ). There are many past reasons

  14. 1998 Army Modernization Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Biological (CB) Protective Duty Uniform (STO) • Biometrics (SRO) • Nanoscience (SRO) • Millimeter Wave Material and Dissemination Technology... Biometrics and Nanoscience SROs will enable the development of advanced NBC detection and characterization systems, including the exploitation of biologically...Requirements Trailers • Procure HEMAT Trailers Figure K-23 K-19 //;<?. U.S. Army 1997Modernization Plan This final fleet assessment, made against the

  15. The importance of news media in pharmaceutical risk communication: proceedings of a workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebane, Felicia E

    2005-05-01

    In response to mass media's role in the national and global system of pharmaceutical risk communication, the Centers for Education and Research on Therapeutics (CERTs) convened a 'think tank' session on the 'Importance of Media in Pharmaceutical Risk Communication'. Prominent journalists and experts from the pharmaceutical industry, academia, medical practice and government were invited to consider the benefits and challenges of improving the way we communicate the benefits and risks of therapeutics via mass media, especially news media. Workshop discussions revealed a paucity of systematic research directed towards understanding how and why news media report on therapeutic risk, the impact of this coverage and how coverage can be improved. Consequently, participants produced a research agenda capturing the key aspects of the flow of information around this topic, including the meaning of risk, how news audiences process and use therapeutic risk information in the news, how and why news organizations report on therapeutic risk, and the role and impact of the pharmaceutical industry, government officials and academic researchers as sources of therapeutic risk information. The workshop ended with a discussion on action items addressing what news professionals, representatives of regulatory agencies and the medical products industry, and academic researchers can and should do to enable news media to effectively report therapeutic risk information. In sum, this proceedings report provides an outline for developing mass media risk communication research, influencing the practices of journalists and expert sources and ultimately, improving the quality of the public's life. Copyright (c) 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Nostalgia in the Army (17th-19th Centuries).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battesti, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    People died from nostalgia in the army in the 17th-19th centuries. The term 'nostalgia', created by the doctor Johannes Hofer (1669-1752), from Mulhouse, came from the Germanic Heimweh, or 'homesickness'. It affected the young people enrolled in the army, such as Swiss mercenaries. Longing for their native land, they were consumed by an ongoing desire to return home. If it was impossible to do so, they sank into 'a sadness accompanied with insomnia, anorexia and other unpleasant symptoms' that could lead to death. Nostalgia became classified as a disease during the last quarter of the 18th century and ravaged the French army during the Revolution and the Napoleonic wars. However, as soon as the wars ended, it ceased to exist in the army (except the colonial army). It was removed from the nosology in the first half of the 19th century. Rapidly explained as an example of a misdiagnosis or a confusion between 'connection and cause', nostalgia needs to be assessed in regard to the medical debate between 'alienists' and 'organicists'. Creating much concern, nostalgia needs to be considered in the historical context of a society destabilized by modernity, with some individuals uprooted by the sudden transition from civil society to military life. It raises questions about the role that the army played in the creation of the French national union. Nostalgia may have also covered psychic traumatisms later designated as combat fatigue, war neurosis, or post-traumatic stress disorder. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Breaking bad news - an interdisciplinary curricular teaching-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmenroth-Nayda, Anne; Alt-Epping, Bernd; Gágyor, Ildikó

    2011-01-01

    The concerns of patients suffering from life-threatening disease and end-of-life care aspects have gained increasing attention in public perception. The increasing focus on palliative medicine questions can be considered to be paradigmatic for this development. Palliative medicine became a compulsory subject of the undergraduate curriculum in Germany to be implemented until 2013. The preexisting conditions and qualifications at the medical faculties vary, though. We describe the conceptual process, didactic background, and first experiences with the new interdisciplinary course "Delivering bad news" as a compulsory part of the palliative medicine curriculum. Since autumn 2009, this course has been taught at the University Medical Center Göttingen, consisting of two double lessons in the final year of medical education. Considering the curriculum-based learning goals in Göttingen, the focus of this course is to impart knowledge, attitudes and communication skills relating to "bad news". Although the seminar requires adequate staff and is time-consuming, students have accepted it and gave high marks in evaluations. In particular, the teachers' performance and commitment was evaluated positively. We describe the first experiences with a new course. Didactic structure, theoretical contents, role-plays and usage of media (film, novel) are well- suited to communicate topics such as "bad news". Additional experiences and evaluations are necessary. According to the progressive nature of learning, it might be worthwhile to repeat communication- centered questions several times during medical studies.

  18. Visualizing news: obstacles, challenges, and solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Piet Bakker; Gerard Smit; Yael de Haan; Laura Buijs

    2013-01-01

    Depicting news graphically is considered an apt way to deal with challenges of modern journalism: to disclose big data, and present news attractively, visually, and fast to grasp. This study delves into reported obstacles and challenges for the production of news visualizations. It focuses on the

  19. Perceptions of Advertising Influence on Broadcast News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Hubert W.; Barnes, Beth E.

    2001-01-01

    Finds that while students (studying broadcast journalism or advertising) and practitioners (station news directors and agency media directors) were in agreement on the majority of opinion statements discussing advertising's influence on broadcast news content, except students were less bothered by advertising's influence on news content than were…

  20. The News Media as a Political Institution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsten, Mark; Allern, Sigurd

    2011-01-01

    : what new roles, if any, are news organizations and journalists playing in the political system? What are the characteristics of these new roles, and how do news organizations use their newfound political power? We address these questions in the context of an institutional approach to the news coupled...... with Hallin and Mancini's analysis of media systems....

  1. Linking online news and social media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsagkias, M.; de Rijke, M.; Weerkamp, W.

    2011-01-01

    Much of what is discussed in social media is inspired by events in the news and, vice versa, social media provide us with a handle on the impact of news events. We address the following linking task: given a news article, find social media utterances that implicitly reference it. We follow a

  2. Product Differentiation in Local Television News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwater, Tony

    A study was conducted to investigate the extent to which local television stations exhibited diversity in newscast content within three midwest broadcast markets. A second objective was to describe the nature of the news content characteristic of local news stories that were broadcast by only one station within a market (or unique news stories). A…

  3. Making the News: Jobs in TV Journalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csorny, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    What do TV news workers do each day? For many of them, contributing to daily news broadcasts has changed greatly over the years. This evolution will likely continue for years to come. And more changes to news production are expected, according to Tom Weir, an associate professor at the University of South Carolina's School of Journalism and Mass…

  4. News Resources on the World Wide Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notess, Greg R.

    1996-01-01

    Describes up-to-date news sources that are presently available on the Internet and World Wide Web. Highlights include electronic newspapers; AP (Associated Press) sources and Reuters; sports news; stock market information; New York Times; multimedia capabilities, including CNN Interactive; and local and regional news. (LRW)

  5. Semantic Analysis of FBI News Reports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nizamani, Sarwat; Memon, Nasrullah

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present our work on semantic analysis of FBI News reports. In the paper we have considered the News which are of the immense significance for the analyst who want to analyze the News of specific area. With this definite analysis we are able to extract critical events or concepts...

  6. Detecting Terrorism Incidence Type from News Summary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nizamani, Sarwat; Memon, Nasrullah

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the experiments to detect terrorism incidence type from news summary data. We have applied classification techniques on news summary data to analyze the incidence and detect the type of incidence. A number of experiments are conducted using various classification algorithms...... and results show that a simple decision tree classifier can learn incidence type with satisfactory results from news data....

  7. Daily Market News Sentiment and Stock Prices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Allen (David); M.J. McAleer (Michael); A.K. Singh (Abhay)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIn recent years there has been a tremendous growth in the influx of news related to traded assets in international financial markets. This financial news is now available via print media but also through real-time online sources such as internet news and social media sources. The

  8. Possible Courses for News and Public Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Richard C.

    1978-01-01

    Live programming, regular daily news programs, and documentary series, which are suggested as solutions to the limited scope of news and public affairs air time, would enable PBS to increase its coverage of news and public affairs. Some suggestions are also made for restructuring the functions of stations within the system to facilitate this…

  9. NEWS: Eclipse matters (still)!

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-05-01

    This collection of snippets has as its theme the 1999 Solar Eclipse, and covers items that might be of interest to eclipse watchers and their associates. Much information can be obtained from the national web site at http://www.eclipse.org.uk. Set up by the CLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, on behalf of the UK Eclipse Group, the site is intended to keep viewers abreast of developments during the countdown to the eclipse. The list of contents includes: about eclipses; eclipse pictures; eclipse science; safety advice; latest news; and local information. There is also a wealth of images and video footage, so the site has been organized with the visitor having a small PC and modem in mind, so that the key information can be accessed as quickly as possible. Free colour leaflets containing useful details for eclipse watchers can be obtained from the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council. `The Sun - our local star' and `Neutrinos' are additions to PPARC's series introducing key areas of its science. They answer such questions as what the Sun is, what eclipses are, why the Sun is important and where neutrinos come from. They support the National Curriculum Key Stages 3 and 4 plus A-level physics. The A5 leaflets open out into an A2 sized double-sided wall chart and bulk quantitites are available for class sets, visitor centres, exhibitions, open days etc. A full list of PPARC materials can be found at the website http://www.pparc.ac.uk or by order from Mark Wells, PPARC, Polaris House, North Star Avenue, Swindon SN2 1SZ (fax: 01793 442002). A message has been received from George Care, Head of Physics in the Science Department at Mounts Bay School, Penzance, which we now pass on to our readers. During his application for electronic access to Physics Education via the Institute of Physics Affiliated Schools and Colleges scheme, George notes that his school is on the track of the eclipse this summer and he has invited us to pass on the details to anyone who

  10. Army Healthcare Enterprise Management System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    .... The complaint alleged that the Army Healthcare Enterprise Management System was not properly competed, potential conflicts of interest existed, and possible contract performance problems existed...

  11. NEWS: Post-16 update

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-05-01

    .15 pm. Twelve hours travel by air will reach the other side of the world. Given such a change in the range of human activity, is it surprising that society has changed and adapted, and some historical incidents and lifestyles hardly make sense? The journals of Dorothy Wordsworth describe a life spent at walking pace. Jane Austen's novels take place at horse speed. Many modern novels are of the jet age, and world travel is part of the plot. Reading accounts of warfare, we must remember that an army perhaps moved 15 miles a day if it hurried (and arrived exhausted). It becomes very clear why Britain could be several independent kingdoms. Turning to another area of physics, we might even speculate how easy life for Romeo and Juliet would have been with a mobile phone each.

  12. Fake news propagate differently from real news even at early stages of spreading

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Zilong; Zhao, Jichang; Sano, Yukie; Levy, Orr; Takayasu, Hideki; Takayasu, Misako; Li, Daqing; Havlin, Shlomo

    2018-01-01

    Social media can be a double-edged sword for modern communications, either a convenient channel exchanging ideas or an unexpected conduit circulating fake news through a large population. Existing studies of fake news focus on efforts on theoretical modelling of propagation or identification methods based on black-box machine learning, neglecting the possibility of identifying fake news using only structural features of propagation of fake news compared to those of real news and in particular...

  13. The Dutch and the news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annemarie Wennekers; Jos de Haan

    2017-01-01

    Original title: Nederlanders en nieuws For a long time, the television and newspapers were the most prominent news sources in the Netherlands, but digitalisation and the rise of new media have caused major shifts in the media landscape. Based on a time use survey focusing on media (Media:Tijd

  14. Journalism and Explaining News Content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albæk, E.; Skovsgaard, M.; de Vreese, C.H.; Nussbaum, J.F.

    Three models are presented to explain variation in news content. In the first model the explanation is based on the individual journalist, in the second model on the professional journalist, and in the third model on the organized journalist. The individual journalist model focuses on how the

  15. Myth, Method and International News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lule, Jack

    Defining myth as a cultural narrative in symbolic form that articulates a world view and offers consensus with that view, this paper uses a brief "New York Times" report on the Soviet shooting down of South Korean airline flight 007 as the basis for comparison of international news and myth. Following a review of the literature on myth…

  16. How to Tell Bad News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01

    Therapists, physicians, police officers, and emergency staff often are the messengers of bad news. They have to tell a patient, a parent, or a loved one about a death, an accident, a school shooting, a life-threatening diagnosis, a terrorist attack, or a suicide. Usually the messenger bears a heavy responsibility but has little training and seeks…

  17. Customized News in Your Mailbox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudich, Joe

    1996-01-01

    Customized Internet services deliver news and selected research via e-mail, fax, Web browser, or their own software. Some are clipping services while others are full-fledged online newspapers. Most charge a monthly subscription fee, but a few are free to registered users. Provides the addresses, cost, scope, and evaluation of eight services. (PEN)

  18. Biofantasies: genetics and medicine in the print news media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, A

    2001-04-01

    The contemporary news media is an important site for exploring the diverse and complex cultural images of genetics and its medical possibilities, and of the mechanisms by which these images are (re) produced and sustained. This article investigates how the print news media 'frames' stories on genetics and medicine. It is based on a discourse analysis of articles appearing in three Australian newspapers in the late 1990s. Gene stories were found to be prominent in each of the newspapers, and to emphasise the medical benefits of genetic research. Stories frequently cite and quote scientists, who explain the nature and significance of the research and/or its implications for treatment or prevention. Many stories focus on new genetic discoveries, and portray genetic researchers as involved in a quest to unlock nature's secrets. Stories of hope, and depictions of geneticists as warriors or heroes, appear regularly. The positive vision of genetics is supported by the use of particular metaphors, accompanying illustrative material, 'human interest' stories, and reference to credible sources. There is rarely mention of the influence of non-genetic factors and 'multifactorial' interactions on disorders, or questioning of the goals, direction, methods, or value of genetic research. Scientists made extensive use of the media in their efforts to maintain a positive image of research in the face of public concerns about scientists 'going too far', following the announcement of the cloning of Dolly. Boundaries were drawn between 'therapeutic cloning'--implicitly defined as 'good', useful, and legitimate--and 'reproductive cloning'--seen as 'bad', dangerous, and illegitimate. By framing news stories as they do, the print news media are likely to exert a powerful influence on public responses to health problems. With new genetic technologies becoming more integrated in preventive medicine and public health, it is important to investigate how news stories help shape the agenda for

  19. United States Army Medical Materiel Development Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-10

    and BPL were provided by the contractor to USAMMDA personnel as required. 3 ,I SAutomatic Data Processing Support: During 1988, USAMI.DA procured...PABO, and WRAIR cooperated to immunize 40,000 volunteers in a double blind study of 0. neningitidis Vaccine. Controls received a licensed Group C

  20. Modified Diet Recipes for Army Medical Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-20

    meatballs , Eggs , whole slightly 1 egg 45 weighing 33 grams each. beaten 3. Place on sheet pan and bake Water 1/3 cup 1/3 cup 10 minutes, or until... egg , water, and rolled oats. Shape into 30 meatballs , weighing 45 grams each. Place on sheet pan and bake 20 minutes or until done* Drain well... egg , water, and rolled oats. Shape into 30 meatballs , weighing 45 grams each. Place on sheet pan and bake 20 minutes or until done. Drain well

  1. Flexitime in an Army Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    and Costigan (1973) conducted a longitudinal study of employee responses to the four day week in a medium-sized pharmaceutical company. The patterns...New York, New York, 1979. Nord, W.R. and Costigan, R. Worker adjustment to the four - day week : a longitudinal study. Journal of Applied Psychology, 58

  2. The shifting cross-media news landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Kim Christian; Steeg Larsen, Bent

    2010-01-01

    and lifestyles. Theoretically the study is anchored in Habermas’s notion of the public sphere, and its recent reconceptualizations in theories of ‘cultural citizenship’, 'civic agency' and 'public connection'. The project operationalizes these theories through the concept of users' perceived “worthwhileness......The article offers new insights for democracy and for news producers by mapping the use and users of today’s cross-media news landscape, as the everyday consumption of news across the range of available news media and formats is shifting as a result of transformations of technology, culture......” of news media, a user-anchored concept which incorporates the different functionalities of the situational cross-media use of news by citizen/consumers in everyday life. Empirically the article presents the findings of a large-scale survey that traces the imminent challenges facing players in the news...

  3. Navigating cross-media news use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swart, Joëlle; Peters, Chris; Broersma, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    distinctive cross-media repertoires, and what makes these compositions meaningful. This article analyzes the value of different platforms, genres and practices in everyday life by mapping patterns of cross-media news use. Combining Q methodology with think-aloud protocols and day-in-the-life-interviews, five...... distinct news media repertoires are identified: 1) regionally-oriented 2) background-oriented 3) digital 4) laid-back and 5) nationally-oriented news use. Our findings indicate that users do not always use what they prefer, nor do they prefer what they use. Moreover, the boundaries they draw between news......The current news media landscape is characterized by an abundance of digital outlets and increased opportunities for users to navigate news themselves. Yet, it is still unclear how people negotiate this fluctuating environment to decide which news media to select or ignore, how they assemble...

  4. Exploring Digital News Publishing Business Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindskow, Kasper

    News publishers in the industrialized world are experiencing a fundamental challenge to their business models because of the changing modes of consumption, competition, and production of their offerings that are associated with the emergence of the networked information society. The erosion...... of the traditional business models poses an existential threat to news publishing and has given rise to a continuing struggle among news publishers to design digital business models that will be sustainable in the future. This dissertation argues that a central and underresearched aspect of digital news publishing...... business models concerns the production networks that support the co-production of digital news offerings. To fill this knowledge gap, this dissertation explores the strategic design of the digital news publishing production networks that are associated with HTML-based news offerings on the open Web...

  5. Breaking bad news in prenatal medicine: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Rita; George, Astrid; Spitz, Elisabeth; Vieux, Rachel

    2017-02-01

    The diagnosis of a fetal anomaly in perinatal medicine forces expectant parents and healthcare providers to face the difficult process of breaking bad news. This exploratory literature review was aimed at providing a medical and psychological view of the psychological experience in expectant parents and physicians in the context of prenatal diagnosis of a fetal anomaly. An exploratory search of PubMed and PsycINFO/PsycARTICLES databases performed by an interdisciplinary team composed of a physician and psychologists. Search terms were: prenatal diagnosis AND bad news; prenatal diagnosis AND psychological consequences; prenatal diagnosis AND psychological sequelae; prenatal diagnosis AND fetal abnormality. The processing of selected articles followed a standardised five-step procedure. A total of 860 articles were screened of which 32 were retained for analysis. Four main themes emerged from the explanatory content analysis: (1) parents' subjective experience; (2) physicians' subjective experience; (3) encounters between expectant parents and professionals; and (4) ethical challenges in breaking bad news in prenatal medicine. Expectant parents go through a complex and multidimensional experience when the diagnosis of a fetal anomaly is disclosed. Simultaneously, physicians consider breaking bad news as a very stressful event and are poorly prepared in this regard. A better knowledge of factors underlying psychological adjustment of the parental dyad and on the subjective experience of physicians delivering these diagnoses could enable better adaptation for both patients and professionals.

  6. Army Blast Claims Evaluation Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    ATIN: AFZX-JA Building 4551 Fort Polk, LA 71459-5000 Commander U.S. Army Engineer Center and Fort Leonard Wood ATIN: AlZT-JA Building 1706 East...U.S. Armed Forces Claims Service, Korea APO AP 96205-0084 No. of Copies Organization 1 Commander U.S. Army South ATI’N: SOJA Building 154 APO

  7. Research and Practice of the News Map Compilation Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T.; Liu, W.; Ma, W.

    2018-04-01

    Based on the needs of the news media on the map, this paper researches on the news map compilation service, conducts demand research on the service of compiling news maps, designs and compiles the public authority base map suitable for media publication, and constructs the news base map material library. It studies the compilation of domestic and international news maps with timeliness and strong pertinence and cross-regional characteristics, constructs the hot news thematic gallery and news map customization services, conducts research on types of news maps, establish closer liaison and cooperation methods with news media, and guides news media to use correct maps. Through the practice of the news map compilation service, this paper lists two cases of news map preparation services used by different media, compares and analyses cases, summarizes the research situation of news map compilation service, and at the same time puts forward outstanding problems and development suggestions in the service of news map compilation service.

  8. The Dynamic Cross-Correlations between Mass Media News, New Media News, and Stock Returns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuochao Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the dynamic cross-correlations between mass media news, new media news, and stock returns for the SSE 50 Index in Chinese stock market by employing the MF-DCCA method. The empirical results show that (1 there exist power-law cross-correlations between two types of news as well as between news and its corresponding SSE 50 Index return; (2 the cross-correlations between mass media news and SSE 50 Index returns show larger multifractality and more complicated structures; (3 mass media news and new media news have both complementary and competitive relationships; (4 with the rolling window analysis, we further find that there is a general increasing trend for the cross-correlations between the two types of news as well as the cross-correlations between news and returns and this trend becomes more persistent over time.

  9. Move! Eat better: news

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Are you curious to know whether you’re doing enough daily exercise…? Test yourself with a pedometer!   Through the Move! Eat better campaign, launched in May 2012, the CERN medical service is aiming to improve the health of members of the personnel by encouraging them to prioritise physical activity in conjunction with a balanced diet. Various successful activities have already taken place: relay race/Nordic walk, Bike2work, Zumba and fitness workshops, two conferences (“Physical activity for health” and “Good nutrition every day”), events in the restaurants, as well as posters and a website. Although everyone has got the message from our various communications that physical activity is good for your health, there is still a relevant question being asked: “What is the minimum amount of exercise recommended?” 10,000 steps per day is the ideal figure, which has been demonstrated as beneficial by scientific studies ...

  10. News from the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2009-01-01

    The Chinese government has given its final approval to build the nuclear power plant in Taishan, which must be equipped with two Areva reactors in Guangdong. Areva delivers two steam generators at T.M.I.. The United arab emirates have approved a law establishing the legal framework for their development programme in civil nuclear energy, a step required before the award of a contract estimated at 41 million dollars. The emirates government undertakes to waive the local enrichment of uranium. Armenia wants to produce 40% of its electric power by nuclear energy in 2025. The Osiris reactor restarted production of radioisotopes for medical use. It ensures the provision of 7% of world production. (N.C.)

  11. Good news is bad news: Leverage cycles and sudden stops

    OpenAIRE

    Akinci, Ozge; Chahrour, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    We show that a model with imperfectly forecastable changes in future productivity and an occasionally binding collateral constraint can match a set of stylized facts about “sudden stop” events. “Good” news about future productivity raises leverage during times of expansion, increasing the probability that the constraint binds, and a sudden stop occurs, in future periods. The economy exhibits a boom period in the run-up to the sudden stop, with output, consumption, and investment all above tre...

  12. The Army Study Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-09

    STUDDIES BY CATEGORY STUDY TITLE SPONSOR NMtTHOO PPA ADM RE:MOTE LINK PRUG DARCOM CONTRACT ADV TECH MODEL FULL DARCON CONTRACT ARMY COMMAND ANDi CONTROL...HOUUSE NUN -RLCURRIN 1 LMANUS DARCON I"-HUSL FF-TH-hLLI TM~k ECUNLNI(. ANALYSIS DARCOM CUNTRALT FOR SFELTKUM ANALYZERS UPLRA1IUN&L FLt)AI/EKPSL TKADL...TECHNULOGY A5 AESM:NT TRADOC bUTH *TEN YEAR INSTRUMENTATIOft ANALYSkIS OCSA ot" PHASE I TERRAIN MODELS DARCOM bUTH lEST CRITLRIA FUOR NUN -IIILLL-K WEAPUN

  13. News and Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-02-01

    News from Journal House Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems Many readers are trying to modify the way they teach and in so doing are trying to write new types of questions and problems. The Journal has a new online resource, the JCE Internet Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems Web site, http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/JCEWWW/Resources/CQandChP/index.html . The site is a source of questions and problems that can be used in teaching and assessing conceptual understanding and problem solving in chemistry. Here you can find a library of free-response and multiple-choice conceptual questions and challenge problems, tips for writing these questions and problems, and a discussion of types of concept questions. This site is intended to be a means of sharing conceptual questions and challenge problems among chemical educators. It will be as inclusive as possible, and to achieve this readers need to share their questions and alert the authors to references or Web sites. The screen captures shown below should provide a feeling for what you will find when you visit the site. The authors, William R. Robinson and Susan C. Nurrenbern, welcome additions to the library of conceptual questions or other comments or suggestions. Contact them by email, fax, or regular mail. William R. Robinson and Susan C. Nurrenbern, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1393. Bill: phone: 765/494-5453; fax: 765/494-0239; email: wrrobin@purdue.edu. Sue: phone: 765/494-0823; fax: 765/494-0239; email: nurrenbe@purdue.edu. fax: 765/494-0239. 1998 Ford Foundation Fellowships The National Research Council has announced the recipients of the 1998 fellowships for minority scholars. Three categories of fellowships were awarded: 50 to beginning graduate students, 33 to students writing their dissertations, and 28 to recent Ph.D. recipients. There were about 1,000 applicants. For information about the next competition contact the Fellowship Office of the National

  14. News and Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-05-01

    1998 ACS Meeting in Boston he suffered a serious fall following a stroke, from which he never recovered. One of his last photographs, taken the previous day at a Journal luncheon, appears on page 1360 of the November 1998 issue. His commentary on his long career in chemistry and education appears on page 1520 of the December 1998 issue. Seaborg was a Nobel laureate, discoverer of elements, scientific advisor to presidents, former chancellor of the University of California, former chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission, chairman of the steering committee of the CHEM Study project, founder of Lawrence Hall of Science, , the list goes on and on. He was at the same time a passionate supporter of education. Seaborg published fourteen articles in the Journal between 1951 and 1998. He was interviewed in 1975 by David Ridgway as part of the Impact series (JCE 1975, 52, 70), and that interview is highly recommended reading (see supplement to this article). He received the 1994 ACS George C. Pimentel Award in Chemical Education; his award address was published in the ACS Division of Chemical Education's CHED Newsletter, Fall 1995. Memorial articles with details of his life and his scientific contributions have appeared in The New York Times (Saturday, February 27, 1999, page 1) and Chemical & Engineering News (March 8, 1999, page 29). But there is also the spirit of the man, what he believed in, what he tried to do, what he hoped he had accomplished. A sense of that can be gained from the excerpts that are reprinted below, taken first from the Impact interview and then from the award address. Ridgway: On reflection, now, out of your many contributions to chemistry, is there one that you feel has had more of an impact than others? Seaborg: The discovery of plutonium would answer that question. The impact there is probably nearly as great as any single chemical discovery. Ridgway: What was the state of the "art" in your field when you first decided to bend your energies in this

  15. Asymmetric News Effects on Volatility: Good vs. Bad News in Good vs. Bad Times

    OpenAIRE

    Laakkonen, Helinä; Lanne, Markku

    2008-01-01

    We study the impact of positive and negative macroeconomic US and European news announcements in different phases of the business cycle on the highfrequency volatility of the EUR/USD exchange rate. The results suggest that in general bad news increases volatility more than good news. The news effects also depend on the state of the economy: bad news increases volatility more in good times than in bad times, while there is no difference between the volatility effects of good news in bad and go...

  16. Fake news in healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. An article in the National Review by Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry points out that there is considerable waste in healthcare spending (1. He blames much of this on two entitlements-Medicare and employer-sponsored health insurance. He also lays much of the blame on doctors. “Doctors are the biggest villains in American health care. ... As with public-school teachers, we should be able to recognize that a profession as a whole can be pathological even as many individual members are perfectly good actors, and even if many of them are heroes. And just like public-school teachers, the medical profession as a whole puts its own interests ahead of those of the citizens it claims to be dedicated to serve.” Who is Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry and how could he say something so nasty about teachers and my profession? A quick internet search revealed that Mr. Gobry is a fellow at the Ethics & Public Policy Center …

  17. Delivering bad news in emergency care medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Douglas W

    2017-01-01

    Forecasting is a strategy for delivering bad news and is compared to two other strategies, stalling and being blunt. Forecasting provides some warning that bad news is forthcoming without keeping the recipient in a state of indefinite suspense (stalling) or conveying the news abruptly (being blunt). Forecasting appears to be more effective than stalling or being blunt in helping a recipient to "realize" the bad news because it involves the deliverer and recipient in a particular social relation. The deliverer of bad news initiates the telling by giving an advance indication of the bad news to come; this allows the recipient to calculate the news in advance of its final presentation, when the deliverer confirms what the recipient has been led to anticipate. Thus, realization of bad news emerges from intimate collaboration, whereas stalling and being blunt require recipients to apprehend the news in a social vacuum. Exacerbating disruption to recipients' everyday world, stalling and being blunt increase the probability of misapprehension (denying, blaming, taking the situation as a joke, etc.) and thereby inhibit rather than facilitate realization. Particular attention is paid to the "perspective display sequence", a particular forecasting strategy that enables both confirming the recipient's perspective and using that perspective to affirm the clinical news. An example from acute or emergency medicine is examined at the close of the paper.

  18. News clippings for introductory astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrowsky, Matthew

    1999-09-01

    Most students entering our introductory astronomy course for nonscience majors arrive not merely lacking scientific facts-they also have misconceptions about the nature of science, and many have a handicapping ``science anxiety'' (in addition to math anxiety). So I have added a ``current science'' requirement to our introductory course. Each student must compile a file of five astronomy news articles taken from readily available sources.

  19. 76 FR 66282 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-26

    ... Committee: U.S. Army War College Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Dates of Meeting: November 15, 2011. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command... issues and matters related to the continued growth and development of the United States Army War College...

  20. 76 FR 72914 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ...: U.S. Army War College Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Dates of Meeting: December 14, 2011. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command... issues and matters related to the continued growth and development of the United States Army War College...

  1. For Video Games, Bad News Is Good News: News Reporting of Violent Video Game Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copenhaver, Allen; Mitrofan, Oana; Ferguson, Christopher J

    2017-12-01

    News coverage of video game violence studies has been critiqued for focusing mainly on studies supporting negative effects and failing to report studies that did not find evidence for such effects. These concerns were tested in a sample of 68 published studies using child and adolescent samples. Contrary to our hypotheses, study effect size was not a predictor of either newspaper coverage or publication in journals with a high-impact factor. However, a relationship between poorer study quality and newspaper coverage approached significance. High-impact journals were not found to publish studies with higher quality. Poorer quality studies, which tended to highlight negative findings, also received more citations in scholarly sources. Our findings suggest that negative effects of violent video games exposure in children and adolescents, rather than large effect size or high methodological quality, increase the likelihood of a study being cited in other academic publications and subsequently receiving news media coverage.

  2. Giving bad news: a qualitative research exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aein, Fereshteh; Delaram, Masoumeh

    2014-06-01

    The manner in which healthcare professionals deliver bad news affects the way it is received, interpreted, understood, and dealt with. Despite the fact that clinicians are responsible for breaking bad news, it has been shown that they lack skills necessary to perform this task. The purpose of this study was to explore Iranian mothers' experiences to receive bad news about their children cancer and to summarize suggestions for improving delivering bad news by healthcare providers. A qualitative approach using content analysis was adopted. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 mothers from two pediatric hospitals in Iran. Five major categories emerged from the data analysis, including dumping information, shock and upset, emotional work, burden of delivering bad news to the family members, and a room for multidisciplinary approach. Effective communication of healthcare team with mothers is required during breaking bad news. Using multidisciplinary approaches to prevent harmful reactions and providing appropriate support are recommended.

  3. The Changing Landscape of Science News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordon, James

    2011-03-01

    Social media are revolutionizing the ways that people communicate and the ways they get their news. Traditional news outlets are in decline, and no subject area is declining faster than science news. Every day there are fewer professional science journalists working in traditional media. On the other hand, ever greater numbers of scientists, science enthusiasts, and online journalists are turning to blogs, podcasts, eBooks, twitter feeds, and social media sites like Facebook and Tumbler to spread news about science. I will present an overview of the state of science journalism and speculate on the likely directions it seems to be heading. I will also offer some general guidelines to help scientists understand what makes a good science news story, as well as suggesting ways that they can get their work in the news.

  4. Nigerian Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Medical Journal publishes original articles, reviews, memoranda, reports, case reports, reports of meetings as supplements, letters to the Editor, Association New, book reviews as well as any news of medical relevance. Topics published are of interest to clinicians, researchers, resident doctors, epidemiologists ...

  5. How to Write News for Broadcast and Print Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dary, David

    This book is a primer on the techniques of news writing and the application of those principles to print and broadcast journalism. Chapters include: "The News Media," which presents a brief history of journalism and the foundations on which it is based; "What Is News?"; "Gathering News," which discusses news beats, reporters' qualifications, and…

  6. News with an attitude: assessing the mechanisms underlying the effects of opinionated news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boukes, M.; Boomgaarden, H.G.; Moorman, M.; de Vreese, C.H.

    2014-01-01

    Opinionated news targets communities of likeminded viewers, relies on dramaturgical storytelling techniques, and shares characteristics with political satire. Accordingly, opinionated news should be understood as a specific form of political entertainment. We have investigated the mechanisms

  7. Portraying the Army Reserve Components in Army War Games and Exercises

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dillon, Dick

    2002-01-01

    .... Ensuring that accuracy and realism was the primary purpose of the Role of the Army National Guard and Army Reserve in Army Exercises workshop conducted at the Collins Center for Strategic Leadership from 23-26 September 2002.

  8. The Cognitive Information Effect of Televised News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lăzăroiu, George; Pera, Aurel; Ştefănescu-Mihăilă, Ramona O; Bratu, Sofia; Mircică, Nela

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize the key findings which prove that the biased perceptions of viewers may provide an inaccurate image of the informational validity of televised news. The news may generate distorted recollections of what occurred in particular reported events if displayed routines influence viewers not to pay attention to the essential features of a narrative. Elaborating on Fiske and Hartley (2010), Zelizer (2010), and Gunter (2015), we indicate that the character of the news setting has altered and individuals' news consumption routines have changed in adapting to media advancements. The news may be undergone at various psychological stages by news publics. Televised news may transmit information undeviatingly to publics that may (not) be committed successfully to memory. Our paper shows that individuals' skills to handle information that is displayed in a linguistic configuration are influenced by their abilities in the utilization of certain symbol systems that are employed to represent notions and meanings. Televised news may shape what individuals grasp, influence their perceptions, convictions, and views regarding prevailing events and matters, and transmit knowledge and interpretation. If news stories can be jotted down in a linguistic style that sidesteps making needless processing demands and captivate news users by facilitating them to make connections with former knowledge, they may be more worthy of note and more edifying. We conclude that news narratives present a cognitive demanding task to individuals, displaying novel information regarding evolving events in a multifarious format. Broadcast news exhibits intricate contents, displaying configurations that employ excessively the cognitive abilities for information processing of viewers.

  9. The Cognitive Information Effect of Televised News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Lăzăroiu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review is to summarize the key findings which prove that the biased perceptions of viewers may provide an inaccurate image of the informational validity of televised news. The news may generate distorted recollections of what occurred in particular reported events if displayed routines influence viewers not to pay attention to the essential features of a narrative. Elaborating on Fiske and Hartley (2010, Zelizer (2010, and Gunter (2015, we indicate that the character of the news setting has altered and individuals’ news consumption routines have changed in adapting to media advancements. The news may be undergone at various psychological stages by news publics. Televised news may transmit information undeviatingly to publics that may (not be committed successfully to memory. Our paper shows that individuals’ skills to handle information that is displayed in a linguistic configuration are influenced by their abilities in the utilization of certain symbol systems that are employed to represent notions and meanings. Televised news may shape what individuals grasp, influence their perceptions, convictions, and views regarding prevailing events and matters, and transmit knowledge and interpretation. If news stories can be jotted down in a linguistic style that sidesteps making needless processing demands and captivate news users by facilitating them to make connections with former knowledge, they may be more worthy of note and more edifying. We conclude that news narratives present a cognitive demanding task to individuals, displaying novel information regarding evolving events in a multifarious format. Broadcast news exhibits intricate contents, displaying configurations that employ excessively the cognitive abilities for information processing of viewers.

  10. The Stock Market's Reaction to Unemployment News: Why Bad News is Usually Good for Stocks

    OpenAIRE

    John H. Boyd; Ravi Jagannathan; Jian Hu

    2001-01-01

    We find that on average an announcement of rising unemployment is 'good news' for stocks during economic expansions and 'bad news' during economic contractions. Thus stock prices usually increase on news of rising unemployment, since the economy is usually in an expansion phase. We provide an explanation for this phenomenon. Unemployment news bundles two primitive types of information relevant for valuing stocks: information about future interest rates and future corporate earnings and divide...

  11. New format for ATLAS e-news

    CERN Multimedia

    Pauline Gagnon

    ATLAS e-news got a new look! As of November 30, 2007, we have a new format for ATLAS e-news. Please go to: http://atlas-service-enews.web.cern.ch/atlas-service-enews/index.html . ATLAS e-news will now be published on a weekly basis. If you are not an ATLAS colaboration member but still want to know how the ATLAS experiment is doing, we will soon have a version of ATLAS e-news intended for the general public. Information will be sent out in due time.

  12. Tailor-Made News: Meeting the demands of news users on mobile and social media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot Kormelink, T.; Costera Meijer, I.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the technological possibilities for portable, personalized, and participatory news use, the public has not turned en masse from passive receivers who consume news on the producers' terms, into active users who tailor news to fit their personal preferences and practices. Unmistakably, some

  13. The Usefulness of a News Media Literacy Measure in Evaluating a News Literacy Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksl, Adam; Craft, Stephanie; Ashley, Seth; Miller, Dean

    2017-01-01

    A survey of college students showed those who had taken a news literacy course had significantly higher levels of news media literacy, greater knowledge of current events, and higher motivation to consume news, compared with students who had not taken the course. The effect of taking the course did not diminish over time. Results validate the News…

  14. Young people’s news orientations and uses of traditional and new media for news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Cauwenberge, A.; d'Haenens, L.; Beentjes, H.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on Flemish college students’ news orientations and their uses of traditional and new media for news within a public service media environment. We used five homogeneous focus groups that covered variation in news media use. The analysis of the focus groups revealed major

  15. Navigating Cross-Media News Use : Media repertoires and the value of news in everyday life.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, Joelle; Peters, Chris; Broersma, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    The current news media landscape is characterized by an abundance of digital outlets and increased opportunities for users to navigate news themselves. Yet, it is still unclear how people negotiate this fluctuating environment to decide which news media to select or ignore, how they assemble

  16. The University of Nevada Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) May 2011 March 2015: Situational Reports (SITREPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-19

    from the DoD Language Office , USACC Chief Culture and Language Division Office , and USACC PAO: http://www.unr.edu/nevada-today/news/2012/rotc-cadets...28 Mar 7.c.ii. Wooster HS AFI, 30 Mar 8. Guest Speakers- Dr. Randy Frost, Military Officer Associations, CSM (R) Cornet, USAA, financial planning...collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 19-07-2017 FINAL The University of Nevada Army Reserve Officer Training

  17. Increasing Army Retention Through Incentives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beerman, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    .... If the Army fails to address the enlisted retention issue in the near future departures of experienced NCOs will have a detrimental impact our military's ability to provide for our nation's security...

  18. Christian Contributions to Army Values

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D'Emma, Gregory

    2000-01-01

    .... The Army builds the soldier's heart, spirit, and soul by the values we instill. Over the years these values of loyalty, duty, respect, selfless service, honor, integrity, and personal courage have been trained and reinforced...

  19. Racial Extremism in the Army

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hudson, Walter M

    1998-01-01

    ... modem phenomenon of "skinheads." I then discuss the history of white supremacist extremism in the Army, culminating in the December, 1995 murders of two black civilians by soldiers assigned to the 82d Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, North Carolina...

  20. News and Features Updates from USA.gov

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — Stay on top of important government news and information with the USA.gov Updates: News and Features RSS feed. We'll update this feed when we add news and featured...

  1. Terra News: sensationalism and fait-divers on the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Golembiewski

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an analysis of the news program Jornal do Terra (Terra News shown on the Terra website. The study involved two aspects: forms of news presentations on TV, based on studies by Pedro Maciel, and criteria of news value, based on Mário Erbolatto’s view. In addition, we used Luis Arthur Ferraretto’s studies of the news formats used specifically on the radio. The objective of this work was to verify what kind of news is transmitted by the news program Terra News, and to compare it with the traditional news program we watch on TV. The study confirmed that Terra News utilizes conventional formats of news presentation and makes a selection of sensationalist news about fait-divers.

  2. TERRA NEWS: Sensationalism and Fait-divers on the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Golembiewski

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an analysis of the news program Jornal do Terra (Terra News shown on the Terra website. The study involved two aspects: forms of news presentations on TV, based on studies by Pedro Maciel, and criteria of news value, based on Mário Erbolatto’s view. In addition, we used Luis Arthur Ferraretto’s studies of the news formats used specifically on the radio. The objective of this work was to verify what kind of news is transmitted by the news program Terra News, and to compare it with the traditional news program we watch on TV. The study confirmed that Terra News utilizes conventional formats of news presentation and makes a selection of sensationalist news about fait-divers.

  3. Outsourcing the news? An empirical assessment of the role of sources and news agencies in the contemporary news landscape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boumans, J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Journalists are increasingly accused of uncritically recycling subsidized material in the form of press releases and news agency copy. This practice has been labeled churnalism and is believed to compromise journalism’s autonomy and threaten news quality. While the context - rampant competition,

  4. Turning Science Results into News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanjek, Christopher

    2006-09-01

    Do you want to get into the New York Times? Aside from writing an angry letter or robbing a bank, getting into the news (with your science result) requires a well-crafted press release. Reaching out to reporters is very different from reaching out to fellow scientists. Scientific significance is not the same as newsworthiness, but many science results can be molded into interesting stories that reporters can relate to their audience. This presentation will present examples of science stories that made it big and some that flopped. We will also examine what makes a story attractive to newspaper and magazine editors.

  5. Miscellaneous news from the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradel, J.

    2005-01-01

    Different news from the world, Ukraine hopes to build 11 new nuclear reactors up to 2030, Armenia allows the construction of a for radioactive waste storage (in operation in 50 years), Poland has announced the opening of a nuclear power plant for 2020, Sweden closed the second reactor of the Barsebaeck nuclear power plant on the 31 of may (2005), the energy situation in the Baltic sea region, on February 2005 six governments(Canada, France, Japan, United States, United kingdom, Switzerland) have signed a framework agreement for international collaboration on research and development of generation four nuclear energy systems. Finland does the choice of E.P.R.. (N.C.)

  6. Robotics In Manufacturing: Army View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, F. J.

    1983-05-01

    (Figure 1) This is an outline of my presentation today. The U. S. Army has a dual interest in the use of robots, namely: 1. As a substitute for or an extension of the soldier in the battlefield, and 2. in the factories that make Army materiel, or - as we call it -the the production base. The Production Base can again be divided into three separate segments, i.e., the Army owned and operated facilities or GOG6s, such as Rock Island and Watervliet arsenals, and not to be overlooked, the depot operations. There the Army manufactures gun tubes and other related parts for artillery weapons and repairs and overhauls them. A second category is the Army owned and contractor operated facilities or GOCOs,such as the ammunition plants, the tank plants at Lima, Ohio and Warren, Michigan and the Stratford Engine Plant in Connecticut where gas turbines for helicopter and the Abrams tank are manufactured. The last category covers the industrial base, that is those factories which are not only operated but also owned by the contractor himself also referred to as COCOs. You can see from this description that the Army is supported by a base which produces a diversified line of products. Therefore, the task of technology development and technology insertion is considerably more complex than what one encounters in the average U. S. Manufacturing organization.

  7. 2002 Industry Studies: News Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    USAF CAPT John W. Coleman II, USN Reserve Col Christos Dellas , Greek Army Col Tim Fletcher USAF Lt Col Tim Malinski USAF Lt Col Deb Martinez USAF Ms...Majority Support Government Restrictions on War Coverage,” Washington Post, 29 November 2001, Sec. C, p.1. 54 Lucia Moses, “E&P Survey: Circ Bump was...Afghan War,” The Washington Post, 7 December 2001, Sec. A, p. 43. Moses, Lucia , “E&P Survey: Circ Bump was Modest,” Editor & Publisher, 22 April 2002

  8. Press problem related to nuclear energy news reporting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Mitsuo

    2008-01-01

    Since the event of Niigataken Chuetsu-oki Earthquake in 2007 and the subsequent press reports on damage of nuclear power station after it, a stance of media is being questioned. In order to clear this problem, basic organizational structure of the press related to nuclear energy news was analyzed. Local news department, social news department, science news department and economical news department involve in nuclear energy news the accordance with their own situations and concerns. This structure makes problem of nuclear energy news reporting complicated. Changing this system is required but very difficult. It is concluded that the press problem around nuclear energy news is strange. (author)

  9. Power structure in Chilean news media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahamonde, Jorge; Bollen, Johan; Elejalde, Erick; Ferres, Leo; Poblete, Barbara

    2018-01-01

    Even democracies endowed with the most active free press struggle to maintain diversity of news coverage. Consolidation and market forces may cause only a few dominant players to control the news cycle. Editorial policies may be biased by corporate ownership relations, narrowing news coverage and focus. To an increasing degree this problem also applies to social media news distribution, since it is subject to the same socio-economic drivers. To study the effects of consolidation and ownership on news diversity, we model the diversity of Chilean coverage on the basis of ownership records and social media data. We create similarity networks of news outlets on the basis of their ownership and the topics they cover. We then examine the relationships between the topology of ownership networks and content similarity to characterize how ownership affects news coverage. A network analysis reveals that Chilean media is highly concentrated both in terms of ownership as well as in terms of topics covered. Our method can be used to determine which groups of outlets and ownership exert the greatest influence on news coverage.

  10. News Values and the Vividness of Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennamer, J. David

    Most journalism textbooks begin with lists of what have been called "news values." These are criteria to be used to judge the newsworthiness of issues, events, and persons. The list of news values that most journalists have memorized can be replaced with a single concept--vividness. Vividness is a characteristic of the information…

  11. The Places and Spaces of News Audiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Historically, or so we would like to believe, the story of everyday life for many people included regular, definitive moments of news consumption. Journalism, in fact, was distributed around these routines: papers were delivered before breakfast, the evening news on TV buttressed the transition...

  12. Workforce Competitiveness Collection. "LINCS" Resource Collection News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Literacy Information and Communication System, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This edition of "'LINCS' Resource Collection News" features the Workforce Competitiveness Collection, covering the topics of workforce education, English language acquisition, and technology. Each month Collections News features one of the three "LINCS" (Literacy Information and Communication System) Resource Collections--Basic…

  13. News Analytics for Financial Decision Support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Milea (Viorel)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThis PhD thesis contributes to the newly emerged, growing body of scientific work on the use of News Analytics in Finance. Regarded as the next significant development in Automated Trading, News Analytics extends trading algorithms to incorporate information extracted from textual

  14. Television news and fear; A child survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walma van der Molen, J.H.; Valkenburg, P.M.; Peeters, A.L.

    2002-01-01

    Using telephone interviews among a random sample of 537 Dutch children aged 7–12 years old, we investigated (a) the prevalence of fear reactions to television news among younger and older children and among boys and girls, (b) what types of news items children in different age and gender groups

  15. Predicting User Views in Online News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hardt, Daniel; Rambow, Owen

    2017-01-01

    We analyze user viewing behavior on anonline news site. We collect data from64,000 news articles, and use text featuresto predict frequency of user views.We compare predictiveness of the headlineand “teaser” (viewed before clicking) andthe body (viewed after clicking). Both arepredictive of click...

  16. News analytics for financial decision support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milea, D.V.

    2013-01-01

    This PhD thesis contributes to the newly emerged, growing body of scientific work on the use of News Analytics in Finance. Regarded as the next significant development in Automated Trading, News Analytics extends trading algorithms to incorporate information extracted from textual messages, by

  17. Corporate actors in Western European television news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, P.

    2009-01-01

    News about corporations can be understood as an interdependent relationship among the public relations function, organizational logic and the logic of the media. This research addresses the visibility and role of corporate actors in Western European public television news. A quantitative content

  18. Developing a News Media Literacy Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Seth; Maksl, Adam; Craft, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Using a framework previously applied to other areas of media literacy, this study developed and assessed a measurement scale focused specifically on critical news media literacy. Our scale appears to successfully measure news media literacy as we have conceptualized it based on previous research, demonstrated through assessments of content,…

  19. Space Shuttle Status News Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Richard Gilbech, External Tank "Tiger Team" Lead, begins this space shuttle news conference with detailing the two major objectives of the team. The objectives include: 1) Finding the root cause of the foam loss on STS-114; and 2) Near and long term improvements for the external tank. Wayne Hale, Space Shuttle Program Manager, presents a chart to explain the external tank foam loss during STS-114. He gives a possible launch date for STS-121 after there has been a repair to the foam on the External Tank. He further discusses the changes that need to be made to the surrounding areas of the plant in New Orleans, due to Hurricane Katrina. Bill Gerstemaier, NASA Associate Administrator for Space Operations, elaborates on the testing of the external tank foam loss. The discussion ends with questions from the news media about a fix for the foam, replacement of the tiles, foam loss avoidance, the root cause of foam loss and a possible date for a new external tank to be shipped to NASA Kennedy Space Center.

  20. The NEWS Water Cycle Climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodell, M.; Beaudoing, H. K.; L'Ecuyer, T.; Olson, W. S.

    2012-12-01

    NASA's Energy and Water Cycle Study (NEWS) program fosters collaborative research towards improved quantification and prediction of water and energy cycle consequences of climate change. In order to measure change, it is first necessary to describe current conditions. The goal of the first phase of the NEWS Water and Energy Cycle Climatology project was to develop "state of the global water cycle" and "state of the global energy cycle" assessments based on data from modern ground and space based observing systems and data integrating models. The project was a multi-institutional collaboration with more than 20 active contributors. This presentation will describe the results of the water cycle component of the first phase of the project, which include seasonal (monthly) climatologies of water fluxes over land, ocean, and atmosphere at continental and ocean basin scales. The requirement of closure of the water budget (i.e., mass conservation) at various scales was exploited to constrain the flux estimates via an optimization approach that will also be described. Further, error assessments were included with the input datasets, and we examine these in relation to inferred uncertainty in the optimized flux estimates in order to gauge our current ability to close the water budget within an expected uncertainty range.

  1. The NEWS Water Cycle Climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodell, Matthew; Beaudoing, Hiroko Kato; L'Ecuyer, Tristan; William, Olson

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Energy and Water Cycle Study (NEWS) program fosters collaborative research towards improved quantification and prediction of water and energy cycle consequences of climate change. In order to measure change, it is first necessary to describe current conditions. The goal of the first phase of the NEWS Water and Energy Cycle Climatology project was to develop "state of the global water cycle" and "state of the global energy cycle" assessments based on data from modern ground and space based observing systems and data integrating models. The project was a multi-institutional collaboration with more than 20 active contributors. This presentation will describe the results of the water cycle component of the first phase of the project, which include seasonal (monthly) climatologies of water fluxes over land, ocean, and atmosphere at continental and ocean basin scales. The requirement of closure of the water budget (i.e., mass conservation) at various scales was exploited to constrain the flux estimates via an optimization approach that will also be described. Further, error assessments were included with the input datasets, and we examine these in relation to inferred uncertainty in the optimized flux estimates in order to gauge our current ability to close the water budget within an expected uncertainty range.

  2. News from Council - September 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    I would like to inform you of the main news from the Council this week. First of all, the Council congratulated CERN and the Collaborations on the superb performance of the accelerator complex and experiments. It has been a great year so far, with important physics results across the whole spectrum of the CERN research programme.   Looking forward, one of the main accomplishments from this week’s meetings is that the Council has approved the opening of a credit facility with the European Investment Bank (EIB) to cover the cash shortage during the peak years of the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) construction. This is very good news since it will allow us to carry out the work necessary for the HL-LHC without compromising the rest of the Laboratory’s scientific programme. Turning to the scientific and geographical enlargement, the Council approved the admission of India as an Associate Member State, and I very much hope that the agreement can be signed in the near future so that Indi...

  3. News

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Microscopy: Schools to gain remote access to Oxford University-based SEM Canada: Perimeter Institute calls international applicants to its 2005 summer school ASE: ASE 2005 refreshes the teaching parts that other conferences cannot reach Scotland: Glasgow hosts Kelvin exhibition Climate Analysis: Met Office sets up project to predict climate change Wales: Welsh teachers meet at Christ College, Brecon ESERA: ESERA 2005 unveils its conference programme Higher Education: Educators address school-university transition Christmas Lecture Series: Royal Institution supports Christmas Lecture series with interactive CD-ROM Events: UK’s Science Week kicks off in March Grants: PPARC and IOP to provide grants worth up to £400 Camera Competition: Congratulations go to camera winners Teachers’ TV: Teachers’ channel hits the small screen Physics and Music: Foster and Liebeck presentation combines physics and music Science on Stage: SOS gears up for Geneva festival Nanoworld: Hirsch lecture at Oxford focuses on the nanoworld GIREP: GIREP conference aims to raise physics’ profile Course: STELAR offers free radio-communication course

  4. News

    Science.gov (United States)

    industry to discuss utilizing artificial intelligence and quantum science throughout the Air Force Air Force leaders met with scientists and industry members May 17 at the Artificial Intelligence and quantum Fallen Airman Profiles 2015 Air Force Events Cybersecurity Government Shutdown 2015 ISR Medal of Honor

  5. News

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-01

    11-14 Curriculum: Supporting Physics Teaching (11-14) Europe: Sci-tech couldn't be without it! Art-Science: Makrolab in Mountain Year Digital Curriculum: Should the BBC learn from the past? Scotland: Teachers get Rocket Science Malaysia: Controversy over the language medium for science teaching UK Science: Next stage of Science Year announced Special Educational Needs: Science for special needs students Folk Physics: Good vibrations Environment: IoM3 - a move towards sustainability? UK Primary Science: The threat of afternoon science

  6. News

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    <正> A high rank officer of Tianjin Toyota said recently that Toyota NBC V car, which represents the latest technology of Toyata specially designed for catering to Chinese market will be produced in Tianjin Toyota in 2002. The new model will be equipped with 1.3-litre or 1.5-litre VVT-I engine whose performance is much better than that of 8A engine installed in Xiali 2000 car. Both manual transmission and automatic transmission are available at user’s option. Now the working shops for NBC V car are

  7. News

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-11-01

    IRELAND New courses for high-tech Ireland; SCIENCE YEAR Science Year launched with a jump; THE NETHERLANDS School science teachers face uncertainty; KOREA Embedding physics in a cultural context; TEACHING RESOURCES Teacher, get your hook; ICT RESOURCES Stock-take of ICT progress; INTERNET Teachers to test-drive new physics gateway; NEW ZEALAND Physics is valued in New Zealand; JAPAN Advancing Physics in Japan; HIGHER EDUCATION Networking works in Cologne; INSTITUTE MATTERS IoP demands a better deal for physics teachers; AUSTRALIA Physics numbers decline: educators blame the low impact curriculum; SCIENCE FOR THE PUBLIC More than sixty seconds in Glasgow; INTERNET A gift selection of papers from IoP; TEACHING STYLES I know what you did last summer;

  8. News

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    Meeting: Brecon hosts 'alternative-style' Education Group Conference Meeting: Schools' Physics Group meeting delivers valuable teaching update Saturn Mission: PPARC’s Saturn school resource goes online Funding: Grant scheme supports Einstein Year activities Meeting: Liverpool Teachers’ Conference revives enthusiasm for physics Loan Scheme: Moon samples loaned to schools Awards: Schoolnet rewards good use of ICT in learning Funding: PPARC provides cash for science projects Workshop: Experts in physics education research share knowledge at international event Bulgaria: Transit of Venus comes to town Conference: CERN weekend provides lessons in particle physics Summer School: Teachers receive the summer-school treatment

  9. News

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-05-01

    Physics on Stage: Physics on the political stage Women in Physics: Allez les girls! Curriculum: Students want ethics debate in school science Physics on Stage: Buzzing around the tulips Events: GIREP 2002 Competition: Schumacher in the shower! Higher Education: Universities consider conceptual physics courses Resources: Evaluation of Advancing Physics Research Frontiers: Physics Teachers @ CERN 2002 UK Curriculum: Preparing useful citizens China: Changing the approach NSTA Annual Convention: Innovations and simplicity Europe: European Community Science and Society Action Plan Citizenship: ASE-Wellcome Trust citizenship education initiative

  10. News

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-11-01

    Resources: First Faulkes Telescope on its way! Events: Everything under the Sun - GIREP 2002 Experiments: The most beautiful experiment, your favourite demonstration Science year: Planet Science takes off Resources: New CD packages Lecture: Fantastic Plastic Summer workshop: The Wright Stuff Resources: Amazing Space 14-16 curriculum: 21st century science ASE conference: ASE 2003 South Africa: Sasol SciFest Earth sciences: JESEI: the answer to all your Earthly problems

  11. News

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    Energy: Increasing global energy needs require drastic policy changes Germany: Science teachers talk tactics in Bavaria Physics Day: NPL hosts A-level physics day Engineering: ICE members consider the past and the future of engineering IOP Awards: Superb teachers receive awards for their contribution to physics New Zealand: Unlikely location serves up stimulating conference Astronomy: Teaching ideas abound at EAAE event in Spain Mexico: Sharing knowledge about better physics teaching

  12. Data Exchanges in Mobile News Apps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammer, Aske; Wallberg, Filip

    This paper maps the flows of data to and from third-party actors when users access content in mobile news apps. This way, it analyzes the strategic networks of collaboration and data exchange that news organizations engage in in the digital economy, expanding the traditional two-sided model...... of media economics (centered around sales to audiences and advertisers) to also account for what happens “behind the curtain”. Research already shows that the trade with data constitutes a central component of web-based business models (Evens & Van Damme, 2016; Gerlitz & Helmond, 2013; Lindskow, 2016......), but no systematic scrutiny of the same phenomenon exists with regards to mobile news use even though the use of mobile platforms for news accessing increases these years (Newman, Levy, & Nielsen, 2015). This study measures all calls made by the news apps upon accessing content, mapping which third-party actors get...

  13. Role, perspective and knowledge of Iranian critical care nurses about breaking bad news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanipour, Masoomeh; Karim, Zahra; Bahrani, Naser

    2016-05-01

    Given the issue of caring critically ill patients, nurses are involved in the process of breaking bad news in critical care units, while little research has been conducted on this challenging issue. The purpose of this study was to determine the role, perspective and knowledge of Iranian critical care nurses regarding breaking bad news. This descriptive study was conducted on a sample of 160 nurses working in critical care units of hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Stratified and quota sampling methods were used. The data collection tool was a four-part questionnaire with validity and reliability confirmed via content validity and test-retest, respectively. The study showed that most critical care nurses were involved in breaking bad news, with different roles. The majority of participants (91.2%) had a positive attitude towards involvement of nurses in breaking bad news. In this study, 78.8% of nurses had moderate knowledge about how to break bad news, and only a few had good level of knowledge (16.2%). According to the findings, while critical care nurses took different roles in the process of breaking bad news and they had positive attitude towards participation in this process, yet their knowledge about this process was inadequate. Thus, designing educational programmes to enhance critical care nurses' knowledge and skills in this area seems necessary. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Inpatient Obstetric Care at Irwin Army Community Hospital: A Study to Determine the Most Efficient Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-03-01

    Reese’s new birthing suites may curb maternity malpractice suits. Modern Healthcare, 16 (11), 48. Clark, L., & Stewart, R. (1982). Nurse-midwifery...Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington VA 22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law , no person shall be...US Army Medical Department Center and School Bldg 2841 MCCS-HRA (US Army-Baylor Program in HCA) 3151 Scott Road, Suite 1412 Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234

  15. Application of the Taxonomy of Injuries: Analysis of Army Recruit Injuries, CY 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-31

    Assessing Fitness for Military Enlistment: Physical , Medical, and Mental Health Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. 13. U.S. Army...Public Health Information Paper Application of the Taxonomy of Injuries: Analysis of Army Recruit Injuries, CY 2016 PHIP No. 12-01-0118...Recruit Injuries, CY2016; Public Health Information Paper 12-01-0118 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER n/a 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  16. The Effects of a Customer Service Initiative at Moncrief Army Community Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-06

    Vroom (1964) in job satisfaction , Linder-Pelz argued that expectancy (i.e., the evaluation of object attributes) was determined by the relationship...Sf. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADORESS(ES) MONCRIEF ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL 4 500 STUART STREET FORT JACKSON, SC 29207...8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) US ARMY MEDICAL DEPARTMENT CENTER AND SCHOOL

  17. Diversity Issues in the Army as Perceived by Army Students at the United States Army War College

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Webster, Cecil

    1997-01-01

    ..., welfare, and other related programs. In recognizing this diversity, this paper identifies some diversity issues within the Army, analyzes the perception of those diversity issues by the resident Army students in the USAWC Class of 1997...

  18. Comparative analysis of field ration for military personnel of the ukrainian army and armies of other countries worldwide

    OpenAIRE

    M. Mardar; M. Hkrupalo; M. Stateva

    2017-01-01

    For the purpose of improvement of the Ukrainian nutritional standards this Article provides comparative analysis of field rations of different countries worldwide to make a proposal on improvement of food-stuff assortment in food ration for military personnel in the Armed Forces of Ukraine, Army of USA, the British Army, Army of Germany, Army of Italy, Army of Canada, Army of France, Army of Belarus, Army of Armenia. In accordance with the comparative analysis it was established that ration c...

  19. Strategic Analysis and Associated Management Products Supporting the Reengineering of Bayne-Jones Army Community Hospital: Consultative Products and Findings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fulton, Larry

    1998-01-01

    .... ̂Product 2 - "Bayne-Jones Army Community Hospital Web Site," a strategic Internet web site for marketing health and wellness, the TRICARE medical network, the Joint Readiness Training Center Surgeon's...

  20. Answering the Hottest Question in Army Education: What Is Army University?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kem, John S.; LeBoeuf, Eugene J.; Martin, James B.

    2016-01-01

    The most common question heard by senior members of Army University is always, "What is Army University?" The newest education institution in the U.S. Army was created to unify the training and educational institutions of the Army, making the large learning organization more effective and efficient for its soldiers, bringing together 37…

  1. News in early intervention in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffray, Marie-Maude; Thevenet, Marion; Georgieff, Nicolas

    2016-09-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental trouble which prevents the child from socio-communicative interaction, and learning from his environment. Non-medical early intervention attempts to improve prognosis. We will review the main current hypothesis, intervention models and scientific supports about early intervention. We conducted a search of the literature published on Medline between 2010 and 2015 related to intervention models provided to children with ASD aged less than 3 years. Data were extracted from systematic reviews and recent randomized controlled trials with moderate to high GRADE quality of evidence. Early intervention refers to brain plasticity theory. With the epidemiological studies of infant "at risk" there is an attempt to intervene earlier before full syndrome is present. Interventions tend to follow more on a developmental hierarchy of socio-communicative skills and to focus on the dyadic relation between the child and the caregivers to improve the core autistic symptoms. Over the last 6 years, there's been news and fine-tuned ways about early intervention, and more and more systematic evaluation. However, there are only few interventions which were evaluated in trial with a strong GRADE recommendation and all of them have methodological concerns. It is important to be cautious in recommendations for mental health politic, even if it is important to improve access to services for all children and their families, hence finance and design rigorous project in research.

  2. Tumor Talk and Child Well-Being: Perceptions of “good” and “bad” news among parents of children with advanced cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feraco, Angela M.; Dussel, Veronica; Orellana, Liliana; Kang, Tammy I.; Geyer, J. Russell; Rosenberg, Abby R.; Feudtner, Chris; Wolfe, Joanne

    2017-01-01

    Context Little is known about how parents of children with advanced cancer classify news they receive about their child’s medical condition. Objective To develop concepts of “good news” and “bad news” in discussions of advanced childhood cancer from parent perspectives. Methods Parents of children with advanced cancer cared for at three children’s hospitals were asked to share details of conversations in the preceding 3 months that contained “good news” or “bad news” related to their child’s medical condition. We used mixed methods to evaluate parent responses to both open-ended and fixed response items. Results Of 104 enrolled parents, 86 (83%) completed the survey. Six (7%) parents reported discussing neither good nor bad news, 18 (21%) reported only bad news, 15 (17%) reported only good news, and 46 (54%) reported both good and bad news (1 missing response). Seventy-six parents (88%) answered free response items. Descriptions of both good and bad news discussions consisted predominantly of “tumor talk” or cancer control. Additional treatment options featured prominently, particularly in discussions of bad news (42%). Child well-being, an important good news theme, encompassed treatment tolerance, symptom reduction, and quality of life. Conclusion A majority of parents of children with advanced cancer report discussing both good and bad news in the preceding 3 months. While news related primarily to cancer control, parents also describe good news discussions related to their child’s well-being. Understanding how parents of children with advanced cancer classify and describe the news they receive may enhance efforts to promote family-centered communication. PMID:28062345

  3. Operational Reach: Is Current Army Doctrine Adequate?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heintzelman, Scott

    2003-01-01

    The term operational reach, an element of operational design, is new to U.S. Army doctrine. Operational reach is not found in the previous edition of the Army's basic operational doctrine, Field Manual...

  4. 1986 AMEDD (Army Medical Department) Clinical Psychology Short Course: Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    system in which it operates. Beginning with Ferdinand de Saussure (1857-1914) and his published lectures entitled, Course in General Linguistics (1915...an important contribution was made to the study of language and human communication. Saussure introduced the idea that the study of one language (alone...and by itself) without reference to other language or languages was, indeed, a worthy occupation for a language scientist. Saussure built upon the

  5. United States Army Medical Department Journal. Leadership in the Army Medical Department, October - December 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    growth following the gap is the grandchildren of the baby boomers known as generation Y , or millennial . The rise in the birth rate is noticeable in...M. Healthy design. Lancet. 2004;364:405-406. 13. Urich RS, Zimring CM, Zhu X, Dubose J, Seo H, Choi Y , et al. A review of the literature on...origin or background, from Latin ethnicus (nation, people). Religion \\ri-’li-J3n\\ a personal set or institutionalized system of attitudes, beliefs, and

  6. The Evolution of Army Leader Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Human Resources Command, OPMD- MFE -I. 4 U.S. Army General Officer Management Office, Army General Officer Roster (Washington, DC, U.S. Department of the...Human Resources Command, Command Management Branch post board data analysis. 15 Data from the United States Army Human Resources Command, OPMD- MFE -A...May 1, 2008), D-1. 25 19 Data from the United States Army Human Resources Command, OPMD- MFE -A, 01 February, 2013. 20 U.S. Joint Chiefs of

  7. News from the Biological Stain Commission no. 12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyon, H O

    2012-01-01

    In this 12(th) issue of News from the Biological Stain Commission (BSC) under the heading of Regulatory affairs, the Biological Stain Commission's International Affairs Committee presents information from the meetings of ISO/TC 212/WG 1 Quality and competence in the medical laboratory and ISO....../TC 212/WG 3 In vitro diagnostic products both held on 2 - 3 June 2010, plus information on the second plenary meeting of ISO/TC 212 Clinical laboratory testing and in vitro diagnostic test systems held on 4 June 2010. All meetings took place in Seoul, Republic of Korea. Finally, information is provided...

  8. Mitigating the “Life-Sucking” Power of the Electronic Health Record (Editorial/News Medical Image of the Week: Bronchial Clot Removal via Cryotherapy Substitution of Assistants for Nurses Increases Mortality, Decreases Quality (News Corticosteroids and Influenza A associated Acute Respiratory Distress  Syndrome November 2016 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes Medical Image of the Week: Extrapleural Pneumolysis for Tuberculosis CMS Releases Data on Drug Spending (News Trump Proposes Initial Healthcare Agenda (News Tucson Critical Care Journal Club: Albumin Use in the Critical Care Unit Has the VA Become a White Elephant? (Editorial Inhaler Device Preferences in Older Adults with Chronic Lung Disease Election Results of Southwest Ballot Measures Affecting Healthcare (News Medical Image of the Week: Intraventricular Hemorrhage Casting Southwest Ballot Measures Affecting Healthcare (News ACGME Proposes Dropping the 16 Hour Resident Shift Limit (News November 2016 Imaging Case of the Month Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: RT Out, Pembrolizumab In, and Vaccine Hope or Hype (News Medical Image of the Week: Lynch Syndrome November 2016 Critical Care Case of the Month November 2016 Pulmonary Case of the Month

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. An article in PulmCCM discussed “life-sucking” electronic health care records (EHR (1. It is in turn based on an article in the Annals of Internal Medicine on the work time spent by physicians (2. The latter, funded by the American Medical Association, observed 57 physicians in internal medicine, family medicine, cardiology, and orthopedics over hundreds of hours. The study revealed that physicians spend almost two hours working on their electronic health record for every one hour of face-to-face patient time. Interestingly, physicians who used a documentation assistant or dictation spent more time with patients (31 and 44% compared to those with no documentation support (23%. The PulmCCM goes on to list some of the reasons that the EHR requires so much time: ●The best and brightest minds in software design don't go to work for Epic, Cerner, Allscripts, and whoever the other ones are. ●There's a high barrier …

  9. 76 FR 12087 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ...: U.S. Army War College Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Dates of Meeting: March 24, 2011. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command... faculty; table and examine online College issues; assess resident and distance education programs, self...

  10. 75 FR 7255 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-18

    ... Committee: U.S. Army War College Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Date of Meeting: March 11, 2010. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command...; table and examine online College issues; assess resident and distance education programs, self- study...

  11. 32 CFR 631.14 - Army policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army policy. 631.14 Section 631.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...-Installation Operations (Military Patrols and Investigative Activities) and Policy § 631.14 Army policy. (a...

  12. Annual Research Progress Report Letterman Army Institute of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-06-30

    occurs in the human oral cavity following trauma °r -J J« "^ an important defense mechanism in the highly infected oral environment ^d...antiseptic to temporarily reduce the bacterial population of the oral cavity . A collaborative study between Letterman Army Medical Center and...penicillin resistant strains of bacteria are frequently- observed components of the microbiota of oral and maxlllofacial in- fections surveyed at Letterman

  13. Army Hearing Program Status Report Quarter 1 Fiscal Year 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-27

    Occupational Health Objectives for Fiscal Year 2016, 21 October 2015. Memorandum, Office of the Surgeon General, subject: Public Health Management System ...Army’s Safety and Occupational Health objectives. U.S. Army Medical Command (MEDCOM) Chief of Staff Memorandum, dated 15 December 2016, mandates... Occupational and Environmental Health Readiness System – Hearing Conservation (DOEHRS-HC), and an average of 2 CIV and 3 MIL losses were recorded

  14. Out of the dissecting room: news media portrayal of human anatomy teaching and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan de Bere, Sam; Petersen, Alan

    2006-07-01

    Radical changes in medical research and education have recently led to a number of innovative developments in terms of how human anatomy is represented and understood. New ways of introducing medical students to anatomy (including living anatomies and virtual simulations) have provoked widespread debate, with discussion of their relative merits compared to more traditional approaches that use cadaveric dissection. Outside the field of medicine, in the wider public sphere, the practice of anatomical study may often seem mysterious. The dissemination of news on anatomy, we contend, is central to the question of how medical researchers and educators engage with the public. Our analysis of news media coverage in the UK demonstrates that news-making, by giving prominence to certain facts, themes and images, serves to mask issues about anatomy and its practices that need debate. We examine the ways in which news media, through processes of selection and the 'framing' of issues, may perform an agenda-setting role. We draw attention to the use of positive 'awe and amazement' frames including 'miracles of modern science', 'medical heroes', and 'gifts of life', alongside more negative 'guts and gore' coverage including 'Frankenstein', 'Brave New World' and 'Rape of the Body' frames that concentrate on high profile scandals associated with the use and misuse of human bodies, tissues and parts. We also highlight the selective use of commentaries from members of the medical profession, which are more prevalent in positive 'awe and amazement' stories than in stories with negative coverage. We conclude by arguing for greater collaboration between journalists on the one hand, and medical educators and researchers on the other, in the making of news in order to provide portrayals of anatomy which bear a closer relationship to the everyday reality of professional work.

  15. Mental Health Risk Factors for Suicides in the US Army, 2007-8

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    Levin A. Military brass address suicide crisis and strategies to cure it. Psychiatr News 2009;44:10. 6. Black SA, ed. Brief to the U.S. Army Suicide... schizophrenia . Br J Psychiatry 2000;177:212e17. 19. Conner KR, Cox C, Duberstein PR, et al. Violence, alcohol, and completed suicide: a caseecontrol...study. Am J Psychiatry 2001;158:1701e5. 20. de Hert M, Peuskens J. Psychiatric aspects of suicidal behaviour: schizophrenia . In: Hawton K, Van Heerigen K

  16. The news machine hacking, the untold story

    CERN Document Server

    Hanning, James

    2014-01-01

    There is one mystery figure at the heart of ?Hackergate' ? Glenn Mulcaire, the News of the World's top private investigator. The former AFC Wimbledon footballer has never spoken publicly or in court about his work investigating and backing up front-page news stories (such as the News of the World's award-winning David Beckham scoop). Mulcaire's arrest in 2006 for intercepting royal-household phone messages barely registered at the time. Yet his work has continued to generate headlines and embarrassment for the establishment ? with a Prime Minister on the back foot after his former aide Andy

  17. News search, blogs and feeds a toolkit

    CERN Document Server

    Vage, Lars

    2010-01-01

    This book is about news search and monitoring. Aimed at professionals with a strategic need of monitoring the surrounding world, users with a need to find the best news sources, monitoring services and news search strategies and techniques will benefit from reading this book. The main purpose is to present a practical handbook with an analysis of readily available tools, blending with passages of a theoretical nature. It is also useful for students at LIS programmes and related information programmes and for librarians and information professionals. The authors aim to aid the reader in reachin

  18. Physicians' perceptions of breaking bad news to cancer patients and family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Ayed Alshammary

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Physicians face a dilemma when families do not wish the patient to know about the cancer diagnosis, and this highlights the necessity of taking into consideration the social circumstances in healthcare. When taking these into consideration, curriculum in the medical school must, therefore, be updated and must integrate the acquisition of skills in breaking bad news early in training.

  19. The Role of Audiovisual Mass Media News in Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrani, Taher; Sim, Tam Shu

    2011-01-01

    The present paper focuses on the role of audio/visual mass media news in language learning. In this regard, the two important issues regarding the selection and preparation of TV news for language learning are the content of the news and the linguistic difficulty. Content is described as whether the news is specialized or universal. Universal…

  20. Engagement with News Content in Online Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeldorf-Hirsch, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Reports indicate that as the Internet is displacing traditional news sources, younger users continue to be disconnected from the news. Fortunately, the Internet provides new ways of sharing and discussing news stories with others through social networking sites such as Facebook, which may be important for engaging users in the news they read…

  1. Hypertext in online news stories: More control, more appreciation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagerwerf, L.; Verheij, D.

    2014-01-01

    News websites struggle tailoring news stories to divergent needs of online news users. We examined a way to bridge these needs by representing sources in hypertext. News items were designed to be short and concise, with hyperlinks citing sources. Readers could either ignore hyperlinks or explore

  2. Predicting the volume of comments on online news stories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsagkias, M.; Weerkamp, W.; de Rijke, M.; Cheung, D.; Song, I.-Y.; Chu, W.; Hu, X.; Lin, J.; Li, J.; Peng, Z.

    2009-01-01

    On-line news agents provide commenting facilities for readers to express their views with regard to news stories. The number of user supplied comments on a news article may be indicative of its importance or impact. We report on exploratory work that predicts the comment volume of news articles

  3. Healthy depictions? Depicting adoption and adoption news events on broadcast news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Susan L; Chatterjee, Karishma; Karel, Amanda I

    2009-01-01

    Given that the public uses the media to learn about adoption as a family form, this study analyzes U.S. television news coverage of adoption between 2001 and 2005 (N = 309 stories), to identify the types of news events covered about adoption. A majority of news stories covered fraud, crime, legal disputes, and negative international adoption cases. Adoptees as defective or unhealthy were depicted more in negative news event stories, birth parents appeared less overall, and adoptive parents were most likely to have healthy depictions in positively oriented adoption experience, big family, and reunion stories. Although three quarters of the stories used primary adoption participants as news sources, one-third of the negative event stories did not contain healthy depictions of adoption participants. The authors discuss ways journalists and researchers might improve adoption news coverage.

  4. Standardization and Implementation of a Standard Emergency Code Call System within Estern Region Medical Command

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    ACHs) exist the same way that Kaiser has established different levels of services within a geographical region ( Hawaii : Hilo , Kona, Honolulu, Maui...California, Hawaii , etc., the Army MHS is divided into regions. Within these regions, Army Medical Centers (MEDCENSs) and Army Community Hospitals

  5. A content-based news video retrieval system: NVRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huayong; He, Tingting

    2009-10-01

    This paper focus on TV news programs and design a content-based news video browsing and retrieval system, NVRS, which is convenient for users to fast browsing and retrieving news video by different categories such as political, finance, amusement, etc. Combining audiovisual features and caption text information, the system automatically segments a complete news program into separate news stories. NVRS supports keyword-based news story retrieval, category-based news story browsing and generates key-frame-based video abstract for each story. Experiments show that the method of story segmentation is effective and the retrieval is also efficient.

  6. A test of rivaling approaches to explain news effects: A multi-wave panel study of agenda setting, social and economic conditions, the tone of the news, and horse race news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinnijenhuis, J.; van Hoof, A.M.J.; Oegema, D.; de Ridder, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Different "paradigmatic" approaches to explain news effects on voting may supplement each other, because their starting points are based on different news types in political campaign news: news on issue positions of parties, news on real-world developments, news on support or criticism for parties,

  7. Incorporating popularity in a personalized news recommender system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal Jonnalagedda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Online news reading has become a widely popular way to read news articles from news sources around the globe. With the enormous amount of news articles available, users are easily overwhelmed by information of little interest to them. News recommender systems help users manage this flood by recommending articles based on user interests rather than presenting articles in order of their occurrence. We present our research on developing personalized news recommendation system with the help of a popular micro-blogging service, “Twitter.” News articles are ranked based on the popularity of the article identified from Twitter’s public timeline. In addition, users construct profiles based on their interests and news articles are also ranked based on their match to the user profile. By integrating these two approaches, we present a hybrid news recommendation model that recommends interesting news articles to the user based on their popularity as well as their relevance to the user profile.

  8. News coverage of climate change in Nature News and ScienceNOW during 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian Hvidtfelt; Kjærgaard, Rikke Schmidt

    2011-01-01

    of appreciating climate change, its severe consequences, and its anthropogenic causes. During that year the two journals’ online news services Nature News and ScienceNOW framed climate change to fit particular agendas resulting in markedly different narratives. This article demonstrates that Nature News reported...... more critically on political decisions, scientific results, and social matters of climate change compared to ScienceNOW. Operating under different institutional constraints ScienceNOW generally took a more cautious line. The evidence drawn from both textual and visual analyses shows that news sections...

  9. Does iris(in) bring bad news or good news?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscemi, Silvio; Corleo, Davide; Buscemi, Carola; Giordano, Carla

    2017-09-20

    Irisin, a novel myokine produced in response to physical activity, promotes white-to-brown fat transdifferentiation. The name irisin referred to the ancient Greek goddess Iris, the messenger who delivered (bad) news from the gods. In mice, it has been demonstrated that irisin plays a key role in metabolic regulation, energy expenditure and glucose homeostasis. New findings from various studies carried out in both animals and humans suggest that irisin might also have other favorable effects, such as increasing bone cortical mass, preventing hepatic lipid accumulation, and improving cognitive functions, thus mediating many exercise-induced health benefits. However, data on the role and function of irisin in humans have prompted controversy, due mostly to the only recent confirmation of the presence of irisin in humans. Another strong limitation to the understanding of irisin mechanisms of action is the lack of knowledge about its receptor, which until now remains unidentified in humans and in animals. This review presents an overall analysis of the history of irisin, its expression, and its involvement in health, especially in humans. Level of Evidence Level V, review.

  10. Large-scale Comparative Sentiment Analysis of News Articles

    OpenAIRE

    Wanner, Franz; Rohrdantz, Christian; Mansmann, Florian; Stoffel, Andreas; Oelke, Daniela; Krstajic, Milos; Keim, Daniel; Luo, Dongning; Yang, Jing; Atkinson, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Online media offers great possibilities to retrieve more news items than ever. In contrast to these technical developments, human capabilities to read all these news items have not increased likewise. To bridge this gap, this poster presents a visual analytics tool for conducting semi-automatic sentiment analysis of large news feeds. The tool retrieves and analyzes the news of two categories (Terrorist Attack and Natural Disasters) and news which belong to both categories of the Europe Media ...

  11. Studying Fake News via Network Analysis: Detection and Mitigation

    OpenAIRE

    Shu, Kai; Bernard, H. Russell; Liu, Huan

    2018-01-01

    Social media for news consumption is becoming increasingly popular due to its easy access, fast dissemination, and low cost. However, social media also enable the wide propagation of "fake news", i.e., news with intentionally false information. Fake news on social media poses significant negative societal effects, and also presents unique challenges. To tackle the challenges, many existing works exploit various features, from a network perspective, to detect and mitigate fake news. In essence...

  12. Nuclear Malaysia in The News 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear was a term that always misunderstands by public as a terrifying term. The nuclear activities around Malaysia was disseminated in newspaper and Malaysian Nuclear Agency as a responsible agency for nuclear for peace were collecting that news and compiled them to make the public aware the benefits of nuclear energy to develop our country. All the news about nuclear were collected using various type of newspaper published in Malaysia such as Utusan Malaysia, Berita Harian, Daily Express, News Straits Time, The Star, Borneo Post and others. This news was compiled according to their main topics such as energy, nuclear in agriculture, education and others. Each year one edition of this report will publish and disseminate it to the other libraries, government agencies, school and others to make the public aware the existence of nuclear activities around their countries.

  13. Alternative Fuel News, Volume 4, Number 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ficker, C.

    2000-11-14

    This issue of Alternative Fuel News focuses on transit buses and refuse haulers. Many transit agencies and waste management companies are investigating alternatives to traditional diesel buses and refuse haulers.

  14. Nuclear Malaysia in the news 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear was a term that always misunderstood by public as a terrifying term. Nuclear activities around Malaysia were disseminated in newspaper and Malaysian Nuclear Agency as a responsible agency were collecting that news and compiled them. The purpose for this compilation were to make the public aware the benefits of nuclear energy and all the activities regarding nuclear surround them. All the news about nuclear technology were collected using various type of newspaper published in Malaysia such as Utusan Malaysia, Berita Harian, Daily Express, News Straits Time, The Star, Borneo Post and others. This news was compiled according to their main topics such as energy, nuclear in agriculture, education and others. Each year one edition of this report will publish and disseminate it to the other libraries, government agencies, school and others to make the public aware the existence of nuclear activities around their countries.

  15. Uncovering the skewness news impact curve

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Anatolyev, Stanislav; Petukhov, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 4 (2016), s. 746-771 ISSN 1479-8409 Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : conditional skewness * news impact curve * stock returns Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.800, year: 2016

  16. Nuclear Malaysia in the news 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear was a term that always misunderstands by public as a terrifying term. The nuclear activities around Malaysia was disseminated in newspaper and Malaysian Nuclear Agency as a responsible agency for nuclear for peace were collecting that news and compiled them to make the public aware the benefits of nuclear energy to develop our country. All the news about nuclear were collected using various type of newspaper published in Malaysia such as Utusan Malaysia, Berita Harian, Daily Express, News Straits Time, The Star, Borneo Post and others. This news was compiled according to their main topics such as energy, nuclear in agriculture, education and others. Each year one edition of this report will publish and disseminate it to the other libraries, government agencies, school and others to make the public aware the existence of nuclear activities around their countries.

  17. Uncovering the skewness news impact curve

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Anatolyev, Stanislav; Petukhov, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 4 (2016), s. 746-771 ISSN 1479-8409 Institutional support: PRVOUK-P23 Keywords : conditional skewness * news impact curve * stock returns Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.800, year: 2016

  18. Alternative Fuel News, Vol. 3 No. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-23

    This special issue of Alternative Fuel News highlights the Fifth National Clean Cities Conference held in Louisville, Kentucky. The momentum for the program is stronger than ever and the coalitions are working to propel the alternative fuel industry forward.

  19. Nuclear Malaysia in the news 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear was a term that always misunderstands by public as a terrifying term. The nuclear activities around Malaysia was disseminated in newspaper and Malaysian Nuclear Agency as a responsible agency for nuclear for peace were collecting that news and compiled them to make the public aware the benefits of nuclear energy to develop our country. All the news about nuclear were collected using various type of newspaper published in Malaysia such as Utusan Malaysia, Berita Harian, Daily Express, News Straits Time, The Star, Borneo Post and others. This news was compiled according to their main topics such as energy, nuclear in agriculture, education and others. Each year one edition of this report will publish and disseminate it to the other libraries, government agencies, school and others to make the public aware the existence of nuclear activities around their countries.

  20. Automatic Amharic text news classification: Aneural networks ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    School of Computing and Electrical Engineering, Institute of Technology, Bahir Dar University, Bahir Dar ... The study is on classification of Amharic news automatically using neural networks approach. Learning Vector ... INTRODUCTION.

  1. Nuclear Malaysia in the news 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear was a term that always misunderstood by public as a terrifying term. Nuclear activities around Malaysia were disseminated in newspaper and Malaysian Nuclear Agency as a responsible agency were collecting that news and compiled them. The purpose for this compilation were to make the public aware the benefits of nuclear energy and all the activities regarding nuclear surround them. All the news about nuclear technology were collected using various type of newspaper published in Malaysia such as Utusan Malaysia, Berita Harian, Daily Express, News Straits Time, The Star, Borneo Post and others. This news was compiled according to their main topics such as energy, nuclear in agriculture, education and others. Each year one edition of this report will publish and disseminate it to the other libraries, government agencies, school and others to make the public aware the existence of nuclear activities around their countries.

  2. The Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Digital News Audiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Chris

    2016-01-01

    of changing the socially-situated affordances of news use. Having sketched these contours, the chapter then highlights analytical challenges for understanding and conceptualizing the new interrelations between digital news content, production, and consumption, grounding this analysis with theoretical insights...... that emphasize the significance of spatiotemporal dynamics. The emphasis here is on the interrelations and mobilities of digital news audiences, based on a recognition of the productive impacts of media use while being careful to note the limitations of a paradigm shift that points solely to the possibilities...... generated by the ubiquitous presence of media in our everyday lives. Aspects of interaction and personalization beget by new media technologies certainly shape the possibilities, practices and power audiences have to choose news wherever, whenever, and however they want. However, this simultaneously...

  3. Nuclear Malaysia in the news 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear was a term that always misunderstood by public as a terrifying term. Nuclear activities around Malaysia were disseminated in newspaper and Malaysian Nuclear Agency as a responsible agency were collecting that news and compiled them. The purpose for this compilation were to make the public aware the benefits of nuclear energy and all the activities regarding nuclear surround them. All the news about nuclear technology were collected using various type of newspaper published in Malaysia such as Utusan Malaysia, Berita Harian, Daily Express, News Straits Time, The Star, Borneo Post and others. This news was compiled according to their main topics such as energy, nuclear in agriculture, education and others. Each year one edition of this report will publish and disseminate it to the other libraries, government agencies, school and others to make the public aware the existence of nuclear activities around their countries.

  4. News Agencies and Global Communication: Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    News Agencies and Global Communication: Development Implications for Third World Nations. ... It argues that most of these roles have some consequences undesirable to the Third World Nations. ... village”, cultural imperialism, ethnocentrism, media imperialism, media dependency, global ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  5. Nuclear Malaysia in the news 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear was a term that always misunderstood by public as a terrifying term. Nuclear activities around Malaysia were disseminated in newspaper and Malaysian Nuclear Agency as a responsible agency were collecting that news and compiled them. The purpose for this compilation were to make the public aware the benefits of nuclear energy and all the activities regarding nuclear surround them. All the news about nuclear technology were collected using various type of newspaper published in Malaysia such as Utusan Malaysia, Berita Harian, Daily Express, News Straits Time, The Star, Borneo Post and others. This news was compiled according to their main topics such as energy, nuclear in agriculture, education and others. Each year one edition of this report will publish and disseminate it to the other libraries, government agencies, school and others to make the public aware the existence of nuclear activities around their countries.

  6. News Media Framing of Negative Campaigning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus Tue

    2014-01-01

    that news coverage of negative campaigning does apply the strategic game frame to a significantly larger degree than articles covering positive campaigning. This finding has significant implications for campaigning politicians and for scholars studying campaign and media effects.......News media coverage of election campaigns is often characterized by use of the strategic game frame and a focus on politicians’ use of negative campaigning. However, the exact relationship between these two characteristics of news coverage is largely unexplored. This article theorizes that consumer...... demand and norms of journalistic independence might induce the news media outlets to cover negative campaigning with a strategic game frame. A comprehensive content analysis based on several newspaper types, several election campaigns, and several different measurements of media framing confirms...

  7. The Electronic Archiving of Arab News Agencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifa Ayub Gigawy

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This Research aims to present the electronic archives of Arab news agency websites and their methods of searching for and retrieving information. Also, its aim is to examine all their methods in order to find out which are the best and most practically useful ones. The research refers to the news agencies and the Internet, through the methods that users encounter in these inquires and links which present information. It concentrates on practical ways of searching for news items in both texts and pictures. The research contains tables showing the results. It presents a brief summery for each of Arab news agencies.The research comes to the conclusion that there are many things which need to be considered, and also some suggestions as to how the search for and retrieval of information might be improved

  8. The shifting temporalities of online news

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Henrik; Brügger, Niels

    2018-01-01

    websites (as well as other characteristics of online archives), the construction of the empirical base stands in a complex relation to the analytical framework applied. As much as the article is a historical analysis of the temporality of online news, it, thus, also offers a range of methodological......As much as news websites news can be characterised by speed and immediacy, they are also recognisable online periodicals, which accumulate preceding news items. This is, as with the constitution of time in general, linked to relations between change and continuity. This article aims to understand...... consequently employs a framework for webpage analysis that primarily focuses on the syntactical level where temporalities emerge as relations between textual elements that change at very different intervals. This framework is applied to examples from the different stages of The Guardian’s webpage from 1996...

  9. Engaging and Disengaging with Political News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørmen, Jacob; Linaa Jensen, Jakob

    (most notably by Prior, 2007; Stromback, Djerf-Pierre, & Shehata, 2012) that this development also can lead to an increase in the number of people who utilize this enhanced media choice to skip news altogether. One area that merits special attention in this context is political news. Critical engagement......, 1992) and 'performance of identity' (Madianou, 2009) that take place throughout people's everyday life. To further understand these processes it is important to attend to how users engage – or disengage – with political news. To do this we present a typology of news users based on an exploratory...... and conversing face-to-face) that users engage in for political discussion, and compare these across demographics as well as relevant media use patterns. The findings from the survey will be supplemented by results from a series of qualitative interviews that shed light on the motivations users have for engaging...

  10. CSIR eNews: Laser technology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info CSIR e-NewsLaserT1_2009.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 1889 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name CSIR e-NewsLaserT1_2009.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Laser...

  11. Broadcast news gisting using lexical cohesion analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Stokes, Nicola; Newman, Eamonn; Carthy, Joe; Smeaton, Alan F.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we describe an extractive method of creating very short summaries or gists that capture the essence of a news story using a linguistic technique called lexical chaining. The recent interest in robust gisting and title generation techniques originates from a need to improve the indexing and browsing capabilities of interactive digital multimedia systems. More specifically these systems deal with streams of continuous data, like a news programme, that require further annotation be...

  12. News Impact Curve for Stochastic Volatility Models

    OpenAIRE

    Makoto Takahashi; Yasuhiro Omori; Toshiaki Watanabe

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a new method to compute the news impact curve for stochastic volatility (SV) models. The new method incorporates the joint movement of return and volatility, which has been ignored by the extant literature, by simply adding a couple of steps to the Bayesian MCMC estimation procedures for SV models. This simple procedure is versatile and applicable to various SV type models. Contrary to the monotonic news impact functions in the extant literature, the new method gives a U-s...

  13. Medications: Myths Versus Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Questions to Ask Your Doctor • Medication Information • Health Trackers • Tools & Resources Subscribe to Heart Insight magazine and monthly e-newsletter Our digital magazine delivers helpful articles and the latest news on keeping your heart healthy. Sign up today! Email:* State: Zip Code: By clicking ...

  14. Male parentage in army ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronauer, Daniel J C; Schöning, Caspar; Boomsma, Jacobus J

    2006-01-01

    of active research in insect sociobiology. Here we present microsatellite data for 176 males from eight colonies of the African army ant Dorylus (Anomma) molestus. Comparison with worker genotypes and inferred queen genotypes from the same colonies show that workers do not or at best very rarely reproduce...

  15. The Army word recognition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, David R.; Haratz, David

    1977-01-01

    The application of speech recognition technology in the Army command and control area is presented. The problems associated with this program are described as well as as its relevance in terms of the man/machine interactions, voice inflexions, and the amount of training needed to interact with and utilize the automated system.

  16. Army Transformation to Expeditionary Formations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bryson, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    This thesis explores the path of transformation in the U.S. Army from its inception in the late 1990s by then Chief of Staff GEN Eric Shinseki to the Interim Brigade Combat Team and through Operations Enduring and Iraqi Freedom...

  17. Qualification of contemporary French TV news

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie LELEU-MERVIEL

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The News is one of the main programs on TV. In this regard, many investigations are concerned with TV News tackling the problem of the specificity of the audiovisual media. So, descriptive methods were designed to investigate conception and writing processes. Today, the emerging forms (non-stop news TV channels, no comment images TV, revitalize the information processing at television.Carrying on with the analyses of (Compte & Mouchon, 1990, this paper develops a method to examine the news productions in a relevant way. To do so, this article advocates the use of MCR, Méthode générale de Conceptualisation Relativisée based upon knowledge weaving theory (Mugur-Schächter, 2006. This study analysed a few TV news programs by using MCR tools. The method was applied to a corpus of news programs which were broadcasted the same day by two French channels. The study revealed the specificities of the present TV innovations.

  18. 'BREAKS' Protocol for Breaking Bad News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Vijayakumar; Bista, Bibek; Koshy, Cheriyan

    2010-05-01

    Information that drastically alters the life world of the patient is termed as bad news. Conveying bad news is a skilled communication, and not at all easy. The amount of truth to be disclosed is subjective. A properly structured and well-orchestrated communication has a positive therapeutic effect. This is a process of negotiation between patient and physician, but physicians often find it difficult due to many reasons. They feel incompetent and are afraid of unleashing a negative reaction from the patient or their relatives. The physician is reminded of his or her own vulnerability to terminal illness, and find themselves powerless over emotional distress. Lack of sufficient training in breaking bad news is a handicap to most physicians and health care workers. Adherence to the principles of client-centered counseling is helpful in attaining this skill. Fundamental insight of the patient is exploited and the bad news is delivered in a structured manner, because the patient is the one who knows what is hurting him most and he is the one who knows how to move forward. Six-step SPIKES protocol is widely used for breaking bad news. In this paper, we put forward another six-step protocol, the BREAKS protocol as a systematic and easy communication strategy for breaking bad news. Development of competence in dealing with difficult situations has positive therapeutic outcome and is a professionally satisfying one.

  19. National Institute of General Medical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Over Navigation Links National Institute of General Medical Sciences Site Map Staff Search My Order Search the ... NIGMS Website Research Funding Research Training News & Meetings Science Education About NIGMS Feature Slides View All Slides ...

  20. Medications and Supplements (Other Than Steroids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people taking this drug. Cardiac Medications Aniotensin-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitors (i.e. Lisinopril, Captopril, Enalapril) These ... Care About PPMD ❯ Mission & Impact Staff & Board News History Finance & Operations Partners Media Contact us Get Involved ❯ ...

  1. The New News Media: Democratic implications of undergraduate education and news consumption over social and traditional media

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Communication students at Simon Fraser University were surveyed and interviewed to deduce perceptions and behaviour of news consumption over social and traditional media. Both social media and traditional media are used to consume news with traditional media acting as the primary news source and as more accessible and reliable than social media. News stories considered important or having various perspectives were verified the most, especially world news. Extent of accessibility of sources an...

  2. News from the gas world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadonneix, P.; Bergmann, B.; Chabrelie, M.F.

    2000-01-01

    Mr Pierre Gadonneix, President of Gaz de France, presented 'The Gaz de France Group in the new European context: opportunities and strategy of a major gas operator' during the 21. world gas congress, which was held in Nice from 6. to 9. June 2000. A few weeks from the liberalization of the gas market in Europe. It seems interesting to publish this article, which very pertinently presents the point of view of the leading French gas operator. We also considered it right to publish the presentation of Mr Burckhard Bergmann, President of Eurogas, who presented the European vision. To complete this panorama of the gas situation, we are also publishing news about the international gas situation in 1999, written by Marie-Francoise Chabrelie of Cedigaz which is summarized here under: in a changing environment, characterized by privatisation, the deregulation and the opening up of markets (Europe, Australia), natural gas has progressively gained ground in the world energy market. This trend was confirmed in 1999. Major discoveries open the way to new projects for local use and export. In spite of the uncertainties regarding the situation in countries of the ex-Soviet Union, several favourable factors, including economic recovery in Asia faster than forecast, indicate a growth hypothesis ranging from 2.5% for this year. (authors)

  3. Prevention of suicidal behaviour among army personnel: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, M J; Sharpe, D; Rutter, D; Weaver, T

    2009-09-01

    To examine the context of suicidal behaviour among soldiers in the United Kingdom and identify factors that could reduce the risk of such behaviour. A series of in-depth interviews with service providers involved in treating soldiers following deliberate self harm. Their responses were compared with those of a small sub-sample of soldiers who presented to Army medical services following self harm. We interviewed 21 service providers with a range of experience and professional backgrounds and 10 soldiers. Service providers told us that the rarity of suicide among soldiers together with lower levels of mental illness amongst those who end their lives made suicide prevention in the Army a difficult task. However they highlighted concerns about recruitment and retention of young soldiers, and stated that stigmatisation of mental illness in the Army sometimes prevented those with suicidal ideation seeking help. They also highlighted the role of alcohol use in precipitating self-harm. Soldiers who had self-harmed told us that they struggled to balance the demands of work and family life and described harming themselves impulsively often while intoxicated with alcohol. Soldiers look to sources of support outside the Army, and see commanding officers, rather than healthcare professionals, as helping resolve their problems. Neither service providers nor soldiers mentioned helplines and other 'independent' sources of confidential advice and support which are available to soldiers serving with the British Army. Our findings highlight problems associated with efforts to reduce suicide among soldiers but suggest that these should focus continuing to try to reduce stigmatisation of mental distress and specifically on the role of commanding officers. Greater efforts should also be made to publicise existing sources of help and reduce levels of alcohol misuse.

  4. 2013 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Army Civilian Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-30

    Army civilian workforce with regard to gender and ethnic origin (Office of the Assistant G-1 for Civilian Personnel, 2013). The reported education...climates of perceived inequality . Civilian leader comments frequently referenced favoritism as reflecting cronyism, unfair personnel actions, and...interests of others, unequal enforcement of standards and discipline, and use of discretion in workplace justice. As demonstrated in previous CASAL

  5. A Blind Angle? News Sources, Gender and Ethnicity in Danish TV News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiig, Christina

    The paper will present and discuss a framework for grasping some of the democratic consequences of biased TV news programs. In line with Jürgen Habermas, one can ask what consequences it has for a democratic public sphere that the national TV news landscape is biased in term of source diversity (...

  6. Children's Recall of the News: TV News Stories Compared with Three Print Versions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Molen, Juliette H. Walma; van der Voort, Tom H. A.

    1998-01-01

    A sample of 144 fourth and sixth graders was presented with five children's news stories, in television form or in one of three print versions. Results indicated that children who watched news on television remembered the stories better than children who read one of the three print versions, regardless of their level of reading proficiency.…

  7. News Sources, Gender and Majority-Minority in Danish TV News Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiig, Christina

    In this paper, I am going to identify some central methodological challenges in relation to a project on TV-news and news sources in a perspective of intersectionality and to sketch a research design. In what follows, I will present some methodological issues and research designs of previous...

  8. When good news is bad news: explicating the moderated mediation dynamic behind the reversed mobilization effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuck, A.R.T.; de Vreese, C.H.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the mobilizing potential of positive news framing on opponents of a referendum proposal. On the basis of an experiment (N = 470), using bootstrapping as a method to assess conditional indirect effects, mediation analysis showed that positive news framing—endorsing a

  9. 77 FR 50089 - Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY... the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory... learning environment. The agenda will include topics relating to Army Learning Model 2015 and support to...

  10. 77 FR 11084 - Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY... the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory... Army 2020 learning environment. The agenda will include topics relating Arm Learning Model 2015 and to...

  11. 75 FR 19302 - Radiation Sources on Army Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    ... possession of ionizing radiation sources by non-Army agencies (including their civilian contractors) on an... radiation sources on Army land. The Army requires Non-Army agencies (including their civilian contractors... ionizing radiation sources on an Army Installation. For the purpose of this proposed rule, ``ionizing...

  12. 78 FR 33074 - Army Science Board Summer Study Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    ...--This study evaluates what science and technology competencies the Army must maintain and/or develop as... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Session AGENCY... the Army announces the following committee meeting: 1. Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). 2...

  13. Television news coverage of obesity in China, 1982-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhe; Xu, Rui Qing; Zhao, Kun; Li, Ke Ji

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how obesity was covered in television news in China, including the trends over time and the characteristics of obesity-related news. The frame analysis was adopted to assess the content of obesity-related news broadcasted in China Central Television (CCTV) from 1982 to 2009. To investigate the characteristics of the news, the obesity-related news was divided into subgroups according to populations concerned, as well as the period in which the news was broadcasted. The differences between subgroups were examined. A total of 1 599 pieces of news reported obesity, in which 1 278 pieces (79.92%) aired in "wealthy" period (2006-2009). More news was concerned with adults (1 134, 70.92%). "Individual behavior" dominated most of the cause frames (389, 24.33%), solution frames (522, 32.65%), and responsibility frames (860, 53.78%). There was more news mentioning individual factors in news aired in "wealthy" period and news concerning children. The coverage of social-structure causes was higher in news concerning children, while the coverage of social-structure solutions was higher in news concerning children and news aired in "wealthy" period. Although the coverage of obesity was modest, it showed an incremental trend as the economy grew. Obesity was mostly depicted as an individual problem in terms of responsibility, causes and solutions. Copyright © 2012 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. RESEARCH AND PRACTICE OF THE NEWS MAP COMPILATION SERVICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Zhao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on the needs of the news media on the map, this paper researches on the news map compilation service, conducts demand research on the service of compiling news maps, designs and compiles the public authority base map suitable for media publication, and constructs the news base map material library. It studies the compilation of domestic and international news maps with timeliness and strong pertinence and cross-regional characteristics, constructs the hot news thematic gallery and news map customization services, conducts research on types of news maps, establish closer liaison and cooperation methods with news media, and guides news media to use correct maps. Through the practice of the news map compilation service, this paper lists two cases of news map preparation services used by different media, compares and analyses cases, summarizes the research situation of news map compilation service, and at the same time puts forward outstanding problems and development suggestions in the service of news map compilation service.

  15. The Fight for the High Ground: The U.S. Army and Interrogation during Operation Iraqi Freedom I, May 2003-April 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-12

    Captain Wood has stated that she " plagiarized " the interrogation policy of TF 121 (according to news reporting, the name of this SMU task force at...the time of her plagiarization ) to create a draft interrogation policy for her own interrogators at Abu Ghraib. 85 She then submitted this draft...29 Ibid. 30 Lieutenant Colonel Dean Bland, The Abu Ghraib Scandal: Impact on the Army Profession and the Intelligence Process, Academic Research

  16. Local television news reporting of kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffery, Jonathan B; Jacobson, Lynn M; Goldstein, Kenneth M; Pribble, James M

    2006-12-01

    Local television is the primary news source for the majority of Americans. This study aims to describe how local news reports on kidney disease. Using our searchable database of health-related late local news segments from 2002, we identified stories with the key words kidney, hypertension, blood pressure, or diabetes. This database is a representative sample of the late local news on 122 stations in the 50 largest US media markets, comprising 60% of the population. The content of each identified story was reviewed to determine whether it mentioned: (1) chronic kidney disease (CKD), (2) screening for kidney disease, or (3) kidney disease as a potential complication (for blood pressure- or diabetes-related stories). Only 2 of 1,799 database news stories (0.11%) included "kidney" as a summary key word; neither referred to CKD, screening, or complications of other diseases. Of 19 stories about hypertension or blood pressure (1.06% of all stories) and the 14 stories about diabetes (0.78% of all stories), none mentioned these criteria. Despite efforts to increase public awareness of and screening for CKD, local television news (the most important news source for a majority of Americans) did little to help achieve these goals. Further work will be needed to confirm whether this paucity of coverage varies over time and determine why so little attention is given to CKD. Educating physicians and public relations personnel who advocate for kidney disease about journalists' needs may be an important step to help advance public awareness of CKD.

  17. News Authorship and News Sources: Impacts on Environmental Coverage in The Nigerian Press

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogadimma C. Emenyeonu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the impacts of news authorship and news sources on environmental coverage in the Nigerian press to shed light on the roles they play in news construction. The study finds that journalists in conjunction with policy makers are the catalyst for environmental information, whereas citizens who are pivotal in creating relevant public opinion on environmental issues are left behind. The study reveals that investigative reporting lacks in environmental coverage because most coverage are events driven which explains why environmental news is reported as straight news and as such journalists rely heavily on official sources rather than subsidiary sources. The study opines that for proper environmental coverage, journalists must choose sources from both main and subsidiary actors and revert to proactive, investigative and interpretive reporting so as to make environmental stories relatable to the intended audiences.

  18. A Surgical Business Composite Score for Army Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Douglas R; Robinson, Andrew B; Comer, Tracy A; Meno, Jenifer A; Welder, Matthew D

    2016-06-01

    Measuring surgical business performance for Army military treatment facilities is currently done through 6 business metrics developed by the Army Medical Command (MEDCOM) Surgical Services Service Line (3SL). Development of a composite score for business performance has the potential to simplify and synthesize measurement, improving focus for strategic goal setting and implementation. However, several considerations, ranging from data availability to submetric selection, must be addressed to ensure the score is accurate and representative. This article presents the methodology used in the composite score's creation and presents a metric based on return on investment and a measure of cases recaptured from private networks. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  19. [Influence of the news media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarena Luna, R

    1991-01-01

    Newspapers, in addition to news, also cover topics of permanent interest to their readers. One such topic is sexuality. The appearance of the incurable sexually transmitted disease AIDS obliges a reconsideration of the complex and contradictory concept of sexuality. Sexuality is not often spoken of openly; rather, it is secret, hidden, and referred to obliquely. Sexuality is the manifestation and satisfaction of the sexual impulses common to all individuals. Sexuality is determined by anatomic and physiologic aspects and also by the knowledge, experiences, values, and norms internalized by the individual living in a social group. Messages about sexual conduct are constantly being received. This social part of sexuality supported by customs and morals is the part that is directly influenced by communications media. An important objective of the media is to create awareness and mold opinions. Mexico's large national circulation newspapers present different points of view about sexuality. Newspapers that continually critique homosexual practices and those that demonstrate implicit approval of pornographic videos by advertising them both present attitudes without providing opportunities to reason, compare, or support opinions. Sexuality is usually referred to indirectly and superficially in the press. Sex education may be mentioned but not the erotic implications of sexuality, and acceptance or opposition to use of condoms may be discussed without mention of psychological barriers to their use. The national press is not prepared to propose new attitudes toward sexuality in the age of AIDS. Only 1 national newspaper in Mexico regularly provides information on AIDS including aspects related to sexual pleasure and responsibility and safer sex. The majority continue with their pre-AIDS coverage of sexuality, using it to arouse interest but providing little depth. Newspapers should provide more extensive coverage on sexuality and its modifications due to AIDS, a reality

  20. Fake News Detection on Social Media: A Data Mining Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Shu, Kai; Sliva, Amy; Wang, Suhang; Tang, Jiliang; Liu, Huan

    2017-01-01

    Social media for news consumption is a double-edged sword. On the one hand, its low cost, easy access, and rapid dissemination of information lead people to seek out and consume news from social media. On the other hand, it enables the wide spread of "fake news", i.e., low quality news with intentionally false information. The extensive spread of fake news has the potential for extremely negative impacts on individuals and society. Therefore, fake news detection on social media has recently b...

  1. 76 FR 56406 - Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Demonstration Project; Department of the Army; Army...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Demonstration Project; Department of the Army; Army Research, Development and Engineering Command; Tank... personnel management demonstration project for eligible TARDEC employees. Within that notice the table...

  2. Measuring the Interestingness of News Articles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pon, R K; Cardenas, A F; Buttler, D J

    2007-09-24

    An explosive growth of online news has taken place. Users are inundated with thousands of news articles, only some of which are interesting. A system to filter out uninteresting articles would aid users that need to read and analyze many articles daily, such as financial analysts and government officials. The most obvious approach for reducing the amount of information overload is to learn keywords of interest for a user (Carreira et al., 2004). Although filtering articles based on keywords removes many irrelevant articles, there are still many uninteresting articles that are highly relevant to keyword searches. A relevant article may not be interesting for various reasons, such as the article's age or if it discusses an event that the user has already read about in other articles. Although it has been shown that collaborative filtering can aid in personalized recommendation systems (Wang et al., 2006), a large number of users is needed. In a limited user environment, such as a small group of analysts monitoring news events, collaborative filtering would be ineffective. The definition of what makes an article interesting--or its 'interestingness'--varies from user to user and is continually evolving, calling for adaptable user personalization. Furthermore, due to the nature of news, most articles are uninteresting since many are similar or report events outside the scope of an individual's concerns. There has been much work in news recommendation systems, but none have yet addressed the question of what makes an article interesting.

  3. Modeling news dissemination on nuclear issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis Junior, Jose S.B.; Barroso, Antonio C.O.; Menezes, Mario O., E-mail: jsbrj@ime.usp.b, E-mail: barroso@ipen.b, E-mail: mario@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Using a modified epidemiological model, the dissemination of news by media agents after the occurrence of large scale disasters was studied. A modified compartmented model was developed in a previous paper presented at INAC 2007. There it used to study to the Chernobyl's nuclear accident (1986) and the Concorde airplane crash (2000). Now the model has been applied to a larger and more diverse group of events - nuclear, non-nuclear and naturally caused disasters. To be comprehensive, old and recent events from various regions of the world were selected. A more robust news repository was used, and improved search techniques were developed to ensure that the scripts would not count false positive news. The same model was used but with improved non-linear embedded simulation optimization algorithms to generate the parameters of interest for our model. Individual parameters and some specific combination of them allow some interesting perceptions on how the nature of the accident / disaster gives rise to different profiles of growth and decay of the news. In our studies events involving nuclear causes generate news repercussion with more explosive / robust surge profiles and longer decaying tails than those of other natures. As a consequence of these differences, public opinion and policy makers are also much more sensitive to some issues than to others. The model, through its epidemiological parameters, shows in quantitative manner how 'nervous' the media content generators are with respect to nuclear installations and how resilient this negative feelings about nuclear is. (author)

  4. News exposure predicts anti-Muslim prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, John H; Sibley, Chris G; Osborne, Danny; Bulbulia, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    News coverage of Islamic extremism is reigniting debates about the media's role in promoting prejudice toward Muslims. Psychological theories of media-induced prejudice date to the 1950's, and find support from controlled experiments. However, national-scale studies of media effects on Muslim prejudice are lacking. Orthogonal research investigating media-induced prejudice toward immigrants has failed to establish any link. Moreover, it has been found that people interpret the news in ways that confirm pre-existing attitudes, suggesting that media induced Muslim prejudice in liberal democracies is unlikely. Here, we test the association between news exposure and anti-Muslim prejudice in a diverse national sample from one of the world's most tolerant societies, where media effects are least likely to hold (N = 16,584, New Zealand). In support of media-induced Islamophobia, results show that greater news exposure is associated with both increased anger and reduced warmth toward Muslims. Additionally, the relationship between media exposure and anti-Muslim prejudice does not reliably vary with political ideology, supporting claims that it is widespread representations of Muslims in the news, rather than partisan media biases, that drives anti-Muslim prejudice.

  5. Modeling news dissemination on nuclear issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis Junior, Jose S.B.; Barroso, Antonio C.O.; Menezes, Mario O.

    2011-01-01

    Using a modified epidemiological model, the dissemination of news by media agents after the occurrence of large scale disasters was studied. A modified compartmented model was developed in a previous paper presented at INAC 2007. There it used to study to the Chernobyl's nuclear accident (1986) and the Concorde airplane crash (2000). Now the model has been applied to a larger and more diverse group of events - nuclear, non-nuclear and naturally caused disasters. To be comprehensive, old and recent events from various regions of the world were selected. A more robust news repository was used, and improved search techniques were developed to ensure that the scripts would not count false positive news. The same model was used but with improved non-linear embedded simulation optimization algorithms to generate the parameters of interest for our model. Individual parameters and some specific combination of them allow some interesting perceptions on how the nature of the accident / disaster gives rise to different profiles of growth and decay of the news. In our studies events involving nuclear causes generate news repercussion with more explosive / robust surge profiles and longer decaying tails than those of other natures. As a consequence of these differences, public opinion and policy makers are also much more sensitive to some issues than to others. The model, through its epidemiological parameters, shows in quantitative manner how 'nervous' the media content generators are with respect to nuclear installations and how resilient this negative feelings about nuclear is. (author)

  6. Thrilling News Revisited: The Role of Suspense for the Enjoyment of News Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, Kai; Zimmermann, Daniel; Wilbers, Anne-Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    Previous research on news perception has been dominated by a cognitively oriented perspective on reception processes, whereas emotions have been widely neglected. Consequently, it has remained open which features of a news story might elicit affective responses and hence modulate news perception, shifting the focus to the emotional potential of the narrative. According to the affective-disposition theory, the experience of suspense is the striving force of immersion in fictional dramas. Thereby, a positive affective disposition toward the protagonist of a story and a high likelihood of a bad ending should increase suspense that, in turn, should positively influence reading appreciation and lingering interest in the story. We investigated whether suspense and its determinants also play such a key role in the context of news stories. Study 1 ( n = 263) successfully replicated results of an earlier study, whereas Studies 2 ( n = 255) and 3 ( n = 599) challenged the generalizability of some effects related to manipulated characteristics of a news story. In contrast, correlational relationships between perceived news characteristics and news evaluation were relatively stable. In particular, participants' liking of the protagonist and the perceived likelihood of a good ending were positively associated with suspense, reading appreciation, and lingering interest. This result indicates a preference for happy endings and contradicts the notion that likely negative outcomes are beneficial for suspense and the enjoyment of news stories, as postulated by the affective-disposition theory in the context of fictional dramas. Moreover, experienced suspense reliably mediated the correlations between, on the one hand, participants' liking of the protagonist and the perceived likelihood of a good ending and, on the other hand, reading appreciation and lingering interest. The news story's personal relevance was less influential than expected. Further, we observed a large absence of

  7. 2013 CENTER FOR ARMY LEADERSHIP ANNUAL SURVEY OF ARMY LEADERSHIP (CASAL): MAIN FINDINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-30

    The Center for Army Profession and Ethic (CAPE) has fielded education and training materials (including doctrine, pamphlets , videos, brochures , and...Army Pamphlet (DA PAM) 600-3, Commissioned Officer Development and Career Management, states that a goal of warrant officer training and education... Pamphlet 600-25, U.S. Army noncommissioned officer professional development and career management. Washington, D.C.: Headquarters, Department of the Army

  8. Racial Extremism in the Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-04-01

    of Deference ...................................................................................................... 46 1. The Separation of Powers Doctrine...to the military. This deference has a two-fold basis. First, the separation of powers in the U.S. Constitution gives authority to the executive (and...Why should there be judicial deference to the Army’s policy on extremism? There are two principal reasons. First, the Constitution’s separation of powers doctrine

  9. 2011 Army Strategic Planning Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    TESI ) of 22,000 Soldiers, the Army’s total force by the end of the mid-term period is programmed to be 520K (AC). We will achieve a more...dwell ratios, extending TESI authority to adequately man deploying units and sustain the All-Volunteer Force, right-sizing the generating force, and... TESI Temporary End-Strength Increase WMD Weapons of Mass Destruction 2011 ARMY STRATEGIC PLANNING GUIDANCE Page 19 2011

  10. Inverting the Army Intelligence Pyramid

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    British experience fighting the Provisional Irish Republican Army ( PIRA ) in Northern Ireland, which began an insurgency in 1969.91...they became extremely successful.”93 Martin Van Creveld posits that the British Army’s success against the PIRA in Northern Ireland stands out as...and MI6 (Secret Intelligence Service) to defeat the PIRA .97 92 John Kiszely, "Learning About

  11. Information Management: Army Information Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-05-31

    funds or personnel to produce free programming solely for the benefit of a commercial CATV company. (6) The Army will require that the CATV franchisee ...provided, future customer requirements, and emerging IT capabilities which can benefit the customer. The Army’s increasing employment of IT dictates a...proactive oversight/insight system is operational and ensures mission benefit , cost, and schedule goals are met. (2) IT performance measures at the

  12. 78 FR 24735 - Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    ... include topics relating to the Army Learning Model that seeks to improve the Army's learning model by leveraging technology without sacrificing standards so the Army can provide credible, rigorous, and relevant...

  13. Issues and Insights from the Army Technology Seminar Game

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Darilek, Richard

    2001-01-01

    ...). The AAN goals were to link Army XXI to a long-term vision of the Army extending well into the 21st century and to ensure that this vision informed evolving Army research and development requirements...

  14. Army Reserve Military Intelligence: Time for Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-20

    Miramax Books, 2002. Goleman , Daniel . Emotional Intelligence . New York: Bantam Books, 1997. Goleman , Daniel , Richard Boyatzis, and Annie McKee...or position of the Department of the Army, Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government. ARMY RESERVE MILITARY INTELLIGENCE : TIME FOR CHANGE...Research Project 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Army Reserve Military Intelligence : Time for Change 5a

  15. Effectiveness of the Army Mentorship Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nieberding, Richard J

    2007-01-01

    ...). From the artifacts associated with this mentorship program, it appears that the Army highly values this program as a way to create a culture and climate that fosters learning and development for future leadership. This project will examine the effectiveness of mentorship in the today's Army and evaluate whether the program is sufficient to meet the needs for the Army's next generation of soldiers and leaders.

  16. The United States Army 1996 Modernization Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-03-08

    time and with less risk. IMA technology improvements are leveraged and inserted into the Army’s information architectures as the competitive market place...to procure a family of complementary, interoperable systems. At the end of the near-term, "Active Defense RD&A Startegy Army will begin fielding...Haul and Engineer tractors were fielded that brought modern technologies from the commercial market to the Army. However, adequate quantities were

  17. The interaction of financial news between mass media and new media: Evidence from news on Chinese stock market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongjie; Zhang, Zuochao; Liu, Lanbiao; Shen, Dehua

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate both the contemporaneous and the lead-lag relationships between the mass media news and the new media news of the financial news on the constitute stocks of the CSI 300. The empirical results show that: (1) there exists a strong correlation between these two types of news; (2) the granger causality direction from new media news to mass media news is increasingly obvious, while the reverse direction has a downward trend; (3) new media is playing a increasingly important role in the stock market and exhibits a trend to substitutes the mass media.

  18. Exploring the New Narrative of Internet News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Hui Chen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates that digital tools provide opportunities for new storytelling techniques. To take full advantage of the new media resources and to establish an innovative news narrative structure, the existing research limit and the relationship between narrative and the media were examined. This paper progresses from a discussion on the narrative structure to how the plot of a story is influenced by its discourse, and then to how different media characteristics can change the structure and voice of the involved narrative. A new narrative structure that can be used to explore the hypertext and interactivity of Internet news is described. Finally, this paper discusses the cultivation of news storytelling in the digital age.

  19. [Breaking bad news in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Andrea; Ríos, Matías; Manríquez, José Manuel; Rojas, Gonzalo

    2014-10-01

    Breaking bad news is a complex task that requires multiple communication skills from health professionals. Clinical practice demands to communicate all type of bad news, from a diagnosis of cancer to adverse effects of a treatment. On the other hand, since the beginning of the health reform in 2003, the need to improve the quality of services was proposed, among which the concern about the rights and duties of patients stands out. Therefore, the health care provider-patient relationship becomes again the subject of discussion and study, and a topic of great importance for clinical work. We revise the consequences of breaking bad news for the patient and for the health care provider, as well as the current protocols available for this purpose. The importance of developing communication skills both for future health professionals as for those who currently work in the area is emphasized.

  20. Swisster – a news website for Anglophones

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Employees of CERN can now sign up for a free account at Swisster.ch, an English language website devoted to Swiss news and current affairs. « prev next » The website, which is aimed at English speakers in Switzerland, normally requires an annual subscription of 300 CHF, but has teamed up with sponsors to offer a free subscription for CERN employees. The service provides a daily newsletter containing the main news and other information sent to subscribers every working day. The Swisster website also offers a variety of services such as health, education and food forums called "corners", as well as weather & snow forecasts, blogs and even a TV guide for Anglophones. The editorial team of English-speaking journalists is based in Lausanne, Geneva, Zurich and Neuchatel and covers news for expatriates and English speakers living and working in Switzerland. Swisster.ch also has a Saturday morning radio show from 08:30 to 09:30, on Radio Cit�...